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From the New York Times Magazine, an article about how colleges are biased in favor of lazy white boys and discriminate against amazing hard-working black and Latino Women of Color. That’s why Silicon Valley is full of indolent white boys making huge amounts of money in easy jobs like starting their own businesses, while amazing black women and Puerto Rican men have to take on life’s greatest challenges, such as being a college admissions staffer or writing op-eds about how society should pay more attention to their hair.

What College Admissions Offices Really Want

Elite schools say they’re looking for academic excellence and diversity.
But their thirst for tuition revenue means that wealth trumps all.

By PAUL TOUGH SEPT. 9, 2019

In the fall of 2014, Angel Pérez was hired to oversee enrollment at Trinity College, a small liberal-arts school that occupies a picturesque 100-acre hillside campus overlooking Hartford.

Trinity, with its famous squash team, is often thought of as the preppiest college in the Northeast, what Washington and Lee is to the Southeast.

It’s not exactly representative.

By the way, the 2019 Trinity men’s squash team was a real Rainbow Coalition of the Global Rich:

Trinity College men’s squash junior Kush Kumar (Dhampur, India) was named to the College Squash Association (CSA) All-American First Team and classmate Thoboki Mohohlo (Johannesburg, South Africa) earned CSA All-American Second Team honors to add to the Bantams’ post-season accolades. Kumar, senior tri-captain Tom De Mulder (Ghent, Belgium) and sophomore Ziad Sakr (Tanta, Egypt) were also named to the 2019 All-New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) All-Conference First Team, while senior Nku Patrick (San Fernando, Trinidad) earned All-NESCAC Second Team honors.

Back to Paul Tough’s article in the NYT:

… Pérez grew up in very different circumstances, born in Puerto Rico in 1976 to a teenage mother and a father who delivered milk door to door. …

A guidance counselor persuaded him to apply to Skidmore College, a selective private institution in upstate New York that Pérez had never heard of. He took the SAT just once, and he scored poorly. But miraculously, someone in Skidmore’s admissions office decided to ignore his lousy test score in favor of his excellent grades and admit him with full financial aid. It was a decision that changed Pérez’s life.

Pérez got his first job in admissions straight out of college, motivated by the opportunity to do for young people what that admissions officer did for him: spot hidden potential in students with unconventional academic records and transform young lives. He rose through the profession, working first at Skidmore and then at the Claremont Colleges in Southern California …

The story of Angel Perez, who did poorly on the SAT but was let into Skidmore anyway and then became a Skidmore admissions officer looking for more Mini-Mes just like himself to admit to Skidmore reminds me of Richard Armour’s definition: “The Admissions Office is in charge of admitting the college’s mistakes.”

Often, these mistakes, not being able to get jobs in the outside world, wind up working for the Admissions Office.

It’s all the Great Cycle of Life, college admissions-style.

“I remember when I got the call about this job,” Pérez told me the first time we met, on a cold winter day in 2017. We were in his window-lined office in Trinity’s admissions building, which looked out over the college’s snow-covered athletic fields. “I was sitting in lovely Claremont, California, and my response was, Why would I move to Hartford, Connecticut?”

There should be an app to add the subsequent unvocalized thoughts of New York Times interview subjects, like in Peep Show: “Why would I move to Hartford, Connecticut?” exclaimed Pérez. “Hartford is full of Puerto Ricans!

“But then I started having conversations with the president, and I was so inspired by her vision of taking an institution that has been historically white, wealthy and privileged and really bringing it into the modern day and age.”

There shall be No Refuge! The fact that Trinity is famous as a Last Redoubt of old time WASPiness is exactly why it must be assimilated into The Diversity.

Then the article talks about Caroline Hoxby’s studies of under-recruited smart high school students:

Hoxby’s papers gave new momentum to the national effort to make selective colleges more socioeconomically diverse. In news releases, wealthy colleges trumpeted their efforts to recruit and admit more low-income and black and Latino students.

Actually, what Hoxby found was that the biggest reservoir of smart high school students that elite colleges were overlooking were white boys in Red States.

Paul Tough goes on to point out that the subjective standardized tests are discriminating against amazing Women of Color who are aceing their GPAs but they just don’t test well. That’s because these girls are Rebels. In contrast, because Society is so biased in favor of white boys, they tend to get lower GPAs from their teachers even as they do better on the SAT and ACT test. That’s because they are Conformists, right?

Or something. I mean, Science proves that white males are bad. We all know that, right?

Among the roughly two million students who take the SAT each year, about two-thirds, according to the College Board’s categorization, receive scores that are “nondiscrepant,” or in line with their high school grades.

For those students, the SAT doesn’t really affect their college prospects at all — their test scores send the same signal to college-admissions offices that their high school grades do. The students for whom test scores make a difference in admissions are the two groups who have “discrepant” scores — meaning either that their SAT score is much higher than their high school grades would predict (let’s call them the inflated-SAT group)

Or instead of “inflated-SAT group,” you could call them “smart.”

or their SAT score is much lower than their high school grades would predict (let’s call them the deflated-SAT group).

Or you could call them the “inflated-GPA group.”

Those two categories each make up about a sixth of each cohort of high school seniors.

In 2010 three College Board researchers analyzed data from more than 150,000 students who took the SAT, and they found that the demographics of the two “discrepant” groups differed substantially. The students with the inflated SAT scores were more likely to be white or Asian

By the way this is the only time the word “Asian” is used in this long article. In contrast, “white” is used 9 times. Of course, Asians are wholly irrelevant to the question of who gets into elite colleges, right?

than the students in the deflated-SAT group, and they were much more likely to be male. Their families were also much better off. Compared with the students with the deflated SAT scores, the inflated-SAT students were more than twice as likely to have parents who earned more than $100,000 a year and more than twice as likely to have parents with graduate degrees.

Because of course we know that intelligence isn’t hereditary, the fact that kids who do better on the SAT than they do on their grades tend to have smart parents are obviously just working incredibly hard at their SAT prep class even though they are lazy at everything else, right?

These were the students — the only students — who were getting an advantage in admissions from the SAT. …

By contrast, according to the College Board’s demographic analysis, students in the deflated-SAT group, the ones whose SAT scores were significantly lower than their high school grades would have predicted, were twice as likely to be black as students in the inflated-SAT group, nearly twice as likely to be female and almost three times as likely to be Hispanic. They were three times as likely as students in the inflated-SAT group to have parents who earned less than $30,000 a year, and they were almost three times as likely to have parents who hadn’t attended college. They were the students — the only students — whose college chances suffered when admissions offices considered the SAT in addition to high school grades.

The significance of the College Board’s discrepant-score research comes into clearer focus when you consider data from a second College Board study, the National SAT Validity Study, which every year or two analyzes the records of students who take the SAT and then enroll in college. The 2018 validity study (which used data from 2013, before the SAT was redesigned) showed that working- and middle-class high school students, students whose parents earned between $40,000 and $80,000, had an average grade-point average in high school of 3.63. Wealthy students, whose parents earned more than $200,000, had an average high school G.P.A. of 3.66, almost exactly the same as the working-class ones.

But students in the $40,000-to-$80,000 family-income cohort had average SAT scores of 1,624 (out of 2,400, as the SAT was scored before the redesign), while students in the over-$200,000 cohort had average scores of 1,793. That’s a 169-point advantage for the well-off ones. High school grades, considered alone, made for a fairly level playing field for students from different economic backgrounds. But SAT scores tilted that playing field in favor of the rich.

It’s almost as if higher income parents work to get their kids into more rigorous high schools with tougher grading standards.

25 years ago I was negotiating a 9 figure deal with an executive at Oracle who showed me his Oracle ID card which had #5 on it: he was the giant database software company’s fifth-ever employee. He said that he had tried college for a couple of weeks, “but it was just the same as high school,” so he called up Larry Ellison, for whom he’d been doing some coding as a high school kid, and got hired by Larry’s little start-up Oracle. And that was the end of his educational career.

I’m sure he had a really high SAT score and not such a high HS GPA score, so Paul Tough could explain to him that his fortune in Oracle stock options were rightly the possession of amazing Women of Color with high HS GPAs.

Anyway, I was going to sum up by saying this article shows how easy it is to figure out how the world works if you know ahead of time who are the Good People and who are the Bad People. But on second thought, that’s backward: this article is ingenious at pandering to its readers’ dumbest prejudices as it wields Occam’s Butterknife.

What’s actually easier mentally, what requires juggling fewer balls conceptually, what needs the least number of epicycles, is the simplest and most accurate explanation.

 
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  1. “Elite schools say they’re looking for academic excellence in college.”

    Then there wouldn’t be any blacks.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Kent Nationalist
    , @Ed
  2. Jack D says:

    The logic of this article leads to getting rid of the SAT entirely. According to this article, it either matches your grades and therefore doesn’t add any information at all, or when it does add information this information is always “racist” and should be disregarded. So the best thing would be not to give the SAT at all and just go by high school grades, which are apparently less “racist”.

    The College Board must have seen where this is going and they tried to come up with the “Adversity Score” in order to save their test, but there was too much backlash on reducing adversity to a single number. Since the Adversity Score would be “reverse racist” (it would favor minorities), when added to the racist SAT score the combined score would be neutral or non-racist and so the SAT could survive.

    However, they have not really thrown in the towel on this – the College Board still going to do some kind of “adversity profile” on each student where they can signal “adversity” over a number of factors rather than just a single #. The Admissions Dept. of each college will have to do the hard math of turning all the adversity factors back into a single #. This is probably too much math for Perez (with an accent over the 1st e) but they can probably hire some Asian guy to program it for them.

    Other colleges have just gotten rid of the SAT altogether since the SAT is not woke and impedes them from taking the kind of vibrant diverse students they would really like to admit in the 1st place.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    , @Joe Schmoe
  3. Chooses to live in 91.2% white Montauk, of course. But he’s fighting for real diversity!

    • Replies: @Forbes
    , @Charles Pewitt
  4. GuyInOhio says:

    Oh so many years ago in the cave man era before high schoolers had flip phones, let alone smartphones I took the ACT & SAT tests multiple times… and honestly in retrospect I don’t know why, I don’t recall it having an appreciable effect on my opportunities- maybe inching up the scores slightly…

    That these kids are “one and done” (and mediocre) sort of blows my mind as “selective schools” (hahahahaha Skidmore!) give out free rides… but not really. They get no better education than they’d get at “State U”… but they feel like they’ve been branded like cattle to go on to become… yeah, admissions personnel

  5. Jack D says:
    @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey

    This is not fair. Without affirmative action, 1 or 2% of students at elite schools might still be black. However, most of those would be half-bloods raised by white mothers like Obama, talented tenth and Caribbean blacks like Malcolm Gladwell who are really 80% white and Nigerian Igbos. The number of African American slave descendants with 80%+ African blood like Moochelle would indeed be vanishingly small. Would it be zero? No, but pretty damn close.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  6. @Jack D

    The logic of this article leads to getting rid of the SAT entirely. According to this article, it either matches your grades and therefore doesn’t add any information at all, or when it does add information this information is always “racist” and should be disregarded. So the best thing would be not to give the SAT at all and just go by high school grades, which are apparently less “racist”.

    It’s like the old story (sadly apochryphal) from the Caliph Omar, justifying the destruction of the Great Library of Alexandria “If the books of this library contain matters opposed to the Koran, they are heretical and must be burned. If they contain only the doctrine of the Koran, burn them anyway, for they are superfluous.”

  7. anonymous[198] • Disclaimer says:

    The talk bubbling up in Silicon Valley is about “Income Sharing Agreements” (ISA’s), where students pay decreased tuition but agree to kick back a percentage of their income for X years. They are mostly discussed in the context of “software bootcamps.” But ISA’s make VC’s uneasy, because the perceptive ones realize it would basically nuke elite higher education, and many of them have soft spots for their alma maters.

    A university could recruit an all-male, disproportionately white student body, focusing on 95th-99th percentile intelligence (i.e., the ones increasingly rejected from Ivies), with a focus on computer-centric STEM degrees. They would pay nothing in tuition, and in return the school would have an ISA on any income and equity (which would resemble a power law, much like startup returns). Such a university could forgo federal student loans, allowing them to ignore Title IX and be economically rational (i.e. very un-PC) in the admissions process. The ISA returns could easily be securitized, offloading some of the risk. A model could easily scale up to several hundred thousand students, and swamp smaller elite schools in the hiring market.

    The economics don’t work at all for current elite schools, which are both wedded to Title IX and rely heavily on a small percentage of high-achieving males (disproportionately on Wall Street) to support their endowments, thus subsidizing 98% of the student body, who will do nothing in their careers. Take away that small percentage of students, and it’s game over.

  8. Barnard says:

    What College Admissions Offices Really Want

    Isn’t the answer lots of foreign students, especially ones from China paying full tuition? That seems to what they recruit for.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
  9. Anon[280] • Disclaimer says:

    Is taking the SAT a single time so unusual these days that journalists find it something that needs to be explicitly noted? In my day you took the PSAT (for scholarships), then a year later you took the SAT once, no prep courses, but you read the application brochure and did the test questions in it.

    I think the poster child for a deflated SAT student was the notorious Kashawn Campbell, straight A student at Jefferson High in South L.A., but unable to wrote a coherent sentence at UC Berkeley. The L.A. Times wrote up his bizarre story here:

    https://www.latimes.com/local/la-me-c1-cal-freshmen-20130816-dto-htmlstory.html

    He was clearly slightly retarded. A more humane system would have intercepted him sooner, got him appropriate training, and kept him out of student debt hell.

  10. What the article is really saying is that white boys are getting lower high-school GPAs than their actual measured IQ/SAT score would predict.

    The author doesn’t realize it, but he just proved that high school discriminates against white boys. A civil right commission must be assembled at once to figure out why women and black and brown bodies are getting higher GPAs than they should.

    I am just kidding — girls get better high school grades because they are conformist brown nosers. Blacks and browns get higher grades because they are being graded on a lower curve.

    The SAT is thus doing precisely what it was designed to do – i.e., picking out intellectual talent from the noise of made up high school grades that measure a lot of different things.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @rexl
  11. Angel Pérez:

    The majority of students were really smart and engaged and curious, and then you’ve got these other students” — the affluent group with pumped-up SAT scores and lower G.P.A.s — “who were wondering, How did I get into this school?”

    Or, maybe:

    • Agree: Realist
    • Replies: @Charon
    , @JP
  12. “while amazing black women have to take on life’s greatest challenges like writing op-eds about how society should pay more attention to their hair.”

    How many small businesses have been started by anonymous black women with nothing more than a small business loan from the bank? (And I mean a legit business, where the owner works 10-12 hours a day running it on site.)

    Country wide, I’m going to say less than 500.

