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Open Thread on California Recall Election
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What’s going to happen in the two-section election on Tuesday in which Gavin “California Psycho” Newsom is at risk of recall if 50%+1 vote to kick him.

If he is recalled, then whoever comes in first of the dozens of candidates, including black Republican talk radio host Larry Elder, becomes governor.

But the Democrats have veto-proof supermajorities in the state legislature and there’s another gubernatorial election in 14 months.

 
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  1. gent says:

    Obviously he’s going to survive the recall because the DNC will cheat.

  2. More fires, and probably an earthquake.

    But definitely traffic. Traffic, traffic, traffic.

    But the weather will continue to be great.

    • LOL: El Dato, bomag
  3. The question is who can fix the fastest and the baddest and the bestest. Must be hard triangulating all them candidates.

  4. It doesn’t matter how we vote because the Dems can cheat enough to get any result they want. Back when it was Gray Davis the school unions were pissed off and the D’s said let him go. Now they want to keep their big man, so they will.

    The farmers have their recall signs out on I-5 and the rural roads all have recall Newsom on them. But the big commie-controlled counties (LA, I’m looking at you) will bring in plenty of careless, clueless votes to maintain Nuisance.

    I swear I’m so cynical about this state I could swoon. When I read other commenters here complaining about blacks ruining everything I just cackle with laughter. Those poor people can’t hold a candle to wealthy, white liberals!

    • Replies: @Rooster111
  5. ‘…But the Democrats have veto-proof supermajorities in the state legislature and there’s another gubernatorial election in 14 months.’

    Whatever will happen?

    Frankly, California’s a lost cause.

    But it can still offer salutary lessons to others. Hence it would be a shame if Newsom turns back the recall.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  6. Rose McGowan

    Rose McGowan goes after people who go after her or people she cares about.

    Rose McGowan has a gift with words and she wears a dress well.

    Rose McGowan says:

    “…Prius driving Obama voting douchebag…”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Bill P
  7. @Buzz Mohawk

    ‘…But the weather will continue to be great.’

    So one assumes. But what if they somehow come up with a way to wreck that?

  8. Remember when Ricky bought that car and he and Lucy,Fred and Ethel drove to California?
    That was a different Cullyfohnia!!!

  9. Larry Elder reveals he is actually white man with heavy tan.
    “What did you expect? I’m a white supremacist!!”

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
  10. There is a tradition in Sacramento that the governor’s veto is never overriden — even if the legislation passed with veto-proof majorities. A veto has not been overriden since the 1970s.

    So, a Governor Elder should be able to veto successfully.

    He would also be able to issue executive orders, suspend or veto regulations, and appoint judges and board members.

    Plus, the Democrats would immediately stq

    • Agree: Dutch Boy
    • Replies: @Dutch Boy
    , @jsm
    , @gandydancer
  11. Plus, the Democrats would immediately start warring over the chance to run for governor in 2022.

  12. Anonymous[234] • Disclaimer says:

    Sadly, there is practically no chance he is recalled. Not even 1%. Politics had gone completely tribal, and there is no escape from it.

  13. Gamecock says:

    Democrats are counting the votes; Newsom will be fine.

    He’ll get 114% of the vote.

    • Agree: Peterike, bomag
  14. I’d rather see Newsom stay in.

    I hate the guy but Larry Elder is a libertarian conservative entertainer and not a serious challenge to the system.

    Basically a Black Rush Limbaugh who thinks that abolishing the minimum wage and privatizing the schools will fix our problems. Black conservatives by nature are race deniers which makes them prone to globalist libertarian garbage.

    But more importantly Elder wouldn’t be able to get anything passed with the Dem majority. The MSM however would blame all of California’s problems on him.

    I say leave Newsom and let him sweat it out.

  15. TWS says:

    It’s cute you think elections still matter.

  16. Newsom certainly puts the goober in gubernatorial

  17. Imagine caring about elections post November 2020.

    • Agree: Redman
  18. SafeNow says:

    Newsom is ahead 22 points in the latest poll, so, even allowing for the social-desirability response factor, it’s all over. Newsom won because it was understood that he could deliver more free stuff from Washington. In fact, he explicitly referred to “my partnership” with the Washington administration. California’s problems were assumed by voters to be intractable, so, you might as well go for the free stuff.

    The Elder campaign should have focused more on the affronts, humiliations, and compromises of everyday life. Not wildfires and other big events, but rather, everyday life. If I had been running, the message of my campaign would have been to make everyday life around 15% less infuriating during my short time in office. Schools, time spent dialing bureaucrats, regulatory overreach – – not fixed – – sorry – – around 15 percent.

  19. Ano says:

    Dear Mr Sailer,

    Thank y0u for voting…

    …Fifty times…er, 51…52…53 (excuse us, the photocopier is still running)…

    …mailing in from your address at Hollywood Forever Cemetary…

    …joining Rudolph Valentino and Douglas Fairbanks in voting ‘No!’…

    Of course, Steve, the final result will not be declared until we have counted all the votes from Californians currently overseas….e.g. Guam etc etc…

    So, in the meantime keep on enjoying the next few years (and years) of Governor Serial-Killer’s reign!

    Yours,

    Democrat Partei of Kalifornia

    • Replies: @El Dato
  20. “Elections” are for idiots and suckers.

    Last November very thoroughly proved that to be correct.

    The Leftist Elite have no clothes.

    • Agree: TWS
  21. fish says:

    But the weather will continue to be great.

    Buzz…..you don’t know the half of it! Today, Glorious!

  22. Yawn, the election is irrelevant. When Douch’em wins, he will punish – or in Sailer’s case reward – everyone with brutal CoronaHoax abuses. If the blaque guy wins, individual counties will punish everyone with CoronAbuse and the super-majority Democrat supreme court will rule that brutal CoronAbuse is good 🐑

    Scarcely was a more meaningless election ever staged.

  23. JR Ewing says:

    Newsom will will win.

    California hasn’t hit rock bottom yet, and besides, if there was any chance of him not winning, the dems would find a way to make him win, just like they did in November with Biden.

    Except in the most rural of precincts, there are no more free or fair elections in the United States. They got away with it in 2020 and they’ll continue to get away with it from now on. We are Venezuela now.

  24. Thomm says:

    The virtually non-existent support for Larry Elder among the WNs on this website speaks volumes. They aren’t Republicans or even believers in America.

    They obviously prefer a white leftist (Gavin Newsom) over a Black Reaganite Conservative (Elder). Then again, a lot of the White Trashionalists here have openly said that having sex with a black (or even mulatto) woman is worse than having sex with a white man, so at least they are consistent in their application for race as the ONLY criteria for anything*, including sexual preference.

    I mean, Ron Unz, who ran for the same office under the same party banner many years ago, was and is an advocate of open Hispanic immigration, both legal and illegal. RUnzie Baby also wanted a high minimum wage (a far-left position that is odd for a Republican to take, explaining why he did so poorly in his campaign). Elder is against both of those positions, of course.

    Steve should not moderate out this comment. The conspicuous absence of support for Larry Elder among the White Trashionalist commentariat here is worthy of shining the flashlight on. White Trashionalists obviously disagree with the Trumpist Right on Larry Elder’s suitability for the Governorship of a \$3T economy, so they have much to answer for.

    *In reality, the white race has a very high variance, and the types of dregs that becomes WNs (if male) or radical feminists (if female) have nothing to do with normal, mainstream, heterosexual whites. That is why while 55% of white women voted for Trump, virtually zero are found in WN circles.

    • Troll: William Badwhite
    • Replies: @Daniel H
  25. Whatever ballots they need will be produced by a ‘red mirage’. This election in California is entirely by mail and there are millions of ballots sloshing around that will magically ‘appear’.

    The real story of this election is that everyone’s radar is on for election fraud. People are waking up. It would have been far better if the audit in Arizona had been released already but this is not going away until the truth is fully out.

    https://www.infowars.com/posts/its-happening-again-gop-voters-discover-their-ballots-already-cast-in-california-recall-election/

  26. California is a one-party state.

    Had the Republicans ran a major celebrity in the mold of Arnold Schwarzenegger (no, the former Bruce Jenner does not qualify), then maybe they would have a chance. But apparently no such celebrity was available.

    Newsom appeared to be in trouble until the Dems figured out that they could just campaign against Trump and the Republicans and get bailed out of their misrule.

    But the Democrats have veto-proof supermajorities in the state legislature and there’s another gubernatorial election in 14 months.

    Yes, even if there’s a massive political earthquake and Elder is elected on a bipartisan wave of contempt for Newsom, the radio host would still be powerless in office. And then he would be promptly removed from office in two years when a new election was scheduled.

    If you think Trump was besieged by the Deep State in DC, just imagine how it would have been for Elder in Sacramento. He would have been far more powerless than the former U.S. president.

    Still, it would’ve been nice to ruin Gavin Newsom’s political career before he tried to go national.

  27. Farenheit says:

    If I “protest crap” on the street, does that mean I’m for or against Newsom??

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  28. if I still lived in Mexifornia, I’d vote for recall and for the Tranny. A Tranny

    would be an excellent guv for Mexifornia.

  29. Open Thread

    Irish pennant has more of a ring to it. Newsom is an honorary Irishman anyway, what with his hair and choice of profession. Still, is it appropriate for a black girl like Jennifer Oliver O’Connell to refer to him as “Governor Hair Gel”? Most black women are obsessed with their own locks.

    • Replies: @Alden
  30. @Pincher Martin

    Had the Republicans ran…

    Run.

    Whatever happened to past participles? Have they “went” the way of feminine modesty?

  31. Anonymous[177] • Disclaimer says:

    Newsom has the same chance of losing as Brezhnev did and for the same reason.

  32. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:

    if elder wins can california be sold for a higher price (to the chinese)?

  33. Trelane says:

    What is governor Newsom’s credential? Is he good at something? Does he have a skill? Is he an expert in some area? Is he talented? Does he possess some special knowledge? Why is he governor?

    • Replies: @Stan
    , @Jmaie
  34. epebble says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    I haven’t “saw” one in a long, long time.

  35. roonaldo says:

    Voting machine manipulation and other forms of electoral fraud should ensure pretty boy’s continued governorship, though I hope I’m wrong, since it would be such fun to go outside and hear the wailing of Hollywooders from 1200 miles away.

  36. Daniel H says:

    Had the Republicans ran…..Run.

    Whatever happened to past participles? Have they “went” the way of feminine modesty?

    Is the sentence construction past perfect or past subjunctive? Looks like past subjunctive to me, notwithstanding the had. But what is the conjugation of the past subjunctive of run in English (it’s there, largely obscured, but there nonetheless)? Got me, but “Had the Republicans ran….” has a nice feel to it, so it may in fact be correct.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  37. @Pincher Martin

    Had the Republicans ran a major celebrity in the mold of Arnold Schwarzenegger (no, the former Bruce Jenner does not qualify), then maybe they would have a chance. But apparently no such celebrity was available.

    Not really relevant. No one has to beat Newsom. Recall Newsom has to beat Keep Newsom. Then Elder or somebody will end up top crab in the bucket of 50 or so and become Governor, without any necessity of topping the Keep Newsom vote.

