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NYT: the Appalling Injustice That an Important Person Lost a Nice Job Over 9/11 Happening on Her Watch
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This being 21st Century America, practically nobody in a position of power lost his job for 9/11 happening on his watch. This now being 2021 America, the New York Times runs an article lamenting the accountability campaign against one of the very few public officials to lose her job over the fall of the World Trade Center: the Democratic Republican hack [thanks to commenters who caught this] who got put in charge of the Boston airport (despite no experience whatsoever) from which the two planes that attacked New York City took off:

After the 9/11 Attacks, Boston Found a Focus for Its Anger

Terrorists boarded two planes in Boston and flew them into the World Trade Center. Massachusetts zeroed in on its top airport official, who has never quite recovered.

By Ellen Barry
Sept. 12, 2021

BOSTON — Virginia Buckingham remembers the moment when she realized that she had been singled out. She had stopped at Dunkin’ Donuts on her way into Logan International Airport, which she oversaw as the top official at the Massachusetts Port Authority. As she stood in line, a man behind her whispered to his friend, “That’s her.”

The week before, terrorists had boarded two jets at Logan, hijacked them, and flew them into the Twin Towers. The city’s newspapers had plunged into reporting on the airport’s security record, and into her, a political appointee. But no one had been fired yet, and the columnists were getting antsy.

“When do the heads start to roll at Massport?” wrote Howie Carr at The Boston Herald. “It’s been over a week now, and Ginny Buckingham still isn’t a stay-at-home mom.”

Over at The Boston Globe, Joan Vennochi chided the governor for dragging her feet. “Somewhere in Afghanistan,” she wrote, “Osama bin Laden is laughing at what passes for leadership in Massachusetts.”

While New York and Washington were focused on disaster sites, Boston was struggling with a horrible truth: Its airport had served as the launching pad for the two planes that destroyed the World Trade Center.

… The fact that the planes came from Boston was a source of shame. Shreds of guilt clung to many airport workers — to the ticket agent who checked in Mohamed Atta, to the flight attendant who called in sick. …

In Boston — unlike New York, Washington and Portland, Maine, the other communities where terrorists boarded planes — it was seen as an airport problem. And here, there was an expectation that officials would be sacked.

No evidence ever emerged that failures by airport officials contributed to the attacks: At the time, box cutters, the weapons the terrorists used, were legal to carry on planes, and airlines, not airports, handled security checkpoints. But in the intensity of that moment, that did not matter. Joseph Lawless, the airport’s director of security, who had formerly worked as a driver to a Massachusetts governor, was transferred two and a half weeks after the attacks. A month after that, Ms. Buckingham resigned under pressure.

Eventually, journalists moved on. But Ms. Buckingham could not. Twenty years later, she remains pained by her treatment those six weeks, something she described in a new memoir, “On My Watch.” At 36, her career in politics was finished.

… That thought led directly to Ms. Buckingham, who had been appointed two years earlier, by Mr. Cellucci. The Port Authority, as Ms. Swift put it, had an “earned reputation as being run by political appointees, not airport expertise.”

Ms. Buckingham fell into that category. She was an old hand at State House politics; she had served as chief of staff to two governors, and press secretary to one. But she had no background in transportation or security. …

And the papers took up the cause. The Herald, Boston’s scrappy tabloid, ran a poll asking voters whether she should resign or be fired. The Globe, Boston’s crusading broadsheet, dug into a fertile topic, the history of patronage hiring at the Port Authority, publishing about 90 articles touching on that topic over the next three months.

It’s almost as if Boston back then had two competing, crusading newspapers, unlike the great majority of American cities today.

The article keeps it obscure that this was a Democratic vendetta against a Republican pol. It’s point, though, is that somebody who’d climbed the greasy pole of politics to get a well-paid job without having any particular skills at the job lost her job just because 2700 people died, and we can’t have pour le encourage les autres-type treatment of elites anymore.

… As time passed, it became less plausible to blame anyone in particular for the carnage of Sept. 11.

The NYT sums up the tragedy of her subsequent life:

… Her husband, David Lowy, urged her to resign, rather than wait to be fired. “I just wanted the barrage to stop,” said Mr. Lowy, now an associate judge on the state’s Supreme Judicial Court. …

Life went on: She had a second child. She found a therapist who specialized in trauma. She got a new job, writing editorials at The Herald, then left for a corporate job at Pfizer, the pharmaceutical company. She took early retirement. She dropped her youngest off at college.

 
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  1. Gee, it’s almost as if someone with a government job partly felt the repercussions of what amounted to “bad business.” It sounds like she and her husband both landed not only on their feet, but like gold-plated cats, on very good feet indeed. Don’t feel sorry for them at all.

    BTW, Boston is the first place I remember landing at an airport and not being able to meet anyone at the gate. It was 1983, and I had to walk from there to find my girlfriend waiting with a crowd of other people. I didn’t know anything then, because growing up, friends and family were always right there when I got off the plane. That was the old days. We can’t have nice things anymore.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Buzz Mohawk


    growing up, friends and family were always right there when I got off the plane. That was the old days. We can’t have nice things anymore.
     
    In that sense, I am afraid the terrorists really did win.
  2. What a pointless post without an indication whether she did something wrong or not. Was that airport so much less secure than the other ones? Were they an exception? Had the other ones been preparing for 9/11? Were there perfectly fine anti-arabs-with-box-cutters rules that she axed for political reasons? Yeah right. “On her watch” is retarded, it means nothing.

    • Agree: Escher
    • Disagree: Ben tillman
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @kihowi

    The NYT article is what’s pointless. Steve’s post is making fun of the pointless article

    Replies: @Joseph Doaks

    , @SMK
    @kihowi

    They should not have been at a Boston airport. They shold not have been given flying lessons, in which they weren't taught how to land, the hardest skill to learn, so I've read or heard somewhere. And this raised no suspicions? Or if it did, the authorites were not informed. And if informed, would they have acted. They should not have been in the US. Or in Canada, where all or most of them lived before they were allowed to enter and live in the US and take flying lessons. Or in Germany, apparently, before they moved to Canada.

    This women was only the last of many people, myriads of them, to enable this atrocity, And she shold not have been in this positon. Why are there Muslims, any Muslims, in the US, Canada, the UK, Western Europe, Australia, New Zealand? No Muslims, no 9/11 and other acts of terroism and all the rapes and gang-rapes and other crimes they commit.

    These jihadist fanatics committed suicide, righteously, as they murdered some 3,ooo infidels, motivated by the evil of Islam and the belief that they would ascend to heaven to enjoy sex with 72 black-eyed virgins. Would all 19 jihadist have an orgy with the 72 virgins, or would each Jihadist have sex his own 72 virgins? And after the orgy, obviously, the women or girls would no longer be virgins. So what then? Would Allah behead or stone them to death or both? And create more virgins for the next jihadists? Just think of all the virgins who've had sex with all the jihadists since Islam was founded in the 7th century?

    , @Ben tillman
    @kihowi

    She was sucking the taxpayer’s teat. She was getting paid for doing nothing.

  3. The hijackers exploited a weakness in the in-flight procedures and physical security. No random bureaucrat should be expected to take the fall for that. No part of the screening procedures had accounted for hijackers using the planes as cruise missiles.

    Also, ironically, the strengthening of the cockpit doors has made another 9/11 *more* likely. Now a rogue pilot in the cockpit can’t be stopped by any means.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @zacie

    Bureaucrats should never, ever be expected to take a fall. That'd be just plain cruel.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  4. Another “injustice”????

    “Former Minneapolis police officer’s murder conviction reversed in deadly shooting of Australian woman.”

    September 15, 2021 / 12:53 PM / CBS/AP

    The Minnesota Supreme Court on Wednesday reversed the third-degree murder conviction of a former Minneapolis police officer who fatally shot an Australian woman in 2017, saying the charge doesn’t fit the circumstances in this case. Mohamed Noor was convicted of third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of Justine Ruszczyk Damond, a dual U.S.-Australian citizen who called 911 to report a possible sexual assault behind her home.

    Noor was sentenced to 12 1/2 years on the murder count but was not sentenced for manslaughter.

    The ruling means his murder conviction is overturned and the case will now go back to the district court, where he will be sentenced on the manslaughter count. He has already served more than 28 months of his murder sentence. If sentenced to the presumptive four years for manslaughter, he could be eligible for supervised release around the end of this year.

