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From the New York Times news section:

Thousands of Haitians Are Being Allowed Into the U.S. But What Comes Next?

Members of a Haitian church in Philadelphia opened their hearts and pocketbooks to sponsor a family of immigrants. Then came another, and another.

By Miriam Jordan
Sept. 30, 2021

HAMILTON TOWNSHIP, N.J. — In early May, Rooldy Alexandre, a Haitian American pastor, answered a late-night call from a man speaking Creole who identified himself as Josue Alexis and said he had been following Mr. Alexandre’s sermons online. “Pastor, I just crossed the border with my pregnant wife and young child,” the man said. “Can you help?”

They needed someone to receive them in the United States.

“As a pastor, I am used to calls from people in need. It was the first time I received a call from the border,” Mr. Alexandre, 53, said. “I just had to act.” He agreed to buy them plane tickets.

Beersheba Adventist Church in Philadelphia is now supporting nine Haitians who have crossed the southwestern border in recent months, including Mr. Alexis and his family. They are living in a three-story clapboard house about 20 miles away in New Jersey, their rent, food and supplies paid for by 120 Haitian congregants who are pooling their money until the families can become self-sufficient.

… Thousands more — mainly families with young children, or vulnerable pregnant women — have been allowed to stay, often because they could, like Mr. Alexis, produce evidence of a friend or relative who could help provide a foothold.

After all, who is more likely to pay more in taxes than they take out in services than families with young children or vulnerable pregnant women?

The highly publicized crush of Haitians this month underscores the continuing difficulty of deterring mass migration on the southwestern border, even with an arsenal of measures designed to slow the arrival of migrants during a pandemic. It also shows the degree to which early generations of immigrants continue to pave the way for others who come later, in a pattern that is as old as the nation itself.

Haitian chain migrants are who we are.

By 2015, two of his older sisters had emigrated, one to Brazil and the other to Chile. After arriving in Santiago [capital of Chile] in 2016, he found a job in a chemicals lab and, on the side, played soccer for a semiprofessional team. The following year, he married a fellow Haitian, Antoinette Peroux, who worked as a cashier at a Burger King. Antonio was born in 2018.

They managed, the couple said, but it was difficult to obtain legal permanent residency in Chile; immigrants without status were exploited and paid low salaries. Ms. Peroux was passed over for promotions because she was not Chilean, she said.

In 2020, the couple was paying close attention to the Democratic presidential candidate, Joseph R. Biden Jr. He promised to restore the possibility of asylum for people persecuted in their own countries and to be kinder toward immigrants than the incumbent he was running against, Donald J. Trump.

“I decided that Chile was a first step,” Mr. Alexis said. “To really advance, we needed to reach the United States.”

He and his wife gathered about \$5,000 and began the trek to North America, by foot and by bus, sometimes paying smugglers to guide them along remote, perilous trails. …

When Mr. Biden was elected, the family celebrated at a refugee camp in Panama, where they had been waiting for Costa Rica to ease Covid-related border restrictions.

It was there that they befriended Julien Cheridor, 53, a Haitian accountant who had also decided to leave Chile. He told Mr. Alexis about a pastor in Pennsylvania whom he had known in his youth, and Mr. Alexis began listening to his sermons.

“The words of the pastor inspired me,” Mr. Alexis said. …

They crossed on May 6 into Arizona, where they and other migrants were quickly apprehended and loaded into a Border Patrol van that ferried them to a station for processing.

From there, they were bused to a facility in Phoenix, where they were tested for Covid-19 and told to contact relatives to book tickets to their destination. Mr. Alexis tried to reach an uncle in Boston; he didn’t answer.

Fearing they were running out of time, he thought of Mr. Alexandre.

After buying their plane tickets, the pastor called an emergency meeting of the church board to discuss next steps. …

On May 10, Antonio’s third birthday, the family moved into a large room on the first floor of the big house. Twelve days later, they had a stroke of extraordinarily good fortune: The Biden administration announced that it was extending temporary protected status to Haitians who had arrived in the United States on or before May 21, allowing them to live and work in the country without fear of deportation in recognition of the hardships that existed in their homeland. ..

Less than a month after the Alexis family settled into the house in New Jersey, on June 3, Mr. Alexandre received a text from a migrant hotel in El Paso. “Your family has arrived. Please book their tickets,” it said. He was incredulous.

He called the number, and the phone was passed to Mr. Cheridor, the man who had initially told Mr. Alexis about Mr. Alexandre. Mr. Cheridor had just made it across the border, and reminded the pastor that they had attended the same church in Haiti decades ago. The pastor remembered him.

In addition to asking for airfare and accommodation for himself, Mr. Cheridor had another favor to ask. Could the church help a mother and daughter he had met along the way? …

Then in late July, Mr. Alexis called the pastor again. This time, it was his sister, Marie, who had crossed the border with her husband and toddler. She did not need help with airfare. But could the church let her family stay at the house?

… “The church is doing whatever we can to support our compatriots,” he said.

 
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  1. This fits with an earlier comment I made about the only Haitian employee I ever had. I caught him stealing office supplied and loading them into the trunk of his car.

    Years later, I ran into him and learned that he had become the pastor of a Haitian church.

    Such people are Who We Will Become.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Buzz Mohawk

    It seems the ministry/priesthood/imman-ism/etc. has been compromised in the usual way of most institutions today.

    , @Corvinus
    @Buzz Mohawk

    "This fits with an earlier comment I made about the only Haitian employee I ever had. I caught him stealing office supplied and loading them into the trunk of his car."

    Somehow I would say you are embellishing here to placate the crowd.

    "Years later, I ran into him and learned that he had become the pastor of a Haitian church."

    Right. He found God and repented. Something to consider...

    Replies: @gandydancer

  2. I think you guys are looking at this all wrong. Increased Mexican immigration brought delicious Mexican food and restaurants all over this country. Italian food in this country is damn near totally accepted as being completely American at this point. Increased Vietnamese immigration brought delicious banh mis to this country. Increased Haitian immigration will only increase the amount of delicious Haitian fast food that we can all enjoy. Right? Right???

    • LOL: bomag
    • Troll: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @PaceLaw

    Because we can't just look up delicious Haitian recipes online.

    , @bingobongo
    @PaceLaw

    a food truck in every pot.

    , @Barnard
    @PaceLaw

    This is classic joke related to refugee resettlement and some liberals even make the claim unironically that these people are just like us only with better food. It made me curious in this case, what is Haitian food? Wikipedia produced some pictures of some rather unappetizing looking soups. Has anyone ever been to a Haitian restaurant? How is it any different from other Caribbean food?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Sick 'n Tired, @PaceLaw, @Ed, @Jonathan Mason

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @PaceLaw

    "delicious Haitian fast food"

    Baron Samedi's BBQ. Question the origin of the meat and you become the meat. Machete!

    , @Sick 'n Tired
    @PaceLaw

    Mud cookie lovers everywhere rejoice! Now we can finally get some authentic mud cookiess in this country!

    https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna22902512

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mud_cookie#:~:text=A%20mud%20cookie%2C%20or%20bonbon,market)%20where%20women%20purchase%20it.

    , @George Rockwell
    @PaceLaw

    Haitians, literally, eat mud cookies. I'll pass on any other culinary delights they might have conjured up.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Chileno

    , @Uncle Dan
    @PaceLaw

    Is this why we Americans are getting fatter and fatter? Before all these exotic immigrants with their delicious food arrived, we were all slim and trim.

  3. “What comes next” is we have many thousands more people we will have to babysit for the rest of their lives, and most of their progeny as well.

    • Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax
    @Fred C Dobbs

    Bonus points: They and their children will be ripe for grievance mongering.

    Replies: @TG

    , @SteveRogers42
    @Fred C Dobbs

    Millions.

  4. There should be drone strikes to disperse these groups as they advance, and massive military force on the border or forward defense zones in interior Mexico.

    We can do this. It’s who we were

    • Agree: Ben tillman
    • Thanks: Grahamsno(G64)
    • Replies: @Recently Based
    @Anonymous

    This is one of things that has always struck me as surreal about the "If we build a 50' wall, they'll bring a 51' ladder" argument that got so much traction in political debates.

    Take your 51' ladder to the Korean peninsula and try to cross in either direction between North and South. Take your 51' ladder to Gaza and try to enter Israel.

    There was materially no migration in either direction across the Iron Curtain -- which covered thousands of miles of mountainous and forested territory across multiple countries -- in either direction for decades. We know how to close a f&*^&$ng border.

    Replies: @Expletive Deleted, @martin_2

  5. How about cutting to the chase and importing all of the Congolese?

  6. who is more likely to pay more in taxes than they take out in services than families with young children

    We can’t have open or closed borders, and tuition-free, public education.

    It makes little difference to NJ taxpayers whether the school kids, upon whom their \$ is being wasted, were born in Port-au-Prince, Philly, or Camden.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Abolish_public_education


    It makes little difference to NJ taxpayers whether the school kids, upon whom their $ is being wasted, were born in Port-au-Prince, Philly, or Camden.
     
    Well, there is the fact that those born in Port-au-Prince will require a score of ESL teachers and bilingual teachers and culturally appropriate administrators, who will likely be in addition to the current stable of public school teachers and administrators.

    It's also the case that long ago the New Jersey Supreme Court instituted - out of whole cloth - certain "equity" requirements regarding public school funding in the Abbott decisions. The Haitian minors will be readily manipulated by the public school lobby to maximize its grift.

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @Reg Cæsar

  7. Alexandre’s ragamuffin band.

  8. Are the NY Times readers supposed to cry a tear or two at the ending and call their Congressmen to urge more of the same, or is this just the newspaper’s way of rubbing it in – “We got Trump the hell out of there, and now we are free to finish the destruction. You deplorables can’t do squat all about it. Check this out!”

    I’ll take any [Agree]s to mean the latter.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The problem with New Yorkers is twofold:

    1) They live like rats, crowded together in the millions on an island and some shaggy boroughs, and thus are comfortable with the idea of more rats crowding into American living space.

    2) They are mostly innumerate and lack spatial understanding to go with it, and therefore are unable to understand that there is a limit to how much wretched refuse we can take on before the rest of the country starts to stink like New York.

    The New York Times reflects all of this, and it has become a parody of itself.

    As far as your survey goes, I will say the answer is both.

    , @cityview
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Your first choice is exactly what readers are supposed to do.

    , @gandydancer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I know it's tempting to think the NYT is just trolling us, but, no, its writers really ARE that stupid and ignorant. "Young Haitian families" really ARE good candidates to be net positive tax contributors and (same mindset mentioned elsewhere in this thread) Psaki is absolutely right to think that businesses raising prices if government-imposed costs go up is immoral and inexcusable... in NYT writership's and readership's Bizarroworld. That a knuckle-dragger like you might read what they write never crosses their mind.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  9. With the latest DHS memo instructing ICE (and the world) to cease doing the task of making sure we are a nation, can we all agree that it is the end? The charade of having a country seems to be drawing to a close for once and for all.

    It is truly worth a read for the comedic value. In one section, ancient words from the Supreme Court are held up as a precedent for the lack of immigration law enforcement….. From 2012. Another part laments that there are too many illegal aliens to deal with so why bother?

    The book promoting America having 1 billion population is now the future.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @ArthurinCali


    ...can we all agree that it is the end?
     
    It's the end of a nice country. The question becomes: do we stop at Brazil, or move onward to South African ethos?
    , @AnotherDad
    @ArthurinCali


    With the latest DHS memo instructing ICE (and the world) to cease doing the task of making sure we are a nation, can we all agree that it is the end? The charade of having a country seems to be drawing to a close for once and for all.
     
    Biden is actively destroying what's left of the American nation before our eyes.

    That the Republicans do not already have articles of impeachment drafted and are banging on this 24-7 is appalling.

    ~~

    And yes, i'll say it again. Say "separate nations"

    This spectacle is perfect for making the point. "You want these people in your nation--great. You have them. You pay for them. You live with them. Thrusting them on us is abuse, is tyranny. We want to have our nation for ourselves, our children, our posterity."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  10. @Achmed E. Newman
    Are the NY Times readers supposed to cry a tear or two at the ending and call their Congressmen to urge more of the same, or is this just the newspaper's way of rubbing it in - "We got Trump the hell out of there, and now we are free to finish the destruction. You deplorables can't do squat all about it. Check this out!"

    I'll take any [Agree]s to mean the latter.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @cityview, @gandydancer

    The problem with New Yorkers is twofold:

    1) They live like rats, crowded together in the millions on an island and some shaggy boroughs, and thus are comfortable with the idea of more rats crowding into American living space.

    2) They are mostly innumerate and lack spatial understanding to go with it, and therefore are unable to understand that there is a limit to how much wretched refuse we can take on before the rest of the country starts to stink like New York.

    The New York Times reflects all of this, and it has become a parody of itself.

    As far as your survey goes, I will say the answer is both.

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian
  11. We need our CivNats and Citizenists to lecture these people that they owe White Americans as much as their own people.

    Also, Google is running a feature of a political activist Rodolfo Gonzales whom they quote saying:

    “I am the masses of my people and I refuse to be absorbed.”

    Please go into the ghettos and barrios and preach the good word of color blind loyalty. Let us know how it works out.

    https://www.google.com/doodles/celebrating-rodolfo-corky-gonzales

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @RichardTaylor

    I was wondering why Google was honoring a white man like Magnum, P.I.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

  12. The ‘conservative’ witch on the supreme court can adopt hem all in the mansion she bought. Nothing preserves a constitution like good values; genes & science are a myth. Sprinkle magic dust.

    • Agree: Old and Grumpy
  13. I wonder if the Times is tactfully hinting that maybe all this wasn’t such a great idea. ‘…When Mr. Biden was elected, the family celebrated at a refugee camp in Panama…’

    I mean, the Times could hardly just come out and say it. At the same time, the piece includes several details that I would think would have been omitted if they were still banging the drum.

  14. Going to be really embarrassing when the NYT has to retract this whole article… I have it on good authority from a cabinet secretary that the border is actually CLOSED.

    • LOL: Charon
  15. This article implies that people have to have someone here to take them in and be responsible for them? If that is true, it is news to me.

    I only know what was quoted here but while the subject of asylum comes up, nothing is mentioned about their particular tales of oppression and persecution. Interesting omission.

    There was a very good article at CNBC yesterday about the latest announcements on immigration, including further non-enforcement and adding judicial duties to the border agents’ jobs. It is definitely worth reading in its entirety. As I read things, if you were here before November of 2020, they will not charge you for just being here illegally.

    “We are guided by the knowledge that there are individuals in our country who have been here for generations and contributed to our country’s well-being,” Mayorkas said in the memo.

    “As we strive to provide them with a path to status, we will not work in conflict by spending resources seeking to remove those who do not pose a threat and, in fact, make our Nation stronger,” he continued.

