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From the New York Times news section:

How the Biden Administration Can Help Solve Our Reality Crisis

These steps, experts say, could prod more people to abandon the scourge of hoaxes and lies.

By Kevin Roose

Kevin Roose is a technology columnist for The Times, and the host of the “Rabbit Hole” podcast. His column, “The Shift,” examines the intersection of technology, business, and culture. You can find him on Twitter, LinkedIn, or Instagram. @kevinroose • Facebook
Feb. 2, 2021

Hoaxes, lies and collective delusions aren’t new, but the extent to which millions of Americans have embraced them may be. Thirty percent of Republicans have a favorable view of QAnon, according to a recent YouGov poll. According to other polls, more than 70 percent of Republicans believe Mr. Trump legitimately won the election, and 40 percent of Americans — including plenty of Democrats — believe the baseless theory that Covid-19 was manufactured in a Chinese lab.

This got almost no publicity, but in a survey, over 30% of Democrats blamed violence at the Mostly Peaceful Protests on white supremacists.

The muddled, chaotic information ecosystem that produces these misguided beliefs doesn’t just jeopardize some lofty ideal of national unity. It actively exacerbates our biggest national problems, and creates more work for those trying to solve them. And it raises an important question for the Biden administration: How do you unite a country in which millions of people have chosen to create their own version of reality?

In the past year alone, we have seen conspiracy theorists cause Covid-19 vaccine delays, sabotage a wildfire response and engineer a false election fraud narrative.

We have also seen that if left unchecked, networked conspiracy theories and online disinformation campaigns can lead to offline violence, as they did during last month’s deadly Capitol riot.

We’ve seen anti-white conspiracy theorists riot hundreds of times and cause thousands of extra murders as part of processing George Floyd’s death. But that’s not news fit to print.

I’ve spent the past several years reporting on our national reality crisis, and I worry that unless the Biden administration treats conspiracy theories and disinformation as the urgent threats they are, our parallel universes will only drift further apart, and the potential for violent unrest and civic dysfunction will only grow. …

Several experts I spoke with recommended that the Biden administration put together a cross-agency task force to tackle disinformation and domestic extremism, which would be led by something like a “reality czar.”

It sounds a little dystopian, I’ll grant. But let’s hear them out. …

This task force could also meet regularly with tech platforms, and push for structural changes that could help those companies tackle their own extremism and misinformation problems. (For example, it could formulate “safe harbor” exemptions that would allow platforms to share data about QAnon and other conspiracy theory communities with researchers and government agencies without running afoul of privacy laws.) And it could become the tip of the spear for the federal government’s response to the reality crisis. …

While we are drawing from Russian examples of good statecraft, how about a secret police force/army like the Soviet Union’s MVD? Of course, the Biden Administration’s MVD would have to be staffed like the DMV …

 
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  1. Neoconned says:

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.france24.com/en/asia-pacific/20210203-who-covid-19-investigation-team-visits-chinese-virus-lab-in-wuhan

    This dude is a dumb a**……

    Even the WHO is seriously considering the possibility it escaped from a Chinese lab…..or hell that it was released by our spooks in wuhan by our spooks…..

    • Agree: ben tillman, Kronos, Cato
    • Thanks: Coemgen
    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Desiderius
    , @SMK
    , @HA
    , @Richard B
  2. JohnnyD says:

    How long until we have Woke reeducation camps?

  3. The fact that they would equate the lab origins hypothesis for COVID-19–which is the most parsimonious explanation of how this pandemic began 1000 miles from where the host species lives without any trace– with QAnon shows you that this piece is in itself pure disinformation.

  4. Anon[334] • Disclaimer says:

    40 percent of Americans — including plenty of Democrats — believe the baseless theory that Covid-19 was manufactured in a Chinese lab.

    There is a concerted effort to dismiss the idea of a lab escape to be a conspiracy theory or baseless. Many of the experts who declare it baseless are either affiliated with the lab, or seem terrified that their grant money for Gain of Function research is going to dry up.

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @R.G. Camara
    , @Dumbo
  5. Is the Iraqi Information Minister from 2003 available? Because that guy was great.

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • LOL: black sea
    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  6. Well here we are with a glimpse of the future.

    A reality czar to crack down on verifiably false conspiracy theories in an effort to help educate the public and strengthen our democracy……

    Oh and we will add anything related to race as well. We know that none of it is real because our establishment paid scientists have voted in unison that only a racist would study such things. The science has spoken!

  7. CCZ says:

    “unless the Biden administration treats conspiracy theories and disinformation as the urgent threats they are”

    So that is the continuing “security mission” of the National Guard in Washington, D.C.

    “The U.S. Department of Defense has asked Illinois to assist federal and local agencies in this continued effort….I am ready to ensure that the state of Illinois continues its proud legacy of protecting our democracy. Ultimately, we must root out the dark forces of racism, white supremacy and disinformation that have created this moment….” Illinois Governor Pritzker said in a statement.

    https://chicago.suntimes.com/politics/2021/1/28/22254777/pritzker-illinois-national-guard-washington-capitol-homeland-security-heightened-threat-environment

    • Replies: @Forbes
  8. Alfa158 says:

    “While we are drawing from Russian examples of good statecraft, how about a secret police force/army like the Soviet Union’s MVD?”
    Maybe I’m inferring too much, but isn’t that exactly where he is going with this?

  9. Rob McX says:

    About the author Kevin Roose, from Wikipedia:

    Roose wrote The Unlikely Disciple while undercover at Liberty University, aiming to explore the culture of life at a fundamental Evangelical university. Roose, raised in a secular and liberal environment, wanted to better understand conservative Christian culture.

    He obviously has no concept of irony.

  10. This got almost no publicity, but in a survey, over 30% of Democrats blamed violence at the Mostly Peaceful Protests on white supremacists.

    I think the fraction of cable news readers that thinks so is higher.While we are drawing from Russian examples of good statecraft, how about a secret police force/army like the Soviet Union’s MVD? Of course, the Biden Administration’s MVD would have to be staffed like the DMV …

    Palindrome Wednesday?

    Seriously, the BWLM force would have to have these departments:
    1. Enforcer in charge of Don’t. Touch. My. Hair.
    2. National Uh-Huh coordinator.
    3. Office of Empowerment.
    4. Isn’t Stacey Abrams Gorgeous doubters hunt down and kill task force.
    5. Department of Hair.
    6. …
    taking suggestions

  11. Anonymous[710] • Disclaimer says:

    Carrying on the War on Whiteness (Classics front) once led by Donna Zuckerberg … From the New York Times Magazine:

    Steve,

    It is a war on Whites, not on “whiteness.” Don’t do your enemy’s bidding by trying to whitewash it.

    We’ve seen anti-white conspiracy theorists riot hundreds of times and cause thousands of extra murders as part of processing George Floyd’s death. But that’s not news fit to print.

    “White” should be capitalized.

    • Troll: Corvinus
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  12. Rebunga says:

    The Ministry of Truth has a nice ring to it. Where have I heard that before?

    • Replies: @tyrone
    , @Seneca44
  13. Kevin Roose is a technology columnist for The Times

    Kevin Roose = Evokes iron.

  14. Several experts I spoke with recommended that the Biden administration put together a cross-agency task force to tackle disinformation and domestic extremism, which would be led by something like a “reality czar.”

    Who better to put together a cross-agency task force to tackle disinformation and domestic extremism than Joe Biden, who at the start of his campaign said he felt he had to run because Trump called Neo-Nazis and white supremacists “fine people,” one of the most divisive and easily disproven hoaxes in the history of hoaxes. Biden also promoted such idiotic hoaxes as the claims that “Trump told people to drink bleach” and “Trump called veterans losers and suckers.” Biden also claimed information about his son Hunter’s collecting payoffs from foreign nations was “typical of Russian disinformation.”

    If Biden puts together such a task force, I suggest he appoint Adam Schiff to lead it, and he could be assisted by equally impartial truth-seekers such as Andrew Weissman, Jerry Nadler, Stephen Colbert, Marc Elias, John Weaver, Rob Reiner, George Conway, Jim Carrey, Maxine Waters, and Alec Baldwin.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    , @anon
  15. Looking forward to the first report from the reality Czar’s office, The Protocols of the Elders of White Supremacy.

    Also, doesn’t a Tsar need a Rasputin to really get some heat going? That shit don’t stir itself. Who’s the best choice Dr. Sharpton or Dr. Farrakhan?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  16. @415 reasons

    The fact that is was published in the New York Times and pertains to domestic politics shows you that it’s pure disinformation.

    • Agree: Hypnotoad666
    • Replies: @Polistra
  17. Lot says:
    @Anon

    Of all the wet markets on China, it was a complete coincidence that Covid19 first broke out at the one walking distance from China’s largest virus laboratory, which was focused on coronaviruses and had long been criticized for sloppy safety procedures!

    That’s the second time I have seen the lab escape referred to in the MSM as a crazy conspiracy theory lately.

    Evidence for the theory has been respectfully summarized by NY Mag, Washington Post, NY Post etc.

    The WaPo article was bizarre in that it is a “fact check” saying a WIV accidental release is “doubtful” in the headline and conclusion paragraph, but with the article itself pouring forth tons of evidence for this, and little contrary evidence:

    https://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/fact-check-was-the-new-coronavirus-accidentally-released-from-a-wuhan-lab-its-doubtful/

    The tactic by commies and their American stooges seems to be ignoring the evidence of accidental release and attacking the strawman of a bioweapon.

    NY Mag’s big article:

    https://nymag.com/intelligencer/article/coronavirus-lab-escape-theory.html

    “There is a reasonable chance that what we are dealing with is the result of a lab accident,” Alina Chan, a scientist at Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, told Baker in July.”

  18. From the New York Times news section:

    How the Biden Administration Can Help Solve Our Reality Crisis

    These steps, experts say,

    As soon as you say “expert”, you have gone from news to opinion.

    • Agree: Hypnotoad666
    • Troll: Corvinus
  19. Sean says:

    The Czarist model is not the one they have in mind.

  20. There’s no need for a “reality czar” if the courts are willing to back up a campaign of intimidation-by-lawsuit. The NY Post and Newsmax, which for a while provided useful information on the election of 2020, are now desperately running for cover.

    The “running for cover” is almost literally correct; “walking towards cover” certainly is. As the Post reports…
    https://nypost.com/2021/02/03/newsmax-anchor-leaves-interview-with-my-pillows-mike-lindell/

    Note how the NY Post has adopted “baseless” and “unfounded” as mandatory epithets to be attached to any mention of election fraud, and the verbs “spew” and “spout” as mandatory substitutes for “say” when referring to the utterances of disapproved persons.

  21. anon[977] • Disclaimer says:

    In order for this to work a Ministry of Information will be required.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @wren
  22. Hoaxes, lies and collective delusions aren’t new, but the extent to which millions of Americans have embraced them may be. Thirty percent of Republicans have a favorable view of QAnon, according to a recent YouGov poll.

    According to other polls, more than 70 percent of Republicans believe Mr. Trump legitimately won the election, and

    40 percent of Americans — including plenty of Democrats — believe the baseless theory that Covid-19 was manufactured in a Chinese lab.

    That’s three lies right there.

    Having a favorable opinion of QAnon doesn’t mean you’re being fooled or are lying or are deluded. It usually means YOU DON’T KNOW WHAT THE HELL IT IS, but you think it supports your candidate, so . . . .

    No one has bothered to prove that Trump didn’t legitimately win the election. Until that happens, no one is lying or deluded.

    You have to be a moron or a shameless liar to assert that the “theory” (i.e., hypothesis supported by evidence) that the CV was manufactured in a Chinese lab is baseless. Is there any OTHER theory?

    • Replies: @RVS
  23. In the past year alone, we have seen conspiracy theorists cause Covid-19 vaccine delays, sabotage a wildfire response and engineer a false election fraud narrative.

    In the past year alone, we have seen The Fucking Lancet publish fake science about HCQ just to hurt Trump and his supporters at the expense of thousands of lives.

  24. Thoughts says:

    I know enough military white males to staff an NVKD. It’s always been a huge fallacy on the right that white men in the military are natural conservatives. I was pleasantly shocked that Trump got a standing ovation at West Point. The most virulent ‘Punch a Nazi’ I know in real life is a West Point grad. And yes, he is VERY scary. I couldn’t imagine anyone I want farther from a gun…

    Remember how Princess Diana said “I always felt I was destined for something greater” I get that feeling from normal-at-first-appearance anti-white white males. They are waiting.

    And then there is Lloyd Austin…what a name…

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9221231/Pentagon-stumped-extremism-ranks-orders-stand-60-days.html

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    , @Anonymous
  25. I became intrigued with the idea that COVID-19 came from the Wuhan Institute for Virology upon reading this article last summer:

    https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/did-anthony-faucis-promotion-of-dangerous-research-help-create-the-covid-19-pandemic

    The theory seems more or less confirmed by recent reporting here:

    http://video.foxnews.com/v/6225847837001/

    • Agree: BB753
  26. @Anon

    “Baseless” is the new “debunked.”

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  27. Thoughts says:

    The other thing that I find upsetting is…

    I know more Liberals obsessed with QAnon then Conservatives.

    I’ve never read QAnon. Don’t know where to find him. Occasionally a snippet of something written will appear in a comment section, but it was always like “Well I hope it’s true…but that’s not how the real world works…nice dream though.”

    I can just see all my ex-liberal friends going “I bet Thoughts is one of those brainwashed QAnon People! Thoughts must be a lot crazier than I thought Thoughts was!’

    And I, the Conservative Trump supporter, am sitting here going …’Whaaa What ya talkin about!?”

    Qanon is like Bugaloo Boys. Exists only in the minds of Liberals.

    Tucker Carlsen is where most mainstream conservatives get their info. Then you have places like Zerohedge and in the past, Drudge. I don’t know any QAnon people.

  28. @Jack Armstrong

    Jack Dorsey.

    • Agree: El Dato
    • LOL: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @El Dato
  29. Anon[194] • Disclaimer says:
    @Neoconned

    Yes, things have really flipped on the Wuhan lab front. If by “manufactured in the Wuhan lab” it’s meant “subjected to serial ‘gain of function’ procedures” and if by “released” it’s meant “subjected to sloppy storage procedures,” then that’s the top theory at this point, and explains why the WHO team was in the lab yesterday. The wet market theory seems to have lost expert support, and nobody’s pushing a deliberate biowarfare angle either.

    This kind of broke into the open after the Vox-owned, progressive New York Magazine made a long story about it their print version cover story. They knew it was basically what Trump was saying all along, and they knew they’d get hammered on Twitter, so they had a fact checking team spend a month on it.

    At any rate, it’s a corker of an article, a true life mystery, written by a guy who is a novelist in his day gig, so it’s quite riveting. It’s long, but worth reading beginning to end. It’s infuriating to read all these scientists now saying, “Oh yeah, we thought it was the lab all along, but we kept our heads down to avoid being cancelled, and now that Trump’s gone nobody cares that much anymore.”

    The article:

    https://nymag.com/intelligencer/article/coronavirus-lab-escape-theory.html

    The editor’s note about the article:

    https://nymag.com/press/2021/01/on-the-cover-of-new-york-magazine-the-lab-leak-hypothesis.html

  30. Mr. Anon says:

    According to other polls, more than 70 percent of Republicans believe Mr. Trump legitimately won the election, and 40 percent of Americans — including plenty of Democrats — believe the baseless theory that Covid-19 was manufactured in a Chinese lab.

    The theory is not “baseless”. It may or may not be true. But it is not baseless.

    In the past year alone, we have seen conspiracy theorists cause Covid-19 vaccine delays, sabotage a wildfire response and engineer a false election fraud narrative.

    It is not a false narrative. It is an entirely plausible possibility.

    Kevin Roose is a smug, pretentious asshole who is not half as smart as he thinks he is. Douchebags like him think they define reality. They don’t.

    • Agree: Craig Nelsen
  31. Mr. Anon says:
    @R.G. Camara

    @Anon

    “Baseless” is the new “debunked.”

    Or “refuted”.

  32. @James Speaks

    taking suggestions

    A joint task force on nooses is a desideratum.

  33. @Lot

    Of all the wet markets on China, it was a complete coincidence that Covid19 first broke out at the one walking distance from China’s largest virus laboratory, which was focused on coronaviruses and had long been criticized for sloppy safety procedures!

    That wet market was a seafood market and there was no evidence that they were selling pangolins.

    https://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/fact-check-was-the-new-coronavirus-accidentally-released-from-a-wuhan-lab-its-doubtful/

    That was supposed to debunk the idea? Wow.

    No wonder the establishment hates free speech. Some of their arguments are so terrible that they become counter-productive.

  34. Bruno says:

    NYT is also at war with McKinsey. It writes articles against the management consulting firm on a recurrent basis. I suspect the reason is Mckisney directors (senior partners) are 500 people making on average 5M a year wich is more than partners at best law firms and equal to Goldman Sachs
    « partnership » are only 10% Danes and not 50% as is customary and expected in those circles.

    Despite them having occasionally some well known young recruits (like Chelsea Clinton), the process is really meritocratic. The person who cracks the cases while smiling nicely and being corporate fit is the one recruited .

    The process is so meritocratic that they often ends up with siblings at director level in the same city d’esprits them coming from no prominent family but just because of the genes and meritocracy.

    NYT had the same attacks against Princteton, wich is not a pure meritocratic environement, and the Ivy university quickly took more Danes in.

  35. Hoaxes, lies and collective delusions aren’t new, but the extent to which millions of Americans have embraced them may be.

    With that intro i thought for sure he was going after “George Floyd was killed.”

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  36. @Anon

    The MSM deceitfully places focus on the theory that the virus was created in the lab.

    The more likely scenario is that the virus was taken from an animal and then accidentally released from the lab.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @J.Ross
    , @Mr. Anon
  37. @ben tillman

    As soon as you say “expert”, you have gone from news to opinion.

    What exactly does their “expertise” consist of? Lavrenti Beria and Feliks Dzerzhinsky were also “experts”.

  38. @Thoughts

    Qanon isn’t what worries them. If anything Qanon is the excuse to give them what they really want which is to shut down websites like this one.

    Liberals are absolutely terrified of race being discussed openly.

    Years of college indoctrination can dissipate in an evening with the right article.

    The wiser liberals are also worried about losing their own officer corps.

    Racial discussions can demoralize activist liberals. It takes away their ability to believe that they are on the side of intellectual integrity. It can be very demoralizing to find out that your side is lying but you need to chin up and do it anyways for the cause. This after years of media and college indoctrination where you are told that only the right has to lie and deceive.

    We also see that they have no response once the jig is up. This is why they are so interested in censorship. In an open debate they really have nothing to stand on. I’ve been in debates where liberals become neurotic and start arguing with each other because they have no direction outside a controlled environment.

    • Agree: V. Hickel
  39. @Thoughts

    QAnon is a psyop, that’s why. The FBI is using GPS and facial recognition technology to identify everyone present at or near the Capitol Jan 6th. They claim Q helped provoke the riot. Yet we are supposed to believe the NSA is somehow incapable of finding the individual(s) responsible for starting the Q cult?

    I think the QAnon people mainly communicated through Facebook groups, discord chats, and youtube comments. Occasionally there were posts on 4chan but everyone made fun of it.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  40. @415 reasons

    When the left talks about a “reality” Czar, you have to remember that they believe reality is a “social construct.” Thus, “reality” to them is synonymous with social conformity, not objectively verifiable truth.

    In the objectively verifiable truth world you would establish the reality of a fair election by investigating and negating all the observed instances of fraud. For example, you would establish what Ruby Freeman was actually doing on the videotape that looks like she is running fake ballots through the scanner.

    In the “social construct” reality world, you just tell people to STFU about asking questions because “conspiracy theories.”

    In short, we need a “Reality Czar” to first teach the left what “reality” means. Then we can start to reach common ground.

  41. SafeNow says:

    We’ll also need a Czar of Common Sense. Fauci recently said two masks are better than one, because it’s only common sense. (Why didn’t Fauci possess common sense eight months ago? When did he acquire it? What was the trick, the life hack, to acquiring it?) This establishes “common sense” as a sufficient basis for policy decisions. It should be a cabinet-level position. Biden might pick Elon Musk, inventor of the cave-rescue submarine. Or Bill Gates, inventor of the thousand-dollar residential toilet for the third world.

    • Replies: @Travis
    , @Reg Cæsar
  42. @ben tillman

    As soon as you say “expert”, you have gone from news to opinion.

    Exactly right.

    And what about those “experts” who disagree with the NYT “experts”? Don’t worry about them, the NYT has experts to tell you which experts to believe. (Hint: it’s always the NYT experts who are right, those other experts are just misinformation experts. The NYT experts say so. And they must be right because they are, you know, experts.)

  43. Rob McX says:

    I’d say “Reality Czar” is a term we’ll hear a lot over the next few years, to the extent that its originator will regret coining it. It has an irresistibly sinister ring to it.

    • Agree: Kronos
  44. Kronos says:
    @JohnnyD

    Who’d pay for Woke re-education camps? Also, that sounds like competition to the schools.

    • LOL: Cato
    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
  45. @Thoughts

    I watched a documentary on the alleged Flat Earth cult. They literally couldn’t find a single person who really believes it. Everyone involved is either doing it ironically or pretending to believe to seem contrarian and interesting.

    The alleged Q cult seems the same. I’ve never seen an interview of an actual person who says they believe there is a guy named Q dropping prophetic but cryptic messages from inside the power elite. If the cult was widespread, you’d think they could find one actual believer.

    I think it’s mostly a lefty fever dream, like Russia Collusion or Systemic Racism.

  46. @Harry Baldwin

    ‘…If Biden puts together such a task force, I suggest he appoint Adam Schiff to lead it, and he could be assisted by equally impartial truth-seekers such as Andrew Weissman, Jerry Nadler, Stephen Colbert, Marc Elias, John Weaver, Rob Reiner, George Conway, Jim Carrey, Maxine Waters, and Alec Baldwin.’

    Be careful what you wish for.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  47. Kronos says:
    @John Johnson

    Qanon isn’t what worries them. If anything Qanon is the excuse to give them what they really want which is to shut down websites like this one.

    I think in a sense they do worry. MSM outlets have utterly trashed their own reputations especially over the last 20 years. Iraq War, The Great Recession, Hillary 2016, etc. The smart ones realize that the problem isn’t that most people believe Q/Trump over the MSM, it’s that Q/Trump have better credibility over the MSM.

    • Replies: @Tetra
    , @Corvinus
  48. @Morton's toes

    ‘Is the Iraqi Information Minister from 2003 available? Because that guy was great.’

    I have this theory that every President we’ve elected since Bush Sr. has managed to set a new low (yes, I think Trump was worse than Obama).

    Now, here’s my question. If, at this point, we elect the Iraqi Information Minister from 2003 to be President in 2024, would that continue the trend or break it?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  49. @JohnnyD

    You’re already in one.

    • Agree: bomag
  50. @Rob McX

    Also, anyone whose claim to expertise unironically uses “the intersection of” is ipso facto a charlatan.