    Implications for Derek Chauvin???? Oh, I forgot, he’s white.

    • Replies: @James B. Shearer
    @CCZ

    "Implications for Derek Chauvin???? .."

    Presumably his third degree murder conviction will be reversed as well. Which won't help him much given his other convictions. He might also try for a new trial since his judge didn't want to allow the third-degree charge in the first place because it was likely to be overturned.

    , @Whiskey
    @CCZ

    Black people are sacred racial redeemers of the original sin of Whiteness. And as OJ showed, it is no crime for blacks to murder Whites. Indeed is it is required. White people are the repository of original racial sin, and are genetically evil, and bear blood guilt. So they must be murdered by blacks to restore justice and sacred redemption for the Industrial Revolution.

    This is the official religion of America and has been since the Civil Rights Movement. It was King's real dream, the one he really had, not the boob bait for bubbas that he spewed out periodically.

    Pretty much 99.9999999% of blacks believe this, about 85% of Jews in America (and about 15% in Israel), and about 45% of Whites.

    It is what it is. No one should have any illusions. Or ideals. The end of Christianity led to the worship of blacks as holy racial redeemers for ordinary WHITE people having nice things too.

    , @Pericles
    @CCZ

    Pulling your gun out inside your police car and shooting a woman who comes to report a crime can surely not be murder. We can only hope Noor takes Minneapolis to the cleaners for this sort of judicial behavior. Jacob Frey can crawl around and kiss the feet of the Noor clan as a bonus.

    , @Ben tillman
    @CCZ

    Remind me why he wasn’t charged with first-degree murder.

    And why does this stupid article call utility knives “box-cutters”?

  5. As she stood in line, a man behind her whispered to his friend, “That’s her.”

    Didn’t happen.

    • Agree: northeast, Hangnail Hans
    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @HammerJack

    Agreed. Maybe the guy "whispered" really loudly. Perhaps he "whispered" "dinger" and she misunderstood. It happens.

  6. Ginny Buckingham was a Republican hack, not a Democratic hack, from the RINO wing of the party, which managed to elect a few Republican governors.

    Before 9/11, Logan airport tended to be notoriously lax on its security checks, which made for a relatively pleasant experience if you were flying out of Logan.

    I flew out out of Logan shortly after it re-opened following 9/11, and, very briefly, it went 180 degrees in the opposite direction. There were big, burly men with guns manning security, and they didn’t give a crap about political correctness. Anyone who looked at all Middle Eastern was being singled out and intensely questioned.

    That wasn’t very nice, but it was probably effective.

    That didn’t last.

    Soon it was all security theater, with the TSA picking out elderly nuns and similar people to harass (not hyperbole, these are things I witnessed with my own eyes).

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Garlic

    Thanks.

    , @Mike Tre
    @Garlic

    I remember a photo taken a few years later of an arab muslim TSA broad in a burka using a metal detector to scan a nun.

    Edit: Here it is:

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/7f/9c/0a/7f9c0a488f14f6eb6f718dfb8ef93682.jpg

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans, @Ron Mexico

  7. “Joseph Lawless, the airport’s director of security, who had formerly worked as a driver to a Massachusetts governor, was transferred two and a half weeks after the attacks.”

    Too bad this guy couldn’t be fired.

    Or George W. Bush.

  8. What a different world that was: people being held accountable for something that may or may not have been their fault directly. If Enron were to happen today, would Kenneth Lay and Jeff Skelling be held accountable? Back to the airport situation: Maybe, hopefully, the Massachusetts Port Authority replaced Mrs. Buckingham with someone who had relevant experience. Or perhaps they learned nothing at all and accepted another patronage appointee. Nowadays you’re a sexist/racist/homophobe/Islamophobe/anti-Semite/ableist/etc. for pointing out any kind of leadership deficiency in TPTB.

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    @OFWHAP

    You don’t know much about Massachusetts, do you? The hackarama rules!

  9. Joseph Lawless, the airport’s director of security

    Just get a guy with a different name…

    • LOL: Joseph Doaks
  10. From NYT October 31 2001:

    “Virginia Buckingham, who resigned last week as head of Massport, will get \$112,500 in severance pay. She also signed a two-year consulting contract with Massport for \$62,500.”

    I hear the sound of the world’s smallest violin playing my heart breaks for her.

    • Thanks: Art Deco, Joseph Doaks
    • Replies: @mc23
    @ArthurinCali

    That helps to explain the 2nd child.

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @ArthurinCali

    "Heckuva job, Ginny!"

  11. The NYT was also sympathetic 20 years before that article (exactly).
    https://www.nytimes.com/2001/09/12/us/a-day-of-terror-security-boston-s-airport-security-is-described-as-standard.html

    But several aviation security experts said today that Mr. Lawless was right: if anything, Logan’s level of security is typical of large international airports — and that, not some specific Boston flaw, is the cause for concern, they said.

    What happened to her does seem a bit unjust compared to what happened to GWB.

    • Agree: William Badwhite
    • Replies: @Tono Bungay
    @res

    In a world where almost no important people are held to account, it will always seem unjust if one is, no matter how responsible he was. Now, if somehow we could start a trend, then it wouldn't seem so unjust.

  12. The Globe, Boston’s crusading broadsheet

    On the bright side, the Sulzbergers paid \$1.1 Billion for the Globe and then sold it for \$70 Million. It’s probably worth at least \$70K now.

    And wait a minute: this woman wasn’t fired, but resigned?? I’m failing to see the trauma or injustice here. Is she a friend of the reporter or editor?

    Is it just a matter–as Steve implies–that we must never hold women or minorities responsible for anything? We already know that.

    • Replies: @gandydancer
    @HammerJack


    And wait a minute: this woman wasn’t fired, but resigned?? I’m failing to see the trauma or injustice here.
     
    She "resigned", and "got $112,500 in severance pay [and] a two-year consulting contract with Massport for $62,500.” (see post#10) So she was fired, but with a golden parachute. That she was at any time worth her salary is not in evidence, of course, but there's apparently no reason to blame her for 9/11, either.

    Not true of George Bush and Norm Mineta.

  13. She got a new job, writing editorials at The Herald, then left for a corporate job at Pfizer, the pharmaceutical company. She took early retirement. She dropped her youngest off at college.

    Oh that poor thing, she lost her patronage job at the airport only to get another patronage job at a massive pharma corporation. And at the end of it all, she suffered the trauma and hardship of early retirement…..

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Pop Warner

    And her husband's career topped out at the Massachusetts Supreme Court rather than at the US Supreme Court.

  14. @Pop Warner

    She got a new job, writing editorials at The Herald, then left for a corporate job at Pfizer, the pharmaceutical company. She took early retirement. She dropped her youngest off at college.
     
    Oh that poor thing, she lost her patronage job at the airport only to get another patronage job at a massive pharma corporation. And at the end of it all, she suffered the trauma and hardship of early retirement.....

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    And her husband’s career topped out at the Massachusetts Supreme Court rather than at the US Supreme Court.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  15. Steve,

    C’mon man!

    In 2021 America the buck stops at the nearest heterosexual white guy who is neither rich nor well-connected!

    But, if he is a part of the Deep State, when we have to throw the fella from the sleigh, the wolves will only give him a little probation.

    https://www.rt.com/usa/514079-clinesmith-sentence-fbi-russiagate/

    Yours,

    Joe

    PS: Because of your 100% responsibility for the Afghanistan debacle, I have fired you from your blog.

    • Thanks: Pop Warner
    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Ano


    But, if he is a part of the Deep State, when we have to throw the fella from the sleigh, the wolves will only give him a little probation.

     

    In that case, the wolves carried the guy back to the sled.
  16. U.S. and Canadian airport officials were having their annual conference someplace in Canada when 9-11 hit, saving most of them from having to answer any tough U.S. press questions about airport security, while airline officials got grilled hard.

  17. What were the qualifications of the person who replaced her? Pretty much the same I would guess.

  18. @OFWHAP
    What a different world that was: people being held accountable for something that may or may not have been their fault directly. If Enron were to happen today, would Kenneth Lay and Jeff Skelling be held accountable? Back to the airport situation: Maybe, hopefully, the Massachusetts Port Authority replaced Mrs. Buckingham with someone who had relevant experience. Or perhaps they learned nothing at all and accepted another patronage appointee. Nowadays you're a sexist/racist/homophobe/Islamophobe/anti-Semite/ableist/etc. for pointing out any kind of leadership deficiency in TPTB.