    It is interesting that he mentions generations. Yes it has been a long time since the last big amnesty of 1986. But there were a number of smaller amnesties in the 1990s I think, plus people’s American born children and legal spouses can sponsor their illegal parents. A lot of illegal immigrants are legal by now. I wonder how many have been illegal for more than a generation?

    https://www.cnbc.com/2021/09/30/immigration-us-will-no-longer-deport-people-simply-because-they-are-undocumented.html

    Bonus Off Topic

    Infuriating but good article about how NASA administrator James Webb almost didn’t have a telescope named after him because he did nothing special to stop the government from firing gays at a time when that is what the government did. Incredibly ridiculous and unrealistic quotes abound.

    https://www.npr.org/2021/09/30/1041707730/shadowed-by-controversy-nasa-wont-rename-new-space-telescope

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @notsaying


    "At best, Webb's record is complicated," says Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, a cosmologist at the University of New Hampshire who co-authored an article calling for the telescope to be renamed. "And at worst, we're basically just sending this incredible instrument into the sky with the name of a homophobe on it, in my opinion."
     
    Whenever you look up at the sky, remember that the name of a homophobe is up there!

    Replies: @notsaying

  16. https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/lsereviewofbooks/2013/08/05/book-review-exodus-how-migration-is-changing-our-world/

    At the heart of the book lies a simplified model of migration, linking migration to the size of the diaspora: the larger the diaspora, the easier is immigration. Simultaneously, a sizeable diaspora slows down the absorption of immigrants into mainstream society. Consequently, under certain conditions, unrestricted immigration can lead to an explosive growth in immigrants, increasing the diaspora and stalling integration. The effect of an explosive growth in the number of immigrants, discussed in chapter 3, is probably the most important – and most controversial – contribution of the book.

    An already established Diasporas of countrymen in the receiving country lowers the cost to the immigrant of moving to another country;. It starts with the relatively affluent and skilled, then as they put down roots and can help, the less well off can afford to immigrate. Hence there is rapid acceleration into exponential growth in immigrants from that country. A lot of the young people in many countries want to immigrate, the EXODUS will be beyond imagining.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Sean

    So it's an "introdus", but why does one need to write a whole book on it?

    A single article in Scientific American - back when it still did science. - would have sufficed. Something like this:

    https://i.postimg.cc/nL57kDr8/Rural-market-Networks-Page-1-Scientific-American-1975.jpg

    , @Hannah Katz
    @Sean

    But.. but... Why would these Haitians want to move to a racist country like America when they could live in a black led paradise like Haiti. Black rule is cool!

  17. @notsaying
    This article implies that people have to have someone here to take them in and be responsible for them? If that is true, it is news to me.

    I only know what was quoted here but while the subject of asylum comes up, nothing is mentioned about their particular tales of oppression and persecution. Interesting omission.

    There was a very good article at CNBC yesterday about the latest announcements on immigration, including further non-enforcement and adding judicial duties to the border agents' jobs. It is definitely worth reading in its entirety. As I read things, if you were here before November of 2020, they will not charge you for just being here illegally.

    "We are guided by the knowledge that there are individuals in our country who have been here for generations and contributed to our country’s well-being,” Mayorkas said in the memo.

    “As we strive to provide them with a path to status, we will not work in conflict by spending resources seeking to remove those who do not pose a threat and, in fact, make our Nation stronger,” he continued.

    It is interesting that he mentions generations. Yes it has been a long time since the last big amnesty of 1986. But there were a number of smaller amnesties in the 1990s I think, plus people's American born children and legal spouses can sponsor their illegal parents. A lot of illegal immigrants are legal by now. I wonder how many have been illegal for more than a generation?

    https://www.cnbc.com/2021/09/30/immigration-us-will-no-longer-deport-people-simply-because-they-are-undocumented.html

    Bonus Off Topic

    Infuriating but good article about how NASA administrator James Webb almost didn't have a telescope named after him because he did nothing special to stop the government from firing gays at a time when that is what the government did. Incredibly ridiculous and unrealistic quotes abound.

    https://www.npr.org/2021/09/30/1041707730/shadowed-by-controversy-nasa-wont-rename-new-space-telescope

    Replies: @El Dato

    “At best, Webb’s record is complicated,” says Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, a cosmologist at the University of New Hampshire who co-authored an article calling for the telescope to be renamed. “And at worst, we’re basically just sending this incredible instrument into the sky with the name of a homophobe on it, in my opinion.”

    Whenever you look up at the sky, remember that the name of a homophobe is up there!

    • Replies: @notsaying
    @El Dato

    I am happy to say that is not what I will be thinking.

    All they seem to have on Webb is that he was a man of his time. They have no examples of him targeting gays himself. If they think he could have saved anybody's job they are even more naive than I thought. When did attitudes about gays and lesbians really start to shift? The 1960s? When did the US government (or other First World countries) stop firing known homosexuals? The 1970s maybe.

    If you go by these activists' criteria, nothing could be named after anybody in charge of anything much before Reagan. I say nuts to that. Like I said recently in the post about women's body parts being named for men, you can be angry or regret things weren't different in the past but they weren't. Trying to deny the real achievements of those in prior eras is not the way to go.

    People like Prescod-Weinstein are completely oblivious to the fact that we will all be judged by future generations, too. Do we only want to be judged by what we did wrong or didn't do, or by what we did right as well? Among other things, Wokeness is a form of severe tunnel vision that should not be trusted.

  18. @Sean

    https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/lsereviewofbooks/2013/08/05/book-review-exodus-how-migration-is-changing-our-world/

    At the heart of the book lies a simplified model of migration, linking migration to the size of the diaspora: the larger the diaspora, the easier is immigration. Simultaneously, a sizeable diaspora slows down the absorption of immigrants into mainstream society. Consequently, under certain conditions, unrestricted immigration can lead to an explosive growth in immigrants, increasing the diaspora and stalling integration. The effect of an explosive growth in the number of immigrants, discussed in chapter 3, is probably the most important – and most controversial – contribution of the book.
     
    An already established Diasporas of countrymen in the receiving country lowers the cost to the immigrant of moving to another country;. It starts with the relatively affluent and skilled, then as they put down roots and can help, the less well off can afford to immigrate. Hence there is rapid acceleration into exponential growth in immigrants from that country. A lot of the young people in many countries want to immigrate, the EXODUS will be beyond imagining.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Hannah Katz

    So it’s an “introdus”, but why does one need to write a whole book on it?

    A single article in Scientific American – back when it still did science. – would have sufficed. Something like this:

  19. @RichardTaylor
    We need our CivNats and Citizenists to lecture these people that they owe White Americans as much as their own people.

    Also, Google is running a feature of a political activist Rodolfo Gonzales whom they quote saying:

    "I am the masses of my people and I refuse to be absorbed."

    Please go into the ghettos and barrios and preach the good word of color blind loyalty. Let us know how it works out.

    https://www.google.com/doodles/celebrating-rodolfo-corky-gonzales

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I was wondering why Google was honoring a white man like Magnum, P.I.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @Steve Sailer

    Where you been? Magnum's a tacobender now--and Higgins is a White woman. And I think Tomas is slipping her the ol' Taquito.

    Ole!

    Replies: @Listener

  20. This article talks about DHS Secretary Mayorkas being afraid we might see a doubling of people trying to come in because the Trump regulation about Covid and the borders is ending. How will they handle more people when they can’t handle who they are getting now,?

    It also describes the seven page memo he put out about new deportation guidelines that I talked about in my first post. He wants his action-oriented agents in the field to determine who to deport, on their own without supervisory approvals:

    He doesn’t want any farm workers picked up for deportation. “Others he instructed ICE to pass over are the elderly and migrants who speak out at public demonstrations, according to the memo obtained by the same outlet.

    ‘It instead requires an assessment of the individual and the totality of the facts and circumstances,’ the memo reads.

    It leaves little room for ICE to deport anyone other than violent criminals.

    For migrants who’ve been apprehended by ICE and have committed crimes, Mayorkas said agents should consider a broad range of factors: How serious their offense was, whether they used a weapon, past criminal history and even when they arrived in the US or have a mental condition.

    He also wants them to look at how the deportation would affect the person’s family.”

    Come on. Is this what those guys signed up for? You tell them to weigh all these different factors but the end result is nobody goes home but violent criminals? That is not justice: this is gaming our own system; that is rubber-stamping.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10046943/DHS-fears-400-000-migrants-cross-border-October-Biden-drops-Trump-era-COVID-rule.html

    • Replies: @Uncle Dan
    @notsaying

    Why assume the agents have permission to deport violent invaders? The agent must still consider what effect the deportation would have on the invader’s family, his mental condition, and how long he’s been occupying the US.

  21. @El Dato
    @notsaying


    "At best, Webb's record is complicated," says Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, a cosmologist at the University of New Hampshire who co-authored an article calling for the telescope to be renamed. "And at worst, we're basically just sending this incredible instrument into the sky with the name of a homophobe on it, in my opinion."
     
    Whenever you look up at the sky, remember that the name of a homophobe is up there!

    Replies: @notsaying

    I am happy to say that is not what I will be thinking.

    All they seem to have on Webb is that he was a man of his time. They have no examples of him targeting gays himself. If they think he could have saved anybody’s job they are even more naive than I thought. When did attitudes about gays and lesbians really start to shift? The 1960s? When did the US government (or other First World countries) stop firing known homosexuals? The 1970s maybe.

    If you go by these activists’ criteria, nothing could be named after anybody in charge of anything much before Reagan. I say nuts to that. Like I said recently in the post about women’s body parts being named for men, you can be angry or regret things weren’t different in the past but they weren’t. Trying to deny the real achievements of those in prior eras is not the way to go.

    People like Prescod-Weinstein are completely oblivious to the fact that we will all be judged by future generations, too. Do we only want to be judged by what we did wrong or didn’t do, or by what we did right as well? Among other things, Wokeness is a form of severe tunnel vision that should not be trusted.

  22. Was listening to Melvin’s Lysol album on Youtube, as it’s not on Spotify due to copyright over the album name, and while overawed with the brilliance of the comments, along with the music, was struck by a sort of argument arising, unrelated, as to whether Hung Bunny, and the album in general, was “A huge influence on the doom and sludge genre”.

    It’s one of those eternally fascinating things about music: who was the true progenitor of what genre?

    You could spend endless hours labouring over the subject, and it’s something constantly alluring to the dilettante which ties us to the fully inducted academic professional: Who or what was progenitor of a new style and how to truly diagramme out the intricate evolutionary tree?

    At each step of the way, at each branch, a new progenitor who must acknowledge his predecessor. A common ancestral point of birth, with many spider web junctions of lineage on the way to, today.

    When it comes to posting excerpts from a mainstream opinion or news articles, interspersed with sarcastic, ironic or pointed commentary to form the whole of a satirical take down, I reckon you’re the progenitor of this genre.

    It’s exactly this format which has taken off in not only blogs, which are now antiquated, but in the final frontier of bloviating in Substack. You’re a pioneer of blogging. But not only that, a pioneer of blogging for profit.

    You’re the T. S. Eliot of our age.

  23. @PaceLaw
    I think you guys are looking at this all wrong. Increased Mexican immigration brought delicious Mexican food and restaurants all over this country. Italian food in this country is damn near totally accepted as being completely American at this point. Increased Vietnamese immigration brought delicious banh mis to this country. Increased Haitian immigration will only increase the amount of delicious Haitian fast food that we can all enjoy. Right? Right???

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @bingobongo, @Barnard, @SunBakedSuburb, @Sick 'n Tired, @George Rockwell, @Uncle Dan

    Because we can’t just look up delicious Haitian recipes online.

  24. @Sean

    https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/lsereviewofbooks/2013/08/05/book-review-exodus-how-migration-is-changing-our-world/

    At the heart of the book lies a simplified model of migration, linking migration to the size of the diaspora: the larger the diaspora, the easier is immigration. Simultaneously, a sizeable diaspora slows down the absorption of immigrants into mainstream society. Consequently, under certain conditions, unrestricted immigration can lead to an explosive growth in immigrants, increasing the diaspora and stalling integration. The effect of an explosive growth in the number of immigrants, discussed in chapter 3, is probably the most important – and most controversial – contribution of the book.
     
    An already established Diasporas of countrymen in the receiving country lowers the cost to the immigrant of moving to another country;. It starts with the relatively affluent and skilled, then as they put down roots and can help, the less well off can afford to immigrate. Hence there is rapid acceleration into exponential growth in immigrants from that country. A lot of the young people in many countries want to immigrate, the EXODUS will be beyond imagining.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Hannah Katz

    But.. but… Why would these Haitians want to move to a racist country like America when they could live in a black led paradise like Haiti. Black rule is cool!

  25. Isn’t it odd that we never see any reports in these news articles about the experiences of the Chileans or the Brazilians with the Haitians? All I can recall reading is that some Haitians said they weren’t welcomed or treated properly in Chile.

    Second point: The Times says that “The highly publicized crush of Haitians this month underscores the continuing difficulty of deterring mass migration on the southwestern border, even with an arsenal of measures designed to slow the arrival of migrants during a pandemic.” But, at least comparatively speaking, didn’t Trump “deter” fairly well?

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Tono Bungay

    Yes, that is a huge gap in all the reporting on the subject. The sample couple mentioned in the story were able to put together $5,000 when they were in Chile, which is quite a lot of money to save in South America, so how bad were things in Chile?

    Well there has been loss of employment opportunities in all countries including the US, due to Covid-19.

    For example international tourism which employees large numbers of people in transportation, hotels, and restaurants is practically moribund.

    While schools and universities have been closed there has been less demand for cleaners and maintenance staff, or cafeteria workers.

    It would not be that difficult to look up stories including the word Haitiano in Chilean newspapers, and maybe that is something that I will do if I have the time.

    I personally know a Haitian guy who arrived in Tijuana and crossed over into San Diego in 2016. He had been living in the Dominican Republic, and had then gone to Brazil, and then finally to the United States.

    When he arrived in the United States he had thrown away his passport, so as not to reveal previous movements, border crossings, and visas. Apparently this is a common practice. In fact he also had a Dominican Republic passport and citizenship documents which he had also thrown away.

    This process of post 2010 earthquake Haitian emigrants moving to South America, and then on to the United States has been going on for some years. The TPS status of Haitians has meant that they can enter into the United States by coming overland to the border, but can't just jump on a Spirit plane in Port-au-Prince and fly to Fort Lauderdale.

    I have said before that there really needs to be a summit of Western hemisphere leaders to discuss the issues related to refugee movements and settlement within the Americas, and in particular to the Haitian and Venezuelan Exodus.

    Isn't there a nation or country within the Americas that could play a leadership role?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @Polistra
    @Tono Bungay


    Isn’t it odd that we never see any reports in these news articles about the experiences of the Chileans or the Brazilians with the Haitians? All I can recall reading is that some Haitians said they weren’t welcomed or treated properly in Chile.
     
