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NYT: "The Dangerous History of Immunoprivilege"
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You’ve read all about “black bodies.” Soon we’ll be reading all about the racist injustice being performatively performed on “black antibodies.”

From the New York Times opinion page:

The Dangerous History of Immunoprivilege

We’ve seen what happens when people with immunity to a deadly disease are given special treatment. It isn’t pretty.

By Kathryn Olivarius
Kathryn Olivarius is an assistant professor of history at Stanford University and author of the forthcoming “Necropolis: Disease, Power, and Capitalism in the Cotton Kingdom.”

April 12, 2020, 3:00 p.m. ET

… The likes of Glenn Beck and Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick of Texas have fashioned the willingness to endure a bout with coronavirus as a patriotic, pro-economy act; Germany, Italy, and Britain are all toying with notions of “immunity passports” — proof that a person has beaten Covid-19 — that would allow people with antibodies to go back to work faster.

That people could wield their hard-earned “immunocapital” to save the economy sounds like science fiction. But as we wait months or years for a viable vaccine, leveraging peoples’ antibodies may well be part of our economic strategy. If so, we should heed lessons from the past and beware of the potential social perils. As a historian, my research has focused on a time and place — the 19th-century Deep South — that once operated by a very similar logic, only with a far more lethal and fearsome virus: yellow fever. Immunity on a case-by-case basis did permit the economy to expand, but it did so unevenly: to the benefit of those already atop the social ladder, and at the expense of everyone else. When a raging virus collided with the forces of capitalism, immunological discrimination became just one more form of bias in a region already premised on racial, ethnic, gender and financial inequality.

Yellow fever, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, was inescapable in the 19th-century Deep South and a point of near-constant terror in New Orleans, the region’s hub. In the six decades between the Louisiana Purchase and the Civil War, New Orleans experienced 22 full-blown epidemics, cumulatively killing over 150,000 people. (Perhaps another 150,000 died in nearby American cities.) The virus killed about half of all those it infected and it killed them horribly, with many victims vomiting thick black blood, the consistency and color of coffee grounds. The lucky survivors became “acclimated,” or immune for life.

Antebellum New Orleans was a slave society where whites dominated free people of color and enslaved people though legally sanctioned violence. But another invisible hierarchy came to co-mingle with the racial order; white “acclimated citizens” stood atop the social pyramid, followed by white “unacclimated strangers,” followed by everyone else. Surviving yellow fever was locally known as the “baptism of citizenship:” proof that a white person had been chosen by God and had established himself as a legitimate and permanent player in the Cotton Kingdom.

Immunity mattered. “Unacclimated” white people were considered unemployable. As the German immigrant Gustav Dresel lamented in the 1830s, “I looked around in vain for a position as bookkeeper,” but “to engage a young man who was not acclimated would be a bad speculation.” Life insurers rejected unacclimated applicants outright or else charged a hefty “climate premium.” If you were white, immunity-status impacted where you lived, how much you earned, your ability to get credit, and whom you were able to marry. …

But immunity was more than a product of epidemiological luck. In the context of the Deep South, it was wielded as a weapon. From the start, wealthy white New Orleanians made sure that while mosquitoes were equal-opportunity vectors, yellow fever would be anything but colorblind. Pro-slavery theorists used yellow fever to argue that racial slavery was natural, even humanitarian, because it allowed whites to socially distance themselves; they could stay at home, in relative safety, if black people were forced to labor and trade on their behalf. In 1853, the “Weekly Delta” newspaper claimed, ludicrously, that three-quarters of all deaths from yellow fever were among abolitionists.

Black people, with limited access to health care, were of course as scared of yellow fever as anyone else.

Actually, blacks were much less likely to die of yellow fever, a West African disease, than were whites (much less poor American Indians).

But those enslaved people who’d acquired immunity increased their monetary value to their owners by up to 50 percent. In essence, black people’s immunity became white people’s capital.

Yellow fever did not make the South into a slave society, but it widened the divide between rich and poor.

Human biodiversity in resistance to different diseases explains much about why blacks were valued as slaves in the warmer parts of the New World, where they outsurvived whites and Amerindians, but not in the colder parts, where they tended to die of respiratory infections in larger numbers.

High mortality, it turns out, was economically profitable for New Orleans’s most powerful citizens because yellow fever kept wage workers insecure, and so unable to bargain effectively.

That sounds dubious. I’m sure the disease risk kept the supply of labor low, driving up wages.

As I pointed out in my column last year, “Alternative America,” about what American history would have been like without slavery, the disease burden problem explains much about the economic usefulness of slavery. If America had foregone slavery, the main difference would have been the South would have been populated more slowly:

Granted, an America without slavery would not have developed the lowland Deep South as rapidly as it did, much as Florida south of the panhandle was largely empty until the 20th century. For example, Miami was not incorporated until 1896, at which point it was estimated that only 1,800 souls resided in the area. In 1900, barely a half million people lived in the entire state of Florida, compared with 21 million today.

And yet, the failure of Americans to do much with the bulk of the Florida peninsula until the 20th century does not loom depressingly in contemporary thinking.

Similarly, if the cotton belt centered on Mississippi and Alabama had taken a few more generations to develop due to the requirement to either pay free white workers high enough wages or to develop better technology that could do without them, I doubt if Americans in our alternative 2019 would lament this history any more than Americans today mourn all the oranges that weren’t grown in Florida in the 19th century.

That said, New Orleans was so strategically important controlling the entrance and exit of the Mississippi watershed that it would have had to have been populated, although perhaps the US would have concentrated military might further up at the Vicksburg chokepoint.

 
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  1. You will ride with us, and you will die with us: it’s as inclusive as that for me and my [black bodies].

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    Appears to be a funeral procession consisting of the hearse and a bunch of motorcycles, not the highest powered, with a few scooters and one ATV mixed in, some of them riding on the sidewalk almost as fast as the ones on the street
    , @Ed
    Lol well the streets are empty.
    , @Jack Armstrong
    What a Becky!
    , @ic1000
    Though she missed the beginning, Becky’s Melissa’s video caught about 120 bikes and 30 ATVs. Where are they stored? Maybe you don’t need a key to run the freight elevator, where the riders live.

    As far as I can tell, she was annoyed that they didn’t keep a six foot distance, rightly so.
    , @Clifford Brown
    In fairness, this happens every weekend in non-Plague times, but they do tend to stay off the sidewalks.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    JR, There is a documentory, "Twelve O'clock Boys" that shows the packs of ATV and dirt bike riders that terreoize the streets of Baltimore. Worth a look. The main character is 11 year old "Pug" who longs to ride with the bikers. Raised by a single mother who has no idea that Pug hasn't been to school for 60 some days.
    , @Forbes
    This is a rite of spring time in NYC, usually around Easter Saturday. They drive all though the city--not just Manhattan. Several years (a decade?) ago , there was a shooting or beating on the Upper West Side and some smashed car windows for a driver (Asian) who wasn't happy with the harassing traffic.

    Even then, racial/ethnic activists berated the NYPD who were shadowing the "parade" as they had monitored social media for the meet-up coordination of the event.

    The "parade" is mimicked by the younger, non-drivers license crowd by organizing a similar parade on bicycles. Last year I got caught crossing Third Avenue while about 200 teens passed by--ignoring traffic lights and riding against traffic, and down the sidewalk. Of course they did!
  2. Actually, blacks were much less likely to die of yellow fever, a West African disease, than were whites (much less poor American Indians).

    Some numbers for that.
    https://mbio.asm.org/content/5/3/e01253-14
    Human Genetic Variation and Yellow Fever Mortality during 19th Century U.S. Epidemics

    ABSTRACT
    We calculated the incidence, mortality, and case fatality rates for Caucasians and non-Caucasians during 19th century yellow fever (YF) epidemics in the United States and determined statistical significance for differences in the rates in different populations. We evaluated nongenetic host factors, including socioeconomic, environmental, cultural, demographic, and acquired immunity status that could have influenced these differences. While differences in incidence rates were not significant between Caucasians and non-Caucasians, differences in mortality and case fatality rates were statistically significant for all epidemics tested (P < 0.01). Caucasians diagnosed with YF were 6.8 times more likely to succumb than non-Caucasians with the disease. No other major causes of death during the 19th century demonstrated a similar mortality skew toward Caucasians. Nongenetic host factors were examined and could not explain these large differences. We propose that the remarkably lower case mortality rates for individuals of non-Caucasian ancestry is the result of human genetic variation in loci encoding innate immune mediators.

    But remember everyone, race is a social construct.

    P.S. Different diseases among Union troops in 1864. See Table S5 for more details.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    If "immunoprivilege" is a thing, blacks are the ones who have it.

    If it wasn't for their superior immunity to the tropical diseases of Africa (from which the Europeans died like flies), they would have been replaced by settlers from Europe or Asia a long time ago. As it was, they were protected by a disease barrier that made the Sub-Sahara effectively uninhabitable to non-Africans.

    By the way, here's a fun fact about the decidedly non-immunoprivileged Amerindians:

    Smallpox infection was introduced to the Western Hemisphere during the 16th century by an African slave who was a member of the Spanish expedition led by Panfilo de Narvaez in 1520 [1–6]. https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/41/9/1285/278013
     
    , @Almost Missouri
    So, Yellow Fever was 680% more lethal to whites than to blacks, but the NYT headline is the usual "Blacks Hardest Hit!!!!1!!1!"

    In case they ever wonder why they get called "fake news", they just produced Exhibit #5982364.

    If you want to have a completely false picture of the world, the New York Times is an excellent way to get that.

    What irritates those of us who don't want false perceptions (99%) is that we still have to keep track of which lies the Times spreads because it is essentially the bulletin board of the ruling class.

    I used to read historical accounts of how Soviet citizens had to apprise themselves daily of The Current Truth so that they could conform their public selves to their rulers' demands. Reading such accounts is no longer necessary as now we all live it.

    , @ic1000
    Recent work with malaria shows that when the evidence for differential susceptibility or mortality is this strong, the causal genes (alleles, actually) can be identified. SNP chips and well-designed GWASs are powerful tools.

    Fortunately for the NYT-mindset elites, the victims and survivors of these epidemics are long departed, so a study would be difficult. Impossibly difficult. Students can continue to learn (by omission) that natural selection has nothing to do with humans.

    The thesis of The 10,000 Year Explosion was definitively disproven by reasons.
    , @AnotherDad
    Maybe having this whole "Civil War" thing wasn't such a great idea?
    , @James Forrestal

    Actually, blacks were much less likely to die of yellow fever, a West African disease, than were whites (much less poor American Indians).
     

    Some numbers for that.
     

    Human biodiversity in resistance to different diseases explains much about why blacks were valued as slaves in the warmer parts of the New World, where they outsurvived whites and Amerindians, but not in the colder parts, where they tended to die of respiratory infections in larger numbers.
     
    Why do you and Steve keep mentioning these blasphemous hatefacts? You're both very "racist." It's like a nanoaggression or something. Wow, just wow.

    But remember everyone, race is a social construct.
     
    Well, at least you've got that part down. Now just repeat to yourself 20 times at bedtime every night:

    "Just skin color!" "Social construct!" "Muh White immunoprivilege!"

    And you'll soon be cured of these heretical doubts.

    But at least you didn't endorse another one of Steve's problematic claims:

    High mortality, it turns out, was economically profitable for New Orleans’s most powerful citizens because yellow fever kept wage workers insecure, and so unable to bargain effectively.

    That sounds dubious. I’m sure the disease risk kept the supply of labor low, driving up wages.
     
    Anyone repeating the long-discredited trope that (ceteris paribus) decreasing the supply of labor leads to an increase in the price of labor is merely demonstrating their own inextricable entanglement with the privileged structures of immuno-oppression. Steve needs to check his White immunoprivilege.* And don't start talking about the history of wage growth in the aftermath of the Black Plague in Europe, either -- that's clearly just a "racist" dog whistle (the BLACK Plague? Seriously?)

    *Similarly, "increasing the supply of labor leads to a decrease in the price of labor" is a long-discredited xenophobic canard -- anyone who dares to invoke this trope is obviously asserting their own "citizen privilege" in order to reinforce the structures of alien oppression.
  3. Antebellum New Orleans was a slave society where whites dominated free people of color and enslaved people though legally sanctioned violence.

    You don’t say, professor? Why, I learn something new every day. Hey! I know what let’s do! Let’s have what happened between a fairly small number of people in a few places a couple of centuries ago justify violence against white people forever! Wouldn’t that be cool?

    And while we’re at it, professor, would you please tally up the number of white people already raped, tortured, maimed and murdered by black people over the last 50 years or so?

    Then I really could learn something new.

    • Replies: @Abe

    You don’t say, professor? Why, I learn something new every day. Hey! I know what let’s do! Let’s have what happened between a fairly small number of people in a few places a couple of centuries ago
     
    All part of the GNP - GROSS NEGATIVE PRODUCT. American society c. 2019 was so super-abundantly wealthy it could support whole swaths of GROSS NEGATIVE PRODUCT- i.e. THE NEW YORK TIMES/WASHINGTON POST, all those college ‘studies’ departments, the interesting case of the interesting career of Tim Wise- devoted to nothing but destroying health, happiness, and utility (what positive purpose is there in reminding anyone about Emmitt Till?) as big as many countries’ real economies.
  4. Professor Olivarius full well understands the kinds of ideas she needs to espouse to get ahead in academia in America in 2020. But at some future point in time, she may well run into trouble for “appropriating other people’s narratives.” In the future, scholarship by white academics that touches on any aspect of black people’s lives and history will probably be denounced, given the direction things are headed.

    • Replies: @Change that Matters

    In the future, scholarship by white academics that touches on any aspect of black people’s lives and history will probably be denounced, given the direction things are headed.
     
    If you're correct, and I think you are, then Professor Olivarius is a perfect example of the Real Racist.

    Think about it. Olivarius believes she can freely and safely appropriate the Black Narrative because her authoritative position is rooted in centuries of oppressive white power. She has faith the White Security Apparatus will defend her right to continue appropriating that Narrative for as long as she desires tenure and a fat pension. No wonder she looks so happy and 'healthy'.

    Take that, Blacks Antibodies!
    , @Hypnotoad666
    Is "Translucent-American" a recognized ethnic group?
    , @Dumbo
    She's cute for an academic, at least in this picture. Couldn't find any info on her being married or having children, so it's likely another high-IQ, low-fertility case. And an anti-white white woman.
  5. “Black antibodies” haha!

    OK, completely O/T here, but in praise of the iSteve crowd:

    I wish I’d had the time to participate in your post called “Trump’s Biggest Decision”. There were already 150 comments or so when I read through them. Let me tell you, there were about 10 of them I wanted to reply to, but just so many good ones on there, from the usual commenters and others. The thread veered into the economic mess coming from the induced-panicky reaction to this Kung Flu, and that is the stuff that is REALLY worth discussing.

    You have a great audience, or at least the participating ones, Steve. Even though comments of mine take longer to appear, depending on the time of day, than on others’ blogs here, I always find so much to enjoy reading or replying to. Let’s hope we don’t get the trolls on here too much, because you’ve got a great thing going.

    That’s all.

  6. >Similarly, if the cotton belt centered on Mississippi and Alabama had taken a few more generations to develop due to the requirement to either pay free white workers high enough wages or to develop better technology that could do without them, I doubt if Americans in our alternative 2019 would lament this history any more than Americans today mourn all the oranges that weren’t grown in Florida in the 19th century. <

    Imagine there are no black people
    it's easy if you try
    No slavery below us
    Above us only sky
    Imagine all the white people living for today

    • LOL: Jim Bob Lassiter
  7. Somewhat OT, but important. We had seventy years of communism to illustrate the failure of economic planning. Now our politicians think they can plan the shutdown of economic life with no unintended consequences.
    Breakdown in food supply chain is coming:

    https://market-ticker.org/akcs-www?post=238925

    Hysterical, moronic imbecility is the chief virtue today.

  8. Anonymous[152] • Disclaimer says:

    Low point of the past week of press conferences might have been the PC status signalling by Dr Fauci and Surgeon General Daffy on the subject of elevated black infection rates.

    Everybody knows blacks eat more junk drink more junk smoke more junk blah blah blah. Doesn’t matter. We need to pretend that whites are immuno privileged.

    White obesity and white diabetes are behavior driven outcomes but black obesity and black diabetes are mysteriously not. That’s the story and they’re sticking to it.

    Even if Fauci declares on Monday that historically consistent undesirable black health outcomes are known facts of life to the medical profession —– by Thursday he’s whining about what amounts to a black-white health gap caused by guess fucking what.

    • Agree: Hail
    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    You forgot to mention how they’re always handling their junk.
  9. If America had foregone slavery, the main difference would have been the South would have been populated more slowly:

    Without slavery, America would be a vastly better place:

    The more important slavery was in a country or state the lower the level of income was in the future. Nathan Nunn “Slavery, Inequality and Economic Development in the Americas: An Examination of the Engerman-Sokoloff Argument (October 2007).

    Slave states had lower levels of educational attainment and less innovation (measured by patents) than states without slavery. This was true even in the areas that were most like the North in geography and economic activity. See John Majewski “Why Did Northerners Oppose the Expansion of Slavery? Economic Development and Education in the Limestone South” Chapter 14 in Slavery’s Capitalism

    http://bradleyahansen.blogspot.com/2016/12/capitalism-and-slavery-debate-is-not.html

    And here’s Gavin Wright on how things would have turned out if the USA had abolished slavery shortly after the Revolution:

    The preceding section suggests that if slavery had been abolished nationally at the time of the Constitution, the Cotton South would have developed through family-scale farms like the rest of the country, delivering as much or perhaps more cotton to the eager textile mills of Lancashire, and building a more diverse and prosperous regional economy in the process.

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ZLLNGFiwtrjeza5oZwFQRG-J3MQdn1cP/view

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Without slavery, America would be a vastly better place
     
    Well actually, you mean without the presence of millions of Africans that America would’ve been a better place. Slavery and then later segregation were simply attempts to deal with this brute fact.

    Having millions of free roaming blacks creates the situation you have in Detroit now.
    , @Arclight
    The one thing I can wholeheartedly agree with the woke on is the idea of slavery as our country's original sin. If the founders could have been given a glimpse of what Philadelphia and our largest cities looked like 200 years in the future, they would have outlawed slavery immediately.

    As we look at the massive demographic changes over the last 30 years and those in store in the next generation along with the ascendancy of the America-hating left, it owes most of its energy, policy successes, and supposed moral authority to the long shadow of this 'peculiar institution'.
  10. In 1900, barely a half million people lived in the entire state of Florida, compared with 21 million today.

    Uh, if we have a lengthy power outage for any reason in mid-summer, the population will soon return to those levels. In Florida, you do not need central heat but you do need air conditioning.

    Also, I do not see how the SJW at NYT can complain about immunoprivilege; it will benefit the ethnic group that fails in the hand washing department. (Higher incidence of disease bestows immunity on higher percentage of folks.)

    BTW, the way this article is going (abuse of the blacks), let me be the first to say, “Emmet Till.”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    When did electric fans come along? They may have had a lot to do with the population of Florida south of the Panhandle.
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    For a younger generation, the rallying cry will be Treyvon and Michael Brown. With a cameo appearance by Rachel Jeantel.
  11. Yellow fever?” Uh-oh, another angry Asian-American op-ed piece coming any moment now

  12. @PiltdownMan
    Professor Olivarius full well understands the kinds of ideas she needs to espouse to get ahead in academia in America in 2020. But at some future point in time, she may well run into trouble for "appropriating other people's narratives." In the future, scholarship by white academics that touches on any aspect of black people's lives and history will probably be denounced, given the direction things are headed.

    https://history.stanford.edu/sites/g/files/sbiybj9471/f/styles/large-square/public/k._olivarius_0.jpg

    In the future, scholarship by white academics that touches on any aspect of black people’s lives and history will probably be denounced, given the direction things are headed.

    If you’re correct, and I think you are, then Professor Olivarius is a perfect example of the Real Racist.

    Think about it. Olivarius believes she can freely and safely appropriate the Black Narrative because her authoritative position is rooted in centuries of oppressive white power. She has faith the White Security Apparatus will defend her right to continue appropriating that Narrative for as long as she desires tenure and a fat pension. No wonder she looks so happy and ‘healthy’.

    Take that, Blacks Antibodies!

    • Replies: @Anon
    We need to figure out a way to purge teachers like this from our universities. It would be great to have a have a series of good quality academic journals in the social sciences that shred PC profs and their blithering nonsense papers into a zillion pieces.
  13. Immunoprivilege

    So far beyond parody that it isn’t even funny.

    • LOL: James N. Kennett
  14. Black people, with limited access to health care, were of course as scared of yellow fever as anyone else.

    Cochran is always saying the medical care was useless in those days and essentially no more than a tax on the wealthy.

    • Replies: @gcochran
    Yellow fever was dangerous for blacks, way more dangerous for whites.

    Mds didn't have anything that worked against it, back then.
  15. Black people, with limited access to health care, were of course as scared of yellow fever as anyone else.

    LOL. Nineteenth Century “healthcare” consisted of leeches and laudanum. The less “access” you had the more likely you were to survive.

    Also, how dare those immune people cash in on their “privilege.” I mean, all they did was vomit black blood, endure excruciating pain, and run a 50% chance of death. What a bunch of privileged elites!

    Even by NYT standards, this is a really, really stupid article.

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @Pericles

    Even by NYT standards, this is a really, really stupid article.

     

    It's Stanford Tenure Track Brain Power! Ooh, I see in comment 33 that it's also accredited Yale and Oxford Brain Power! Take that, bigots!
    , @ic1000
    > Even by NYT standards, this is a really, really stupid article.

    Asst. Prof. Olivarius has a specialist's knowledge of the 19th-century Deep South -- the time and place her research has focused on, and the subject of her article. So she knows that the connection between mosquitoes and yellow fever wasn't made until 1900 (Ref. 1, here). She also knows that most NYT readers don't have facts like these at their fingertips.

    So this phrasing

    But immunity was more than a product of epidemiological luck. In the context of the Deep South, it was wielded as a weapon. From the start, wealthy white New Orleanians made sure that while mosquitoes were equal-opportunity vectors, yellow fever would be anything but colorblind.
     
    is really, really stupid. Those wealthy New Orleanians couldn't make sure of anything that they were ignorant of.

    The Op-Ed page is Facebook For Elites, not a history lesson. This blonde's article is a social media post, advertising that she's enlisted as a volunteer in the Cold Civil War. A tenure decision can't be far away, and this can only help.
  16. @J.Ross
    You will ride with us, and you will die with us: it's as inclusive as that for me and my [black bodies].

    https://www.twitter.com/MelissaAFrancis/status/1249455529111552005

    Appears to be a funeral procession consisting of the hearse and a bunch of motorcycles, not the highest powered, with a few scooters and one ATV mixed in, some of them riding on the sidewalk almost as fast as the ones on the street

  17. Anonymous[240] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    If America had foregone slavery, the main difference would have been the South would have been populated more slowly:
     
    Without slavery, America would be a vastly better place:

    The more important slavery was in a country or state the lower the level of income was in the future. Nathan Nunn “Slavery, Inequality and Economic Development in the Americas: An Examination of the Engerman-Sokoloff Argument (October 2007).
     

    Slave states had lower levels of educational attainment and less innovation (measured by patents) than states without slavery. This was true even in the areas that were most like the North in geography and economic activity. See John Majewski “Why Did Northerners Oppose the Expansion of Slavery? Economic Development and Education in the Limestone South” Chapter 14 in Slavery’s Capitalism
     
    http://bradleyahansen.blogspot.com/2016/12/capitalism-and-slavery-debate-is-not.html


    And here's Gavin Wright on how things would have turned out if the USA had abolished slavery shortly after the Revolution:

    The preceding section suggests that if slavery had been abolished nationally at the time of the Constitution, the Cotton South would have developed through family-scale farms like the rest of the country, delivering as much or perhaps more cotton to the eager textile mills of Lancashire, and building a more diverse and prosperous regional economy in the process.

     

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ZLLNGFiwtrjeza5oZwFQRG-J3MQdn1cP/view

    Without slavery, America would be a vastly better place

    Well actually, you mean without the presence of millions of Africans that America would’ve been a better place. Slavery and then later segregation were simply attempts to deal with this brute fact.

    Having millions of free roaming blacks creates the situation you have in Detroit now.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Well actually, you mean without the presence of millions of Africans that America would’ve been a better place. Slavery and then later segregation were simply attempts to deal with this brute fact.
     
    Slavery brought Africans to America; it was the cause, not the result.
  18. The virus killed about half of all those it infected and it killed them horribly, with many victims vomiting thick black blood, the consistency and color of coffee grounds. The lucky survivors became “acclimated,” or immune for life.

    Pretty standard, really… here’s an everyday colonial American salt cake recipe:

    Blindness and retching of the blackest BLOOD are oft noted upon consumption of the wond’rous Salt Cake, but will likely abate following Two and Twenty hours.

    • LOL: HammerJack
  19. Anonymous[152] • Disclaimer says:

    Oh man the DOOOM narrative is getting crushed by the data…

    Stanford professor of medicine John Ioannidis concludes in a new study that the risk of death from Covid19 for people under 65 years of age, even in global “hotspots“, is equivalent to the risk of a fatal car accident for daily commuters driving between 9 and 400 miles.

    In a serological pilot study, the German virologist Hendrick Streeck comes to the interim result that the lethality of Covid19 is at 0.37% and the mortality (based on the total population) at 0.06%. These values are about ten times lower than those of the WHO and about five times lower than those of Johns Hopkins University.

    A Danish study with 1500 blood donors found that the lethality of Covid19 is only 1.6 per thousand, i.e. more than 20 times lower than originally assumed by the WHO and thus in the range of a strong (pandemic) influenza. At the same time Denmark has decided to reopen schools and kindergartens next week.

    Lots more huge collection of updated info here:

    http://freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/3834517/posts

    Source of info is here (I can’t get this site to load properly):

    https://swprs.org/a-swiss-doctor-on-covid-19/#latest

    BTW DIDIER RAOULT HAS SAID ALL ALONG THAT THE DATA SHOW RESPIRATORY ILLNESS OVERALL IS WITHIN NORMAL RANGE FALL 2019 THRU SPRING 2020

    • Thanks: Manfred Arcane
  20. @James Speaks

    In 1900, barely a half million people lived in the entire state of Florida, compared with 21 million today.
     
    Uh, if we have a lengthy power outage for any reason in mid-summer, the population will soon return to those levels. In Florida, you do not need central heat but you do need air conditioning.

    Also, I do not see how the SJW at NYT can complain about immunoprivilege; it will benefit the ethnic group that fails in the hand washing department. (Higher incidence of disease bestows immunity on higher percentage of folks.)

    BTW, the way this article is going (abuse of the blacks), let me be the first to say, "Emmet Till."

    When did electric fans come along? They may have had a lot to do with the population of Florida south of the Panhandle.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Between 1882 and 1886.
    , @Joe Stalin
    https://youtu.be/3LA4YnTxPbE

    https://fanimation.com/museum/
    , @Hypnotoad666
    Who needs electric fans when you've got white privilege.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/03/31/article-0-0093C8D000000259-56_468x322.jpg
    , @James Speaks
    Electric fans helped a little, but in classrooms in 1970, you were blessed intermittently, a few seconds at a time, when the oscillating fan sent that refreshing breathe of air your way. We got central air in my house in 1966. Imagine my wonderment upon ariving at university that the classrooms were all air conditioned. Not the dorms, though.
  21. “Actually, blacks were much less likely to die of yellow fever, a West African disease, than were whites”

    That an assistant professor of History wouldn’t know this basic fact is baffling. That, coupled with overlooking the fact of New Orleans’ strategic importance (the War of 1812, Battle of New Orleans) to the Mississippi River and all the trade and commerce occurring in that region of the US, is really beyond belief. And she gets to teach History at Stanford.

    All this talk about wages for workers also tends to show an ignorance that the modern labor union with its collective bargaining didn’t come to total fruition until the FDR administration, when Slavery in the US had been over for nearly three quarters of a century. It simply wasn’t a thing to have slave strikes in the nineteenth century, or collective bargaining (complete with federal arbitrators) at the ol’ plantation in Mississippi.

    Also, what seems to be overlooked, is that without slavery during the period 1619-1865, the importation of the total number of Africans to the US would be probably 90-99% less than it was. There’d have been no practical purpose for them to be brought here at all.

    What kind of educators are teaching at elite universities these days anyway?

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    Educators who know that you don't point out the NYT's tolerance of slavery pre-Civil War.
    , @PiltdownMan

    What kind of educators are teaching at elite universities these days anyway?
     
    Kathryn Olivarius has a B.A. in history from Yale, and an M.Phil and D.Phil (Ph.D.) in history from Oxford. The more pertinent question might be, to what sort of students are our elite universities handing out advanced degree in the humanities, anyway?

    I've noticed that young women who write opinion pieces for the New York Times these days, or are reporters, often seem to be have been Yale undergrads. There must be some mutual backscratching network thing going on.
    , @Mr McKenna
    Even in that glorious eventuality, though, we still imported another class of people who have made it their business to wreck the nation. And their handiwork includes this:


    More Africans have migrated to the USA in any recent ten-year period of their own free will than were transported here over the entire 200+ years of the slave trade. That’s how bad it is here for Africans–we simply can’t keep them from flocking here. And this is just counting legal migrants. Whatever racism actually is, it’s proving impossible to prevent Africans from being attracted to it. They simply can’t get enough.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/21/nyregion/more-africans-enter-us-than-in-days-of-slavery.html

    African migration has ramped up considerably since that article was published.

    What this means, anyway, is that even if this country had never imported a single African slave, we’d still be dealing with millions of Africans, in their glorious, manifold manifestations. Because Reasons, as Steve likes to say.
     
    'TWMNBN'
    , @DevOps Dad
    She could possibly be 26 years old, naive, and a newly minted phd. She obviously isn't familiar with the writings of Charles C. Mann.

    From the wonderful book 1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created

    Then there’s the role malaria (and to a lesser degree, yellow fever) likely played in the rise of the Atlantic slave trade. This other “Old World” disease was no friendlier to Native Americans, but it flourished in the warmer areas of the Americas so virulently that European colonists died there in droves. But Africans’ inherited and acquired resistances to the illness meant that, “biologically speaking, they were fitter, which is another way of saying that in these places they were—loaded words!—genetically superior.”

    Sadly, Africans’ immunity “became a wellspring for their enslavement,” since for (unscrupulous) Europeans “the economic logic was hard to ignore. If they wanted to grow tobacco, rice, or sugar, they were better off using African slaves than European indentured servants or Indian slaves.”

  22. @J.Ross
    You will ride with us, and you will die with us: it's as inclusive as that for me and my [black bodies].

    https://www.twitter.com/MelissaAFrancis/status/1249455529111552005

    Lol well the streets are empty.

  23. @Steve Sailer
    When did electric fans come along? They may have had a lot to do with the population of Florida south of the Panhandle.

    Between 1882 and 1886.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    Panhandle weather is often just as hot and humid (sometimes more so) as south Florida. SFL often enjoys breezes off the ocean or gulf and breezes cut the mosquito problem as well as anything.
  24. @James Speaks

    In 1900, barely a half million people lived in the entire state of Florida, compared with 21 million today.
     
    Uh, if we have a lengthy power outage for any reason in mid-summer, the population will soon return to those levels. In Florida, you do not need central heat but you do need air conditioning.

    Also, I do not see how the SJW at NYT can complain about immunoprivilege; it will benefit the ethnic group that fails in the hand washing department. (Higher incidence of disease bestows immunity on higher percentage of folks.)

    BTW, the way this article is going (abuse of the blacks), let me be the first to say, "Emmet Till."

    For a younger generation, the rallying cry will be Treyvon and Michael Brown. With a cameo appearance by Rachel Jeantel.

  25. Pro-slavery theorists used yellow fever to argue that racial slavery was natural, even humanitarian, because it allowed whites to socially distance themselves; they could stay at home, in relative safety, if black people were forced to labor and trade on their behalf.

    Caucasians diagnosed with YF were 6.8 times more likely to succumb than non-Caucasians with the disease. No other major causes of death during the 19th century demonstrated a similar mortality skew toward Caucasians.

    It must be something of a miracle that the working class Cajuns survived at all. Maybe it was a Holocaust or Holodomor of the transplanted Acadians.

    • Replies: @Federalist
    New Orleans was not populated by the Acadians.
  26. @Steve Sailer
    When did electric fans come along? They may have had a lot to do with the population of Florida south of the Panhandle.
  27. @Mr McKenna

    Antebellum New Orleans was a slave society where whites dominated free people of color and enslaved people though legally sanctioned violence.
     
    You don't say, professor? Why, I learn something new every day. Hey! I know what let's do! Let's have what happened between a fairly small number of people in a few places a couple of centuries ago justify violence against white people forever! Wouldn't that be cool?

    And while we're at it, professor, would you please tally up the number of white people already raped, tortured, maimed and murdered by black people over the last 50 years or so?

    Then I really could learn something new.

    You don’t say, professor? Why, I learn something new every day. Hey! I know what let’s do! Let’s have what happened between a fairly small number of people in a few places a couple of centuries ago

    All part of the GNP – GROSS NEGATIVE PRODUCT. American society c. 2019 was so super-abundantly wealthy it could support whole swaths of GROSS NEGATIVE PRODUCT- i.e. THE NEW YORK TIMES/WASHINGTON POST, all those college ‘studies’ departments, the interesting case of the interesting career of Tim Wise- devoted to nothing but destroying health, happiness, and utility (what positive purpose is there in reminding anyone about Emmitt Till?) as big as many countries’ real economies.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  28. @res

    Actually, blacks were much less likely to die of yellow fever, a West African disease, than were whites (much less poor American Indians).
     
    Some numbers for that.
    https://mbio.asm.org/content/5/3/e01253-14
    Human Genetic Variation and Yellow Fever Mortality during 19th Century U.S. Epidemics

    ABSTRACT
    We calculated the incidence, mortality, and case fatality rates for Caucasians and non-Caucasians during 19th century yellow fever (YF) epidemics in the United States and determined statistical significance for differences in the rates in different populations. We evaluated nongenetic host factors, including socioeconomic, environmental, cultural, demographic, and acquired immunity status that could have influenced these differences. While differences in incidence rates were not significant between Caucasians and non-Caucasians, differences in mortality and case fatality rates were statistically significant for all epidemics tested (P < 0.01). Caucasians diagnosed with YF were 6.8 times more likely to succumb than non-Caucasians with the disease. No other major causes of death during the 19th century demonstrated a similar mortality skew toward Caucasians. Nongenetic host factors were examined and could not explain these large differences. We propose that the remarkably lower case mortality rates for individuals of non-Caucasian ancestry is the result of human genetic variation in loci encoding innate immune mediators.
     
