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In the iSteve comments, AnotherDad responds to an anonymous question:

“Slightly OT: why don’t South Asians see themselves as a race?”

Because they aren’t a race, but something like 40,000 microraces.

If you at those genetic principal component analysis plots of world populations this pops out. For some nations or at least regions in large nations, the people are a composite of a couple or a few components, but most everyone in the nation has pretty much the same components in pretty much the same proportions. I.e. there really is an “English race”.

Not so the Indians, even in a single state people–i.e. from separate “communities”–are a smattering of five or six different components in wildly varying proportions.

South Asians are actually kind of like what SJWs in comment sections are always contending blacks are: so incredibly diverse that to call them a race is absurd.

On the other hand, you can usually guess that a South Asian is a South Asian from facial features, even if they vary widely in skin color. Pakistani prime minister and cricket star Imran Khan, whom I always pointing out looks like a taller Mark Wahlberg, is a rare South Asian who doesn’t look South Asian. He’s the exception that proves the rule.

By the way, that reminds me that I use the phrase “on the other hand” rather a lot:

On the other hand, I apparently use the phrase “by the way” even more:

Yet, I apparently don’t say the “exception that proves the rule” very often even though it’s one of my favorite phrases.

Many years ago I got into squabble with Judge Richard Posner over the phrase, which he objected to on the grounds that it is self-evidently illogical. My view is that if a person is famous for being exceptional, that suggests something about what is typical for the group. For example, Beethoven is famous for having been a deaf great composer, which implies that being a deaf great composer is unusual. Granted, many current day composers argue that the respect ordinary people pay Beethoven for having composed, say, his Ninth Symphony while deaf is unwarranted because, if they happened to be deaf, they could compose while deaf too. On the other hand, they haven’t composed the Ninth Symphony while not deaf, so I’m not sure how much weight to give their arguments.

 
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  1. Imran Khan looks like a Pathan, the ethnic group which represents 60% of Afghanistan and 15% of Pakistan. Plenty of south Asians with only a quarter Pathan ancestry look like him.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan, Cortes
    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Ali Choudhury


    Imran Khan looks like a Pathan, the ethnic group which represents 60% of Afghanistan and 15% of Pakistan.

     

    Meet this new lookalike of PM Imran Khan from KP

    https://www.geo.tv/latest/208954-meet-this-new-lookalike-of-pm-imran-khan-from-kp

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    , @George
    @Ali Choudhury

    Imran Khan's family WP page refers to maternal and paternal 'tribes'. So perhaps South Asians before Europeans and Americans began to think in terms of a broad category of race Europeans thought of themselves as something equivalent to tribes.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_of_Imran_Khan

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

  2. Winston Churchill seems to have grasped the genetic diversity of India when he said, “India is no more a nation than is the equator.”

    AnotherDad is one of the best commentators on the Unz site.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Diversity Heretic

    India’s unifying threads were always cultural, not genetic. India is the Territory connected by the Sanskrit language, the Brahmin caste, and the Hindu religion. Bali, Suriname, french Guiana, Mauritius are Indian countries even though they are geographically remote.

    When you lose those threads, the people are no longer Indian. As Jinnah accurately observed, South Asian Muslims were not Indians.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @BenKenobi
    @Diversity Heretic

    On the other hand, everybody hates pajeets.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @AnotherDad
    @Diversity Heretic

    Thanks Diversity Heretic.


    BTW: Reading my comment here, i see i got all of a dozen words in before leaving out a verb! ("If you *look* at those ...")

    Apologies to my fellow Unz commenters for the "needs editor" nature of much of what i write.

    I'm more an analytical (math, logic oriented) than verbal guy. My brain is usually racing ahead with its incoherent thoughts about the world, while the CSU (coherent sentence unit) and FCU (finger control unit) are struggling to keep up. Stuff hits the floor. Then i often feel some "could have said it better" or "need to add XYZ" and rearrange in some way that messes up tense or case or voice or number. Need to thoroughly, carefully reread everything and use the preview feature, but usually don't. (Sometimes am racing the edit window timer trying to clean up. But sometimes rushing on to something else.) Unfortunately, i was not born with an excess of patience.

    I blame HBD. My Irish side. (Beats looking in the mirror.)

    I appreciate all you folks who read through--mentally correcting--my comments hoping to find something worthwhile for your efforts.

    All i can say is ... i'll try to do better: make my writing more comprehensible and your reading easier.

    , @MBlanc46
    @Diversity Heretic

    You’re spot on about Another Dad.

  3. Steve have you been drinking

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @AndrewR

    On the one hand he has a beer and on the other some scotch

  4. Apparently, persons from India can place Indians in their home states and linguistic groups by looks alone, with accents (in English) providing confirmation.

    A guy I knew at work claimed that for people from within his own linguistic group, he could infallibly tell what sub caste they were from—again, from looks alone.

    An 1837 British catalog of the types in a single Indian town listed 72 sub-caste types.

    https://archive.org/details/seventytwospecimens1837/page/n9/mode/2up

  5. @Ali Choudhury
    Imran Khan looks like a Pathan, the ethnic group which represents 60% of Afghanistan and 15% of Pakistan. Plenty of south Asians with only a quarter Pathan ancestry look like him.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @George

    Imran Khan looks like a Pathan, the ethnic group which represents 60% of Afghanistan and 15% of Pakistan.

    Meet this new lookalike of PM Imran Khan from KP

    https://www.geo.tv/latest/208954-meet-this-new-lookalike-of-pm-imran-khan-from-kp

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @PiltdownMan

    I used to be able to tell them by how they bobble their heads right and left all the time. Until egotistical Americans started doing it.

  6. The phrase “exception that proves the rule” is very Stevish: it’s difficult to understand intuitively, but once you study it and learn the meaning , you get a big “a-ha!” moment where it suddenly makes total sense and you can’t believe how clear and wonderful it is.

    I’m personally waiting for that moment when it comes to appreciation for golf course architecture.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @R.G. Camara

    I once explained it to PiltdownChild1 as "the (seeming) exception that proves (i.e. puts to the test) the rule."

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @photondancer, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @Paco Wové

    , @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @R.G. Camara


    Beethoven is famous for having been a deaf great composer, which implies that being a deaf great composer is unusual.
     
    Well, I don't think being deaf is what made Beethoven famous.

    Actually it's sort of like completely irrelevant to his greatness.

    Does that prove a rule? He's also a famous white composer ;)

    3....2....1....

    , @DuanDiRen
    @R.G. Camara

    This is (I guess) a joke on Steve's part: whenever people in the USSR asked about a glaring contradiction, their supervisors would remind them of Lenin's quote "Ignore the exception, which only really goes to prove the rule".

    , @Anon7
    @R.G. Camara

    "The exception proves the rule" is thought to have emerged from the legal phrase "exceptio probat regulam in casibus non exceptis", an argument attributed to Cicero.

    This argument states if an exception exists or has to be stated, then this exception proves that there must be some rule to which the case is an exception. The second part of Cicero's phrase, "in casibus non exceptis" or "in cases not excepted," is almost always missing from modern uses of the statement that "the exception proves the rule".

    Thanks, Wikipedia.

    , @Catdog
    @R.G. Camara

    It would be easier for people to understand the rule if they didn't see it so often misapplied, e.g. like Steve is doing with Imran Khan, despite his insistence that he isn't misapplying it.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @R.G. Camara

    Unfortunately, the “exception that proves the rule” phrase is also the kneejerk reaction of hacks when their lousy theory turns out to have more exception than rule.

    Properly, the phrase is meaningful when something that is often exceptional to general rules, like Japan, turns out to be exceptional to a particular rule too. It is even better when something that is exceptional for known reasons, like fraud, turns out to be exceptional again for a particular theory that is not supposed to apply to cases with those known reasons, such as fraudulent cases. In other words, when the "exceptionalism" is really exquisite consistency.

    There is also the somewhat pedantic digression that the phrase is supposed to be "the exception that probes the rule" or the "the exception that tests the rule", which may also be a useful concept, but is a different meaning.

    That reminds me of the pedantic digression that often occurs when someone says "begs the question". There is an obvious and useful meaning to this phrase when one is presented with an "answer" that invites much more questioning than it provides answers, yet using this phrase in comment forums such as this one often results in some pedant going all "Ackshually the phrase really means blah blah blah" complete with wiki links. Okay fine, it can have a specialized legalistic meaning, but most people quite reasonably understand it as above.

    Replies: @eD

    , @J.Ross
    @R.G. Camara

    This is a good phrase because of experience observing patterns which everyone can draw upon. Wherever you have seen a pattern you have almost always also seen either an exception or been able to imagine one. In art classes you probably learned to punch up patterns by making exceptions or contrasts, or you probably saw advertisememts that do this. I'm really insulted and worried about this literally Communistic media-wide embrace of argument from authority, where nobody is allowed to know anything or be able to figure anything out. Ben Carson's successful non-vaccine treatment of his wuflu bout was either not reported at all or was reported in a hilariously stupid manner, with terrified warnings of the experimental (as opposed to, y'know, a new vaccine) nature of Carson's prescription, and the drug itself unnamed. Remind me, what did Carson do for a living before he was HUD secretary? Was he like a rapper or something?
    Mike Gallagher put together an extremely good, must-hear montage of local news liars (remember that using the internet to find local news was the main antidote to the national lyingpress), all reciting what is clearly a centrally sourced scripted message, Norkish in its brazen propaganda message. They, or rather the person who wrote it for them all, decry the failure of social media to not censor more aggressively, bemoan irresponsible wild stories propagated through social media (so, Russian hackers forever), and assure you that official news is the only news you are allowed to watch. And they do it in exactly the same words spoken at about the same speed, accross dozens of different local stations. We're at the point of owing apologies to Alex Jones. I wish that diarrhea of CIA filth, freely admitting that they were CIA filth, all running for and winning local and lower level offices, had been met with panic and rage. Perhaps this is wrong (certainly it doesn't square with our meaningless and order-disrupting laws) but there should be a regulation that when you join the CIA you give up the right to run for public office. Perhaps we are now seeing the results of that sinister project. We have fallen victim to our own color revolution and now the government is passing into the hands of economy-destroying morons who want a war with Russia.

    , @John Cunningham
    @R.G. Camara

    It started in Latin as "exceptio probat regulam," or the exception puts the rule to the proof.

  7. @R.G. Camara
    The phrase "exception that proves the rule" is very Stevish: it's difficult to understand intuitively, but once you study it and learn the meaning , you get a big "a-ha!" moment where it suddenly makes total sense and you can't believe how clear and wonderful it is.

    I'm personally waiting for that moment when it comes to appreciation for golf course architecture.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @DuanDiRen, @Anon7, @Catdog, @Almost Missouri, @J.Ross, @John Cunningham

    I once explained it to PiltdownChild1 as “the (seeming) exception that proves (i.e. puts to the test) the rule.”

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @PiltdownMan

    "Any girl without a shirt shall be allowed into the rock show free of charge" is the exception I like to think of. Because it implies that the rule is that girls wearing shirts shall have to pay full price, as will all men, regardless of having a shirt or not.

    Also I like the visual.

    Replies: @Erik L

    , @photondancer
    @PiltdownMan

    Yeah, 'prove' used to mean 'test' which is why we still say 'prove it!' as a challenge. Exceptions prove your rule isn't a rule, it's just a generalisation over a limited sample.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Dr. DoomNGloom
    @PiltdownMan

    The phrase is best understood as an idiomatic shorthand that does not use the most common modern definition of "prove". Instead it requires a more nuanced understanding of Popper 's solution to Hume's problem of induction.

    "Puts the test" is the best understanding of "proves". Grammarist claims it comes from a translation of Cicero


    exceptio probat regulam in casibus non exceptis
     
    , which means

    the exception confirms the rule in cases not excepted
     
    If one starts with a literal and severe definition of "prove", the phrase seems like the "only a true Scotsman" fallacy. Taken as "test the rule", it becomes more of an exercise in examining outliers, edge cases, and confounders.

    It is to say, if the rule usually works, there must be exceptional circumstances where it fails, so "what are they?" Of course this doesn't "prove" the rule in the most literal sense because of the problem of induction. One following Popper's approach would examine the outlier to determine if the general rule would hold up given this case.

    Replies: @Muggles

    , @Paco Wové
    @PiltdownMan

    Right, it's "prove" as in "to test". Similarly, "Dugway Proving Grounds". An exception puts the rule to the test -- why is it an exception? Why does it not invalidate the rule? The point being, the exception could very well invalidate the rule, if you can't explain it adequately.

  8. Nothing illogical about it, exception that proves the rule means exception that tests the rule.

    The old fashioned meaning of prove which still survives in things like Aberdeen Proving Grounds.

  9. @PiltdownMan
    @R.G. Camara

    I once explained it to PiltdownChild1 as "the (seeming) exception that proves (i.e. puts to the test) the rule."

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @photondancer, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @Paco Wové

    “Any girl without a shirt shall be allowed into the rock show free of charge” is the exception I like to think of. Because it implies that the rule is that girls wearing shirts shall have to pay full price, as will all men, regardless of having a shirt or not.

    Also I like the visual.

    • Replies: @Erik L
    @R.G. Camara

    I read years ago a claim that this came from a legal principle. If a sign says "no parking midnight to 6 AM" that "proves" in a legal sense that it is ok to park there the rest of the time. Sounds plausible but also possibly made up

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

  10. @R.G. Camara
    The phrase "exception that proves the rule" is very Stevish: it's difficult to understand intuitively, but once you study it and learn the meaning , you get a big "a-ha!" moment where it suddenly makes total sense and you can't believe how clear and wonderful it is.

    I'm personally waiting for that moment when it comes to appreciation for golf course architecture.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @DuanDiRen, @Anon7, @Catdog, @Almost Missouri, @J.Ross, @John Cunningham

    Beethoven is famous for having been a deaf great composer, which implies that being a deaf great composer is unusual.

    Well, I don’t think being deaf is what made Beethoven famous.

    Actually it’s sort of like completely irrelevant to his greatness.

    Does that prove a rule? He’s also a famous white composer 😉

    3….2….1….

  11. I had a college professor who got upset when we wrote “on the other hand” without saying “on the one hand” first. Just thought I’d say that.

    • Replies: @Morton's toes
    @Gilbert Ratchet

    If you were Shiva you could have on the other other hand and on the other other other hand! Not sure if having four hands would be worth it but those additional to-argument-chain-extensions might be handy.

    or something

  12. You also tend to say “In other words” a lot as well.

  13. Look at the bright side: Google hasn’t disappeared you … yet.

  14. SEARCH: “steve sailer” “it’s almost as if”

    Results: 5.7 billion

    • Replies: @reactionry
    @Anon

    "Results: 5.7 billion"

    Indeed

    , @reactionry
    @Anon

    "Results: 5.7 billion"

    I strongly suspect that you took a big steaming data dump* on the discussion and that you, like all Anons (and the adjacent anons), are a shapeshifter who is a member of the Dominion which controls the Deep Space Nine State and is allied with Kim Cardassian who is within six degrees of separation from Hugo Chavez and Karl Marx. Your massive fraud warrants a recount, if not investigation by a three-letter agency, which, alas, would likely be dominated by aliens and adverse to self-probing.


    * dump - Those who are deaf to calls from the Siren Song of Probity & Propriety might appreciate and/or recall this elementary school Oldie:

    What's brown and sits on the piano?

    Beethoven's Last Movement

    Also see Sidney Powell, Enoch Powell, Rivers of Bloody Votes

  15. I thought ‘the exception that proves the rule’ meant that the person to whom the rule isn’t applied tends to demonstrate why the rule exists – ‘See that guy? Don’t be that guy.’

  16. @PiltdownMan
    @R.G. Camara

    I once explained it to PiltdownChild1 as "the (seeming) exception that proves (i.e. puts to the test) the rule."

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @photondancer, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @Paco Wové

    Yeah, ‘prove’ used to mean ‘test’ which is why we still say ‘prove it!’ as a challenge. Exceptions prove your rule isn’t a rule, it’s just a generalisation over a limited sample.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @photondancer

    Yeah, ‘prove’ used to mean ‘test’ which is why we still say ‘prove it!’ as a challenge. Exceptions prove your rule isn’t a rule, it’s just a generalisation over a limited sample.

    The exception that proves the general rule.

    E before I after C is the exception that proves the generalization? Nah, it proves the rule.

    We must be fun at parties.

    Replies: @photondancer

  17. @PiltdownMan
    @R.G. Camara

    I once explained it to PiltdownChild1 as "the (seeming) exception that proves (i.e. puts to the test) the rule."