    Wherever Africans are found, Africans are well aware that they will be treated like gods in only two places: Western Europe and the USA. Hence the moths are forever attracted to the flame of white supremacy!

    About covid? Fauci is on record today having said that while it's scientifically possible for African migrants to contract covid, they're not really capable of spreading it, because reasons, and if you ask one more question you are racist.

    He went on to threaten to cancel Christmas if white people don't behave, and maybe permanently.

    https://www.rt.com/usa/536488-fauci-covid-christmas-immigrants/

  26. Bringing them in is just phase 1 of the plan. Phase 2 is settling them in a nice, safe, low cost-of-living Red state.

  27. The former leader of the British Conservative party Michael Howard wrote 16 years ago of “The British Dream” where all passports holders are loyal, work to strengthen the country and uphold its values of “decency, tolerance and fair-play”.

    Gandhi put it very well in a different context: “We must cease to be exclusive Hindus, or Muslims, or Sikhs, Parsis, Christians or Jews. Whilst we may staunchly adhere to our respective faiths, we must be Indians first, and … last.”

    1 It didn’t work out like that for India … or Gandhi.

    2 “Values” are a nonsense – a mere contrivance that almost every human on earth can agree to.

    3 The British, of course, did not have “a dream” but they did have a country.

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2005/aug/17/july7.politics

  28. Up in Canada in the French-speaking port city of Montreal, they’ve been importing Haitians since the 1970’s. Their arrival was welcomed by slum owners.

    Legacy Greek, Jewish and Portuguese inhabitants fled their historic neighborhoods. The transformation was nick-named ‘Bronxification’.

    The Haitians established a reputation for gang violence. Because they were ready to take the risks of being the street-level dealers and pimps, the older organized criminals of mafia and bikers began employing their services.

    If you order a cocaine delivery by phone in Montreal, the person delivering will most likely be black.

  29. @PaceLaw
    I think you guys are looking at this all wrong. Increased Mexican immigration brought delicious Mexican food and restaurants all over this country. Italian food in this country is damn near totally accepted as being completely American at this point. Increased Vietnamese immigration brought delicious banh mis to this country. Increased Haitian immigration will only increase the amount of delicious Haitian fast food that we can all enjoy. Right? Right???

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @bingobongo, @Barnard, @SunBakedSuburb, @Sick 'n Tired, @George Rockwell, @Uncle Dan

    a food truck in every pot.

  30. OK, bring all of Haiti here. While that is happening, we should buy up Haiti. I know they have an earthquake problem, but they have the ideal climate that requires little energy use for heating or cooling. Nor have I heard of Haiti getting hit with a hurricane. So since we aren’t going to be stopping the great American suicide via goy diaspora, let’s make Haiti European Owned Again.

    I’m so not looking forward to this winter and the rising cost of energy. Any Caribbean island sounds divine right now.

    • Replies: @Flip
    @Old and Grumpy

    Let’s settle Amish and Mennonite farmers there.

  31. After all, who is more likely to pay more in taxes than they take out in services than families with young children or vulnerable pregnant women?

    I couldn’t care less if they were net tax contributors. They don’t belong here regardless. Our country is not a corporation whose sole concern is profitability.

  32. @Abolish_public_education
    who is more likely to pay more in taxes than they take out in services than families with young children

    We can’t have open or closed borders, and tuition-free, public education.

    It makes little difference to NJ taxpayers whether the school kids, upon whom their $ is being wasted, were born in Port-au-Prince, Philly, or Camden.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    It makes little difference to NJ taxpayers whether the school kids, upon whom their \$ is being wasted, were born in Port-au-Prince, Philly, or Camden.

    Well, there is the fact that those born in Port-au-Prince will require a score of ESL teachers and bilingual teachers and culturally appropriate administrators, who will likely be in addition to the current stable of public school teachers and administrators.

    It’s also the case that long ago the New Jersey Supreme Court instituted – out of whole cloth – certain “equity” requirements regarding public school funding in the Abbott decisions. The Haitian minors will be readily manipulated by the public school lobby to maximize its grift.

    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    As a New Jersey resident (and a taxpayer, not necessarily the same thing...), I immediately thought about that angle, and with foreboding.

    Life in Blue Tick hell.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)


    Well, there is the fact that those born in Port-au-Prince will require a score of ESL teachers and bilingual teachers and culturally appropriate administrators, who will likely be in addition to the current stable of public school teachers and administrators.
     
    In other words, the local flavor of voodoo. Ask Viki Knox about her experience with that.
  33. • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
    @Hangnail Hans

    Sigh. They likely took advantage of that heads up to line up transportation for this new batch of invaders, making it expeditious.

    Can you doubt this?

  34. When Mr. Biden was elected, the family celebrated at a refugee camp in Panama

    I wager more people celebrated Biden’s victory outside America than within the country.

    • Agree: Sick 'n Tired
    • LOL: notsaying
    • Replies: @Sick 'n Tired
    @Escher

    I was working in the Caribbean when Obama was elected, and by the number of pictures sold (like having a picture of Mao or Fidel) and Obama t-shirts people were walking around in, and the excitement they all had for him, you'd think they were living in Atlanta.

  35. @PaceLaw
    I think you guys are looking at this all wrong. Increased Mexican immigration brought delicious Mexican food and restaurants all over this country. Italian food in this country is damn near totally accepted as being completely American at this point. Increased Vietnamese immigration brought delicious banh mis to this country. Increased Haitian immigration will only increase the amount of delicious Haitian fast food that we can all enjoy. Right? Right???

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @bingobongo, @Barnard, @SunBakedSuburb, @Sick 'n Tired, @George Rockwell, @Uncle Dan

    This is classic joke related to refugee resettlement and some liberals even make the claim unironically that these people are just like us only with better food. It made me curious in this case, what is Haitian food? Wikipedia produced some pictures of some rather unappetizing looking soups. Has anyone ever been to a Haitian restaurant? How is it any different from other Caribbean food?

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Barnard

    "Has anyone ever been to a Haitian restaurant?"

    The best Haitian restaurant is right in your backyard, or wherever dirt and water are abundant.. Mud cookies are the treasured national dish.

    Of course, to get authentic "real" Haitian mud cookies, you'll need to have a bunch of Haitians camping in your backyard to make them for you. But don't worry, they'll be camping there whether you invite them or not.

    , @Sick 'n Tired
    @Barnard

    It's similar to authentic Chinese food, in the sense that they'll eat pretty much anything that moves. A Haitian I worked with used to catch doves, or go fishing in the pond at the back of the property and show us his catch of large goldfish.

    A friend of mine was an EMT and showed up at a call to an apartment by a lake with 10+ Haitians living in it, all of them were sick, so that usually means it came from something they ate. The only one who spoke/understood English was a 7 year old boy. When they asked him what they had eaten, he replied "Water Chicken". The EMTs didn't know what it was until the boy pointed to the Muscovy ducks walking around by the lake. For anyone who has never been to S. Florida and is unfamiliar with them, here you go:

    https://fortmyers.floridaweekly.com/articles/misunderstood-mistreated-maligned-muscovy/#:~:text=These%20are%20all%20ways%20Florida's,face%2C%E2%80%9D%20writes%20Charles%20Sobczak.

    , @PaceLaw
    @Barnard

    Here’s a link for you Barnard. Of course, everything looks better in a glossy photo. With the terrible state that Haiti is in, I’d be surprised if they have enough pigs and chickens around to slaughter in order to make these recipes.

    https://www.tasteatlas.com/most-popular-dishes-in-haiti

    , @Ed
    @Barnard

    I went to a Haitian restaurant in Montreal. It was fairly packed with a mixed crowd. I had red snapper which was good but I suppose anyone could make it.

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Barnard


    Has anyone ever been to a Haitian restaurant? How is at any different from other Caribbean food?
     
    Haitian cuisine, as you might expect, is French influenced and if you have money you can get very good meals in restaurants with plenty of fresh salads and produce and seafood.

    For poorer Haitians rice is a stable, and stews are usually cooked on the stove top, mostly of chicken, pork, and fish and usually seasoned with a standard kind of Creole seasoning that I personally do not care for. Eggs are eaten, obviously.

    There is excellent fresh bread in Haiti, and good coffee. Milkshakes made with papaya and seasoned with a little bit of lime are popular and are often made at roadside stands. Pineapples and coconuts are popular.

    There is relatively little consumption of processed or frozen foods, other than a few items like canned milk.

    Not a huge difference, then, from other Caribbean cuisines where rice and beans and various root vegetables are eaten. Curry and roti is popular in Jamaica and Trinidad,, but less so Haiti.

  36. If you want a vision of the future, imagine endless iterations of the Mariel boatlift stomping on an American face – forever.

  37. They managed, the couple said, but it was difficult to obtain legal permanent residency in Chile; immigrants without status were exploited and paid low salaries. Ms. Peroux was passed over for promotions because she was not Chilean, she said.

    Hate to break it to you, Antoinette, but it is difficult to obtain legal permanent residency in the US and illegals are exploited and paid low salaries here, too. Since you speak a French-based creole, maybe you’d be happier somewhere they speak French, like Quebec? I hear Justin Trudeau is just dying to let in more diverse vibrants like yourself.

    • Replies: @magila
    @Matttt

    They get nearly every benefit available to citizens after they cross, more if she manages to hatch a mentally retarded baby here. Much more than she ever made in Chile.

    Another thing--they were unemployable in Chile. If he worked at a lab, which I doubt, he took out the trash. The Haitians I see spend their days moving boxes of fruit from Point A to Point B and back again, or, more commonly, drinking in public and cat-calling the Hispanic wyminz.

    The bad news is Chile has at least 100,000 of these leeches left, and they will all be on the move once they see their countrymen made it here. Good news for Chile, very bad for us.

    Replies: @Sick 'n Tired, @Uncle Dan

  38. @PaceLaw
    I think you guys are looking at this all wrong. Increased Mexican immigration brought delicious Mexican food and restaurants all over this country. Italian food in this country is damn near totally accepted as being completely American at this point. Increased Vietnamese immigration brought delicious banh mis to this country. Increased Haitian immigration will only increase the amount of delicious Haitian fast food that we can all enjoy. Right? Right???

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @bingobongo, @Barnard, @SunBakedSuburb, @Sick 'n Tired, @George Rockwell, @Uncle Dan

    “delicious Haitian fast food”

    Baron Samedi’s BBQ. Question the origin of the meat and you become the meat. Machete!

  39. I wonder how much of the current invasion is simply Chile trying to shake off its imported fruit pickers.

  40. @Buzz Mohawk
    This fits with an earlier comment I made about the only Haitian employee I ever had. I caught him stealing office supplied and loading them into the trunk of his car.

    Years later, I ran into him and learned that he had become the pastor of a Haitian church.

    Such people are Who We Will Become.

    Replies: @bomag, @Corvinus

    It seems the ministry/priesthood/imman-ism/etc. has been compromised in the usual way of most institutions today.

  41. @PaceLaw
    I think you guys are looking at this all wrong. Increased Mexican immigration brought delicious Mexican food and restaurants all over this country. Italian food in this country is damn near totally accepted as being completely American at this point. Increased Vietnamese immigration brought delicious banh mis to this country. Increased Haitian immigration will only increase the amount of delicious Haitian fast food that we can all enjoy. Right? Right???

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @bingobongo, @Barnard, @SunBakedSuburb, @Sick 'n Tired, @George Rockwell, @Uncle Dan

    Mud cookie lovers everywhere rejoice! Now we can finally get some authentic mud cookiess in this country!

    https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna22902512

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mud_cookie#:~:text=A%20mud%20cookie%2C%20or%20bonbon,market)%20where%20women%20purchase%20it.

  42. .. their rent, food and supplies paid for by 120 Haitian congregants who are pooling their money until the families can become self-sufficient.

    I have a feeling that 97% of this is baloney.

    If that group were really so productive and altruistic then their home country wouldn’t be such a s*hole.

    • Replies: @notsaying
    @Abolish_public_education

    I do not want to be naive but the decent people of Haiti have a lot more freedom to be themselves here than they do at home where everybody wants to rob you. They have a lot more money here too, so I can see where they might get together to sponsor people. They may figure I will help others so others will help my family and friends that I will encourage to come. There is an element of self interest here as well, I think.

    I saw this article at Yahoo about Haitians helping each other to go to Tijuana and the US. They seemed quite determined to get out of Haiti and never go back.

    "They have extraordinary communication with each other. They all pull in the same direction," said Jose Garcia, director of the city's Juventud 2000 shelter. "They have phones in their hand all the time and always know how things are on the border."

    Wilner Metelus, a Haitian who heads advocacy group the Citizens Committee in Defense of Naturalized Persons and Afro-Mexicans, said previous arrivals had shown the latest influx of Haitians how to avoid official raids and make progress."


    https://www.yahoo.com/news/made-haitians-learn-experience-reach-090618568.html

    Replies: @Sick 'n Tired, @John Johnson

  43. @Fred C Dobbs
    "What comes next" is we have many thousands more people we will have to babysit for the rest of their lives, and most of their progeny as well.

    Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax, @SteveRogers42

    Bonus points: They and their children will be ripe for grievance mongering.

    • Replies: @TG
    @Malcolm X-Lax

    ..as well as for special racial privileges.

    I mean, Haiti has only been free for over two centuries. And any distant historical beefs the Haitians might have are with the French. So obviously, Americans will have to go to the back of the line for all of these Haitian refugees because of the legacy of discrimination that happened to completely different people in a completely different country.

  44. Anonymous[374] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s commonly said, when things are going well, a Haitian will tend to conform to the edicts of the Catholic religion. But when things go poorly, the Haitian will passionately return to voo doo. It’s like a social virus. It’s either working, or waiting. But it stays in your system, and peeks out occasionally, looking for opportunity via these black vessels, or even white carriers will do.

    Once voo doo gets a foothold here, it will quietly proliferate, and the worse things get economically in the United States, the more voo doo will be empowered.

  45. @Achmed E. Newman
    Are the NY Times readers supposed to cry a tear or two at the ending and call their Congressmen to urge more of the same, or is this just the newspaper's way of rubbing it in - "We got Trump the hell out of there, and now we are free to finish the destruction. You deplorables can't do squat all about it. Check this out!"

    I'll take any [Agree]s to mean the latter.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @cityview, @gandydancer

    Your first choice is exactly what readers are supposed to do.

  46. @Barnard
    @PaceLaw

    This is classic joke related to refugee resettlement and some liberals even make the claim unironically that these people are just like us only with better food. It made me curious in this case, what is Haitian food? Wikipedia produced some pictures of some rather unappetizing looking soups. Has anyone ever been to a Haitian restaurant? How is it any different from other Caribbean food?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Sick 'n Tired, @PaceLaw, @Ed, @Jonathan Mason

    “Has anyone ever been to a Haitian restaurant?”

