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Obama: "That's Not American. ... We Don't Have Religious Tests to Our Compassion." Except Lautenberg Amendment
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As I pointed out in my new Taki’s column, “Four Ways to Save Europe,” when ¡Jeb¡ mildly suggested that American refugee efforts for Middle Easterners should be focused more on the Christians who are being slaughtered than on the Muslims doing the slaughtering, our former Muslim child President was appalled:

“When I heard political leaders suggest that there would be a religious test for which a person who’s fleeing a warn-torn [sic] country is admitted…that’s shameful,” Obama said, growing visibly heated. “That’s not American. That’s not who we are. We don’t have religious tests to our compassion.”

Of course, refugee eligibility has sometimes been determined based on religion/ethnicity, most famously in the Save Soviet Jews law of the early 1970s that went on well after the fall of the Berlin Wall. This is not exactly obscure history, since a noteworthy fraction of the current punditariat (the Gessen siblings, Eugene Volokh, etc.) and media moguls (Sergey Brin of Google) got into America under this special privilege for Soviet Jews. For example, Julia Ioffe writes in Foreign Policy:

Je Suis Refugee
America can — and must — do more to help Europe’s migrants. I’m living proof of why.

BY JULIA IOFFE SEPTEMBER 7, 2015

The reason I’m writing this in English — and that I have a column in Foreign Policy at all — is that 25 years ago, on April 28, 1990

i.e., almost a half year after the Fall of the Berlin Wall, but who can remember detailed dates like November 9, 1989?

my family arrived in the United States as refugees from the Soviet Union. It is a day the four of us mark every year because it was the beginning of a new, free, and prosperous life. Had it not been for the American Jews lobbying Congress and the White House on our behalf for years, had it not been for the Jackson-Vanik amendment, had it not been for the fact that the geopolitical struggle against the USSR was hitched up to its humanitarian ramifications, had it not been for Mikhail Gorbachev wanting to put a human face on socialism, I would be writing this in Russian. More likely, I probably wouldn’t be writing this at all.

I think often about April 28, 1990, and the two years my parents spent waiting in lines at the U.S. embassy in Moscow. It’s a moment that splits my life in two. What would my life have been like if not for all those political forces — and my parents’ foresight and dedication — that snapped my 7-year-old self on a radically different course?

I don’t know that my life would have been terrible, but I know that I would not have reconnected with my family’s Jewish heritage.

You didn’t have to be religiously Jewish, just ethnically Jewish.

I knew a Russian lady back in the post-Soviet Yeltsin era who was one of the first of the big wave of Slavic blondes to wash up in the U.S. The INS was threatening to kick her out, so her latest strategy to stay in the U.S.A. was to gather genealogical documents from Russia that would prove, if you looked at them from just the right angle, that she was Jewish and thus qualified for refugee status under the Jackson-Vanik agreement and Lautenberg Amendment. I could never keep straight in my head her complicated genealogical theory of why she was, legally, Jewish — it was like one of those theories that the King of England would commission during the Hundred Years War about why he was also the rightful King of France.

Nor could I understand why being Jewish in Yeltsin’s mid-1990s Russia entitled you to refugee status in America. Practically everytime I opened the newspaper in the mid-1990s there was an interview with a Jewish economist from Harvard or MIT about how the Yeltsin government was implementing all the advanced ideas they had told them about.

 
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  1. Whenever a politician puts the interests of Americans over foreigners it is described as being “un-American”. Whenever a politician puts foreign interests over American interests it is described as being “American”.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @tanabear

    Americide.

  2. Maybe even less obscure than Jackson-Vanik, does Obama think it would have been un-American to prioritize Jewish refugees during the Holocaust?

    • Replies: @WhatEvvs
    @Anonymous

    Exactly. What's happening to the Christians and the Yazidis is as bad, if news reports are to be believed (and I think they are, although we always have to be on guard against propaganda).

    I keep saying it, Obama is becoming repulsive to the majority of white America. If the Republicans don't totally screw it up, they might just have a chance....

  3. Practically everytime I opened the newspaper in the mid-1990s there was an interview with a Jewish economist from Harvard or MIT about how the Yeltsin government was implementing all the advanced ideas they had told them about.

    Well, that could explain why the Jews in Russia wanted to get out.

    • Replies: @Blah
    @Rob McX

    Except those who became the vast majority of oligarchs.

  4. You don’t mind if I say that I support special refugee rules for Syrian Christians and Yazidis. And I’m not the only one.

    (BTW the spell check says ‘Yazidis’ is an error)

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @anony-mouse

    "(BTW the spell check says ‘Yazidis’ is an error)"

    ISIS was encountering the same problem. They solved it by lopping off the heads of the Yazidis.

    (BTW my spell check is showing no such error.)

    , @Karl
    @anony-mouse

    >> if I say that I support special refugee rules for Syrian Christians

    Within the past week: If you're an Ethiopian Orthodox christian who has a first-degree relative who serves in the IDF (active or reserve), you will be deemed to be eligible to claim Israeli citizenship and refugee'd in at taxpayer expense. This appears to be about 9100 Ethiopians.

    Why now? Cynical me thinks its Netanyahu throwing a bone to those ultra-Orthodox parties who joined his coalition. Their rabbis will be the ones who get paid to teach and convert them to Judaism. The new Ethiopians will be "conscripted" into these classrooms.

    The Russkies had to have a Jewish mother or a Jewish spouse. Self-affidavits were eventually accepted - I mean, could you PROVE that your deceased dad was Methodist? They were not required to convert. If memory serves, they got 30 days of full benefits, another 5 months of some assist. Healthy russkies always find SOME kind of gainful employment.... they'd be more likely to be doing shady "business" (taxi syndicates or whatever) than collecting welfare. Ethiopians often are on welfare 2-3 generations.

    IDF has a school where (active-duty's who request it) can do a conversion(start to finish) in a month. The ultra-orthodox streeeettcccchhh out the process to about a year - milk the taxpayers.

  5. Fred Wilson blogged about Paris & #RefugeesWelcome today: http://avc.com/2015/11/knee-jerk-reactions/

    ~300 comments so far.

  6. I’m always greeted by incredulity when I tell atheist Jews they are basically racist. Tradition, rituals, and the Holocaust are the main counters.

    • Replies: @Big Bill
    @Eric

    Rabbi Kahane (of the banned Kach party) used to drive secular, atheist Israelis nuts when he made the same point.

    As Kahane brutally pointed out, it is easy to worship secular democracy, freedom of religion, gay pride parades, and anti-racism when you have a natural majority, but what do you do when the time comes that you are being outbred/replaced by a rapidly growing minority? Do you keep worshipping "Democracy" and be inevitably replaced? Is Western liberalism (in Israel AND Europe) a suicide cult? Or do you get "racist" and survive?

    SEE: https://rabbikahane.wordpress.com/2010/08/25/rabbi-kahane-interview-with-raphael-mergui-and-philippe-simonnot/

  7. iSteveFan says:

    I know it is not popular to say so, but I actually believed the USSR had a right to restrict emigration of highly educated people. Since the USSR was the supposed workers’ paradise and those lucky few received a free education at the expense of their fellow workers, it made sense to not allow someone to leave and take their skills to another nation. It’s one reason I really don’t want Uncle Sam paying for our health care or education. It might make him think we are indebted to him too.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @iSteveFan

    Cuba has trained a lot baseball players and doctors at public expense. It's not unreasonable for the Cuban government to ask for a cut of the income of Cuban ballplayers and doctors when they come to the U.S.

    Replies: @WhatEvvs, @donut

    , @njguy73
    @iSteveFan

    Here's a piece by Hans-Hermann Hoppe on immigration as it relates to property rights and who truly owns a country. Any thoughts?

    http://archive.lewrockwell.com/hoppe/hoppe1.html

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @iSteveFan

    It’s one reason I really don’t want Uncle Sam paying for our health care or education.

    If the government starts picking up the tab for everyone's education, shouldn't it expect students not to waste its money? In the Soviet Union, I imagine the government didn't pay people of below-average intelligence to attend college, people of no artistic ability to attend art school, and people to major in disciplines of no value to society, like grievance studies.

    Has anyone asked Hillary or Bernie about this?

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    , @Karl
    @iSteveFan

    >>> I actually believed the USSR had a right to restrict emigration of highly educated people

    but that was NOT what brought the wrath of the Hebrews down on the Soviet government.

    the cause of the wrath was the criminalization of Hebrew language study.

    , @Ray P
    @iSteveFan

    Mr. Gorbachev, put up this wall!

    U.S. citizens living abroad have to pay U.S. taxes. Patricia Highsmith, resident in Switzerland, complained of it.

    , @LKM
    @iSteveFan

    I've actually thought the same thing, but at the end of the day, it's not as though Soviet-era university students had any other option to finance their education. It's not like their parents could start college funds.

    That being said, if a state does provide substantial aid in terms of tuition, what you're suggesting would be fair so long as the restrictions weren't imposed retroactively.

  8. @anony-mouse
    You don't mind if I say that I support special refugee rules for Syrian Christians and Yazidis. And I'm not the only one.

    (BTW the spell check says 'Yazidis' is an error)

    Replies: @tbraton, @Karl

    “(BTW the spell check says ‘Yazidis’ is an error)”

    ISIS was encountering the same problem. They solved it by lopping off the heads of the Yazidis.

    (BTW my spell check is showing no such error.)

    • Agree: Clyde
  9. Bitches

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @donut

    "Bitches"

    You are a fan of South Park, what do you think of the new character introduced this season PC Principle?

