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NYT: Should Classic Rock Songs be Toppled Like Confederate Statues?
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From the NYT’s ex-man opinion columnist:

Should Classic Rock Songs Be Toppled Like Confederate Statues?

Nov. 3, 2021

By Jennifer Finney Boylan, Contributing Opinion Writer

… But when Patrisha McLean, Don McLean’s ex-wife, hears “American Pie,” she isn’t reminded of golden moments of adolescence or even the classic age of rock ’n’ roll memorialized by the song.

Instead, she remember all the mailbox money her ex-husband made off “American Pie.”

Ms. McLean says she was subjected to years of emotional and physical abuse from her former husband.

Ms. McLean was married to her husband for 29 years before the night five years ago that she made a 911 call. In the aftermath, Mr. McLean was arrested on suspicion of domestic violence. He was charged with six misdemeanors; he pleaded guilty to four as part of a plea agreement in which the domestic violence charge would be dismissed after a year. For the other three charges — criminal restraint, criminal mischief and making domestic violence threats — he paid some \$3,000 in fines.

… His iconic song still plays on the radio.

… Can I still love their music if I’m appalled by various events in the lives of Johnny Cash or Elvis or Jerry Lee Lewis? Or by Eric Clapton’s racist rants and anti-vaccination activism? …

There are a lot of things I revere about “Brown Sugar,” and Mr. Richards’s guitar riffs not least.

Obviously, Jennifer Finley Boylan always felt like a girl on the inside, even back when he was a dude playing air guitar to “Brown Sugar.” What young woman doesn’t deeply identify with Keith Richards?

But I can tell you that in 50 years, it has not once occurred to me that this song might even remotely be about the empowerment of Black women. If the Stones don’t know why the song has to go, does simply removing it from their tour sheet go far enough? …

For a lot of baby boomers, it’s painful to realize that some of the songs first lodged in our memories in adolescence really need a second look. And it’s hard to explain why younger versions of ourselves ever thought they were OK in the first place.

Because they were adolescents?

We’ve got this wacky situation where music for adolescents from the late 1960s-early 1970s is revered as high culture

Maybe reconsidering those songs, and their artists, can inspire us to think about the future and how to bring about a world that is more inclusive and more just.

It would be interesting to make up a list of famous songs by black singers and songwriters with a history of domestic violence. For example, Rolling Stone, a magazine for white boomer guitar rock fans, just published its new Woke-ified top 500 songs list, with Aretha Franklin’s “Respect” #1 replacing Rolling Stone’s traditional favorite (for understandable namesake reasons), Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone.”

#6 is Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On.” Of course, Marvin’s domestic life is notorious.

#3 is Sam Cooke’s “A Change Is Gonna Come,” which seems lamer that a lot of other Cooke songs, but Rolling Stone loves the handful of famous songs with leftist angles. Of course, a pantsless Sam was shot dead by a woman motel manager in 1964 in an embarrassing scandal.

But both Gaye and Cooke were tremendous talents.

#2 is Public Enemy’s “Fight the Power.” Flavor Flav, Public Enemy’s hypeman, has been arrested several times for domestic violence.

“Respect” was written by Otis Redding for himself, who died in a 1967 plane crash. He appears to have been a pretty good all-around guy, whose widow and their four kids revere his memory.

Although dying at age 26 can help in that regard. For example, James Brown was impressively drug free for the first three decades of his career, but then in his 50s he got into a drug: for some reason his drug of choice was perhaps the worst one of all, angel dust.

 
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  1. Of all the RS songs that would be targeted, I thought it would be Some Girls.

  2. Of course the song “American Pie” can no longer be played but any rap song with N^gg^r or Motherf^^ker can go platinum.

    • Thanks: true.enough
  3. Tony says:

    And lets not forget Ike turner, a gentleman in every sense of the word.

    • Agree: Tom F.
    • LOL: Cool Daddy Jimbo, bomag, bruce county
  4. J.Ross says:

    Worked at a place with a few old guys and a lot of younger guys. Went on a lot of road trips where it was mainly the old guy driving and his CaseLogic CD collection playing soundtrack. Inevitable result: confused young former rap fan admits 70s rock is better and becomes Bad Company until the day they die.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  5. CCZ says:

    Bye, Bye Jimi Hendrix!!!!

    Hey Joe, where you goin’ with that gun in your hand?
    Hey Joe, I said where you goin’ with that gun in your hand?
    Alright. I’m goin down to shoot my old lady,
    you know I caught her messin’ ’round with another man.

    Uh, hey Joe, I heard you shot your woman down,
    you shot her down.
    Uh, hey Joe, I heard you shot you old lady down,
    you shot her down to the ground. Yeah!

  6. anon[139] • Disclaimer says:

    What amazes me is that, for the last 50+ years, the United States has been (and still is) defined by the lowest aspects of its culture, venerating social artifacts produced by its lowest stature, least accomplished members of society.

  7. @Buffalo Joe

    Not to mention rap performers’ tendency to murder one another.

    • Replies: @Wade Hampton
    , @a reader
  8. Altai says:

    On NPR’s news quiz program “Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me!”, Boylan achieved a perfect score when tested about Hot Dogs.

    https://www.npr.org/2021/05/22/999433357/not-my-job-we-quiz-author-jenny-finney-boylan-about-hot-dogs

    Why does the Guardian not get what Tatiana McGrath is a satire of again?

  9. @Buffalo Joe

    Of course the song “American Pie” can no longer be played but any rap song with N^gg^r or Motherf^^ker can go platinum.

    And then to compound the absurdity, when a white person emulates their hip hop heroes and quotes these lyrics or tries to act gangsta – “wassup my n******?” – on social media, some enterprising reporter or someone with an axe to grind digs up those tweets or emails from years earlier and proceeds to ruin their life. All because they were trying too hard to be black.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  10. Anonymous[950] • Disclaimer says:

    Don’t forget Douche Baggy Bag getting off Scott-free on an accessory to murder rap. He had a flimsy defense, but stacked the courtroom with a bunch of thugs to impress the jury into making the healthier decision. Still can’t understand how his career flourished after that, aside from white bigotry, “well he helped kill a guy, but that’s what blacks do, it’s in their nature, and we like the Snoop story and want to keep it going.”

    http://www.mtv.com/news/1434317/snoop-trial-winds-down/

    On the same topic, Rod Stewart had a hit song celebrating sex with a Latina minor, which is not a song he plays at concerts anymore. For some reason.

    Shall we cancel Rod this week? Or do we think, while he might have committed statutory rape, or at least sang a song celebrating it, he is indeed a rock star, it’s in their nature, and we like the Rod Stewart story and want to keep it going.”

  11. anon[117] • Disclaimer says:

    I wonder how many Rolling Stone readers even heard #3, Change is Gonna Come? I consider myself a music buff (especially of 60’s music) and know the legend of the song, but after listening to the vid on youtube, it really doesn’t ring a bell with me.

    I might have heard it in some civil rights documentary or something, or Sam Cooke’s distinctive voice sounds familiar, but that’s about all the even slight familiarity I could pretend to muster for it.

  12. Curle says:

    “His iconic song”.

    How is a song iconic? Famous or nostalgic and iconic are not the same thing. What the Hell is American Pie an icon for? I know what the Cross is an icon for.

    I assume mailbox money is money that arrives in the mail rather than distributed at a job site. Never heard this term before and I’m almost as old as you.

    Brown Sugar is basically a song expressing the idea Black girls are so wild in the sack even the slavers couldn’t resist them. That song is clearly an appreciation of Black females. Maybe this weirdo writer is getting jealous of the Sistas now that he’s a she.

  13. inertial says:

    Unlike statues, rock songs knock your brains out before they are toppled.

    I can’t say that I’d be very sad if rock music is ever canceled. It shouldn’t have existed in the first place.

  14. Ralph L says:

    Don McLean was abusive? Next they’ll say David Gates was a serial rapist.

  15. Lagertha says:

    This is just big fun; this is the real Lagertha: https://youtu.be/ZTttgc0DPA4

  16. Lagertha says:

    Happy Thanksgiving, Everyone.

