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NYT: Yale's Asian Students Say Yale Didn't Discriminate Against THEM
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From the New York Times news section:

Justice Dept. Says Yale Discriminates. Here’s What Students Think.

The Trump administration’s charge that the university discriminates against Asian-American applicants was disputed by many Asian-American students and others.

By Anemona Hartocollis and Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio
Aug. 14, 2020
Updated 8:13 p.m. ET

When Siddarth Shankar applied to Yale in 2017, he did not hesitate to identify himself as Asian-American, and wrote about how visiting family members in conflict-ridden Kashmir had shaped his worldview.

He did not expect to get in, because he knew he had tough competition as a student at a public high school in the affluent Washington suburb of McLean, Va., where most students were either white or, like him, Asian-American, and many apply to the Ivy League. But he was admitted.

Now he sees the Trump administration’s accusation that Yale discriminated against Asian-American and white applicants, leveled against the university by the Justice Department’s civil rights division on Thursday, as unfathomable and divisive.

… Yale students widely criticized the administration’s finding, which came two years after a complaint was filed against the university by a group called the Asian American Coalition for Education…

“When I talk to my Asian-American friends, this is not what we wanted,” said Alec Dai, a Yale senior from New York City whose parents immigrated from Guangzhou, China. “It’s not like people on campus were asking for this kind of justice that doesn’t exist.”

This Asian Yale student went on to say, “Maybe some of my ex-friends who didn’t get into Yale think Yale discriminates, but I don’t talk to those losers anymore. I have much higher-class Yale Man friends to talk to now.”

 
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  1. I mean if you cant trust shidrar shanker who can you trust ?

    When prodded further he said, ^ I love the bangladeshis.”

  2. Anonymous[353] • Disclaimer says:

    When Siddarth Shankar applied to Yale in 2017, he did not hesitate to identify himself as Asian-American, and wrote about how visiting family members in conflict-ridden Kashmir had shaped his worldview.

    This indicates that Siddarth indeed may have benefited from his ancestry and family history in gaining admission to Yale.

    If he is from Kashmir, would he be Hindu or Muslim?

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anonymous

    Siddarth may be Buddhist or Hindu. Shankar is a Hindu name. Indian Kashmir has Hindus, Buddhists and Muslims. Pakistani Kashmir is Muslim.

    , @Lurker
    @Anonymous

    Hindu or Buddhist I think.

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Anonymous

    Siddartha was the Buddha's first name, but then the Buddha came from a Hindu family.

  3. What does Ron Unz think of all this?

    • LOL: ic1000, Richard B
  4. These sorts of articles have been floating around for a good 30 years (at least) and are pretty cliche at this point. I can remember this sort of article appearing in the student newspaper when I was an undergrad, for god’s sake! And it reappears every four years, once one group has moved on and a new cohort has taken their place. “I was really against affirmative action in high school but now that I’m ensconced in the Ivy League I realize it has a lot of merits.”

    Of course the undergraduate population is not homogeneous: some still oppose affirmative action. For example people applying to med/law school are still against affirmative action (although they generally keep it to themselves.) But once they get in (if they get in) they think it’s the greatest thing since sliced bread.

    Once you’re in, the net effect of affirmative action is to make your degree even more exclusive.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @SimpleSong


    some still oppose affirmative action. For example people applying to med/law school are still against affirmative action
     
    Med school, grad school, job...they'll all be swimming against affirmative action until the day they retire.
    , @bomag
    @SimpleSong


    Once you’re in, the net effect of affirmative action is to make your degree even more exclusive.
     
    Problem here is that the corruption of AA drags the whole place down more than this added exclusivity.

    Sort of like being in favor of legalizing all drugs because it will make the sober even more valuable; but the junkies stay dysfunctional longer than you can enjoy the added solvency of sobriety.
  5. Interviewing the Asian students who did get into Yale is surely the most unbiased, objective, disinterested, impartial, equitable, and just all-around-fair way of getting totally trustworthy and authoritative takes on this ruling.

    Too bad not every upper-middle-class Asian-American kid has relatives in Kashmir they can visit as fodder for a Victim Narrative admissions essay.

    Articles like this one are undisguised trolling at this point.

    • Agree: Charon, ic1000, Gordo, Ben tillman
    • Thanks: Abe
    • LOL: Thulean Friend
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Is it trolling if you really believe the bs you're writing?

    Replies: @Richard B

  6. Once you’re in, obviously your incentives change. Who do you want for your competition? A bunch of high scoring Asians? Or some affirmative action admittees to make up the bottom half of the grade curve?

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @Elli
    @Gimeiyo

    There is no bottom half of the grade curve at Yale.

    Gentleman's A's all around.

  7. Next week the New Duranty Times will interview lottery winners on the value of state lotteries.

    • Thanks: Mr McKenna, Charon
    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @anon

    Siddharth, what do you think about over-population? "Too many of you, and just the right amount of me".

    , @bomag
    @anon

    https://xkcd.com/1827/

  8. @Anonymous

    When Siddarth Shankar applied to Yale in 2017, he did not hesitate to identify himself as Asian-American, and wrote about how visiting family members in conflict-ridden Kashmir had shaped his worldview.
     
    This indicates that Siddarth indeed may have benefited from his ancestry and family history in gaining admission to Yale.

    If he is from Kashmir, would he be Hindu or Muslim?

    Replies: @anon, @Lurker, @YetAnotherAnon

    Siddarth may be Buddhist or Hindu. Shankar is a Hindu name. Indian Kashmir has Hindus, Buddhists and Muslims. Pakistani Kashmir is Muslim.

  9. >here’s what students think
    Meaning here’s some replies we have carefully curated to prove we are right about everything.
    >Asians
    >First guy is named Siddarth
    Sigh.
    >When Siddarth Nahasapidapedlam applied, he didn’t let anyone know that he was Asian.
    Sighing intensifies.
    I got that far.

  10. By Anemona Hartocollis and Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio

    The first one sounds like a species of plant, the second like an Irish-Italian-Mexican version of Bruce Springsteen. Or Kamala Harris.

    Where do they find these people?

    Anemona Hartocollis = Hormonal escalation.

    Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio = I’m colluding in a deletion role.

    • LOL: Chrisnonymous
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    http://nyc19.nytimes-institute.com/author/giulia-mcdonnell-nieto-del-rio/

    , @International Jew
    @Reg Cæsar

    It's a nice name actually. Anemona means "wind" (think of a breeze blowing through her long thick dark hair as she stands, dressed in a thin white gown, on a balcony overlooking the harbor of Santorini). Hartocollis might mean "bread grower".

    Replies: @jon

    , @Mousey
    @Reg Cæsar

    Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio

    Giulia = Julie McDonnell (real name)
    Nieto del Rio = Grandson of the River (name included in diversity application)
    Maybe a trans name and its all made up.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    , @mmack
    @Reg Cæsar

    I broke out laughing reading the author's names. I honestly thought the first author was named Ammonia, and was stunned "Julia's" parents didn't see fit to give the poor dear a hyphen in that twenty foot long last name. I mean it's the living, breathing human equivalent of Monty Python's JohannGambolputty skit:

    https://youtu.be/yYMRjnM6j6w

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @Reg Cæsar

    Reg-meet Giulia:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1196918762810859520/7phgrxUG.jpg

    Reg-meet Anemona:

    https://penntoday.upenn.edu/sites/default/files/images/Times-story.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    Would an Anemone by any other name smell as, you know, you know the thing

  11. OT
    Just read that Biden repeated third grade. Has there ever been a president who was held back in grade school ?

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Bernard

    You have to be pretty dense or very immature to be held back and forced to repeat a grade. However, Biden is both dense and immature. Considering how goofy he is, I can't imagine what he must have been like as a third grader.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    , @Hibernian
    @Bernard

    There have probably been a few who should have been.

    , @Muggles
    @Bernard

    "Come on, Man!"

    , @Duke84
    @Bernard

    I'm not sure but Andrew Johnson never went to school a day in his life.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  12. I recently finished reading a book on Japan’s war against China during the 30’s before WWII proper had gotten kicked off. Americans have had a long quasi-love affair with the Chinese, and so Japan’s pre-War depredations generated quite a bit of negative publicity in the U.S. among both intelligentsia and general public. Hemingway and his wife at the time toured the Nationalist-held parts of China but did not come away more sympathetic as a result, largely thanks to the almost medieval levels of grinding poverty they encountered among the common people. I can’t help think this must also have played a role in making 1940’s State Dept. China hands more sympathetic to Mao and the Communists than they otherwise should have been. Why involve yourself in the struggle for a free China if it’s only to bring back the same bastards who created and then callously sustained such massive human misery in the first place?