  51. Sean says:

    David Icke was banned from Twitter for what he was saying about Covid-19. He was once a professional soccer player, but in his early twenties he developed rheumatoid arthritis, his ideas became ever outré, until he finally became the exponent of the most egregious conspiracy theories around.

    There is a lot of emerging science about the connection between activation of the immune system and mental derangement. Interestingly, Professor Bullmore in his book The Inflamed Mind specifically mentions rheumatoid arthritis as a paradigmic inflammatory disease causing pessimistic rumination, brain fog, and depression. Bulmore speculates that socially undesirable behavior, which I suppose may include expounding conspiracy theories, when one’s immune system is fighting a pathogen is a group selection adaptation to separate an infectious person person from the rest of their tribe. Maybe keeping them cackling away to themselves while on the internet in an unventilated basement serves the same function.

    More concretely, he suggests poor dental hygiene is an avoidable risk factor for inflammation. Are people in West Virginia with not very purty mouths and metabolic syndrome more likely to believe crazy stuff about the government? Perhaps one day governments will medicate political dissidents with large doses of aspirin or other NSAID, which may well reduce their propensity to accept conspiracy theories. Statins have been found to be anti inflammatory by the way.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    , @Dumbo
    , @Anon
  52. Dumbo says:
    @Anon

    I don’t know if Covid “came out of a lab”, but it seems at least a plausible explanation. It is certainly true that bat viruses were being studied, perhaps modified, around there.

    But at any rate what is clear is that in the future such things such as releases of pathogens (accidental or on purpose) will happen more and more, due to the growing studies being done with such organism and genetic modification. I guess at some point we will have a “bio-Chernobyl”.

    I think many people don’t realize the level of experimentation that is going on nowadays with such things. Viruses, transgenic animals producing human antibodies, even mRNA vaccines, which are not traditional “vaccines” at all and could be used to all kinds of purposes… It’s a veritable “Brave New World” of craziness out there, like the Island of Dr. Moreau. And a human rule is that, sooner or later, someone will screw up. Again, either by accident or on purpose.

    • Agree: El Dato
  53. anon[153] • Disclaimer says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    Who better to put together a cross-agency task force to tackle disinformation and domestic extremism than Joe Biden

    .
    Biden is a low functioning pot-plant . He wouldn’t know Arthur from Martha.

    • Agree: Bubba
    • LOL: James Speaks
    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @James Speaks
  54. wren says:
    @anon

    The Kurtzman on the door was named after Harvey Kurtzman who was a cartoonist and editor at Mad Magazine. Gilliam was a fan.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harvey_Kurtzman

    Gilliam was apparently thinking of calling that film 1984 1/2, which in our current 1984^2 society feels kind of quaint to me.

    The movie was written by Tom Stoppard. I just learned that he grew up thinking he had one Jewish grandparent and found out very late in life that he had four.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Jack D
  55. @wren

    My guess is that Stoppard intended “Brazil” to answer the question “What if ‘1984’ had been written by Waugh rather than by Orwell?”

    The year before “1984” was published Waugh wrote a satire on dystopian dictatorships, Scott-King’s Modern Europe and later wrote a sci-fi novel.

    • Thanks: wren, AKAHorace
    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Polistra
    , @Bill Jones
  56. Polistra says:
    @Moral Stone

    The fact that it was published in the New York Times and pertains to domestic politics shows you that it’s pure disinformation.

    FTFY

    • Agree: Adam Smith, Bubba
  57. Tetra says:
    @Kronos

    That makes sense large numbers of people aren’t supposed to when confronted with the wild ramblings of psyop agents and their campaigns find them reasonable.

    They’re supposed to be driven away by the more crazy statements mixed in with truth which associates certain views together in the offended person’s mind to discredit them. But if large numbers of people begin to think it’s plausible that there are baby eating satanic pedophiles running the country and that the frogs are turning gay then it becomes a problem.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @J.Ross
    , @Reg Cæsar
  58. Polistra says:
    @ben tillman

    Not to mention, the ‘experts’ (like ‘doctors’ and ‘scientists’) who ‘say’ whatever are generally anonymous, which I take to mean invented, since it’s the MSM at work.

    • Replies: @Alice in Wonderland
  59. El Dato says:

    Perceptive Nebojsa is perceptive.

    Congress ‘QAnon’ purge is about outlawing dissent and anyone hoping to restore the Republic should hate it

    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s labeling of Republicans as the “QAnon” party suggests that the latest Capitol drama isn’t about a single Georgia congresswoman, but about purging and repressing all dissent in Our Democracy.

    To hear the Democrats and the mainstream media say it, Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Georgia) is a clear and present danger, a threat of imminent harm that must be at the very least stripped of her committee assignments, or expelled from Congress altogether.

    The Democrats had hoped House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy would purge the congresswoman for them, but when he apparently refused, Pelosi released a vitriolic statement on Wednesday, calling him a representative from “Q-California,” and accusing him of “failure to lead his party” and “handing the keys over” to the “anti-Semite, QAnon adherent and 9/11 Truther” Greene.

    Several keen-eyed people have observed that the brigading of Greene – who was elected in November with something like 75 percent of the vote in her district – is a tactic straight out of Saul Alinsky’s ‘Rules for Radicals,’ specifically #13 about isolating and polarizing a single target. There’s absolutely no reason to think the Democrats will stop at Greene, as their talk of “people with guns” being a danger has already targeted Rep. Lauren Boebert (R-Colorado), for example.

    The rhetoric is more extreme than ever. Expecting gitmoization of several repubs for wrongthink by summer.

    • LOL: Kronos
    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    , @Polistra
  60. wren says:
    @Lot

    This is another good article:

    https://www.bostonmagazine.com/news/2020/09/09/alina-chan-broad-institute-coronavirus/

    It was written by the same guy who wrote that borderline heretical article about sunscreen that I often post here.

    • Thanks: Neoconned
    • Replies: @El Dato
  61. Polistra says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Incidentally, the film was written by “Terry Gilliam, Charles McKeown, and Tom Stoppard.”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @wren
  62. wren says:

    Steve had a very good characterization of this nyt writer a few months ago:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/the-totalitarianism-is-strong-in-this-one/

  63. Anon[194] • Disclaimer says:
    @John Johnson

    Yes, sorry if I wasn’t clear. Read the linked article. A bat virus collected by a researcher was modified in the lab using an altogether common procedure called gain of function. This is a standard experiment, done in the U.S., China, and elsewhere. Did I mention to read the article? Gain of function specifically aims to make viruses cross species boundaries. Sound crazy? Then read the article. The idea is to then try to combat the newly strengthen virus. Of course, you’re supposed to KEEP IT FROM ESCAPING THE LAB!!!

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @John Johnson
  64. @Polistra

    Stoppard has cashed a lot of screenwriting checks over the decades, but has he written a movie hit other than “Shakespeare in Love” (which is kind of Stoppard Lite)?

    • Replies: @kimchilover
  65. Well, it appears the Chicoms are paying NYT writers.

  66. @Lot

    I didn’t know about the 1977 epidemic of H1N1 caused by a lab leak (of still unknown origin?).

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0011184

    The most famous case of a released laboratory strain is the re-emergent H1N1 influenza A virus which was first observed in China in May of 1977 and in Russia shortly thereafter [3], [4]. This outbreak marked the return of a seasonal H1N1 human influenza virus after a nearly 20-year absence following its displacement during the 1957 H2N2 pandemic. Scientists quickly realized that something was unusual about this re-emergent H1N1 strain; it was genetically similar, though not identical, to an H1N1 isolate from 1950 [5], [6]. Initially it was suggested that this virus could have lain dormant or evolved slowly in non-human hosts for decades, but it is now generally assumed that the virus was kept frozen in a yet unidentified laboratory [7], [8]. The glaring discrepancy between the amount of inferred evolutionary time (Figure 1A) and amount of sequence evolution (Figure 1B) leading to the 1977 outbreak provides evidence supporting this conclusion.

    https://mbio.asm.org/content/6/4/e01013-15

    The 1977-1978 influenza epidemic was probably not a natural event, as the genetic sequence of the virus was nearly identical to the sequences of decades-old strains. While there are several hypotheses that could explain its origin, the possibility that the 1977 epidemic resulted from a laboratory accident has recently gained popularity in discussions about the biosafety risks of gain-of-function (GOF) influenza virus research, as an argument for why this research should not be performed.

    H1N1 is better known today as swine flu, which has killed a lot of people and made an even larger number pretty poorly. I’ve never really had seasonal flu, but swine flu flattened me for three weeks and I lost half a stone in week 1. Not recommended as a weight loss aid though. You could see how it could kill the elderly or already ill.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/did-leak-from-a-laboratory-cause-swine-flu-pandemic-1724448.html

    It has swept across the world killing at least 300 people and infecting thousands more. Yet the swine flu pandemic might not have happened had it not been for the accidental release of the same strain of influenza virus from a research laboratory in the late 1970s, according to a new study.

    Scientists investigating the genetic make-up of flu viruses have concluded there is a high probability that the H1N1 strain of influenza “A” behind the current pandemic might never have been re-introduced into the human population were it not for an accidental leak from a laboratory working on the same strain in 1977.

  67. wren says:
    @Polistra

    It was produced by Arnon Milchan, an, uh, interesting character.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnon_Milchan

    Memorable score by Michael Kamen.

    One of my favorite films.

    • Replies: @wren
  68. @Hypnotoad666

    Vox Day seemed to believe QAnon. His was the only site on which I ever saw it promoted. Vox Day is an intelligent guy with an interesting take on some issues, so I wondered if the Q stuff was sort of prank, trying to give the Progressives a taste of their own medicine.

  69. @Colin Wright

    I have this theory that every President we’ve elected since Bush Sr. has managed to set a new low (yes, I think Trump was worse than Obama).

    I have the somewhat the same theory, but I’d say every President since Reagan has been worse than his predecessor until Obama. It depends on whether you think organizing a coup against your successor tops invasing and occupying of Iraq. Trump was definitely better than Obama. If he hadn’t been faced with a media and political opposition that was insanely partisan, and an intelligence apparatus that was terrified about what he might expose about them, he could have had been the most successful president in my lifetime.

    As for Biden, after two weeks of watching him in action, I’m confident he’ll be the worst president in history, and with a vengeance.

    • Agree: wren, Desiderius
    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @TWS
  70. @Colin Wright

    Be careful what you wish for.

    If there’ were any possibility I might get what I wish for, the position of Reality Czar would be shared by Dave Chappelle and Norm MacDonald.

    • LOL: Desiderius, Seneca44
    • Replies: @Danindc
  71. El Dato says:
    @wren

    Thanks.

    Still, an article about someone called “Alina Chan” increases the chuckle factor immensely.

    Chan felt the familiar surge of puzzle endorphins.

    The tendency of sciency story writers to emulate the style of Greg Egan or some other SciFi writer should be corrected by whippings in the editor’s dungeon.

    Here is one on the model builders from the medium woke Quanta Mag:

    The Hard Lessons of Modeling the Coronavirus Pandemic: In the fight against COVID-19, disease modelers have struggled with misunderstanding and misuse of their work. They have also come to realize how unready the state of modeling was for this pandemic.

    Here is one on the protein structures from the superbly woke Nautilus Mag

    The Dangerous Evolution of the Coronavirus: These scientists have a new model for identifying variants before they kill.

  72. El Dato says:
    @Anon

    “It seemed like a good idea at the time”

  73. dimples says:
    @Anon

    Probably the WHO investigation will be like the Warren Commission. No evidence will be found of a gain of function lab leak, so the new ‘evidence based’ journalism will be “Sorry guys no evidence of a lab leak we’ve officially looked and found none, its a zoonotic transfer” and anybody claiming otherwise will now be cancelled or persecuted for disseminating a dangerous conspiracy theory.

  74. Anon[218] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Top of news tonight in Japan:

    https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2021/02/04/national/yoshiro-mori-women-comment/

    Tokyo Olympic head Yoshiro Mori complained about what he believes is the tendency of women to talk too much and to have “a strong sense of rivalry” when he was asked about increasing gender diversity among board members of the Japanese Olympic Committee.

    He cited his experience as a former president of the Japan Rugby Football Union, saying, “Women have a strong sense of rivalry. If one (female) member raises her hand to speak, all the others feel the need to speak too. Everyone ends up saying something.”

    “Somebody told me that if we increase the number of women (on the board), we have to also restrict their speaking time to an extent. Otherwise they’ll never stop, which is problematic,” Mori said on Wednesday.

    Mori is an 83-year-old political insider who has a Trump-like tendancy to say what he thinks. These “gaffs” pop up from time to time, and seem to particularly infuriate Japanese women. There are calls for him to resign for being sexist.

    However, all he really said was:

    1. Women talk a long time in meetings.

    2. Women are competitive in meetings? I suspect what he meant was that women support each other by repeating what the other women have said, but I don’t know.

    3. He is annoyed by women’s behavior in meetings (“problematic”).

    My question, re 1 and 2, is are they true statments? They are either true or false. I think women behave differently in social situations compared to men. I expect he was noticing actual behavior, relative to male behavior. As for 3, I believe him when he says women sometimes annoy him in meetings. He would be the expert on that. Should he have said it? That’s a separate question. But women in the U.S. have no problem complaining about men in meetings:

    Here in the U.S. we have women in companies complaining about being interrupted by men in meetings (manterruption) and men repeating a woman’s idea in meetings and getting credit for it (bropropriation). And there has been an erruption of “My male colleages are mean to me on Zoom” articles in the past year. So the idea that men and women have different meeting behaviors is not a new idea Mori thought up.

    Mori gaff greatest hits on Wikipedia:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoshirō_Mori#Gaffes

    When asked about the Year 2000 problem in the United States, Mori quipped that “when there is a blackout, the murderers always come out. It’s that type of society.

    A fake gaff he supposedly said, so good it’s too bad it didn’t happen:

    At the G8 summit in 2000, upon meeting U.S. President Bill Clinton, Mori was to say “How are you.” Instead, he allegedly slipped up and said “Who are you;” Clinton answered “Well, I’m Hillary Clinton’s husband,” to which Mori replied “Me too.”

    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/who-are-you/

    • Replies: @photondancer
  75. dimples says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    I’ve been checking out Vox Day for a few months. He crashed out badly with the God Emperor About to Cross the Rubicon crap. His commenters seem to be a really dumb lot I assume because he censors out any of the more intelligent ones.

  76. dimples says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    “I wondered if the Q stuff was sort of prank, trying to give the Progressives a taste of their own medicine.”

    No, the Q stuff was a prank to give Conservatives a taste of their own medicine.

  77. Dumbo says:
    @Sean

    Perhaps one day governments will medicate political dissidents with large doses of aspirin or other NSAID, which may well reduce their propensity to accept conspiracy theories.

    No need. The current methods are working just fine. Most people are conformist, anyway. I don’t see much of anyone protesting about demographic replacement, lockdown authoritarian measures, forced vaccinations, etc. Of course perhaps one day they will “find out” that “brain inflammation” causes “racism” and “anti-semitism”, and they will be able to eradicate that too. Perhaps with a new type of chemical or genetic lobotomy.

  78. Dumbo says:
    @Sean

    socially undesirable behavior, which I suppose may include expounding conspiracy theories, when one’s immune system is fighting a pathogen is a group selection adaptation to separate an infectious person person from the rest of their tribe.

    This explanation for “conspiracy theories” sounds like a conspiracy theory in itself. The reality is much simpler. Most people accept the mainstream media news instead of unknown “fake news” sites such as Unz Review, because of the same reason why they buy well-known food brands, or copy what others do – to avoid risk. Or so they believe. It might not be “the best source of information”, but they believe it’s less likely that it will be a complete fabrication, and it is also a way of socializing with others (conformism means acceptance).

    Of course, this is not really true. Media news, especially nowadays, can easily be fabricated, especially if it doesn’t require any verification (see the “gas attack” in Syria, for instance).

    The reason why we see more and more “conspiracy theories” is because less and less people believe the media and the governments. There is no trust anymore. And, I would add, with good reason.

    • Replies: @Johnny Rico
  79. They are the evil they think they oppose. They weren’t always it, but as soon as they set themselves up against this great other it was inevitable that they would become it.

    And in reaction their transformation will create an equal and opposing force until flood runs on the streets in floods and gushes.

    Pricks

  80. tyrone says:
    @Rebunga

    They already have their Emmanuel Goldstein…….and plenty of spares.

  81. Anon[314] • Disclaimer says:
    @415 reasons

    It is amazing how little the origin of COVID-19 is discussed. There’s endless analysis of the efficacy of vaccines, the logistics of their distribution, the response of governments, and so on. People want to learn so as to limit the damage of a future pandemic. Which is all well and good, but here’s an even better idea: why don’t we reduce the odds that one happens in the first place?

    If it’s actually true that the pandemic started with a lab leak of a gain-of-function enhanced virus, then confirming that and changing research practices is critically important. And suppressing the idea as a conspiracy theory is “dangerous misinformation” of the highest order.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Charlotte
  82. tyrone says:

    When the democratic party grows up it will be just like it’s papa ….the CCP.

  83. The Biden MVD would likely be recruited from the various states’ DMV offices as a new form of affirmative action.

  84. Kronos says:
    @Tetra

    But if large numbers of people begin to think it’s plausible that there are baby eating satanic pedophiles running the country and that the frogs are turning gay then it becomes a problem.

    It’s not like the “discovery” Jeffery Epstein helped matters on that front.

  85. The proper response should be:

    “We oppose to being voted into a racial minority in the Nation that we are the Historic Racial Majority by nonwhite LEGAL IMMIGRANTS and their US born nonwhite children”

    The NYT would have us believe that the White Men who fought the Nazis during WW2 were Antifa Social Justice Warriors…..same for the White Men who fought for the Union during the Civil War…

    • Replies: @HammerJack
  86. J.Ross says:
    @Tetra

    The frog sex changes as a result of chemical pollution is probably the most proven, least controversial classic Alex Jones claim. The satanic pedophile thing had plenty of circumstantial evidence but was never investigated and so can never go away. You want it to go away then investigate it properly. There was a nice young mainstream TV guy who described the perfectly reasonable circumstantial evidence aaaaaand his next broadcast was announcing that he was voluntarily leaving his chosen career forever. Well that’s not wierd at all is it? After the Epstein story broke an ABC journalist effectively corroborated it by describing (to her producer, not on the air) how she had investigated the same story and reached the same conclusions but the story was nixed at the last minute without explanation. She was then fired. I am so sick and tired of these know-nothing drug-protected useless eaters talking as if they knew anthing about this and their appeal, the meat of their argument, is this deeply nonsensical call to be reasonable, while wearing a mask in a car and violating the Constitution and Fallon Fox beating women in public for money and abrogating laws and principles which our recent ancestors never expected to be violated. What the hell does being reasonable mean? It is completely beyond discussion that our ruling class is pushing through radical changes using technological and communications centralization, and that in fact they wanted to do this earlier but Trump interrupted their plans. It is not harmful in any way that people believe things that you do not, or that you find offensive, or even things that are simply wrong. This is a central precept of our society. You are wrong if you do not accept this. You don’t get to have an opinion on this, or on gun ownership. It is the Chinese who think everyone must be on the same page.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    , @Charlotte
  87. Kronos says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    My guess is he did see some messed up “Eyes Wide Shut” shit while working with the US media elite back in the day. I believe they originally wanted him to take over William F. Buckley‘s syndicated column around the year 2000.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  88. @El Dato

    Could someone fill me in on “What Do We Do With a Problem Named Marjoria”?

    Is Ms. Greene really “that over the top” and “beyond the pale” compared to the hyperbole coming from just about everyone else these days?

    Or is the good Member of Congress even toxic to a bona fide alt-Rightist?

    • Replies: @El Dato
  89. J.Ross says:
    @John Johnson

    This is wrong, look at the … British guy who was on Fox whose name I cannot remember. I wasn’t able to find the video on Youtube but the relevant segment was repeated on rightwing radio. Obama banned gain of function experiments because of repeated incidents of escape. In one case an Indonesian who wasn’t even working on the gain of function, but was in the same building, became infected.
    Fauci made this virus, through out-contracted specialists, who eventually out-contracted to the Wuhan lab. There is no basis for accusing Fauci of wanting the plague or of not taking (and expecting) every safety precaution, the people he contracted with are the best in the world, but without Fauci’s gain of function experiments this strain would not exist and would not have gotten out. This is a fact. This is beyond controversy. The alternative is that at the same time that Fauci and his partners were deliberately creating covid there just happened to be a naturally occuring long lost twin which happened to pop up in the same city at the same time.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    , @Clyde
  90. Under-reported fact: Soldiers at world games in China in 2019 took home what sounds like a serious bacterial infection.

    https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/did-soldier-athletes-returning-from-military-games-in-wuhan-bring-home-covid-19

    It could have been they were exposed to a contagion that native Chinese were used to, or, it could have been Covid. Nobody is in a hurry to clarify. If tough athlete-soldiers were felled by it, it would have been lethal to old folks.

  91. J.Ross says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    The original basis of Q-anon is that ethical deep state bureaucrats and agents would bring unethical colleagues to prosecution. If that’s crazy then we’re in much more trouble than anyone has realized. By the way, is there any mainstream disapproval or decrying of the parallel and much more widely attested theory that Trump was a criminal and would be imprisoned, which is now manifesting in a second (and unconstitutional) impeachment?

  92. Here is my attempt at woke logic. Reality is you are born a gender. However gender is now fluid, which still sounds more like incontinence to me. but I am digressing. If in woke world gender is fluid, so must reality be fluid.

    What are these people so scared of they need a propaganda czar to enforce their world view on everyone? All influencers that matter are pretty much on team NYT. Or would this just be part of the buildup to Holodomor – American style? Sadly that looks like where we are headed with the purge of white boys from the military.

  93. Democracy depends on having a population that is sufficiently well informed to make decisions between two options.

    At the founding of the United States large numbers of the population were considered not to be qualified to vote, including all women.

    Over time democracy in the United States evolved to the extent that every adult who was a citizen, whether natural born or naturalized, was allowed to vote.

    Democracy doesn’t really work in countries like Haiti, because there are so many people who are easily swayed by conspiracy theories. It would be a shame if the USA became like Haiti.

    I don’t know what the answer is but once you reach the situation that there is no consensus about what reality is, then electoral democracy just isn’t going to work anymore, because democracy demands that people are willing to accept being ruled by an administration that half the population did not vote for.

    So it looks like the USA is doomed, or becoming overdue for another American revolution, and a new constitution for the modern age. This could involve a lot more regional devolution, where you could have abortion territory and abortion-free territory, for example, or city-states that’s are governed differently from the rural hinterland.

    After all France, which provided a large part of the model for the American revolution and the American Constitution, has now quietly evolved into a component state of the EU and liberty, equality, and fraternity are just antique slogans replaced by regulations and treaties.

    • Troll: GeneralRipper
  94. @Mr. Anon

    It is not impossible that the virus escaped from a Chinese lab, but the evidence is not yet there.

    It should be possible to fairly easily determine whether a virus identical to the Covid-19 virus was being studied at the lab prior to when people started getting sick in Wuhan.

    Without that evidence you never really going to be able to show that it escaped from the lab, because workers at the lab could conceivably have been infected with the virus outside in the community.