  13. peterike says:

    Elite schools say they’re looking for academic excellence and diversity. But their thirst for tuition revenue means that wealth trumps all.

    For a brief, shining moment I thought the MSM was finally going to focus on the scandal of wealthy foreigners taking up high-value college seats! Alas, no, just more “get whitey” stuff.

    the ones whose SAT scores were significantly lower than their high school grades would have predicted, were twice as likely to be black as students in the inflated-SAT group, nearly twice as likely to be female and almost three times as likely to be Hispanic.

    I dunno, but this may have SOMETHING to do with the fact that you can graduate near the top of your high school class and have something like a sixth grade reading level, which puts you way ahead of your peers.

  14. There was a bit of a local scandal when a local high school had 23 co-valedictorians. Several parents pointed out their kid a 4.0 on college oriented classes, while others had easier classes.

  15. Mike1 says:

    Congratulations on the positive comment regarding people starting their own businesses. Until conservative intellectuals get behind business owners (not corporations: business OWNERS) the battle we are in will keep getting lost. I expect left leaning writers to hate business owners but it is depressing that most people that identify as conservative writers clearly feel the same way.

    From the article it forever amuses me that “wealth” is always described by income level. Obviously a high income helps to build wealth but the two are not the same thing.

  16. Paul says:

    Among the smart kids when I was in high school, I noticed the girls usually put in more effort and got better grades — except in math. I figured that the explanation was the boys were by and large better at math than the girls.

  17. Jack D says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    What you are saying is just the mirror image of what the article said. They say that HS grades are the “real” signal and the SAT is just (racist) noise and you say the opposite.

    What the actual data shows is that grades PLUS SATs have superior predictive power to either one alone. Therefore, both of these signals carry useful information. While HS grades may be tainted against boys, they still tell you something. While the SATs may be “racist” against NAMs, they still tell you something too and when you combine the two you get the clearest possible signal. Maybe white boy A with the low grades but high SATs is bright but not willing to put the hard work in. Maybe white boy B with slightly lower SATs but all A’s would be more likely to make it in the long run. Maybe black girl C gets all A’s because she goes to a ghetto school and is better behaved than most students, but her very low SAT score reveals that she is not going to be able to keep up with a demanding college curriculum. Etc. The existing system is not perfect but it has worked fairly well up until now and should not be jettisoned lightly or for very weak ideological reasons.

    • Replies: @Jimbo
    , @Hypnotoad666
  18. The SAT and ACT are optional and no longer required for admission to Trinity College, Skidmore College, or the University of Chicago.

    https://www.fairtest.org/university/optional

    • Replies: @eah
  19. Forbes says:
    @Malcolm X-Lax

    Just speed balling, but 8.8% non-white will be the maid, gardener and lawn care community…

  20. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    There should be an app to add the subsequent unvocalized thoughts of New York Times interview subjects, like in Peep Show: “Why would I move to Hartford, Connecticut?” exclaimed Pérez. “Hartford is full of Puerto Ricans!”

    Just laughed out loud in an empty restaurant reading that.

    The big picture solution to all of this that the NYT would never mention is for the country to have a smaller percentage of academically underperforming minorities. If America were, say, only 15% NAM, then you could just admit NAMs at roughly the same rate as everyone else, and it wouldn’t do much harm. With our current demographics, it leads to a cycle of worsening standards, wasted energy, etc.

  21. El Dato says:

    “But then I started having conversations with the president, and I was so inspired by her vision of taking an institution that has been historically white, wealthy and privileged and really bringing it into the modern day and age.”

    “I want to play a game”

    • Replies: @guest
  22. No article about the assassination of the Kingfish by a Jewish communist nearly a century ago and the attempts by an NR writer to clear the name of yet another of the Chosen by dragging up old conspiracy theories?

  23. Andy says:

    I wonder at what point this dysgenic policy of actually giving more educational opportunities to low IQ individuals will begin to hurt America? Especially when it is now competing head to head technologically with the high IQ Han Chinese

  24. Jimbo says:
    @Jack D

    Exactly. I had high SATs but middling HS grades, because I was lazy. I remained lazy and barely made it out of the State school I attended. The predictive power of the combination was dead accurate in my case.

  25. @Paul

    Don’t forget that you can’t bullshit math. Unlike liberal arts classes where you do well by telling the teacher what they want to hear, in math there is an actual correct answer.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    , @Peterike
    , @MBlanc46
  26. while amazing black women have to take on life’s greatest challenges like writing op-eds about how society should pay more attention to their hair.

    You left out working at the DMV

  27. students in the deflated-SAT group, the ones whose SAT scores were significantly lower than their high school grades would have predicted, were twice as likely to be black as students in the inflated-SAT group, nearly twice as likely to be female and almost three times as likely to be Hispanic.

    It’s almost as if teachers in NAM high schools have to grade on lower standards just so that everyone doesn’t get D’s and F’s.

  28. Whiskey says: • Website

    A couple of things. First the anti White male sentiment is never going down only ever increasing because it is driven by White women. Filled with rage at the ordinary nature of the men around them.

    The FT did a weekend series on urban air pollution and all the correspondents were young White Women. The degree of feminization in the priesthood media is shocking and accounts for the anti White male rage.

    Second the US will rapidly decline as we get the soft equivalent of Stalin sending his best techs and scientists to Siberia. Without smart young White men we are easy 1941 meat for China.

    Third the Dissident Right owns young White men. Working part time as a Starbucks barista while the girl they liked in HS goes on to some career and aspiring rappers makes the DR backers. Those guys will be all in for Jim Crow v2 no more mr nice guy. This seems to be the long term goal of some obvious fed informants. Be like Stalin, fed inform until it’s revolutionary time.

    The flip side is that the establishment owns White Women. Especially young ones. They can only get ahead by the Dindu Hindu alliance. They are not moving up on their own merits. And systematic exclusion of White boys from college equals massive inter racial marriages and ending Whites in America at least.

  29. J.Ross says:

    The new Joker movie coming out represents a climax of a widespread establishmentarian propaganda campaign with earlier iterations in every kind of mass media. White civilizational accomplishment is denied by pseudo-intellectuals, white personal accomplishment is denied by pseudo-journalists, and now white madness is diagnosed by pseudo-psychiatrists.
    Normies think that fiction is real. They know what fiction is, of course, but they’re rightly sensitive to the limitations always present, some of which come from a certain window of believability. Many fictional works are extensively researched or at least based on a news event. What normies may not realize is that, as illistrated by Dick Wolf’s lunatic unrealism franchise Law and Order, it is entirely possible to lie flagrantly or regarding the essential details, within a story that is significantly true to news accounts.
    Normies view a major fictitious work, not as interchangeable with a news report, but as a kind of confirmation of the legitimacy or seriousness of an issue. This opens the way for Hollywood to become hysterical about something that isn’t happening, with the perverted telephone game sequence that normies take the hype, which reacts to nothing, for the thing to which reaction is merited. Sharks existed for millions of years before the movie Jaws, there were occasional shark attack panics before 1975, but after Spielberg’s first blockbuster, people focused on sharks in a way they never had before. They did so in context that didn’t make sense. And now this movie will have them focusing on harmless bullied nerds as a greater threat to public safety than the immigration lawlessness that led to a Jihadi shooting in California or the law enforcement confusion that led to multiple shootings in Florida.
    We can’t complain about paid activists faking social movements, we can’t complain about immigrants refusing to assimilate, we can’t complain about billionaires trying to restructure our laws, we can’t complain about tech trusts having their legal status both ways and censoring their critics, we can’t complain about any group (no matter how harmful) which has a lobby or organized advocacy. But there is one group which has no defenders. And there is a perverse, decadent overlap between hysteria-fiction free to defame and “journalism” which occupies the same space but doesn’t have special effects, big names, or an editor (kek, see what I did there).

    • Replies: @Altai
  30. The students for whom test scores make a difference in admissions are the two groups who have “discrepant” scores — meaning either that their SAT score is much higher than their high school grades would predict (let’s call them the inflated-SAT group)

    The students with the inflated SAT scores were more likely to be white or Asian

    I’m going to posit here that it is probably the case that the “inflated SAT” group isn’t having its GPA inflated simply because members can sit at a desk without committing violent felonies, which is probably the case with the “deflated SAT” group.

    It’s funny that the “control” variable they’re using is the (highly non-standard) GPA rather than the entirely standard SAT.

  31. nymom says:
    @anonymous

    Who said an idea like ISA for these STEM schools would be disproportionately white…I see it as being disproportionately Asian just like the New York City Science/Tech. schools right now…

    • Replies: @Forbes
  32. @Malcolm X-Lax

    Chooses to live in 91.2% white Montauk, of course. But he’s fighting for real diversity!

    In the mostly White town of Montauk, New York, even the sharks that swim offshore are mostly White.

    Hillary Clinton moved to the mostly White town of Chappaqua, New York, in order to avoid having to live anywhere near Blacks or other non-Whites.

    Wealthy Whites and upper middle class Whites in New York State will do whatever they have to in order to avoid the trauma of living around Blacks and other non-Whites.

    Plutocrat Whites and upper middle class Whites are hypocrite rats when it comes to practicing what they preach about the joys of living cheek by jowl with Blacks and other non-Whites.

    • Agree: Malcolm X-Lax
  33. There are a bunch of jobs that are mentally demanding where you can just decide you have that job and do it: poker player, software engineer, reseller/picker etc. You’d think since POC are so horribly discriminated against professionally you’d find tons of NAMs buying art stored in barns for 100 years or playing in the World Series of poker to make money, but somehow you don’t. Wokeness is not very predictive.

    • Agree: Aft
  34. njguy73 says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    Before 1965 Black women could start hair-care product stores easily. Then immigration “reform” and affirmative action being given to Korean immigrants drove the Blacks out.

    And yet John Lewis and Elijah Cummings, who marched with Dr. King for Freedom and Jobs, want more immigration.

    Explain that to me.

    • Replies: @everybodyhatesscott
    , @Flip
  35. Kronos says:

    Still an amazing article from EducationRealist on the politics/slight-of-hand of GPA.

    https://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2017/08/01/gpa-and-the-ironies-of-integration/

    • Replies: @nymom
  36. i think at this point you can stop discussing the particulars of these articles, and instead analyze them from the only perspective that’s relevant – how does it attack european men.

    the majority of journalism is about this now, regardless of the exact topic. so instead of getting into the details of any article, we should simply categorize them into what kind of attack it was.

    1) european men ruined the world
    2) european men get into college too easily
    3) there’s too many european men in (field X)
    4) there’s too many european men on my television/movie screen
    4) there’s no such thing as europeans, so give up your countries, bigots

    and so on. there’s probably 3 or 4 main attacks, almost all newspaper and magazine articles can be broken down into a few categories.

    • Agree: jim jones
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    , @J.Ross
  37. I have known a number of people over the years whose test scores and grades did not match.

    Each of these groups fall into several, non-exclusive, categories:

    I. Test scores high, GPA low disparity.

    A. Kids who are smart, but with learning disabilities. A friend of mine was in this category. He loves to fix things. He will take someone else’s junk — a TV, a Corvette, a Mercedes — fix it up, and sell it. He’s made money off of this for over 40 years now. Very smart guy. He was somehow able to finish up school in the local college.

    B. Smart, but lazy. I had a friend like this in HS. He got a full Merit Scholarship to a big name school. He flunked out. He finished up in the local college.

    C. Smart, but can’t deal with school and homework. My first kid is like this. Almost flunked out of HS. A nearby school with one of the top Division III teams in his sport offered him a scholarship if he could get his grades up. So he worked his butt off his senior year, and barely got in. He graduated with a STEM degree — but a 2.8 average. BUT, he was a star athlete. He now has a job. Not a great job, since his grades were crappy. But he is doing very well in his job.

    II. Test scores low, GPA high disparity.

    A. Mediocre minds who are extremely well organized. I knew a guy like this in HS. Not that bright, but he did very well. Within a few years of graduating college, he was manager of the local Wal-Mart. Not bad for a bear of average brain.

    B. Smart kids who somehow don’t test well. I put my #2 kid in this category, although my #2 kid is an amazingly well organized student. Mediocre test scores, but graduated HS with high honors. Last B was sophomore year. My #2 kid is now a senior at Wisconsin, high honors in a STEM program. A true star in college. Kid #2 wants to go to med school, but is scared of the MCAT.

    C. Mediocre kids in really bad high schools. This could be rural, or ghetto. I knew a kid like that in college. Washed out really quickly.

    So, basically, the kids with good grades and bad test scores are far more likely to do well in college than the kids with bad grades and good test score. Some admissions officers have told me they look a lot more at the grades these days, rather than the test scores.

  38. Gordo says:

    I think there should be separate colleges by race; no harassment, no discrimination, Wakanda achieved sooner than we could guess.

    • Replies: @Marquandian Hero
  39. @MikeatMikedotMike

    I would guess a lot higher.

    Remember, a large group with a small percentage of blacks will have more blacks than a small group with a large percentage of blacks.

    For example, there are more black brain surgeons in the US than there are black NBA players.

    There are so many small businessmen in this country, that even if only 2-3 % were black women, then there would still be quite a few thousand black women running businesses.

    In fact, I did used to rent out a place to a black woman who ran her own business. It was a duplex apartment I used to own. She used one level for living, and the other level for her day care business. She kept the place unbelievably clean, and she paid the rent.

    In the town where I grew up, there was a poor black neighborhood, called N***** Holler by the whites, a different name by the blacks. Just about every black woman in the neighborhood had her own house cleaning business. It was weird when I found out the lady who came in and cleaned our house every week was the best friend of a girl in my HS home room.

    But, almost every black woman in that neighborhood supported herself through her own business.

  40. @Anon

    I don’t think people realize just *how* different schools are in terms of what grades mean.

    My sister is one of those millennial white women so she volunteered at one of the worst school districts in the country when she was in medical school. She discovered to her horror that the Valedictorian–the girl the school was so proud of for being the one who was going to make it–was essentially illiterate. And I mean illiterate by fifth grade standards, not high school senior standards. She couldn’t write a sentence when my sister was helping her with an essay. Of course she had gotten all sorts of scholarships to colleges but my sister had no idea what she would do when she got there.

    It’s sad because she was a “good” student–she did everything asked of her with a smile and had ambitions. That was enough for her to be a star at her failed school. There was just no way she was capable of legitimate college-level work.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
  41. Charon says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    It’s almost like you haven’t understood a single thing anyone has said here.

  42. Often, these mistakes, not being able to get jobs in the outside world, wind up working for the Admissions Office.

    It’s all the Great Cycle of Life, college admissions-style.

    It’s the great circle aound the toilet bowl.

    You know, many people believe, mistakenly, that coriolis forces make water flush down a toilet counterclockwise or clockwise, depending on the hemisphere in which one is making the observation; nature or God at work, a nice way to say forces that are out of our control.