    The best Haitian restaurant is right in your backyard, or wherever dirt and water are abundant.. Mud cookies are the treasured national dish.

    Of course, to get authentic “real” Haitian mud cookies, you’ll need to have a bunch of Haitians camping in your backyard to make them for you. But don’t worry, they’ll be camping there whether you invite them or not.

  47. @Escher

    When Mr. Biden was elected, the family celebrated at a refugee camp in Panama

     

    I wager more people celebrated Biden’s victory outside America than within the country.

    Replies: @Sick 'n Tired

    I was working in the Caribbean when Obama was elected, and by the number of pictures sold (like having a picture of Mao or Fidel) and Obama t-shirts people were walking around in, and the excitement they all had for him, you’d think they were living in Atlanta.

  48. @Anonymous
    There should be drone strikes to disperse these groups as they advance, and massive military force on the border or forward defense zones in interior Mexico.

    We can do this. It's who we were

    Replies: @Recently Based

    This is one of things that has always struck me as surreal about the “If we build a 50′ wall, they’ll bring a 51′ ladder” argument that got so much traction in political debates.

    Take your 51′ ladder to the Korean peninsula and try to cross in either direction between North and South. Take your 51′ ladder to Gaza and try to enter Israel.

    There was materially no migration in either direction across the Iron Curtain — which covered thousands of miles of mountainous and forested territory across multiple countries — in either direction for decades. We know how to close a f&*^&\$ng border.

    • Thanks: Polistra
    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    @Recently Based


    “If we build a 50′ wall, they’ll bring a 51′ ladder”
     
    Simply couldn't happen in Britain. A 51ft ladder against such a wall would subtend a dangerously acute angle at the apex (or viceyversa), not the specified 1:4 ratio.
    Therefore their laddering loicense would be revoked by a very cross constable, and 38 clipboard-wielding 'Elf 'n' Safety officers. After that they would be swarmed by hundreds of social workers "for their own good" and any children found abducted into the "care" system, for resupply to posh nonces.

    [On Airstrip One, the official title of .. absolutely anything .. of course means its precise opposite.]
    , @martin_2
    @Recently Based

    A 51 foot ladder (which, as has already been pointed out, is not long enough anyway to scale a 50 foot wall) would be very heavy and would require considerable effort to place against the wall. And having reached the top of the wall, how do they propose to get down the other side? Are they going to lift the ladder up and over? That would be physically impossible.

    The 51 foot ladder argument is one that is typically advanced by the goofiest type of white libtard who has no real life experience of ladders and walls.

  49. … “The church is doing whatever we can to support our compatriots,” he said.

    Boldface added

  50. @Barnard
    @PaceLaw

    This is classic joke related to refugee resettlement and some liberals even make the claim unironically that these people are just like us only with better food. It made me curious in this case, what is Haitian food? Wikipedia produced some pictures of some rather unappetizing looking soups. Has anyone ever been to a Haitian restaurant? How is it any different from other Caribbean food?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Sick 'n Tired, @PaceLaw, @Ed, @Jonathan Mason

    It’s similar to authentic Chinese food, in the sense that they’ll eat pretty much anything that moves. A Haitian I worked with used to catch doves, or go fishing in the pond at the back of the property and show us his catch of large goldfish.

    A friend of mine was an EMT and showed up at a call to an apartment by a lake with 10+ Haitians living in it, all of them were sick, so that usually means it came from something they ate. The only one who spoke/understood English was a 7 year old boy. When they asked him what they had eaten, he replied “Water Chicken”. The EMTs didn’t know what it was until the boy pointed to the Muscovy ducks walking around by the lake. For anyone who has never been to S. Florida and is unfamiliar with them, here you go:

    https://fortmyers.floridaweekly.com/articles/misunderstood-mistreated-maligned-muscovy/#:~:text=These%20are%20all%20ways%20Florida’s,face%2C%E2%80%9D%20writes%20Charles%20Sobczak.

  51. There‘re NOT There’s.

    SPEAK ENGLISH STEVE!

    • Troll: Polistra
  52. @Malcolm X-Lax
    @Fred C Dobbs

    Bonus points: They and their children will be ripe for grievance mongering.

    Replies: @TG

    ..as well as for special racial privileges.

    I mean, Haiti has only been free for over two centuries. And any distant historical beefs the Haitians might have are with the French. So obviously, Americans will have to go to the back of the line for all of these Haitian refugees because of the legacy of discrimination that happened to completely different people in a completely different country.

  53. There is nothing so utterly disgusting as a rich person using policy that will make them even richer, at the expense of impoverishing everyone else, and then claiming the moral high ground. We should reject any claims that this flooding of the nation with people fleeing countries they have trashed, is in any way moral. And I include in this list the paid intellectual whores of the rich, and their paid ‘social activism’ whores.

    All these third-world refugees will drive wages and living standards down for most of us, but they will drive profits and rents up for the rich. Period.

    Mass immigration is a vicious amoral policy of total greed. We should forcefully reject any claims to the contrary.

    • Agree: Polistra
    • Replies: @Cortes
    @TG

    Well said. Thanks.

  54. It’s one thing to be a cuck on Hispanic immigration. I can honestly see how that can be in many people’s interest. Hispanics work for crap wages. They don’t call workers’ comp. If they start to organize, well ICE gets a call about the organizers. They contribute less than they take, but many of the people (who matter) in favor of the invasion are opposed to “socialism”, so they think that worse is better. After a generation, Hispanics become a solid part of the lower middle class, so unlike Asians, they are not a threat to rich people’s children

    Even looking at it from a longer-run perspective it is not crazy. Latin American nations are not world-beaters, but the rich live mighty well, especially in the whiter nations, like the Southern Cone. Sure their public finances are a mess but see re: socialism above.

    [MORE]

    None of that applies to Haitians. My mom used to volunteer teaching ESL to Haitians. To hear her talk about them, they are African Americans, but dumber. The zero-generation immigrant men raise their kids and send money home. The next generation? They act like African Americans, but somewhat dumber. The men are not happy to work crap jobs and smile. They are no more interested in raising their byblows than are domestic AA. So the women are kinda super blacks. None of them are smart enough to get on the bottom step of the affirmative action escalator. They work here and there as domestics. They are involved with their churches, but these are the people to whom we owe zombies. At best, they believe in fantasy helpful white Jesus. At worst, they are sacrificing chickens in the street for harder boners. In two generations, they are typical blacks, just dumber and less reality-based.

    So, very little work comes out of them, a lot of social services go into them. The worst trait, from the immigration booster view, is that they make it very clear that we need immigrants propaganda is clearly, obviously false. No one needs Haitians. People can pretend that
    1) Hispanics immigrate
    2) ???
    3) We are all rich!
    is not totally insane, but no one can say that Haitians improve the US with a straight face. My one hope for Haitian immigrants is that being Haitian in America is so different from being Haitian in Haiti that they lose contact and sympathy with their fellows, and Haitians are poor enough and selfish enough that immigration does not become a self-licking ice cream cone.

    Haitians even leave us with impoverished fantasies!

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Rob

    My one hope for Haitian immigrants is that being Haitian in America is so different from being Haitian in Haiti that they lose contact and sympathy with their fellows, and Haitians are poor enough and selfish enough that immigration does not become a self-licking ice cream cone.

    I wish I could be that optimistic.

    What I think is happening is that Africans around the world are losing their faith in globalism. They no longer believe that the right globalist equation can fix a country like Haiti.

    In that light there is no reason for them to stick around Bantu island. It's a third world bucket of crabs.

    I also believe that liberals are slowly losing faith in globalism as well even if they don't want to. I've noticed that liberals have a very hard time talking about Haiti. Even when just talking about charity they get a nervous look in their eyes. I believe their subconscious is terrified that Bantu island may represent the worst possible reality which is that racial inequality has a natural component and cannot be fixed by removing racist Whites. They want to look away and change the subject.

  55. @ArthurinCali
    With the latest DHS memo instructing ICE (and the world) to cease doing the task of making sure we are a nation, can we all agree that it is the end? The charade of having a country seems to be drawing to a close for once and for all.

    It is truly worth a read for the comedic value. In one section, ancient words from the Supreme Court are held up as a precedent for the lack of immigration law enforcement..... From 2012. Another part laments that there are too many illegal aliens to deal with so why bother?

    The book promoting America having 1 billion population is now the future.

    Replies: @bomag, @AnotherDad

    …can we all agree that it is the end?

    It’s the end of a nice country. The question becomes: do we stop at Brazil, or move onward to South African ethos?


  56. Hundreds of millions more non-whites seek entrance to the United States, and millions being born each day. Over the next decade another 14 million non-whites will migrate into the US. and just 18 million whites will be born. Whites will be a minority of those under the age of 45 in ten year time. The most important demographics for our future is the population under the age of 40. Most of the migrants are under the age of 40 while most the majority of the White population is over the age of 40. Ending immigration would delay this demographic change by a decade if white births continue at the current level.

    • Replies: @Rob
    @Travis

    That is terrifying. Long-term economic growth is driven by very smart, creative people. When the white innovation-aged population declines x%, the innovation output must decline by more. Innovation thrives on network effects. Asians are smart, sure, but they are uncreative. I think this is demonstrated by thousands of years of Asian history, and like Africans being considerably less intelligent, does not require psychometric evidence, though that would be nice.

    Someone distinguished two broad types of creativity, though I forgot what terms he used. Maybe a quick duckducking will turn it up. Yep. Here’s a guy quoted in an Atlantic article.


    In the R&D business, we kind of lump people into two categories: inventors and engineers. The inventor is the kite kind of person. They have a zillion ideas and they come up with great first prototypes. But generally an inventor … is not a tidy person. He sees the big picture and … [is] constantly lashing something together that doesn’t really work. And then the engineers are the strings, the craftsmen [who pick out a good idea] and make it really practical. So, one is about a good idea, the other is about … making it practical.
     

    Pretty clearly Asians do fine on the “engineering” sort of creativity. Once shown a path, they can follow it, but they don’t find paths on their own. In fairness, this may change. Asian culture stifles creativity, and culture is downstream from biology, but it can be a wide stream. Like, white, European culture has changed considerably from, say, the medieval period to today. Not only that, but Asians in America do not live in Asian culture. They live in a culture created by white people who value innovation. Maybe Asian conformity will outweigh their uncreativity, and they will pick up the schizotypal sort of creativity? That is a huge bet. Not to mention, it’s a bet we did not have to make. The government and trend makers could have encourages Americans to reproduce.

    Still and all, it is much more likely Asians will get to inventing than blacks and Hispanics turning smart and innovating. I’d be moderately interested in seeing what sort of creative folk could be bred from a mixed Asian-black population. Blacks are more creative, but their low intelligence keeps them from contributing anything more than beats and simple rhymes.

    I don’t see how America becomes a first-world nation when half the working-age population is third-world. I say becomes because the US is a third-world nation for quite a few people living here, including many Americans. As a Quora commenter responded to Is the US considered a third world country?, public schools are in a never-ending crisis, and our dumb students are the least literate in the first world. Sure, you and I know that is because they are third worlders residing in a strange land, but they will soon become illiterate adults. People who cannot read very well can contribute grunt labor, not much else. They live in a first-world country as animals occupying the city of Rome post-collapse. They use the built infrastructure for shelter, but they had nothing to do with its construction and can barely imagine maintaining it. There was a commenter here for a while, Counter-Insurgency, who said cities were at the end of their lives, pulling in resources from productive suburbs and rural areas, but they cannot create enough wealth to maintain themselves, much less raise standards of living.

    One supposed problem is “gun violence” by which people mostly mean black gunplay. Trying to police blacks like a first-world population is hugely expensive. From trying to collect every bullet casing from a miles-long running gun battle in Chicago to the expense of caring for huge numbers of male blacks whom we have to incarcerate, policing blacks only builds resentment. Cities should cordon off black areas and de-police them. In time, some group will arise that blacks consider the legitimate authority, and blacks will cooperate with their police, if only to avoid being tortured as recalcitrant witnesses. The “defined the police” mantra is accurate in that we spend huge resources policing blacks, and they don’t even appreciate it. Leave them to their wolves.

    How we stay a first-world nation with a massive third-world undertow is the American issue of the twenty-first century. It did not have to be this way. We could have had a base on Mars. Instead, we have 100 million aliens. Maybe we can have a South African-style economy, where whites live in first-world conditions, and so do minorities that can keep up, but everyone else devolves to their natural level? But SA has insane crime, and with a black government, is going to kill the goose. Then they will starve, but waddaya waddaya.

    Replies: @Gabe Ruth, @Pat Kittle

  57. No type of blacks belongs to any predominantly non-black country.

  58. @Recently Based
    @Anonymous

    This is one of things that has always struck me as surreal about the "If we build a 50' wall, they'll bring a 51' ladder" argument that got so much traction in political debates.

    Take your 51' ladder to the Korean peninsula and try to cross in either direction between North and South. Take your 51' ladder to Gaza and try to enter Israel.

    There was materially no migration in either direction across the Iron Curtain -- which covered thousands of miles of mountainous and forested territory across multiple countries -- in either direction for decades. We know how to close a f&*^&$ng border.

    Replies: @Expletive Deleted, @martin_2

    “If we build a 50′ wall, they’ll bring a 51′ ladder”

    Simply couldn’t happen in Britain. A 51ft ladder against such a wall would subtend a dangerously acute angle at the apex (or viceyversa), not the specified 1:4 ratio.
    Therefore their laddering loicense would be revoked by a very cross constable, and 38 clipboard-wielding ‘Elf ‘n’ Safety officers. After that they would be swarmed by hundreds of social workers “for their own good” and any children found abducted into the “care” system, for resupply to posh nonces.

    [On Airstrip One, the official title of .. absolutely anything .. of course means its precise opposite.]

    • LOL: Listener
  59. @Abolish_public_education
    .. their rent, food and supplies paid for by 120 Haitian congregants who are pooling their money until the families can become self-sufficient.

    I have a feeling that 97% of this is baloney.

    If that group were really so productive and altruistic then their home country wouldn’t be such a s*hole.

    Replies: @notsaying

    I do not want to be naive but the decent people of Haiti have a lot more freedom to be themselves here than they do at home where everybody wants to rob you. They have a lot more money here too, so I can see where they might get together to sponsor people. They may figure I will help others so others will help my family and friends that I will encourage to come. There is an element of self interest here as well, I think.

    I saw this article at Yahoo about Haitians helping each other to go to Tijuana and the US. They seemed quite determined to get out of Haiti and never go back.

    “They have extraordinary communication with each other. They all pull in the same direction,” said Jose Garcia, director of the city’s Juventud 2000 shelter. “They have phones in their hand all the time and always know how things are on the border.”