    I wonder how the recall provision in the CA Constitution is phrased. Could Newsom have run to replace himself if recalled?

    I saw Robert Barnes in his YouTube/Rumble vidcast with VivaFrei say that he thought the election was in the bag for Newsom on the basis of (D) turnout spiking. He’s pretty based, and at least claims to have a good record as an elections bettor.

    But I’m not convinced. The recall always depended on convincing non-(R) to recall Newsom, so (D) turnout doesn’t tell you whether that happened.

    Elder has been pretty useless as an anti-Newsom candidate. I remember the first time (maybe the only time?) I saw an ad for him on YT and I hit “SKIP ADS” when it started going on, off the bat, about some (D) tax increase that I had never heard of and didn’t give a damn about. That’s not why we’re having a recall election. Then I caught a bit of his interview with the SacBee panel and he was nattering on about the Great Society and suchlike. That’s not why we’re having a recall election, either. The Dems & (I)’s who elected him had already priced in all that normal Left/Right stuff in the last election. This is about the COVID Panic Shutdown and the preceding/prefiguring idiotic electricity shutoffs or it isn’t about anything unusual and Gruesome Newsom will win.

    I looked on Elder’s site and could find nothing about the shutoffs at all. Was he FOR them?

    It doesn’t help my entusiasm for him that his response to a SacBee query was that Biden’s election was “free and fair”, an invitation to be crooked in this one if I ever saw one.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  38. @Reg Cæsar

    You write it how you prefer, and I will write it the way I like.

    But having read many of your posts, I suggest you spend less time worrying about my grammar and more time thinking about everything else.

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • LOL: Trelane
    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Anon
  39. This guy is right out of DEM central casting; at least he’s not a lawyer. He knows nothing, except how to fix his nice hair and further his own political career.

    During this summer/fire season, PG&E has not turned off the power in my region, unlike in the previous two years when it unplugged me every few weeks. This despite its customers using the A/C more than ever and, in my case, fires burning close to home.

    My area votes GOP. If Gruesome survives the recall, and I hope he loses (and to the biggest dope on Q2), I expect my power to go off on Wednesday morning, a huge rate increase to be granted, my fire insurance premium to skyrocket, etc.

    [MORE]

    Every elected official — even one who doesn’t totally suck — deserves to face a recall. Keep them busy defending their seats. Petitions should be submitted in staggered fashion so that there’s at least two recall elections, occurring somewhere in the state, each week.

    The government has made its bureaucracies so numerous and big that taxpayers can’t follow them. Abolish the “Merit” system! Every government job should be filled by popular election, and subject to term limits. (That is how it’s supposed to be.) None of this having to wait ten years for the Dept of Ed to claim its authority, under NCLB, to “fire” the staff (i.e. move them to another campus) of a school that has been beyond horrible for generations.

    • Replies: @gandydancer
  40. Currahee says:

    Of course it was over before it started. Live here; here’s CA political power:

    -govt. unions and SEIU
    -dizzylib upper middle class and tech overlords who control the wealth
    -Hollywood Jews who have tremendous influence (again money and power)
    -apathetic Mexicans who vote as told.
    There it is and it ain’t changin’.

    Blacks?? Don’t matter anymore; the Mexicans ran them off the patch.

    Nice weather.

  41. Anon[367] • Disclaimer says:
    @Pincher Martin

    I would imagine that many commenters really do appreciate the comments of Reg Caesar. He is well informed, often provides additional, useful information and usually does so with a good measure of wit. What a shame that you seem unable to appreciate that.

    A simple “thank you” would have been the appropriate response to receiving that much needed gift from Reg, enabling you to have a better grasp of the English language.

    • Agree: gandydancer
    • Disagree: Daniel H
    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    , @Daniel H
  42. @Daniel H

    It’s a counterfactual conditional, with a past counterfactual action tied to a present hypothetical consequence.

    Like most grammar mavens, he’s just a meathead.

  43. JimDandy says:

    I just assume (and have assumed all along) that he will stay in office, no matter how many votes he gets.

  44. Stan says:
    @Trelane

    Questions you should ask Willie Brown.

  45. @anon

    “can california be sold for a higher price (to the chinese)?”

    Whatchoo talkin’ bout “sold”, Willis?

    Why buy something when you are in the process of simply taking it? Or really, having it handed to you for free?

  46. Hope Ashli Babbitt fills out all three of the ballots mailed to her for Larry.

    • Thanks: Old Prude
  47. @gandydancer

    Not really relevant. No one has to beat Newsom. Recall Newsom has to beat Keep Newsom. Then Elder or somebody will end up top crab in the bucket of 50 or so and become Governor, without any necessity of topping the Keep Newsom vote.

    While you’re correct, that’s not how the campaign was run.

    The California state Democrats made the election about Trump and Elder. If the polling in the state is even close to accurate (and it might not be), the tactic was highly effective.

    As long as the election was only about Newsom’s performance, his support lagged in the polls and recall was a real possibility. As soon as the Dems made the election about Republicans being in charge, Newsom’s prospects got an immediate and sizable boost.

    So, yes, the election really is about who was running for the Republicans, despite the mechanics of how a recall election is actually handled.

    But I’m not convinced. The recall always depended on convincing non-(R) to recall Newsom, so (D) turnout doesn’t tell you whether that happened.

    I agree with you on that. Republicans by themselves do not have enough power in this state to pass anything.

    Elder has been pretty useless as an anti-Newsom candidate.

    I don’t think any Republican politician would have made a big difference unless he was a celebrity. Cox? Faulconer? Moderate establishment candidates get smacked in this state as badly as the more ideological Republican candidates.

    • Replies: @gandydancer
    , @Pericles
  48. @Farenheit

    This is an excellent question. I dislike crap, barf, AND trash on the street. In fact, I don’t like beggars, bums, or human petri dishes standing on street corners looking for discarded cigarette butts.

    I suspect this makes me against Nuisance, but he lives in a nice gated community in the foothills where there are no such things. Maybe the guv is against the guv? Maybe he wears that mask for so many pictures so that he won’t smell the garbage left all around Sacramento by his “voters.”

    • Replies: @danand
  49. As always, Elder to win. The question is, beyond the margin of fraud?

  50. Marquis says:

    Most overblown story in politics in some time. Newsome couldn’t lose legitimately, but of course there will be no legitimate election. And even if he did lose there’s nothing elder could do. California is long gone.

    This is all Republican media masturbation to make their base forget they tried to run a tranny two months ago. Idiots.

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @gandydancer
    , @Bill Jones
  51. @stillCARealist

    Two sides of the same coin. Where you find wealthy White liberals, you will eventually find blacks. White liberals all self destructive in all manner.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  52. Gamecock says:
    @John Johnson

    I can translate Johnson:

    ‘I’d rather see Newsom stay in.

    I hate the guy but I’m a Democrat’

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  53. @Anon

    I would imagine that many commenters really do appreciate the comments of Reg Caesar. He is well informed, often provides additional, useful information and usually does so with a good measure of wit.

    Then you thank him. That will allow you to directly address him with that over-the-top description of his virtues. I’m sure it will make his day. You can then spend the rest of the evening correcting each other’s split infinitives as you give each other back rubs.

    I think he’s a meathead. There’s nothing wrong with my sentence.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Stan Adams
  54. @Abolish_public_education

    During this summer/fire season, PG&E has not turned off the power in my region, unlike in the previous two years when it unplugged me every few weeks. This despite its customers using the A/C more than ever and, in my case, fires burning close to home. / My area votes GOP. If Gruesome survives the recall… I expect my power to go off on Wednesday morning…

    Bingo, It’s the one positive result of the recall so far that apparently Loathsome told the CPUC not to remind voters of the shutoffs.

    I said above that a search of Elder’s site shows no mention of the shutoffs. There’s a “Topics” tab on the landing page, but that isn’t one of them. Some Elder fan told me that “Power and [Something]” was a Topic and, oddly, when I had ddg search the site, sure enough it found a second, apparently hidden or superseded, Topics page and that was one of them. But clicking through showed that it, too, said nothing about the shutoffs.

    A lot of former Loathsome voters were hurt by the Panic and the shutoffs, and motivating them to recall Newsom was recall’s only chance, but the Useless GOP’s candidates seemed just fine with memory-holing the reason the recall was put in motion.- Smh.

    • Agree: res
  55. @Colin Wright

    Frankly, California’s a lost cause.

    Perhaps it’s time to return it to Mexico. Along with “New” Mexico, Nevada, Colorado, Oregon, and increasingly wobbly Arizona. Slough off DC and Hawaii as well. That would have subtracted 100 electors from Biden, and taken away 90% of his purported “popular ” vote margin.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  56. @Charles Pewitt

    Evidently dating Marilyn Manson can knock some sense into a girl.

    • LOL: R.G. Camara, El Dato
  57. The wild-eyed panic Newsom has effused during this isn’t necessarily because “the right might win!”

    His panic is about about his career, not anything else.

    Up until now, Newsom’s political career has been gliding along at an excellent pace. A rich, do-nothing, party all the time kid gets on the California political ladder and gets dutifully boosted up the ladder for his incompetence and laziness. DA, Mayor of San Fran, Lieutenant Governor, and now Governor. All while treating his job and duties as nothing more than window dressing, to let the lobbyists and underlings handle.

    A white, better-looking Obama.

    And in the current political climate, Newsom had eyes on either Feinstein’s Senate seat or the Presidency— likely both in his mind. I mean, for a guy as young as him who’s gotten so high, both were available, although Feinstein, despite having dementia herself, seems determined to weld herself into office till the day she dies, Strom Thurmond-style.

    Tantalizingly, the national media gave Newsom praise during COVID, and given Biden’s dementia, Kamala’s unfavorability, and the lack of any deep bench nationally for the D’s, Newsom might have thought 2024 would be his year. Especially after his chief “national hero Democrat governor” Andrew Cuomo got #MeTooed. It was all lining up for a 2024 Newsom run .

    And now this. If Newsom gets kicked out, he will be thrown back into the political wilderness, likely for life. He might get Feinstein’s seat, but nationally he wouldn’t have a chance for the D nom in 2024 or 2028. And Newsom, unlike true believer and political worker Jerry Brown, is not the kind of man to start over and rebuild himself. As I said, he’s been a figurehead leader for his entire career as Obama was, with he ego to match, but he has no clue about actual “groundswell” support.

    Hence Newsom’s public panic. He’s not a leader, and if he loses he really doesn’t know what he’ll do. And those who are riding his coattails know it too. I’ll bet half of them are making calls every day, seeing if another big-name D pol might have any staff openings.

    But this is about Newsom himself losing, not the left. They will remain firmly in control. The last time this happened, you got Gov. Arnold, who did squat and just morphed into a traitorous commie. How the heck will Larry Elder, a radio talk show host and minor attorney, do any better at either managing the California Deep State with thousands of recalcitrant lefties or be able to survive the beatdown of the media?