    But remember everyone, race is a social construct.

    P.S. Different diseases among Union troops in 1864. See Table S5 for more details.

    https://mbio.asm.org/content/mbio/5/3/e01253-14/F2.large.jpg

    If “immunoprivilege” is a thing, blacks are the ones who have it.

    If it wasn’t for their superior immunity to the tropical diseases of Africa (from which the Europeans died like flies), they would have been replaced by settlers from Europe or Asia a long time ago. As it was, they were protected by a disease barrier that made the Sub-Sahara effectively uninhabitable to non-Africans.

    By the way, here’s a fun fact about the decidedly non-immunoprivileged Amerindians:

    Smallpox infection was introduced to the Western Hemisphere during the 16th century by an African slave who was a member of the Spanish expedition led by Panfilo de Narvaez in 1520 [1–6]. https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/41/9/1285/278013

  29. Lazy-eyed Ben Butler, famous for inventing ‘contrabands” (daring African American slaves who began to flee to Union locations thus beginning the undercutting of the Confederate economic support system) seems to have been on the cutting edge on eliminating Yellow Fever in New Orleans.

    Transported to the city of Gumbo and beads, occupying General Butler quickly began a cleansing both in corruption, Confederate support, and city streets.

    Gordon Berg writes, “New Orleans had another problem: disease. The densely populated maritime trading center of roughly 170,000 souls was built amid the swamps of southern Louisiana. Geography, combined with chronic poor sanitation, contributed to the frequent summertime appearance of mosquito-borne yellow fever—“Yellow Jack”—a deadly killer wherever it appeared. In 1853 an outbreak killed nearly 8,000 people in the area. Many locals counted on a reappearance of the disease to make the Union occupation brief. Butler was a successful attorney, not a medical man. But he had studied the fever’s deadly potential; his father, John, died from the disease in the West Indies soon after Butler was born. To stymie the fever’s spread, the best practice of the time called for quarantining ships arriving from Caribbean ports known for outbreaks in the past.”

    Perhaps a stronger hand on legal, illegal, and out of country visitors should have been so quarantined in the last months with Cov-19. Naw, I mean what can you learn from history.

    Berg continues, “Union regimental surgeons had no experience with yellow fever, so Butler hired Army surgeon Charles McCormick, reputed to be the nation’s foremost fever expert. He was charged with improving the overall health of the city. After inspecting the area around the French Market and its open food stalls, Butler ordered that years of decaying garbage covering the original stone floor be scrubbed down to its foundation.”

    Just wait till the homeless areas of Los Angeles, Orange County (yes, that old Republican strongpoint), San Francisco, New York city, etc. spread disease in areas which have become fecally enhanced by liberal looking-the-other way city managers. Just a recent cleansing of the underpasses along the Orange County river system found over 100 stolen bikes just in one spot (I had a friend fight off one of these “two wheel liberators’), thousands of tons of awful offal, and vermin four legged and other that migrated to nearby Angel Stadium which then needed extensive fumigation.

    Retconning history covers up, “Only two cases of the contagion were reported during Butler’s tenure in New Orleans and, while both patients died, the fever quickly subsided. New Orleans did not experience another yellow fever outbreak until 1867.” Berg gives a new look at Spoons Butler. And how to handle disease. 19th century style.

    • Thanks: Hail
    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
    Speaking of Yellow Fever and New Orleans, former Confederate General John Bell ("Sam") Hood and his wife both died of Yellow Fever in the 1878-1879 New Orleans outbreak. They left 10 orphaned children. The pox did what Union ordnance could not.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Bell_Hood

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/62/Lt._Gen._John_B._Hood.jpg/453px-Lt._Gen._John_B._Hood.jpg
  30. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Actually, blacks were much less likely to die of yellow fever, a West African disease, than were whites"

    That an assistant professor of History wouldn't know this basic fact is baffling. That, coupled with overlooking the fact of New Orleans' strategic importance (the War of 1812, Battle of New Orleans) to the Mississippi River and all the trade and commerce occurring in that region of the US, is really beyond belief. And she gets to teach History at Stanford.

    All this talk about wages for workers also tends to show an ignorance that the modern labor union with its collective bargaining didn't come to total fruition until the FDR administration, when Slavery in the US had been over for nearly three quarters of a century. It simply wasn't a thing to have slave strikes in the nineteenth century, or collective bargaining (complete with federal arbitrators) at the ol' plantation in Mississippi.

    Also, what seems to be overlooked, is that without slavery during the period 1619-1865, the importation of the total number of Africans to the US would be probably 90-99% less than it was. There'd have been no practical purpose for them to be brought here at all.

    What kind of educators are teaching at elite universities these days anyway?

    Educators who know that you don’t point out the NYT’s tolerance of slavery pre-Civil War.

    • LOL: kaganovitch
  31. @PiltdownMan
    Professor Olivarius full well understands the kinds of ideas she needs to espouse to get ahead in academia in America in 2020. But at some future point in time, she may well run into trouble for "appropriating other people's narratives." In the future, scholarship by white academics that touches on any aspect of black people's lives and history will probably be denounced, given the direction things are headed.

    https://history.stanford.edu/sites/g/files/sbiybj9471/f/styles/large-square/public/k._olivarius_0.jpg

    Is “Translucent-American” a recognized ethnic group?

  32. what American history would have been like without slavery

    White. Like Canada’s.

    blacks were valued…

    In three words, the root of all American evil. Or stupidity, at least.

    mosquitoes were equal-opportunity vectors…

    What do you get when you cross a Sherpa with a mosquito?

    Nothing. You can’t combine scalers and vectors.

    (Sorry. Bad math joke.)

    • LOL: ic1000
  33. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Actually, blacks were much less likely to die of yellow fever, a West African disease, than were whites"

    That an assistant professor of History wouldn't know this basic fact is baffling. That, coupled with overlooking the fact of New Orleans' strategic importance (the War of 1812, Battle of New Orleans) to the Mississippi River and all the trade and commerce occurring in that region of the US, is really beyond belief. And she gets to teach History at Stanford.

    All this talk about wages for workers also tends to show an ignorance that the modern labor union with its collective bargaining didn't come to total fruition until the FDR administration, when Slavery in the US had been over for nearly three quarters of a century. It simply wasn't a thing to have slave strikes in the nineteenth century, or collective bargaining (complete with federal arbitrators) at the ol' plantation in Mississippi.

    Also, what seems to be overlooked, is that without slavery during the period 1619-1865, the importation of the total number of Africans to the US would be probably 90-99% less than it was. There'd have been no practical purpose for them to be brought here at all.

    What kind of educators are teaching at elite universities these days anyway?

    What kind of educators are teaching at elite universities these days anyway?

    Kathryn Olivarius has a B.A. in history from Yale, and an M.Phil and D.Phil (Ph.D.) in history from Oxford. The more pertinent question might be, to what sort of students are our elite universities handing out advanced degree in the humanities, anyway?

    I’ve noticed that young women who write opinion pieces for the New York Times these days, or are reporters, often seem to be have been Yale undergrads. There must be some mutual backscratching network thing going on.

    • Replies: @Hail

    what sort of students are our elite universities handing out advanced degree in the humanities, anyway?
     
    Kathryn Olivarius describes herself as "born and raised in New York, Washington D.C., and London" (from her Stanford bio; but how can she be "born" in three places? This is imprecise writing unworthy of someone of her station).

    The dates of degree conferral are interesting:

    Yale, BA, 2011;
    Oxford MA, 2013;
    Oxford PhD, 2016.

    Assuming she entered Yale the fall after graduating from high school, she went straight through, "K-to-18" (thru MA) without interruption for any purpose, then grabbed a three-year PhD. (Three years for a PhD; unusually, suspiciously fast.)

    She was therefore, as far as I can tell, in nothing but a long education track through as late as her 28th birthday, with no gaps for work, no children (naturally), no anything else. No Peace Corps or the like. Just straight through floating along the education bubble. (She is married, though. From a Jan. 2018 Stanford Daily interview: "The first thing I do every morning is The New York Times crossword puzzle. I don’t talk to my husband. [...].")

    And she remains in it now at ca. age 31. Kathryn Olivarius is now Ron Unz' neighbor as Assistant Professor of History at Stanford, Aug. 2017 thru Feb. 2020. (As of March 2020 she is CoronaPanic'ed-out until further notice.)

    From her Stanford bio:


    I am also interested in historical notions of consent (sexual or otherwise); slave revolts in the United States and the Caribbean; anti- and pro-slavery thought; class and ethnicity in antebellum America; the history of life insurance and environmental risk; comparative slave systems; technology and slavery; the Haitian Revolution; and boosterism in the American West.
     
    Yale BA thesis:

    “Panic! on the Yazoo: Land Pirates, King Cotton, and the Lynchings of Madison County, Mississippi, 1835.”
     
    Oxford Master's thesis:

    “American Slavery’s Most Important Non-Event: Understanding the 1808 African Slave Trade Ban in the Long War for the West.”
     
    Oxford PhD thesis:

    “Necropolis: Yellow Fever, Immunity, and Capitalism in the Deep South, 1800-1860.” (Supervisors: Pekka Hämäläinen and Lawrence Goldman)
     
    Kathryn Olivarius is credited with co-founding, with her sister, a charity called GenerationNext to support Black children. That was in 2005, when she would have been about 16. The group's website claims the sisters were inspired by Black children upon a Jan. 2003 visit to South Africa and were determined to form the group thereafter. They had spent 2002 raising funds in London to give the children. So Dr. Olivarius' trajectory is: age 13 to age 31 on a continuous pro-Black life quest.
    .
    https://hailtoyou.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/kathryn-olivarius-generation-next-charity.jpeg
  34. Somebody should write an account of the decline of the New York Times.

  35. Interesting context, according to Wikipedia, 95% of slaves out of Africa did not go to North America.

    They went to Brazil and the Caribbeans. Sadly, Brazil and the rest of Latin America’s official policy has been interracial marriage. Thankfully, there were Whites who avoided that fate.

  36. How many survivors of the 1918-19 scourge do we still have with us? The last WWI vet died in 2012.

    Below are some who survived, but were a tad young to retain memories (two passed away in February), followed by interviews with other survivors taken over a dozen years ago:

    Dave McCoy (1915-2020), the ski entrepreneur that Steve posted about at his passing. He spent those flu years in El Segundo. How did SoCal do in the pandemic?

    Kirk Douglas (1916-2020). Anyone here read his autobiography? Did he mention the flu? Seems his primary problem in chilly Amsterdam (N.Y.) was his drunk father.

    Beverly Cleary (b. 4/12/1916– happy birthday!). Her memoir A Girl from Yamhill skips from her birth to her farm memories a few years later. Nothing about the flu. “Old John A., as everyone called him, was the town undertaker. Some keeper of vital statistics once wrote reprimanding Old John A. for not reporting Yamhill’s deaths. He replied that he was doing the best he could, but no one in Yamhill had died that year.” That probably wasn’t 1918!

    Olivia de Havilland (b. 1 July 1916). Anyone read the bio of her and her sister Joan Fontaine by Charles Higham? Is the epidemic mentioned in that? The two were born in Japan, where their father taught. Both had serious health problems– Olivia tonsilitis, Joan anemia, measles, and strep throat– but were these connected to the pandemic? Did it hit Japan?

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    John McCain's mother, Roberta McCain, age 108, is still around, and reportedly in good health. She would have childhood memories of 1918. Of course, there are numerous recorded eyewitness accounts and contemporary written reports in the record. It wasn't that long ago. My grandad was 51 when it happened, and I remember my grandmom talking about it, briefly.
    , @Anon
    Lit crit Mary McCarthy wrote that her parents died in the 1918 epidemic, thus orphaning herself and her siblings. She had a miserable childhood that she describes in Memories of a Catholic Girlhood.
    , @Jack D
    My about to turn 98 mother in law was born after the epidemic. Assuming that say age 4 or so is the youngest age to have any significant memories you would have to be at least 106 to remember anything and there aren't that many who are over 106.

    She exists because of the 1918 epidemic. She is the product of her father's second marriage. He lost his first wife (the '18 epidemic unlike Wuhan Virus, had a taste for young flesh) in the epidemic. She knows nothing about her because her father, perhaps out of respect for (or fear of - you had to know this woman) wife #2, never spoke of her and of course now it's too late and she regrets not having asked. I'm pretty sure that at least some details could be learned thru a little genealogical research.
    , @Alden
    I read the bio of Fontaine and de Havilland. No mention of Spanish flu.

    Mother and sibling of English author Anthony Burgess died of Spanish flu the day his father was released from the army. Father called Mother in the morning to tell her he was on his way to London to catch a train to Manchester where they lived. Mother seemed fine when they spoke.

    Father arrived around 4 in the after noon. He found baby Anthony crying and wife and the other child dead.

    Friend was looking for records on her great grandmother named Katherine Ann Conway, 3 very common names. She found dozens of Katherine Ann Conway’s of the right age. Many died in 1918.
  37. @Steve Sailer
    When did electric fans come along? They may have had a lot to do with the population of Florida south of the Panhandle.

    Who needs electric fans when you’ve got white privilege.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Electric celebrities?

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7b/MaxheadroomMpegMan.jpg
  38. @Reg Cæsar
    How many survivors of the 1918-19 scourge do we still have with us? The last WWI vet died in 2012.

    Below are some who survived, but were a tad young to retain memories (two passed away in February), followed by interviews with other survivors taken over a dozen years ago:


    Dave McCoy (1915-2020), the ski entrepreneur that Steve posted about at his passing. He spent those flu years in El Segundo. How did SoCal do in the pandemic?

    Kirk Douglas (1916-2020). Anyone here read his autobiography? Did he mention the flu? Seems his primary problem in chilly Amsterdam (N.Y.) was his drunk father.

    Beverly Cleary (b. 4/12/1916-- happy birthday!). Her memoir A Girl from Yamhill skips from her birth to her farm memories a few years later. Nothing about the flu. "Old John A., as everyone called him, was the town undertaker. Some keeper of vital statistics once wrote reprimanding Old John A. for not reporting Yamhill's deaths. He replied that he was doing the best he could, but no one in Yamhill had died that year." That probably wasn't 1918!

    Olivia de Havilland (b. 1 July 1916). Anyone read the bio of her and her sister Joan Fontaine by Charles Higham? Is the epidemic mentioned in that? The two were born in Japan, where their father taught. Both had serious health problems-- Olivia tonsilitis, Joan anemia, measles, and strep throat-- but were these connected to the pandemic? Did it hit Japan?


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LP2YDHplOXE&t=18s


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owTz6Icec_U

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWrwv6-OonU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7k20VFZeLKY

    John McCain’s mother, Roberta McCain, age 108, is still around, and reportedly in good health. She would have childhood memories of 1918. Of course, there are numerous recorded eyewitness accounts and contemporary written reports in the record. It wasn’t that long ago. My grandad was 51 when it happened, and I remember my grandmom talking about it, briefly.

  39. Das Immunokapital, vielleicht?

  40. There is a theory that New Orleans’ “let the good times roll” approach to life was a consequence of the inevitable toll taken by Yellow Fever, along with the periodic hurricane devastation and flooding. It wasn’t the city you chose to live in if you aspired to old age.

  41. Question. How was one known/proved to be Yellow Fever acclimated (i.e., immunized)?

    Thanks for any response to this query!

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    A divorce decree?
    , @Jack D
    I think the assumption was that if you had lived in NO for X number of years (longer than the last Yellow Fever epidemic) then you were assumed to have had it and survived.

    The whole thing frankly sounds like bullshit where you take some scattered bits of fact and construct an entire historical narrative out of them that is mostly the product of your imagination and desire to prove some point that aligns with your political preferences.

    Yellow Fever was not exclusive to NO or the South. There were Yellow Fever epidemics at least as far north as Philadelphia and probably further north too. I just happen to know about Philly - major epidemic in 1793 that killed 10% of the population.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1793_Philadelphia_yellow_fever_epidemic).
  42. Hail says: • Website
    @PiltdownMan

    What kind of educators are teaching at elite universities these days anyway?
     
    Kathryn Olivarius has a B.A. in history from Yale, and an M.Phil and D.Phil (Ph.D.) in history from Oxford. The more pertinent question might be, to what sort of students are our elite universities handing out advanced degree in the humanities, anyway?

    I've noticed that young women who write opinion pieces for the New York Times these days, or are reporters, often seem to be have been Yale undergrads. There must be some mutual backscratching network thing going on.

    what sort of students are our elite universities handing out advanced degree in the humanities, anyway?

    Kathryn Olivarius describes herself as “born and raised in New York, Washington D.C., and London” (from her Stanford bio; but how can she be “born” in three places? This is imprecise writing unworthy of someone of her station).

    The dates of degree conferral are interesting:

    Yale, BA, 2011;
    Oxford MA, 2013;
    Oxford PhD, 2016.

    Assuming she entered Yale the fall after graduating from high school, she went straight through, “K-to-18” (thru MA) without interruption for any purpose, then grabbed a three-year PhD. (Three years for a PhD; unusually, suspiciously fast.)

    She was therefore, as far as I can tell, in nothing but a long education track through as late as her 28th birthday, with no gaps for work, no children (naturally), no anything else. No Peace Corps or the like. Just straight through floating along the education bubble. (She is married, though. From a Jan. 2018 Stanford Daily interview: “The first thing I do every morning is The New York Times crossword puzzle. I don’t talk to my husband. […].”)

    And she remains in it now at ca. age 31. Kathryn Olivarius is now Ron Unz’ neighbor as Assistant Professor of History at Stanford, Aug. 2017 thru Feb. 2020. (As of March 2020 she is CoronaPanic’ed-out until further notice.)

    From her Stanford bio:

    I am also interested in historical notions of consent (sexual or otherwise); slave revolts in the United States and the Caribbean; anti- and pro-slavery thought; class and ethnicity in antebellum America; the history of life insurance and environmental risk; comparative slave systems; technology and slavery; the Haitian Revolution; and boosterism in the American West.

    Yale BA thesis:

    “Panic! on the Yazoo: Land Pirates, King Cotton, and the Lynchings of Madison County, Mississippi, 1835.”

    Oxford Master’s thesis:

    “American Slavery’s Most Important Non-Event: Understanding the 1808 African Slave Trade Ban in the Long War for the West.”

    Oxford PhD thesis:

    “Necropolis: Yellow Fever, Immunity, and Capitalism in the Deep South, 1800-1860.” (Supervisors: Pekka Hämäläinen and Lawrence Goldman)

    Kathryn Olivarius is credited with co-founding, with her sister, a charity called GenerationNext to support Black children. That was in 2005, when she would have been about 16. The group’s website claims the sisters were inspired by Black children upon a Jan. 2003 visit to South Africa and were determined to form the group thereafter. They had spent 2002 raising funds in London to give the children. So Dr. Olivarius’ trajectory is: age 13 to age 31 on a continuous pro-Black life quest.
    .

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    Thanks. She definitely knows how to get ahead in today's society.

    I'd call her cynical but that might be an insult to cynics.
    , @Lugash
    Hail, thank you for providing this and other biographical summaries of iSteve subjects of interest.
    , @Whiskey
    Pretty much proof. White women are the natural and eternal enemy of White men.
    , @Hail
    "My dad was a PhD in history as well." -- Kathryn Olivarius

    Father: Jef McAllister (born 1956). Horace Greeley High School, 1973; Yale BA, summa cum laude, 1977; from 1978 to 1983 was at Oxford for History PhD (as a "Marshall Scholar"). PhD Thesis: "British Science Policy in British Industrial Reconstruction, 1942-51." Then right back to Yale for a JD in 1986. Some more info is on his wiki page. He became a career journalist, and as of 2007 is full-time as a Managing Partner at McAllister Olivarius law firm, co-founded with wife in the 1990s.

    Mother: Ann Olivarius (born 1955). Yale BA, summa cum laude, 1977; from 1983 to 1986 was a Yale Law School and Yale School of Management dual degree candidate. She was "the first person to complete the 5-year joint degree program in 3 years, graduating with highest honors in 1986" (from her website AnnOlivarius dot com). Ten years at Goldman Sachs and similar places, then started own law firm (1996). "Olivarius has successfully pursued impact lawsuits against major companies, financial institutions and law firms for race and sex discrimination." Ann is also a trustee of the Generation Next group for Black children.

    (Jef and Ann's lives were remarkably parallel from 1973 to the present; taking several of the same degrees at the same place and same years, and co-founding a law firm they are both actively engaged in to the present..)

    There's no doubt about it that these are remarkably accomplished parents. But what kind of people are they really? Where did Kathryn Olivarius get the idea to make it her life's work to serve the interests of Black victimology-industrial complex? That I don't know. But there are some more clues yet in this puzzle:

    Kathryn Olivarius' mother uses her maiden name, never changed her name. The wiki entry for Jef McAllister has them married in 1981, both about age 25. I wonder what % of newly-married women were not changing their names in 1981.

    What's more interesting, and highly unusual, is that their daughter, Kathryn, uses her mother's maiden surname (Olivarius), too, creating a maternal-surname-inheritance (matrilineal) chain that is unprecedented for Western culture (except in cases of bastardy, maybe). Naturally, Kathryn, who as of 2017 was married, didn't change her name upon her own marriage. If she has a child and convinces her husband to surname the baby "Olivarius," this will be something indeed.

    Kathryn's older sister uses the hyphenated form. Her name is Chase Olivarius-McAllister (Yale BA, 2010> As of 2020, Chase tweets @ChaseOM under the handle "Chase Manhattan Skank;" in a 2015 tweet she confirms that she is Chase Olivarius-McAllister). Her latest tweet, as of this writing, is: "Diddy speaks on the Racial Impact of the Corona VIRUS #StateOfEmergency" (retweeted from @Raphouse_Tv). Chase's first non-retweet tweet is:


    It's 2020. We're four years into the violent, rightwing, misogynist, white person insanity that is life in Trump's America -- and yet I still wasn't prepared for Tiger King!

    How is any of this allowed????? The guns, the sex cults, the hair cuts????

    #society
    #TigerKing
     

    (A search for 'Tiger King' shows as the top result someone saying "Show Tiger King to White Supremacists.")

    ________________

    Kathryn says, in her 2018 Stanford Daily interview:


    I grew up in the U.K., actually, despite the lack of accent, and so I decided to go back to the U.K. to go to Oxford to do my master’s and PhD, and I’ve always been interested in American History, even though I grew up in the U.K.
     
    Her father was Time magazine bureau chief for London, 1999 to 2007, perhaps moving when Kathryn was 9 or 10 and staying through about Kathryn's 18th birthday. She "decided to go back to the U.K. to go to Oxford to do [her] master’s and PhD" but doesn't mention that her father had a PhD from the same place. And that both her parents were at Yale in the 1970s, where she was in the early 2010s.
    , @Dumbo
    So no children so far, and if she "doesn’t talk to her husband until she's finished the NYT crossword puzzle", it's more likely that they will adopt a back kiddo than have real biological white children...

    Such a waste. It's like a religion, or a disease. Sacrificing your time, not to mention your own life and posterity, for the idolization of Black (and other non-white) Bodies.
    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    Note that doing a PhD in the UK is often much more efficient than slogging through the USA version. There's usually no need to do coursework; you have to have a research proposal ready when you apply, and then you just blast right ahead into your dissertation. Three years is not necessarily a suspicious amount of time in which to finish one.
    , @Stephen Paul Foster
    The elites Uni's like Stanford typically hire fresh Ph.Ds. from fellow elites at the (lowest) assistant professor rank, keep them for four or five years, then flush them out so as not to tenure them -- the tenure slog, a lot like making senior partner in a top law firm -- only the smartest who are willing to work 90 hours a week make that hurdle. The rejects rebound to second or third tier unis, but are bitter and angry, which means their "research" becomes even more virulently anti-male...white...Christian.

    Olivarious clearly won't have to worry about the jump to tenure. Her genitalia + "research" expertise will silence any skeptics on the tenure review committee -- unless, she'd be taking a slot reserved for LaShanta Adebayo or Wadimba Adebayo. Not sure about the later -- Pokemon ambiguity at work.

    , @ic1000
    > Kathryn Olivarius is credited with co-founding, with her sister, a charity called GenerationNext to support Black children.

    This would have been the catnip that clinched young Kathryn’s thick envelope, postmarked New Haven.

    Yes, 4.0 GPA, 5s on AP exams, alumni parents, and excellent interviewing skills are important, these sorts of things are what a white or Asian candidate needs to get serious consideration from Yale. (Unless you’re an athletic recruit; she wasn’t.)

    It’s surprising how many aspiring Ivy Leaguers can check these boxes (Kathryn’s semi-exotic UK childhood substitutes nicely for a fine SuperZip high school pedigree).

    Pro tip: volunteering for GenerationNext or being President of GenerationNext: these things are doubtlessly nice. To showcase the world-changing effectiveness of your missionary zeal, figure out how to found your own charity.
    , @AnotherDad
    Interesting info. Thanks Hail.

    Kathryn Olivarius is a prime example of the profound damage that minoritarianism does to a lot of white women.

    Minoritarian propaganda is able to play on the high affective empathy of white gentiles and in some--pretty substantial--number of young women, reprogram their natural nurturing instinct--which is there so they will care for their own children--into destroying their own fertility in favor of working against their own nation, race, civilization.

    Olivarius is an extreme case, setup for it by her privileged upbringing by annoying academic-lawyer good-white parents. But these gals are everywhere. A couple Thanksgiving's back, one of my daughter's good friends--sort of 4th child for me--brought along a couple of her new roommates. One was doing a public health masters at UW. Fairly attractive girl--well above average--with seemingly all the right equipment for both enjoyment and production. Her interest--"refugees", "working with refugee children." This from ordinary middle middle class background--not annoying civil-rights shakedown lawyer mom like Olivarius. Young white women do not even understand why they are valued--what it is that they can do that actually has great value.

    ~~

    Perspective is in order in these times. Corona-chan kills maybe--worst case--1%, probably 90% of whom are in their 70s, 80s, 90s and already ten days to ten years from death.

    The minoritarian virus is reprogramming young white girls' minds by the millions, rendering millions of white wombs less productive or outright barren, and quickly snuffing out our entire race.

    It's not even a contest. Minoritarianism is the much deadlier virus.

  43. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Actually, blacks were much less likely to die of yellow fever, a West African disease, than were whites"

    That an assistant professor of History wouldn't know this basic fact is baffling. That, coupled with overlooking the fact of New Orleans' strategic importance (the War of 1812, Battle of New Orleans) to the Mississippi River and all the trade and commerce occurring in that region of the US, is really beyond belief. And she gets to teach History at Stanford.

    All this talk about wages for workers also tends to show an ignorance that the modern labor union with its collective bargaining didn't come to total fruition until the FDR administration, when Slavery in the US had been over for nearly three quarters of a century. It simply wasn't a thing to have slave strikes in the nineteenth century, or collective bargaining (complete with federal arbitrators) at the ol' plantation in Mississippi.

    Also, what seems to be overlooked, is that without slavery during the period 1619-1865, the importation of the total number of Africans to the US would be probably 90-99% less than it was. There'd have been no practical purpose for them to be brought here at all.

    What kind of educators are teaching at elite universities these days anyway?

    Even in that glorious eventuality, though, we still imported another class of people who have made it their business to wreck the nation. And their handiwork includes this:

    More Africans have migrated to the USA in any recent ten-year period of their own free will than were transported here over the entire 200+ years of the slave trade. That’s how bad it is here for Africans–we simply can’t keep them from flocking here. And this is just counting legal migrants. Whatever racism actually is, it’s proving impossible to prevent Africans from being attracted to it. They simply can’t get enough.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/21/nyregion/more-africans-enter-us-than-in-days-of-slavery.html

    African migration has ramped up considerably since that article was published.

    What this means, anyway, is that even if this country had never imported a single African slave, we’d still be dealing with millions of Africans, in their glorious, manifold manifestations. Because Reasons, as Steve likes to say.

    ‘TWMNBN’

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    then grabbed a three-year PhD. (Three years for a PhD; unusually, suspiciously fast.)
     
    You have to add in a year (typically) for the M.Phil. Typically, the track for American students who get a bachelor's degree here, and thenproceed to the UK for higher studies leading to a doctorate is M.Phil/M.A--->D.Phil/Ph.D. That's four years, at a minimum, which also equates to the minimum of four years it takes to get a Ph.D. in a university over here.

    Even so, a historian or other humanities student completing a doctorate in four years is unusual. Many scholars seeking a doctorate in History or English typically take six or seven years. There is a lot of written material to be researched and collated in those fields of study.

  44. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Between 1882 and 1886.

    Panhandle weather is often just as hot and humid (sometimes more so) as south Florida. SFL often enjoys breezes off the ocean or gulf and breezes cut the mosquito problem as well as anything.

  45. @Hail

    what sort of students are our elite universities handing out advanced degree in the humanities, anyway?
     
    Kathryn Olivarius describes herself as "born and raised in New York, Washington D.C., and London" (from her Stanford bio; but how can she be "born" in three places? This is imprecise writing unworthy of someone of her station).

    The dates of degree conferral are interesting:

    Yale, BA, 2011;
    Oxford MA, 2013;
    Oxford PhD, 2016.

    Assuming she entered Yale the fall after graduating from high school, she went straight through, "K-to-18" (thru MA) without interruption for any purpose, then grabbed a three-year PhD. (Three years for a PhD; unusually, suspiciously fast.)

    She was therefore, as far as I can tell, in nothing but a long education track through as late as her 28th birthday, with no gaps for work, no children (naturally), no anything else. No Peace Corps or the like. Just straight through floating along the education bubble. (She is married, though. From a Jan. 2018 Stanford Daily interview: "The first thing I do every morning is The New York Times crossword puzzle. I don’t talk to my husband. [...].")

    And she remains in it now at ca. age 31. Kathryn Olivarius is now Ron Unz' neighbor as Assistant Professor of History at Stanford, Aug. 2017 thru Feb. 2020. (As of March 2020 she is CoronaPanic'ed-out until further notice.)

    From her Stanford bio:


    I am also interested in historical notions of consent (sexual or otherwise); slave revolts in the United States and the Caribbean; anti- and pro-slavery thought; class and ethnicity in antebellum America; the history of life insurance and environmental risk; comparative slave systems; technology and slavery; the Haitian Revolution; and boosterism in the American West.
     
    Yale BA thesis:

    “Panic! on the Yazoo: Land Pirates, King Cotton, and the Lynchings of Madison County, Mississippi, 1835.”
     
    Oxford Master's thesis:

    “American Slavery’s Most Important Non-Event: Understanding the 1808 African Slave Trade Ban in the Long War for the West.”
     
    Oxford PhD thesis:

    “Necropolis: Yellow Fever, Immunity, and Capitalism in the Deep South, 1800-1860.” (Supervisors: Pekka Hämäläinen and Lawrence Goldman)
     
    Kathryn Olivarius is credited with co-founding, with her sister, a charity called GenerationNext to support Black children. That was in 2005, when she would have been about 16. The group's website claims the sisters were inspired by Black children upon a Jan. 2003 visit to South Africa and were determined to form the group thereafter. They had spent 2002 raising funds in London to give the children. So Dr. Olivarius' trajectory is: age 13 to age 31 on a continuous pro-Black life quest.
    .
    https://hailtoyou.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/kathryn-olivarius-generation-next-charity.jpeg

    Thanks. She definitely knows how to get ahead in today’s society.

    I’d call her cynical but that might be an insult to cynics.

  46. @fnn

    Black people, with limited access to health care, were of course as scared of yellow fever as anyone else.
     
    Cochran is always saying the medical care was useless in those days and essentially no more than a tax on the wealthy.

    Yellow fever was dangerous for blacks, way more dangerous for whites.

    Mds didn’t have anything that worked against it, back then.

  47. Yellow fever, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, was inescapable in the 19th-century Deep South … The virus killed about half of all those it infected and it killed them horribly, with many victims vomiting thick black blood, the consistency and color of coffee grounds.

    This end-stage symptom was known as vomito negro – I suppose that description is now considered racially insensitive.

  48. @Hail

    what sort of students are our elite universities handing out advanced degree in the humanities, anyway?
     
    Kathryn Olivarius describes herself as "born and raised in New York, Washington D.C., and London" (from her Stanford bio; but how can she be "born" in three places? This is imprecise writing unworthy of someone of her station).

    The dates of degree conferral are interesting:

    Yale, BA, 2011;
    Oxford MA, 2013;
    Oxford PhD, 2016.

    Assuming she entered Yale the fall after graduating from high school, she went straight through, "K-to-18" (thru MA) without interruption for any purpose, then grabbed a three-year PhD. (Three years for a PhD; unusually, suspiciously fast.)

    She was therefore, as far as I can tell, in nothing but a long education track through as late as her 28th birthday, with no gaps for work, no children (naturally), no anything else. No Peace Corps or the like. Just straight through floating along the education bubble. (She is married, though. From a Jan. 2018 Stanford Daily interview: "The first thing I do every morning is The New York Times crossword puzzle. I don’t talk to my husband. [...].")

    And she remains in it now at ca. age 31. Kathryn Olivarius is now Ron Unz' neighbor as Assistant Professor of History at Stanford, Aug. 2017 thru Feb. 2020. (As of March 2020 she is CoronaPanic'ed-out until further notice.)

    From her Stanford bio:


    I am also interested in historical notions of consent (sexual or otherwise); slave revolts in the United States and the Caribbean; anti- and pro-slavery thought; class and ethnicity in antebellum America; the history of life insurance and environmental risk; comparative slave systems; technology and slavery; the Haitian Revolution; and boosterism in the American West.
     
    Yale BA thesis:

    “Panic! on the Yazoo: Land Pirates, King Cotton, and the Lynchings of Madison County, Mississippi, 1835.”
     
    Oxford Master's thesis:

    “American Slavery’s Most Important Non-Event: Understanding the 1808 African Slave Trade Ban in the Long War for the West.”
     
    Oxford PhD thesis:

    “Necropolis: Yellow Fever, Immunity, and Capitalism in the Deep South, 1800-1860.” (Supervisors: Pekka Hämäläinen and Lawrence Goldman)
     
    Kathryn Olivarius is credited with co-founding, with her sister, a charity called GenerationNext to support Black children. That was in 2005, when she would have been about 16. The group's website claims the sisters were inspired by Black children upon a Jan. 2003 visit to South Africa and were determined to form the group thereafter. They had spent 2002 raising funds in London to give the children. So Dr. Olivarius' trajectory is: age 13 to age 31 on a continuous pro-Black life quest.
    .
    https://hailtoyou.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/kathryn-olivarius-generation-next-charity.jpeg

    Hail, thank you for providing this and other biographical summaries of iSteve subjects of interest.