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @photondancer, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @Paco Wové

    The phrase is best understood as an idiomatic shorthand that does not use the most common modern definition of “prove”. Instead it requires a more nuanced understanding of Popper ‘s solution to Hume’s problem of induction.

    “Puts the test” is the best understanding of “proves”. Grammarist claims it comes from a translation of Cicero

    exceptio probat regulam in casibus non exceptis

    , which means

    the exception confirms the rule in cases not excepted

    If one starts with a literal and severe definition of “prove”, the phrase seems like the “only a true Scotsman” fallacy. Taken as “test the rule”, it becomes more of an exercise in examining outliers, edge cases, and confounders.

    It is to say, if the rule usually works, there must be exceptional circumstances where it fails, so “what are they?” Of course this doesn’t “prove” the rule in the most literal sense because of the problem of induction. One following Popper’s approach would examine the outlier to determine if the general rule would hold up given this case.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Dr. DoomNGloom

    And Dr. DoomNGloom's discourse here is a textbook example of "mansplaining."

    Well done sir, well done!

  18. @R.G. Camara
    The phrase "exception that proves the rule" is very Stevish: it's difficult to understand intuitively, but once you study it and learn the meaning , you get a big "a-ha!" moment where it suddenly makes total sense and you can't believe how clear and wonderful it is.

    I'm personally waiting for that moment when it comes to appreciation for golf course architecture.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @DuanDiRen, @Anon7, @Catdog, @Almost Missouri, @J.Ross, @John Cunningham

    This is (I guess) a joke on Steve’s part: whenever people in the USSR asked about a glaring contradiction, their supervisors would remind them of Lenin’s quote “Ignore the exception, which only really goes to prove the rule”.

  19. Anonymous[251] • Disclaimer says:
    @Diversity Heretic
    Winston Churchill seems to have grasped the genetic diversity of India when he said, "India is no more a nation than is the equator."

    AnotherDad is one of the best commentators on the Unz site.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @BenKenobi, @AnotherDad, @MBlanc46

    India’s unifying threads were always cultural, not genetic. India is the Territory connected by the Sanskrit language, the Brahmin caste, and the Hindu religion. Bali, Suriname, french Guiana, Mauritius are Indian countries even though they are geographically remote.

    When you lose those threads, the people are no longer Indian. As Jinnah accurately observed, South Asian Muslims were not Indians.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Anonymous

    That reasoning sounds like a Hindu version of pan-Islamism.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

  20. Obviously, we are in some interegnum. “On the other hand…” !!!! Steve, just announce you’re on holiday until the election is sorted out.

  21. @PiltdownMan
    @R.G. Camara

    I once explained it to PiltdownChild1 as "the (seeming) exception that proves (i.e. puts to the test) the rule."

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @photondancer, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @Paco Wové

    Right, it’s “prove” as in “to test”. Similarly, “Dugway Proving Grounds”. An exception puts the rule to the test — why is it an exception? Why does it not invalidate the rule? The point being, the exception could very well invalidate the rule, if you can’t explain it adequately.

  22. When google says “About XXX results” returned from a search, they’re providing a fake number.

    Click through the returned pages until there are no more, and you get:
    “steve sailer” “on the other hand”: About 100,000 results -> Page 12 of about 116 results

    So google only returned 116 results that you can actually click on and go to a web-page – NOT 100K; google exaggerated the number of results by about 943 times.

    Similarly,
    “steve sailer” “by the way”: About 258,000 results -> Page 9 of about 87 results
    Exaggerated by > 2,900 times.

    • Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost
    @Flemur

    That’s interesting and raises a whole host of questions. Not many people seem interested in breaking open the black box of Big Tech, maybe because natural curiosity seems to be ebbing with the rise of the gadgets the last two decades.

    Rise of the Gadgets... sounds like a spoof of a Terminator movie. The world we live in, dystopian farce.

    , @jb
    @Flemur


    Click through the returned pages until there are no more, and you get:
    “steve sailer” “on the other hand”: About 100,000 results -> Page 12 of about 116 results
     
    When I click on "repeat the search with the omitted results included" I get 333 results. Still nowhere near 100,000.

    This isn't specific to Steve. I've noticed it with a lot of searches, and I don't have any clear idea what's going on.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  23. @R.G. Camara
    The phrase "exception that proves the rule" is very Stevish: it's difficult to understand intuitively, but once you study it and learn the meaning , you get a big "a-ha!" moment where it suddenly makes total sense and you can't believe how clear and wonderful it is.

    I'm personally waiting for that moment when it comes to appreciation for golf course architecture.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @DuanDiRen, @Anon7, @Catdog, @Almost Missouri, @J.Ross, @John Cunningham

    “The exception proves the rule” is thought to have emerged from the legal phrase “exceptio probat regulam in casibus non exceptis”, an argument attributed to Cicero.

    This argument states if an exception exists or has to be stated, then this exception proves that there must be some rule to which the case is an exception. The second part of Cicero’s phrase, “in casibus non exceptis” or “in cases not excepted,” is almost always missing from modern uses of the statement that “the exception proves the rule”.

    Thanks, Wikipedia.

  24. @R.G. Camara
    The phrase "exception that proves the rule" is very Stevish: it's difficult to understand intuitively, but once you study it and learn the meaning , you get a big "a-ha!" moment where it suddenly makes total sense and you can't believe how clear and wonderful it is.

    I'm personally waiting for that moment when it comes to appreciation for golf course architecture.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @DuanDiRen, @Anon7, @Catdog, @Almost Missouri, @J.Ross, @John Cunningham

    It would be easier for people to understand the rule if they didn’t see it so often misapplied, e.g. like Steve is doing with Imran Khan, despite his insistence that he isn’t misapplying it.

  25. OT:

    ADL said the quiet part loud.

    I thought the idea that JFK wrote (Or put his name to) ‘A Nation of Immigrants’ at the behest of the ADL was a ‘trope’ and ‘conspiracy theory’.

    • Thanks: Charon
    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Altai

    JFK's little* brother, Ted Kennedy, was a prominent supporter of the Hart-Celler Act, the capstone to a century of Jewish attempts to turn the USA into a diverse paradise for Jews and the origin of all the USA's current immigration-related issues. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_and_Nationality_Act_of_1965
    ----------------
    * in every sense of the word except body mass.

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Altai

    Did Kennedy write Nation of Immigrants the same way he "wrote" Profiles in Courage? That is, by having Ted Sorenson write it for him.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @reactionry

    , @Pop Warner
    @Altai

    I wish people on the right would stop idolizing Kennedy because he might have been taken out by Mossad and allegedly went against the fed. He supported civil rights from the getgo, invited MLK to the White House despite knowing he was and was controlled by communists, and detested the immigration laws of his time that restricted immigration largely to Western and Northern Europe. It's no surprise that the ADL would get him to write some open borders screed when he had the same resentment against the WASP elite they did. And two years after his assassination his brother was one of the strongest advocates for the Hart-Cellar Act in the Senate. Liberal boomers lionize him for his martyrdom, but a lot on the right do too.

    , @Neuday
    @Altai


    I thought the idea that JFK wrote (Or put his name to) ‘A Nation of Immigrants’ at the behest of the ADL was a ‘trope’ and ‘conspiracy theory’.
     
    Not at all. The Wikipedia entry on the book admits it, if anyone is interested in who killed America and how:

    The book was written by Kennedy in 1958, while he was still a senator. It was written as part of the Anti-Defamation League's series entitled the One Nation Library. In the 1950s, former ADL National Director Ben Epstein was concerned by rising xenophobia and anti-immigrant rhetoric, so he reached out to then-Senator Kennedy to write a manuscript on immigration reform.

    Replies: @Charon

    , @Rob McX
    @Altai


    In 1958, @ADL commissioned then-Senator Kennedy to write “A Nation of Immigrants,” a book whose calls for immigration reform still remain relevant.
     
    In other words, the USA, changed beyond all recognition by mass non-white immigration, still needs more of it. Those people haven't even got started yet.
  26. If we excluded from the set “rules” those rules which had exceptions, we wouldn’t even be left with Newtonian physics, and it is ridiculous that a modern judge would make this time-wasting not-even-academic quibble considering what judges do.

  27. Something today for Steve:

    from Forbes,

    The US Rhodes Scholarship Winners for 2021 Are Among the Most Diverse Ever

    Twenty-two of the 32 are students of color; ten are Black, which equals the greatest number ever elected in one year in the United States. Nine are first-generation Americans or immigrants; and one is a Dreamer with active DACA status. Seventeen of the winners are women, 14 are men, and one is non-binary.

    • Thanks: Charon
    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Well....does US have a future as a sustainable first-world country?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Can't believe ppl were trying to persuade me to go to Oxford. No fuppin way. Not an elite institution anymore, a Woke Joke. No learning, just diversitards rehashing PC Frankfurter rat-diarrhoea. Same what Turdlet Khant has done with the Met.

    IMPORT 3RD WORLD
    BECOME 3RD WORLD

    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Buzz Mohawk

    A good argument against long-term endowments, trusts, foundations, etc. Poor Cecil must be revolving at high speed within his grave.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    , @bruce county
    @Buzz Mohawk

    So there is a great possibility that construction of Wakanda may well be in the works in the near future.

    , @Wilkey
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I read through all of their bios so that you don't have to. I'm often impressed even by the resumes of people I highly disagree with but, apart from a handful of them who have done genuinely interesting work, this might just be the list of the most obnoxiously boring people in the world.

    It's pretty much what you would expect from an institution that was first infiltrated and then overwhelmed by the Left. Perhaps at most 10 of the 32 recipients' bios weren't dominated by left-wing activism and identity politics. That's just their short bios. Undoubtedly several more of them (or all of them) probably dropped some left-wing activism into their applications or interviews.

    Every single recipient from a military academy was either black or Jewish.

    The "they" recipient is an "Inuit" who is as white as Anthony Wiener. "They" did a senior thesis which compares "aspects of imperialism in Yiddish...Inupiat poetry. So IOW, this "they" is a Jewish Inuit.

    How shocking. You bias a scholarship program in favor of minorities and left-wing activists and you end up with....a whole lot of recipients who are minorities and left-wing activists. Who would ever have thought?

    Replies: @Polynikes

  28. @Buzz Mohawk
    Something today for Steve:

    from Forbes,

    The US Rhodes Scholarship Winners for 2021 Are Among the Most Diverse Ever


    Twenty-two of the 32 are students of color; ten are Black, which equals the greatest number ever elected in one year in the United States. Nine are first-generation Americans or immigrants; and one is a Dreamer with active DACA status. Seventeen of the winners are women, 14 are men, and one is non-binary.
     

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey, @Jus' Sayin'..., @bruce county, @Wilkey

    Well….does US have a future as a sustainable first-world country?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Well….does US have a future as a sustainable first-world country?
     
    No, not if it keeps passing over and discriminating against White males from the middle of the country, who used to be respected and allowed to make contributions to mankind.

    Steve Sailer has himself pointed out here something many of us already know: the most overlooked, wasted human resource in the United States now, is young Americans from the same place and the same stock as men like these:

    https://webapp2.wright.edu/web1/newsroom/files/2011/12/21-1-19-GS-wil-orv-onporch.jpg

    http://mediad.publicbroadcasting.net/p/kalw/files/styles/medium/public/201404/Philo_T._Farnsworth.gif

    https://factfile.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Charles-Lindbergh-Image.jpg

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/02320/a3_2320115b.jpg

    Notably, though, none of these men were Rhodes Scholars. In fact, none of them went to what is considered an "elite" university. So maybe that bullshit doesn't really matter.

    Replies: @Whiskey

  29. @R.G. Camara
    The phrase "exception that proves the rule" is very Stevish: it's difficult to understand intuitively, but once you study it and learn the meaning , you get a big "a-ha!" moment where it suddenly makes total sense and you can't believe how clear and wonderful it is.

    I'm personally waiting for that moment when it comes to appreciation for golf course architecture.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @DuanDiRen, @Anon7, @Catdog, @Almost Missouri, @J.Ross, @John Cunningham

    Unfortunately, the “exception that proves the rule” phrase is also the kneejerk reaction of hacks when their lousy theory turns out to have more exception than rule.

    Properly, the phrase is meaningful when something that is often exceptional to general rules, like Japan, turns out to be exceptional to a particular rule too. It is even better when something that is exceptional for known reasons, like fraud, turns out to be exceptional again for a particular theory that is not supposed to apply to cases with those known reasons, such as fraudulent cases. In other words, when the “exceptionalism” is really exquisite consistency.

    There is also the somewhat pedantic digression that the phrase is supposed to be “the exception that probes the rule” or the “the exception that tests the rule”, which may also be a useful concept, but is a different meaning.

    That reminds me of the pedantic digression that often occurs when someone says “begs the question”. There is an obvious and useful meaning to this phrase when one is presented with an “answer” that invites much more questioning than it provides answers, yet using this phrase in comment forums such as this one often results in some pedant going all “Ackshually the phrase really means blah blah blah” complete with wiki links. Okay fine, it can have a specialized legalistic meaning, but most people quite reasonably understand it as above.

    • Replies: @eD
    @Almost Missouri

    Exception that proves the rule. You posit that all black people are stupid (making this example iSteve reader friendly). But you meet a smart black person! You then have to explain that this person is either actually not black, maybe he or she is South Asian, or in fact stupid, or abandon the rule. That is the correct use of the saying, but it is normally used as either noise or to convey something like "I didn't mean that ALL black people are stupid."

  30. Slightly off topic but speaking of Asiatic folk:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/jurijfedorov/status/1330645949333516289

    Blacks will miss white guilt dearly in minority-majority America.

    • Agree: vhrm
  31. On the other hand, they haven’t composed the Ninth Symphony while not deaf, so I’m not sure how much weight to give their arguments.

    This is a good example of one of my personal favorite observations: People who smugly talk down and belittle those who have done great things have never done great things themselves.

    Whether they are saying astronauts are dull, ordinary men, or calling Charles Lindbergh just a pilot, “like a cab driver.” (Yes, one well-known, New York Jerk actually said that about Lindbergh on a documentary years ago, no doubt because he didn’t like the hero’s politics.)

    None of these self-important mediocrities has done anything nearly as interesting or as hard as landing on the Moon or flying solo from New York to Paris in a 1927 airplane.

    Oh, BTW, everybody knows the best black musicians are blind.

    • Replies: @Anon7
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Or at least mostly blind, like Art Tatum, the greatest jazz pianist of the Thirties and Forties, who had no sight in one eye, and only partial sight in his other eye.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-r4sbJ7-NI

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    , @Ganderson
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I like the “ he only really wrote one good novel” or perhaps “ only had one good year in the bigs”. In both instances that’s one more than I wrote/had.

    , @Matt Buckalew
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Imagine being an astronaut groupie. Lindbergh matters because he was a pioneer. Guess what sweetie we’ve been to space.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  32. @R.G. Camara
    The phrase "exception that proves the rule" is very Stevish: it's difficult to understand intuitively, but once you study it and learn the meaning , you get a big "a-ha!" moment where it suddenly makes total sense and you can't believe how clear and wonderful it is.

    I'm personally waiting for that moment when it comes to appreciation for golf course architecture.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @DuanDiRen, @Anon7, @Catdog, @Almost Missouri, @J.Ross, @John Cunningham

    This is a good phrase because of experience observing patterns which everyone can draw upon. Wherever you have seen a pattern you have almost always also seen either an exception or been able to imagine one. In art classes you probably learned to punch up patterns by making exceptions or contrasts, or you probably saw advertisememts that do this. I’m really insulted and worried about this literally Communistic media-wide embrace of argument from authority, where nobody is allowed to know anything or be able to figure anything out. Ben Carson’s successful non-vaccine treatment of his wuflu bout was either not reported at all or was reported in a hilariously stupid manner, with terrified warnings of the experimental (as opposed to, y’know, a new vaccine) nature of Carson’s prescription, and the drug itself unnamed. Remind me, what did Carson do for a living before he was HUD secretary? Was he like a rapper or something?
    Mike Gallagher put together an extremely good, must-hear montage of local news liars (remember that using the internet to find local news was the main antidote to the national lyingpress), all reciting what is clearly a centrally sourced scripted message, Norkish in its brazen propaganda message. They, or rather the person who wrote it for them all, decry the failure of social media to not censor more aggressively, bemoan irresponsible wild stories propagated through social media (so, Russian hackers forever), and assure you that official news is the only news you are allowed to watch. And they do it in exactly the same words spoken at about the same speed, accross dozens of different local stations. We’re at the point of owing apologies to Alex Jones. I wish that diarrhea of CIA filth, freely admitting that they were CIA filth, all running for and winning local and lower level offices, had been met with panic and rage. Perhaps this is wrong (certainly it doesn’t square with our meaningless and order-disrupting laws) but there should be a regulation that when you join the CIA you give up the right to run for public office. Perhaps we are now seeing the results of that sinister project. We have fallen victim to our own color revolution and now the government is passing into the hands of economy-destroying morons who want a war with Russia.