    Replies: @Ganderson

    You don’t know much about Massachusetts, do you? The hackarama rules!

  19. @ArthurinCali
    From NYT October 31 2001:

    "Virginia Buckingham, who resigned last week as head of Massport, will get $112,500 in severance pay. She also signed a two-year consulting contract with Massport for $62,500."

    I hear the sound of the world's smallest violin playing my heart breaks for her.

    Replies: @mc23, @Hypnotoad666

    That helps to explain the 2nd child.

  20. This being 21st Century America, practically nobody in a position of power lost his job for 9/11 happening on his watch.

    Where is Husband Kimmel when you need him?

    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    @Reg Cæsar

    Kimmel and Short's treatment contrasts sharply with that of the zero-none-nada - USAF Generals who were fired after 9-11.

  21. “Life went on: …She got a new job, writing editorials at The Herald,”

    CONAN O’BRIEN (to a supermodel): Job? Modeling? You can’t be serious. That isn’t an actual “job.” You know what is a “job”? TURNING A BIG CRANK!!

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    There's an irony in that; the Herald is or at least was Boston's answer to the New York Post. They aare or at least were Mr. Carr's employer.

  22. When I saw the headline, I thought this would be about Jamie Gorelick. Yeah, I don’t know what I was thinking.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Thirdtwin

    Agree. Gorelick has long been the poster girl for elite immunity to adverse consequences. She's the one who created the DoJ policies that prevented foreign intelligence from being used for criminal investigations, leading directly to the FBI HQ forbidding the Minneapolis office from looking at Moussaoui's laptop in August 2001, which could have prevented certain events a few weeks later. One Minneapolis agent complained bitterly but prophetically that he was just "trying to keep someone from taking a plane and crashing it into the World Trade Center". Indeed you were, Agent Minneapolis, but DC HQ had different ideas.

    However strongly Gorelick felt about preventing inappropriate collaboration between foreign intelligence officers and domestic criminal investigations, her fastidiousness didn't extend to avoiding the conflict of interest of herself serving on the 9/11 Commission reviewing her own misdeeds.

    Somehow, from arranging for thousands of Americans to get murdered, to then being authorized to do her own whitewash, she got promoted to a Fannie Mae executive where she got multi-millions dollars to oversee it as it descended into its record-breaking accounting scandal and financial loss. However it happened, I'm sure it had nothing to do with her being a major Clinton-crony.

    Well, no biggie, she had a plan to restore Fannie Mae's solvency: just buy and repackage a bunch of those newfangled mortgage-backed securities. I can't remember how that one worked out. It was probably fine though.

    https://directorblue.blogspot.com/2008/09/jamie-gorelick-mistress-of-disaster.html

    Incidentally, since the Trump election we've seen that however sanctimonious the DC panjandrums are about protecting foreigners from the legitimate efforts of our own spy services, their solicitousness does not extend to protecting actual Americans, even the actual American President, from the illegitimate efforts of those same spy services. Funny how that worked out.

  23. OT: Idealistic young Chinese Cal Berkeley grad blows the whistle on Lizzie Holmes:

    Theranos Trial: Ex-Lab Associate Continues Bombshell Testimony

    SAN JOSE (BCN) — A former lab associate continued her testimony Wednesday in the federal criminal trial against Elizabeth Holmes, founder and CEO of the blood testing company Theranos.

    Erika Cheung told the jury that the Theranos “Edison” machines, supposedly able to deliver multiple blood test results based on a fingerprick’s worth of blood, “frequently failed” quality control tests.

    More:

    https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2021/09/15/theranos-trial-ex-lab-associate-continues-bombshell-testimony/

    • Replies: @BB
    @Ripple Earthdevil

    Fake it until you make it works fine in SV, just not for medicine. Had Holmes used her seemingly preternatural grifting skill set on a new search engine or AI, she would be sitting pretty, if not at the first company, then the fourth of fifth. She would be sitting on several boards right now talking about women’s empowerment! For the life of me I cannot figure out the choice of a medical product. In medicine they are bound to find out.

  24. “When do the heads start to roll at Massport?” wrote Howie Carr at The Boston Herald. “It’s been over a week now, and Ginny Buckingham still isn’t a stay-at-home mom.”

    Haha, commenter Ganderson has told me how much he likes Howie Carr. Great sample there!

    Now, the lady’s writing a book of memoirs about being an airport manager? I think I’d read the Oprah book of the month if I get that bored. At the small airports, airport manager is a political thing too. The guy drives around looking for debris for an hour, goes back to the office and looks up N numbers from transient aircraft to write them letters about their possible violations of noise abatement procedures. Then, he has lunch… it’s all so tiresome… after lunch, I mean … zzzzz….

  25. I don’t really mourn this loss, but honestly, what could she have done?

    That said, there was a time when regardless of whether they were to blame or not, someone in even a symbolic position of authority – especially political- like this would have stepped down voluntarily before anyone could get her fired. Male thinking/behavior probably.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Paul Rise

    Then Milley and Biden don't have "male thinking"

  26. In New England, all scores are settled at Dunkin’ Donuts.

  27. Meanwhile, some shnook who stops a black lunatic from running off with other people’s babies is dragged in the national media and his career is kaput.

  28. Milley/Sackler/Austin/Pollard/Pelosi/Hunter etc will never be punished in any way the maid who fails to make the bed in time will be fired anarchotyranny good news winter is coming

    • Replies: @James B. Shearer
    @J.Ross

    "Milley/Sackler/Austin/Pollard/Pelosi/Hunter etc will never be punished in any way .."

    Pollard spent 30 years in jail. Maybe not enough but it wasn't nothing.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  29. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "Life went on: ...She got a new job, writing editorials at The Herald,"

    CONAN O'BRIEN (to a supermodel): Job? Modeling? You can't be serious. That isn't an actual "job." You know what is a "job"? TURNING A BIG CRANK!!

    Replies: @Hibernian

    There’s an irony in that; the Herald is or at least was Boston’s answer to the New York Post. They aare or at least were Mr. Carr’s employer.

  30. So why does the New York Times care?

    Could be a coincidence, of course…

    ‘…Though Buckingham isn’t Jewish, she finds meaning in the Jewish people’s story of resilience.

    Buckingham’s husband is Jewish, and they made the choice to raise Jewish children. She remembers going to synagogue with her family shortly after 9/11…’

  31. @Reg Cæsar

    This being 21st Century America, practically nobody in a position of power lost his job for 9/11 happening on his watch.
     
    Where is Husband Kimmel when you need him?



    https://mediad.publicbroadcasting.net/p/wpr/files/styles/x_large/public/201807/admiral_husband_kimmel_2.png

    Replies: @SteveRogers42

    Kimmel and Short’s treatment contrasts sharply with that of the zero-none-nada – USAF Generals who were fired after 9-11.

  32. @Garlic
    Ginny Buckingham was a Republican hack, not a Democratic hack, from the RINO wing of the party, which managed to elect a few Republican governors.

    Before 9/11, Logan airport tended to be notoriously lax on its security checks, which made for a relatively pleasant experience if you were flying out of Logan.

    I flew out out of Logan shortly after it re-opened following 9/11, and, very briefly, it went 180 degrees in the opposite direction. There were big, burly men with guns manning security, and they didn’t give a crap about political correctness. Anyone who looked at all Middle Eastern was being singled out and intensely questioned.

    That wasn’t very nice, but it was probably effective.

    That didn’t last.

    Soon it was all security theater, with the TSA picking out elderly nuns and similar people to harass (not hyperbole, these are things I witnessed with my own eyes).

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mike Tre

    Thanks.

  33. Sometimes I see interviews of guys exonerated after decades behind bars for crimes they didn’t commit. Mostly, they don’t complain. They express gratitude, often to God, and they don’t waste time on blame. Then they do what they can with what’s left of their lives. What a contrast. Matthew 5:5 comes to mind.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Bill P


    Sometimes I see interviews of guys exonerated after decades behind bars for crimes they didn’t commit. Mostly, they don’t complain.
     
    Might be because they know perfectly well they were guilty as charged, and that they just got lucky in the exoneration game.