    Another anecdote from a different war- at great effort and expense the U.S. Army tried to replicate its own gleaming new air mobile (helicopter) forces among the soldiers of South Vietnam. And yet what happened when these elite troops met their first trial by fire?- they dropped their rifles and then proceeded to use their helicopters as a means to extort money from civilians wanting to flee the fire zone.

    Which is to say such grasping, corrupt, bereft of any social solidarity/I-got-mine-sucks-to-you behavior among the nation of high-IQ peasants demographic is about as old as General Tso’s orange chicken recipe (not that American whites are much better).

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @Abe


    so Japan’s pre-War depredations generated quite a bit of negative publicity in the U.S.
     
    Generated as in organically or generated as in being the view elitists wanted retailed?
    , @Fun To Do Bad Things
    @Abe


    I recently finished reading a book on Japan’s war against China during the 30’s before WWII proper had gotten kicked off.
     
    What was the book?

    Replies: @Abe

    , @Hibernian
    @Abe


    I can’t help think this must also have played a role in making 1940’s State Dept. China hands more sympathetic to Mao and the Communists than they otherwise should have been.
     
    Sure. It couldn't have been that they were left leaning to begin with.

    Replies: @Abe

    , @I, Mudd
    @Abe

    "the almost medieval levels of grinding poverty they encountered among the common people"

    Yup. A relative of mine served in a Superfortress unit during WWII. Some of the stories he told me were astonishing. The guys in that unit Iiterally travelled around the world by the time they got home.

    I have a copy of the "unit book" that officers would put together when they got back. When I look through the book it's like things hadn't changed much in rural Chine for about 500 years.

    It turns out the Bangor, Maine public library scanned a copy of this unit book. The webpage includes the book's Dedication under the description in the listing; it's quite moving.

    Search for: A Pictorial History of the 444th Bombardment Group. Should come up on a library server.

  13. about as old as General Tso’s orange chicken

    Leave the President, his age, and his hair out of this.

  14. @Anonymous

    When Siddarth Shankar applied to Yale in 2017, he did not hesitate to identify himself as Asian-American, and wrote about how visiting family members in conflict-ridden Kashmir had shaped his worldview.
     
    This indicates that Siddarth indeed may have benefited from his ancestry and family history in gaining admission to Yale.

    If he is from Kashmir, would he be Hindu or Muslim?

    Replies: @anon, @Lurker, @YetAnotherAnon

    Hindu or Buddhist I think.

  15. @Abe
    I recently finished reading a book on Japan’s war against China during the 30’s before WWII proper had gotten kicked off. Americans have had a long quasi-love affair with the Chinese, and so Japan’s pre-War depredations generated quite a bit of negative publicity in the U.S. among both intelligentsia and general public. Hemingway and his wife at the time toured the Nationalist-held parts of China but did not come away more sympathetic as a result, largely thanks to the almost medieval levels of grinding poverty they encountered among the common people. I can’t help think this must also have played a role in making 1940’s State Dept. China hands more sympathetic to Mao and the Communists than they otherwise should have been. Why involve yourself in the struggle for a free China if it’s only to bring back the same bastards who created and then callously sustained such massive human misery in the first place?

    Another anecdote from a different war- at great effort and expense the U.S. Army tried to replicate its own gleaming new air mobile (helicopter) forces among the soldiers of South Vietnam. And yet what happened when these elite troops met their first trial by fire?- they dropped their rifles and then proceeded to use their helicopters as a means to extort money from civilians wanting to flee the fire zone.

    Which is to say such grasping, corrupt, bereft of any social solidarity/I-got-mine-sucks-to-you behavior among the nation of high-IQ peasants demographic is about as old as General Tso’s orange chicken recipe (not that American whites are much better).

    Replies: @Lurker, @Fun To Do Bad Things, @Hibernian, @I, Mudd

    so Japan’s pre-War depredations generated quite a bit of negative publicity in the U.S.

    Generated as in organically or generated as in being the view elitists wanted retailed?

    • Thanks: Mr McKenna
  16. @Abe
    I recently finished reading a book on Japan’s war against China during the 30’s before WWII proper had gotten kicked off. Americans have had a long quasi-love affair with the Chinese, and so Japan’s pre-War depredations generated quite a bit of negative publicity in the U.S. among both intelligentsia and general public. Hemingway and his wife at the time toured the Nationalist-held parts of China but did not come away more sympathetic as a result, largely thanks to the almost medieval levels of grinding poverty they encountered among the common people. I can’t help think this must also have played a role in making 1940’s State Dept. China hands more sympathetic to Mao and the Communists than they otherwise should have been. Why involve yourself in the struggle for a free China if it’s only to bring back the same bastards who created and then callously sustained such massive human misery in the first place?

    Another anecdote from a different war- at great effort and expense the U.S. Army tried to replicate its own gleaming new air mobile (helicopter) forces among the soldiers of South Vietnam. And yet what happened when these elite troops met their first trial by fire?- they dropped their rifles and then proceeded to use their helicopters as a means to extort money from civilians wanting to flee the fire zone.

    Which is to say such grasping, corrupt, bereft of any social solidarity/I-got-mine-sucks-to-you behavior among the nation of high-IQ peasants demographic is about as old as General Tso’s orange chicken recipe (not that American whites are much better).

    Replies: @Lurker, @Fun To Do Bad Things, @Hibernian, @I, Mudd

    I recently finished reading a book on Japan’s war against China during the 30’s before WWII proper had gotten kicked off.

    What was the book?

    • Replies: @Abe
    @Fun To Do Bad Things


    What was the book?
     
    WAR IN THE FAR EAST, by Peter Harmsen. I got it as a Kindle cheapie (for $4 or less) and would not recommend paying any more for it, simply because you can read Wikipedia and get almost the same level of detail.

    It does have various tidbits that I enjoyed learning, however. One was how Germany (i.e. Hitler)- needing any ally it could get- supported the Nationalist Chinese through most of the 30’s, right until the Berlin-Rome-Tokyo Axis finally came together. This went as far as sending military advisers and military supplies- on Wikipedia you can find photos of Nationalist Chinese troops wearing stormtrooper-style stahlhelm’s.

    Replies: @Templar

  17. Most Asians support AA because they are major beneficiaries of it in the workplace, small business loans etc. That monetary compensation makes discrimination at Ivies less of an issue if you can go to a “public Ivy” like Berkeley/UVA/UW/UMich instead.

    The major losers of AA are Gentile Whites.

    • Agree: West reanimator
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Thulean Friend


    Most Asians support AA because they are major beneficiaries of it in the workplace, small business loans etc.
     
    How can this be legal?
  18. @Reg Cæsar

    By Anemona Hartocollis and Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio
     
    The first one sounds like a species of plant, the second like an Irish-Italian-Mexican version of Bruce Springsteen. Or Kamala Harris.

    Where do they find these people?

    Anemona Hartocollis = Hormonal escalation.

    Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio = I'm colluding in a deletion role.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @International Jew, @Mousey, @mmack, @Bardon Kaldian, @Anonymous

  19. “ Most Asians support AA because they are major beneficiaries of it in the workplace, small business loans etc. ”

    Chinese in California and NY are very opposed to AA, as they are harmed the most by it.

    I don’t think businesses under 50 employees do AA other than (1) required by local governments (2) required by larger corporations, of which Wal-Mart is an especially bad actor (3) they do PR work. All in that might be 10% of small businesses.

    As for minority business loans, they certainly should be abolished. But if you think that is a factor in the success of asian small businesses, tell me how big the program is per year.

    Indians dominate cheap motels because they work hard and use their chain migrating relatives as cheap labor, not because of minority business loans. And really, this is America, the private sector is not exactly stingy with loans.

  20. @Thulean Friend
    Most Asians support AA because they are major beneficiaries of it in the workplace, small business loans etc. That monetary compensation makes discrimination at Ivies less of an issue if you can go to a "public Ivy" like Berkeley/UVA/UW/UMich instead.

    The major losers of AA are Gentile Whites.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Most Asians support AA because they are major beneficiaries of it in the workplace, small business loans etc.