  33. The whole stuff is overblown: Indians are Gypsies. Northern Indians are more likely to resemble bleached, light Gypsies, and the rest are darker Gypsies.

    Khan is not racially South Asian, but more like Pashtun from Afghanistan & similar darker Caucasians one can find in Iran & around.

    All real South Asians are very easily recognizable (Gandhi, Nehru, ..). These are typical South Asian faces:

    and these are Iranian-like faces (Iranians, Tajiks, Pashtuns,…):

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Those Iranians look like Amalekites to me.

    Meanwhile, Chosen Ones are clearly pulling legs and yanking chains:

    https://www.wmfe.org/uprooting-prejudice-at-the-holocaust-memorial-resource-and-education-center-of-florida/168984

    No comment.

    Ok, comment.

    Putting a George Floyd tribute in a Holocaust museum feels like a cultural Kafka trap

    , @Cortes
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The final one looks remarkably like Robert Shaw.

    , @Anonymous
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The lines between the Iranian type and Indian type blur.

    In one case I know of, there are 3 siblings: the daughter looks typically Indian (dark olive skin, round face, plump cheeks and big eyes), one son looks Iranian (well-defined features and fair skin) , and another son looks distinctly Mongoloid (no syndromes, he’s doing the best of the three). The parents come from the same caste and the gene pool would be expected to be fairly shallow.

    It’s an extreme case, but there are lots of families where the skin tone and features differ between siblings, with swarthiness and round features contrasting with fairness and a fine-boned appearance. Even Iranians occasionally produce South Asian-looking offspring.

    This isn’t unexpected, given the history of the region, but it makes drawing a line between the South Asian type and Iranian type tricky.

  34. I would personally prefer to see “on the gripping hand” used a bit more often, rather than the tedious “on the other other hand.”

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @Moral Stone

    The correct usage is that you first have to say, “on the one hand..... but on the other hand.....”
    If there is a third alternative, only then can you use “on the gripping hand”.
    I recommend using “on the gripping hand” with caution as it may mark the user as nerdish.

    I think I just outed myself as a nerd.

  35. @Buzz Mohawk
    Something today for Steve:

    from Forbes,

    The US Rhodes Scholarship Winners for 2021 Are Among the Most Diverse Ever


    Twenty-two of the 32 are students of color; ten are Black, which equals the greatest number ever elected in one year in the United States. Nine are first-generation Americans or immigrants; and one is a Dreamer with active DACA status. Seventeen of the winners are women, 14 are men, and one is non-binary.
     

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey, @Jus' Sayin'..., @bruce county, @Wilkey

    Can’t believe ppl were trying to persuade me to go to Oxford. No fuppin way. Not an elite institution anymore, a Woke Joke. No learning, just diversitards rehashing PC Frankfurter rat-diarrhoea. Same what Turdlet Khant has done with the Met.

    IMPORT 3RD WORLD
    BECOME 3RD WORLD

  36. @Ali Choudhury
    Imran Khan looks like a Pathan, the ethnic group which represents 60% of Afghanistan and 15% of Pakistan. Plenty of south Asians with only a quarter Pathan ancestry look like him.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @George

    Imran Khan’s family WP page refers to maternal and paternal ‘tribes’. So perhaps South Asians before Europeans and Americans began to think in terms of a broad category of race Europeans thought of themselves as something equivalent to tribes.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_of_Imran_Khan

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @George

    Pashtuns, as well as other ethnicities in Pakistan's northwest areas are, in fact, made up of distinct tribes, in the sociological sense.

    https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/pakistan/pashtun-tribes.htm

    https://archive.org/details/glossaryoftribes03rose

  37. @Altai
    OT:

    ADL said the quiet part loud.

    https://twitter.com/JGreenblattADL/status/1330517262281936896

    I thought the idea that JFK wrote (Or put his name to) 'A Nation of Immigrants' at the behest of the ADL was a 'trope' and 'conspiracy theory'.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Hypnotoad666, @Pop Warner, @Neuday, @Rob McX

    JFK’s little* brother, Ted Kennedy, was a prominent supporter of the Hart-Celler Act, the capstone to a century of Jewish attempts to turn the USA into a diverse paradise for Jews and the origin of all the USA’s current immigration-related issues. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_and_Nationality_Act_of_1965
    —————-
    * in every sense of the word except body mass.

  38. @Buzz Mohawk
    Something today for Steve:

    from Forbes,

    The US Rhodes Scholarship Winners for 2021 Are Among the Most Diverse Ever


    Twenty-two of the 32 are students of color; ten are Black, which equals the greatest number ever elected in one year in the United States. Nine are first-generation Americans or immigrants; and one is a Dreamer with active DACA status. Seventeen of the winners are women, 14 are men, and one is non-binary.
     

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey, @Jus' Sayin'..., @bruce county, @Wilkey

    A good argument against long-term endowments, trusts, foundations, etc. Poor Cecil must be revolving at high speed within his grave.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    It's a shame we can't harness the energy from spinning corpses, we could have gone completely green decades ago.

  39. @Altai
    OT:

    ADL said the quiet part loud.

    https://twitter.com/JGreenblattADL/status/1330517262281936896

    I thought the idea that JFK wrote (Or put his name to) 'A Nation of Immigrants' at the behest of the ADL was a 'trope' and 'conspiracy theory'.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Hypnotoad666, @Pop Warner, @Neuday, @Rob McX

    Did Kennedy write Nation of Immigrants the same way he “wrote” Profiles in Courage? That is, by having Ted Sorenson write it for him.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Hypnotoad666

    The only recent sitting Prez who could write a book would be William Clinton.

    Rest are semi literates.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    , @reactionry
    @Hypnotoad666

    "Mr. Sorensen once said he suspected the headline on his obituary would read: 'Theodore Sorenson, Kennedy Speechwriter,' misspelling his name..."

    I knew the correct spelling, but deliberately had fun with Google trying to get returns for "Ted Sorenson" and "Theodore Sorensen."

    https://www.google.com/search?biw=1130&bih=761&ei=1vm7X-eOOYjG5gLwoaGQDw&q=misspelled+misjudged+obituary+%22Ted+Sorenson%22+&oq=misspelled+misjudged+obituary+%22Ted+Sorenson%22+&gs_lcp=CgZwc3ktYWIQAzoFCAAQzQI6BQgAEMkDOgQIABAKOgQILhAKOgoILhDHARCvARAKOgIIADoKCAAQCBAHEAoQHjoICAAQCBANEB46BAghEApQsC5Y7ssBYK7RAWgBcAB4AIABgwGIAZcYkgEEMjguNpgBAKABAaoBB2d3cy13aXrAAQE&sclient=psy-ab&ved=0ahUKEwjn0f_HoJntAhUIo1kKHfBQCPIQ4dUDCA0&uact=5

  40. @R.G. Camara
    @PiltdownMan

    "Any girl without a shirt shall be allowed into the rock show free of charge" is the exception I like to think of. Because it implies that the rule is that girls wearing shirts shall have to pay full price, as will all men, regardless of having a shirt or not.

    Also I like the visual.

    Replies: @Erik L

    I read years ago a claim that this came from a legal principle. If a sign says “no parking midnight to 6 AM” that “proves” in a legal sense that it is ok to park there the rest of the time. Sounds plausible but also possibly made up

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Erik L

    There is a legal doctrine of interpretation pretentiously expressed in Latin as Expressio unius est exclusio alterius – i.e., “to express or include one thing implies the exclusion of the other, or of the alternative."

    On the other hand, an opposite rule of interpretation was expressed by Mitch Hedberg, who said: "I used to do drugs . . . . I still do drugs, but I used to, too."

  41. @Buzz Mohawk

    On the other hand, they haven’t composed the Ninth Symphony while not deaf, so I’m not sure how much weight to give their arguments.
     
    This is a good example of one of my personal favorite observations: People who smugly talk down and belittle those who have done great things have never done great things themselves.

    Whether they are saying astronauts are dull, ordinary men, or calling Charles Lindbergh just a pilot, "like a cab driver." (Yes, one well-known, New York Jerk actually said that about Lindbergh on a documentary years ago, no doubt because he didn't like the hero's politics.)

    None of these self-important mediocrities has done anything nearly as interesting or as hard as landing on the Moon or flying solo from New York to Paris in a 1927 airplane.

    Oh, BTW, everybody knows the best black musicians are blind.

    Replies: @Anon7, @Ganderson, @Matt Buckalew

    Or at least mostly blind, like Art Tatum, the greatest jazz pianist of the Thirties and Forties, who had no sight in one eye, and only partial sight in his other eye.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Anon7


    Or at least mostly blind, like Art Tatum, the greatest jazz pianist of the Thirties and Forties, who had no sight in one eye, and only partial sight in his other eye.
     
    If you think that's impressive, get a load of this from a man who was born blind.

    https://youtu.be/wbAoeZZvntk

    Playing starts at 1:36

    Replies: @Anon7

  42. @Bardon Kaldian
    The whole stuff is overblown: Indians are Gypsies. Northern Indians are more likely to resemble bleached, light Gypsies, and the rest are darker Gypsies.

    Khan is not racially South Asian, but more like Pashtun from Afghanistan & similar darker Caucasians one can find in Iran & around.

    All real South Asians are very easily recognizable (Gandhi, Nehru, ..). These are typical South Asian faces:

    https://media1.s-nbcnews.com/j/newscms/2020_07/3227766/200212-lilly-singh-tan-france-jameela-jamil-2x1-se-1245p_2e9b5fcf7cda62b40acfa4d48633912b.nbcnews-fp-1200-630.jpg

    https://samhin.org/wp-content/uploads/South-Asian-Culture.jpg

    and these are Iranian-like faces (Iranians, Tajiks, Pashtuns,...):

    https://www.worldatlas.com/upload/08/cd/28/tajik-girls-on-holiday-navruz.jpg

    https://storage.googleapis.com/afs-prod/media/49a3df47ef564bfeb983cbd27e146e52/800.jpeg

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/fc/9f/5f/fc9f5f948a966c4dd6423b0a59c9b766.jpg

    Replies: @El Dato, @Cortes, @Anonymous

    Those Iranians look like Amalekites to me.

    Meanwhile, Chosen Ones are clearly pulling legs and yanking chains:

    https://www.wmfe.org/uprooting-prejudice-at-the-holocaust-memorial-resource-and-education-center-of-florida/168984

    No comment.

    Ok, comment.

    Putting a George Floyd tribute in a Holocaust museum feels like a cultural Kafka trap

  43. @Flemur
    When google says "About XXX results" returned from a search, they're providing a fake number.

    Click through the returned pages until there are no more, and you get:
    "steve sailer" "on the other hand": About 100,000 results -> Page 12 of about 116 results

    So google only returned 116 results that you can actually click on and go to a web-page - NOT 100K; google exaggerated the number of results by about 943 times.

    Similarly,
    "steve sailer" "by the way": About 258,000 results -> Page 9 of about 87 results
    Exaggerated by > 2,900 times.

    Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost, @jb

    That’s interesting and raises a whole host of questions. Not many people seem interested in breaking open the black box of Big Tech, maybe because natural curiosity seems to be ebbing with the rise of the gadgets the last two decades.

    Rise of the Gadgets… sounds like a spoof of a Terminator movie. The world we live in, dystopian farce.

  44. @Almost Missouri
    @R.G. Camara

    Unfortunately, the “exception that proves the rule” phrase is also the kneejerk reaction of hacks when their lousy theory turns out to have more exception than rule.

    Properly, the phrase is meaningful when something that is often exceptional to general rules, like Japan, turns out to be exceptional to a particular rule too. It is even better when something that is exceptional for known reasons, like fraud, turns out to be exceptional again for a particular theory that is not supposed to apply to cases with those known reasons, such as fraudulent cases. In other words, when the "exceptionalism" is really exquisite consistency.

    There is also the somewhat pedantic digression that the phrase is supposed to be "the exception that probes the rule" or the "the exception that tests the rule", which may also be a useful concept, but is a different meaning.

    That reminds me of the pedantic digression that often occurs when someone says "begs the question". There is an obvious and useful meaning to this phrase when one is presented with an "answer" that invites much more questioning than it provides answers, yet using this phrase in comment forums such as this one often results in some pedant going all "Ackshually the phrase really means blah blah blah" complete with wiki links. Okay fine, it can have a specialized legalistic meaning, but most people quite reasonably understand it as above.

    Replies: @eD

    Exception that proves the rule. You posit that all black people are stupid (making this example iSteve reader friendly). But you meet a smart black person! You then have to explain that this person is either actually not black, maybe he or she is South Asian, or in fact stupid, or abandon the rule. That is the correct use of the saying, but it is normally used as either noise or to convey something like “I didn’t mean that ALL black people are stupid.”

  45. @Altai
    OT:

    ADL said the quiet part loud.

    https://twitter.com/JGreenblattADL/status/1330517262281936896

    I thought the idea that JFK wrote (Or put his name to) 'A Nation of Immigrants' at the behest of the ADL was a 'trope' and 'conspiracy theory'.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Hypnotoad666, @Pop Warner, @Neuday, @Rob McX

    I wish people on the right would stop idolizing Kennedy because he might have been taken out by Mossad and allegedly went against the fed. He supported civil rights from the getgo, invited MLK to the White House despite knowing he was and was controlled by communists, and detested the immigration laws of his time that restricted immigration largely to Western and Northern Europe. It’s no surprise that the ADL would get him to write some open borders screed when he had the same resentment against the WASP elite they did. And two years after his assassination his brother was one of the strongest advocates for the Hart-Cellar Act in the Senate. Liberal boomers lionize him for his martyrdom, but a lot on the right do too.

  46. @Diversity Heretic
    Winston Churchill seems to have grasped the genetic diversity of India when he said, "India is no more a nation than is the equator."

    AnotherDad is one of the best commentators on the Unz site.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @BenKenobi, @AnotherDad, @MBlanc46

    On the other hand, everybody hates pajeets.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @BenKenobi

    even in Vancouver? why?

    Replies: @BenKenobi

  47. Well, on the one hand I kind of see iSteve’s point, but on the other hand, I really could care less. Really.

  48. @Flemur
    When google says "About XXX results" returned from a search, they're providing a fake number.

    Click through the returned pages until there are no more, and you get:
    "steve sailer" "on the other hand": About 100,000 results -> Page 12 of about 116 results

    So google only returned 116 results that you can actually click on and go to a web-page - NOT 100K; google exaggerated the number of results by about 943 times.

    Similarly,
    "steve sailer" "by the way": About 258,000 results -> Page 9 of about 87 results
    Exaggerated by > 2,900 times.

    Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost, @jb

    Click through the returned pages until there are no more, and you get:
    “steve sailer” “on the other hand”: About 100,000 results -> Page 12 of about 116 results

    When I click on “repeat the search with the omitted results included” I get 333 results. Still nowhere near 100,000.

    This isn’t specific to Steve. I’ve noticed it with a lot of searches, and I don’t have any clear idea what’s going on.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @jb

    I stopped using "basically" in high school because I noticed it was the 90s equivalent to the 80s filler word "like." Then I saw Steve using it properly, and I was impressed (but still dislike it).

  49. @Buzz Mohawk
    Something today for Steve:

    from Forbes,

    The US Rhodes Scholarship Winners for 2021 Are Among the Most Diverse Ever


    Twenty-two of the 32 are students of color; ten are Black, which equals the greatest number ever elected in one year in the United States. Nine are first-generation Americans or immigrants; and one is a Dreamer with active DACA status. Seventeen of the winners are women, 14 are men, and one is non-binary.
     

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey, @Jus' Sayin'..., @bruce county, @Wilkey

    So there is a great possibility that construction of Wakanda may well be in the works in the near future.

  50. I guess it depends how much stock you put in a man-made “rule.”

    “No team trailing by more than [x] points at halftime has ever won the game”
    “Home prices only go up”
    “56,807 days without a civil war”

  51. There is the old joke about a business man sick of getting equivocating legal advice that “on the one hand. . . ,” but “on the other hand . . .” The business man declares: “what I need is a one-armed lawyer.”