    • Agree: Dtbb, ic1000
  49. @Hail

    what sort of students are our elite universities handing out advanced degree in the humanities, anyway?
     
    Kathryn Olivarius describes herself as "born and raised in New York, Washington D.C., and London" (from her Stanford bio; but how can she be "born" in three places? This is imprecise writing unworthy of someone of her station).

    The dates of degree conferral are interesting:

    Yale, BA, 2011;
    Oxford MA, 2013;
    Oxford PhD, 2016.

    Assuming she entered Yale the fall after graduating from high school, she went straight through, "K-to-18" (thru MA) without interruption for any purpose, then grabbed a three-year PhD. (Three years for a PhD; unusually, suspiciously fast.)

    She was therefore, as far as I can tell, in nothing but a long education track through as late as her 28th birthday, with no gaps for work, no children (naturally), no anything else. No Peace Corps or the like. Just straight through floating along the education bubble. (She is married, though. From a Jan. 2018 Stanford Daily interview: "The first thing I do every morning is The New York Times crossword puzzle. I don’t talk to my husband. [...].")

    And she remains in it now at ca. age 31. Kathryn Olivarius is now Ron Unz' neighbor as Assistant Professor of History at Stanford, Aug. 2017 thru Feb. 2020. (As of March 2020 she is CoronaPanic'ed-out until further notice.)

    From her Stanford bio:


    I am also interested in historical notions of consent (sexual or otherwise); slave revolts in the United States and the Caribbean; anti- and pro-slavery thought; class and ethnicity in antebellum America; the history of life insurance and environmental risk; comparative slave systems; technology and slavery; the Haitian Revolution; and boosterism in the American West.
     
    Yale BA thesis:

    “Panic! on the Yazoo: Land Pirates, King Cotton, and the Lynchings of Madison County, Mississippi, 1835.”
     
    Oxford Master's thesis:

    “American Slavery’s Most Important Non-Event: Understanding the 1808 African Slave Trade Ban in the Long War for the West.”
     
    Oxford PhD thesis:

    “Necropolis: Yellow Fever, Immunity, and Capitalism in the Deep South, 1800-1860.” (Supervisors: Pekka Hämäläinen and Lawrence Goldman)
     
    Kathryn Olivarius is credited with co-founding, with her sister, a charity called GenerationNext to support Black children. That was in 2005, when she would have been about 16. The group's website claims the sisters were inspired by Black children upon a Jan. 2003 visit to South Africa and were determined to form the group thereafter. They had spent 2002 raising funds in London to give the children. So Dr. Olivarius' trajectory is: age 13 to age 31 on a continuous pro-Black life quest.
    .
    https://hailtoyou.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/kathryn-olivarius-generation-next-charity.jpeg

    Pretty much proof. White women are the natural and eternal enemy of White men.

  50. @Steve Sailer
    When did electric fans come along? They may have had a lot to do with the population of Florida south of the Panhandle.

    Electric fans helped a little, but in classrooms in 1970, you were blessed intermittently, a few seconds at a time, when the oscillating fan sent that refreshing breathe of air your way. We got central air in my house in 1966. Imagine my wonderment upon ariving at university that the classrooms were all air conditioned. Not the dorms, though.

  51. Hail says: • Website
    @Hail

    what sort of students are our elite universities handing out advanced degree in the humanities, anyway?
     
    Kathryn Olivarius describes herself as "born and raised in New York, Washington D.C., and London" (from her Stanford bio; but how can she be "born" in three places? This is imprecise writing unworthy of someone of her station).

    The dates of degree conferral are interesting:

    Yale, BA, 2011;
    Oxford MA, 2013;
    Oxford PhD, 2016.

    Assuming she entered Yale the fall after graduating from high school, she went straight through, "K-to-18" (thru MA) without interruption for any purpose, then grabbed a three-year PhD. (Three years for a PhD; unusually, suspiciously fast.)

    She was therefore, as far as I can tell, in nothing but a long education track through as late as her 28th birthday, with no gaps for work, no children (naturally), no anything else. No Peace Corps or the like. Just straight through floating along the education bubble. (She is married, though. From a Jan. 2018 Stanford Daily interview: "The first thing I do every morning is The New York Times crossword puzzle. I don’t talk to my husband. [...].")

    And she remains in it now at ca. age 31. Kathryn Olivarius is now Ron Unz' neighbor as Assistant Professor of History at Stanford, Aug. 2017 thru Feb. 2020. (As of March 2020 she is CoronaPanic'ed-out until further notice.)

    From her Stanford bio:


    I am also interested in historical notions of consent (sexual or otherwise); slave revolts in the United States and the Caribbean; anti- and pro-slavery thought; class and ethnicity in antebellum America; the history of life insurance and environmental risk; comparative slave systems; technology and slavery; the Haitian Revolution; and boosterism in the American West.
     
    Yale BA thesis:

    “Panic! on the Yazoo: Land Pirates, King Cotton, and the Lynchings of Madison County, Mississippi, 1835.”
     
    Oxford Master's thesis:

    “American Slavery’s Most Important Non-Event: Understanding the 1808 African Slave Trade Ban in the Long War for the West.”
     
    Oxford PhD thesis:

    “Necropolis: Yellow Fever, Immunity, and Capitalism in the Deep South, 1800-1860.” (Supervisors: Pekka Hämäläinen and Lawrence Goldman)
     
    Kathryn Olivarius is credited with co-founding, with her sister, a charity called GenerationNext to support Black children. That was in 2005, when she would have been about 16. The group's website claims the sisters were inspired by Black children upon a Jan. 2003 visit to South Africa and were determined to form the group thereafter. They had spent 2002 raising funds in London to give the children. So Dr. Olivarius' trajectory is: age 13 to age 31 on a continuous pro-Black life quest.
    .
    https://hailtoyou.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/kathryn-olivarius-generation-next-charity.jpeg

    “My dad was a PhD in history as well.” — Kathryn Olivarius

    Father: Jef McAllister (born 1956). Horace Greeley High School, 1973; Yale BA, summa cum laude, 1977; from 1978 to 1983 was at Oxford for History PhD (as a “Marshall Scholar“). PhD Thesis: “British Science Policy in British Industrial Reconstruction, 1942-51.” Then right back to Yale for a JD in 1986. Some more info is on his wiki page. He became a career journalist, and as of 2007 is full-time as a Managing Partner at McAllister Olivarius law firm, co-founded with wife in the 1990s.

    Mother: Ann Olivarius (born 1955). Yale BA, summa cum laude, 1977; from 1983 to 1986 was a Yale Law School and Yale School of Management dual degree candidate. She was “the first person to complete the 5-year joint degree program in 3 years, graduating with highest honors in 1986” (from her website AnnOlivarius dot com). Ten years at Goldman Sachs and similar places, then started own law firm (1996). “Olivarius has successfully pursued impact lawsuits against major companies, financial institutions and law firms for race and sex discrimination.” Ann is also a trustee of the Generation Next group for Black children.

    (Jef and Ann’s lives were remarkably parallel from 1973 to the present; taking several of the same degrees at the same place and same years, and co-founding a law firm they are both actively engaged in to the present..)

    There’s no doubt about it that these are remarkably accomplished parents. But what kind of people are they really? Where did Kathryn Olivarius get the idea to make it her life’s work to serve the interests of Black victimology-industrial complex? That I don’t know. But there are some more clues yet in this puzzle:

    Kathryn Olivarius’ mother uses her maiden name, never changed her name. The wiki entry for Jef McAllister has them married in 1981, both about age 25. I wonder what % of newly-married women were not changing their names in 1981.

    What’s more interesting, and highly unusual, is that their daughter, Kathryn, uses her mother’s maiden surname (Olivarius), too, creating a maternal-surname-inheritance (matrilineal) chain that is unprecedented for Western culture (except in cases of bastardy, maybe). Naturally, Kathryn, who as of 2017 was married, didn’t change her name upon her own marriage. If she has a child and convinces her husband to surname the baby “Olivarius,” this will be something indeed.

    Kathryn’s older sister uses the hyphenated form. Her name is Chase Olivarius-McAllister (Yale BA, 2010> As of 2020, Chase tweets @ChaseOM under the handle “Chase Manhattan Skank;” in a 2015 tweet she confirms that she is Chase Olivarius-McAllister). Her latest tweet, as of this writing, is: “Diddy speaks on the Racial Impact of the Corona VIRUS #StateOfEmergency” (retweeted from @Raphouse_Tv). Chase’s first non-retweet tweet is:

    It’s 2020. We’re four years into the violent, rightwing, misogynist, white person insanity that is life in Trump’s America — and yet I still wasn’t prepared for Tiger King!

    How is any of this allowed????? The guns, the sex cults, the hair cuts????

    #society
    #TigerKing

    (A search for ‘Tiger King’ shows as the top result someone saying “Show Tiger King to White Supremacists.”)

    ________________

    Kathryn says, in her 2018 Stanford Daily interview:

    I grew up in the U.K., actually, despite the lack of accent, and so I decided to go back to the U.K. to go to Oxford to do my master’s and PhD, and I’ve always been interested in American History, even though I grew up in the U.K.

    Her father was Time magazine bureau chief for London, 1999 to 2007, perhaps moving when Kathryn was 9 or 10 and staying through about Kathryn’s 18th birthday. She “decided to go back to the U.K. to go to Oxford to do [her] master’s and PhD” but doesn’t mention that her father had a PhD from the same place. And that both her parents were at Yale in the 1970s, where she was in the early 2010s.

    • Replies: @Abe

    (A search for ‘Tiger King’ shows as the top result someone saying “Show Tiger King to White Supremacists.”)
     
    Steve claims he is too cash-strapped to subscribe to NETFLIX, otherwise I’m sure we’d have had a dozen or so posts on it by now, plus at least one, and maybe two, full-length Taki’s essays- it’s a real observation/noticing-o-rama.

    My only problem with the show is that- on purely technical grounds- I question its reality. Most of the footage is shot in beautiful, high-quality ‘film-tone’ HD. I therefore question how much of it is real, contemporaneous footage, instead of (at-best) post-hoc recreations for the benefit of the Netflix production crew, or (at-worst) simple out-and-out acting. For example, there’s this whole hitman-on-the-run subplot with extensive before, during, and after footage shot in gorgeous Netflix original series event HD (the hitman in question is actually a full-time handyman at the zoo whose shady criminal background makes Tiger King think, FARGO-like, that he can therefore be put to use doing some wetwork). So which is it- did this whole hitman plot come together in front of the Netflix crew who did nothing, or did they after-the-fact stage scenes of the plot coming together? Neither possibility speaks to the verity of what we are shown.

    With that said, if any of the show’s characters are even halfway real, I like them much better than entitled, bubble-dwelling a-hole non-entities like the Olivariuses . They are the sort of people who slap themselves on the back for their open-mindedness and tolerance, yet are busy on social media sharing book reviews of the 5 best how-to-survive-the-holidays-with-relatives-who-may-not-hate-Trump-with-all-their-hearts-and-souls self-helf guides.

    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    I had a look at Ann Olivarius's website. She sounds like a pretty formidable character.

    In addition to the stuff you mentioned, she was one of the plaintiffs in the 1979 case Alexander v. Yale, which determined that, in educational institutions, sexual harassment against female students could be counted as discrimination under Title IX. According to the Wikipedia entry, Ann Olivarius was one of five plaintiffs. The other four claimed to have been harassed, but not Ann:


    Ann Olivarius alleged that the absence of a procedure for complaining about sexual harassment forced her to expend her own time and money on helping fellow students who had been sexually harassed, and that in the course of providing that help she was threatened by individuals whom she was investigating, and that Yale failed to protect her from those individuals.

     

    So she was already acting as an advocate of some sort as an undergrad.

    Olivarius also takes personal credit for coining the term 'date rape'.

  52. Her mother was advisor to Mandela, I see.

    http://www.annolivarius.com

  53. @Anonymous

    Without slavery, America would be a vastly better place
     
    Well actually, you mean without the presence of millions of Africans that America would’ve been a better place. Slavery and then later segregation were simply attempts to deal with this brute fact.

    Having millions of free roaming blacks creates the situation you have in Detroit now.

    Well actually, you mean without the presence of millions of Africans that America would’ve been a better place. Slavery and then later segregation were simply attempts to deal with this brute fact.

    Slavery brought Africans to America; it was the cause, not the result.

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    Slavery also brought all kinds of White indentured servants (constructively speaking slaves, or a very close substitute for same). I have a hunch that their contemporary descendants, in their collectivity, do not currently comport themselves in the fashion that our bearers of African enrichment do.
  54. @Change that Matters

    In the future, scholarship by white academics that touches on any aspect of black people’s lives and history will probably be denounced, given the direction things are headed.
     
    If you're correct, and I think you are, then Professor Olivarius is a perfect example of the Real Racist.

    Think about it. Olivarius believes she can freely and safely appropriate the Black Narrative because her authoritative position is rooted in centuries of oppressive white power. She has faith the White Security Apparatus will defend her right to continue appropriating that Narrative for as long as she desires tenure and a fat pension. No wonder she looks so happy and 'healthy'.

    Take that, Blacks Antibodies!

    We need to figure out a way to purge teachers like this from our universities. It would be great to have a have a series of good quality academic journals in the social sciences that shred PC profs and their blithering nonsense papers into a zillion pieces.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    It would require one of the few right wing rich people, like the Koch Brothers or Betsy DeVos or her brother Eric Prince, to be a new John D. Rockefeller or Leland Stanford and found a new institution, probably in a small Southern, Midwestern, or Rocky Mountain town, and staff it with well credentialed but dissident professors, who have trouble getting jobs at any other than very small time institutions, because of their views.
  55. @Reg Cæsar
    How many survivors of the 1918-19 scourge do we still have with us? The last WWI vet died in 2012.

    Below are some who survived, but were a tad young to retain memories (two passed away in February), followed by interviews with other survivors taken over a dozen years ago:


    Dave McCoy (1915-2020), the ski entrepreneur that Steve posted about at his passing. He spent those flu years in El Segundo. How did SoCal do in the pandemic?

    Kirk Douglas (1916-2020). Anyone here read his autobiography? Did he mention the flu? Seems his primary problem in chilly Amsterdam (N.Y.) was his drunk father.

    Beverly Cleary (b. 4/12/1916-- happy birthday!). Her memoir A Girl from Yamhill skips from her birth to her farm memories a few years later. Nothing about the flu. "Old John A., as everyone called him, was the town undertaker. Some keeper of vital statistics once wrote reprimanding Old John A. for not reporting Yamhill's deaths. He replied that he was doing the best he could, but no one in Yamhill had died that year." That probably wasn't 1918!

    Olivia de Havilland (b. 1 July 1916). Anyone read the bio of her and her sister Joan Fontaine by Charles Higham? Is the epidemic mentioned in that? The two were born in Japan, where their father taught. Both had serious health problems-- Olivia tonsilitis, Joan anemia, measles, and strep throat-- but were these connected to the pandemic? Did it hit Japan?


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LP2YDHplOXE&t=18s


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owTz6Icec_U

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWrwv6-OonU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7k20VFZeLKY

    Lit crit Mary McCarthy wrote that her parents died in the 1918 epidemic, thus orphaning herself and her siblings. She had a miserable childhood that she describes in Memories of a Catholic Girlhood.

  56. @J.Ross
    You will ride with us, and you will die with us: it's as inclusive as that for me and my [black bodies].

    https://www.twitter.com/MelissaAFrancis/status/1249455529111552005

    What a Becky!

    • LOL: Malcolm X-Lax
    • Replies: @Ragno
    Or is she a Karen? I'm sorry, I can no longer tell the difference between white women it's culturally acceptable to hate.
  57. @PiltdownMan
    Professor Olivarius full well understands the kinds of ideas she needs to espouse to get ahead in academia in America in 2020. But at some future point in time, she may well run into trouble for "appropriating other people's narratives." In the future, scholarship by white academics that touches on any aspect of black people's lives and history will probably be denounced, given the direction things are headed.

    https://history.stanford.edu/sites/g/files/sbiybj9471/f/styles/large-square/public/k._olivarius_0.jpg

    She’s cute for an academic, at least in this picture. Couldn’t find any info on her being married or having children, so it’s likely another high-IQ, low-fertility case. And an anti-white white woman.

    • Replies: @Jack Armstrong
    Old picture, she’s a fatty now.
  58. @Hail

    what sort of students are our elite universities handing out advanced degree in the humanities, anyway?
     
    Kathryn Olivarius describes herself as "born and raised in New York, Washington D.C., and London" (from her Stanford bio; but how can she be "born" in three places? This is imprecise writing unworthy of someone of her station).

    The dates of degree conferral are interesting:

    Yale, BA, 2011;
    Oxford MA, 2013;
    Oxford PhD, 2016.

    Assuming she entered Yale the fall after graduating from high school, she went straight through, "K-to-18" (thru MA) without interruption for any purpose, then grabbed a three-year PhD. (Three years for a PhD; unusually, suspiciously fast.)

    She was therefore, as far as I can tell, in nothing but a long education track through as late as her 28th birthday, with no gaps for work, no children (naturally), no anything else. No Peace Corps or the like. Just straight through floating along the education bubble. (She is married, though. From a Jan. 2018 Stanford Daily interview: "The first thing I do every morning is The New York Times crossword puzzle. I don’t talk to my husband. [...].")

    And she remains in it now at ca. age 31. Kathryn Olivarius is now Ron Unz' neighbor as Assistant Professor of History at Stanford, Aug. 2017 thru Feb. 2020. (As of March 2020 she is CoronaPanic'ed-out until further notice.)

    From her Stanford bio:


    I am also interested in historical notions of consent (sexual or otherwise); slave revolts in the United States and the Caribbean; anti- and pro-slavery thought; class and ethnicity in antebellum America; the history of life insurance and environmental risk; comparative slave systems; technology and slavery; the Haitian Revolution; and boosterism in the American West.
     
    Yale BA thesis:

    “Panic! on the Yazoo: Land Pirates, King Cotton, and the Lynchings of Madison County, Mississippi, 1835.”
     
    Oxford Master's thesis:

    “American Slavery’s Most Important Non-Event: Understanding the 1808 African Slave Trade Ban in the Long War for the West.”
     
    Oxford PhD thesis:

    “Necropolis: Yellow Fever, Immunity, and Capitalism in the Deep South, 1800-1860.” (Supervisors: Pekka Hämäläinen and Lawrence Goldman)
     
    Kathryn Olivarius is credited with co-founding, with her sister, a charity called GenerationNext to support Black children. That was in 2005, when she would have been about 16. The group's website claims the sisters were inspired by Black children upon a Jan. 2003 visit to South Africa and were determined to form the group thereafter. They had spent 2002 raising funds in London to give the children. So Dr. Olivarius' trajectory is: age 13 to age 31 on a continuous pro-Black life quest.
    .
    https://hailtoyou.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/kathryn-olivarius-generation-next-charity.jpeg

    So no children so far, and if she “doesn’t talk to her husband until she’s finished the NYT crossword puzzle”, it’s more likely that they will adopt a back kiddo than have real biological white children…

    Such a waste. It’s like a religion, or a disease. Sacrificing your time, not to mention your own life and posterity, for the idolization of Black (and other non-white) Bodies.

  59. Hail:

    Thanks for your thorough sleuthing expose of one of the Jukes Families of modern-day America.

    Only the late Tom Wolfe could do justice to this collection of scalawags!

  60. @Hail
    "My dad was a PhD in history as well." -- Kathryn Olivarius

    Father: Jef McAllister (born 1956). Horace Greeley High School, 1973; Yale BA, summa cum laude, 1977; from 1978 to 1983 was at Oxford for History PhD (as a "Marshall Scholar"). PhD Thesis: "British Science Policy in British Industrial Reconstruction, 1942-51." Then right back to Yale for a JD in 1986. Some more info is on his wiki page. He became a career journalist, and as of 2007 is full-time as a Managing Partner at McAllister Olivarius law firm, co-founded with wife in the 1990s.

    Mother: Ann Olivarius (born 1955). Yale BA, summa cum laude, 1977; from 1983 to 1986 was a Yale Law School and Yale School of Management dual degree candidate. She was "the first person to complete the 5-year joint degree program in 3 years, graduating with highest honors in 1986" (from her website AnnOlivarius dot com). Ten years at Goldman Sachs and similar places, then started own law firm (1996). "Olivarius has successfully pursued impact lawsuits against major companies, financial institutions and law firms for race and sex discrimination." Ann is also a trustee of the Generation Next group for Black children.

    (Jef and Ann's lives were remarkably parallel from 1973 to the present; taking several of the same degrees at the same place and same years, and co-founding a law firm they are both actively engaged in to the present..)

    There's no doubt about it that these are remarkably accomplished parents. But what kind of people are they really? Where did Kathryn Olivarius get the idea to make it her life's work to serve the interests of Black victimology-industrial complex? That I don't know. But there are some more clues yet in this puzzle:

    Kathryn Olivarius' mother uses her maiden name, never changed her name. The wiki entry for Jef McAllister has them married in 1981, both about age 25. I wonder what % of newly-married women were not changing their names in 1981.

    What's more interesting, and highly unusual, is that their daughter, Kathryn, uses her mother's maiden surname (Olivarius), too, creating a maternal-surname-inheritance (matrilineal) chain that is unprecedented for Western culture (except in cases of bastardy, maybe). Naturally, Kathryn, who as of 2017 was married, didn't change her name upon her own marriage. If she has a child and convinces her husband to surname the baby "Olivarius," this will be something indeed.

    Kathryn's older sister uses the hyphenated form. Her name is Chase Olivarius-McAllister (Yale BA, 2010> As of 2020, Chase tweets @ChaseOM under the handle "Chase Manhattan Skank;" in a 2015 tweet she confirms that she is Chase Olivarius-McAllister). Her latest tweet, as of this writing, is: "Diddy speaks on the Racial Impact of the Corona VIRUS #StateOfEmergency" (retweeted from @Raphouse_Tv). Chase's first non-retweet tweet is:


    It's 2020. We're four years into the violent, rightwing, misogynist, white person insanity that is life in Trump's America -- and yet I still wasn't prepared for Tiger King!

    How is any of this allowed????? The guns, the sex cults, the hair cuts????

    #society
    #TigerKing
     

    (A search for 'Tiger King' shows as the top result someone saying "Show Tiger King to White Supremacists.")

    ________________

    Kathryn says, in her 2018 Stanford Daily interview:


    I grew up in the U.K., actually, despite the lack of accent, and so I decided to go back to the U.K. to go to Oxford to do my master’s and PhD, and I’ve always been interested in American History, even though I grew up in the U.K.
     
    Her father was Time magazine bureau chief for London, 1999 to 2007, perhaps moving when Kathryn was 9 or 10 and staying through about Kathryn's 18th birthday. She "decided to go back to the U.K. to go to Oxford to do [her] master’s and PhD" but doesn't mention that her father had a PhD from the same place. And that both her parents were at Yale in the 1970s, where she was in the early 2010s.

    (A search for ‘Tiger King’ shows as the top result someone saying “Show Tiger King to White Supremacists.”)

    Steve claims he is too cash-strapped to subscribe to NETFLIX, otherwise I’m sure we’d have had a dozen or so posts on it by now, plus at least one, and maybe two, full-length Taki’s essays- it’s a real observation/noticing-o-rama.

    My only problem with the show is that- on purely technical grounds- I question its reality. Most of the footage is shot in beautiful, high-quality ‘film-tone’ HD. I therefore question how much of it is real, contemporaneous footage, instead of (at-best) post-hoc recreations for the benefit of the Netflix production crew, or (at-worst) simple out-and-out acting. For example, there’s this whole hitman-on-the-run subplot with extensive before, during, and after footage shot in gorgeous Netflix original series event HD (the hitman in question is actually a full-time handyman at the zoo whose shady criminal background makes Tiger King think, FARGO-like, that he can therefore be put to use doing some wetwork). So which is it- did this whole hitman plot come together in front of the Netflix crew who did nothing, or did they after-the-fact stage scenes of the plot coming together? Neither possibility speaks to the verity of what we are shown.

    With that said, if any of the show’s characters are even halfway real, I like them much better than entitled, bubble-dwelling a-hole non-entities like the Olivariuses . They are the sort of people who slap themselves on the back for their open-mindedness and tolerance, yet are busy on social media sharing book reviews of the 5 best how-to-survive-the-holidays-with-relatives-who-may-not-hate-Trump-with-all-their-hearts-and-souls self-helf guides.

  61. @Dumbo
    She's cute for an academic, at least in this picture. Couldn't find any info on her being married or having children, so it's likely another high-IQ, low-fertility case. And an anti-white white woman.

    Old picture, she’s a fatty now.

    • Replies: @Hail
    Video of Dr. Kathryn Olivarius speaking in summer 2019 (she was probably age 30 at this time):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=65QecJr67YY

    She gives some insight into her life, the socio-economic status(es) of her peers, her own life-trajectory, and her thinking about the purpose of life. Transcript:


    [Intro] I remember one summer in particular, the bugs were so bad that you could never take off your clothes, for the most part, or you were always wearing long sleeves, long pants. It happens to rain basically constantly.

    My name is Kathryn Olivarius. I'm an assistant professor of history at Stanford.

    In the summers, when I was a college student, I worked at a canoe tubing camp called Keewaydin in Northern Ontario, where I led trips for girls ranging from the ages of about 11 to 18. This is not your typical summer camp. It's almost not fun, how do I put that? (Laughs)

    My friends in college, they were working on movie sets in the summer, they were working for investment banks in New York, they were traveling around the world, they were doing other things. That made me very nervous a lot of the time. But if could go back and tell my 19-year-old self something now, it would be, "Man, keep doing what you love doing."

    I think we have this idea in life that we're on the straight path. There's this school, then there's AP tests, and there's applications to college. You know, that can happen, but it also might not happen. When I was canoe tripping, you fail all the time. You fall over with the canoe and you land in this sort of spectacular fashion. Failure can be just as generative and just as important as success.

    There is literally always a silver lining, and very often it just means you've gotta sort of dust yourself off and have a laugh and then try again.

    (upbeat music)
     

    There is a fair amount of interest there, but you can read the transcript as well as I can.

    I wonder how she ended up with this northern Ontario canoe tubing camp job in one or more of the summers between 2008 and 2010.

    I also note that Dr. Kathyrn is one of those who chooses to use the term 'literally' to mean 'metaphorically.' We need to coin a term such as "literally-literally" to solve this problem. (Until they take that one over too, but it's worth a shot.)

  62. @Hail

    what sort of students are our elite universities handing out advanced degree in the humanities, anyway?
     
    Kathryn Olivarius describes herself as "born and raised in New York, Washington D.C., and London" (from her Stanford bio; but how can she be "born" in three places? This is imprecise writing unworthy of someone of her station).

    The dates of degree conferral are interesting:

    Yale, BA, 2011;
    Oxford MA, 2013;
    Oxford PhD, 2016.

    Assuming she entered Yale the fall after graduating from high school, she went straight through, "K-to-18" (thru MA) without interruption for any purpose, then grabbed a three-year PhD. (Three years for a PhD; unusually, suspiciously fast.)

    She was therefore, as far as I can tell, in nothing but a long education track through as late as her 28th birthday, with no gaps for work, no children (naturally), no anything else. No Peace Corps or the like. Just straight through floating along the education bubble. (She is married, though. From a Jan. 2018 Stanford Daily interview: "The first thing I do every morning is The New York Times crossword puzzle. I don’t talk to my husband. [...].")

    And she remains in it now at ca. age 31. Kathryn Olivarius is now Ron Unz' neighbor as Assistant Professor of History at Stanford, Aug. 2017 thru Feb. 2020. (As of March 2020 she is CoronaPanic'ed-out until further notice.)

    From her Stanford bio:


    I am also interested in historical notions of consent (sexual or otherwise); slave revolts in the United States and the Caribbean; anti- and pro-slavery thought; class and ethnicity in antebellum America; the history of life insurance and environmental risk; comparative slave systems; technology and slavery; the Haitian Revolution; and boosterism in the American West.
     
    Yale BA thesis:

    “Panic! on the Yazoo: Land Pirates, King Cotton, and the Lynchings of Madison County, Mississippi, 1835.”
     
    Oxford Master's thesis:

    “American Slavery’s Most Important Non-Event: Understanding the 1808 African Slave Trade Ban in the Long War for the West.”
     
    Oxford PhD thesis:

    “Necropolis: Yellow Fever, Immunity, and Capitalism in the Deep South, 1800-1860.” (Supervisors: Pekka Hämäläinen and Lawrence Goldman)
     
    Kathryn Olivarius is credited with co-founding, with her sister, a charity called GenerationNext to support Black children. That was in 2005, when she would have been about 16. The group's website claims the sisters were inspired by Black children upon a Jan. 2003 visit to South Africa and were determined to form the group thereafter. They had spent 2002 raising funds in London to give the children. So Dr. Olivarius' trajectory is: age 13 to age 31 on a continuous pro-Black life quest.
    .
    https://hailtoyou.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/kathryn-olivarius-generation-next-charity.jpeg

    Note that doing a PhD in the UK is often much more efficient than slogging through the USA version. There’s usually no need to do coursework; you have to have a research proposal ready when you apply, and then you just blast right ahead into your dissertation. Three years is not necessarily a suspicious amount of time in which to finish one.

  63. @res

    Actually, blacks were much less likely to die of yellow fever, a West African disease, than were whites (much less poor American Indians).
     
    Some numbers for that.
    https://mbio.asm.org/content/5/3/e01253-14
    Human Genetic Variation and Yellow Fever Mortality during 19th Century U.S. Epidemics

    ABSTRACT
    We calculated the incidence, mortality, and case fatality rates for Caucasians and non-Caucasians during 19th century yellow fever (YF) epidemics in the United States and determined statistical significance for differences in the rates in different populations. We evaluated nongenetic host factors, including socioeconomic, environmental, cultural, demographic, and acquired immunity status that could have influenced these differences. While differences in incidence rates were not significant between Caucasians and non-Caucasians, differences in mortality and case fatality rates were statistically significant for all epidemics tested (P < 0.01). Caucasians diagnosed with YF were 6.8 times more likely to succumb than non-Caucasians with the disease. No other major causes of death during the 19th century demonstrated a similar mortality skew toward Caucasians. Nongenetic host factors were examined and could not explain these large differences. We propose that the remarkably lower case mortality rates for individuals of non-Caucasian ancestry is the result of human genetic variation in loci encoding innate immune mediators.
     
    But remember everyone, race is a social construct.

    P.S. Different diseases among Union troops in 1864. See Table S5 for more details.

    https://mbio.asm.org/content/mbio/5/3/e01253-14/F2.large.jpg

    So, Yellow Fever was 680% more lethal to whites than to blacks, but the NYT headline is the usual “Blacks Hardest Hit!!!!1!!1!”

    In case they ever wonder why they get called “fake news”, they just produced Exhibit #5982364.

    If you want to have a completely false picture of the world, the New York Times is an excellent way to get that.

    What irritates those of us who don’t want false perceptions (99%) is that we still have to keep track of which lies the Times spreads because it is essentially the bulletin board of the ruling class.

    I used to read historical accounts of how Soviet citizens had to apprise themselves daily of The Current Truth so that they could conform their public selves to their rulers’ demands. Reading such accounts is no longer necessary as now we all live it.

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @Hibernian
    I think at least so far HR departments and local politicians give the vast majority of us a good idea what to pretend to believe at work and in public. Brainwashed immediate and extended family members are an inportant source, too.
    , @peterike

    If you want to have a completely false picture of the world, the New York Times is an excellent way to get that.
     
    Indeed, and keep in mind that a significant percentage of people of wealth / prestige / fame get fed this diet of anti-white hysteria and other nonsense on a daily basis, and never once do they so much as hear there's an alternate point of view possible. The hive mind is very real and that mind is more corrupted and insane by the day.
  64. @Hail
    "My dad was a PhD in history as well." -- Kathryn Olivarius

    Father: Jef McAllister (born 1956). Horace Greeley High School, 1973; Yale BA, summa cum laude, 1977; from 1978 to 1983 was at Oxford for History PhD (as a "Marshall Scholar"). PhD Thesis: "British Science Policy in British Industrial Reconstruction, 1942-51." Then right back to Yale for a JD in 1986. Some more info is on his wiki page. He became a career journalist, and as of 2007 is full-time as a Managing Partner at McAllister Olivarius law firm, co-founded with wife in the 1990s.

    Mother: Ann Olivarius (born 1955). Yale BA, summa cum laude, 1977; from 1983 to 1986 was a Yale Law School and Yale School of Management dual degree candidate. She was "the first person to complete the 5-year joint degree program in 3 years, graduating with highest honors in 1986" (from her website AnnOlivarius dot com). Ten years at Goldman Sachs and similar places, then started own law firm (1996). "Olivarius has successfully pursued impact lawsuits against major companies, financial institutions and law firms for race and sex discrimination." Ann is also a trustee of the Generation Next group for Black children.

    (Jef and Ann's lives were remarkably parallel from 1973 to the present; taking several of the same degrees at the same place and same years, and co-founding a law firm they are both actively engaged in to the present..)

    There's no doubt about it that these are remarkably accomplished parents. But what kind of people are they really? Where did Kathryn Olivarius get the idea to make it her life's work to serve the interests of Black victimology-industrial complex? That I don't know. But there are some more clues yet in this puzzle:

    Kathryn Olivarius' mother uses her maiden name, never changed her name. The wiki entry for Jef McAllister has them married in 1981, both about age 25. I wonder what % of newly-married women were not changing their names in 1981.

    What's more interesting, and highly unusual, is that their daughter, Kathryn, uses her mother's maiden surname (Olivarius), too, creating a maternal-surname-inheritance (matrilineal) chain that is unprecedented for Western culture (except in cases of bastardy, maybe). Naturally, Kathryn, who as of 2017 was married, didn't change her name upon her own marriage. If she has a child and convinces her husband to surname the baby "Olivarius," this will be something indeed.

    Kathryn's older sister uses the hyphenated form. Her name is Chase Olivarius-McAllister (Yale BA, 2010> As of 2020, Chase tweets @ChaseOM under the handle "Chase Manhattan Skank;" in a 2015 tweet she confirms that she is Chase Olivarius-McAllister). Her latest tweet, as of this writing, is: "Diddy speaks on the Racial Impact of the Corona VIRUS #StateOfEmergency" (retweeted from @Raphouse_Tv). Chase's first non-retweet tweet is:


    It's 2020. We're four years into the violent, rightwing, misogynist, white person insanity that is life in Trump's America -- and yet I still wasn't prepared for Tiger King!