    Wilner Metelus, a Haitian who heads advocacy group the Citizens Committee in Defense of Naturalized Persons and Afro-Mexicans, said previous arrivals had shown the latest influx of Haitians how to avoid official raids and make progress.”

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/made-haitians-learn-experience-reach-090618568.html

    • Replies: @Sick 'n Tired
    @notsaying

    Anyone who has ever worked with Haitians as observed them talking on their phones ALL DAY LONG, no idea who they're on the phone with, but they are constantly on them.

    , @John Johnson
    @notsaying

    I do not want to be naive but the decent people of Haiti have a lot more freedom to be themselves here than they do at home where everybody wants to rob you.I saw this article at Yahoo about Haitians helping each other to go to Tijuana and the US. They seemed quite determined to get out of Haiti and never go back.

    What amazing people. They swear to leave the country of their birth and never return.

    “They have extraordinary communication with each other. They all pull in the same direction,” said Jose Garcia, director of the city’s Juventud 2000 shelter. “They have phones in their hand all the time and always know how things are on the border.

    Yes they work together using cell phones. Is everyone really amazed by that?

    I love how everyone betrays their own low standards for Africans.

    LOOK U GUYS THEY CAN USE CELL PHONES AND WORK IN GROUPS

    DUMB RACISTS THINK THEY ARE PRIMITIVES OR SOMETHING

  60. @notsaying
    @Abolish_public_education

    I do not want to be naive but the decent people of Haiti have a lot more freedom to be themselves here than they do at home where everybody wants to rob you. They have a lot more money here too, so I can see where they might get together to sponsor people. They may figure I will help others so others will help my family and friends that I will encourage to come. There is an element of self interest here as well, I think.

    I saw this article at Yahoo about Haitians helping each other to go to Tijuana and the US. They seemed quite determined to get out of Haiti and never go back.

    "They have extraordinary communication with each other. They all pull in the same direction," said Jose Garcia, director of the city's Juventud 2000 shelter. "They have phones in their hand all the time and always know how things are on the border."

    Wilner Metelus, a Haitian who heads advocacy group the Citizens Committee in Defense of Naturalized Persons and Afro-Mexicans, said previous arrivals had shown the latest influx of Haitians how to avoid official raids and make progress."


    https://www.yahoo.com/news/made-haitians-learn-experience-reach-090618568.html

    Replies: @Sick 'n Tired, @John Johnson

    Anyone who has ever worked with Haitians as observed them talking on their phones ALL DAY LONG, no idea who they’re on the phone with, but they are constantly on them.

  61. @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Abolish_public_education


    It makes little difference to NJ taxpayers whether the school kids, upon whom their $ is being wasted, were born in Port-au-Prince, Philly, or Camden.
     
    Well, there is the fact that those born in Port-au-Prince will require a score of ESL teachers and bilingual teachers and culturally appropriate administrators, who will likely be in addition to the current stable of public school teachers and administrators.

    It's also the case that long ago the New Jersey Supreme Court instituted - out of whole cloth - certain "equity" requirements regarding public school funding in the Abbott decisions. The Haitian minors will be readily manipulated by the public school lobby to maximize its grift.

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @Reg Cæsar

    As a New Jersey resident (and a taxpayer, not necessarily the same thing…), I immediately thought about that angle, and with foreboding.

    Life in Blue Tick hell.

  62. @Hangnail Hans
    https://i.ibb.co/sbWbhSn/Capture-2021-10-01-10-01-11-2.png

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian

    Sigh. They likely took advantage of that heads up to line up transportation for this new batch of invaders, making it expeditious.

    Can you doubt this?

  63. @Old and Grumpy
    OK, bring all of Haiti here. While that is happening, we should buy up Haiti. I know they have an earthquake problem, but they have the ideal climate that requires little energy use for heating or cooling. Nor have I heard of Haiti getting hit with a hurricane. So since we aren't going to be stopping the great American suicide via goy diaspora, let's make Haiti European Owned Again.

    I'm so not looking forward to this winter and the rising cost of energy. Any Caribbean island sounds divine right now.

    Replies: @Flip

    Let’s settle Amish and Mennonite farmers there.

  64. @Barnard
    @PaceLaw

    This is classic joke related to refugee resettlement and some liberals even make the claim unironically that these people are just like us only with better food. It made me curious in this case, what is Haitian food? Wikipedia produced some pictures of some rather unappetizing looking soups. Has anyone ever been to a Haitian restaurant? How is it any different from other Caribbean food?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Sick 'n Tired, @PaceLaw, @Ed, @Jonathan Mason

    Here’s a link for you Barnard. Of course, everything looks better in a glossy photo. With the terrible state that Haiti is in, I’d be surprised if they have enough pigs and chickens around to slaughter in order to make these recipes.

    https://www.tasteatlas.com/most-popular-dishes-in-haiti

  65. @notsaying
    @Abolish_public_education

    I do not want to be naive but the decent people of Haiti have a lot more freedom to be themselves here than they do at home where everybody wants to rob you. They have a lot more money here too, so I can see where they might get together to sponsor people. They may figure I will help others so others will help my family and friends that I will encourage to come. There is an element of self interest here as well, I think.

    I saw this article at Yahoo about Haitians helping each other to go to Tijuana and the US. They seemed quite determined to get out of Haiti and never go back.

    "They have extraordinary communication with each other. They all pull in the same direction," said Jose Garcia, director of the city's Juventud 2000 shelter. "They have phones in their hand all the time and always know how things are on the border."

    Wilner Metelus, a Haitian who heads advocacy group the Citizens Committee in Defense of Naturalized Persons and Afro-Mexicans, said previous arrivals had shown the latest influx of Haitians how to avoid official raids and make progress."


    https://www.yahoo.com/news/made-haitians-learn-experience-reach-090618568.html

    Replies: @Sick 'n Tired, @John Johnson

    I do not want to be naive but the decent people of Haiti have a lot more freedom to be themselves here than they do at home where everybody wants to rob you.I saw this article at Yahoo about Haitians helping each other to go to Tijuana and the US. They seemed quite determined to get out of Haiti and never go back.

    What amazing people. They swear to leave the country of their birth and never return.

    “They have extraordinary communication with each other. They all pull in the same direction,” said Jose Garcia, director of the city’s Juventud 2000 shelter. “They have phones in their hand all the time and always know how things are on the border.

    Yes they work together using cell phones. Is everyone really amazed by that?

    I love how everyone betrays their own low standards for Africans.

    LOOK U GUYS THEY CAN USE CELL PHONES AND WORK IN GROUPS

    DUMB RACISTS THINK THEY ARE PRIMITIVES OR SOMETHING

  66. @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Abolish_public_education


    It makes little difference to NJ taxpayers whether the school kids, upon whom their $ is being wasted, were born in Port-au-Prince, Philly, or Camden.
     
    Well, there is the fact that those born in Port-au-Prince will require a score of ESL teachers and bilingual teachers and culturally appropriate administrators, who will likely be in addition to the current stable of public school teachers and administrators.

    It's also the case that long ago the New Jersey Supreme Court instituted - out of whole cloth - certain "equity" requirements regarding public school funding in the Abbott decisions. The Haitian minors will be readily manipulated by the public school lobby to maximize its grift.

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @Reg Cæsar

    Well, there is the fact that those born in Port-au-Prince will require a score of ESL teachers and bilingual teachers and culturally appropriate administrators, who will likely be in addition to the current stable of public school teachers and administrators.

    In other words, the local flavor of voodoo. Ask Viki Knox about her experience with that.

  67. @Rob
    It’s one thing to be a cuck on Hispanic immigration. I can honestly see how that can be in many people’s interest. Hispanics work for crap wages. They don’t call workers’ comp. If they start to organize, well ICE gets a call about the organizers. They contribute less than they take, but many of the people (who matter) in favor of the invasion are opposed to “socialism”, so they think that worse is better. After a generation, Hispanics become a solid part of the lower middle class, so unlike Asians, they are not a threat to rich people’s children

    Even looking at it from a longer-run perspective it is not crazy. Latin American nations are not world-beaters, but the rich live mighty well, especially in the whiter nations, like the Southern Cone. Sure their public finances are a mess but see re: socialism above.

    None of that applies to Haitians. My mom used to volunteer teaching ESL to Haitians. To hear her talk about them, they are African Americans, but dumber. The zero-generation immigrant men raise their kids and send money home. The next generation? They act like African Americans, but somewhat dumber. The men are not happy to work crap jobs and smile. They are no more interested in raising their byblows than are domestic AA. So the women are kinda super blacks. None of them are smart enough to get on the bottom step of the affirmative action escalator. They work here and there as domestics. They are involved with their churches, but these are the people to whom we owe zombies. At best, they believe in fantasy helpful white Jesus. At worst, they are sacrificing chickens in the street for harder boners. In two generations, they are typical blacks, just dumber and less reality-based.

    So, very little work comes out of them, a lot of social services go into them. The worst trait, from the immigration booster view, is that they make it very clear that we need immigrants propaganda is clearly, obviously false. No one needs Haitians. People can pretend that
    1) Hispanics immigrate
    2) ???
    3) We are all rich!
    is not totally insane, but no one can say that Haitians improve the US with a straight face. My one hope for Haitian immigrants is that being Haitian in America is so different from being Haitian in Haiti that they lose contact and sympathy with their fellows, and Haitians are poor enough and selfish enough that immigration does not become a self-licking ice cream cone.

    Haitians even leave us with impoverished fantasies!

    Replies: @John Johnson

    My one hope for Haitian immigrants is that being Haitian in America is so different from being Haitian in Haiti that they lose contact and sympathy with their fellows, and Haitians are poor enough and selfish enough that immigration does not become a self-licking ice cream cone.

    I wish I could be that optimistic.

    What I think is happening is that Africans around the world are losing their faith in globalism. They no longer believe that the right globalist equation can fix a country like Haiti.

    In that light there is no reason for them to stick around Bantu island. It’s a third world bucket of crabs.

    I also believe that liberals are slowly losing faith in globalism as well even if they don’t want to. I’ve noticed that liberals have a very hard time talking about Haiti. Even when just talking about charity they get a nervous look in their eyes. I believe their subconscious is terrified that Bantu island may represent the worst possible reality which is that racial inequality has a natural component and cannot be fixed by removing racist Whites. They want to look away and change the subject.

  68. @Steve Sailer
    @RichardTaylor

    I was wondering why Google was honoring a white man like Magnum, P.I.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    Where you been? Magnum’s a tacobender now–and Higgins is a White woman. And I think Tomas is slipping her the ol’ Taquito.

    Ole!

    • Replies: @Listener
    @AceDeuce

    "Where you been? Magnum’s a tacobender now–and Higgins is a White woman. And I think Tomas is slipping her the ol’ Taquito.

    Ole!"

    When I was in college Magnun PI was on Thursday nights which was a big party night at UF. I never went out until it was over...made lots of dates wait. I loved that show.
    The remake with the mexican is unwatchable IMO.

  69. I like the way the word clapboard is made to sound like they are living in a slum. Most of the houses in Buffalo have clapboard siding, it was the thing. And the couple from Chile managed to scrape together \$5000, which is more than most blacks, if we are to believe the MSM, in America are worth.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Buffalo Joe


    I like the way the word clapboard is made to sound like they are living in a slum.
     
    Are the blackguards' cupboards made of clapboard, too?
    , @Ron Mexico
    @Buffalo Joe

    Anecdotal, but on Thursday this Haitian couple (pork plant) walked into our rectory and basically demanded that the parish find them a house or apartment to rent. Guess they don't know what a realtor is. Then later a Hispanic dude was incensed that my wife wouldn't allow his kids to join first Communion and Confirmation classes, which already started, without being a participant in our parish. He ended the conversation with "that's okay, in 20 years this will be a brown country, anyway." Anyway, indeed.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  70. @PaceLaw
    I think you guys are looking at this all wrong. Increased Mexican immigration brought delicious Mexican food and restaurants all over this country. Italian food in this country is damn near totally accepted as being completely American at this point. Increased Vietnamese immigration brought delicious banh mis to this country. Increased Haitian immigration will only increase the amount of delicious Haitian fast food that we can all enjoy. Right? Right???

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @bingobongo, @Barnard, @SunBakedSuburb, @Sick 'n Tired, @George Rockwell, @Uncle Dan

    Haitians, literally, eat mud cookies. I’ll pass on any other culinary delights they might have conjured up.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @George Rockwell

    Haitians, literally, eat mud cookies. I’ll pass on any other culinary delights they might have conjured up.

    When I first heard about this I really thought that there must be more to the story. Like only at some point in history they actually used mud. Or by mud they mean chocolate.

    No it's really just mud mixed with a little butter and baked in the sun.

    They eat it when they are starving to fill their stomachs.

    Understandably they are embarrassed to talk about this practice but it is well documented.

    https://dyinginhaiti.blogspot.com/2007/07/mud-pies-in-soleil.html

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    , @Chileno
    @George Rockwell

    I have to say that the stray cats population in Chile decreased dramatically since the arriving of Haitians.

  71. @Buffalo Joe
    I like the way the word clapboard is made to sound like they are living in a slum. Most of the houses in Buffalo have clapboard siding, it was the thing. And the couple from Chile managed to scrape together $5000, which is more than most blacks, if we are to believe the MSM, in America are worth.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Ron Mexico

    I like the way the word clapboard is made to sound like they are living in a slum.

    Are the blackguards’ cupboards made of clapboard, too?

    • Thanks: Polistra
  72. @Recently Based
    @Anonymous

    This is one of things that has always struck me as surreal about the "If we build a 50' wall, they'll bring a 51' ladder" argument that got so much traction in political debates.

    Take your 51' ladder to the Korean peninsula and try to cross in either direction between North and South. Take your 51' ladder to Gaza and try to enter Israel.

    There was materially no migration in either direction across the Iron Curtain -- which covered thousands of miles of mountainous and forested territory across multiple countries -- in either direction for decades. We know how to close a f&*^&$ng border.

    Replies: @Expletive Deleted, @martin_2

    A 51 foot ladder (which, as has already been pointed out, is not long enough anyway to scale a 50 foot wall) would be very heavy and would require considerable effort to place against the wall. And having reached the top of the wall, how do they propose to get down the other side? Are they going to lift the ladder up and over? That would be physically impossible.

    The 51 foot ladder argument is one that is typically advanced by the goofiest type of white libtard who has no real life experience of ladders and walls.

  73. @Buffalo Joe
    I like the way the word clapboard is made to sound like they are living in a slum. Most of the houses in Buffalo have clapboard siding, it was the thing. And the couple from Chile managed to scrape together $5000, which is more than most blacks, if we are to believe the MSM, in America are worth.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Ron Mexico

    Anecdotal, but on Thursday this Haitian couple (pork plant) walked into our rectory and basically demanded that the parish find them a house or apartment to rent. Guess they don’t know what a realtor is. Then later a Hispanic dude was incensed that my wife wouldn’t allow his kids to join first Communion and Confirmation classes, which already started, without being a participant in our parish. He ended the conversation with “that’s okay, in 20 years this will be a brown country, anyway.” Anyway, indeed.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Ron Mexico


    Guess they don’t know what a realtor [sic] is.
     