    I also once had an English teacher tell me it was improper to say “on the other hand,” unless you had already introduced the prior point with “on the one hand . . .”

    I had to look up “on the gripping hand” but apparently it’s basically a way of saying “on the third hand.” It comes from a science fiction story involving three-armed aliens. According to Urban Dictionary, it’s an “Expression common among sci fi geeks and computer people.”

    From a science fiction novel entitled “The Mote In God’s Eye” where an intelligent alien race has evolved with two minor arms (with fine fingers for work) on their right and one larger (gripping) arm with three strong fingers on their left.

    Once I understand it, I like it as an expression. But I don’t see it catching on when you first have to explain about the three-armed aliens with different types of arms.

    • Replies: @Servant of Gla'aki
    @Hypnotoad666


    From a science fiction novel entitled “The Mote In God’s Eye” where an intelligent alien race has evolved with two minor arms (with fine fingers for work) on their right and one larger (gripping) arm with three strong fingers on their left.
     
    Donald Trump = Crazy Eddy
  52. @Anon
    SEARCH: "steve sailer" "it's almost as if"

    Results: 5.7 billion

    Replies: @reactionry, @reactionry

    “Results: 5.7 billion”

    Indeed

  53. @Moral Stone
    I would personally prefer to see “on the gripping hand” used a bit more often, rather than the tedious “on the other other hand.”

    Replies: @Alfa158

    The correct usage is that you first have to say, “on the one hand….. but on the other hand…..”
    If there is a third alternative, only then can you use “on the gripping hand”.
    I recommend using “on the gripping hand” with caution as it may mark the user as nerdish.

    I think I just outed myself as a nerd.

    • Agree: El Dato
  54. @Diversity Heretic
    Winston Churchill seems to have grasped the genetic diversity of India when he said, "India is no more a nation than is the equator."

    AnotherDad is one of the best commentators on the Unz site.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @BenKenobi, @AnotherDad, @MBlanc46

    Thanks Diversity Heretic.

    BTW: Reading my comment here, i see i got all of a dozen words in before leaving out a verb! (“If you *look* at those …”)

    Apologies to my fellow Unz commenters for the “needs editor” nature of much of what i write.

    I’m more an analytical (math, logic oriented) than verbal guy. My brain is usually racing ahead with its incoherent thoughts about the world, while the CSU (coherent sentence unit) and FCU (finger control unit) are struggling to keep up. Stuff hits the floor. Then i often feel some “could have said it better” or “need to add XYZ” and rearrange in some way that messes up tense or case or voice or number. Need to thoroughly, carefully reread everything and use the preview feature, but usually don’t. (Sometimes am racing the edit window timer trying to clean up. But sometimes rushing on to something else.) Unfortunately, i was not born with an excess of patience.

    I blame HBD. My Irish side. (Beats looking in the mirror.)

    I appreciate all you folks who read through–mentally correcting–my comments hoping to find something worthwhile for your efforts.

    All i can say is … i’ll try to do better: make my writing more comprehensible and your reading easier.

  55. Anonymous[350] • Disclaimer says:

    ‘South Asians’ see themselves as a race alright:
    Hindus, Muslims, Sikhs, Buddhists, Pakistanis, Bengalis, Pathans, Punjabis, Mains, Dalits, Brahmins, Tamils, Singhalese etc etc etc all come together, unite and fight as one – as long as they are in the white man’s country, wresting power from the white man.
    In this endeavor they can also count on the full undivided support of white women, blacks, The Economist etc etc.

    • Agree: reactionry
  56. Steve posted about “The exception that proves the rule” in 2014. What I find most exceptional about this post is that it elicited only 17 comments. Can you imagine an iSteve post today with that few?

    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2014/02/exception-that-proves-rule-proves.html

    I recall an excellent dissection of the expression “an exception that proves the rule” on the blog of the late Lawrence Auster, that paramount splitter of hairs, but extensive Google searching fails to locate it.

    • Replies: @reactionry
    @Harry Baldwin

    OT?

    I read a few columns by Lawrence Auster on account of his inclusion in John Derbyshire's list of worthy blogs of the Dark Enlightenment and recall LA's use of the term, "unprincipled exception."

    http://www.amnation.com/vfr/archives/005864.html

    A True Leftist (a kilt-wearing Leftist is not particularly exceptional) believes in the annihilation of freedom of speech (the individual (a property of the State i.e. The People) should be required to not only espouse, but also believe in, Leftist dogma) and civil liberties, but makes something of an unprincipled exception in sometimes advocating freedom of speech and civil liberties in the early phases of subverting a democracy.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Harry Baldwin

  57. @AndrewR
    Steve have you been drinking

    Replies: @Anonymous

    On the one hand he has a beer and on the other some scotch

  58. @Hypnotoad666
    @Altai

    Did Kennedy write Nation of Immigrants the same way he "wrote" Profiles in Courage? That is, by having Ted Sorenson write it for him.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @reactionry

    The only recent sitting Prez who could write a book would be William Clinton.

    Rest are semi literates.

    • Agree: Pincher Martin
    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Anonymous

    I do get a kick out of Obama writing an endless stream of memoirs. He's like an idiot savant, incapable of writing anything unless he is the topic - in which case he can't stop writing.

    Replies: @anon

  59. @Altai
    OT:

    ADL said the quiet part loud.

    https://twitter.com/JGreenblattADL/status/1330517262281936896

    I thought the idea that JFK wrote (Or put his name to) 'A Nation of Immigrants' at the behest of the ADL was a 'trope' and 'conspiracy theory'.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Hypnotoad666, @Pop Warner, @Neuday, @Rob McX

    I thought the idea that JFK wrote (Or put his name to) ‘A Nation of Immigrants’ at the behest of the ADL was a ‘trope’ and ‘conspiracy theory’.

    Not at all. The Wikipedia entry on the book admits it, if anyone is interested in who killed America and how:

    The book was written by Kennedy in 1958, while he was still a senator. It was written as part of the Anti-Defamation League’s series entitled the One Nation Library. In the 1950s, former ADL National Director Ben Epstein was concerned by rising xenophobia and anti-immigrant rhetoric, so he reached out to then-Senator Kennedy to write a manuscript on immigration reform.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @Neuday


    In the 1950s, former ADL National Director Ben Epstein was concerned by rising xenophobia and anti-immigrant rhetoric
     
    Already working overtime to wreck the paradise on earth that white men had labored for centuries to create.

    I wish I could have lived back then, especially if I could somehow have avoided (better yet prevented) what followed.
  60. @Anon
    SEARCH: "steve sailer" "it's almost as if"

    Results: 5.7 billion

    Replies: @reactionry, @reactionry

    “Results: 5.7 billion”

    I strongly suspect that you took a big steaming data dump* on the discussion and that you, like all Anons (and the adjacent anons), are a shapeshifter who is a member of the Dominion which controls the Deep Space Nine State and is allied with Kim Cardassian who is within six degrees of separation from Hugo Chavez and Karl Marx. Your massive fraud warrants a recount, if not investigation by a three-letter agency, which, alas, would likely be dominated by aliens and adverse to self-probing.

    [MORE]

    * dump – Those who are deaf to calls from the Siren Song of Probity & Propriety might appreciate and/or recall this elementary school Oldie:

    What’s brown and sits on the piano?

    Beethoven’s Last Movement

    Also see Sidney Powell, Enoch Powell, Rivers of Bloody Votes

  61. I rented a car once for a new Indian employee. The service rep was Pakistani. There was a definite cooling of atmosphere and avoiding eye contact with each other. The Indian told me afterwards he recognized the rep as Pakistani. So they maybe diverse but not so diverse they can’t recognize ancient enemies

    • Replies: @Charon
    @Mikeja

    Our brilliant future. Import all of the third world and then act surprised when our country ends up like the third world.

    Replies: @vhrm

    , @Anon
    @Mikeja

    Ancient enemies that date back to 1947.

    India doesn't allow for dual citizenship, so the nationalistic fervor will be replaced with racial affinity in a couple of years.

    , @Muggles
    @Mikeja


    I rented a car once for a new Indian employee. The service rep was Pakistani. There was a definite cooling of atmosphere and avoiding eye contact with each other
     
    100 years ago, or 150 (before you could rent cars of course) you might see this same reaction if one were Irish, the other English.

    Now, not so much, but you still see this at times. I've seen Jews who bristled at a German accent. I'm sure there are others.

    What actual nationality, at some level, doesn't hate his neighbors?

    Of course this thought will soon become a criminal Hate Crime. We're supposed to be kinder but stand apart at least six feet with a mask on. Don't think about touching me.

    The new reality for the Biden-Harris era, kinder but much scarier.
  62. But back to New York Times-style diversity, now in the Biden Administration.

    New York Times: “Biden Will Nominate First Woman to Lead Intelligence, First Latino to Run Homeland Security”

    “At an event in Wilmington, Del., Mr. Biden will announce plans to nominate Alejandro Mayorkas to be his secretary of the Department of Homeland Security…”

    From Alejandro Mayorkas’s Wikipedia bio: “Mayorkas was born in Havana, Cuba in 1959. His parents arrived with him and his sister to the United States in late 1960 as political refugees, following the Cuban revolution…His father was of Cuban Jewish background and his mother a Romanian Jew whose family fled to Cuba.

    “Diversity”: they got every kind of Jew you could want.

    Mayorkas is “Hispanic” because his family lived in Cuba for a bit. I had a treehouse as a kid. Does that make me a bird?

    • Replies: @Thomas
    @Wilkey

    Early life check: confirmed. Eastern. Standard. Time.

    https://ibb.co/9ysCdnz

    , @Charon
    @Wilkey

    I've known so-called "Cubans" like that. Polyglot Hebrews who were essentially thrown out for exploiting the Cuban people. Moved to Florida and New York where the pickings were easier. Functionally indistinguishable from neoplasms.

  63. @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Buzz Mohawk

    A good argument against long-term endowments, trusts, foundations, etc. Poor Cecil must be revolving at high speed within his grave.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    It’s a shame we can’t harness the energy from spinning corpses, we could have gone completely green decades ago.

  64. @Hypnotoad666
    @Altai

    Did Kennedy write Nation of Immigrants the same way he "wrote" Profiles in Courage? That is, by having Ted Sorenson write it for him.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @reactionry

    “Mr. Sorensen once said he suspected the headline on his obituary would read: ‘Theodore Sorenson, Kennedy Speechwriter,’ misspelling his name…”

    I knew the correct spelling, but deliberately had fun with Google trying to get returns for “Ted Sorenson” and “Theodore Sorensen.”

    https://www.google.com/search?biw=1130&bih=761&ei=1vm7X-eOOYjG5gLwoaGQDw&q=misspelled+misjudged+obituary+%22Ted+Sorenson%22+&oq=misspelled+misjudged+obituary+%22Ted+Sorenson%22+&gs_lcp=CgZwc3ktYWIQAzoFCAAQzQI6BQgAEMkDOgQIABAKOgQILhAKOgoILhDHARCvARAKOgIIADoKCAAQCBAHEAoQHjoICAAQCBANEB46BAghEApQsC5Y7ssBYK7RAWgBcAB4AIABgwGIAZcYkgEEMjguNpgBAKABAaoBB2d3cy13aXrAAQE&sclient=psy-ab&ved=0ahUKEwjn0f_HoJntAhUIo1kKHfBQCPIQ4dUDCA0&uact=5

  65. The proper expression (by the way!) is, “the exception that tests the rule” — meaning you have to apply some critical thinking to the exception and to the rule, to see if the exception might actually prove or disprove anything or is just an isolated one-off.

  66. “Pakistani prime minister and cricket star Imran Khan, whom I always pointing out looks like a taller Mark Wahlberg, is a rare South Asian who doesn’t look South Asian. He’s the exception that proves the rule.”

    Sort of like Mick Jagger is the rare Englishman who looks like an Aborigine.

  67. Anon[200] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Killings in L.A. spike dramatically, leaving families shattered, communities reeling

    https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2020-11-23/los-angeles-increase-homicides-shootings-crime

    “I would caution people against looking for local explanations for what is clearly a nationally driven trend,” Asher said.

    He said there is a major correlation between the “stresses of the pandemic” and the violence, but more study is needed on the connection. There also could be a connection between the violence and “the loss of police legitimacy” before and during massive protests this year, he said.

  68. Regarding the diversity of African peoples, there is a sense in which it’s true: the diversity of African peoples is quite high, and some of the most divergent lineages of humanity (the San, the Biaka and Mbuti pygmies, the Hadza) all live in Africa.

    Unlike India, though, these diverse populations are not present in anything like equivalent numbers. The Bantu expansions drastically outnumber all these small tribes of hunter gatherers, and in some cases (like the Mbuti pygmies) are still in the process of displacing or destroying these populations.

    So if you encounter someone “from Africa” who is a recent migrant to Europe the odds that this person is from a Bantu speaking group as opposed to one of more diverse lineages is quite high.

    • Agree: Lot
  69. @Harry Baldwin
    Steve posted about "The exception that proves the rule" in 2014. What I find most exceptional about this post is that it elicited only 17 comments. Can you imagine an iSteve post today with that few?

    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2014/02/exception-that-proves-rule-proves.html

    I recall an excellent dissection of the expression "an exception that proves the rule" on the blog of the late Lawrence Auster, that paramount splitter of hairs, but extensive Google searching fails to locate it.

    Replies: @reactionry

    OT?

    I read a few columns by Lawrence Auster on account of his inclusion in John Derbyshire’s list of worthy blogs of the Dark Enlightenment and recall LA’s use of the term, “unprincipled exception.”

    http://www.amnation.com/vfr/archives/005864.html

    A True Leftist (a kilt-wearing Leftist is not particularly exceptional) believes in the annihilation of freedom of speech (the individual (a property of the State i.e. The People) should be required to not only espouse, but also believe in, Leftist dogma) and civil liberties, but makes something of an unprincipled exception in sometimes advocating freedom of speech and civil liberties in the early phases of subverting a democracy.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @reactionry

    Bringing consistency to leftism is like bringing balm to cancer.

    Meanwhile, disquieting numbers from La France

    French police DEMOLISH protest camp, after 450 migrants pitch their tents in center of Paris (VIDEOS)


    Utopia56 has demanded that the French government provide “1,000 immediate accommodation places” for homeless migrants, and called on the state to set up a “permanent reception system” to house more entering the country.

    The total number of illegal migrants living in Paris is unknown. A migrant rights group last year estimated that 2,000 were sleeping on the streets of the French capital, while a 2018 government report claimed that between 150,000 and 400,000 were living either homeless or in accommodation in the suburban region of Seine-Saint-Denis alone.
     

    Also, Muslims know how to give Whitey the Feelz:

    Everything is a Holocaust, in particular sending Muslim kids to schools. That's what Nazis did with Jews:

    ‘What the Nazis did to the Jews’: Pakistani minister lashes out at Macron amid uproar over French leader's ‘ultimatum’ to Muslims

    Also, we are all Europe over here! Open up already! (This is immediately followed by a demand to stop checking Turkish cargo bound for Lybia, which is granted mid-inspection).

    Turkey considers itself integral part of Europe, Erdogan says, calls on EU to grant it FULL MEMBERSHIP

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @reactionry

    Auster's concept of the unprincipled exception referred to those concessions to reality that leftists make despite them being contrary to their professed principles. For example, sending their kids to a private school while being a staunch advocate of diverse public schools. Or using zoning and environmental regulations to maintain the quality of life in their wealthy, far-left community, as do Malibu residents. Or supporting strict gun control while employing armed bodyguards.

  70. @Buzz Mohawk
    Something today for Steve:

    from Forbes,

    The US Rhodes Scholarship Winners for 2021 Are Among the Most Diverse Ever


    Twenty-two of the 32 are students of color; ten are Black, which equals the greatest number ever elected in one year in the United States. Nine are first-generation Americans or immigrants; and one is a Dreamer with active DACA status. Seventeen of the winners are women, 14 are men, and one is non-binary.
     

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey, @Jus' Sayin'..., @bruce county, @Wilkey

    I read through all of their bios so that you don’t have to. I’m often impressed even by the resumes of people I highly disagree with but, apart from a handful of them who have done genuinely interesting work, this might just be the list of the most obnoxiously boring people in the world.

    It’s pretty much what you would expect from an institution that was first infiltrated and then overwhelmed by the Left. Perhaps at most 10 of the 32 recipients’ bios weren’t dominated by left-wing activism and identity politics. That’s just their short bios. Undoubtedly several more of them (or all of them) probably dropped some left-wing activism into their applications or interviews.