    • Replies: @Corn
    , @Reg Cæsar
    , @Reg Cæsar
  17. @OilcanFloyd

    You might start with Stray Cat Blues.

  18. jcd1974 says:
    @Curle

    “mailbox money” are the royalty checks that arrive in the mail twice a year forever (copyright is now the life of the artist plus 75 years).

    • Thanks: Curle
  19. Rob says:

    The notorious behavior of rock & rollers, plus earlier musicians makes one wonder if the loose morals, by puritanical definitions, do not go back to the earliest musicians.

    Things that are obviously musical instruments, like bone flutes with holes carved in the right places (don’t ask me where) have been played by moderns, perhaps in reproduction, and the music is said to be haunting. Maybe peeps would say that ‘bout any ancient music. Interestingly, virtually the only Indian music that ever became popular, for a very liberal definition of popular, is music from Peruvian Indians, presumably the Aymara, though I’m too lazy to open a new tab. If the Aymara don’t live in Peru, well, what’s google for, if not to catch people tryin’ to sound smarter than they are on the internet.

    [MORE]

    In “primitive” societies, everyone is part of music-making. It unites the band. It may be no coincidence that what you (probably) call a tribe, 10-100 people that come together every evening, is called a band by anthropologists. Tribe refers to what should be called ethnic group. Somewhat humorously, most high school teams that I ever knew about had “team songs” that changed when the captains changed. Went to high school in New York and Virginia, so I’m guessing that this is true throughout the US. Indeed, small groups of people who coalesce, even involuntarily, but bond often had “group songs”. I remember having them from a psych ward or two, though I don’t remember them. Actually, I do remember one. I am sure music is something of a sore spot for whites and blacks on the same team, as whites like music, but blacks only listen to rap. Probably every white athlete who had a Twitter feed is cancellable for using ninja, typically in quotes from a part of a rap rap, which may not be obvious because it’s unattributed and rap fades into obscurity so fast. Rap rap was not an accidental repetition song means music, though I must admit to being fond enough of some old rap to listen to it every few years.

    Perhaps rock musician is an appealing career to teenage boys not only for the girls and fame, but to stay together with high school friends, not knowing how much those tend to fade in importance?

    At some point in social development, probably coinciding with specialty instruments that could not be made for everyone, music became the provenance of professional musicians. Perhaps the early large, settled villages/towns of the ancient middle east had professional musicians? I wonder if the settled tribes of the Pacific Northwest had professional musicians. Back when those tribes were living cultures, trading with but very separate from whites, people believed that kingdoms and empires postdated settled agriculture by thousands of years. I know kings had musicians, but a bronze age king was not like post-feudal kings, but was more a warlord, but with lots of subjects. I’ll bet bards, by whatever name, were the only part of Mycenaean palace culture to survive the Late Bronze Age Collapse. Probably survived in the Middle East too, only to be swept away by Islam — no one ever says this, but Arabs were basically the Indo-Europeans (popularly called Yamnaya) who swept away all the cultures of Europe — but the Arabs did it later. Also interestingly, I am pretty sure the Arabs did not conquer any Western Indo-European peoples. Also interestingly, Arabia was an independent origin of lactose tolerance, for camel milk. Perhaps lactose tolerance is an unsung hero (or villain) of the Arab expansion. Someone should ask Greg Cochran. I have totally forgotten what I meant to say in this paragraph. Think I’m just gonna end it.

    If musicians are not exploiting old circuitry to get laid, if the combination of traits that you think of when someone says “he’s a musician” are actually adaptations, that’s interesting. Otherwise, one wonders how many truly exceptionally talented people there are who could have been very successful in some field but could not pass through all the “fitting in” filters to get where ability could be expressed. Super-successful rock and rollers would be an interesting place to look for very rare genes of large positive effect on one or a few traits, but big effects that would be defects if they were not carried in the very sought-after genomes of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. Someone, I forget who, said Keith Richards would be a fascinating person for people who specialize in the neurology of addiction to study. I concur and think all The Rolling Stones would be interesting for lots of geneticists to study, before their genomes roll into the grave, in like, another fifty years. Richards presumably has lots of kids. Are they resistant to drug addiction like dad? The Stones’ very rare alleles influencing neural development or function would be super-interesting.

    Unlike most talents, musical ability is both noticed early and appreciated by many, including the most important arbiters of teenage status, pretty girls. There was a kid who almost built a breeder reactor in his backyard. David Hahn had a one-person nuclear program that got further along than anything Iraq ever did. I am not saying Hahn could have built a nuclear bomb alone and on a high school student’s budget, but I would not have wanted any foreign regime or non-state group to have gotten hold of him. Note the past tense. Hahn is now dead. Wikipedia says he died at 39 of substance use. Maybe he was just a chemistry prodigy? But chemistry does not have many prodigies. It draws on so many cognitive abilities, verbal, mathematical, and spatial that kids with Ph.D. chemist-level abilities are rare.

    Even the author of The Radioactive Boy Scout lamented that Hahn’s talents were never used. It seems that colleges were never scouting for bizarrely high-ability kids, not like sports, which actually matter to schools, even though they are worthless at the professional level. If Hahn had had mentorship and a path forward, his naval recruiter said he could work with the nuclear weapons, but a criminal conviction was a bar on that, hell, if he had even had girls impressed by chemistry, he would have seen college as a path forward. At a minimum, we should see if we can get “ancient” DNA from his grave.

    I really do wonder if music is the only field where we have super-talented and very individually weird people.

  20. Trinity says:

    Public Enemy like all (c)rap = shit no talent bums.

    “What’s Going On” by Marvin Gaye is indeed a CLASSIC and a wonderful song. Marvin Gaye did put out some really bad tunes as well, “Sexual Healing” was lame IMO.

    Aretha Franklin is VASTLY OVERRATED and to prove that I am colorblind at least when it comes to music, I consider Tina Turner the Queen of Rock & Roll, followed closely by Linda Ronstadt even though it is hard to put the eclectic music of Ronstadt in any one category. Obviously we all know who the King of Rock and Roll was, it was that boy from Mississippi with the long sideburns. Turner was indeed a super talent and along with Elvis and Linda Ronstadt, she could take hit songs by other artists and make them her own. She OWNED Al Green’s “Lets Stay Together” and The Beatles, “Help.”

    Best Rolling Stones tunes IMO are “Gimme Shelter,” “Bitch,” “Wild Horses,” “Honky Tonk Woman” and “Almost Hear You Sigh.” And probably not anyone’s favorite but mine, “Hot Stuff.” Lest we forget the Stones put out “Harlem Shuffle” and “Hey Negrita.” haha. Look for those songs to be deemed “racist.” And in “Miss You”, Mick talks about meeting some “Puerto Rican girls who are dying to meet you.” Friend and his girlfriend just saw the Stoooones perform the other night at Raymond James Stadium. I bet Mons Venus and 2001 Odyssey were hopping that night. teehee. Remember blasting off in the space ship at 2001 while Luther Ingram was singing, (“If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don’t Want To Be Right.” Check out Leann Rimes version, best cover IMO. That song has been done by everyone from Barbara Mandrell to Rod Stewart.

    Cue: Pick Up The Pieces by the Average White Band. Ah, the story I associate with this song. Oh hell yeah.

    • Replies: @Jefferson Temple
  21. Luke Lea says:

    Do you think they’d let Kinky Friedman sing this song anymore?

    • Replies: @Dmon
  22. “Tranny whines about the teenage boy songs he used to love but now he’s mad about because he’s old, part of a weird cult, and thoroughly screwed up.”

    OTOH, isn’t all this Woke cancelling really just a return to the time when artists had to uphold a certain moral code publicly or be censored into poverty? Like when Jerry Lee Lewis marrying his child-bride-cousin got him pushed off the hit charts in many places? Or when an out-of-wedlock baby for a movie starlet had to be hushed up as a “niece”, otherwise the public would stop going to their movies? Or when actors hushed up their degenerate sexual preferences?