    Replies: @donut, @MEH 0910

  10. @iSteveFan
    I know it is not popular to say so, but I actually believed the USSR had a right to restrict emigration of highly educated people. Since the USSR was the supposed workers' paradise and those lucky few received a free education at the expense of their fellow workers, it made sense to not allow someone to leave and take their skills to another nation. It's one reason I really don't want Uncle Sam paying for our health care or education. It might make him think we are indebted to him too.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @njguy73, @Harry Baldwin, @Karl, @Ray P, @LKM

    Cuba has trained a lot baseball players and doctors at public expense. It’s not unreasonable for the Cuban government to ask for a cut of the income of Cuban ballplayers and doctors when they come to the U.S.

    • Replies: @WhatEvvs
    @Steve Sailer

    They also have a world class ballet company. Go figure.

    , @donut
    @Steve Sailer

    So let them play baseball and practice medicine in Cuba and they can hop around in their f**king tutus there as well you bleeding heart ***** .

  11. Off topic – sorry, but I am requesting an iSteve Public Service Announcement to change the narrative.

    Current narrative as heard on influential Diane Rehm show this morning: The Syrian refugees America is bring in are mostly women and minors, only 2% are “war age males” or some term like that.

    Steve, your country needs you to remind them that the last attack conducted on our soil was carried out by two young men who arrived as minors under refugee status. Steve, please get the refugee/minor status of the Boston Bombers back out of the memory hole and into our short term media memory.
    Sincerely,
    Guy walled in by career threatening politically correct thought police

    • Replies: @p s c
    @fedupwithbigbiz

    I read Dana Milbank' article in the Philadelphia Inquirer today (published yesterday in the Washington Post) and in it he went nuclear. He mentioned that America refused to accept Jewish refugees from Germany in 1939 on a ship called the "St. Louis" and also stated that not one refugee has ever committed an act of terrorism against America.

    It's always 1939.

    Replies: @Jim Sweeney, @Jefferson, @Frida K-Lo

  12. I hate to keep being That Guy, but The Four Ways To Save Europe are just wishes. Everyone has wishes, but what’s needed are implementation plans.

    For a tangible example, how would you get a “National Immigration Safety Board” (assuming for the moment that’s useful)? In the past, attempts to collect statistics that would be used against illegal immigration were quashed by the usual suspects. What’s the plan to deal with pushback? Hannity saying “Can you believe this? Why won’t Obama create Sen. Sessions’ NISB??!?!?!?” isn’t going to get ‘er done.

    Why doesn’t anyone coming up with smart plans ever have an equally smart implementation plan?

    • Replies: @Jim Sweeney
    @24AheadDotCom

    Because all those smart people have never had management jobs; they are all consultant/public service types. It's why Trump can build the wall but Bush couldn't

  13. I think these emigrants were required to pay a significant (by Russian standards) amount of money to leave, in order to pay for their educations and other freebies they received growing up in the USSR. Was this changed at some point?

    • Replies: @Karl
    @FineSwine

    >>> to pay for their educations and other freebies they received growing up in the USSR. Was this changed at some point?

    Russian Jewish emigres to Israel were cut off from their pension rights. I don't know the exact details so I will give the Russian government the benefit of the doubt that they did so based on some articulateable rationale, & in accordance with some piece of Russkie semi-transparent due process.

    What is also true is that ==just now== within the past few weeks, the Russian government agreed to - well, I don't know EXACTLY what, as the Hebrew press didn't go deeply in details - but they agreed to un-cut-off in some manner. Monies are now possible to flow. Anyone who really wants to know ought to go hangout at the coffee shops of Netanya's malls. First thing in the morning after opening, when the pastries & breads are hot out of the oven. The Russkie senior citizens are there. But hurry up, the Frogs are taking the city over.

    Every major hospital in Israel has a Russian Orthodox clergyman in the roster of chaplains. Because Russian medical tourists are THE largest single fraction of cash-customers for most Israeli hospitals. Whereas if you give treatment to an Israeli, you (the hospital) are arguing (with the Israeli insurance companies) over every centavo of payment.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  14. Was Hussein Obama violently bullied as a child by White Christian boys in Indonesia and Hawaii? That would explain why he hates White Christians so much.

    It was his dead beat Black Muslim father who abandoned him as a child, yet he will go all out to defend Islam and Blackness.

    Can you imagine how even more hatred Hussein would have in his heart for White Christians if his dead beat father belonged to that demographic and it was his mother who was the Black Muslim Kenyan who had to raise him all by herself.

    It is weird that someone can come out of a White woman’s vagina and still have an extreme hatred for White people even though it was his White family members who fed him, clothed him, and put a roof over his head when he was growing up. Hussein is such an ungrateful bastard. His Black family members never clothed him, fed him, and put a roof over his head.

  15. I don’t expect you to remember my birthday but while we can let’s remember the Jew’s

  16. We don’t choose our parents, the culture we’re born into, the color of our skin, the religion that’s bestowed upon us, our socioeconomic class, the order in which we’re born, the education we receive…and they all have a direct impact on the opportunities and disadvantages we’ll have in life. Furthermore, we have zero influence on these when we’re most vulnerable.

    We are all the same deep inside – please don’t discriminate against factors that someone didn’t have any influence over. Some people fall on the advantageous side of the birth lottery and some get the short end of the stick. I wish more people thought about that.

    • Replies: @TangoMan
    @Cullen

    I'm not following you. Why should I purposely make my life worse off because my parents made good choices and, for instance, your parents made bad choices? The good choices my parents made are part of their inheritance to me. They were "part owners" of society and they passed that on to me with the expectation that my life would be better from their bequest and that as I lived my life that I would add value to the society of which I was a "part owner" and pass this down to my children. I don't know of any parents who wish for their children to squander their inheritance by dispersing it, willy nilly, to strangers and drinking buddies and hookers and bums on the street.

    The same reasoning applies to your suggestions. Everyone living in the world of 500 years ago had a chance to come and discover America, people in Syria could have started a mass exodus and come and settled America before the English and French and other Europeans arrived, but they didn't. The benefits for those of us living here are not due to chance or magic air, they're the result of the work and sacrifices of our ancestors. When I pay taxes, when I volunteer to work on civic commissions or with social service clubs or spend a Saturday helping build a park, I do these things to make my society a little bit better for myself and my family and my friends, not for some Somalian to come here and claim EQUAL benefit to the community assets of the US. I assume that the same mindset informed Americans of earlier ages - they were building America for themselves and their children, not for foreigners to come and claim an equal share.

    The upshot here is that there is nothing unfair about a "birth lottery" anymore than it's unfair that a child inherits from his parents when they pass on. Syrians and Iraqis and Somalians and others could be the beneficiaries of equally prosperous societies if their ancestors had made different choices but their ancestors took a different road, so any inequity that they sense should really be laid at the feet of their ancestors rather than shoved into my face.

    Replies: @BRF

    , @Anonym
    @Cullen

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Trouble_with_Tribbles

    , @Massimo Heitor
    @Cullen


    Some people fall on the advantageous side of the birth lottery and some get the short end of the stick. I wish more people thought about that.
     
    That is quite obvious.

    We put pressure on parents to invest in their children because it is supposed to give their children advantages that they didn't earn as individuals. If people believed that children deserved the same opportunity regardless of parents, then parents shouldn't be involved in raising children.
    , @MEH 0910
    @Cullen


    We are all the same deep inside
     
    No we're not. People vary, even deep inside.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Cullen


    Some people fall on the advantageous side of the birth lottery and some get the short end of the stick. I wish more people thought about that.
     
    I cannot imagine how anyone can accept this notion.

    There is no lottery. If you are a materialism birth is entirely deterministic. No other outcome is possible, hence, no lottery.

    If you accept anything beyond materialism then the notion that somehow chance is involved is a fact-free reaction to the ridiculous zeitgeist of the moment.

    Reach up with either hand and slide at least one finger between your head and the temple of the ludicrous excuse for rose-colored glasses your 'betters' have placed in front of your eyes. Remove those glasses and throw them into the dumpster. You have been sold an anti-human bill of goods. Reject the absurdity, forswear the preposterity, disavow the misanthropicity. Stupidity is optional. Dodge the bullet before you can't.

    Replies: @Cryptogenic

    , @Big Bill
    @Cullen

    Why did you mention "color of skin" and not "genes"?

    The color of one's skin is merely a convenient visible marker for a host of other physical, mental and cultural characteristics defined by genetics (that are equally unchangeable "accidents of birth").

    I think you are wrong in one respect. We think long and hard about unchosen and unchangeable characteristics of individuals and groups.

    For example, African refugees with 75 IQs will produce generation after generation after generation of 75 IQ Africans, whether in the USA, Europe, or Africa.

    Have you thought about that?

    , @Patton
    @Cullen

    Is your argument that because we can't control those things, we're required to ignore them when comparing ourselves to one another?

    We should ignore reality because we couldn't control it?

    , @This Is Our Home
    @Cullen

    You are only your mother's son because of factors outside of your control. You should therefore love her no more than you love anyone else in the world!

    See? We can all pretend to be super caring and compassionate individuals while actually being emotional voids with the maturity of a three year old.

    I suppose it is not your fault. You haven't been taught any virtues. Things like gratitude, loyalty, honour and integrity...

    Replies: @5371

    , @Hunsdon
    @Cullen

    I think I read this somewhere before. "Deep thoughts by Jack Handy", was it?

  17. The reason I’m writing this…

    Well, good for her, I guess; but has she added that much value here compared to staying in Soviet Russia? Maybe we should ask the person just behind her in the hiring sequence for a counter point.