    I wish him well and hope it all proves me wrong. But still…

    • Thanks: El Dato
  58. Rose McGowan is a weird lady. She’s American, with American parents, went to HS in Washington state, yet speaks of the U.S. like a Martian would. The earthlings I’ve met during my travels in this strange land known as America have disappointed me greatly. Then this HS dropout says Americans are renowned throughout the globe for being uneducated, herself exempt from this slander of course, as she’s been to Italy and some other European countries, spreading the gospel of David Berg’s cult. I’m not sure she’s a help to Elder at all and this whole business of Newsom’s wife who’s the sister-in-law of some bigshot lawyer who knows David Boies is pretty byzantine.

  59. @Pincher Martin

    The question is, Elder non withstanding, who comes after Newsome? Gavin might be the last white Governor for the next 100 years. That leaves a massive vacuum both financially and personality wise. A dull Hispanic? An Asian technocrat who nobody listens too? An Indian high tech guru? Unknown but I have a feeling we will look back on these days as being serene and idyllic (well, at least for those who can’t remember California when it rocked).

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  60. @Pincher Martin

    There’s nothing wrong with my sentence.

    Then there be nothin’ wrong wi’ this one, neither. To a relativist.

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  61. @Pincher Martin

    …the election really is about who was running for the Republicans, despite the mechanics of how a recall election is actually handled… I don’t think any Republican politician would have made a big difference unless he was a celebrity. Cox? Faulconer?

    Who’s Cox? And Faulconer ran, to no effect that I noticed. His name only came up b/c he was the preferred candidate of the prostitute/mistress. A celebrity might have run but, again, it wouldn’t have mattered unless Loathsome lost on question#1. And I saw NO ONE going there, celebrity or not. But I admit I only saw the ads of Elder and Trimino and the “100 Reasions to Recall Newsom” vid on YT.

    Moderate establishment candidates get smacked in this state as badly as the more ideological Republican candidates.

    Yet Elder ran as one. The key was to make the election about Loathsome. Could that have been done? I don’t know. But what oxygen there was was sucked up by Elder, and he didn’t even try.

    Trump didn’t win over the 15 midgets b/c he was a celebrity. He won b/c he said what the electors wanted to hear when the 15 donor-owned midgets wouldn’t step up. If Elder had been willing to do that he might have caught fire. Instead he ran against taxes, for vouchers…. zzzzz…. *snore*

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  62. @Pincher Martin

    I think he’s a meathead.

    Ah, he’s not a bad guy. I’d rather read one of his digressions than the latest screed by Whiskey or el pato pequeño.

    Steve, what do you think of Angelyne’s chances?

    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
  63. FPD72 says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Whatever happened to past participles? Have they “went” the way of feminine modesty?

    You are partially correct; “run” is the proper word. But I think you misidentified the grammatical form. “Had…run” is the hypothesis of a Type Three conditional statement (the “if” is implied by the following “then” in the conclusion). So “had…run” in this instance is a past perfect subjunctive.

    The proper form for the conclusion of a Type Three conditional statement is a past participle.

    That said, I also lament the corruption of past participles and the perfect tense.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  64. @Reg Cæsar

    To a relativist.

    I get it. You’re a prescriptivist. You have filled your head with a bunch of arbitrary grammar rules you believe make sense, and you look at it as your duty to inflict those rules on the rest of society, lest the world fall apart and the niggers take over.

    I just look at you as a meathead who should’ve taken up a more worthwhile intellectual hobby than being a grammar maven. It’s bad enough you waste your own time, but do you have to waste everyone else’s?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  65. Acilius says: • Website

    There is a nonzero chance that the Governor of California will be appointing a replacement for Dianne Feinstein sometime before January 2023, so if by some odd chance the polls are wrong and Larry Elder fills that that office between now and then, some friend of his might become a US Senator.

    Which reminds me, Steve, I’ve always thought you were just swell…

  66. as says:

    Gavin Newson is incredibly good looking.

    I hate him as a person and as a leader though.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    , @Anon
  67. @gent

    To beat a phrase to death;
    “You have a keen grasp of the obvious”.

  68. Roger says:

    538 said Newsom is 20 points ahead. And early voting is heavy in Democrat areas. I would like to see Larry Elder win, but he has very little chance.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  69. @Reg Cæsar

    ‘Perhaps it’s time to return it to Mexico. Along with “New” Mexico, Nevada, Colorado, Oregon, and increasingly wobbly Arizona. Slough off DC and Hawaii as well. That would have subtracted 100 electors from Biden, and taken away 90% of his purported “popular ” vote margin.’

    Just the cities would suffice. It’s a common misconception that the divide is between states; it’s more town versus country.

  70. Jmaie says:
    @Trelane

    What is governor Newsom’s credential? Is he good at something?

    He is good at being Nancy Pelosi’s nephew…

    • Replies: @gandydancer
  71. res says:
    @Pincher Martin

    Newsom appeared to be in trouble until the Dems figured out that they could just campaign against Trump and the Republicans and get bailed out of their misrule.

    This.

    • Replies: @gandydancer
  72. @Pincher Martin

    “Obviously murder and graffiti are two vastly different crimes. But they are part of the same continuum, and a climate that tolerates one is more likely to tolerate the other.” –Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, 1998

    I’m William Bratton, you’re Chesa Boudin. How “boomer” of me.

    NYPD: Broken Windows Is Not Broken [pdf]

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  73. @Roger

    538 said Newsom is 20 points ahead.

    Of 50%? That’s the only number that matters.

    • Replies: @gandydancer
  74. @FPD72

    But I think you misidentified the grammatical form.

    Thanks. I “kind’ve” suspected that, but figured it was close enough, and another commenter “would of” clued me in.

  75. @Gamecock

    I can translate Johnson:

    ‘I’d rather see Newsom stay in.

    I hate the guy but I’m a Democrat’

    I can translate Gamecock: If you question GOP strategy then you must be a Democrat!!!!!!

    Yea I ran into this same mindless attitude with Team Trump here last year. I warned that the polls were making it clear that he was losing independents by not taking the virus seriously. But Team Trump assured me that everything was fine and I must be on “the other side” or something.

    In this recall the GOP plan is even worse. Trump at least had a good chance of winning even if by slight margin.

    Running a Black Rush Limbaugh is terrible strategy. First of all the polls have been consistent in that California independents favor moderate Republicans. The GOP looked at the numbers and said YEA BUT WE HAVE A BLACK [email protected]!!!!!!

    The California GOP thinks they can pull a win by race card but there really isn’t much of a Black vote in California and Hispanics don’t suffer from White guilt. Blacks consistently vote Democrat and will only slightly deviate if the Republican is Black. Again the GOP is not looking at the numbers.

    But more importantly Newsom only has one more year. If Elder wins (unlikely) he will only have one year and both houses are controlled by Democrats. The extremely pro-Democrat California media will depict Elder as being unable to fix any of California’s problems. Will they point out that he has two houses against him? Of course not, this is war. Elder is a clueless libertarian anyways and really doesn’t have many good ideas. All of this will just help the Democrats in the next election.

    That is why I would vote to leave Newsom in.

    Now commence tribal chants and calls to dump me in the volcano.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  76. Dan Hayes says:
    @as

    This fits JFK’s reincarnation to a T!

  77. Anon[546] • Disclaimer says:

    I voted weeks ago, as have many, given California’s pandemic-inspired “vote by mail ballots for everybody” policy, and Delta.

    I think this favors Newsom, somehow. Democrats would be more likely to vote late in response to panicky media warnings about the dangers if he lost (which are not that great for reasons Steve stated).

  78. Anon[546] • Disclaimer says:
    @Pincher Martin

    I suggest you spend less time worrying about my grammar

    I’m not making any comment on Pincher, but this raises an issue that I’ve been thinking about. Ever since the explosion of self-published media and the death of copyediting and proofreading, we now get to see the raw draft of what people write (although Grammarly-type programs are beginning to obfuscate things again).

    I think you can do a Wordsum-level rough-and-ready IQ assessment of people based on their grammar, punctuation, spelling, and ability to produce concise, clearly thought-through sentences and paragraphs.

    You need a sufficiently large corpus, not a single e-mail, blog post, or comment, to do this. Everyone makes goofs in the moment, there/their/they’re and its/it’s for instance.

    As English instruction has deteriorated kids are simply not taught or exposed to the sort of schoolmarm grammar, punctuation, and spelling instruction that the more elder among us were inundated with. And yet … there are still people, young bloggers and journalists and random young commenters who seem to have absorbed all the traditional language skills. Some of these guys must have been taught it, and some may be language buffs who read up on it on their own.

    But I think a lot of it is that smart people seek out stuff to read, and they get a sense of what well-written text is. They notice how things are done, they remember it, and they use it themselves. I think this is an indicator of intelligence. Also, there is a “genetic environmental” or “nature of nurture” angle, where I think smart people manage to seek out and end up in the remaining schoolmarm class section, or they seek out books on writing and read them.

    Another thing you can sense through writing is how unconventional the writer is. For instance, I bet there are at least weak correlations between not using capital letters and tattoos, and between putting the comma or period outside quotes and autism.

  79. @Anon

    between putting the comma or period outside quotes and autism.

    In school, I was taught always to put the punctuation inside the quotation marks.

    [MORE]

    “Stacy is a bitch,” Becky said.

    “Stacy, you’re not going to believe this, but Becky called you a bitch,” Christine said.

    “Really?” Stacy asked. “What were her exact words?”

    “Her exact words were, ‘Stacy is a bitch.’”

    “Well,” Stacy said. “Talk about the pot calling the kettle black. If I’m a bitch, then Becky is a c…”

    “Hi,” Chad said, striding confidently into the room. “Sorry I’m late. What’s going on?”

    Stacy smiled. Now was her chance to exact revenge.

    “Chad,” she cooed, “you’re not going to believe this, but Becky is spreading rumors about you.”

    “Oh, I know all about it,” Chad said. “She’s running around telling everyone, ‘Chad has herpes.’ ‘Chad has a choad.’ ‘Chad has no stamina.’ It’s all because I rejected her. She’s such a nasty c…”

    “I’d better go,” Christine said. “I have to be at rehearsal in half an hour.”

    “Thanks, Chris. Be sure to keep me updated on Becky’s slanderous remarks.”

    “I still can’t believe she has the gall to call you her ‘best friend,’” Christine said. “She certainly has a bizarre definition of ‘friendship.’”

    “It’s just the way she is,” Stacy said, blowing her friend an “air kiss.”

    “Talk to you later, Stace. Ciao and out.”

    • Agree: El Dato
    • Replies: @Anon
  80. Anon[225] • Disclaimer says:
    @as

    I think Newsom looks like “Griffy” in “Zippy the Pinhead”

    https://www.zippythepinhead.com/pages/aacast.html

  81. Bill H. says: • Website

    Headline in the San Diego Union Tribune, page 1, above the fold, huge type on the day before the recall election,
    “Newsome leads in polls, while Elder promotes false narratives.”

    • Replies: @res
  82. @Rooster111

    Rooster111 wrote:

    Two sides of the same coin. Where you find wealthy White liberals, you will eventually find blacks. White liberals all self destructive in all manner.

    No, actually CA is only 6-7 percent Black, compared to ~13 nationally.

    Our problem is not Blacks (nor Hispanics). It is the ruling Woke White elite and their wannabes, the parasitic verbalist overclass.