    For most of history, entertainers have had a dance with authorities over whether they had the correct moral persona; most entertainers were social outcasts/low on the totem pole of society, and so there was no real pushback. A play that subverted the accepted and promoted cultural norms or an actor caught in a dalliance outside of marriage was a swift way to authorities either arresting people, banning performances, or running people out of town before sundown. Governments since forever have had vice controls on entertainers and squeezed hard in many cases, and entertainers have never been known for being morally upright as a group, regardless of the social norms.

    We’re just unused to this situation since the line from the Cult Marxists in the USA since the 1950s has been “Government morality bad, freedom of expression good!” and the courts have agreed. Except now, with the Marxists in charge, the tune has changed to “Government morality good, freedom of expression bad!”

    • Thanks: ic1000
    • Replies: @animalogic
    , @ic1000
  23. Fascinating that something as inherently ridiculous as rock music may now be getting the boot. Rock music labels were money printing machines from the 1970s through the 1990s leading to some really misguided business practices. It sure looks like fun in retrospect.

    Best version of the most cancellable “rockish” song ever.

    • Replies: @Curle
    , @Voltarde
  24. Cato says:

    I remember in the bars in which I dissipated myself and my inheritance in the 1980s and early 90s — the band would start up and play a few of their own numbers, then the audience would begin to chant “Freebird”, or “Stairway to Heaven”. The audience was all white. Let me repeat: WHITE! Definitely those songs need to go.

    • Replies: @Larry, San Francisco
  25. Instead, she remember all the mailbox money her ex-husband

    and, don’t forget, finance major (Iona College, ’68)

    made off “American Pie.”

    “Made off.” Good one there!

    Bye, bye Miss 401(k)
    Put my lucre in a euchre and it frittered away
    To white-shoe boys drinking Chardonnay.
    These’ll be the f****** that pay!

  26. So we’ve come completely full circle well within a half century.

    When I was growing up, “2 Live Crew” was raising the ire of civilized people, and the left came running to the rappers’ defense, mocking anyone who criticized the vulgar and sexually explicit lyrics as bible-humping Puritanical fascists.

    And now the same party–if not the very same people–are saying we need to “topple” the very stuff they would’ve defended thirty-some years ago had said Puritanical fascists went after it back then.

    If these clowns had any historical memory and shame, they might realize how ridiculous they are.

  27. Whiskey says: • Website

    Critical Drinker has a video on Youtube about how people trashing Star Wars, Raiders, Star Trek, Captain Picard, Luke Skywalker etc. are basically trashing people’s childhood memories. Deliberately so. And get the reaction they wanted. Which is anger.

    So yes, we can have a purge run by weirdo trannies and other fringe elements, of people’s childhood memories. All that does is make more enemies. Donald Trump was initially propelled by the anger of normal White dudes over wokeness in Video Games and Gamergate.

    And as Critical Drinker noted, nothing offered in replacement of the trashed childhood memories is any good. First nothing even the most artful can replace the emotional resonance of a song, a movie, a character, that informed your life when you were young and all the memories contained within. Much less the utter garbage. Replace the classic songs with what? Endless rap garbage? The latest pop tart?

    The people who push such things of course are weirdo deviants who in a better age would have been dealt with — no doubt they’d rather forget their childhoods by erasing everyone else’s.

    • Thanks: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Ray P
  28. MEH 0910 says:
    @Steve Sailer

    The Rolling Stones – Stray Cat Blues (Official Lyric Video)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stray_Cat_Blues

  29. Dmon says:
    @Luke Lea

    They’re definitely not letting him sing this one.

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
  30. Moses says:

    You’re all so cute pointing out worse behaviors of Black musicians and suggesting the woke cancel rules be applied regardless of race, gender or sexual orientation.

    That’s not how it works.

    Don McLean was a White cisgendered man. Everyone knows only White men and, occasionally, problematic White-adjacent persons can be canceled.

    Them’s the rules.

    But but all means, don’t stop your quaint beliefs — it’s adorable!

    • Agree: Old and Grumpy
    • Replies: @Old Prude
  31. Curle says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Must drive the Feminists crazy that they can’t cancel The Crystals.

  32. Anonymous[202] • Disclaimer says:

    And it’s hard to explain why younger versions of ourselves ever thought they were OK in the first place.

    ??? Hard to explain? Rock music has been about anarchy, rebellion, and craziness. That’s the whole appeal. The fantasy of irresponsibility, like watching crime movies with shoot-outs and car chases. Who takes that stuff for real?

    Also, it takes some humor to appreciate rock music. Sweet Home Alabama is funny about Neil Young being such a scold.

    One can argue rock culture’s influence has ultimately been baneful and meretricious — fair enough — , but rock is inseparable from a certain craziness and recklessness. It’s like a football game is what it is. Brutal and violent and can’t be anything but.

    Also, it’s hardly original to gripe some artists had troubled private lives. Don Mclean was one of the milder acts of Rock, and if anything, has been forgotten and mocked mainly because he was too sappy. He fell off the radar fast, and only ‘American Pie’ is still remembered(and also mocked as it’s utterly meaningless).

    Tranny as church lady on rock.

    Lo-Lo-Lo-Lola.

    • Replies: @Voltarde
  33. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    Oscar Levant, professionally active from the 1930s to early 1960s, composed a number of classical pieces of genuine talent, but gave it up and made his living writing popular music for radio, movies and television because no one much cared for classical music anymore.

    Levant enjoyed a superb education in classical music and piano technique. He studied composition with Arnold Schoenberg and piano with Zygmunt Stojowski. At the height of his career, he performed under the batons of Toscanini, Beecham, Mitropoulos, Reiner, Monteux, and Ormandy. But he gave it all up because people preferred listening to tunes like Slim Gaillard’s “Flat-foot Floogie,” a ditty about a black prostitute with syphilis, rather than Levant’s Nocturne for Orchestra. For many people, just mentioning names like Toscanini, Stojowski and Monteaux causes their eyes to glaze over. It wasn’t always like that, but it has been now for a long time.

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @AndrewR
  34. Moses says:
    @Matthew Kelly

    If these clowns had any historical memory and shame, they might realize how ridiculous they are.

    You misunderstand. There is no inconsistency or shame at all.

    “These clowns” knew and know exactly what they were/are doing.

    Their objective is to rip down traditional American (aka White) culture and sow the seeds of societal degeneracy and depravity.

    They have succeeded.

    Tipper’s 1990s crusade seems so quaint now, doesn’t it? Doubleplus because she was wife of a top Democrat! Unthinkable today.

  35. Pixo says:
    @CCZ

    Rolling Stone did dump him from their new list. I found elsewhere the highest rated 2004 list songs dropped from the new list.

    1. “Hound Dog,” Elvis Presley – 1956
    2. “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’,” The Righteous Brothers – 1964
    3. “When A Man Loves A Woman,” Percy Sledge – 1966
    4. “Long Tall Sally,” Little Richard – 1956
    5. “The Times They Are A-Changin’,” Bob Dylan – 1964
    6. “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin On,” Jerry Lee Lewis – 1957
    7. “For What It’s Worth,” Buffalo Springfield – 1966
    8. “Sunshine Of Your Love,” Cream – 1967
    9. “California Girls,” The Beach Boys – 1965
    10. “Mystery Train,” Elvis Presley – 1953
    11. “I Got You (I Feel Good),” James Brown – 1965
    12. “Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown),” The Beatles – 1965
    13. “Blue Suede Shoes,” Carl Perkins – 1956
    14. “Roll Over Beethoven,” Chuck Berry – 1956
    15. “You Can’t Always Get What You Want,” The Rolling Stones – 1969
    16. “Voodoo Child (Slight Return),” Jimi Hendrix – 1968
    17. “Be-Bop-A-Lula,” Gene Vincent And His Blue Caps – 1956
    18. “Hot Stuff,” Donna Summer – 1979
    19. “Living For The City,” Stevie Wonder – 1973
    20. “The Boxer,” Simon And Garfunkel – 1970
    21. “Not Fade Away,” Buddy Holly And The Crickets – 1957
    22. “Brown Eyed Girl,” Van Morrison – 1967
    23. “I’ve Been Loving You Too Long (To Stop Now),” Otis Redding – 1965
    24. “That’s All Right,” Elvis Presley – 1954
    25. “You Send Me,” Sam Cooke – 1957

    https://rocknyc.live/rolling-stones-latest-top-500-greatest-songs-of-all-time-list-bye-bye-boomer-bye-bye.html

    • Replies: @frankie p
  36. This is a non sequitur. They want to demolish the Washington Monument, the Jefferson Memorial, and the Lincoln Memorial.