    They're not alone.


    https://www.nar.realtor/logos-and-trademark-rules/top-5-things-you-need-to-know-about-the-realtor-trademarks

    Replies: @Polistra

  74. I believe the game plan is Demand Destruction, and a sojourn through the eighteenth century is preferable to Seneca’s Cliff compleat with Orlov’s Five Stages. Who better to destroy our Complex Society than humankind’s locusts?

  75. @Matttt

    They managed, the couple said, but it was difficult to obtain legal permanent residency in Chile; immigrants without status were exploited and paid low salaries. Ms. Peroux was passed over for promotions because she was not Chilean, she said.
     
    Hate to break it to you, Antoinette, but it is difficult to obtain legal permanent residency in the US and illegals are exploited and paid low salaries here, too. Since you speak a French-based creole, maybe you'd be happier somewhere they speak French, like Quebec? I hear Justin Trudeau is just dying to let in more diverse vibrants like yourself.

    Replies: @magila

    They get nearly every benefit available to citizens after they cross, more if she manages to hatch a mentally retarded baby here. Much more than she ever made in Chile.

    Another thing–they were unemployable in Chile. If he worked at a lab, which I doubt, he took out the trash. The Haitians I see spend their days moving boxes of fruit from Point A to Point B and back again, or, more commonly, drinking in public and cat-calling the Hispanic wyminz.

    The bad news is Chile has at least 100,000 of these leeches left, and they will all be on the move once they see their countrymen made it here. Good news for Chile, very bad for us.

    • Thanks: Polistra
    • Replies: @Sick 'n Tired
    @magila

    Sounds like it's a good time to move to Chile.

    , @Uncle Dan
    @magila

    Maybe we could learn a thing or two from the Chileans?

  76. @Barnard
    @PaceLaw

    This is classic joke related to refugee resettlement and some liberals even make the claim unironically that these people are just like us only with better food. It made me curious in this case, what is Haitian food? Wikipedia produced some pictures of some rather unappetizing looking soups. Has anyone ever been to a Haitian restaurant? How is it any different from other Caribbean food?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Sick 'n Tired, @PaceLaw, @Ed, @Jonathan Mason

    I went to a Haitian restaurant in Montreal. It was fairly packed with a mixed crowd. I had red snapper which was good but I suppose anyone could make it.

  77. @Travis
    https://twitter.com/JDKnox4/status/1442992236996829185?s=20
    Hundreds of millions more non-whites seek entrance to the United States, and millions being born each day. Over the next decade another 14 million non-whites will migrate into the US. and just 18 million whites will be born. Whites will be a minority of those under the age of 45 in ten year time. The most important demographics for our future is the population under the age of 40. Most of the migrants are under the age of 40 while most the majority of the White population is over the age of 40. Ending immigration would delay this demographic change by a decade if white births continue at the current level.

    Replies: @Rob

    That is terrifying. Long-term economic growth is driven by very smart, creative people. When the white innovation-aged population declines x%, the innovation output must decline by more. Innovation thrives on network effects. Asians are smart, sure, but they are uncreative. I think this is demonstrated by thousands of years of Asian history, and like Africans being considerably less intelligent, does not require psychometric evidence, though that would be nice.

    Someone distinguished two broad types of creativity, though I forgot what terms he used. Maybe a quick duckducking will turn it up. Yep. Here’s a guy quoted in an Atlantic article.

    In the R&D business, we kind of lump people into two categories: inventors and engineers. The inventor is the kite kind of person. They have a zillion ideas and they come up with great first prototypes. But generally an inventor … is not a tidy person. He sees the big picture and … [is] constantly lashing something together that doesn’t really work. And then the engineers are the strings, the craftsmen [who pick out a good idea] and make it really practical. So, one is about a good idea, the other is about … making it practical.

    [MORE]

    Pretty clearly Asians do fine on the “engineering” sort of creativity. Once shown a path, they can follow it, but they don’t find paths on their own. In fairness, this may change. Asian culture stifles creativity, and culture is downstream from biology, but it can be a wide stream. Like, white, European culture has changed considerably from, say, the medieval period to today. Not only that, but Asians in America do not live in Asian culture. They live in a culture created by white people who value innovation. Maybe Asian conformity will outweigh their uncreativity, and they will pick up the schizotypal sort of creativity? That is a huge bet. Not to mention, it’s a bet we did not have to make. The government and trend makers could have encourages Americans to reproduce.

    Still and all, it is much more likely Asians will get to inventing than blacks and Hispanics turning smart and innovating. I’d be moderately interested in seeing what sort of creative folk could be bred from a mixed Asian-black population. Blacks are more creative, but their low intelligence keeps them from contributing anything more than beats and simple rhymes.

    I don’t see how America becomes a first-world nation when half the working-age population is third-world. I say becomes because the US is a third-world nation for quite a few people living here, including many Americans. As a Quora commenter responded to Is the US considered a third world country?, public schools are in a never-ending crisis, and our dumb students are the least literate in the first world. Sure, you and I know that is because they are third worlders residing in a strange land, but they will soon become illiterate adults. People who cannot read very well can contribute grunt labor, not much else. They live in a first-world country as animals occupying the city of Rome post-collapse. They use the built infrastructure for shelter, but they had nothing to do with its construction and can barely imagine maintaining it. There was a commenter here for a while, Counter-Insurgency, who said cities were at the end of their lives, pulling in resources from productive suburbs and rural areas, but they cannot create enough wealth to maintain themselves, much less raise standards of living.

    One supposed problem is “gun violence” by which people mostly mean black gunplay. Trying to police blacks like a first-world population is hugely expensive. From trying to collect every bullet casing from a miles-long running gun battle in Chicago to the expense of caring for huge numbers of male blacks whom we have to incarcerate, policing blacks only builds resentment. Cities should cordon off black areas and de-police them. In time, some group will arise that blacks consider the legitimate authority, and blacks will cooperate with their police, if only to avoid being tortured as recalcitrant witnesses. The “defined the police” mantra is accurate in that we spend huge resources policing blacks, and they don’t even appreciate it. Leave them to their wolves.

    How we stay a first-world nation with a massive third-world undertow is the American issue of the twenty-first century. It did not have to be this way. We could have had a base on Mars. Instead, we have 100 million aliens. Maybe we can have a South African-style economy, where whites live in first-world conditions, and so do minorities that can keep up, but everyone else devolves to their natural level? But SA has insane crime, and with a black government, is going to kill the goose. Then they will starve, but waddaya waddaya.

    • Agree: AceDeuce
    • Replies: @Gabe Ruth
    @Rob

    I remember Counterinsurgency, very interesting commenter.

    I can't totally discount the global depopulation conspiracy as the purpose of COVID and associated vaccines, but hiding certain realities about our future, such as the incapacity of the ruling class to hold it together and the resource crunch, makes more sense to me.

    Why it matters to our rulers is an interesting question. I believe it comes down maintaining legitimacy of USG sovereignty over states that are not total basket cases (yet) and the military. The current medico-fascist policies forming on the coasts right now are motivated by an elite calculation similar to that of the hawkish German generals who believed it would be better to fight Russia now sooner rather than later.

    Are they right? American whites are shrinking at an alarming rate, but the ones that don't get with the program and euthanize themselves might be selected for borderer traits like plain cussedness. One can hope, but one thing is certain: Timothy McVeigh will not be a villain to future white Americans, should there be any.

    , @Pat Kittle
    @Rob


    Long-term economic growth is driven by very smart, creative people.
     
    There's nothing smart or creative about believing "long-term economic growth" is possible. For that you'd need an infinitely large world.

    Too bad otherwise smart people can't get that simple fact through their innumerate heads.
  78. Why does everyone want to leave Haiti? I thought all of their problems had been solved.
    https://www.clintonfoundation.org/our-work/clinton-foundation-haiti

  79. @ArthurinCali
    With the latest DHS memo instructing ICE (and the world) to cease doing the task of making sure we are a nation, can we all agree that it is the end? The charade of having a country seems to be drawing to a close for once and for all.

    It is truly worth a read for the comedic value. In one section, ancient words from the Supreme Court are held up as a precedent for the lack of immigration law enforcement..... From 2012. Another part laments that there are too many illegal aliens to deal with so why bother?

    The book promoting America having 1 billion population is now the future.

    Replies: @bomag, @AnotherDad

    With the latest DHS memo instructing ICE (and the world) to cease doing the task of making sure we are a nation, can we all agree that it is the end? The charade of having a country seems to be drawing to a close for once and for all.

    Biden is actively destroying what’s left of the American nation before our eyes.

    That the Republicans do not already have articles of impeachment drafted and are banging on this 24-7 is appalling.

    ~~

    And yes, i’ll say it again. Say “separate nations”

    This spectacle is perfect for making the point. “You want these people in your nation–great. You have them. You pay for them. You live with them. Thrusting them on us is abuse, is tyranny. We want to have our nation for ourselves, our children, our posterity.”

    • Troll: Corvinus
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad


    That the Republicans do not already have articles of impeachment drafted... is appalling.
     
    https://s.hdnux.com/photos/01/20/35/12/21091004/6/2100x0.jpg

    Replies: @AnotherDad

  80. @magila
    @Matttt

    They get nearly every benefit available to citizens after they cross, more if she manages to hatch a mentally retarded baby here. Much more than she ever made in Chile.

    Another thing--they were unemployable in Chile. If he worked at a lab, which I doubt, he took out the trash. The Haitians I see spend their days moving boxes of fruit from Point A to Point B and back again, or, more commonly, drinking in public and cat-calling the Hispanic wyminz.

    The bad news is Chile has at least 100,000 of these leeches left, and they will all be on the move once they see their countrymen made it here. Good news for Chile, very bad for us.

    Replies: @Sick 'n Tired, @Uncle Dan

    Sounds like it’s a good time to move to Chile.

  81. @PaceLaw
    I think you guys are looking at this all wrong. Increased Mexican immigration brought delicious Mexican food and restaurants all over this country. Italian food in this country is damn near totally accepted as being completely American at this point. Increased Vietnamese immigration brought delicious banh mis to this country. Increased Haitian immigration will only increase the amount of delicious Haitian fast food that we can all enjoy. Right? Right???

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @bingobongo, @Barnard, @SunBakedSuburb, @Sick 'n Tired, @George Rockwell, @Uncle Dan

    Is this why we Americans are getting fatter and fatter? Before all these exotic immigrants with their delicious food arrived, we were all slim and trim.

  82. @notsaying
    This article talks about DHS Secretary Mayorkas being afraid we might see a doubling of people trying to come in because the Trump regulation about Covid and the borders is ending. How will they handle more people when they can't handle who they are getting now,?

    It also describes the seven page memo he put out about new deportation guidelines that I talked about in my first post. He wants his action-oriented agents in the field to determine who to deport, on their own without supervisory approvals:

    He doesn't want any farm workers picked up for deportation. "Others he instructed ICE to pass over are the elderly and migrants who speak out at public demonstrations, according to the memo obtained by the same outlet.

    'It instead requires an assessment of the individual and the totality of the facts and circumstances,' the memo reads.

    It leaves little room for ICE to deport anyone other than violent criminals.

    For migrants who've been apprehended by ICE and have committed crimes, Mayorkas said agents should consider a broad range of factors: How serious their offense was, whether they used a weapon, past criminal history and even when they arrived in the US or have a mental condition.

    He also wants them to look at how the deportation would affect the person's family."

    Come on. Is this what those guys signed up for? You tell them to weigh all these different factors but the end result is nobody goes home but violent criminals? That is not justice: this is gaming our own system; that is rubber-stamping.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10046943/DHS-fears-400-000-migrants-cross-border-October-Biden-drops-Trump-era-COVID-rule.html

    Replies: @Uncle Dan

    Why assume the agents have permission to deport violent invaders? The agent must still consider what effect the deportation would have on the invader’s family, his mental condition, and how long he’s been occupying the US.

  83. @Ron Mexico
    @Buffalo Joe

    Anecdotal, but on Thursday this Haitian couple (pork plant) walked into our rectory and basically demanded that the parish find them a house or apartment to rent. Guess they don't know what a realtor is. Then later a Hispanic dude was incensed that my wife wouldn't allow his kids to join first Communion and Confirmation classes, which already started, without being a participant in our parish. He ended the conversation with "that's okay, in 20 years this will be a brown country, anyway." Anyway, indeed.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Guess they don’t know what a realtor [sic] is.

    They’re not alone.

    https://www.nar.realtor/logos-and-trademark-rules/top-5-things-you-need-to-know-about-the-realtor-trademarks

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Reg Cæsar

    Sorry, but no one in the real-estate 'industry' has the moral ground from which to dictate to anyone about anything, much less the use of language.

    It's like the USPS instructing us about rules and efficiency, when they can't even understand their own regulations, much less implement them properly. Nope, sorry.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  84. @AnotherDad
    @ArthurinCali


    With the latest DHS memo instructing ICE (and the world) to cease doing the task of making sure we are a nation, can we all agree that it is the end? The charade of having a country seems to be drawing to a close for once and for all.
     
    Biden is actively destroying what's left of the American nation before our eyes.

    That the Republicans do not already have articles of impeachment drafted and are banging on this 24-7 is appalling.

    ~~

    And yes, i'll say it again. Say "separate nations"

    This spectacle is perfect for making the point. "You want these people in your nation--great. You have them. You pay for them. You live with them. Thrusting them on us is abuse, is tyranny. We want to have our nation for ourselves, our children, our posterity."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    That the Republicans do not already have articles of impeachment drafted… is appalling.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Reg Cæsar

    So what.

    A) It's making the point both about what the President's duty actually is. And that this situation is intolerable. I.e. a treasonous policy for us. Grounds for separation.

    B) It's not going to succeed, but if it did ... great! Then you've established precedent on the border/protection from invasion. You can apply that to Kamala Harris as well.

    The nation can survive yet another mediocrity--even one as annoying as Harris. (In fact, her incredible nails-on-blackboard repulsiveness would be an asset for conservatives in the future.) What the nation can not survive is invasion.

    Republicans need to treat the border situation as an existential matter--because it is. If this keeps up there will be nothing left to conserve anyway so "conservatism" is pointless.

  85. @magila
    @Matttt

    They get nearly every benefit available to citizens after they cross, more if she manages to hatch a mentally retarded baby here. Much more than she ever made in Chile.

    Another thing--they were unemployable in Chile. If he worked at a lab, which I doubt, he took out the trash. The Haitians I see spend their days moving boxes of fruit from Point A to Point B and back again, or, more commonly, drinking in public and cat-calling the Hispanic wyminz.

