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Oh, No, Bill Gates Has Bought 0.03% of All the Farmland in the U.S.
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It was recently disclosed that former World’s Richest Man Bill Gates now owns 242,000 acres of U.S. farmland, which is a lot.

It’s the equivalent of 378 square miles, or of a 19 mile by 20 mile expanse. That’s a big place.

On the other hand, it is a little under half of the size of the average one of the 105 counties in Kansas. Overall, that’s about 0.03% of all the farmland in the US.

 
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  1. No, even the biggest Billionaire is not a worry here. There’s a big difference between 50 billion and numbers in the multiple trillions. I’m moving this over from that other thread:

    At an average of ~ $8,000/acre for the good farmland and $2,000 to $4,000/acre for the rest, divided 1/3 to 2/3, I came up with $4 Trillion in value for the entire “Fruited Plain” of America. I checked later and the web told me $2.7 Trillion.

    Does anyone think the Chinese won’t come in looting the place, after the financial SHTF, same way the big NY finance guys looted Russia in the 1990s? As Peak Stupidity discussed in “Will America be looted by China? – Part 4: The Fruited Plain”, even the high number is just ONE DECADE of US trade deficits with China. Is it all worth it for that cheap Chinese crap from Wal-Mart?

    Another question. Can you look at numbers like the total value of American farmland, housing, or corporate assets, and still say the US Gov’t’s spending an extra $1.9 Trillion here or there is not a problem?

    Don’t worry about the Bill Gateses. Look in a different direction for whom you should worry about.

    • Replies: @peterike
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Does anyone think the Chinese won’t come in looting the place, after the financial SHTF, same way the big NY finance guys looted Russia in the 1990s?
     
    First, that would be (((NY finance guys))) who looted Russia, and took their "Russian" ethnic cohorts along for the ride, asset striping the entire nation. At least until Putin clawed some of it back for the Russian people. Oh, why does the media hate Russia so much? See the previous sentence.

    And indeed, China might well come in and start buying up more farmland than they already have, and they will be amply aided by the same (((NY finance guys))) that looted Russia. These people are, as the saying goes, "rootless" after all, so who cares if the Chinese buy up America's roots? And the great Jewish/Asian ruling class alliance is only just getting started.
    , @The Alarmist
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It’s not so much that it is Gates, but it is a signal of more to come. I wonder if there’s a farmland fund prospectus in the WEF welcome pack.

    , @Lot
    @Achmed E. Newman

    High net worth people and university endowments have been bulk buying timber and farmland for at least 20 years.

    It hasn’t been a losing investment, but it has mostly underperformed.

    Chinese funds going to America are mostly retail level Chinese wealthy wanting an escape hatch in a more stable nation. Chinese ADR stock and crypto scams meanwhile partly reverse the flow from middle class Americans to Chinese plugged in with the Party enough they can rob foreigners with impunity.

    Replies: @3g4me

    , @JimDandy
    @Achmed E. Newman

    This direction?

    https://nationalfile.com/revealed-anti-white-pro-blm-social-media-posts-of-black-woman-charged-in-white-childs-death-after-jan-6-capitol-protest/

  2. It would be fun to watch that nerd get kicked by a mule.

    • Agree: Liza
    • Replies: @Simon Tugmutton
    @Anon

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iK6SS8CXYZo

  3. On the other hand, it is a little under half of the size of the average county in Kansas. Overall, that’s about 0.03% of all the farmland in the US.

    Does he not also have a fair bit down Patagonia way?

    Buy land, they’re not making any more of it.

  4. So what is he growing on his farmland?

    • LOL: Sean
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Jonathan Mason

    The real problem with growing crops is all of the bugs you have to deal with.

    But Bill Gates is used to producing things with lots of bugs, so he should be well prepared.

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Jonathan Mason

    "So what is he growing on his farmland?"

    Pig-men. Goat-boys. Milking cows with your mother's face. Don't worry, says Steves 2 and 7: It's "silly" to squander precious space on sweater-boy's Dr. Moreau fantasy when blacks are shooting blacks in record numbers[!]. What is needed is yet another 2 and 7 graph on murderous blacks because the current black violence spike is anomalous and without precedent. So it must be analyzed down to its granular level. Someone should notify Desert Inn Steve that Steves 2 and 7's obsession with a historic norm is embarrassing the entire Steve franchise.

    , @Adam Smith
    @Jonathan Mason

    He can grow pollinators under CRP.

    , @paranoid goy
    @Jonathan Mason

    Nobody is showing me any maps, but here's my theory: Billy da Patch might be growing GMOs or hybrid crops (at a loss, even?) in the middle of traditional farming communities, and spreading his poison pollen?
    MonSatano has successfully sued private farmers for (unwittingly) reusing their own seed that was contaminated by GMO and hybrid frankencrops. Not many people know that hybrid organisms are usually sterile, which would destroy a traditional farmer's business model of selecting and replanting his own seeds year after year.
    Extrapolated, is this the real plan behind mRNA "vaccines"? Polluting your cells with his (patented) proteins, even though manufactured by your own body, gives him legal ownership of your genome, according to the "independent judiciary" anyway.
    All hail Baal Gates, Chief Evangelist of GMO, Holy Profit of Population Reduction, may his abortion temples supply the kakastocracy with fresh baby blood and spare body parts forever!

    Replies: @Jack D

  5. In the grand scheme of things, that’s not that much farmland.

    But it’s still more than enough to secretly grow a mutant race of mole children for the cabal

    Disapprove

  6. 0.03% = 1/3,333

    Good thing Americans only number in the hundreds of thousands. There’s also only three or four other billionaires around, so that’s not a big deal, it’s not like they could do the same, push it a little more after each recession, and end up owning most of the available farmland. I think.

  7. So, whats he up to? Is it just an investment?

    Shortly after the 2008 crash, I thought I read news stories that farm land had skyrocketed in value. So is he just parking cash somewhere knowing that the post covid depression will increase its value?

    Or is it an environmental/conservation maneuver like Ted Turner did decades ago?

  8. When I first read about this, some little time ago, I thought, “oh shit, another oligarch with near-infinite power.” Then I stopped and thought from my own experience:

    One family I have known for forty years owns nearly a square mile of farmland in New York State. That is just a typical, family farm. The property was given to their ancestor as reward for his service in the American Revolution. There is a bronze plaque in front of the barn; it was put there over a century ago.

    Another family I know owns 400 acres in the Rocky Mountains, where I built my log cabin and lived for seven months before college. That is roughly 3/4 of a square mile (which in America is 640 acres, BTW.)

    Bill Gates owns approximately 378 times what either one of my old friends owns … Wait a minute … more than, but of the same magnitude, without doing the math.

    Hey, let’s do the arithmetic: Two of my old friends own a total of approximately 1000 acres. Bill owns 242,000. Okay, so Bill, one of the richest assholes on the planet owns 242 times what 2 friends of mine own.

    I say big, fucking deal. It sounds like a lot by itself, but viewed as part of a very large, rich country where my friends are nothing special, Bill’s land is nothing special either. I’m surprised somebody else doesn’t own more.

    In fact, Steve, maybe you should look into corporate ownership of land. How many acres do agricultural companies own in the US? I bet some own a hell of a lot more, and a much, much greater share of America’s farmland. How much of that, BTW, changed hands from old, American farm families to corporations?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Correction: 400 acres, the approximate size of that land, is roughly, or nearly, 2/3 of a square mile, not 3/4, for anybody who cares. Trust me, if you are living on it, it seems big either way.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    , @AndrewR
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Hope Bill Gates sees this

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Buzz Mohawk

    "Steve, maybe you should look into corporate ownership of land."

    But blacks.

    , @kaganovitch
    @Buzz Mohawk

    In fact, Steve, maybe you should look into corporate ownership of land. How many acres do agricultural companies own in the US? I bet some own a hell of a lot more, and a much, much greater share of America’s farmland. How much of that, BTW, changed hands from old, American farm families to corporations?

    J.R.Simplot, for one, owns almost twice Gates holdings with 422,000 acres. I don't think all of that is farmland though. Stewart Resnick , a nice Jewish boy from New Jersey, owns around 200.000 acres
    ( he is the owner of POM juices, Fiji water and a bunch of other SWPL brands.) If you are talking about land in general, Weyerhauser owns around 12,000,000 acres of timberland. Ted Turner and John Malone own around 2,000,000 acres each of ranch land fwiw.

    , @anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Farmland is a fine diversification thing for Bill. But agriculture is a bad business. It is capital intensive and its product is a commodity. Check the price of corn and beans. They have been in mid single digits my entire life.

    If a farmer owns his land, then he could hang on or even thrive forever. Which is one reason for the low commodity prices.

    But farming, in general, is a "bad" business. Bad being capital intensive and selling into commodity markets.

    Replies: @128, @The Alarmist

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Not agreeing or disagreeing with anyone, but just to clarify "farmland" discussions, there are varying definitions of "farmland" and even within definitions, widely varying quality and yields. "Land" ≠ "rangeland" ≠ "farmland". Within "farmland", an acre of marginal northern hillside ≠ an acre warm southern bottomland. West of the 98th meridian, most land needs irrigation and water is increasingly scarce, so the productivity of most Western land depends more on the local water rights than on the quality of the land itself. (In the most extreme cases—COUGHImperial ValleyCOUGH—the farming is borderline hydroponic: soil nearly irrelevant.) And most Western irrigation is subsidized, often in opaque and byzantine ways, so resultant land prices are less market prices than reflections of local subsidy arrangements. (Oh and tax shelters, so tax law plays in too! And other arcana of corporate and trust law!)

    tl;dr: Number of acres tells very little about the productivity of land holdings. It tells you even less about such productivity in a dollar-collapse scenario where weird subsidies and price guarantees stop mattering.

    Bill Gates may or may not be aware of this.

  9. Thank you!

    I have been reading the “Sky is falling meme” about Gates’ farm repeatedly and wondered?

    Your quantitative mind put the issue to rest.

  10. Ben Cartwright — Bill Gates
    Adam Cartwright — Gordon Letwin (has his own ranch, now)
    “Hoss” — Steve Balmer (who else?)
    “Little Joe” — Paul Allen (associates with angels)

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
  11. Billionaires frequently own tropical desert islands.

    Gates is more of a family guy. Maybe he goes full Rousseau with all the “natural” stuff.

  12. @Buzz Mohawk
    When I first read about this, some little time ago, I thought, "oh shit, another oligarch with near-infinite power." Then I stopped and thought from my own experience:

    One family I have known for forty years owns nearly a square mile of farmland in New York State. That is just a typical, family farm. The property was given to their ancestor as reward for his service in the American Revolution. There is a bronze plaque in front of the barn; it was put there over a century ago.

    Another family I know owns 400 acres in the Rocky Mountains, where I built my log cabin and lived for seven months before college. That is roughly 3/4 of a square mile (which in America is 640 acres, BTW.)

    Bill Gates owns approximately 378 times what either one of my old friends owns ... Wait a minute ... more than, but of the same magnitude, without doing the math.

    Hey, let's do the arithmetic: Two of my old friends own a total of approximately 1000 acres. Bill owns 242,000. Okay, so Bill, one of the richest assholes on the planet owns 242 times what 2 friends of mine own.

    I say big, fucking deal. It sounds like a lot by itself, but viewed as part of a very large, rich country where my friends are nothing special, Bill's land is nothing special either. I'm surprised somebody else doesn't own more.

    In fact, Steve, maybe you should look into corporate ownership of land. How many acres do agricultural companies own in the US? I bet some own a hell of a lot more, and a much, much greater share of America's farmland. How much of that, BTW, changed hands from old, American farm families to corporations?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @AndrewR, @SunBakedSuburb, @kaganovitch, @anon, @Almost Missouri

    Correction: 400 acres, the approximate size of that land, is roughly, or nearly, 2/3 of a square mile, not 3/4, for anybody who cares. Trust me, if you are living on it, it seems big either way.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Depending on how the plot is shaped, 400 acres doesn’t seem very big when you are trying to take off or land a Beech Duchess on it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Buzz Mohawk

  13. From USA Today in 2019:
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2019/11/25/these-people-own-the-most-land-in-america/40649951/

    To make the top 50 list you had to own at least 260,000 acres.

  14. Corn production is highly subsidized. Maybe there will be an increased ethanol mandate in fuel.

    Bill Gates Understands the Importance of Biofuel
    https://gevo.com/education/bill-gates-understands-the-importance-of-biofuel/

  15. @Buzz Mohawk
    When I first read about this, some little time ago, I thought, "oh shit, another oligarch with near-infinite power." Then I stopped and thought from my own experience:

    One family I have known for forty years owns nearly a square mile of farmland in New York State. That is just a typical, family farm. The property was given to their ancestor as reward for his service in the American Revolution. There is a bronze plaque in front of the barn; it was put there over a century ago.

    Another family I know owns 400 acres in the Rocky Mountains, where I built my log cabin and lived for seven months before college. That is roughly 3/4 of a square mile (which in America is 640 acres, BTW.)

    Bill Gates owns approximately 378 times what either one of my old friends owns ... Wait a minute ... more than, but of the same magnitude, without doing the math.

    Hey, let's do the arithmetic: Two of my old friends own a total of approximately 1000 acres. Bill owns 242,000. Okay, so Bill, one of the richest assholes on the planet owns 242 times what 2 friends of mine own.

    I say big, fucking deal. It sounds like a lot by itself, but viewed as part of a very large, rich country where my friends are nothing special, Bill's land is nothing special either. I'm surprised somebody else doesn't own more.

    In fact, Steve, maybe you should look into corporate ownership of land. How many acres do agricultural companies own in the US? I bet some own a hell of a lot more, and a much, much greater share of America's farmland. How much of that, BTW, changed hands from old, American farm families to corporations?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @AndrewR, @SunBakedSuburb, @kaganovitch, @anon, @Almost Missouri

    Hope Bill Gates sees this

  16. The interesting thing is not such much THAT Gates bought the farmland, but WHY he bought it. Has he said?

    I’m hoping that Bill Gates does, indeed, buy the farm in the very near future.

    • Troll: Inquiring Mind
  17. Anon[266] • Disclaimer says:

    Japan has a bizarre system to measure area. Although the metric system is in use, in practice area measurements use the following three units:

    1. The tatami mat (roughly 1.6 square meters)

    2. Tokyo Dome (area taken up by this baseball stadium)

    3. Yamanote Line (area enclosed by this loop train route in Tokyo)

    I recommend the “Bill Gates” as an American measurement of area. Let’s make it happen.

  18. I am copying and pasting here part of what I just posted above, because I think it deserves attention, and because I think it would be revealing to readers if Steve would do the statistical research. He is eminently qualified to do so, and I would love to read his results.

    In fact, Steve, maybe you should look into corporate ownership of land. How many acres do agricultural companies own in the US? I bet some own a hell of a lot more, and a much, much greater share of America’s farmland. How much of that, BTW, changed hands from old, American farm families to corporations?

    For a long time now, American farmland has been changing hands from truly private owners, families like the ones I know, to faceless corporations with Washington D.C. lobbyists and Congressmen at their disposal.

    Frankly, if Bill and Melinda Gates want to privately own farmland, I say more power to them. They are, after all, a family.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    @Buzz Mohawk


    For a long time now, American farmland has been changing hands from truly private owners, families like the ones I know, to faceless corporations with Washington D.C. lobbyists and Congressmen at their disposal.
     
    But that's part of technological advancement: the more value capital investment gets you, the more centralized it will be. Agricultural isn't really all that high margin and it's high investment; I have friends with inherited farms and it's a huge amount of effort - advanced degree, crop dusters, flight licenses, labor hiring, etc.

    Ultimately, most of them sell out and take jobs in better paid and more high status fields. Low-margin, high effort is pretty discouraging besides the romantic aspects.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @dearieme, @Desiderius

    , @Redneck farmer
    @Buzz Mohawk

    One of the states passed an anti-corporate farming law. An ag law professor observed that one of the largest hog companies was legally a family farm under the laws definition.