  18. @iSteveFan
    I know it is not popular to say so, but I actually believed the USSR had a right to restrict emigration of highly educated people. Since the USSR was the supposed workers' paradise and those lucky few received a free education at the expense of their fellow workers, it made sense to not allow someone to leave and take their skills to another nation. It's one reason I really don't want Uncle Sam paying for our health care or education. It might make him think we are indebted to him too.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @njguy73, @Harry Baldwin, @Karl, @Ray P, @LKM

    Here’s a piece by Hans-Hermann Hoppe on immigration as it relates to property rights and who truly owns a country. Any thoughts?

    http://archive.lewrockwell.com/hoppe/hoppe1.html

  19. @fedupwithbigbiz
    Off topic - sorry, but I am requesting an iSteve Public Service Announcement to change the narrative.

    Current narrative as heard on influential Diane Rehm show this morning: The Syrian refugees America is bring in are mostly women and minors, only 2% are "war age males" or some term like that.

    Steve, your country needs you to remind them that the last attack conducted on our soil was carried out by two young men who arrived as minors under refugee status. Steve, please get the refugee/minor status of the Boston Bombers back out of the memory hole and into our short term media memory.
    Sincerely,
    Guy walled in by career threatening politically correct thought police

    Replies: @p s c

    I read Dana Milbank’ article in the Philadelphia Inquirer today (published yesterday in the Washington Post) and in it he went nuclear. He mentioned that America refused to accept Jewish refugees from Germany in 1939 on a ship called the “St. Louis” and also stated that not one refugee has ever committed an act of terrorism against America.

    It’s always 1939.

    • Replies: @Jim Sweeney
    @p s c

    Did Milbank remind you who was president in 1939? Or which party held the House and Senate?

    I wonder why?

    Replies: @tbraton

    , @Jefferson
    @p s c

    "It’s always 1939."

    And the Left has the nerve to say that it is Conservatives who are living in the past.

    , @Frida K-Lo
    @p s c

    If the Jewish argument is going to be made, why isn't it suggested the refugees go to Israel? Israel is much closer and a wealthy modern nation.

  20. @Cullen
    We don’t choose our parents, the culture we’re born into, the color of our skin, the religion that’s bestowed upon us, our socioeconomic class, the order in which we’re born, the education we receive…and they all have a direct impact on the opportunities and disadvantages we’ll have in life. Furthermore, we have zero influence on these when we’re most vulnerable.

    We are all the same deep inside - please don't discriminate against factors that someone didn't have any influence over. Some people fall on the advantageous side of the birth lottery and some get the short end of the stick. I wish more people thought about that.

    Replies: @TangoMan, @Anonym, @Massimo Heitor, @MEH 0910, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Big Bill, @Patton, @This Is Our Home, @Hunsdon

    I’m not following you. Why should I purposely make my life worse off because my parents made good choices and, for instance, your parents made bad choices? The good choices my parents made are part of their inheritance to me. They were “part owners” of society and they passed that on to me with the expectation that my life would be better from their bequest and that as I lived my life that I would add value to the society of which I was a “part owner” and pass this down to my children. I don’t know of any parents who wish for their children to squander their inheritance by dispersing it, willy nilly, to strangers and drinking buddies and hookers and bums on the street.

    The same reasoning applies to your suggestions. Everyone living in the world of 500 years ago had a chance to come and discover America, people in Syria could have started a mass exodus and come and settled America before the English and French and other Europeans arrived, but they didn’t. The benefits for those of us living here are not due to chance or magic air, they’re the result of the work and sacrifices of our ancestors. When I pay taxes, when I volunteer to work on civic commissions or with social service clubs or spend a Saturday helping build a park, I do these things to make my society a little bit better for myself and my family and my friends, not for some Somalian to come here and claim EQUAL benefit to the community assets of the US. I assume that the same mindset informed Americans of earlier ages – they were building America for themselves and their children, not for foreigners to come and claim an equal share.

    The upshot here is that there is nothing unfair about a “birth lottery” anymore than it’s unfair that a child inherits from his parents when they pass on. Syrians and Iraqis and Somalians and others could be the beneficiaries of equally prosperous societies if their ancestors had made different choices but their ancestors took a different road, so any inequity that they sense should really be laid at the feet of their ancestors rather than shoved into my face.

    • Agree: Ozymandias
    • Replies: @BRF
    @TangoMan

    Well said!

  21. @Rob McX

    Practically everytime I opened the newspaper in the mid-1990s there was an interview with a Jewish economist from Harvard or MIT about how the Yeltsin government was implementing all the advanced ideas they had told them about.
     
    Well, that could explain why the Jews in Russia wanted to get out.

    Replies: @Blah

    Except those who became the vast majority of oligarchs.

  22. @donut
    Bitches

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45E4fWW2eaw

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “Bitches”

    You are a fan of South Park, what do you think of the new character introduced this season PC Principle?

    • Replies: @donut
    @Jefferson

    What do you think I think ?

    , @MEH 0910
    @Jefferson

    http://southpark.cc.com/clips/t7cbvf/please-welcome-pc-principal

    "Like it or not, PC is back, and it's bigger than ever!"

  23. Was Tony Rezko a Syrian refugee?

  24. Ricky Vaughn retweeted some lib calling him a master troll and warning others not to engage him. I really like Vaughn and I think his twitter feed is one the best reads in the internet.

    But he has a very high IQ and he won’t mind if I state that Sailer is a far bigger sh#t disturber and an incredibly subtle troll, the real master.

  25. @24AheadDotCom
    I hate to keep being That Guy, but The Four Ways To Save Europe are just wishes. Everyone has wishes, but what's needed are implementation plans.

    For a tangible example, how would you get a "National Immigration Safety Board" (assuming for the moment that's useful)? In the past, attempts to collect statistics that would be used against illegal immigration were quashed by the usual suspects. What's the plan to deal with pushback? Hannity saying "Can you believe this? Why won't Obama create Sen. Sessions' NISB??!?!?!?" isn't going to get 'er done.

    Why doesn't anyone coming up with smart plans ever have an equally smart implementation plan?

    Replies: @Jim Sweeney

    Because all those smart people have never had management jobs; they are all consultant/public service types. It’s why Trump can build the wall but Bush couldn’t

  26. @p s c
    @fedupwithbigbiz

    I read Dana Milbank' article in the Philadelphia Inquirer today (published yesterday in the Washington Post) and in it he went nuclear. He mentioned that America refused to accept Jewish refugees from Germany in 1939 on a ship called the "St. Louis" and also stated that not one refugee has ever committed an act of terrorism against America.

    It's always 1939.

    Replies: @Jim Sweeney, @Jefferson, @Frida K-Lo

    Did Milbank remind you who was president in 1939? Or which party held the House and Senate?

    I wonder why?

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @Jim Sweeney

    "Did Milbank remind you who was president in 1939? Or which party held the House and Senate?"

    Wasn't that the same President who interned many Japanese-Americans during WWII and a smaller number of Italian-Americans and German-Americans? At the instigation of then California Attorney General Earl Warren who later went on to greater fame as an idol of civil libertarians, and the subsequent approval by the Supreme Court, most of whose members that very President had appointed. That President? (BTW, do you know who opposed the internment of Japanese-Americans and others? Why J. Edgar Hoover, that great scourge of civil liberties. That happens to be one of my favorite ironies of American history, right up there with Woodrow Wilson throwing Eugene Debs into prison for opposing WWI and Warren G. Harding freeing the same Debs, when he was President.)

  27. @p s c
    @fedupwithbigbiz

    I read Dana Milbank' article in the Philadelphia Inquirer today (published yesterday in the Washington Post) and in it he went nuclear. He mentioned that America refused to accept Jewish refugees from Germany in 1939 on a ship called the "St. Louis" and also stated that not one refugee has ever committed an act of terrorism against America.

    It's always 1939.

    Replies: @Jim Sweeney, @Jefferson, @Frida K-Lo

    “It’s always 1939.”

    And the Left has the nerve to say that it is Conservatives who are living in the past.

  28. WhatEvvs [AKA "Internet Addict"] says:
    @Anonymous
    Maybe even less obscure than Jackson-Vanik, does Obama think it would have been un-American to prioritize Jewish refugees during the Holocaust?

    Replies: @WhatEvvs

    Exactly. What’s happening to the Christians and the Yazidis is as bad, if news reports are to be believed (and I think they are, although we always have to be on guard against propaganda).

    I keep saying it, Obama is becoming repulsive to the majority of white America. If the Republicans don’t totally screw it up, they might just have a chance….

  29. @tanabear
    Whenever a politician puts the interests of Americans over foreigners it is described as being "un-American". Whenever a politician puts foreign interests over American interests it is described as being "American".

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Americide.

  30. WhatEvvs [AKA "Internet Addict"] says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @iSteveFan

    Cuba has trained a lot baseball players and doctors at public expense. It's not unreasonable for the Cuban government to ask for a cut of the income of Cuban ballplayers and doctors when they come to the U.S.

    Replies: @WhatEvvs, @donut

    They also have a world class ballet company. Go figure.

  31. To compassion maybe not.

    But to combustion…

  32. @Cullen
    We don’t choose our parents, the culture we’re born into, the color of our skin, the religion that’s bestowed upon us, our socioeconomic class, the order in which we’re born, the education we receive…and they all have a direct impact on the opportunities and disadvantages we’ll have in life. Furthermore, we have zero influence on these when we’re most vulnerable.

    We are all the same deep inside - please don't discriminate against factors that someone didn't have any influence over. Some people fall on the advantageous side of the birth lottery and some get the short end of the stick. I wish more people thought about that.

    Replies: @TangoMan, @Anonym, @Massimo Heitor, @MEH 0910, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Big Bill, @Patton, @This Is Our Home, @Hunsdon

  33. @iSteveFan
    I know it is not popular to say so, but I actually believed the USSR had a right to restrict emigration of highly educated people. Since the USSR was the supposed workers' paradise and those lucky few received a free education at the expense of their fellow workers, it made sense to not allow someone to leave and take their skills to another nation. It's one reason I really don't want Uncle Sam paying for our health care or education. It might make him think we are indebted to him too.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @njguy73, @Harry Baldwin, @Karl, @Ray P, @LKM

    It’s one reason I really don’t want Uncle Sam paying for our health care or education.