    As Ann Coulter has observed, the exoneration game is a bit of a racket. They just wait around for the prosecutor to move on, evidence to get lost, and witnesses to die or move away. Then they move on some technicality or legal fad for a new trial or a "re-examination of the case", preferably in front of a sympathetic magistrate. And ‎voilà: "exoneration".

    The Central Park Five was an example of this. The original prosecution emphasized that they knew there were more attackers whom they did not catch, but that didn't stop them from prosecuting the ones they did catch. But a couple of decades later the [non-]shocking [non-]news that "DNA proves that someone else was involved in the Central Park attack!" led to the erroneous conclusion that those already convicted somehow weren't involved.

    Replies: @Bill P

  34. @Garlic
    Ginny Buckingham was a Republican hack, not a Democratic hack, from the RINO wing of the party, which managed to elect a few Republican governors.

    Before 9/11, Logan airport tended to be notoriously lax on its security checks, which made for a relatively pleasant experience if you were flying out of Logan.

    I flew out out of Logan shortly after it re-opened following 9/11, and, very briefly, it went 180 degrees in the opposite direction. There were big, burly men with guns manning security, and they didn’t give a crap about political correctness. Anyone who looked at all Middle Eastern was being singled out and intensely questioned.

    That wasn’t very nice, but it was probably effective.

    That didn’t last.

    Soon it was all security theater, with the TSA picking out elderly nuns and similar people to harass (not hyperbole, these are things I witnessed with my own eyes).

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mike Tre

    I remember a photo taken a few years later of an arab muslim TSA broad in a burka using a metal detector to scan a nun.

    Edit: Here it is:

    • Replies: @Hangnail Hans
    @Mike Tre

    Requiem for a once-great nation.

    , @Ron Mexico
    @Mike Tre

    The wily TSA!

  35. I give Steve a C- on his essay. He didn’t actually demonstrate why she deserved to lose her job. It was mostly snarky whining on Steve’s part. I expect better.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @ScarletNumber

    To encourage the others.

    Replies: @D. K.

  36. @J.Ross
    Milley/Sackler/Austin/Pollard/Pelosi/Hunter etc will never be punished in any way the maid who fails to make the bed in time will be fired anarchotyranny good news winter is coming

    Replies: @James B. Shearer

    “Milley/Sackler/Austin/Pollard/Pelosi/Hunter etc will never be punished in any way ..”

    Pollard spent 30 years in jail. Maybe not enough but it wasn’t nothing.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @James B. Shearer

    It wasn't what one of us would get for failing to properly make a bed. He neutered the United States Navy -- if he's breathing then he is unpunished.

  37. @CCZ
    Another "injustice"????

    "Former Minneapolis police officer's murder conviction reversed in deadly shooting of Australian woman."

    September 15, 2021 / 12:53 PM / CBS/AP


    The Minnesota Supreme Court on Wednesday reversed the third-degree murder conviction of a former Minneapolis police officer who fatally shot an Australian woman in 2017, saying the charge doesn't fit the circumstances in this case. Mohamed Noor was convicted of third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of Justine Ruszczyk Damond, a dual U.S.-Australian citizen who called 911 to report a possible sexual assault behind her home.

    Noor was sentenced to 12 1/2 years on the murder count but was not sentenced for manslaughter.

    The ruling means his murder conviction is overturned and the case will now go back to the district court, where he will be sentenced on the manslaughter count. He has already served more than 28 months of his murder sentence. If sentenced to the presumptive four years for manslaughter, he could be eligible for supervised release around the end of this year.
     
    Implications for Derek Chauvin???? Oh, I forgot, he's white.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer, @Whiskey, @Pericles, @Ben tillman

    “Implications for Derek Chauvin???? ..”

    Presumably his third degree murder conviction will be reversed as well. Which won’t help him much given his other convictions. He might also try for a new trial since his judge didn’t want to allow the third-degree charge in the first place because it was likely to be overturned.

  38. She got a new job, writing editorials at The Herald, then left for a corporate job at Pfizer, the pharmaceutical company. She took early retirement.

    The hijacking wasn’t her fault, but still… cry me a fucking river. She lost a political hack job. It’s not as if she had to jump from the towers or anything.

    Sounds like things turned out pretty well for her.

  39. @HammerJack

    As she stood in line, a man behind her whispered to his friend, “That’s her.”
     
    Didn't happen.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

    Agreed. Maybe the guy “whispered” really loudly. Perhaps he “whispered” “dinger” and she misunderstood. It happens.

  40. @Thirdtwin
    When I saw the headline, I thought this would be about Jamie Gorelick. Yeah, I don’t know what I was thinking.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Agree. Gorelick has long been the poster girl for elite immunity to adverse consequences. She’s the one who created the DoJ policies that prevented foreign intelligence from being used for criminal investigations, leading directly to the FBI HQ forbidding the Minneapolis office from looking at Moussaoui’s laptop in August 2001, which could have prevented certain events a few weeks later. One Minneapolis agent complained bitterly but prophetically that he was just “trying to keep someone from taking a plane and crashing it into the World Trade Center”. Indeed you were, Agent Minneapolis, but DC HQ had different ideas.

    However strongly Gorelick felt about preventing inappropriate collaboration between foreign intelligence officers and domestic criminal investigations, her fastidiousness didn’t extend to avoiding the conflict of interest of herself serving on the 9/11 Commission reviewing her own misdeeds.

    Somehow, from arranging for thousands of Americans to get murdered, to then being authorized to do her own whitewash, she got promoted to a Fannie Mae executive where she got multi-millions dollars to oversee it as it descended into its record-breaking accounting scandal and financial loss. However it happened, I’m sure it had nothing to do with her being a major Clinton-crony.

    Well, no biggie, she had a plan to restore Fannie Mae’s solvency: just buy and repackage a bunch of those newfangled mortgage-backed securities. I can’t remember how that one worked out. It was probably fine though.

    https://directorblue.blogspot.com/2008/09/jamie-gorelick-mistress-of-disaster.html

    Incidentally, since the Trump election we’ve seen that however sanctimonious the DC panjandrums are about protecting foreigners from the legitimate efforts of our own spy services, their solicitousness does not extend to protecting actual Americans, even the actual American President, from the illegitimate efforts of those same spy services. Funny how that worked out.

  41. @Bill P
    Sometimes I see interviews of guys exonerated after decades behind bars for crimes they didn't commit. Mostly, they don't complain. They express gratitude, often to God, and they don't waste time on blame. Then they do what they can with what's left of their lives. What a contrast. Matthew 5:5 comes to mind.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Sometimes I see interviews of guys exonerated after decades behind bars for crimes they didn’t commit. Mostly, they don’t complain.

    Might be because they know perfectly well they were guilty as charged, and that they just got lucky in the exoneration game.

    As Ann Coulter has observed, the exoneration game is a bit of a racket. They just wait around for the prosecutor to move on, evidence to get lost, and witnesses to die or move away. Then they move on some technicality or legal fad for a new trial or a “re-examination of the case”, preferably in front of a sympathetic magistrate. And ‎voilà: “exoneration”.

    The Central Park Five was an example of this. The original prosecution emphasized that they knew there were more attackers whom they did not catch, but that didn’t stop them from prosecuting the ones they did catch. But a couple of decades later the [non-]shocking [non-]news that “DNA proves that someone else was involved in the Central Park attack!” led to the erroneous conclusion that those already convicted somehow weren’t involved.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
    • Replies: @Bill P
    @Almost Missouri

    Quite a few guys got exonerated by DNA in the 2000s. They were truly innocent (in many cases their accusers recanted), and extraordinarily gracious about it all. Every time I feel sorry for myself I think of them.

    I think I'll spend a little time tonight being grateful for what I have before I go to sleep.

    Replies: @gandydancer

  42. Anon[163] • Disclaimer says:

    On the other hand … I don’t think things would have happened any differently even if the most experienced, competent person in the world had had her job.

    There are only two scenarios where I could see things going differently:

    1. A super competent airport head raising standards (IQ) for all jobs (which would require higher pay), and getting people in at all levels with more initiative to notice things and make on-the-fly decisions.

    However: Could the head of the airport raise pay that much? Does the airport even employ the workers there? My impression is that the whole place is staffed by subcontractor companies. Are there better companies that could have been used? I imagine that they are all the same.