  19. @Achmed E. Newman
    No, even the biggest Billionaire is not a worry here. There's a big difference between 50 billion and numbers in the multiple trillions. I'm moving this over from that other thread:

    At an average of ~ $8,000/acre for the good farmland and $2,000 to $4,000/acre for the rest, divided 1/3 to 2/3, I came up with $4 Trillion in value for the entire “Fruited Plain” of America. I checked later and the web told me $2.7 Trillion.

    Does anyone think the Chinese won’t come in looting the place, after the financial SHTF, same way the big NY finance guys looted Russia in the 1990s? As Peak Stupidity discussed in “Will America be looted by China? – Part 4: The Fruited Plain”, even the high number is just ONE DECADE of US trade deficits with China. Is it all worth it for that cheap Chinese crap from Wal-Mart?

    Another question. Can you look at numbers like the total value of American farmland, housing, or corporate assets, and still say the US Gov’t’s spending an extra $1.9 Trillion here or there is not a problem?

    Don't worry about the Bill Gateses. Look in a different direction for whom you should worry about.

    Replies: @peterike, @The Alarmist, @Lot, @JimDandy

    Does anyone think the Chinese won’t come in looting the place, after the financial SHTF, same way the big NY finance guys looted Russia in the 1990s?

    First, that would be (((NY finance guys))) who looted Russia, and took their “Russian” ethnic cohorts along for the ride, asset striping the entire nation. At least until Putin clawed some of it back for the Russian people. Oh, why does the media hate Russia so much? See the previous sentence.

    And indeed, China might well come in and start buying up more farmland than they already have, and they will be amply aided by the same (((NY finance guys))) that looted Russia. These people are, as the saying goes, “rootless” after all, so who cares if the Chinese buy up America’s roots? And the great Jewish/Asian ruling class alliance is only just getting started.

    • Agree: 3g4me
  20. 378 square miles … just big enough for a vast underground fortress and a phalanx of nuclear silos aimed at world capitols. Assign some evil compatriots to play innocent-looking “farmers” up on the surface

  21. It doesn’t take that much farmland to feed Americans because of technology. We are a big net exporter of food I believe. Americans won’t be starving. FYI, a lot of land is categorized as farmland only for tax reasons.

    America has something like $120 trillion in net assets. That is, $250 trillion in assets minus $130 trillion in debt. We have a long way to go before we collapse. Sure, we could have stock market crashes, even a depression, but the federal government will never lose what they call ‘state capacity’: the ability to enforce law, wield a military and collect taxes. Not in our lifetimes anyway.

    We should give up our dream of a Big Crash that tears it all down and saves the day.

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @RichardTaylor

    You’re not taking into account who’s being put in charge. Abundance of food is one thing, transporting it throughout a rapidly deteriorating infrastructure is something else. Look who is in charge of places like Baltimore and Detroit, and now Chicago. These places are falling apart. Roads and bridges require intelligent people to maintain them. Power grids, water treatment, and waste removal as well.

    Give a negro sports baller 50 million dollars and he’ll be broke by age 30. Now give him a city.

    Replies: @RichardTaylor

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @RichardTaylor


    We have a long way to go before we collapse.
     
    Wait, what happened to "White Genocide"?

    Sure, we could have stock market crashes, even a depression, but the federal government will never lose what they call ‘state capacity’: the ability to enforce law, wield a military and collect taxes.
     
    With the gorillas in charge?
  22. I wonder if he owns as much farmland as John Mellencamp, who is the largest farmland owner in Indiana.

    Such being America’s tax laws, a great deal of farmland is owned by people who wouldn’t know triticale from millet.

    Maybe we need a rule – you can’t own farmland if you can’t milk a cow. (An actual cow, obviously. Not a cash cow.)

  23. New Jersey had a few embarrassing high-profile cases where celebrity landowners — e.g. Bon Jovi — were getting tax breaks generally intended for real farmers. I don’t suppose Gates needs this kind of deduction.

  24. Well, based on what we know about Bill Gates, I’m sure he has nothing but the best intentions in mind for us rubes.

  25. @Buzz Mohawk
    I am copying and pasting here part of what I just posted above, because I think it deserves attention, and because I think it would be revealing to readers if Steve would do the statistical research. He is eminently qualified to do so, and I would love to read his results.

    In fact, Steve, maybe you should look into corporate ownership of land. How many acres do agricultural companies own in the US? I bet some own a hell of a lot more, and a much, much greater share of America’s farmland. How much of that, BTW, changed hands from old, American farm families to corporations?
     
    For a long time now, American farmland has been changing hands from truly private owners, families like the ones I know, to faceless corporations with Washington D.C. lobbyists and Congressmen at their disposal.

    Frankly, if Bill and Melinda Gates want to privately own farmland, I say more power to them. They are, after all, a family.

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh, @Redneck farmer

    For a long time now, American farmland has been changing hands from truly private owners, families like the ones I know, to faceless corporations with Washington D.C. lobbyists and Congressmen at their disposal.

    But that’s part of technological advancement: the more value capital investment gets you, the more centralized it will be. Agricultural isn’t really all that high margin and it’s high investment; I have friends with inherited farms and it’s a huge amount of effort – advanced degree, crop dusters, flight licenses, labor hiring, etc.

    Ultimately, most of them sell out and take jobs in better paid and more high status fields. Low-margin, high effort is pretty discouraging besides the romantic aspects.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Daniel Chieh

    Yeah, that's all that matters. Thanks, Dan.

    , @dearieme
    @Daniel Chieh

    take jobs in better paid and more high status fields.

    I thought for a moment you'd made a joke but I decided you hadn't.

    , @Desiderius
    @Daniel Chieh

    Farming is a high status field.

  26. But the size of his landholdings will potentially allow him to develop farming and business models historically not good for farmers and may lead to him having an outsized voice on agricultural policy.

    And what man has been better at lobbying the US government for the last 30 years?

    • Agree: Mr. Anon
    • Replies: @SimpleSong
    @Altai

    Well... to some extent the horse has already left the barn. Big agribusiness (Monsanto, John Deere) is absolutely terrible for small to medium scale famers for a variety of reasons.

    We are rapidly heading towards a dichotomy of megafarms and hobby farms with nothing in between. On the outskirts of big cities you'll see lots of 20 acre operations owned by retired doctors, then in the country 2000+ acre operations growing one, or possibly two crops, staffed by one white guy and four mexicans, and completely empty small towns.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @stillCARealist

  27. @Daniel Chieh
    @Buzz Mohawk


    For a long time now, American farmland has been changing hands from truly private owners, families like the ones I know, to faceless corporations with Washington D.C. lobbyists and Congressmen at their disposal.
     
    But that's part of technological advancement: the more value capital investment gets you, the more centralized it will be. Agricultural isn't really all that high margin and it's high investment; I have friends with inherited farms and it's a huge amount of effort - advanced degree, crop dusters, flight licenses, labor hiring, etc.

    Ultimately, most of them sell out and take jobs in better paid and more high status fields. Low-margin, high effort is pretty discouraging besides the romantic aspects.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @dearieme, @Desiderius

    Yeah, that’s all that matters. Thanks, Dan.

  28. 1. John Malone – 2.2 million acres
    2. Ted Turner – 2.0 million acres
    3. Emmerson family – 2.0 million acres
    4. Reed family – 1.7 million acres
    5. Stan Kroenke – 1.4 million acres

    50. Hadley family – 260,000 acres

    https://www.usatoday.com/money/

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @utu

    Yeah, I knew Ted Turner's holding make Gates look like a piker, from Wiki...

    Turner owns 15 ranches in Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and South Dakota. Totaling 1,910,585 acres, his land-holdings across America make Turner one of the largest individual landowners in North America (by acreage). ... Turner's biggest ranch is Vermejo Park Ranch in New Mexico. At 920 square miles, it is the largest privately owned, contiguous tract of land in the United States.

  29. https://landreport.com/americas-100-largest-landowners/

    49th on the list and Bezos has him by a long way at 25th. I guess Elon is holding out to get his on Mars.

  30. Kinda how 94.1% sounds like a BIG number and hey it’s pretty much the same number as 99.98%. Heck, 94.1 might be LARGER than 99.98 if you squint hard enough.

    Sailer can suddenly re-understand percentiles when it’s convenient.

    Verdict: shill.

  31. People that live or recreate in the country (hunting, etc) generally love big landowners. Keeps things sparse. The 1-10 acre plots are the worst.

  32. @Jonathan Mason
    So what is he growing on his farmland?

    Replies: @Wilkey, @SunBakedSuburb, @Adam Smith, @paranoid goy

    The real problem with growing crops is all of the bugs you have to deal with.

    But Bill Gates is used to producing things with lots of bugs, so he should be well prepared.

  33. Oh No, Bill Gates Has Bought 0.03% of All the Farmland in the U.S.

    He has the means to buy more. A lot of rich people are buying up land – people who in the past would have diversified their portfolios by buying up stocks. What does that say about their faith in “The Economy” (hallowed be its name).

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Mr. Anon


    He has the means to buy more. A lot of rich people are buying up land – people who in the past would have diversified their portfolios by buying up stocks.
     
    This is one of the real problems with wealth and income disparity. Whenever concerns about income disparity come up most establishment, Chamber of Commerce Republicans pooh-pooh it as not mattering, focusing more on the increasing number of gadgets and cheap Chinese crap that Americans can now afford to buy.

    But there are some pretty important things you can never create more of, and chief among those is land. Combine the rapidly increasing wealth gap with mass immigration and decent land could quickly become unaffordable for many or even most Americans.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  34. @Buzz Mohawk
    I am copying and pasting here part of what I just posted above, because I think it deserves attention, and because I think it would be revealing to readers if Steve would do the statistical research. He is eminently qualified to do so, and I would love to read his results.

    In fact, Steve, maybe you should look into corporate ownership of land. How many acres do agricultural companies own in the US? I bet some own a hell of a lot more, and a much, much greater share of America’s farmland. How much of that, BTW, changed hands from old, American farm families to corporations?
     
    For a long time now, American farmland has been changing hands from truly private owners, families like the ones I know, to faceless corporations with Washington D.C. lobbyists and Congressmen at their disposal.

    Frankly, if Bill and Melinda Gates want to privately own farmland, I say more power to them. They are, after all, a family.

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh, @Redneck farmer

    One of the states passed an anti-corporate farming law. An ag law professor observed that one of the largest hog companies was legally a family farm under the laws definition.

  35. The federal government owns 28% of the land. John Malone is number one on this list of the 100 largest private land owners in the United States. Ted Turner is number 4. As these holdings get passed down to subsequent generations, I would expect them to get more and more in line with globohomo, much like the Walton heirs and the Rockefellers. Stan Kronke at number 5 is married to a Walton.

    https://landreport.com/americas-100-largest-landowners/

  36. It’s a hedge against inflation and an overpriced stock market.

  37. @Jonathan Mason
    So what is he growing on his farmland?

    Replies: @Wilkey, @SunBakedSuburb, @Adam Smith, @paranoid goy

    “So what is he growing on his farmland?”

    Pig-men. Goat-boys. Milking cows with your mother’s face. Don’t worry, says Steves 2 and 7: It’s “silly” to squander precious space on sweater-boy’s Dr. Moreau fantasy when blacks are shooting blacks in record numbers[!]. What is needed is yet another 2 and 7 graph on murderous blacks because the current black violence spike is anomalous and without precedent. So it must be analyzed down to its granular level. Someone should notify Desert Inn Steve that Steves 2 and 7’s obsession with a historic norm is embarrassing the entire Steve franchise.

  38. @Buzz Mohawk
    When I first read about this, some little time ago, I thought, "oh shit, another oligarch with near-infinite power." Then I stopped and thought from my own experience:

    One family I have known for forty years owns nearly a square mile of farmland in New York State. That is just a typical, family farm. The property was given to their ancestor as reward for his service in the American Revolution. There is a bronze plaque in front of the barn; it was put there over a century ago.

    Another family I know owns 400 acres in the Rocky Mountains, where I built my log cabin and lived for seven months before college. That is roughly 3/4 of a square mile (which in America is 640 acres, BTW.)

    Bill Gates owns approximately 378 times what either one of my old friends owns ... Wait a minute ... more than, but of the same magnitude, without doing the math.

    Hey, let's do the arithmetic: Two of my old friends own a total of approximately 1000 acres. Bill owns 242,000. Okay, so Bill, one of the richest assholes on the planet owns 242 times what 2 friends of mine own.

    I say big, fucking deal. It sounds like a lot by itself, but viewed as part of a very large, rich country where my friends are nothing special, Bill's land is nothing special either. I'm surprised somebody else doesn't own more.

    In fact, Steve, maybe you should look into corporate ownership of land. How many acres do agricultural companies own in the US? I bet some own a hell of a lot more, and a much, much greater share of America's farmland. How much of that, BTW, changed hands from old, American farm families to corporations?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @AndrewR, @SunBakedSuburb, @kaganovitch, @anon, @Almost Missouri

    “Steve, maybe you should look into corporate ownership of land.”

    But blacks.

  39. @Daniel Chieh
    @Buzz Mohawk


    For a long time now, American farmland has been changing hands from truly private owners, families like the ones I know, to faceless corporations with Washington D.C. lobbyists and Congressmen at their disposal.
     
    But that's part of technological advancement: the more value capital investment gets you, the more centralized it will be. Agricultural isn't really all that high margin and it's high investment; I have friends with inherited farms and it's a huge amount of effort - advanced degree, crop dusters, flight licenses, labor hiring, etc.

    Ultimately, most of them sell out and take jobs in better paid and more high status fields. Low-margin, high effort is pretty discouraging besides the romantic aspects.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @dearieme, @Desiderius

    take jobs in better paid and more high status fields.

    I thought for a moment you’d made a joke but I decided you hadn’t.

  40. OT: Okay, here is yet another consequence of Steve’s favorite (exaggerated reaction to a) virus:

    Godiva chocolates is closing its stores in the United States.

    For years now, friends and we have used Godiva stores as a go-to resource for special gifts, always appreciated and enjoyed on both ends. As recently as this Christmas, one neighbor went to a Godiva shop and then gave us a beautiful gift of chocolates.

    No more.

    Thanks a lot, dumbasses, for destroying our culture. As you so fondly like to say, “This is why we can’t have nice things.” Yes, you’re damn right. YOU are now the reason why we can’t have nice things. Are you happy now?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Buzz Mohawk

    https://youtu.be/vdvnOH060Qg

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    , @epebble
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Don't fret too much. Harry & David from my neck of the woods is quite nice.

    https://cdn1.harryanddavid.com/wcsstore/HarryAndDavid/images/catalog/19_33202_30W_01ex.jpg?width=545&height=597&quality=80&auto=webp&optimize={medium}

    , @The Alarmist
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Thanks a lot, dumbasses, for destroying our culture.
     
    There you go again, trying to appropriate Belgian chocolates manufactured by a Turkish-owned conglomerate as American culture. Silly boy ... on this side of the pond, the joke is that an American’s idea of culture is yoghurt. ;)

    It really is a dark winter.

    Replies: @stillCARealist

    , @Mike Tre
    @Buzz Mohawk

    As they say, we should just kill everybody, as long as it saves just one life.

    Replies: @Liza

    , @MGB
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Gawdiva! So what do you want, the elderly tossed onto ice floes? If not for the lockdown, millions (plural!) would have died. (They are certainly under representing Covid deaths, even now. For all we know, it's probably already millions, what with the MSM's lack of interest in updating the story.) And we know this because denialists, like you, you fucking murderer, despite masking up, and slathering yourself in sanitizer, and genuflecting to have your temperature taken, and social distancing, despite following all the rules, you still refuse to sweat and quiver and shake in your boots at the truth of the ongoing viral holocaust, you still refuse to wear the mask while driving alone in your car. That's the kind of dedication that will defeat this disease. Trump killed 300k, no, wait, 400k, and he's responsible for the future deaths of any octogenarian with congestive heart failure and diabetes (maybe with a sprinkle of viral debris in her nose, for good measure) because, well, he is. And if some long-time employee of Godiva USA drinks herself to death after losing her job, that's a price I'm willing to pay. After all, she could have gotten a job working from home updating the porntube website or something equally critical to the future of America. She just chose not to.