    How is any of this allowed????? The guns, the sex cults, the hair cuts????

    #society
    #TigerKing
     

    (A search for 'Tiger King' shows as the top result someone saying "Show Tiger King to White Supremacists.")

    ________________

    Kathryn says, in her 2018 Stanford Daily interview:


    I grew up in the U.K., actually, despite the lack of accent, and so I decided to go back to the U.K. to go to Oxford to do my master’s and PhD, and I’ve always been interested in American History, even though I grew up in the U.K.
     
    Her father was Time magazine bureau chief for London, 1999 to 2007, perhaps moving when Kathryn was 9 or 10 and staying through about Kathryn's 18th birthday. She "decided to go back to the U.K. to go to Oxford to do [her] master’s and PhD" but doesn't mention that her father had a PhD from the same place. And that both her parents were at Yale in the 1970s, where she was in the early 2010s.

    I had a look at Ann Olivarius’s website. She sounds like a pretty formidable character.

    In addition to the stuff you mentioned, she was one of the plaintiffs in the 1979 case Alexander v. Yale, which determined that, in educational institutions, sexual harassment against female students could be counted as discrimination under Title IX. According to the Wikipedia entry, Ann Olivarius was one of five plaintiffs. The other four claimed to have been harassed, but not Ann:

    Ann Olivarius alleged that the absence of a procedure for complaining about sexual harassment forced her to expend her own time and money on helping fellow students who had been sexually harassed, and that in the course of providing that help she was threatened by individuals whom she was investigating, and that Yale failed to protect her from those individuals.

    So she was already acting as an advocate of some sort as an undergrad.

    Olivarius also takes personal credit for coining the term ‘date rape’.

    • Replies: @Hail

    Explore more about Ann's work as a...

    - Lawyer
    - Feminist
    - Philanthropist
    - Financier
    - Human Rights
    - Activist
    - Scholar
     


    In 2019, Olivarius was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award from YaleWomen, for her tireless work throughout her career fighting for gender equity and a more just society.
     
    Back at her bio page we see this:

    Olivarius’ journey to the feminist front lines began in New Jersey, where she grew up the oldest of five daughters in a Catholic family that often struggled to make ends meet
     
    Looking into the genealogy here for more possible insights.

    Ann's parents (Kathyrn Olivarius' maternal grandparents) are Kenneth William Olivarius (1925–2012) and Ann Marie Beckley (1932–1999). Ann was one of six (five daughters, one son). The family was associated with Park Ridge and Old Tappan, New Jersey, and all of Ann's ancestral lines are associated with NYC as of ca.1890.

    Ann Olivarius' mother (Ann Beckley) appears to be primarily Irish-Catholic origin. Surnames of her grandparents (b.1860s to 1872) and their places of origin are: Beckley [b.England], Sullivan [b.New York but of Irish Potato Famine emigrant stock], Adams [b.Rhode Island; at-least-partial origin in Ireland], Moore [b.Ireland].

    Ann Olivarius' father, Kenneth W. Olivarius, was born and raised in Brooklyn per his obituary, which also has this:


    He was a 1942 graduate of Brooklyn Technical High School and received his Bachelors' degree from St. Johns University. Kenneth was a U.S. Navy Veteran serving as a radar man in the Pacific Theater during World War II. After returning from the war, Kenneth met and married the love of his life, Ann Beckley [...]

    He was the owner and president of Olivarius and Associates until retiring in 2008. Prior to that, Kenneth had a successful career as a national sales manager for General Foods, Manhattan Sales Co., and Duralight Lamps before starting his own company in 1977.
     

    She may have been generous with her claim that her family struggled to make ends meet.

    Ann's father Kenneth W. Olivarius' personal ancestry is:

    [Parents]
    - Holger Johannes Olivarius (1892–1948)
    - Adele Elvira Carpeneto (1895–1968)

    [Grandparents] (i.e., the four paternal great-grandparents of Ann)
    - Holger Frderik Thye de Fine Olivarius (1858–1915) of Denmark; imm. 1873
    (married in 1889 at Brooklyn)
    - Caroline Wildermuth (1870–1917) of NYC; German-born Lutheran parents

    - Andrea Carpeneto (1868–1940) orig. of Tribogna, Genova, Liguria, Italy
    (married in 1893 at Manhattan)
    - Christina Elizabeth Debarbieri (1870–1962) also orig. of Tribogna, Italy

    The Italian grandparents' being listed as born in the same town in Italy must mean they had arrived not long before their 1893 marriage (likely the man first by a few years, as usual), which was registered at Manhattan.

    As for the Denmark-born grandfather (Holger Frderik Thye de Fine Olivarius), he is recorded as baptized in 1858, presumably in the Lutheran church. His son (father of Kenneth Olivarius; grandfather of Ann), though, is buried at a Catholic cemetery in Brooklyn, making Ann Marie Olivarius (1955–) of all-Catholic origin on her father's side back to her grandparents (though up to half Lutheran by religious-ancestry, if you go back far enough), and principally but not entirely Irish-Catholic on her mother's side.

    As far as I can tell, this shakes out to: 2/16ths Denmark (incl. the Olivarius surname), 2/16ths Germany, 4/16ths (northern-)Italian, 6/16ths Irish-Catholic, 1/16th nineteenth-century English, 1/16th unclear (possibly Colonial-Yankee or possibly this line too is Irish-Catholic). (The Moldbug 'Puritan'/Calvinist theory fails here as she has no Calvinist ancestry.)

    If that is all too boring for whoever may be reading this, present or future, we do find one more surprising 'Black' connection:

    Tracing the Olivarius paternal ancestral line, we find a Holger de Fine Olivarius born in 1788 in "The West Indies." His mother (Anna Marie Heitmann, 1758–1827) was the "daughter of a plantation manager," which (prepare your gasps now) means...Slaves...involved. His father was some character out of Copenhagen who wound up in the West Indies, but the line ends up back in Denmark whence it came to the US in 1873 (the 1873-arrival ancestor appears to have come alone at age 15, probably meeting some relative, but his own father never left Denmark).

    The Olivarius surname goes way back (an ancestor, Niels Olivarius [1637–1711], earned a Master's [Magister] degree in 1677. If I know my Scandinavian genealogy, and I do (Ann's great-grandfather's place of origin is near one of my ancestors'; I claim to responsibility for her actions!), I know that a fixed family name back in the 18th century is an almost-100%-definite sign of an aristocratic family.

    (Comment: Ann Olivarius chose to keep her maiden name, which her daughter Dr. Kathryn Olivarius also keeps. Ironically for this act of anti-patriarchy surname rebellion, it turns out the name she kept is an aristocratic family-name with ties to slave-owning and the slave-system in the West Indies. Which is the kind of thing Dr. Kathryn would condemn. Will Dr. Kathryn go so far as to condemn her own same-named ancestor for ties to slavery in the West Indies?)

  65. @Hypnotoad666

    Black people, with limited access to health care, were of course as scared of yellow fever as anyone else.
     
    LOL. Nineteenth Century "healthcare" consisted of leeches and laudanum. The less "access" you had the more likely you were to survive.

    Also, how dare those immune people cash in on their "privilege." I mean, all they did was vomit black blood, endure excruciating pain, and run a 50% chance of death. What a bunch of privileged elites!

    Even by NYT standards, this is a really, really stupid article.

    Even by NYT standards, this is a really, really stupid article.

    It’s Stanford Tenure Track Brain Power! Ooh, I see in comment 33 that it’s also accredited Yale and Oxford Brain Power! Take that, bigots!

  66. @Too Observant
    Lazy-eyed Ben Butler, famous for inventing ‘contrabands” (daring African American slaves who began to flee to Union locations thus beginning the undercutting of the Confederate economic support system) seems to have been on the cutting edge on eliminating Yellow Fever in New Orleans.

    Transported to the city of Gumbo and beads, occupying General Butler quickly began a cleansing both in corruption, Confederate support, and city streets.

    Gordon Berg writes, “New Orleans had another problem: disease. The densely populated maritime trading center of roughly 170,000 souls was built amid the swamps of southern Louisiana. Geography, combined with chronic poor sanitation, contributed to the frequent summertime appearance of mosquito-borne yellow fever—“Yellow Jack”—a deadly killer wherever it appeared. In 1853 an outbreak killed nearly 8,000 people in the area. Many locals counted on a reappearance of the disease to make the Union occupation brief. Butler was a successful attorney, not a medical man. But he had studied the fever’s deadly potential; his father, John, died from the disease in the West Indies soon after Butler was born. To stymie the fever’s spread, the best practice of the time called for quarantining ships arriving from Caribbean ports known for outbreaks in the past.”

    Perhaps a stronger hand on legal, illegal, and out of country visitors should have been so quarantined in the last months with Cov-19. Naw, I mean what can you learn from history.

    Berg continues, “Union regimental surgeons had no experience with yellow fever, so Butler hired Army surgeon Charles McCormick, reputed to be the nation’s foremost fever expert. He was charged with improving the overall health of the city. After inspecting the area around the French Market and its open food stalls, Butler ordered that years of decaying garbage covering the original stone floor be scrubbed down to its foundation.”

    Just wait till the homeless areas of Los Angeles, Orange County (yes, that old Republican strongpoint), San Francisco, New York city, etc. spread disease in areas which have become fecally enhanced by liberal looking-the-other way city managers. Just a recent cleansing of the underpasses along the Orange County river system found over 100 stolen bikes just in one spot (I had a friend fight off one of these “two wheel liberators’), thousands of tons of awful offal, and vermin four legged and other that migrated to nearby Angel Stadium which then needed extensive fumigation.

    Retconning history covers up, “Only two cases of the contagion were reported during Butler’s tenure in New Orleans and, while both patients died, the fever quickly subsided. New Orleans did not experience another yellow fever outbreak until 1867.” Berg gives a new look at Spoons Butler. And how to handle disease. 19th century style.

    Speaking of Yellow Fever and New Orleans, former Confederate General John Bell (“Sam”) Hood and his wife both died of Yellow Fever in the 1878-1879 New Orleans outbreak. They left 10 orphaned children. The pox did what Union ordnance could not.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Bell_Hood

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    The man lost the last knuckle of his middle finger on his left hand. Left it at Gettysburg, I suppose.

    (I just now read on Wiki where he was severely wounded in the left arm at Gettysburg. Not a bad guess if I do say so myself)

  67. @Dan Hayes
    Question. How was one known/proved to be Yellow Fever acclimated (i.e., immunized)?

    Thanks for any response to this query!

    A divorce decree?

  68. @Anon
    We need to figure out a way to purge teachers like this from our universities. It would be great to have a have a series of good quality academic journals in the social sciences that shred PC profs and their blithering nonsense papers into a zillion pieces.

    It would require one of the few right wing rich people, like the Koch Brothers or Betsy DeVos or her brother Eric Prince, to be a new John D. Rockefeller or Leland Stanford and found a new institution, probably in a small Southern, Midwestern, or Rocky Mountain town, and staff it with well credentialed but dissident professors, who have trouble getting jobs at any other than very small time institutions, because of their views.

    • Replies: @peterike

    It would require one of the few right wing rich people, like the Koch Brothers or Betsy DeVos or her brother Eric Prince, to be a new John D. Rockefeller or Leland Stanford and found a new institution, probably in a small Southern, Midwestern, or Rocky Mountain town, and staff it with well credentialed but dissident professors, who have trouble getting jobs at any other than very small time institutions, because of their views.
     
    No corporation would ever hire anyone who graduated from this University.
  69. @Almost Missouri
    So, Yellow Fever was 680% more lethal to whites than to blacks, but the NYT headline is the usual "Blacks Hardest Hit!!!!1!!1!"

    In case they ever wonder why they get called "fake news", they just produced Exhibit #5982364.

    If you want to have a completely false picture of the world, the New York Times is an excellent way to get that.

    What irritates those of us who don't want false perceptions (99%) is that we still have to keep track of which lies the Times spreads because it is essentially the bulletin board of the ruling class.

    I used to read historical accounts of how Soviet citizens had to apprise themselves daily of The Current Truth so that they could conform their public selves to their rulers' demands. Reading such accounts is no longer necessary as now we all live it.

    I think at least so far HR departments and local politicians give the vast majority of us a good idea what to pretend to believe at work and in public. Brainwashed immediate and extended family members are an inportant source, too.

  70. @Hail

    what sort of students are our elite universities handing out advanced degree in the humanities, anyway?
     
    Kathryn Olivarius describes herself as "born and raised in New York, Washington D.C., and London" (from her Stanford bio; but how can she be "born" in three places? This is imprecise writing unworthy of someone of her station).

    The dates of degree conferral are interesting:

    Yale, BA, 2011;
    Oxford MA, 2013;
    Oxford PhD, 2016.

    Assuming she entered Yale the fall after graduating from high school, she went straight through, "K-to-18" (thru MA) without interruption for any purpose, then grabbed a three-year PhD. (Three years for a PhD; unusually, suspiciously fast.)

    She was therefore, as far as I can tell, in nothing but a long education track through as late as her 28th birthday, with no gaps for work, no children (naturally), no anything else. No Peace Corps or the like. Just straight through floating along the education bubble. (She is married, though. From a Jan. 2018 Stanford Daily interview: "The first thing I do every morning is The New York Times crossword puzzle. I don’t talk to my husband. [...].")

    And she remains in it now at ca. age 31. Kathryn Olivarius is now Ron Unz' neighbor as Assistant Professor of History at Stanford, Aug. 2017 thru Feb. 2020. (As of March 2020 she is CoronaPanic'ed-out until further notice.)

    From her Stanford bio:


    I am also interested in historical notions of consent (sexual or otherwise); slave revolts in the United States and the Caribbean; anti- and pro-slavery thought; class and ethnicity in antebellum America; the history of life insurance and environmental risk; comparative slave systems; technology and slavery; the Haitian Revolution; and boosterism in the American West.
     
    Yale BA thesis:

    “Panic! on the Yazoo: Land Pirates, King Cotton, and the Lynchings of Madison County, Mississippi, 1835.”
     
    Oxford Master's thesis:

    “American Slavery’s Most Important Non-Event: Understanding the 1808 African Slave Trade Ban in the Long War for the West.”
     
    Oxford PhD thesis:

    “Necropolis: Yellow Fever, Immunity, and Capitalism in the Deep South, 1800-1860.” (Supervisors: Pekka Hämäläinen and Lawrence Goldman)
     
    Kathryn Olivarius is credited with co-founding, with her sister, a charity called GenerationNext to support Black children. That was in 2005, when she would have been about 16. The group's website claims the sisters were inspired by Black children upon a Jan. 2003 visit to South Africa and were determined to form the group thereafter. They had spent 2002 raising funds in London to give the children. So Dr. Olivarius' trajectory is: age 13 to age 31 on a continuous pro-Black life quest.
    .
    https://hailtoyou.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/kathryn-olivarius-generation-next-charity.jpeg

    The elites Uni’s like Stanford typically hire fresh Ph.Ds. from fellow elites at the (lowest) assistant professor rank, keep them for four or five years, then flush them out so as not to tenure them — the tenure slog, a lot like making senior partner in a top law firm — only the smartest who are willing to work 90 hours a week make that hurdle. The rejects rebound to second or third tier unis, but are bitter and angry, which means their “research” becomes even more virulently anti-male…white…Christian.

    Olivarious clearly won’t have to worry about the jump to tenure. Her genitalia + “research” expertise will silence any skeptics on the tenure review committee — unless, she’d be taking a slot reserved for LaShanta Adebayo or Wadimba Adebayo. Not sure about the later — Pokemon ambiguity at work.

    • Agree: Hail
  71. @The Last Real Calvinist
    I had a look at Ann Olivarius's website. She sounds like a pretty formidable character.

    In addition to the stuff you mentioned, she was one of the plaintiffs in the 1979 case Alexander v. Yale, which determined that, in educational institutions, sexual harassment against female students could be counted as discrimination under Title IX. According to the Wikipedia entry, Ann Olivarius was one of five plaintiffs. The other four claimed to have been harassed, but not Ann:


    Ann Olivarius alleged that the absence of a procedure for complaining about sexual harassment forced her to expend her own time and money on helping fellow students who had been sexually harassed, and that in the course of providing that help she was threatened by individuals whom she was investigating, and that Yale failed to protect her from those individuals.

     

    So she was already acting as an advocate of some sort as an undergrad.

    Olivarius also takes personal credit for coining the term 'date rape'.

    Explore more about Ann’s work as a…

    – Lawyer
    – Feminist
    – Philanthropist
    – Financier
    – Human Rights
    – Activist
    – Scholar

    In 2019, Olivarius was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award from YaleWomen, for her tireless work throughout her career fighting for gender equity and a more just society.

    Back at her bio page we see this:

    Olivarius’ journey to the feminist front lines began in New Jersey, where she grew up the oldest of five daughters in a Catholic family that often struggled to make ends meet

    Looking into the genealogy here for more possible insights.

    Ann’s parents (Kathyrn Olivarius’ maternal grandparents) are Kenneth William Olivarius (1925–2012) and Ann Marie Beckley (1932–1999). Ann was one of six (five daughters, one son). The family was associated with Park Ridge and Old Tappan, New Jersey, and all of Ann’s ancestral lines are associated with NYC as of ca.1890.

    Ann Olivarius’ mother (Ann Beckley) appears to be primarily Irish-Catholic origin. Surnames of her grandparents (b.1860s to 1872) and their places of origin are: Beckley [b.England], Sullivan [b.New York but of Irish Potato Famine emigrant stock], Adams [b.Rhode Island; at-least-partial origin in Ireland], Moore [b.Ireland].

    Ann Olivarius’ father, Kenneth W. Olivarius, was born and raised in Brooklyn per his obituary, which also has this:

    He was a 1942 graduate of Brooklyn Technical High School and received his Bachelors’ degree from St. Johns University. Kenneth was a U.S. Navy Veteran serving as a radar man in the Pacific Theater during World War II. After returning from the war, Kenneth met and married the love of his life, Ann Beckley […]

    He was the owner and president of Olivarius and Associates until retiring in 2008. Prior to that, Kenneth had a successful career as a national sales manager for General Foods, Manhattan Sales Co., and Duralight Lamps before starting his own company in 1977.

    She may have been generous with her claim that her family struggled to make ends meet.

    Ann’s father Kenneth W. Olivarius’ personal ancestry is:

    [Parents]
    – Holger Johannes Olivarius (1892–1948)
    – Adele Elvira Carpeneto (1895–1968)

    [Grandparents] (i.e., the four paternal great-grandparents of Ann)
    – Holger Frderik Thye de Fine Olivarius (1858–1915) of Denmark; imm. 1873
    (married in 1889 at Brooklyn)
    – Caroline Wildermuth (1870–1917) of NYC; German-born Lutheran parents

    – Andrea Carpeneto (1868–1940) orig. of Tribogna, Genova, Liguria, Italy
    (married in 1893 at Manhattan)
    – Christina Elizabeth Debarbieri (1870–1962) also orig. of Tribogna, Italy

    The Italian grandparents’ being listed as born in the same town in Italy must mean they had arrived not long before their 1893 marriage (likely the man first by a few years, as usual), which was registered at Manhattan.

    As for the Denmark-born grandfather (Holger Frderik Thye de Fine Olivarius), he is recorded as baptized in 1858, presumably in the Lutheran church. His son (father of Kenneth Olivarius; grandfather of Ann), though, is buried at a Catholic cemetery in Brooklyn, making Ann Marie Olivarius (1955–) of all-Catholic origin on her father’s side back to her grandparents (though up to half Lutheran by religious-ancestry, if you go back far enough), and principally but not entirely Irish-Catholic on her mother’s side.

    As far as I can tell, this shakes out to: 2/16ths Denmark (incl. the Olivarius surname), 2/16ths Germany, 4/16ths (northern-)Italian, 6/16ths Irish-Catholic, 1/16th nineteenth-century English, 1/16th unclear (possibly Colonial-Yankee or possibly this line too is Irish-Catholic). (The Moldbug ‘Puritan’/Calvinist theory fails here as she has no Calvinist ancestry.)

    If that is all too boring for whoever may be reading this, present or future, we do find one more surprising ‘Black’ connection:

    Tracing the Olivarius paternal ancestral line, we find a Holger de Fine Olivarius born in 1788 in “The West Indies.” His mother (Anna Marie Heitmann, 1758–1827) was the “daughter of a plantation manager,” which (prepare your gasps now) means…Slaves…involved. His father was some character out of Copenhagen who wound up in the West Indies, but the line ends up back in Denmark whence it came to the US in 1873 (the 1873-arrival ancestor appears to have come alone at age 15, probably meeting some relative, but his own father never left Denmark).

    The Olivarius surname goes way back (an ancestor, Niels Olivarius [1637–1711], earned a Master’s [Magister] degree in 1677. If I know my Scandinavian genealogy, and I do (Ann’s great-grandfather’s place of origin is near one of my ancestors’; I claim to responsibility for her actions!), I know that a fixed family name back in the 18th century is an almost-100%-definite sign of an aristocratic family.

    (Comment: Ann Olivarius chose to keep her maiden name, which her daughter Dr. Kathryn Olivarius also keeps. Ironically for this act of anti-patriarchy surname rebellion, it turns out the name she kept is an aristocratic family-name with ties to slave-owning and the slave-system in the West Indies. Which is the kind of thing Dr. Kathryn would condemn. Will Dr. Kathryn go so far as to condemn her own same-named ancestor for ties to slavery in the West Indies?)

    • Replies: @James N. Kennett


    Explore more about Ann’s work as a…

    – Lawyer
    – Feminist
    Philanthropist
    – Financier
    – Human Rights
    – Activist
    – Scholar

     

    (my emphasis)

    The term "philanthropist" is normally reserved, perversely, for people who spend a lot of their own money on charitable causes.

    We need another term, perhaps "misanthropist", for someone who takes every opportunity to screw over members of their outgroup. Not "misanthrope" which already has another meaning. Bonus points if the person appears to be a member of their own outgroup, such as an anti-white white.
  72. I suspect there would have been more drama in America without slavery than we think. Think of the drama Europe had over the last century: two world war which killed, what, 70-75 million?

    I also think back to the 30 years war in Europe in the 1600s which took something like 20% of the population down. So, maybe we’d have been like Canada, but maybe not. Hopefully, White people have had enough of killing each other now.

  73. @Jack Armstrong
    Old picture, she’s a fatty now.

    Video of Dr. Kathryn Olivarius speaking in summer 2019 (she was probably age 30 at this time):

    She gives some insight into her life, the socio-economic status(es) of her peers, her own life-trajectory, and her thinking about the purpose of life. Transcript:

    [MORE]

    [Intro] I remember one summer in particular, the bugs were so bad that you could never take off your clothes, for the most part, or you were always wearing long sleeves, long pants. It happens to rain basically constantly.

    My name is Kathryn Olivarius. I’m an assistant professor of history at Stanford.

    In the summers, when I was a college student, I worked at a canoe tubing camp called Keewaydin in Northern Ontario, where I led trips for girls ranging from the ages of about 11 to 18. This is not your typical summer camp. It’s almost not fun, how do I put that? (Laughs)

    My friends in college, they were working on movie sets in the summer, they were working for investment banks in New York, they were traveling around the world, they were doing other things. That made me very nervous a lot of the time. But if could go back and tell my 19-year-old self something now, it would be, “Man, keep doing what you love doing.”

    I think we have this idea in life that we’re on the straight path. There’s this school, then there’s AP tests, and there’s applications to college. You know, that can happen, but it also might not happen. When I was canoe tripping, you fail all the time. You fall over with the canoe and you land in this sort of spectacular fashion. Failure can be just as generative and just as important as success.

    There is literally always a silver lining, and very often it just means you’ve gotta sort of dust yourself off and have a laugh and then try again.

    (upbeat music)

    There is a fair amount of interest there, but you can read the transcript as well as I can.

    I wonder how she ended up with this northern Ontario canoe tubing camp job in one or more of the summers between 2008 and 2010.

    I also note that Dr. Kathyrn is one of those who chooses to use the term ‘literally’ to mean ‘metaphorically.’ We need to coin a term such as “literally-literally” to solve this problem. (Until they take that one over too, but it’s worth a shot.)

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    I wonder where her tattoos are.
    , @Dan Hayes
    An insufferable Stanford bitch (pardon the redundancy!).
  74. I read this sort of thing and I despair. It was only fifty years ago that universities were still recognisably a home to scholarship and science. Now the scholarship has been replaced by this sort of crap, and the science by Global Warmmongering, irreproducible results, hysterical mismodelling of epidemics, and fundamental physics suitable only for raising a dismissive laugh.

    Let ’em all go bust.

  75. There’s something really creepy about Stanford. Just a parenthetical observation..

  76. @syonredux

    Well actually, you mean without the presence of millions of Africans that America would’ve been a better place. Slavery and then later segregation were simply attempts to deal with this brute fact.
     
    Slavery brought Africans to America; it was the cause, not the result.

    Slavery also brought all kinds of White indentured servants (constructively speaking slaves, or a very close substitute for same). I have a hunch that their contemporary descendants, in their collectivity, do not currently comport themselves in the fashion that our bearers of African enrichment do.

  77. @Hail
    Video of Dr. Kathryn Olivarius speaking in summer 2019 (she was probably age 30 at this time):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=65QecJr67YY

    She gives some insight into her life, the socio-economic status(es) of her peers, her own life-trajectory, and her thinking about the purpose of life. Transcript:


    [Intro] I remember one summer in particular, the bugs were so bad that you could never take off your clothes, for the most part, or you were always wearing long sleeves, long pants. It happens to rain basically constantly.

    My name is Kathryn Olivarius. I'm an assistant professor of history at Stanford.

    In the summers, when I was a college student, I worked at a canoe tubing camp called Keewaydin in Northern Ontario, where I led trips for girls ranging from the ages of about 11 to 18. This is not your typical summer camp. It's almost not fun, how do I put that? (Laughs)

    My friends in college, they were working on movie sets in the summer, they were working for investment banks in New York, they were traveling around the world, they were doing other things. That made me very nervous a lot of the time. But if could go back and tell my 19-year-old self something now, it would be, "Man, keep doing what you love doing."

    I think we have this idea in life that we're on the straight path. There's this school, then there's AP tests, and there's applications to college. You know, that can happen, but it also might not happen. When I was canoe tripping, you fail all the time. You fall over with the canoe and you land in this sort of spectacular fashion. Failure can be just as generative and just as important as success.

    There is literally always a silver lining, and very often it just means you've gotta sort of dust yourself off and have a laugh and then try again.

    (upbeat music)
     

    There is a fair amount of interest there, but you can read the transcript as well as I can.

    I wonder how she ended up with this northern Ontario canoe tubing camp job in one or more of the summers between 2008 and 2010.

    I also note that Dr. Kathyrn is one of those who chooses to use the term 'literally' to mean 'metaphorically.' We need to coin a term such as "literally-literally" to solve this problem. (Until they take that one over too, but it's worth a shot.)

    I wonder where her tattoos are.

  78. @J.Ross
    You will ride with us, and you will die with us: it's as inclusive as that for me and my [black bodies].

    https://www.twitter.com/MelissaAFrancis/status/1249455529111552005

    Though she missed the beginning, Becky’s Melissa’s video caught about 120 bikes and 30 ATVs. Where are they stored? Maybe you don’t need a key to run the freight elevator, where the riders live.

    As far as I can tell, she was annoyed that they didn’t keep a six foot distance, rightly so.

  79. @Hibernian
    It would require one of the few right wing rich people, like the Koch Brothers or Betsy DeVos or her brother Eric Prince, to be a new John D. Rockefeller or Leland Stanford and found a new institution, probably in a small Southern, Midwestern, or Rocky Mountain town, and staff it with well credentialed but dissident professors, who have trouble getting jobs at any other than very small time institutions, because of their views.

    It would require one of the few right wing rich people, like the Koch Brothers or Betsy DeVos or her brother Eric Prince, to be a new John D. Rockefeller or Leland Stanford and found a new institution, probably in a small Southern, Midwestern, or Rocky Mountain town, and staff it with well credentialed but dissident professors, who have trouble getting jobs at any other than very small time institutions, because of their views.

    No corporation would ever hire anyone who graduated from this University.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    Do Brigham Young, Franciscan University of Steubenville, George Mason, Wheaton (of Illinois) or Hillsdale graduates find it impossible to find corporate jobs? (Reason for strting fresh rather than expanding one of those I named is that a billionaire is going to put his or her stamp on the school.)
    , @Crawfurdmuir
    There are colleges that are hospitable to conservatives. Hillsdale and Grove City don't seem to have trouble placing their graduates with employers. Such institutions don't have difficulty existing; they are just vastly outnumbered. My guess is that most of their graduates go on either directly to private-sector employment or to professional schools (business, law, medicine). Perhaps a person with one of their degrees would have difficulty getting into a Ph.D. program at a conventionally left-wing university.
  80. @res

    Actually, blacks were much less likely to die of yellow fever, a West African disease, than were whites (much less poor American Indians).
     
    Some numbers for that.
    https://mbio.asm.org/content/5/3/e01253-14
    Human Genetic Variation and Yellow Fever Mortality during 19th Century U.S. Epidemics

    ABSTRACT
    We calculated the incidence, mortality, and case fatality rates for Caucasians and non-Caucasians during 19th century yellow fever (YF) epidemics in the United States and determined statistical significance for differences in the rates in different populations. We evaluated nongenetic host factors, including socioeconomic, environmental, cultural, demographic, and acquired immunity status that could have influenced these differences. While differences in incidence rates were not significant between Caucasians and non-Caucasians, differences in mortality and case fatality rates were statistically significant for all epidemics tested (P < 0.01). Caucasians diagnosed with YF were 6.8 times more likely to succumb than non-Caucasians with the disease. No other major causes of death during the 19th century demonstrated a similar mortality skew toward Caucasians. Nongenetic host factors were examined and could not explain these large differences. We propose that the remarkably lower case mortality rates for individuals of non-Caucasian ancestry is the result of human genetic variation in loci encoding innate immune mediators.
     
    But remember everyone, race is a social construct.

    P.S. Different diseases among Union troops in 1864. See Table S5 for more details.

    https://mbio.asm.org/content/mbio/5/3/e01253-14/F2.large.jpg

    Recent work with malaria shows that when the evidence for differential susceptibility or mortality is this strong, the causal genes (alleles, actually) can be identified. SNP chips and well-designed GWASs are powerful tools.

    Fortunately for the NYT-mindset elites, the victims and survivors of these epidemics are long departed, so a study would be difficult. Impossibly difficult. Students can continue to learn (by omission) that natural selection has nothing to do with humans.

    The thesis of The 10,000 Year Explosion was definitively disproven by reasons.

    • Thanks: Mr McKenna
    • Replies: @gcochran
    We have found some of the causal alleles for malaria resistance, and for resistance to sleeping sickness, but not for yellow fever. I think people are afraid to do field studies anywhere where it exists.
  81. @Almost Missouri
    So, Yellow Fever was 680% more lethal to whites than to blacks, but the NYT headline is the usual "Blacks Hardest Hit!!!!1!!1!"

    In case they ever wonder why they get called "fake news", they just produced Exhibit #5982364.

    If you want to have a completely false picture of the world, the New York Times is an excellent way to get that.

    What irritates those of us who don't want false perceptions (99%) is that we still have to keep track of which lies the Times spreads because it is essentially the bulletin board of the ruling class.

    I used to read historical accounts of how Soviet citizens had to apprise themselves daily of The Current Truth so that they could conform their public selves to their rulers' demands. Reading such accounts is no longer necessary as now we all live it.

    If you want to have a completely false picture of the world, the New York Times is an excellent way to get that.

    Indeed, and keep in mind that a significant percentage of people of wealth / prestige / fame get fed this diet of anti-white hysteria and other nonsense on a daily basis, and never once do they so much as hear there’s an alternate point of view possible. The hive mind is very real and that mind is more corrupted and insane by the day.

  82. @Hail

    what sort of students are our elite universities handing out advanced degree in the humanities, anyway?
     
    Kathryn Olivarius describes herself as "born and raised in New York, Washington D.C., and London" (from her Stanford bio; but how can she be "born" in three places? This is imprecise writing unworthy of someone of her station).

    The dates of degree conferral are interesting:

    Yale, BA, 2011;
    Oxford MA, 2013;
    Oxford PhD, 2016.

    Assuming she entered Yale the fall after graduating from high school, she went straight through, "K-to-18" (thru MA) without interruption for any purpose, then grabbed a three-year PhD. (Three years for a PhD; unusually, suspiciously fast.)

    She was therefore, as far as I can tell, in nothing but a long education track through as late as her 28th birthday, with no gaps for work, no children (naturally), no anything else. No Peace Corps or the like. Just straight through floating along the education bubble. (She is married, though. From a Jan. 2018 Stanford Daily interview: "The first thing I do every morning is The New York Times crossword puzzle. I don’t talk to my husband. [...].")

    And she remains in it now at ca. age 31. Kathryn Olivarius is now Ron Unz' neighbor as Assistant Professor of History at Stanford, Aug. 2017 thru Feb. 2020. (As of March 2020 she is CoronaPanic'ed-out until further notice.)

    From her Stanford bio:


    I am also interested in historical notions of consent (sexual or otherwise); slave revolts in the United States and the Caribbean; anti- and pro-slavery thought; class and ethnicity in antebellum America; the history of life insurance and environmental risk; comparative slave systems; technology and slavery; the Haitian Revolution; and boosterism in the American West.
     
    Yale BA thesis:

    “Panic! on the Yazoo: Land Pirates, King Cotton, and the Lynchings of Madison County, Mississippi, 1835.”
     
    Oxford Master's thesis:

    “American Slavery’s Most Important Non-Event: Understanding the 1808 African Slave Trade Ban in the Long War for the West.”
     
    Oxford PhD thesis:

    “Necropolis: Yellow Fever, Immunity, and Capitalism in the Deep South, 1800-1860.” (Supervisors: Pekka Hämäläinen and Lawrence Goldman)
     
    Kathryn Olivarius is credited with co-founding, with her sister, a charity called GenerationNext to support Black children. That was in 2005, when she would have been about 16. The group's website claims the sisters were inspired by Black children upon a Jan. 2003 visit to South Africa and were determined to form the group thereafter. They had spent 2002 raising funds in London to give the children. So Dr. Olivarius' trajectory is: age 13 to age 31 on a continuous pro-Black life quest.
    .
    https://hailtoyou.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/kathryn-olivarius-generation-next-charity.jpeg

    > Kathryn Olivarius is credited with co-founding, with her sister, a charity called GenerationNext to support Black children.