    2. The airport head who is extremely politically incorrect with regard to race could have, from the top, egged on employees to be on the lookout for terrorism, and suggest that maybe a little profiling would help in that regard.

    However, was that realistic? How long would the guy have lasted given race sensibilities, with even George Bush harping on it?

    But the buck stops here. I have nothing against firing people at the top even if their responsibility for something is tenuous.

    • Replies: @Rob
    @Anon


    Could the head of the airport raise pay that much? Does the airport even employ the workers there? My impression is that the whole place is staffed by subcontractor companies.
     
    That is an interesting observation. When companies use subcontractors, they lose a lot of control over how their operation runs. The labor market tightens, so they hire worse people at what they pay? Can’t raise the pay, buddy. It’s set by contract.

    As far as I could tell though, The TSA just turned bored black people who never find anything into bored whites who never find anything.

    Not complaining, mind you. I once had a half oz of pot on me going through the line, a security guard saw it, looked at me, and I gave him a “hey, y’know” look, and he smiled and put it back. And I went on my merry way.

    I know companies contract out things that are not part of their core operations, but even the little things matter to consumers. For some companies though, a side business could blow up into big business. Think Apple would be doing so well (ok, not this week) if they had subcontracted the iPod? Sure they would have owned that particular mp3 player, but making inventing iPods gave them the ability to make the iPhone. The brain implant, iThink, is coming soon.

    Then again, what with the shareholder theory of value ascendant, maybe spinoffs are fine, as long as shareholders benefit. But I think stocks paying dividends that one can reinvest is healthier for the economy than for the marginal price of stocks to go through the roof. If only because dividends can be taxed, and companies are holding huge piles of cash, waiting for a Republican or neoliberal congress to give them a tax holiday.

    Speaking of tax holidays, you know how owners of commercial real estate are allowed to deduct “depreciation” accrual from actual dollars earned. Supposedly, if the actual depreciation is lower than they took in deductions, they have to pay the tax savings on the sale of the property. Often owners pay no taxes because rent - depreciation =0 or less. So, why is there no “ground roots” “conservative” activist group advocating an accrued depreciation tax holiday? It would make the real estate market more liquid, move land and buildings to more profitable uses, let more people own real estate, maybe, but this is a lol, reduce the price of the real estate... everything they say about tax holidays. It would be astroturfed dirty pool, but that should not stop everyone.

    Yeah, I know this is way off-topic, but I’m posting because I did not do all this typing for nothing!
  43. @James B. Shearer
    @J.Ross

    "Milley/Sackler/Austin/Pollard/Pelosi/Hunter etc will never be punished in any way .."

    Pollard spent 30 years in jail. Maybe not enough but it wasn't nothing.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    It wasn’t what one of us would get for failing to properly make a bed. He neutered the United States Navy — if he’s breathing then he is unpunished.

  44. ALDEN WAS RIGHT
    MUHAMMAD NUWR’S CONVICTION OVERTURNED
    MURDER ALL THE WOMEN YOU WANT AS LONG AS DEY WHITE
    https://minnesota.cbslocal.com/video/5999198-mohamed-noors-murder-conviction-reversed/

    • Agree: Joseph Doaks
  45. She’s interviewed on the podcast Hubwonk and she seems like a nice person.

  46. @Paul Rise
    I don't really mourn this loss, but honestly, what could she have done?

    That said, there was a time when regardless of whether they were to blame or not, someone in even a symbolic position of authority - especially political- like this would have stepped down voluntarily before anyone could get her fired. Male thinking/behavior probably.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Then Milley and Biden don’t have “male thinking”

  47. @CCZ
    Another "injustice"????

    "Former Minneapolis police officer's murder conviction reversed in deadly shooting of Australian woman."

    September 15, 2021 / 12:53 PM / CBS/AP


    The Minnesota Supreme Court on Wednesday reversed the third-degree murder conviction of a former Minneapolis police officer who fatally shot an Australian woman in 2017, saying the charge doesn't fit the circumstances in this case. Mohamed Noor was convicted of third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of Justine Ruszczyk Damond, a dual U.S.-Australian citizen who called 911 to report a possible sexual assault behind her home.

    Noor was sentenced to 12 1/2 years on the murder count but was not sentenced for manslaughter.

    The ruling means his murder conviction is overturned and the case will now go back to the district court, where he will be sentenced on the manslaughter count. He has already served more than 28 months of his murder sentence. If sentenced to the presumptive four years for manslaughter, he could be eligible for supervised release around the end of this year.
     
    Implications for Derek Chauvin???? Oh, I forgot, he's white.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer, @Whiskey, @Pericles, @Ben tillman

    Black people are sacred racial redeemers of the original sin of Whiteness. And as OJ showed, it is no crime for blacks to murder Whites. Indeed is it is required. White people are the repository of original racial sin, and are genetically evil, and bear blood guilt. So they must be murdered by blacks to restore justice and sacred redemption for the Industrial Revolution.

    This is the official religion of America and has been since the Civil Rights Movement. It was King’s real dream, the one he really had, not the boob bait for bubbas that he spewed out periodically.

    Pretty much 99.9999999% of blacks believe this, about 85% of Jews in America (and about 15% in Israel), and about 45% of Whites.

    It is what it is. No one should have any illusions. Or ideals. The end of Christianity led to the worship of blacks as holy racial redeemers for ordinary WHITE people having nice things too.

  48. @ScarletNumber
    I give Steve a C- on his essay. He didn't actually demonstrate why she deserved to lose her job. It was mostly snarky whining on Steve's part. I expect better.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    To encourage the others.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    @Steve Sailer

    "To encourage the others."

    You must be a big fan of the Ancient Romans.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decimation_(punishment)

    Replies: @gandydancer

  49. @Steve Sailer
    @ScarletNumber

    To encourage the others.

    Replies: @D. K.

    “To encourage the others.”

    You must be a big fan of the Ancient Romans.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decimation_(punishment)

    • Replies: @gandydancer
    @D. K.


    You must be a big fan of the Ancient Romans.
     
    The exact ratio at which it's better to let the guilty go free than punish the innocent is not a Law of Nature. And there's always some ratio in effect. Some cost-benefit analysis is necessary.

    In this case the injustice of firing the woman is considerably reduced by her lack of claim to the job.

  50. @Buzz Mohawk
    Gee, it's almost as if someone with a government job partly felt the repercussions of what amounted to "bad business." It sounds like she and her husband both landed not only on their feet, but like gold-plated cats, on very good feet indeed. Don't feel sorry for them at all.

    BTW, Boston is the first place I remember landing at an airport and not being able to meet anyone at the gate. It was 1983, and I had to walk from there to find my girlfriend waiting with a crowd of other people. I didn't know anything then, because growing up, friends and family were always right there when I got off the plane. That was the old days. We can't have nice things anymore.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    growing up, friends and family were always right there when I got off the plane. That was the old days. We can’t have nice things anymore.

    In that sense, I am afraid the terrorists really did win.

  51. @zacie
    The hijackers exploited a weakness in the in-flight procedures and physical security. No random bureaucrat should be expected to take the fall for that. No part of the screening procedures had accounted for hijackers using the planes as cruise missiles.

    Also, ironically, the strengthening of the cockpit doors has made another 9/11 *more* likely. Now a rogue pilot in the cockpit can’t be stopped by any means.

    Replies: @Pericles

    Bureaucrats should never, ever be expected to take a fall. That’d be just plain cruel.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Pericles

    There was one bureaucrat who did lose his job.

    No, not for 9/11 or anything minor like that.

    For not preventing Larry Nassar from touching celebrity young women down there:

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/fbi-fires-agent-larry-nassar-usa-gymnastics-doctor/

  52. @ArthurinCali
    From NYT October 31 2001:

    "Virginia Buckingham, who resigned last week as head of Massport, will get $112,500 in severance pay. She also signed a two-year consulting contract with Massport for $62,500."

    I hear the sound of the world's smallest violin playing my heart breaks for her.

    Replies: @mc23, @Hypnotoad666

    “Heckuva job, Ginny!”

  53. @CCZ
    Another "injustice"????

    "Former Minneapolis police officer's murder conviction reversed in deadly shooting of Australian woman."