    , @Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Godiva is notorious for making poor-quality chocolates with impressive packaging to mask the lousy product. Buy Lindt if you want something that tastes better and which is more widely available on the US market.

    Replies: @128, @Old Prude

    , @Known Fact
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Oh no, Godiva was one of my favorite mystery-shopping projects. Nice women, free chocolate ...

    , @Too Long Didn't Read
    @Buzz Mohawk

    As far as I can tell, Godiva's shops were clustered inside shopping malls, or sometimes as a sublease of a higher end retailer like Nordstrom or maybe Neiman Marcus. But...indoor malls have been declining in foot traffic for a few years, and the Coof plus Only Black Lives Matter looting hasn't done them a bit of good. If Godiva's is switching to online it's mostly just a result of market plus social forces. Might as well blame Bezos, for all the good it will do for you.

    Thanks a lot, dumbasses, for destroying our culture.

    To whom is this little rant directed? At governors such as Cuomo - mostly D's? At rioters peaceful protestors? At others who comment here? At the random passersby who carefully avoid eye contact with you at the bus stop? Whom?

    Who you talkin' at, Willis?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Buzz Mohawk

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=DgI-NhaThLs

    , @3g4me
    @Buzz Mohawk

    @ 43 Buzz Mohawk: Godiva chocolates are Turkish/Korean owned and NOT by any definition Belgian chocolates (not produced there and utterly lacking Belgian quality). They may have been genuine perhaps 35 years ago, but are now standard, overpriced, crappy-quality 'murrican chocolate and you pay for the name, not the quality. Same goes for NY's "Harry and David" foodstuffs - overpriced garbage that's coasting on an old reputation. Go to bargain-priced Aldi grocery store during the holiday season and stock up on genuine Belgian chocolates for a song.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Jack D

  41. @Altai
    But the size of his landholdings will potentially allow him to develop farming and business models historically not good for farmers and may lead to him having an outsized voice on agricultural policy.

    And what man has been better at lobbying the US government for the last 30 years?

    Replies: @SimpleSong

    Well… to some extent the horse has already left the barn. Big agribusiness (Monsanto, John Deere) is absolutely terrible for small to medium scale famers for a variety of reasons.

    We are rapidly heading towards a dichotomy of megafarms and hobby farms with nothing in between. On the outskirts of big cities you’ll see lots of 20 acre operations owned by retired doctors, then in the country 2000+ acre operations growing one, or possibly two crops, staffed by one white guy and four mexicans, and completely empty small towns.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @SimpleSong

    All the smart people left small and medium farms in the 50s, 60s and 70s. Who with any intelligence would bust their asses all day long, every day at the mercy of heartless Mother Nature, when a factory job, with holidays and a pension pays as much, if not more? A small dairy farm is white slavery. Running 600 sheep might net you $40k, with a great deal of blood, mucus and manure between checks. Screw that. I'll work the line.

    A large farm managed coldly like a business can remunerate a smart person to some degree, and a hobby farm is great fun. But small and medium farms went out with the industrial age.

    , @stillCARealist
    @SimpleSong

    Wolfgang Puck said the same thing about restaurants: you'll have the chains and the ultra-chic expensive, and not much in between.

  42. Gates is probably placing a modest bet on soybeans with his farmland purchases. A general worldwide protein (both animal and plant based) shortage is looming due to the prolonged drought and monetary crisis in Argentina.

  43. The only land Bill Gates should occupy in the United States is the 0.00000000002% he is buried under, and the sooner the better.

  44. https://www.unz.com/mhudson/the-consequences-of-moving-from-industrial-to-financial-capitalism/#new_comments

    The wealth is no longer made here by industrializing. It’s made financially, mainly by making capital gains. Rising prices for real estate or for stocks and for bonds. […] The way people get wealthy today isn’t by making an income, it’s been by making a capital gain. Total returns are current income plus the capital gains. As for capital gains each year; the land value gains alone are larger than the whole GDP growth from year to year. So that’s where the money is, that’s where the wealth is. So, they are after speculative capital gains, …. See the prices go up and then inflate the prices by buying in and then sell out at the high price. Pull the money out, get a capital gain and let the economy crash, I mean that’s the business plan.

  45. Overall, that’s about 0.03% of all the farmland in the US.

    Or to put it another way 0.0000012% of all the families in the USA own 0.03% of all the farmland in the USA.

    But it’s not domestic ownership of domestic natural resources that most concerns me. Its foreign ownership. The USA is so in debt to the People’s Republic of China that the only conceivable way of ever redeeming this debt is some form of impoverishment, or bargain basement auctioning of the USA’s intrinsically valuable resources (phony financial assets don’t count), or some combination of the two. I’ll bet that the Bidens are already negotiating with their Chinese paymasters, the details of how US resources are to be auctioned and how those auctions can be fixed to favor the Chinese.

  46. @utu
    1. John Malone - 2.2 million acres
    2. Ted Turner - 2.0 million acres
    3. Emmerson family - 2.0 million acres
    4. Reed family - 1.7 million acres
    5. Stan Kroenke - 1.4 million acres

    50. Hadley family - 260,000 acres

    https://www.usatoday.com/money/

    Replies: @Forbes

    Yeah, I knew Ted Turner’s holding make Gates look like a piker, from Wiki…

    Turner owns 15 ranches in Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and South Dakota. Totaling 1,910,585 acres, his land-holdings across America make Turner one of the largest individual landowners in North America (by acreage). … Turner’s biggest ranch is Vermejo Park Ranch in New Mexico. At 920 square miles, it is the largest privately owned, contiguous tract of land in the United States.

  47. Just for reference, Count Dmitri Sheremetev owned 1.9 million acres of Russian farmland/woods/pasture upon his death in 1871.

    The Liechtensteins owned over 400,000 acres of land in Poland and Czechoslovakia, (all of which the Communists seized in 1945.)

    The Esterhazys owned 700 villages, and who knows how many acres in Pre-Trianon Hungary.

    So Gates is still well behind historical aristocrats.

  48. What about the black farmers? When they get their free land-watch out!😎

  49. @Achmed E. Newman
    No, even the biggest Billionaire is not a worry here. There's a big difference between 50 billion and numbers in the multiple trillions. I'm moving this over from that other thread:

    At an average of ~ $8,000/acre for the good farmland and $2,000 to $4,000/acre for the rest, divided 1/3 to 2/3, I came up with $4 Trillion in value for the entire “Fruited Plain” of America. I checked later and the web told me $2.7 Trillion.

    Does anyone think the Chinese won’t come in looting the place, after the financial SHTF, same way the big NY finance guys looted Russia in the 1990s? As Peak Stupidity discussed in “Will America be looted by China? – Part 4: The Fruited Plain”, even the high number is just ONE DECADE of US trade deficits with China. Is it all worth it for that cheap Chinese crap from Wal-Mart?

    Another question. Can you look at numbers like the total value of American farmland, housing, or corporate assets, and still say the US Gov’t’s spending an extra $1.9 Trillion here or there is not a problem?

    Don't worry about the Bill Gateses. Look in a different direction for whom you should worry about.

    Replies: @peterike, @The Alarmist, @Lot, @JimDandy

    It’s not so much that it is Gates, but it is a signal of more to come. I wonder if there’s a farmland fund prospectus in the WEF welcome pack.

  50. @Buzz Mohawk
    When I first read about this, some little time ago, I thought, "oh shit, another oligarch with near-infinite power." Then I stopped and thought from my own experience:

    One family I have known for forty years owns nearly a square mile of farmland in New York State. That is just a typical, family farm. The property was given to their ancestor as reward for his service in the American Revolution. There is a bronze plaque in front of the barn; it was put there over a century ago.

    Another family I know owns 400 acres in the Rocky Mountains, where I built my log cabin and lived for seven months before college. That is roughly 3/4 of a square mile (which in America is 640 acres, BTW.)

    Bill Gates owns approximately 378 times what either one of my old friends owns ... Wait a minute ... more than, but of the same magnitude, without doing the math.

    Hey, let's do the arithmetic: Two of my old friends own a total of approximately 1000 acres. Bill owns 242,000. Okay, so Bill, one of the richest assholes on the planet owns 242 times what 2 friends of mine own.

    I say big, fucking deal. It sounds like a lot by itself, but viewed as part of a very large, rich country where my friends are nothing special, Bill's land is nothing special either. I'm surprised somebody else doesn't own more.

    In fact, Steve, maybe you should look into corporate ownership of land. How many acres do agricultural companies own in the US? I bet some own a hell of a lot more, and a much, much greater share of America's farmland. How much of that, BTW, changed hands from old, American farm families to corporations?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @AndrewR, @SunBakedSuburb, @kaganovitch, @anon, @Almost Missouri

    In fact, Steve, maybe you should look into corporate ownership of land. How many acres do agricultural companies own in the US? I bet some own a hell of a lot more, and a much, much greater share of America’s farmland. How much of that, BTW, changed hands from old, American farm families to corporations?

    J.R.Simplot, for one, owns almost twice Gates holdings with 422,000 acres. I don’t think all of that is farmland though. Stewart Resnick , a nice Jewish boy from New Jersey, owns around 200.000 acres
    ( he is the owner of POM juices, Fiji water and a bunch of other SWPL brands.) If you are talking about land in general, Weyerhauser owns around 12,000,000 acres of timberland. Ted Turner and John Malone own around 2,000,000 acres each of ranch land fwiw.

  51. @SimpleSong
    @Altai

    Well... to some extent the horse has already left the barn. Big agribusiness (Monsanto, John Deere) is absolutely terrible for small to medium scale famers for a variety of reasons.

    We are rapidly heading towards a dichotomy of megafarms and hobby farms with nothing in between. On the outskirts of big cities you'll see lots of 20 acre operations owned by retired doctors, then in the country 2000+ acre operations growing one, or possibly two crops, staffed by one white guy and four mexicans, and completely empty small towns.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @stillCARealist

    All the smart people left small and medium farms in the 50s, 60s and 70s. Who with any intelligence would bust their asses all day long, every day at the mercy of heartless Mother Nature, when a factory job, with holidays and a pension pays as much, if not more? A small dairy farm is white slavery. Running 600 sheep might net you $40k, with a great deal of blood, mucus and manure between checks. Screw that. I’ll work the line.

    A large farm managed coldly like a business can remunerate a smart person to some degree, and a hobby farm is great fun. But small and medium farms went out with the industrial age.

    • Agree: Daniel Chieh
  52. Hugh Grosvenor, the 7th Duke of Westminster, owns 140,000 acres, over 300 of which are in the most expensive neighborhoods in London.

    And he’s not yet 30.

    • Replies: @dearieme
    @black sea

    Hugh Grosvenor, the 7th Duke of Westminster, owns 140,000 acres, over 300 of which are in the most expensive neighborhoods in London.

    Balls. Who on earth told you that?

    The whole business is explained here.
    https://www.grosvenorestate.com/the-grosvenor-estate.aspx

    "The business assets of the Grosvenor Estate are owned by a series of UK resident (i.e. onshore) trusts, the beneficiaries of which are both current members of the Grosvenor family and future, as yet unborn, descendants." That is to say the land does NOT belong to His Grace.

    , @Flip
    @black sea

    Prince Charles beneficially owns the Duchy of Cornwall.

    "The duchy owns (531.3 square kilometres (205.1 sq mi) – 0.2% of UK land) over 23 counties, including farming, residential, and commercial properties, as well as an investment portfolio."

    Replies: @dearieme

  53. Anonymous[422] • Disclaimer says:

    Meanwhile, is anyone paying attention to current financial markets? Popular daytrade speculator stock GME was stopped around 4 times today to let speculators cool off. TSLA is currently off the hook.

    It’s looking like there’s nobody at the reigns of this stock market. Or perhaps they’ve adopted the financial strategy of “just let assholes be assholes.”

    Daytraders, as tradition dictates, appear to be saying, “this time it’s different, old man.” I’ve always found that to be a leading indicator.

    Additionally, all this MIGHT be an answer to why Bill Gates has recently secured his families food supply. He has the resources to surround his little farm plot with troops 24/7 should he feel the need.

    I could be wrong, but it… feels like… the something remarkably shitty is a-comin’…

  54. @Daniel Chieh
    @Buzz Mohawk


    For a long time now, American farmland has been changing hands from truly private owners, families like the ones I know, to faceless corporations with Washington D.C. lobbyists and Congressmen at their disposal.
     
    But that's part of technological advancement: the more value capital investment gets you, the more centralized it will be. Agricultural isn't really all that high margin and it's high investment; I have friends with inherited farms and it's a huge amount of effort - advanced degree, crop dusters, flight licenses, labor hiring, etc.

    Ultimately, most of them sell out and take jobs in better paid and more high status fields. Low-margin, high effort is pretty discouraging besides the romantic aspects.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @dearieme, @Desiderius

    Farming is a high status field.

  55. @Buzz Mohawk
    OT: Okay, here is yet another consequence of Steve's favorite (exaggerated reaction to a) virus:

    Godiva chocolates is closing its stores in the United States.

    For years now, friends and we have used Godiva stores as a go-to resource for special gifts, always appreciated and enjoyed on both ends. As recently as this Christmas, one neighbor went to a Godiva shop and then gave us a beautiful gift of chocolates.

    No more.

    Thanks a lot, dumbasses, for destroying our culture. As you so fondly like to say, "This is why we can't have nice things." Yes, you're damn right. YOU are now the reason why we can't have nice things. Are you happy now?

    https://www.godivachocolates.eu/images/gene/prod/zoom/goch000262_03_godiva-discovery-hamper.jpg

    Replies: @Desiderius, @epebble, @The Alarmist, @Mike Tre, @MGB, @Anon, @Known Fact, @Too Long Didn't Read, @Reg Cæsar, @3g4me

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @Desiderius

    Those four lads sure own a lot of real estate in the modern world.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  56. @black sea
    Hugh Grosvenor, the 7th Duke of Westminster, owns 140,000 acres, over 300 of which are in the most expensive neighborhoods in London.

    And he's not yet 30.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Flip

    Hugh Grosvenor, the 7th Duke of Westminster, owns 140,000 acres, over 300 of which are in the most expensive neighborhoods in London.

    Balls. Who on earth told you that?

    The whole business is explained here.
    https://www.grosvenorestate.com/the-grosvenor-estate.aspx

    “The business assets of the Grosvenor Estate are owned by a series of UK resident (i.e. onshore) trusts, the beneficiaries of which are both current members of the Grosvenor family and future, as yet unborn, descendants.” That is to say the land does NOT belong to His Grace.

  57. @Buzz Mohawk
    OT: Okay, here is yet another consequence of Steve's favorite (exaggerated reaction to a) virus:

    Godiva chocolates is closing its stores in the United States.

    For years now, friends and we have used Godiva stores as a go-to resource for special gifts, always appreciated and enjoyed on both ends. As recently as this Christmas, one neighbor went to a Godiva shop and then gave us a beautiful gift of chocolates.

    No more.

    Thanks a lot, dumbasses, for destroying our culture. As you so fondly like to say, "This is why we can't have nice things." Yes, you're damn right. YOU are now the reason why we can't have nice things. Are you happy now?

    https://www.godivachocolates.eu/images/gene/prod/zoom/goch000262_03_godiva-discovery-hamper.jpg

    Replies: @Desiderius, @epebble, @The Alarmist, @Mike Tre, @MGB, @Anon, @Known Fact, @Too Long Didn't Read, @Reg Cæsar, @3g4me

    • Disagree: 3g4me
  58. @Desiderius
    @Buzz Mohawk

    https://youtu.be/vdvnOH060Qg

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    Those four lads sure own a lot of real estate in the modern world.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Paperback Writer

    Rundown neighborhood

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

  59. Bill Gates is a major funder of the Black Lives Matter race hate group which has engaged in 10 years of the racial intimidation of innocent Native Born White Americans. Wouldn’t it be great if Tucker Carlson could just state it as simply as this 8 o’clock tonight……

  60. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Correction: 400 acres, the approximate size of that land, is roughly, or nearly, 2/3 of a square mile, not 3/4, for anybody who cares. Trust me, if you are living on it, it seems big either way.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    Depending on how the plot is shaped, 400 acres doesn’t seem very big when you are trying to take off or land a Beech Duchess on it.