    How can this be legal?

  21. But if you interview black Yale students they will surely say that Yale discriminates against them.

    • Agree: Mr McKenna
  22. @Bernard
    OT
    Just read that Biden repeated third grade. Has there ever been a president who was held back in grade school ?

    Replies: @Anon, @Hibernian, @Muggles, @Duke84

    You have to be pretty dense or very immature to be held back and forced to repeat a grade. However, Biden is both dense and immature. Considering how goofy he is, I can’t imagine what he must have been like as a third grader.

    • Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Anon

    I can't imagine anyone is held back in the third grade.
    Has this story been verified?

  23. Ammonia Horticulture (my daily microaggression) wrote both the news story on this that followed the initial Reuters piece as well as this story, which reads more like an op-ed. It’s like the news department has set up a separate op-ed branch to compete with the real op-ed department.

  24. Successful asians don’t want to be around too many other asians. Diminishes the brand. They want to be the chosen asian. To hell with the rest of them.

    I used to be in the headhunting business. I young Chinese lady turned down a job I had arranged for her because when she went to visit the hiring manager she saw a room full of Chinese. No thanks she said. In her mind the job was low status because the department was full of Chinese.

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
    @Daniel H

    I knew a recruiter (old WASP, breeding but not much money) who used to recruit for NJ Big Pharma and Tech.

    Told me her job was basically to import yuge numbers of H1Bs from India. Project managers from, get this, Nigeria.

    True story, but dated. Must have been the early aughts. Is this shit still going on?

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    , @Russ
    @Daniel H


    Successful asians don’t want to be around too many other asians. Diminishes the brand. They want to be the chosen asian. To hell with the rest of them.
     
    And that's it: The brand.

    Recall that #MeToo successfully scored Harvey Weinstein's scalp, but, once Corey Haim or Feldman began calling out the Hollywood homosexuals and pedophiles, there went the energy out of #MeToo.

    Likewise, the cancel-the-slaveowner kick this summer scored Woodrow Wilson's scalp at Princeton, but, once Tucker Carlson began calling out Old Yale for his slaveownery, there went the energy out of this renaming kick.

    Still, Yale's brand has taken a hit. So, with this latest DOJ action, the alarms are sounding to circle the wagons, and damned if Asian-American Yale grads don't know that crystal-clearly.
  25. @Reg Cæsar

    By Anemona Hartocollis and Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio
     
    The first one sounds like a species of plant, the second like an Irish-Italian-Mexican version of Bruce Springsteen. Or Kamala Harris.

    Where do they find these people?

    Anemona Hartocollis = Hormonal escalation.

    Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio = I'm colluding in a deletion role.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @International Jew, @Mousey, @mmack, @Bardon Kaldian, @Anonymous

    It’s a nice name actually. Anemona means “wind” (think of a breeze blowing through her long thick dark hair as she stands, dressed in a thin white gown, on a balcony overlooking the harbor of Santorini). Hartocollis might mean “bread grower”.

    • Replies: @jon
    @International Jew


    Anemona means “wind” (think of a breeze blowing through her long thick dark hair as she stands, dressed in a thin white gown, on a balcony overlooking the harbor of Santorini).
     
    Or in the harbor:
    https://cdn.reefs.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/11824256924_d90384d531_k.jpg

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  26. The remedy is obvious: Stop all government activity that involves a consideration of race, including especially all affirmative action and all anti-discrimination enforcement. End all subsidies to universities, including especially all support for student loans. Allow universities, as well as all private individuals, organizations and companies, to “discriminate” as they please.

  27. “Yale University is the kindest, bravest, warmest, most wonderful university I’ve ever known in my life.”

  28. @SimpleSong
    These sorts of articles have been floating around for a good 30 years (at least) and are pretty cliche at this point. I can remember this sort of article appearing in the student newspaper when I was an undergrad, for god's sake! And it reappears every four years, once one group has moved on and a new cohort has taken their place. "I was really against affirmative action in high school but now that I'm ensconced in the Ivy League I realize it has a lot of merits."

    Of course the undergraduate population is not homogeneous: some still oppose affirmative action. For example people applying to med/law school are still against affirmative action (although they generally keep it to themselves.) But once they get in (if they get in) they think it's the greatest thing since sliced bread.

    Once you're in, the net effect of affirmative action is to make your degree even more exclusive.

    Replies: @International Jew, @bomag

    some still oppose affirmative action. For example people applying to med/law school are still against affirmative action

    Med school, grad school, job…they’ll all be swimming against affirmative action until the day they retire.

  29. Anemona Hartocollis and Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio

    Is it just me, or a lot of these journalists and pundits in the NYT have strange or unusual names? Or are they pseudonyms, or are they trolling us? It’s not the first time I notice this, usually if it’s not an obvious Jewish name (Goldfeld, etc) it’s an unusual name. Anemona is nice, but why not Amoeba?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Dumbo

    Anemona Hartocollis of the NYT has been an iSteve favorite for some time:

    https://www.unz.com/?s=Anemona&Action=Search&authors=steve-sailer&ptype=isteve

    But the strapping blonde Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio is new.

  30. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Interviewing the Asian students who did get into Yale is surely the most unbiased, objective, disinterested, impartial, equitable, and just all-around-fair way of getting totally trustworthy and authoritative takes on this ruling.

    Too bad not every upper-middle-class Asian-American kid has relatives in Kashmir they can visit as fodder for a Victim Narrative admissions essay.

    Articles like this one are undisguised trolling at this point.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    Is it trolling if you really believe the bs you’re writing?

    • LOL: bomag
    • Replies: @Richard B
    @Redneck farmer


    Is it trolling if you really believe the bs you’re writing?
     
    No. It's sincere delusion.
  31. @International Jew
    @Reg Cæsar

    It's a nice name actually. Anemona means "wind" (think of a breeze blowing through her long thick dark hair as she stands, dressed in a thin white gown, on a balcony overlooking the harbor of Santorini). Hartocollis might mean "bread grower".

    Replies: @jon

    Anemona means “wind” (think of a breeze blowing through her long thick dark hair as she stands, dressed in a thin white gown, on a balcony overlooking the harbor of Santorini).

    Or in the harbor:

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @jon

    This reminds me of an old Dilbert

    https://imgur.com/6QnYbeO

  32. I knew a legacy Yalie who was miserable because she couldn’t get a decent job despite having a Yale degree. It seems actual talent still matters in some walks of real life. Her mistake was not setting her sights on government service or big finance and instead trying to go into tech with no real aptitude for tech, figuring a Yale degree would be golden there too.

  33. The girl in the clip is ridiculous but doesn’t realise it. Is it that easy to inculcate young women into cults?

    • Replies: @anon
    @Altai

    The girl in the clip is ridiculous but doesn’t realise it.

    She is a special snowflake, totally unique, just like many, many others in her age group.

    Is it that easy to inculcate young women into cults?

    Yes.
    Group think is powerful, in-group preference is powerful, etc.

    , @Kinda Salty
    @Altai

    She is ridiculous. It is an abuse of the English language to say that seeing a Confederate flag is an “atrocity” — who says such a thing? If that’s an atrocity, then she’s lived a very pampered life so far!

    It’s irritating to see some of the most privileged people on the planet (young, affluent Americans from mostly decent upbringings) getting bent out of shape over minor indignities such as “microagressions”. What will these people do when life actually gets hard as it does for everyone, eventually? She’s at Yale, why not have a sense of gratitude and see it as a massive opportunity and gobble up all the knowledge, social contacts, etc. that it has to offer? Snowflake indeed.

    Replies: @Menes

  34. Nature.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-02367-5
    Five tips for boosting diversity on campus
    Universities and those who work there must reimagine spaces, behaviour and processes to promote a sense of belonging for everyone, say Danielle McCullough and Ruth Gotian.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-02181-z
    US geoscience programmes drop controversial admissions test
    A standardized exam is under fire amid claims that it perpetuates bias and exclusion.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-01883-8
    What Black scientists want from colleagues and their institutions
    Frustrated and exhausted by systemic racism in the science community, Black researchers outline steps for action.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-01920-6
    The time tax put on scientists of colour
    The pressure on researchers from ethnic minority groups to participate in campus diversity issues comes at a cost.

    https://www.nature.com/collections/qsgnpdtgbr
    Achieving diversity in Research

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-02288-3
    ‘It’s like we’re going back 30 years’: how the coronavirus is gutting diversity in science
    The pandemic is sabotaging the careers of researchers from under-represented groups, but institutions can help to staunch the outflow.

    • Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Altai


    Nature.
     
    Absolutely unreal. And people here think we're on the verge of turning all of this around.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Russ, @Ben tillman, @lavoisier

  35. @anon
    Next week the New Duranty Times will interview lottery winners on the value of state lotteries.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @bomag

    Siddharth, what do you think about over-population? “Too many of you, and just the right amount of me”.

    • Agree: Mr McKenna, bomag
  36. All you have to do to gain an advantage for your kids is to circle Hispanic in the elementary school application… They’ll be set for college applications down the road and no verification needed.

  37. @Dumbo

    Anemona Hartocollis and Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio
     
    Is it just me, or a lot of these journalists and pundits in the NYT have strange or unusual names? Or are they pseudonyms, or are they trolling us? It's not the first time I notice this, usually if it's not an obvious Jewish name (Goldfeld, etc) it's an unusual name. Anemona is nice, but why not Amoeba?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Anemona Hartocollis of the NYT has been an iSteve favorite for some time:

    https://www.unz.com/?s=Anemona&Action=Search&authors=steve-sailer&ptype=isteve

    But the strapping blonde Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio is new.

  38. Funny that the NYT didn’t have an Asian-American contribute to writing the article regarding Asians at Yale. For the NYT, Asians must be some exotic group that is sometimes heard about, but yet remain on the whole totally uninteresting, compared to say, other minorities that really count and carry weight in society as a whole.

  39. @jon
    @International Jew


    Anemona means “wind” (think of a breeze blowing through her long thick dark hair as she stands, dressed in a thin white gown, on a balcony overlooking the harbor of Santorini).
     
    Or in the harbor:
    https://cdn.reefs.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/11824256924_d90384d531_k.jpg

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    This reminds me of an old Dilbert

    View post on imgur.com

  40. @Altai
    Nature.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-02367-5
    Five tips for boosting diversity on campus
    Universities and those who work there must reimagine spaces, behaviour and processes to promote a sense of belonging for everyone, say Danielle McCullough and Ruth Gotian.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-02181-z
    US geoscience programmes drop controversial admissions test
    A standardized exam is under fire amid claims that it perpetuates bias and exclusion.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-01883-8
    What Black scientists want from colleagues and their institutions
    Frustrated and exhausted by systemic racism in the science community, Black researchers outline steps for action.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-01920-6
    The time tax put on scientists of colour
    The pressure on researchers from ethnic minority groups to participate in campus diversity issues comes at a cost.

    https://www.nature.com/collections/qsgnpdtgbr
    Achieving diversity in Research

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-02288-3
    ‘It’s like we’re going back 30 years’: how the coronavirus is gutting diversity in science
    The pandemic is sabotaging the careers of researchers from under-represented groups, but institutions can help to staunch the outflow.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Nature.

    Absolutely unreal. And people here think we’re on the verge of turning all of this around.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    New Scientist is the same, alas, has been for more than a decade. Sumit Paul-Choudhury, pretty woke himself, was succeeded by Emily Wilson, a Chemistry grad who, like Sunit, chose after graduation to write about science rather than do it.

    https://images.newscientist.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/31150316/emily-wilson-by-david-levene-e1517422243631.jpg

    , @Russ
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder




    Nature.
     

     
    Absolutely unreal. And people here think we’re on the verge of turning all of this around.
     
    We have yet to hit bottom.

    Plowing through all that in every issue of Nature has grown wearisome.
    , @Ben tillman
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    No, I don’t believe anyone here thinks we’re on the verge of turning things around.

    , @lavoisier
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Nature is woke too. Sad. Very sad.

  41. @Anon
    @Bernard

    You have to be pretty dense or very immature to be held back and forced to repeat a grade. However, Biden is both dense and immature. Considering how goofy he is, I can't imagine what he must have been like as a third grader.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    I can’t imagine anyone is held back in the third grade.
    Has this story been verified?

  42. @Reg Cæsar

    By Anemona Hartocollis and Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio
     
    The first one sounds like a species of plant, the second like an Irish-Italian-Mexican version of Bruce Springsteen. Or Kamala Harris.

    Where do they find these people?

    Anemona Hartocollis = Hormonal escalation.

    Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio = I'm colluding in a deletion role.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @International Jew, @Mousey, @mmack, @Bardon Kaldian, @Anonymous

    Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio

    Giulia = Julie McDonnell (real name)
    Nieto del Rio = Grandson of the River (name included in diversity application)
    Maybe a trans name and its all made up.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Mousey

    She's a J school grad student at Columbia, so I'd guess she's freelancing at the NYT. She gets published, and the NYT gets cheap SJW articles. Doesn't look like a tranny.

    http://www.globalcitizenspress.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/DSCF0811-683x1024.jpg

  43. When Siddarth Shankar applied to Yale in 2017, he did not hesitate to identify himself as Asian-American

    The alternative:

    “Name?”
    “Siddarth Shankar.”
    “Race?”
    “Prefer not to say.”

  44. The quotations certainly show that some dim buggers are admitted to Yale. I taught many MIT students in my time and only one was dim. Should I conclude MIT may well be a better university than Yale?

  45. The current Asian students need to let The NY Times readers know that they’ll play ball after the revolution.

  46. @Anonymous

    When Siddarth Shankar applied to Yale in 2017, he did not hesitate to identify himself as Asian-American, and wrote about how visiting family members in conflict-ridden Kashmir had shaped his worldview.
     
    This indicates that Siddarth indeed may have benefited from his ancestry and family history in gaining admission to Yale.

    If he is from Kashmir, would he be Hindu or Muslim?

    Replies: @anon, @Lurker, @YetAnotherAnon

    Siddartha was the Buddha’s first name, but then the Buddha came from a Hindu family.

  47. I’m sure the Asian Yale students they interviewed were a really representative sample.

  48. @Bernard
    OT
    Just read that Biden repeated third grade. Has there ever been a president who was held back in grade school ?

    Replies: @Anon, @Hibernian, @Muggles, @Duke84

    There have probably been a few who should have been.

  49. @Abe
    I recently finished reading a book on Japan’s war against China during the 30’s before WWII proper had gotten kicked off. Americans have had a long quasi-love affair with the Chinese, and so Japan’s pre-War depredations generated quite a bit of negative publicity in the U.S. among both intelligentsia and general public. Hemingway and his wife at the time toured the Nationalist-held parts of China but did not come away more sympathetic as a result, largely thanks to the almost medieval levels of grinding poverty they encountered among the common people. I can’t help think this must also have played a role in making 1940’s State Dept. China hands more sympathetic to Mao and the Communists than they otherwise should have been. Why involve yourself in the struggle for a free China if it’s only to bring back the same bastards who created and then callously sustained such massive human misery in the first place?

    Another anecdote from a different war- at great effort and expense the U.S. Army tried to replicate its own gleaming new air mobile (helicopter) forces among the soldiers of South Vietnam. And yet what happened when these elite troops met their first trial by fire?- they dropped their rifles and then proceeded to use their helicopters as a means to extort money from civilians wanting to flee the fire zone.

    Which is to say such grasping, corrupt, bereft of any social solidarity/I-got-mine-sucks-to-you behavior among the nation of high-IQ peasants demographic is about as old as General Tso’s orange chicken recipe (not that American whites are much better).

    Replies: @Lurker, @Fun To Do Bad Things, @Hibernian, @I, Mudd

    I can’t help think this must also have played a role in making 1940’s State Dept. China hands more sympathetic to Mao and the Communists than they otherwise should have been.

    Sure. It couldn’t have been that they were left leaning to begin with.

    • Replies: @Abe
    @Hibernian


    Sure. It couldn’t have been that they were left leaning to begin with.
     
    Sure they were left-leaning to begin with. But wouldn’t you be tempted to be left-leaning yourself (if only just a little) if the status quo ante- i.e. “conservative”- option was simply restoring to the top of an immense pyramid of human misery a bunch of heartless, grasping Empress Tiger moms along the lines of Madame Chiang (maybe the only national leader, as Mr. Derbyshire has pointed out, to have urged the use of nuclear weapons against her own people) or Madame Ngo (different country but same type- whose cackling glee over the famous self-immolation of a Buddhist monk in Saigon makes Hillary Clinton and her gloating over the downfall of Khadafi seem like Marie Kondo by comparison)?