    September 15, 2021 / 12:53 PM / CBS/AP


    The Minnesota Supreme Court on Wednesday reversed the third-degree murder conviction of a former Minneapolis police officer who fatally shot an Australian woman in 2017, saying the charge doesn't fit the circumstances in this case. Mohamed Noor was convicted of third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of Justine Ruszczyk Damond, a dual U.S.-Australian citizen who called 911 to report a possible sexual assault behind her home.

    Noor was sentenced to 12 1/2 years on the murder count but was not sentenced for manslaughter.

    The ruling means his murder conviction is overturned and the case will now go back to the district court, where he will be sentenced on the manslaughter count. He has already served more than 28 months of his murder sentence. If sentenced to the presumptive four years for manslaughter, he could be eligible for supervised release around the end of this year.
     
    Implications for Derek Chauvin???? Oh, I forgot, he's white.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer, @Whiskey, @Pericles, @Ben tillman

    Pulling your gun out inside your police car and shooting a woman who comes to report a crime can surely not be murder. We can only hope Noor takes Minneapolis to the cleaners for this sort of judicial behavior. Jacob Frey can crawl around and kiss the feet of the Noor clan as a bonus.

  54. @Ano
    Steve,

    C'mon man!

    In 2021 America the buck stops at the nearest heterosexual white guy who is neither rich nor well-connected!

    But, if he is a part of the Deep State, when we have to throw the fella from the sleigh, the wolves will only give him a little probation.

    https://www.rt.com/usa/514079-clinesmith-sentence-fbi-russiagate/

    Yours,

    Joe

    PS: Because of your 100% responsibility for the Afghanistan debacle, I have fired you from your blog.

    Replies: @Pericles

    But, if he is a part of the Deep State, when we have to throw the fella from the sleigh, the wolves will only give him a little probation.

    In that case, the wolves carried the guy back to the sled.

  55. @Almost Missouri
    @Bill P


    Sometimes I see interviews of guys exonerated after decades behind bars for crimes they didn’t commit. Mostly, they don’t complain.
     
    Might be because they know perfectly well they were guilty as charged, and that they just got lucky in the exoneration game.

    As Ann Coulter has observed, the exoneration game is a bit of a racket. They just wait around for the prosecutor to move on, evidence to get lost, and witnesses to die or move away. Then they move on some technicality or legal fad for a new trial or a "re-examination of the case", preferably in front of a sympathetic magistrate. And ‎voilà: "exoneration".

    The Central Park Five was an example of this. The original prosecution emphasized that they knew there were more attackers whom they did not catch, but that didn't stop them from prosecuting the ones they did catch. But a couple of decades later the [non-]shocking [non-]news that "DNA proves that someone else was involved in the Central Park attack!" led to the erroneous conclusion that those already convicted somehow weren't involved.

    Replies: @Bill P

    Quite a few guys got exonerated by DNA in the 2000s. They were truly innocent (in many cases their accusers recanted), and extraordinarily gracious about it all. Every time I feel sorry for myself I think of them.

    I think I’ll spend a little time tonight being grateful for what I have before I go to sleep.

    • Replies: @gandydancer
    @Bill P

    The previously mentioned Central Park 5 were "exonerated" by DNA, weren't they? It wasn't just a cellmate grassing on the new guy and/or a confession?

    I'm not remembering all the non-complaining that you do, and am considerably less convinced by a lot of the "exonerations", anyway. The CP5 were guilty as hell. Rape, assault, get paid.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer, @D. K.

  56. @Mike Tre
    @Garlic

    I remember a photo taken a few years later of an arab muslim TSA broad in a burka using a metal detector to scan a nun.

    Edit: Here it is:

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/7f/9c/0a/7f9c0a488f14f6eb6f718dfb8ef93682.jpg

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans, @Ron Mexico

    Requiem for a once-great nation.

  57. @res
    The NYT was also sympathetic 20 years before that article (exactly).
    https://www.nytimes.com/2001/09/12/us/a-day-of-terror-security-boston-s-airport-security-is-described-as-standard.html

    But several aviation security experts said today that Mr. Lawless was right: if anything, Logan's level of security is typical of large international airports -- and that, not some specific Boston flaw, is the cause for concern, they said.
     
    What happened to her does seem a bit unjust compared to what happened to GWB.

    Replies: @Tono Bungay

    In a world where almost no important people are held to account, it will always seem unjust if one is, no matter how responsible he was. Now, if somehow we could start a trend, then it wouldn’t seem so unjust.

  58. @HammerJack

    The Globe, Boston’s crusading broadsheet
     
    On the bright side, the Sulzbergers paid $1.1 Billion for the Globe and then sold it for $70 Million. It's probably worth at least $70K now.

    And wait a minute: this woman wasn't fired, but resigned?? I'm failing to see the trauma or injustice here. Is she a friend of the reporter or editor?

    Is it just a matter--as Steve implies--that we must never hold women or minorities responsible for anything? We already know that.

    Replies: @gandydancer

    And wait a minute: this woman wasn’t fired, but resigned?? I’m failing to see the trauma or injustice here.

    She “resigned”, and “got \$112,500 in severance pay [and] a two-year consulting contract with Massport for \$62,500.” (see post#10) So she was fired, but with a golden parachute. That she was at any time worth her salary is not in evidence, of course, but there’s apparently no reason to blame her for 9/11, either.

    Not true of George Bush and Norm Mineta.

  59. @Mike Tre
    @Garlic

    I remember a photo taken a few years later of an arab muslim TSA broad in a burka using a metal detector to scan a nun.

    Edit: Here it is:

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/7f/9c/0a/7f9c0a488f14f6eb6f718dfb8ef93682.jpg

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans, @Ron Mexico

    The wily TSA!

  60. @Bill P
    @Almost Missouri

    Quite a few guys got exonerated by DNA in the 2000s. They were truly innocent (in many cases their accusers recanted), and extraordinarily gracious about it all. Every time I feel sorry for myself I think of them.

    I think I'll spend a little time tonight being grateful for what I have before I go to sleep.

    Replies: @gandydancer

    The previously mentioned Central Park 5 were “exonerated” by DNA, weren’t they? It wasn’t just a cellmate grassing on the new guy and/or a confession?

    I’m not remembering all the non-complaining that you do, and am considerably less convinced by a lot of the “exonerations”, anyway. The CP5 were guilty as hell. Rape, assault, get paid.

    • Replies: @James B. Shearer
    @gandydancer

    "...The CP5 were guilty as hell. .."

    Probably not of raping and almost killing the woman. IIRC it wasn't their DNA, they eventually found out whose DNA it was and he could have done the rape and almost murder by himself.

    Replies: @gandydancer, @Ben tillman

    , @D. K.
    @gandydancer

    https://anncoulter.com/2014/04/23/what-you-wont-read-in-the-papers-about-the-central-park-five/

  61. Crusading newspapers my rear end. They both created a nonexistent controversy to boost their circulations and hence their advertising rates. Journalism is a for-profit business, first and foremost, always has been. It plays the role of what Jefferson called “the tocsin of liberty” only when it can make a profit out of appearing to be performing a public service. Otherwise it is the reliable cheerleader for the status quo. Ben Franklin, for one example, grew rich with lucrative printing contracts from the colonial Pennsylvania Assembly, not for dissenting against it, but for printing in his Pennsylvania Gazette newspaper just what the legislators wanted the people to believe. The New York Times’ 1871 campaign against Boss Tweed was about the Republican Yankee establishment getting revenge on the corrupt Democratic Irish political machine that had been strongly pro-southern in the late war. The list goes on and on.

    • Agree: gandydancer
    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
  62. Massachusetts is the same place that elected a man, a high school grad with no economic, financial, or political experience, to three terms as State Treasurer (1955-1961). His previous career was spent working in a stockroom at a Gillette razor blade factory.

    He simply got his name put on the ballot, and spent a grand total of \$200 on his first “campaign”. In 1960, he ran for Governor, and received 9% of the statewide vote.

    His name? John F. Kennedy.

    • LOL: gandydancer
  63. @Pericles
    @zacie

    Bureaucrats should never, ever be expected to take a fall. That'd be just plain cruel.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    There was one bureaucrat who did lose his job.

    No, not for 9/11 or anything minor like that.

    For not preventing Larry Nassar from touching celebrity young women down there:

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/fbi-fires-agent-larry-nassar-usa-gymnastics-doctor/

  64. It is an unrecognized (by women) fact that, should her career not work out, there are valued, socially beneficial roles for them to fill. There is nothing like that for men. Perhaps it’s benevolent sexism, but it sure looks like female privilege. There used to be monasteries for men who could not handle whatever aspect of life made them join the monastery. But a lot of good came out of them.