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @The Alarmist


    Depending on how the plot is shaped, 400 acres doesn’t seem very big when you are trying to take off or land a Beech Duchess on it.

     

    Billund, Denmark, pop. ca. 6,000, has an airport that can handle 747s and A350s. Of course, it's the home of Lego and Legoland.



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYBhf-RWGYc
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @The Alarmist

    You would have loved Meadowlark Airport. It was 80 acres between two streets in Huntington Beach.

    http://www.runyard.org/OPL/moms-opl-book/L16_post_1978Ricks.jpg
    Don't hit the telephone wires!

    Replies: @The Alarmist

  61. Well, Bill Gates says that since there’s a virus that kills 0.02 % of patients, he has to vaccinate 7 billion human beings. Isn’t that irrational alarmism too? While making Bill a multiple trillionaire.

  62. I wonder where he would rank among feudal European lords.

  63. @Buzz Mohawk
    OT: Okay, here is yet another consequence of Steve's favorite (exaggerated reaction to a) virus:

    Godiva chocolates is closing its stores in the United States.

    For years now, friends and we have used Godiva stores as a go-to resource for special gifts, always appreciated and enjoyed on both ends. As recently as this Christmas, one neighbor went to a Godiva shop and then gave us a beautiful gift of chocolates.

    No more.

    Thanks a lot, dumbasses, for destroying our culture. As you so fondly like to say, "This is why we can't have nice things." Yes, you're damn right. YOU are now the reason why we can't have nice things. Are you happy now?

    https://www.godivachocolates.eu/images/gene/prod/zoom/goch000262_03_godiva-discovery-hamper.jpg

    Replies: @Desiderius, @epebble, @The Alarmist, @Mike Tre, @MGB, @Anon, @Known Fact, @Too Long Didn't Read, @Reg Cæsar, @3g4me

    Thanks a lot, dumbasses, for destroying our culture.

    There you go again, trying to appropriate Belgian chocolates manufactured by a Turkish-owned conglomerate as American culture. Silly boy … on this side of the pond, the joke is that an American’s idea of culture is yoghurt. 😉

    It really is a dark winter.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @The Alarmist

    What is "yoghurt"? Is that something like yogurt? What's up with the silent h? Maybe there's some guttural sound about it that I'm missing.

    But you're right about Godiva. They're overpriced and not so special. I'm a Lindt/Ghirardelli fanatic myself. Gigantic transnational chocolate conglomerates can still make a delicious treat at a decent price that I can eat by the pound... or kilo... or whatever.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Old Palo Altan

  64. @Buzz Mohawk
    OT: Okay, here is yet another consequence of Steve's favorite (exaggerated reaction to a) virus:

    Godiva chocolates is closing its stores in the United States.

    For years now, friends and we have used Godiva stores as a go-to resource for special gifts, always appreciated and enjoyed on both ends. As recently as this Christmas, one neighbor went to a Godiva shop and then gave us a beautiful gift of chocolates.

    No more.

    Thanks a lot, dumbasses, for destroying our culture. As you so fondly like to say, "This is why we can't have nice things." Yes, you're damn right. YOU are now the reason why we can't have nice things. Are you happy now?

    https://www.godivachocolates.eu/images/gene/prod/zoom/goch000262_03_godiva-discovery-hamper.jpg

    Replies: @Desiderius, @epebble, @The Alarmist, @Mike Tre, @MGB, @Anon, @Known Fact, @Too Long Didn't Read, @Reg Cæsar, @3g4me

    As they say, we should just kill everybody, as long as it saves just one life.

    • LOL: kaganovitch
    • Replies: @Liza
    @Mike Tre

    Or as others say, "You want me to set my kid on fire so yours can stay warm."

  65. Don’t worry, Steve. I assume that our intrepid Press – recently freed from the overwhelming burden of “fact checking” the President of the United States – will soon get around to asking Mr. Gates about this matter of public concern.

  66. Off topic. ISteve, please review and sailerize this so that we don’t have to (can find no mention of this via unz search function).

    Another extremely privileged and ungrateful product of recent immigration who wants to erase Americans, her family from the most ethnically bigoted and overpopulated country in the world, trained to hate us at Oberlin. And she’s a “science journalist.” You know what that means these days: she declares the science, those who question her are spreading harmful misinformation and must be silenced.

    The Next Great Migration: The Beauty and Terror of Life on the Move

    A prize-winning journalist upends our centuries-long assumptions about migration through science, history, and reporting–predicting its lifesaving power in the face of climate change.

    The news today is full of stories of dislocated people on the move. Wild species, too, are escaping warming seas and desiccated lands, creeping, swimming, and flying in a mass exodus from their past habitats. News media presents this scrambling of the planet’s migration patterns as unprecedented, provoking fears of the spread of disease and conflict and waves of anxiety across the Western world. On both sides of the Atlantic, experts issue alarmed predictions of millions of invading aliens, unstoppable as an advancing tsunami, and countries respond by electing anti-immigration leaders who slam closed borders that were historically porous.

    But the science and history of migration in animals, plants, and humans tell a different story. Far from being a disruptive behavior to be quelled at any cost, migration is an ancient and lifesaving response to environmental change, a biological imperative as necessary as breathing. Climate changes triggered the first human migrations out of Africa. Falling sea levels allowed our passage across the Bering Sea. Unhampered by barbed wire, migration allowed our ancestors to people the planet, catapulting us into the highest reaches of the Himalayan mountains and the most remote islands of the Pacific, creating and disseminating the biological, cultural, and social diversity that ecosystems and societies depend upon. In other words, migration is not the crisis–it is the solution.

    Conclusively tracking the history of misinformation from the 18th century through today’s anti-immigration policies, The Next Great Migration makes the case for a future in which migration is not a source of fear, but of hope.

    It’s as stupid as a freshman paper for an Oberlin humanities course.

    From the tsunami of virtue-spurting reviews:

    An ambitious work of journalism that argues migration has played a vital role in our planet’s history.

    So have meteors, volcanoes, ice ages, and plagues.

    Interweaving the human history of movement with parables from nature, she reframes migration not as an exception in an otherwise static world but instead as a biological and cultural norm―and one that should be embraced, not feared . . . a provocative invitation to imagine the inevitable migration of the future as an opportunity, rather than a threat.

    Carthage! Embrace the immigrant Latins. Asia! Embrace the Mongol hordes. American indigenes! Embrace the Columbian exchange, 90% disease mortality, and European conquest and dispossession. India! Embrace the British fleeing from bad weather. China! Embrace the opium wars.

    Compare to tragedy of the commons, innate human territoriality, and the world’s most important graph.

    • Agree: Lurker
    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @New Dealer


    On both sides of the Atlantic, experts issue alarmed predictions of millions of invading aliens, unstoppable as an advancing tsunami, and countries respond by electing anti-immigration leaders who slam closed borders that were historically porous.
     
    If only!
    , @Lurker
    @New Dealer


    virtue-spurting
     
    Lol! Very good.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  67. @Jonathan Mason
    So what is he growing on his farmland?

    Replies: @Wilkey, @SunBakedSuburb, @Adam Smith, @paranoid goy

    He can grow pollinators under CRP.

  68. @Achmed E. Newman
    No, even the biggest Billionaire is not a worry here. There's a big difference between 50 billion and numbers in the multiple trillions. I'm moving this over from that other thread:

    At an average of ~ $8,000/acre for the good farmland and $2,000 to $4,000/acre for the rest, divided 1/3 to 2/3, I came up with $4 Trillion in value for the entire “Fruited Plain” of America. I checked later and the web told me $2.7 Trillion.

    Does anyone think the Chinese won’t come in looting the place, after the financial SHTF, same way the big NY finance guys looted Russia in the 1990s? As Peak Stupidity discussed in “Will America be looted by China? – Part 4: The Fruited Plain”, even the high number is just ONE DECADE of US trade deficits with China. Is it all worth it for that cheap Chinese crap from Wal-Mart?

    Another question. Can you look at numbers like the total value of American farmland, housing, or corporate assets, and still say the US Gov’t’s spending an extra $1.9 Trillion here or there is not a problem?

    Don't worry about the Bill Gateses. Look in a different direction for whom you should worry about.

    Replies: @peterike, @The Alarmist, @Lot, @JimDandy

    High net worth people and university endowments have been bulk buying timber and farmland for at least 20 years.

    It hasn’t been a losing investment, but it has mostly underperformed.

    Chinese funds going to America are mostly retail level Chinese wealthy wanting an escape hatch in a more stable nation. Chinese ADR stock and crypto scams meanwhile partly reverse the flow from middle class Americans to Chinese plugged in with the Party enough they can rob foreigners with impunity.

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @3g4me
    @Lot

    @71 Lot: Oh, so reassuring to hear that some of your co-ethnics and others of their ilk are not reaping huge profits on the purchases of land. Of course, to some of us there are things that matter a lot more than money, but you continue hewing closely to your great heritage.

  69. The Resnicks own more than 180,000 acres of farmland in California, and the land comes with extremely valuable water rights.

  70. @black sea
    Hugh Grosvenor, the 7th Duke of Westminster, owns 140,000 acres, over 300 of which are in the most expensive neighborhoods in London.

    And he's not yet 30.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Flip

    Prince Charles beneficially owns the Duchy of Cornwall.

    “The duchy owns (531.3 square kilometres (205.1 sq mi) – 0.2% of UK land) over 23 counties, including farming, residential, and commercial properties, as well as an investment portfolio.”

    • Replies: @dearieme
    @Flip

    You say Prince Charles beneficially owns the Duchy of Cornwall


    I'm unfamiliar with the concept of "beneficially owns". It's not ownership in the usual sense because "The Duke has no access to the Duchy's capital value".

    He gets the income though "and he pays income tax on the annual revenue, which is used to fund the public, charitable and private activities of The Duke and Duchess of Cornwall, The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and The Duke and Duchess of Sussex."

    It may be that the D & D of Sussex will get little in future because they've refused to perform their royal duties. No work, no pay.

    https://duchyofcornwall.org/the-duke-of-cornwall.html

  71. @New Dealer
    Off topic. ISteve, please review and sailerize this so that we don't have to (can find no mention of this via unz search function).

    Another extremely privileged and ungrateful product of recent immigration who wants to erase Americans, her family from the most ethnically bigoted and overpopulated country in the world, trained to hate us at Oberlin. And she’s a “science journalist.” You know what that means these days: she declares the science, those who question her are spreading harmful misinformation and must be silenced.

    The Next Great Migration: The Beauty and Terror of Life on the Move
    https://www.amazon.com/Next-Great-Migration-Sonia-Shah/dp/1635571979/


    A prize-winning journalist upends our centuries-long assumptions about migration through science, history, and reporting--predicting its lifesaving power in the face of climate change.

    The news today is full of stories of dislocated people on the move. Wild species, too, are escaping warming seas and desiccated lands, creeping, swimming, and flying in a mass exodus from their past habitats. News media presents this scrambling of the planet's migration patterns as unprecedented, provoking fears of the spread of disease and conflict and waves of anxiety across the Western world. On both sides of the Atlantic, experts issue alarmed predictions of millions of invading aliens, unstoppable as an advancing tsunami, and countries respond by electing anti-immigration leaders who slam closed borders that were historically porous.

    But the science and history of migration in animals, plants, and humans tell a different story. Far from being a disruptive behavior to be quelled at any cost, migration is an ancient and lifesaving response to environmental change, a biological imperative as necessary as breathing. Climate changes triggered the first human migrations out of Africa. Falling sea levels allowed our passage across the Bering Sea. Unhampered by barbed wire, migration allowed our ancestors to people the planet, catapulting us into the highest reaches of the Himalayan mountains and the most remote islands of the Pacific, creating and disseminating the biological, cultural, and social diversity that ecosystems and societies depend upon. In other words, migration is not the crisis--it is the solution.

    Conclusively tracking the history of misinformation from the 18th century through today's anti-immigration policies, The Next Great Migration makes the case for a future in which migration is not a source of fear, but of hope.

     

    It's as stupid as a freshman paper for an Oberlin humanities course.

    From the tsunami of virtue-spurting reviews:


    An ambitious work of journalism that argues migration has played a vital role in our planet’s history.

     

    So have meteors, volcanoes, ice ages, and plagues.

    Interweaving the human history of movement with parables from nature, she reframes migration not as an exception in an otherwise static world but instead as a biological and cultural norm―and one that should be embraced, not feared . . . a provocative invitation to imagine the inevitable migration of the future as an opportunity, rather than a threat.
     
    Carthage! Embrace the immigrant Latins. Asia! Embrace the Mongol hordes. American indigenes! Embrace the Columbian exchange, 90% disease mortality, and European conquest and dispossession. India! Embrace the British fleeing from bad weather. China! Embrace the opium wars.

    Compare to tragedy of the commons, innate human territoriality, and the world’s most important graph.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Lurker

    On both sides of the Atlantic, experts issue alarmed predictions of millions of invading aliens, unstoppable as an advancing tsunami, and countries respond by electing anti-immigration leaders who slam closed borders that were historically porous.

    If only!

    • Agree: Liza
  72. @Buzz Mohawk
    OT: Okay, here is yet another consequence of Steve's favorite (exaggerated reaction to a) virus:

    Godiva chocolates is closing its stores in the United States.

    For years now, friends and we have used Godiva stores as a go-to resource for special gifts, always appreciated and enjoyed on both ends. As recently as this Christmas, one neighbor went to a Godiva shop and then gave us a beautiful gift of chocolates.

    No more.

    Thanks a lot, dumbasses, for destroying our culture. As you so fondly like to say, "This is why we can't have nice things." Yes, you're damn right. YOU are now the reason why we can't have nice things. Are you happy now?

    https://www.godivachocolates.eu/images/gene/prod/zoom/goch000262_03_godiva-discovery-hamper.jpg

    Replies: @Desiderius, @epebble, @The Alarmist, @Mike Tre, @MGB, @Anon, @Known Fact, @Too Long Didn't Read, @Reg Cæsar, @3g4me

    Gawdiva! So what do you want, the elderly tossed onto ice floes? If not for the lockdown, millions (plural!) would have died. (They are certainly under representing Covid deaths, even now. For all we know, it’s probably already millions, what with the MSM’s lack of interest in updating the story.) And we know this because denialists, like you, you fucking murderer, despite masking up, and slathering yourself in sanitizer, and genuflecting to have your temperature taken, and social distancing, despite following all the rules, you still refuse to sweat and quiver and shake in your boots at the truth of the ongoing viral holocaust, you still refuse to wear the mask while driving alone in your car. That’s the kind of dedication that will defeat this disease. Trump killed 300k, no, wait, 400k, and he’s responsible for the future deaths of any octogenarian with congestive heart failure and diabetes (maybe with a sprinkle of viral debris in her nose, for good measure) because, well, he is. And if some long-time employee of Godiva USA drinks herself to death after losing her job, that’s a price I’m willing to pay. After all, she could have gotten a job working from home updating the porntube website or something equally critical to the future of America. She just chose not to.

    • Thanks: Old Prude
  73. I never figured Gates to be the outdoorsy, home-spun farm ownin’ kind of guy. I can see Ted Turner with his ranches, but not Gates with farms.
    This must be investment diversification for him with no sentiment attached. If the country collapses, good luck to him trying to assert practical control over the rural land he owns on paper.