    This would have been the catnip that clinched young Kathryn’s thick envelope, postmarked New Haven.

    Yes, 4.0 GPA, 5s on AP exams, alumni parents, and excellent interviewing skills are important, these sorts of things are what a white or Asian candidate needs to get serious consideration from Yale. (Unless you’re an athletic recruit; she wasn’t.)

    It’s surprising how many aspiring Ivy Leaguers can check these boxes (Kathryn’s semi-exotic UK childhood substitutes nicely for a fine SuperZip high school pedigree).

    Pro tip: volunteering for GenerationNext or being President of GenerationNext: these things are doubtlessly nice. To showcase the world-changing effectiveness of your missionary zeal, figure out how to found your own charity.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Pro tip: volunteering for GenerationNext or being President of GenerationNext: these things are doubtlessly nice. To showcase the world-changing effectiveness of your missionary zeal, figure out how to found your own charity.

     

    Yes, very much so. As we were going through the college app process with Daughter C this past school year, we checked out some 'How to get into big name places' advice, and what you say is completely true. You're warned now that just volunteering -- even if you've traveled to Borneo to administer locally-sourced, organic enemas to constipated orangutan babies that you rescued from evil loggers -- is de rigueur, and even a bit stale. You won't stand out.

    There's now an entrepreneurial edge that's required, but of course not something that would be useful and possibly make money. It's better to found and 'run' a pointless NGO, or be an 'influencer' on some sort of uber-woke microtopic.

  83. @syonredux

    If America had foregone slavery, the main difference would have been the South would have been populated more slowly:
     
    Without slavery, America would be a vastly better place:

    The more important slavery was in a country or state the lower the level of income was in the future. Nathan Nunn “Slavery, Inequality and Economic Development in the Americas: An Examination of the Engerman-Sokoloff Argument (October 2007).
     

    Slave states had lower levels of educational attainment and less innovation (measured by patents) than states without slavery. This was true even in the areas that were most like the North in geography and economic activity. See John Majewski “Why Did Northerners Oppose the Expansion of Slavery? Economic Development and Education in the Limestone South” Chapter 14 in Slavery’s Capitalism
     
    http://bradleyahansen.blogspot.com/2016/12/capitalism-and-slavery-debate-is-not.html


    And here's Gavin Wright on how things would have turned out if the USA had abolished slavery shortly after the Revolution:

    The preceding section suggests that if slavery had been abolished nationally at the time of the Constitution, the Cotton South would have developed through family-scale farms like the rest of the country, delivering as much or perhaps more cotton to the eager textile mills of Lancashire, and building a more diverse and prosperous regional economy in the process.

     

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ZLLNGFiwtrjeza5oZwFQRG-J3MQdn1cP/view

    The one thing I can wholeheartedly agree with the woke on is the idea of slavery as our country’s original sin. If the founders could have been given a glimpse of what Philadelphia and our largest cities looked like 200 years in the future, they would have outlawed slavery immediately.

    As we look at the massive demographic changes over the last 30 years and those in store in the next generation along with the ascendancy of the America-hating left, it owes most of its energy, policy successes, and supposed moral authority to the long shadow of this ‘peculiar institution’.

    • Replies: @Jack D

    If the founders could have been given a glimpse of what Philadelphia and our largest cities looked like 200 years in the future, they would have outlawed slavery immediately.
     
    By then it was 150 years too late. If you read Notes on the State of Virginia, Jefferson (the man was no fool) full well realized that blacks were never going to be able to live peacefully alongside whites. But the solution that he (and many others) proposed - to send them all back to Africa, proved to be impractical. As we are seeing now with this epidemic, decision makers have an OODA loop problem. By the time you complete the OODA loop, it's too late and circumstances have moved on, making your proposed action futile, impractical or even counter-productive.

    They should not have started with slaves to begin with, never put a single one on the boat. But at the time, for large plantation owners, it seemed like a solution to their need for labor, especially cheap labor. You see, crops were rotting in the fields. Does this sound familiar? So you have the problem that what is good for certain individuals is not necessarily good for the society as a whole, and the problem that what appears good in the short run may be very bad in the long run. And the problem that something that starts out very small and localized can grow to become much larger and consume an entire society over time. These are all very tough problems with no easy solutions and I fear that the generation of 2020 is not any better at (in fact worse at) solving them than the generation of 1620.

    , @XYZ (no Mr.)
    And yet the American people continued to prosper well into the 20th Century. One of the most entertaining things about iSteve is just how much many commenters here spout progressive historical themes, who would never ever call themselves progressive. And of course these themes, slavery is original sin, Americans didn't give a damn about history until immigrants came along, etc, etc all have one specific goal: to delegitimize the historic core of the American nation.

    Slavery was wrong. And yet most white Americans post-Civil War didn't give a damn about it, nor were particularly worried about racism, even if they themselves were not hateful towards others. Nor went to sleep thinking much either way about black people, or their plight. (Oddly virulent racists spend as much time on this as progressives.)

    As we all know, up until 100 years after the abolishment of slavery things in America were not perfect, but certainly no relation to today.

    There is a brutal parallelism to the 'slavery as original sin' argument. Some American black people blame slavery for conditions today -- which I reject as weak excuse making. Some commenters here also blame slavery for conditions today....

    So instead of waxing about original sin, how about focus instead on the characteristics of all who could vote in America by the 1960s.... because that group of individuals absolutely made the choices that got us where we are today, not a plantation owner along the James River in 1630. Explanation is needed on why previous generations of Americans, much closer to the institution of slavery, seemed themselves much more immune to propaganda and guilt tripping. It's almost like they were made of sterner stuff, and truly loved their land and people...

    Or perhaps the shadow of slavery is like the Wuhan virus, slowly spreading behind the scenes until its aftereffects went exponential in the 1960s.
  84. @Dan Hayes
    Question. How was one known/proved to be Yellow Fever acclimated (i.e., immunized)?

    Thanks for any response to this query!

    I think the assumption was that if you had lived in NO for X number of years (longer than the last Yellow Fever epidemic) then you were assumed to have had it and survived.

    The whole thing frankly sounds like bullshit where you take some scattered bits of fact and construct an entire historical narrative out of them that is mostly the product of your imagination and desire to prove some point that aligns with your political preferences.

    Yellow Fever was not exclusive to NO or the South. There were Yellow Fever epidemics at least as far north as Philadelphia and probably further north too. I just happen to know about Philly – major epidemic in 1793 that killed 10% of the population.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1793_Philadelphia_yellow_fever_epidemic).

    • Thanks: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @syonredux

    Yellow Fever was not exclusive to NO or the South. There were Yellow Fever epidemics at least as far north as Philadelphia and probably further north too. I just happen to know about Philly – major epidemic in 1793 that killed 10% of the population.
     
    Frequency is critical. One of the reasons why the 1793 Philadelphia epidemic is so famous is because YF was not a constant factor (E.g, the WIKIPEDIA article notes that the 1793 epidemic was the city's first in 30 years). In NO, in contrast, YF was a perennial problem:

    Yellow fever was a threat in New Orleans and south Louisiana virtually every year, during the warmest months. Among the more prominent victims were: Spanish colonial Governor Manuel Gayoso de Lemos (1799); the first and second wives (d. 1804 and 1809) of territorial Governor William C. C. Claiborne and his young daughter (1804); one of New Orleans' most important early city planners Barthelemy Lafon (1820), architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe and one of his sons (1820, 1817, respectively), who were in New Orleans building the city's first waterworks; Jesse Burton Harrison (1841), a young lawyer and author;[19] Confederate Brig. Gen. Young Marshall Moody (1866); architect James Gallier, Jr. (1868); and Confederate Lt. Gen. John Bell Hood and his wife and daughter (1879).[20]
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_yellow_fever
    , @AnotherDad

    Yellow Fever was not exclusive to NO or the South. There were Yellow Fever epidemics at least as far north as Philadelphia and probably further north too. I just happen to know about Philly – major epidemic in 1793 that killed 10% of the population.
     
    They didn't lockdown their mosquitos. Big mistake.
  85. @Arclight
    The one thing I can wholeheartedly agree with the woke on is the idea of slavery as our country's original sin. If the founders could have been given a glimpse of what Philadelphia and our largest cities looked like 200 years in the future, they would have outlawed slavery immediately.

    As we look at the massive demographic changes over the last 30 years and those in store in the next generation along with the ascendancy of the America-hating left, it owes most of its energy, policy successes, and supposed moral authority to the long shadow of this 'peculiar institution'.

    If the founders could have been given a glimpse of what Philadelphia and our largest cities looked like 200 years in the future, they would have outlawed slavery immediately.

    By then it was 150 years too late. If you read Notes on the State of Virginia, Jefferson (the man was no fool) full well realized that blacks were never going to be able to live peacefully alongside whites. But the solution that he (and many others) proposed – to send them all back to Africa, proved to be impractical. As we are seeing now with this epidemic, decision makers have an OODA loop problem. By the time you complete the OODA loop, it’s too late and circumstances have moved on, making your proposed action futile, impractical or even counter-productive.

    They should not have started with slaves to begin with, never put a single one on the boat. But at the time, for large plantation owners, it seemed like a solution to their need for labor, especially cheap labor. You see, crops were rotting in the fields. Does this sound familiar? So you have the problem that what is good for certain individuals is not necessarily good for the society as a whole, and the problem that what appears good in the short run may be very bad in the long run. And the problem that something that starts out very small and localized can grow to become much larger and consume an entire society over time. These are all very tough problems with no easy solutions and I fear that the generation of 2020 is not any better at (in fact worse at) solving them than the generation of 1620.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @syonredux

    By then it was 150 years too late. If you read Notes on the State of Virginia, Jefferson (the man was no fool) full well realized that blacks were never going to be able to live peacefully alongside whites. But the solution that he (and many others) proposed – to send them all back to Africa, proved to be impractical.
     
    It was very practical; they simply lacked the will.
  86. @J.Ross
    You will ride with us, and you will die with us: it's as inclusive as that for me and my [black bodies].

    https://www.twitter.com/MelissaAFrancis/status/1249455529111552005

    In fairness, this happens every weekend in non-Plague times, but they do tend to stay off the sidewalks.

  87. @Reg Cæsar
    How many survivors of the 1918-19 scourge do we still have with us? The last WWI vet died in 2012.

    Below are some who survived, but were a tad young to retain memories (two passed away in February), followed by interviews with other survivors taken over a dozen years ago:


    Dave McCoy (1915-2020), the ski entrepreneur that Steve posted about at his passing. He spent those flu years in El Segundo. How did SoCal do in the pandemic?

    Kirk Douglas (1916-2020). Anyone here read his autobiography? Did he mention the flu? Seems his primary problem in chilly Amsterdam (N.Y.) was his drunk father.

    Beverly Cleary (b. 4/12/1916-- happy birthday!). Her memoir A Girl from Yamhill skips from her birth to her farm memories a few years later. Nothing about the flu. "Old John A., as everyone called him, was the town undertaker. Some keeper of vital statistics once wrote reprimanding Old John A. for not reporting Yamhill's deaths. He replied that he was doing the best he could, but no one in Yamhill had died that year." That probably wasn't 1918!

    Olivia de Havilland (b. 1 July 1916). Anyone read the bio of her and her sister Joan Fontaine by Charles Higham? Is the epidemic mentioned in that? The two were born in Japan, where their father taught. Both had serious health problems-- Olivia tonsilitis, Joan anemia, measles, and strep throat-- but were these connected to the pandemic? Did it hit Japan?


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LP2YDHplOXE&t=18s


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owTz6Icec_U

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWrwv6-OonU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7k20VFZeLKY

    My about to turn 98 mother in law was born after the epidemic. Assuming that say age 4 or so is the youngest age to have any significant memories you would have to be at least 106 to remember anything and there aren’t that many who are over 106.

    She exists because of the 1918 epidemic. She is the product of her father’s second marriage. He lost his first wife (the ’18 epidemic unlike Wuhan Virus, had a taste for young flesh) in the epidemic. She knows nothing about her because her father, perhaps out of respect for (or fear of – you had to know this woman) wife #2, never spoke of her and of course now it’s too late and she regrets not having asked. I’m pretty sure that at least some details could be learned thru a little genealogical research.

  88. @J.Ross
    You will ride with us, and you will die with us: it's as inclusive as that for me and my [black bodies].

    https://www.twitter.com/MelissaAFrancis/status/1249455529111552005

    JR, There is a documentory, “Twelve O’clock Boys” that shows the packs of ATV and dirt bike riders that terreoize the streets of Baltimore. Worth a look. The main character is 11 year old “Pug” who longs to ride with the bikers. Raised by a single mother who has no idea that Pug hasn’t been to school for 60 some days.

    • Thanks: J.Ross
  89. @res

    Actually, blacks were much less likely to die of yellow fever, a West African disease, than were whites (much less poor American Indians).
     
    Some numbers for that.
    https://mbio.asm.org/content/5/3/e01253-14
    Human Genetic Variation and Yellow Fever Mortality during 19th Century U.S. Epidemics

    ABSTRACT
    We calculated the incidence, mortality, and case fatality rates for Caucasians and non-Caucasians during 19th century yellow fever (YF) epidemics in the United States and determined statistical significance for differences in the rates in different populations. We evaluated nongenetic host factors, including socioeconomic, environmental, cultural, demographic, and acquired immunity status that could have influenced these differences. While differences in incidence rates were not significant between Caucasians and non-Caucasians, differences in mortality and case fatality rates were statistically significant for all epidemics tested (P < 0.01). Caucasians diagnosed with YF were 6.8 times more likely to succumb than non-Caucasians with the disease. No other major causes of death during the 19th century demonstrated a similar mortality skew toward Caucasians. Nongenetic host factors were examined and could not explain these large differences. We propose that the remarkably lower case mortality rates for individuals of non-Caucasian ancestry is the result of human genetic variation in loci encoding innate immune mediators.
     
    But remember everyone, race is a social construct.

    P.S. Different diseases among Union troops in 1864. See Table S5 for more details.

    https://mbio.asm.org/content/mbio/5/3/e01253-14/F2.large.jpg

    Maybe having this whole “Civil War” thing wasn’t such a great idea?

  90. @Jack D

    If the founders could have been given a glimpse of what Philadelphia and our largest cities looked like 200 years in the future, they would have outlawed slavery immediately.
     
    By then it was 150 years too late. If you read Notes on the State of Virginia, Jefferson (the man was no fool) full well realized that blacks were never going to be able to live peacefully alongside whites. But the solution that he (and many others) proposed - to send them all back to Africa, proved to be impractical. As we are seeing now with this epidemic, decision makers have an OODA loop problem. By the time you complete the OODA loop, it's too late and circumstances have moved on, making your proposed action futile, impractical or even counter-productive.

    They should not have started with slaves to begin with, never put a single one on the boat. But at the time, for large plantation owners, it seemed like a solution to their need for labor, especially cheap labor. You see, crops were rotting in the fields. Does this sound familiar? So you have the problem that what is good for certain individuals is not necessarily good for the society as a whole, and the problem that what appears good in the short run may be very bad in the long run. And the problem that something that starts out very small and localized can grow to become much larger and consume an entire society over time. These are all very tough problems with no easy solutions and I fear that the generation of 2020 is not any better at (in fact worse at) solving them than the generation of 1620.

    By then it was 150 years too late. If you read Notes on the State of Virginia, Jefferson (the man was no fool) full well realized that blacks were never going to be able to live peacefully alongside whites. But the solution that he (and many others) proposed – to send them all back to Africa, proved to be impractical.

    It was very practical; they simply lacked the will.

    • Agree: Mr McKenna
  91. @Jack D
    I think the assumption was that if you had lived in NO for X number of years (longer than the last Yellow Fever epidemic) then you were assumed to have had it and survived.

    The whole thing frankly sounds like bullshit where you take some scattered bits of fact and construct an entire historical narrative out of them that is mostly the product of your imagination and desire to prove some point that aligns with your political preferences.

    Yellow Fever was not exclusive to NO or the South. There were Yellow Fever epidemics at least as far north as Philadelphia and probably further north too. I just happen to know about Philly - major epidemic in 1793 that killed 10% of the population.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1793_Philadelphia_yellow_fever_epidemic).

    Yellow Fever was not exclusive to NO or the South. There were Yellow Fever epidemics at least as far north as Philadelphia and probably further north too. I just happen to know about Philly – major epidemic in 1793 that killed 10% of the population.

    Frequency is critical. One of the reasons why the 1793 Philadelphia epidemic is so famous is because YF was not a constant factor (E.g, the WIKIPEDIA article notes that the 1793 epidemic was the city’s first in 30 years). In NO, in contrast, YF was a perennial problem:

    Yellow fever was a threat in New Orleans and south Louisiana virtually every year, during the warmest months. Among the more prominent victims were: Spanish colonial Governor Manuel Gayoso de Lemos (1799); the first and second wives (d. 1804 and 1809) of territorial Governor William C. C. Claiborne and his young daughter (1804); one of New Orleans’ most important early city planners Barthelemy Lafon (1820), architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe and one of his sons (1820, 1817, respectively), who were in New Orleans building the city’s first waterworks; Jesse Burton Harrison (1841), a young lawyer and author;[19] Confederate Brig. Gen. Young Marshall Moody (1866); architect James Gallier, Jr. (1868); and Confederate Lt. Gen. John Bell Hood and his wife and daughter (1879).[20]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_yellow_fever

  92. @Hail
    Video of Dr. Kathryn Olivarius speaking in summer 2019 (she was probably age 30 at this time):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=65QecJr67YY

    She gives some insight into her life, the socio-economic status(es) of her peers, her own life-trajectory, and her thinking about the purpose of life. Transcript:


    [Intro] I remember one summer in particular, the bugs were so bad that you could never take off your clothes, for the most part, or you were always wearing long sleeves, long pants. It happens to rain basically constantly.

    My name is Kathryn Olivarius. I'm an assistant professor of history at Stanford.

    In the summers, when I was a college student, I worked at a canoe tubing camp called Keewaydin in Northern Ontario, where I led trips for girls ranging from the ages of about 11 to 18. This is not your typical summer camp. It's almost not fun, how do I put that? (Laughs)

    My friends in college, they were working on movie sets in the summer, they were working for investment banks in New York, they were traveling around the world, they were doing other things. That made me very nervous a lot of the time. But if could go back and tell my 19-year-old self something now, it would be, "Man, keep doing what you love doing."

    I think we have this idea in life that we're on the straight path. There's this school, then there's AP tests, and there's applications to college. You know, that can happen, but it also might not happen. When I was canoe tripping, you fail all the time. You fall over with the canoe and you land in this sort of spectacular fashion. Failure can be just as generative and just as important as success.

    There is literally always a silver lining, and very often it just means you've gotta sort of dust yourself off and have a laugh and then try again.

    (upbeat music)
     

    There is a fair amount of interest there, but you can read the transcript as well as I can.

    I wonder how she ended up with this northern Ontario canoe tubing camp job in one or more of the summers between 2008 and 2010.

    I also note that Dr. Kathyrn is one of those who chooses to use the term 'literally' to mean 'metaphorically.' We need to coin a term such as "literally-literally" to solve this problem. (Until they take that one over too, but it's worth a shot.)

    An insufferable Stanford bitch (pardon the redundancy!).

  93. Black people, with limited access to health care, were of course as scared of yellow fever as anyone else.

    You know what else? The slave quarters didn’t even have air conditioning!

  94. @ic1000
    Recent work with malaria shows that when the evidence for differential susceptibility or mortality is this strong, the causal genes (alleles, actually) can be identified. SNP chips and well-designed GWASs are powerful tools.

    Fortunately for the NYT-mindset elites, the victims and survivors of these epidemics are long departed, so a study would be difficult. Impossibly difficult. Students can continue to learn (by omission) that natural selection has nothing to do with humans.

    The thesis of The 10,000 Year Explosion was definitively disproven by reasons.

    We have found some of the causal alleles for malaria resistance, and for resistance to sleeping sickness, but not for yellow fever. I think people are afraid to do field studies anywhere where it exists.

  95. @Hypnotoad666

    Black people, with limited access to health care, were of course as scared of yellow fever as anyone else.
     
    LOL. Nineteenth Century "healthcare" consisted of leeches and laudanum. The less "access" you had the more likely you were to survive.

    Also, how dare those immune people cash in on their "privilege." I mean, all they did was vomit black blood, endure excruciating pain, and run a 50% chance of death. What a bunch of privileged elites!

    Even by NYT standards, this is a really, really stupid article.

    > Even by NYT standards, this is a really, really stupid article.

    Asst. Prof. Olivarius has a specialist’s knowledge of the 19th-century Deep South — the time and place her research has focused on, and the subject of her article. So she knows that the connection between mosquitoes and yellow fever wasn’t made until 1900 (Ref. 1, here). She also knows that most NYT readers don’t have facts like these at their fingertips.

    So this phrasing

    But immunity was more than a product of epidemiological luck. In the context of the Deep South, it was wielded as a weapon. From the start, wealthy white New Orleanians made sure that while mosquitoes were equal-opportunity vectors, yellow fever would be anything but colorblind.

    is really, really stupid. Those wealthy New Orleanians couldn’t make sure of anything that they were ignorant of.

    The Op-Ed page is Facebook For Elites, not a history lesson. This blonde’s article is a social media post, advertising that she’s enlisted as a volunteer in the Cold Civil War. A tenure decision can’t be far away, and this can only help.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    The Op-Ed page is Facebook For Elites, not a history lesson.
     
    Spot on.

    "History" as an anachronistic exercise in virtue signalling is pretty much the opposite of real History.
  96. @Hail

    what sort of students are our elite universities handing out advanced degree in the humanities, anyway?
     
    Kathryn Olivarius describes herself as "born and raised in New York, Washington D.C., and London" (from her Stanford bio; but how can she be "born" in three places? This is imprecise writing unworthy of someone of her station).

    The dates of degree conferral are interesting:

    Yale, BA, 2011;
    Oxford MA, 2013;
    Oxford PhD, 2016.

    Assuming she entered Yale the fall after graduating from high school, she went straight through, "K-to-18" (thru MA) without interruption for any purpose, then grabbed a three-year PhD. (Three years for a PhD; unusually, suspiciously fast.)

    She was therefore, as far as I can tell, in nothing but a long education track through as late as her 28th birthday, with no gaps for work, no children (naturally), no anything else. No Peace Corps or the like. Just straight through floating along the education bubble. (She is married, though. From a Jan. 2018 Stanford Daily interview: "The first thing I do every morning is The New York Times crossword puzzle. I don’t talk to my husband. [...].")

    And she remains in it now at ca. age 31. Kathryn Olivarius is now Ron Unz' neighbor as Assistant Professor of History at Stanford, Aug. 2017 thru Feb. 2020. (As of March 2020 she is CoronaPanic'ed-out until further notice.)

    From her Stanford bio:


    I am also interested in historical notions of consent (sexual or otherwise); slave revolts in the United States and the Caribbean; anti- and pro-slavery thought; class and ethnicity in antebellum America; the history of life insurance and environmental risk; comparative slave systems; technology and slavery; the Haitian Revolution; and boosterism in the American West.
     
    Yale BA thesis:

    “Panic! on the Yazoo: Land Pirates, King Cotton, and the Lynchings of Madison County, Mississippi, 1835.”
     
    Oxford Master's thesis:

    “American Slavery’s Most Important Non-Event: Understanding the 1808 African Slave Trade Ban in the Long War for the West.”
     
    Oxford PhD thesis:

    “Necropolis: Yellow Fever, Immunity, and Capitalism in the Deep South, 1800-1860.” (Supervisors: Pekka Hämäläinen and Lawrence Goldman)
     
    Kathryn Olivarius is credited with co-founding, with her sister, a charity called GenerationNext to support Black children. That was in 2005, when she would have been about 16. The group's website claims the sisters were inspired by Black children upon a Jan. 2003 visit to South Africa and were determined to form the group thereafter. They had spent 2002 raising funds in London to give the children. So Dr. Olivarius' trajectory is: age 13 to age 31 on a continuous pro-Black life quest.
    .
    https://hailtoyou.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/kathryn-olivarius-generation-next-charity.jpeg

    Interesting info. Thanks Hail.

    Kathryn Olivarius is a prime example of the profound damage that minoritarianism does to a lot of white women.

    Minoritarian propaganda is able to play on the high affective empathy of white gentiles and in some–pretty substantial–number of young women, reprogram their natural nurturing instinct–which is there so they will care for their own children–into destroying their own fertility in favor of working against their own nation, race, civilization.

    Olivarius is an extreme case, setup for it by her privileged upbringing by annoying academic-lawyer good-white parents. But these gals are everywhere. A couple Thanksgiving’s back, one of my daughter’s good friends–sort of 4th child for me–brought along a couple of her new roommates. One was doing a public health masters at UW. Fairly attractive girl–well above average–with seemingly all the right equipment for both enjoyment and production. Her interest–“refugees”, “working with refugee children.” This from ordinary middle middle class background–not annoying civil-rights shakedown lawyer mom like Olivarius. Young white women do not even understand why they are valued–what it is that they can do that actually has great value.

    ~~

    Perspective is in order in these times. Corona-chan kills maybe–worst case–1%, probably 90% of whom are in their 70s, 80s, 90s and already ten days to ten years from death.

    The minoritarian virus is reprogramming young white girls’ minds by the millions, rendering millions of white wombs less productive or outright barren, and quickly snuffing out our entire race.

    It’s not even a contest. Minoritarianism is the much deadlier virus.

    • Replies: @Neoconned
    If you truly want to increase white birth rates you need to:

    1) IMMEDIATELY destroy the feminist movement. Ban female suffrage. Import white female immigrants or at least quasi white females.....think white Hispanics, Christian Arabs etc This will increase competiton for the domestic female population. Destroy female employer industries.....fast food, hospitality etc

    2) Cut off all welfare for single moms etc Impose Saudi type chaperone rules....

    3) Act like Muslims in regards to female rights.

    Otherwise expect more of what the PUAs and Heartiste types predict.....more importation of foreign men to lounge around on welfare & a combination of petty crime income and living off the wages of theor idiot hard working masochistic women who put them thru grueling hard labor service jobs to support their loser thug men who sit around all day drinking and smoking blunts.

    I hate to put it like that but i don't see any better solutions.

    If there are some please.....let me know. White dudes in general and American white guys in particular have been cucking out since what? Shakespearean times perhaps? Tolerating womens whoring around etc
  97. @ic1000
    > Even by NYT standards, this is a really, really stupid article.

    Asst. Prof. Olivarius has a specialist's knowledge of the 19th-century Deep South -- the time and place her research has focused on, and the subject of her article. So she knows that the connection between mosquitoes and yellow fever wasn't made until 1900 (Ref. 1, here). She also knows that most NYT readers don't have facts like these at their fingertips.

    So this phrasing

    But immunity was more than a product of epidemiological luck. In the context of the Deep South, it was wielded as a weapon. From the start, wealthy white New Orleanians made sure that while mosquitoes were equal-opportunity vectors, yellow fever would be anything but colorblind.
     
    is really, really stupid. Those wealthy New Orleanians couldn't make sure of anything that they were ignorant of.

    The Op-Ed page is Facebook For Elites, not a history lesson. This blonde's article is a social media post, advertising that she's enlisted as a volunteer in the Cold Civil War. A tenure decision can't be far away, and this can only help.

    The Op-Ed page is Facebook For Elites, not a history lesson.

    Spot on.

    “History” as an anachronistic exercise in virtue signalling is pretty much the opposite of real History.

    • Agree: Hail
  98. @Arclight
    The one thing I can wholeheartedly agree with the woke on is the idea of slavery as our country's original sin. If the founders could have been given a glimpse of what Philadelphia and our largest cities looked like 200 years in the future, they would have outlawed slavery immediately.

    As we look at the massive demographic changes over the last 30 years and those in store in the next generation along with the ascendancy of the America-hating left, it owes most of its energy, policy successes, and supposed moral authority to the long shadow of this 'peculiar institution'.

    And yet the American people continued to prosper well into the 20th Century. One of the most entertaining things about iSteve is just how much many commenters here spout progressive historical themes, who would never ever call themselves progressive. And of course these themes, slavery is original sin, Americans didn’t give a damn about history until immigrants came along, etc, etc all have one specific goal: to delegitimize the historic core of the American nation.

    Slavery was wrong. And yet most white Americans post-Civil War didn’t give a damn about it, nor were particularly worried about racism, even if they themselves were not hateful towards others. Nor went to sleep thinking much either way about black people, or their plight. (Oddly virulent racists spend as much time on this as progressives.)

    As we all know, up until 100 years after the abolishment of slavery things in America were not perfect, but certainly no relation to today.

    There is a brutal parallelism to the ‘slavery as original sin’ argument. Some American black people blame slavery for conditions today — which I reject as weak excuse making. Some commenters here also blame slavery for conditions today….

    So instead of waxing about original sin, how about focus instead on the characteristics of all who could vote in America by the 1960s…. because that group of individuals absolutely made the choices that got us where we are today, not a plantation owner along the James River in 1630. Explanation is needed on why previous generations of Americans, much closer to the institution of slavery, seemed themselves much more immune to propaganda and guilt tripping. It’s almost like they were made of sterner stuff, and truly loved their land and people…

    Or perhaps the shadow of slavery is like the Wuhan virus, slowly spreading behind the scenes until its aftereffects went exponential in the 1960s.

  99. @Reg Cæsar
    How many survivors of the 1918-19 scourge do we still have with us? The last WWI vet died in 2012.

    Below are some who survived, but were a tad young to retain memories (two passed away in February), followed by interviews with other survivors taken over a dozen years ago:


    Dave McCoy (1915-2020), the ski entrepreneur that Steve posted about at his passing. He spent those flu years in El Segundo. How did SoCal do in the pandemic?

    Kirk Douglas (1916-2020). Anyone here read his autobiography? Did he mention the flu? Seems his primary problem in chilly Amsterdam (N.Y.) was his drunk father.

    Beverly Cleary (b. 4/12/1916-- happy birthday!). Her memoir A Girl from Yamhill skips from her birth to her farm memories a few years later. Nothing about the flu. "Old John A., as everyone called him, was the town undertaker. Some keeper of vital statistics once wrote reprimanding Old John A. for not reporting Yamhill's deaths. He replied that he was doing the best he could, but no one in Yamhill had died that year." That probably wasn't 1918!

    Olivia de Havilland (b. 1 July 1916). Anyone read the bio of her and her sister Joan Fontaine by Charles Higham? Is the epidemic mentioned in that? The two were born in Japan, where their father taught. Both had serious health problems-- Olivia tonsilitis, Joan anemia, measles, and strep throat-- but were these connected to the pandemic? Did it hit Japan?


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LP2YDHplOXE&t=18s


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owTz6Icec_U

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWrwv6-OonU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7k20VFZeLKY

    I read the bio of Fontaine and de Havilland. No mention of Spanish flu.

    Mother and sibling of English author Anthony Burgess died of Spanish flu the day his father was released from the army. Father called Mother in the morning to tell her he was on his way to London to catch a train to Manchester where they lived. Mother seemed fine when they spoke.

    Father arrived around 4 in the after noon. He found baby Anthony crying and wife and the other child dead.

    Friend was looking for records on her great grandmother named Katherine Ann Conway, 3 very common names. She found dozens of Katherine Ann Conway’s of the right age. Many died in 1918.

  100. @Jack D
    I think the assumption was that if you had lived in NO for X number of years (longer than the last Yellow Fever epidemic) then you were assumed to have had it and survived.

    The whole thing frankly sounds like bullshit where you take some scattered bits of fact and construct an entire historical narrative out of them that is mostly the product of your imagination and desire to prove some point that aligns with your political preferences.

    Yellow Fever was not exclusive to NO or the South. There were Yellow Fever epidemics at least as far north as Philadelphia and probably further north too. I just happen to know about Philly - major epidemic in 1793 that killed 10% of the population.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1793_Philadelphia_yellow_fever_epidemic).

    Yellow Fever was not exclusive to NO or the South. There were Yellow Fever epidemics at least as far north as Philadelphia and probably further north too. I just happen to know about Philly – major epidemic in 1793 that killed 10% of the population.

    They didn’t lockdown their mosquitos. Big mistake.

  101. @Anonymous
    Low point of the past week of press conferences might have been the PC status signalling by Dr Fauci and Surgeon General Daffy on the subject of elevated black infection rates.

    Everybody knows blacks eat more junk drink more junk smoke more junk blah blah blah. Doesn't matter. We need to pretend that whites are immuno privileged.

    White obesity and white diabetes are behavior driven outcomes but black obesity and black diabetes are mysteriously not. That's the story and they're sticking to it.

    Even if Fauci declares on Monday that historically consistent undesirable black health outcomes are known facts of life to the medical profession ----- by Thursday he's whining about what amounts to a black-white health gap caused by guess fucking what.

    You forgot to mention how they’re always handling their junk.

  102. @Captain Tripps
    Speaking of Yellow Fever and New Orleans, former Confederate General John Bell ("Sam") Hood and his wife both died of Yellow Fever in the 1878-1879 New Orleans outbreak. They left 10 orphaned children. The pox did what Union ordnance could not.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Bell_Hood

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/62/Lt._Gen._John_B._Hood.jpg/453px-Lt._Gen._John_B._Hood.jpg

    The man lost the last knuckle of his middle finger on his left hand. Left it at Gettysburg, I suppose.

    (I just now read on Wiki where he was severely wounded in the left arm at Gettysburg. Not a bad guess if I do say so myself)

  103. My Man Alexander Hamilton was a Yellow Fever survivor.

    Thanks God. Who knows what would have happened without Hamilton to do staff officering for Washington, sell the constitution, fund the national debt and get the Census going. Among other things. And even in death he probably put an end to the political career of Aaron Burr.

    Talk about racist-sexist-homophobic White Privilege! How come some deserving Woman of Color didn’t get the chances that Hamilton patriarchally grabbed?

  104. True New Orleans is important because it is the gateway to the Mississippi and thus all that river traffic plus being a major Gulf port of entry for all kinds of imported crap but i agree to a point….we would have been better off without slavery and all the wretchedness that has come w it.

    Friend of mine told me once “wouldnt we have been better off had we picked our own cotton? And then avoided all those cop and prison and welfare etc costs?” Pretty much.

    This miserable humid crudhole has never really recovered from the Civil War. And the post Katrina influx of Hispanics has done nothing but aided the neo-slavery elites who use them as a docile quasi slave class and suppress wages pf working class blacks and whites(like me)…..im a born southerner but deep down i think I’m an unapologetic “Damned Yankee”….