    The truth is that the amount of water at play is too insignificant for coriolis to matter very much, and the direction of swirl is governed by the shape and construction of the toilet, things that are very much within our control.

    The lesson here is that left has figured out how to shape and structure their little toilet colleges to pump out as much left-spinning shit as the economy will take. The crime is that the broader public has bought into the fantasy that their shit doesn’t stink and, indeed, is the fertiliser we vitally need to get ahead in life.

    • LOL: Bill Jones
  43. One factor is the growth of the prep industry. Some people of moderate ability can score higher with enough coaching. They just won’t go up too high

    Also, rich kids now game the system for disability related extra time. “Oh, I have ADHD so I need twice the time”.

    The extra time does not work for the super smart, as processing speed is a factor for intelligence anyway. If someone finishes the GRE in half the time and still gets 99% they are wicked smart, or if they rock the multi choice section on the bar exam and finish in half the time of everyone else, well, they are off the charts

  44. Barnard says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    For example, there are more black brain surgeons in the US than there are black NBA players.

    The NBA is 75% black and if you figure 30 teams have rosters of 15 players (including IR) that gives you 338 black NBA players. If you count guys who don’t make it through a whole season, get sent to the developmental league, etc. you are looking at closer to 375-400.

    According to this article, 4% of neurosurgeons in the U.S. are black. The total number of neurosurgeons is 3,369, which would put the number of blacks at 135. I’m curious why you chose to make that up for your example.

    https://neurosurgery.uams.edu/2018/07/neurosurgery-departments-gender-racial-diversity-bucks-national-trends/

  45. Charon says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    They would rather slit their wrists than admit the obvious: the educational establishment is systemically biased against whites–particularly white males–and the divergent SAT scores consistently demonstrate this.

    Hence, the drive to de-emphasize and ultimately to destroy standardized testing. The tests don’t tell us what we want to hear.

  46. @Paleo Liberal

    My job has me spending quite a bit more time in the ghettos of Chicago than I prefer, plus the town I live in has more blacks than the national average. I have never in my memory been in an establishment owned by a black man or woman. Hispanics and Asians own almost all of the petty services (including the beauty shops specific to black styles) and eateries.

    The day care businesses run by black women is a fair point. However, home daycare is not exactly entrepreneurial in the sense that someone has developed a skill and turned it into a self made living providing good and friendly service to the general public at a fair price. All daycare requires is extra space and employed neighbors with kids. Show me the black women running successful dry cleaning shops, laundry mats, taylor shops, eateries, appliance repair, liquor/tobacco shops, grocery stores, fitness centers, etc., etc. They don’t exist.

    “There are so many small businessmen in this country, that even if only 2-3 % were black women,”

    That number is absurdly high. I’d say it’s closer to .01%

  47. Wilkey says:

    Assuming that grades are given honestly (which tends to be more often the case in white schools) I would put grades above test scores in predicting, well maybe not “success” (as in extremely high incomes, fame, etc.) but generally doing well in life, graduating from college, getting and staying married, owning a home, etc. Good grades show that you’re able to pay attention and put in the effort day-in and day-out. That’s more important than super-high intelligence for most things in life.

    I knew plenty of people in high school who had good grades but merely average or only slightly-above-average test scores who are doing quite well. High test scores and poor grades suggests people who are unable or unwilling to put in the work, have emotional or family issues, or whatever. Those with high test scores and good grades do well, of course, although I think it overpredicts success for Asians. Asians are a hugely disproportionate share of students at elite colleges, but their share of supersuccessful people in post-college life just doesn’t suggest to me that they should be 30-40-50% of Ivy League student bodies.

    • Replies: @peterike
    , @Sam Lowry
  48. @Paleo Liberal

    Well I’d like to say I sincerely doubt the inexplicably high GPA negresses who can’t fool the SAT will out perform high SAT scorers in any STEM field purely out of common sense, I’d also like to point out that even judging by your own anecdotes your conclusion doesn’t follow since 2 of the 3 of who you think should have been more successful did poorly (with your final example by far the worst individual outcome) compared to all 3 of whom you think should be unsuccessful having graduated. Unless that guy you knew went to university in order to land a gig as walmart manager?

    There’s also my own experience of all the brains in HS (including myself) being very lazy and yet going on to continue to excel in University/College. So basically high SAT seems obviously necessary for genuine excellence (discounting that vanishingly small % who genuinely don’t “test well” – most of these are midwits coping with not actually being that bright), whereas high GPA midwits who can reliably work through the tedium of assignments while following instructions are more suited to be members of the bureaucratic make-work class that Universities seem increasingly committed to churning out.

    Do you think the many explicit recommendations by the establishment media to ignore higher SAT scores due to minority underperformance might have something to do with what that career bureaucrat told you?

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
  49. @Barnard

    I think that is a big reason why it is so hard to get into a good college these days.

    In my day, fewer people went to college, and there were only a handful of foreign students. On top of that, this was before decade upon decade of Asian immigrants. Even my younger brother, who went to an elite college in the mid 80s, said by then there were tons of Asian and Asian-American students.

    These days we have a larger population, more immigration on the top and bottom of the Bell Curve, and far fewer spaces because of foreign students.

    One big example is Penn. It used to be the runt of the Ivy League. Of the Ivies, it was the easiest one to get into. It was the fourth most difficult college to get into in the Philadelphia area. Penn accepted about 70% of the applicants about 50 years ago. Who wants to go to college in West Philadelphia? Not the Fresh Prince.

    The cachet of an Ivy education is so sought after these days that Penn has an acceptance rate of 7% now. Hey, when every smart kid in China applies to every Ivy, all the Ivies are incredibly selective.

  50. @Jack D

    What the actual data shows is that grades PLUS SATs have superior predictive power to either one alone. Therefore, both of these signals carry useful information.

    I know. I was just being a little snarky by inverting their own flawed logic.

    The College Board and Universities have decades of experience and mountains of data which they have crunched with every regression analysis possible. They know what they are doing when they look for academic “merit.”

    Of course, the political imperatives of affirmative action naturally get layered on top of this process. But the woke people still can’t resist trying to also prove that the underlying measurements of merit are “racist” in the first place. Their sophistry never works and they just look silly.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @ferdowski
  51. Anonymous[376] • Disclaimer says:

    As a recent college grad, my own subjective experience was that my Alma Mater’s thirst for tuition dollars led it not to admit “mediocre” white students, but totally unqualified, wealthy ESL Chinese. They did not make for great group partners in open ended work, but their extensive cheating networks meant we had the key to any problem sets assignment where I was working with Chinese students…

    • Replies: @peterike
  52. Anon[304] • Disclaimer says:

    I tend to divide intellects into farmer, hunter, and shepherd. Farmers are the producers. They have staggering reserves of energy, and if they have 50 things they need to do in a day, they get them all done. Day in, day out, they’re utterly reliable. They do well in school because they are always mentally alert, and they always have that extra reserve of mental energy for tackling a new subject, and they always get their homework done. They are not necessarily the brightest kids, and they don’t always score well on tests, but their grades are mostly good. Their test scores tend to match their grades.

    Hunters work in sprints. Their energy is either way up or way down. They rarely study, and then they pull frantic all-nighters to bone up before a test. They can be either bright or mediocre, but they tend to be very ADHD, and their energy levels are unreliable. They don’t do well when it comes to a demand for steady work because they run out of steam a lot. They have to psych themselves up to work, and then they blast a project through on adrenaline.

    Shepherds are the laziest of all, but they have great brain power. They are chronic daydreamers in school and don’t do well on grades, but they test well. They tend to underperform in early life and have mediocre grades, but they are a fountain of ideas. They do better later if they enter a work environment that capitalizes on their ideas.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
  53. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Paleo Liberal

    For example, there are more black brain surgeons in the US than there are black NBA players.

    I doubt it.

  54. @anonymous

    The talk bubbling up in Silicon Valley is about “Income Sharing Agreements” (ISA’s), where students pay decreased tuition but agree to kick back a percentage of their income for X years.

    Interesting idea. But I don’t think it could get off the ground due to the high transaction costs of policing and collecting the income percentages. Plus lots of opportunities to game the process along the way with various forms of deferred comp, etc.

    • Replies: @madclassix
    , @Lot
    , @Steve Sailer
  55. @Dave Pinsen

    For example, there are more black brain surgeons in the US than there are black NBA players.

    I doubt it.

    Being a Dr. and an NBA player are not mutually exclusive.

  56. Occam’s Butterknife

    At least this article wasn’t about MCAT discrepants! (Yet.)

    Occam’s izmel: this article from NewsDay— Zimbabwe’s, not Long Island’s– could be a cross between affirmative action and the Babylon Bee. The line between reality and fantasy is left unclear. How much would a celebrity’s child’s prepuce pull on eBay?

    Where do our foreskins go?

    From http://circcentral.bobmeyer99.com:

  57. @Barnard

    The total number of neurosurgeons is 3,369, which would put the number of blacks at 135. I’m curious why you chose to make that up for your example.

    Most of PL’s posts are “I once knew a guy in high school who…” and “my niece help to invent the helicopter” type stuff about what he vaguely believes to be true or to have once been true and aren’t actually sourced or indeed based on anything at all other than a general impression. He seems like a pretty amiable guy though.

    Speaking of amiable guys, does anyone know how to get Buffalo Joe to come back, i.e. maybe know who he was in real time? He was a good source on all things Buffalo, plus a lot of mechanical and construction-related info. Whatever it was that caused him to leave, I think he misinterpreted.

  58. Anonymous[192] • Disclaimer says:

    Tough Shit.

    What always offends and surprises me about these type of articles is that the author himself *never but never* does the decent thing, and set the example, by voluntarily giving up his *own* white privilege by means of, for example, voluntarily relinquishing his well compensated sinecure to an ‘oppressed minority’ or even failing that voluntarily donating a weighted chunk of his salary into a college fund devoted to ‘oppressed minorities’.

    Oh no. You’ll never see that – ‘Hmmm, ha, hmm’, ‘er no,’ ‘no’, ‘that’s not the point’, ‘society’s problem’,’ the system….’ etc etc blah, blah blah.

    No. There’s always an infinite supply of ‘other white schmucks’ out there who will make the vicarious sacrifice to embellish the Tough cooties.

    • Replies: @houston 1992
  59. @prime noticer

    i think at this point you can stop discussing the particulars of these articles, and instead analyze them from the only perspective that’s relevant – how does it attack european men.

    Hear, hear!

  60. @Dave Pinsen

    There are about 3,700 neurosurgeons in the US.

    https://work.chron.com/job-outlook-neurosurgeon-20074.html

    There are just under 500 players in the NBA. So say 400 blacks in the league. Blacks would have to be neurosurgeons at the same rate as the rest of the population for theirs to outnumber hoopsters. Highly unlikely.

    However, there are some 45,000 total surgeons in the US. So there may very well be more black surgeons all told than basketballers. And aren’t surgeons looked down upon by their colleagues as being among the “dumber” doctors? They’re performers, not thinkers.

    https://work.chron.com/job-outlook-neurosurgeon-20074.html

    • Replies: @Charon
    , @Dave Pinsen
  61. @MikeatMikedotMike

    If you count childcare at home , it’s thousands in NYC alone.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
    , @nymom
  62. peterike says:
    @Wilkey

    Asians are a hugely disproportionate share of students at elite colleges, but their share of supersuccessful people in post-college life just doesn’t suggest to me that they should be 30-40-50% of Ivy League student bodies.

    That wave is still building. On the non-STEM side, Asians are increasingly popping up in the kinds of things that non-STEM Ivy League graduates do: writing for Cosmo online and crap like that. Working in movies and TV. Getting Professorships to indoctrinate the next generation. In other words, shaping the narrative. They are still the junior level for now, but you will increasingly see Asians (off the boat Desis and first-gen Chinese) moving up the ranks in media at all levels. And yay, they are just as anti-white as the Jews they are replacing! Or rather, joining up with.

    This is not “supersuccessful” as in ultra-rich, but people with media jobs are super important to keeping the spice flowing.

    How many people are supersuccessful anyway? There’s plenty of Desis striking it rich (as in hundreds of millions) in Silicon Valley. This is the basic Desi template:

    1. Come to America and work for an established tech company that was started by Americans

    2. After five or ten years, bail out and take the intellectual property and a bunch of your fellow Desis with you. Tweak it just enough to avoid legal hassles and come out with your own startup. Which is basically the next generation product for the company you stole it from, but you can move faster because startup.

    3. Cash in! Often selling it back to the company you stole it from, or one of their competitors.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    , @Kaz
  63. JMcG says:
    @William Badwhite

    I asked about Buffalo Joe a few weeks ago. I was told that because of some issue in his family, he was not going to post any more and asked that all his prior posts be deleted. I definitely miss his contributions.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  64. @Paleo Liberal

    For example, there are more black brain surgeons in the US than there are black NBA players.

    There is virtually no chance that this is true. There are around 500 NBA players at any one time, 75 percent of whom are Black, so total of 375. There are, according to Wiki, around 3,700 neurosurgeons in the USA. Blacks are %4 of physicians in the USA. This would result in 148 Black neurosurgeons if percentage were consistent across all specialties. In reality , of course, percentage of Black physicians is heavily skewed in GP or Family practice direction and I would bet that there are no more than 50 Black neurosurgeons in the USA, if that. Or is it your belief that they are heavily over represented in the most cognitively demanding segments of Medicine?

  65. guest says:

    Why such drives to make admissions more diverse? Every official image from every college always has perfect racial balance already:

  66. Charon says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    And aren’t surgeons looked down upon by their colleagues as being among the “dumber” doctors? They’re performers, not thinkers.

    Never occurred to me before, but it makes all the sense in the world. Technicians rather than strategists. Hence surgery over wi-fi and surgery performed by robots. Wow.

  67. guest says:
    @El Dato

    The modern age may be un-white, but does he really want the school to give up privilege and wealth? I mean, that would probably be the result of handing full control over to him. But I think the idea is that they’ll keep the privilege and forcibly redistribute it to nonwhites.

  68. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Reg Cæsar

    Surgeons have to be salesmen, to some extent, building relationships with -ologists who refer patients to them. And neurosurgery is a particularly high-stress, high-risk field, which explains why there are so few female ones.

    An old joke goes like this: Neurologists know everything and do nothing; neurosurgeons know nothing and do everything; and neuropathologists know everything and do everything – but too late.

    It would be interesting to see how black physicians are distributed by specialty. I wouldn’t be surprised if many are in fields such as emergency medicine, where they’re not selected by patients.