    Every single recipient from a military academy was either black or Jewish.

    The “they” recipient is an “Inuit” who is as white as Anthony Wiener. “They” did a senior thesis which compares “aspects of imperialism in Yiddish…Inupiat poetry. So IOW, this “they” is a Jewish Inuit.

    How shocking. You bias a scholarship program in favor of minorities and left-wing activists and you end up with….a whole lot of recipients who are minorities and left-wing activists. Who would ever have thought?

    • Thanks: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Polynikes
    @Wilkey

    We’ll never see it when China hits us. We talk of Romes fall but it’ll be more like the modern US fleet and army obliterating the decrepit Spanish forces at the turn of the previous century. American sailors, and everyone else, thought they were sailing to their doom to one of the preeminent naval powers. And why not? Spain and England had dominated the seas for about five hundred years. When rising economic super power USA with her new modern ships rolled in to battle the complacent decrepit fleet in the pacific it was a rout. Spain never saw it coming and really hasn’t recovered.

  71. @Anon7
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Or at least mostly blind, like Art Tatum, the greatest jazz pianist of the Thirties and Forties, who had no sight in one eye, and only partial sight in his other eye.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-r4sbJ7-NI

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    Or at least mostly blind, like Art Tatum, the greatest jazz pianist of the Thirties and Forties, who had no sight in one eye, and only partial sight in his other eye.

    If you think that’s impressive, get a load of this from a man who was born blind.

    Playing starts at 1:36

    • Replies: @Anon7
    @Pincher Martin

    He's amazing; I don't know a lot of classical music, but I've seen other performers try this piece, and Tsujii has great precision and hand speed, a beautiful interpretation.

    However, Tatum wasn't just playing by rote repetition and long practice; he made it up as he went along.

    Start at 8:55 in this interview between Andre Previn and Oscar Peterson. Previn tells a story about one of the greatest classical piano virtuosos of the twentieth century, Vladimir Horowitz, who was himself a big fan of Art Tatum...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDGzG-QWjAg

  72. @Anonymous
    @Hypnotoad666

    The only recent sitting Prez who could write a book would be William Clinton.

    Rest are semi literates.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    I do get a kick out of Obama writing an endless stream of memoirs. He’s like an idiot savant, incapable of writing anything unless he is the topic – in which case he can’t stop writing.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Pincher Martin

    I wonder at what point in time the Lightbringer[1] will grace the world with a memoir that describes his process of writing memoirs? I'm sure it would quickly ascend to a high perch in the NY Reviews, not to mention accruing thousands of 5-star ratings on Amazon.

    Perhaps he's just saving that for later?

    [1] Rather a Promethean name, isn't it? Or do I mean Luciferian?

  73. @Erik L
    @R.G. Camara

    I read years ago a claim that this came from a legal principle. If a sign says "no parking midnight to 6 AM" that "proves" in a legal sense that it is ok to park there the rest of the time. Sounds plausible but also possibly made up

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    There is a legal doctrine of interpretation pretentiously expressed in Latin as Expressio unius est exclusio alterius – i.e., “to express or include one thing implies the exclusion of the other, or of the alternative.”

    On the other hand, an opposite rule of interpretation was expressed by Mitch Hedberg, who said: “I used to do drugs . . . . I still do drugs, but I used to, too.”

    • LOL: reactionry
  74. After an all-nighter on the sauce in San Sebastián, Spain with a group of friends back in the day, I nearly hurled the fine cafe breakfast just eaten when I caught sight of a guy at a table nearby taking a sip of his own coffee. The hand holding the cup had another little hand on top with the junior pinkie crooked just as genteelly as the main hand’s.

    “Never again! That’s me finished with drink!” I may have lied. On the other hand, the story about the other hand is true.

  75. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Well....does US have a future as a sustainable first-world country?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Well….does US have a future as a sustainable first-world country?

    No, not if it keeps passing over and discriminating against White males from the middle of the country, who used to be respected and allowed to make contributions to mankind.

    Steve Sailer has himself pointed out here something many of us already know: the most overlooked, wasted human resource in the United States now, is young Americans from the same place and the same stock as men like these:

    [MORE]


    Notably, though, none of these men were Rhodes Scholars. In fact, none of them went to what is considered an “elite” university. So maybe that bullshit doesn’t really matter.

    • Replies: @Whiskey
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Elites say those guys are disposable. And not needed. Chen and Srinivas can keep enough of stuff running so Shaneequa and D’Quarius can run the remote drones.

    Misery for Dirt People is a feature not bug. Look at defunding police. Etc.

  76. anon[232] • Disclaimer says:
    @Pincher Martin
    @Anonymous

    I do get a kick out of Obama writing an endless stream of memoirs. He's like an idiot savant, incapable of writing anything unless he is the topic - in which case he can't stop writing.

    Replies: @anon

    I wonder at what point in time the Lightbringer[1] will grace the world with a memoir that describes his process of writing memoirs? I’m sure it would quickly ascend to a high perch in the NY Reviews, not to mention accruing thousands of 5-star ratings on Amazon.

    Perhaps he’s just saving that for later?

    [1] Rather a Promethean name, isn’t it? Or do I mean Luciferian?

    • LOL: Pincher Martin
  77. I don’t care how many kinds of South Asians there are. They are all not worth the trouble and will be an endless source of crime, mischief, grifting, corruption and rabid anti-white hatred going forward.

    Prediction: if Biden gets seated as President, Asian immigration of all kinds will explode exponentially. Nothing will be done to stop it.

  78. Biden has picked a proud Man of Color as head of Homeland Security:

    Biden picks first Latino to head DHS,

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2020/11/23/biden-picks-alejandro-mayorkas-first-latino-head-homeland-security/6392845002/

    • LOL: Wilkey
    • Replies: @oliver elkington
    @syonredux

    To be fair he does look Latino, the dark eyebrows really give it away ...pfft.

  79. @Buzz Mohawk

    On the other hand, they haven’t composed the Ninth Symphony while not deaf, so I’m not sure how much weight to give their arguments.
     
    This is a good example of one of my personal favorite observations: People who smugly talk down and belittle those who have done great things have never done great things themselves.

    Whether they are saying astronauts are dull, ordinary men, or calling Charles Lindbergh just a pilot, "like a cab driver." (Yes, one well-known, New York Jerk actually said that about Lindbergh on a documentary years ago, no doubt because he didn't like the hero's politics.)

    None of these self-important mediocrities has done anything nearly as interesting or as hard as landing on the Moon or flying solo from New York to Paris in a 1927 airplane.

    Oh, BTW, everybody knows the best black musicians are blind.

    Replies: @Anon7, @Ganderson, @Matt Buckalew

    I like the “ he only really wrote one good novel” or perhaps “ only had one good year in the bigs”. In both instances that’s one more than I wrote/had.

  80. Rats taking over NYC? Rat reports are up almost as much as murders. Are the rats the killers? Your murderball reporter Steve Sailer is on the case.

  81. OT: I present Biden’s Homeland Security Secretary nominee, who sees his mission to “oversee the protection of all Americans and those who flee persecution in search of a better life for themselves and their loved ones.”

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Thomas

    'When I was very young, the United States provided my family and me a place of refuge. Now, I have been nominated to be the DHS Secretary and oversee the protection of all Americans and those who flee persecution in search of a better life for themselves and their loved ones.'

    That is to say, as Homeland Security Secretary, Mayorkas will concern himself with the protection of Americans -- to the extent that this can be reconciled with admitting a flood of immigrants.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    , @Wilkey
    @Thomas

    "When I was very young, the United States provided my family and me a place of refuge. I am now going to repay that favor by ripping the door off its hinges and ensuring that the Americans (ca. 1960) who welcomed us, and their descendants, become a minority in their own country."

    FTFH.

    During the Obama Administration Mayorkas was a leading figure in the implementation of DACA. He has to be confirmed by the US Senate. I would suggest that his involvement with DACA should be the key reason to block his confirmation. DHS is responsible for implementing the enforcement of our immigration laws and the security of our border. The head of DHS should not be a man who has done so much to undermine our border security. Call your senators on this one ASAP.

    , @Ancient Briton
    @Thomas

    He's a bit shakey on the 'Homeland' concept, n'est pas?

  82. @BenKenobi
    @Diversity Heretic

    On the other hand, everybody hates pajeets.

    Replies: @Anon

    even in Vancouver? why?

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @Anon


    why?
     
    Experience.
  83. OT, Alejandro Mayorkas seems like a decent choice for Homeland Security. Touted as a Latino immigrant, he is the son of a white Jewish Cuban father and Romanian refugee mother who has lived in the US since he was one year old. He was involved in prosecution of the Mexican mafia and the 18th st gang. AOC probably won’t be too happy.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @SF

    'OT, Alejandro Mayorkas seems like a decent choice for Homeland Security. Touted as a Latino immigrant, he is the son of a white Jewish Cuban father and Romanian refugee mother who has lived in the US since he was one year old. He was involved in prosecution of the Mexican mafia and the 18th st gang. AOC probably won’t be too happy.'

    His mother's Jewish as well. And Biden's proposed Secretary of State is Jewish too!

    And the eight largest donors to Biden's campaign were all Jews! I ask you, what are the odds?

    It's something, huh?

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Flip

  84. @Bardon Kaldian
    The whole stuff is overblown: Indians are Gypsies. Northern Indians are more likely to resemble bleached, light Gypsies, and the rest are darker Gypsies.

    Khan is not racially South Asian, but more like Pashtun from Afghanistan & similar darker Caucasians one can find in Iran & around.

    All real South Asians are very easily recognizable (Gandhi, Nehru, ..). These are typical South Asian faces:

    https://media1.s-nbcnews.com/j/newscms/2020_07/3227766/200212-lilly-singh-tan-france-jameela-jamil-2x1-se-1245p_2e9b5fcf7cda62b40acfa4d48633912b.nbcnews-fp-1200-630.jpg

    https://samhin.org/wp-content/uploads/South-Asian-Culture.jpg

    and these are Iranian-like faces (Iranians, Tajiks, Pashtuns,...):

    https://www.worldatlas.com/upload/08/cd/28/tajik-girls-on-holiday-navruz.jpg

    https://storage.googleapis.com/afs-prod/media/49a3df47ef564bfeb983cbd27e146e52/800.jpeg

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/fc/9f/5f/fc9f5f948a966c4dd6423b0a59c9b766.jpg

    Replies: @El Dato, @Cortes, @Anonymous

    The final one looks remarkably like Robert Shaw.

  85. Sarah Silverman talking about one of her favorite topics…..

    Sarah Silverman Wonders Why Jewish Actresses Don’t Play Jewish Roles

    • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    @syonredux

    I like to watch re-runs of western shows like Gunsmoke. Whenever I see a very Jewish-looking actor, like Harold J. Stone or Ned Glass, on a western show, I like to say “What is this, Frontier Bris?”.

  86. @syonredux
    Sarah Silverman talking about one of her favorite topics.....

    Sarah Silverman Wonders Why Jewish Actresses Don’t Play Jewish Roles


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ll6Ob4369vI

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex

    I like to watch re-runs of western shows like Gunsmoke. Whenever I see a very Jewish-looking actor, like Harold J. Stone or Ned Glass, on a western show, I like to say “What is this, Frontier Bris?”.

  87. @Altai
    OT:

    ADL said the quiet part loud.

    https://twitter.com/JGreenblattADL/status/1330517262281936896

    I thought the idea that JFK wrote (Or put his name to) 'A Nation of Immigrants' at the behest of the ADL was a 'trope' and 'conspiracy theory'.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Hypnotoad666, @Pop Warner, @Neuday, @Rob McX

    In 1958, @ADL commissioned then-Senator Kennedy to write “A Nation of Immigrants,” a book whose calls for immigration reform still remain relevant.

    In other words, the USA, changed beyond all recognition by mass non-white immigration, still needs more of it. Those people haven’t even got started yet.

  88. My favorite Indian DNA fact is that within villages, different castes are more genetically different that the difference between Northern and Southern Europeans. In other words, they have been in the same place geographically for thousands of years, but have never mixed. It’s as if a few Italian families had moved to Norway, and had not mixed with the locals for thousands of years. Perhaps a better analogy is Jews and Gypsies in Europe.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @TelfoedJohn

    If they think that about each other, just imagine what they think about people of profoundly different nationalities and cultures - when they, inevitably, start moving in on them.

    , @Muggles
    @TelfoedJohn


    My favorite Indian DNA fact is that within villages, different castes are more genetically different that the difference between Northern and Southern Europeans
     
    Considering the size of most villages, you have to think that is bad for genetics (i.e. inbreeding.) With several castes in a small place, that limits things even more.

    Probably many cousin marriages, which are very common in rural areas anyway. Add castes to that (also, despite religious differences, common in Pakistan) and that' has to both lower IQ overall and lead to other heredity problems.

    The upper castes go to a lot of trouble to arrange marriages between families, usually distant (relatively speaking). That would mitigate inbreeding. But the lower castes couldn't usually afford that.

    Might explain why many rural Indians still resist using indoor toilets.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

  89. Anonymous[142] • Disclaimer says:
    @photondancer
    @PiltdownMan

    Yeah, 'prove' used to mean 'test' which is why we still say 'prove it!' as a challenge. Exceptions prove your rule isn't a rule, it's just a generalisation over a limited sample.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Yeah, ‘prove’ used to mean ‘test’ which is why we still say ‘prove it!’ as a challenge. Exceptions prove your rule isn’t a rule, it’s just a generalisation over a limited sample.

    The exception that proves the general rule.

    E before I after C is the exception that proves the generalization? Nah, it proves the rule.

    We must be fun at parties.

    • Replies: @photondancer
    @Anonymous

    You just have to go to the right kind of parties. ;-)

  90. This is from the new /news/ feature and appears to confirm that Biden’s presidency will be the third Obama term, with all the persecution, censorship and lying at full blast.
    https://unlimitedhangout.com/2020/11/reports/us-uk-intel-agencies-declare-cyber-war-on-independent-media/

  91. ‘Yet, I apparently don’t say the “exception that proves the rule” very often even though it’s one of my favorite phrases…’

    Maybe the exception doesn’t prove the rule very often.

  92. @Thomas
    OT: I present Biden's Homeland Security Secretary nominee, who sees his mission to "oversee the protection of all Americans and those who flee persecution in search of a better life for themselves and their loved ones."

    https://twitter.com/AliMayorkas/status/1330937834908250115?s=19

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Wilkey, @Ancient Briton

    ‘When I was very young, the United States provided my family and me a place of refuge. Now, I have been nominated to be the DHS Secretary and oversee the protection of all Americans and those who flee persecution in search of a better life for themselves and their loved ones.’

    That is to say, as Homeland Security Secretary, Mayorkas will concern himself with the protection of Americans — to the extent that this can be reconciled with admitting a flood of immigrants.

    • Agree: Rob McX
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Colin Wright

    He apparently was involved with the implementation of DACA during the Obama Administration. There's Reasons 1-800,000 to refuse to confirm him. Call your senator like, tomorrow - especially if he, she, they, or it is a Republican. Or even if they aren't. Seriously. We should not allow someone to run DHS who has been actively involved in an un-Constitutional, illegal program to undermine border security.

  93. @Anonymous
    @Diversity Heretic

    India’s unifying threads were always cultural, not genetic. India is the Territory connected by the Sanskrit language, the Brahmin caste, and the Hindu religion. Bali, Suriname, french Guiana, Mauritius are Indian countries even though they are geographically remote.

    When you lose those threads, the people are no longer Indian. As Jinnah accurately observed, South Asian Muslims were not Indians.

    Replies: @Anon

    That reasoning sounds like a Hindu version of pan-Islamism.

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    @Anon

    Yeah, I will start worrying about Hindu nationalism when they start crashing airplanes into buildings and making videos of chopping a person's head off.

    Hindu nepotism in engineering and software employment just doesn't rise to the same level of concern for me.

    Replies: @Anon

  94. @Anon
    @BenKenobi

    even in Vancouver? why?

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    why?

    Experience.

  95. @SF
    OT, Alejandro Mayorkas seems like a decent choice for Homeland Security. Touted as a Latino immigrant, he is the son of a white Jewish Cuban father and Romanian refugee mother who has lived in the US since he was one year old. He was involved in prosecution of the Mexican mafia and the 18th st gang. AOC probably won't be too happy.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘OT, Alejandro Mayorkas seems like a decent choice for Homeland Security. Touted as a Latino immigrant, he is the son of a white Jewish Cuban father and Romanian refugee mother who has lived in the US since he was one year old. He was involved in prosecution of the Mexican mafia and the 18th st gang. AOC probably won’t be too happy.’