  37. Trinity says:

    Not that I consider him a musician any more than I do Chuck D or Flava Flav, but read the lyrics of Leonard Cohen’s “First We Take Manhattan.” Interesting to say the least and revealing too. Sounds like the dude has some issues.

  38. @Matthew Kelly

    If you go back a bit more, people wanted to topple early rock’n’roll back in the 1950s, because it was “improper.”

    Although the details are now different, that’s more or less the argument this modern-day bluestocking is making here.

  39. Mr. Anon says:

    Trannies destroy everything they touch.

  40. Thomm says:

    You are forgetting about the greatest cultural appropriation of all time :

  41. SafeNow says:

    We’ve got this wacky situation where music for adolescents from the late 1960s-early 1970s is revered as high culture

    “high culture” seems a bit facetious. “revered” and “adolescents” are rather flippant. Roger Ebert, in his original review of “The Graduate,” referred to “The forgettable music of Simon and Garfunkel.” Years later, Ebert graciously said, “I was wrong.” Ebert had been attempting to be a music critic. I think Steve, a critic, is treading on original-Ebert ground here. There exist actual music critics. I think these critics would assess the musicality of that period in a non-sarcastic and mainly very positive way.

    Aside from the above, in the “comments” below the Youtubes of those songs, zillions of people who are currently young praise those classics, and say that nothing better has come along since. They are sincere, not “wacky.”

    • Replies: @John Milton's Ghost
  42. @Steve Sailer

    Not to mention one of the rejected cover art ideas for “Beggar’s Banquet”, a painting of the band wearing Nazi SS uniforms partying with naked pre-pubescent girls.

  43. @anon

    Agree. It’s tempting to say it’s a boomer thing, and it did become big in that generation, but the roots go back earlier: Ginsberg and the beatniks, the Lost Generation, the blackified music. Contemporary Europeans seemed to recognize the degeneracy of it, while simultaneously they couldn’t get enough of it, kinda like tobacco three centuries earlier.

    Anyhow, Steve coined another of his classic one-liner epigrams of radical noticing:

    We’ve got this wacky situation where music for adolescents from the late 1960s-early 1970s is revered as high culture

    I’m told that there is some actual objective evidence that late 1960s-early 1970s pop is musicologically more complex … than what came after it, but that’s sort of like saying that the homos of the 1970s were better than homos we’re stuck with now, and equally overlooks how the former spawned the latter, and overlooks—as inertial says—that we didn’t need any of it.

    • Replies: @Trinity
  44. Ano says:
    @Matthew Kelly

    Rock ‘n Roll has got to go!

  45. Trinity says:
    @Almost Missouri

    The best music hands down was from the mid 1970s until the late 1990s. Before that was meh, except for rare exceptions like Elvis and the Stones and even the Stones reached their peak IMO in the early to mid 1970s and had some good tunes in the 1980s as well. Late 1960s and early 1970s? Good but, that period from about 1974 to 1999 was the cream of the crop especially 1974 until the about 1997 or so. MOST everything after 2000 is pure shit, there are some rare exceptions but not many.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    , @Slim
  46. There are a lot of things I revere about “Brown Sugar,” and Mr. Richards’s guitar riffs not least.

    It’s considered an anti-slavery song, but if you’ll really think about it, “Brown Sugar” is a celebration of sexual sadism. Look up the lyrics and read them. I have never liked it.

  47. @Curle

    But did he (Finley Boylan) pluck his eyebrows and shave his legs?

  48. @CCZ

    Patti Smith koshered that one back in 1974:

    (By the way, the shredding lead guitar at the song’s end is Tom Verlaine, former Patti paramour and the co-founder of Television.)

    • Replies: @Pericles
  49. Actually, 70s music and pop culture celebrated a lot of abusive behavior. It was pretty rapey. And often dwelled on abusing underage girls.

    I’m not a PC scold but it was worse than we like to admit.

    I pulled into town in a police car
    Your daddy said I took it just a little too far
    You’re telling her things but your girlfriend lied
    You can’t catch me ’cause the rabbit done died

    There are dozens of examples of 30 year old rock stars jumping on seriously underage girls.

  50. @Dmon

    Fortunately, the First Amendment protects parody; otherwise, Merle Haggard would have sued the payess off poor Kinky (and his Texas Jewboys).

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  51. Anon[196] • Disclaimer says:

    Speaking of suppressing rock songs, here are three classic rock songs that were suppressed for various reasons at the time and which only came out later.

    Syd Barrett mocking Bob Dylan:

    The Who blowing the Stones off stage during the Stones’ own TV program:

    John Lennon blatantly trying to write a Bob Dylan song:

    Who really cares about rap? I sure don’t. It’s unlistenable.

  52. @Anon

    Indeed, this demo of Strawberry Fields Forever by Lennon sounds like a Dylan song like Positively 4th Street with its brash acoustic guitar chording.

    The single wound up sounding way different.

    • Replies: @Jack Armstrong
    , @S Johnson
  53. Curle says:
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    It was called jailbait rock for a reason.

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
  54. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    I pulled into town in a police car
    Your daddy said I took it just a little too far
    You’re telling her things but your girlfriend lied
    You can’t catch me ’cause the rabbit done died

    ACKSHULLY I don’t think that verse is about underage sex, but an entertainer rolling into town and taking advantage of a smitten groupie, and her powerful father using his influence to punish the rock star. That was still an era where good girls were supposed to be virgins and many fathers did get upset at guys who took that virginity pre-marriage, especially slime musicians with long hair.

    OTOH Lynyrd Skynyrd’s “What’s Your Name?” seems more likely to be describing seducing an underage teen groupie:

    “What’s your name, little girl?
    What’s your name?
    Shootin’ you straight, little girl?
    For there ain’t no shame.”

  55. @Flying Dutchman

    Ian: “They’re not going to release the album because they’ve decided that the cover is…sexist.”

    Nigel: “So what? What’s wrong with being sexy?”

  56. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    The sexual exploitation of minors in 1968-1978 pop/ rock music should be re-examined. Really strange stuff was going down in LA before disco broke.

    • Replies: @Corn
    , @Brutusale
  57. Wait until the trannies start paying attention to the lyrics of old school rap…..

  58. The music may have died, but we’re going to dig it up and crucify it in the name of social justice.

  59. JimDandy says:

    Where does I’d Love to Change the World by Ten Years After rank on the list?

  60. @Cato

    A band I used to follow called Dash Rip Rock had a solution for that. They played Staitway to Heaven with the lyrics from Freebird. They called it “Stairway to Freebird”:

    • Thanks: Cato
  61. Anon[262] • Disclaimer says:

    Elvis Costello deftly rewrote “Oliver’s Army” to seamlessly remove “white [n-word]” from the lyrics. I get a frisson when I hear a version by someone on YouTube who sticks with the original lyrics, usually live, with dodgy sound, to preserve deniability.

    What are other songs whose lyrics changed? Pre-rock era Woody Guthrie was pretty enthusiastic about glorifying the mowing down of American Indians so that the hard-working American farmer could expand west. Fortunately Guthrie wrote so many verses to his songs that you could drop two or three and still be left with a full song.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    , @JMcG
    , @Eric Novak
  62. @Trinity

    The best period of American music, hands down, was circa 1920-1960. FIFY

    We had Irvie Berlin, Jerome Kern, Oscar Hammerstein II, the Brothers Gershwin, Richard Rodgers and Larry Hart, Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer and Aaron Copland.

    We endured three days the music died.

    George Gershwin, “the man that got away,” left us on July 11, 1937.

    Jerry Kern stopped hearing the music on November 11, 1945.

    And finally, the Big C got Oscar on August 23, 1960.