    The problem with the Trump administration is that it has claimed that it has evidence that the virus escaped from the lab, but it is unable to show that evidence. This is a bit like Dick Cheney claiming that the US had evidence that Iraq had Germ warfare weapons, and that it knew where they were.

    It didn’t have the evidence and it didn’t know where they were, and when Iraq was invaded it didn’t use them!

  95. Travis says:

    Social media is already acting as the enforcers of political speech. For years the volunteer auxiliary though police monitored the internet and then with the election of Trump the Social media firms themselves began hiring though police to monitor, censor and cancel Americans for their ideology.

    Creating a government agency to police speech would require the government establish a team of bureaucrats to monitor Twitter, Facebook , TV , radio and the press for political incorrect ideas.

    The Volunteer Auxiliary Thought Police want to start getting paid for their services. Over the last decade thousands of woke volunteers police the internet and use cancel culture to ban people from social media, get people fired from their jobs and create blacklists to ensure even teenagers are held accountable for their speech and expelled from colleges across America for something they said when they were 12 years-old. This volunteer brigade of woke political enforcers are looking to cash in and get hired by the Biden administration to further advance their agenda and create government blacklists to ensure their opponents can never obtain a job or attend college or have a social media account.

  96. Jack D says:

    In the past year alone, we have also seen the current President claim that the light bulb was invented by a Black man and not “a white guy named Edison”, but we won’t mention that.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  97. BB753 says:

    Edward Bernays, Freud’s nephew, famously said that propaganda and mass mind- control don’t work in the absence of censure and control of mass-media. You can be sure that our elite masters have all read his book “Propaganda”. Why do you think that after Trump’s fluke victory in 2016 (they didn’t bother to cheat as much as usual the Mainstream Media largely lost monopoly of news to social media) Google, WordPress, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, etc started cracking down on “fake news” sites and independent news and opinion makers?

  98. RVS says:
    @ben tillman

    Here is a link to a 2015 medical publication funded by Dr. Fauci’s agency, and co-authored by scientists at the University of North Carolina and the Wuhan Institute of Virology. They describe research into a bat coronavirus that causes a deadly respiratory infection in a strain of mice with human-like ACE-2 lung receptors. By the way, the vaccine they developed against the virus protected young mice, but killed the old mice.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4797993/

  99. @Anon

    An Asian girl journalist was working on this story. Razib Khan was retweeting her. I guess she got her story stolen/scooped. 2021 lesson: don’t publicly tweet your story before you publish it.

    • Replies: @Anon
  100. @Dumbo

    Back in the 1990s, I told Richard John Neuhaus of First Things that we needed a journal devoted to the intersection of technology with religion and politics. I guess I was right. There has been too little attention paid to the Dr.Moreau-ish scientific community on the right.

  101. @Alfa158

    Yes. It’s the like the new gun bill. Step by step.

  102. Wheels says:

    Never let these people forget that they believed Jussie Smollett

  103. El Dato says:

    This reminds of the story of

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reality_Winner

    Why did she do it? Did she want to do Trump in?
    Was the leaked stuff about “Russian Interference in the elections” fake?
    Why did The Intercept burn her “through undue haste”?
    Was it a psyops from the start?
    Does she even exist?
    Is it a case of nominative determinism?
    Will we ever know?

  104. @Neoconned

    It’s ok, at least Steve’s whataboutism doesn’t concede the premise.

    Wait.

    Tbf it’s not just Steve it’s everybody.

  105. El Dato says:
    @Jack D

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Emeagwali

    He was cited by Bill Clinton as an example of what Nigerians can achieve when given the opportunity and is frequently featured in popular press articles for Black History Month.

    The Internet says that he also

    – Invented the Internet
    – Build the Worlds’ Fastest Computer
    – is called the “Bill Gates of Africa” (how does that even make sense?)

    and probably other things.

    Actually used the CM-2 to run code in 1989. Which is nice.

    http://sc16.supercomputing.org/2016/08/25/acm-gordon-bell-prize-recognizes-top-accomplishments-running-science-apps-hpc/index.html

    Price-Performance First Place: Philip Emeagwali, University of Michigan; “Oil reservoir modeling,” 400 Mflops/$1M on a CM-2

    The CM-2 was a weird animal, with 64K 1-bit processors arranged on the corners of a hypercube of network links. Maybe there is a market in Nvidia pumping out a “Connection Machine” add-on card today?

  106. @Jonathan Mason

    An investigation into the source of the virus should look carefully at any research that was going on at the Wuhan lab into viruses identical to or very similar to the Covid-19 virus, and should include an examination of all the people who were directly involved in working on it, with examination of their medical records, and blood work testing to see if they have antibodies to the virus.

    This would only be a start. It is no good investigating at the conspiracy theory level. You have to dig down to the level of the actual people physically involved in the research.

    • Agree: El Dato
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  107. Jack D says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    As for Biden, after two weeks of watching him in action, I’m confident he’ll be the worst president in history,

    The worst president UP TO THIS POINT. You’ve haven’t seen President Kamala in action. Just remember this – when people tell you that things couldn’t possibly get any worse, they are wrong. Things can almost ALWAYS get worse. A lot worse. You ain’t seen nuthin’ yet.

    • Agree: Adam Smith, AnotherDad
    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
  108. @Harry Baldwin

    Beale’s been out of country too long. If you look at people who’ve lost the plot, from Strzok to Kerr to Mattis to the most rabid advocates of the Domestic War on Terror, spending a significant chunk of one’s life overseas is the common thread.

    Obama also fits this pattern to an extent, but he kept his stateside savvy.

  109. Neuday says:

    A government that’s 28 trillion dollars in debt with something like 225 trillion in unfunded entitlements has no business even discussing a “reality czar”. The success of our food supply chain is the only thing keeping reality at bay.

  110. Neoconned says:
    @415 reasons

    Also for the record….ive travelled extensively and stay in what is arguably the MOST GOP region in the country….

    I’ve NEVER met either a member of Qanon, or the Proud Boyz….& i still haven’t gotten a clear definition of what the Alt Right…..Hillarys political team literally invented the term in 2016….i don’t recall it being bandied about before then…..and I’ve been a news junkie going on two decades…

    For such a demonized group(and watched, the Proud Boys have federal LEOs and informers amongst them)….ive never seen a single march or met a member of any of these groups….h

  111. @Jack D

    The worst president UP TO THIS POINT. You’ve haven’t seen President Kamala in action. Just remember this – when people tell you that things couldn’t possibly get any worse, they are wrong. Things can almost ALWAYS get worse. A lot worse. You ain’t seen nuthin’ yet.

    Oh they will get worse.

    Kamala can’t even handle a heavily edited softball interview without her nostrils flaring.

    She will be a ball of emotional rage and we can all guess as to which groups she will direct her frustrations.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  112. Travis says:
    @SafeNow

    good point. But back in March the CDC, Fauci , and the Surgeon General all opposed the wearing of masks. There initial response was backed up by decades of research indicating that masks are not effective at reducing the spread of colds or influenza. This is why the World health Organization opposed the widespread use of masks, as they do not work and may give people a false sense of security.

    There is currently more evidence that the wearing of cloth masks is more harmful than helpful. Cloth masks may help aerosolize the virus in addition to being breeding grounds for bacteria. Yet despite the known failures of masks, Fauci and our federal government is now mandating people to wear masks, even when outside in our national parks.

    • Replies: @SafeNow
  113. @Anon

    Yes, sorry if I wasn’t clear. Read the linked article. A bat virus collected by a researcher was modified in the lab using an altogether common procedure called gain of function.

    I’m not criticizing your post. It was very clear.

    What I am saying is that the MSM has been trying to deflect focus on China by depicting the release theory as involving a virus entirely created in a lab. It is of course unlikely that it is 100% man made but irrelevant when the common theory is that the virus did originally come from an animal but China captured and then accidentally released it.

    They are playing a game of deflection by focusing on the most unlikely scenario.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  114. Jack D says:
    @wren

    I really don’t believe these stories, but usually they involve Czech (Albright) or Hungarian (Kerry) Jews for some reason. Didn’t Stoppard notice growing up that he had zero grandparents and aunts and uncles? Didn’t he ask, what ever happened to grandma (All four grandparents as well as some aunts died in the camps)?

    I can understand why his parents lied to him. One reaction to the enormity of the Holocaust was to say “let’s put this whole Jewish thing behind us. If we’re not Jewish anymore then they will never gas my kids the way they gassed my parents and sisters.” But in my experience, family secrets like this are rarely kept. It’s like believing in Santa Claus – yes when your kids (especially kids as smart as Stoppard) are 5 or 6 years old they might still buy your bullshit – “grandma is on a long vacation to the North Pole. She’ll be back any day now.” But at some point it’s not going to work anymore.

    This leaves two possibilities – either folks like Stoppard and Albright really do know and they decided that for career reasons or whatever it was better to maintain the lie, Hilaria Baldwin style (nowadays being Jewish in America is double plus good, at least until the People of Color take over, but in England in the 1950s I’m not sure it was an asset.) Or else they don’t WANT to know and purposely shield themselves from any sort of inquiry. If you don’t know the truth then you don’t have to deal with it.

  115. @Jonathan Mason

    Democracy doesn’t really work in countries like Haiti, because there are so many people who are easily swayed by conspiracy theories. It would be a shame if the USA became like Haiti.

    Democracy in the US would work better if we admitted that it doesn’t work well in Haiti.

    Race denial makes people stupid and leads them down unhealthy paths where ideologues take advantage of willful blindness.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
  116. Art Deco says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Democracy depends on having a population that is sufficiently well informed to make decisions between two options.

    Disagree. It depends in part on having a minority who can perceive poor performance and whose perception regulates their electoral behavior. The minority must be of sufficient size to winnow the body of elected officials and contain the influence of fools and bad actors. If the deadweight in the electorate is distributed evenly over the spectrum, this minority can be quite small. That’s the demand side.

    It also depends on having recruitment mechanisms and recruitment pools which generate suitable candidates for public positions.

    Collectively, we fail on both counts. We have sh!t politicians and swing voters tend to be frivolous people. Note, we’re learning that the guilds in every professional-managerial occupation are now controlled by sh!ts in the profession. See, for a minor example, Peter Szilagyi and his co-conspirators.

    • Thanks: Calvin Hobbes
    • Replies: @David In TN
  117. Mr. Anon says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    I really don’t need lectures from you on – well – on anything.

    I noticed that you replied to your own post, which you seem to do alot. Increasingly it seems, you are the only person who wants to talk to you.

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    , @JMcG
  118. The Volunteer Auxiliary thought police want to get federal jobs. many of them are already getting paid by social media firms to censor , ban and blacklist Americans who oppose government propaganda and have a right leaning ideology. But once they get hired by the government they will have better job security, more power and better hours.

    How many members of the auxiliary thought police will get hired by our Federal Ministry of Truth? The Reality Czar sounds even worse than the ministry of Truth.

  119. This is not a new idea; the excerable Cass Sunstein was advocating for pro-regime propaganda in 2008. I wonder why we haven’t been hearing much from the guy. Maybe ditching his wife for Samantha Power proved to be too much for even our most degenerate betters.

    Wikispooks:
    “Sunstein co-authored a now infamous 2008 paper, entitled “Conspiracy Theories” which tried to link questioning governments’ official narratives with violence, and suggested that “the best response [to “conspiracy theorists”] consists in cognitive infiltration of extremist groups”.[5] Various commentators have roundly criticized this intellectual stance.[6][7] who argue that it would violate prohibitions on government propaganda aimed at domestic citizens”

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  120. Mr. Anon says:
    @John Johnson

    The MSM deceitfully places focus on the theory that the virus was created in the lab.

    The more likely scenario is that the virus was taken from an animal and then accidentally released from the lab.

    Created in a lab? No. Augmented in a lab? Possible. The WIV was doing Gain of Function research on Corona viruses, some of which was sponsored by Anthony Fauci’s NIAID (Fauci is an enthusiastic supporter of GoF).

  121. @Mr. Anon

    Even mentioning phrases such as “stolen election” and “illegitimate president” has become taboo in many forums, tantamount to screaming the n-word out on 42nd St. Corporate radio chains have reportedly warned their hosts.

  122. Aardvark says:
    @ben tillman

    Expert = “Someone who will dutifully parrot the establishment crime family narrative with seemingly great authority”…

    Hence in reality they are no more elevated than the position of court jesters.

  123. Mr. Anon says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    I know a guy who was a Q follower – an otherwise perfectly sensible guy. Ashli Babbitt was one, as was – I suppose – Buffalo-headdress man of Capitol “insurrection” fame. There were a lot of people who bought into it. A lot of people believe in astrology and healing crystals. A lot of people believed that Ted Cruz’s father was a Kennedy assassin. A lot of people believe that Michelle Obama is a man. There is no shortage of credulity in the World.

    Q-Anon seemed to have burbled up from the chans, perhaps in some organic fashion. Maybe it started out as a gas, or as wish-fullfillment. It seemed to have evolved into a scam for selling merch. What I think to be likely – perhaps even very likely – is that at some point state-actors got involved to monitor it or even to nudge it this way or that.

  124. @Rob McX

    That’s long been one of my favorite liberal-media staples — sending some urbane lefty out to the hinterlands to report on what those crazy Christians are up to. Like an anthropologist paddling upriver to reach the strange and sinister Heart of Whiteness.

    • Replies: @photondancer
  125. @John Derbyshire

    I likely read that piece and filed it in mass storage. So I have to give you credit for making me more attuned to sp- words in the wild.

    These swirling clouds of epithets…Homer for imbeciles!

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  126. Art Deco says:
    @Jack D

    Jack, I can introduce you to an English professor hired and tenured at a selective research university who did not know the year her living and breathing father was born. “It’s not pertinent information” she tells me. Information flows of the sort to which you’re referring are regulated by the older generation and the young generally accept what ever matrix they live in and are commonly remarkably incurious. I could give you examples from our families. The young are often not the least bit curious about their family history.

    While we’re at it, John Kerry’s paternal-side family was from the Hapsburg slice of Silesia, not from Hungary. Kerry’s grandfather and great-uncle began using the name ‘Kerry’ before their children were born and before said grandfather migrated to the United States in 1905. (The great-uncle died in 1933 and spent the previous decade living in Austria). The maiden name of Kerry’s paternal-side grandmother was ‘Lowe’, which is ethnically ambiguous. See also Andrew Greeley on one point: people from ethnically mixed backgrounds commonly draw much more from one side than the other; John Kerry’s schooling was paid for by maternal-side relations; everything about his manners, habits, and nexus of associations suggests someone steeped in a blueblood / Foreign Service milieu.

    With Albright, it’s more believable that she’s running some con. Her family migrated from Czechoslovakia to England to Czechoslovakia to the US in her lifetime and she and her siblings have had legal disputes with a family in Prague over art work the Korbel family had taken with them when they migrated from Prague to the United States in 1948. (The Korbels returned to Prague after the war and reclaimed their old apartment, evicting the family who were occupying it; they appropriated the furnishings in the apartment at the same time and the dispute was over which item was rightfully whose). When interviewed, she’s also been able to identify relatives in photographs who did not survive the war.

    • Agree: vhrm
    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @vhrm
  127. Anon[754] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sean

    Maybe keeping them cackling away to themselves while on the internet in an unventilated basement serves the same function.

    David Icke became a world famous and wealthy figure and best selling author through his conspiracy books and lectures though. Before then he was an obscure, minor TV presenter in Britain. Alex Jones also became famous and wealthy.

    • Replies: @Sean
  128. @Lot

    I will say that even if COVID-19 was accidentally released by Shi Zhengli using the money and sick ideas of Tony Fauci and Peter Daszak, I’m sure it hasn’t escaped their attention that it WAS a perfect bio weapon.

    The U.S. after COVID has become more like China in embracing information authoritarianism and its economic and political collapse has accelerated by a decade in the space of a year.

    Honestly they must be pleased as punch with how it’s all turned out.

  129. Mr. Mean says:

    The sheer chutzpah after Russiagate and peddling systemic racism and hands up don’t shoot for the last 8 years.

  130. jamie b. says:

    …the baseless theory that Covid-19 was manufactured in a Chinese lab.

    The consensus might be shifting on that…

    https://www.razib.com/wordpress/category/covid-19/

  131. Don’t forget systemic racism. Clearly the reason why Whites, compared to NE Asians, are more likely to be killed by police and are arrested and incarcerated at higher rates, score lower on tests, earn less money and die younger. Racism! But systemic racism has its own racism. That’s why it causes brown E Indians to score highly on standardized tests but Brown Mexicans to score poorly. It also makes Blacks good at basketball but Mexicans bad at basketball.

    Systemic racism reminds me of thetans in Scientology. Systemic racism is a cross between a conspiracy theory and a religious belief. As is said “unfalsifiabe postmodern claptrap”. But Science!

  132. @Kronos

    I suspect that the Woke Essays to get into college will, as in everything else, be dominated by Asians, who will start a cottage industry of selling them online to the highest bidder.

    • Replies: @vhrm
  133. @Hypnotoad666

    Like many things, there is likely a grain of truth lost among a swamp of misinformation (which is likely by design). People had been referring to Epstein’s island long before anyone had even heard of Epstein, and they were lumped in with the rest of the crazies.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  134. El Dato says:

    OT: Black History Month.

    Black Boxing Specialist Floyd Mayweather is evidently triggered by some tuber:

    Floyd Mayweather launches race tirade at Jake Paul after YouTuber claims boxing icon can’t read in brutal personal barb

    which brings us:

    “And I don’t even play when it comes to education because millions of blacks got lynched just for reading. Let me see, you went to get a black boxing trainer, try to dress like you’re black, wear jewelry like black people, try to dance like black people, but you don’t want to be BLACK.

    “All you do is jack black swag from us. You go from groupie fan to a fake professional fighter, this world is crazy.”

    • Replies: @Tex
  135. wren says:
    @wren

    I had no idea how prolific and influential Michael Kamen was.

    He was a big part of a lot of music that I have enjoyed over the years.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Kamen

    • Replies: @Polistra
  136. Of course, the Biden Administration’s MVD would have to be staffed like the DMV…

    Or this:

    Woman pours boiling water on sleeping boyfriend and records it on Snapchat, IL cops say
    Chacour Koop
    Tue, February 2, 2021, 3:28 PM

    Perfect byline for the story.

    Chacour Koop = Cook our chap. Cook up roach.


    Roselle woman accused of pouring boiling water on boyfriend, posting it on Snapchat

    “I kind of feel bad now because he got 2&3rd degree Burns from face to waist & they rushin him to burn center but oh well (shrugging shoulder emoji*) …”

    *🤷

    In other news, they caught Florida Man:

    [MORE]

  137. @Harry Baldwin

    I guess it depends on what you mean by “believe” QAnon.

    Do you believe in what I might call his “directional principles” — patriotism, nationalism, and complete loathing of the corrupt oligarchy, along with pedophilia and other assorted sins– or do you believe that he was a modern day Delphic prognosticator, engaging in slippery ambiguous “predictions” that some sort of political transformation was near at hand?

    I visit Vox Popoli regularly and with both Vox and his commentators I’d say it was more hopeful anticipation of the latter rather than outright belief.

    I thought it was great when QAnon was brought up to Trump, and he said something along the lines of “who isn’t against child trafficking?”

    Leave it to crazy leftoids to get all aghast and “Oh, I never!!” about some anonymous and frankly harmless Internet character who managed to get a following and who promulgated nationalist principles that were more or less commonplace 20 years ago.

    Endless psyops from our “betters.”

    It is very very tiresome.

  138. Hibernian says:
    @International Jew

    The Post allows some conservative opinion columnists and reports crime. That’s the best you can say for them. I’ve noticed they’ve been gradually becoming more like the Daily News.

  139. Hibernian says:
    @Thoughts

    The two West Point trained officers (one Lieutenant, one Captain) I was aware of in 21 years in the National Guard were not impressive. Not the worst, but not at all impressive.

    • Replies: @ATate
  140. @John Derbyshire

    Why is it that only an “sp—” word will do for remarks that journalists find unacceptable? And why do they so rarely venture beyond “spew” and “spout”?

    It’s especially damning to accuse anyone of using those sp— words today, when spewing and spouting makes you a super spreader of the -19 virus!

  141. Anonymous[141] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thoughts

    I was at the Naval Academy in the 80s, and it was pretty right wing.

    • Thanks: vhrm
    • Replies: @HammerJack
  142. Seneca44 says:
    @Rebunga

    Or perhaps a Committee for Public Safety? That would certainly give a more continental flair to appeal to the Times readers.

  143. @Jonathan Mason

    It should be possible to fairly easily determine whether a virus identical to the Covid-19 virus was being studied at the lab prior to when people started getting sick in Wuhan.

    It SHOULD be possible if someone decides to REALLY investigate it, which just MIGHT include Anthony Fauci coming clean about gain-of-function activities transferred from the USA to Wuhan and perhaps funded by NIAID.

    And then our pals the Chinese have to become open and transparent, even if it means effectively saying, “Sorry, we fucked up, Dr. Wang forgot to close the door on the way out of the lab, and so, alas, we were major contributors to a catastrophic global pandemic that killed millions and ruined the economic lives of millions more. Oh, well. We still have lots of stuff to sell at WalMart!!”

    And, just to put the cherry on top, we’d have to have the sphincter-licking legacy and social media do a total about face and cover the entire story fairly and completely.

    What do you think the odds are of all THAT happening?

    You’d have a better chance of winning the next PowerBall.

  144. Ben H says:

    As their own “reality” spiraled unto further levels of implausibility it became necessary to quarantine the sane people.

    • Thanks: Harry Baldwin
  145. put together a cross-agency task force to tackle…domestic extremism

    allow platforms to share data…with…government agencies without running afoul of privacy laws

    Hey, that was my idea.

    • Agree: Kronos
  146. Farenheit says:
    @Jack D

    The worst president UP TO THIS POINT. You’ve haven’t seen President Kamala in action. Just remember this – when people tell you that things couldn’t possibly get any worse, they are wrong. Things can almost ALWAYS get worse. A lot worse. You ain’t seen nuthin’ yet.

    A good sequel into that old Soviet joke.

    “Is Joe Biden a good President..Humm, about average. Worse than the President before him, but much better than the President who will come after him”

  147. V. Hickel says:
    @International Jew

    I stopped reading the Post after the inexplicable and shameful post-mortem hit pieces on Ashli Babbit.

  148. @Kronos

    My guess is he did see some messed up “Eyes Wide Shut” shit while working with the US media elite back in the day.

    One can only imagine.

    [MORE]

    • LOL: Kronos
    • Replies: @Kronos
  149. V. Hickel says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    clearly you arent a visitor at Vox Popoli.

  150. In Soviet Union we have of course freedom of speech. However, it is forbidden to lie.

    • Thanks: Kronos
  151. “Baseless?” That Nicholson Baker piece in New York magazine provides a good basis. That guy is serious about his research and basically obsessed with detail.