    It is the White elite who are letting the state burn down, who won’t provide power or water, and who are allowing our cities to be destroyed by the homeless.

    It does look tonight as if we are stuck with Governor Nuisance, but people out here are really unhappy, even a lot of White Leftists.

    An openly Leftist acquaintance who lives in SF complained to me a couple years ago about the collapse of her city, citing specifically the homneless. The son of a neighbor, who is an anti-Trumper, apologized to me a few weeks ago for being in despair for his home state (I told him it was cool to be angry about the reality of what we are living through). And the checkout guy at the local Walmart was completely open about the fact that he has had enough and is voting for the recall (takes some guts — people out here are afraid to publicly state their opinions).

    All anecdotal, I know, but an upset is possible.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Bill Jones
    , @Alden
  83. @Marquis

    This is all Republican media masturbation to make their base forget they tried to run a tranny two months ago. Idiots.

    Jenner wasn’t “run” by the “Republican media “, whatever you have in mind by that term.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  84. @John Johnson

    John Johnson wrote:

    But more importantly Newsom only has one more year. If Elder wins (unlikely) he will only have one year and both houses are controlled by Democrats. The extremely pro-Democrat California media will depict Elder as being unable to fix any of California’s problems. Will they point out that he has two houses against him? Of course not, this is war. Elder is a clueless libertarian anyways and really doesn’t have many good ideas. All of this will just help the Democrats in the next election.

    That is why I would vote to leave Newsom in.

    The state is really, truly collapsing and Newsom is an incompetent pretty-boy wuss.

    Yeah, if Elder gets in, he won’t fix it, but it will be a warning shot to the Dems that they need to look at reality.

    There are (relatively) sane Dems, but they are afraid, very, very afraid. If we can dump the Nuisance, we may give some spine to Pat-Brown-style Dems who can make the state livable. California was kinda livable under Pat Brown (even under the young Jerry Brown). Not perfect, but not a nightmare.

    • Replies: @Gamecock
  85. danand says:
    @stillCARealist

    “This is an excellent question. I dislike crap, barf, AND trash on the street. In fact, I don’t like beggars, bums, or human petri dishes standing on street corners looking for discarded cigarette butts.”

    StillCARealist, from the earliest days of this recall, to my mind there was but one single, nearly universally unifying issue to ride with. One that just about any of the 40+ listed candidates could have had a shot at winning with.

    Tell us they will be the man-trans-woman who would enforce: California Penal Code section 647 (e):

    …criminalizes anyone, “Who lodges in any building, structure, vehicle, or place, whether public or private, without the permission of the owner or person entitled to the possession or in control of it.”

    For several years going California has been literally been paying “bums”, for lack of my knowing this hours woke identifier, to migrate here. So they come, both from the near & far reaches of the US, and from the beyond.

    Now at every red lighted median, every grocery store door passed; their is that sign, that voice, that smell.

    Newsom’s California Dream

  86. @Jmaie

    He is good at being Nancy Pelosi’s nephew…

    Interesting tidbit, but… not exactly, it turns out.

    Gavin Newsome’s maternal aunty, Barbara Newsome, once married Nancy Pelosi’s brother-in-law, Ron Pelosi. Ron is Paul’s (Nancy Pelosi’s husband) brother. However, Barbara and Ron divorced each other in 1977 when Gavin was only 10 years old.

    https://celebshaunt.com/is-gavin-newsom-related-to-nancy-pelosi/

    • Replies: @Pericles
    , @Alden
  87. @res

    That they were able to campaign against Trump/Elder I blame on Elder (and not just Elder) for totally dropping the ball. Like the \$100 bill blowing around on the sidewalk that Trump briefly adopted in 2016 there were actually potentially resonant issues that Elder COULD have run on rather than as an irrelevant GOP schlub. Such as the ones used to garner sigs for the recall petition. How hard was that to figure out, really? But there were 15 midgets on the stage with Trump in 2016 for all of whom it was a mystery, and things have not improved for the Party of the Walking Brain-Dead.

    It will, however, be interesting to see how accurate the polling is, this time.

    • Replies: @res
  88. JimB says:
    @gent

    Or as another infamous Joe said, it’s not the people who vote that count, it’s the people who count the votes.

  89. Bernard says:

    It’s hopeless, it truly is. The best that can be said is that it will tarnish Newsom’s name and cause the Democrats to spend some money. But hey, the weather’s nice.

  90. @PhysicistDave

    No, actually CA is only 6-7 percent Black, compared to ~13 nationally.

    They moved to Georgia and voted for Biden.

    • Agree: The Anti-Gnostic
  91. @Prof. Woland

    Gavin might be the last white Governor for the next 100 years.

    I doubt it.

    Non-Hispanic whites are still over one-third of the state population, and an even larger percentage of the voting population. And as Steve Sailer frequently points, Hispanics, who are the only group in the state larger than non-Hispanic whites, aren’t very political.

    So even if we can’t see it now, and even if it doesn’t happen for a couple of decades, political alliances will eventually shift and new coalitions will be born. White political leaders will likely pop up on both sides of the new political divide. There are still numerous young white leaders in the state Democratic Party today who are women, gays, Jews, etc.

    The problem as I see it isn’t that Newsom will likely be the last white governor, but that he is merely the latest evidence showing we won’t have a conservative Republican governor of *any* color anytime soon. Diversity creates inequality which in turn creates more supplicants for government largesse. The large and secure white middle class of California is gone for good, and it was that class which was willing to support the conservative policies of reduced spending, low taxes, a stout defense, and being tough on crime.

    I don’t see that returning to California in my lifetime.

    Unknown but I have a feeling we will look back on these days as being serene and idyllic (well, at least for those who can’t remember California when it rocked).

    This is the real problem with the diversity caused by mass immigration. The state used to be a better place to live. Liberal and conservative politicians both had to govern well at the state level or they would be replaced by their political opposite when their tenure was up. It was a fair political fight giving both parties a chance to win.

    I doubt there will be a revolution in this state, but continued steady decline seems likely.

    • Replies: @Prof. Woland
  92. Anon[225] • Disclaimer says:
    @Stan Adams

    In school, I was taught always to put the punctuation inside the quotation marks.

    Yes, that’s the American English rule. Geeks and computer programmers (spectrum types) often rebel against this because it bothers them that something is infringing on the quoted material. I even do this in emails when writing my mom to type something into a web page or configuration page somewhere. Recently I’ve just made sure to put it on a separate line.

    Autistics cannot deal with the fuzziness of a rule that says to put small punctuation inside quotes, except when it’s a password or something for a computer, and put big punctuation outside quotes. IT’S JUST NOT LOGICAL! AAAAHHHH!

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    , @gandydancer
  93. @gandydancer

    Who’s Cox?

    John Cox is the businessman with the bear. He’s currently running. He also got curb-stomped in the 2018 gubernatorial election against Newsom.

    And Faulconer ran, to no effect that I noticed.

    Yes, because he’s a moderate Republican and, like Cox, NOT a celebrity.

    A celebrity might have run but, again, it wouldn’t have mattered unless Loathsome lost on question#1.

    You’re not understanding that the list of GOP alternatives to Newsom who are on the ballot affects how a lot of unhappy Democrats and independents will vote on Question #1. The two questions are not unrelated in their minds. They might not be happy with the state of California today. They might even dislike Newsom. But they aren’t going to allow a Republican to take Newsom’s place. So they will vote “No” on the recall.

    An example of how a celebrity in the race might have changed things? Schwarzenegger is not much liked by many California Republicans today because of his dislike of Trump and his failed tenure as governor. I certainly don’t like him. But if we could go back in time and bring back the Schwarzenegger of 2003 to run in the election today, I bet Newsom is voted out of office and Arnold wins the gubernatorial race and takes Newsom’s place just as he took Gray Davis’ place in 2003.

    • Replies: @gandydancer
  94. El Dato says:
    @Ano

    What happened to plastered “if he were antifa I wouldn’t be surprised” guy “found in a car”?

    CA police find 300 unopened recall ballots, with gun, drugs and mail, in man’s car

    TORRANCE, Calif. — Authorities are investigating why 300 unopened vote-by-mail ballots for the upcoming recall election were found – along with a gun, drugs and stolen mail – in a car parked at a Southern California convenience store.

    The discovery was made on August 16 when police in Torrance, California, were called about a man sleeping in his car at a 7-Eleven parking lot.

    “Inside the vehicle, the officers found a loaded handgun, some narcotics, and then they found a bunch of mail and what turned out to be over 300 election ballots in the backseat of the vehicle,” said Sgt. Mark Ponegalek with the Torrance Police Department.

    ….

    The Los Angeles County Registrar’s office said that those ballots for the Sept. 14 recall election of Gov. Gavin Newsom had been sent out but were not filled out and returned by voters.

    They said there is no indication the ballots were taken specifically in an attempt to influence the results of the recall vote, as there was other stolen mail found with them.

  95. @Pincher Martin

    You’re not taking my point that the effectiveness of the switch to Trump/Elder depended on Elder being a patsy making almost no appeal on the issues that triggered the recall. The people hurt by the shutdown/shutoffs wouldn’t be so moved by partisan considerations if Elder had represented more than same-old same-old Republicanism. There was nothing like the current personally involving issues in 2003, just Ahnold’s image vs grey nothingness. Conditions which are different are not the same.

    I’ve never seen anyone with a bear. In what circles do you travel that you see this?

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    , @Alden
  96. @Reg Cæsar

    What a segue.

    It’s just as I said. The antiquated rules of grammar have taken over your brain, leaving room for little else. You now fantasize that you’re really fighting crime when you point out that some petty prescriptivist rule has been broken. “…they are part of the same continuum…” Well, no, they’re really not.

    Here are the only two rules for writing that matter: Write clearly and have something worth writing about. How you go about doing so is your own business.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  97. @Anon

    Migrating punctuation inside quotation marks is idiotic.

    The only thing that should be inside quotation marks is the text quoted, plus ellipses and insertions marked by square brackets as appropriate. Maybe there’s some etc., but not much.

    My refusal to do the idiotic has something to do with “autism”, how?

  98. Daniel H says:
    @Thomm

    The virtually non-existent support for Larry Elder among the WNs on this website speaks volumes. They aren’t Republicans or even believers in America.

    Nope, you’re right. That train left the barn a long time ago. It’s all over except for the shouting.

  99. Pericles says:
    @Pincher Martin

    Lol, all of this gives me such a comfy feeling, D versus R, polling the vooter this way and that, surely the veto-proof majority of Ds won’t strike down the veto of an R since traditionally, in short all that old nonsense, not one year after Nov. 2020, and in one of the prime rotten states of America no less.

    Well folks, do enjoy your spectacle.

  100. Daniel H says:
    @Anon

    A simple “thank you” would have been the appropriate response to receiving that much needed gift from Reg, enabling you to have a better grasp of the English language.

    Except Caesar is likely wrong in the grammar. Comes off as a prickly, pushy pedant.

    On more reflection, the sentence is absolutely in the subjunctive mood, not the past perfect, and the question of the minute, what is the conjugation of the past subjunctive of “run”?

  101. Daniel H says:
    @Bragadocious

    Rose McGowan is a weird lady.