  69. @njguy73

    A magical fish offers to grant one wish to a Russian peasant. He is wondering which treasures he should request from the fish. Then, the fish explains that whatever the peasant wishes for and receives himself, his neighbor will receive double. The peasant says, “Ok, then I want you to poke out one of my eyes.”

    It’s like that but with sticking it to whitey.

  70. @William Badwhite

    I’d also been wondering about Buffalo Joe – a little worried actually. I’ve always appreciated his comments.

  71. @Paleo Liberal

    Also, Neurosurgery unlike the NBA can draw on the distaff side of the Black demographic too, rendering the NBA- neurosurgery numbers even more lopsided in favor of NBA.

  72. @Barnard

    I see you beat me to point. Btw I think the Univ. Arkansas doc is just conflating neurosurgeons with physicians in general to arrive at %4.

  73. R.G. Camara says: • Website
    @Dave Pinsen

    Emergency room black doctors might go either way:

    On one hand, the improvisation required and high-frenetic energy of the emergency room might mesh well with black’s personality traits.

    On the other, the empathy required and the triage abilities might be below the average for blacks.

    A good indicator would be the percentage of Jewish emergency room doctors versus the average per race. Jews and blacks are similarly situated in terms of low empathy (especially for outgroups), high improvisation , and like of chaotic situations above whites.

    • Replies: @Anonymouse
  74. R.G. Camara says: • Website
    @anonymous2space

    I hate to quote W., but it really is the soft bigotry of low expectations there. Mixed with the ease of travel in our globalistic world.

    In the old days, not only would she have been held to higher standards that she would’ve met, but she would’ve remained the smartest girl in her little black town.

    Now, she leaves and never gets to have that ego boost remain except via denial, and whites are just happy to have a black around who bothers acting civilized.

    Much like Obama was, although he was at least above-average intelligent.

  75. David says:

    The Paul Tough of this article is the same NY Times author that John Derbyshire used as an example of willful delusion among educational theorists in his 2009 (indexless) masterwork, We Are Doomed. I feel kind of sorry for the Mr Tough, writing educational hokum for a whole decade or more.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  76. Flip says:
    @njguy73

    I see lots of jobs that used to be done by blacks that are now done by Mexicans.

    • Replies: @bigdicknick
  77. @kaganovitch

    How about we count businesses that:

    Must make a significant financial investment in materials and overhead just to get started.

    Must promote a positive and professional, customer friendly image towards unacquainted walk ins, present a knowledgeable understanding of the product/service they are providing, and offer a competitive price for said goods/services, and remain patient with customers unfamiliar with certain aspects of the good/service being provided.

    Must be able to manage overhead costs and the necessary supply chain, meaning ordering the correct amount of products and supplies needed to maintain business operations in a profitable manner.

    Must be able to do payroll and all the ancillaries related to having employees.

    Maintaining compliance with all government imposed regulations, taxation, insurance, and whatever other credentials are required to operate.

    I’m no business owner myself, so I may have left something out, but that all seems a bit more complicated than watching a handful of toddlers watch TV in my living room all day.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  78. OFF TOPIC —

    How offended should we be if Antonio Brown called his white boss a ‘cracker?’

    Greg Moore
    Arizona Republic

    Antonio Brown supposedly called his boss “a cracker,” and we’re supposed to care?

    Spare me.

    The guy’s acting like a nutjob, and he should be dismissed as such.

    To recap, Brown, one of the best football players of his generation, has been in the throes of a public meltdown.

    Frankly, it’s been frightening.

    He feuded months ago with his former quarterback and coach in Pittsburgh, effectively forcing the Steelers organization to trade him to the Raiders.

    Brown’s new coach loved his play and his work ethic so much that he said so at every opportunity. And his new club has a reputation for welcoming castoffs, malcontents and free spirits.

    It seemed like a perfect fit.

    It wasn’t.

    Brown, like close to 70% of the players in the NFL, is black.

    An ESPN reporter said multiple sources told her that Brown “called Mayock a ‘cracker’ and unleashed a barrage of cuss words during the altercation.”

    The Raiders cut Brown loose, obviously.

    Another team, the world champion New England Patriots, wasted no time in signing him.

    Brown, through a different ESPN reporter, has denied using the slur and said the whole thing is being overblown.

    But remind me again why we should care?

    Let’s even set aside the self-evident fallacy of trying to reverse the situation — it’s impossible. If a racial minority slurs someone in power, the person in power might not even notice.

    If a person in power slurs a minority, it’s bigger than a one-on-one conflict. It would lead to an erosion of trust between that person’s organization and an entire ethnic community. (It also might confirm evidence of bias — lack of minority hires and promotions — that would otherwise be anecdotal.)

    🙂

  79. @Hypnotoad666

    It’s already happening here, for example: https://lambdaschool.com/

    Time will tell how successful it is.

  80. R.G. Camara says: • Website

    Again, amongst many other that need admitting, we cannot be free until our intellectual class openly admits that race exists and that it is far more than skin deep, and significantly affects both IQ and social expectations and behavior.

    It’s mostly Nature, not Nurture.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Pericles
  81. eah says:
    @Triumph104

    Trinity Enrolls Class of 2023

    Trinity College’s newly enrolled Class of 2023, numbering 618 students, … The incoming class is 53 percent men and 47 percent women. American students of color, including multiethnic students, are 22.5 percent of the enrolled class. … Fourteen percent of the class are international students, and, with the arrival of this class, 77 countries will be represented at Trinity, … Trinity’s overall acceptance rate this year was 33 percent. … In Trinity’s fourth year as a test-optional institution, 58 percent of the enrolled students chose not to submit standardized test scores.

    • Replies: @eah
  82. JimB says:

    Often, these mistakes, not being able to get jobs in the outside world, wind up working for the Admissions Office.

    This is definitely at thing at the UCs. Minorities occasionally graduate in seemingly impressive majors like economics, biology, or applied math, but usually by barely squeaking through the required coursework and often having to make up failed classes in summer school. Their low GPAs make them non-competitive for jobs in their area of study, but the university hires them at a starting salary of $90K in admin, and before you know it they have failed upwards to Asst. VC of Human Resources.

  83. @JMcG

    Apologies for not knowing how to link to a specific comment but the first comment is the most recent and thus the one explaining his signing off.

    I seem to recall gays and lesbians being discussed on Steve’s blog at other times, so not sure why he chose to take that one personally or as having been directed at his daughter.

    http://www.unz.com/comments/all/?commenterfilter=buffalo+joe

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @JMcG
  84. SKNC says:

    The idea that rich people use test prep unavailable to poor people to inflate their scores is one of the more deathless progressives canards.

  85. J.Ross says:
    @prime noticer

    Yes, these should be tags: “whites so lazy,” “whites so unaccomplished,” “whites so rapey,” or along those lines, not just one “anti-white screed” tag but about five or six more specific ones.
    Steve doesn’t really use tags and I can’t say I miss them here but it would be useful to get handle on say, “whites be touchin mah weave” pulling ahead of “whites so rapey” at a particular time when other things are happening.

  86. June 18, 2019 at 8:09 pm GMT • 200 Words
    About six months ago my youngest daughter came to me in tears. When I asked what was wrong she told me she had a girl friend. As we held each other and she cried I asked why she was crying? Did she think I would not love my youngest, my baby, any less. I told her she was a gift to me from God, as were her siblings, nothing could diminish my love for her. Her three sisters and one brother are her rocks, and as they say, who would choose the harder road. This is a woman of such grace and charm and humor that when her boss was transferred he cried because he was leaving her behind. When she left to travel back home I sent her this text: Nothing made me sadder than the fact that you spend so much time alone. I prayed that you would find some one or some one would find you. I go to bed happy tonight. I stand with and by my children, as they are, always. So, as I would not let you insult my child in my presence, I can not let you insult her in print. My last comment ever. Steve, when you have time please delete all my past comments.

    Drama Queen Joe hissy-fitted outta here. Screw him.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    , @J.Ross
  87. El Dato says:
    @David

    But if it brings in the bacon….

    Many (most?) people don’t particularly care about the stuff they produce as long as they receive a paycheck.

  88. Charon says:

    Rastamouse creator avoids jail for benefits fraud after judge says his daughter wasn’t keen on prison sentence

    The court heard that De Souza has now sold the rights to the character and fell into debt after a series of failed business ventures.

  89. OT, but they got PewDiePie.

    if they can get him, the most popular person on youtube who is not even very political, they can shut down pretty much anybody on the internet who doesn’t have their own hosting.

    even then, who knows what lengths they’ll go to. shut down your bank, your credit system, your electricity company. set up operations in a foreign country? they’ll force congress to pass a law to block your domain. the great jewish firewall.

    they’ll certainly come for ron unz and unz.com when the next democrat president is in office. so i’m thinking Steve can only avoid discussing this for so long. his livelihood will be gone once (they) come for him.

  90. Jack D says:
    @William Badwhite

    Thanks for posting this. Somehow I missed it at the time. I know that Joe is not a young man and I was concerned that he had had some health issue. I’m glad in a way to see that it was just the Italian in him taking insult and not anything having to do with his health.

    It didn’t seem to me that Steve’s remark was so insulting to lesbians that Joe was justified in stomping off in this way, but I guess that’s up to him. It just seemed like one of Steve’s unpolitically correct noticings of things that you are not supposed to say in public any more – hey has anyone noticed that there are a lot of lesbians in the WNBA? He didn’t say that lesbians are bad or anything, just that they are disproportionately found in the WNBA just like say people in the fruit and vegetable business used to be disproportionately Italian or perpetrators of securities fraud tend to be disproportionately Jewish.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    , @J.Ross
  91. JMcG says:
    @William Badwhite

    Thank you. That’s a damn shame.

  92. @Dave Pinsen

    Which is greater?

    1. the number of white players in the NBA

    -or-

    2. the number of African-AMERICAN board certified neurosurgeons who have completed a fellowship in trauma/neurocritical care, functional and stereotactic surgery, or surgical neuro-oncology. (There is no “brain surgeon” sub-specialty).

    Place your bets.

  93. Alden says:

    “ adversity score” aka the poor poor pitiful me essay.

    Although I grew up in an 80% White suburb in a million plus 3,000 sq ft house and my Dad is a 175K affirmative action federal employee and Mom is a 200K affirmative action administrator in the nearest dysfunctional big city school system, my gr gr gr parents were slaves and I am black and my high school had only 10% black students and my entire childhood was spent in this hellish atmosphere of White privilege.

  94. Jack D says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    But Stephen J. Gould proved many years ago that merit can never be reduced to a single # anyway so the SATs are completely invalid. Or something like that.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  95. The number of non-academic administrative and professional employees at U.S. colleges and universities has more than doubled in the last 25 years, vastly outpacing the growth in the number of students or faculty, according to an analysis of federal figures. https://www.necir.org/2014/02/06/new-analysis-shows-problematic-boom-in-higher-ed-administrators/

    Of course I’m sure there isn’t any correlation to this

    A good rule of thumb is that tuition rates will increase at about twice the general inflation rate. During any 17-year period from 1958 to 2001, the average annual tuition inflation rate was between 6% and 9%, ranging from 1.2 times general inflation to 2.1 times general inflation. On average, tuition tends to increase about 8% per year. An 8% college inflation rate means that the cost of college doubles every nine years. For a baby born today, this means that college costs will be more than three times current rates when the child matriculates in college. This section of FinAid provides detailed information about the rate of increase of college tuition. http://www.finaid.org/savings/tuition-inflation.phtml

    or this

  96. Altai says:
    @J.Ross

    On the subject of the Joker film and the standing ovation at Cannes. Apparently the mayor who becomes the focus of his ire is Thomas Wayne (Bruce Wayne’s father re-imagined not as a kind paragon of noblesse oblige but a conniving cruel thug like politician.) and they originally wanted Alec Baldwin to play him… A bit on the nose? The actor they got actually looks less like he’s doing a Trump impression on than an Alec Baldwin impression, though. Looks more like Baldwin too.

    So basically the trailers portray it as one thing (With much blue tick humming and hawing about it inspiring ‘white male incel terrorism’. I do think there is a point to be made about releasing a film that could be said to be glamourising a madman lashing out violently against society given the spates of mass shootings.) but really it’s ‘the Joker kills Trump and that makes him a relatable protagonist now!’

    I do find it interesting that the writers chose NYC (Yes it’s supposed to be in ‘Gotham’ but it’s clearly meant to be NYC which is odd because Gotham is usually meant to be Chicago) in 1980 to set a film about a main character and his disassociation/social isolation/schizophrenia. A setting of complete rapid diversification and social retreat and low trust.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  97. @Athletic and Whitesplosive

    I am not sure why you consider someone who was a Wal-Mart manager in his 20s to not be particularly successful.

    The average salary for a Wal-Mart store manager is a little over $92,000. Which is well above the average salary for someone in his 20s.

    The point was, this fellow, who I did know in HS, was someone of average intelligence who, through hard work, had well above average grades, and a well above average career.

    And yes, people do go to school for that sort of thing. It’s called business school. They have classes in management.

    So 2 of the 3 examples I gave of people whose grades were much higher than their test scores were students from good high schools, who did well for themselves.

    In the case of the really smart guy with bad grades who went to an elite school — he left the elite school. So did the guy from a ghetto HS with good grades and bad test scores.

    All in all, the people with good grades in HS but poor test scores did better in college than those with poor grades and good test scores.

  98. Of course Angel Perez thinks he can work at an elite educational institution in America and participate in “bringing it into the modern day and age” it’s never been pointed out to him that Trinity College is the product of the most successful organization in history which is Anglo-Saxon America, in which Puerto Ricans like him have played and can play no significant role. Once the proper consciousness is restored and the primacy in human affairs of Anglo-Saxon space is re-asserted, we won’t be hearing from Angel Perez or his kind.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
  99. Wilkey says:
    @peterike

    That wave is still building. On the non-STEM side, Asians are increasingly popping up in the kinds of things that non-STEM Ivy League graduates do: writing for Cosmo online and crap like that. Working in movies and TV. Getting Professorships to indoctrinate the next generation

    You may be right, but I’m still doubtful. Being a writer for Cosmo isn’t exactly the same as writing the great American novel, or even the semi-OK American novel. And a job as a professor isn’t success, per se. It’s just something that follows naturally from spending a lot of time in college.

  100. @Jack D

    I could be wrong, but it seemed to me that Buffalo Joe was upset because he felt other posters were insulting to lesbians, which included his daughter.

    I remember that there were some people on that thread who were rather hostile to lesbians. I can see how BJ felt upset.

    As for myself, I know there are people who are offended by the presence of a liberal on iSteve. There are others who would be upset about my mixed race family, or a former niece and current nephew of mine who is a transgender Jew.

    The difference being, I am NOT part of the “alt-right” or whatever. I know there are a certain number of people here who are racist, or sexist, or anti-Semite, or anti-lesbian, or anti-whatever.