  152. From the summary of new film:

    FBI informant William O’Neal (LaKeith Stanfield) infiltrates the Illinois Black Panther Party and is tasked with keeping tabs on their charismatic leader, Chairman Fred Hampton (Daniel Kaluuya). A career thief, O’Neal revels in the danger of manipulating both his comrades and his handler, Special Agent Roy Mitchell (Jesse Plemons). Hampton’s political prowess grows just as he’s falling in love with fellow revolutionary Deborah Johnson (Dominique Fishback). Meanwhile, a battle wages for O’Neal’s soul. Will he align with the forces of good? Or subdue Hampton and The Panthers by any means, as FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover (Martin Sheen) commands?

    Indeed, the Black Panthers are “the forces of good”, which souls must align with to save themselves, whereas the (old) FBI is the devil.

    When there is a revolution back the other way, will the post-revolutionaries make similar paeans to QAnon etc? Would a QAnon world be any more unbalanced or disrupted from reality?

  153. @Dumbo

    “I guess at some point we will have a “bio-Chernobyl”.”

    Aren’t we in the middle of it right now? Imagine if Chernobyl had shut down a huge chunk of the world economy, killed a million people, and disrupted human life on a global scale .

    • Replies: @El Dato
  154. Jack D says:
    @Art Deco

    Sorry, you’re right about the Kerry/Kohn family not being from Hungary. The borders have moved but nowadays Horní Benešov (the former Bennisch) is in the Czech Republic. The Czech Jewish community was quite ancient but not large in number compared to Poland. Especially once you got outside of Prague, Jews were few in number and so the Jewish communities did not really have the critical mass or the religious fanaticism or the hostility of the locals to maintain their population (the same thing happened in the small Southern towns of the US) and were more or less in the process of dissolving when Hitler speeded things up. Like the US, the locals were in the process of killing the Jews with kindness – Bohemia had the highest Jewish intermarriage rate in Europe (and intermarriage was often associated with conversion to Christianity – your life would just go easier as a Christian, there would be no doors closed to you.) In modern America the default option for Jews who are not religiously inclined is to be more or less atheist but in the Czech lands the advisable thing to do was conversion, at least on paper.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  155. @International Jew

    sp- words in the wild

    If they need a good sp-word to signal disapproval, maybe we can revive “spake,” as in “thus spake the heretic.”

    These swirling clouds of epithets

    When one of the hacks gets on a roll with their litany of abusive adjectives (“racist, Islamophobic, xenophobic, homophobic, misogynistic . . .”), I’ve often thought they should just have a LGBTQ-style acronym to efficiently cover all the epithets. RIXHM . . . or whatever. And then keep adding letters as new ways to be offended are discovered.

  156. @Reg Cæsar

    If the timestamp didn’t work (sometimes it does, sometimes it doesn’t), the master spewer is at 3:14. And there are at least three Canadians on stage, so it’s technically international.

  157. MEH 0910 says:

    • Replies: @El Dato
  158. vhrm says:
    @Art Deco

    Jack, I can introduce you to an English professor hired and tenured at a selective research university who did not know the year her living and breathing father was born.

    A similar thing I’ve been surprised by repeatedly is discovering people I know who don’t know what their spouses do for a living. I’ve seen this mostly with women. Same with some high school and college kids about their parents, let alone their grand parents. And I’m pretty sure in most of these cases they just didn’t know rather than being demure about it for privacy or other reasons. To me it seems like a serious lack of curiosity but like you described they mostly just shrugged and said they just didn’t care about that kind of biographical info.

    I think you’re right that it just varies widely in families how much this stuff is discussed or passed down.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  159. vhrm says:
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    Both the woke essays and paid college application “consulting” of varying levels of intensity and integrity have been going strong for at least a decade. It’s probably been a lot longer for rich people, but i think it’s spread down into various areas of the other classes too for strivers or strivers families.

  160. El Dato says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I hope someone of the young ones brings up the time to compose this catchy eurotune with a clip of Dorsey being on dark guru trip (and liking it).

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
  161. OT….I see India’s farmers are resisting a set of pro-big ag laws. Ag liberalization reforms spurred massive immigration from Mexico when American Big Corn slaughtered the local Mexican corn farmers (campesinos) after NAFTA.

    https://thecounter.org/border-crisis-immigration-mexican-corn-nafta/

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  162. El Dato says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Yes, but it could have been much worse.

    I vaguely someone once discussing the possibility of modifying a smallpox virus to make it more deadly (maybe 10-15 years ago?). Pants got shat and this led to some soul-searching in the bio-community.

  163. Maybe this point has already been made, but I really doubt TPTB would be so ham-fisted as to actually create a “Reality Czar” or “Secretary of Truth.”

    If I had to guess, I’d say they use the FCC to suppress dissenting voices. First, the Fairness Doctrine is brought back. By itself, that would cause many or most broadcast outlets to cave, because of the trouble and expense involved. The ones that don’t will have their licenses threatened (this would apply, of course, only to English language media. The Spanish outlets would be left alone). Next, cable and satellite outlets will be subjected to licensing, and have the same standards applied to them.

    Print media would also be required to be licensed, with perhaps an exemption for those organized as non-profits. Bezos may have already re-incorporated the WaPo in that fashion.

    Last to go will be the internet. The FCC may leave that alone, under the assumption that the big tech monopolies will do their work for them.

    Have I left anything out? The whole point is enforcing ideological conformity, so I suppose next you’ll see most corporations will have a chief ideological officer. They won’t call it that of course; Facebook just hired a vice president for civil rights which sounds much less menacing. So in the largest corporations, you’ll have executives at the VP level for HR, DIE, and ideology. Eventually there will be nowhere left to go if you want to escape the 24/7 agitprop.

  164. @Tetra

    …that the frogs are turning gay then it becomes a problem.

    Yves Saint-Laurent aside,

    Œstrogen in birth control pills has a negative impact on fish

    Our species wasn’t the only one whose fertility was affected by the Pill. Plus, if we’re eating these fish (on Friday, no less!), we have a vicious cycle going.

    Fish Are Taking Your Birth Control

    Collapse of a fish population after exposure to a synthetic estrogen

    Where’s PETA?

  165. ATate says:
    @Hibernian

    My current supervisor is a West Point graduate.

    She just had a “talk” with me because I used the expression “tits up”.

    I’m not joking.

    An officer in your military, someone who ostensibly is willing to give their life for their country, was offended by “tits up”.

    Very few of the military are conservative. In particular the officers. The most conservative tend to be more in the combat arms and enlisted.

    Your basic pogue (if under 35) is progressive. In the intelligence corps it’s probably 95/5 (if that) liberal progressive to conservative. I can’t stand intel people.

    The military, other than combat arms, is gone. I’ve been “in” the military (enlisted Marine, National Guard, Contractor and Civilian) for almost 25 years. We’re done for…

  166. Danindc says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    Norm and Chapelle have wildly different world views. Norm loves whitey and Chapelle not so much.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Harry Baldwin
  167. He shall mark our goings, question whence we came,
    Set his guards about us, as in Freedom’s name.
    He shall peep and mutter, and night shall bring
    Watchers ‘neath our window, lest we mock the King.

    -Rudyard Kipling

    …Our Reality Crisis

    The Padded Crossword has extensive experience with reality crises.

    Our reality crisis = Lousy criteria, sir.

    Reality czar = Raze clarity. Lazy, erratic.

  168. MEH 0910 says:
    @Captain Mccluskey

    OT….I see India’s farmers are resisting a set of pro-big ag laws.

    It is on topic, as in this particular case the NYT sez that free speech is a good thing:

    Punching free speechifying up vs. punching free speechifying down. Who, Whom.

  169. • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  170. El Dato says:
    @Inquiring Mind

    I really don’t know but it can’t be worse than anyone of “the squad”.

    Just recently la Marjoria was attacked by a squad member for being maskless, then it was time to claim “victim of rassosupremacism” status, and then a recording of actually happened got revealed. It’s all so tiresome.

  171. More disingenious bullshit from They Who Must Not Be Named, this time as commentary on the most recent victim of cancel culture, country singer Morgan Wallen (who’s had the #1 album in America for the past three weeks) who was filmed late at night by a nosy neighbour calling a white friend the dreaded n-word as they stumbled around drunk and who promptly sold the tape to TMZ.

    (context: Hits Daily Double is one of the premiere music industry trades):

    A country star puking up vile racist epithets while “having fun” is one of those zeitgeist moments, in this post-Trump, QAnon-crazy American twilight, that make declarations easy. “Don’t use the N-word in public” is a low bar but one that’s pretty straightforward to set.

    But our takeaway from all this can’t just be a renewed commitment to not saying the quiet part out loud. Not when scores of innocent Black folks keep getting killed by cops—while violent white racists are escorted gently down the Capitol steps or given a pass to go on vacation in Mexico. Not when unrepentant white supremacists run amok in government. Not when the cultural gatekeepers making anodyne statements about the perils of intolerance are still mostly white.

    https://hitsdailydouble.com/news&id=325036&title=THE-OTHER-PANDEMIC

    Notice how they contrast “scores of innocent Black folks”, further perpetuating the lies about the likes of George Floyd, Michael Brown, Breonna Taylor etc etc., and “violent white racists escorted gently out of the Capitol”—AS IF A WHITE WOMAN PROTESTOR WASN’T SHOT TO DEATH POINT BLANK BY POLICE AT THE CAPITOL. It’s like we’re living in Crazy Town.

    And the utter chutzpah at mentioning “cultural gatekeepers” when the writers of this website ARE members of that gatekeeper class and they’re actively endorsing destroying this man’s career for saying one word.

    • Replies: @Thea
  172. Kronos says:
    @Stan Adams

    Who’s the guy on the bottom?

  173. Forbes says:
    @CCZ

    It gets better. Sec’y of Defense orders 60-day stand-down to confront extremism in the military.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/defense-secretary-orders-60-day-stand-down-confront-extremism-military

    Re-education camps to follow…

  174. @Lot

    Covid19 first broke out at the one walking distance from China’s largest virus laboratory, which was focused on coronaviruses and had long been criticized for sloppy safety procedures!

    Given this is the case, the simplest explanation seems to be that someone from the lab got infected, and it spread from there; just an accident. We know the virus is extremely contagious because the masks, social distancing, etc., have almost eliminated flu cases but covid is going strong.

  175. @vhrm

    A similar thing I’ve been surprised by repeatedly is discovering people I know who don’t know what their spouses do for a living. I’ve seen this mostly with women. Same with some high school and college kids about their parents, let alone their grand parents.

    Huh…..

    I believe you, but I find this incomprehensible.

  176. @Kronos

    Shepard Smith

    • Thanks: Kronos
    • Replies: @Kronos
  177. Forbes says:
    @ben tillman

    ex•pert ĕk′spûrt″

    n. Someone who knows more and more about less and less until he knows everything about nothing.

  178. TWS says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    Turns out you can’t be an alzheimer’s patient and president.

  179. @James Speaks

    Seriously, the BWLM force would have to have these departments:
    1. Enforcer in charge of Don’t. Touch. My. Hair.
    2. National Uh-Huh coordinator.
    3. Office of Empowerment.
    4. Isn’t Stacey Abrams Gorgeous doubters hunt down and kill task force.
    5. Department of Hair.
    6. …
    taking suggestions

    6. Office of Melanin Measurement
    7. Task force to get the awful Emmett Till murder by white people more news coverage
    8. Office to increase Black spontaneity and self confidence
    9. Special task force to insure any and all advertisements feature only Black people

    • Replies: @James Speaks
  180. @Kronos

    Longtime Fox (now NBC) anchor Shepard Smith

    • Thanks: Kronos
  181. @John Johnson

    Years of college indoctrination can dissipate in an evening with the right article.

    Yup.

    That’s what happened to me.

    Razib Khan, GNXP

  182. SMK says: • Website
    @Neoconned

    Talk about “projection,” accusing those you hate and fear of exactly what you’re guilty of and far more dementedly, systemically, and perniciously. For those few of us who tell no lies and hold and advance no delusions and conspiracy theories, savor the irony, ponder the absurdity and insanity of such beliefs and accusations. Not only this author but almost all leftists are like patients in a lunatic asylum decrying the psychiatrists who treat their mental illnesses as the real paranoid-schizophrenics.

  183. Tex says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    After all France, which provided a large part of the model for the American revolution and the American Constitution, has now quietly evolved into a component state of the EU and liberty, equality, and fraternity are just antique slogans replaced by regulations and treaties.

    Hate to break it to you, but the American colonies rebelled in 1775 and the US Constitution was written in 1787. The French Revolution didn’t get going until 1789.

    What was that about consensus reality?

  184. @Hapalong Cassidy

    People had been referring to Epstein’s island long before anyone had even heard of Epstein, and they were lumped in with the rest of the crazies.

    It must have been at least five years ago that someone I knew told me that Bill Clinton had been taking trips to a “pedophile island” and that it was a scandal that the media was covering up. I assumed it was some exaggerated nonsense.

  185. Tex says:
    @El Dato

    And I don’t even play when it comes to education because millions of blacks got lynched just for reading.

    Not really off topic, as it goes right to the core of nonsensical beliefs that are opposed to reality. Like millions of blacks read. LOL

  186. @Polistra

    “experts say” is a dog whistle to conformists

  187. @Anonymous

    Aye. But it’s ages ago now.

  188. @J.Ross

    You want it to go away then investigate it properly.

    This exactly.

    But instead the MSM-Tech propaganda machine have decided that they can just announce the official “truth” that they have socially constructed and then proceed to shut down, de-platform, and punish anyone who offers evidence to the contrary.

    For example, they refuse to investigate and refute the specific eyewitness accounts of election fraud. Instead, they just say it’s treasonous to question elections, so STFU or get banned. When a rational person sees that position, it makes the fraud allegations seem more likely to be true.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @Corvinus
  189. @War for Blair Mountain

    The triumph of racial identity politics is that it no longer matters what you may have done. All that matters is your skin color.

  190. JimDandy says:
    @JohnnyD

    We do. MANY workplaces make such “camps” mandatory.

    • Agree: HammerJack
  191. Altai says:

    The army will also undergo purges to ensure it’s loyalty.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    , @photondancer
  192. @Dumbo

    “Accepting” implies a decision. This choice or decision does not even occur to “most” people.

    I would guess it does not occur to you either in that you have already decided not to accept the mainstream media. Contempt prior to investigation.

    UNZ Review is not to my knowledge a source of “news.” It is almost pure opinion, however well informed.

    If you want as close as you will get to “news” look up yesterday’s date on wikipedia and read the global headlines. Do this every day and you will soon become more informed than just about everybody you know.

  193. @Jonathan Mason

    “An investigation into the source of the virus should look carefully at any research that was going on at the Wuhan lab into viruses identical to or very similar to the Covid-19 virus, and should include an examination of all the people who were directly involved in working on it, with examination of their medical records, and blood work testing to see if they have antibodies to the virus.”

    Ain’t gonna happen.

    https://www.rte.ie/news/coronavirus/2021/0203/1194707-coronavirus-global/

    The WHO, which has sought to manage expectations for the mission, has said its members would be limited to visits organised by their Chinese hosts and have no contact with community members, because of health curbs.

    While the novel coronavirus that sparked the pandemic was first identified in Wuhan, Beijing has sought to cast doubt on the notion that it originated in China, pointing to imported frozen food as a conduit.

    The team will spend two weeks in field work after having completed two weeks in hotel quarantine after arrival in Wuhan.

    A WHO team finally started work on its investigation in recent days after months of delays, with the experts visiting the Wuhan Institute of Virology on Wednesday.

    Peter Daszak, one of the experts, tweeted that the team had an “extremely important meeting today with staff” and a “frank, open discussion”.

    Nevertheless, top WHO officials have played down the chances of finding definitive answers on the trip.

    One year later. Do you think anything like the scenario you outlined will happen? Both the WHO and Biden are paid for by the Chinese.

  194. El Dato says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    We still don’t even know what happened to NORAD and the several dozen “plane hijacking exercises” that coincidentally occurred on 9/11. Slow down.

  195. @Jack D

    “Jews were few in number and so the Jewish communities did not really have the critical mass or the religious fanaticism or the hostility of the locals to maintain their population”

    Pissing people off as a demographic strategy?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  196. @Jeff Albertson

    Maybe ditching his wife for Samantha Power proved to be too much for even our most degenerate betters.

    Wouldn’t it be nice to think so. Slim to no chance that’s so though. He’s probably not radical enough for this crowd.

  197. Polistra says:
    @El Dato

    Congress ‘QAnon’ purge is about outlawing dissent and anyone hoping to restore the Republic should hate it

    Remember how in the early years of the Roman Empire, certain patriots continued to call for the restoration of the Republic? What happened to them? IIRC at first they were laughed at, then something more serious developed.

    Now when I say “Remember” I mean “remember from your studies” not that you’re that old. But we know all about Classical Studies now, don’t we?

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/after-such-knowledge-what-forgiveness-3/

  198. Polistra says:
    @wren

    The word “Freedomburger” dates from 1972?!

    Definitely ahead of his time.

  199. Corvinus says:

    “We’ve seen anti-white conspiracy theorists riot hundreds of times and cause thousands of extra murders as part of processing George Floyd’s death. But that’s not news fit to print.”

    It’s fit to print by YOU, Mr. Sailer, and those of your ilk. But that does mean your conclusion is accurate.

    “We have also seen that if left unchecked, networked conspiracy theories and online disinformation campaigns can lead to offline violence, as they did during last month’s deadly Capitol riot.”

    I think deep down you believe this to be true, Mr. Sailer, but you just can’t bring your cagey self to admit that here. Do some NOTICING, please, from a man whom I am fairly confident who have read before.

    QAnon is an ARG (Alternate Reality Game). It was set up that way and is managed that way. QAnoners are playing an ARG and refuse to stop for the very reason transreality gaming can be hazardous: you can forget what’s game and what’s reality. QAnoners are lost in a dangerous game.

    The reason this matters is that Trump and his agents aim to expand the gamification of reality beyond the confines of QAnon’s ARG mythology. Now they’re turning the finding of evidence of “election fraud” into a transreality game with its own mythology. All of this is dangerous.

    When we think of the far right as a space of “fake news” rather than the gamification of reality, we falsely accept the notion that Trumpists are interested in news. They’re not. They’re interested in tailored escapism, and in redefining reality as a mythology they can live with.

    When you misdefine someone as simply an indiscriminate “news consumer” rather than deeming them a LARPer—Live-Action Roleplayer—you erroneously analyze their characteristics and erroneously model their behavior.

    This is why I described the Trump era as the First Reality War, and urged folks in intel to treat reality as an active combat theater. Government will need many more digital-age cultural theorists than it anticipated. Not cyber folks—I mean world-builders and their interlocutors.

    The good news: the generation coming up gets transmedia, transreality, XR, ARGs, pervasive gaming, immersive theater, reality mining, gamification, collaborative OSINT and the like far more than their elders. Which is key, as much of the Trumpist threat will come in such spheres.

    Trump himself is an ARG—and people enjoy the game too much to stop.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/03/opinion/qanon-conspiracy-theories.html

    A Dec 30 NPR/Ipsos poll found that “recent misinformation, including false claims related to Covid-19 and QAnon, are gaining a foothold among some Americans.”

    According to the survey, nearly a fifth of American adults, 17 percent, believe that “a group of Satan-worshiping elites who run a child sex ring are trying to control our politics.” Almost a third “believe that voter fraud helped Joe Biden win the 2020 election.” Even more, 39 percent, agree that “there is a deep state working to undermine President Trump.”

    • Troll: GeneralRipper
    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    , @El Dato
  200. Corvinus says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    “For example, they refuse to investigate and refute the specific eyewitness accounts of election fraud.”

    Except it has been refuted. You simply don’t want to believe it.

    • Troll: GeneralRipper
    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  201. @Corvinus

    Except it has been refuted. You simply don’t want to believe it.

    Sure thing, Coronavirus. Why don’t you share the facts that prove each instance of sworn eyewitness testimony was perjury. I know, I know, . . . it’s always someone else’s burden to prove, and you read in the NY Times that someone somewhere said there is no evidence. So case closed.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  202. Corvinus says:
    @Kronos

    “The smart ones realize that the problem isn’t that most people believe Q/Trump over the MSM, it’s that Q/Trump have better credibility over the MSM.”

    LOL. Q/Trump are the kings of false information. I am hoping you were engaging in satire.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  203. @Corvinus

    ‘Almost a third “believe that voter fraud helped Joe Biden win the 2020 election.” ‘

    I believe it was more like almost half — a half which includes me.

    It was fairly obvious, really.

  204. HA says:
    @Neoconned

    “Even the WHO is seriously considering the possibility it escaped from a Chinese lab…”

    Are you kidding me? The same WHO who caved in to Chinese government pressure to approve “traditional medicine” so as to enable their quackery to be transacted world-wide? Tiger penis and bear gallbladder juice for the global masses!

    I’m not dismissing anything about any misdeeds or mistakes in any Chinese lab, but when the WHO has any unkind word to say about anything the Chinese government is involved in, THEN come talk to me. Until then, I’m going to continue assuming that the WHO’s only role here is to be a fixer and whitewasher.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    , @HA
  205. @Alfa158

    “While we are drawing from Russian examples of good statecraft, how about a secret police force/army like the Soviet Union’s MVD?”
    Maybe I’m inferring too much, but isn’t that exactly where he is going with this?

    Okay, but don’t we already have that in the FBI?

  206. El Dato says:
    @Corvinus

    Even more, 39 percent, agree that “there is a deep state working to undermine President Trump.”

    Get me Reality Czar on the blower, quick!

    I always imagine Corvinus looks like Reverend Cavil from Battlestar Galactica (The Reboot). I wonder why.

    Meanwhile, Representatives deploy emotional blackmail against the People. We are in deep cult territory here.

    Congress holds taxpayer-funded group therapy session for AOC and pals, who were totally traumatized by Capitol raid

    As the story currently stands, Ocasio-Cortez is a “survivor” in the same way that the cast of ‘Survivor’ are. Nevertheless, she managed to compare her experience on January 6 to that of a war veteran, prompting another round of mockery.

    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez may have been scared for her life. Nobody but her knows how it felt to be in her shoes that day. Yet anyone attempting to disagree with her on factual grounds is missing the point.

    By elevating something as nebulous as “lived experience” to political discourse, AOC has managed to pull off something truly remarkable. Any opposition to her version of events isn’t debate any more. It’s a personal attack on a “survivor.” You’re with her or you’re with the “insurrectionists.” You believe her, or you hate sexual assault victims. You’ll honor her “lived experience,” or you’ll side with the “white-supremacist sympathizers” in the Republican party who enabled her trauma.

    They will cry while they tell you to drink the kool aid.

  207. Charlotte says:
    @Anon

    Two possible explanations come to mind.

    One, media, scientific, and governmental elites are closing ranks against a truly horrifying possibility: the unwashed masses dictating limits to them, instead of the other way around. Seriously, I think the idea that the non-elite, non-experts, ordinary people, could succeed in restricting research (Science!) causes a real sense of panic. Elite reporters are going to identify with elite virologists. Attacks on expertise (even justified ones) are attacks on them, their careers, their influence, their importance, even their progressive worldview, which can be described as pursuing utopia through science.