    If the government starts picking up the tab for everyone’s education, shouldn’t it expect students not to waste its money? In the Soviet Union, I imagine the government didn’t pay people of below-average intelligence to attend college, people of no artistic ability to attend art school, and people to major in disciplines of no value to society, like grievance studies.

    Has anyone asked Hillary or Bernie about this?

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Harry Baldwin

    That wasn't just the policy of the Soviet Union; it was (and, AFAIK, still is) the policy of social democracies like Germany and France.

    This is one example of American liberals not acknowledging a "price" of social democracy (giving up the notion that everyone has the same potential in everything). Another example is when they claim they can pay for everything by just raising taxes on the rich. Taxes are higher on everyone in social democracies, not just the rich.

  34. From Wikpedia :

    “An invasive species is a plant or animal that is not native to a specific location (an Introduced species); and has a tendency to spread, which is believed to cause damage to the environment, human economy and/or human health.”

  35. @Jefferson
    @donut

    "Bitches"

    You are a fan of South Park, what do you think of the new character introduced this season PC Principle?

    Replies: @donut, @MEH 0910

    What do you think I think ?

  36. This will clarify a lot of what Steve brought up.
    http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/427262/refugee-religious-test-shameful-and-not-american-except-federal-law-requires-it-andrew

    Under federal law, the executive branch is expressly required to take religion into account in determining who is granted asylum. Under the provision governing asylum (section 1158 of Title 8, U.S. Code), an alien applying for admission must establish that … religion [among other things] … was or will be at least one central reason for persecuting the applicant. Moreover, to qualify for asylum in the United States, the applicant must be a “refugee” as defined by federal law.

    That definition (set forth in Section 1101(a)(42)(A) of Title , U.S. Code) also requires the executive branch to take account of the alien’s religion: The term “refugee” means (A) any person who is outside any country of such person’s nationality … and who is unable or unwilling to return to … that country because of persecution or a well-founded fear of persecution on account of … religion [among other things] …[.] The law requires a “religious test.”

    And the reason for that is obvious. Asylum law is not a reflection of the incumbent president’s personal (and rather eccentric) sense of compassion. Asylum is a discretionary national act of compassion that is directed, by law not whim, to address persecution.

    Read more at: http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/427262/refugee-religious-test-shameful-and-not-american-except-federal-law-requires-it-andrew

  37. @TangoMan
    @Cullen

    I'm not following you. Why should I purposely make my life worse off because my parents made good choices and, for instance, your parents made bad choices? The good choices my parents made are part of their inheritance to me. They were "part owners" of society and they passed that on to me with the expectation that my life would be better from their bequest and that as I lived my life that I would add value to the society of which I was a "part owner" and pass this down to my children. I don't know of any parents who wish for their children to squander their inheritance by dispersing it, willy nilly, to strangers and drinking buddies and hookers and bums on the street.

    The same reasoning applies to your suggestions. Everyone living in the world of 500 years ago had a chance to come and discover America, people in Syria could have started a mass exodus and come and settled America before the English and French and other Europeans arrived, but they didn't. The benefits for those of us living here are not due to chance or magic air, they're the result of the work and sacrifices of our ancestors. When I pay taxes, when I volunteer to work on civic commissions or with social service clubs or spend a Saturday helping build a park, I do these things to make my society a little bit better for myself and my family and my friends, not for some Somalian to come here and claim EQUAL benefit to the community assets of the US. I assume that the same mindset informed Americans of earlier ages - they were building America for themselves and their children, not for foreigners to come and claim an equal share.

    The upshot here is that there is nothing unfair about a "birth lottery" anymore than it's unfair that a child inherits from his parents when they pass on. Syrians and Iraqis and Somalians and others could be the beneficiaries of equally prosperous societies if their ancestors had made different choices but their ancestors took a different road, so any inequity that they sense should really be laid at the feet of their ancestors rather than shoved into my face.

    Replies: @BRF

    Well said!

  38. @Harry Baldwin
    @iSteveFan

    It’s one reason I really don’t want Uncle Sam paying for our health care or education.

    If the government starts picking up the tab for everyone's education, shouldn't it expect students not to waste its money? In the Soviet Union, I imagine the government didn't pay people of below-average intelligence to attend college, people of no artistic ability to attend art school, and people to major in disciplines of no value to society, like grievance studies.

    Has anyone asked Hillary or Bernie about this?

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    That wasn’t just the policy of the Soviet Union; it was (and, AFAIK, still is) the policy of social democracies like Germany and France.

    This is one example of American liberals not acknowledging a “price” of social democracy (giving up the notion that everyone has the same potential in everything). Another example is when they claim they can pay for everything by just raising taxes on the rich. Taxes are higher on everyone in social democracies, not just the rich.

  39. @iSteveFan
    I know it is not popular to say so, but I actually believed the USSR had a right to restrict emigration of highly educated people. Since the USSR was the supposed workers' paradise and those lucky few received a free education at the expense of their fellow workers, it made sense to not allow someone to leave and take their skills to another nation. It's one reason I really don't want Uncle Sam paying for our health care or education. It might make him think we are indebted to him too.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @njguy73, @Harry Baldwin, @Karl, @Ray P, @LKM

    >>> I actually believed the USSR had a right to restrict emigration of highly educated people

    but that was NOT what brought the wrath of the Hebrews down on the Soviet government.

    the cause of the wrath was the criminalization of Hebrew language study.

  40. @Cullen
    We don’t choose our parents, the culture we’re born into, the color of our skin, the religion that’s bestowed upon us, our socioeconomic class, the order in which we’re born, the education we receive…and they all have a direct impact on the opportunities and disadvantages we’ll have in life. Furthermore, we have zero influence on these when we’re most vulnerable.

    We are all the same deep inside - please don't discriminate against factors that someone didn't have any influence over. Some people fall on the advantageous side of the birth lottery and some get the short end of the stick. I wish more people thought about that.

    Replies: @TangoMan, @Anonym, @Massimo Heitor, @MEH 0910, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Big Bill, @Patton, @This Is Our Home, @Hunsdon

    Some people fall on the advantageous side of the birth lottery and some get the short end of the stick. I wish more people thought about that.

    That is quite obvious.

    We put pressure on parents to invest in their children because it is supposed to give their children advantages that they didn’t earn as individuals. If people believed that children deserved the same opportunity regardless of parents, then parents shouldn’t be involved in raising children.

  41. Sailer, you don’t need to dig back to 1989. There is a simpler explanation:

    The whole point of refugee/asylum status is for people who are persecuted by religion, ethnicity, or political opinion. Christians are explicitly persecuted as a group in the middle east, so giving Middle Eastern Christians special refugee/asylum status makes sense and fits the basic purpose of refugee/asylum status.

    As a counter example, Christians don’t face religious persecution in South America so it wouldn’t make sense to give South American Christians special refugee status on religious grounds.

  42. @FineSwine
    I think these emigrants were required to pay a significant (by Russian standards) amount of money to leave, in order to pay for their educations and other freebies they received growing up in the USSR. Was this changed at some point?

    Replies: @Karl

    >>> to pay for their educations and other freebies they received growing up in the USSR. Was this changed at some point?

    Russian Jewish emigres to Israel were cut off from their pension rights. I don’t know the exact details so I will give the Russian government the benefit of the doubt that they did so based on some articulateable rationale, & in accordance with some piece of Russkie semi-transparent due process.

    What is also true is that ==just now== within the past few weeks, the Russian government agreed to – well, I don’t know EXACTLY what, as the Hebrew press didn’t go deeply in details – but they agreed to un-cut-off in some manner. Monies are now possible to flow. Anyone who really wants to know ought to go hangout at the coffee shops of Netanya’s malls. First thing in the morning after opening, when the pastries & breads are hot out of the oven. The Russkie senior citizens are there. But hurry up, the Frogs are taking the city over.

    Every major hospital in Israel has a Russian Orthodox clergyman in the roster of chaplains. Because Russian medical tourists are THE largest single fraction of cash-customers for most Israeli hospitals. Whereas if you give treatment to an Israeli, you (the hospital) are arguing (with the Israeli insurance companies) over every centavo of payment.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Karl

    Netanyahu flew to Moscow to see Putin a few weeks ago to tell him not to go into Syria, but then came out of the meeting a lot quieter than he went in. Putin and Netanyahu seem like they could work out a modus vivendi.

  43. into America under this special privilege for Soviet Jews.

    To be fair, the US literally boat-lifted thousands of Vietnamese out of Saigon and into Orange County, CA. No papers were checked. Among them might have been Ho Chi Mihn
    warriors and other hardcore communists. But nothing bad happened. If anything, the settled Vietnamese lean relatively Republican by California political metrics.

    Immigration is not a box chocolates.

    • Replies: @Big Bill
    @jJay

    The "boat people" were Chinese living in Vietnam. Ethnic cleansing.

    , @Karl
    @jJay

    >> into America under this special privilege for Soviet Jews.

    What I know of Jackson-Vanik is only that written in Wikipedia. While, I don't doubt that the Jews were the proximate ==cause== of the legislation - the law itself was written with zero religious testing. And also, Jews have never received any special USA-immigration privilege ===qua=== Jews. Jews operate MUCH more smoothly than Blacks.

    Correct me if I'm wrong, the only legally-created privileges in US jurisprudence are for Native Americans (non-licensed fishing & hunting, etc) and "under-represented" blacks/etc who are on the list of - someone name the legislation which favors them by explicit reference, please.