    His mother’s Jewish as well. And Biden’s proposed Secretary of State is Jewish too!

    And the eight largest donors to Biden’s campaign were all Jews! I ask you, what are the odds?

    It’s something, huh?

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Colin Wright

    More exciting news.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    , @Flip
    @Colin Wright

    Rahm Emanuel is going to get a big job too

  96. anonymous[751] • Disclaimer says:

    it’s not illogical, though i’m not surprised that pseudo-intellectual self-aggrandizing quack posner doesn’t realize it.

    “exception that proves the rule” is a very logical legal phrase that dates to ancient rome. what it means, in its original logical form, is that if a parking meter says “NO PARKING ON TUESDAY” one is allowed to infer that that parking *is* allowed the rest of the time. ie, no parking on tuesday is the exception that proves the *rule* that parking is allowed in general.

    nobody uses this correctly, of course.

    kind of like “begs the question” and “disinterested” which i think you have lamented the loss of. contra cutesey steven pinker populist bullshit, there is sometimes a problem when people misuse phrases and lose distinctions because there is real content in the original meanings and distinctions. it is *better* to have both the concepts of “begs the question” and “raises the question” than to just lose the former and pretend it’s the latter.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @anonymous


    ... is that if a parking meter says “NO PARKING ON TUESDAY” one is allowed to infer that that parking *is* allowed the rest of the time.
     
    I won a traffic court case in Denver using this principle, sort of, I think. I was ticketed for turning right on a red light at 12:03 AM downtown.

    Boring story follows:

    Right turns on red were the norm. Exceptions to that rule were stated on signs mounted on the traffic lights.

    On the way to court, I went back and looked at the signs there in the weird three-way crossroads where I had been ticked downtown on a trafficless night at 12:30 in the morning. It was indeed posted as an exception to the rule.

    "No right turn on red between the hours of 7:33PM and 2:36AM on alternate Tuesdays," or some such bullshit.

    Then I actually admitted to the young lady judge that I had determined that the cop was right.

    She judged in my favor and actually commended me for my civilized behavior and presentation, even though I had just admitted that the cop was right!

    She said he had not satisfied the burden of proof that there was an exception to the rule in that intersection. Before my own testimony, I had cross-examined my accusor, something I had learned in school, and he couldn't answer. He had no proof that there was an exception there that I could not turn right on red.

    He had even brought his wife and kids with him. I guess he was nervous. Anyway, right turns were allowed on red all over town, but he had actually caught me in one exception at that one strange place, but I think the judge just liked me.

    Replies: @anonymous

  97. @Colin Wright
    @SF

    'OT, Alejandro Mayorkas seems like a decent choice for Homeland Security. Touted as a Latino immigrant, he is the son of a white Jewish Cuban father and Romanian refugee mother who has lived in the US since he was one year old. He was involved in prosecution of the Mexican mafia and the 18th st gang. AOC probably won’t be too happy.'

    His mother's Jewish as well. And Biden's proposed Secretary of State is Jewish too!

    And the eight largest donors to Biden's campaign were all Jews! I ask you, what are the odds?

    It's something, huh?

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Flip

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Rob McX

    Unbelievable. Sooner or later, Biden's going to ground out or something -- but as of now, he's four for four.

    I don't actually have anything against Janet Yellen -- but isn't this getting a little blatant?

    Replies: @Anon, @anon

  98. @Wilkey
    But back to New York Times-style diversity, now in the Biden Administration.

    New York Times: "Biden Will Nominate First Woman to Lead Intelligence, First Latino to Run Homeland Security"

    "At an event in Wilmington, Del., Mr. Biden will announce plans to nominate Alejandro Mayorkas to be his secretary of the Department of Homeland Security..."

     

    From Alejandro Mayorkas's Wikipedia bio: "Mayorkas was born in Havana, Cuba in 1959. His parents arrived with him and his sister to the United States in late 1960 as political refugees, following the Cuban revolution...His father was of Cuban Jewish background and his mother a Romanian Jew whose family fled to Cuba.

    "Diversity": they got every kind of Jew you could want.

    Mayorkas is "Hispanic" because his family lived in Cuba for a bit. I had a treehouse as a kid. Does that make me a bird?

    Replies: @Thomas, @Charon

    Early life check: confirmed. Eastern. Standard. Time.

    https://ibb.co/9ysCdnz

  99. @Neuday
    @Altai


    I thought the idea that JFK wrote (Or put his name to) ‘A Nation of Immigrants’ at the behest of the ADL was a ‘trope’ and ‘conspiracy theory’.
     
    Not at all. The Wikipedia entry on the book admits it, if anyone is interested in who killed America and how:

    The book was written by Kennedy in 1958, while he was still a senator. It was written as part of the Anti-Defamation League's series entitled the One Nation Library. In the 1950s, former ADL National Director Ben Epstein was concerned by rising xenophobia and anti-immigrant rhetoric, so he reached out to then-Senator Kennedy to write a manuscript on immigration reform.

    Replies: @Charon

    In the 1950s, former ADL National Director Ben Epstein was concerned by rising xenophobia and anti-immigrant rhetoric

    Already working overtime to wreck the paradise on earth that white men had labored for centuries to create.

    I wish I could have lived back then, especially if I could somehow have avoided (better yet prevented) what followed.

  100. @Mikeja
    I rented a car once for a new Indian employee. The service rep was Pakistani. There was a definite cooling of atmosphere and avoiding eye contact with each other. The Indian told me afterwards he recognized the rep as Pakistani. So they maybe diverse but not so diverse they can’t recognize ancient enemies

    Replies: @Charon, @Anon, @Muggles

    Our brilliant future. Import all of the third world and then act surprised when our country ends up like the third world.

    • Replies: @vhrm
    @Charon


    Our brilliant future. Import all of the third world and then act surprised when our country ends up like the third world.
     
    Eh, sort of. I live in an area with a lot of Chinese (old mainland cantonese, new mainland mandarin, HK and Taiwan ... all off them) and Filipinos, some Koreans and some Japanese. There's no real conflict.

    now, it's true that that's not a third world example... idk the details, but apparently the Mexicans and Central Americans do care a lot about their ethnic affiliations and are in constant gang wars in the prisons and on the streets. (though I think that's temporary too since there send to be a lot of intermarriage in the non gang tiers which ARE much larger)

  101. @R.G. Camara
    The phrase "exception that proves the rule" is very Stevish: it's difficult to understand intuitively, but once you study it and learn the meaning , you get a big "a-ha!" moment where it suddenly makes total sense and you can't believe how clear and wonderful it is.

    I'm personally waiting for that moment when it comes to appreciation for golf course architecture.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @DuanDiRen, @Anon7, @Catdog, @Almost Missouri, @J.Ross, @John Cunningham

    It started in Latin as “exceptio probat regulam,” or the exception puts the rule to the proof.

  102. @reactionry
    @Harry Baldwin

    OT?

    I read a few columns by Lawrence Auster on account of his inclusion in John Derbyshire's list of worthy blogs of the Dark Enlightenment and recall LA's use of the term, "unprincipled exception."

    http://www.amnation.com/vfr/archives/005864.html

    A True Leftist (a kilt-wearing Leftist is not particularly exceptional) believes in the annihilation of freedom of speech (the individual (a property of the State i.e. The People) should be required to not only espouse, but also believe in, Leftist dogma) and civil liberties, but makes something of an unprincipled exception in sometimes advocating freedom of speech and civil liberties in the early phases of subverting a democracy.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Harry Baldwin

    Bringing consistency to leftism is like bringing balm to cancer.

    Meanwhile, disquieting numbers from La France

    French police DEMOLISH protest camp, after 450 migrants pitch their tents in center of Paris (VIDEOS)

    Utopia56 has demanded that the French government provide “1,000 immediate accommodation places” for homeless migrants, and called on the state to set up a “permanent reception system” to house more entering the country.

    The total number of illegal migrants living in Paris is unknown. A migrant rights group last year estimated that 2,000 were sleeping on the streets of the French capital, while a 2018 government report claimed that between 150,000 and 400,000 were living either homeless or in accommodation in the suburban region of Seine-Saint-Denis alone.

    Also, Muslims know how to give Whitey the Feelz:

    Everything is a Holocaust, in particular sending Muslim kids to schools. That’s what Nazis did with Jews:

    ‘What the Nazis did to the Jews’: Pakistani minister lashes out at Macron amid uproar over French leader’s ‘ultimatum’ to Muslims

    Also, we are all Europe over here! Open up already! (This is immediately followed by a demand to stop checking Turkish cargo bound for Lybia, which is granted mid-inspection).

    Turkey considers itself integral part of Europe, Erdogan says, calls on EU to grant it FULL MEMBERSHIP

  103. @Wilkey
    But back to New York Times-style diversity, now in the Biden Administration.

    New York Times: "Biden Will Nominate First Woman to Lead Intelligence, First Latino to Run Homeland Security"

    "At an event in Wilmington, Del., Mr. Biden will announce plans to nominate Alejandro Mayorkas to be his secretary of the Department of Homeland Security..."

     

    From Alejandro Mayorkas's Wikipedia bio: "Mayorkas was born in Havana, Cuba in 1959. His parents arrived with him and his sister to the United States in late 1960 as political refugees, following the Cuban revolution...His father was of Cuban Jewish background and his mother a Romanian Jew whose family fled to Cuba.

    "Diversity": they got every kind of Jew you could want.

    Mayorkas is "Hispanic" because his family lived in Cuba for a bit. I had a treehouse as a kid. Does that make me a bird?

    Replies: @Thomas, @Charon

    I’ve known so-called “Cubans” like that. Polyglot Hebrews who were essentially thrown out for exploiting the Cuban people. Moved to Florida and New York where the pickings were easier. Functionally indistinguishable from neoplasms.

  104. https://emojis.slackmojis.com/emojis/images/1450464805/195/google.png “Steve Sailer” “terribly”

    About 41,700 results (0.40 seconds)

    https://emojis.slackmojis.com/emojis/images/1450464805/195/google.png “Steve Sailer” “impression”

    About 76,500 results (0.38 seconds)

    https://emojis.slackmojis.com/emojis/images/1450464805/195/google.png

    “Steve Sailer” “vague impression”

    About 800 results (0.35 seconds)

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Reg Cæsar

    How many hits for "Steve Sailer" "rocket surgery"? Or "Steve Sailer" "Occam's Butterknife"?

  105. anon[289] • Disclaimer says:

    I remember hearing a rumor a few years ago that Stevie wonder, who is known for being a blind pianist, is not actually blind and can see. It’s almost a running joke.

    I believe he did it to gain sympathy and do an exception that proves the rule hoax.

  106. @Reg Cæsar

    https://emojis.slackmojis.com/emojis/images/1450464805/195/google.png "Steve Sailer" "terribly"

    About 41,700 results (0.40 seconds)
     


    https://emojis.slackmojis.com/emojis/images/1450464805/195/google.png "Steve Sailer" "impression"

    About 76,500 results (0.38 seconds)
     


    https://emojis.slackmojis.com/emojis/images/1450464805/195/google.png

    "Steve Sailer" "vague impression"

    About 800 results (0.35 seconds)
     

    Replies: @Wilkey

    How many hits for “Steve Sailer” “rocket surgery”? Or “Steve Sailer” “Occam’s Butterknife”?

  107. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Well….does US have a future as a sustainable first-world country?
     
    No, not if it keeps passing over and discriminating against White males from the middle of the country, who used to be respected and allowed to make contributions to mankind.

    Steve Sailer has himself pointed out here something many of us already know: the most overlooked, wasted human resource in the United States now, is young Americans from the same place and the same stock as men like these:

    https://webapp2.wright.edu/web1/newsroom/files/2011/12/21-1-19-GS-wil-orv-onporch.jpg

    http://mediad.publicbroadcasting.net/p/kalw/files/styles/medium/public/201404/Philo_T._Farnsworth.gif

    https://factfile.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Charles-Lindbergh-Image.jpg

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/02320/a3_2320115b.jpg

    Notably, though, none of these men were Rhodes Scholars. In fact, none of them went to what is considered an "elite" university. So maybe that bullshit doesn't really matter.

    Replies: @Whiskey

    Elites say those guys are disposable. And not needed. Chen and Srinivas can keep enough of stuff running so Shaneequa and D’Quarius can run the remote drones.

    Misery for Dirt People is a feature not bug. Look at defunding police. Etc.

  108. @syonredux
    Biden has picked a proud Man of Color as head of Homeland Security:

    http://billingtoncybersecurity.com/media/S2-Official-Pic-e1456243643316.jpg


    Biden picks first Latino to head DHS,



    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2020/11/23/biden-picks-alejandro-mayorkas-first-latino-head-homeland-security/6392845002/

    Replies: @oliver elkington

    To be fair he does look Latino, the dark eyebrows really give it away …pfft.

  109. @Thomas
    OT: I present Biden's Homeland Security Secretary nominee, who sees his mission to "oversee the protection of all Americans and those who flee persecution in search of a better life for themselves and their loved ones."

    https://twitter.com/AliMayorkas/status/1330937834908250115?s=19

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Wilkey, @Ancient Briton

    “When I was very young, the United States provided my family and me a place of refuge. I am now going to repay that favor by ripping the door off its hinges and ensuring that the Americans (ca. 1960) who welcomed us, and their descendants, become a minority in their own country.”

    FTFH.

    During the Obama Administration Mayorkas was a leading figure in the implementation of DACA. He has to be confirmed by the US Senate. I would suggest that his involvement with DACA should be the key reason to block his confirmation. DHS is responsible for implementing the enforcement of our immigration laws and the security of our border. The head of DHS should not be a man who has done so much to undermine our border security. Call your senators on this one ASAP.

  110. @anonymous
    it's not illogical, though i'm not surprised that pseudo-intellectual self-aggrandizing quack posner doesn't realize it.

    "exception that proves the rule" is a very logical legal phrase that dates to ancient rome. what it means, in its original logical form, is that if a parking meter says "NO PARKING ON TUESDAY" one is allowed to infer that that parking *is* allowed the rest of the time. ie, no parking on tuesday is the exception that proves the *rule* that parking is allowed in general.

    nobody uses this correctly, of course.


    kind of like "begs the question" and "disinterested" which i think you have lamented the loss of. contra cutesey steven pinker populist bullshit, there is sometimes a problem when people misuse phrases and lose distinctions because there is real content in the original meanings and distinctions. it is *better* to have both the concepts of "begs the question" and "raises the question" than to just lose the former and pretend it's the latter.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    … is that if a parking meter says “NO PARKING ON TUESDAY” one is allowed to infer that that parking *is* allowed the rest of the time.

    I won a traffic court case in Denver using this principle, sort of, I think. I was ticketed for turning right on a red light at 12:03 AM downtown.

    Boring story follows:

    [MORE]

    Right turns on red were the norm. Exceptions to that rule were stated on signs mounted on the traffic lights.

    On the way to court, I went back and looked at the signs there in the weird three-way crossroads where I had been ticked downtown on a trafficless night at 12:30 in the morning. It was indeed posted as an exception to the rule.

    “No right turn on red between the hours of 7:33PM and 2:36AM on alternate Tuesdays,” or some such bullshit.

    Then I actually admitted to the young lady judge that I had determined that the cop was right.

    She judged in my favor and actually commended me for my civilized behavior and presentation, even though I had just admitted that the cop was right!

    She said he had not satisfied the burden of proof that there was an exception to the rule in that intersection. Before my own testimony, I had cross-examined my accusor, something I had learned in school, and he couldn’t answer. He had no proof that there was an exception there that I could not turn right on red.

    He had even brought his wife and kids with him. I guess he was nervous. Anyway, right turns were allowed on red all over town, but he had actually caught me in one exception at that one strange place, but I think the judge just liked me.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Hey, I will admit I've seen white privilege before. It's rare but....

    And by "white privilege" I mean judges who deal with people all day tend to have pretty good radar. A friend of mine got hit with felony gun charges for guns he had legally purchased in Vermont (lax gun laws) and brought to upstate NY (pretty tight on handguns). He made a mistake but not a malicious one. But he was definitely wrong on the law.

    I remember him coming back from court and saying he was the only one there wearing a suit. "These idiots go to court in ripped jeans and t-shirts?"