    The second, moving into conspiracy theory territory here, is that certain governments oppose scrutiny and controls because they want maximum freedom for research that lays the groundwork for certain forms of biowarfare. I’m sure some people, somewhere, are looking into how to weaponize diseases against specific genetic profiles. They probably don’t want too much speculation on the implications of any, say, gain-of-function studies they are funding.

  208. @Steve Sailer

    Stoppard was script doctor on Burton’s Sleepy Hollow, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade and The Bourne Ultimatum (and he’s rumored to have worked on Episode III: Revenge of the Sith…the least awful of the prequels).

  209. Speaking of reality ..

    The Chicago Teachers Union, which has responded to calls, by the city’s loony mayor and its frustrated parents, to re-open the schools (i.e. get the teachers back to in-person babysitting) has escalated the matter into a full-on labor dispute, e.g. threatened to go out on strike.

    Incidentally, the mayor has comforted the taxpayers by informing them that, while the schools have been shuttered, the unionized staffers responsible for such indispensable functions as modulating the thermostats and distributing free meals have not missed a day.

    In case you weren’t aware, the teachers have been getting a paid, virtual vacation.

    (Don’t get me wrong. I’m thrilled that the schools are closed; the virtual plug should get pulled, also.)

  210. @Jonathan Mason

    After all France, which provided a large part of the model for the American revolution and the American Constitution, has now quietly evolved into a component state of the EU and liberty, equality, and fraternity are just antique slogans replaced by regulations and treaties.

    I’ll ponder this bit of Masonry.

  211. Sean says:
    @Anon

    Cooperation within the group is essential to survival but when organisms come together, infectious (viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitical) disease spreads. Hence the fact that well known immune system substance interferon (gamma) stimulates pro social behavior while also boosting anti-pathogen (anti infectious disease activity) in the individual’s body.

    Alex Jones wealth derives from a food supplement selling business model; his own lawyers virtually said in court during hi divorce and civil case brought by bereaved Sandy Hook couple that he is an entertainer who does not believe much of what his public persona says, and indeed no reasonable person could believe it. Jones is an entertainer takes his audience down a rabbit hole far more than Joe Rogan who will listen to people speak their truth while being non-committal. Rogan seems far more likeable that Jones. Healthier too.

    Prior to Bullmore’s hypothesis, it had been suggested that the evolutionary pressure for depression accompanying inflammation was for strategic withdrawal to prevent loss of social status when a person is below par. David Icke certainly didn’t conform to any idea of him protecting his standing in society. Icke was sports presenter for the daily BBC2 national highbrow current affairs program Newsnight, then a nationally famous politician for the Green Party before he started to come out with completely hatstand ideas. His mainstream political career ended in a toe curling moment on a much watched talk show (Wogan) in which he was told the audience were not laughing with him, they were laughing at him. Icke’s rheumatoid arthritis was not infectious of course, but his bizarre ideas certainly led to him being less at the center of his society than he would otherwise have been. People shied away from him. Conspiracy theorists on the internet are oft times removing themselves from reproductive fitness opportunities

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    , @Anonymous
  212. El Dato says:
    @MEH 0910

    Matt Welch missed the one where the US is currently emerging from Apartheid.

    Put Racial Justice at Center of the Biden-Harris Transition Plan

    After nearly 50 years of violence and discrimination against Black and other non-white South Africans, the first post-apartheid government, led by President Nelson Mandela and the African National Congress (ANC), undertook a range of reforms relating to housing and criminal justice. Parts of the Biden plan resemble these early initiatives.

    Here’s what worked, what didn’t, and implications for the United States today.

    [Unconvincing elucubrations elided]

    Here is something that didn’t have equitable outcomes. Regrettably.

    Regrettably, many of the ANC’s efforts to reform prisons were ultimately hampered by political pressure to take a harsher stance amidst a rising crime rate. Facing an outcry from the white population, the government established maximum-security private prisons and encouraged judges to grant longer sentences. This tougher approach led to increasingly overcrowded prisons that remain racially imbalanced—as of 2016, nearly 98 percent of prisoners are Black or coloured, much higher than their 85 percent share of the population.

  213. Polistra says:
    @HA

    Alas, the WHO–like the CDC–has become a thoroughly sclerotic, politicized institution whose pronouncements now mean next to nothing. And which utterances, not incidentally, are promoted by the MSM as the Gospel Truth in every instance–including when they contradict themselves.

    • Agree: Cortes
  214. Charlotte says:
    @J.Ross

    What the hell does being reasonable mean? It is completely beyond discussion that our ruling class is pushing through radical changes using technological and communications centralization, and that in fact they wanted to do this earlier but Trump interrupted their plans.

    This, exactly. If the MSM is losing control of the narrative, this is the underlying cause.

  215. nebulafox says:
    @Altai

    I keep seeing former 3-stars on Twitter mouthing off about how shocked-shocked, I tell you!-they were at the omnipresence of Drudge, FOX, whatever on the cell phones of their soldiers, Marines, airmen, and sailors. As if they didn’t know where the heaviest recruiting pools are, demographically and geographically, in the United States. Especially for enlisted personnel-you really think that red-state, blue-collar young men with predictably right-wing political views aren’t over-represented? What a crock.

    I don’t see how America’s military preparedness is not negatively impacted by the increasing mutual alienation between the high command and the traditional drawing pool for enlisted men. This problem has been in the making for quite some time, to be fair. But the Biden Administration’s policies are going to turn a bad problem into a catastrophe.

  216. The root of this issue is minoritarianism.

    Minoritarianism spews out some many outright and incoherent lies, and fences off so many no-go/no-thought zones about race, sex, blacks, Jews, Latinos, immigrants, men/women, sexual perversions, genes, culture, education, production/parasitism, nation vs. state … that a lot of people are always looking as at least some aspect of the reigning ideology and going “huh!”.

    Regular regurgitation of ridiculous minoritarian pieties:
    — “diversity is our greatest strength”
    — “immigration makes us stronger”
    — “gender equality” (i.e. women are just as good as men … except where they’re better)
    — “gender is a social construct”
    — “structural racism”
    destroys any notion of a common, generally assented to national ideology and any belief in the truthfulness of elites.

  217. SafeNow says:
    @Travis

    Thanks. I agree about cloth masks. I read a recent study saying that a cotton mask is at best the same as no mask, and might be five times worse than no mask. it also talks about Lombard speech occurring while wearing a mask. This is speech that has higher volume and elongation of vowel sounds.

  218. Rob McX says:

    A country that believes diversity is strength and gender is fluid needs an Ivan the Terrible of reality czars.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  219. @nebulafox

    The US Army and the Russian Military are at most two feet at times on patrol in Syria(You can thank Donald Trump for this!!!)…on itchy trigger finger by a global homo US Army Soldier….The Russian Military won’t tolerate Vladimir Putin’s good guy restraint if it happens.

    The 1964 Civil Rights Act should never had been allowed to pass… White America should have separated from Blacks in 1964…If this had happened, the 1965 Immigration Reform Act would never have passed-America 2021 would still be demographically 90 percent White.

  220. @Rob McX

    A country that believes diversity is strength and gender is fluid needs an Ivan the Terrible of reality czars.

    Gender isn’t fluid, it’s non-existent. At least in English, other than in pronouns.

    Sex isn’t fluid, but requires them.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
  221. Cortes says:

    The only Tsar lacking in the USA is in the bacon sector.

    High time for the Tsar of all the rashers.

    I’ll get me coat.

    Try the veal.

  222. @SafeNow

    Why didn’t Fauci possess common sense eight months ago?

    We suffered a paucity at the time.

    Fauci recently said two masks are better than one…

    I just bought a mask, at a Hmong-run store, handmade from GOP-themed fabric. Cash required, though cards were good for food there.

    Is it safer to wear that over or under the synthetic-fiber mask? I mean epidemiologically safer, not politically.

  223. @John Johnson

    Oh they will get worse.

    Kamala can’t even handle a heavily edited softball interview without her nostrils flaring.

    She will be a ball of emotional rage and we can all guess as to which groups she will direct her frustrations.

    The sooner we get Kamala the better. She is deeply unpleasant and can not hide her unpleasantness.

    What is needed now–and needed quickly–is for white Americans to–and really all productive middle class Americans who enjoy living in a Western (i.e. white) nation–to wake the hell up. Wake up to the toxic, cancerous character of minoritarianism.

    Minoritarianism has been frog boiling for 50+. If we’re going to recover and throw minoritarianism out–or simply separate our a coherent Western-Civ America from minoritarian “America”, we need the slow boil to end and us frogs to realize the water has bubbles.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
  224. @Just another serf

    I like the way you think. Item 7 might benefit from a Constitutional Amendment replacing the Pledge of Allegiance with ….

    • Agree: Just another serf
  225. @Danindc

    Norm and Chapelle have wildly different world views. Norm loves whitey and Chapelle not so much.

    Norm grew up in Quebec City without learning any French. That takes some attitude.

    Those Frogs, by the way, aren’t as close to the boiling point as other Canadians, or Americans.

  226. Rob McX says:
    @AnotherDad

    Minoritarianism has been frog boiling for 50+. If we’re going to recover and throw minoritarianism out–or simply separate our a coherent Western-Civ America from minoritarian “America”, we need the slow boil to end and us frogs to realize the water has bubbles.

    The trouble with that point of view is that people on the right have been saying it for decades – one more push from the minoritarians and whites will wake up. Twenty – or even ten – years ago, they would probably have predicted that the situation as it is today would be sufficient to provoke a revolution.

    I think it would take a massive social upheaval, with disruptions in the food and power supplies, to finally jolt whites out of their collective coma.

  227. JimB says:

    Biden needs a consciousness czar to bring him out of his coma occasionally for photo ops

    • LOL: El Dato
  228. Kronos says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I’ve never heard of him. Who the hell name’s their kid Shepard as a first name?

    • Replies: @Cortes
    , @Harry Baldwin
  229. Rob McX says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Of course. I neglected to put quotation marks around gender.

  230. @anon

    Biden is a low functioning pot-plant.

    That would make a great chapter title in a novel. I feel a book coming on. It will have aliens.

    He wouldn’t know Arthur from Martha.

    Thought that was Lindsey Graham or Adam Schiff. Might I suggest:

    He wouldn’t know a tram was up him until the conductor rang a bell”

  231. Corvinus says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    “Why don’t you share the facts that prove each instance of sworn eyewitness testimony was perjury.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2020/11/20/affidavit-giuliani-vote-fraud/

    Most of the affidavits center on allegations that volunteers who wanted to watch votes being counted weren’t able to be as close to the count as they wanted (given the coronavirus pandemic) or alleging vague claims…Moreover, a key issue is whether the affidavit is filed in court, as most filed by the Trump’s lawyers were not…Other witnesses signed affidavits that said, “I believe my vote for Donald J. Trump and Michael Pence was not counted.” But when pressed by judges, they admitted they didn’t have any actual evidence to support that. A similar thing happened in Chatham County, Ga., where the GOP called two witnesses as part of its allegation that 53 ballots received after Election Day were predated to make them appear valid. But under questioning, the witnesses acknowledged they didn’t know whether the ballots were actually received after the deadline, while witnesses for the local elections board testified under oath that they were received on time.

    And “hearsay” is not evidence.

    https://lawandcrime.com/2020-election/come-on-now-michigan-judge-scoffs-at-and-tosses-trump-campaign-lawsuit-backed-by-hearsay-evidence/

    In President Donald Trump’s second loss in court in a single day, a Michigan judge rejected the Trump campaign’s bid to stop counting ballots without their inspectors present. The judge scoffed at plaintiffs’ “hearsay” evidence that a lawyer said she heard from a poll worker regarding dates supposedly changed on ballots.

    “‘I heard someone else say something,’” Michigan Judge Cynthia Stephens said on Thursday, summing up an affidavit submitted by the Trump campaign. “Tell me how that is not hearsay. Come on now!”

    An attorney for the Democratic National Committee, seeking to intervene in the case, argued that the Trump campaign lacked factual support.

    “No evidence in the record would allow the court to find a likelihood of success on the merits,” the DNC’s counsel Kevin Hamilton said in court.

    “All of this is really an effort to stop the counting of ballots by Michigan voters,” he added later.

    Remember, Trump’s lawyers consistently backed down when asked by courts to offer specific evidence. Again, how do you specifically address the fact they said they did not allege fraud when pressed by the courts?

    And we are still waiting for Sydney Powell to reveal her smoking gun evidence of how Trump votes were changed to Biden votes, thanks to the seizure of servers in Germany by the U.S. Army.

    Furthermore, how do you explain Representative Cawthorn’s response?

    “I know, I know, . . . it’s always someone else’s burden to prove”

    Indeed, it was Trump’s lawyers who had to meet that legal standard. Why didn’t they?

    “and you read in the NY Times that someone somewhere said there is no evidence. So case closed.”

    More like I read several sources, including ex-AG Barr’s statements, as well as the responses to alleged widespread voter fraud by GOP Secretary of Staters.

  232. @Anonymous

    “White” should be capitalized.

    Unlike losers such as Winston Churchill, Theodore Roosevelt, Lothrop Stoddard, and Carleton Coon, we should follow the practice of these journalistic pioneers:

    This is your model, brave Mr Anonymous:

  233. Corvinus says:
    @El Dato

    Thanks for the red herring. Now I’m off to get some Grey Poupon.

  234. fnn says:

    Likely the author of this book would be a good choice for Reality Czar:

  235. Kronos says:
    @Corvinus

    LOL. Q/Trump are the kings of false information. I am hoping you were engaging in satire.

    Nope.

    I firmly believe the MSM is so horrifically bad at news reporting and nefarious with their continuous gaslighting (think Syria gas attack) that Q and Trump possess a higher credibility level. If Q and Trump had a financial credit rating of 425, the MSM has a credit of 160. If you grew up in the aftermath of 9/11 you were never exposed to the (allegedly) decent quality news provided by Ted Turner and company to bump up the overall credibility score of the MSM.

    I’d trust a gutter clown selling penis enlargement pills more over the MSM any day.

    • Agree: GeneralRipper
    • Replies: @Corvinus
  236. Jack D says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    No, it’s an unintended consequence of demographic success. The historic pattern is that Jews are initially welcome in small numbers but when they outgrow their ecological niche that breeds the resentment of the locals. For example, in colonial America anti-Semitism was virtually unknown but so were Jews. So there was none of the restricted hotels, admission quotas, etc. stuff that came later when millions of Jews arrived.

  237. @Rob McX

    I think it would take a massive social upheaval, with disruptions in the food and power supplies, to finally jolt whites out of their collective coma.

    You may be right. We may be doomed.

    But the only way that some sort of American nation survives is indeed from people waking up and defeating minoritarianism either directly or through separation.

  238. Cortes says:
    @Kronos

    Irish Catholic proverb #1916:

    NEVER trust anyone whose first name is a surname.

    • Thanks: Kronos
    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    , @Hibernian
    , @JMcG
  239. @JohnnyWalker123

    “Your organization has done little for its members…”

    Indeed, SAG-AFTRA is the only union in the land that permits the boss to make its members work naked.

    https://perezhilton.com/movie-nude-scenes-were-thankful-for/

  240. @El Dato

    There are so many mixed metaphors here along with a dose of cultural appropriation.

    But those backup singers seem to be laughing at their own joke about the silliness of it all.

  241. @Mr. Anon

    “I really don’t need lectures from you on – well – on anything.”

    Lol. John Mason, Jack Off of All Trades D., and Telling (the fakevax shill) write 75% of the comments here by wordcount. They do love them some lectures!

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  242. @Jack D

    For example, in colonial America anti-Semitism was virtually unknown but so were Jews. So there was none of the restricted hotels, admission quotas, etc. stuff that came later when millions of Jews arrived.

    Better yet, they were granted– and possess to this day– the privilege of avuncular marriage in Rhode Island and Providence Plantations:

    Marriages of kindred allowed by Jewish religion

    The provisions of §§ 15-1-1 ? 15-1-3 shall not extend to, or in any way affect, any marriage which shall be solemnized among the Jewish people, within the degrees of affinity or consanguinity allowed by their religion.

    (G.L. 1896, ch. 191, § 4; G.L. 1909, ch. 243, § 4; G.L. 1923, ch. 287, § 4; G.L. 1938, ch. 415, § 4; G.L. 1956, § 5-1-4.)

    https://theamm.org/marriage-laws/rhode-island/1171

    Well, maybe not in “Providence Plantations”, which no longer exist:

  243. @Anon

    Dale Spender made a name for herself in the 1980s with studies that showed men talked much more in mixed sex groups, including meetings, and tended to hugely overestimate the amount of time women spoke. Basically, whenever women managed to speak more than 20% of the time in a mixed sex group they were perceived as hogging the floor and talking too much.

    It would be good if someone tried replicating these results today to see if it still holds but modern ‘feminists’ wouldn’t dream of doing actual scholarship from what I’ve seen.

  244. @Known Fact

    Oh yes. Here in multicultural Sydney, there were for many years a popular series of jaunts for inner city liberals to the more ethnic suburbs to sample the food, called food safaris. Well, we all know what a safari is: an expedition to see the wild animals in their natural habitat, all the while staying at a safe distance from them. The insensitivity of it gobsmacked me but they never picked up on it.

    • Replies: @Anon
  245. MBlanc46 says:
    @Jack D

    Rosenberg’s Rule: Everything always gets worse.

  246. @Rob McX

    Agree with your points but I think whites won’t wake up until after they are completely enslaved. And the scary part is that whites are being trained to welcome slavery and to love their new masters. So, many won’t wake up even then.

    The people running this enterprise are a bit smarter and vastly more hateful than any slave owners from the 1830s.

  247. @Altai

    So the next 60 days would be a good time to attack the USA or its overseas assets? I wonder how many people even now are pondering their options.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  248. @El Dato

    Snopes has now weighed in. AOC spoke the unvarnished truth and anyone saying otherwise is a white supremacist, a cyberbully, or Ted Cruz. Or, of course, some combination thereof.

    https://www.rt.com/usa/514656-snopes-aoc-exaggerated-capitol-danger/

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @MEH 0910
  249. @Sean

    his own lawyers virtually said in court during his divorce and civil case brought by bereaved Sandy Hook couple that he is an entertainer who does not believe much of what his public persona says, and indeed no reasonable person could believe it.

    Rachel Maddows lawyers said the same thing when she was sued for defamation by OANN:

    Bashant wrote in her ruling that even though the host used the word “literally” to describe OANN’s alleged ties to Russia, she “had inserted her own colorful commentary into and throughout the segment, laughing, expressing her dismay (i.e., saying ‘I mean, what?’) and calling the segment a ‘sparkly story’ and one we must ‘take in stride.’ For her to exaggerate the facts and call OAN Russian propaganda was consistent with her tone up to that point, and the Court finds a reasonable viewer would not take the statement as factual given this context. The context of Maddow’s statement shows reasonable viewers would consider the contested statement to be her opinion.”

    • Replies: @Sean
  250. @Danindc

    That’s the point! In the political realm, if you want to thrash out the truth, you have to have both sides represented.

    • Replies: @Danindc
  251. Richard B says:
    @Neoconned

    This dude is a dumb a**……

    No doubt. But what about the people who hired him?

    A bunch of big fish swimming in a tiny pond of Protective Stupidity.

    How the Biden Administration Can Help Solve Our Reality Crisis

    Translation:

    Biden Administration Needs a Flight from Reality Czar to Censor Hate Facts

  252. @Rob McX

    Some of the Progressives I know will say things like, “I object to that term ‘white privilege,” or “I don’t think trans-women should be competing in women’s sports,” but they’re still always going to vote for Progressives so it’s not going to change anything.

    • Replies: @anon
  253. anon[147] • Disclaimer says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    The late Lawrence Auster referred to such things as “unprincipled exceptions”.

    The unprincipled exception is a non-liberal value or assertion, not explicitly identified as non-liberal, that liberals use to escape the inconvenient, personally harmful, or suicidal consequences of their own liberalism without questioning liberalism itself.

  254. Corvinus says:
    @Kronos

    “I firmly believe the MSM is so horrifically bad at news reporting and nefarious with their continuous gaslighting (think Syria gas attack) that Q and Trump possess a higher credibility level.”

    Your basis for belief rests on emotion, not logic and reason.

    • Troll: GeneralRipper
    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @Mr. Anon
    , @nebulafox
  255. duncsbaby says:
    @JohnnyD

    It’s already here in the form of workshops and seminars. Most major corporations will mandate attendance, if not on person, then on zoom. All white men will be made to confess their sins in order to hold their job.

  256. @Corvinus

    Remember, Trump’s lawyers consistently backed down when asked by courts to offer specific evidence.

    That’s been the aspect of the whole thing that has truly made Trump and his team of amateurs/kooks/incompetents/Rudy Guiliani look like hysterical fools. I mean I believe there was a good amount of Democrat fraud, and I’m definitely open to that fraud having been sufficient to swing the election. But IF YOU CAN’T PROVE IT, at that moment, by marshalling any EVIDENCE – then you DON’T shriek and shout it to the public and go nuclear with lawsuits and the rallies, because you will to anyone outside your bubble you look and sound like someone who’s losing it and isn’t to be taken seriously. Even I know that.

    Trump in November and December could have been grave and restrained and spoken about his deep concerns for election integrity – in other words sounded and behaved like an adult with just a little statesmanlike dignity – and it would have got across what he really thought, and the very fact of him being calm but gravely serious would have actually made an impression on everyone. He could said that he would devote his post-presidential life to pushing for election integrity reforms, etc. Woulda, coulda, what a fucking buffoon we wound up hitching ourselves too.

    • Troll: GeneralRipper
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  257. Jack D says:
    @HammerJack

    It took less than 48 hours for the right-wing disinformation machine to contrive a way to minimize what Ocasio-Cortez said she had experienced.

    In a circus of cyberbullying that began on Feb. 3, 2021, conservative news outlets and social media conspiracy trolls latched on to the misleading* claim that Ocasio-Cortez “wasn’t in the Capitol building”

    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/aoc-capitol-attack/

    Yeah, this sounds fair and balanced to me. Nothing but a fact check – no political agenda here. Just the facts, ma’am.

    * In Snopes speak, “misleading” means that something is actually true but is embarrassing to the left. It’s like reading Pravda back in the day – you have to read between the lines. So, “the misleading claim that Ocasio-Cortez wasn’t in the Capitol building” means that it’s true that Ocasio-Cortez really wasn’t in the Capitol building.

    OAC was afraid because a cop came to her office to tell her to evacuate. People of Color are afraid of the popo so she hid in the bathroom. If a cop HADN’T come, this would have been evidence of racism. Heads I win, tails you lose.

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    , @MEH 0910
  258. Kronos says:
    @Corvinus

    Your basis for belief rests on emotion, not logic and reason.

    Would you care to state what the MSM got right?

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  259. Anon[218] • Disclaimer says:
    @Chrisnonymous

    An Asian girl journalist was working on this story. Razib Khan was retweeting her. I guess she got her story stolen/scooped. 2021 lesson: don’t publicly tweet your story before you publish it.