    • Agree: Joseph Doaks
  65. @Anon
    On the other hand ... I don't think things would have happened any differently even if the most experienced, competent person in the world had had her job.

    There are only two scenarios where I could see things going differently:

    1. A super competent airport head raising standards (IQ) for all jobs (which would require higher pay), and getting people in at all levels with more initiative to notice things and make on-the-fly decisions.

    However: Could the head of the airport raise pay that much? Does the airport even employ the workers there? My impression is that the whole place is staffed by subcontractor companies. Are there better companies that could have been used? I imagine that they are all the same.

    2. The airport head who is extremely politically incorrect with regard to race could have, from the top, egged on employees to be on the lookout for terrorism, and suggest that maybe a little profiling would help in that regard.

    However, was that realistic? How long would the guy have lasted given race sensibilities, with even George Bush harping on it?

    But the buck stops here. I have nothing against firing people at the top even if their responsibility for something is tenuous.

    Replies: @Rob

    Could the head of the airport raise pay that much? Does the airport even employ the workers there? My impression is that the whole place is staffed by subcontractor companies.

    That is an interesting observation. When companies use subcontractors, they lose a lot of control over how their operation runs. The labor market tightens, so they hire worse people at what they pay? Can’t raise the pay, buddy. It’s set by contract.

    As far as I could tell though, The TSA just turned bored black people who never find anything into bored whites who never find anything.

    Not complaining, mind you. I once had a half oz of pot on me going through the line, a security guard saw it, looked at me, and I gave him a “hey, y’know” look, and he smiled and put it back. And I went on my merry way.

    [MORE]

    I know companies contract out things that are not part of their core operations, but even the little things matter to consumers. For some companies though, a side business could blow up into big business. Think Apple would be doing so well (ok, not this week) if they had subcontracted the iPod? Sure they would have owned that particular mp3 player, but making inventing iPods gave them the ability to make the iPhone. The brain implant, iThink, is coming soon.

    Then again, what with the shareholder theory of value ascendant, maybe spinoffs are fine, as long as shareholders benefit. But I think stocks paying dividends that one can reinvest is healthier for the economy than for the marginal price of stocks to go through the roof. If only because dividends can be taxed, and companies are holding huge piles of cash, waiting for a Republican or neoliberal congress to give them a tax holiday.

    Speaking of tax holidays, you know how owners of commercial real estate are allowed to deduct “depreciation” accrual from actual dollars earned. Supposedly, if the actual depreciation is lower than they took in deductions, they have to pay the tax savings on the sale of the property. Often owners pay no taxes because rent – depreciation =0 or less. So, why is there no “ground roots” “conservative” activist group advocating an accrued depreciation tax holiday? It would make the real estate market more liquid, move land and buildings to more profitable uses, let more people own real estate, maybe, but this is a lol, reduce the price of the real estate… everything they say about tax holidays. It would be astroturfed dirty pool, but that should not stop everyone.

    Yeah, I know this is way off-topic, but I’m posting because I did not do all this typing for nothing!

  66. @kihowi
    What a pointless post without an indication whether she did something wrong or not. Was that airport so much less secure than the other ones? Were they an exception? Had the other ones been preparing for 9/11? Were there perfectly fine anti-arabs-with-box-cutters rules that she axed for political reasons? Yeah right. "On her watch" is retarded, it means nothing.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @SMK, @Ben tillman

    The NYT article is what’s pointless. Steve’s post is making fun of the pointless article

    • Replies: @Joseph Doaks
    @Anonymous

    "The NYT article is what’s pointless. Steve’s post is making fun of the pointless article"

    Steve's performing a public service by reminding us that the NYT is pointless.

  67. @kihowi
    What a pointless post without an indication whether she did something wrong or not. Was that airport so much less secure than the other ones? Were they an exception? Had the other ones been preparing for 9/11? Were there perfectly fine anti-arabs-with-box-cutters rules that she axed for political reasons? Yeah right. "On her watch" is retarded, it means nothing.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @SMK, @Ben tillman

    They should not have been at a Boston airport. They shold not have been given flying lessons, in which they weren’t taught how to land, the hardest skill to learn, so I’ve read or heard somewhere. And this raised no suspicions? Or if it did, the authorites were not informed. And if informed, would they have acted. They should not have been in the US. Or in Canada, where all or most of them lived before they were allowed to enter and live in the US and take flying lessons. Or in Germany, apparently, before they moved to Canada.

    This women was only the last of many people, myriads of them, to enable this atrocity, And she shold not have been in this positon. Why are there Muslims, any Muslims, in the US, Canada, the UK, Western Europe, Australia, New Zealand? No Muslims, no 9/11 and other acts of terroism and all the rapes and gang-rapes and other crimes they commit.

    These jihadist fanatics committed suicide, righteously, as they murdered some 3,ooo infidels, motivated by the evil of Islam and the belief that they would ascend to heaven to enjoy sex with 72 black-eyed virgins. Would all 19 jihadist have an orgy with the 72 virgins, or would each Jihadist have sex his own 72 virgins? And after the orgy, obviously, the women or girls would no longer be virgins. So what then? Would Allah behead or stone them to death or both? And create more virgins for the next jihadists? Just think of all the virgins who’ve had sex with all the jihadists since Islam was founded in the 7th century?

    • Agree: William Badwhite
  68. @gandydancer
    @Bill P

    The previously mentioned Central Park 5 were "exonerated" by DNA, weren't they? It wasn't just a cellmate grassing on the new guy and/or a confession?

    I'm not remembering all the non-complaining that you do, and am considerably less convinced by a lot of the "exonerations", anyway. The CP5 were guilty as hell. Rape, assault, get paid.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer, @D. K.

    “…The CP5 were guilty as hell. ..”

    Probably not of raping and almost killing the woman. IIRC it wasn’t their DNA, they eventually found out whose DNA it was and he could have done the rape and almost murder by himself.

    • Replies: @gandydancer
    @James B. Shearer


    “…The CP5 were guilty as hell. ..”

    Probably not of raping and almost killing the woman. IIRC it wasn’t their DNA, they eventually found out whose DNA it was and he could have done the rape and almost murder by himself.
     

    Nope. Rather than rely on "IIRC", inform yourself better. I did a quick search, so you can start here: https://anncoulter.com/2014/04/23/what-you-wont-read-in-the-papers-about-the-central-park-five/

    edit: H./t to D.K., who did the same search and provided the same first result.

    , @Ben tillman
    @James B. Shearer

    That’s total bullshit. Finding that one person raped her in no way implies that others did not. The evidence against the CP5 for that crime was overwhelming.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer

  69. @gandydancer
    @Bill P

    The previously mentioned Central Park 5 were "exonerated" by DNA, weren't they? It wasn't just a cellmate grassing on the new guy and/or a confession?

    I'm not remembering all the non-complaining that you do, and am considerably less convinced by a lot of the "exonerations", anyway. The CP5 were guilty as hell. Rape, assault, get paid.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer, @D. K.

  70. “Joseph Lawless, the airport’s director of security, who had formerly worked as a driver to a Massachusetts governor”

    I do get an Afghanistan sort of vibe from that. You’d rather hope a Director Of Security had a police or military background. Has America always been like that, and just until recently being Director Of Security was a sinecure, because airports were safe places? But even then you’d have smuggling and the like.

    • Replies: @CCZ
    @YetAnotherAnon


    "who had formerly worked as a driver to a Massachusetts governor”
     
    Well, there is always the New Jersey governor's homosexual Israeli lover!!!!

    James Edward McGreevey, Democrat, served as the 52nd Governor of New Jersey from 2002 until his resignation in 2004 following the revelation of his extramarital affair with a [male] gubernatorial appointee.

    During his gubernatorial tenure, McGreevey—who was then married to his wife Dina Matos —appointed his secret lover, Israeli national Golan Cipel, as homeland security advisor. McGreevey was criticized for appointing Cipel as homeland security adviser because he lacked relevant experience or qualifications for the position. In addition, Cipel could not gain a security approval from the federal government, as he was Israeli and not a U.S. citizen. On August 12, 2004, following threats of a lawsuit that would have exposed his affair, McGreevey publicly acknowledged his homosexuality and his extramarital relationship; he also announced that he would resign the governorship effective November 15, 2004. [Wiki]
     
  71. @James B. Shearer
    @gandydancer

    "...The CP5 were guilty as hell. .."