    All three proved irreplaceable.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    , @Almost Missouri
  63. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @Curle

    How is a song iconic? Famous or nostalgic and iconic are not the same thing. What the Hell is American Pie an icon for?

    Actually, if not considered to be a brute force attack, that’s a fair question. Here’s an an answer that nobody here might want.

    Icon: A symbol (picture, song, sounds) that evokes an idea that it does not directly describe, e.g. the Russian Orthodox icons, or “Let’s Go, Brandon!”.

    “American Pie” follows the loss of dancing from Western popular culture as R&R transformed from music to be danced to into music to be listened to. However, its iconic significance is far greater than that. It is an icon for the loss of everything — family, local society, sovereignty of the citizen body over government, the Enlightenment idea of reason as a common ground in which those who feared death could settle differences. The loss of a society.
    See:

    And, for those who remember the events of the time, or have studied them, here’s the, ah, iconic explanation of the iconic song:
    See:

    Even today, it is hard to say quite what it was that was lost. Those raised in a social system that is gone have very little ability to describe the lost social system, and those who were born afterwards cannot imagine the complexity and feel of lost a social system. You might try looking at the film “Hamburger Hill” (

    ), which is also an icon of a lost society, to get some idea of what the society was like and especially how it was lost. “Hamburger hill” makes the point, implicitly, that human life, including Black life, which had been improving up to 1970, has been deteriorating since as it lost its sovereignty over institutions (popular music and professional government), and, without even theoretical sovereignty, lost lost all aspirational goals other than seeking restoration for historical victimization.

    Today, one can only think of American society c.a. 1950 (when R&R was dancing music) as a straw man: either a lost paradise (which is is not, nothing secular is paradise and it was far too easy to get drafted and sent to West Bumf*ck to slow down projecties) or as a lost Hell (because it was not run by the Left). “American Pie” is an icon of loss for those who remember the society and remember its loss.

    • Agree: Mr Mox, Wade Hampton
    • Thanks: ic1000
    • Replies: @Curle
  64. @Flying Dutchman

    Completely false. The image you’re talking about is from Rock Dreams, a 1973 book of illustrations by Belgian artist/illustrator Guy Peellaert.
    https://dietcokeandsympathy.blogspot.com/2012/01/rock-dreams-part-1.html

    This was pre-computer-days so making paintings using a collage-esque photoshoppy technique was cutting edge. Peellaert got some work out of it as he ended up doing the covers for “It’s only rock ‘n’ roll” and Bowie’s “Diamond Dogs”. The cover that was rejected for “Beggar’s Banquet” was a photo of toilet graffiti. Tame stuff by today’s standards.

    • Replies: @Flying Dutchman
    , @Clyde
  65. @MEH 0910

    The stray cat is 15 on the studio version but on the live “Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out” version Sir Mick sings:

    I can see that you’re just thirteen years old
    I don’t want your I.D
    You look so lonesome and you’re so far from home

    Ain’t no hanging matter
    It’s no capital crime

    Would have been a good song for Michael Jackson to cover — no?

    • Replies: @OilcanFloyd
    , @MEH 0910
  66. @Steve Sailer

    Same for the Stones and “Sympathy for the Devil” — you can pinpoint when the sessions started as “who killed Kennedy” becomes “who killed the KennedyS”.

    The recording of “Sympathy for the Devil” began at London’s Olympic Sound Studios on 4 June 1968 and continued into the next day; overdubs were done on 8, 9 and 10 June. Personnel included on the recording include Nicky Hopkins on piano; Rocky Dijon on congas; Bill Wyman on maracas. Marianne Faithfull, Anita Pallenberg, Brian Jones, Charlie Watts, producer Jimmy Miller, Wyman and Richards can be seen performing backup vocals in the film Sympathy for the Devil (see below) by Jean-Luc Godard. Richards plays bass on the original recording, and also the song’s electric-guitar solo.

    A rare Charlie Watts vocal contribution too.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Reg Cæsar
  67. Mr Mox says:

    …and how to bring about a world that is more inclusive and more just.

    To make the world more inclusive and just, we must exclude!

    • Replies: @Veteran Aryan
  68. Mr. Anon says:

    Better reasons not to play “American Pie” are a.) everyone’s heard it a thousand times and b.) it sucks wang.

    • Agree: Carol
    • Disagree: Jack Armstrong
    • Replies: @Pontius
  69. @Larry, San Francisco

    The best version of Stairway to Heaven is Little Roger and the Goosebumps’.

  70. Mr. Anon says:
    @Nicholas Stix

    Richard Rodgers was one of the greatest American composers. Much under-rated, I think.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  71. @Flying Dutchman

    That was a painting from Guy Peellaert’s book Rock Dreams. The book came out in 1973, too late for Beggar’s Banquet (1968). Peellaert did do the cover of the Stones’ 1974 album It’s Only Rock ’n Roll.

    • Agree: Jack Armstrong
  72. @Curle

    A song written by Gerry Goffin and Carole King. Even Lou Reed advocated hitting women.

    There she goes again
    She’s out on the streets again
    She’s down on her knees, my friend
    But you know she’ll never ask you please again
    Now take a look, there’s no tears in her eyes
    She won’t take it from just any guy, what can you do
    You see her walkin’ on down the street
    Look at all your friends she’s gonna meet
    You better hit her

  73. Pericles says:
    @Gary in Gramercy

    Ah yes, the celebrated writer of ‘Rock’n’Roll N-word’ which, by the way, still can be found on YT. One can only marvel at the fact she has evaded cancellation.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  74. Pericles says:
    @Anon

    Who really cares about rap? I sure don’t. It’s unlistenable.

    Nina Gordon covers ‘Straight outta Compton’

  75. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    LoIQW, when it comes to underaged girls, the Dead spelled it out in the Mexicali Blues. (Mexicali is just south of the border with Calexico on the north side.)

    Laid back in an old saloon, with a peso in my hand,
    watching flies and children on the street.
    And I catch a glimpse of black-eyed girls who giggle when I smile.
    There’s a little boy who wants to shine my feet.
    And it’s three days ride from Bakersfield and I don’t know why I came.
    I guess I came to keep from paying dues.
    So instead I’ve got a bottle and a girl who’s just fourteen,
    and a damn good case of the Mexicali blues
    Yeah.

    Is there anything a man don’t stand to lose
    when the devil wants to take it all away?
    Cherish well your thoughts, and keep a tight grip on your booze,
    ’cause thinkin’ and drinkin’ are all I have today.

    She said her name was Billy Jean and she was fresh in town.
    I didn’t know a stage line ran from Hell.
    She had raven hair, a ruffled dress, a necklace made of gold,
    all the French perfume you’d care to smell.
    She took me up into her room and whispered in my ear,
    “Go on, my friend, do anything you choose.”
    Now I’m payin’ for those happy hours I spent there in her arms,
    with a lifetime’s worth of the Mexicali Blues.

    It’s a John Perry Barlow and Bobby song

    With this live version, you may as well stay for their version of Johnny Cash’s Big River

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORu7YfRDf0c

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  76. @Achmed E. Newman

    (Hopefully, the video will be embedded right later – seen this bug before.)

    Anyway, how are they gonna cancel the Dead? You can’t.

  77. @R.G. Camara

    I once heard someone say that of all UNimportant things, football was the most important. The same can be said for “popular” music, rock ‘n roll etc.
    That people find the need to attack such music or music (etc) made by the morally questionable just shows what unmitigated piss-ants they are.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
  78. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    “dozens of examples of 30 year old rock stars jumping on seriously underage girls”

    When rock started 30 years old was decrepit. “Never trust anyone over 30” was the hippy motto in 1967. Most bands hit the big time between 18-22 – no one ever imagined they might still be filling venues 10 years later, let alone 40.

    There’s no doubt though that musicians (and DJs, and roadies, and lighting guys, and anyone in the business) didn’t worry too much about the legal age of consent.

    All they wanted me to do was abuse them, sexually, which, of course, I was only too happy to do,’ DJ John Peel told the Guardian in 1975, speaking about Texas schoolgirls. He married a 15 year old Texan in 1965 when he was 26.