    Replies: @Hibernian

  50. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Altai


    Nature.
     
    Absolutely unreal. And people here think we're on the verge of turning all of this around.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Russ, @Ben tillman, @lavoisier

    New Scientist is the same, alas, has been for more than a decade. Sumit Paul-Choudhury, pretty woke himself, was succeeded by Emily Wilson, a Chemistry grad who, like Sunit, chose after graduation to write about science rather than do it.

  51. @Fun To Do Bad Things
    @Abe


    I recently finished reading a book on Japan’s war against China during the 30’s before WWII proper had gotten kicked off.
     
    What was the book?

    Replies: @Abe

    What was the book?

    WAR IN THE FAR EAST, by Peter Harmsen. I got it as a Kindle cheapie (for $4 or less) and would not recommend paying any more for it, simply because you can read Wikipedia and get almost the same level of detail.

    It does have various tidbits that I enjoyed learning, however. One was how Germany (i.e. Hitler)- needing any ally it could get- supported the Nationalist Chinese through most of the 30’s, right until the Berlin-Rome-Tokyo Axis finally came together. This went as far as sending military advisers and military supplies- on Wikipedia you can find photos of Nationalist Chinese troops wearing stormtrooper-style stahlhelm’s.

    • Replies: @Templar
    @Abe

    Hitler sent weapons and advisers to support the Abyssinians *against* Mussolini's Fascists Armies!
    Hitler was OG Antifa!

  52. @Daniel H
    Successful asians don't want to be around too many other asians. Diminishes the brand. They want to be the chosen asian. To hell with the rest of them.

    I used to be in the headhunting business. I young Chinese lady turned down a job I had arranged for her because when she went to visit the hiring manager she saw a room full of Chinese. No thanks she said. In her mind the job was low status because the department was full of Chinese.

    Replies: @Jane Plain, @Russ

    I knew a recruiter (old WASP, breeding but not much money) who used to recruit for NJ Big Pharma and Tech.

    Told me her job was basically to import yuge numbers of H1Bs from India. Project managers from, get this, Nigeria.

    True story, but dated. Must have been the early aughts. Is this shit still going on?

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Jane Plain


    Is this shit still going on?
     
    Yes.

    The Troy-Parsippany area is totally overrun with Pajeets.

    Replies: @Jane Plain

  53. @Reg Cæsar

    By Anemona Hartocollis and Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio
     
    The first one sounds like a species of plant, the second like an Irish-Italian-Mexican version of Bruce Springsteen. Or Kamala Harris.

    Where do they find these people?

    Anemona Hartocollis = Hormonal escalation.

    Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio = I'm colluding in a deletion role.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @International Jew, @Mousey, @mmack, @Bardon Kaldian, @Anonymous

    I broke out laughing reading the author’s names. I honestly thought the first author was named Ammonia, and was stunned “Julia’s” parents didn’t see fit to give the poor dear a hyphen in that twenty foot long last name. I mean it’s the living, breathing human equivalent of Monty Python’s JohannGambolputty skit:

  54. @Altai
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KPVJgnCEqT0

    The girl in the clip is ridiculous but doesn't realise it. Is it that easy to inculcate young women into cults?

    Replies: @anon, @Kinda Salty

    The girl in the clip is ridiculous but doesn’t realise it.

    She is a special snowflake, totally unique, just like many, many others in her age group.

    Is it that easy to inculcate young women into cults?

    Yes.
    Group think is powerful, in-group preference is powerful, etc.

  55. @Daniel H
    Successful asians don't want to be around too many other asians. Diminishes the brand. They want to be the chosen asian. To hell with the rest of them.

    I used to be in the headhunting business. I young Chinese lady turned down a job I had arranged for her because when she went to visit the hiring manager she saw a room full of Chinese. No thanks she said. In her mind the job was low status because the department was full of Chinese.

    Replies: @Jane Plain, @Russ

    Successful asians don’t want to be around too many other asians. Diminishes the brand. They want to be the chosen asian. To hell with the rest of them.

    And that’s it: The brand.

    Recall that #MeToo successfully scored Harvey Weinstein’s scalp, but, once Corey Haim or Feldman began calling out the Hollywood homosexuals and pedophiles, there went the energy out of #MeToo.

    Likewise, the cancel-the-slaveowner kick this summer scored Woodrow Wilson’s scalp at Princeton, but, once Tucker Carlson began calling out Old Yale for his slaveownery, there went the energy out of this renaming kick.

    Still, Yale’s brand has taken a hit. So, with this latest DOJ action, the alarms are sounding to circle the wagons, and damned if Asian-American Yale grads don’t know that crystal-clearly.

  56. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Altai


    Nature.
     
    Absolutely unreal. And people here think we're on the verge of turning all of this around.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Russ, @Ben tillman, @lavoisier

    Nature.

    Absolutely unreal. And people here think we’re on the verge of turning all of this around.

    We have yet to hit bottom.

    Plowing through all that in every issue of Nature has grown wearisome.

  57. This Asian Yale student went on to say, “Maybe some of my ex-friends who didn’t get into Yale think Yale discriminates, but I don’t talk to those losers anymore. I have much higher-class Yale Man friends to talk to now.

    And that’s how the progressive echo ruining our country got created. If Biden gets elected, maybe the right will form their own Antifa and burn down Yale. BLM created the precedent. Destroy your oppressors symbols of oppression.

  58. NYT’s “news” section

    always get a chuckle out of that

    Of course the people WHO GOT IN weren’t discriminated against.

    Jesus, so stupid

  59. @Hibernian
    @Abe


    I can’t help think this must also have played a role in making 1940’s State Dept. China hands more sympathetic to Mao and the Communists than they otherwise should have been.
     
    Sure. It couldn't have been that they were left leaning to begin with.

    Replies: @Abe

    Sure. It couldn’t have been that they were left leaning to begin with.

    Sure they were left-leaning to begin with. But wouldn’t you be tempted to be left-leaning yourself (if only just a little) if the status quo ante- i.e. “conservative”- option was simply restoring to the top of an immense pyramid of human misery a bunch of heartless, grasping Empress Tiger moms along the lines of Madame Chiang (maybe the only national leader, as Mr. Derbyshire has pointed out, to have urged the use of nuclear weapons against her own people) or Madame Ngo (different country but same type- whose cackling glee over the famous self-immolation of a Buddhist monk in Saigon makes Hillary Clinton and her gloating over the downfall of Khadafi seem like Marie Kondo by comparison)?

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Abe

    I've lived in Chicago for a little over 40 years and I've never believed that the existence of poverty was proof of the righteousness of Marxism.

  60. #1619 Hannah Nicole Jones is laying down the law: White-adjacent uppity Asians better remember that Blacks take priority:

    Look at the outcomes for Black descendants of American slavery compared to every other group, and with the exception Indigenous Americans, we are at the absolute bottom. It’s OK to acknowledge/advocate for specific solutions for that while joining forces for other equity efforts.

    Most Asian Americans arrived in this country after the end of legal segregation and discrimination, thanks to the Black resistance struggle. Yale has direct ties to slavery. Further, the DOJ is not going after the segregated and unequal schools that Black children attend.

    If Ivys and universities like UNC Chapel Hill really want to get around these cynical affirmative action complaints, they should just create a special admissions program for descendants of American slavery. This would be a *legacy* admission policy, and therefore, not race-based.

    It would also force colleges to be serious about admitting the people for whom affirmative action programs were actually created: Native-born Black descendants of slavery.

    Today I’ve learned the extent to which people of color whose families immigrated to America will All Lives Matter the singular experience of Black Americans whose ancestors were enslaved HERE all while expecting Black Americans to advocate for all. It’s been a lesson.

    • Replies: @anon
    @syonredux

    WhooEee! She mad! Better watch out! And keep away from the storm drains, too.

    https://s3.amazonaws.com/digitaltrends-uploads-prod/2015/05/pennywise-it.jpg

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @syonredux

    https://youtu.be/iFme5QgpJxo

    , @Menes
    @syonredux


    White-adjacent uppity Asians
     
    Racially (since it is all about race with guys), east and southeast asians (the great majority of asian-americans) are "native american-adjacent" not white-adjacent.