    She’s got a hopelessly sad look on her face, like she’s always on the verge of crying or grabbing the next chardonnay. Pimped out by her parents to the Hollywood machine at a tender age. She never had a chance.

  102. Pericles says:
    @Anon

    I bet there are at least weak correlation … between putting the comma or period outside quotes and autism.

    And programming at least, lol. Entities need to be properly nested you know.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  103. Pericles says:
    @gandydancer

    OK, so Gavin is Ron Pelosi’s ex-nephew?

    • Replies: @gandydancer
  104. @Reg Cæsar

    Of 50%? That’s the only number that matters.

    538 says 15.8%, but that’s after “adjustments” and “weighting”.
    https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/california-recall-polls/
    I didn’t buy their “random error” excuse in 2020 etc., so there’s that.

  105. Gamecock says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Don’t bother, Dave. Johnson is a Pelosi Democrat.

    We are all demons.

  106. Old Prude says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Run, runner, runniest
    Fun, funnier, funniest
    Bun, bunner, bunniest, and just for California:
    Bum, bummer, bummiest…

  107. SF says:

    Covid is not a problem that responds to laissez faire approaches, and I’m not going to trust my family’s health to an antivax nut. I held my nose and voted no.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
  108. @PhysicistDave

    the parasitic verbalist overclass

    I like this. I’ll be stealing it.

    Would it be too indicative of felonious intent if a started a sticky note with Bon Mot’s ala Sailer?

  109. @gent

    Elder will win easily on the actual votes, but then the mail in votes will break overwhelmingly for Gov Gav, as will the ballot harvesting tallies. During the night, after the election workers are sent home with instructions to finish up the next day, in will come the Dem operatives with pallet loads of Newsome ballots. It will not even be close.

    And if you observe the obvious, you are guilty of treason, per the MSM.

    • Replies: @bomag
  110. @Stan Adams

    I love this slate of write-ins! From top left going clockwise, it looks like we have:
    1) G. Gordon Liddy (reincarnated with a vaguely Latin-sounding name)
    2) Barbara Eden’s daughter?
    3) The lead singer from the Buggles (Video Killed the Radio Star) now 30 years older
    4) The lead singer from Parliament(?)

    As comedian Yakov Smirnoff (you younger iSteve denizens can look him up) used to say, “America! What a country!”

  111. countenance says: • Website

    My take all along is that the very idea that Gavin Newsom could be recalled and that Larry Elder could replace him ought to be a practical joke in deep blue California, but the real news is that both have a puncher’s chance of happening, and the real political lesson is that it almost did even though (I don’t think) it will.

  112. El Dato says:
    @Pericles

    This why we have LISPy languages.

    Is it still politically correct to use elephants in drawings?

    Anyway, people who insist that they are right about putting the punctuation where the rules say they shouldn’t be are the REAL autists.

  113. Spud Boy says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Air full of smoke sort of takes away from the great weather. I used to live there.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  114. @Daniel H

    You do have to feel for these girls who are run through the meat grinder of the Hollywood flesh factory:

  115. @John Johnson

    “Larry Elder is a libertarian conservative entertainer”

    If LA-based radio hosts are the alternative to the vacant Getty boy my vote is for Phil Hendrie. But since Phil wasn’t on the ballot I chose Angelique, the 82 year old adult entertainer. See her in sunlight: it’s a William Castle frightmare.

  116. Alden says:
    @John Johnson

    A year or two without any new laws passed would be very beneficial to California. We don’t need state legislators any more . There’s enough laws and amendments to last for centuries.

  117. Alden says:
    @gandydancer

    Barbara divorced Ron Pelosi because of continual adultery. Ron was the designated political player of the Pelosi dynasty. But abdicated in favor of Nancy.

  118. @gandydancer

    You’re not taking my point that the effectiveness of the switch to Trump/Elder depended on Elder being a patsy making almost no appeal on the issues that triggered the recall.

    Because I don’t think it mattered. There are several Republican candidates in this race other than Larry Elder, including two well-known establishment types. They aren’t making any headway, either.

    For example, here is Kevin Faulconer, the former San Diego mayor, on the issues.

    He highlights the shutdowns, as well as many other major problems Californians face right now. He’s currently hovering around five percent in the polls.

    You’re not correctly identifying the problem in California right now, which has nothing to do with finding the right GOP candidate and everything to do with knowing that _no_ GOP candidate can possibly win a statewide office anymore without the perfect setup.

    I’ve never seen anyone with a bear. In what circles do you travel that you see this?

    Do you never turn on a TV set?

    https://external-content.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=https%3A%2F%2Fi1.wp.com%2Fmedia.nbcmiami.com%2F2021%2F05%2FGettyImages-1316354881.jpg%3Fquality%3D85%26resize%3D1200%252C675%26strip%3Dall%26ssl%3D1&f=1&nofb=1

  119. If the Dems steal this one openly, even normies may notice.

    Elder would talk about the fraud on his show, his show would be canceled by some stations, and he would encounter a social media ban. Normies may notice that too.

    Then more normies might vote against the Establishment in 2022. Oh wait, nevermind

  120. Alden says:
    @gandydancer

    There were some ads of Cox with a bear. But he stopped because people laughed at his ads. I got 35 text messages overnight to vote for either Elder or Newsom today. I learned long ago that government is the enemy. Doesn’t matter who’s in charge. That’s the Asian Way. Which Americans should accept

    I’d love to see Larry Elder win just to see the liberals heads explode. Mainly because I’d like to see the 160 year old San Francisco strangle hold on California politics end. It’s gotten worse
    because of Bay Area tech money and influence.

    Schwarzenegger was very very bad for California employers. He was a frontman for the Workmen’s compensation insurance companies. Allowed them to raise the rates employers must pay to astronomical heights. While making it difficult for injured workers to be permitted to obtain necessary medical treatment. High premiums but no pay outs. A year of hearings for permission to get an X-ray. By which time the worker is permanently disabled. And the employer’s moved to another state because the premium was raised so high.

  121. @Bragadocious

    “spreading the gospel of David Berg’s cult”

    How can Rose, a child at the time, be blamed for anything she was coerced/forced to do while her despicable parents languished in that cult? Activities which included sex with the adults in Berg’s operation (yep. Like many 60s and 70s cult leaders, Berg was connected to a company funded by either military or civilian intelligence psychological warfare units).

    “this whole business of Newsom’s wife who’s the sister-in-law of some bigshot lawyer who knows David Boies is pretty byzantine.”

    Think of the networks populated by operatives of the malignant power system as a spider’s web. Look, up there in the shadows, you can just make out the silhouette of the arachnid deity that runs the show.

    • Replies: @Bragadocious
  122. @Anon

    You mentioned in your earlier comment that a person’s willingness to adhere to arbitrary and seemingly illogical punctuation rules is an indicator of his personality.

    [MORE]

    In school, I always took pride in my compliance with the dictates of authority figures. Not being popular with my ostensible peers, I compensated by sucking up to teachers and administrators. I was very good at it.

    My mother, a veteran of the salt mines of public education, encouraged my efforts; she insisted that I do everything in my power to ingratiate myself with my instructors. Even my grandmother did her part by buying expensive Christmas presents for me to hand out at the end of the year.

    (I had a number of Jewish teachers over the years, but with one notable exception none of them took offense to my “holiday” gifts. The one exception accepted the gift with a curt, “I realize that you didn’t mean to cause offense, even if I am offended.”)

    One year Grandma bought a selection of lovely scarves for the women. I didn’t even look at them; I just put them in the boxes, wrote the names on the tags, and handed them out. (Note my Oxford comma.)

    When I came back from Christmas break, one of my teachers stopped me in the hallway and said, “[Stan], several of us were just talking in the teachers’ lounge, and we’re amazed by how perfectly you matched each scarf to each woman’s individual personality. There aren’t many men who have that kind of innate sensitivity toward women. One day your wife will appreciate it. Thank you so much.”

    I flashed my best fake smile and said, “I’m so glad. You’re welcome.”

    Currying the favor of the authorities enabled me to get away with breaking the rules. I skipped a couple of months’ worth of my senior year and still graduated with honors. I was nominated for two special awards and was invited to a special banquet downtown.

    I was a dominant figure in almost every class I ever attended – not because I was the smartest person in the room, and (certainly) not because I was the hardest-working, but because I was confident to the point of arrogance about my ability to articulate my views on anything and everything, regardless of whether I knew my ass from the Grand Canyon. I was notorious for interrupting the flow of the discussion to talk about whatever the hell I wanted to talk about. (You may have noticed that I have a tendency to do that here, as well.) And I was not shy about pointing out flaws (real or perceived) in my classmates’ arguments.

    A girl once told me in exasperation, “During our class discussions, I have to use my thesaurus just to figure out that you’re insulting me. You’re an arrogant asshole.”

    Of course, I never thought of myself as arrogant. I always regarded myself as the underdog nerd, valiantly struggling against the oppressive social hierarchy. I never knew just how much I was resented.

    A few years ago, I ran into someone I knew in school, and I was surprised when he told me I was widely regarded as a “spoiled, stuck-up prick” who could get away with anything.

    “You had contempt for everyone,” he said. And he was right – I did. But I never realized that it was so blindingly obvious.

    Many if not most of the people who harbor lifelong resentment against the “popular” kids who were mean to them in school were just as nasty and aggressive as the jocks, preps, and cheerleaders they envied. Certainly I was.

    • Agree: gandydancer
  123. Bill P says:
    @Charles Pewitt

    Rose McGowan goes after people who go after her or people she cares about.

    She got that from her dad, an artist who raised four kids (including three daughters) alone in a little house in north Seattle. It’s an admirable quality.

    • Agree: gandydancer
  124. Dutch Boy says:

    I was not optimistic about the prospects for getting rid of Gov. Newsance. Besides the large Democratic edge in voter registration, he has the solid support of the moneybags and corporations (esp. Silicon Valley) in the state. The election system is also tailored for fraud, so anything reasonably close will go the Democrats, who control the election machinery, The state will continue to crumble.

  125. Dutch Boy says:
    @Justice Duvall

    Elder once thought California was ungovernable until he became acquainted with the facts you cited.

  126. Bill P says:
    @Daniel H

    The idea of Rose’s dad pimping her out is laughable. I knew that guy, and he’d chase boys away from his daughters with a baseball bat. No, he had nothing to do with her career choice. She went down to LA very much on her own, and against his wishes.

  127. @Pincher Martin

    _no_ GOP candidate can possibly win a statewide office anymore without ..

    The set-up could be:

    • a ‘once in fifty years’ situation where the DEMs have made things so intolerable that party members stay home on election day, or

    • any time when a movie star, or other popular celebrity, chooses to run.

    The former is our only statistical chance to get small government via a political solution, but the GOPs are so awful that they’d use such a rare opportunity in order to prove to voters that conservatives are good DEMs, too.

    • Agree: gandydancer
    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  128. res says:
    @Anon

    But I think a lot of it is that smart people seek out stuff to read, and they get a sense of what well-written text is. They notice how things are done, they remember it, and they use it themselves.