  74. At what point does having more money than you could possibly spend start to feel like not having any money? I have a theory that once you run out of things to buy that you possibly can use you have reached that point. Then maybe the realization hits you that no amount of money is going to do you a bit of good when “that time” comes as it will to us all. So now he’s just spending for the sake of spending.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Semi-Hemi


    At what point does having more money than you could possibly spend start to feel like not having any money?
     
    For a lot of ordinary people who come into huge windfalls, it seems to come pretty early. The papers are full of stories of miserable lottery winners.

    Replies: @128

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Semi-Hemi

    In the days of the Roman Empire it was coming for very rich men to use that surplus wealth to enhance the towns and cities that they lived in, for example building parks, zoos, or public baths, temples, etc., or by patronizing the arts and commissioning paintings and sculptures.

    America has enough billionaires that if they took on a few projects they could make quite a change.

    Replies: @128

  75. @Buzz Mohawk
    OT: Okay, here is yet another consequence of Steve's favorite (exaggerated reaction to a) virus:

    Godiva chocolates is closing its stores in the United States.

    For years now, friends and we have used Godiva stores as a go-to resource for special gifts, always appreciated and enjoyed on both ends. As recently as this Christmas, one neighbor went to a Godiva shop and then gave us a beautiful gift of chocolates.

    No more.

    Thanks a lot, dumbasses, for destroying our culture. As you so fondly like to say, "This is why we can't have nice things." Yes, you're damn right. YOU are now the reason why we can't have nice things. Are you happy now?

    https://www.godivachocolates.eu/images/gene/prod/zoom/goch000262_03_godiva-discovery-hamper.jpg

    Replies: @Desiderius, @epebble, @The Alarmist, @Mike Tre, @MGB, @Anon, @Known Fact, @Too Long Didn't Read, @Reg Cæsar, @3g4me

    Godiva is notorious for making poor-quality chocolates with impressive packaging to mask the lousy product. Buy Lindt if you want something that tastes better and which is more widely available on the US market.

    • Replies: @128
    @Anon

    Ritter?

    , @Old Prude
    @Anon

    In Maine we have Haven's whose chocolates are absolutely fabulous.

  76. @Buzz Mohawk
    OT: Okay, here is yet another consequence of Steve's favorite (exaggerated reaction to a) virus:

    Godiva chocolates is closing its stores in the United States.

    For years now, friends and we have used Godiva stores as a go-to resource for special gifts, always appreciated and enjoyed on both ends. As recently as this Christmas, one neighbor went to a Godiva shop and then gave us a beautiful gift of chocolates.

    No more.

    Thanks a lot, dumbasses, for destroying our culture. As you so fondly like to say, "This is why we can't have nice things." Yes, you're damn right. YOU are now the reason why we can't have nice things. Are you happy now?

    https://www.godivachocolates.eu/images/gene/prod/zoom/goch000262_03_godiva-discovery-hamper.jpg

    Replies: @Desiderius, @epebble, @The Alarmist, @Mike Tre, @MGB, @Anon, @Known Fact, @Too Long Didn't Read, @Reg Cæsar, @3g4me

    Oh no, Godiva was one of my favorite mystery-shopping projects. Nice women, free chocolate …

  77. Re: Bill Gates’ farmland. Who is he going to get to work it?

  78. Oh No, Bill Gates Has Bought 0.03% of All the Farmland in the U.S.

    There goes the neigh-borhood.

  79. Semi-OT, but still oligarch related: It seems Twitter has placed limits on mocking Bezos for his insistence that in-person voting is the only fair way to conduct an Amazon unionization election. According to Twitter: “This claim of election fraud is disputed, and this Tweet can’t be replied to, Retweeted, or liked due to a risk of violence.”

    https://redstate.com/shipwreckedcrew/2021/01/25/316030-n316030

  80. @The Alarmist
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Depending on how the plot is shaped, 400 acres doesn’t seem very big when you are trying to take off or land a Beech Duchess on it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Buzz Mohawk

    Depending on how the plot is shaped, 400 acres doesn’t seem very big when you are trying to take off or land a Beech Duchess on it.

    Billund, Denmark, pop. ca. 6,000, has an airport that can handle 747s and A350s. Of course, it’s the home of Lego and Legoland.

  81. OT:

    Can one of you frequent posters point to or explain the comment moderation rules here at UR?

    I searched here at unz, but don’t seem to find them explicitly listed. It is clear some have them posted without awaiting moderation, and others are not seen until the post is accepted after awaiting moderation. I note that when a post is in awaiting moderation, and you then look at the same thread in a second browser it is not visible and from this assume it is not visible to other readers until it has been accepted in the moderation process.

    I remember seeing at one time in a thread that Ron left comment moderation decisions to each article author. Not sure how this works for authors like Pat Buchanan where it is his syndicated column and he has no actual involvement direct with the site.

    Perhaps this is a special hell Ron reserves for those like me that have pissed him off one time or another.

    Thanks
    Bob

  82. @Paperback Writer
    @Desiderius

    Those four lads sure own a lot of real estate in the modern world.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Rundown neighborhood

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @Desiderius

    Not their fault.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  83. Look on the bright side, maybe this means no Zimbabwe style land reform……no ,I’m just kidding ,we’re fucked.

  84. @Semi-Hemi
    At what point does having more money than you could possibly spend start to feel like not having any money? I have a theory that once you run out of things to buy that you possibly can use you have reached that point. Then maybe the realization hits you that no amount of money is going to do you a bit of good when "that time" comes as it will to us all. So now he's just spending for the sake of spending.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Jonathan Mason

    At what point does having more money than you could possibly spend start to feel like not having any money?

    For a lot of ordinary people who come into huge windfalls, it seems to come pretty early. The papers are full of stories of miserable lottery winners.

    • Replies: @128
    @Rob McX

    Lawyers do not seem to be a very happy lot.

  85. @Buzz Mohawk
    OT: Okay, here is yet another consequence of Steve's favorite (exaggerated reaction to a) virus:

    Godiva chocolates is closing its stores in the United States.

    For years now, friends and we have used Godiva stores as a go-to resource for special gifts, always appreciated and enjoyed on both ends. As recently as this Christmas, one neighbor went to a Godiva shop and then gave us a beautiful gift of chocolates.

    No more.

    Thanks a lot, dumbasses, for destroying our culture. As you so fondly like to say, "This is why we can't have nice things." Yes, you're damn right. YOU are now the reason why we can't have nice things. Are you happy now?

    https://www.godivachocolates.eu/images/gene/prod/zoom/goch000262_03_godiva-discovery-hamper.jpg

    Replies: @Desiderius, @epebble, @The Alarmist, @Mike Tre, @MGB, @Anon, @Known Fact, @Too Long Didn't Read, @Reg Cæsar, @3g4me

    As far as I can tell, Godiva’s shops were clustered inside shopping malls, or sometimes as a sublease of a higher end retailer like Nordstrom or maybe Neiman Marcus. But…indoor malls have been declining in foot traffic for a few years, and the Coof plus Only Black Lives Matter looting hasn’t done them a bit of good. If Godiva’s is switching to online it’s mostly just a result of market plus social forces. Might as well blame Bezos, for all the good it will do for you.

    Thanks a lot, dumbasses, for destroying our culture.

    To whom is this little rant directed? At governors such as Cuomo – mostly D’s? At rioters peaceful protestors? At others who comment here? At the random passersby who carefully avoid eye contact with you at the bus stop? Whom?

    Who you talkin’ at, Willis?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Too Long Didn't Read


    At the random passersby who carefully avoid eye contact with you at the bus stop?
     
    They all stare right at me because they're out to get me. They want to take my chocolates away.
  86. anon[392] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    When I first read about this, some little time ago, I thought, "oh shit, another oligarch with near-infinite power." Then I stopped and thought from my own experience:

    One family I have known for forty years owns nearly a square mile of farmland in New York State. That is just a typical, family farm. The property was given to their ancestor as reward for his service in the American Revolution. There is a bronze plaque in front of the barn; it was put there over a century ago.

    Another family I know owns 400 acres in the Rocky Mountains, where I built my log cabin and lived for seven months before college. That is roughly 3/4 of a square mile (which in America is 640 acres, BTW.)

    Bill Gates owns approximately 378 times what either one of my old friends owns ... Wait a minute ... more than, but of the same magnitude, without doing the math.

    Hey, let's do the arithmetic: Two of my old friends own a total of approximately 1000 acres. Bill owns 242,000. Okay, so Bill, one of the richest assholes on the planet owns 242 times what 2 friends of mine own.

    I say big, fucking deal. It sounds like a lot by itself, but viewed as part of a very large, rich country where my friends are nothing special, Bill's land is nothing special either. I'm surprised somebody else doesn't own more.

    In fact, Steve, maybe you should look into corporate ownership of land. How many acres do agricultural companies own in the US? I bet some own a hell of a lot more, and a much, much greater share of America's farmland. How much of that, BTW, changed hands from old, American farm families to corporations?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @AndrewR, @SunBakedSuburb, @kaganovitch, @anon, @Almost Missouri

    Farmland is a fine diversification thing for Bill. But agriculture is a bad business. It is capital intensive and its product is a commodity. Check the price of corn and beans. They have been in mid single digits my entire life.

    If a farmer owns his land, then he could hang on or even thrive forever. Which is one reason for the low commodity prices.

    But farming, in general, is a “bad” business. Bad being capital intensive and selling into commodity markets.

    • Replies: @128
    @anon

    Japan has a price floor for farmers which gives them a certain guaranteed profit margin which makes it not quite a bad thing, paying farmers to not overproduce, so as to manage supply also works.

    Replies: @anon

    , @The Alarmist
    @anon

    Farming is a bad business, unless you want to ensure the quality of your own foodstuffs as a primary objective. I would not be surprised if that might be motivating the Gates family.

  87. @Flip
    @black sea

    Prince Charles beneficially owns the Duchy of Cornwall.

    "The duchy owns (531.3 square kilometres (205.1 sq mi) – 0.2% of UK land) over 23 counties, including farming, residential, and commercial properties, as well as an investment portfolio."

    Replies: @dearieme

    You say Prince Charles beneficially owns the Duchy of Cornwall

    I’m unfamiliar with the concept of “beneficially owns”. It’s not ownership in the usual sense because “The Duke has no access to the Duchy’s capital value”.

    He gets the income though “and he pays income tax on the annual revenue, which is used to fund the public, charitable and private activities of The Duke and Duchess of Cornwall, The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and The Duke and Duchess of Sussex.

    It may be that the D & D of Sussex will get little in future because they’ve refused to perform their royal duties. No work, no pay.

    https://duchyofcornwall.org/the-duke-of-cornwall.html

  88. @Rob McX
    @Semi-Hemi


    At what point does having more money than you could possibly spend start to feel like not having any money?
     
    For a lot of ordinary people who come into huge windfalls, it seems to come pretty early. The papers are full of stories of miserable lottery winners.

    Replies: @128

    Lawyers do not seem to be a very happy lot.

  89. @anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Farmland is a fine diversification thing for Bill. But agriculture is a bad business. It is capital intensive and its product is a commodity. Check the price of corn and beans. They have been in mid single digits my entire life.

    If a farmer owns his land, then he could hang on or even thrive forever. Which is one reason for the low commodity prices.

    But farming, in general, is a "bad" business. Bad being capital intensive and selling into commodity markets.

    Replies: @128, @The Alarmist

    Japan has a price floor for farmers which gives them a certain guaranteed profit margin which makes it not quite a bad thing, paying farmers to not overproduce, so as to manage supply also works.

    • Replies: @anon
    @128

    Japan has a price floor for farmers which gives them a certain guaranteed profit margin which makes it not quite a bad thing, paying farmers to not overproduce, so as to manage supply also works.

    Remarkable! Why hasn't anyone ever thought of this in the US? Maybe there should be a Department of Agriculture created, and that bureau could also provide price supports and other market interventions in the US, too! Then farming in the US would surely be as profitable as it clearly is in Japan!

    Replies: @Znzn

  90. @Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Godiva is notorious for making poor-quality chocolates with impressive packaging to mask the lousy product. Buy Lindt if you want something that tastes better and which is more widely available on the US market.

    Replies: @128, @Old Prude

    Ritter?

  91. @Semi-Hemi
    At what point does having more money than you could possibly spend start to feel like not having any money? I have a theory that once you run out of things to buy that you possibly can use you have reached that point. Then maybe the realization hits you that no amount of money is going to do you a bit of good when "that time" comes as it will to us all. So now he's just spending for the sake of spending.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Jonathan Mason

    In the days of the Roman Empire it was coming for very rich men to use that surplus wealth to enhance the towns and cities that they lived in, for example building parks, zoos, or public baths, temples, etc., or by patronizing the arts and commissioning paintings and sculptures.

    America has enough billionaires that if they took on a few projects they could make quite a change.

    • Replies: @128
    @Jonathan Mason

    You could build a hospital that provides free sex change for 10 year olds as a charitable contribution for the community. Or a centre housing Syrian refugees in the middle of a midsize town.

  92. @SimpleSong
    @Altai

    Well... to some extent the horse has already left the barn. Big agribusiness (Monsanto, John Deere) is absolutely terrible for small to medium scale famers for a variety of reasons.

    We are rapidly heading towards a dichotomy of megafarms and hobby farms with nothing in between. On the outskirts of big cities you'll see lots of 20 acre operations owned by retired doctors, then in the country 2000+ acre operations growing one, or possibly two crops, staffed by one white guy and four mexicans, and completely empty small towns.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @stillCARealist

    Wolfgang Puck said the same thing about restaurants: you’ll have the chains and the ultra-chic expensive, and not much in between.

  93. @Achmed E. Newman
    No, even the biggest Billionaire is not a worry here. There's a big difference between 50 billion and numbers in the multiple trillions. I'm moving this over from that other thread:

    At an average of ~ $8,000/acre for the good farmland and $2,000 to $4,000/acre for the rest, divided 1/3 to 2/3, I came up with $4 Trillion in value for the entire “Fruited Plain” of America. I checked later and the web told me $2.7 Trillion.

    Does anyone think the Chinese won’t come in looting the place, after the financial SHTF, same way the big NY finance guys looted Russia in the 1990s? As Peak Stupidity discussed in “Will America be looted by China? – Part 4: The Fruited Plain”, even the high number is just ONE DECADE of US trade deficits with China. Is it all worth it for that cheap Chinese crap from Wal-Mart?

    Another question. Can you look at numbers like the total value of American farmland, housing, or corporate assets, and still say the US Gov’t’s spending an extra $1.9 Trillion here or there is not a problem?

    Don't worry about the Bill Gateses. Look in a different direction for whom you should worry about.

    Replies: @peterike, @The Alarmist, @Lot, @JimDandy

  94. @The Alarmist
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Thanks a lot, dumbasses, for destroying our culture.
     
    There you go again, trying to appropriate Belgian chocolates manufactured by a Turkish-owned conglomerate as American culture. Silly boy ... on this side of the pond, the joke is that an American’s idea of culture is yoghurt. ;)

    It really is a dark winter.

    Replies: @stillCARealist

    What is “yoghurt”? Is that something like yogurt? What’s up with the silent h? Maybe there’s some guttural sound about it that I’m missing.

    But you’re right about Godiva. They’re overpriced and not so special. I’m a Lindt/Ghirardelli fanatic myself. Gigantic transnational chocolate conglomerates can still make a delicious treat at a decent price that I can eat by the pound… or kilo… or whatever.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @stillCARealist

    I hate to say it, but most of the chocolate in the States is utter crap, even the expensive stuff. The stuff I get in my local supermarché is better than Godiva and at a fraction of the cost.

    , @Old Palo Altan
    @stillCARealist

    Godiva, and indeed most Belgian chocolates , are cheap and nasty.
    Ditto anything British, except of course for the magical products of Charbonnel & Walker, just off New Bond Street.
    Wisest to buy Swiss, and, yes, Lindt is perhaps the best of these.

    But surely See's Candies are still first-rate? They were a constant guilty pleasure during my years as a resident of northern California, which ended in 1979.
    About five years ago I was brought a box by some visitors to North Britain and found them every bit as good as I had remembered them.