    The bad news is Chile has at least 100,000 of these leeches left, and they will all be on the move once they see their countrymen made it here. Good news for Chile, very bad for us.

    Replies: @Sick 'n Tired, @Uncle Dan

    Maybe we could learn a thing or two from the Chileans?

  86. @TG
    There is nothing so utterly disgusting as a rich person using policy that will make them even richer, at the expense of impoverishing everyone else, and then claiming the moral high ground. We should reject any claims that this flooding of the nation with people fleeing countries they have trashed, is in any way moral. And I include in this list the paid intellectual whores of the rich, and their paid 'social activism' whores.

    All these third-world refugees will drive wages and living standards down for most of us, but they will drive profits and rents up for the rich. Period.

    Mass immigration is a vicious amoral policy of total greed. We should forcefully reject any claims to the contrary.

    Replies: @Cortes

    Well said. Thanks.

  87. @Fred C Dobbs
    "What comes next" is we have many thousands more people we will have to babysit for the rest of their lives, and most of their progeny as well.

    Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax, @SteveRogers42

    Millions.

  88. @George Rockwell
    @PaceLaw

    Haitians, literally, eat mud cookies. I'll pass on any other culinary delights they might have conjured up.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Chileno

    Haitians, literally, eat mud cookies. I’ll pass on any other culinary delights they might have conjured up.

    When I first heard about this I really thought that there must be more to the story. Like only at some point in history they actually used mud. Or by mud they mean chocolate.

    No it’s really just mud mixed with a little butter and baked in the sun.

    They eat it when they are starving to fill their stomachs.

    Understandably they are embarrassed to talk about this practice but it is well documented.

    https://dyinginhaiti.blogspot.com/2007/07/mud-pies-in-soleil.html

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @John Johnson

    "Understandably they are embarrassed to talk about this practice"

    Oh no they aren't. If they had any sense of shame at all, then they would have put together something better than, well, Haiti.

  89. @AceDeuce
    @Steve Sailer

    Where you been? Magnum's a tacobender now--and Higgins is a White woman. And I think Tomas is slipping her the ol' Taquito.

    Ole!

    Replies: @Listener

    “Where you been? Magnum’s a tacobender now–and Higgins is a White woman. And I think Tomas is slipping her the ol’ Taquito.

    Ole!”

    When I was in college Magnun PI was on Thursday nights which was a big party night at UF. I never went out until it was over…made lots of dates wait. I loved that show.
    The remake with the mexican is unwatchable IMO.

    • Agree: AceDeuce
  90. @Reg Cæsar
    @Ron Mexico


    Guess they don’t know what a realtor [sic] is.
     
    They're not alone.


    https://www.nar.realtor/logos-and-trademark-rules/top-5-things-you-need-to-know-about-the-realtor-trademarks

    Replies: @Polistra

    Sorry, but no one in the real-estate ‘industry’ has the moral ground from which to dictate to anyone about anything, much less the use of language.

    It’s like the USPS instructing us about rules and efficiency, when they can’t even understand their own regulations, much less implement them properly. Nope, sorry.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Polistra


    Sorry, but no one in the real-estate ‘industry’ has the moral ground...
     
    Trademark law isn't moral ground but legal ground. You also imply that the Haitians were right and Ron Mexico wrong.

    Replies: @Polistra

  91. @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad


    That the Republicans do not already have articles of impeachment drafted... is appalling.
     
    https://s.hdnux.com/photos/01/20/35/12/21091004/6/2100x0.jpg

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    So what.

    A) It’s making the point both about what the President’s duty actually is. And that this situation is intolerable. I.e. a treasonous policy for us. Grounds for separation.

    B) It’s not going to succeed, but if it did … great! Then you’ve established precedent on the border/protection from invasion. You can apply that to Kamala Harris as well.

    The nation can survive yet another mediocrity–even one as annoying as Harris. (In fact, her incredible nails-on-blackboard repulsiveness would be an asset for conservatives in the future.) What the nation can not survive is invasion.

    Republicans need to treat the border situation as an existential matter–because it is. If this keeps up there will be nothing left to conserve anyway so “conservatism” is pointless.

    • Agree: Ron Mexico
  92. @Polistra
    @Reg Cæsar

    Sorry, but no one in the real-estate 'industry' has the moral ground from which to dictate to anyone about anything, much less the use of language.

    It's like the USPS instructing us about rules and efficiency, when they can't even understand their own regulations, much less implement them properly. Nope, sorry.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Sorry, but no one in the real-estate ‘industry’ has the moral ground…

    Trademark law isn’t moral ground but legal ground. You also imply that the Haitians were right and Ron Mexico wrong.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Reg Cæsar

    Implied no such thing, and when you want to have an in-depth discussion about the moral implications of trademark law, LMK. Fair warning though: it ain't pretty.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  93. @John Johnson
    @George Rockwell

    Haitians, literally, eat mud cookies. I’ll pass on any other culinary delights they might have conjured up.

    When I first heard about this I really thought that there must be more to the story. Like only at some point in history they actually used mud. Or by mud they mean chocolate.

    No it's really just mud mixed with a little butter and baked in the sun.

    They eat it when they are starving to fill their stomachs.

    Understandably they are embarrassed to talk about this practice but it is well documented.

    https://dyinginhaiti.blogspot.com/2007/07/mud-pies-in-soleil.html

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “Understandably they are embarrassed to talk about this practice”

    Oh no they aren’t. If they had any sense of shame at all, then they would have put together something better than, well, Haiti.

  94. @Tono Bungay
    Isn't it odd that we never see any reports in these news articles about the experiences of the Chileans or the Brazilians with the Haitians? All I can recall reading is that some Haitians said they weren't welcomed or treated properly in Chile.

    Second point: The Times says that "The highly publicized crush of Haitians this month underscores the continuing difficulty of deterring mass migration on the southwestern border, even with an arsenal of measures designed to slow the arrival of migrants during a pandemic." But, at least comparatively speaking, didn't Trump "deter" fairly well?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Polistra

    Yes, that is a huge gap in all the reporting on the subject. The sample couple mentioned in the story were able to put together \$5,000 when they were in Chile, which is quite a lot of money to save in South America, so how bad were things in Chile?

    Well there has been loss of employment opportunities in all countries including the US, due to Covid-19.

    For example international tourism which employees large numbers of people in transportation, hotels, and restaurants is practically moribund.

    While schools and universities have been closed there has been less demand for cleaners and maintenance staff, or cafeteria workers.

    It would not be that difficult to look up stories including the word Haitiano in Chilean newspapers, and maybe that is something that I will do if I have the time.

    I personally know a Haitian guy who arrived in Tijuana and crossed over into San Diego in 2016. He had been living in the Dominican Republic, and had then gone to Brazil, and then finally to the United States.

    When he arrived in the United States he had thrown away his passport, so as not to reveal previous movements, border crossings, and visas. Apparently this is a common practice. In fact he also had a Dominican Republic passport and citizenship documents which he had also thrown away.

    This process of post 2010 earthquake Haitian emigrants moving to South America, and then on to the United States has been going on for some years. The TPS status of Haitians has meant that they can enter into the United States by coming overland to the border, but can’t just jump on a Spirit plane in Port-au-Prince and fly to Fort Lauderdale.

    I have said before that there really needs to be a summit of Western hemisphere leaders to discuss the issues related to refugee movements and settlement within the Americas, and in particular to the Haitian and Venezuelan Exodus.

    Isn’t there a nation or country within the Americas that could play a leadership role?

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Jonathan Mason

    I did have a look at the Chilean newspapers and they are having their own problems with huge numbers of refugees from Venezuela and Haiti, and in particular with violent reactions against the new immigrants.

    Some people in Chile are tossing around the idea of building a wall or at least having some kind of defenses on their borders.

    I was also reading an editorial the other day from the Dominican Republic in which the author was pretty gung-ho on the idea of building a wall along the border with Haitian. About a third of the labor force in the Dominican Republic in the agriculture and construction industries is Haitian.

    Meanwhile in England they are suffering from a shortage of 100,000 truck drivers. Maybe they could set up a driving school in Haiti to teach people to drive trucks on the left hand side of the road and then give them visas to go to England provided that they can show both vaccination and vasectomy certificates.

    Replies: @gandydancer

  95. @Barnard
    @PaceLaw

    This is classic joke related to refugee resettlement and some liberals even make the claim unironically that these people are just like us only with better food. It made me curious in this case, what is Haitian food? Wikipedia produced some pictures of some rather unappetizing looking soups. Has anyone ever been to a Haitian restaurant? How is it any different from other Caribbean food?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Sick 'n Tired, @PaceLaw, @Ed, @Jonathan Mason

    Has anyone ever been to a Haitian restaurant? How is at any different from other Caribbean food?

    Haitian cuisine, as you might expect, is French influenced and if you have money you can get very good meals in restaurants with plenty of fresh salads and produce and seafood.

    For poorer Haitians rice is a stable, and stews are usually cooked on the stove top, mostly of chicken, pork, and fish and usually seasoned with a standard kind of Creole seasoning that I personally do not care for. Eggs are eaten, obviously.

    There is excellent fresh bread in Haiti, and good coffee. Milkshakes made with papaya and seasoned with a little bit of lime are popular and are often made at roadside stands. Pineapples and coconuts are popular.

    There is relatively little consumption of processed or frozen foods, other than a few items like canned milk.

    Not a huge difference, then, from other Caribbean cuisines where rice and beans and various root vegetables are eaten. Curry and roti is popular in Jamaica and Trinidad,, but less so Haiti.

  96. @Achmed E. Newman
    Are the NY Times readers supposed to cry a tear or two at the ending and call their Congressmen to urge more of the same, or is this just the newspaper's way of rubbing it in - "We got Trump the hell out of there, and now we are free to finish the destruction. You deplorables can't do squat all about it. Check this out!"

    I'll take any [Agree]s to mean the latter.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @cityview, @gandydancer

    I know it’s tempting to think the NYT is just trolling us, but, no, its writers really ARE that stupid and ignorant. “Young Haitian families” really ARE good candidates to be net positive tax contributors and (same mindset mentioned elsewhere in this thread) Psaki is absolutely right to think that businesses raising prices if government-imposed costs go up is immoral and inexcusable… in NYT writership’s and readership’s Bizarroworld. That a knuckle-dragger like you might read what they write never crosses their mind.

    • Agree: notsaying
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @gandydancer


    That a knuckle-dragger like you might read what they write never crosses their mind.
     
    Hey, not my fault! iSteve keeps putting their ridiculous writing in his posts!

    ;-}
  97. Camp of the Saints is Who We Are, apparently.

    I suppose it had to happen — Good Times -> Soft Men and all that.

    The sequel should get interesting and cathartic.

  98. Message out of the UK Commonwealth: “mass immigration isn’t working out so well, housing and infrastructure can’t keep up, we need quality rather than quantity”

    Message out of the US: “the vaccines are working, business as usual with mass immigration.”

    I know the rhetoric from Johnson and co is more talk than substance, but can’t you Americans at least take some baby steps towards immigration control.

  99. @Buzz Mohawk
    This fits with an earlier comment I made about the only Haitian employee I ever had. I caught him stealing office supplied and loading them into the trunk of his car.

    Years later, I ran into him and learned that he had become the pastor of a Haitian church.

    Such people are Who We Will Become.

    Replies: @bomag, @Corvinus

    “This fits with an earlier comment I made about the only Haitian employee I ever had. I caught him stealing office supplied and loading them into the trunk of his car.”

    Somehow I would say you are embellishing here to placate the crowd.

    “Years later, I ran into him and learned that he had become the pastor of a Haitian church.”

    Right. He found God and repented. Something to consider…

    • Replies: @gandydancer
    @Corvinus


    “Years later, I ran into him and learned that he had become the pastor of a Haitian church.”

    Right. He found God and repented. Something to consider…
     
    That's not the way to bet.

    The first time I got ripped off face-to-face by someone I knew it was by a black pastor who worked as a janitor in the SFSU computer lab where I had a work-study job. He kept borrowing and repaying small amounts, then upped the ante a bit just before quitting. It wasn''t a large amount, but I still remember around 50y later.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  100. @Reg Cæsar
    @Polistra


    Sorry, but no one in the real-estate ‘industry’ has the moral ground...
     
    Trademark law isn't moral ground but legal ground. You also imply that the Haitians were right and Ron Mexico wrong.

    Replies: @Polistra

    Implied no such thing, and when you want to have an in-depth discussion about the moral implications of trademark law, LMK. Fair warning though: it ain’t pretty.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Polistra

    Is realtor even a real word? Any more than kwik or lite or EZ?

    Replies: @gandydancer

  101. @Tono Bungay
    Isn't it odd that we never see any reports in these news articles about the experiences of the Chileans or the Brazilians with the Haitians? All I can recall reading is that some Haitians said they weren't welcomed or treated properly in Chile.

    Second point: The Times says that "The highly publicized crush of Haitians this month underscores the continuing difficulty of deterring mass migration on the southwestern border, even with an arsenal of measures designed to slow the arrival of migrants during a pandemic." But, at least comparatively speaking, didn't Trump "deter" fairly well?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Polistra

    Isn’t it odd that we never see any reports in these news articles about the experiences of the Chileans or the Brazilians with the Haitians? All I can recall reading is that some Haitians said they weren’t welcomed or treated properly in Chile.

    Wherever Africans are found, Africans are well aware that they will be treated like gods in only two places: Western Europe and the USA. Hence the moths are forever attracted to the flame of white supremacy!

    About covid? Fauci is on record today having said that while it’s scientifically possible for African migrants to contract covid, they’re not really capable of spreading it, because reasons, and if you ask one more question you are racist.

    He went on to threaten to cancel Christmas if white people don’t behave, and maybe permanently.

    https://www.rt.com/usa/536488-fauci-covid-christmas-immigrants/

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman, Charon
  102. @gandydancer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I know it's tempting to think the NYT is just trolling us, but, no, its writers really ARE that stupid and ignorant. "Young Haitian families" really ARE good candidates to be net positive tax contributors and (same mindset mentioned elsewhere in this thread) Psaki is absolutely right to think that businesses raising prices if government-imposed costs go up is immoral and inexcusable... in NYT writership's and readership's Bizarroworld. That a knuckle-dragger like you might read what they write never crosses their mind.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    That a knuckle-dragger like you might read what they write never crosses their mind.

    Hey, not my fault! iSteve keeps putting their ridiculous writing in his posts!

    ;-}

  103. @Rob
    @Travis

    That is terrifying. Long-term economic growth is driven by very smart, creative people. When the white innovation-aged population declines x%, the innovation output must decline by more. Innovation thrives on network effects. Asians are smart, sure, but they are uncreative. I think this is demonstrated by thousands of years of Asian history, and like Africans being considerably less intelligent, does not require psychometric evidence, though that would be nice.