    Wait, some religious groups were exempted from Social Security. Old-Order-Mennonites, & R.Catholic clergy, is it?

    The law does also take note of who is "allowed" to put Chaplains into the US Armed Forces. Who has that reference?

    Replies: @Karl

  44. Said Obama today, “First, they [Republicans] were worried about the press being too tough on them during debates. Now they’re worried about three-year-old orphans.”

    What a childish schmuck our president is. When were the Republicans worried about the press being too tough on them? The MSNBC reporters were doing their usual job of acting as hatchmen for the Democrat Party and the Republican candidates called them on it. No worries at all. On the other hand, on the rare occasions the press has asked Obama a tough question, he hasn’t handled it well. He gets very petulant.

    As far as the three-year-old orphans, we’ll take in all Obama can round up, but no one else. Deal? Obama talks about three-year-old orphans the way he talks about illegal alien valedictorians, like that’s the norm.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @Harry Baldwin

    "The MSNBC reporters were doing their usual job of acting as hatchmen for the Democrat Party and the Republican candidates called them on it. No worries at all. On the other hand, on the rare occasions the press has asked Obama a tough question, he hasn’t handled it well. He gets very petulant."

    Minor correction. It was CNBC, not MSNBC. (Same parent company, but I don't think any Republican in his right mind would ever entertain the possibility of MSNBC hosting a Republican debate.)

    As far as Obama goes, we saw a clear demonstration of what you are talking about when Obama was interviewed by Steve Croft on 60 Minutes a few weeks ago. Croft was incredulous that Obama was claiming credit for foreseeing that arming the Syrian rebels was not going to work out. "Then, Mr. President, why did you go ahead with that program if you thought it wasn't going to work out?" "Let's talk about climate change, Steve."

  45. @Karl
    @FineSwine

    >>> to pay for their educations and other freebies they received growing up in the USSR. Was this changed at some point?

    Russian Jewish emigres to Israel were cut off from their pension rights. I don't know the exact details so I will give the Russian government the benefit of the doubt that they did so based on some articulateable rationale, & in accordance with some piece of Russkie semi-transparent due process.

    What is also true is that ==just now== within the past few weeks, the Russian government agreed to - well, I don't know EXACTLY what, as the Hebrew press didn't go deeply in details - but they agreed to un-cut-off in some manner. Monies are now possible to flow. Anyone who really wants to know ought to go hangout at the coffee shops of Netanya's malls. First thing in the morning after opening, when the pastries & breads are hot out of the oven. The Russkie senior citizens are there. But hurry up, the Frogs are taking the city over.

    Every major hospital in Israel has a Russian Orthodox clergyman in the roster of chaplains. Because Russian medical tourists are THE largest single fraction of cash-customers for most Israeli hospitals. Whereas if you give treatment to an Israeli, you (the hospital) are arguing (with the Israeli insurance companies) over every centavo of payment.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Netanyahu flew to Moscow to see Putin a few weeks ago to tell him not to go into Syria, but then came out of the meeting a lot quieter than he went in. Putin and Netanyahu seem like they could work out a modus vivendi.

  46. @Cullen
    We don’t choose our parents, the culture we’re born into, the color of our skin, the religion that’s bestowed upon us, our socioeconomic class, the order in which we’re born, the education we receive…and they all have a direct impact on the opportunities and disadvantages we’ll have in life. Furthermore, we have zero influence on these when we’re most vulnerable.

    We are all the same deep inside - please don't discriminate against factors that someone didn't have any influence over. Some people fall on the advantageous side of the birth lottery and some get the short end of the stick. I wish more people thought about that.

    Replies: @TangoMan, @Anonym, @Massimo Heitor, @MEH 0910, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Big Bill, @Patton, @This Is Our Home, @Hunsdon

    We are all the same deep inside

    No we’re not. People vary, even deep inside.

  47. @Cullen
    We don’t choose our parents, the culture we’re born into, the color of our skin, the religion that’s bestowed upon us, our socioeconomic class, the order in which we’re born, the education we receive…and they all have a direct impact on the opportunities and disadvantages we’ll have in life. Furthermore, we have zero influence on these when we’re most vulnerable.

    We are all the same deep inside - please don't discriminate against factors that someone didn't have any influence over. Some people fall on the advantageous side of the birth lottery and some get the short end of the stick. I wish more people thought about that.

    Replies: @TangoMan, @Anonym, @Massimo Heitor, @MEH 0910, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Big Bill, @Patton, @This Is Our Home, @Hunsdon

    Some people fall on the advantageous side of the birth lottery and some get the short end of the stick. I wish more people thought about that.

    I cannot imagine how anyone can accept this notion.

    There is no lottery. If you are a materialism birth is entirely deterministic. No other outcome is possible, hence, no lottery.

    If you accept anything beyond materialism then the notion that somehow chance is involved is a fact-free reaction to the ridiculous zeitgeist of the moment.

    Reach up with either hand and slide at least one finger between your head and the temple of the ludicrous excuse for rose-colored glasses your ‘betters’ have placed in front of your eyes. Remove those glasses and throw them into the dumpster. You have been sold an anti-human bill of goods. Reject the absurdity, forswear the preposterity, disavow the misanthropicity. Stupidity is optional. Dodge the bullet before you can’t.

    • Replies: @Cryptogenic
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    If you don't accept materialism then you have just secured a condition for imagining life as a lottery. And stupidity is definitely not optional, especially if you accept materialism.

  48. @Jefferson
    @donut

    "Bitches"

    You are a fan of South Park, what do you think of the new character introduced this season PC Principle?

    Replies: @donut, @MEH 0910

    http://southpark.cc.com/clips/t7cbvf/please-welcome-pc-principal

    “Like it or not, PC is back, and it’s bigger than ever!”

  49. @anony-mouse
    You don't mind if I say that I support special refugee rules for Syrian Christians and Yazidis. And I'm not the only one.

    (BTW the spell check says 'Yazidis' is an error)

    Replies: @tbraton, @Karl

    >> if I say that I support special refugee rules for Syrian Christians

    Within the past week: If you’re an Ethiopian Orthodox christian who has a first-degree relative who serves in the IDF (active or reserve), you will be deemed to be eligible to claim Israeli citizenship and refugee’d in at taxpayer expense. This appears to be about 9100 Ethiopians.

    Why now? Cynical me thinks its Netanyahu throwing a bone to those ultra-Orthodox parties who joined his coalition. Their rabbis will be the ones who get paid to teach and convert them to Judaism. The new Ethiopians will be “conscripted” into these classrooms.

    The Russkies had to have a Jewish mother or a Jewish spouse. Self-affidavits were eventually accepted – I mean, could you PROVE that your deceased dad was Methodist? They were not required to convert. If memory serves, they got 30 days of full benefits, another 5 months of some assist. Healthy russkies always find SOME kind of gainful employment…. they’d be more likely to be doing shady “business” (taxi syndicates or whatever) than collecting welfare. Ethiopians often are on welfare 2-3 generations.

    IDF has a school where (active-duty’s who request it) can do a conversion(start to finish) in a month. The ultra-orthodox streeeettcccchhh out the process to about a year – milk the taxpayers.

  50. @Steve Sailer
    @iSteveFan

    Cuba has trained a lot baseball players and doctors at public expense. It's not unreasonable for the Cuban government to ask for a cut of the income of Cuban ballplayers and doctors when they come to the U.S.

    Replies: @WhatEvvs, @donut

    So let them play baseball and practice medicine in Cuba and they can hop around in their f**king tutus there as well you bleeding heart ***** .

  51. @Jim Sweeney
    @p s c

    Did Milbank remind you who was president in 1939? Or which party held the House and Senate?

    I wonder why?

    Replies: @tbraton

    “Did Milbank remind you who was president in 1939? Or which party held the House and Senate?”

    Wasn’t that the same President who interned many Japanese-Americans during WWII and a smaller number of Italian-Americans and German-Americans? At the instigation of then California Attorney General Earl Warren who later went on to greater fame as an idol of civil libertarians, and the subsequent approval by the Supreme Court, most of whose members that very President had appointed. That President? (BTW, do you know who opposed the internment of Japanese-Americans and others? Why J. Edgar Hoover, that great scourge of civil liberties. That happens to be one of my favorite ironies of American history, right up there with Woodrow Wilson throwing Eugene Debs into prison for opposing WWI and Warren G. Harding freeing the same Debs, when he was President.)

  52. I can’t stop laughing everytime I read “Jeb!”. In Polish, it’s quite vulgar word.
    jebać – to fuck. Jeb is an imperative.

    You can use it to creative a lot of other words: przyjebać – to hit
    zajebać – to kill, wyjebać – to throw out, odjebać – many meanings, i.e. to cut hair and get nice cloth to look elegant. Once I’ve collected about 16 meanings which could be created from adjective created from this word, and 55 meanings which could be created from verbs created from this word – unfortunately, only two nouns…

    And, of course, “jeb!” can be also used as kind of vulgar onomatopeia, e.g. in a (vulgar) comic book when hit someone instead of writing “bang!” you could write “jeb!” (not really, since the word is too vulgar, but I hope you catch my drift).

    Basically, “Jeb Busha” would mean “fuck Bush”.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @szopen

    "I can’t stop laughing everytime I read “Jeb!”. In Polish, it’s quite vulgar word.
    jebać – to fuck. Jeb is an imperative."

    I always knew there was a reason to oppose Jeb!!!, but I couldn't put my finger on it. Thanks for the laugh. Ironically, we've come to learn that "Bush" happens to translate the same way in American English. BTW does putting three exclamation points after his name change the translation of Jeb!!!'s name in Polish?

    Replies: @szopen

  53. @Eric
    I'm always greeted by incredulity when I tell atheist Jews they are basically racist. Tradition, rituals, and the Holocaust are the main counters.