    This is not true. The editor’s note, which you didn’t read even though I linked to it and it isn’t that long, explains the origin of the cover story:

    A novelist and essayist writing in New York for the first time, whose most recent book is Baseless: My Search for Secrets in the Ruins of the Freedom of Information Act, Nicholson Baker says that he became curious about the origins of the pandemic last year and began doing research and conducting interviews, before putting it aside because it was “too fraught, too politically charged, too complicated.” After New York deputy editor David Wallace-Wells heard Baker discuss the origins of the pandemic on the Longform Podcast, he approached Baker to tackle the subject for New York. He spent about three months working on the story, conducting about 25 interviews and surveying the history of gain-of-function research.

    Additionally:

    Given the seriousness and sensitivity of the subject matter (among the effects of the politicization of the disease has been the bullying and harassment of Asian Americans), New York’s fact-checking team spent a month vetting the story; additionally, Baker and the magazine shared drafts of the essay with multiple scientists, including two molecular biologists who believe that SARS-CoV-2 is a zoonotic virus, who all provided critical feedback to help ensure the accuracy of the work.

    The story was being written about and tweeted about from many people. The most prolifically retweeted account was Alina Chan’s, a genetic researcher at the Broad Institute. She’s written about in the New York article, but a long piece by Rowan Jacobsen in Boston Magazine in September was a more in-depth profile of Chan:

    Could COVID-19 Have Escaped from a Lab?
    https://www.bostonmagazine.com/news/2020/09/09/alina-chan-broad-institute-coronavirus/

    This is also worth reading after the New York piece, since it goes into more depth on her particular story.

    Hey, wait, Chan isn’t the “Asian girl journalist” you mentioned? Chan is not a journalist and was actively contacting and cooperating with journalists who would talk to her. She coauthored a few research papers on her findings (discussed in both Boston Magazine and New York Magazine).

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
  260. @Cortes

    NEVER trust anyone whose first name is a surname.

    That seems to be Rowan Atkinson’s attitude in this hilarious interview of Elton John .

  261. Anon[218] • Disclaimer says:
    @photondancer

    This popped up at Althouse, perhaps a meta study of what you’re talking about, but 30 years old at this point:

    https://pure.mpg.de/rest/items/item_68785_7/component/file_506904/content

    https://althouse.blogspot.com/2021/02/when-you-increase-number-of-female.html#more

    It is a widely held belief that women talk more than men; but experimental evidence has suggested that this belief is mistaken. The present study investigated whether listener bias contributes to this mistake. Dialogues were recorded in mixed-sex and single-sex versions, and male and female listeners judged the proportions of talk contributed to the dialogues by each participant. Female contributions to mixed-sex dialogues were rated as greater than male contributions by both male and female listeners. Female contributions were more likely to be overestimated when they were speaking a dialogue part perceived as probably female than when they were speaking a dialogue part perceived as probably male. It is suggested that the misestimates are due to a complex of factors that may involve both perceptual effects such as misjudgment of rates of speech and sociological effects such as attitudes to social roles and perception of power relations.

    “misestimates due to misjudgment of rates of speech and sociological effects such as attitudes to social roles and perception of power relations”

    I would also add that other factors might be involved, although I wouldn’t expect cancel-averse researchers to consider them:

    – Perhaps women like to talk about stupid subjects (in the opinion of the men, such as stuff not related to business profitability).

    – Perhaps women tend to repeat each other as a social support mechanism, when men just want to hear it once and end the damn meeting.

    – Perhaps women treat meetings a social occasions rather than short, efficient business communication sessions, in the same way that older people talk to retail checkout clerks for way longer than necessary.

    In other words, perhaps women would rather be nurses or schoolteachers, but were shamed into “not throwing away their smarts” and pushed towards business, to which they are not as well suited, and they spend an inordinate amount of time trying to feminize business and turning it into something it isn’t.

  262. Mr. Anon says:
    @Corvinus

    And you are – as ever – a stupid, contemptible ass.

  263. Sean says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    Jones’s court cases were personal not business. He is careful to make it clear he is an entertainer.

    Of tap water “he said I have the government documents where they said they’re going to encourage homosexuality with chemicals so people don’t have children.” ‘Tis when public figures of any kind–even comedians doing stand u–say anything uncomplimentary about a certain fast food chain on knows they are really meaning it, because that company always sues.

    The humiliated position Mr. Icke has knowingly put himself in lets one know he is serious; he is the main force behind the anti Covid-19 vaccination movement in Britain, and this not anything he said about Rothschilds led to him being totally deplatformed from mainstream and even social media.

    I think Icke’s strange ideas spring from his auto immune disorder; he once was a successful and widely respected man. In view of his antivax activism, its ironic an evolutionary adaption is seemingly compelling him to sacrifice all his social status by expounding absolute rubbish and through this keep everyone away from him.

    • Replies: @James Forrestal
  264. @Anon

    Women like talking person to person in private more than men do on average. More men are likely to want to speak out in public meetings.

  265. J.Ross says:
    @photondancer

    Well gosh, China, North Korea, and a few others have reliably done that in the opening period for each new administration, so maybe. Of course, in Biden’s case, there’d be no information they don’t already know.

  266. El Dato says:

    OT: CNN reports that Officer Sicknick still hasn’t been murdered by a fire extinguisher. Officials are now looking at whether he was murdered by bear spray deployed by protestors. Late imperial justice: “we will find something”.

    Would Officer Sicknick be sickened by this kind of “honoring”? One hopes he would.

    Sicknick will lie in honor at the Capitol beginning Tuesday evening, Congressional leaders announced late last week, bestowing on him a sacred tribute that’s typically reserved for dead American political leaders.

    In Sicknick’s case, it’s still not known publicly what caused him to collapse the night of the insurrection. Findings from a medical examiner’s review have not yet been released and authorities have not made any announcements about that ongoing process.

    “The U.S. Congress is united in grief, gratitude and solemn appreciation for the service and sacrifice of Officer Brian Sicknick,” Pelosi and Schumer said in a joint statement. “May this ceremony and the knowledge that so many mourn with and pray for them be a comfort to Officer Sicknick’s family during this sad time.”

  267. @Anon

    Thanks, I’ll read the study and see what it says.. I note that they cite Ms Spender.

    As for your various perhapses, this is why I would like a follow up study. I have anecdotal evidence to the contrary (e.g. in a previous job I was nearly driven crazy by one talkative bloke who always prolonged our weekly meetings by 20-30 minutes because he was treating them as a social occasion, when most of the rest of us just wanted to get out) but that’s not conclusive.

  268. @El Dato

    Is being a Fire-Extinguisher Denier a “thing”?

  269. Tulip says:

    Beyond the politicization of the MSM and journalists, and the practice of lying on behalf of politicians in exchange for access, journalists as a class have always been scientifically illiterate, innumerate, usually historically illiterate, and prefer Black and White over the shades of nuance that characterize the “real world”. Even when they aren’t blatantly lying on behalf of Establishment politicians and the national security agencies, you are still dealing with a photogenic group of airheads. All the TV heads are pretty much high-functioning fashion models.

    I used to think that the NYT et. al. were all cynical lie merchants, yet I have come around to the belief that the confidence of the MSM in their “truth” is best explained by the Dunning-Kruger effect.

  270. @J.Ross

    the people he contracted with are the best in the world, but…

    The French initially provided funding and assistance for the WIV, they pulled out because of quality and safety issues. So, apparently, not the the best in the world….

  271. @Anon

    Yes, Chan. People who write non-technical articles for journalistic outlets are journalists.

  272. Danindc says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    I don’t want a guy who hates whites having much of a say on anything. Do you?

  273. @Art Deco

    “…and swing voters tend to be frivolous people.”

    Exactly. In my experience such people know little about issues and don’t pay much attention to politics.

    A similar instance was John McCain winning 2008 GOP presidential primaries. Exit poll interviews revealed many if not most voted for McCain because “he was a war hero.” When told McCain was for amnesty for illegal aliens, they were shocked. They hadn’t bothered to learn McCain’s policy positions.

  274. MEH 0910 says:
    @El Dato


    [MORE]

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  275. @Kronos

    Who the hell name’s their kid Shepard as a first name?

    Parents who had hoped their son would choose to find release with sheep rather than with other men.

  276. MEH 0910 says:
    @Jack D

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  277. @David In TN

    A similar instance was John McCain winning 2008 GOP presidential primaries. Exit poll interviews revealed many if not most voted for McCain because “he was a war hero.”

    Ed Bernays smiles somewhere at the idea of “Songbird” being retconned to “war hero”.

    In view of the Howard Zinnification of so much material one wonders how much “history” that is taught is just gaslighting. A quarter? A third? Half?

    One of the great services Unz has done is his ongoing “American Pravda” series. Who was John T. Flynn, and why was he airbrushed out of polite society back during the FDR years?

  278. @El Dato

    Interestingly, Officer Sicknick was an enthusiastic Trump supporter who had written to his congressional representative to protest the impeachment. But his corpse makes a useful prop to Democrats who normally couldn’t care less about dead police officers.

    https://nypost.com/2021/01/10/what-the-left-wants-to-ignore-about-slain-capitol-police-officer/

    • Replies: @Jack D
  279. Hibernian says:
    @Cortes

    The surname Ryan at some point became a popular boy’s given name in Irish and non-Irish families alike. I think it might have something to do with Ryan O’ Neal. It seemed to happen after his peak of popularity.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  280. Jack D says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    You can imagine that if there had been a BLM sponsored “peaceful protest” in DC and Officer Sicknick had been brained by an Antifa, his body would not be lying in state at the Capitol. Instead there would have been stories in the press about what a racist he was and someone would have come forward to say that they heard him use the N-word in 2009 and the implication would be that the pig deserved it.

    The MSM hardly even bothers to disguise the gaslighting that they are doing on us anymore, so I don’t even know if you can still call it gaslighting. Maybe it’s more like Darymple’s thesis that they are rubbing the lies in our face to show our powerlessness.

  281. MEH 0910 says:
    @HammerJack

    • Replies: @El Dato
  282. @Jack D

    But you’re no longer demographically successful and the panic that has engendered has been bad for both the Jews and those who have grown to rely on your leadership and innovation.

    Us.

  283. El Dato says:
    @MEH 0910

    AOC is the new Schrödinger’s Cat.

    In mortal danger – but both inside and outside the Capitol at the same time.

    Nevertheless the hateful emoting and rancid motional blackmail seems to get more pointed every day. At some point something is going to break in a very ugly way.

    ‘I’m sorry, I’m sorry’: US congressman tears up while apologizing for his ‘white privilege’ on House floor (VIDEO)

    During a Thursday evening House discussion, in which members of Congress were invited to “share their stories” about the day Donald Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol, Rep. Dean Phillips recalled that he had asked his fellow Democrats to follow him to the Republican side of the chamber in an effort to “blend in” as conservatives.

    “But within moments I recognized that blending in was not an option available to my colleagues of color,” Phillips said, his voice beginning to break.

    Oh?

  284. @Sam Malone

    But IF YOU CAN’T PROVE IT, at that moment, by marshalling any EVIDENCE…

    There is plenty of evidence for a cover-up. There has been little energy spent in uncovering.

    Fraud is to be assumed. That is why electronic voting is banned in Germany, and “absentee” ballots in French and Finnish elections must be cast from outside those countries.

    This is fascinating– an admission that it really happened, but it was good, and justified:

    TIME Mag: “Trump Was Right. There WAS A Conspiracy”

    • Replies: @Sam Malone
    , @Corvinus
  285. nebulafox says:
    @Jack D

    Throughout the Deep South, there’s a small Sephardi community that dates back to the antebellum days, long before the main Ashkenazi wave of the turn of the century. You know who they are because they typically have dark hair and Portuguese sounding last names instead of lighter hair and English/Scots-Irish sounding ones. Otherwise, though, they don’t stand out, politically or socially. It would have been interesting to see them interact with Freedom Rider students from the North in the 1960s with an Ashkenazi background-they might not have even suspected they were co-religionists.

    (They aren’t alone: there are also Chinese who came over long before 1965 in rural Mississippi who talk with the same accent that everybody else does. Humans be humans.)

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @S. Anonyia
  286. MEH 0910 says:
    @El Dato

    AOC was using the “violence” charge against Jimmy Dore before the Capitol riot:

    AOC Deletes Tweet — Betrays Her Own Campaign Promises #FraudSquad

    AOC is using the Capitol riot to deflect from being called out as a sell-out by Jimmy Dore.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  287. nebulafox says:
    @Corvinus

    Logic and reason: Mattis openly admitted after the report of the initial gas attack that the truth was that they didn’t know who released it, contradicting the drumbeat narrative of the previous year.

    Further logic and reason: why would Assad have done something that could have potentially provoked an American response, when that was the only thing that could have prevented him from staying in power at that point? The Assad dictatorship is not known for eccentricities in the region: plenty of brutality, but little of the Saddam-esque soap opera stunts. And while Bashar might not be his old man, he’s not stupid, either: if he was, he wouldn’t have survived.

    And even if he was crazy and stupid, his Russian and Iranian benefactors would have been even less keen on tolerating that kind of stunt, knowing the possible consequences. They certainly would have acted afterwards if he did it.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @Corvinus
  288. @Corvinus

    Indeed, it was Trump’s lawyers who had to meet that legal standard. Why didn’t they?

    Okay, I am not a lawyer, but I thought that it is the responsibility of the police, sheriff, etc., to investigate, and then prosecutors, DA’s etc., to make the case in such crimes. Joe Citizen reports a crime, police investigate it. It is not Joe Citizen’s job to go and do all of the investigation and evidence collection because he lacks the authority to do so. My question is why should a candidate have to do the law enforcement job of investigation and evidence collection. I mean, it is fine for Joe Citizen to provide what evidence or claims he may have, but he shouldn’t just be told to push off if he can’t prove how exactly a crime happened when he doesn’t even have access to do so. So, why is vote fraud a crime that the candidate has to investigate on his own? Why is the government playing the part of disinterested observer rather than that of investigator and prosecutor? It shouldn’t be Trump vs. County elections. It should be State of Pennsylvania vs. County elections board, or whatever it is called.

    • Agree: Hibernian
  289. El Dato says:
    @nebulafox

    Plus, using “gas” doesn’t seem to be a modus operandi that is used by enemies of the Axis of Kindness.

    Plus, if you gas, then you gas hard. You don’t drop a couple of cylinders into bedrooms or intersections.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halabja_chemical_attack

    The Halabja chemical attack … was a massacre of Kurdish people that took place on 16 March 1988, during the closing days of the Iran–Iraq War in the Kurdish city of Halabja in Iraqi Kurdistan. The attack was part of the Al-Anfal Campaign in Kurdistan, as well as part of the Iraqi Army’s attempt to repel the Iranian Operation Zafar 7. It took place 48 hours after the capture of the town by the Iranian Army. A United Nations (UN) medical investigation concluded that mustard gas was used in the attack, along with unidentified nerve agents.

    The attack killed between 3,200 and 5,000 people and injured 7,000 to 10,000 more, most of them civilians. Preliminary results from surveys of the affected region showed an increased rate of cancer and birth defects in the years after the attack. The incident, which has been officially defined by the Supreme Iraqi Criminal Tribunal as a genocidal massacre against the Kurdish people in Iraq, was the largest chemical weapons attack directed against a civilian-populated area in history.

    An interesting note on the the complete reliability and objectivity of US intelligence:

    The U.S. State Department, in the immediate aftermath of the incident, took the official position that Iran was partly to blame (? how does the “partly” work here ?). A preliminary Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) study at the time reported that Iran was responsible for the attack, an assessment which was used subsequently by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) for much of the early 1990s.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  290. El Dato says:
    @MEH 0910

    This is all Kindergarten-level behaviour that used to be corrected by the schoolteacher smacking the kid around a bit.

    Would be embarrassing if it weren’t so dangerous.

  291. El Dato says:

    Reality Czarism and how does Rihanna make moolah?

    Activism for hire? By ditching climate change for Sikh separatism, Greta Thunberg shows her naivety and erodes her credibility

    Indian officials believe Dhaliwal’s Skyrocket company paid Rihanna $2.5 million to post her support for the farmers’ protest earlier this week. With more than 100 million followers on Twitter, that is serious social media reach and, you’d have to say, worth every cent.

    Also, Greta, whose childhood was somehow stolen from her by Global Warming, is now decidedly burnt. Time to become a physicist maybe and not proceed with the Fridays for Climate?

  292. @Reg Cæsar

    There is plenty of evidence for a cover-up. There has been little energy spent in uncovering.

    You say that plenty of evidence exists, and that putting more energy into bringing it to light is all that’s needed. So why then have Trump and his team not invested such energy in marshalling concrete evidence that would withstand scrutiny in court? They’re the people to do it, right? BUT THEY HAVEN’T, because they couldn’t, and we have to face that.

    Now it may very well be that in real life uncovering concrete evidence of substantial mass electoral fraud after the fact is nearly impossible. I suspect there was such fraud, but if you can’t prove it, because life isn’t fair, then you have to decide what steps to take next.

    The steps Trump decided on – and that many of us continue to go along with – is the impotent one of simply bellowing and shrieking that fraud occurred AND that incontrovertible evidence is all just laying right there and can be/has been presented. That last part is clearly NOT true. I wish it was, but since Trump’s team did not repeat in court the charges they aired in news conferences, clearly they possessed no rock solid evidence.

    I’m sayin that the alternative steps Trump could have taken would have served him and his movement better. As I said, it would have been to swallow the bitter pill and maintain a dignified but grave manner and ALLUDE to fraud via nuanced statements, NOT to hysterically affirm what you cannot prove. Even if that strategy accomplished nothing, it would have accomplished more than the strategy Trump chose.

    • Replies: @anon
  293. Hibernian says:
    @El Dato

    Talk about pride masquerading as humility!

  294. anon[460] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sam Malone

    You say that plenty of evidence exists, and that putting more energy into bringing it to light is all that’s needed.

    Quite a bit of evidence of collusion and conspiracy is now right out in the open, thanks to this end-zone-sack-dance in TIME. The Party is very proud of its work.

    You could read it and learn a few things, if you wished.

    https://time.com/5936036/secret-2020-election-campaign/

    Their work touched every aspect of the election. They got states to change voting systems and laws and helped secure hundreds of millions in public and private funding. They fended off voter-suppression lawsuits, recruited armies of poll workers and got millions of people to vote by mail for the first time. They successfully pressured social media companies to take a harder line against disinformation and used data-driven strategies to fight viral smears. They executed national public-awareness campaigns that helped Americans understand how the vote count would unfold over days or weeks, preventing Trump’s conspiracy theories and false claims of victory from getting more traction. After Election Day, they monitored every pressure point to ensure that Trump could not overturn the result.

    • Troll: Corvinus
    • Replies: @anon
    , @Sam Malone
  295. @El Dato

    The weird thing about all this hysteria is, can you imagine how bad the riots would have been had Trump been declared the winner? Blocks after block of stores in Manhattan were boarded up before the election in fear of what would have happened had that been the official result. Instead, once it was decided that Biden would be president, the plywood came down.

    American cities would have burned at like no time in the past 60 years had the election not been given to Biden. Yet if that had happened, the media and Democrats would have seen no need to impose restrictions on left-wing speech and extremist activity. Does anyone doubt this?

  296. nebulafox says:
    @El Dato

    Oh, nobody actually in the field was ever under any illusions about who was responsible for that one. The Iraqis used gas regularly against the Iranians, with our full knowledge, throughout the 1980s. Why anybody was shocked when Saddam used it against the Kurds, I have no idea. Between Iraqi gas attacks and the Iranian usage of underage soldiers to clear minefields… should have been a clear that the whole region was nothing but trouble to any civilized society, that nothing good could come by getting involved there.

    That said, this dynamic does help illustrate the difference between the two regimes: not all dictators are alike. The Assads have generally always been a pretty sober, dour bunch running a very tight, rather paranoid ship. Back in the old man’s days, next to North Korea and North Vietnam, Soviet intelligence agents were never as closely watched or kept out of the loop, and this in a client state! They’ve had to be. Saddam had his sectarian divides to deal with, but he was never in the same position that the Alawites have faced in Syria as a sect viewed as heretical by many conservative Sunnis. They had to be careful. It’s hard to imagine either the father or the son creating a blood Qu’ran or butchering women with electric beaters at weddings.

    (And if it isn’t already clear, just because Saddam was indeed a mass murdering monster-the guy took Stalin as his main political role model and got his start in politics as an assassin, what does one expect?-doesn’t mean that deposing him wasn’t probably the stupidest, most damaging American foreign policy move in modern history-a tall order-or that American propaganda wasn’t willing to resort to open character assassination.)

    • Replies: @Jack D
  297. Jack D says:
    @nebulafox

    Sephardim going back to Colonial days are few in numbers and for the most part their lines have died out or they are no longer Jewish. There was later some Sephardic Jewish immigration from “Syria” (which then included Lebanon) who often started out as pack peddlers and then eventually settled down and founded dry goods stores in the South, some of which grew to be department stores. There were also German Jews whose roots go back to the great 1840s wave of German immigration and who also did the pack peddler thing. They are found in all the Southern (and near southern) cities that had German populations – for example Cincinnati, right across the river from Kentucky, was once a great center of German Jews. Also in unlikely places on the frontier, like Santa Fe, NM.

  298. nebulafox says:
    @MEH 0910

    There’s something very dangerous about the trend of using “trauma” as credibility in modern American culture: the most ruthless and socially adept bullies and petty authoritarians are going to utilize the hell out of it without shame.

    Therapy culture in general is producing problems for the less verbally or socially adept.

    • Agree: Jack D
    • Replies: @photondancer
  299. Jack D says:
    @nebulafox

    that American propaganda wasn’t willing to resort to open character assassination.

    How can you assassinate the character of a person who has no character? Anything that American propaganda could have invented about Saddam could not have been worse than the reality. The man was a butcher.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  300. nebulafox says:
    @Jack D

    For starters, Iraqi troops did not barge into hospitals in Kuwait, inflate people’s intestines, and steal incubators just so civilians would die for the hell of it-and certainly not on Saddam’s orders. Far from being the out-of-touch Caligula portrayed in the press, moreover, Saddam had real reasons to distrust American intentions by 1990. I don’t subscribe to the notion that America caused the Gulf War anymore than we caused the Japanese to attack Pearl Harbor, but just as was the case then, miscommunication was an issue that could have been avoided. I need not go into the reality that the people who actually caused 9/11 hated Saddam as much we did, Saddam’s (very foolish and counterproductive) embrace of political Islam in the 1990s aside.

    It’s sort of like the German invasion of Belgium in 1914: what happened was awful enough. All not being satisfied with that and resorting to inventing stories about German soldiers crucifying people or hacking off the breasts of nuns (or generally putting the atrocities on the same level as what the Belgians themselves did in the Congo) achieved was skepticism about larger scale German atrocities in the next war. But then, people in the media are generally not as bright as they think they are, and are allergic to public memory that lasts more than a year.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  301. @nebulafox

    Most of the Jews in the Deep South are Ashkenazi with origins in Germany or Poland. Large communities in Atlanta, suburban Birmingham, and Memphis. There may be a few Sephardic Jews around New Orleans but they aren’t going to be darker than the nearby whites, and their names aren’t necessarily going to be any weirder than that of the Catholics, who usually have French, Irish, German, or Spanish roots and not English/Scottish.