    Replies: @syonredux

  61. @Altai
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KPVJgnCEqT0

    The girl in the clip is ridiculous but doesn't realise it. Is it that easy to inculcate young women into cults?

    Replies: @anon, @Kinda Salty

    She is ridiculous. It is an abuse of the English language to say that seeing a Confederate flag is an “atrocity” — who says such a thing? If that’s an atrocity, then she’s lived a very pampered life so far!

    It’s irritating to see some of the most privileged people on the planet (young, affluent Americans from mostly decent upbringings) getting bent out of shape over minor indignities such as “microagressions”. What will these people do when life actually gets hard as it does for everyone, eventually? She’s at Yale, why not have a sense of gratitude and see it as a massive opportunity and gobble up all the knowledge, social contacts, etc. that it has to offer? Snowflake indeed.

    • Replies: @Menes
    @Kinda Salty


    It is an abuse of the English language to say that seeing a Confederate flag is an “atrocity” — who says such a thing?
     
    Germany and Austria say 'such a thing' about the Nazi flag. As do Russia and France. And a number of other countries in Europe. They banned Hitler's banner:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post%E2%80%93World_War_II_legality_of_Nazi_flags


    Hitler wanted to do to the slavs what was done to native americans (genocide and land grab) and black americans (enslavement). Would that be an atrocity in your book or not?

    Replies: @bomag

  62. @syonredux
    https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1000118161574977536/MJ-FExjk_400x400.jpg



    #1619 Hannah Nicole Jones is laying down the law: White-adjacent uppity Asians better remember that Blacks take priority:

    Look at the outcomes for Black descendants of American slavery compared to every other group, and with the exception Indigenous Americans, we are at the absolute bottom. It’s OK to acknowledge/advocate for specific solutions for that while joining forces for other equity efforts.
     
    https://twitter.com/nhannahjones/status/1294412586356793345

    Most Asian Americans arrived in this country after the end of legal segregation and discrimination, thanks to the Black resistance struggle. Yale has direct ties to slavery. Further, the DOJ is not going after the segregated and unequal schools that Black children attend.

     

    https://twitter.com/nhannahjones/status/1294011155636199431

    If Ivys and universities like UNC Chapel Hill really want to get around these cynical affirmative action complaints, they should just create a special admissions program for descendants of American slavery. This would be a *legacy* admission policy, and therefore, not race-based.
     
    https://twitter.com/nhannahjones/status/1294263294178594816

    It would also force colleges to be serious about admitting the people for whom affirmative action programs were actually created: Native-born Black descendants of slavery.
     
    https://twitter.com/nhannahjones/status/1294264054815563776

    Today I’ve learned the extent to which people of color whose families immigrated to America will All Lives Matter the singular experience of Black Americans whose ancestors were enslaved HERE all while expecting Black Americans to advocate for all. It’s been a lesson.

     

    https://twitter.com/nhannahjones/status/1294409114114830342

    Replies: @anon, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Menes

    WhooEee! She mad! Better watch out! And keep away from the storm drains, too.

  63. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Altai


    Nature.
     
    Absolutely unreal. And people here think we're on the verge of turning all of this around.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Russ, @Ben tillman, @lavoisier

    No, I don’t believe anyone here thinks we’re on the verge of turning things around.

  64. @Bernard
    OT
    Just read that Biden repeated third grade. Has there ever been a president who was held back in grade school ?

    Replies: @Anon, @Hibernian, @Muggles, @Duke84

    “Come on, Man!”

  65. @Abe
    I recently finished reading a book on Japan’s war against China during the 30’s before WWII proper had gotten kicked off. Americans have had a long quasi-love affair with the Chinese, and so Japan’s pre-War depredations generated quite a bit of negative publicity in the U.S. among both intelligentsia and general public. Hemingway and his wife at the time toured the Nationalist-held parts of China but did not come away more sympathetic as a result, largely thanks to the almost medieval levels of grinding poverty they encountered among the common people. I can’t help think this must also have played a role in making 1940’s State Dept. China hands more sympathetic to Mao and the Communists than they otherwise should have been. Why involve yourself in the struggle for a free China if it’s only to bring back the same bastards who created and then callously sustained such massive human misery in the first place?

    Another anecdote from a different war- at great effort and expense the U.S. Army tried to replicate its own gleaming new air mobile (helicopter) forces among the soldiers of South Vietnam. And yet what happened when these elite troops met their first trial by fire?- they dropped their rifles and then proceeded to use their helicopters as a means to extort money from civilians wanting to flee the fire zone.

    Which is to say such grasping, corrupt, bereft of any social solidarity/I-got-mine-sucks-to-you behavior among the nation of high-IQ peasants demographic is about as old as General Tso’s orange chicken recipe (not that American whites are much better).

    Replies: @Lurker, @Fun To Do Bad Things, @Hibernian, @I, Mudd

    “the almost medieval levels of grinding poverty they encountered among the common people”

    Yup. A relative of mine served in a Superfortress unit during WWII. Some of the stories he told me were astonishing. The guys in that unit Iiterally travelled around the world by the time they got home.

    I have a copy of the “unit book” that officers would put together when they got back. When I look through the book it’s like things hadn’t changed much in rural Chine for about 500 years.

    It turns out the Bangor, Maine public library scanned a copy of this unit book. The webpage includes the book’s Dedication under the description in the listing; it’s quite moving.

    Search for: A Pictorial History of the 444th Bombardment Group. Should come up on a library server.

  66. @Redneck farmer
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Is it trolling if you really believe the bs you're writing?

    Replies: @Richard B

    Is it trolling if you really believe the bs you’re writing?

    No. It’s sincere delusion.

  67. @Abe
    @Hibernian


    Sure. It couldn’t have been that they were left leaning to begin with.
     
    Sure they were left-leaning to begin with. But wouldn’t you be tempted to be left-leaning yourself (if only just a little) if the status quo ante- i.e. “conservative”- option was simply restoring to the top of an immense pyramid of human misery a bunch of heartless, grasping Empress Tiger moms along the lines of Madame Chiang (maybe the only national leader, as Mr. Derbyshire has pointed out, to have urged the use of nuclear weapons against her own people) or Madame Ngo (different country but same type- whose cackling glee over the famous self-immolation of a Buddhist monk in Saigon makes Hillary Clinton and her gloating over the downfall of Khadafi seem like Marie Kondo by comparison)?

    Replies: @Hibernian

    I’ve lived in Chicago for a little over 40 years and I’ve never believed that the existence of poverty was proof of the righteousness of Marxism.

  68. @Abe
    @Fun To Do Bad Things


    What was the book?
     
    WAR IN THE FAR EAST, by Peter Harmsen. I got it as a Kindle cheapie (for $4 or less) and would not recommend paying any more for it, simply because you can read Wikipedia and get almost the same level of detail.

    It does have various tidbits that I enjoyed learning, however. One was how Germany (i.e. Hitler)- needing any ally it could get- supported the Nationalist Chinese through most of the 30’s, right until the Berlin-Rome-Tokyo Axis finally came together. This went as far as sending military advisers and military supplies- on Wikipedia you can find photos of Nationalist Chinese troops wearing stormtrooper-style stahlhelm’s.

    Replies: @Templar

    Hitler sent weapons and advisers to support the Abyssinians *against* Mussolini’s Fascists Armies!
    Hitler was OG Antifa!

  69. @Mousey
    @Reg Cæsar

    Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio

    Giulia = Julie McDonnell (real name)
    Nieto del Rio = Grandson of the River (name included in diversity application)
    Maybe a trans name and its all made up.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    She’s a J school grad student at Columbia, so I’d guess she’s freelancing at the NYT. She gets published, and the NYT gets cheap SJW articles. Doesn’t look like a tranny.

  70. @Jane Plain
    @Daniel H

    I knew a recruiter (old WASP, breeding but not much money) who used to recruit for NJ Big Pharma and Tech.

    Told me her job was basically to import yuge numbers of H1Bs from India. Project managers from, get this, Nigeria.

    True story, but dated. Must have been the early aughts. Is this shit still going on?

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    Is this shit still going on?

    Yes.

    The Troy-Parsippany area is totally overrun with Pajeets.

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Pajeets I know about; the Nigerian project manager boom I did not.

  71. Keep in mind that this is the NYT reporting. Their purpose here is to separate the Asians from the whites, which is why they are only printing the opinions of a few carefully selected Asians. That way, they can make the claim in the future that this issue is only among bitter whites who hate diversity and that there is not really a problem.