  95. anon[236] • Disclaimer says:
    @128
    @anon

    Japan has a price floor for farmers which gives them a certain guaranteed profit margin which makes it not quite a bad thing, paying farmers to not overproduce, so as to manage supply also works.

    Replies: @anon

    Japan has a price floor for farmers which gives them a certain guaranteed profit margin which makes it not quite a bad thing, paying farmers to not overproduce, so as to manage supply also works.

    Remarkable! Why hasn’t anyone ever thought of this in the US? Maybe there should be a Department of Agriculture created, and that bureau could also provide price supports and other market interventions in the US, too! Then farming in the US would surely be as profitable as it clearly is in Japan!

    • Replies: @Znzn
    @anon

    How are open borders and free trade with China working out for you free market Libertarians so far?

  96. @anon
    @128

    Japan has a price floor for farmers which gives them a certain guaranteed profit margin which makes it not quite a bad thing, paying farmers to not overproduce, so as to manage supply also works.

    Remarkable! Why hasn't anyone ever thought of this in the US? Maybe there should be a Department of Agriculture created, and that bureau could also provide price supports and other market interventions in the US, too! Then farming in the US would surely be as profitable as it clearly is in Japan!

    Replies: @Znzn

    How are open borders and free trade with China working out for you free market Libertarians so far?

  97. @Mr. Anon

    Oh No, Bill Gates Has Bought 0.03% of All the Farmland in the U.S.
     
    He has the means to buy more. A lot of rich people are buying up land - people who in the past would have diversified their portfolios by buying up stocks. What does that say about their faith in "The Economy" (hallowed be its name).

    Replies: @Wilkey

    He has the means to buy more. A lot of rich people are buying up land – people who in the past would have diversified their portfolios by buying up stocks.

    This is one of the real problems with wealth and income disparity. Whenever concerns about income disparity come up most establishment, Chamber of Commerce Republicans pooh-pooh it as not mattering, focusing more on the increasing number of gadgets and cheap Chinese crap that Americans can now afford to buy.

    But there are some pretty important things you can never create more of, and chief among those is land. Combine the rapidly increasing wealth gap with mass immigration and decent land could quickly become unaffordable for many or even most Americans.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Wilkey


    Combine the rapidly increasing wealth gap with mass immigration and decent land could quickly become unaffordable for many or even most Americans.
     
    Yes, especially when he have "A billion Americans".
  98. @Jonathan Mason
    @Semi-Hemi

    In the days of the Roman Empire it was coming for very rich men to use that surplus wealth to enhance the towns and cities that they lived in, for example building parks, zoos, or public baths, temples, etc., or by patronizing the arts and commissioning paintings and sculptures.

    America has enough billionaires that if they took on a few projects they could make quite a change.

    Replies: @128

    You could build a hospital that provides free sex change for 10 year olds as a charitable contribution for the community. Or a centre housing Syrian refugees in the middle of a midsize town.

  99. Gates knows Steve that you do not, which is that food inflation is already large, and on track to become massive.

    The whole “Great Reset” of Davos/Gates making the Deplorables eat cockroaches and weeds and drink sewage water is because China is moving to middle income, all 1.1 billion of her, and places like Thailand, Malaysia, Turkey, Iran, Algeria, and other places are not far behind. Maybe even Indonesia.

    Since arable, productive land is pretty much all farmed, the only way President Xi can provide the Chinese Dream to his people is looting the food resources of the US.

    Take for example Turkeys. Not six years ago you could get Butterball frozen turkeys at Thanksgiving for 59 cents a pound. Now its $1.99 a pound this past Thanksgiving. Part of that is inflation — all those dollars push up prices for consumers no matter how much corporate and government debt the fed purchases. Part of that is energy costs being higher. And a great part of it is much higher Chinese demand.

    We are one aircraft carrier sunk by China to the point of wheelbarrows of cash needed to buy bread. Physical control of land and agricultural assets are at a premium.

    Per your commenters that small farms are uneconomical? Not if the dollar collapses and all factory farm food is shipped off to China. Think Davos is a joke? Those are the dudes running the Western World. And like Gates joined at the hip with China and Xi.

    • Replies: @Neoconned
    @Whiskey

    @Whiskey: check out any of Jim Rogers videos on YouTube.....hes had the same thesis the last 1p odd yrs: go long agriculture and farmland and water rights....

  100. @Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Godiva is notorious for making poor-quality chocolates with impressive packaging to mask the lousy product. Buy Lindt if you want something that tastes better and which is more widely available on the US market.

    Replies: @128, @Old Prude

    In Maine we have Haven’s whose chocolates are absolutely fabulous.

  101. @RichardTaylor
    It doesn't take that much farmland to feed Americans because of technology. We are a big net exporter of food I believe. Americans won't be starving. FYI, a lot of land is categorized as farmland only for tax reasons.

    America has something like $120 trillion in net assets. That is, $250 trillion in assets minus $130 trillion in debt. We have a long way to go before we collapse. Sure, we could have stock market crashes, even a depression, but the federal government will never lose what they call 'state capacity': the ability to enforce law, wield a military and collect taxes. Not in our lifetimes anyway.

    We should give up our dream of a Big Crash that tears it all down and saves the day.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @Reg Cæsar

    You’re not taking into account who’s being put in charge. Abundance of food is one thing, transporting it throughout a rapidly deteriorating infrastructure is something else. Look who is in charge of places like Baltimore and Detroit, and now Chicago. These places are falling apart. Roads and bridges require intelligent people to maintain them. Power grids, water treatment, and waste removal as well.

    Give a negro sports baller 50 million dollars and he’ll be broke by age 30. Now give him a city.

    • Replies: @RichardTaylor
    @Mike Tre

    But they aren't even starving in South Africa yet. Actually, mass starvation is a thing of the past in Africa for the most part, except for civil wars. So, we have many generations to go before it gets that bad in America, if ever.

  102. @New Dealer
    Off topic. ISteve, please review and sailerize this so that we don't have to (can find no mention of this via unz search function).

    Another extremely privileged and ungrateful product of recent immigration who wants to erase Americans, her family from the most ethnically bigoted and overpopulated country in the world, trained to hate us at Oberlin. And she’s a “science journalist.” You know what that means these days: she declares the science, those who question her are spreading harmful misinformation and must be silenced.

    The Next Great Migration: The Beauty and Terror of Life on the Move
    https://www.amazon.com/Next-Great-Migration-Sonia-Shah/dp/1635571979/


    A prize-winning journalist upends our centuries-long assumptions about migration through science, history, and reporting--predicting its lifesaving power in the face of climate change.

    The news today is full of stories of dislocated people on the move. Wild species, too, are escaping warming seas and desiccated lands, creeping, swimming, and flying in a mass exodus from their past habitats. News media presents this scrambling of the planet's migration patterns as unprecedented, provoking fears of the spread of disease and conflict and waves of anxiety across the Western world. On both sides of the Atlantic, experts issue alarmed predictions of millions of invading aliens, unstoppable as an advancing tsunami, and countries respond by electing anti-immigration leaders who slam closed borders that were historically porous.

    But the science and history of migration in animals, plants, and humans tell a different story. Far from being a disruptive behavior to be quelled at any cost, migration is an ancient and lifesaving response to environmental change, a biological imperative as necessary as breathing. Climate changes triggered the first human migrations out of Africa. Falling sea levels allowed our passage across the Bering Sea. Unhampered by barbed wire, migration allowed our ancestors to people the planet, catapulting us into the highest reaches of the Himalayan mountains and the most remote islands of the Pacific, creating and disseminating the biological, cultural, and social diversity that ecosystems and societies depend upon. In other words, migration is not the crisis--it is the solution.

    Conclusively tracking the history of misinformation from the 18th century through today's anti-immigration policies, The Next Great Migration makes the case for a future in which migration is not a source of fear, but of hope.

     

    It's as stupid as a freshman paper for an Oberlin humanities course.

    From the tsunami of virtue-spurting reviews:


    An ambitious work of journalism that argues migration has played a vital role in our planet’s history.

     

    So have meteors, volcanoes, ice ages, and plagues.

    Interweaving the human history of movement with parables from nature, she reframes migration not as an exception in an otherwise static world but instead as a biological and cultural norm―and one that should be embraced, not feared . . . a provocative invitation to imagine the inevitable migration of the future as an opportunity, rather than a threat.
     
    Carthage! Embrace the immigrant Latins. Asia! Embrace the Mongol hordes. American indigenes! Embrace the Columbian exchange, 90% disease mortality, and European conquest and dispossession. India! Embrace the British fleeing from bad weather. China! Embrace the opium wars.

    Compare to tragedy of the commons, innate human territoriality, and the world’s most important graph.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Lurker

    virtue-spurting

    Lol! Very good.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Lurker



    virtue-spurting

     

    Lol! Very good.
     
    It's assonant. For alliteration, try virtue-vomiting. Next on the menu is virtue-hemorrhaging.

    Then there is aristorrhea.
  103. @RichardTaylor
    It doesn't take that much farmland to feed Americans because of technology. We are a big net exporter of food I believe. Americans won't be starving. FYI, a lot of land is categorized as farmland only for tax reasons.

    America has something like $120 trillion in net assets. That is, $250 trillion in assets minus $130 trillion in debt. We have a long way to go before we collapse. Sure, we could have stock market crashes, even a depression, but the federal government will never lose what they call 'state capacity': the ability to enforce law, wield a military and collect taxes. Not in our lifetimes anyway.

    We should give up our dream of a Big Crash that tears it all down and saves the day.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @Reg Cæsar

    We have a long way to go before we collapse.

    Wait, what happened to “White Genocide”?

    Sure, we could have stock market crashes, even a depression, but the federal government will never lose what they call ‘state capacity’: the ability to enforce law, wield a military and collect taxes.

    With the gorillas in charge?

  104. @Desiderius
    @Paperback Writer

    Rundown neighborhood

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    Not their fault.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Paperback Writer

    Agreed

  105. @Lurker
    @New Dealer


    virtue-spurting
     
    Lol! Very good.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    virtue-spurting

    Lol! Very good.

    It’s assonant. For alliteration, try virtue-vomiting. Next on the menu is virtue-hemorrhaging.

    Then there is aristorrhea.

    • LOL: Liza
  106. @Wilkey
    @Mr. Anon


    He has the means to buy more. A lot of rich people are buying up land – people who in the past would have diversified their portfolios by buying up stocks.
     
    This is one of the real problems with wealth and income disparity. Whenever concerns about income disparity come up most establishment, Chamber of Commerce Republicans pooh-pooh it as not mattering, focusing more on the increasing number of gadgets and cheap Chinese crap that Americans can now afford to buy.

    But there are some pretty important things you can never create more of, and chief among those is land. Combine the rapidly increasing wealth gap with mass immigration and decent land could quickly become unaffordable for many or even most Americans.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Combine the rapidly increasing wealth gap with mass immigration and decent land could quickly become unaffordable for many or even most Americans.

    Yes, especially when he have “A billion Americans”.

  107. @Buzz Mohawk
    OT: Okay, here is yet another consequence of Steve's favorite (exaggerated reaction to a) virus:

    Godiva chocolates is closing its stores in the United States.

    For years now, friends and we have used Godiva stores as a go-to resource for special gifts, always appreciated and enjoyed on both ends. As recently as this Christmas, one neighbor went to a Godiva shop and then gave us a beautiful gift of chocolates.

    No more.

    Thanks a lot, dumbasses, for destroying our culture. As you so fondly like to say, "This is why we can't have nice things." Yes, you're damn right. YOU are now the reason why we can't have nice things. Are you happy now?

    https://www.godivachocolates.eu/images/gene/prod/zoom/goch000262_03_godiva-discovery-hamper.jpg

    Replies: @Desiderius, @epebble, @The Alarmist, @Mike Tre, @MGB, @Anon, @Known Fact, @Too Long Didn't Read, @Reg Cæsar, @3g4me

  108. For the record this is anecdotal…..so take it for what it is worth….

    I grew up in the NOLA region….the soil here is VERY salty and favors Florida type “pine savannah” habitat…..some land here is very fertile….it was called “King Cotton” for a reason…but much of the land is pu

  109. Bill Gates is smart. Never would have guessed that.

    15 years back i could have picked up an 120 acre parcel catty-cornered to my cousin’s farm. Needed some work–retiling, etc.–but i could have gotten it < 1500/acre. Was interested. Seemed like a good idea–he could have farmed it crop share. But then i was back home, a pile of work … off the front burner of my brain. Never got back to my uncle to make it happen and it sold off to a guy up the road. D'oh.

    The Fed has gone crazy to keep this party going. The only reason it hasn't bitten us in the ass, is "who's next". The US is becoming ever more of a joke, but for the dollar to get bounced you have to have a successor. China's the obvious candidate, but they have there issues. So the dollar remains the world's reserve currency … for lack of alternative. Where else you gonna put your money?

    But ultimately all these new dollars will have an effect. That effect almost certainly includes a gallon of gas or a bushel of corn costing more in dollars.

  110. For the record this is anecdotal…..so take it for what it is worth….

    I grew up in the NOLA region….the soil here is VERY salty and favors Florida type “pine savannah” habitat…..some land here is very fertile….it was called “King Cotton” for a reason…but much of the land is put bluntly undeveloped swamp…..as in “clear the land and drain the swamp yourself”….pure redneck stuff.

    Land prices now within 10 to 15 minutes of the Gulf of Mexico is 10 to 20k per ACRE…..and thats appreciating FAST…..i live 40 minutes in the country now…..land here is 6k an acre…..this is an hour inland and a 30 minute drive to the nearest fast food or Walmart….

    In the 1970s off Interstate 10(“the ten freeway”as Steve knows it, goes from Florida to LA) you could buy prime land off the Interstate here for 7$ PER ACRE….and no i am not joking…..now? 20k per acre of undeveloped land….

    And just wait til Asian “hot money” flows in…..pho restaurants herr charge ten bucks a bowl for what i consider gutter food…..even trash is expensive…..

  111. @Mike Tre
    @RichardTaylor

    You’re not taking into account who’s being put in charge. Abundance of food is one thing, transporting it throughout a rapidly deteriorating infrastructure is something else. Look who is in charge of places like Baltimore and Detroit, and now Chicago. These places are falling apart. Roads and bridges require intelligent people to maintain them. Power grids, water treatment, and waste removal as well.

    Give a negro sports baller 50 million dollars and he’ll be broke by age 30. Now give him a city.

    Replies: @RichardTaylor

    But they aren’t even starving in South Africa yet. Actually, mass starvation is a thing of the past in Africa for the most part, except for civil wars. So, we have many generations to go before it gets that bad in America, if ever.

  112. My parents owned, among other assets, a 240 acre farm. We didn’t live there but often went on weekends, did some bush-hogging or other chores, rode our pony, walked around. 240 acres is so big that there were corners I never visited. Hard to imagine that one man owns 1,000 farms that size.

  113. @Too Long Didn't Read
    @Buzz Mohawk

    As far as I can tell, Godiva's shops were clustered inside shopping malls, or sometimes as a sublease of a higher end retailer like Nordstrom or maybe Neiman Marcus. But...indoor malls have been declining in foot traffic for a few years, and the Coof plus Only Black Lives Matter looting hasn't done them a bit of good. If Godiva's is switching to online it's mostly just a result of market plus social forces. Might as well blame Bezos, for all the good it will do for you.

    Thanks a lot, dumbasses, for destroying our culture.

    To whom is this little rant directed? At governors such as Cuomo - mostly D's? At rioters peaceful protestors? At others who comment here? At the random passersby who carefully avoid eye contact with you at the bus stop? Whom?

    Who you talkin' at, Willis?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    At the random passersby who carefully avoid eye contact with you at the bus stop?

    They all stare right at me because they’re out to get me. They want to take my chocolates away.

  114. @Anon
    It would be fun to watch that nerd get kicked by a mule.