    It’s not “just” songs which are cancelled though. When did you last hear Gary Glitter on an oldies show? Despite being a huge part of the Glam Rock era his songs have been wiped off the BBC. Does anyone know – has Polanski been unpersoned? Are his movies ever shown on TV?

    Though in the light of subsequent revelations his always dubious lyrics are even more dubious.

  79. Voltarde says:
    @Anonymous

    Sweet Home Alabama is funny about Neil Young being such a scold.

    Lynyrd Skynyrd – Sweet Home Alabama – 7/2/1977 – Oakland Coliseum Stadium

    Oakland, for goodness sakes!

    • Thanks: Trinity
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Trinity
  80. BB753 says:

    Can Bob Dylan please renounce his Nobel Prize because of his use of the n-word in Hurricane? Schadenfreude never ends. I hope all these old liberals get a taste of their own medicine.

  81. AndrewR says:
    @J.Ross

    There is a lot of great 70s rock but you can only listen to the same songs so many times before they get boring. I don’t care for these generational and genre-al pissing contests. There is good (and bad) music from every year and every genre. A young rap fan who gets exposed to grandpa rock doesn’t become a “former rap fan.”

  82. AndrewR says:
    @Anonymous

    You bizarrely imply that classical training in music would not be very beneficial in composing popular music. Unbelievable.

    • Disagree: bomag
    • Replies: @Known Fact
  83. @Voltarde

    The Bay Area after WWII was full of rednecks. E.g., the Fogertys of Creedence Clearwater Revival were the sons of parents from Iowa and Montana, but they got into deep southern styles.

    • Thanks: Voltarde
  84. @Obstinate Cymric

    I can recall reading a biography of The Beatles in “Reader’s Digest” that speculated upon how many descendants the Beatles left behind in Australia after their 1964 tour.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    , @Anonymous
  85. @Pericles

    Patti Smith rapped but without rhythm:

    • Replies: @Jack Armstrong
    , @Pericles
  86. Voltarde says:
    @Clifford Brown

    It’s interesting that Robbie Robertson, a Canadian, wrote “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down”.

    “… (Robbie) Robertson was born Jaime Royal Robertson[5] on July 5, 1943. He was an only child. His mother was Rosemarie Dolly Chrysler, born February 6, 1922, a Cayuga and Mohawk woman who was raised on the Six Nations Reserve southwest of Toronto, Ontario.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robbie_Robertson

    iSteve and others have noted some similarities between the fate of Native Americans and that of the historic American white population.

    In Canada, the Métis leader Louis Riel can’t be criticized by the political establishment, unlike, say, Robert E. Lee in America. Riel led two rebellions, one in 1869 and another in 1885:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_River_Rebellion
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North-West_Rebellion

    • Replies: @Joe Joe
  87. @animalogic

    I’d actually have to disagree. Popular music, as pop culture, can be incredibly influential in moving social norms. Sex and drugs became normalized in many teenagers minds since the 1960s through music, as it made them seem either fun or no big deal.

    Of course, pop music is, like all of pop culture, only effective in the in the aggregate; one song or album or band won’t move the needle long term, just like one TV show or movie won’t change a culture. The Marxist control of Hollywood and the music industry was successful in degenerating us into our current fallen form not from Abbey Road or NWA or Madonna, but because it continuously churned out Abbey Roads/NWAs/Madonnas or copycat lesser versions that saturated the airwaves and caused us to drown in filth for so many decades that we came to think of the filth as clean, pure water we should drink.

  88. ic1000 says:
    @R.G. Camara

    We’re just unused to this situation since the line from the Cultural Marxists in the USA since the 1950s has been “Government morality bad, freedom of expression good!” and the courts have agreed. Except now, with the Marxists in charge, the tune has changed to “Government morality good, freedom of expression bad!”

    This’ll be #68 in the thread, hopefully far enough down to excuse a somewhat inchoate reflection on this point.

    [MORE]

    I’m following the final season of Mike Duncan’s Revolutions podcast, which takes the listener step-by-step through that Russian one. Episode 73 has, finally, gotten Lenin and his merry band of pranksters to the cusp of October 1917 — so this has been the longest buildup ever for an epic zombie or disaster flick.

    There won’t be another 73 episodes to cover the rivers of blood that flowed from the pistol shots to the backs of Russian heads, etc. etc. Duncan’s audience likes tales of intrigue better than compilations of murder statistics.

    Leon Trotsky came up with the idea of Permanent Revolution (amusingly turgid Commie-speak explanation here).

    In this light, NYT authoress Jennifer Finlay Boylan is channeling the spirit of Trotsky. Our dawning era of Cultural Marxist triumph has an insatiable appetite for a new intelligentsia that will control the means of production of revolutionary ideas. Yeah, the ideas are dopey, and their inventors are midwits, and Boylan xerself will soon be discarded onto the ash-heap of history.

    That matters as little to today’s Commissars as it did to their forebears of the ’20s, ’30s, and 40s.

    Long Live the Revolution!

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
  89. The size and scope of woketards can’t be anywhere near what (((fake news))) portrays.

    How many overnourished purple-haired swine listen to plain old commercial radio–especially classic rock–when there’s satellite and internet sources galore?

  90. @CCZ

    Neil Young: Down by the river / I shot my baby

    Led Zeppelin, [“Hats Off to (Roy) Harper”]: Gave my baby / A twenty-dollar bill / If that don’t fix her I’m sure my shot shot shotgun will

    • Replies: @CCZ
  91. Goddard says:
    @Joe Stalin

    Gives the lie to the old adage, where there’s fire, there’s smoke.

  92. @ic1000

    Lenin’s train ride becomes more ominous the more you think about it. It may be a worse crime for the German government than the Holocaust due to the murders and mayhem and long-term suffering Lenin’s revolution caused.

    I heard a Great Courses lecture on communism. The speaker was good, but he gave little airtime to some juicy bits that I think were quite important but downplayed by proper historians, both right and left.

    Like how late 19th century and early 20th century communists (many young horny university students) sought to break apart “bourgeoisie morality” by having wild sex with one another in all forms of degeneracy — which actually led to a lot of failed communist movements as commies turned on ex-lovers and cuckholders and rivals and had them expelled from various communist groups. In fact, the commies might have pulled off an organized coup long before 1917 if they’d just kept it all in their pants and stopped turning their social hours into a ribald, graphic, porno version of Peyton Place.

    • Replies: @ic1000
  93. “We’ve got this wacky situation where music for adolescents from the late 1960s-early 1970s is revered as high culture”

    As opposed to the music that came later in the ’70’s, from the Sex Pistols, the Ramones, David Bowie, Talking Heads, etc. Music from dorks is of way more higher culture than music from Clapton, Page, Hendrix, and Richards. Everyone knows that from just a pure music ability talentwise, that Clapton, Page, and Hendrix are creampuffs compared to David Bowie and the Ramones.

    I mean, the Ramones changed the entire course of music history, didn’t they? The greatest music ever composed during the entire 20th century.

    • LOL: YetAnotherAnon
  94. @J.Ross

    The best Rolling Stones cut of all time, off the greatest Rolling Stone album of all time (Aftermath). After that it was all downhill for the Rolling Stones. Seriously. They should have just kept making songs like Under My Thumb for-ever!!

  95. Slim says:
    @Trinity

    Oddly, those dates coincide almost exactly with my career in the record business. Not oddly, I agree with you.

  96. @R.G. Camara

    ” Popular music, as pop culture, can be incredibly influential in moving social norms. Sex and drugs became normalized in many teenagers minds since the 1960s through music”

    Just as “busting a cap” in some “n***** ass” when you’d been “dissed” was normalised in the 90s.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  97. “Scarred old slaver knows he’s doin’ all right
    Hear him whip the women just around midnight”

    Frankly I’m surprised it’s taken this long for it to be cancelled.

  98. @Jack Armstrong

    No wonder the lyrics to many rock songs are garbled. I would have never guessed that those are the actual words to the song. I thought that the issue is that most rock singers can’t sing, but they may also be hiding lyrics.