    I tend to get more upset about what I perceive as bad behavior on the Left end of the spectrum. I am part of the Left, but I get upset when my fellow leftists behave badly.

  101. ferdowski says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    I know it’s been pointed out, but I think it’s hard to exaggerate the extent to which getting consistently good grades hinges on a certain submissiveness of spirit, desire to get a star-sticker on the fridge, and ability to sit quietly in a chair facing forward for 6 hours at a stretch. Having done hiring for a readin’ and ritin’ position that also required initiative, I was surprised at first what bad candidates people with higher degrees make.

  102. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Charon

    The surgical robots today are all operated by surgeons, AFAIK – the idea is that smaller incisions are needed with a robot because it can insert tools smaller than those held by a surgeon’s hands.

  103. JP says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Affluent white guy who graduated from high school about a decade ago chiming in here, because this one really gets my goat. Back then, I personally achieved a 2380 on the SAT, and bagged perfect scores on a veritable plethora of AP and SAT subjects tests (none of these attainments, in my opinion are horribly non trivial or impressive). But my GPA ranked merely in the low 3.3 range. Why? Because high school classes, even at my affluent, supposedly high quality MA public high school, comprise a regimen of enforced mediocrity, in which participation grades, homework grades, and copious other drivel dilute test / essay scores as measures of performance. I would return from school each day, immerse myself in western literature, study extracurricular mathematics, etc, but get shafted in my classes the next day because I didn’t comply with their animal training and scrupulously attend to their brainless homework exercises. I consider “pumped-up SAT scores and lower G.P.A.” folk entirely more impressive than their opposites. Further; I hope that hell exists; I hope that a vengeful God exists; and I hope that the likes of Angel Pérez who would have superior people persecuted end up getting raped with sharp knives for an eternity as cosmic vengeance.

  104. ferdowski says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    read the comments sections from on-line African newspapers for a real eye-opener

  105. @Flip

    I used to work next door to a food processing company that went from mostly blacks with some whites and a few latinos to all latinos over a period of like 5 years.

  106. Ed says:
    @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey

    Yes, there would be but alas you wouldn’t as you seem to be unfamiliar with basic statistics.

    • Replies: @Realist
  107. Anon55uu says:

    https://www.theonion.com/black-guy-photoshopped-in-1819565862

    Old but amusing take on college administrators and catalogs

    • Replies: @Pericles
  108. R.G. Camara says: • Website
    @Paleo Liberal

    or a former niece and current nephew of mine who is a transgender Jew.

    LMAO.

    No, liar, your niece is still your niece. no matter what she demands or what you claim are the “appropriate” pronouns. But it is amusing how you people of the lie will lie about truth to the bitter end.

  109. J.Ross says:
    @Jack D

    There’s a definite change at a specific point. Joe was a working class Italian-American who was very comfortable throwing around play insults and play threats, then he becomes abnormally piqued by something RG Camera said, then there’s the emotional explanation and the request to delete.
    In only a few comments before the end he’s mentioning his daughter defensively. Go back a month and he sounds like a totally different person (but family is a red line for a lot of people).
    Given the way he talked earlier (he routinely talked about throwing down, both for real and as a standing rhetorical offer to the stupid people of the world) and the then-unclear reasons behind his new tone toward his kid I don’t think RG could have realized the offensiveness of what he was saying.
    Then again, another thing leaps out now: Joe frequently talked about dropping offensive media altogether to avoid the indigestion.

    • Replies: @Pericles
  110. eah says:

    OT

    Probably somewhat less of a “treat” to actually live there.

  111. @MikeatMikedotMike

    I agree with you: running a daycare or doing housecleaning is not the same as running a business. I’m employed as a freelancer and I wouldn’t say I’m running a business.

  112. @MikeatMikedotMike

    I looked up some figures.

    There are supposedly 27 million small businesses in the US, of which 2.5 million are black owned.

    Granted, black owned businesses tend to be smaller than average, and female owned businesses tend to be smaller than male owned businesses.

    It is possible that as many as a million small businesses are owned partly or in whole by black women. Granted, a very large percentage will be house cleaning or child care or whatnot. But there are black female entrepreneurs in this country.

    In fact, the first African American billionaire was female. Oprah Winfrey.

  113. @Charon

    My father, who was a doctor, thought of orthopedists and dermatologists as being the bottom ranks. But then, he was a surgeon, so what would he say?

    (One of his jokes: “You know the great thing about being a dermatologist? Your patients never die and they never get better.”)

  114. Forbes says:
    @nymom

    NYC test admission schools are disproportionately Asian because, in part, the white school student population is 15%. Whites who can afford to escape the system are in private or parochial schools.

    An ISA for a STEM college would likely be selecting from a pool of white students with a larger proportion than 15%.

  115. Altai says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    (One of his jokes: “You know the great thing about being a dermatologist? Your patients never die and they never get better.”)

    Isn’t that supposed to be the joke about psychologists?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  116. @Paleo Liberal

    Thanks for keeping your expectations low LOL

  117. anon[338] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    And so he picked African Studies as his major. Not clear he ever graduated, but he now shows as a “district leader” for Primerica in LA:

    http://www.primerica.com/kcampbell21

  118. @Harry Baldwin

    Where I live the dermatologists are booked up for weeks in advance. I suspect it is kind of a racket, patients have to be continually re-booked for followup exams if any skin problems are found, and they appear easy to find. Hope I am not being unfair to the profession.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  119. Lot says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    Agree. And can an 18 year old really agree to pay 8% of his income when he is 30 in a way that can be enforced? I wouldn’t take either side of an ISA.

    And if the 30 year old cashes out 100 million in an IPO, is a court actually going to make him pay more than 100 times the value of his tuition?

    Finally, in the IPO example some creative accounting could have the company “loan” the guy 500,000 a year and forgive it all once the ISA expires.

    The FinTech trend seems to mostly be the ancient evil of usury rebranded with corporate techbro buzzwords. Disruption! Disintermediation! P2P!

  120. Sam Lowry says:
    @Wilkey

    Asians at Ivy + schools have been flooding into finance in the past 10 years and make up a large portion of the lower echelon front office ranks at most bulge bracket banks and elite boutiques. The days of the smartest Asians going into medicine/science have been over for a while. FOB Asians still do but switched on Asians (meaning most Ivy+ Asians) know finance is the track that beats all others. Once the Ivies lift their Asian quotas in the years to come Asians ranks in finance will really boom. This will be way larger than past Jewish numbers in finance. Meaning, most really rich people in the US (i.e. those that own or have access to private jet travel, say the $40mm + set) in the mid/late 21st century will be Asians. That will impact the culture in ways we can’t even imagine.

  121. Anonotron says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    The plural of anecdote is not data.

    They usually evaluate the quality of SATs by their ability to predict college GPA. So do a regression to predict college GPA with SAT, high school GPA, an interaction effect between them and maybe some dummies for college major. That would help answer the question.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    , @res
  122. Kaz says:
    @peterike

    2. After five or ten years, bail out and take the intellectual property and a bunch of your fellow Desis with you. Tweak it just enough to avoid legal hassles and come out with your own startup. Which is basically the next generation product for the company you stole it from, but you can move faster because startup.

    Because Asians can’t do honest work?

    • Replies: @peterike
  123. Anon7 says:

    OT: Then:

    “In the United States today, we have more than our share of the nattering nabobs of negativism. They have formed their own 4-H Club — the ‘hopeless, hysterical hypochondriacs of history.’”
    Spiro Agnew (William Safire)

    Now, the Washington Post:

    Six in Ten Americans Expect a Recession

    Three tropical disturbances to watch as we hit the peak of Atlantic hurricane season

  124. Daniel H says:
    @Andy

    I wonder at what point this dysgenic policy of actually giving more educational opportunities to low IQ individuals will begin to hurt America? Especially when it is now competing head to head technologically with the high IQ Han Chinese

    Ha, ha. It already has been hurting us, for decades now. These ridiculous policies, along with the smartest fraction being hoovered up by the FIRE economy spells doom for America. And it is a doom that won’t take many decades to play out. The next 10-20 years will tell.

    • Agree: Travis
  125. Daniel H says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    My father, who was a doctor, thought of orthopedists and dermatologists as being the bottom ranks. But then, he was a surgeon, so what would he say?

    Dermatology is one of the harder residencies to enter. Lots of $$$$$ in dermatology.

  126. anonymous[354] • Disclaimer says:
    @ScarletNumber

    Well, yes and no. The PSAT’s and SAT’s I took were multiple choice on math. You didn’t even need to know algebra (I didn’t) to be able to approximate the answer using arithmetic, and thus guess the right answer. Had the problems required actual “show your work” calculation, I probably would have wound up with a terrible score on the math portion, instead of a high-middle.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
  127. newrouter says:

    >PAUL TOUGH <

    I wonder if he would have a tough time of it reciting the multiplication tables 1 -12 without a calculator?

  128. @Andy

    At what point?! We’re there already. You see it in the shambolic state of transportation and other infrastructure where the management and workers are from the “discrepant” part of the population.

    • Agree: Andy
  129. R.G. Camara says: • Website
    @Andy

    We know that in South Africa it’s taken a full generation (i.e. 20 years) for the country’s infrastructure to completely fall apart since power transferred from the more competent to the less competent. Of course the violent crime rate soared before that, but in terms of the water and power not working on the regular and the roads falling apart, it’s taken 20 years for that to be fully realized.

    In other words, certain things require greater erosion than others. Lots of bright, evil people still in power as of right now.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  130. @Paul

    Conversely, I noticed this was true from maybe first grade until high school junior year, when the high end AP courses (both in science/math and history/English) swung decidedly in favor of the smarter guys because more than just diligence and conformity were required to earn high grades. The smartest and most diligent girls still did well, but the boys replaced most of them in the top 5, and stayed there in college. I know, as I was one such boy.

  131. R.G. Camara says: • Website
    @HunInTheSun

    All you need to do to keep Puerto Ricans from showing up is rain. For some reason, rain causes Puerto Ricans to want to stay inside and be lazy far more than other ethnicities. I know several school workers who have noted that when it rains lots of Puerto Rican students will be absent or will play sick and try to go home early. Probably has something to do with their evolution on an island where rain came in the form of big storms, so they naturally have an aversion to it.

    I can bet that the heavy rains of the Pacific Northwest have kept Puerto Ricans from showing up there. I don’t think blacks are as affected by rain, if at all, except as far as other races go.

    *And yes, I know I know, that “rain is a cop’s best friend” but relative to all ethnicities Puerto Ricans seem especially adverse to going outside or doing anything when it rains compared with other groups.

  132. Maybe this is just a me thing im kind of weird but in my case(87 highschool grad) i think a deep cynicsm infected me regarding school.As a young guy growing up in Boston i couldnt articulate my feelings regarding liberal instititions (hs,college,church,journalism) because i didnt come from a family that talked politics,it wasnt until i read some random thomas sowell book that i realised i leaned conservative in my mid 20s.
    Now at 50 years old ive accomplished little and live month by month.Ive lived for my 5 kids and they are doing very well but other than that ….My only original idea a ranking system i invented to seed a college football playoff system is getting a bit of media coverage and endorsement here in las vegas…if by some miracle it ever blew up(it is awesome,my 6th child) i promise i will give nice chunk to steve thats long overdue. I appreciate the steveosphere as its nice to know others have similiar outlooks although in my everday life ive never met another sailer fan which is unfathomable to me …i do share alot of posts though!

  133. Peterike says:
    @ScarletNumber

    “Unlike liberal arts classes where you do well by telling the teacher what they want to hear, in math there is an actual correct answer.”

    You clearly are not up on the latest in progressive pedagogy. That whole “correct answer” thing was tossed out a while ago.

  134. @Gordo

    Yes. They should put evil whites in segregated, underfunded schools with textbooks from the 1940s, no computers and slide rules, then lavishly fund Wakandan secondary schools: the best science labs. The best textbooks. The best computers.

    Let’s see who does better.

  135. Lagertha says:

    This is just one more boring attack on white men like Tucker, who was graduated from Trinity. Trinity is in the crosshairs of the media, but unfortunately for them, the president of Trinity is a black woman. And Hartford is in a Democrat stronghold/stranglehold.

  136. @anonymous

    “Income Sharing Arrangements” sounds so much nicer than “Indentured Servitude Agreements” although the same acronym applies.

  137. Anonymous[277] • Disclaimer says:

    Story that ran a few years back in the LA Times about a kid from South Central with a “deflated” SAT score and his experiences as a freshman at UC Berkeley.

    https://www.latimes.com/local/la-me-c1-cal-freshmen-20130816-dto-htmlstory.html

    I wonder, what was the better predictor of this kid’s academic performance: his grades or his test scores? I also wonder how long it will be acceptable for newspapers to write stories like this, or even for colleges to give failing grades to minorities who show up to every class and turn in their assignments on time.

  138. @eah

    Who among us has not dreamed of living in a hipster homeless shelter?

  139. res says:
    @William Badwhite

    I hadn’t realized Buffalo Joe had stopped commenting. Sad to hear that. I looked at his commenting history and his last comment sounded pretty angry so we may have lost him as a commenter.

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/why-did-the-wnba-become-the-angry-lesbians-league/#comment-3277342

    I hope he and his daughter are well. I will miss his comments.

    • Replies: @Charon
  140. Lugash says:
    @eah

    Ghost Ship II: Los Angeles

  141. nymom says:
    @Kronos

    For the life of me I couldn’t figure out what that guy was saying in the article. He had so many qualifications for various schools and variety of schools, programs and students that I was completely confused half way through it and towards the end he had totally lost me…

    Sorry…

    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @Kronos
  142. res says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    It would be interesting to see how black physicians are distributed by specialty. I wouldn’t be surprised if many are in fields such as emergency medicine, where they’re not selected by patients.

    The data is from 2008, but Table 3a: Major Professional Activity by Practice Specialty, Black or African-American U.S. MD Physicians, 2008
    on page 56 of https://www.aamc.org/download/432976/data/factsandfigures2010.pdf
    has a good list. Title of the document is: Diversity in the Physician Workforce: Facts & Figures 2010

    Internal Medicine has the most with 5,021, followed by Family/General Practice with 3,725, Pediatrics with 3,182, and Obstretics/Gynecology with 3,089. The rest are less than ~1,500.

    There is much more data in that document. Like

    Table 9: Practice Specialty by Race and Ethnicity, 2008
    which lets you compare total numbers in each specialty by race.

    Table 10a and 10b are similar to Table 9, but broken out for men and women separately.

    Poorly formatted (but readable if you make an effort) version of Table 3a after the MORE.