    Replies: @Simon Tugmutton

  115. @The Alarmist
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Depending on how the plot is shaped, 400 acres doesn’t seem very big when you are trying to take off or land a Beech Duchess on it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Buzz Mohawk

    You would have loved Meadowlark Airport. It was 80 acres between two streets in Huntington Beach.
    Don’t hit the telephone wires!

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Lulz ... at least they have 2,000 feet of asphalt ... my grass makes things a bit more challenging. Shame they couldn’t turn it into a residential airpark.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Buzz Mohawk

  116. @Paperback Writer
    @Desiderius

    Not their fault.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Agreed

  117. Sure you’re at Unz? We’re supposed to disagree about everything here, even the things we agree about.

  118. @Jonathan Mason
    So what is he growing on his farmland?

    Replies: @Wilkey, @SunBakedSuburb, @Adam Smith, @paranoid goy

    Nobody is showing me any maps, but here’s my theory: Billy da Patch might be growing GMOs or hybrid crops (at a loss, even?) in the middle of traditional farming communities, and spreading his poison pollen?
    MonSatano has successfully sued private farmers for (unwittingly) reusing their own seed that was contaminated by GMO and hybrid frankencrops. Not many people know that hybrid organisms are usually sterile, which would destroy a traditional farmer’s business model of selecting and replanting his own seeds year after year.
    Extrapolated, is this the real plan behind mRNA “vaccines”? Polluting your cells with his (patented) proteins, even though manufactured by your own body, gives him legal ownership of your genome, according to the “independent judiciary” anyway.
    All hail Baal Gates, Chief Evangelist of GMO, Holy Profit of Population Reduction, may his abortion temples supply the kakastocracy with fresh baby blood and spare body parts forever!

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @paranoid goy


    MonSatano has successfully sued private farmers for (unwittingly) reusing their own seed that was contaminated by GMO and hybrid frankencrops. Not many people know that hybrid organisms are usually sterile, which would destroy a traditional farmer’s business model of selecting and replanting his own seeds year after year.
     
    This makes no sense. If the hybrid crops were truly sterile then the farmers couldn't replant them, even accidentally.

    The reason that Monsanto has been successful in suing certain farmers is that Monsanto proved in court to a jury of the farmers' peers that the farmers, clearly and in intentional violation of patent law and of the agreements that they signed when they bought the patented seed, saved some of their crops and replanted them because they were too cheap to pay the full price for Monsanto Roundup resistant seed. The juries didn't buy the farmers' clearly bullshit, dog ate my homework excuses that the pollen blew in from next door because there was ample evidence that they knew exactly what they were doing and were spraying Roundup on their crops. Roundup resistant seed only gives you a higher yield if you spray the herbicide on your crops to kill all the weeds that compete with the crop. If you spray herbicide on non-resistant seed it kills the crop as well as the weeds so no one would spray Roundup on their crops unless they were pretty sure that it had the Monsanto patented genes.

    There are plenty of heirloom, non-herbicide resistant varieties of corn, soybeans, etc. but these farmers wanted the benefit of patented higher yielding herbicide resistant varieties without having to pay for them. This makes them no better or more sympathetic than guys who steal cable service or bypass their electric meter or whatever.

    Replies: @paranoid goy

  119. @stillCARealist
    @The Alarmist

    What is "yoghurt"? Is that something like yogurt? What's up with the silent h? Maybe there's some guttural sound about it that I'm missing.

    But you're right about Godiva. They're overpriced and not so special. I'm a Lindt/Ghirardelli fanatic myself. Gigantic transnational chocolate conglomerates can still make a delicious treat at a decent price that I can eat by the pound... or kilo... or whatever.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Old Palo Altan

    I hate to say it, but most of the chocolate in the States is utter crap, even the expensive stuff. The stuff I get in my local supermarché is better than Godiva and at a fraction of the cost.

  120. @Buzz Mohawk
    @The Alarmist

    You would have loved Meadowlark Airport. It was 80 acres between two streets in Huntington Beach.

    http://www.runyard.org/OPL/moms-opl-book/L16_post_1978Ricks.jpg
    Don't hit the telephone wires!

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    Lulz … at least they have 2,000 feet of asphalt … my grass makes things a bit more challenging. Shame they couldn’t turn it into a residential airpark.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @The Alarmist

    Wait, wait, I know a Cub that might be interested. Asphalt is for the birds.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @The Alarmist

    You remind me of a neighbor from hometown days. He was a pilot who had a ranch a mile down the road from us. He flew a Stearman out of there. After he passed away, his property became a county park, as per his wishes. I've just now gone to Google Maps and eyeballed the remnants of his runway: About 1,500 feet of mountain meadow grass at an altitude of 7,500 feet. Not entirely flat either.

    He would come roaring over us in his red biplane, right through the valley, over our heads. It was wonderful.

    https://thumbs.dreamstime.com/b/red-stearman-2021095.jpg

    So you fly a Duchess! I understand that's a great little twin, and a good way to get into multi-engine flying. Nice-looking plane.

  121. @anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Farmland is a fine diversification thing for Bill. But agriculture is a bad business. It is capital intensive and its product is a commodity. Check the price of corn and beans. They have been in mid single digits my entire life.

    If a farmer owns his land, then he could hang on or even thrive forever. Which is one reason for the low commodity prices.

    But farming, in general, is a "bad" business. Bad being capital intensive and selling into commodity markets.

    Replies: @128, @The Alarmist

    Farming is a bad business, unless you want to ensure the quality of your own foodstuffs as a primary objective. I would not be surprised if that might be motivating the Gates family.

  122. @Buzz Mohawk
    OT: Okay, here is yet another consequence of Steve's favorite (exaggerated reaction to a) virus:

    Godiva chocolates is closing its stores in the United States.

    For years now, friends and we have used Godiva stores as a go-to resource for special gifts, always appreciated and enjoyed on both ends. As recently as this Christmas, one neighbor went to a Godiva shop and then gave us a beautiful gift of chocolates.

    No more.

    Thanks a lot, dumbasses, for destroying our culture. As you so fondly like to say, "This is why we can't have nice things." Yes, you're damn right. YOU are now the reason why we can't have nice things. Are you happy now?

    https://www.godivachocolates.eu/images/gene/prod/zoom/goch000262_03_godiva-discovery-hamper.jpg

    Replies: @Desiderius, @epebble, @The Alarmist, @Mike Tre, @MGB, @Anon, @Known Fact, @Too Long Didn't Read, @Reg Cæsar, @3g4me

    @ 43 Buzz Mohawk: Godiva chocolates are Turkish/Korean owned and NOT by any definition Belgian chocolates (not produced there and utterly lacking Belgian quality). They may have been genuine perhaps 35 years ago, but are now standard, overpriced, crappy-quality ‘murrican chocolate and you pay for the name, not the quality. Same goes for NY’s “Harry and David” foodstuffs – overpriced garbage that’s coasting on an old reputation. Go to bargain-priced Aldi grocery store during the holiday season and stock up on genuine Belgian chocolates for a song.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @3g4me

    Amen, brother. I didn’t even know I liked chocolate until I had some out of a shop in a town near me. It’s all handmade by a guy who was trained in Belgium, I believe. My wife won’t even look at chocolate out of anywhere else. Even the Cadbury’s that we get in Ireland has gone to hell now.

    , @Jack D
    @3g4me

    Godiva has two factories, one in Brussels, and another in Pennsylvania. The ownership nowadays is a Turkish conglomerate (before that it was the Campbell Soup Company).

    The chocolate that they sell at Aldi, especially during the holidays, is pretty good for the money but you get what you pay for. Cocoa beans don't grow in Belgium. You can make fine chocolate, or not so fine chocolate, pretty much anywhere. If you really want good stuff you should seek out an artisanal chocolate maker for the same reason you should buy beer from an artisanal brewer and not from InBev Budweiser, coffee not from Starbucks, etc.. At some point, mass production is just incompatible with top quality because mass production requires massive quantities and top shelf raw materials and skilled artisanal labor are by definition not available in massive quantities.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri

  123. @Lot
    @Achmed E. Newman

    High net worth people and university endowments have been bulk buying timber and farmland for at least 20 years.

    It hasn’t been a losing investment, but it has mostly underperformed.

    Chinese funds going to America are mostly retail level Chinese wealthy wanting an escape hatch in a more stable nation. Chinese ADR stock and crypto scams meanwhile partly reverse the flow from middle class Americans to Chinese plugged in with the Party enough they can rob foreigners with impunity.

    Replies: @3g4me

    @71 Lot: Oh, so reassuring to hear that some of your co-ethnics and others of their ilk are not reaping huge profits on the purchases of land. Of course, to some of us there are things that matter a lot more than money, but you continue hewing closely to your great heritage.

  124. @Whiskey
    Gates knows Steve that you do not, which is that food inflation is already large, and on track to become massive.

    The whole "Great Reset" of Davos/Gates making the Deplorables eat cockroaches and weeds and drink sewage water is because China is moving to middle income, all 1.1 billion of her, and places like Thailand, Malaysia, Turkey, Iran, Algeria, and other places are not far behind. Maybe even Indonesia.

    Since arable, productive land is pretty much all farmed, the only way President Xi can provide the Chinese Dream to his people is looting the food resources of the US.

    Take for example Turkeys. Not six years ago you could get Butterball frozen turkeys at Thanksgiving for 59 cents a pound. Now its $1.99 a pound this past Thanksgiving. Part of that is inflation -- all those dollars push up prices for consumers no matter how much corporate and government debt the fed purchases. Part of that is energy costs being higher. And a great part of it is much higher Chinese demand.

    We are one aircraft carrier sunk by China to the point of wheelbarrows of cash needed to buy bread. Physical control of land and agricultural assets are at a premium.

    Per your commenters that small farms are uneconomical? Not if the dollar collapses and all factory farm food is shipped off to China. Think Davos is a joke? Those are the dudes running the Western World. And like Gates joined at the hip with China and Xi.

    Replies: @Neoconned

    : check out any of Jim Rogers videos on YouTube…..hes had the same thesis the last 1p odd yrs: go long agriculture and farmland and water rights….

  125. @The Alarmist
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Lulz ... at least they have 2,000 feet of asphalt ... my grass makes things a bit more challenging. Shame they couldn’t turn it into a residential airpark.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Buzz Mohawk

    Wait, wait, I know a Cub that might be interested. Asphalt is for the birds.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @JMcG

    lulz ... I got my ASES in a Cub on floats. I was surprised the thing would fly with me, the check pilot and our tackle, but it did. As we did one takeoff, I swear I saw a catfish the size of a small car swimming near the dam in a lake in middle GA.

  126. @3g4me
    @Buzz Mohawk

    @ 43 Buzz Mohawk: Godiva chocolates are Turkish/Korean owned and NOT by any definition Belgian chocolates (not produced there and utterly lacking Belgian quality). They may have been genuine perhaps 35 years ago, but are now standard, overpriced, crappy-quality 'murrican chocolate and you pay for the name, not the quality. Same goes for NY's "Harry and David" foodstuffs - overpriced garbage that's coasting on an old reputation. Go to bargain-priced Aldi grocery store during the holiday season and stock up on genuine Belgian chocolates for a song.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Jack D

    Amen, brother. I didn’t even know I liked chocolate until I had some out of a shop in a town near me. It’s all handmade by a guy who was trained in Belgium, I believe. My wife won’t even look at chocolate out of anywhere else. Even the Cadbury’s that we get in Ireland has gone to hell now.

  127. @paranoid goy
    @Jonathan Mason

    Nobody is showing me any maps, but here's my theory: Billy da Patch might be growing GMOs or hybrid crops (at a loss, even?) in the middle of traditional farming communities, and spreading his poison pollen?
    MonSatano has successfully sued private farmers for (unwittingly) reusing their own seed that was contaminated by GMO and hybrid frankencrops. Not many people know that hybrid organisms are usually sterile, which would destroy a traditional farmer's business model of selecting and replanting his own seeds year after year.
    Extrapolated, is this the real plan behind mRNA "vaccines"? Polluting your cells with his (patented) proteins, even though manufactured by your own body, gives him legal ownership of your genome, according to the "independent judiciary" anyway.
    All hail Baal Gates, Chief Evangelist of GMO, Holy Profit of Population Reduction, may his abortion temples supply the kakastocracy with fresh baby blood and spare body parts forever!

    Replies: @Jack D

    MonSatano has successfully sued private farmers for (unwittingly) reusing their own seed that was contaminated by GMO and hybrid frankencrops. Not many people know that hybrid organisms are usually sterile, which would destroy a traditional farmer’s business model of selecting and replanting his own seeds year after year.

    This makes no sense. If the hybrid crops were truly sterile then the farmers couldn’t replant them, even accidentally.

    The reason that Monsanto has been successful in suing certain farmers is that Monsanto proved in court to a jury of the farmers’ peers that the farmers, clearly and in intentional violation of patent law and of the agreements that they signed when they bought the patented seed, saved some of their crops and replanted them because they were too cheap to pay the full price for Monsanto Roundup resistant seed. The juries didn’t buy the farmers’ clearly bullshit, dog ate my homework excuses that the pollen blew in from next door because there was ample evidence that they knew exactly what they were doing and were spraying Roundup on their crops. Roundup resistant seed only gives you a higher yield if you spray the herbicide on your crops to kill all the weeds that compete with the crop. If you spray herbicide on non-resistant seed it kills the crop as well as the weeds so no one would spray Roundup on their crops unless they were pretty sure that it had the Monsanto patented genes.

    There are plenty of heirloom, non-herbicide resistant varieties of corn, soybeans, etc. but these farmers wanted the benefit of patented higher yielding herbicide resistant varieties without having to pay for them. This makes them no better or more sympathetic than guys who steal cable service or bypass their electric meter or whatever.

    • Replies: @paranoid goy
    @Jack D

    You work for Monsanto, ya?
    Also, I mention gmo AND hybrids, I do not equate them.
    And if you ever done any farming, you would know that those hybrid seeds do sprout and grow, but the seed from that is often literally empty inside.
    As for "plenty evidence", well, once again, evidence before an "independent judiciary" is a fickle beast, isn't it? Sort of like global warming logic there.
    IF you knew anything about farming, and ever atually grew heritage crops, you would know the joys of breaking open a cob of corn and finding Panar's frankendreck interspersed with your own breed.

  128. @3g4me
    @Buzz Mohawk

    @ 43 Buzz Mohawk: Godiva chocolates are Turkish/Korean owned and NOT by any definition Belgian chocolates (not produced there and utterly lacking Belgian quality). They may have been genuine perhaps 35 years ago, but are now standard, overpriced, crappy-quality 'murrican chocolate and you pay for the name, not the quality. Same goes for NY's "Harry and David" foodstuffs - overpriced garbage that's coasting on an old reputation. Go to bargain-priced Aldi grocery store during the holiday season and stock up on genuine Belgian chocolates for a song.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Jack D

    Godiva has two factories, one in Brussels, and another in Pennsylvania. The ownership nowadays is a Turkish conglomerate (before that it was the Campbell Soup Company).

    The chocolate that they sell at Aldi, especially during the holidays, is pretty good for the money but you get what you pay for. Cocoa beans don’t grow in Belgium. You can make fine chocolate, or not so fine chocolate, pretty much anywhere. If you really want good stuff you should seek out an artisanal chocolate maker for the same reason you should buy beer from an artisanal brewer and not from InBev Budweiser, coffee not from Starbucks, etc.. At some point, mass production is just incompatible with top quality because mass production requires massive quantities and top shelf raw materials and skilled artisanal labor are by definition not available in massive quantities.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    I've learned a little about chocolate from this thread, so except for the usual embarrassment over looking like a rube, I guess I'm glad I started it.

    "You like THAT crap?! Well, let me tell you..!" That sort of thing. Hell, I like Hershey bars, sometimes prefer them, dammit, and they're made over in your neck of the woods too.

    There is a Frenchman nearby who is a trained, certified or blessed-by-the-Pope chocolatier, so when we feel like spending the money and going to the trouble, there is his shop. He's also a fine baker, appointed by God or something, and we like his baguettes. (The ones we've had in France seem stale in comparison, and they probably are, but what do we know? Maybe they keep them in a bucket in the back to sell to the Americans.)