    It will be interesting to see how this changes with the rise of the internet. Unless you seek out books and newspapers (and even those are becoming worse) so much reading material out there is unedited (or are even the editors incompetent now?). How will this affect upcoming generations?

    I think my own grammar and spelling become worse the more time I spend reading things on the internet.

    I bet there are at least weak correlations … between putting the comma or period outside quotes and autism.

    LOL. Probably some truth to that. And I say that as someone who is bothered by punctuation inside quotation marks subtly changing meaning. For example, I dislike partial (non sentence ending) quotes being concluded by a period inside the quotes. Also bothered by cases like: Try searching the internet for “Newsom Pelosi nephew.” We can argue about where proper attention to detail ends and the spectrum begins, but I do think you would find a correlation as you said.

  129. jsm says:
    @Justice Duvall

    Seriously? You think “traditions” is something dems go by when it’s to their disadvantage to do so?

  130. res says:
    @Bill H.

    That’s hilarious. How could it happen given how often “Newsom” appears in the paper? Do you have a screenshot? I would like to record it for posterity and can’t find anything similar on their website.

  131. res says:
    @gandydancer

    I don’t doubt Elder and the recall Newsom campaign in general could have done better, but what I was referring to was the keep Newsom campaign associating the recall with Republicans in general (e.g. the alliterative “Republican recall” was used in ads). In a state which is 24% percent registered Republican that seems like a winning tactic. Even many of the more reasonable Californians (that bar is not necessarily that high, sadly) are reflexively anti-Republican and would vote accordingly given that framing no matter how bad Newsom’s record is.

    It is actually rather telling that they chose to use that framing rather than trying to run on Newson’s record.

    • Agree: Pincher Martin
    • Replies: @gandydancer
  132. I don’t know whether in-person voting, i.e. polling station, is available for this recall. I haven’t seen any signs/flags around town indicating that it is.

    Abolish convenience (postage paid!) voting. Asking voters to show up is not asking too much. If you’re too afraid of getting sick to leave your house, out of town (on holiday!), [voluntarily] deployed to Afghanistan, etc, then you have chosen not to vote.

    The recall petition was certified on July 1st. It’s ridiculous that it took this much time for voters to be allowed to weigh in.

    One reason why it takes so long to gather signatures is because the bar is high (in terms of raw numbers); it’s 12% of those who voted for governor last time. Since a GOP can no longer get elected governor (so what?) in the general, GOPs should not vote. For roughly every eight who boycott, the bar lowers by one.

    For instance, in ‘18 Cox received 4.7M votes. 38%. A trouncing. Had he received ~0, he obviously would have lost just the same, but the bar would have been ~564,000 sigs less.

  133. @Abolish_public_education

    The former is our only statistical chance to get small government via a political solution, but the GOPs are so awful that they’d use such a rare opportunity in order to prove to voters that conservatives are good DEMs, too.

    We Californians won’t get elected officials dedicated to small government again in our lifetimes. Immigrants and their children, who now make up more of this state than do Republicans, don’t have an affinity for small government conservatism. Some of the wealthier immigrants like low taxes, of course, but they don’t seem to make the long-term connection between the size of their tax bill and the size of government. They support most of the Democrats’ big government plans.

    Besides, it’s not as if the modern Republican Party was ever dedicated to small government conservatism beyond throwing a few rhetorical flourishes in its direction. Even under Reagan, government grew. Under the first Bush, it grew. Under the second Bush, it grew a lot. Trump’s populism doesn’t even bother to pay homage to small government conservatism, considering it a relic of the Reagan Era.

    Ironically, the most fiscally conservative presidency of my lifetime was Bill Clinton’s eight years in office. Yes, his budgetary decisions were driven by a GOP-controlled congress and the political triangulation he felt he had to do to stay in office, but the results are undeniable: low taxes, less government, and budget surpluses.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @gandydancer
    , @Alden
  134. @Alden

    I learned long ago that government is the enemy. Doesn’t matter who’s in charge. That’s the Asian Way. Which Americans should accept

    ????

    You’re saying the “Asian Way” is understanding that government is the enemy no matter who is in charge and we Americans should just accept that?

    I don’t think a single part of that sequence of thoughts is true.

    • Disagree: RadicalCenter
  135. @Marquis

    This is all Republican media masturbation to make their base forget they tried to run a tranny two months ago. Idiots.

    What’s your understanding of l’affaire Jenner?

    I’d be interested to know.

  136. @Alden

    I learned long ago that government is the enemy. Doesn’t matter who’s in charge.

    • AGREE!: Adam Smith

  137. @SunBakedSuburb

    I don’t blame her, she’s a victim. But in adopting Eurotrash talking points she clearly identifies with them. She needs (more) therapy.

    And it seems she did not help Elder.

  138. @Pincher Martin

    We will see. I am just kind of throwing that out there but I do not have a crystal ball.

    You mention Feminists, Gays, and Jews but are they really white? Jews and Gays don’t identify as white and they seem to have their own genetic nepotistic in groups. I believe Peter Brimelow brings this up in his wonderful article on the Tipping Point.

    https://vdare.com/articles/the-democratic-party-has-tipped-great-news-for-the-gop-which-doesn-t-deserve-it

    With whites now becoming a minority in the Democratic party, they are forced to subordinate their goals to their hungrier more aggressive coalition cohorts. If they want to get anything done they have to take their needs into consideration first. There is some use to having a white front man or woman (Biden, Newsome, Pelosi) but that is only to fool the few whites left that could be considered swing voters. Diversity is also killing those too.

    Having a truly diverse populace would be better to say, South Africa, where you have a more racially homogenous and undesirable population to contend with. But here, much like there, the blacks are still so intimidated and afraid of whites that the various tribes are hesitant to form a coalition with them knowing that if 90% of the population is probably enough to keep them rising up again.

  139. @Pincher Martin

    Abolish_public_education: A GOP candidate can win a statewide when “a ‘once in fifty years’ situation where the DEMs have made things… intolerable…”

    You’re still not getting it, and your reply to me shows the same blindness exhibited by Elder and Faulconer. I guess you haven’t had your electricity shut off for days on multiple occasions and haven’t been deeply affected by the COVID Panic. THOSE are the issues that triggered the recall, but you prattle on about “elect[ing]officials dedicated to small government”. Sure, if we did that would be lovely, but it’s an electoral loser. If Elder had gotten in he in practical terms would have been able to actually do nothing other than be not-Gruesome, but he would have had a bully pulpit of sorts to campaign against the welfare state until there was an actual election and he was (probably) thrown out of office by an electorate that likes big government.

    But first he needed to get elected, and for that he needed to make the election about the Panic and the prefiguring shutoffs.

    He didn’t. Not remotely. And as the leading crab in the bucket he had the best opportunity to do so.

    Your misrepresentation of what Faulconer did is illuminating:

    …here (https://www.kevinfaulconer.com/issues ] is Kevin Faulconer, the former San Diego mayor, on the issues.

    He highlights the shutdowns, as well as many other major problems Californians face right now. He’s currently hovering around five percent in the polls.

    No he didn’t. What are you smoking? Follow the link:

    WILDFIRES: LIVES, HOMES AND PROPERTY
    As Governor, I will STOP cutting wildfire funding. Read More

    HELPING OUR HEROES
    I will pass reforms to make sure our veterans are taxed less and housed more. Read More

    SAVE CALIFORNIA RESTAURANTS PLAN
    I will enact the Save California Restaurants plan to help our restaurants recover. Read More

    TAX CUT PLAN
    The California Comeback Tax Cut to Help Make Our Golden State Affordable Again. Read More

    REDUCING HOMELESSNESS
    We need real action to solve homelessness, California’s humanitarian crisis. Read More

    REFORM CALIFORNIA’S UNEMPLOYMENT SYSTEM
    We must reform the EDD, safeguard our unemployment dollars and get help to those who deserve it. Read More

    IMPROVING OUR QUALITY OF LIFE
    Our housing is too expensive, and our roads need repair. Read More

    KEEPING OUR COMMUNITIES SAFE
    Protecting our neighborhoods is government’s top priority. Read More

    RESPECTING YOUR HARD-EARNED MONEY
    You should be able to keep more of the money you work so hard to earn. Read More

    MAKING GOVERNMENT WORK
    You deserve a government that actually does its job. Read More

    CLEANING UP OUR COMMUNITIES
    We need to restore pride to our neighborhoods. Read More

    RELIABLE AND AFFORDABLE ENERGY
    We should be able to afford our utilities and rely on them to function. Read More

    PUTTING KIDS AND TEACHERS FIRST
    Every child deserves a quality education. Read More

    CLASSROOM EDUCATION SHOULD BE NORM, NOT EXCEPTION
    We must help students start making up for learning loss during the pandemic. Read More

    ACCESSIBLE WATER TO ALL CALIFORNIANS
    Read More

  140. @gandydancer

    Damn Unz’s 5-minute madness.

    So in Faulconer’s landing page… Gruesome’s COVID Panic…. WHERE ARE YOU?

    And, no, promising “reliable power”, deep in the page, is not remotely making Gruesome’s unnecessary electricity shutoffs the issue. Not only did he not “highlight the shutdowns” as you claim, HE DIDN’T EVEN MENTION THEM except by vague implication.

    Jeez. You’re not dumb, I’m pretty sure. You can do better addressing my point than you have so far. Why the evasion? I don’t get it.

  141. @Pericles

    In other words, they are in the same circles, but the idea that Gruesome is governor by virtue of nepotism — which was the suggestion — is bizarre.

  142. Jack D says:
    @Spud Boy

    The wildfire smoke is better than the photochemical smog that used to cover LA back in the day before automotive pollution controls.

    • Replies: @res
  143. J.Ross says:
    @Bragadocious

    No, in this she’s totally sound, it shows the sliminess and moral bankruptcy of these achievement-free glamor-worshipping empty headed social climbers. Newsom’s wife was helping Weinstein, because at the time she was working for him, because at the time it was a big social climber glamorous thing.

    • Thanks: Alden
  144. @Buzz Mohawk

    But the weather will continue to be great.

    How is that drought treating you?

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @gandydancer
  145. @res

    In a state which is 24% percent registered Republican that seems like a winning tactic.

    OF COURSE it was a winning tactic IF the GOP allowed the election to be (D) vs (R) instead of Gruesome’s shutdowns vs sanity, which they did.

    What is so difficult to understand about what I’m saying that you all are so resistant to letting it penetrate?

    It was like 2016 when only Trump would come out against the Invasion. He didn’t win because he was a celebrity. He won because he was the ONLY ONE willing to be on the right side of the issue. (Wimpily, and for a limited time, but there was no better choice. It was startling to see anyone do this, and his opponents made him seem better than he was, and that helped him.)

    In California in 2021 not one single candidate for Governor was willing to declare himself on the side of sanity.

    I don’t get it.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
  146. @Justice Duvall

    Plus, the Democrats would immediately stq

    Is this a typo? I’m not seeing anything relevant here: https://acronyms.thefreedictionary.com/STQ

    There is a tradition in Sacramento that the governor’s veto is never overriden… So, a Governor Elder should be able to veto successfully.

    Nope. The “tradition” would have been changed just for him. The expectation would have been, probably rightly, that he’d out in a year and he’d have had little leverage.