    Where are you talking about? A few small towns in Mississippi?

    • Agree: Jack D
    • Replies: @nebulafox
  302. Thea says:
    @DextersLabRat

    Just wait till they discover what rappers say…

    • Replies: @DextersLabRat
  303. Corvinus says:
    @nebulafox

    My point to Kronos was his purely illogical belief that Q and Trump are more credible than the MSM. I was NOT addressing the fiasco in Syria.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  304. Corvinus says:
    @Kronos

    “Would you care to state what the MSM got right?”

    For starters…

    https://abcnews.go.com/US/video-surfaces-showing-trump-ally-roger-stone-flanked/story?id=75706765

    Now, if I listed other events, would you try to find ways to dismiss each and every one as being “Jewish propaganda”, or would you actually engage in critical thought?

    • Replies: @Kronos
  305. Corvinus says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    “There is plenty of evidence for a cover-up”.

    Citations required.

    “Fraud is to be assumed”.

    No, fraud is to be proven. It’s too easy to make that assumption and cry foul when one’s candidate loses.

    “and “absentee” ballots in French and Finnish elections must be cast from outside those countries.”

    https://www.politico.eu/article/france-is-split-over-american-mail-in-ballots-2021-regional-election/

    Mail-in ballots are popular in other European countries. More than 13 million German voters posted their ballots in the 2017 general election, making up 29 percent of the electorate. In the U.K. general election of the same year, nearly 7 million voted by post, making up 22 percent of total ballots cast. And the Netherlands has just allowed its senior citizens to vote by mail in its next general election in March 2021, so that vulnerable people don’t need to go to crowded polling stations.

    “This is fascinating– an admission that it really happened, but it was good, and justified”

    That is Fake News on your part.

  306. anon[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    Lol @ silly Coronavinus scrambling to pretend that TIME magazine is a troll publication. Dude, it’s part of the media empire that employs you!

    The Party now can admit that the election was rigged, and even celebrate it. You better email your bosses and get the new official line, I think it’s something like “We had to rig the election to save free elections!” or some other Castro-like line. Can’t be a good online trolling stooge if you don’t have the latest talking points, now can you?

    • Replies: @petit bourgeois
    , @Corvinus
  307. JMcG says:
    @Mr. Anon

    The ignore commenter button is your friend.

  308. @anon

    Agree. This is the asshat who told me that I don’t do what I do for a living without any evidence. Don’t feed the troll.

    It’s like those graphs of Michigan and Wisconsin Nate Silver published that show middle-of-the-night ballot dumping all went for Biden isn’t substantial evidence.

    Those graphs are akin to Stacey Abrams’ boot on your neck, forever. That is what a one-party state is going to look like.

    There are two universal laws in political science:

    1. Every political system has bribery; and

    2. Every election has fraud.

    It took 80 years of corrupt elections in Mexico until the people finally changed the law to require voter ID. We can’t even have the election integrity of Mexico. It’s like the evil party is against anything resembling “chain of custody” for ballots.

  309. Anonymous[914] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sean

    Rogan straddled multiple genres in his ascent to popularity, from conspiracy to mainstream talk and MMA. It was primarily his conspiracy and conspiracy adjacent stuff e.g. ancient aliens that made him popular, while his mainstream TV and MMA work kept his foot in the more acceptable door. Rogan was a full blown moon landing denier. He only recently began to renounce or obscure his earlier conspiracy views after he achieved huge mainstream popularity. His show is not as entertaining as it used to be, because he now frequently interviews very mainstream famous people and he’s not as freewheeling as he used to be. We have no idea what his real private beliefs are today.

    As for Rogan’s health, he’s been on TRT and HGH for more than 10 years now, resulting in very noticeable and significant physiological changes since his mid 30s, which is long after such changes typically stop. Jones was quite a fit bodybuilder as a young lad. He has now has a typical middle aged man’s build, the kind of a man whose youthful eating habits persist into middle age long after the youthful activity patterns have significantly declined. Rogan has the bloated gut from chronic HGH use, often seen among bodybuilders. I wouldn’t say he’s healthier.

    https://www.esquire.com/lifestyle/news/a49246/alex-jones-shirtless/

    https://fitnessvolt.com/joe-rogan-gut/

    David Icke is world famous as a result of his conspiracy theories. He would’ve been an obscure sport presenter scarcely known outside of Britain otherwise. Such fame typically enhances fitness opportunities. Women love fame. There’s also the theory that Icke’s theories are deliberately outlandish and mythical rather than literal to protect from changes of anti-Semitism et al.

    Pathogens also can enhance sociability in order to facilitate their spread, so your notion that they can only turn people into hermits is off base.

    • Replies: @Sean
  310. JMcG says:
    @Cortes

    Hmmm, Oliver Cromwell, King William… by God, I think you’re on to something.

  311. @Harry Baldwin

    The Chicago school system is in a (fake) labor dispute with the Chicago Teachers Union about reopening.

    The CTU claims it’s holding out because the district’s virus safety-protocol is inadequate. The loony mayor of Chicago claims that the city is in compliance with legal guidelines.

    The mayor attributes any lingering, unsafe conditions to Trump‘s failure to distribute the vaccine.

  312. Anonymous[414] • Disclaimer says:
    @nebulafox

    In the summer of 1990 all eyes were on Eastern Europe and nobody was watching the Middle East.

  313. @anon

    You somehow don’t get around to explaining why, if the concrete incontrovertible evidence of mass fraud is all there right in the open, Trump and his team didn’t bring it before a court.

    I criticize them for failing to do that, and at the same time uselessly and impotently shrieking to the world that such fraud occurred and that they were going to provide all the concrete proof any day now, and then never did. THAT was unforgiveable if you are a supporter of Trump’s policies, as opposed to Trump the person. It was a buffoon-tier play, and it made him easy to caricature as ridiculous and accomplished less than nothing.

    I’m fully aware that the very idea he would have entertained for a moment my alternative strategy – expressing grave concern about the election irregularities and vowing to focus on national election reform in his post-presidential life as a way of making a serious point to the country, dog-whistling to his base, and not allowing himself to be so catastrophically caricatured by the media – is moonshine. This is a man with no capacity for reflection or self-restraint, just bluster and bravado and mouth mouth mouth as the day is long.

  314. @Hibernian

    Irish Catholic proverb #1916:

    NEVER trust anyone whose first name is a surname.

    The surname Ryan at some point became a popular boy’s given name in Irish and non-Irish families alike. I think it might have something to do with Ryan O’ Neal. It seemed to happen after his peak of popularity.

    Possibly because Brian was seen as overused at the time– rare in the ’40s, occasional in the ’50s, everywhere in the ’60s– so it was natural to seek out a similar name instead.

    Teenage girls went out for Love Story in 1970. The lead character was Jennifer, which suddenly went from a slightly trendy middle-class name to ubiquity shortly thereafter. Male star Ryan O’Neal played Oliver, which didn’t appeal to young girls as much at the time– Oliver Twist, the disgusting Oliver Reed– so they went with Ryan instead. (Oliver took off around 2000. It’s#1 in England now.)

    https://www.babynamewizard.com/voyager#prefix=ryan&sw=both&exact=false
    https://www.babynamewizard.com/voyager#prefix=brian&sw=both&exact=true
    https://www.babynamewizard.com/voyager#prefix=oliver&sw=both&exact=false
    https://www.babynamewizard.com/voyager#prefix=jennifer&sw=both&exact=false

    Ironically, O’Neal was christened Charles Patrick Ryan O’Neal. The SAG allows only one actor to a name, so likely that was why he used his third name. Other than Mary Tyler Moore, few at the time got around this with a middle name on the marquee. That’s a sure sign that the names on either side are too common. (Will Smith, Paul Walker, Michelle Williams, and Jennifer Lawrence were just lucky.)

    Irish surnames, as a class, have been popular for at over a half-century now. Kelly, Shannon, Ryan, Cody, Brady… I’ve seen Lennon, Cassidy, Callahan, and even Shaughnessy used around here lately.

    http://www.namenerds.com/irish/last.html

  315. nebulafox says:
    @S. Anonyia

    >A few small towns in Mississippi?

    Well, actually, yes. Probably should not have generalized it further.

  316. nebulafox says:
    @Corvinus

    To increasing amounts of Americans, among them myself, NYT and WaPo are now on the same level as Breitbart or Vox or Drudge. Sometimes they tell the truth, but you should always assume they aren’t until proven otherwise.

    And I have zero sympathy for them. Nobody forced Sulzberger to make the Grey Lady into a more official version of Slate. They chose this route over the last five years, they live with the negative consequences of that decision.

  317. @Thea

    They know full well. That’s the point. Different rules for whites.

  318. Corvinus says:
    @anon

    “Lol @ silly Coronavinus scrambling to pretend that TIME magazine is a troll publication.”

    Actually, that would be YOU and the rest of the ill-informed Anony’s that lurk the backwaters of this fine opinion webzine when it comes to the NYT, Time, CNN, and other mainstream media outlets.

    “The Party now can admit that the election was rigged, and even celebrate it.”

    Not quite.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2020/11/20/affidavit-giuliani-vote-fraud/

    Most of the affidavits center on allegations that volunteers who wanted to watch votes being counted weren’t able to be as close to the count as they wanted (given the coronavirus pandemic) or alleging vague claims…Moreover, a key issue is whether the affidavit is filed in court, as most filed by the Trump’s lawyers were not…Other witnesses signed affidavits that said, “I believe my vote for Donald J. Trump and Michael Pence was not counted.” But when pressed by judges, they admitted they didn’t have any actual evidence to support that. A similar thing happened in Chatham County, Ga., where the GOP called two witnesses as part of its allegation that 53 ballots received after Election Day were predated to make them appear valid. But under questioning, the witnesses acknowledged they didn’t know whether the ballots were actually received after the deadline, while witnesses for the local elections board testified under oath that they were received on time

    .

    https://lawandcrime.com/2020-election/come-on-now-michigan-judge-scoffs-at-and-tosses-trump-campaign-lawsuit-backed-by-hearsay-evidence

    In President Donald Trump’s second loss in court in a single day, a Michigan judge rejected the Trump campaign’s bid to stop counting ballots without their inspectors present. The judge scoffed at plaintiffs’ “hearsay” evidence that a lawyer said she heard from a poll worker regarding dates supposedly changed on ballots.

    “‘I heard someone else say something,’” Michigan Judge Cynthia Stephens said on Thursday, summing up an affidavit submitted by the Trump campaign. “Tell me how that is not hearsay. Come on now!”

    An attorney for the Democratic National Committee, seeking to intervene in the case, argued that the Trump campaign lacked factual support.

    “No evidence in the record would allow the court to find a likelihood of success on the merits,” the DNC’s counsel Kevin Hamilton said in court.

    “All of this is really an effort to stop the counting of ballots by Michigan voters,” he added later.

    Remember, Trump’s lawyers consistently backed down when asked by courts to offer specific evidence. Again, how do you specifically address the fact they said they did not allege fraud when pressed by the courts?

    And we are still waiting for Sydney Powell to reveal her smoking gun evidence of how Trump votes were changed to Biden votes, thanks to the seizure of servers in Germany by the U.S. Army.

    Furthermore, how do you explain Representative Cawthorn’s response?

    • Replies: @anon
  319. MEH 0910 says:
    @Jack D

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  320. Clyde says:
    @J.Ross

    Fauci made this virus, through out-contracted specialists, who eventually out-contracted to the Wuhan lab

    Exactly! Your post lays it out well. These lousy nutty professor scientists are addicted to their gain of function research. How else are they going to get paid? They are all sucking on the Gov’t tit, be they in China or America. As you stated, we were doing gain of function research here. Obama banned this, so Fauci outsourced it to China and funded it. Funded a bit indirectly to the Chinese but I have no doubt that Anthony Fauci knew where this Federal money was going. To the China Wuhan bio-lab. The Chinese took a bat virus and modified it. The virus escaped or was released on purpose. Was probably unintentional but you better believe that the Chinese are super investigating gain of function now. They see all the chaos in the US and Europe. Next time they might release a virus intentionally.
    In fact some of the new Covid strains we see now might be intentional releases by Chinese.

  321. anon[331] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus

    Actually, that would be YOU and the rest of the ill-informed Anony’s that lurk the backwaters of this fine opinion webzine when it comes to the NYT, Time, CNN, and other mainstream media outlets.

    Dude, don’t argue with me, take it up with TIME. It’s not my article, it’s their article all about the “Secret 2020 election campaign” that begins with:

    In a way, Trump was right. There was a conspiracy unfolding behind the scenes…

    https://time.com/5936036/secret-2020-election-campaign/

    Their work touched every aspect of the election. They got states to change voting systems and laws and helped secure hundreds of millions in public and private funding. They fended off voter-suppression lawsuits, recruited armies of poll workers and got millions of people to vote by mail for the first time. They successfully pressured social media companies to take a harder line against disinformation and used data-driven strategies to fight viral smears. They executed national public-awareness campaigns that helped Americans understand how the vote count would unfold over days or weeks, preventing Trump’s conspiracy theories and false claims of victory from getting more traction. After Election Day, they monitored every pressure point to ensure that Trump could not overturn the result.

    Instead of rehashing all your tired half truths, how about you contact your bosses and get the new talking points, so you can be their trolling stooge in the manner they expect? I think it is supposed to be something like “we had to rig the election in order to save it”, or something like that. You do want to get paid, don’t you?

    • Replies: @petit bourgeois
    , @Corvinus
  322. Kronos says:
    @Corvinus

    I try my best(ish) to be honest. I love the Sailer blog for the fun discussions that are seriously debated. Also, since when have I trash talked stuff as Jewish propaganda? (I trash talk Baby Boomers primarily as a matter of principle. I get my biggest dopamine hits with trashing yuppie boomers.)

    I believe the MSM’s lies and spin has been far more damaging and nefarious to the US than anything drummed up by Q and Trump. Those two have inflated stories before, but nothing of any true diabolical consequence. Their lies are much more akin to peacocking and basic showmanship.

    It’s the MSM with a whole negative balance sheet of horrific losses in credibility. Stuff that has cost trillions of dollars and the deaths of hundreds of thousands. So if Q/Trump came to Kronos’s “social credit union” looking for a social credit rating, I’d give them something generally higher then anything I’d give the MSM. (Imagine owning a humble credit union and a former top Leman Brothers exec comes in asks for a job. You’d chase him out.)

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  323. @anon

    Dude, he’s accusing you of doing exactly what he is doing: remaining anonymous.

    This is what the left establishment has been doing for years.

    Please don’t feed the troll. It doesn’t create any new knowledge. It’s just a strategy of distraction from evidence of a stolen election.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  324. Mr. Anon says:
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    Jack D is an ethnic chauvinist, but he is a smart guy who makes interesting observations.

    Mason, as far as I can tell, is mostly a gas-bag, though not nearly as much as a**-clowns like Corvinus.

  325. MEH 0910 says:

  326. Sean says:
    @Anonymous

    Icke was on track to be a national level politician in Britain with the Green party, so he could have done very well for himself. Pissing it all away makes me think, Icke is a believer. I don’t think Alex Jones ever makes those kind of good faith if misguided moves, so massive disparity in health would not be expected between him and Joe Rogan. While Rogan does have weirdos on, he himself is always sociable and has his goombahs (Rogan is mainly Italian) around during the show. His likability explains why he is successful, Chubby people often are sociable. Its IGF2 that gives the gut bulge in pro bodybuilders and I doubt Rogan is on that.

    To cause a global pandemic AOTBE a pathogen needs the infectious person to be out and about, which most people normally will be. In the previous novel Chinese coronavirus (2003’s SARS ) by the time the infected were infectious they were very sick, and it was only really caught inside households. The virus that is causing Covid-19 (SARS-CoV-2) is transmissible early in the infection before people take to their bed.

    I said that Bullmore’s hypothesis is of the immune system when encountering a pathogen and fighting it inside the organism’s body also having a tandem psychological response mechanism for isolating an infected individual from the group for the group’s benefit. Inflammation is great in auto immunity, which Icke did in fact have a nasty case of. It is well known that schizophrenics have diseases of inflammation like psoriasis, and psychosis and similar disorders confer high risk for COVID-19-related death independent of pre existing physical conditions.

  327. Corvinus says:
    @anon

    “Dude, don’t argue with me, take it up with TIME. It’s not my article, it’s their article all about the “Secret 2020 election campaign” that begins with:”

    LOL, do you even understand nuance and tone? Efforts were made to ensure the election would be free and fair, credible and uncorrupted through communication and cooperation. In other words, Trump and his supporters labeled those ground game and grass roots efforts to protect our representative democracy as being “a conspiracy”. Remember, Trump made it clear that for months to everyone that the 2020 Election would not be fair, and that he would reject ANYTHING but his own re-election as “fake” and “rigged”. That is insane.

    “Instead of rehashing all your tired half truths…”

    Why don’t you address the points I made rather than in typical anony fashion run away from discourse?

    “how about you contact your bosses and get the new talking points, so you can be their trolling stooge in the manner they expect?”

    I have to admit, projection is your strong suit.

  328. Corvinus says:
    @petit bourgeois

    “It’s just a strategy of distraction from evidence of a stolen election.”

    Comment 332 provides evidence to the contrary. Uncomfortable it makes you, to be sure.

    “It’s like those graphs of Michigan and Wisconsin Nate Silver published that show middle-of-the-night ballot dumping all went for Biden isn’t substantial evidence.”

    That actually didn’t happen the way you make it out to be.

    –The votes came a few hours after polls closed.
    –They came from each states’ most populous counties.
    –They were documented by election officials (bi-partisan), a police escort, and the media of them being delivered.
    –The margin recorded was in line with the shifts across the state.

    In other words, variations in who led the vote count in a particular state stemmed from the normal tabulation processes playing out for counting mail-in votes. Officials have warned for months that one of the consequences of the flood of mail ballots is that they take longer to count.

    “There are two universal laws in political science: 1. Every political system has bribery; and 2. Every election has fraud.”

    Depends upon the extent, right? Doesn’t surprise me that you don’t add that caveat to your own crafted “universal laws”.

    “It took 80 years of corrupt elections in Mexico until the people finally changed the law to require voter ID.”

    But we do have Voter ID laws. All states require a person to provide some form of official identification before they are permitted to register to vote, receive a ballot for an election, or to actually vote in American elections.

  329. Corvinus says:
    @Kronos

    “I try my best(ish) to be honest.”

    Except the obstacle is clinging on to the Fake News mantra and being rife with confirmation bias. So, let’s put this honesty to the test. What is your rebuttal to Comment 332?

    “I trash talk Baby Boomers primarily as a matter of principle.”

    That group isn’t as reviled as you think it is.

    “I believe the MSM’s lies and spin has been far more damaging and nefarious to the US than anything drummed up by Q and Trump.”

    So, you’re basing it on opinion and emotion. Good to know.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  330. @Steve Sailer

    “Oryx and Crake”, Margaret Atwood’s latest (or third latest) dystopian novel is a bit slow to start but as the blurb says

    Margaret Atwood’s new novel is so utterly compelling, so prescient, so relevant, so terrifyingly-all-too-likely-to-be-true, that listeners may find their view of the world forever changed after listening to it.

    The installation of Resident Biden seems to make it more likely.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00009OYYN/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_d_asin_title_o03aud_?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Give it a shot.

  331. @Corvinus

    Beside the fact that you’re an idiot, you cannot refute the fact that there is no chain of custody for a mail in ballots. Thus, they can be manufactured and dumped in the middle of the night, which is exactly what happened. The Democratic machine did the same thing in 1960.

    Don’t give me this horseshit that the Democrats don’t manufacture ballots and dump them in the middle of the night. Next you’re going to tell me that there’s no such thing as a democratic machine in operation. You cannot disprove otherwise because again, you’re an idiot. Republicans aren’t smart enough to engage in late-night ballot dumping, troll.

    Without in-person voting and voter identification, your theory that it’s a legitimate election with no fraud is nonsense. Show me the chain of custody for all of those middle of the night ballot dumps. You can’t. The rules were changed because of a plague and the rules are set up to rig the election.

    You’re like one of the three stooges Moe. Heads I win tails you lose.

    You can’t establish chain of custody because you’re a liar and a fraud yourself. You know nothing about election fraud. You’re just here to troll and spread lies. And collect a paycheck from some nefarious organization whether it be domestic or foreign. You are the enemy of a free people.

    The Mexicans figured this out a long time ago. But you’re not even as smart as your average Mexican.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  332. Kronos says:
    @Corvinus

    Except the obstacle is clinging on to the Fake News mantra and being rife with confirmation bias. So, let’s put this honesty to the test. What is your rebuttal to Comment 332?

    I don’t have one. There are some promising leads and time will tell, but I don’t have any solid/direct documentation of voter fraud. My suspicion stems from actions (that are documented) taken by the DNC in 2016 and 2020 within the Democratic primaries of both years. When highly unethical behavior was done against candidate Bernie Sanders in both 2016 and 2020. I’m a big subscriber to bayesian probability, if people cheat in the primaries they’ll likely cheat in the generals.

    (Remember these fun two? One secretly gave Sanders campaign strategies to Clinton and the other had all the media big wigs meet up at his personal residence for fancy dinners to direct media policy. And I’m not referring to “Pizzagate” that’s it’s own thing.)

    John “Skippy” Podesta

    Debbie Wasserman Schultz

    https://theduran.com/dnc-launches-shadow-app-to-screw-bernie-again-in-iowa-caucus-video/

    I remember the Democratic Party establishment utterly debased themselves after Trump’s surprise victory in November. That’s when Russiagate got started and high ranking people openly begged/ambushed Republican electoral college members to change their votes. Eight months into Trump’s term they still had legal schoolers trying to figure out how to get Hillary into office.

    One big advantage establishment fixers had in 2020 over 2016 was time to prepare. (The Democrats have their own Roger Stones no doubt.) They had years to prepare contingency plans. Also, I’d imagine losing to Trump again wasn’t considered a option. His victory caused dangerous cracks within the party. If he won again you’d have a serious internal crisis. Both involving major donors and constituencies. If they had a “to save democracy we need to destroy it” mindset it would be in 2020. They had motive. So if solid evidence emerges that the Democrats (and Neocons) pulled a 1960 Kennedy style “win” on Trump I won’t be surprised. You’ve got plenty of bayesian priors to back it up.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    , @Corvinus
  333. How the Biden Administration Can Help Solve Our “Reality” Crisis

    He means hyperreality crisis, of course.

    This piece from the Sulzberger Blog (sometimes known as the Gray Yenta) is easier to understand if, for every one of the 10 instances where the author (Kevin Roose) employs the word “reality,” you substitute a term that better captures his intended meaning, which is “The Narrative” [aka hegemonic hyperreality]. And when he deploys pejorative terms such a such as “collective delusion” [once], “misguided beliefs” [also 1x], “lie” [2x], “hoax” [3x], “misinformation”*[4], as well as his favorite labels, the traditional “conspiracy theory/ theories/ theorists”[10x], and the up-and-coming “disinformation” [11x]? He actually means “alternative narratives,” of course.