    After a couple of times dealing with my friend, the judge straight up told the prosecutor he wouldn't allow them to pursue felony charges. The DA apparently whined to the judge in a Biden-like fashion, "Cmon, man! I can't go back there with nothing! These are automatic felonies!" and the judge just said, "No, it's now a disturbing the peace citation because I just said so. Keep the guns but he gets nothing. We're done here."

    I guess what I'm saying is yes, my friend got off with the Chappelle Show white man defense of "I'm sorry....I didn't know I couldn't do that." The thing is, though, that was accurate and the judge believed it was accurate.



    Judges will know if you're a piece of shit because they deal with pieces of shit all day.

  111. @Colin Wright
    @SF

    'OT, Alejandro Mayorkas seems like a decent choice for Homeland Security. Touted as a Latino immigrant, he is the son of a white Jewish Cuban father and Romanian refugee mother who has lived in the US since he was one year old. He was involved in prosecution of the Mexican mafia and the 18th st gang. AOC probably won’t be too happy.'

    His mother's Jewish as well. And Biden's proposed Secretary of State is Jewish too!

    And the eight largest donors to Biden's campaign were all Jews! I ask you, what are the odds?

    It's something, huh?

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Flip

    Rahm Emanuel is going to get a big job too

  112. @Colin Wright
    @Thomas

    'When I was very young, the United States provided my family and me a place of refuge. Now, I have been nominated to be the DHS Secretary and oversee the protection of all Americans and those who flee persecution in search of a better life for themselves and their loved ones.'

    That is to say, as Homeland Security Secretary, Mayorkas will concern himself with the protection of Americans -- to the extent that this can be reconciled with admitting a flood of immigrants.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    He apparently was involved with the implementation of DACA during the Obama Administration. There’s Reasons 1-800,000 to refuse to confirm him. Call your senator like, tomorrow – especially if he, she, they, or it is a Republican. Or even if they aren’t. Seriously. We should not allow someone to run DHS who has been actively involved in an un-Constitutional, illegal program to undermine border security.

  113. Imran Khan’s wife and former spiritual advisor Bushra Bibi is another interesting subject. Pakistani and Indian tabloids/Twitter think she is a witch who owns two jinns and feeds them raw meat. She rarely goes outside without white veils. They do seem more spooky than devout/conservative. Apparently she’s told Imran he is the key to Pakistan’s destiny.

    Strange place.

  114. Anonymous[373] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bardon Kaldian
    The whole stuff is overblown: Indians are Gypsies. Northern Indians are more likely to resemble bleached, light Gypsies, and the rest are darker Gypsies.

    Khan is not racially South Asian, but more like Pashtun from Afghanistan & similar darker Caucasians one can find in Iran & around.

    All real South Asians are very easily recognizable (Gandhi, Nehru, ..). These are typical South Asian faces:

    https://media1.s-nbcnews.com/j/newscms/2020_07/3227766/200212-lilly-singh-tan-france-jameela-jamil-2x1-se-1245p_2e9b5fcf7cda62b40acfa4d48633912b.nbcnews-fp-1200-630.jpg

    https://samhin.org/wp-content/uploads/South-Asian-Culture.jpg

    and these are Iranian-like faces (Iranians, Tajiks, Pashtuns,...):

    https://www.worldatlas.com/upload/08/cd/28/tajik-girls-on-holiday-navruz.jpg

    https://storage.googleapis.com/afs-prod/media/49a3df47ef564bfeb983cbd27e146e52/800.jpeg

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/fc/9f/5f/fc9f5f948a966c4dd6423b0a59c9b766.jpg

    Replies: @El Dato, @Cortes, @Anonymous

    The lines between the Iranian type and Indian type blur.

    In one case I know of, there are 3 siblings: the daughter looks typically Indian (dark olive skin, round face, plump cheeks and big eyes), one son looks Iranian (well-defined features and fair skin) , and another son looks distinctly Mongoloid (no syndromes, he’s doing the best of the three). The parents come from the same caste and the gene pool would be expected to be fairly shallow.

    It’s an extreme case, but there are lots of families where the skin tone and features differ between siblings, with swarthiness and round features contrasting with fairness and a fine-boned appearance. Even Iranians occasionally produce South Asian-looking offspring.

    This isn’t unexpected, given the history of the region, but it makes drawing a line between the South Asian type and Iranian type tricky.

  115. Re: Deaf Great Beethoven. Of course. But these people seem a bit airhead not knowing that Beethoven was already great, accomplished and celebrated both as composer and pianist long before he became deaf. And that affected the music–maybe making it more powerful, that struggle, agony. But there’s a huge lot of work before he became deaf. He could still hear music up until about 1812, but he was never totally deaf. Also, it’s important that while it is very admirable that his composition continued and grew into magnificence, the deafness did stop his performing as a pianist, from which he got major income. And he became very withdrawn. Also, although his ‘totally deaf period’ is considered his greatest music, it is not a huge amount, and the 9th Symphony is the only one of the symphonies he composed while totally deaf.

  116. @Wilkey
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I read through all of their bios so that you don't have to. I'm often impressed even by the resumes of people I highly disagree with but, apart from a handful of them who have done genuinely interesting work, this might just be the list of the most obnoxiously boring people in the world.

    It's pretty much what you would expect from an institution that was first infiltrated and then overwhelmed by the Left. Perhaps at most 10 of the 32 recipients' bios weren't dominated by left-wing activism and identity politics. That's just their short bios. Undoubtedly several more of them (or all of them) probably dropped some left-wing activism into their applications or interviews.

    Every single recipient from a military academy was either black or Jewish.

    The "they" recipient is an "Inuit" who is as white as Anthony Wiener. "They" did a senior thesis which compares "aspects of imperialism in Yiddish...Inupiat poetry. So IOW, this "they" is a Jewish Inuit.

    How shocking. You bias a scholarship program in favor of minorities and left-wing activists and you end up with....a whole lot of recipients who are minorities and left-wing activists. Who would ever have thought?

    Replies: @Polynikes

    We’ll never see it when China hits us. We talk of Romes fall but it’ll be more like the modern US fleet and army obliterating the decrepit Spanish forces at the turn of the previous century. American sailors, and everyone else, thought they were sailing to their doom to one of the preeminent naval powers. And why not? Spain and England had dominated the seas for about five hundred years. When rising economic super power USA with her new modern ships rolled in to battle the complacent decrepit fleet in the pacific it was a rout. Spain never saw it coming and really hasn’t recovered.

  117. @Thomas
    OT: I present Biden's Homeland Security Secretary nominee, who sees his mission to "oversee the protection of all Americans and those who flee persecution in search of a better life for themselves and their loved ones."

    https://twitter.com/AliMayorkas/status/1330937834908250115?s=19

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Wilkey, @Ancient Briton

    He’s a bit shakey on the ‘Homeland’ concept, n’est pas?

  118. anonymous[751] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    @anonymous


    ... is that if a parking meter says “NO PARKING ON TUESDAY” one is allowed to infer that that parking *is* allowed the rest of the time.
     
    I won a traffic court case in Denver using this principle, sort of, I think. I was ticketed for turning right on a red light at 12:03 AM downtown.

    Boring story follows:

    Right turns on red were the norm. Exceptions to that rule were stated on signs mounted on the traffic lights.

    On the way to court, I went back and looked at the signs there in the weird three-way crossroads where I had been ticked downtown on a trafficless night at 12:30 in the morning. It was indeed posted as an exception to the rule.

    "No right turn on red between the hours of 7:33PM and 2:36AM on alternate Tuesdays," or some such bullshit.

    Then I actually admitted to the young lady judge that I had determined that the cop was right.

    She judged in my favor and actually commended me for my civilized behavior and presentation, even though I had just admitted that the cop was right!

    She said he had not satisfied the burden of proof that there was an exception to the rule in that intersection. Before my own testimony, I had cross-examined my accusor, something I had learned in school, and he couldn't answer. He had no proof that there was an exception there that I could not turn right on red.

    He had even brought his wife and kids with him. I guess he was nervous. Anyway, right turns were allowed on red all over town, but he had actually caught me in one exception at that one strange place, but I think the judge just liked me.

    Replies: @anonymous

    Hey, I will admit I’ve seen white privilege before. It’s rare but….

    And by “white privilege” I mean judges who deal with people all day tend to have pretty good radar. A friend of mine got hit with felony gun charges for guns he had legally purchased in Vermont (lax gun laws) and brought to upstate NY (pretty tight on handguns). He made a mistake but not a malicious one. But he was definitely wrong on the law.

    I remember him coming back from court and saying he was the only one there wearing a suit. “These idiots go to court in ripped jeans and t-shirts?”

    After a couple of times dealing with my friend, the judge straight up told the prosecutor he wouldn’t allow them to pursue felony charges. The DA apparently whined to the judge in a Biden-like fashion, “Cmon, man! I can’t go back there with nothing! These are automatic felonies!” and the judge just said, “No, it’s now a disturbing the peace citation because I just said so. Keep the guns but he gets nothing. We’re done here.”

    I guess what I’m saying is yes, my friend got off with the Chappelle Show white man defense of “I’m sorry….I didn’t know I couldn’t do that.” The thing is, though, that was accurate and the judge believed it was accurate.

    Judges will know if you’re a piece of shit because they deal with pieces of shit all day.

  119. On the Other Hand …

    • LOL: Inquiring Mind
  120. @Buzz Mohawk

    On the other hand, they haven’t composed the Ninth Symphony while not deaf, so I’m not sure how much weight to give their arguments.
     
    This is a good example of one of my personal favorite observations: People who smugly talk down and belittle those who have done great things have never done great things themselves.

    Whether they are saying astronauts are dull, ordinary men, or calling Charles Lindbergh just a pilot, "like a cab driver." (Yes, one well-known, New York Jerk actually said that about Lindbergh on a documentary years ago, no doubt because he didn't like the hero's politics.)

    None of these self-important mediocrities has done anything nearly as interesting or as hard as landing on the Moon or flying solo from New York to Paris in a 1927 airplane.

    Oh, BTW, everybody knows the best black musicians are blind.

    Replies: @Anon7, @Ganderson, @Matt Buckalew

    Imagine being an astronaut groupie. Lindbergh matters because he was a pioneer. Guess what sweetie we’ve been to space.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Matt Buckalew


    Guess what sweetie we’ve been to space.
     
    Have you?

    QED

    Replies: @Matt Buckalew

  121. @Diversity Heretic
    Winston Churchill seems to have grasped the genetic diversity of India when he said, "India is no more a nation than is the equator."

    AnotherDad is one of the best commentators on the Unz site.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @BenKenobi, @AnotherDad, @MBlanc46

    You’re spot on about Another Dad.

  122. @Pincher Martin
    @Anon7


    Or at least mostly blind, like Art Tatum, the greatest jazz pianist of the Thirties and Forties, who had no sight in one eye, and only partial sight in his other eye.
     
    If you think that's impressive, get a load of this from a man who was born blind.

    https://youtu.be/wbAoeZZvntk

    Playing starts at 1:36

    Replies: @Anon7

    He’s amazing; I don’t know a lot of classical music, but I’ve seen other performers try this piece, and Tsujii has great precision and hand speed, a beautiful interpretation.

    However, Tatum wasn’t just playing by rote repetition and long practice; he made it up as he went along.

    Start at 8:55 in this interview between Andre Previn and Oscar Peterson. Previn tells a story about one of the greatest classical piano virtuosos of the twentieth century, Vladimir Horowitz, who was himself a big fan of Art Tatum…

  123. @Rob McX
    @Colin Wright

    More exciting news.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    Unbelievable. Sooner or later, Biden’s going to ground out or something — but as of now, he’s four for four.

    I don’t actually have anything against Janet Yellen — but isn’t this getting a little blatant?

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Colin Wright

    Only three Biden cabinet members (of 15) have been announced. All are Jewish:

    1) Treasury - Janet Yellen
    2) State - Anthony Blinken
    3) Homeland Security - Alejandro Mayorkas

    The Big Four cabinet positions are State, Treasury, Defense and Justice.

    Merrick Garland, also Jewish, is rumored to be under consideration for Attorney General. That would make three out of four top cabinet positions filled by Jews.

    Biden's Chief of Staff, Ron Klain, is also Jewish.

    I don't ever want to hear another goddamned thing about "diversity" from the Democrats in my entire life. Nor do I ever want to hear about how badly Jews are oppressed in this country.

    Replies: @Flip, @Colin Wright

    , @anon
    @Colin Wright

    I don’t actually have anything against Janet Yellen — but isn’t this getting a little blatant?

    What are you gonna do about it, goy?

    The "in your face" aspect of it is not exactly an accident.

  124. @George
    @Ali Choudhury

    Imran Khan's family WP page refers to maternal and paternal 'tribes'. So perhaps South Asians before Europeans and Americans began to think in terms of a broad category of race Europeans thought of themselves as something equivalent to tribes.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_of_Imran_Khan

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

    Pashtuns, as well as other ethnicities in Pakistan’s northwest areas are, in fact, made up of distinct tribes, in the sociological sense.

    https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/pakistan/pashtun-tribes.htm

    https://archive.org/details/glossaryoftribes03rose

  125. It took me many years to understand it, but “the exception that proves the rule” actually makes perfect sense. I explain it like this: if something is an exceptional case, there must necessarily be a general case from which it is exceptional. The fact that looking like Mark Wahlberg is exceptional for an Indian man rests on the fact that Indians do not, as a rule, look like Mark Wahlberg.

    On the other hand, I can see why people get confused.

    By the way, “South Asian” always struck me as a strange term. Look at a map! West Asian would surely be more appropriate, if anything. Personally, I preferred the old Britishism “Paki” as an all-encompassing term for the kinds of people we’re talking about here. If I recall correctly, “paki” meant something like “people from several different (specifically western Asian) countries”, hence “Pakistan”.

    On the other hand, “Paki” is now considered racist.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Oh, I don't know.

    "South Asia" seems accurate. The region is dead center, at the southern edge of the continent of Asia. Indian newspapers online seem to refer to what we call the Middle East as "West Asia." Now, that makes sense. Iraq, Syria, Arabia and all the rest are to the West of them, and at the Western edge of the continent. Or perhaps it would be more accurate to refer to the Middle East as Southwestern Asia, with the parts of Russia immediately east of the Urals being referred to, accurately, as "West Asia."

    https://i.imgur.com/Stlihbc.jpg

    Replies: @Servant of Gla'aki

  126. @reactionry
    @Harry Baldwin

    OT?

    I read a few columns by Lawrence Auster on account of his inclusion in John Derbyshire's list of worthy blogs of the Dark Enlightenment and recall LA's use of the term, "unprincipled exception."

    http://www.amnation.com/vfr/archives/005864.html

    A True Leftist (a kilt-wearing Leftist is not particularly exceptional) believes in the annihilation of freedom of speech (the individual (a property of the State i.e. The People) should be required to not only espouse, but also believe in, Leftist dogma) and civil liberties, but makes something of an unprincipled exception in sometimes advocating freedom of speech and civil liberties in the early phases of subverting a democracy.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Harry Baldwin

    Auster’s concept of the unprincipled exception referred to those concessions to reality that leftists make despite them being contrary to their professed principles. For example, sending their kids to a private school while being a staunch advocate of diverse public schools. Or using zoning and environmental regulations to maintain the quality of life in their wealthy, far-left community, as do Malibu residents. Or supporting strict gun control while employing armed bodyguards.

  127. @Anonymous
    @photondancer

    Yeah, ‘prove’ used to mean ‘test’ which is why we still say ‘prove it!’ as a challenge. Exceptions prove your rule isn’t a rule, it’s just a generalisation over a limited sample.

    The exception that proves the general rule.

    E before I after C is the exception that proves the generalization? Nah, it proves the rule.

    We must be fun at parties.

    Replies: @photondancer

    You just have to go to the right kind of parties. 😉

  128. @Gilbert Ratchet
    I had a college professor who got upset when we wrote "on the other hand" without saying "on the one hand" first. Just thought I'd say that.

    Replies: @Morton's toes

    If you were Shiva you could have on the other other hand and on the other other other hand! Not sure if having four hands would be worth it but those additional to-argument-chain-extensions might be handy.

    or something

  129. “On the other hand” and “by the way” are very common in Ancient Greek. “On the other hand” is the “men… de” construction (on the one hand… on the other hand) and “by the way” is very similar to using the particle “ge”. May I suggest using more resultant clauses like “as a result X” to improve your classical rhetoric.

  130. Anon[151] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright
    @Rob McX

    Unbelievable. Sooner or later, Biden's going to ground out or something -- but as of now, he's four for four.