  147. @gandydancer

    Jenner wasn’t “run” by the “Republican media “, whatever you have in mind by that term.

    Yep. Anybody willing to pay the \$4,194.94 filing fee was on the ballot. There were a couple pages of names. I am actually surprised more semi-celebrities didn’t sign up.

  148. res says:
    @Jack D

    True for O3 , PAN, VOCs, and NOx. Some discussion here including the following image.
    https://earthscience.stackexchange.com/questions/8557/how-do-current-pollution-levels-in-los-angeles-compare-to-the-1970s

    But it is hard to know for particulates. From that link.

    Particulate matter is a bit tougher to quantify. PM10 (coarse and fine particles together) has been tracked since the late 80s, but PM2.5 (fine particles) has only been tracked since 1999.

    The link they gave is broken, so here is an archive version.
    https://web.archive.org/web/20140812193427/http://www.aqmd.gov/home/library/public-information/2005-news-archives/2004-cleanest-year-on-record-for-particulate-pollution

    For some reason the 1987-2004 PM10 chart there is broken, so here it is.

    For comparison, here is PM2.5 data from the SF Bay Area during last years wildfires (a really nice piece of work). Take a look at 9/10/20!
    https://observablehq.com/@enjalot/purpleair-historical-data

    PM2.5 of 250 ug/m^3 is pretty nasty. I would put that up against what LA saw in the 70s (though it was much shorter duration than what LA had).
    That is equivalent to an AQI of 300. This page gives the PM2.5 to AQI mapping and various guidelines.
    https://smartairfilters.com/en/blog/difference-pm2-5-aqi-measurements/

    Here is a history of PM air quality standards for the US.
    https://www.epa.gov/pm-pollution/timeline-particulate-matter-pm-national-ambient-air-quality-standards-naaqs

  149. J.Ross says:

    DON’T BELIEVE THE NEWS
    DON’T BELIEVE THE POLLS
    DON’T BELIEVE THE EARLY HEADLINES
    VOTE FOR ELDER AND WAIT FOR SUBSTANTIVE NEWS
    but also prepare for street-sweeping operations once all alternatives have failed

  150. @Anon

    Yes, that’s the American English rule. Geeks and computer programmers (spectrum types) often rebel against this because it bothers them that something is infringing on the quoted material…. Autistics cannot deal with the fuzziness of a rule that says to put small punctuation inside quotes, except when it’s a password or something for a computer, and put big punctuation outside quotes. IT’S JUST NOT LOGICAL! AAAAHHHH!

    Autism, as I understand it, and to a first approximation, refers to an inability to recognize the rules. Why you imagine the rule is “fuzzy” in a way that anyone would find difficult to deal with I cannot imagine. It’s not “fuzzy”, it’s just stupid beyond the power of words to express. The way written English handles quotation is anyway inadequate, but who is making this moronic “rule” and what is your compulsion to obey it? Have you no spine?

    Is it “autistic” to refuse to capitalize “Black” and not “white” just because some morons demand it?

  151. @Prof. Woland

    Jews and Gays don’t identify as white…

    No, YOU may not consider them White, but I’m pretty certain THEY (well, not homo blacks, Asians, etc.) check the “White” box on the Census forms and in response to other inquiries about their race.

  152. @Chris Mallory

    The drought is somewhere in the mountains. The WEATHER here by the Bay is fine, as usual.

  153. Alden says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Newsomes really are an old Irish Catholic political San Francisco Family like Pat Brown Leo McCarthy Hallinans Finnigans and the rest. Leftist democrats everyone. For 160 years.

    It doesn’t matter who’s governor.

  154. Alden says:
    @PhysicistDave

    I think there’s a lot more blacks in California that 6-7 percent. Because they don’t fill out the census forms. For instance west Los Angeles. According to the census there are very few blacks in WLA. Yet they are all over the commercial streets. Maybe they come here just to hang out and annoy people.

    San Francisco the eastern part of the city south of California street is full of blacks. They seem to be loitering in every block. And they’re still way way over represented in post office and government jobs.

    Bank of America is closing many branch offices and trying to drive customers to online and ATMS only. I wonder if BofA knows something the rest of us don’t.

  155. Alden says:
    @Pincher Martin

    Every Armenian and Persian I’ve ever spoken with is a conservative who votes republican. Affirmative action and black criminals robbing small businesses has a lot to do with it. Glendale was once a republican town because of the Armenians. But Mexicans arrived and turned the town democrat.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  156. @Prof. Woland

    You mention Feminists, Gays, and Jews but are they really white?

    Nancy Pelosi, Pete Buttigieg and Dianne Feinstein are all as white as I am. I’m not sure why you would say they don’t identify as white even if that isn’t their primary public identity, and even if they actively promote an anti-white political agenda. I also don’t think it matters if some whites reject their racial identity in favor of something like being gay or a feminist, since most non-white Democrats will still see them as white.

    I do agree that if the Democratic Party continues to be an anti-white party, it will drive more whites who don’t have an alternative identity (gay, Jew, women) into the GOP – not that the current Republican establishment will welcome them.

    There is some use to having a white front man or woman (Biden, Newsome, Pelosi) but that is only to fool the few whites left that could be considered swing voters. Diversity is also killing those too.

    I wouldn’t overdo this line of thought. More whites voted for the last two Democratic presidents, Biden and Obama, than did Blacks, Latinos and Asians combined. More than 43 million whites voted for Biden in 2020, for example. That’s just over half his support. Those whites certainly weren’t all Jews and gays, although a high number were women.

    • Agree: gandydancer
    • Replies: @Prof. Woland
  157. @Alden

    Every Armenian and Persian I’ve ever spoken with is a conservative who votes republican.

    If I were you, I’d worry about the sample size of people who confide their politics to you. From Wikipedia:

    An August 2008 Zogby International poll, commissioned by the Public Affairs Alliance of Iranian Americans, found that approximately one-half of Iranian Americans identified themselves as registered Democrats, in contrast to one in eight as Republicans and one in four as independents (2008). A 2019 Zogby International survey, commissioned by PAAIA, found that in the 2016 presidential election, 56% of Iranian Americans respondents voted for Hillary Clinton, the democratic candidate. The survey also states that 69% of Iranian American respondents planned to vote for the democratic candidate in the 2020 election.

    It’s almost always a safe bet to assume every immigrant group in the U.S. votes Democratic. You’ll be right 80 to 90% of the time. The exceptions are small and contingent on special circumstances that can change quickly. Cubans during the Cold War voted Republican, for example, but their children tended to vote for the Democrats until recently, when their allegiance shifted back to the Republicans.

    • Thanks: gandydancer
    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Alden
  158. Alden says:
    @Pincher Martin

    I think almost all the Persians I know are Jews. Maybe the democrats are Muslims. Very very different from black worshipping American Jews. I’ve gathered that affirmative action is the big thing with them. They all seem to want their kids to go to nearby UCLA so they can live at home. Also met a few Persian Zoroastrians real Roman Catholics and other kinds of Christians.

  159. Alden says:
    @Pincher Martin

    Vietnamese turned democrat as did the Cubans 12 years of American schooling turns out democrats.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  160. @gandydancer

    You’re still not getting it, and your reply to me shows the same blindness exhibited by Elder and Faulconer. I guess you haven’t had your electricity shut off for days on multiple occasions and haven’t been deeply affected by the COVID Panic.

    The shutdowns? No, I haven’t been directly impacted by them. I live in the middle of San Jose, which has not been affected. But then *most* Californian voters live in cities which have not been directly affected by the shutdowns.

    The wildfires came closer to home. But other than a few days of smoky air, I was still not directly impacted.

    So my experience probably has more in common with the average state voter than does your experience. The more rural and exurban areas of California, which were hit hardest by the shutdowns and wildfires over the last two years, are not where most voters in the state are found. And many of those voters are already Republican. Placer, El Dorado, Butte, Tehama, Plumas, Lassen, Siskiyou, and Shasta Counties have a lot of Republicans, but unfortunately not a lot of voters compared to the rest of the state.

    COVID is a different story since many Californians support Newsom’s policies on the virus. They might’ve been turned off by his hypocrisy when – to name just one example – he went to the French Laundry and didn’t social distance or wear a mask, but polling shows that most Californians supported the measures he took to slow down the spread of COVID. They certainly aren’t looking to Florida or Texas as a model for how to do it.

    Besides, unlike the shutdowns, Elder has not slow-played his opposition to the mandates. It isn’t helping him in the polls.

    Perhaps there’s a reason. Here’s what CNN found in one poll of state voters:

    The Covid-19 pandemic remains at the top of voters’ minds, with about one-third saying it’s the biggest issue for the state. That’s followed by just over one-fifth saying homelessness, about 1 in 6 saying the economy and wildfires, respectively, and slightly under one-tenth saying crime. Concerns vary across partisan lines: more than 4 in 10 Democrats call coronavirus their top issue, while only about one-fifth of Republicans say the same. On the flip side, Republicans are more than three times as likely as Democrats to name the economy as their top concern.

    Those who call the pandemic or wildfires the state’s top concern overwhelmingly oppose the recall, as do a smaller majority of those who say California’s biggest issue is homelessness. About two-thirds of voters who call the economy the biggest issue favor removing Newsom, as do roughly 9 in 10 of those who say crime is the biggest concern.

    Voters have mixed outlooks on the pandemic’s course in California, with about 4 in 10 saying the situation is getting better, 3 in 10 that it remains about the same, and just under one-quarter that it’s worsening.

    So it would not appear based on this poll that focusing on COVID would help any Republican candidate that much. The same goes for the wildfires.

    A better approach would’ve been more general. Focus instead on Newsom’s multiple failures since nearly everyone in the state is likely to be unhappy with something right now.

    *****

    As for Faulconer’s position on the shutdowns, I provided two links to his website, with the second one being about the shutdowns. “We should be able to afford our utilities and rely on them to function. When you flip your light switch, you expect it to work. But under Gavin Newsom, Californians are more likely to be left in the dark. And even those who do have working lights may wish they couldn’t see their high power bills.”

    How can he be any clearer than that?

  161. @Pincher Martin

    Why do you bother capitalizing? Others here don’t. That’s just as “arbitrary”. I’ll stick with Albinics.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  162. @Alden

    Vietnamese turned democrat as did the Cubans 12 years of American schooling turns out democrats.

    American schooling didn’t turn me, you, or most other American whites into Democrats.

    The real reason for their defection is that the Cold War ended. As long as the Democrats were the political party of capitulating to the commies, why would most Cuban- or Vietnamese-Americans, who knew more on a personal level about the evils of Communism than most Americans would ever know, belong to that party?

    But when the Cold War ended, so did their reason for being Republican. Most older Cuban and Vietnamese immigrants stayed in the GOP out of habit or fidelity, but the younger generations began gravitating toward the Democrats, who have always been the political party of immigrants.

    I don’t know why that trend suddenly reversed among Cuban-Americans, but it’s an anomaly and not one I would count on repeating among other immigrants groups with any frequency.

  163. El Dato says:

    Newsom must be having laugh attacks behind closed doors such that little crumbs of apple pie are shooting out of various body orifices.