    Someone distinguished two broad types of creativity, though I forgot what terms he used. Maybe a quick duckducking will turn it up. Yep. Here’s a guy quoted in an Atlantic article.


    In the R&D business, we kind of lump people into two categories: inventors and engineers. The inventor is the kite kind of person. They have a zillion ideas and they come up with great first prototypes. But generally an inventor … is not a tidy person. He sees the big picture and … [is] constantly lashing something together that doesn’t really work. And then the engineers are the strings, the craftsmen [who pick out a good idea] and make it really practical. So, one is about a good idea, the other is about … making it practical.
     

    Pretty clearly Asians do fine on the “engineering” sort of creativity. Once shown a path, they can follow it, but they don’t find paths on their own. In fairness, this may change. Asian culture stifles creativity, and culture is downstream from biology, but it can be a wide stream. Like, white, European culture has changed considerably from, say, the medieval period to today. Not only that, but Asians in America do not live in Asian culture. They live in a culture created by white people who value innovation. Maybe Asian conformity will outweigh their uncreativity, and they will pick up the schizotypal sort of creativity? That is a huge bet. Not to mention, it’s a bet we did not have to make. The government and trend makers could have encourages Americans to reproduce.

    Still and all, it is much more likely Asians will get to inventing than blacks and Hispanics turning smart and innovating. I’d be moderately interested in seeing what sort of creative folk could be bred from a mixed Asian-black population. Blacks are more creative, but their low intelligence keeps them from contributing anything more than beats and simple rhymes.

    I don’t see how America becomes a first-world nation when half the working-age population is third-world. I say becomes because the US is a third-world nation for quite a few people living here, including many Americans. As a Quora commenter responded to Is the US considered a third world country?, public schools are in a never-ending crisis, and our dumb students are the least literate in the first world. Sure, you and I know that is because they are third worlders residing in a strange land, but they will soon become illiterate adults. People who cannot read very well can contribute grunt labor, not much else. They live in a first-world country as animals occupying the city of Rome post-collapse. They use the built infrastructure for shelter, but they had nothing to do with its construction and can barely imagine maintaining it. There was a commenter here for a while, Counter-Insurgency, who said cities were at the end of their lives, pulling in resources from productive suburbs and rural areas, but they cannot create enough wealth to maintain themselves, much less raise standards of living.

    One supposed problem is “gun violence” by which people mostly mean black gunplay. Trying to police blacks like a first-world population is hugely expensive. From trying to collect every bullet casing from a miles-long running gun battle in Chicago to the expense of caring for huge numbers of male blacks whom we have to incarcerate, policing blacks only builds resentment. Cities should cordon off black areas and de-police them. In time, some group will arise that blacks consider the legitimate authority, and blacks will cooperate with their police, if only to avoid being tortured as recalcitrant witnesses. The “defined the police” mantra is accurate in that we spend huge resources policing blacks, and they don’t even appreciate it. Leave them to their wolves.

    How we stay a first-world nation with a massive third-world undertow is the American issue of the twenty-first century. It did not have to be this way. We could have had a base on Mars. Instead, we have 100 million aliens. Maybe we can have a South African-style economy, where whites live in first-world conditions, and so do minorities that can keep up, but everyone else devolves to their natural level? But SA has insane crime, and with a black government, is going to kill the goose. Then they will starve, but waddaya waddaya.

    Replies: @Gabe Ruth, @Pat Kittle

    I remember Counterinsurgency, very interesting commenter.

    I can’t totally discount the global depopulation conspiracy as the purpose of COVID and associated vaccines, but hiding certain realities about our future, such as the incapacity of the ruling class to hold it together and the resource crunch, makes more sense to me.

    Why it matters to our rulers is an interesting question. I believe it comes down maintaining legitimacy of USG sovereignty over states that are not total basket cases (yet) and the military. The current medico-fascist policies forming on the coasts right now are motivated by an elite calculation similar to that of the hawkish German generals who believed it would be better to fight Russia now sooner rather than later.

    Are they right? American whites are shrinking at an alarming rate, but the ones that don’t get with the program and euthanize themselves might be selected for borderer traits like plain cussedness. One can hope, but one thing is certain: Timothy McVeigh will not be a villain to future white Americans, should there be any.

  104. @Polistra
    @Reg Cæsar

    Implied no such thing, and when you want to have an in-depth discussion about the moral implications of trademark law, LMK. Fair warning though: it ain't pretty.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Is realtor even a real word? Any more than kwik or lite or EZ?

    • Replies: @gandydancer
    @Reg Cæsar


    Is realtor even a real word?
     
    Like kleenex for facial tissue it has he advantage of being shorter than "real estate grifter", with no substitute matching it in that respect, that I or apparently anyone else can think of.
  105. @Jonathan Mason
    @Tono Bungay

    Yes, that is a huge gap in all the reporting on the subject. The sample couple mentioned in the story were able to put together $5,000 when they were in Chile, which is quite a lot of money to save in South America, so how bad were things in Chile?

    Well there has been loss of employment opportunities in all countries including the US, due to Covid-19.

    For example international tourism which employees large numbers of people in transportation, hotels, and restaurants is practically moribund.

    While schools and universities have been closed there has been less demand for cleaners and maintenance staff, or cafeteria workers.

    It would not be that difficult to look up stories including the word Haitiano in Chilean newspapers, and maybe that is something that I will do if I have the time.

    I personally know a Haitian guy who arrived in Tijuana and crossed over into San Diego in 2016. He had been living in the Dominican Republic, and had then gone to Brazil, and then finally to the United States.

    When he arrived in the United States he had thrown away his passport, so as not to reveal previous movements, border crossings, and visas. Apparently this is a common practice. In fact he also had a Dominican Republic passport and citizenship documents which he had also thrown away.

    This process of post 2010 earthquake Haitian emigrants moving to South America, and then on to the United States has been going on for some years. The TPS status of Haitians has meant that they can enter into the United States by coming overland to the border, but can't just jump on a Spirit plane in Port-au-Prince and fly to Fort Lauderdale.

    I have said before that there really needs to be a summit of Western hemisphere leaders to discuss the issues related to refugee movements and settlement within the Americas, and in particular to the Haitian and Venezuelan Exodus.

    Isn't there a nation or country within the Americas that could play a leadership role?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I did have a look at the Chilean newspapers and they are having their own problems with huge numbers of refugees from Venezuela and Haiti, and in particular with violent reactions against the new immigrants.

    Some people in Chile are tossing around the idea of building a wall or at least having some kind of defenses on their borders.

    I was also reading an editorial the other day from the Dominican Republic in which the author was pretty gung-ho on the idea of building a wall along the border with Haitian. About a third of the labor force in the Dominican Republic in the agriculture and construction industries is Haitian.

    Meanwhile in England they are suffering from a shortage of 100,000 truck drivers. Maybe they could set up a driving school in Haiti to teach people to drive trucks on the left hand side of the road and then give them visas to go to England provided that they can show both vaccination and vasectomy certificates.

    • Replies: @gandydancer
    @Jonathan Mason


    Meanwhile in England they are suffering from a shortage of 100,000 truck drivers.
     
    At what wage?
  106. @George Rockwell
    @PaceLaw

    Haitians, literally, eat mud cookies. I'll pass on any other culinary delights they might have conjured up.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Chileno

    I have to say that the stray cats population in Chile decreased dramatically since the arriving of Haitians.

  107. @Rob
    @Travis

    That is terrifying. Long-term economic growth is driven by very smart, creative people. When the white innovation-aged population declines x%, the innovation output must decline by more. Innovation thrives on network effects. Asians are smart, sure, but they are uncreative. I think this is demonstrated by thousands of years of Asian history, and like Africans being considerably less intelligent, does not require psychometric evidence, though that would be nice.

    Someone distinguished two broad types of creativity, though I forgot what terms he used. Maybe a quick duckducking will turn it up. Yep. Here’s a guy quoted in an Atlantic article.


    In the R&D business, we kind of lump people into two categories: inventors and engineers. The inventor is the kite kind of person. They have a zillion ideas and they come up with great first prototypes. But generally an inventor … is not a tidy person. He sees the big picture and … [is] constantly lashing something together that doesn’t really work. And then the engineers are the strings, the craftsmen [who pick out a good idea] and make it really practical. So, one is about a good idea, the other is about … making it practical.
     

    Pretty clearly Asians do fine on the “engineering” sort of creativity. Once shown a path, they can follow it, but they don’t find paths on their own. In fairness, this may change. Asian culture stifles creativity, and culture is downstream from biology, but it can be a wide stream. Like, white, European culture has changed considerably from, say, the medieval period to today. Not only that, but Asians in America do not live in Asian culture. They live in a culture created by white people who value innovation. Maybe Asian conformity will outweigh their uncreativity, and they will pick up the schizotypal sort of creativity? That is a huge bet. Not to mention, it’s a bet we did not have to make. The government and trend makers could have encourages Americans to reproduce.

    Still and all, it is much more likely Asians will get to inventing than blacks and Hispanics turning smart and innovating. I’d be moderately interested in seeing what sort of creative folk could be bred from a mixed Asian-black population. Blacks are more creative, but their low intelligence keeps them from contributing anything more than beats and simple rhymes.

    I don’t see how America becomes a first-world nation when half the working-age population is third-world. I say becomes because the US is a third-world nation for quite a few people living here, including many Americans. As a Quora commenter responded to Is the US considered a third world country?, public schools are in a never-ending crisis, and our dumb students are the least literate in the first world. Sure, you and I know that is because they are third worlders residing in a strange land, but they will soon become illiterate adults. People who cannot read very well can contribute grunt labor, not much else. They live in a first-world country as animals occupying the city of Rome post-collapse. They use the built infrastructure for shelter, but they had nothing to do with its construction and can barely imagine maintaining it. There was a commenter here for a while, Counter-Insurgency, who said cities were at the end of their lives, pulling in resources from productive suburbs and rural areas, but they cannot create enough wealth to maintain themselves, much less raise standards of living.

    One supposed problem is “gun violence” by which people mostly mean black gunplay. Trying to police blacks like a first-world population is hugely expensive. From trying to collect every bullet casing from a miles-long running gun battle in Chicago to the expense of caring for huge numbers of male blacks whom we have to incarcerate, policing blacks only builds resentment. Cities should cordon off black areas and de-police them. In time, some group will arise that blacks consider the legitimate authority, and blacks will cooperate with their police, if only to avoid being tortured as recalcitrant witnesses. The “defined the police” mantra is accurate in that we spend huge resources policing blacks, and they don’t even appreciate it. Leave them to their wolves.

    How we stay a first-world nation with a massive third-world undertow is the American issue of the twenty-first century. It did not have to be this way. We could have had a base on Mars. Instead, we have 100 million aliens. Maybe we can have a South African-style economy, where whites live in first-world conditions, and so do minorities that can keep up, but everyone else devolves to their natural level? But SA has insane crime, and with a black government, is going to kill the goose. Then they will starve, but waddaya waddaya.

    Replies: @Gabe Ruth, @Pat Kittle

    Long-term economic growth is driven by very smart, creative people.

    There’s nothing smart or creative about believing “long-term economic growth” is possible. For that you’d need an infinitely large world.

    Too bad otherwise smart people can’t get that simple fact through their innumerate heads.

    • Agree: gandydancer
  108. Over-population is our core problem — and Haiti’s.

    They need birth control; we need border control.

    • Replies: @gandydancer
    @Pat Kittle


    They need birth control; we need border control.
     
    We need expulsion, at least. As Trump said when first lying about his intentions, "They all must go!"
  109. @Corvinus
    @Buzz Mohawk

    "This fits with an earlier comment I made about the only Haitian employee I ever had. I caught him stealing office supplied and loading them into the trunk of his car."

    Somehow I would say you are embellishing here to placate the crowd.

    "Years later, I ran into him and learned that he had become the pastor of a Haitian church."

    Right. He found God and repented. Something to consider...

    Replies: @gandydancer

    “Years later, I ran into him and learned that he had become the pastor of a Haitian church.”

    Right. He found God and repented. Something to consider…

    That’s not the way to bet.

    The first time I got ripped off face-to-face by someone I knew it was by a black pastor who worked as a janitor in the SFSU computer lab where I had a work-study job. He kept borrowing and repaying small amounts, then upped the ante a bit just before quitting. It wasn”t a large amount, but I still remember around 50y later.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @gandydancer

    "The first time I got ripped off face-to-face by someone I knew it was by a black pastor who worked as a janitor in the SFSU computer lab where I had a work-study job. He kept borrowing and repaying small amounts, then upped the ante a bit just before quitting. It wasn”t a large amount, but I still remember around 50y later."

    Cool made up story, bro.

  110. @Reg Cæsar
    @Polistra

    Is realtor even a real word? Any more than kwik or lite or EZ?

    Replies: @gandydancer

    Is realtor even a real word?

    Like kleenex for facial tissue it has he advantage of being shorter than “real estate grifter”, with no substitute matching it in that respect, that I or apparently anyone else can think of.

  111. @Jonathan Mason
    @Jonathan Mason

    I did have a look at the Chilean newspapers and they are having their own problems with huge numbers of refugees from Venezuela and Haiti, and in particular with violent reactions against the new immigrants.

    Some people in Chile are tossing around the idea of building a wall or at least having some kind of defenses on their borders.

    I was also reading an editorial the other day from the Dominican Republic in which the author was pretty gung-ho on the idea of building a wall along the border with Haitian. About a third of the labor force in the Dominican Republic in the agriculture and construction industries is Haitian.

    Meanwhile in England they are suffering from a shortage of 100,000 truck drivers. Maybe they could set up a driving school in Haiti to teach people to drive trucks on the left hand side of the road and then give them visas to go to England provided that they can show both vaccination and vasectomy certificates.

    Replies: @gandydancer

    Meanwhile in England they are suffering from a shortage of 100,000 truck drivers.

    At what wage?

  112. @Pat Kittle
    Over-population is our core problem -- and Haiti's.

    They need birth control; we need border control.

    Replies: @gandydancer

    They need birth control; we need border control.

    We need expulsion, at least. As Trump said when first lying about his intentions, “They all must go!”

  113. @gandydancer
    @Corvinus


    “Years later, I ran into him and learned that he had become the pastor of a Haitian church.”

    Right. He found God and repented. Something to consider…
     
    That's not the way to bet.

    The first time I got ripped off face-to-face by someone I knew it was by a black pastor who worked as a janitor in the SFSU computer lab where I had a work-study job. He kept borrowing and repaying small amounts, then upped the ante a bit just before quitting. It wasn''t a large amount, but I still remember around 50y later.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “The first time I got ripped off face-to-face by someone I knew it was by a black pastor who worked as a janitor in the SFSU computer lab where I had a work-study job. He kept borrowing and repaying small amounts, then upped the ante a bit just before quitting. It wasn”t a large amount, but I still remember around 50y later.”

    Cool made up story, bro.

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