  105. disease an issue, but very hot very wet air as big of an issue.

    as soon as AC invented, people starting populating the deep south and southwest.

    american indians were not thick on the ground in the hottest parts of America, even with thousands of years to fill in the area.

  106. By Kathryn Olivarius

    What’s with the spelling Kathryn? I can see Caroline becoming Carolyn with the influence of Lynn, but Kathryn? Is this like Brazilian musicians having names with Y and other letters not in their language, to look cooler?

    Anyway, it suggests some level of parental irresponsibility.

    Kathryn Olivarius = A honky virus trial.

    By the way, there is a town called Porno in the state of Borno, Nigeria. For some reason, its only Wikipedia page is in German:

    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porno_(Nigeria)

  107. @AnotherDad
    Interesting info. Thanks Hail.

    Kathryn Olivarius is a prime example of the profound damage that minoritarianism does to a lot of white women.

    Minoritarian propaganda is able to play on the high affective empathy of white gentiles and in some--pretty substantial--number of young women, reprogram their natural nurturing instinct--which is there so they will care for their own children--into destroying their own fertility in favor of working against their own nation, race, civilization.

    Olivarius is an extreme case, setup for it by her privileged upbringing by annoying academic-lawyer good-white parents. But these gals are everywhere. A couple Thanksgiving's back, one of my daughter's good friends--sort of 4th child for me--brought along a couple of her new roommates. One was doing a public health masters at UW. Fairly attractive girl--well above average--with seemingly all the right equipment for both enjoyment and production. Her interest--"refugees", "working with refugee children." This from ordinary middle middle class background--not annoying civil-rights shakedown lawyer mom like Olivarius. Young white women do not even understand why they are valued--what it is that they can do that actually has great value.

    ~~

    Perspective is in order in these times. Corona-chan kills maybe--worst case--1%, probably 90% of whom are in their 70s, 80s, 90s and already ten days to ten years from death.

    The minoritarian virus is reprogramming young white girls' minds by the millions, rendering millions of white wombs less productive or outright barren, and quickly snuffing out our entire race.

    It's not even a contest. Minoritarianism is the much deadlier virus.

    If you truly want to increase white birth rates you need to:

    1) IMMEDIATELY destroy the feminist movement. Ban female suffrage. Import white female immigrants or at least quasi white females…..think white Hispanics, Christian Arabs etc This will increase competiton for the domestic female population. Destroy female employer industries…..fast food, hospitality etc

    2) Cut off all welfare for single moms etc Impose Saudi type chaperone rules….

    3) Act like Muslims in regards to female rights.

    Otherwise expect more of what the PUAs and Heartiste types predict…..more importation of foreign men to lounge around on welfare & a combination of petty crime income and living off the wages of theor idiot hard working masochistic women who put them thru grueling hard labor service jobs to support their loser thug men who sit around all day drinking and smoking blunts.

    I hate to put it like that but i don’t see any better solutions.

    If there are some please…..let me know. White dudes in general and American white guys in particular have been cucking out since what? Shakespearean times perhaps? Tolerating womens whoring around etc

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @BB753
    4) Ban women from universities and any form of higher education, whether as students or teachers.
    5) No white-collar work for women. If women want to enjoy a middle-class standard of living, they should marry good husbands.
    6) Ban the pill.
    7) In case of divorce, the husband always gets to keep the kids.
  108. @J.Ross
    You will ride with us, and you will die with us: it's as inclusive as that for me and my [black bodies].

    https://www.twitter.com/MelissaAFrancis/status/1249455529111552005

    This is a rite of spring time in NYC, usually around Easter Saturday. They drive all though the city–not just Manhattan. Several years (a decade?) ago , there was a shooting or beating on the Upper West Side and some smashed car windows for a driver (Asian) who wasn’t happy with the harassing traffic.

    Even then, racial/ethnic activists berated the NYPD who were shadowing the “parade” as they had monitored social media for the meet-up coordination of the event.

    The “parade” is mimicked by the younger, non-drivers license crowd by organizing a similar parade on bicycles. Last year I got caught crossing Third Avenue while about 200 teens passed by–ignoring traffic lights and riding against traffic, and down the sidewalk. Of course they did!

  109. @peterike

    It would require one of the few right wing rich people, like the Koch Brothers or Betsy DeVos or her brother Eric Prince, to be a new John D. Rockefeller or Leland Stanford and found a new institution, probably in a small Southern, Midwestern, or Rocky Mountain town, and staff it with well credentialed but dissident professors, who have trouble getting jobs at any other than very small time institutions, because of their views.
     
    No corporation would ever hire anyone who graduated from this University.

    Do Brigham Young, Franciscan University of Steubenville, George Mason, Wheaton (of Illinois) or Hillsdale graduates find it impossible to find corporate jobs? (Reason for strting fresh rather than expanding one of those I named is that a billionaire is going to put his or her stamp on the school.)

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    I would expect that Brigham Young graduates would find high-level corporate jobs with the help of ensconced coreligionists. Like masonic-type brotherhood for Mormons in today's FBI (where Catholics were previously favored by J E Hoover).
    , @Anonymous
    Graduates of such schools are probably especially sought by smaller firms owned by people with aligned interests, and of course certain companies do have specific animosities against specific beliefs: I'm sure Trad Catholic owned firms don't especially want Mormon or fundamentalist candidates with any special zeal for those positions, and vice versa, but major companies probably don't care that much.
  110. If they ever develop a vaccine for this pandemic, they’re going to have to credit a black-transgender-Muslim-refugee lab assistant.

  111. Yellow fever, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, was inescapable in the 19th-century Deep South and a point of near-constant terror in New Orleans, the region’s hub.

    It was not the “hub”. New Orleans was peripheral.

  112. As I pointed out in my column last year, “Alternative America,” about what American history would have been like without slavery, the disease burden problem explains much about the economic usefulness of slavery. If America had foregone slavery, the main difference would have been the South would have been populated more slowly:

    Or at a similar or greater speed by Spaniards or even Portuguese using African slaves.

  113. @Hibernian
    Do Brigham Young, Franciscan University of Steubenville, George Mason, Wheaton (of Illinois) or Hillsdale graduates find it impossible to find corporate jobs? (Reason for strting fresh rather than expanding one of those I named is that a billionaire is going to put his or her stamp on the school.)

    I would expect that Brigham Young graduates would find high-level corporate jobs with the help of ensconced coreligionists. Like masonic-type brotherhood for Mormons in today’s FBI (where Catholics were previously favored by J E Hoover).

  114. @Jack Armstrong
    What a Becky!

    Or is she a Karen? I’m sorry, I can no longer tell the difference between white women it’s culturally acceptable to hate.

    • Replies: @Jack Armstrong
    The Becky/Karen distinction is always a tough call for white males.
  115. @Mr McKenna
    Even in that glorious eventuality, though, we still imported another class of people who have made it their business to wreck the nation. And their handiwork includes this:


    More Africans have migrated to the USA in any recent ten-year period of their own free will than were transported here over the entire 200+ years of the slave trade. That’s how bad it is here for Africans–we simply can’t keep them from flocking here. And this is just counting legal migrants. Whatever racism actually is, it’s proving impossible to prevent Africans from being attracted to it. They simply can’t get enough.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/21/nyregion/more-africans-enter-us-than-in-days-of-slavery.html

    African migration has ramped up considerably since that article was published.

    What this means, anyway, is that even if this country had never imported a single African slave, we’d still be dealing with millions of Africans, in their glorious, manifold manifestations. Because Reasons, as Steve likes to say.
     
    'TWMNBN'

    then grabbed a three-year PhD. (Three years for a PhD; unusually, suspiciously fast.)

    You have to add in a year (typically) for the M.Phil. Typically, the track for American students who get a bachelor’s degree here, and thenproceed to the UK for higher studies leading to a doctorate is M.Phil/M.A—>D.Phil/Ph.D. That’s four years, at a minimum, which also equates to the minimum of four years it takes to get a Ph.D. in a university over here.

    Even so, a historian or other humanities student completing a doctorate in four years is unusual. Many scholars seeking a doctorate in History or English typically take six or seven years. There is a lot of written material to be researched and collated in those fields of study.

  116. @Hail

    Explore more about Ann's work as a...

    - Lawyer
    - Feminist
    - Philanthropist
    - Financier
    - Human Rights
    - Activist
    - Scholar
     


    In 2019, Olivarius was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award from YaleWomen, for her tireless work throughout her career fighting for gender equity and a more just society.
     
    Back at her bio page we see this:

    Olivarius’ journey to the feminist front lines began in New Jersey, where she grew up the oldest of five daughters in a Catholic family that often struggled to make ends meet
     
    Looking into the genealogy here for more possible insights.

    Ann's parents (Kathyrn Olivarius' maternal grandparents) are Kenneth William Olivarius (1925–2012) and Ann Marie Beckley (1932–1999). Ann was one of six (five daughters, one son). The family was associated with Park Ridge and Old Tappan, New Jersey, and all of Ann's ancestral lines are associated with NYC as of ca.1890.

    Ann Olivarius' mother (Ann Beckley) appears to be primarily Irish-Catholic origin. Surnames of her grandparents (b.1860s to 1872) and their places of origin are: Beckley [b.England], Sullivan [b.New York but of Irish Potato Famine emigrant stock], Adams [b.Rhode Island; at-least-partial origin in Ireland], Moore [b.Ireland].

    Ann Olivarius' father, Kenneth W. Olivarius, was born and raised in Brooklyn per his obituary, which also has this:


    He was a 1942 graduate of Brooklyn Technical High School and received his Bachelors' degree from St. Johns University. Kenneth was a U.S. Navy Veteran serving as a radar man in the Pacific Theater during World War II. After returning from the war, Kenneth met and married the love of his life, Ann Beckley [...]

    He was the owner and president of Olivarius and Associates until retiring in 2008. Prior to that, Kenneth had a successful career as a national sales manager for General Foods, Manhattan Sales Co., and Duralight Lamps before starting his own company in 1977.
     

    She may have been generous with her claim that her family struggled to make ends meet.

    Ann's father Kenneth W. Olivarius' personal ancestry is:

    [Parents]
    - Holger Johannes Olivarius (1892–1948)
    - Adele Elvira Carpeneto (1895–1968)

    [Grandparents] (i.e., the four paternal great-grandparents of Ann)
    - Holger Frderik Thye de Fine Olivarius (1858–1915) of Denmark; imm. 1873
    (married in 1889 at Brooklyn)
    - Caroline Wildermuth (1870–1917) of NYC; German-born Lutheran parents

    - Andrea Carpeneto (1868–1940) orig. of Tribogna, Genova, Liguria, Italy
    (married in 1893 at Manhattan)
    - Christina Elizabeth Debarbieri (1870–1962) also orig. of Tribogna, Italy

    The Italian grandparents' being listed as born in the same town in Italy must mean they had arrived not long before their 1893 marriage (likely the man first by a few years, as usual), which was registered at Manhattan.

    As for the Denmark-born grandfather (Holger Frderik Thye de Fine Olivarius), he is recorded as baptized in 1858, presumably in the Lutheran church. His son (father of Kenneth Olivarius; grandfather of Ann), though, is buried at a Catholic cemetery in Brooklyn, making Ann Marie Olivarius (1955–) of all-Catholic origin on her father's side back to her grandparents (though up to half Lutheran by religious-ancestry, if you go back far enough), and principally but not entirely Irish-Catholic on her mother's side.

    As far as I can tell, this shakes out to: 2/16ths Denmark (incl. the Olivarius surname), 2/16ths Germany, 4/16ths (northern-)Italian, 6/16ths Irish-Catholic, 1/16th nineteenth-century English, 1/16th unclear (possibly Colonial-Yankee or possibly this line too is Irish-Catholic). (The Moldbug 'Puritan'/Calvinist theory fails here as she has no Calvinist ancestry.)

    If that is all too boring for whoever may be reading this, present or future, we do find one more surprising 'Black' connection:

    Tracing the Olivarius paternal ancestral line, we find a Holger de Fine Olivarius born in 1788 in "The West Indies." His mother (Anna Marie Heitmann, 1758–1827) was the "daughter of a plantation manager," which (prepare your gasps now) means...Slaves...involved. His father was some character out of Copenhagen who wound up in the West Indies, but the line ends up back in Denmark whence it came to the US in 1873 (the 1873-arrival ancestor appears to have come alone at age 15, probably meeting some relative, but his own father never left Denmark).

    The Olivarius surname goes way back (an ancestor, Niels Olivarius [1637–1711], earned a Master's [Magister] degree in 1677. If I know my Scandinavian genealogy, and I do (Ann's great-grandfather's place of origin is near one of my ancestors'; I claim to responsibility for her actions!), I know that a fixed family name back in the 18th century is an almost-100%-definite sign of an aristocratic family.

    (Comment: Ann Olivarius chose to keep her maiden name, which her daughter Dr. Kathryn Olivarius also keeps. Ironically for this act of anti-patriarchy surname rebellion, it turns out the name she kept is an aristocratic family-name with ties to slave-owning and the slave-system in the West Indies. Which is the kind of thing Dr. Kathryn would condemn. Will Dr. Kathryn go so far as to condemn her own same-named ancestor for ties to slavery in the West Indies?)

    Explore more about Ann’s work as a…

    – Lawyer
    – Feminist
    Philanthropist
    – Financier
    – Human Rights
    – Activist
    – Scholar

    (my emphasis)

    The term “philanthropist” is normally reserved, perversely, for people who spend a lot of their own money on charitable causes.

    We need another term, perhaps “misanthropist”, for someone who takes every opportunity to screw over members of their outgroup. Not “misanthrope” which already has another meaning. Bonus points if the person appears to be a member of their own outgroup, such as an anti-white white.

    • Agree: Hail
  117. @ic1000
    > Kathryn Olivarius is credited with co-founding, with her sister, a charity called GenerationNext to support Black children.

    This would have been the catnip that clinched young Kathryn’s thick envelope, postmarked New Haven.

    Yes, 4.0 GPA, 5s on AP exams, alumni parents, and excellent interviewing skills are important, these sorts of things are what a white or Asian candidate needs to get serious consideration from Yale. (Unless you’re an athletic recruit; she wasn’t.)

    It’s surprising how many aspiring Ivy Leaguers can check these boxes (Kathryn’s semi-exotic UK childhood substitutes nicely for a fine SuperZip high school pedigree).

    Pro tip: volunteering for GenerationNext or being President of GenerationNext: these things are doubtlessly nice. To showcase the world-changing effectiveness of your missionary zeal, figure out how to found your own charity.

    Pro tip: volunteering for GenerationNext or being President of GenerationNext: these things are doubtlessly nice. To showcase the world-changing effectiveness of your missionary zeal, figure out how to found your own charity.

    Yes, very much so. As we were going through the college app process with Daughter C this past school year, we checked out some ‘How to get into big name places’ advice, and what you say is completely true. You’re warned now that just volunteering — even if you’ve traveled to Borneo to administer locally-sourced, organic enemas to constipated orangutan babies that you rescued from evil loggers — is de rigueur, and even a bit stale. You won’t stand out.

    There’s now an entrepreneurial edge that’s required, but of course not something that would be useful and possibly make money. It’s better to found and ‘run’ a pointless NGO, or be an ‘influencer’ on some sort of uber-woke microtopic.

    • Replies: @Hail

    It’s better to found and ‘run’ a pointless NGO, or be an ‘influencer’ on some sort of uber-woke microtopic.
     
    From "going to the moon" to "running pointles NGOs for status points" in fifty years.

    How about that on somebody's gravestone epitaph:

    Daughter.
    Friend.
    Ran a pointless NGO.
     
    , @ic1000
    > There’s now an entrepreneurial edge that’s required, but of course not something that would be useful and possibly make money. It’s better to found and ‘run’ a pointless NGO, or be an ‘influencer’ on some sort of uber-woke microtopic.

    Yep. Founding an organization that’s you-alone would brand you as a loser, and an unpopular one at that. Your successful charity should have lots of volunteers... who are marking themselves as Not Ivy Material, by virtue of the hours spent on your idea.

    As long as your friends don’t recognize what it means when they help you protect sea turtles from killer plastic straws in the landfill, it’s all good.

    Kind of a ‘meta’ winnowing process, though.
  118. @peterike

    It would require one of the few right wing rich people, like the Koch Brothers or Betsy DeVos or her brother Eric Prince, to be a new John D. Rockefeller or Leland Stanford and found a new institution, probably in a small Southern, Midwestern, or Rocky Mountain town, and staff it with well credentialed but dissident professors, who have trouble getting jobs at any other than very small time institutions, because of their views.
     
    No corporation would ever hire anyone who graduated from this University.

    There are colleges that are hospitable to conservatives. Hillsdale and Grove City don’t seem to have trouble placing their graduates with employers. Such institutions don’t have difficulty existing; they are just vastly outnumbered. My guess is that most of their graduates go on either directly to private-sector employment or to professional schools (business, law, medicine). Perhaps a person with one of their degrees would have difficulty getting into a Ph.D. program at a conventionally left-wing university.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    My guess is that most of their graduates go on either directly to private-sector employment or to professional schools (business, law, medicine).
     
    I don't know if I would consider business schools, at least MBA programs, akin to law or medical (dental, podiatric, pharmacy, arguably chiropractic) schools. "Professions" per se, are legal fiat monopolies. You must go to an accredited school of medicine or osteopathy to be a doctor, a pharmacy school to be a pharmacist, etc. And in general (California being an exception possibly testing the rule) you have to go to an accredited school of law to be able to take the bar and practice law. The CPA program is similar, to sit for the CPA exam you have to have basically six years of college now. But the MBA degree confers no legal monopoly status: companies hire them because it's considered the done thing, but there is no legal monopoly they wield.

    I'm guessing a graduate of a school like Hillsdale would be in the same position as a graduate of one of the more traditionalistic and fundamentalist Christian schools such as Bob Jones or our local Mid-America Nazarene University. I know MANU grads who have went on to master's and doctorate programs at KU, UMKC, UMSL, et al with no problems. maybe an Ivy League school would be less welcoming. I don't know.
    , @Jack D
    If there are any colleges that gives you an inside track to the corridors of money and power, Hillsdale and Grove City are sure to be on the list. Supreme Court Justice, President, tech billionaire - you name it - Hillsdale and Grove City are the places to be.

    For some reason, my high school guidance counselor wanted me to go to Grove City instead of Penn. I don't know whether she was getting a kickback or was some kind of Christian Fundamentalist or what, but she kept pushing it. She called my mother in and in my presence described to her in some detail a lurid Penthouse letters type fantasy set at Penn involving one roommate having sex with his girlfriend while the other was present in the bunk bed above (or below? I forget) him. Apparently she had it on good information that this happened every day at Penn so this brothel, this den of iniquity, should be avoided at all costs. The whole thing was mortifyingly embarrassing to me, who never ever discussed sex with his parents in any way shape or form (I'm still waiting for them to tell me about the birds and the bees).

    Somehow, despite her urgings I ended up going to Penn anyway. American universities were such strange alien places to my parents and so far outside their life experience that they might as well have been on the moon and they were willing to trust my judgment despite the strange story that that goyish lady told them. I am forever thankful to my parents that they didn't listen to that crazy woman.

  119. @Neoconned
    If you truly want to increase white birth rates you need to:

    1) IMMEDIATELY destroy the feminist movement. Ban female suffrage. Import white female immigrants or at least quasi white females.....think white Hispanics, Christian Arabs etc This will increase competiton for the domestic female population. Destroy female employer industries.....fast food, hospitality etc

    2) Cut off all welfare for single moms etc Impose Saudi type chaperone rules....

    3) Act like Muslims in regards to female rights.

    Otherwise expect more of what the PUAs and Heartiste types predict.....more importation of foreign men to lounge around on welfare & a combination of petty crime income and living off the wages of theor idiot hard working masochistic women who put them thru grueling hard labor service jobs to support their loser thug men who sit around all day drinking and smoking blunts.

    I hate to put it like that but i don't see any better solutions.

    If there are some please.....let me know. White dudes in general and American white guys in particular have been cucking out since what? Shakespearean times perhaps? Tolerating womens whoring around etc

    4) Ban women from universities and any form of higher education, whether as students or teachers.
    5) No white-collar work for women. If women want to enjoy a middle-class standard of living, they should marry good husbands.
    6) Ban the pill.
    7) In case of divorce, the husband always gets to keep the kids.

    • Replies: @anon
    Dude, put down the pipe or bong or hookah...whatever. You're tripping on a powerful drug, fantasy.

    lol.

  120. @BB753
    4) Ban women from universities and any form of higher education, whether as students or teachers.
    5) No white-collar work for women. If women want to enjoy a middle-class standard of living, they should marry good husbands.
    6) Ban the pill.
    7) In case of divorce, the husband always gets to keep the kids.

    Dude, put down the pipe or bong or hookah…whatever. You’re tripping on a powerful drug, fantasy.

    lol.

    • Replies: @BB753
    If you had told me 20 years ago that gay marriage would be legal one day and that we'd have trans kids, sixty + year old trannies making the covers of fashion magazines, and 53 "genders" taught at school, I'd also have said you were crazy.
    Things change, sometimes very fast.
    How do we put the cat back in the bag? Sometimes the cat gets back inside of the bag by itself. So women will one day beg for the return of hetetopatriarchy, once they realize they'll be safer and happier under the old arrangements.
    You can call me a dreamer, but I'm not the only one, to quote the tritest song in history.
  121. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Crawfurdmuir
    There are colleges that are hospitable to conservatives. Hillsdale and Grove City don't seem to have trouble placing their graduates with employers. Such institutions don't have difficulty existing; they are just vastly outnumbered. My guess is that most of their graduates go on either directly to private-sector employment or to professional schools (business, law, medicine). Perhaps a person with one of their degrees would have difficulty getting into a Ph.D. program at a conventionally left-wing university.

    My guess is that most of their graduates go on either directly to private-sector employment or to professional schools (business, law, medicine).

    I don’t know if I would consider business schools, at least MBA programs, akin to law or medical (dental, podiatric, pharmacy, arguably chiropractic) schools. “Professions” per se, are legal fiat monopolies. You must go to an accredited school of medicine or osteopathy to be a doctor, a pharmacy school to be a pharmacist, etc. And in general (California being an exception possibly testing the rule) you have to go to an accredited school of law to be able to take the bar and practice law. The CPA program is similar, to sit for the CPA exam you have to have basically six years of college now. But the MBA degree confers no legal monopoly status: companies hire them because it’s considered the done thing, but there is no legal monopoly they wield.

    I’m guessing a graduate of a school like Hillsdale would be in the same position as a graduate of one of the more traditionalistic and fundamentalist Christian schools such as Bob Jones or our local Mid-America Nazarene University. I know MANU grads who have went on to master’s and doctorate programs at KU, UMKC, UMSL, et al with no problems. maybe an Ivy League school would be less welcoming. I don’t know.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    When we were looking into Hillsdale for Daughter C, it appeared they did pretty well placing students in grad and professional programs, including many at highly-rated universities.

    My impression is that they aim to produce numerous students who are ready and willing to go into culture war combat with their eyes open.

    I think Hillsdale students would do way better than Bob Jones grads in job/grad school placements.

  122. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hibernian
    Do Brigham Young, Franciscan University of Steubenville, George Mason, Wheaton (of Illinois) or Hillsdale graduates find it impossible to find corporate jobs? (Reason for strting fresh rather than expanding one of those I named is that a billionaire is going to put his or her stamp on the school.)

    Graduates of such schools are probably especially sought by smaller firms owned by people with aligned interests, and of course certain companies do have specific animosities against specific beliefs: I’m sure Trad Catholic owned firms don’t especially want Mormon or fundamentalist candidates with any special zeal for those positions, and vice versa, but major companies probably don’t care that much.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Anon, Successful businesses, small or large, are successfully run by successful people. Trick is to find those people or establish a pipeline to a decent school. Companies often find the best employees through paid intern programs. They establish a link to a college, let's say through the Accounting Department. That department steers the brightest to the internship. Those interns, when they have established themselves, return to their Alma Mater to recruit. Saw it happen to two of my children.
  123. @Anonymous

    My guess is that most of their graduates go on either directly to private-sector employment or to professional schools (business, law, medicine).
     
    I don't know if I would consider business schools, at least MBA programs, akin to law or medical (dental, podiatric, pharmacy, arguably chiropractic) schools. "Professions" per se, are legal fiat monopolies. You must go to an accredited school of medicine or osteopathy to be a doctor, a pharmacy school to be a pharmacist, etc. And in general (California being an exception possibly testing the rule) you have to go to an accredited school of law to be able to take the bar and practice law. The CPA program is similar, to sit for the CPA exam you have to have basically six years of college now. But the MBA degree confers no legal monopoly status: companies hire them because it's considered the done thing, but there is no legal monopoly they wield.

    I'm guessing a graduate of a school like Hillsdale would be in the same position as a graduate of one of the more traditionalistic and fundamentalist Christian schools such as Bob Jones or our local Mid-America Nazarene University. I know MANU grads who have went on to master's and doctorate programs at KU, UMKC, UMSL, et al with no problems. maybe an Ivy League school would be less welcoming. I don't know.

    When we were looking into Hillsdale for Daughter C, it appeared they did pretty well placing students in grad and professional programs, including many at highly-rated universities.

    My impression is that they aim to produce numerous students who are ready and willing to go into culture war combat with their eyes open.

    I think Hillsdale students would do way better than Bob Jones grads in job/grad school placements.

  124. @Ragno
    Or is she a Karen? I'm sorry, I can no longer tell the difference between white women it's culturally acceptable to hate.

    The Becky/Karen distinction is always a tough call for white males.

  125. @anon
    Dude, put down the pipe or bong or hookah...whatever. You're tripping on a powerful drug, fantasy.

    lol.

    If you had told me 20 years ago that gay marriage would be legal one day and that we’d have trans kids, sixty + year old trannies making the covers of fashion magazines, and 53 “genders” taught at school, I’d also have said you were crazy.
    Things change, sometimes very fast.
    How do we put the cat back in the bag? Sometimes the cat gets back inside of the bag by itself. So women will one day beg for the return of hetetopatriarchy, once they realize they’ll be safer and happier under the old arrangements.
    You can call me a dreamer, but I’m not the only one, to quote the tritest song in history.

    • Replies: @anon
    If you had told me 20 years ago that gay marriage would be legal one day and that we’d have trans kids, sixty + year old trannies making the covers of fashion magazines, and 53 “genders” taught at school, I’d also have said you were crazy.


    Things change, sometimes very fast.


    Well, yeah. There could be more to that statement than you really grasp.

    If you had told the average American in 1914 that the US would be involved in a major war in France 3 years later, they would have reacted the same way. If you had told the average American in 1937 that they would be part of another world-wide war in just a bit over 4 years in the future, the reaction wouldn't be quite the same, but similar. So what changed, in both cases? Perhaps we should take this over to the Bob Iger No Such Thing As Inner Party thread?

    Edward Bernays has a hint for those who are willing to read and ponder. He was a major advertising man in the 1920's, but he also did some sort of work for someone in the war years. Examine his work for the tobacco companies in the late 1920's and think about the kind of applied psychology he used. He wrote two books in the 1920's. They are still in print. They are worth reading. But reading them changes the way one views the world, and especially media. Fair warning.

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Edward_Bernays

    Read those books, then look back at the campaign to normalize homosexuality. There's a pattern that should become clear.

    How do we put the cat back in the bag?

    Who is this "we"? How many people are in the "we"? The intertubes are full of "we" who turn out to be a massive movement that might fill up two booths at Dennys, maybe.

    Sometimes the cat gets back inside of the bag by itself.

    Can you think of an example to support this assertion?

    So women will one day beg for the return of hetetopatriarchy, once they realize they’ll be safer and happier under the old arrangements.

    Will they? Have you ever read the monograph of Sir John Glubb?

    You can call me a dreamer, but I’m not the only one, to quote the tritest song in history.

    There used to be a lot of dreamers in Europe who were convinced that the Bolsheviks were just a short term thing that would soon be over. I suppose they were right in the long run, but anyone who spent the 1920's, 30's, 40's, 50's, 60's and 70's waiting for their dream to come true was probably disappointed in their old age.

    The market can remain irrational longer than anyone can remain solvent. That doesn't invalidate reversion to the mean over the longer term, but what "longer term" means is debatable.

    The guy I replied to was long on "we gotta" and short on "we gonna". That's cheap talk and a waste of time. Comboxes are notoriously long on rhetorical words and short on action items.

    PS: In my experience, people who quote Lennon are usually really stupid. Nothing personal. Just saying.
  126. @Anonymous
    Graduates of such schools are probably especially sought by smaller firms owned by people with aligned interests, and of course certain companies do have specific animosities against specific beliefs: I'm sure Trad Catholic owned firms don't especially want Mormon or fundamentalist candidates with any special zeal for those positions, and vice versa, but major companies probably don't care that much.

    Anon, Successful businesses, small or large, are successfully run by successful people. Trick is to find those people or establish a pipeline to a decent school. Companies often find the best employees through paid intern programs. They establish a link to a college, let’s say through the Accounting Department. That department steers the brightest to the internship. Those interns, when they have established themselves, return to their Alma Mater to recruit. Saw it happen to two of my children.

  127. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Pro tip: volunteering for GenerationNext or being President of GenerationNext: these things are doubtlessly nice. To showcase the world-changing effectiveness of your missionary zeal, figure out how to found your own charity.

     

    Yes, very much so. As we were going through the college app process with Daughter C this past school year, we checked out some 'How to get into big name places' advice, and what you say is completely true. You're warned now that just volunteering -- even if you've traveled to Borneo to administer locally-sourced, organic enemas to constipated orangutan babies that you rescued from evil loggers -- is de rigueur, and even a bit stale. You won't stand out.

    There's now an entrepreneurial edge that's required, but of course not something that would be useful and possibly make money. It's better to found and 'run' a pointless NGO, or be an 'influencer' on some sort of uber-woke microtopic.

    It’s better to found and ‘run’ a pointless NGO, or be an ‘influencer’ on some sort of uber-woke microtopic.

    From “going to the moon” to “running pointles NGOs for status points” in fifty years.

    How about that on somebody’s gravestone epitaph:

    Daughter.
    Friend.
    Ran a pointless NGO.

  128. anon[383] • Disclaimer says:
    @BB753
    If you had told me 20 years ago that gay marriage would be legal one day and that we'd have trans kids, sixty + year old trannies making the covers of fashion magazines, and 53 "genders" taught at school, I'd also have said you were crazy.
    Things change, sometimes very fast.
    How do we put the cat back in the bag? Sometimes the cat gets back inside of the bag by itself. So women will one day beg for the return of hetetopatriarchy, once they realize they'll be safer and happier under the old arrangements.
    You can call me a dreamer, but I'm not the only one, to quote the tritest song in history.

    If you had told me 20 years ago that gay marriage would be legal one day and that we’d have trans kids, sixty + year old trannies making the covers of fashion magazines, and 53 “genders” taught at school, I’d also have said you were crazy.


    Things change, sometimes very fast.

    Well, yeah. There could be more to that statement than you really grasp.

    If you had told the average American in 1914 that the US would be involved in a major war in France 3 years later, they would have reacted the same way. If you had told the average American in 1937 that they would be part of another world-wide war in just a bit over 4 years in the future, the reaction wouldn’t be quite the same, but similar. So what changed, in both cases? Perhaps we should take this over to the Bob Iger No Such Thing As Inner Party thread?

    Edward Bernays has a hint for those who are willing to read and ponder. He was a major advertising man in the 1920’s, but he also did some sort of work for someone in the war years. Examine his work for the tobacco companies in the late 1920’s and think about the kind of applied psychology he used. He wrote two books in the 1920’s. They are still in print. They are worth reading. But reading them changes the way one views the world, and especially media. Fair warning.

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Edward_Bernays

    Read those books, then look back at the campaign to normalize homosexuality. There’s a pattern that should become clear.

    How do we put the cat back in the bag?

    Who is this “we”? How many people are in the “we”? The intertubes are full of “we” who turn out to be a massive movement that might fill up two booths at Dennys, maybe.

    Sometimes the cat gets back inside of the bag by itself.

    Can you think of an example to support this assertion?

    So women will one day beg for the return of hetetopatriarchy, once they realize they’ll be safer and happier under the old arrangements.

    Will they? Have you ever read the monograph of Sir John Glubb?

    You can call me a dreamer, but I’m not the only one, to quote the tritest song in history.

    There used to be a lot of dreamers in Europe who were convinced that the Bolsheviks were just a short term thing that would soon be over. I suppose they were right in the long run, but anyone who spent the 1920’s, 30’s, 40’s, 50’s, 60’s and 70’s waiting for their dream to come true was probably disappointed in their old age.

    The market can remain irrational longer than anyone can remain solvent. That doesn’t invalidate reversion to the mean over the longer term, but what “longer term” means is debatable.

    The guy I replied to was long on “we gotta” and short on “we gonna”. That’s cheap talk and a waste of time. Comboxes are notoriously long on rhetorical words and short on action items.

    PS: In my experience, people who quote Lennon are usually really stupid. Nothing personal. Just saying.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    383, a well thought out reply to a good post. Wish you hadn't included the PS. It wasn't necessary. My opinion.
    , @BB753
    To be sure, there are not that many reactionaries today. The western world has become uniformly liberal. Even so-called conservatives don't realize they are really classical liberals.
    You see, it all began with the Enlightenment, a movement which was largely masonic and protestant in origin, bringing together rich merchants, thinkers, occultists, aristocrats in their effort to topple Throne and Altar, that is, the old European monarchies and the Catholic Church.
    There were two main branches, let's call them the Girondins (classical liberals, led by Condorcet and with some help from Paine and Benjamin Franklin and ultimately also British intelligence ) and the Jacobines (Robespierre, Marat, etc) , after the right and left of the French "assemblée". In France, the Jacobines prevailed, then returned after the brief Restoration, first as the empire of Louis Phillipe and then as the Second Republic. While in America, the Revolution was led by Classical Liberals, or "girondins".
    Of course, the same secret societies and masonic lodges which brought about the 1848 French and German revolutions went on to create the Socialist International, from which sprang the various Russian revolutionaries which went on to create the USSR.
    So basically, the USA and the USSR, in their prime, represented, respectively, the right and left wings of the same political movement. I know this is a tough one to swallow for an American, but these are the facts. Read Tragedy and Hope, by Carroll Quigley, for details.

    So what we're witnessing today is the merging of these two types of polities, to create a technocratic worldwide police state ( the globalist New World Order), without a free market, with corporations, bankers and the government in collusion, erasing national borders, national identities, families, sexual identities, and crushing any rights, the better to rule with an iron fist over a blob of undistinguishable epicene atomized doped-out inviduals. A sort of blend of Orwell's 1984 and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, which he wrote as a transhumanist new-agey utopia.
    Further reading would include HG Wells, Julian Huxley, Zbigniew Brzezinski, the Memoirs of David Rockefeller, etc. It's not as if these people were shy about what they intended to do.