    Replies: @Big Bill

    Rabbi Kahane (of the banned Kach party) used to drive secular, atheist Israelis nuts when he made the same point.

    As Kahane brutally pointed out, it is easy to worship secular democracy, freedom of religion, gay pride parades, and anti-racism when you have a natural majority, but what do you do when the time comes that you are being outbred/replaced by a rapidly growing minority? Do you keep worshipping “Democracy” and be inevitably replaced? Is Western liberalism (in Israel AND Europe) a suicide cult? Or do you get “racist” and survive?

    SEE: https://rabbikahane.wordpress.com/2010/08/25/rabbi-kahane-interview-with-raphael-mergui-and-philippe-simonnot/

  54. Mr Peterson where have you gone ?

  55. @Harry Baldwin
    Said Obama today, "First, they [Republicans] were worried about the press being too tough on them during debates. Now they’re worried about three-year-old orphans."

    What a childish schmuck our president is. When were the Republicans worried about the press being too tough on them? The MSNBC reporters were doing their usual job of acting as hatchmen for the Democrat Party and the Republican candidates called them on it. No worries at all. On the other hand, on the rare occasions the press has asked Obama a tough question, he hasn't handled it well. He gets very petulant.

    As far as the three-year-old orphans, we'll take in all Obama can round up, but no one else. Deal? Obama talks about three-year-old orphans the way he talks about illegal alien valedictorians, like that's the norm.

    Replies: @tbraton

    “The MSNBC reporters were doing their usual job of acting as hatchmen for the Democrat Party and the Republican candidates called them on it. No worries at all. On the other hand, on the rare occasions the press has asked Obama a tough question, he hasn’t handled it well. He gets very petulant.”

    Minor correction. It was CNBC, not MSNBC. (Same parent company, but I don’t think any Republican in his right mind would ever entertain the possibility of MSNBC hosting a Republican debate.)

    As far as Obama goes, we saw a clear demonstration of what you are talking about when Obama was interviewed by Steve Croft on 60 Minutes a few weeks ago. Croft was incredulous that Obama was claiming credit for foreseeing that arming the Syrian rebels was not going to work out. “Then, Mr. President, why did you go ahead with that program if you thought it wasn’t going to work out?” “Let’s talk about climate change, Steve.”

  56. @Cullen
    We don’t choose our parents, the culture we’re born into, the color of our skin, the religion that’s bestowed upon us, our socioeconomic class, the order in which we’re born, the education we receive…and they all have a direct impact on the opportunities and disadvantages we’ll have in life. Furthermore, we have zero influence on these when we’re most vulnerable.

    We are all the same deep inside - please don't discriminate against factors that someone didn't have any influence over. Some people fall on the advantageous side of the birth lottery and some get the short end of the stick. I wish more people thought about that.

    Replies: @TangoMan, @Anonym, @Massimo Heitor, @MEH 0910, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Big Bill, @Patton, @This Is Our Home, @Hunsdon

    Why did you mention “color of skin” and not “genes”?

    The color of one’s skin is merely a convenient visible marker for a host of other physical, mental and cultural characteristics defined by genetics (that are equally unchangeable “accidents of birth”).

    I think you are wrong in one respect. We think long and hard about unchosen and unchangeable characteristics of individuals and groups.

    For example, African refugees with 75 IQs will produce generation after generation after generation of 75 IQ Africans, whether in the USA, Europe, or Africa.

    Have you thought about that?

  57. @szopen
    I can't stop laughing everytime I read "Jeb!". In Polish, it's quite vulgar word.
    jebać - to fuck. Jeb is an imperative.

    You can use it to creative a lot of other words: przyjebać - to hit
    zajebać - to kill, wyjebać - to throw out, odjebać - many meanings, i.e. to cut hair and get nice cloth to look elegant. Once I've collected about 16 meanings which could be created from adjective created from this word, and 55 meanings which could be created from verbs created from this word - unfortunately, only two nouns...

    And, of course, "jeb!" can be also used as kind of vulgar onomatopeia, e.g. in a (vulgar) comic book when hit someone instead of writing "bang!" you could write "jeb!" (not really, since the word is too vulgar, but I hope you catch my drift).

    Basically, "Jeb Busha" would mean "fuck Bush".

    Replies: @tbraton

    “I can’t stop laughing everytime I read “Jeb!”. In Polish, it’s quite vulgar word.
    jebać – to fuck. Jeb is an imperative.”

    I always knew there was a reason to oppose Jeb!!!, but I couldn’t put my finger on it. Thanks for the laugh. Ironically, we’ve come to learn that “Bush” happens to translate the same way in American English. BTW does putting three exclamation points after his name change the translation of Jeb!!!’s name in Polish?

    • Replies: @szopen
    @tbraton


    BTW does putting three exclamation points after his name change the translation of Jeb!!!’s name in Polish?
     
    No, of course not.

    BTW this only works with written "Jeb", as we pronounce "j" as "y" (i.e. "yeb").

    Replies: @tbraton

  58. @Cullen
    We don’t choose our parents, the culture we’re born into, the color of our skin, the religion that’s bestowed upon us, our socioeconomic class, the order in which we’re born, the education we receive…and they all have a direct impact on the opportunities and disadvantages we’ll have in life. Furthermore, we have zero influence on these when we’re most vulnerable.

    We are all the same deep inside - please don't discriminate against factors that someone didn't have any influence over. Some people fall on the advantageous side of the birth lottery and some get the short end of the stick. I wish more people thought about that.

    Replies: @TangoMan, @Anonym, @Massimo Heitor, @MEH 0910, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Big Bill, @Patton, @This Is Our Home, @Hunsdon

    Is your argument that because we can’t control those things, we’re required to ignore them when comparing ourselves to one another?

    We should ignore reality because we couldn’t control it?

  59. Its no accident that Scoop Jackson is the hero of the jewish Neocons, a Soviet offcial once said that he knew that the Soviet Union was finished when jews started leaving it.

  60. @tbraton
    @szopen

    "I can’t stop laughing everytime I read “Jeb!”. In Polish, it’s quite vulgar word.
    jebać – to fuck. Jeb is an imperative."

    I always knew there was a reason to oppose Jeb!!!, but I couldn't put my finger on it. Thanks for the laugh. Ironically, we've come to learn that "Bush" happens to translate the same way in American English. BTW does putting three exclamation points after his name change the translation of Jeb!!!'s name in Polish?

    Replies: @szopen

    BTW does putting three exclamation points after his name change the translation of Jeb!!!’s name in Polish?

    No, of course not.

    BTW this only works with written “Jeb”, as we pronounce “j” as “y” (i.e. “yeb”).

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @szopen

    I was teasing about the three exclamation points which I like to place after Jeb!!! I decided to add the third "!" after coming across a column in which the author (humorist Dave Barry, as I recall) mockingly added a second exclamation point, to further emphasize the ridiculousness both of the symbol and the man. I do find highly amusing the way Jeb translates into Polish.

    Replies: @Hunsdon

  61. This Is Our Home [AKA "Robert Rediger"] says:
    @Cullen
    We don’t choose our parents, the culture we’re born into, the color of our skin, the religion that’s bestowed upon us, our socioeconomic class, the order in which we’re born, the education we receive…and they all have a direct impact on the opportunities and disadvantages we’ll have in life. Furthermore, we have zero influence on these when we’re most vulnerable.

    We are all the same deep inside - please don't discriminate against factors that someone didn't have any influence over. Some people fall on the advantageous side of the birth lottery and some get the short end of the stick. I wish more people thought about that.

    Replies: @TangoMan, @Anonym, @Massimo Heitor, @MEH 0910, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Big Bill, @Patton, @This Is Our Home, @Hunsdon

    You are only your mother’s son because of factors outside of your control. You should therefore love her no more than you love anyone else in the world!

    See? We can all pretend to be super caring and compassionate individuals while actually being emotional voids with the maturity of a three year old.

    I suppose it is not your fault. You haven’t been taught any virtues. Things like gratitude, loyalty, honour and integrity…

    • Replies: @5371
    @This Is Our Home

    Reductio ad absurdum doesn't work with people who have no capacity for perceiving the absurd.

  62. @This Is Our Home
    @Cullen

    You are only your mother's son because of factors outside of your control. You should therefore love her no more than you love anyone else in the world!

    See? We can all pretend to be super caring and compassionate individuals while actually being emotional voids with the maturity of a three year old.

    I suppose it is not your fault. You haven't been taught any virtues. Things like gratitude, loyalty, honour and integrity...

    Replies: @5371

    Reductio ad absurdum doesn’t work with people who have no capacity for perceiving the absurd.

  63. @jJay
    into America under this special privilege for Soviet Jews.

    To be fair, the US literally boat-lifted thousands of Vietnamese out of Saigon and into Orange County, CA. No papers were checked. Among them might have been Ho Chi Mihn
    warriors and other hardcore communists. But nothing bad happened. If anything, the settled Vietnamese lean relatively Republican by California political metrics.

    Immigration is not a box chocolates.

    Replies: @Big Bill, @Karl

    The “boat people” were Chinese living in Vietnam. Ethnic cleansing.

  64. You can discuss the merits that Soviet-Jewish immigration has brought America — that’s more of a matter of opinion. (I would argue that there’s been a *huge* net plus, despite the handful of annoying characters in the NYC media world. Sergey Brin is the extreme example you mention, but the tech boom is littered with Soviet Jews… that’s why it also happened the same time in Tel Aviv, as in the US. Just one example.)