    Probably not of raping and almost killing the woman. IIRC it wasn't their DNA, they eventually found out whose DNA it was and he could have done the rape and almost murder by himself.

    Replies: @gandydancer, @Ben tillman

    “…The CP5 were guilty as hell. ..”

    Probably not of raping and almost killing the woman. IIRC it wasn’t their DNA, they eventually found out whose DNA it was and he could have done the rape and almost murder by himself.

    Nope. Rather than rely on “IIRC”, inform yourself better. I did a quick search, so you can start here: https://anncoulter.com/2014/04/23/what-you-wont-read-in-the-papers-about-the-central-park-five/

    edit: H./t to D.K., who did the same search and provided the same first result.

  72. @YetAnotherAnon
    "Joseph Lawless, the airport’s director of security, who had formerly worked as a driver to a Massachusetts governor"

    I do get an Afghanistan sort of vibe from that. You'd rather hope a Director Of Security had a police or military background. Has America always been like that, and just until recently being Director Of Security was a sinecure, because airports were safe places? But even then you'd have smuggling and the like.

    Replies: @CCZ

    “who had formerly worked as a driver to a Massachusetts governor”

    Well, there is always the New Jersey governor’s homosexual Israeli lover!!!!

    James Edward McGreevey, Democrat, served as the 52nd Governor of New Jersey from 2002 until his resignation in 2004 following the revelation of his extramarital affair with a [male] gubernatorial appointee.

    During his gubernatorial tenure, McGreevey—who was then married to his wife Dina Matos —appointed his secret lover, Israeli national Golan Cipel, as homeland security advisor. McGreevey was criticized for appointing Cipel as homeland security adviser because he lacked relevant experience or qualifications for the position. In addition, Cipel could not gain a security approval from the federal government, as he was Israeli and not a U.S. citizen. On August 12, 2004, following threats of a lawsuit that would have exposed his affair, McGreevey publicly acknowledged his homosexuality and his extramarital relationship; he also announced that he would resign the governorship effective November 15, 2004. [Wiki]

  73. @D. K.
    @Steve Sailer

    "To encourage the others."

    You must be a big fan of the Ancient Romans.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decimation_(punishment)

    Replies: @gandydancer

    You must be a big fan of the Ancient Romans.

    The exact ratio at which it’s better to let the guilty go free than punish the innocent is not a Law of Nature. And there’s always some ratio in effect. Some cost-benefit analysis is necessary.

    In this case the injustice of firing the woman is considerably reduced by her lack of claim to the job.

  74. @kihowi
    What a pointless post without an indication whether she did something wrong or not. Was that airport so much less secure than the other ones? Were they an exception? Had the other ones been preparing for 9/11? Were there perfectly fine anti-arabs-with-box-cutters rules that she axed for political reasons? Yeah right. "On her watch" is retarded, it means nothing.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @SMK, @Ben tillman

    She was sucking the taxpayer’s teat. She was getting paid for doing nothing.

  75. @CCZ
    Another "injustice"????

    "Former Minneapolis police officer's murder conviction reversed in deadly shooting of Australian woman."

    September 15, 2021 / 12:53 PM / CBS/AP


    The Minnesota Supreme Court on Wednesday reversed the third-degree murder conviction of a former Minneapolis police officer who fatally shot an Australian woman in 2017, saying the charge doesn't fit the circumstances in this case. Mohamed Noor was convicted of third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of Justine Ruszczyk Damond, a dual U.S.-Australian citizen who called 911 to report a possible sexual assault behind her home.

    Noor was sentenced to 12 1/2 years on the murder count but was not sentenced for manslaughter.

    The ruling means his murder conviction is overturned and the case will now go back to the district court, where he will be sentenced on the manslaughter count. He has already served more than 28 months of his murder sentence. If sentenced to the presumptive four years for manslaughter, he could be eligible for supervised release around the end of this year.
     
    Implications for Derek Chauvin???? Oh, I forgot, he's white.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer, @Whiskey, @Pericles, @Ben tillman

    Remind me why he wasn’t charged with first-degree murder.

    And why does this stupid article call utility knives “box-cutters”?

  76. @James B. Shearer
    @gandydancer

    "...The CP5 were guilty as hell. .."

    Probably not of raping and almost killing the woman. IIRC it wasn't their DNA, they eventually found out whose DNA it was and he could have done the rape and almost murder by himself.

    Replies: @gandydancer, @Ben tillman

    That’s total bullshit. Finding that one person raped her in no way implies that others did not. The evidence against the CP5 for that crime was overwhelming.

    • Replies: @James B. Shearer
    @Ben tillman

    "... The evidence against the CP5 for that crime was overwhelming."

    Not convinced. For another somewhat similar case see Jeffrey Mark Deskovic.

    Replies: @ben tillman

  77. @Ben tillman
    @James B. Shearer

    That’s total bullshit. Finding that one person raped her in no way implies that others did not. The evidence against the CP5 for that crime was overwhelming.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer

    “… The evidence against the CP5 for that crime was overwhelming.”

    Not convinced. For another somewhat similar case see Jeffrey Mark Deskovic.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @James B. Shearer

    Not convinced? It's simple logic.

    And the original evidence of guilt was overwhelming:

    https://centralpark5joggerattackers.com/videos/?fbclid=IwAR1R0KkLX9xKHcs9dak882gEvfOLGWsBRMhS5cT_YVMJmpTJYTyvbc82XYM

  78. @Anonymous
    @kihowi

    The NYT article is what’s pointless. Steve’s post is making fun of the pointless article

    Replies: @Joseph Doaks

    “The NYT article is what’s pointless. Steve’s post is making fun of the pointless article”

    Steve’s performing a public service by reminding us that the NYT is pointless.

  79. @James B. Shearer
    @Ben tillman

    "... The evidence against the CP5 for that crime was overwhelming."

    Not convinced. For another somewhat similar case see Jeffrey Mark Deskovic.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    Not convinced? It’s simple logic.

    And the original evidence of guilt was overwhelming:

    https://centralpark5joggerattackers.com/videos/?fbclid=IwAR1R0KkLX9xKHcs9dak882gEvfOLGWsBRMhS5cT_YVMJmpTJYTyvbc82XYM

  80. Rest assured had the “top official at the Massachusetts Port Authority” been a dashing white male executive named Buck Buckingham, the NYT would be banging the drum demanding his head louder than anyone else….and camped in front of his house, hoping to terrorize any family members foolish enough to walk out the front door.

    It’s pretty much understood, 20 years later, that if Allah’s Boys really wanted to make amends for 9/11, they’d aim a few Cessnas at the Times & WaPo buildings, with a few puddle-jumpers to flatten CNN for good luck.

  81. She was the wrong person for the job, but it’s difficult to tell on inspection how having the wrong person in that job made the marginal difference that day. The reason to get rid of her is that a job like that should never be used for political patronage.

  82. @Ripple Earthdevil
    OT: Idealistic young Chinese Cal Berkeley grad blows the whistle on Lizzie Holmes:

    Theranos Trial: Ex-Lab Associate Continues Bombshell Testimony

    SAN JOSE (BCN) — A former lab associate continued her testimony Wednesday in the federal criminal trial against Elizabeth Holmes, founder and CEO of the blood testing company Theranos.

    Erika Cheung told the jury that the Theranos “Edison” machines, supposedly able to deliver multiple blood test results based on a fingerprick’s worth of blood, “frequently failed” quality control tests.

    More:

    https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2021/09/15/theranos-trial-ex-lab-associate-continues-bombshell-testimony/

    Replies: @BB

    Fake it until you make it works fine in SV, just not for medicine. Had Holmes used her seemingly preternatural grifting skill set on a new search engine or AI, she would be sitting pretty, if not at the first company, then the fourth of fifth. She would be sitting on several boards right now talking about women’s empowerment! For the life of me I cannot figure out the choice of a medical product. In medicine they are bound to find out.

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The Shaping Event of Our Modern World
The Hidden Information in Our Government Archives
Analyzing the History of a Controversial Movement
The unspoken statistical reality of urban crime over the last quarter century.
How America was neoconned into World War IV