    But pray tell me, which book by Glubb did you recommend? The Way of Love: Lessons from a Long Life, Hodder & Stoughton, 1974?

    P.S.: I'm no fan of John Lennon, you didn't quite catch the irony in my quoting him.

    , @Paleo Liberal
    I got an error when I tried the link, but I did look up Bernay’s cigarette campaign. I have read other things about it.

    There is a story I am trying to remember correctly:

    I gather there was the annual “Easter Parade” in which fashionable NYC ladies would show off their finery. Supposedly at one of these parades it was arranged to have very fashionable and very young ladies who were of the “liberated” type step out at various pre-arranged spots with their cigarettes.

    I may be misremembering.
  129. @Crawfurdmuir
    There are colleges that are hospitable to conservatives. Hillsdale and Grove City don't seem to have trouble placing their graduates with employers. Such institutions don't have difficulty existing; they are just vastly outnumbered. My guess is that most of their graduates go on either directly to private-sector employment or to professional schools (business, law, medicine). Perhaps a person with one of their degrees would have difficulty getting into a Ph.D. program at a conventionally left-wing university.

    If there are any colleges that gives you an inside track to the corridors of money and power, Hillsdale and Grove City are sure to be on the list. Supreme Court Justice, President, tech billionaire – you name it – Hillsdale and Grove City are the places to be.

    For some reason, my high school guidance counselor wanted me to go to Grove City instead of Penn. I don’t know whether she was getting a kickback or was some kind of Christian Fundamentalist or what, but she kept pushing it. She called my mother in and in my presence described to her in some detail a lurid Penthouse letters type fantasy set at Penn involving one roommate having sex with his girlfriend while the other was present in the bunk bed above (or below? I forget) him. Apparently she had it on good information that this happened every day at Penn so this brothel, this den of iniquity, should be avoided at all costs. The whole thing was mortifyingly embarrassing to me, who never ever discussed sex with his parents in any way shape or form (I’m still waiting for them to tell me about the birds and the bees).

    Somehow, despite her urgings I ended up going to Penn anyway. American universities were such strange alien places to my parents and so far outside their life experience that they might as well have been on the moon and they were willing to trust my judgment despite the strange story that that goyish lady told them. I am forever thankful to my parents that they didn’t listen to that crazy woman.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Jack, My daughter graduated from a Jesuit College in 2011. She has done well in her career. I didn't push her toward any college, but did remind her that there was athletic aid available at three. But, it was important that she make the choice. Last year I finally asked why she made her choice. The campus. She loved the campus. Can't argue that the grounds weren't great, but that was the determining feature. My first grandchild is now at OSU. My son took her to visit colleges from NYC to SanDiego. I can't imagine an uglier campus, but her choice.
    , @Chrisnonymous

    The whole thing was mortifyingly embarrassing to me, who never ever discussed sex with his parents in any way shape or form (I’m still waiting for them to tell me about the birds and the bees).
     
    You're lucky. This is one of the low points of my youth.

    I was given very accurate and detailed technical information at a very young age (because my mother was pregnant) via a 3D pop-up book called The Facts of Life, which my mother simply left out on a countertop for me to discover. That was pretty good.

    However, during puberty, my father forced me to read aloud to him a book about puberty written for Christians and give my opinions about it. He would paint, and I had to sit on a stool and read, he periodically pausing to ask me what I thought. That is probably my worst father-son memory.
    (He also rented the Sean Connery James Bond films when I was around 10--its own educational experience.)

    I'm pretty firmly of the opinion that kids should get facts at a young age but no religious instruction. If people want to make house rules about curfews or whatever, that's fine, but trying to teach kids theology-based theories of what love and marriage "are" is a big mistake.

    Anyways, nowadays I gather, most kids see hardcore porn on the Internet before puberty anyhow.

    BTW, how was your experience in the Penn dorms? As forewarned?
  130. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Pro tip: volunteering for GenerationNext or being President of GenerationNext: these things are doubtlessly nice. To showcase the world-changing effectiveness of your missionary zeal, figure out how to found your own charity.

     

    Yes, very much so. As we were going through the college app process with Daughter C this past school year, we checked out some 'How to get into big name places' advice, and what you say is completely true. You're warned now that just volunteering -- even if you've traveled to Borneo to administer locally-sourced, organic enemas to constipated orangutan babies that you rescued from evil loggers -- is de rigueur, and even a bit stale. You won't stand out.

    There's now an entrepreneurial edge that's required, but of course not something that would be useful and possibly make money. It's better to found and 'run' a pointless NGO, or be an 'influencer' on some sort of uber-woke microtopic.

    > There’s now an entrepreneurial edge that’s required, but of course not something that would be useful and possibly make money. It’s better to found and ‘run’ a pointless NGO, or be an ‘influencer’ on some sort of uber-woke microtopic.

    Yep. Founding an organization that’s you-alone would brand you as a loser, and an unpopular one at that. Your successful charity should have lots of volunteers… who are marking themselves as Not Ivy Material, by virtue of the hours spent on your idea.

    As long as your friends don’t recognize what it means when they help you protect sea turtles from killer plastic straws in the landfill, it’s all good.

    Kind of a ‘meta’ winnowing process, though.

  131. • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Sigh, wear a white hood over your head and mask. Whites will love you. There. Next problem please.
    , @Hail
    I've said it before. I'll say it again. If you want a leading-indicator that Corona has "jumped the shark," it is these kinds of race stories.
  132. @Hypnotoad666
    Who needs electric fans when you've got white privilege.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/03/31/article-0-0093C8D000000259-56_468x322.jpg

    Electric celebrities?

  133. @anon
    If you had told me 20 years ago that gay marriage would be legal one day and that we’d have trans kids, sixty + year old trannies making the covers of fashion magazines, and 53 “genders” taught at school, I’d also have said you were crazy.


    Things change, sometimes very fast.


    Well, yeah. There could be more to that statement than you really grasp.

    If you had told the average American in 1914 that the US would be involved in a major war in France 3 years later, they would have reacted the same way. If you had told the average American in 1937 that they would be part of another world-wide war in just a bit over 4 years in the future, the reaction wouldn't be quite the same, but similar. So what changed, in both cases? Perhaps we should take this over to the Bob Iger No Such Thing As Inner Party thread?

    Edward Bernays has a hint for those who are willing to read and ponder. He was a major advertising man in the 1920's, but he also did some sort of work for someone in the war years. Examine his work for the tobacco companies in the late 1920's and think about the kind of applied psychology he used. He wrote two books in the 1920's. They are still in print. They are worth reading. But reading them changes the way one views the world, and especially media. Fair warning.

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Edward_Bernays

    Read those books, then look back at the campaign to normalize homosexuality. There's a pattern that should become clear.

    How do we put the cat back in the bag?

    Who is this "we"? How many people are in the "we"? The intertubes are full of "we" who turn out to be a massive movement that might fill up two booths at Dennys, maybe.

    Sometimes the cat gets back inside of the bag by itself.

    Can you think of an example to support this assertion?

    So women will one day beg for the return of hetetopatriarchy, once they realize they’ll be safer and happier under the old arrangements.

    Will they? Have you ever read the monograph of Sir John Glubb?

    You can call me a dreamer, but I’m not the only one, to quote the tritest song in history.

    There used to be a lot of dreamers in Europe who were convinced that the Bolsheviks were just a short term thing that would soon be over. I suppose they were right in the long run, but anyone who spent the 1920's, 30's, 40's, 50's, 60's and 70's waiting for their dream to come true was probably disappointed in their old age.

    The market can remain irrational longer than anyone can remain solvent. That doesn't invalidate reversion to the mean over the longer term, but what "longer term" means is debatable.

    The guy I replied to was long on "we gotta" and short on "we gonna". That's cheap talk and a waste of time. Comboxes are notoriously long on rhetorical words and short on action items.

    PS: In my experience, people who quote Lennon are usually really stupid. Nothing personal. Just saying.

    383, a well thought out reply to a good post. Wish you hadn’t included the PS. It wasn’t necessary. My opinion.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    Yeah, the PS wasn’t called for. Other than that a great post.

    As for Lennon, although I feel “Imagine “ was by far his most overrated song, there are reasons to quote him. He was one of the greatest and most influential song writers of his time, and was well enough known that his works are part of the 20th Century Canon.
  134. @Jack D
    If there are any colleges that gives you an inside track to the corridors of money and power, Hillsdale and Grove City are sure to be on the list. Supreme Court Justice, President, tech billionaire - you name it - Hillsdale and Grove City are the places to be.

    For some reason, my high school guidance counselor wanted me to go to Grove City instead of Penn. I don't know whether she was getting a kickback or was some kind of Christian Fundamentalist or what, but she kept pushing it. She called my mother in and in my presence described to her in some detail a lurid Penthouse letters type fantasy set at Penn involving one roommate having sex with his girlfriend while the other was present in the bunk bed above (or below? I forget) him. Apparently she had it on good information that this happened every day at Penn so this brothel, this den of iniquity, should be avoided at all costs. The whole thing was mortifyingly embarrassing to me, who never ever discussed sex with his parents in any way shape or form (I'm still waiting for them to tell me about the birds and the bees).

    Somehow, despite her urgings I ended up going to Penn anyway. American universities were such strange alien places to my parents and so far outside their life experience that they might as well have been on the moon and they were willing to trust my judgment despite the strange story that that goyish lady told them. I am forever thankful to my parents that they didn't listen to that crazy woman.

    Jack, My daughter graduated from a Jesuit College in 2011. She has done well in her career. I didn’t push her toward any college, but did remind her that there was athletic aid available at three. But, it was important that she make the choice. Last year I finally asked why she made her choice. The campus. She loved the campus. Can’t argue that the grounds weren’t great, but that was the determining feature. My first grandchild is now at OSU. My son took her to visit colleges from NYC to SanDiego. I can’t imagine an uglier campus, but her choice.

  135. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1250121681756192769

    Sigh, wear a white hood over your head and mask. Whites will love you. There. Next problem please.

  136. @Jack D
    If there are any colleges that gives you an inside track to the corridors of money and power, Hillsdale and Grove City are sure to be on the list. Supreme Court Justice, President, tech billionaire - you name it - Hillsdale and Grove City are the places to be.

    For some reason, my high school guidance counselor wanted me to go to Grove City instead of Penn. I don't know whether she was getting a kickback or was some kind of Christian Fundamentalist or what, but she kept pushing it. She called my mother in and in my presence described to her in some detail a lurid Penthouse letters type fantasy set at Penn involving one roommate having sex with his girlfriend while the other was present in the bunk bed above (or below? I forget) him. Apparently she had it on good information that this happened every day at Penn so this brothel, this den of iniquity, should be avoided at all costs. The whole thing was mortifyingly embarrassing to me, who never ever discussed sex with his parents in any way shape or form (I'm still waiting for them to tell me about the birds and the bees).

    Somehow, despite her urgings I ended up going to Penn anyway. American universities were such strange alien places to my parents and so far outside their life experience that they might as well have been on the moon and they were willing to trust my judgment despite the strange story that that goyish lady told them. I am forever thankful to my parents that they didn't listen to that crazy woman.

    The whole thing was mortifyingly embarrassing to me, who never ever discussed sex with his parents in any way shape or form (I’m still waiting for them to tell me about the birds and the bees).

    You’re lucky. This is one of the low points of my youth.

    I was given very accurate and detailed technical information at a very young age (because my mother was pregnant) via a 3D pop-up book called The Facts of Life, which my mother simply left out on a countertop for me to discover. That was pretty good.

    However, during puberty, my father forced me to read aloud to him a book about puberty written for Christians and give my opinions about it. He would paint, and I had to sit on a stool and read, he periodically pausing to ask me what I thought. That is probably my worst father-son memory.
    (He also rented the Sean Connery James Bond films when I was around 10–its own educational experience.)

    I’m pretty firmly of the opinion that kids should get facts at a young age but no religious instruction. If people want to make house rules about curfews or whatever, that’s fine, but trying to teach kids theology-based theories of what love and marriage “are” is a big mistake.

    Anyways, nowadays I gather, most kids see hardcore porn on the Internet before puberty anyhow.

    BTW, how was your experience in the Penn dorms? As forewarned?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    There was a fair amount of copulation but normally you would ask your roommate to leave. There is even a word for this - it is called "being sexiled". I never heard of (let alone saw) anything like what that lady described.
  137. @anon
    If you had told me 20 years ago that gay marriage would be legal one day and that we’d have trans kids, sixty + year old trannies making the covers of fashion magazines, and 53 “genders” taught at school, I’d also have said you were crazy.


    Things change, sometimes very fast.


    Well, yeah. There could be more to that statement than you really grasp.

    If you had told the average American in 1914 that the US would be involved in a major war in France 3 years later, they would have reacted the same way. If you had told the average American in 1937 that they would be part of another world-wide war in just a bit over 4 years in the future, the reaction wouldn't be quite the same, but similar. So what changed, in both cases? Perhaps we should take this over to the Bob Iger No Such Thing As Inner Party thread?

    Edward Bernays has a hint for those who are willing to read and ponder. He was a major advertising man in the 1920's, but he also did some sort of work for someone in the war years. Examine his work for the tobacco companies in the late 1920's and think about the kind of applied psychology he used. He wrote two books in the 1920's. They are still in print. They are worth reading. But reading them changes the way one views the world, and especially media. Fair warning.

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Edward_Bernays

    Read those books, then look back at the campaign to normalize homosexuality. There's a pattern that should become clear.

    How do we put the cat back in the bag?

    Who is this "we"? How many people are in the "we"? The intertubes are full of "we" who turn out to be a massive movement that might fill up two booths at Dennys, maybe.

    Sometimes the cat gets back inside of the bag by itself.

    Can you think of an example to support this assertion?

    So women will one day beg for the return of hetetopatriarchy, once they realize they’ll be safer and happier under the old arrangements.

    Will they? Have you ever read the monograph of Sir John Glubb?

    You can call me a dreamer, but I’m not the only one, to quote the tritest song in history.

    There used to be a lot of dreamers in Europe who were convinced that the Bolsheviks were just a short term thing that would soon be over. I suppose they were right in the long run, but anyone who spent the 1920's, 30's, 40's, 50's, 60's and 70's waiting for their dream to come true was probably disappointed in their old age.

    The market can remain irrational longer than anyone can remain solvent. That doesn't invalidate reversion to the mean over the longer term, but what "longer term" means is debatable.

    The guy I replied to was long on "we gotta" and short on "we gonna". That's cheap talk and a waste of time. Comboxes are notoriously long on rhetorical words and short on action items.

    PS: In my experience, people who quote Lennon are usually really stupid. Nothing personal. Just saying.

    To be sure, there are not that many reactionaries today. The western world has become uniformly liberal. Even so-called conservatives don’t realize they are really classical liberals.
    You see, it all began with the Enlightenment, a movement which was largely masonic and protestant in origin, bringing together rich merchants, thinkers, occultists, aristocrats in their effort to topple Throne and Altar, that is, the old European monarchies and the Catholic Church.
    There were two main branches, let’s call them the Girondins (classical liberals, led by Condorcet and with some help from Paine and Benjamin Franklin and ultimately also British intelligence ) and the Jacobines (Robespierre, Marat, etc) , after the right and left of the French “assemblée”. In France, the Jacobines prevailed, then returned after the brief Restoration, first as the empire of Louis Phillipe and then as the Second Republic. While in America, the Revolution was led by Classical Liberals, or “girondins”.
    Of course, the same secret societies and masonic lodges which brought about the 1848 French and German revolutions went on to create the Socialist International, from which sprang the various Russian revolutionaries which went on to create the USSR.
    So basically, the USA and the USSR, in their prime, represented, respectively, the right and left wings of the same political movement. I know this is a tough one to swallow for an American, but these are the facts. Read Tragedy and Hope, by Carroll Quigley, for details.

    So what we’re witnessing today is the merging of these two types of polities, to create a technocratic worldwide police state ( the globalist New World Order), without a free market, with corporations, bankers and the government in collusion, erasing national borders, national identities, families, sexual identities, and crushing any rights, the better to rule with an iron fist over a blob of undistinguishable epicene atomized doped-out inviduals. A sort of blend of Orwell’s 1984 and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, which he wrote as a transhumanist new-agey utopia.
    Further reading would include HG Wells, Julian Huxley, Zbigniew Brzezinski, the Memoirs of David Rockefeller, etc. It’s not as if these people were shy about what they intended to do.

    But pray tell me, which book by Glubb did you recommend? The Way of Love: Lessons from a Long Life, Hodder & Stoughton, 1974?

    P.S.: I’m no fan of John Lennon, you didn’t quite catch the irony in my quoting him.

    • Replies: @anon
    You see, it all began with the Enlightenment,

    Do you have an action item? This looks like more of "muh Ancien Regime!".
    Might as well whistle "Dixie".

    But pray tell me, which book by Glubb did you recommend?

    "The Fate of Empires".

    , @S

    You see, it all began with the Enlightenment, a movement which was largely masonic and protestant in origin, bringing together rich merchants, thinkers, occultists, aristocrats in their effort to topple Throne and Altar, that is, the old European monarchies and the Catholic Church...So basically, the USA and the USSR, in their prime, represented, respectively, the right and left wings of the same political movement.
     
    Thank you for an excellent and very well informed summation and post.

    How many are aware that Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Paine, and (apparently) Benjamin Franklin, some of the heaviest hitters as 'Founding Fathers' of the 1776 Capitalist American Revolution, were also quite involved with the 1789 Communist French Revolution as well?

    As you allude regarding the US and USSR representing 'right and left wings of the same political movement', applying Occam's Razor, one could look it this as a manufactured Hegelian Dialectic, one I submit which has been broadly controlled by human hands since it's late 18th century inception.

    In line with this, since '1776', the City of London has historically acted as this manufactured dialectic's arbiter (ie 'referee'), and the British Empire (in time joined by the United States) the 'muscle', to enforce the City's decisions in regards to it's promotion of both Capitalist and Communist global revolution, and penalizing severely those who rebel, or, are out of line, with this dialectic's worldwide aims, ie Napoleon, Hitler, Tojo, etc, as an example to others.

    It’s not as if these people were shy about what they intended to do.
     
    Yes, they often tell us of their intentions, if a bit cryptically at times.

    If you are not already familiar with the '48er' Theodore Poesche, and his very obscure and generally unknown 1853 geo-political book linked to and excerpted below, The New Rome; or, the United States of the World, you might find it of some interest.

    The 1912 booklet linked below it, A Political Prophecy, gives the biographical background of The New Rome's two writers, Poesche and Goepp, and the historic context of the 19th century book's publication, along with some analysis of it's content.

    The last link to the outstanding Belcher Foundation site is to an article there which fills in the details which the New Rome book doesn't provide, ie the geo-political plans for British North America made in the decades prior to 1776 by the British Board of Trade, along with powerful elements and hangers on of the British Whig party. The site is dedicated to the remembrance and preservation of the life work of British royal governor Jonathan Belcher, founder of Princeton, and first North American born British freemason. The article dovetails perfectly with the major points of The New Rome.

    The premise of The New Rome is that the 1776 Revolution had been a planned 'false split' between the US and UK, that the United States itself is the direct continuation (as planned) of the British Empire, and that someday in the future a practically unbeatable US/UK united front will form, which will first conquer and gain control of Germany, the center of power upon continental Europe (thereby unleashing a 'world's war' upon the Earth), to be immediately followed afterwards by a global struggle for world supremacy (centered upon Europe) specifically between the United States and Russia, along with each side's respective allies.

    According to this mid 19th century book, the United States prevails against Russia due to the global projection of US air power and the aerial bombardment of Russia's ground forces.

    The world state/empire known as the 'New Rome', or, the 'United States of the World' is then ushered in.

    The New Rome book in it's opening pages desribes itself not as a hypothesis, but rather, a statement of fact before the actual events, ie 'a horoscope', 'a map of the future of mankind', and 'what must be'.

    We shall see.


    ‘Thus the lines are drawn. The choirs are marshalled on each wing of the world’s stage, Russia leading the one, the United States the other. Yet the world is too small for both, and the contest must end in the downfall of the one and the victory of the other.’ The New Rome; or, the United States of the World (1853) - pg 109


    https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-1F1U0gBMi4M/V2M0KRs3qMI/AAAAAAAAKXo/lBtmDL-9-McBjzk3ZskSmoRuBUqC9RztQCLcB/s1600/The%2Bstandoff%2Bat%2BCheckpoint%2BCharlie%2BSoviet%2Btanks%2Bfacing%2BAmerican%2Btanks%252C%2B1961%2B%25281%2529.jpg



    https://majorityrights.com/weblog/comments/the_new_rome_or_the_united_states_of_the_world_1853

    https://archive.org/details/politicalprophec00goeb/page/n3/mode/2up

    https://www.belcherfoundation.org/camerica.htm
  138. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Actually, blacks were much less likely to die of yellow fever, a West African disease, than were whites"

    That an assistant professor of History wouldn't know this basic fact is baffling. That, coupled with overlooking the fact of New Orleans' strategic importance (the War of 1812, Battle of New Orleans) to the Mississippi River and all the trade and commerce occurring in that region of the US, is really beyond belief. And she gets to teach History at Stanford.

    All this talk about wages for workers also tends to show an ignorance that the modern labor union with its collective bargaining didn't come to total fruition until the FDR administration, when Slavery in the US had been over for nearly three quarters of a century. It simply wasn't a thing to have slave strikes in the nineteenth century, or collective bargaining (complete with federal arbitrators) at the ol' plantation in Mississippi.

    Also, what seems to be overlooked, is that without slavery during the period 1619-1865, the importation of the total number of Africans to the US would be probably 90-99% less than it was. There'd have been no practical purpose for them to be brought here at all.

    What kind of educators are teaching at elite universities these days anyway?

    She could possibly be 26 years old, naive, and a newly minted phd. She obviously isn’t familiar with the writings of Charles C. Mann.

    From the wonderful book 1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created

    Then there’s the role malaria (and to a lesser degree, yellow fever) likely played in the rise of the Atlantic slave trade. This other “Old World” disease was no friendlier to Native Americans, but it flourished in the warmer areas of the Americas so virulently that European colonists died there in droves. But Africans’ inherited and acquired resistances to the illness meant that, “biologically speaking, they were fitter, which is another way of saying that in these places they were—loaded words!—genetically superior.”

    Sadly, Africans’ immunity “became a wellspring for their enslavement,” since for (unscrupulous) Europeans “the economic logic was hard to ignore. If they wanted to grow tobacco, rice, or sugar, they were better off using African slaves than European indentured servants or Indian slaves.”

  139. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1250121681756192769

    I’ve said it before. I’ll say it again. If you want a leading-indicator that Corona has “jumped the shark,” it is these kinds of race stories.

  140. @Buffalo Joe
    383, a well thought out reply to a good post. Wish you hadn't included the PS. It wasn't necessary. My opinion.

    Yeah, the PS wasn’t called for. Other than that a great post.

    As for Lennon, although I feel “Imagine “ was by far his most overrated song, there are reasons to quote him. He was one of the greatest and most influential song writers of his time, and was well enough known that his works are part of the 20th Century Canon.

  141. @anon
    If you had told me 20 years ago that gay marriage would be legal one day and that we’d have trans kids, sixty + year old trannies making the covers of fashion magazines, and 53 “genders” taught at school, I’d also have said you were crazy.


    Things change, sometimes very fast.


    Well, yeah. There could be more to that statement than you really grasp.

    If you had told the average American in 1914 that the US would be involved in a major war in France 3 years later, they would have reacted the same way. If you had told the average American in 1937 that they would be part of another world-wide war in just a bit over 4 years in the future, the reaction wouldn't be quite the same, but similar. So what changed, in both cases? Perhaps we should take this over to the Bob Iger No Such Thing As Inner Party thread?

    Edward Bernays has a hint for those who are willing to read and ponder. He was a major advertising man in the 1920's, but he also did some sort of work for someone in the war years. Examine his work for the tobacco companies in the late 1920's and think about the kind of applied psychology he used. He wrote two books in the 1920's. They are still in print. They are worth reading. But reading them changes the way one views the world, and especially media. Fair warning.

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Edward_Bernays

    Read those books, then look back at the campaign to normalize homosexuality. There's a pattern that should become clear.

    How do we put the cat back in the bag?

    Who is this "we"? How many people are in the "we"? The intertubes are full of "we" who turn out to be a massive movement that might fill up two booths at Dennys, maybe.

    Sometimes the cat gets back inside of the bag by itself.

    Can you think of an example to support this assertion?

    So women will one day beg for the return of hetetopatriarchy, once they realize they’ll be safer and happier under the old arrangements.

    Will they? Have you ever read the monograph of Sir John Glubb?

    You can call me a dreamer, but I’m not the only one, to quote the tritest song in history.

    There used to be a lot of dreamers in Europe who were convinced that the Bolsheviks were just a short term thing that would soon be over. I suppose they were right in the long run, but anyone who spent the 1920's, 30's, 40's, 50's, 60's and 70's waiting for their dream to come true was probably disappointed in their old age.

    The market can remain irrational longer than anyone can remain solvent. That doesn't invalidate reversion to the mean over the longer term, but what "longer term" means is debatable.

    The guy I replied to was long on "we gotta" and short on "we gonna". That's cheap talk and a waste of time. Comboxes are notoriously long on rhetorical words and short on action items.

    PS: In my experience, people who quote Lennon are usually really stupid. Nothing personal. Just saying.

    I got an error when I tried the link, but I did look up Bernay’s cigarette campaign. I have read other things about it.

    There is a story I am trying to remember correctly:

    I gather there was the annual “Easter Parade” in which fashionable NYC ladies would show off their finery. Supposedly at one of these parades it was arranged to have very fashionable and very young ladies who were of the “liberated” type step out at various pre-arranged spots with their cigarettes.

    I may be misremembering.

    • Replies: @anon
    Here's a Wiki entry on just the Bernays cigarette campaign. He borrowed the term "Torches of Freedom" from a psychologist and ran with it. Social proof and crowd psychology did the rest. The effects lingered into the 1970's, so job well done as far as tobacco sales are concerned.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torches_of_Freedom

    Now, I wonder what Bernays did in 1916 - 1918? Or what he did in 1937 - 1945? What campaigns / social proofing /applied psychology are still with us?

    Again, the two books he wrote in the 1920's are worth reading. It's not hard going, he was an adman and social manipulator, not much of a theorist. But it will change the way you view media, all media.

    Eh, maybe older people better not read it. Too upsetting.
  142. OT: The keenly anticipated new Dune movie, directed by Denis Villeneuve, has a gender- and race-switched character. Liet Keynes, played by Max von Sydow in an earlier version, will be played by a black woman named Sharon Duncan Brewster, dreads and all. Because, the new Star Wars movies prove that woke = big box office.

    As someone on Reddit said:

    Le sigh.

  143. anon[276] • Disclaimer says:
    @Paleo Liberal
    I got an error when I tried the link, but I did look up Bernay’s cigarette campaign. I have read other things about it.

    There is a story I am trying to remember correctly:

    I gather there was the annual “Easter Parade” in which fashionable NYC ladies would show off their finery. Supposedly at one of these parades it was arranged to have very fashionable and very young ladies who were of the “liberated” type step out at various pre-arranged spots with their cigarettes.

    I may be misremembering.

    Here’s a Wiki entry on just the Bernays cigarette campaign. He borrowed the term “Torches of Freedom” from a psychologist and ran with it. Social proof and crowd psychology did the rest. The effects lingered into the 1970’s, so job well done as far as tobacco sales are concerned.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torches_of_Freedom

    Now, I wonder what Bernays did in 1916 – 1918? Or what he did in 1937 – 1945? What campaigns / social proofing /applied psychology are still with us?

    Again, the two books he wrote in the 1920’s are worth reading. It’s not hard going, he was an adman and social manipulator, not much of a theorist. But it will change the way you view media, all media.

    Eh, maybe older people better not read it. Too upsetting.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Jews love tobacco. I used to smoke cigars and pipes and probably ten percent of the crowd in my smoke shop of choice, and in the other ones around town, had to be Jews or part of the permanent goyische entourage that are effectively Jewish, in a small city of no especial import with a lower than average Jewish population. Certainly less than one percent of this metro area are Jewish.

    Old Malice Rosenbomb, who was to die of smoking induced lung cancer, waxed rhapsodic on the benefits of tobacco:


    “I like to think of fire held in a man's hand. Fire, a dangerous force, tamed at his fingertips. I often wonder about the hours when a man sits alone, watching the smoke of a cigarette, thinking. I wonder what great things have come from such hours. When a man thinks, there is a spot of fire alive in his mind--and it is proper that he should have the burning point of a cigarette as his one expression.”
     
  144. @BB753
    To be sure, there are not that many reactionaries today. The western world has become uniformly liberal. Even so-called conservatives don't realize they are really classical liberals.
    You see, it all began with the Enlightenment, a movement which was largely masonic and protestant in origin, bringing together rich merchants, thinkers, occultists, aristocrats in their effort to topple Throne and Altar, that is, the old European monarchies and the Catholic Church.
    There were two main branches, let's call them the Girondins (classical liberals, led by Condorcet and with some help from Paine and Benjamin Franklin and ultimately also British intelligence ) and the Jacobines (Robespierre, Marat, etc) , after the right and left of the French "assemblée". In France, the Jacobines prevailed, then returned after the brief Restoration, first as the empire of Louis Phillipe and then as the Second Republic. While in America, the Revolution was led by Classical Liberals, or "girondins".
    Of course, the same secret societies and masonic lodges which brought about the 1848 French and German revolutions went on to create the Socialist International, from which sprang the various Russian revolutionaries which went on to create the USSR.
    So basically, the USA and the USSR, in their prime, represented, respectively, the right and left wings of the same political movement. I know this is a tough one to swallow for an American, but these are the facts. Read Tragedy and Hope, by Carroll Quigley, for details.

    So what we're witnessing today is the merging of these two types of polities, to create a technocratic worldwide police state ( the globalist New World Order), without a free market, with corporations, bankers and the government in collusion, erasing national borders, national identities, families, sexual identities, and crushing any rights, the better to rule with an iron fist over a blob of undistinguishable epicene atomized doped-out inviduals. A sort of blend of Orwell's 1984 and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, which he wrote as a transhumanist new-agey utopia.
    Further reading would include HG Wells, Julian Huxley, Zbigniew Brzezinski, the Memoirs of David Rockefeller, etc. It's not as if these people were shy about what they intended to do.

    But pray tell me, which book by Glubb did you recommend? The Way of Love: Lessons from a Long Life, Hodder & Stoughton, 1974?

    P.S.: I'm no fan of John Lennon, you didn't quite catch the irony in my quoting him.

    You see, it all began with the Enlightenment,

    Do you have an action item? This looks like more of “muh Ancien Regime!”.
    Might as well whistle “Dixie”.

    But pray tell me, which book by Glubb did you recommend?

    “The Fate of Empires”.

    • Replies: @BB753
    I was stating facts, I'm not particularly a fan of Throne and Altar, but it was a better and more humane system than the current regime. Perhaps Byzantium had it exactly right, the Empire rules over the temporal realm, and the Church over the spiritual realm, each of these powers balancing each other. Democracy is but a front for the oligarchs to keep the sheeple in their place.

    Can you cite a relevant quote from Glubb?
  145. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon
    Here's a Wiki entry on just the Bernays cigarette campaign. He borrowed the term "Torches of Freedom" from a psychologist and ran with it. Social proof and crowd psychology did the rest. The effects lingered into the 1970's, so job well done as far as tobacco sales are concerned.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torches_of_Freedom

    Now, I wonder what Bernays did in 1916 - 1918? Or what he did in 1937 - 1945? What campaigns / social proofing /applied psychology are still with us?

    Again, the two books he wrote in the 1920's are worth reading. It's not hard going, he was an adman and social manipulator, not much of a theorist. But it will change the way you view media, all media.

    Eh, maybe older people better not read it. Too upsetting.

    Jews love tobacco. I used to smoke cigars and pipes and probably ten percent of the crowd in my smoke shop of choice, and in the other ones around town, had to be Jews or part of the permanent goyische entourage that are effectively Jewish, in a small city of no especial import with a lower than average Jewish population. Certainly less than one percent of this metro area are Jewish.

    Old Malice Rosenbomb, who was to die of smoking induced lung cancer, waxed rhapsodic on the benefits of tobacco:

    “I like to think of fire held in a man’s hand. Fire, a dangerous force, tamed at his fingertips. I often wonder about the hours when a man sits alone, watching the smoke of a cigarette, thinking. I wonder what great things have come from such hours. When a man thinks, there is a spot of fire alive in his mind–and it is proper that he should have the burning point of a cigarette as his one expression.”

    • Replies: @Jack D
    This is probably a generational thing. Smoking is still quite common among the ultra-Orthodox (there is no religious prohibition except on the Sabbath and holidays). My grandfather was a heavy smoker - he liked it so much that he rented the tobacco monopoly for his shtetl from the disabled war veteran to whom it was assigned and as a side business ran a tobacco shop from their home. Their drawing room doubled as a cigar lounge and people would sit around and play chess and read the newspaper, etc. while smoking. My mother said that it was patronized by both Jews and non-Jews. In Poland smoking was a somewhat upscale activity in that you had to have some money to buy tobacco - most peasants could barely afford to eat let alone smoke so the non-Jews were the local "elite" - the mayor, the policeman, the school teacher, etc. So later when Stalin sent them all to Siberia they all knew each other already.

    But nowadays smoking (especially cigarette smoking) is associated with the lower classes and there aren't that many Jews who are lower class.
    , @Anonymous
    Jewish intellectuals smoked. It was part of their image. They took after the French philosophers and artists who breathed more smoke than air.
  146. @Chrisnonymous

    The whole thing was mortifyingly embarrassing to me, who never ever discussed sex with his parents in any way shape or form (I’m still waiting for them to tell me about the birds and the bees).
     
    You're lucky. This is one of the low points of my youth.

    I was given very accurate and detailed technical information at a very young age (because my mother was pregnant) via a 3D pop-up book called The Facts of Life, which my mother simply left out on a countertop for me to discover. That was pretty good.

    However, during puberty, my father forced me to read aloud to him a book about puberty written for Christians and give my opinions about it. He would paint, and I had to sit on a stool and read, he periodically pausing to ask me what I thought. That is probably my worst father-son memory.
    (He also rented the Sean Connery James Bond films when I was around 10--its own educational experience.)