    I don't actually have anything against Janet Yellen -- but isn't this getting a little blatant?

    Replies: @Anon, @anon

    Only three Biden cabinet members (of 15) have been announced. All are Jewish:

    1) Treasury – Janet Yellen
    2) State – Anthony Blinken
    3) Homeland Security – Alejandro Mayorkas

    The Big Four cabinet positions are State, Treasury, Defense and Justice.

    Merrick Garland, also Jewish, is rumored to be under consideration for Attorney General. That would make three out of four top cabinet positions filled by Jews.

    Biden’s Chief of Staff, Ron Klain, is also Jewish.

    I don’t ever want to hear another goddamned thing about “diversity” from the Democrats in my entire life. Nor do I ever want to hear about how badly Jews are oppressed in this country.

    • Replies: @Flip
    @Anon

    Rahm Emanuel will get something, and Harris and Rice are married to Jewish men.

    , @Colin Wright
    @Anon

    I was counting 'Biden''s Chief of Staff as well -- not cabinet posts, but appointments.

  131. @Mikeja
    I rented a car once for a new Indian employee. The service rep was Pakistani. There was a definite cooling of atmosphere and avoiding eye contact with each other. The Indian told me afterwards he recognized the rep as Pakistani. So they maybe diverse but not so diverse they can’t recognize ancient enemies

    Replies: @Charon, @Anon, @Muggles

    Ancient enemies that date back to 1947.

    India doesn’t allow for dual citizenship, so the nationalistic fervor will be replaced with racial affinity in a couple of years.

  132. @TelfoedJohn
    My favorite Indian DNA fact is that within villages, different castes are more genetically different that the difference between Northern and Southern Europeans. In other words, they have been in the same place geographically for thousands of years, but have never mixed. It's as if a few Italian families had moved to Norway, and had not mixed with the locals for thousands of years. Perhaps a better analogy is Jews and Gypsies in Europe.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Muggles

    If they think that about each other, just imagine what they think about people of profoundly different nationalities and cultures – when they, inevitably, start moving in on them.

  133. @PiltdownMan
    @Ali Choudhury


    Imran Khan looks like a Pathan, the ethnic group which represents 60% of Afghanistan and 15% of Pakistan.

     

    Meet this new lookalike of PM Imran Khan from KP

    https://www.geo.tv/latest/208954-meet-this-new-lookalike-of-pm-imran-khan-from-kp

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    I used to be able to tell them by how they bobble their heads right and left all the time. Until egotistical Americans started doing it.

  134. @Matt Buckalew
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Imagine being an astronaut groupie. Lindbergh matters because he was a pioneer. Guess what sweetie we’ve been to space.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Guess what sweetie we’ve been to space.

    Have you?

    QED

    • Replies: @Matt Buckalew
    @Buzz Mohawk

    No I was good at sports so I didn’t need to escape the earth in shame.

  135. @Anon
    @Anonymous

    That reasoning sounds like a Hindu version of pan-Islamism.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

    Yeah, I will start worrying about Hindu nationalism when they start crashing airplanes into buildings and making videos of chopping a person’s head off.

    Hindu nepotism in engineering and software employment just doesn’t rise to the same level of concern for me.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Inquiring Mind

    Yeah good point. Now you’ll excuse me while I have a nice juicy steak without being lynched, while I still can.

    That’s the mistake Western governments make all the time: allow “harmless” minorities in, then express shock when they develop sufficient strength to impose their backward beliefs on us. They did it with Moslems and are now doing it with Hindoos.

  136. @Colin Wright
    @Rob McX

    Unbelievable. Sooner or later, Biden's going to ground out or something -- but as of now, he's four for four.

    I don't actually have anything against Janet Yellen -- but isn't this getting a little blatant?

    Replies: @Anon, @anon

    I don’t actually have anything against Janet Yellen — but isn’t this getting a little blatant?

    What are you gonna do about it, goy?

    The “in your face” aspect of it is not exactly an accident.

  137. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Matt Buckalew


    Guess what sweetie we’ve been to space.
     
    Have you?

    QED

    Replies: @Matt Buckalew

    No I was good at sports so I didn’t need to escape the earth in shame.

  138. By the way, that reminds me that I use the phrase “on the other hand” rather a lot:

    Steve “Tevye” Sailer.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @ES

    And thus the next support appeal acquires a theme song.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CuqwB6mgpmY

  139. “Exception that proves the rule” is a poetic phrase that should be understood to mean “puzzling exception, the contemplation of which evokes a feeling that demonstrates the validity of a widely-held generalization.”

  140. @Charon
    @Mikeja

    Our brilliant future. Import all of the third world and then act surprised when our country ends up like the third world.

    Replies: @vhrm

    Our brilliant future. Import all of the third world and then act surprised when our country ends up like the third world.

    Eh, sort of. I live in an area with a lot of Chinese (old mainland cantonese, new mainland mandarin, HK and Taiwan … all off them) and Filipinos, some Koreans and some Japanese. There’s no real conflict.

    now, it’s true that that’s not a third world example… idk the details, but apparently the Mexicans and Central Americans do care a lot about their ethnic affiliations and are in constant gang wars in the prisons and on the streets. (though I think that’s temporary too since there send to be a lot of intermarriage in the non gang tiers which ARE much larger)

  141. @Dr. DoomNGloom
    @PiltdownMan

    The phrase is best understood as an idiomatic shorthand that does not use the most common modern definition of "prove". Instead it requires a more nuanced understanding of Popper 's solution to Hume's problem of induction.

    "Puts the test" is the best understanding of "proves". Grammarist claims it comes from a translation of Cicero


    exceptio probat regulam in casibus non exceptis
     
    , which means

    the exception confirms the rule in cases not excepted
     
    If one starts with a literal and severe definition of "prove", the phrase seems like the "only a true Scotsman" fallacy. Taken as "test the rule", it becomes more of an exercise in examining outliers, edge cases, and confounders.

    It is to say, if the rule usually works, there must be exceptional circumstances where it fails, so "what are they?" Of course this doesn't "prove" the rule in the most literal sense because of the problem of induction. One following Popper's approach would examine the outlier to determine if the general rule would hold up given this case.

    Replies: @Muggles

    And Dr. DoomNGloom’s discourse here is a textbook example of “mansplaining.”

    Well done sir, well done!

  142. @Mikeja
    I rented a car once for a new Indian employee. The service rep was Pakistani. There was a definite cooling of atmosphere and avoiding eye contact with each other. The Indian told me afterwards he recognized the rep as Pakistani. So they maybe diverse but not so diverse they can’t recognize ancient enemies

    Replies: @Charon, @Anon, @Muggles

    I rented a car once for a new Indian employee. The service rep was Pakistani. There was a definite cooling of atmosphere and avoiding eye contact with each other

    100 years ago, or 150 (before you could rent cars of course) you might see this same reaction if one were Irish, the other English.

    Now, not so much, but you still see this at times. I’ve seen Jews who bristled at a German accent. I’m sure there are others.

    What actual nationality, at some level, doesn’t hate his neighbors?

    Of course this thought will soon become a criminal Hate Crime. We’re supposed to be kinder but stand apart at least six feet with a mask on. Don’t think about touching me.

    The new reality for the Biden-Harris era, kinder but much scarier.

  143. @Anon
    @Colin Wright

    Only three Biden cabinet members (of 15) have been announced. All are Jewish:

    1) Treasury - Janet Yellen
    2) State - Anthony Blinken
    3) Homeland Security - Alejandro Mayorkas

    The Big Four cabinet positions are State, Treasury, Defense and Justice.

    Merrick Garland, also Jewish, is rumored to be under consideration for Attorney General. That would make three out of four top cabinet positions filled by Jews.

    Biden's Chief of Staff, Ron Klain, is also Jewish.

    I don't ever want to hear another goddamned thing about "diversity" from the Democrats in my entire life. Nor do I ever want to hear about how badly Jews are oppressed in this country.

    Replies: @Flip, @Colin Wright

    Rahm Emanuel will get something, and Harris and Rice are married to Jewish men.

  144. @TelfoedJohn
    My favorite Indian DNA fact is that within villages, different castes are more genetically different that the difference between Northern and Southern Europeans. In other words, they have been in the same place geographically for thousands of years, but have never mixed. It's as if a few Italian families had moved to Norway, and had not mixed with the locals for thousands of years. Perhaps a better analogy is Jews and Gypsies in Europe.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Muggles

    My favorite Indian DNA fact is that within villages, different castes are more genetically different that the difference between Northern and Southern Europeans

    Considering the size of most villages, you have to think that is bad for genetics (i.e. inbreeding.) With several castes in a small place, that limits things even more.

    Probably many cousin marriages, which are very common in rural areas anyway. Add castes to that (also, despite religious differences, common in Pakistan) and that’ has to both lower IQ overall and lead to other heredity problems.

    The upper castes go to a lot of trouble to arrange marriages between families, usually distant (relatively speaking). That would mitigate inbreeding. But the lower castes couldn’t usually afford that.

    Might explain why many rural Indians still resist using indoor toilets.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Muggles


    Considering the size of most villages, you have to think that is bad for genetics (i.e. inbreeding.) With several castes in a small place, that limits things even more.
     
    Not necessarily. Within caste marriages aren't limited to being within the village.
  145. Micah Curtis is a game and tech journalist from the US. Aside from writing for RT, he hosts the podcast Micah and The Hatman, and is an independent comic book writer.

    When I read an author’s bionote like this, I know whatever he has written will be a digestive system end product. (And any exception proves the rule.) How can you not laugh till the tears flow at a superannuated teenager who calls himself a game journalist and an independent comic book writer?

    To the sensible person, there can be an agreement that George Floyd did not have to die. However, comparing what happened to him to the horrors of Bergen-Belsen or Auschwitz is beyond absurd. The absurdity is why they do it. …

    In debate or at any other point, the best way to address a Kafka trap is to point out the absurdity of its existence. In this scenario, it is patently absurd to link anything George Floyd-related to the Holocaust …

    Micah, this might be hard for an independent comic book writer, but try to learn a new word every day. After a year or two, you might have an alternative to “absurd.”

    The responses have been nothing but extreme, with some trying to focus too much on the character of Floyd and not enough on his rights, and others trying to use him as a reason to abolish police forces.

    On the one hand …

  146. @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    It took me many years to understand it, but "the exception that proves the rule" actually makes perfect sense. I explain it like this: if something is an exceptional case, there must necessarily be a general case from which it is exceptional. The fact that looking like Mark Wahlberg is exceptional for an Indian man rests on the fact that Indians do not, as a rule, look like Mark Wahlberg.

    On the other hand, I can see why people get confused.

    By the way, "South Asian" always struck me as a strange term. Look at a map! West Asian would surely be more appropriate, if anything. Personally, I preferred the old Britishism "Paki" as an all-encompassing term for the kinds of people we're talking about here. If I recall correctly, "paki" meant something like "people from several different (specifically western Asian) countries", hence "Pakistan".

    On the other hand, "Paki" is now considered racist.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

    Oh, I don’t know.

    “South Asia” seems accurate. The region is dead center, at the southern edge of the continent of Asia. Indian newspapers online seem to refer to what we call the Middle East as “West Asia.” Now, that makes sense. Iraq, Syria, Arabia and all the rest are to the West of them, and at the Western edge of the continent. Or perhaps it would be more accurate to refer to the Middle East as Southwestern Asia, with the parts of Russia immediately east of the Urals being referred to, accurately, as “West Asia.”

    • Replies: @Servant of Gla'aki
    @PiltdownMan

    Mongolia, Turkestan, Tibet, and arguably Afghanistan are ideally part of Central Asia. But nobody will publish a map that subdivides the PRC anymore....

  147. @Muggles
    @TelfoedJohn


    My favorite Indian DNA fact is that within villages, different castes are more genetically different that the difference between Northern and Southern Europeans
     
    Considering the size of most villages, you have to think that is bad for genetics (i.e. inbreeding.) With several castes in a small place, that limits things even more.

    Probably many cousin marriages, which are very common in rural areas anyway. Add castes to that (also, despite religious differences, common in Pakistan) and that' has to both lower IQ overall and lead to other heredity problems.

    The upper castes go to a lot of trouble to arrange marriages between families, usually distant (relatively speaking). That would mitigate inbreeding. But the lower castes couldn't usually afford that.

    Might explain why many rural Indians still resist using indoor toilets.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

    Considering the size of most villages, you have to think that is bad for genetics (i.e. inbreeding.) With several castes in a small place, that limits things even more.

    Not necessarily. Within caste marriages aren’t limited to being within the village.

  148. Anon[245] • Disclaimer says:
    @Inquiring Mind
    @Anon

    Yeah, I will start worrying about Hindu nationalism when they start crashing airplanes into buildings and making videos of chopping a person's head off.

    Hindu nepotism in engineering and software employment just doesn't rise to the same level of concern for me.

    Replies: @Anon

    Yeah good point. Now you’ll excuse me while I have a nice juicy steak without being lynched, while I still can.

    That’s the mistake Western governments make all the time: allow “harmless” minorities in, then express shock when they develop sufficient strength to impose their backward beliefs on us. They did it with Moslems and are now doing it with Hindoos.

  149. @Hypnotoad666
    There is the old joke about a business man sick of getting equivocating legal advice that "on the one hand. . . ," but "on the other hand . . ." The business man declares: "what I need is a one-armed lawyer."

    I also once had an English teacher tell me it was improper to say "on the other hand," unless you had already introduced the prior point with "on the one hand . . ."

    I had to look up "on the gripping hand" but apparently it's basically a way of saying "on the third hand." It comes from a science fiction story involving three-armed aliens. According to Urban Dictionary, it's an "Expression common among sci fi geeks and computer people."

    From a science fiction novel entitled "The Mote In God's Eye" where an intelligent alien race has evolved with two minor arms (with fine fingers for work) on their right and one larger (gripping) arm with three strong fingers on their left.
     
    Once I understand it, I like it as an expression. But I don't see it catching on when you first have to explain about the three-armed aliens with different types of arms.

    Replies: @Servant of Gla'aki

    From a science fiction novel entitled “The Mote In God’s Eye” where an intelligent alien race has evolved with two minor arms (with fine fingers for work) on their right and one larger (gripping) arm with three strong fingers on their left.

    Donald Trump = Crazy Eddy

  150. @PiltdownMan
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Oh, I don't know.

    "South Asia" seems accurate. The region is dead center, at the southern edge of the continent of Asia. Indian newspapers online seem to refer to what we call the Middle East as "West Asia." Now, that makes sense. Iraq, Syria, Arabia and all the rest are to the West of them, and at the Western edge of the continent. Or perhaps it would be more accurate to refer to the Middle East as Southwestern Asia, with the parts of Russia immediately east of the Urals being referred to, accurately, as "West Asia."

    https://i.imgur.com/Stlihbc.jpg

    Replies: @Servant of Gla'aki

    Mongolia, Turkestan, Tibet, and arguably Afghanistan are ideally part of Central Asia. But nobody will publish a map that subdivides the PRC anymore….

  151. @Anon
    @Colin Wright

    Only three Biden cabinet members (of 15) have been announced. All are Jewish:

    1) Treasury - Janet Yellen
    2) State - Anthony Blinken
    3) Homeland Security - Alejandro Mayorkas

    The Big Four cabinet positions are State, Treasury, Defense and Justice.

    Merrick Garland, also Jewish, is rumored to be under consideration for Attorney General. That would make three out of four top cabinet positions filled by Jews.

    Biden's Chief of Staff, Ron Klain, is also Jewish.

    I don't ever want to hear another goddamned thing about "diversity" from the Democrats in my entire life. Nor do I ever want to hear about how badly Jews are oppressed in this country.

    Replies: @Flip, @Colin Wright

    I was counting ‘Biden”s Chief of Staff as well — not cabinet posts, but appointments.

  152. @jb
    @Flemur


    Click through the returned pages until there are no more, and you get:
    “steve sailer” “on the other hand”: About 100,000 results -> Page 12 of about 116 results
     
    When I click on "repeat the search with the omitted results included" I get 333 results. Still nowhere near 100,000.

    This isn't specific to Steve. I've noticed it with a lot of searches, and I don't have any clear idea what's going on.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    I stopped using “basically” in high school because I noticed it was the 90s equivalent to the 80s filler word “like.” Then I saw Steve using it properly, and I was impressed (but still dislike it).

  153. @ES

    By the way, that reminds me that I use the phrase “on the other hand” rather a lot:

     

    Steve "Tevye" Sailer.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    And thus the next support appeal acquires a theme song.

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