    Why would they take that angle? Simple: They have become an anti-white publication and having Asians and whites standing in solidarity on an issue is not a pattern that they would like see repeated on the future. It complicates the vilification. Also, Orange Man Bad!

    • Replies: @Clytemnestra
    @C. Aption

    My thoughts exactly. NYT is blocking Trump's last ditch effort to make a dog-whistle appeal to the White Base he threw under the bus after they swept him into the Oval Office. He did it a little too brown by encouraging his justice department to persecute even the most harmless Pro White activists and tweeted impotently about "monitoring the situation" as his own White supporters were deplatformed and banned from the internet.

    I guess lumping the most obvious Anti-White discrimination with that allegedly against Asians (though I don't see it) is supposed to give his big orange behind some cover.

    This is a waste of time; his and ours. Asians know what time it is and Whites are the American Dalits. They will not want to be lumped with them in any discrimination suit.

    The only thing Trump has going for him with Whites right now is the antics of BLM and Antifa, if that. The Republicans are the same de-balled feckless wonders they have always been and the only defense left against the batshit crazy Democrat left.

    IF Whites come out to vote it will depend on which party can scare them more into voting their way; either way it does not advance them one iota.

  72. @syonredux
    https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1000118161574977536/MJ-FExjk_400x400.jpg



    #1619 Hannah Nicole Jones is laying down the law: White-adjacent uppity Asians better remember that Blacks take priority:

    Look at the outcomes for Black descendants of American slavery compared to every other group, and with the exception Indigenous Americans, we are at the absolute bottom. It’s OK to acknowledge/advocate for specific solutions for that while joining forces for other equity efforts.
     
    https://twitter.com/nhannahjones/status/1294412586356793345

    Most Asian Americans arrived in this country after the end of legal segregation and discrimination, thanks to the Black resistance struggle. Yale has direct ties to slavery. Further, the DOJ is not going after the segregated and unequal schools that Black children attend.

     

    https://twitter.com/nhannahjones/status/1294011155636199431

    If Ivys and universities like UNC Chapel Hill really want to get around these cynical affirmative action complaints, they should just create a special admissions program for descendants of American slavery. This would be a *legacy* admission policy, and therefore, not race-based.
     
    https://twitter.com/nhannahjones/status/1294263294178594816

    It would also force colleges to be serious about admitting the people for whom affirmative action programs were actually created: Native-born Black descendants of slavery.
     
    https://twitter.com/nhannahjones/status/1294264054815563776

    Today I’ve learned the extent to which people of color whose families immigrated to America will All Lives Matter the singular experience of Black Americans whose ancestors were enslaved HERE all while expecting Black Americans to advocate for all. It’s been a lesson.

     

    https://twitter.com/nhannahjones/status/1294409114114830342

    Replies: @anon, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Menes

  73. Anon[168] • Disclaimer says:

    DOJ needs to look into Stanford’s discrimination against whites. Whites are now down to 32% in the 2019 admission cycle, and 23% Asian. How long before whites go below 30%?

    Leland Stanford is probably rolling in his grave. He made his fortune from railroad…built by Chinese laborers. Something tells me he didn’t build the school for the descendants and kinsmen of those laborers.

    • Replies: @Menes
    @Anon


    Whites are now down to 32% in the 2019 admission cycle, and 23% Asian. How long before whites go below 30%?
     
    Take away legacy, sports and athletics based admissions and whites would already be less than 25% at Stanford and the Ivy League. Just search for Lacrosse teams in Google Images for example. Or Swimming teams. Or Skiing teams. Or Ice Curling teams. Or....
  74. @Reg Cæsar

    By Anemona Hartocollis and Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio
     
    The first one sounds like a species of plant, the second like an Irish-Italian-Mexican version of Bruce Springsteen. Or Kamala Harris.

    Where do they find these people?

    Anemona Hartocollis = Hormonal escalation.

    Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio = I'm colluding in a deletion role.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @International Jew, @Mousey, @mmack, @Bardon Kaldian, @Anonymous

    Reg-meet Giulia:

    Reg-meet Anemona:

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Reg-meet Giulia:
     
    Oh, I will. At Buffalo Joe's, for pasta.

    (Haven't seen Jefferson here in awhile, but if it's OK with Joe, we can invite him. I'm not Italian, but our home neighborhood was, and some of it rubbed off.)
  75. @Bernard
    OT
    Just read that Biden repeated third grade. Has there ever been a president who was held back in grade school ?

    Replies: @Anon, @Hibernian, @Muggles, @Duke84

    I’m not sure but Andrew Johnson never went to school a day in his life.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Duke84



    Just read that Biden repeated third grade. Has there ever been a president who was held back in grade school ?
     
    I’m not sure but Andrew Johnson never went to school a day in his life.

     

    Millard Fillmore was taught in a one-room schoolhouse by his future wife. She founded the White House library. Don't write off her smarts.
  76. Blacks believe in a big tent…..

    But Marlon Hill, a Miami-Dade County commission candidate, said he considers himself African-American and Jamaican. He said Harris, who attended historically Black Howard University and was a member of the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority, “appeals to the broadest definition of Blackness in America in 2020. When you think of someone who is Black, you can think of their heritage, of the state that they’re from, [and] you have to think of their parents or the school that they went to. Being Black is not singular in America in 2020.”

    https://www.politico.com/news/2020/08/15/kamala-harris-west-indian-voters-395554

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @syonredux


    Blacks believe in a big tent…..
     
    But if the tent's a-rockin', don't come a-knockin'.



    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/08/13/16/31909002-8623781-image-m-50_1597334238747.jpg
  77. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Reg Cæsar

    Reg-meet Giulia:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1196918762810859520/7phgrxUG.jpg

    Reg-meet Anemona:

    https://penntoday.upenn.edu/sites/default/files/images/Times-story.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Reg-meet Giulia:

    Oh, I will. At Buffalo Joe’s, for pasta.

    (Haven’t seen Jefferson here in awhile, but if it’s OK with Joe, we can invite him. I’m not Italian, but our home neighborhood was, and some of it rubbed off.)

  78. @syonredux
    Blacks believe in a big tent.....

    But Marlon Hill, a Miami-Dade County commission candidate, said he considers himself African-American and Jamaican. He said Harris, who attended historically Black Howard University and was a member of the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority, “appeals to the broadest definition of Blackness in America in 2020. When you think of someone who is Black, you can think of their heritage, of the state that they’re from, [and] you have to think of their parents or the school that they went to. Being Black is not singular in America in 2020.”
     
    https://www.politico.com/news/2020/08/15/kamala-harris-west-indian-voters-395554

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Blacks believe in a big tent…..

    But if the tent’s a-rockin’, don’t come a-knockin’.

  79. @Duke84
    @Bernard

    I'm not sure but Andrew Johnson never went to school a day in his life.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Just read that Biden repeated third grade. Has there ever been a president who was held back in grade school ?

    I’m not sure but Andrew Johnson never went to school a day in his life.

    Millard Fillmore was taught in a one-room schoolhouse by his future wife. She founded the White House library. Don’t write off her smarts.

  80. @Gimeiyo
    Once you're in, obviously your incentives change. Who do you want for your competition? A bunch of high scoring Asians? Or some affirmative action admittees to make up the bottom half of the grade curve?

    Replies: @Elli

    There is no bottom half of the grade curve at Yale.

    Gentleman’s A’s all around.

  81. @Reg Cæsar

    By Anemona Hartocollis and Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio
     
    The first one sounds like a species of plant, the second like an Irish-Italian-Mexican version of Bruce Springsteen. Or Kamala Harris.

    Where do they find these people?

    Anemona Hartocollis = Hormonal escalation.

    Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio = I'm colluding in a deletion role.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @International Jew, @Mousey, @mmack, @Bardon Kaldian, @Anonymous

    Would an Anemone by any other name smell as, you know, you know the thing

  82. You know, Asians who actually get into Yale definitely ain’t dumb. I’m sure they are self-aware enough to know how they could have lost their shot via affirmative action. (The males anyway; the broads are much more likely to be true-believer SJWs.) But when the Grey Lady comes knocking to ask you to profess your fealty to la regle du jeu, what are you gonna do, tell the truth like an idjit?