    Just as the map is not the territory, and the word is not the thing, The Narrative is not reality.

    In each case, the former is a simplified abstraction of the latter; a process that inevitably involves some data loss and distortion. Some maps are objectively better/ more accurate than others; some are more useful for a particular purpose, but no map actually is reality. The same is true of narratives.

    OK, but maybe this Roose guy is just a true believer who’s a little lacking in cognitive firepower, who got his job as a so-called “journalist” via nepotism or something? Perhaps he doesn’t actually understand the difference between facts/ reality on the one hand, and narrative on the other? Well, let’s take a look — straight from the horse’s mouth — one of his own tweets:

    “The tricky thing, for Facebook, is that some of the most viral stories aren’t strictly false*. (Perdue + Loeffler *did* call for the SOS’s resignation.) But they are feeding a stolen election narrative that is going to be hard to dial back.”

    Aren’t strictly false?” Seems like a guy who writes for a living could manage to convey that concept in a… clearer, more succinct fashion. What he’s saying in this [now-deleted] tweet is that the facts that these stories cite are indisputably true, but they are being used to construct a narrative that is undesirable; even heretical. He knows. His NYT piece is carefully-constructed propaganda.

    Of course, as Mr. Sailer has previously pointed out, the NYT is by far the dominant narrative promotion agency in the American economic zone in the current year. So it’s hardly surprising that Roose, as one of their minions, would advocate so stridently for the hegemony of the Sulzberger narrative — and the suppression of all heretics.

    One last note about the structure of the piece: note the subhead about halfway down
    “Assess the damage, and avoid the ‘terrorist’ trap.

    Hey, what a reasonable guy! He believes that the federal security services shouldn’t treat everyone who dissents from the hegemonic narrative as a “terrorist!”

    Well, not really. It’s just a rhetorical trick to try to portray himself as the calm voice of reason, rather than the hate-filled enforcer of The Narrative that he so obviously is. Note the progression of word associations:
    Starts with “lies,” “hoaxes,” “disinformation” etc. [Heretics are untruthful/ deluded]
    Then “disinformation and extremism” [their belief in these alternative narratives is “extreme”]
    Then “violent extremism” [their “extremism” inevitably makes them violent]
    Then finally, anti-White canards like “White supremacist groups” and “far right militias.” [intended to connote “dangerous not-see ‘haters’ “]

    So the intended message is “All of these heretics are violent extremist haters, but I hesitate to call them “terrorists”… because I’m such a nice guy and all.” And shitlib/ anti-White readers will understand it as such.

    According to this Roose guy (and presumably the owners of the Sulzberger Blog), it’s not enough to suppress heretical opinions on social media and on alternative news sites — they must be silenced on private messaging apps as well:
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/03/technology/personaltech/telegram-signal-misinformation.html

    Whether endorsing dissident narratives over the phone will still be allowed by the oligarchs is not yet clear…

  334. @Corvinus

    But we do have Voter ID laws. All states require a person to provide some form of official identification

    Fact check:

    FALSE

    https://ballotpedia.org/Voter_identification_laws_by_state
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voter_Identification_laws_in_the_United_States

    Only 7 states actually require photo ID in order to vote.

    But “Corvinus” knew that, of course — shameless mendacity is a characteristic feature of toxic semitism.

    Cuz voter ID laws are “racist,” doncha know:

    https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2012/10/voter-id-laws-racism/

    “Yeah but that’s “far left” Mother Jones, tho”

    “Centrist” WaPo promoting exactly the same long-debunked semitic canard — and even more vehemently:
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2016/08/03/courts-are-finally-pointing-out-the-racism-behind-voter-id-laws/

    And in an age where the so-called “Civil Rights” Act trumps the Constitution, muh “disparate impact” standard and the responsiveness of the kritarchy to omnipresent anti-White barratry ensures that reasonable, common sense voter ID laws will be increasingly invalidated by judicial fiat in the future.

    Take the recent fate of a Texas voter ID law: in Veasey v. Abbott, the district court struck it down, 5th Circuit concurred, the Supreme Court didn’t even want to look at it.

    But of course, there’s a deeper level of dishonesty here as well. “Corvinus” is making a desperate, failed attempt to change the subject here. What actually happened was urban Democrat machines, oligarchs, and the major narrative promotion agencies colluding to hack an election — as both the NYT and TIME confessed recently. “Corvinus” is attempting to pervert this fraudulent collusion of elites into a story of random individuals individually deciding to commit “voter fraud.”

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  335. MEH 0910 says:
    @Kronos

    https://nypost.com/2017/10/26/how-team-hillary-played-the-press-for-fools-on-russia/

    How Team Hillary played the press for fools on Russia
    By Paul Sperry | October 26, 2017
    […]
    Exhibit A is the book “Shattered: Inside Hillary Clinton’s Doomed Campaign,” by Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes. In light of this week’s revelation that Hillary’s campaign funded the dirty anti-Trump “Steele” dossier, the book takes on a new significance. It reveals:

    “Within 24 hours of her concession speech, [campaign chair John Podesta and manager Robby Mook] assembled her communications team at the Brooklyn headquarters to engineer the case that the election wasn’t entirely on the up-and-up. For a couple of hours, with Shake Shack containers littering the room, they went over the script they would pitch to the press and the public. Already, Russian hacking was the centerpiece of the argument.”

    The plan, according to the book, was to push journalists to cover how “Russian hacking was the major unreported story of the campaign,” and it succeeded to a fare-thee-well. After the election, coverage of the Russian “collusion” story was relentless, and it helped pressure investigations and hearings on Capitol Hill and even the naming of a special counsel, which in turn has triggered virtually nonstop coverage.

    • Thanks: Kronos
    • Replies: @James Forrestal
  336. Corvinus says:
    @Kronos

    “Me–What is your rebuttal to Comment 332? You–I don’t have one.”

    And why is that? Is it because those facts I presented disrupt your narrative, so avoidance of uncomfortable things is your way out?

    “There are some promising leads and time will tell…”

    What “promising leads” are you exactly referring to?

    Perhaps these two cases? I certainly can’t wait for them to come to trial, can YOU? The doors will be blown wide open on the fraud committed by Dominion and Smartmatic, right? I mean, it would be absolute corporation suicide for these two companies to go to court against a woman (Sydney Powell) who repeatedly claimed she had “smoking gun evidence” about their manipulations and machinations, correct? And she dares not settle out of court, this is the fight she has been seeking!

    https://www.businessinsider.com/dominion-lawyer-letters-facebook-youtube-twitter-parler-fox-defamation-lawsuit-2021-2

    https://www.cnn.com/2021/02/04/media/smartmatic-fox-news-giuliani-powell-lawsuit/index.html

    “but I don’t have any solid/direct documentation of voter fraud.”

    So it’s just your opinion, not rooted on specific evidence. Again, great to know.

    And thanks for your red herrings involving Shitlery, Podesta, Wasserman, etc.

    “One big advantage establishment fixers…”

    LOL, you just stated you lack proof of voter fraud, but you double down on perpetuating a false narrative. You are honest…about dishonest matters.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  337. MEH 0910 says:

    Our Favorite Media Screwups w/ Katie Halper: NYT’s ‘Reality Czar’ Idea Is DYSTOPIAN Nightmare

    Katie Halper, host of The Katie Halper Show podcast, reacts to the NYT’s call for the Biden administration to appoint a ‘reality czar’ to combat disinformation.

  338. AKAHorace says:
    @Jack D

    I really don’t believe these stories, but usually they involve Czech (Albright) or Hungarian (Kerry) Jews for some reason. Didn’t Stoppard notice growing up that he had zero grandparents and aunts and uncles? Didn’t he ask, what ever happened to grandma (All four grandparents as well as some aunts died in the camps)?

    There were plenty of non-Jews who died in the camps or were executed outside them as well. A lot of German reprisal massacres for resistance attacks.

  339. @MEH 0910

    Yeah, the Russia conspiracy theory was basically Q for Dems — but endorsed and promoted by the major “news” media, making it [hyper]”real” rather than merely a “conspiracy theory.”

    But the NYP’s spin on this, How Team Hillary played the press for fools on Russia, is clearly BS. The Clintonites somehow tricked (or forced) all of the major narrative promotion agencies to make the patently-nonsensical claim, night after night, for years, that Putin somehow committed widespread voter fraud by remote control? The media oligarchs couldn’t help it! Hillary made them do it! Yeah right.

    And the “Hillary was the real Russian collaborator!”* trope that he starts and ends with is just the icing on the cake.

    *This is (in form, not content) just a variation on the notorious “DR3” (Dems R the Real “Racists”) technique — “oppose” the shitlib narrative in a manner reinforces its the underlying assumptions.

  340. @Jack D

    From Wikipedia:

    Stoppard was born Tomáš Straussler, in Zlín, a city dominated by the shoe manufacturing industry, in the Moravia region of Czechoslovakia. He is the son of Martha Becková and Eugen Straussler, a doctor employed by the Bata shoe company. His parents were non-observant Jews,[6] members of a long-established community. Just before the German occupation of Czechoslovakia, the town’s patron, Jan Antonín Baťa, transferred his Jewish employees, mostly physicians, to branches of his firm outside Europe.[7][8] On 15 March 1939, the day the Nazis invaded Czechoslovakia, the Straussler family fled to Singapore, where Baťa had a factory.

    Before the Japanese occupation of Singapore, Stoppard, his brother, and their mother fled to India. Stoppard’s father remained in Singapore as a British army volunteer, knowing that, as a doctor, he would be needed in its defence.[6] Stoppard was four years old when his father died.[9] In the book Tom Stoppard in Conversation, Stoppard tells how his father died in Japanese captivity, a prisoner of war[10][11] but has said that he subsequently discovered that Straussler was reported to have drowned on board a ship bombed by Japanese forces whilst trying to flee Singapore in 1942.[6]

    In 1941, when Tomáš was five, the three were evacuated to Darjeeling, India. The boys attended Mount Hermon School, an American multi-racial school,[10] where Tomáš became Tom and his brother Petr became Peter.

    In 1945, his mother, Martha, married British army major Kenneth Stoppard, who gave the boys his English surname and, in 1946, moved the family to England.

    Young Stoppard thought England was paradise compared to the only life he could remember: refugee camps in Asia. He became very grateful and chauvinistic about England as this wonderful country that had given him this much better new life.

    Stoppard’s stepfather was a good man, but he didn’t much like Jews, so his mother didn’t talk about Jews much. Stoppard grew up assuming his mother was half-Jewish and his biological father had been gentile. He didn’t realize they were all all Jewish until about the end of the Cold War when he visited Czechoslovakia and got in touch with distant relatives who’d survived.

    Stoppard is unusual looking but he doesn’t look particularly Jewish. He looks like a Rolling Stone.

    Ironically, although Stoppard first became famous with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead only a year or two after the Rolling Stones became famous, he was already too old to like rock music. He liked early 1950s pop music instead.

    But, life can be very long, and now Stoppard is friends with Mick Jagger.

  341. Kronos says:
    @Corvinus

    And why is that? Is it because those facts I presented disrupt your narrative, so avoidance of uncomfortable things is your way out?

    Not really. I’m just more focused on a different angle of the capital protest arrests. Mainly how much were BLM/Antifa were involved with the violence in the capital. I’m watching how the case involving one “John Sullivan” plays out. The guy has Antifa/BLM ties but apparently wanted to be a Trump supporter for a day. Keep in mind this is still a active situation and the dust hasn’t settled yet. The phrase “a lie is already half way around the world…” is certainly true here. It takes time and patience for the truth (or most of it) to come out. So I’m just patiently observing the ongoing stuff while comforting a neighbor’s labradoodle. (The owners are on vacation and the dog has separation anxiety. Much more of a poodle than a lab. I still think bloodhounds are the best dogs though. They have proud looking snouts but much more relaxed than German Shepherds.)

    Another interesting tidbit is that the leader of the Proud Boys was a snitch for the FBI. New information is coming in everyday.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/proud-boys-leader-was-prolific-fbi-snitch-court-docs

    Please keep in mind stuff is still ongoing and recalling bad actors acting in bad faith in the past isn’t inconsequential. A big reason Podesta and Wasserman got caught (thanks to the brave efforts of Julian Assange) was because they were acting against the clock and couldn’t subtly disperse their actions throughout the organization fast enough. They thought Jeb Bush was the real electoral threat and Trump/Sanders were jokes. For 2020 they had years to get stuff and people together. Not to mention that Covid inherently weakened existing voting safeguards. Yes, these are mostly hunches but hopefully time will reveal the truth.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  342. Kronos says:
    @Kronos

    My bad Corvinus, I got your 332 comment mixed up with another one concerning Roger Stone and the Proud Boys. Thus the jump to the capital riots. But you do raise good points. Your looking at this stuff hard. At the current time the evidence does look kinda skimpy. But I do fear more substantiated evidence will emerge.

    • Thanks: Corvinus
  343. Corvinus says:
    @James Forrestal

    You do realize I was presenting Voter ID in its entirety, right, and not just one specific aspect of it, chiefly Voter ID at a polling place? NOTICE that you neglected to include my exact quotation–All states require a person to provide some form of official identification before they are permitted to register to vote, receive a ballot for an election, or to actually vote in American elections.

    A total of 36 states have laws requesting or requiring voters to show some form of identification at the polls. The remaining 14 states use other methods to verify the identity of voters. Most frequently, other identifying information provided at the polling place, such as a signature, is checked against information on file.

    In the future, I suggest a more nuanced approach. In that way, you will be able to more effectively contribute to a discussion.

    “What actually happened was urban Democrat machines, oligarchs, and the major narrative promotion agencies colluding to hack an election — as both the NYT and TIME confessed recently.”

    LOL, no.

    • Replies: @James Forrestal
  344. Corvinus says:
    @petit bourgeois

    “You are the enemy of a free people.”

    LOL, looks like you got triggered again. Rather than offer a cogent rebuttal to Comment 332, you go all ad hominem.

    “you cannot refute the fact that there is no chain of custody for a mail in ballots.”

    Actually, the secretary of state for each state supervises this process, with local officials handling the ballots.**

    Here is the form they use in Texas.

    https://www.sos.state.tx.us/elections/forms/chain-of-custody_1.pdf

    https://www.brennancenter.org/our-work/analysis-opinion/false-narrative-vote-mail-fraud

    Mail balloting is not a newfangled idea; it was already deeply embedded in the American electoral system before the coronavirus hit. In the last two federal elections, roughly one out of every four Americans cast a mail ballot. In five states — Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon, Utah, and Washington — mail balloting has been the primary method of voting. In 28 additional states, all voters have had the right to vote by mail ballot if they choose, without having to provide any reason or excuse. Over time, a growing number of voters have chosen that option. Since 2000 more than 250 million votes have been cast via mailed-out ballots, in all 50 states, according to the Vote at Home Institute. In 2018, more than 31 million Americans cast their ballots by mail, about 25.8 percent of election participants.

    ttps://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/21/opinion/sunday/coronavirus-vote-mail.html

    The good news is that we already have evidence that voting by mail works well. In five states — Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon, Utah and Washington, most or all votes are cast by mail; in three others more than half are. In all, nearly one-quarter of all voters cast ballots by mail in 2016. The experiments in the states have yielded several key findings: First, turnout is significantly higher nearly everywhere voting by mail is used. Second, voters of all political persuasions use it and like it. Third, it’s safe and secure. Bar codes allow for ballot tracking and validation. And states that use vote-by-mail have encountered essentially zero fraud: Oregon, the pioneer in this area, has sent out more than 100 million mail-in ballots since 2000, and has documented only about a dozen cases of proven fraud.

    **These ballots will have to be ready to go out by Labor Day, less than six months from today. They must be postage-paid, so that no one has to pay a penny to vote, and there need to be enough machines and poll workers available to start counting ballots as soon as they come in. Signature-matching software can help ensure ballots are coming from the voters they were sent to, without introducing partisan bias into the process. And where signatures don’t match, voters should have an opportunity to fix the problem and cast a provisional ballot if necessary
    .

    “Thus, they can be manufactured and dumped in the middle of the night, which is exactly what happened….”

    That already has been disproven.

    “Show me the chain of custody for all of those middle of the night ballot dumps. You can’t.”

    Actually, we can. ‘Tis a sample…

    https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/politics/elections/2020/10/29/what-happens-wisconsin-absentee-ballots-before-theyre-counted/6057169002/

    https://news.yahoo.com/georgia-vote-counting-video-shows-235240082.html

    https://www.fox43.com/article/news/local/how-secure-is-the-mail-in-ballot-process-pa-sect-of-state-weighs-in/521-a2dd5ea7-f88a-41ae-97e8-68a543411bd8

    https://www.azcleanelections.gov/election-security/how-votes-are-counted

    Trump lost, but at least Epstein didn’t kill himself.

  345. @Corvinus

    You do realize I was presenting Voter ID in its entirety, and blablabla…

    you neglected to include my exact quotation

    Of course I didn’t quote the entirety of your incoherent, hate-filled blabbering — since it was obvious that you were engaged in a desperate, failed attempt to promote the long-discredited semitic canard that “As long as there’s a name on the list, and we can match a vote to that name. it doesn’t matter who who actually cast that vote! HONEST!”

    It should be self-evident that your mindless repetition of that hoary, self-refuting trope didn’t merit a specific response. But since you’re apparently too slow to pick that up, I’ve been kind enough to spell it out. You’re welcome

    This attitude that “blatant election hacking is fine… if WE do it!” is, of course, the same one that underlies the constant efforts by ignorant, hate-filled anti-Whites like “Corvinus” to promote fraud-enabling measures such as so-called “ballot harvesting” (you’ve got to plant before you can harvest) and to fanatically oppose reasonable, common sense measures to prevent election hacking, such as ensuring that names listed on the voter rolls correspond to eligible voters who are both alive, and reside at the addresses claimed.

    A total of 36 states have laws requesting or requiring voters to show some form of identification at the polls.

    In other words “Got any ID, bud? No? Not even a library card? That’s cool. What did you say your name was again?”

    Uh huh.

    Your abject admission that I was correct in stating that only 7 states in the entire country make any serious effort to verify voters’ identity is appreciated, as is your acknowledgement that 14 states specifically outlaw any attempt to confirm the identity of voters.

    LOL

    It is an obvious fact, well-known to any minimally-informed person, that both TIME and the Sulzberger Blog recently published vitriolic screeds that openly gloated over their success in colluding with “American” oligarchs, other major narrative promotion agencies, and big tech to hack the 2020 election.
    Your pathetic inability to even attempt a specific refutation of this self-evident truth speaks for itself.

    Sad!

    Your implicit admission that I was entirely correct in noting that election fraud is constantly promoted via (((barratry))) and the kritarchy is appreciated.

    To further underscore that point, the reason that only 7 states have reasonable, common sense voter ID laws (rather than 8) is the constant lawfare campaign to overturn the will of the people of North Carolina and their elected representatives.

    The NC state legislature passed a voter ID law in 2013, but it was suppressed by judicial fiat, with the 4th Circuit arguing that it might cause too much interference with election hacking.

    But the intrepid North Carolinians didn’t give up. They overwhelmingly voted to pass a constitutional amendment mandating voter ID. It was immediately attacked via barratry, with kritarch G. Bryan Collins ruling “B-b-but you can’t DO that! Only judges get to determine what’s in the constitution! We need to elect a new legislature and a new people!”

    This judicial “reasoning” proved to be a little too much, even for clown world in the current year, and was overturned on appeal, but the will on the people has yet to be implemented on this issue, and the courts will eventually come up with a more subtle form of legal pilpul to rationalize their support for oligarchic election-hacking.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  346. @nebulafox

    “Therapy culture in general is producing problems for the less verbally or socially adept.”

    And for strong people who aren’t broken by the vicissitudes of life. Once such people were considered inspiring, now they are viewed with great suspicion by those who pride themselves on being ‘traumatised’ by the smallest thing.

  347. Corvinus says:
    @James Forrestal

    “Of course I didn’t quote the entirety of your incoherent, hate-filled blabbering — since it was obvious that you were engaged in a desperate, failed attempt to promote the long-discredited semitic canard”

    Wow, just wow. A ton of mischaracterizations and outright lies in your statement. Indeed, you didn’t properly quote me because I had proven my point–Voter ID is nuanced. No, there was no “desperate, failed attempt” on my part, just evidence and reasoning to prove my points. Furthermore, Comment 359 entirely obliterates YOUR assertions.

    “As long as there’s a name on the list, and we can match a vote to that name. it doesn’t matter who who actually cast that vote! HONEST!”

    That is a false characterization on your part.

    “It should be self-evident that your mindless repetition of that hoary, self-refuting trope didn’t merit a specific response.”

    Your digital “nyah” doesn’t cut it. Discourse requires refutation with evidence on your part, rather than mindless confirmation bias.

    “anti-Whites like “Corvinus””

    What exactly is “anti-white”? What metrics are involved? Do not whites have free will and agency? Can they make their own decisions about race and culture, or must they abide by your every command, lest they be labeled as “anti-white”?

    “Your implicit admission that I was entirely correct in noting that election fraud is constantly promoted via (((barratry))) and the kritarchy is appreciated.”

    You are grasping at straws here. Trigger much?

  348. @Sean

    I think Icke’s strange ideas spring from his auto immune disorder; he once was a successful and widely respected man. In view of his antivax activism, its ironic an evolutionary adaption is seemingly compelling him to sacrifice all his social status by expounding absolute rubbish and through this keep everyone away from him.

    You might wish to acquaint yourself with this concept, “Sean”

    Elaborate theoretical constructs that are entirely disconnected from reality are, of course, characteristic of toxic semitism.

    • Replies: @Sean
  349. HA says:
    @HA

    “Until then, I’m going to continue assuming that the WHO’s only role here is to be a fixer and whitewasher.”

    Toldya so:

  350. Sean says:
    @James Forrestal

    The so called anti viral Remdesivir, mainly works aganst Covid-19 by quelling the immune system. The other couple of proven treatments are thoroughgoing immune modulators, and in one case actually treatments for the very thing Icke has auto immune arthritis

    Report yesterdayhttps://news.sky.com/story/covid-19-arthritis-drug-cuts-risk-of-death-in-severe-coronavirus-patients-and-also-time-in-hospital-study-finds-12215149

    COVID-19: Arthritis drug cuts risk of death in severe coronavirus patients and also time in hospital, study finds. Researchers found that when given alongside the steroid dexamethasone, tocilizumab reduced the relative risk of death by 14%.

    Dexamethasone is given for auto immune disorders in general.

    Anything that damps down your immune system will stop you getting crazy ideas. Excellent dental hygiene especially (Hitler’s teeth were atrociously bad), exercising, and having no excess bodyfat will all make you more of a team player rather than an insalubrious and clearly untrustworthy Deliverance mountain man or Wild at Heart Bobby Peru type. But you can try taking NSAIDs or high dose aspirin. Or breath slow (vagus nerve).

    Even if you are extremely healthy with good habits, the mere fact that you are a conspiracy theorist suggests that you are in a chronic state of immune activation, and so I would be very careful to avoid getting Covid-19 if I were you; it might hit you very hard indeed.

  351. MEH 0910 says:
    @MEH 0910


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