    [MORE]

    Practice Specialty | Full-Time Hospital Staff | Residents/Fellows | Office Based | Other Professional Activity | Total
    Allergy/Immunology 6 10 45 1 62
    Anesthesiology 183 291 1,025 21 1,520
    Cardiology 36 102 341 11 490
    Combined Residency 0 29 2 0 31
    Dermatology 23 56 218 5 302
    Emergency Medicine 227 242 872 29 1,370
    Endocrinology/Diabetes 7 15 49 11 82
    Family/General Practice 277 403 2,946 99 3,725
    Geriatrics 36 50 318 27 431
    Internal Medicine 486 870 3,449 216 5,021
    Medical Genetics 0 1 2 2 5
    Neurosurgery 10 53 83 1 147
    Neurology 13 67 166 11 257
    Obstetrics/Gynecology 202 475 2,368 44 3,089
    Oncology (Cancer) 24 50 128 20 222
    Ophthalmology 29 37 312 14 392
    Orthopedics 31 164 389 3 587
    Other 30 347 123 24 524
    Otolaryngology 17 45 140 2 204
    Pathology 29 104 174 24 331
    Pediatrics 295 636 2,149 102 3,182
    Physical Medicine & Rehab 32 93 304 6 435
    Plastic Surgery 2 27 121 1 151
    Preventative Medicine 29 24 202 55 310
    Psychiatry 152 359 915 46 1,472
    Radiology 76 151 511 12 750
    Surgery 131 547 785 23 1,486
    Urology 20 41 197 4 262
    Total 2,403 5,289 18,334 814 26,840

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  143. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Harry Baldwin

    Orthopedists are surgeons.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  144. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Simply Simon

    A local dermatologist lady works part time and is married to a surgeon. How much of physician shortages are due to female docs deciding to work part time in specialties where they can get away with it?

  145. Peterike says:

    Speaking of education…

    “It is will soon be illegal in California for both public and charter schools to suspend disruptive students from kindergarten through eighth grade”

    What could go wrong?

  146. J.Ross says:
    @Altai

    My fear is that laws are coming to “protect” people from the kind of human being who once read “Dancing Wu Li Masters” in high school, and all these propaganda efforts (especially the completely Nazi, has-to-be-seen-to-be-believed incel segment of Elementary) will form a kind of lazy justification in people’s menories.

  147. @Altai

    Having been to a few dermatologists, I think it works equally well for them.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  148. nymom says:
    @kaganovitch

    Those childcare businesses at home are not real businesses started by the women themselves. Basically it’s sort of a make-shift public benefits programs that allows women to pass a few courses and become “certified” then they can watch the children of other women who are taking courses or in other make-shift work jobs like theirs…

    Anyway most of them appear to be hispanic, not black at all. Although the women whose children they care for in their homes are frequently black.

    My daughter used one of those women to watch her child for a year or two. She was the only cash paying customer the woman had, although she was watching two or three other kids…

    So those are not businesses started by the women themselves.

  149. MBlanc46 says:
    @ScarletNumber

    Fortunately, in my math classes, the correct answer was always what the teacher wanted to hear. Extra credit for getting it via an elegant method.

  150. MBlanc46 says:
    @William Badwhite

    Joe is definitely missed. He was full of interesting items about Buffalo, and one of my favorites.

  151. MBlanc46 says:
    @eah

    Stayed in youth hostels that looked rather like that back on the 1970s.

  152. Lagertha says:
    @anonymous

    Can’t wait!

    The economics don’t work at all for current elite schools, which are both wedded to Title IX and rely heavily on a small percentage of high-achieving males (disproportionately on Wall Street) to support their endowments, thus subsidizing 98% of the student body, who will do nothing in their careers. Take away that small percentage of students, and it’s game over.

    I have sensed this for more than a decade. Reality is: white guys who organically generate a ton of money (greatest inventors of all time) do not grow on trees! – they can not be produced in a SJW lab!

    Males are just different….and high SAT scorers are not to be scorned at. My late mother always felt the USA will fall apart once they ignore their smartest children. Children, the smartest children, have always been thought of as a national resource in Finland. Yeah, yeah, I know, Finland has drunk the idiotic koolaid of mediocrity as a heralded value, ergo, they have foolishly gone all in with multiculturalism – sort of silly and laughable since Finland is still 95% Finn. Anyway, so tired of people hating on smart white boys. But, love it when I know majority have no loans since they went to State Whatever U! hahaaaa

  153. @Paleo Liberal

    You’re contentions defy all measures of observable reality.

  154. @JP

    JP, thanks for your reply, but your last sentence—a bit harsh methinks. Being confined to Puerto Rico for eternity should be punishment enough. 🙂

  155. dvorak says:

    what needs the least number of epicycles, is the simplest and most accurate explanation

    What would Raj Chetty get paid seven figures for, if not to create epicycles?

    Raj Chetty is creating an Epicycle-Industrial Complex, in order to flood our country with his cousins and in order to hunt down and destroy the last remaining functional White working-class communities. It’s called doing well by doing good.

  156. @Anonymous

    nor will they retire before 80 years unless massively incentivised

  157. @eah

    The future of LA looks like Soylent Green.

  158. rexl says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    Jack I enjoy what you write in the comments, but this time you are wrong. And your examples prove how wrong you are, you know. The situation has gotten worse, more crowded perhaps, but worse, just the same.

  159. Both sterile and lacking in privacy. I’ll take my chances at ghost ship, thanks.

  160. They were three times as likely as students in the inflated-SAT group to have parents who earned less than $30,000 a year

    Holy shit. Anyone in the F.U.S.A. earning less than $30,000.00 annually yet having children is, by definition, and thereby almost certainly, genetically reproducibly, among the stupidest persons walking the Earth!

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  161. Yes it’s supposed to be in ‘Gotham’ but it’s clearly meant to be NYC which is odd because Gotham is usually meant to be Chicago.

    Gotham has been a nickname for New York City since 1807. The Batman mythos was generally meant to be set in a fictionalized version of New York City, although this is rarely made explicit. The Chicago setting is actually the outlier. Nolan largely set The Dark Knight in Chicago, but the other Batman films made by Nolan are shot in an amalgam of cities.

    The Dark Knight Rises was shot in numerous cities around the world, but there are several explicit references to New York City. Wayne Enterprises in The Dark Knight Rises is actually set in Trump Tower, for example, which is pretty eerie and unsettling.

    The street brawls with Bane are obviously set and shot on Wall Street. The Wall Street fight scenes were shot by Dolan at the height of the Occupy Wall Street protests in Lower Manhattan. I watched the shoot of a comic book version of a populist uprising take place on Wall Street mere blocks from Zuccotti Park where an apparently real populist uprising was formenting.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  162. @Hypnotoad666

    Pro golfers had a lot of income sharing agreements back during the 1930s when purses were very low so a cold streak could mean you couldn’t afford gas to get to the next tournament.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  163. @Dave Pinsen

    Right; Baldwin makes no sense here. Never have I ever heard of an orthopoedist not an orthopoedic surgeon – I went I have a leg full of metal to show for my extreme expertise in the matter – well above and beyond that of uour average fellow without a leg full of metal.

    Perhaps Baldwin meant podiatrists or optometrists? (They are not even medical doctors.) Surely not oncologists or opthalmologists…those are legitimate fields. What else might one conflate with orthopoedists? Orthodontists?! (Those guys are definitely rich bastards who do little real work, but also not physicians….)

  164. Kronos says:
    @nymom

    Imagine your back in school.

    Your in a class that’s graded on 90% homework and 10% on the big test.

    Now, looking back, did the assigned homework ever really help you prepare for the test? How many people do you know did the homework, turned it in, received a A+, and bombed the test? Quite a few people.

    GPA is simply filler for buffering the negative impact of testing. If grades were based on 80% on tests and homework only 20%, grade inflation would be much lower. Also, guess who’s gonna get slaughtered on a racial bell curve distribution.

    GPA is the “new” back door affirmative action for racial minorities. Keep in mind there are like 5000+ different school curriculums in the US. Some classes even if I’m the same subject are easier than others. If you scored a GPA of 3.86 in LA South Central (Bang Bang) it might be only cognitively equivalent to a 2.24 in Lake Oswego (So Fancy) Portland Oregon.

    Colleges/Universities have got around affirmative action bans by selecting highly inflated GPAs in historically minority zip codes.

    Or at least that’s how I read the article.

  165. @Clifford Brown

    Christopher Nolan’s first Batman movie was set in a fictionalized version of Chicago, such as Lower Wacker, the ultra-brutalist underground street. Nolan grew up partly in Evanston.

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
  166. @Paleo Liberal

    The top manager of a Walmart store probably has, what, a couple of hundred people working for him?

    Sounds like he is doing well.

    • Replies: @AnonAnon
  167. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Physician shortages are primarily due to the doctors’ union, the AMA, being able to control the number of doctors trained and making it tough for doctors trained in first rate Western foreign medical schools to come here. Med school should cost about a third of what it does in the US and we should be training about a third more people or making it easier for US students to go to medical schools in First World countries.

    We also deny the role of technology in making what used to be a matter of fine judgment on the part of very experienced people now often routine and unambiguous with CAT and MRI scans and sophisticated blood analysis.

    We also require a four year degree before going into med school whereas a six year ab initio program would be much better. In theory the present system results in a more well rounded and “humane” doctor but in practice it’s just two years of pointless grind ince pre emd types are not taking rigorous humanities courses, it’s not competitively advantageous for getting into med school.

    Republicans hate unions like the Teamsters or IBEW but they’ll get on their knees for the AMA and the ABA. And I’m not talking prayer here.

    (( Somebody please put up a clip of Adrien Brody’s “you gave him some skull” monologue from Six Ways to Sunday for these occasions…..Sailer, you fink, you still haven’t reviewed it. ))

    • Replies: @anon
  168. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    Dermatology is a very competitive field because there are few residencies, and a lot of med school grads want them, because it’s a 9 to 5 gig that pays really well. making it a field like podiatry or optometry would be a good idea but it won’t happen.

  169. Kronos says:
    @nymom

    You might get a kick out of this oldie, (buts it’s sure a good one.)

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/education-realist-explains-charter/

    P.S. No worries, I had to reread that article four times until I felt I fully grasped it.

  170. Pericles says:
    @Diversity is Great!

    Greg Moore, you regurgitated the whole thing, you’re a good goy (pat on head).

  171. Pericles says:
    @R.G. Camara

    we cannot be free until our intellectual class openly admits

    A false hope, I’m afraid.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  172. Aft says:

    Things that the “National SAT Validity Study” said that are actually relevant:

    Figure 7 shows the mean retention rate by SAT score band, controlling for HSGPA, for the 2006 through 2010 entering college cohorts.
    Within each cohort year, higher SAT scores are associated with higher retention rates.27
    In addition, even for those students within the same HSGPA level, higher SAT scores are associated with higher second-year retention rates.
    An examination of students with an HSGPA of A in the 2010 cohort shows that retention rates increased as SAT score band increased. Students with an HSGPA of A and an SAT score of 890 or lower had a mean retention rate of 55%, while those with an SAT score of 2100 or higher had a mean retention rate of 96%.

    https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED558085.pdf

  173. Aft says:

    More for Paul Tough and his propaganda piece:

    In fact, intelligence is a better predictor of (future) SES than parent SES. Intelligence also predicts education and occupational status better than it does income.

    I do not want to get into the weeds too much with this particular topic, but to try (briefly) to open your mind to the possibility that the parent SES association with academic, occupational, and other forms of “success” are mostly explained through the heritability of intelligence and other phenotypes of interest (e.g., conscientiousness, motivation, personality/extraversion, etc).
    Most people that attain high SES are significantly more intelligent than average and we know that intelligence is heritable. Even allowing for some regression towards the mean (which is *not* 100%), we should well expect that child SES would be quite well associated with the intelligence and other phenotypes that helped shape their parents’ success — especially over the course of several generations.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/randomcriticalanalysis.com/2015/11/25/no-the-sat-doesnt-just-measure-income/amp/

  174. Pericles says:
    @J.Ross

    In only a few comments before the end he’s mentioning his daughter defensively. Go back a month and he sounds like a totally different person (but family is a red line for a lot of people).

    From what I can see, Buffalo Joe has a big problem inside his family, like finding out his kid is schizophrenic or a crack addict or a tranny. Best of luck to him.

  175. @Paleo Liberal

    I hate to break this to you, but no one cares about you either way.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  176. Pericles says:
    @Anon55uu

    Nowadays the blacks are digitally added to your university in a worse way.

  177. eah says:
    @eah

  178. @William Badwhite

    I will give Buffalo Joe credit. He said he was going to leave and he left. It’s been almost three months.

  179. @Diversity is Great!

    A Stephen Smith different from the one Steve cites at Taki’s lays into Brown here:

  180. @Jack D

    The SAT measures a lot of things, but merit isn’t one of them. Unless you’re a Lysenkoist and one inherits one’s parents achievements along with their DNA.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  181. Realist says:
    @Ed

    Yes, there would be but alas you wouldn’t as you seem to be unfamiliar with basic statistics.

    At least 75% of college students…elite included… do not have a working knowledge of statistics.

  182. Realist says:
    @Anon

    … but unable to wrote a coherent sentence at UC Berkeley.

    Speaking of coherent.

  183. Anonymous[284] • Disclaimer says:
    @Paul

    SMPY (John’s Hopkins) showed boys had a strong statistical edge in math precocity (and talent). Most pronounced at the most rarefied levels. Of course, if that’s what you are discussing (e.g. Fields Medalists) fine. But many SS commenters assume that’s the only relevant thing. And difference is much much smaller for the general population (and often that’s what one is worried about). Of course, there are also outliers like Lisa Randall even in the supersmarty group.

  184. peterike says:
    @Anonymous

    They did not make for great group partners in open ended work, but their extensive cheating networks meant we had the key to any problem sets assignment where I was working with Chinese students…

    Can you explain more about how the cheating networks worked? That stuff is very interesting.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  185. FPD72 says:
    @Anon

    In around 1980 I had a conversation with an academic recruiter for Notre Dame University. He told me there were high schools in south Dallas (then 95% black) where the valedictorians had SAT scores in the 800s.

    I was working as the director of a half-way house for juvenile delinquents at the time, while completing grad school. I was in the high school our delinquents attended one day for parent-teacher conferences. This was a school considered the crown jewel of the Dallas school district. I had a teacher tell me that he wished he could have a whole classroom filled with my boys, bacause they were his “hardest working, best behaved, most attentive” students.

    When he said that about my armed robbers, car thieves, and drug dealers, I knew that no child of mine would ever attend a DISD school.

    I had one boy enter our program at the beginning of Christmas break, so I has two weeks of exposure to him before enrolling him in school. Although he had been in special education in a suburban school, I enrolled him in mainstream classes because I thought he could handle them, over his protests. He made the honor roll.