  83. @SimpleSong
    These sorts of articles have been floating around for a good 30 years (at least) and are pretty cliche at this point. I can remember this sort of article appearing in the student newspaper when I was an undergrad, for god's sake! And it reappears every four years, once one group has moved on and a new cohort has taken their place. "I was really against affirmative action in high school but now that I'm ensconced in the Ivy League I realize it has a lot of merits."

    Of course the undergraduate population is not homogeneous: some still oppose affirmative action. For example people applying to med/law school are still against affirmative action (although they generally keep it to themselves.) But once they get in (if they get in) they think it's the greatest thing since sliced bread.

    Once you're in, the net effect of affirmative action is to make your degree even more exclusive.

    Replies: @International Jew, @bomag

    Once you’re in, the net effect of affirmative action is to make your degree even more exclusive.

    Problem here is that the corruption of AA drags the whole place down more than this added exclusivity.

    Sort of like being in favor of legalizing all drugs because it will make the sober even more valuable; but the junkies stay dysfunctional longer than you can enjoy the added solvency of sobriety.

  84. @anon
    Next week the New Duranty Times will interview lottery winners on the value of state lotteries.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @bomag

  85. @C. Aption
    Keep in mind that this is the NYT reporting. Their purpose here is to separate the Asians from the whites, which is why they are only printing the opinions of a few carefully selected Asians. That way, they can make the claim in the future that this issue is only among bitter whites who hate diversity and that there is not really a problem.

    Why would they take that angle? Simple: They have become an anti-white publication and having Asians and whites standing in solidarity on an issue is not a pattern that they would like see repeated on the future. It complicates the vilification. Also, Orange Man Bad!

    Replies: @Clytemnestra

    My thoughts exactly. NYT is blocking Trump’s last ditch effort to make a dog-whistle appeal to the White Base he threw under the bus after they swept him into the Oval Office. He did it a little too brown by encouraging his justice department to persecute even the most harmless Pro White activists and tweeted impotently about “monitoring the situation” as his own White supporters were deplatformed and banned from the internet.

    I guess lumping the most obvious Anti-White discrimination with that allegedly against Asians (though I don’t see it) is supposed to give his big orange behind some cover.

    This is a waste of time; his and ours. Asians know what time it is and Whites are the American Dalits. They will not want to be lumped with them in any discrimination suit.

    The only thing Trump has going for him with Whites right now is the antics of BLM and Antifa, if that. The Republicans are the same de-balled feckless wonders they have always been and the only defense left against the batshit crazy Democrat left.

    IF Whites come out to vote it will depend on which party can scare them more into voting their way; either way it does not advance them one iota.

  86. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Jane Plain


    Is this shit still going on?
     
    Yes.

    The Troy-Parsippany area is totally overrun with Pajeets.

    Replies: @Jane Plain

    Pajeets I know about; the Nigerian project manager boom I did not.

  87. “Maybe some of my ex-friends who didn’t get into Yale think Yale discriminates, but I don’t talk to those losers anymore. I have much higher-class Yale Man friends to talk to now.”

    Wow. And that passes for meritocratic excellence today.

    For sure the guy needs a course in ethics.

  88. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Altai


    Nature.
     
    Absolutely unreal. And people here think we're on the verge of turning all of this around.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Russ, @Ben tillman, @lavoisier

    Nature is woke too. Sad. Very sad.

  89. @Kinda Salty
    @Altai

    She is ridiculous. It is an abuse of the English language to say that seeing a Confederate flag is an “atrocity” — who says such a thing? If that’s an atrocity, then she’s lived a very pampered life so far!

    It’s irritating to see some of the most privileged people on the planet (young, affluent Americans from mostly decent upbringings) getting bent out of shape over minor indignities such as “microagressions”. What will these people do when life actually gets hard as it does for everyone, eventually? She’s at Yale, why not have a sense of gratitude and see it as a massive opportunity and gobble up all the knowledge, social contacts, etc. that it has to offer? Snowflake indeed.

    Replies: @Menes

    It is an abuse of the English language to say that seeing a Confederate flag is an “atrocity” — who says such a thing?

    Germany and Austria say ‘such a thing’ about the Nazi flag. As do Russia and France. And a number of other countries in Europe. They banned Hitler’s banner:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post%E2%80%93World_War_II_legality_of_Nazi_flags

    Hitler wanted to do to the slavs what was done to native americans (genocide and land grab) and black americans (enslavement). Would that be an atrocity in your book or not?

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Menes


    Would that be an atrocity in your book or not?
     
    You can't just string comparisons together and expect someone to accept your conclusion.
  90. @syonredux
    https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1000118161574977536/MJ-FExjk_400x400.jpg



    #1619 Hannah Nicole Jones is laying down the law: White-adjacent uppity Asians better remember that Blacks take priority:

    Look at the outcomes for Black descendants of American slavery compared to every other group, and with the exception Indigenous Americans, we are at the absolute bottom. It’s OK to acknowledge/advocate for specific solutions for that while joining forces for other equity efforts.
     
    https://twitter.com/nhannahjones/status/1294412586356793345

    Most Asian Americans arrived in this country after the end of legal segregation and discrimination, thanks to the Black resistance struggle. Yale has direct ties to slavery. Further, the DOJ is not going after the segregated and unequal schools that Black children attend.

     

    https://twitter.com/nhannahjones/status/1294011155636199431

    If Ivys and universities like UNC Chapel Hill really want to get around these cynical affirmative action complaints, they should just create a special admissions program for descendants of American slavery. This would be a *legacy* admission policy, and therefore, not race-based.
     
    https://twitter.com/nhannahjones/status/1294263294178594816

    It would also force colleges to be serious about admitting the people for whom affirmative action programs were actually created: Native-born Black descendants of slavery.
     
    https://twitter.com/nhannahjones/status/1294264054815563776

    Today I’ve learned the extent to which people of color whose families immigrated to America will All Lives Matter the singular experience of Black Americans whose ancestors were enslaved HERE all while expecting Black Americans to advocate for all. It’s been a lesson.

     

    https://twitter.com/nhannahjones/status/1294409114114830342

    Replies: @anon, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Menes

    White-adjacent uppity Asians

    Racially (since it is all about race with guys), east and southeast asians (the great majority of asian-americans) are “native american-adjacent” not white-adjacent.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Menes


    White-adjacent uppity Asians

    Racially (since it is all about race with guys), east and southeast asians (the great majority of asian-americans) are “native american-adjacent” not white-adjacent.
     
    That's not how Blacks see it......


    http://constructingmodernknowledge.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Hannah-Jones-square-for-site-circle.jpg
  91. @Anon
    DOJ needs to look into Stanford's discrimination against whites. Whites are now down to 32% in the 2019 admission cycle, and 23% Asian. How long before whites go below 30%?

    Leland Stanford is probably rolling in his grave. He made his fortune from railroad...built by Chinese laborers. Something tells me he didn't build the school for the descendants and kinsmen of those laborers.

    Replies: @Menes

    Whites are now down to 32% in the 2019 admission cycle, and 23% Asian. How long before whites go below 30%?

    Take away legacy, sports and athletics based admissions and whites would already be less than 25% at Stanford and the Ivy League. Just search for Lacrosse teams in Google Images for example. Or Swimming teams. Or Skiing teams. Or Ice Curling teams. Or….

  92. @Menes
    @syonredux


    White-adjacent uppity Asians
     
    Racially (since it is all about race with guys), east and southeast asians (the great majority of asian-americans) are "native american-adjacent" not white-adjacent.

    Replies: @syonredux

    White-adjacent uppity Asians

    Racially (since it is all about race with guys), east and southeast asians (the great majority of asian-americans) are “native american-adjacent” not white-adjacent.

    That’s not how Blacks see it……

  93. This is about an (Asian) Indian who *became* “black” –

  94. @Menes
    @Kinda Salty


    It is an abuse of the English language to say that seeing a Confederate flag is an “atrocity” — who says such a thing?
     
    Germany and Austria say 'such a thing' about the Nazi flag. As do Russia and France. And a number of other countries in Europe. They banned Hitler's banner:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post%E2%80%93World_War_II_legality_of_Nazi_flags


    Hitler wanted to do to the slavs what was done to native americans (genocide and land grab) and black americans (enslavement). Would that be an atrocity in your book or not?

    Replies: @bomag

    Would that be an atrocity in your book or not?

    You can’t just string comparisons together and expect someone to accept your conclusion.

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