    But to say that Jews weren’t heavily discriminated against in the USSR is complete nonsense. And you know it’s disingenuous — that’s why the best you can mention as to why Jews don’t deserve refugee status in the US is because AMERICAN Jewish economists consulted Russia in the MID-90s, a different people in a different time!? What does that have to do with Soviet Jews in the 70s in 80s? PS – the vast majority left before 1991.

    I’d prefer you flat out said that “I don’t like Jews, and I don’t want them in my country.” Or, “I don’t believe in America taking in ANY refugees, no matter what.” Just don’t retcon history.

    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    @sprfls

    sprfls said: But to say that Jews weren’t heavily discriminated against in the USSR is complete nonsense.

    Hunsdon said: How? I'm not being snarky, this is a genuine question.

    Replies: @The most deplorable one

    , @The most deplorable one
    @sprfls


    that’s why the best you can mention as to why Jews don’t deserve refugee status in the US is because AMERICAN Jewish economists consulted Russia in the MID-90s, a different people in a different time!?
     
    Because, as we all know, there are no genetic similarities between Russian Jews and American Jews.

    Oh, wait.
    , @LKM
    @sprfls

    The ones that always seem to crop up most consistently in the recollections of former Soviet Jews are lack of emigration rights and quotas at the top universities. I don't know if the former were any more restrictive than those placed on your average Soviet citizen. In some reminiscences, the former are related to the latter, but I don't know if this was truly the case. I can sort of understand why the Soviets would be reluctant to finance an education at Moscow State for someone whom they viewed as a particular flight risk.

  65. ¡Jeb¡ is a moron, but of course he’s right about this; if we take anyone, we should favor Syrian Christians.

    Btw, I went to high school with a lot of these guys. I used to think it’s Jews who dislike Muslim Arabs the most — wrong! I didn’t realize before how much the Syrian Christians despised their Muslim countrymen.

    I can imagine what’s been happening in the last few years has made it even worse.

  66. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Cullen


    Some people fall on the advantageous side of the birth lottery and some get the short end of the stick. I wish more people thought about that.
     
    I cannot imagine how anyone can accept this notion.

    There is no lottery. If you are a materialism birth is entirely deterministic. No other outcome is possible, hence, no lottery.

    If you accept anything beyond materialism then the notion that somehow chance is involved is a fact-free reaction to the ridiculous zeitgeist of the moment.

    Reach up with either hand and slide at least one finger between your head and the temple of the ludicrous excuse for rose-colored glasses your 'betters' have placed in front of your eyes. Remove those glasses and throw them into the dumpster. You have been sold an anti-human bill of goods. Reject the absurdity, forswear the preposterity, disavow the misanthropicity. Stupidity is optional. Dodge the bullet before you can't.

    Replies: @Cryptogenic

    If you don’t accept materialism then you have just secured a condition for imagining life as a lottery. And stupidity is definitely not optional, especially if you accept materialism.

  67. Haven’t had a chance to read the comments but if it is not already linked to, here is a good piece on US asylum law:

    Refugee ‘Religious Test’ Is ‘Shameful’ and ‘Not American’ … Except that Federal Law Requires It

    http://goo.gl/jh7P9P

  68. @iSteveFan
    I know it is not popular to say so, but I actually believed the USSR had a right to restrict emigration of highly educated people. Since the USSR was the supposed workers' paradise and those lucky few received a free education at the expense of their fellow workers, it made sense to not allow someone to leave and take their skills to another nation. It's one reason I really don't want Uncle Sam paying for our health care or education. It might make him think we are indebted to him too.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @njguy73, @Harry Baldwin, @Karl, @Ray P, @LKM

    Mr. Gorbachev, put up this wall!

    U.S. citizens living abroad have to pay U.S. taxes. Patricia Highsmith, resident in Switzerland, complained of it.

  69. We don’t choose our parents, the culture we’re born into, the color of our skin, the religion that’s bestowed upon us, our socioeconomic class, the order in which we’re born, the education we receive…and they all have a direct impact on the opportunities and disadvantages we’ll have in life. Furthermore, we have zero influence on these when we’re most vulnerable.

    We are all the same deep inside – please don’t discriminate against factors that someone didn’t have any influence over. Some people fall on the advantageous side of the birth lottery and some get the short end of the stick. I wish more people thought about that.

    Please stop being a racist. Please stop expecting whites, and only whites, to lower their standard of living to help poor non-whites. Please stop bothering whites, and only whites, about this subject. Please stop being content with only whites giving up their incomes and living spaces to poor non-whites. Stop being so racist. Expect better of non-whites.

    Whites have done far more for poor non-whites than non-whites have for other poor, non-white groups. Please stop being racist and ignoring the Chinese, the Indians, the Koreans, the Japanese, the southeast Asians, the central Asians, the south Asians, the west Asians, the north Africans, the sub-Saharan Africans, the Mexicans, the central Americans, and the South Americans, and the Israelis, all of whom do little or nothing to help.

    It’s racist to expect whites, and only whites, to give over their territories and their incomes to help poor non-whites. It’s racist to single out whites, who have done so much, and to ignore the non-white groups who do nothing.

    It’s also the behavior of a con artist grifter scumbag, the sort of person who scams little old grannies out of their social security checks.

    Please stop being so racist and such a lowlife. Please stop insisting on white suicide as some monstrous form of charity.

    (And good job changing your obvious troll handle from “Cullen McHerd” or whatever it was to “Cullen,” much more subtle)

  70. Where to you get this we stuff Obama man.

    [based on punchline of old Lone Ranger and Tonto joke: cornered in a box canyon by hostile Comanches, the Lone Ranger turns to Tonto and asks, “What do we do now, Tonto?” Tonto replies, “Where do you get this we stuff white man.”]

  71. @szopen
    @tbraton


    BTW does putting three exclamation points after his name change the translation of Jeb!!!’s name in Polish?
     
    No, of course not.

    BTW this only works with written "Jeb", as we pronounce "j" as "y" (i.e. "yeb").

    Replies: @tbraton

    I was teasing about the three exclamation points which I like to place after Jeb!!! I decided to add the third “!” after coming across a column in which the author (humorist Dave Barry, as I recall) mockingly added a second exclamation point, to further emphasize the ridiculousness both of the symbol and the man. I do find highly amusing the way Jeb translates into Polish.

    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    @tbraton

    Also Russian. I wouldn't spell it "jeb" but I prefer a different transliteration system.

  72. I wonder if Julia is related to Adolph Ioffe, member of Lenins inner circle in 1917 and negotiating
    The Treaty of Brest-Litowsk in 1918, and Josef Joffe, publisher of Die Zeit , currently the house organ of the open border fanatics in Germany and Bilderberg member?

  73. @p s c
    @fedupwithbigbiz

    I read Dana Milbank' article in the Philadelphia Inquirer today (published yesterday in the Washington Post) and in it he went nuclear. He mentioned that America refused to accept Jewish refugees from Germany in 1939 on a ship called the "St. Louis" and also stated that not one refugee has ever committed an act of terrorism against America.

    It's always 1939.

    Replies: @Jim Sweeney, @Jefferson, @Frida K-Lo

    If the Jewish argument is going to be made, why isn’t it suggested the refugees go to Israel? Israel is much closer and a wealthy modern nation.

  74. When you think about it, the Paris Islamic terrorist attacks were the final nail in the coffin of Jeb Bush when it comes to his chances of winning the Republican nomination, he is finished now. The Paris attacks happened because the French government views massive 3rd world immigration as an act of love just like Jeb Bush. People who vote in the Republican primaries do not want what happened in Paris to happen in the U.S. Jeb Bush can not protect America from terrorist attacks on our soil with his pro-open borders/pro-amnesty political views.

  75. @Cullen
    We don’t choose our parents, the culture we’re born into, the color of our skin, the religion that’s bestowed upon us, our socioeconomic class, the order in which we’re born, the education we receive…and they all have a direct impact on the opportunities and disadvantages we’ll have in life. Furthermore, we have zero influence on these when we’re most vulnerable.

    We are all the same deep inside - please don't discriminate against factors that someone didn't have any influence over. Some people fall on the advantageous side of the birth lottery and some get the short end of the stick. I wish more people thought about that.

    Replies: @TangoMan, @Anonym, @Massimo Heitor, @MEH 0910, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Big Bill, @Patton, @This Is Our Home, @Hunsdon

    I think I read this somewhere before. “Deep thoughts by Jack Handy”, was it?

  76. @sprfls
    You can discuss the merits that Soviet-Jewish immigration has brought America -- that's more of a matter of opinion. (I would argue that there's been a *huge* net plus, despite the handful of annoying characters in the NYC media world. Sergey Brin is the extreme example you mention, but the tech boom is littered with Soviet Jews... that's why it also happened the same time in Tel Aviv, as in the US. Just one example.)

    But to say that Jews weren't heavily discriminated against in the USSR is complete nonsense. And you know it's disingenuous -- that's why the best you can mention as to why Jews don't deserve refugee status in the US is because AMERICAN Jewish economists consulted Russia in the MID-90s, a different people in a different time!? What does that have to do with Soviet Jews in the 70s in 80s? PS - the vast majority left before 1991.

    I'd prefer you flat out said that "I don't like Jews, and I don't want them in my country." Or, "I don't believe in America taking in ANY refugees, no matter what." Just don't retcon history.

    Replies: @Hunsdon, @The most deplorable one, @LKM

    sprfls said: But to say that Jews weren’t heavily discriminated against in the USSR is complete nonsense.

    Hunsdon said: How? I’m not being snarky, this is a genuine question.

    • Replies: @The most deplorable one
    @Hunsdon

    Well, for one thing, they no longer enjoyed the disproportionate levels of participation as they did back in the Bolshevik days.

    On the other hand, four out of five oligarchs were Jewish, which is just such an evil stereotype.

    On the gripping hand, why couldn't it have been five out of five.