    My own kids were enrolled in a top rated suburban school. They always loved it when state-mandated end-of-course exams were used as finals, because the exams were so easy they were guaranteed an A. If the exams hadn’t been so easy, a majority of NAM students would have failed the classes.

    Moral of the story: not all A students are equal. The academic achievement that would earn an A in a NAM heavy school might get you a C or even a D in a decent school. Elite school administrators know this but want to use grades without SATs for admissions as an “objective” means of affirmative action. The state of Texas has done this with its “top 10%” (or top 7% for UT) law for state university admissions, as a work-around for the Hopwood decision.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
  186. Are we still pretending that the SAT and ACT are tests of “intelligence” and not tests of how well you can take the SAT and ACT?

  187. @Jack D

    This is not fair. Without affirmative action, 1 or 2% of students at elite schools might still be black. However, most of those would be half-bloods raised by white mothers like Obama, talented tenth and Caribbean blacks like Malcolm Gladwell who are really 80% white and Nigerian Igbos. The number of African American slave descendants with 80%+ African blood like Moochelle would indeed be vanishingly small. Would it be zero? No, but pretty damn close.

    I have a copy of the Harvard freshman yearbook from 1931. There were 3 or 4 blacks in the class: one from Boston, one from Baltimore, one from Jamaica, and perhaps one other.

  188. Jack D says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    The College Board calls its associated scholarship program National MERIT Scholarships. The way you demonstrate your MERIT is by scoring high on the PSAT.

  189. @R.G. Camara

    >Jews and blacks are similarly situated in terms of low empathy (especially for outgroups), . . .

    My sense is that that opinion is doubly false. With a fair amount of contact with blacks in stores and on the streets over many years (I am very old), my experience is that black women, teenagers and adults, respond in kind to polite conversational exchanges. And ditto for adult black men (black teenage males aside).They seem to me to consider themselves American citizens, which they are de jure and for the most part these days de facto, and act accordingly. Not so with black civil servants male and female who almost uniformly have a very bad attitude. Many white civil servants have that attitude but less so (cf. Patti and Selma Bouvier). I have no experience with black doctors whose choice of profession suggests that they would not have an ingrained prejudice against other Americans. I am thinking of doctors who graduated from American medical schools. As for doctors from South Asia, I would beware. As for American jews of today having low empathy towards non-jewish Americans, that is an out and out falsehood as I know from my personal experience. As often from the keyboards of the jew haters who frequent this forum, that opinion is obviously a reverse projection: ascribing to the object of one’s dislike a mirror image of one’s own attitude.

  190. AnonAnon says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Glassdoor says the average Walmart store manger salary is more like $140,000 when you include bonuses. This jives with a friend telling me our local Walmart store manger made $300,ooo, here in Orange County. I think it’s a dump and a terrible shopping experience but I guess if you squeeze enough blood from a stone you’re well-rewarded.

  191. If a person intends to major in foreign languages in college (not math, not English mind you, then how does the SAT (which supposedly measures ENGLISH verbal skills and math skills) “measure” how that person will perform over multiple years of college level foreign language study? This is one of the many reasons why the SAT/ACT is nothing more than a racket.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  192. @Dave Pinsen

    Same situation with my neighbors except the husband is a GP.

  193. anon[298] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    The US cannot add any seats in medical school for now because there exists a limited number of residencies. The 3rd and 4th year of medical school sends students out to work with doctors in private practice, hospitals, clinics and so forth. It’s a requirement of the US system. In order to expand the number of seats in med schools, the number of residencies must expand as well. It is a logistical and political issue.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Dave Pinsen
  194. @Diversity is Great!

    Greg may not be completely unbiased here, as he is a negro

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  195. @Paleo Liberal

    Granted, a very large percentage will be house cleaning or child care or whatnot.

    I don’t think being someone’s maid is what most people think of as “running a small business”. I made money by mowing people’s lawns when I was in high school. Despite that, I still don’t tell people that I once was a successful entrepreneur.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    , @peterike
  196. @Anonotron

    No.

    Test scores are 100% predictive of how well you took that particular test on that particular day.

    There is a strong positive correlation between doing well on standardized tests and intelligence.

    There is also a strong positive correlation between doing well in HS and intelligence.

    Which is why about 2/3 of the time the test scores and the grades match.

    What standardized test scores (ACT and SAT, etc) are pretty good at is distinguishing between the kid who did well in HS because he was smart, and the kid who did well because either he worked his butt off or went to a ghetto school where he got all As just for showing up. The standardized tests can also find the diamond in the rough, who was just bored with school.

    The standardized test scores don’t do well measuring learning disabilities or motivation.

    I have known several people in my life who have been stunningly successful. One founded a billion dollar company. Another founded a $100 million + company. Another is a senator. Several are famous scientists. One spent 8 years as president. Another spent 8 years as first lady, and then spent time in the senate and the cabinet.

    On the other hand, I have known some stunningly smart people who never really got anywhere in life. Some are unemployed or underemployed. One joined the Moonies. Several committed suicide.

    On the other hand, one of my cousins is dumb as a post and is a successful small businessman. I have known other people who were not very bright who did well in life, but not the tippy top.

    And remember, Mohammed Ali, an extremely successful person, had an IQ in the 70s.

    The people who have been stunningly successful have the following things in common.

    1. Extremely intelligent or have some sort of stunning talent.
    2. Extremely well organized.
    3. Extremely hard working.
    4. Generally, they didn’t have a major learning disability.
    5. In many cases, good luck played a big role.

    Standardized test scores can measure, to some extent, ONE of those factors. Not completely, but they do a pretty good job of it.

    People can be successful in life, but usually not at the tippy top, with SOME of those. Neil Bush, for example, had some but not all of those. He had the extreme good luck of being George H.W. Bush’s son. He was intelligent, but not extremely intelligent. He was also corrupt as hell, and willing to use his father’s good name for evil purposes.

    Then we have the Kardashian/Jenner clan, who, well, never mind.

  197. res says:
    @Anonotron

    That’s the right idea, but that the problem is that all college majors/classes (and hence GPAs) are not equal.

    Steve Hsu has some good posts on this topic in his blog. Here is an example: https://infoproc.blogspot.com/2010/09/measure-of-success.html

    The feel-good conclusion from our work is that in most majors (e.g., History, English, Biology, social sciences, …) students with modest SAT scores can still obtain high GPAs, presumably through hard work. However, we found almost no cases of SAT-M scorers below about 90th percentile who obtained high upper division GPAs in physics or pure mathematics (second link below).

    Valen Johnson has an interesting 1997 paper looking at an alternative way of evaluating student performance which avoids the problem of inconsistent grading policies between classes.
    https://projecteuclid.org/download/pdf_1/euclid.ss/1030037959

    The basic idea is to correct the raw numbers by looking at students who took the same classes. This excerpt shows they are doing an analysis like you ask for as part of evaluating the proposals:

    For this cohort of undergraduate grades, the multiple R2 for the regression of college GPA on high school GPA and math and verbal SAT scores was 0.252. The regression of achievement indices estimated from the ICM algorithm for the same covariates was 0.346, a substantial increase over the value obtained using raw GPA. For the additive adjustment model, the R2 value was 0.338.

    At one point Duke considered implementing something like this. This article gives an idea how that turned out.
    https://www.1843magazine.com/ideas/the-daily/the-extraordinary-silliness-of-american-college-grading

    There are two potential solutions to this general class of problems. One is to create a standardised test that all students must take, thereby making outcomes directly comparable. This is what happened at the high-school level, for better or worse, with the scholastic aptitude tests (SATs) in reading, writing and maths: all students take the same assessment, so the resulting scores are directly comparable. However, at the university level, it seems implausible to imagine all students across different specialties taking a single, unified test.

    The other solution is to find a way to compare and calibrate different grades from different courses. Over the years, many academics – including Valen Johnson, then of Duke University, and Jonathan Caulkins and his co-authors at Carnegie Mellon – have proposed methods that would try to control for both differences in instructor grading and different levels of student ability. The correction for instructor stringency relies on the idea that all instructors are (implicitly) ranking their students from top to bottom, regardless of the grade cut-offs they use. If we adjust those rankings, we can compare between instructors who give very different grades. The correction for student ability relies on tracking the same students across their various courses, and inferring the average student ability in each course as a result. The adjusted GPA measures reward students both for getting good grades and for taking difficult courses – in short, for working and learning as much as possible.

    At the time of Johnson’s proposal in 1997, Duke University briefly flirted with implementing his alternative GPA (as a supplement to the traditional GPA), but after a rambunctious public consultation the proposal was narrowly defeated in a faculty vote. The opposition mostly came from students and members of the humanities departments, who were worried that their courses would be deemed less demanding. As far as I can tell, no university has ever implemented an alternative GPA.

    Valen Johnson also wrote a book on grade inflation: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FB059I2

    • Replies: @Jack D
  198. @William Badwhite

    Sorry folks, I thought it would just show his picture, not his last 2 million tweets.

  199. anon[414] • Disclaimer says:

    At least when they kept their business transactions on clay tablets even papyrus there is still a record of it today. Not that we needed to know their business transactions but it does help in understanding file systems and storing endless amounts of data in libraries. Then when you want to retrieve some information you just select (whatever) from some table it was kept on. Or maybe you want to grab two of something and join the information on new clay tablet. There is just so much about the past that is reminiscent of today. For each century says “hello world”, like a continuous loop. No real divide between the present you or your past intelligence, your all geniuses.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  200. @Dave Pinsen

    I thought neurosurgery was pretty near the top of the medical tree?

    I had one as next door neighbour for a couple of years, if stress can be measured by the number of bottles you get through on a Friday night after work, it’s a pretty stressful job.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  201. @William Badwhite

    I understand.

    Legally, you were.

    It took a certain amount of hustle to get out there, find some customers, and make some money working for yourself. Good for you. Some of my kids have made money as baby sitters and dog walkers. Not exactly big corporations, but required the ability to find customers, and to do the job responsibly to get the repeat business.

    Also, legally, I was self-employed for a few years because I worked as a contractor on a 1099 basis. I am doing exactly the same sort of thing now, working for a staffing agency on a W-2 basis. The difference is in one case I was legally considered self-employed, and therefore an entrepreneur, whereas in the other case I am legally considered an employee, and NOT a small business owner.

    Take the case of a woman on the left side of the Bell Curve. It takes a certain amount of grit and determination to start a cleaning or child care business, rather than sit home and do nothing all day. Those are the sort of skills successful businessmen have, just on a different level.

  202. @Paleo Liberal

    The point was, this fellow, who I did know in HS, was someone of average intelligence who, through hard work, had well above average grades, and a well above average career.

    Work hard all you want. Without high intelligence, you won’t achieve anything worthwhile.

    By that I mean: you’ll make no discovery. You’ll make no breakthrough. You won’t invent anything. You’ll found nothing that will last more than a decade. You’ll lead no nation. And so on.

    Generic ”you”. I don’t know you. There are exceptions, but they’re just that.

  203. @Steve Sailer

    The first film also had a recreated Chicago shot on soundstages in London, along with some location shots in Chicago.

  204. Anon[751] • Disclaimer says:

    “Test scores are 100% predictive of how well you took that particular test on that particular day.”

    Hardly 100%. On a multiple choice with 10 questions where you know the answer to 1 and guess on 9 you could score anywhere from 1-10. Absolutely no way for anyone to tell that from your score.

  205. Anon[751] • Disclaimer says:

    “Test scores are 100% predictive of how well you took that particular test on that particular day.”

    Hardly 100%. On a multiple choice with 10 questions where you know the answer to 1 and guess on 9 you could score anywhere from 1-10. Absolutely no way for anyone to tell that from your score.

  206. Jack D says:
    @R.G. Camara

    In California (always ahead of the times in America) the power grid is going to start to fall apart sooner. They’ve already taken to shutting it off in large areas every time there is a high risk of wildfire.

    If a massive wildfire starts because of lightning strike or a judgment proof camper or arsonist starts it, well, you and your insurance company are just going to have to bear the cost. But if due to “negligence” (and there’s always negligence, especially as America browns) the spark comes from a power pole or transformer instead of a match or a lightning bolt, that’s the power company’s fault and they are going to have to pay and pay and they have the deep pockets that all plaintiffs lawyers love – billions if it’s a big fire and there’s a big fire every year. So their response is that on any day when there’s a high risk of fire (low humidity, wind), which is a lot of days in Southern California which was a semi-desert until irrigation water was brought in (and a place where humans with their expensive improvements have settled in areas that were historically burned over and over repeatedly for centuries), they are going to just turn off the electricity so that no one can blame them. I doubt the # of fires will go down – when it’s 5% humidity and there’s a brisk wind blowing then it’s only a matter of time (especially since everyone is now going to have a gasoline generator), but the # of fires for which the power company can be blamed will, and in the meantime you can say goodbye to a reliable power grid.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    , @William Badwhite
  207. Jack D says:
    @res

    It seem like you could do something like what they do when they score figure skating. For each move that you execute, they score you on how well you have done but multiplied by a factor for difficulty of execution. So a program where you execute each move perfectly but your moves are not very hard may get a lower score than one where your execution is not perfect but you have been trying much more difficult moves.

    They had to do this because people would otherwise game the system by doing all easy moves and getting a high score on each one. That is exactly the situation we have now in academics, where you can graduate with a 4.0 in Ethnic Studies while your roommate might have a 3.2 as a Physics major even though he is by far the smarter one.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @res
  208. Mini-Mes are part of the epicycle of life, like new equipment.

  209. @Diversity is Great!

    The Vegas odds of the Patriots winning the Super Bowl went from 6-1 to 4-1 when they signed Brown.
    He doesn’t have to do much except draw double coverage. And I’ll bet that the $6 million of his $15 million that is not guaranteed is riddled with clauses. Prediction: AB will realize that, if he does a 2007 Randy Moss imitation, he can win a ring, and then go cash in somewhere else.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  210. @Steve Sailer

    Yeah, i’ll bet a a lot of the old golf greats were shaking their heads in amazement when Rory walked off with $15 million for winning 1, count em’ one, tournament. 7 others won million dollar+ prizes.

  211. anon[414] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Actually you could game the skating world back when you had to skate perfect figure 8’s and such. Doing well on these helped propel you forward in the standings, that’s when they had compulsories. But these same people who could do that well flopped when it came to skating an artistic performance.

  212. J.Ross says:
    @Pericles

    “Combusts,” he clearly meant to say “we cannot be free until our intellectual class openly combusts.”

  213. J.Ross says:
    @anon

    Not all. Many of those transaction records were agricultural debt statements, especially repayment tallies. In medieval England, they didn’t use clay tablets, they used notched sticks. Some late Victorian genius decided to make a symbolic censorship and burned them like ordinary firewood in Parliament.