    I can understand why politicians hate their voters.

  164. El Dato says:

    If bluechecks were allowed to say the n-word, responses would be more hilarious.

  165. @Reg Cæsar

    I already told you the answer to this in the post to which you just responded:

    Here are the only two rules for writing that matter: Write clearly and have something worth writing about. How you go about doing so is your own business.

    Every writer who cares to be understood must follow enough grammar conventions that his writing is clear to intelligent readers.

    But the point of writing is not grammar. We don’t follow conventions for conventions’ sake. We follow them because we wish to communicate effectively. Once that bar is passed, most great writers either dispense with many of the less logical conventions or seem to forget their own strictures. E.B. White, for example, could not write The Elements of Style without breaking his own rules. George Orwell occasionally used the passive voice when he could have used the active voice. My high school English teacher defended correcting my split infinitives because, he said, if I continued to split them some college professors in my immediate future might think I didn’t know better.

    That argument didn’t make sense to me then and it doesn’t make sense to me now. It was only later I read that a lot of the prescriptivist nonsense was made up in the late 19th century by itinerant English teachers looking to make work for themselves in a competitive job market. They sold grammar books like health fads are sold today. Some of the prescriptivist conventions held on as new generations of schoolmarms took over and had to find a justification for keeping their young charges tied to a desk for part of the day as they tortured them with useless information.

    Well, it’s time for you to get off that rack by remembering my second rule for good writing: Find something worth writing about. And try not to be a bore.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  166. bomag says:
    @Hannah Katz

    Will they even bother with the logistics of loading up mail-in ballots? Software can just harvest those not voted by the close of the polls.

  167. As it turns out, Newsom survived. Bigtime in fact–not even close.

    No surprises of course. Elder’s problem was that his base is eroding, and fast. They’re all voting with their feet. Which means that CA will consist of the latter-day nobility class and The Coalition of The Fringes in thrall to them.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  168. @Chrisnonymous

    Dang, I got that one wrong–Elder is still black.

  169. @Daniel H

    Rose McGowan needs to be the subject of a poem. She is what happens when women get “woke” and then try to go home again. You can’t go home again. How many porn stars turn into stepford wives? Zero. Some turn into anti-porn crusaders, but not stepford wives.

  170. @Prester John

    Elder’s problem was that his base is eroding, and fast.

    His base is eroding? It eroded long ago. The GOP stopped being a serious political party in this state at least fifteen years ago, even before Arnold Schwarzenegger was out of the Governor’s Mansion in Sacramento.

  171. @Pincher Martin

    E.B. White, for example, could not write The Elements of Style without breaking his own rules.

    Me and him agree that using the simple past form in the compound predicate is bad form, like walking around with your tighty whities showing. It didn’t use to be that way and is now.

    Me would also add that points that seem trivial on the surface are often a red flag for underlying maladies that need to be addressed. Cf. Mayor Giuliani above.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  172. @Reg Cæsar

    Don’t blame E. B. White. You’re the bore who thinks he’s clever because you have a fetish for antiquated grammar advice. White died thirty-five years ago and his book was last revised in the nineteen-fifties.

    But his advice was never that good.

    50 Years of Stupid Grammar Advice

    “Keep related words together” is further explained in these terms: “The subject of a sentence and the principal verb should not, as a rule, be separated by a phrase or clause that can be transferred to the beginning.” That is a negative passive, containing an adjective, with the subject separated from the principal verb by a phrase (“as a rule”) that could easily have been transferred to the beginning. Another quadruple violation.

    The book’s contempt for its own grammatical dictates seems almost willful, as if the authors were flaunting the fact that the rules don’t apply to them. But I don’t think they are. Given the evidence that they can’t even tell actives from passives, my guess would be that it is sheer ignorance. They know a few terms, like “subject” and “verb” and “phrase,” but they do not control them well enough to monitor and analyze the structure of what they write.

    As the author of the piece points out, Strunk and White’s grammar advice often went counter to the established literary usage of their time:

    Consider the explicit instruction: “With none, use the singular verb when the word means ‘no one’ or ‘not one.’” Is this a rule to be trusted? Let’s investigate.

    * Try searching the script of Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) for “none of us.” There is one example of it as a subject: “None of us are perfect” (spoken by the learned Dr. Chasuble). It has plural agreement.

    * Download and search Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897). It contains no cases of “none of us” with singular-inflected verbs, but one that takes the plural (“I think that none of us were surprised when we were asked to see Mrs. Harker a little before the time of sunset”).

    * Examine the text of Lucy Maud Montgomery’s popular novel Anne of Avonlea (1909). There are no singular examples, but one with the plural (“None of us ever do”).

    It seems to me that the stipulation in Elements is totally at variance not just with modern conversational English but also with literary usage back when Strunk was teaching and White was a boy.

    You don’t have special knowledge about English grammar that the rest of us need to follow to keep society from falling apart. You’re just a pretentious bore.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  173. @Pincher Martin

    We follow them because we wish to communicate effectively. Once that bar is passed…

    Starting a sentence “Me would…” follows that rule– i.e., yours and Cookie Monster’s. There is no lexical difference between I and me. It’s the same word in Mandarin. Why do we have two? German, three? Russian, four?

    You don’t have special knowledge about English grammar…

    That it’s “special” today when it was common knowledge in Ike’s day is a sign of degradation. Compare ground-zero California’s educational ranking in Steve’s day to ours.

    The locals around here say the road is “all tore up” in the summer and the ground is “froze” in the winter, but you don’t see this in the newspapers or hear it on newscasts– yet. We know the difference between dialect and standard English.

    Once-minimal standards are “antiquated” and “pretentious”, in your (equally antiquated) hippie-dippie anything-goes 1970-vintage viewpoint. You’re like a substitute teacher in Room 222*.

    Others say standards are “racist”. They’re closer to the truth.

    *Even David Jolliffe cuts his hair now:

    [MORE]


    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  174. @Reg Cæsar

    That it’s “special” today when it was common knowledge in Ike’s day is a sign of degradation. Compare ground-zero California’s educational ranking in Steve’s day to ours.

    Are you one of those amateur grammarians who lacks basic reading skills?

    As I pointed out in my last post, and as the author of the piece I linked makes clear, Strunk and White’s advice wasn’t “common knowledge” back in the nineteen-fifties. It wasn’t even “common knowledge” when Strunk first came up with his rules in the early 20th century.

    You’ve invented a past which never existed to police a present which doesn’t need you.

    Take White’s advice on the use of “however”:

    There are many other cases of Strunk and White’s being in conflict with readily verifiable facts about English. Consider the claim that a sentence should not begin with “however” in its connective adverb sense (“when the meaning is ‘nevertheless’”).

    Searching for “however” at the beginnings of sentences and “however” elsewhere reveals that good authors alternate between placing the adverb first and placing it after the subject. The ratios vary. Mark Liberman, of the University of Pennsylvania, checked half a dozen of Mark Twain’s books and found roughly seven instances of “however” at the beginning of a sentence for each three placed after the subject, whereas in five selected books by Henry James, the ratio was one to 15. In Dracula I found a ratio of about one to five. The evidence cannot possibly support a claim that “however” at the beginning of a sentence should be eschewed. Strunk and White are just wrong about the facts of English syntax.

    Or how about this one?:

    The copy editor’s old bugaboo about not using “which” to introduce a restrictive relative clause is also an instance of failure to look at the evidence. Elements as revised by White endorses that rule. But 19th-century authors whose prose was never forced through a 20th-century prescriptive copy-editing mill generally alternated between “which” and “that.” (There seems to be a subtle distinction in meaning related to whether new information is being introduced.) There was never a period in the history of English when “which” at the beginning of a restrictive relative clause was an error.

    If you read more good books, perhaps you would be less inclined to think these antiquated grammatical rules you’ve internalized were ever meaningful to writing proper English.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  175. @Pincher Martin

    I prefer Fowler’s to Strunk and White. The older the better. You can keep your Rosalie Maggio. And “Ms.” And tattoos. And hip hop.

    Run, ran, have ran. Eat, ate, have ate. Go, went, have went. Am, was, have was.

    No. Never. Long live pretension!

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  176. @Reg Cæsar

    Well, there’s nothing more pretentious than for an American to use a British guide to proper English usage. But Fowler’s guide is not particularly old. It came out after Strunk’s original guide that E. B. White adopted and updated.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  177. @Pincher Martin

    primary public identity

    I would suggest that someone’s identity is what they believe it to be when no one is looking. That becomes harder when dealing with immutable characteristics such as skin color or race but not entirely. In Latin America, people with one drop of white blood or more typically identify as white. To some that might be the pot telling the kettle it is black but it distills into action. Buttigieg might privately identify as straight or Feinstein as a Christian but they still qualify for preferential treatment and always side with the ‘other’. So what do their actions tell us? That they are a gay and a Jew.

    I don’t have a particular yen against either Jews or gays but due to their endogamic / biological differences, they are never part of the majority wherever they come from or go to. It seems they prefer to live in a plurality and always work towards that goal whereas I like living where my identity group is in the majority. Ironically, most Jews fiercely defend a Jewish majority Israel including DiFi setting up a very obvious contradiction. If she defended my genetic nepotistic interests the way she defends hers I would call here white too. She is not.

    Gays are funny because they seem to resent straight whites but in countries in Europe such as Germany they are beginning to get antsier due to Muslim immigration. As much as they hate straight people they know which side will cut them the better deal when things get rough. So identity is fluid concept more so for some.

    As for the fate of whites in the Democratic Party, I am not sure it is a good one. They are shrinking rapidly. While they were the majority they could handle their cohorts but they have to take more extreme measures to not get eaten. They will still have a large financial advantage for years to come but their influence is eroding to the point to where whatever dreams they had will be subordinate to non white identity groups that deep down hate them and are envious.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  178. @Reg Cæsar

    A book you should read if you are at all interested in why your grammar concerns are ahistorical.

  179. @Prof. Woland

    I would suggest that someone’s identity is what they believe it to be when no one is looking.

    But politics is a team sport. And so what other people on your “team” think of your identity matters to a political coalition just as much as what you think of your identity. Probably more.

    As Steve says, the Democrats are a “coalition of the fringes” kept together only by their mutual hatred of straight white men. But that coalition is often in danger of fraying. Do blacks, for example, really prefer Jews or gay men as their leaders to straight white men? Well, if they did, Bernie and Buttigieg would’ve done better than Biden in South Carolina instead of getting wiped out there.

    So in politics it’s often less about what you think of your identity than what others think of it. Bernie’s Jewishness and Buttigieg’s gayness weren’t political strengths when they had to appeal to a largely black Christian electorate.

    So, no, in politics, your identity is more than just what “you believe it to be when no one is looking.”

    I don’t have a particular yen against either Jews or gays but due to their endogamic / biological differences, they are never part of the majority wherever they come from or go to.

    Yes, but the one Democratic group which you have not mentioned here are white women. They are far more numerous in the Democratic Party than are Jews and gays combined.

    As for the fate of whites in the Democratic Party, I am not sure it is a good one. They are shrinking rapidly.

    I’m not sure how you came to this conclusion. Immigration has been the driving force in growing Democratic voter rolls for years.

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