    I'm pretty firmly of the opinion that kids should get facts at a young age but no religious instruction. If people want to make house rules about curfews or whatever, that's fine, but trying to teach kids theology-based theories of what love and marriage "are" is a big mistake.

    Anyways, nowadays I gather, most kids see hardcore porn on the Internet before puberty anyhow.

    BTW, how was your experience in the Penn dorms? As forewarned?

    There was a fair amount of copulation but normally you would ask your roommate to leave. There is even a word for this – it is called “being sexiled”. I never heard of (let alone saw) anything like what that lady described.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Ah, yes, "sexiled". It was common in my university too.
  147. @Jack D
    There was a fair amount of copulation but normally you would ask your roommate to leave. There is even a word for this - it is called "being sexiled". I never heard of (let alone saw) anything like what that lady described.

    Ah, yes, “sexiled”. It was common in my university too.

  148. @Anonymous
    Jews love tobacco. I used to smoke cigars and pipes and probably ten percent of the crowd in my smoke shop of choice, and in the other ones around town, had to be Jews or part of the permanent goyische entourage that are effectively Jewish, in a small city of no especial import with a lower than average Jewish population. Certainly less than one percent of this metro area are Jewish.

    Old Malice Rosenbomb, who was to die of smoking induced lung cancer, waxed rhapsodic on the benefits of tobacco:


    “I like to think of fire held in a man's hand. Fire, a dangerous force, tamed at his fingertips. I often wonder about the hours when a man sits alone, watching the smoke of a cigarette, thinking. I wonder what great things have come from such hours. When a man thinks, there is a spot of fire alive in his mind--and it is proper that he should have the burning point of a cigarette as his one expression.”
     

    This is probably a generational thing. Smoking is still quite common among the ultra-Orthodox (there is no religious prohibition except on the Sabbath and holidays). My grandfather was a heavy smoker – he liked it so much that he rented the tobacco monopoly for his shtetl from the disabled war veteran to whom it was assigned and as a side business ran a tobacco shop from their home. Their drawing room doubled as a cigar lounge and people would sit around and play chess and read the newspaper, etc. while smoking. My mother said that it was patronized by both Jews and non-Jews. In Poland smoking was a somewhat upscale activity in that you had to have some money to buy tobacco – most peasants could barely afford to eat let alone smoke so the non-Jews were the local “elite” – the mayor, the policeman, the school teacher, etc. So later when Stalin sent them all to Siberia they all knew each other already.

    But nowadays smoking (especially cigarette smoking) is associated with the lower classes and there aren’t that many Jews who are lower class.

  149. @anon
    You see, it all began with the Enlightenment,

    Do you have an action item? This looks like more of "muh Ancien Regime!".
    Might as well whistle "Dixie".

    But pray tell me, which book by Glubb did you recommend?

    "The Fate of Empires".

    I was stating facts, I’m not particularly a fan of Throne and Altar, but it was a better and more humane system than the current regime. Perhaps Byzantium had it exactly right, the Empire rules over the temporal realm, and the Church over the spiritual realm, each of these powers balancing each other. Democracy is but a front for the oligarchs to keep the sheeple in their place.

    Can you cite a relevant quote from Glubb?

    • Replies: @anon
    I was stating facts,

    Well, that's your opinion. Everyone has one, you know.

    I’m not particularly a fan of Throne and Altar, but it was a better and more humane system than the current regime.

    Probably not, but it's moot.

    Perhaps Byzantium had it exactly right, the Empire rules over the temporal realm, and the Church over the spiritual realm, each of these powers balancing each other.

    Lol. Which color do you prefer, blue or green?

    Democracy is but a front for the oligarchs to keep the sheeple in their place.

    Could be. So what? Are you trying to make a point, or just roll in nostalgia for some long gone time?

    Can you cite a relevant quote from Glubb?

    Used to be Pasha Glubb's family was pretty serious about copyright and policed the intertubes for violations. Now one can find PDF's of his monograph easily. I'll give you the outline, which happens to fall under Fair Use. You can decide to read or not read.

    SUMMARY by Sir John Glubb
    As numerous points of interest have arisen in the course of this essay, I close with a brief summary, to refresh the reader’s mind.
    (a) We do not learn from history because our studies are brief and prejudiced.
    (b) In a surprising manner, 250 years emerges as the average length of national greatness.
    (c) This average has not varied for 3,000years. Does it represent ten generations?
    (d) The stages of the rise and fall of great nations seem to be:
    The Age of Pioneers (outburst)
    The Age of Conquests
    The Age of Commerce
    The Age of Affluence
    The Age of Intellect
    The Age of Decadence.
    (e) Decadence is marked by:
    Defensiveness
    Pessimism
    Materialism
    Frivolity
    An influx of foreigners
    The Welfare State
    A weakening of religion.
    (f) Decadence is due to:
    Too long a period of wealth and power
    Selfishness
    Love of money
    The loss of a sense of duty.
    (g) The life histories of great states are amazingly similar, and are due to internal factors.
    (h) Their falls are diverse, because they are largely the result of external causes.
    (i) History should be taught as the history of the human race, though of course with emphasis on the history of the student’s own country.
  150. @fnn

    Pro-slavery theorists used yellow fever to argue that racial slavery was natural, even humanitarian, because it allowed whites to socially distance themselves; they could stay at home, in relative safety, if black people were forced to labor and trade on their behalf.
     

    Caucasians diagnosed with YF were 6.8 times more likely to succumb than non-Caucasians with the disease. No other major causes of death during the 19th century demonstrated a similar mortality skew toward Caucasians.
     
    It must be something of a miracle that the working class Cajuns survived at all. Maybe it was a Holocaust or Holodomor of the transplanted Acadians.

    New Orleans was not populated by the Acadians.

  151. Anonymous[207] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Jews love tobacco. I used to smoke cigars and pipes and probably ten percent of the crowd in my smoke shop of choice, and in the other ones around town, had to be Jews or part of the permanent goyische entourage that are effectively Jewish, in a small city of no especial import with a lower than average Jewish population. Certainly less than one percent of this metro area are Jewish.

    Old Malice Rosenbomb, who was to die of smoking induced lung cancer, waxed rhapsodic on the benefits of tobacco:


    “I like to think of fire held in a man's hand. Fire, a dangerous force, tamed at his fingertips. I often wonder about the hours when a man sits alone, watching the smoke of a cigarette, thinking. I wonder what great things have come from such hours. When a man thinks, there is a spot of fire alive in his mind--and it is proper that he should have the burning point of a cigarette as his one expression.”
     

    Jewish intellectuals smoked. It was part of their image. They took after the French philosophers and artists who breathed more smoke than air.

  152. @res

    Actually, blacks were much less likely to die of yellow fever, a West African disease, than were whites (much less poor American Indians).
     
    Some numbers for that.
    https://mbio.asm.org/content/5/3/e01253-14
    Human Genetic Variation and Yellow Fever Mortality during 19th Century U.S. Epidemics

    ABSTRACT
    We calculated the incidence, mortality, and case fatality rates for Caucasians and non-Caucasians during 19th century yellow fever (YF) epidemics in the United States and determined statistical significance for differences in the rates in different populations. We evaluated nongenetic host factors, including socioeconomic, environmental, cultural, demographic, and acquired immunity status that could have influenced these differences. While differences in incidence rates were not significant between Caucasians and non-Caucasians, differences in mortality and case fatality rates were statistically significant for all epidemics tested (P < 0.01). Caucasians diagnosed with YF were 6.8 times more likely to succumb than non-Caucasians with the disease. No other major causes of death during the 19th century demonstrated a similar mortality skew toward Caucasians. Nongenetic host factors were examined and could not explain these large differences. We propose that the remarkably lower case mortality rates for individuals of non-Caucasian ancestry is the result of human genetic variation in loci encoding innate immune mediators.
     
    But remember everyone, race is a social construct.

    P.S. Different diseases among Union troops in 1864. See Table S5 for more details.

    https://mbio.asm.org/content/mbio/5/3/e01253-14/F2.large.jpg

    Actually, blacks were much less likely to die of yellow fever, a West African disease, than were whites (much less poor American Indians).

    Some numbers for that.

    Human biodiversity in resistance to different diseases explains much about why blacks were valued as slaves in the warmer parts of the New World, where they outsurvived whites and Amerindians, but not in the colder parts, where they tended to die of respiratory infections in larger numbers.

    Why do you and Steve keep mentioning these blasphemous hatefacts? You’re both very “racist.” It’s like a nanoaggression or something. Wow, just wow.

    But remember everyone, race is a social construct.

    Well, at least you’ve got that part down. Now just repeat to yourself 20 times at bedtime every night:

    “Just skin color!” “Social construct!” “Muh White immunoprivilege!”

    And you’ll soon be cured of these heretical doubts.

    But at least you didn’t endorse another one of Steve’s problematic claims:

    High mortality, it turns out, was economically profitable for New Orleans’s most powerful citizens because yellow fever kept wage workers insecure, and so unable to bargain effectively.

    That sounds dubious. I’m sure the disease risk kept the supply of labor low, driving up wages.

    Anyone repeating the long-discredited trope that (ceteris paribus) decreasing the supply of labor leads to an increase in the price of labor is merely demonstrating their own inextricable entanglement with the privileged structures of immuno-oppression. Steve needs to check his White immunoprivilege.* And don’t start talking about the history of wage growth in the aftermath of the Black Plague in Europe, either — that’s clearly just a “racist” dog whistle (the BLACK Plague? Seriously?)

    *Similarly, “increasing the supply of labor leads to a decrease in the price of labor” is a long-discredited xenophobic canard — anyone who dares to invoke this trope is obviously asserting their own “citizen privilege” in order to reinforce the structures of alien oppression.

  153. S says:
    @BB753
    To be sure, there are not that many reactionaries today. The western world has become uniformly liberal. Even so-called conservatives don't realize they are really classical liberals.
    You see, it all began with the Enlightenment, a movement which was largely masonic and protestant in origin, bringing together rich merchants, thinkers, occultists, aristocrats in their effort to topple Throne and Altar, that is, the old European monarchies and the Catholic Church.
    There were two main branches, let's call them the Girondins (classical liberals, led by Condorcet and with some help from Paine and Benjamin Franklin and ultimately also British intelligence ) and the Jacobines (Robespierre, Marat, etc) , after the right and left of the French "assemblée". In France, the Jacobines prevailed, then returned after the brief Restoration, first as the empire of Louis Phillipe and then as the Second Republic. While in America, the Revolution was led by Classical Liberals, or "girondins".
    Of course, the same secret societies and masonic lodges which brought about the 1848 French and German revolutions went on to create the Socialist International, from which sprang the various Russian revolutionaries which went on to create the USSR.
    So basically, the USA and the USSR, in their prime, represented, respectively, the right and left wings of the same political movement. I know this is a tough one to swallow for an American, but these are the facts. Read Tragedy and Hope, by Carroll Quigley, for details.

    So what we're witnessing today is the merging of these two types of polities, to create a technocratic worldwide police state ( the globalist New World Order), without a free market, with corporations, bankers and the government in collusion, erasing national borders, national identities, families, sexual identities, and crushing any rights, the better to rule with an iron fist over a blob of undistinguishable epicene atomized doped-out inviduals. A sort of blend of Orwell's 1984 and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, which he wrote as a transhumanist new-agey utopia.
    Further reading would include HG Wells, Julian Huxley, Zbigniew Brzezinski, the Memoirs of David Rockefeller, etc. It's not as if these people were shy about what they intended to do.

    But pray tell me, which book by Glubb did you recommend? The Way of Love: Lessons from a Long Life, Hodder & Stoughton, 1974?

    P.S.: I'm no fan of John Lennon, you didn't quite catch the irony in my quoting him.

    You see, it all began with the Enlightenment, a movement which was largely masonic and protestant in origin, bringing together rich merchants, thinkers, occultists, aristocrats in their effort to topple Throne and Altar, that is, the old European monarchies and the Catholic Church…So basically, the USA and the USSR, in their prime, represented, respectively, the right and left wings of the same political movement.

    Thank you for an excellent and very well informed summation and post.

    How many are aware that Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Paine, and (apparently) Benjamin Franklin, some of the heaviest hitters as ‘Founding Fathers’ of the 1776 Capitalist American Revolution, were also quite involved with the 1789 Communist French Revolution as well?

    As you allude regarding the US and USSR representing ‘right and left wings of the same political movement’, applying Occam’s Razor, one could look it this as a manufactured Hegelian Dialectic, one I submit which has been broadly controlled by human hands since it’s late 18th century inception.

    In line with this, since ‘1776’, the City of London has historically acted as this manufactured dialectic’s arbiter (ie ‘referee’), and the British Empire (in time joined by the United States) the ‘muscle’, to enforce the City’s decisions in regards to it’s promotion of both Capitalist and Communist global revolution, and penalizing severely those who rebel, or, are out of line, with this dialectic’s worldwide aims, ie Napoleon, Hitler, Tojo, etc, as an example to others.

    It’s not as if these people were shy about what they intended to do.

    Yes, they often tell us of their intentions, if a bit cryptically at times.

    If you are not already familiar with the ’48er’ Theodore Poesche, and his very obscure and generally unknown 1853 geo-political book linked to and excerpted below, The New Rome; or, the United States of the World, you might find it of some interest.

    The 1912 booklet linked below it, A Political Prophecy, gives the biographical background of The New Rome’s two writers, Poesche and Goepp, and the historic context of the 19th century book’s publication, along with some analysis of it’s content.

    The last link to the outstanding Belcher Foundation site is to an article there which fills in the details which the New Rome book doesn’t provide, ie the geo-political plans for British North America made in the decades prior to 1776 by the British Board of Trade, along with powerful elements and hangers on of the British Whig party. The site is dedicated to the remembrance and preservation of the life work of British royal governor Jonathan Belcher, founder of Princeton, and first North American born British freemason. The article dovetails perfectly with the major points of The New Rome.

    The premise of The New Rome is that the 1776 Revolution had been a planned ‘false split’ between the US and UK, that the United States itself is the direct continuation (as planned) of the British Empire, and that someday in the future a practically unbeatable US/UK united front will form, which will first conquer and gain control of Germany, the center of power upon continental Europe (thereby unleashing a ‘world’s war’ upon the Earth), to be immediately followed afterwards by a global struggle for world supremacy (centered upon Europe) specifically between the United States and Russia, along with each side’s respective allies.

    According to this mid 19th century book, the United States prevails against Russia due to the global projection of US air power and the aerial bombardment of Russia’s ground forces.

    The world state/empire known as the ‘New Rome’, or, the ‘United States of the World’ is then ushered in.

    The New Rome book in it’s opening pages desribes itself not as a hypothesis, but rather, a statement of fact before the actual events, ie ‘a horoscope’, ‘a map of the future of mankind’, and ‘what must be’.

    We shall see.

    ‘Thus the lines are drawn. The choirs are marshalled on each wing of the world’s stage, Russia leading the one, the United States the other. Yet the world is too small for both, and the contest must end in the downfall of the one and the victory of the other.’ The New Rome; or, the United States of the World (1853) – pg 109

    https://majorityrights.com/weblog/comments/the_new_rome_or_the_united_states_of_the_world_1853

    https://archive.org/details/politicalprophec00goeb/page/n3/mode/2up

    https://www.belcherfoundation.org/camerica.htm

    • Thanks: BB753
    • Replies: @BB753
    Well, the masonic plan was indeed for an Anglo - American empire to dominate world business.
    But ultimately, communism and capitalism would have to merge, for a better management of world affairs. Which goes to show how phony the Cold War really was.
    The only parts of the plan that failed are that China, whose development was bankrolled by the West well before Nixon visited there, has gone rogue and become a major independent world player and that Russia rejected Anglo-American rule after Putin came to power and claimed its independence.
    , @anon
    Assume for the sake of argument that all this is true. There is a question I'd like you to answer.

    So what?

    The internet is chock full of people insisting they have the sekret trooth of history. Far as I can tell, all they really want to do is rant "SEE! I ToLD YoU!" and maybe sell some subscriptions to a site. Nobody writes a long turgid screed that links up diverse threads of history into an overarching konspiracy and then concludes with:

    "Now, here is what we are going to do".

    Nope. It's always just intellectual masturbation.

    So, what? What's your point? What's your agenda, your plan, your idea?

    Got thinking?
  154. @S

    You see, it all began with the Enlightenment, a movement which was largely masonic and protestant in origin, bringing together rich merchants, thinkers, occultists, aristocrats in their effort to topple Throne and Altar, that is, the old European monarchies and the Catholic Church...So basically, the USA and the USSR, in their prime, represented, respectively, the right and left wings of the same political movement.
     
    Thank you for an excellent and very well informed summation and post.

    How many are aware that Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Paine, and (apparently) Benjamin Franklin, some of the heaviest hitters as 'Founding Fathers' of the 1776 Capitalist American Revolution, were also quite involved with the 1789 Communist French Revolution as well?

    As you allude regarding the US and USSR representing 'right and left wings of the same political movement', applying Occam's Razor, one could look it this as a manufactured Hegelian Dialectic, one I submit which has been broadly controlled by human hands since it's late 18th century inception.

    In line with this, since '1776', the City of London has historically acted as this manufactured dialectic's arbiter (ie 'referee'), and the British Empire (in time joined by the United States) the 'muscle', to enforce the City's decisions in regards to it's promotion of both Capitalist and Communist global revolution, and penalizing severely those who rebel, or, are out of line, with this dialectic's worldwide aims, ie Napoleon, Hitler, Tojo, etc, as an example to others.

    It’s not as if these people were shy about what they intended to do.
     
    Yes, they often tell us of their intentions, if a bit cryptically at times.

    If you are not already familiar with the '48er' Theodore Poesche, and his very obscure and generally unknown 1853 geo-political book linked to and excerpted below, The New Rome; or, the United States of the World, you might find it of some interest.

    The 1912 booklet linked below it, A Political Prophecy, gives the biographical background of The New Rome's two writers, Poesche and Goepp, and the historic context of the 19th century book's publication, along with some analysis of it's content.

    The last link to the outstanding Belcher Foundation site is to an article there which fills in the details which the New Rome book doesn't provide, ie the geo-political plans for British North America made in the decades prior to 1776 by the British Board of Trade, along with powerful elements and hangers on of the British Whig party. The site is dedicated to the remembrance and preservation of the life work of British royal governor Jonathan Belcher, founder of Princeton, and first North American born British freemason. The article dovetails perfectly with the major points of The New Rome.

    The premise of The New Rome is that the 1776 Revolution had been a planned 'false split' between the US and UK, that the United States itself is the direct continuation (as planned) of the British Empire, and that someday in the future a practically unbeatable US/UK united front will form, which will first conquer and gain control of Germany, the center of power upon continental Europe (thereby unleashing a 'world's war' upon the Earth), to be immediately followed afterwards by a global struggle for world supremacy (centered upon Europe) specifically between the United States and Russia, along with each side's respective allies.

    According to this mid 19th century book, the United States prevails against Russia due to the global projection of US air power and the aerial bombardment of Russia's ground forces.

    The world state/empire known as the 'New Rome', or, the 'United States of the World' is then ushered in.

    The New Rome book in it's opening pages desribes itself not as a hypothesis, but rather, a statement of fact before the actual events, ie 'a horoscope', 'a map of the future of mankind', and 'what must be'.

    We shall see.


    ‘Thus the lines are drawn. The choirs are marshalled on each wing of the world’s stage, Russia leading the one, the United States the other. Yet the world is too small for both, and the contest must end in the downfall of the one and the victory of the other.’ The New Rome; or, the United States of the World (1853) - pg 109


    https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-1F1U0gBMi4M/V2M0KRs3qMI/AAAAAAAAKXo/lBtmDL-9-McBjzk3ZskSmoRuBUqC9RztQCLcB/s1600/The%2Bstandoff%2Bat%2BCheckpoint%2BCharlie%2BSoviet%2Btanks%2Bfacing%2BAmerican%2Btanks%252C%2B1961%2B%25281%2529.jpg



    https://majorityrights.com/weblog/comments/the_new_rome_or_the_united_states_of_the_world_1853

    https://archive.org/details/politicalprophec00goeb/page/n3/mode/2up

    https://www.belcherfoundation.org/camerica.htm

    Well, the masonic plan was indeed for an Anglo – American empire to dominate world business.
    But ultimately, communism and capitalism would have to merge, for a better management of world affairs. Which goes to show how phony the Cold War really was.
    The only parts of the plan that failed are that China, whose development was bankrolled by the West well before Nixon visited there, has gone rogue and become a major independent world player and that Russia rejected Anglo-American rule after Putin came to power and claimed its independence.

  155. anon[618] • Disclaimer says:
    @BB753
    I was stating facts, I'm not particularly a fan of Throne and Altar, but it was a better and more humane system than the current regime. Perhaps Byzantium had it exactly right, the Empire rules over the temporal realm, and the Church over the spiritual realm, each of these powers balancing each other. Democracy is but a front for the oligarchs to keep the sheeple in their place.

    Can you cite a relevant quote from Glubb?

    I was stating facts,

    Well, that’s your opinion. Everyone has one, you know.

    I’m not particularly a fan of Throne and Altar, but it was a better and more humane system than the current regime.

    Probably not, but it’s moot.

    Perhaps Byzantium had it exactly right, the Empire rules over the temporal realm, and the Church over the spiritual realm, each of these powers balancing each other.

    Lol. Which color do you prefer, blue or green?

    Democracy is but a front for the oligarchs to keep the sheeple in their place.

    Could be. So what? Are you trying to make a point, or just roll in nostalgia for some long gone time?

    Can you cite a relevant quote from Glubb?

    Used to be Pasha Glubb’s family was pretty serious about copyright and policed the intertubes for violations. Now one can find PDF’s of his monograph easily. I’ll give you the outline, which happens to fall under Fair Use. You can decide to read or not read.

    SUMMARY by Sir John Glubb
    As numerous points of interest have arisen in the course of this essay, I close with a brief summary, to refresh the reader’s mind.
    (a) We do not learn from history because our studies are brief and prejudiced.
    (b) In a surprising manner, 250 years emerges as the average length of national greatness.
    (c) This average has not varied for 3,000years. Does it represent ten generations?
    (d) The stages of the rise and fall of great nations seem to be:
    The Age of Pioneers (outburst)
    The Age of Conquests
    The Age of Commerce
    The Age of Affluence
    The Age of Intellect
    The Age of Decadence.
    (e) Decadence is marked by:
    Defensiveness
    Pessimism
    Materialism
    Frivolity
    An influx of foreigners
    The Welfare State
    A weakening of religion.
    (f) Decadence is due to:
    Too long a period of wealth and power
    Selfishness
    Love of money
    The loss of a sense of duty.
    (g) The life histories of great states are amazingly similar, and are due to internal factors.
    (h) Their falls are diverse, because they are largely the result of external causes.
    (i) History should be taught as the history of the human race, though of course with emphasis on the history of the student’s own country.

    • Replies: @BB753
    Good points by Pasha Glubb. As I said, the current Western regime won't last much longer.
    There's no point in debating with you, as you obviously cannot shake off your liberal prejudices to face reality.
  156. anon[618] • Disclaimer says:
    @S

    You see, it all began with the Enlightenment, a movement which was largely masonic and protestant in origin, bringing together rich merchants, thinkers, occultists, aristocrats in their effort to topple Throne and Altar, that is, the old European monarchies and the Catholic Church...So basically, the USA and the USSR, in their prime, represented, respectively, the right and left wings of the same political movement.
     
    Thank you for an excellent and very well informed summation and post.

    How many are aware that Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Paine, and (apparently) Benjamin Franklin, some of the heaviest hitters as 'Founding Fathers' of the 1776 Capitalist American Revolution, were also quite involved with the 1789 Communist French Revolution as well?

    As you allude regarding the US and USSR representing 'right and left wings of the same political movement', applying Occam's Razor, one could look it this as a manufactured Hegelian Dialectic, one I submit which has been broadly controlled by human hands since it's late 18th century inception.

    In line with this, since '1776', the City of London has historically acted as this manufactured dialectic's arbiter (ie 'referee'), and the British Empire (in time joined by the United States) the 'muscle', to enforce the City's decisions in regards to it's promotion of both Capitalist and Communist global revolution, and penalizing severely those who rebel, or, are out of line, with this dialectic's worldwide aims, ie Napoleon, Hitler, Tojo, etc, as an example to others.

    It’s not as if these people were shy about what they intended to do.
     
    Yes, they often tell us of their intentions, if a bit cryptically at times.

    If you are not already familiar with the '48er' Theodore Poesche, and his very obscure and generally unknown 1853 geo-political book linked to and excerpted below, The New Rome; or, the United States of the World, you might find it of some interest.

    The 1912 booklet linked below it, A Political Prophecy, gives the biographical background of The New Rome's two writers, Poesche and Goepp, and the historic context of the 19th century book's publication, along with some analysis of it's content.

    The last link to the outstanding Belcher Foundation site is to an article there which fills in the details which the New Rome book doesn't provide, ie the geo-political plans for British North America made in the decades prior to 1776 by the British Board of Trade, along with powerful elements and hangers on of the British Whig party. The site is dedicated to the remembrance and preservation of the life work of British royal governor Jonathan Belcher, founder of Princeton, and first North American born British freemason. The article dovetails perfectly with the major points of The New Rome.

    The premise of The New Rome is that the 1776 Revolution had been a planned 'false split' between the US and UK, that the United States itself is the direct continuation (as planned) of the British Empire, and that someday in the future a practically unbeatable US/UK united front will form, which will first conquer and gain control of Germany, the center of power upon continental Europe (thereby unleashing a 'world's war' upon the Earth), to be immediately followed afterwards by a global struggle for world supremacy (centered upon Europe) specifically between the United States and Russia, along with each side's respective allies.

    According to this mid 19th century book, the United States prevails against Russia due to the global projection of US air power and the aerial bombardment of Russia's ground forces.

    The world state/empire known as the 'New Rome', or, the 'United States of the World' is then ushered in.

    The New Rome book in it's opening pages desribes itself not as a hypothesis, but rather, a statement of fact before the actual events, ie 'a horoscope', 'a map of the future of mankind', and 'what must be'.

    We shall see.


    ‘Thus the lines are drawn. The choirs are marshalled on each wing of the world’s stage, Russia leading the one, the United States the other. Yet the world is too small for both, and the contest must end in the downfall of the one and the victory of the other.’ The New Rome; or, the United States of the World (1853) - pg 109


    https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-1F1U0gBMi4M/V2M0KRs3qMI/AAAAAAAAKXo/lBtmDL-9-McBjzk3ZskSmoRuBUqC9RztQCLcB/s1600/The%2Bstandoff%2Bat%2BCheckpoint%2BCharlie%2BSoviet%2Btanks%2Bfacing%2BAmerican%2Btanks%252C%2B1961%2B%25281%2529.jpg



    https://majorityrights.com/weblog/comments/the_new_rome_or_the_united_states_of_the_world_1853

    https://archive.org/details/politicalprophec00goeb/page/n3/mode/2up

    https://www.belcherfoundation.org/camerica.htm

    Assume for the sake of argument that all this is true. There is a question I’d like you to answer.

    So what?

    The internet is chock full of people insisting they have the sekret trooth of history. Far as I can tell, all they really want to do is rant “SEE! I ToLD YoU!” and maybe sell some subscriptions to a site. Nobody writes a long turgid screed that links up diverse threads of history into an overarching konspiracy and then concludes with:

    “Now, here is what we are going to do”.

    Nope. It’s always just intellectual masturbation.

    So, what? What’s your point? What’s your agenda, your plan, your idea?

    Got thinking?

    • LOL: S
    • Replies: @BB753
    As Stalin would say, how many tank divisions do you have? How many billions to buy off officials, government employees, spies, etc. Do you have the backing of a foreign power, and of several banks?
    Because that's how revolutions are made.
    Read Tragedy and Hope, by Carroll Quigley.

    We know how to destroy globalism and the Anglo-American masonic power structure: we just don't have the means available to those who conspired in 1789 against the French monarchy.
    In any case, it will collapse by itself, at the end of this century. It had a good run for three centuries but it's over.
  157. S says:

    Thou protesteth too much.

    To get a supremely intellectual response like ‘so what’ I must have (entirely unintentionally) really said something that greatly disturbed you and caused your ‘retreat’ from the field.

    As far as effective actions to stop the destruction of Euro-people’s some of my past posts have dealt with that. You can find them if you look a bit. Broadly I tend to think you have a valid point about too much talk and philosophising, and not enough action.

    Having said that, it’s a combination of actions and understanding that needs to be undertaken. If someone taking action doesn’t fully comprehend what they are dealing with, their actions can easily come to naught.

    As an example, amongst many others, if Sinn Fein’s leaders and corporate membership had had a far better grasp of this contrived Hegelian Dialectic of Capitalist vs Communist, historically eminating from out of London, which myself and the other poster were discussing, they might well still be representing the interests of the organic Irish people today. Sinn Finn instead got suckered with Marxism and no longer represent the needs of the Irish. Because of that failure to understand, all those decades of sincere struggle seem to have been fought for no purpose as things stand.

    Having said that, what actions are you taking? Instead of ineffectively anonymously trolling others with harassing/haranguing posts, why don’t you yourself lead by example out in the real world?

    Or is anonymously trolling a website too much fun?

  158. @anon
    Assume for the sake of argument that all this is true. There is a question I'd like you to answer.

    So what?

    The internet is chock full of people insisting they have the sekret trooth of history. Far as I can tell, all they really want to do is rant "SEE! I ToLD YoU!" and maybe sell some subscriptions to a site. Nobody writes a long turgid screed that links up diverse threads of history into an overarching konspiracy and then concludes with:

    "Now, here is what we are going to do".

    Nope. It's always just intellectual masturbation.

    So, what? What's your point? What's your agenda, your plan, your idea?

    Got thinking?

    As Stalin would say, how many tank divisions do you have? How many billions to buy off officials, government employees, spies, etc. Do you have the backing of a foreign power, and of several banks?
    Because that’s how revolutions are made.
    Read Tragedy and Hope, by Carroll Quigley.

    We know how to destroy globalism and the Anglo-American masonic power structure: we just don’t have the means available to those who conspired in 1789 against the French monarchy.
    In any case, it will collapse by itself, at the end of this century. It had a good run for three centuries but it’s over.

  159. @anon
    I was stating facts,

    Well, that's your opinion. Everyone has one, you know.

    I’m not particularly a fan of Throne and Altar, but it was a better and more humane system than the current regime.

    Probably not, but it's moot.

    Perhaps Byzantium had it exactly right, the Empire rules over the temporal realm, and the Church over the spiritual realm, each of these powers balancing each other.

    Lol. Which color do you prefer, blue or green?

    Democracy is but a front for the oligarchs to keep the sheeple in their place.

    Could be. So what? Are you trying to make a point, or just roll in nostalgia for some long gone time?

    Can you cite a relevant quote from Glubb?

    Used to be Pasha Glubb's family was pretty serious about copyright and policed the intertubes for violations. Now one can find PDF's of his monograph easily. I'll give you the outline, which happens to fall under Fair Use. You can decide to read or not read.

    SUMMARY by Sir John Glubb
    As numerous points of interest have arisen in the course of this essay, I close with a brief summary, to refresh the reader’s mind.
    (a) We do not learn from history because our studies are brief and prejudiced.
    (b) In a surprising manner, 250 years emerges as the average length of national greatness.
    (c) This average has not varied for 3,000years. Does it represent ten generations?
    (d) The stages of the rise and fall of great nations seem to be:
    The Age of Pioneers (outburst)
    The Age of Conquests
    The Age of Commerce
    The Age of Affluence
    The Age of Intellect
    The Age of Decadence.
    (e) Decadence is marked by:
    Defensiveness
    Pessimism
    Materialism
    Frivolity
    An influx of foreigners
    The Welfare State
    A weakening of religion.
    (f) Decadence is due to:
    Too long a period of wealth and power
    Selfishness
    Love of money
    The loss of a sense of duty.
    (g) The life histories of great states are amazingly similar, and are due to internal factors.
    (h) Their falls are diverse, because they are largely the result of external causes.
    (i) History should be taught as the history of the human race, though of course with emphasis on the history of the student’s own country.

    Good points by Pasha Glubb. As I said, the current Western regime won’t last much longer.
    There’s no point in debating with you, as you obviously cannot shake off your liberal prejudices to face reality.

  160. anon[184] • Disclaimer says:

    As Stalin would say, how many tank divisions do you have? How many billions to buy off officials, government employees, spies, etc. Do you have the backing of a foreign power, and of several banks?
    Because that’s how revolutions are made.

    Hold on there, General Armchair. I don’t have or need any of that stuff. Stop projecting. I’m not the guy yearning for “muh CATHolic MOnarch”, that’s you and your Throne ‘n Altar fanboys.

    I’m just asking questions. You sure do get triggered by questions!

    Read Tragedy and Hope, by Carroll Quigley.

    Lemme search on it…Oh, boy. No thanks. That kind of wacked out stuff is just a waste of my precious time. Nothing personal, I’m not gonna read anything from $cientology either.

    We know how to destroy globalism and the Anglo-American masonic power structure:

    Sure you do. Sure.

    we just don’t have the means available to those who conspired in 1789 against the French monarchy.

    “muh ANCIEN ReGIME” again? Lol, you’re ignorant. This is typical, too.

    In any case, it will collapse by itself, at the end of this century. It had a good run for three centuries but it’s over.

    Then what diff? Who cares? Will you still be alive to say “SEE! SEE! SEE! I TOLD YOU SO!!” or not? Will that make you happy and wealthy and healthy?

    You might consider getting dopamine hits from something other than this, just suggesting.

    BB753
    Good points by Pasha Glubb.

    Yeah, I expected that. Obviously you are a superficial reader, not a serious person. A serious person would read Glubb’s monograph and pay attention to the cause / effect he suggests, and then maybe draw some conclusions. But, you didn’t. You just skimmed for confirmation and said “good”.

    I’ll put a cookie on the lower shelf where you can reach it: what does “overproduction of elites” mean, and what does it imply in the larger picture?

    As I said, the current Western regime won’t last much longer.

    Ok, so what? If that happens, one thing is for sure: it won’t be bar stool philosopher-kang wannabes like you who pick up the pieces. What’s your point? What’s the action item for readers here?

    There’s no point in debating with you, as you obviously cannot shake off your liberal prejudices to face reality.

    Lol, you’re funny. An old man on the interwebs yearns for “Muh Louis! Muh SUN KANG!” but when questioned about his delusions argues “you can’t face reality”.

    The webs is full of cranks who spin ridiculous fantasies about neoReaction while ignoring history and the reality around them.

    Well, I guess you may as well return to your moldbuggery. Have fun!

    lol.

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