  99. @Steve Sailer

    Black girls just wanna get fucked all night
    I just don’t have that much jam

    That’s not as bad as talking bad about their hair, but it’s pretty bad. Who cares about underage girls, anyway?

    • Replies: @CCZ
  100. Joe Joe says:
    @Voltarde

    But did Robertson actually write all or even any of it? I’ve heard(maybe at iSteve???) that he bamboozled his Bandmates into giving him writing creditsa(and thus royalties!!!) for all their songs, even if he didn’t write one verse!!!

    • Replies: @Voltarde
  101. Brutusale says:
    @Obstinate Cymric

    A song so sexist that lesbians cover it!

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
  102. @R.G. Camara

    Popular music, as pop culture, can be incredibly influential in moving social norms.

    The immense damage done to Western women by Sex And the City being exhibit 1A.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  103. @Trinity

    Rapping Lenny was a pretty good Buddhist not that i begged with him for what? That 20v years he spent ruminating on life or something and then woke-up one day to realize his buddy confidant stole all his money. All life is suffering ya know but try it fucking broke so lenny had to get hiss rhyming dictionary back out.
    In my secret life is his best song. He had alot of great ones so i think. He was a crooner and a very talented one. Don’t know where lenny did anything wrong.
    The future was one of the best albums of the 90s imo.

  104. Corn says:
    @Clifford Brown

    I’m a Ted Nugent fan but let’s be honest, he was a big teen-f***er in the ‘70s

    • Replies: @Jack Armstrong
  105. Trinity says:

    What “Stranglehold” by Ted Nugent.

    “I got you in a stranglehold baby, that night I crushed your face.” Whoa, Nelly.

    Cue: Wouldn’t Want To Be Like You by Alan Parsons Project… hehe. Remember doing The Robot to this tune back in the day.

  106. Trinity says:

    The 1980 hit “Into The Night” by Benny Mardones where he talks about falling in love with a 16 year old girl. The hit charted in the top 100 in 1980 and then again in 1989.

  107. @the one they call Desanex

    The funny thing is that people who’d cancel that song would be ok with “Venus In Furs”…

    …or if they weren’t they’d be visibly weaselling – “I don’t want to kink-shame anybody..” meaning of course any dyke or tranny or gay.

  108. Trinity says:
    @Voltarde

    To all those Boomer haters. Take a look at those people attending that concert. See any fat people around? See any 300 lb tattooed purple haired dykes. Look at how much more attractive and fit the people look compared to Zoomers and Millennials who are always talking shit. A picture is worth a thousand words, Zoomers.

    Sure Thing, Zoomer

  109. Anonymous[304] • Disclaimer says:
    @Whiskey

    Critical Drinker has a video on Youtube about how people trashing Star Wars, Raiders, Star Trek, Captain Picard, Luke Skywalker etc. are basically trashing people’s childhood memories. Deliberately so. And get the reaction they wanted. Which is anger.

    It’s interesting how furious western men get about their entertainment being taken away from them, compared to how indifferent most of them are to the same happening with their countries. As long as no one messes too much with their space soap opera and their sportsball, it’s all good.

    Sad.

    • Agree: Corn
    • Replies: @flyingtiger
  110. Ray P says:
    @Whiskey

    I’m surprised you haven’t pointed out that this writer for the Times went from guy to gal in order that (s)he could hate white men all the better.

  111. @OilcanFloyd

    Of all the RS songs that would be targeted, I thought it would be Some Girls.

    My nomination would be Little T&A from 1981’s Tattoo You.

  112. I saw this coming when online versions of Dire Straits’ Money for Nothing had the following stanza seamlessly excised:

    See the little faggot with the earring and the make-up
    Yeah buddy that’s his own hair
    That little faggot got his own jet airplane
    That little faggot he’s a millionaire

    Buy physical media. They’re already surreptitiously editing works. The digitization of works makes it much easier to serially edit works in order to conform to current year hysteria.

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
  113. Curle says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Isn’t the story that Creedence discovered swamp rock while on the road as a cover band prior to hitting it big. Believe it or not, their early name was The Goliwogs.

  114. @Nicholas Stix

    The best period of American music, hands down, was circa 1920-1960.

    I tend to agree. (Mark Steyn has done yeoman’s work persuading people of this over the couple of decades.) Though I still think Gershwin is overrated. He just popularized/negrolofied classical forms. You can say that at least that made classical forms accessible to people who would not otherwise experience it, but in the real world I’ve seen no one ascend from Gershwin to Beethoven, while plenty descend from the heights via Gershwin’s down-ramp. Was he talented? Yes. Was music better for his contribution? Wellll….

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
  115. Ray P says:
    @Obstinate Cymric

    Rosemary’s Baby (1968) was broadcast in Britain this past Halloween. The Johnny Depp (!) movie directed by Polanski, The Ninth Gate (1999), gets shown quite often as well. In the last week on an oldies TV channel a 1981 edition of The Kenny Everett Video Show had the house dance-troupe performing to ‘Brown Sugar’ which I thought quite funny given its recent removal from the band’s set list. (The dance-troupe featured three black men with a half-dozen white girls!) These re-broadcasts of the Everett show do have a warning about outmoded attitudes and ‘language of the time which may cause offense’ pasted on the screen at the start of transmission (including on the second part after the commercial break).

  116. Curle says:
    @Anonymous

    Here’s the heritage dictionary definition:

    noun
    An image; a representation.
    A representation or picture of a sacred or sanctified Christian personage, traditionally used and venerated in the Eastern Church.
    An important and enduring symbol.

    I blame advertisers for all this definition creep. Was listening to an festival radio ad the other day making reference to the ‘iconic’ REO Speedwagon.

    • Replies: @bomag
  117. @Brutusale

    It’s even worse than the song’s lyrics suggest. “Do You Wanna Touch Me (Oh Yeah)” was co-written by Gary Glitter, formerly a beloved British pop/glam rock icon, but now cancelled (and imprisoned) for possession of reams of child pornography, sexual abuse of children and attempted rape.

    Can Joan Jett — former Runaway-cum-rock and roll lesbian heroine — be cancelled by proxy?

    More pertinently, did Glitter’s song inspire this one in response?

    • Replies: @Joe S.Walker
  118. anonymous[139] • Disclaimer says:

    We’ve got this wacky situation where music for adolescents from the late 1960s-early 1970s is revered as high culture

    Yes, thanks for coming out and saying it. I run across all these older people who are stuck in a time warp, rhapsodizing to the simple songs of their youth. Looking back on it I feel all those rock stars glamorized drug use and made it all seem hip and the thing to do. They were the Pied Pipers that lead young people into these dead-end lifestyles, the effects which have snowballed through the years into the current day. The results are with us today, millions of drug-addled and rudderless young people.

  119. @the one they call Desanex

    If Lou didn’t get cancelled for “I Wanna Be Black,” he’s probably safe for eternity.

  120. @Steve Sailer

    The Bay Area after WWII was full of rednecks. E.g., the Fogertys of Creedence Clearwater Revival were the sons of parents from Iowa and Montana, but they got into deep southern styles.

    Steve, are you aware of any books or even long form articles which delve into the rootlessness leading into California’s golden era? It seems like going into the 50s and 60s everyone in California who was anyone was from somewhere else or the child of people from somewhere else who moved to the American paradise where you could reinvent yourself anew. (i.e., Murray Wilson was a Kansan). But obviously rootlessness and itinerancy have dark sides, and the lack of social regimentation and extant institutions and structures puts novel (and society-rending) ideas on par with time-worn truths – and so many bizarre and destructive social trends seemed to have originated in California and migrated back East. You can trace a line from people going West and shedding their inherited identities for new identities of their own creations to our transhuman age of bespoke gender identities. Paradoxically, the ethnonarcissim trend may be a reaction or counter-balance to this.

    This dark side of rootlessness is perhaps best punctuated by the West Coast’s prodigious production of notorious serial killers.