  214. J.Ross says:
    @ScarletNumber

    Ignore this guy Paleo, data about the diversity of commenter here is intrinsically interesting.

    • Troll: ScarletNumber
  215. J.Ross says:
    @anon

    Great, how do we impose the residency on lawyers?

  216. peterike says:
    @Kaz

    Because Asians can’t do honest work?

    Of course they can. But at the same time, they have ZERO compunctions about doing dishonest work. Low-trust vs high-trust. That’s the crux of why the Asian Invasion is a disaster for America.

  217. peterike says:
    @William Badwhite

    I don’t think being someone’s maid is what most people think of as “running a small business”.

    I think the definition is pretty easy. If you’re not paying at least one person other than yourself, it’s not a business.

  218. res says:
    @Jack D

    You get a little of that with GPA bumps for AP classes in high school.

    I’m not sure what the best approach is. At the end of the day it comes down to what the grades should represent. There is a similar effect between different colleges. Plus, grade inflation makes it hard to sort any of this out regardless of everything else.

    But I do think something like Valen Johnson’s approach would change the relative correlations between HS GPA and SAT scores vs. GPA/Alternative GPA. And an adjustment for college attended would probably also make a difference.

    P.S. I am confident that Diversity means none of this will ever happen.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  219. JMcG says:
    @Jack D

    I’d say PGE is just forcing the Utility Commission’s Hand. Government will order them not to power down the grid and PGE will reluctantly agree as long as they are absolved of all liability.

  220. @Jack Armstrong

    That was a bad comment on his part for sure, but nobody bats 1.000 (except for me). He was usually pretty good.

  221. @Anonymouse

    As often from the keyboards of the jew haters who frequent this forum, that opinion is obviously a reverse projection: ascribing to the object of one’s dislike a mirror image of one’s own attitude.

    Given that every one of your posts accuses those with whom you disagree of “jew hate”, you should revisit who is doing the projection.

  222. @MikeatMikedotMike

    Fair enough, though it wasn’t specified in your previous comment.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
  223. @Jack D

    But if due to “negligence”….that’s the power company’s fault and they are going to have to pay and pay and they have the deep pockets that all plaintiffs lawyers love – billions if it’s a big fire and there’s a big fire every year.

    PG&E was also sued by virtually every insurer and re-insurer (and cat fund) for causing the Woolsey and Camp fires. If I’m Geico or Allstate and I have to scratch a $500k check to some guy whose house burned down because PG&E can’t maintain their right-of-ways, I want that $500k back.

    Many (if not all) cat funds specifically do not insure against man-made fires (not an “Act of God”). However, it appears PG&E will successfully stick the re-insurers and the cat funds with the bill by their bankruptcy declaration in January of this year.

    How this will play out in the future is that many (if not all) cat funds will simply not cover CA wildfires at all, regardless of how they started. This means the re-insurers will either drop wildfire coverage entirely or will dramatically increase the premiums that they charge to the insurers, which means owning homes in fire-prone CA is just going to get even more expensive.

    I doubt the # of fires will go down

    There are something like 130mm dead trees in CA if the US Forest Service is to be believed. Add that fuel to the low humidity you cite, then mix in the hilly terrain (fire loves to advance uphill) and its going to keep burning.

    On top of that, PG&E is a large real-life exhibit in the consequences of not meeting the “Smart Fraction”. If they’re not burning down huge swaths of the state annually, they’re blowing up San Bruno: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Bruno_pipeline_explosion

    You can’t have a 1st world society with 3rd world people and California is well on its way to proving that. To have a 1st world country you need people with IQ’s plus or minus 100 doing things like maintaining elevators, overseeing sewage systems, driving freight trains, and maintaining the power grid. You can’t do these things with 75-80 IQ people as it appears PG&E is attempting to do.

    • Replies: @peterike
    , @Johann Ricke
    , @JMcG
  224. Jack D says:
    @res

    P.S. I am confident that Diversity means none of this will ever happen.

    You are absolutely right about that. In many non-diverse countries (e.g. Japan) admission to college is a simple matter of taking the national admissions test. They then rank order the applicants and work their way down from the top of the list until the class is full. Nowadays you can do that in Excel on a laptop in about 5 minutes. You don’t need a huge admissions office with dozens of staffers and application readers. They don’t care if you spend your summers tending to underprivileged snakes at a snake preserve in Costa Rica. They don’t want to read any essays you wrote telling about your sob story. All of the BS that we take for granted is (and was always – in the Bad Old Days it was a way of keep Jews OUT rather than putting Blacks IN and keeping Asian out) driven by the quest for Diversity.

    • Replies: @AnonAnon
  225. peterike says:
    @William Badwhite

    You can’t do these things with 75-80 IQ people as it appears PG&E is attempting to do.

    Hey, hey, hey! Focus on what’s important. PG&E is exceptionally diverse!

    I mean, who DOESN’T want their power company to have their top ten listed officers be a white CEO, followed by four women, a black guy, someone named Dinyar, someone named Fong Wan and someone named Ahmad. Oh yeah, there’s one other white guy, Jim Welch, who is “Generation and Chief Nuclear Officer.”

    Thank god they still got a white guy for that last one.

    Lots more diversity in the full list.

    http://www.pgecorp.com/corp/about-us/officers/company-officers.page

    • LOL: William Badwhite
    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  226. @William Badwhite

    There are something like 130mm dead trees in CA if the US Forest Service is to be believed. Add that fuel to the low humidity you cite, then mix in the hilly terrain (fire loves to advance uphill) and its going to keep burning.

    Maybe I’m overlooking something that is obvious here, but why doesn’t CA just let the dead trees be cleared by the paper and other wood products companies?

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  227. Anonymous[311] • Disclaimer says:
    @peterike

    They used WeChat or some other electronic communication. Basically, I think, somebody had saved a copy of each assignment over the years, and they were posted on social media or obtained through other means. So someone posts asking for the key to some assignment and someone else shares it. Not a grand conspiracy of any sort, but endemic in all disciplines at that school, and, anecdotally from acquaintances, elsewhere.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  228. @Johann Ricke

    Just a guess but I assume its a combination of factors – many are on federal land (national parks and forests); tree huggers that view every tree as sacred; logging companies need roads and access to the trees they’re harvesting; and if they’re already dead I imagine their value as timber has been significantly reduced.

  229. @Dr. Weezil

    Yet by coincidence, these students of indeterminable intelligence who just “take the SAT and ACT well” also turn out to be the least incompetent and the least hopeless in the college classroom.

    The humanities lecturers’ lounge is a great place to hear about how magnificent the Emperor’s new robes are. Sure, this semester all of the best students in our courses are random math and chemistry majors enrolled on a whim, but that’s an anomaly! Nothing to do with how much more selective those programs are in terms of minimum test scores. Somewhere out there, there are hundreds of mechanical engineering students who just can’t reason as well as sociology students. Any semester now, we’ll find them!

    Academia is a feminized environment, in the sense that academics are very poor at articulating what they actually want, and perhaps even poor judges of what they need in the first place. All day long, you hear complaint after complaint about the low competency of incoming students- and the “solution” is opening up the rolls to every drooling retard with a bank book. My, his new robes do look fantastic.

  230. keypusher says:
    @Dr. Weezil

    1980 called, they want their talking points back. You’re going to have to do a whole lot better if you want to participate in the conversation.

  231. @peterike

    Well , if all of California were burnt to cinders that would be bad of course ,but horrific as that tragedy would be, if our diversity became a casualty, I think that’s worse.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  232. J.Ross says:
    @Anonymous

    This is why the problem is the people themselves, and why the delinquents will defeat and replace the teachers: there can be no strategy, no punishment, no mandatory eye shades, against an entire culture determined to break your rules. What really makes rules work is the fact that most people obey them. Diversity is the end of order.

  233. J.Ross says:
    @Jack Armstrong

    A little while before that he did tell a Holocaust joke (which I wouldn’t tell, the gist was that victims were gullible) so the whole sensitivity thing is a little bit hypocritical and “from the days before the internet.”

  234. AnonAnon says:
    @Jack D

    in the Bad Old Days it was a way of keep Jews OUT rather than putting Blacks IN and keeping Asian out

    Lol on the idea that application essays are for keeping Asians out. It’s for keeping WHITE MALES out. They’re the most under-represented group at top colleges.

  235. @Jack D

    Which is more likely, that actual living human beings show their biases by inflating the grades of diligent, fairly bright, personable young women and minorities whom they like, or a machine scored pencil and paper is biased against the aforementioned students?

  236. @eah

    Well, it looks better than sleeping in your car.

  237. @Autochthon

    “Living off depreciation” is a real thing.

  238. @anonymous

    My experience exactly. I scored a bizarrely high math SAT, nearly perfect, simply by being a lightning-fast arithmetic whiz, even though I’ve always been hopeless at algebra, calc, trig, you name it, and often struggled in high school math classes.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
  239. @Anon

    Nice. I like that breakdown. Reminds me of the axiom: “College has ruined many a fine sheepherder.”

  240. @Paleo Liberal

    Thanks. ‘Preciate your comments.

  241. @Known Fact

    lightning-fast arithmetic whiz

    Intuition. Wonder how it correlates with genetic combinations.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  242. JMcG says:
    @William Badwhite

    Electrical Distribution utilities in the US are generally protected from competition by state franchise. Therefore, the need to hire top people is almost entirely absent, there being generally no way of being unprofitable. The results of this as are you suspect.

  243. Charon says:
    @res

    Everyone’s ox gets gored now and then.

  244. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @anon

    You’re referring to clerkships, not residencies. The U.S. government ought to create more by paying for the building of more hospitals.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @anon
  245. @Prester John

    75% of your coursework is outside of your major.

  246. @Jim Don Bob

    As a Giants fan, I certainly hope that AB does his best Randy Ross imitation and 2007 repeats itself.

  247. @kaganovitch

    True. I admit to being oblivious to the stranglehold black women have had on the cutthroat and rigorous industry of home daycare.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  248. Jack D says:
    @Neil Templeton

    No, you don’t need intuition. Remember that the answers to (some) of the problems are given in the multiple choices (there are also fill in problems nowadays). So all you have to do is plug the answers into the equation and one of them will be right. Say it’s (to give a trivial example)

    x-3 = 0

    And they give you A. 1 , B. 2. C.3 D. 4. If you are fast at math, you just plug in these #’s one after the other and stop when you get to the one that results in a true statement.

    For some people, this is faster and easier than solving the problem algebraically. As the OP said, you don’t even need to know algebra to get the answer using this method.

  249. Jack D says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    They are closing hospitals, not building them. Hospital stays have declined greatly – instead of staying a week in the hospital after birth, they send you home the next day. Lots of surgery is done as day surgery – you wake up from the anesthesia and they send you home. It’s just as well, because no only does staying in the hospital cost a bloody fortune (you could be staying at a 5 star resort for a lot less) but you are likely to pick up a deadly infection if you hang around long enough.

  250. anon[297] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    My error, “clerkships” is correct. There may be a shortage of preceptors as well for all I know. In any event, building more hospitals is not the only way to provide more clerkships.

    To reiterate my point, building more medical schools cannot provide more doctors, because in the US the bottleneck is downstream of med school.

  251. I get it. My point was that maybe what is commonly known as intuition is identical, very similar, or highly correlated with a mind capable of very fast calculation.

  252. @MikeatMikedotMike

    True. I admit to being oblivious to the stranglehold black women have had on the cutthroat and rigorous industry of home daycare.

    Nah, it’s not that, in NYC it’s a way of leveraging Rent Control and Housing assistance programs to make money. You need some extra space to run a daycare out of an apartment. If you had to rent that space at market in NYC you couldn’t come close to making a profit. It’s only viable in subsidized space ,thus subsidized communities at competitive advantage.

  253. R.G. Camara says: • Website
    @Anonymouse

    My sense is that that opinion is doubly false. With a fair amount of contact with blacks in stores and on the streets over many years (I am very old), my experience is that black women, teenagers and adults, respond in kind to polite conversational exchanges. And ditto for adult black men (black teenage males aside).They seem to me to consider themselves American citizens, which they are de jure and for the most part these days de facto, and act accordingly

    loll Nothing says patriotism like kneeling for the American flag.

    s for American jews of today having low empathy towards non-jewish Americans, that is an out and out falsehood as I know from my personal experience.

    ROFL. History does not lie, son.

    You people of the lie really will say any nonsense to deny reality, won’t you?

  254. R.G. Camara says: • Website
    @Dr. Weezil

    You amuse me in your denial of the sun coming up in the morning and that the water got you wet. Continue.

  255. R.G. Camara says: • Website
    @FPD72

    Every time they announce some black as having been a “valedictorian” of their high school, I google the school/town to see the demographics. Almost always, its a majority-minority school with higher crime and lower test scores than white, Jewish, and Asian schools.

    For example, black football loudmouth Richard Sherman was touted as smart because he was valedictorian of his high school. Turns out it’s a majority black high school. I’m sure spelling your name correctly and not being arrested get you in the top 10% of the class alone.

    • Replies: @Triumph104
  256. @Realist

    At least 75% of college students…elite included… do not have a working knowledge of statistics.

    Citation please? I think your estimate is too low.

    • Replies: @Realist
  257. @R.G. Camara

    When Richard Sherman graduated as salutatorian from Compton’s Dominguez High School in 2006, the school was 70 percent Hispanic, 27 percent black, according to Schooldigger. Dominguez High hasn’t been majority black since the 1980s.

    In 2014, Shannelle Davis (Jamaican parents) was valedictorian of Benjamin Cardozo High School in Queens, NY. Cardozo was 44 percent Asian, 19 percet Hispanic, 18 percent black, and 16 percent white. Davis graduated from Harvard with a degree in math.

    Kelly Hyles (immigrated from Guyana at age 11) was 2016 valedictorian of The HS for Math, Science & Engineering at the City College of New York. HSMSE was 35 percent Asian, 27 percent white, 22 percent Hispanic, and 10 percent black. HSMSE is one of NYC’s eight specialized high schools.

  258. Realist says:
    @Charles Erwin Wilson 3

    Citation please? I think your estimate is too low.

    It is hard to find data on this, in other words it is hard to find statistics on how many college students take statistics….but I did say ‘at least’.

  259. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @YetAnotherAnon

    That joke probably wasn’t written by a neurosurgeon, but situation in general seems to be that -ologists rib surgeons for their lack of theoretical knowledge and surgeons rib them for their lack of practical skill. There was a memoir published by a general surgeon named William Nolen about fifty years ago. In it, he wrote about being called by a non-surgeon physician to assist in hooking up a patient to a dialysis machine. He saw that the -ologist had been trying to insert the cannula into the patient’s thumb tendon.

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