    It's all so confusing.

  77. @tbraton
    @szopen

    I was teasing about the three exclamation points which I like to place after Jeb!!! I decided to add the third "!" after coming across a column in which the author (humorist Dave Barry, as I recall) mockingly added a second exclamation point, to further emphasize the ridiculousness both of the symbol and the man. I do find highly amusing the way Jeb translates into Polish.

    Replies: @Hunsdon

    Also Russian. I wouldn’t spell it “jeb” but I prefer a different transliteration system.

  78. @jJay
    into America under this special privilege for Soviet Jews.

    To be fair, the US literally boat-lifted thousands of Vietnamese out of Saigon and into Orange County, CA. No papers were checked. Among them might have been Ho Chi Mihn
    warriors and other hardcore communists. But nothing bad happened. If anything, the settled Vietnamese lean relatively Republican by California political metrics.

    Immigration is not a box chocolates.

    Replies: @Big Bill, @Karl

    >> into America under this special privilege for Soviet Jews.

    What I know of Jackson-Vanik is only that written in Wikipedia. While, I don’t doubt that the Jews were the proximate ==cause== of the legislation – the law itself was written with zero religious testing. And also, Jews have never received any special USA-immigration privilege ===qua=== Jews. Jews operate MUCH more smoothly than Blacks.

    Correct me if I’m wrong, the only legally-created privileges in US jurisprudence are for Native Americans (non-licensed fishing & hunting, etc) and “under-represented” blacks/etc who are on the list of – someone name the legislation which favors them by explicit reference, please.

    Wait, some religious groups were exempted from Social Security. Old-Order-Mennonites, & R.Catholic clergy, is it?

    The law does also take note of who is “allowed” to put Chaplains into the US Armed Forces. Who has that reference?

    • Replies: @Karl
    @Karl

    >> The law does also take note of who is “allowed” to put Chaplains into the US Armed Forces.

    The Israeli Chief of Staff is currently fighting for the right to stop paying for Jewish Chaplains in the IDF.

    Maybe he will hand the "IDF conversion school" over to Miri Adelson. She certainly finds the money to fly Israel PopMusic Boybands du jour, over to Tarzana for the benefit of her barkada of Israelis in the LA-BayArea-Vegas axis of tacky.

    Speaking of wealthy barkadas, if you REALLY want to meet the individual vertebrae of the White Tail which wags the Malacanang dog..... go find the social club, "American Women of Makati".

    Then buy a ticket to their annual Chili Cook-off fundraiser.

    Quite the target-rich environment of Ambassadors, and Senior Vice Presidents of Exxon-Mobil.

    And pretty good Tex-Mex food.

  79. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @sprfls
    You can discuss the merits that Soviet-Jewish immigration has brought America -- that's more of a matter of opinion. (I would argue that there's been a *huge* net plus, despite the handful of annoying characters in the NYC media world. Sergey Brin is the extreme example you mention, but the tech boom is littered with Soviet Jews... that's why it also happened the same time in Tel Aviv, as in the US. Just one example.)

    But to say that Jews weren't heavily discriminated against in the USSR is complete nonsense. And you know it's disingenuous -- that's why the best you can mention as to why Jews don't deserve refugee status in the US is because AMERICAN Jewish economists consulted Russia in the MID-90s, a different people in a different time!? What does that have to do with Soviet Jews in the 70s in 80s? PS - the vast majority left before 1991.

    I'd prefer you flat out said that "I don't like Jews, and I don't want them in my country." Or, "I don't believe in America taking in ANY refugees, no matter what." Just don't retcon history.

    Replies: @Hunsdon, @The most deplorable one, @LKM

    that’s why the best you can mention as to why Jews don’t deserve refugee status in the US is because AMERICAN Jewish economists consulted Russia in the MID-90s, a different people in a different time!?

    Because, as we all know, there are no genetic similarities between Russian Jews and American Jews.

    Oh, wait.

  80. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @Hunsdon
    @sprfls

    sprfls said: But to say that Jews weren’t heavily discriminated against in the USSR is complete nonsense.

    Hunsdon said: How? I'm not being snarky, this is a genuine question.

    Replies: @The most deplorable one

    Well, for one thing, they no longer enjoyed the disproportionate levels of participation as they did back in the Bolshevik days.

    On the other hand, four out of five oligarchs were Jewish, which is just such an evil stereotype.

    On the gripping hand, why couldn’t it have been five out of five.

    It’s all so confusing.

  81. @Karl
    @jJay

    >> into America under this special privilege for Soviet Jews.

    What I know of Jackson-Vanik is only that written in Wikipedia. While, I don't doubt that the Jews were the proximate ==cause== of the legislation - the law itself was written with zero religious testing. And also, Jews have never received any special USA-immigration privilege ===qua=== Jews. Jews operate MUCH more smoothly than Blacks.

    Correct me if I'm wrong, the only legally-created privileges in US jurisprudence are for Native Americans (non-licensed fishing & hunting, etc) and "under-represented" blacks/etc who are on the list of - someone name the legislation which favors them by explicit reference, please.

    Wait, some religious groups were exempted from Social Security. Old-Order-Mennonites, & R.Catholic clergy, is it?

    The law does also take note of who is "allowed" to put Chaplains into the US Armed Forces. Who has that reference?

    Replies: @Karl

    >> The law does also take note of who is “allowed” to put Chaplains into the US Armed Forces.

    The Israeli Chief of Staff is currently fighting for the right to stop paying for Jewish Chaplains in the IDF.

    Maybe he will hand the “IDF conversion school” over to Miri Adelson. She certainly finds the money to fly Israel PopMusic Boybands du jour, over to Tarzana for the benefit of her barkada of Israelis in the LA-BayArea-Vegas axis of tacky.

    Speaking of wealthy barkadas, if you REALLY want to meet the individual vertebrae of the White Tail which wags the Malacanang dog….. go find the social club, “American Women of Makati”.

    Then buy a ticket to their annual Chili Cook-off fundraiser.

    Quite the target-rich environment of Ambassadors, and Senior Vice Presidents of Exxon-Mobil.

    And pretty good Tex-Mex food.

  82. @iSteveFan
    I know it is not popular to say so, but I actually believed the USSR had a right to restrict emigration of highly educated people. Since the USSR was the supposed workers' paradise and those lucky few received a free education at the expense of their fellow workers, it made sense to not allow someone to leave and take their skills to another nation. It's one reason I really don't want Uncle Sam paying for our health care or education. It might make him think we are indebted to him too.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @njguy73, @Harry Baldwin, @Karl, @Ray P, @LKM

    I’ve actually thought the same thing, but at the end of the day, it’s not as though Soviet-era university students had any other option to finance their education. It’s not like their parents could start college funds.

    That being said, if a state does provide substantial aid in terms of tuition, what you’re suggesting would be fair so long as the restrictions weren’t imposed retroactively.

  83. @sprfls
    You can discuss the merits that Soviet-Jewish immigration has brought America -- that's more of a matter of opinion. (I would argue that there's been a *huge* net plus, despite the handful of annoying characters in the NYC media world. Sergey Brin is the extreme example you mention, but the tech boom is littered with Soviet Jews... that's why it also happened the same time in Tel Aviv, as in the US. Just one example.)

    But to say that Jews weren't heavily discriminated against in the USSR is complete nonsense. And you know it's disingenuous -- that's why the best you can mention as to why Jews don't deserve refugee status in the US is because AMERICAN Jewish economists consulted Russia in the MID-90s, a different people in a different time!? What does that have to do with Soviet Jews in the 70s in 80s? PS - the vast majority left before 1991.

    I'd prefer you flat out said that "I don't like Jews, and I don't want them in my country." Or, "I don't believe in America taking in ANY refugees, no matter what." Just don't retcon history.

    Replies: @Hunsdon, @The most deplorable one, @LKM

    The ones that always seem to crop up most consistently in the recollections of former Soviet Jews are lack of emigration rights and quotas at the top universities. I don’t know if the former were any more restrictive than those placed on your average Soviet citizen. In some reminiscences, the former are related to the latter, but I don’t know if this was truly the case. I can sort of understand why the Soviets would be reluctant to finance an education at Moscow State for someone whom they viewed as a particular flight risk.

  84. If there’s one thing that I would expect a woman with a degree in Russian history from Princeton to know, it’s when the Soviet Union fell.

    Ioffe, who served as Moscow correspondent for The New Yorker and Foreign made no attempt to hide her dislike of Christian Russia in her farewell piece before she moved on TNR:

    http://www.juliaioffe.com/articles/tnr/what-i-will-and-wont-miss-about-living-in-moscow/

    I won’t miss living in a city where virtually everyone is white and wearing an Orthodox Christian cross, where the only places of worship you see are the onion domes of Orthodox churches, and where the Church and the state are in such close cooperation. The medieval beauty of the architecture wears thin when there’s nothing to contrast it to, and when you know of the abuses happening under its aegis. A monopoly is a monopoly is a monopoly.

    Moscow, by the way, is 14% Muslim. Maybe she can’t tell the different between a church and a mosque.

    Just try for a second, to envision the reaction if a western journalist wrote the following about Bangkok:

    Look, pagodas are nice and all, but seriously, this city would be so much better if there weren’t so many Buddhists here. Also, why is everyone brownish-yellow?

  85. Steve doesn’t understand why being Jewish in 1990s Soviet Union made you qualify as a refugee.

    Its because a stream of 1980’s movies such as Clint Eastwood’s Foxfire established a narrative that Jews living in the Soviet Union were secretly oppressed anti-communists. A whopper to be sure, but Americans and Soviets didn’t have much contact in those days.

  86. At the same time, Syria has sent three Mi-24 gunships and 21 Su-24 competitors to Russia for refurbishing.

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