    Still, when a neighbor leaves a Godiva box hanging on our front door in December, we don't throw it out, and we don't complain that he didn't go to our local chocolatier from Alsace. When I stay at the Hyatt in Denver and they give me complementary passes for the Starbucks in their lobby, I use those too, even though I am something of an old coffeehouse snob who feels the same way about Charbucks as I guess I should about Godiva.

    Beer? I happen to like Yuengling, and I have been picking it up at stores here since they finally started exporting it to The Land of Steady Habits. It's another mass-produced product of your Keystone State, so call me a hillbilly. My sister in Bucks Country introduced me to it.

    I was walking from my apartment to microbreweries in downtown Boulder decades ago, when the whole hipster, tiny beer trend made its way there... Frankly, along the way, there have been many mediocre little brewers who couldn't match what the big, old boys in Europe have been doing forever, but now they've gotten better. Smaller companies and their small products are not always better. I don't drive a Caterham or a TVR either, but I understand, and yes, our local chocolatier makes wonderful treats.

    Replies: @black sea

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Jack D


    Cocoa beans don’t grow in Belgium.
     
    True, but the best cocoa beans don't grow in any country known to the retail market for fine chocolates. Though there was a small firm some years back that set out to make artisanal "single source" chocolate on one of the source islands of premium cocoa beans. Don't know what became of it, if anything. Do know that while the cocoa beans only grow in the tropics, making chocolate candy there is difficult because the heat works against the forming process. It's not just for HBD reasons that the world's fine chocolate candies all come from cool northern climes.

    And for anyone proclaiming the virtues of British "chocolate", British firms are known to use hydrogenated vegetable fat in place of real cocoa butter in their candies. For that alone, the UK should have been ejected from the EU decades ago, if not subject to a declaration of war by Germany, Belgium and Switzerland.

    Replies: @JMcG

  129. @JMcG
    @The Alarmist

    Wait, wait, I know a Cub that might be interested. Asphalt is for the birds.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    lulz … I got my ASES in a Cub on floats. I was surprised the thing would fly with me, the check pilot and our tackle, but it did. As we did one takeoff, I swear I saw a catfish the size of a small car swimming near the dam in a lake in middle GA.

  130. Since Bill has said he’s giving away everything before he buys the farm:

    https://www.businessinsider.com/bill-gates-reveals-why-hes-giving-away-his-90-billion-fortune-2018-2

    Why is he out buying farms?

  131. @Jack D
    @3g4me

    Godiva has two factories, one in Brussels, and another in Pennsylvania. The ownership nowadays is a Turkish conglomerate (before that it was the Campbell Soup Company).

    The chocolate that they sell at Aldi, especially during the holidays, is pretty good for the money but you get what you pay for. Cocoa beans don't grow in Belgium. You can make fine chocolate, or not so fine chocolate, pretty much anywhere. If you really want good stuff you should seek out an artisanal chocolate maker for the same reason you should buy beer from an artisanal brewer and not from InBev Budweiser, coffee not from Starbucks, etc.. At some point, mass production is just incompatible with top quality because mass production requires massive quantities and top shelf raw materials and skilled artisanal labor are by definition not available in massive quantities.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri

    I’ve learned a little about chocolate from this thread, so except for the usual embarrassment over looking like a rube, I guess I’m glad I started it.

    [MORE]

    “You like THAT crap?! Well, let me tell you..!” That sort of thing. Hell, I like Hershey bars, sometimes prefer them, dammit, and they’re made over in your neck of the woods too.

    There is a Frenchman nearby who is a trained, certified or blessed-by-the-Pope chocolatier, so when we feel like spending the money and going to the trouble, there is his shop. He’s also a fine baker, appointed by God or something, and we like his baguettes. (The ones we’ve had in France seem stale in comparison, and they probably are, but what do we know? Maybe they keep them in a bucket in the back to sell to the Americans.)

    Still, when a neighbor leaves a Godiva box hanging on our front door in December, we don’t throw it out, and we don’t complain that he didn’t go to our local chocolatier from Alsace. When I stay at the Hyatt in Denver and they give me complementary passes for the Starbucks in their lobby, I use those too, even though I am something of an old coffeehouse snob who feels the same way about Charbucks as I guess I should about Godiva.

    Beer? I happen to like Yuengling, and I have been picking it up at stores here since they finally started exporting it to The Land of Steady Habits. It’s another mass-produced product of your Keystone State, so call me a hillbilly. My sister in Bucks Country introduced me to it.

    I was walking from my apartment to microbreweries in downtown Boulder decades ago, when the whole hipster, tiny beer trend made its way there… Frankly, along the way, there have been many mediocre little brewers who couldn’t match what the big, old boys in Europe have been doing forever, but now they’ve gotten better. Smaller companies and their small products are not always better. I don’t drive a Caterham or a TVR either, but I understand, and yes, our local chocolatier makes wonderful treats.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Buzz Mohawk


    when a neighbor leaves a Godiva box hanging on our front door in December, we don’t throw it out, and we don’t complain that he didn’t go to our local chocolatier from Alsace.

     

    Godiva, the Chocolate of the Deplorables
  132. @The Alarmist
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Lulz ... at least they have 2,000 feet of asphalt ... my grass makes things a bit more challenging. Shame they couldn’t turn it into a residential airpark.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Buzz Mohawk

    You remind me of a neighbor from hometown days. He was a pilot who had a ranch a mile down the road from us. He flew a Stearman out of there. After he passed away, his property became a county park, as per his wishes. I’ve just now gone to Google Maps and eyeballed the remnants of his runway: About 1,500 feet of mountain meadow grass at an altitude of 7,500 feet. Not entirely flat either.

    He would come roaring over us in his red biplane, right through the valley, over our heads. It was wonderful.

    So you fly a Duchess! I understand that’s a great little twin, and a good way to get into multi-engine flying. Nice-looking plane.

  133. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    I've learned a little about chocolate from this thread, so except for the usual embarrassment over looking like a rube, I guess I'm glad I started it.

    "You like THAT crap?! Well, let me tell you..!" That sort of thing. Hell, I like Hershey bars, sometimes prefer them, dammit, and they're made over in your neck of the woods too.

    There is a Frenchman nearby who is a trained, certified or blessed-by-the-Pope chocolatier, so when we feel like spending the money and going to the trouble, there is his shop. He's also a fine baker, appointed by God or something, and we like his baguettes. (The ones we've had in France seem stale in comparison, and they probably are, but what do we know? Maybe they keep them in a bucket in the back to sell to the Americans.)

    Still, when a neighbor leaves a Godiva box hanging on our front door in December, we don't throw it out, and we don't complain that he didn't go to our local chocolatier from Alsace. When I stay at the Hyatt in Denver and they give me complementary passes for the Starbucks in their lobby, I use those too, even though I am something of an old coffeehouse snob who feels the same way about Charbucks as I guess I should about Godiva.

    Beer? I happen to like Yuengling, and I have been picking it up at stores here since they finally started exporting it to The Land of Steady Habits. It's another mass-produced product of your Keystone State, so call me a hillbilly. My sister in Bucks Country introduced me to it.

    I was walking from my apartment to microbreweries in downtown Boulder decades ago, when the whole hipster, tiny beer trend made its way there... Frankly, along the way, there have been many mediocre little brewers who couldn't match what the big, old boys in Europe have been doing forever, but now they've gotten better. Smaller companies and their small products are not always better. I don't drive a Caterham or a TVR either, but I understand, and yes, our local chocolatier makes wonderful treats.

    Replies: @black sea

    when a neighbor leaves a Godiva box hanging on our front door in December, we don’t throw it out, and we don’t complain that he didn’t go to our local chocolatier from Alsace.

    Godiva, the Chocolate of the Deplorables

  134. @Jack D
    @paranoid goy


    MonSatano has successfully sued private farmers for (unwittingly) reusing their own seed that was contaminated by GMO and hybrid frankencrops. Not many people know that hybrid organisms are usually sterile, which would destroy a traditional farmer’s business model of selecting and replanting his own seeds year after year.
     
    This makes no sense. If the hybrid crops were truly sterile then the farmers couldn't replant them, even accidentally.

    The reason that Monsanto has been successful in suing certain farmers is that Monsanto proved in court to a jury of the farmers' peers that the farmers, clearly and in intentional violation of patent law and of the agreements that they signed when they bought the patented seed, saved some of their crops and replanted them because they were too cheap to pay the full price for Monsanto Roundup resistant seed. The juries didn't buy the farmers' clearly bullshit, dog ate my homework excuses that the pollen blew in from next door because there was ample evidence that they knew exactly what they were doing and were spraying Roundup on their crops. Roundup resistant seed only gives you a higher yield if you spray the herbicide on your crops to kill all the weeds that compete with the crop. If you spray herbicide on non-resistant seed it kills the crop as well as the weeds so no one would spray Roundup on their crops unless they were pretty sure that it had the Monsanto patented genes.

    There are plenty of heirloom, non-herbicide resistant varieties of corn, soybeans, etc. but these farmers wanted the benefit of patented higher yielding herbicide resistant varieties without having to pay for them. This makes them no better or more sympathetic than guys who steal cable service or bypass their electric meter or whatever.

    Replies: @paranoid goy

    You work for Monsanto, ya?
    Also, I mention gmo AND hybrids, I do not equate them.
    And if you ever done any farming, you would know that those hybrid seeds do sprout and grow, but the seed from that is often literally empty inside.
    As for “plenty evidence”, well, once again, evidence before an “independent judiciary” is a fickle beast, isn’t it? Sort of like global warming logic there.
    IF you knew anything about farming, and ever atually grew heritage crops, you would know the joys of breaking open a cob of corn and finding Panar’s frankendreck interspersed with your own breed.

    • Agree: Liza
  135. @Buzz Mohawk
    When I first read about this, some little time ago, I thought, "oh shit, another oligarch with near-infinite power." Then I stopped and thought from my own experience:

    One family I have known for forty years owns nearly a square mile of farmland in New York State. That is just a typical, family farm. The property was given to their ancestor as reward for his service in the American Revolution. There is a bronze plaque in front of the barn; it was put there over a century ago.

    Another family I know owns 400 acres in the Rocky Mountains, where I built my log cabin and lived for seven months before college. That is roughly 3/4 of a square mile (which in America is 640 acres, BTW.)

    Bill Gates owns approximately 378 times what either one of my old friends owns ... Wait a minute ... more than, but of the same magnitude, without doing the math.

    Hey, let's do the arithmetic: Two of my old friends own a total of approximately 1000 acres. Bill owns 242,000. Okay, so Bill, one of the richest assholes on the planet owns 242 times what 2 friends of mine own.

    I say big, fucking deal. It sounds like a lot by itself, but viewed as part of a very large, rich country where my friends are nothing special, Bill's land is nothing special either. I'm surprised somebody else doesn't own more.

    In fact, Steve, maybe you should look into corporate ownership of land. How many acres do agricultural companies own in the US? I bet some own a hell of a lot more, and a much, much greater share of America's farmland. How much of that, BTW, changed hands from old, American farm families to corporations?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @AndrewR, @SunBakedSuburb, @kaganovitch, @anon, @Almost Missouri

    Not agreeing or disagreeing with anyone, but just to clarify “farmland” discussions, there are varying definitions of “farmland” and even within definitions, widely varying quality and yields. “Land” ≠ “rangeland” ≠ “farmland”. Within “farmland”, an acre of marginal northern hillside ≠ an acre warm southern bottomland. West of the 98th meridian, most land needs irrigation and water is increasingly scarce, so the productivity of most Western land depends more on the local water rights than on the quality of the land itself. (In the most extreme cases—COUGHImperial ValleyCOUGH—the farming is borderline hydroponic: soil nearly irrelevant.) And most Western irrigation is subsidized, often in opaque and byzantine ways, so resultant land prices are less market prices than reflections of local subsidy arrangements. (Oh and tax shelters, so tax law plays in too! And other arcana of corporate and trust law!)

    tl;dr: Number of acres tells very little about the productivity of land holdings. It tells you even less about such productivity in a dollar-collapse scenario where weird subsidies and price guarantees stop mattering.

    Bill Gates may or may not be aware of this.

  136. @Jack D
    @3g4me

    Godiva has two factories, one in Brussels, and another in Pennsylvania. The ownership nowadays is a Turkish conglomerate (before that it was the Campbell Soup Company).

    The chocolate that they sell at Aldi, especially during the holidays, is pretty good for the money but you get what you pay for. Cocoa beans don't grow in Belgium. You can make fine chocolate, or not so fine chocolate, pretty much anywhere. If you really want good stuff you should seek out an artisanal chocolate maker for the same reason you should buy beer from an artisanal brewer and not from InBev Budweiser, coffee not from Starbucks, etc.. At some point, mass production is just incompatible with top quality because mass production requires massive quantities and top shelf raw materials and skilled artisanal labor are by definition not available in massive quantities.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri

    Cocoa beans don’t grow in Belgium.

    True, but the best cocoa beans don’t grow in any country known to the retail market for fine chocolates. Though there was a small firm some years back that set out to make artisanal “single source” chocolate on one of the source islands of premium cocoa beans. Don’t know what became of it, if anything. Do know that while the cocoa beans only grow in the tropics, making chocolate candy there is difficult because the heat works against the forming process. It’s not just for HBD reasons that the world’s fine chocolate candies all come from cool northern climes.

    And for anyone proclaiming the virtues of British “chocolate”, British firms are known to use hydrogenated vegetable fat in place of real cocoa butter in their candies. For that alone, the UK should have been ejected from the EU decades ago, if not subject to a declaration of war by Germany, Belgium and Switzerland.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Almost Missouri

    Thank you! Chocolate in England and Ireland is the nastiest stuff I’ve ever had.

  137. @Almost Missouri
    @Jack D


    Cocoa beans don’t grow in Belgium.
     
    True, but the best cocoa beans don't grow in any country known to the retail market for fine chocolates. Though there was a small firm some years back that set out to make artisanal "single source" chocolate on one of the source islands of premium cocoa beans. Don't know what became of it, if anything. Do know that while the cocoa beans only grow in the tropics, making chocolate candy there is difficult because the heat works against the forming process. It's not just for HBD reasons that the world's fine chocolate candies all come from cool northern climes.

    And for anyone proclaiming the virtues of British "chocolate", British firms are known to use hydrogenated vegetable fat in place of real cocoa butter in their candies. For that alone, the UK should have been ejected from the EU decades ago, if not subject to a declaration of war by Germany, Belgium and Switzerland.

    Replies: @JMcG

    Thank you! Chocolate in England and Ireland is the nastiest stuff I’ve ever had.

  138. More concerned that he’s the largest shareholder in Canadian National Railroad. Look how fast Joe shut down Keystone.

  139. @stillCARealist
    @The Alarmist

    What is "yoghurt"? Is that something like yogurt? What's up with the silent h? Maybe there's some guttural sound about it that I'm missing.

    But you're right about Godiva. They're overpriced and not so special. I'm a Lindt/Ghirardelli fanatic myself. Gigantic transnational chocolate conglomerates can still make a delicious treat at a decent price that I can eat by the pound... or kilo... or whatever.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Old Palo Altan

    Godiva, and indeed most Belgian chocolates , are cheap and nasty.
    Ditto anything British, except of course for the magical products of Charbonnel & Walker, just off New Bond Street.
    Wisest to buy Swiss, and, yes, Lindt is perhaps the best of these.

    But surely See’s Candies are still first-rate? They were a constant guilty pleasure during my years as a resident of northern California, which ended in 1979.
    About five years ago I was brought a box by some visitors to North Britain and found them every bit as good as I had remembered them.

  140. @Mike Tre
    @Buzz Mohawk

    As they say, we should just kill everybody, as long as it saves just one life.

    Replies: @Liza

    Or as others say, “You want me to set my kid on fire so yours can stay warm.”

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