  121. This comment was worth the price of admission in itself: “We’ve got this wacky situation where music for adolescents from the late 1960s-early 1970s is revered as high culture.” That’s because all too many people, including smart, successful people, don’t have any other culture, other than TV shows. You simply cannot populate a nation with mature adults if you feed them with TV and rock music in their childhood and early adulthood.

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @Eric Novak
  122. @Jack Armstrong

    That’s not it. I can’t find it online now as it seems to have been scrubbed, but I saw it in a book about the Stones. The now-standard toilet graffiti wasn’t the only idea rejected.

    • Replies: @Jack Armstrong
  123. MEH 0910 says:

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2020/apr/19/black-blue-and-very-bad-taste-the-rolling-stones-billboard-that-still-sparks-controversy

    Even by the standards of 1970s rock’n’roll, it was in bad taste: a billboard on Sunset Boulevard of a bruised and bound woman sitting on a gatefold cover of a new Rolling Stones album that proclaimed: “I’m ‘Black and Blue’ from the Rolling Stones – and I love it.”

    https://iorr.org/albums/black-and-blue.pdf


    [MORE]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_and_Blue#Release_and_reception

    The album was promoted with a controversial billboard on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood that depicted the model Anita Russell, bound by Jagger[14] under the phrase “I’m Black and Blue from the Rolling Stones – and I love it!” The billboard was removed after protests by the feminist group Women Against Violence Against Women, although it earned the band widespread press coverage.[15]

    Time:

    The Sexes: Really Socking It to Women
    Monday, Feb. 07, 1977

    http://content.time.com/time/subscriber/article/0,33009,914772,00.html
    http://content.time.com/time/subscriber/article/0,33009,914772-2,00.html
    http://content.time.com/time/subscriber/article/0,33009,914772-3,00.html

    • Replies: @Ray P
    , @Curle
  124. Rob McX says:
    @Steve Sailer

    So your interest in population genetics was sparked off by the Reader’s Digest?

  125. MEH 0910 says:
    @Jack Armstrong

    Stray Cat Blues (Live)

    [MORE]

    Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! The Rolling Stones In Concert (40th Anniversary Deluxe Version) playlist:
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_kMWuDVYTeiqhgk-Pylgl4Plz4rL3yFaJE

    Beggars Banquet (Official Lyric Videos) playlist:
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKEOCWQDKoveifbYSYpdlD9iqAe5ubrf-

  126. I’m surprised nobody’s mentioned “Every Breath You Take” by The Police. It pretty much glorifies stalking.

  127. Ray P says:
    @MEH 0910

    It was a tribute to the girlfriends of the late Stone Brian Jones.

  128. @Gary in Gramercy

    Fortunately, the First Amendment protects parody; otherwise, Merle Haggard would have sued the payess off poor Kinky (and his Texas Jewboys).

    Is there enough of a tune there to protect? I asked a rock musician if he’d ever heard of such a lawsuit in the country business. His answer? “You can’t copyright a chord progression.”

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    , @JMcG
    , @Marat
  129. @Anon

    This was a shot at Dylan from a (literal) lefty who could actually write a tune:

    • Replies: @Curle
    , @Jack Armstrong
  130. LP5 says:

    Otis Redding was ahead of his time. Consider the snippet from Sittin’ On the Dock of the bay.

    Look like nothing’s gonna change
    Everything, still remains the same
    I can’t do what ten people tell me to do
    So I guess I’ll remain the same, yes

    Those ten people spawned Karens, wokesters and more.

  131. @Gary in Gramercy

    I’ve often thought the sound of Gary Glitter’s records was thoroughly fascist – instruments (all played by his producer and songwriter Mike Leander) compressed to the point where they thud and drone like machinery, all playing on a foursquare beat with zombified strictness. You can imagine jackbooted feet crashing down in unison while the Leader delivers his latest exhortation… and it’s fun, it’s got a thrill all its own!

    Also, this deliberate musical use of monotony and rigidity was genuinely innovative. It was 1972 and they didn’t use drum machines, sequencers or computers.

  132. @Almost Missouri

    Orchestral music comes to a dead end @ Tchaichovsky, Strauss, and Mahler. The only composers after in the 20th century who did great stuff were film composers like Rosza and Williams. Gershwin is awful.

    Wagner did for music what Napoleon did for war. THE END.

    • Disagree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Known Fact
  133. Clyde says:

    When the wokistas deep-six In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida, this will fine by me.

  134. Old Prude says:
    @Moses

    I have some sympathy with the idea of not listening to music if the artist is unlikeable for some reason. I listen to most nothing sung by lesbians or homosexual men. Those few homosexual artist who can put their art before their degeneracy still leave an odor on their oeuvre that is off-putting.

    As for rap, well even if the “artist” were an upstanding peach of a fellow, I would eschew listening.

    • Replies: @Moses
  135. @SafeNow

    The thing about music critics, though, is best summed up by David Lee Roth:
    “Music critics like Elvis Costello because music critics look like Elvis Costello.”

    • LOL: SafeNow, Trinity
    • Replies: @additionalMike
  136. @Mr. Anon

    Richard Rodgers was one of the greatest American composers. Much under-rated, I think.

    Huh? Who “underrates” Rodgers? True, his Hammerstein tunes are less well-regarded than his earlier edgier Hart stuff, but the latter are still worshipped in nightclubs everywhere. Hammerstein wrote the words first, to opera tunes, then gave them to Rodgers to set. That is backwards and limiting, but, in his own words, Dick could “pee a melody”. (Porter was the opposite.)

    And where are Cole Porter and Harry Warren on Nicholas’s list? Or Hoagy Carmichael, Richard Whiting, Frank Loesser…

    By the way, if anyone wants to hear Rodgers and Hammerstein done as if it were Rodgers and Hart, Check out Connie Evingson‘s debut album, on which she also performs the same service for Lerner and Loewe. She is undoubtedly the greatest musical talent to hail from Hibbing, Minnesota.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  137. Muggles says:

    Yes, bitter ex wives are always very complimentary about those former hubbies.

    Just ask ex Bezos or ex Gates wives. Oh, maybe a few billion makes a difference, in “termination benefits”.

    Did or does (now, including ‘rappers’) think that male musicians are great role models and material for husbands? Boyfriends?

    Aren’t artists famously good partners?

    There is a marked difference in the public utterances/behavior of ex wives/girlfriends than from ex husbands/boyfriends. Or perhaps it is just the media attention showered on the former by mainly female “writers” and online bloviaters.

    There is a huge history of “he done me wrong” from females, not much “that crazy bitch” from males. Some gal bashing, but mostly for fun (in music anyway.)

    Since the male targets are always the huge income earners (at least at first) their companions appear to be willing to put up with the bad behavior or wandering eye. 29 years later living with that paunchy old drunk who smacks you around isn’t such fun. Better to cash out early.

    In my limited experience, men tend to stay silent about old wrongs (well, other than the Holocaust, which gets endlessly mentioned often for some reason) but females never seem to forget any perceived negative past experience or slight.

    Gentlemen of Unz, am I wrong? Ladies, your counter? (For those in-between or can’t decide, really, no one wants to hear from you…)

  138. @AndrewR

    Dee Snyder of Twisted Sister fame points out he was a classically trained counter-tenor

  139. @Trinity

    Jennifer Warnes sings First We Take Manhattan. Guitar by Stevie Ray Vaughan. Warnes had a beautiful voice. I am surprised she was not more successful.

    • Agree: flyingtiger
  140. Aside from ephemeral trivia I prefer to learn as little as possible about people I admire for their artistry, or because they play on my sportsball team. If I hear something nice about their charity work or how they worked their way up from obscurity, that’s fine.

    So how Gary Brooker or Annie Haslam may spend their time is not my concern. “I’m sure they’re very nice,” is how my mom would have put it. As far as I can tell, Barry Malzberg, my favorite writer, is a grumpy old Jewish guy in New Jersey and I have no urge to learn anything further

  141. @Anon

    What are other songs whose lyrics changed?

    They don’t play Foreigner’s Dirty White Boy very much anymore, and Mark Knopler changed the lyric “see the little faggot with the earring and the makeup?” from the original version of I Want My MTV.

    Brown Sugar is overrated. Stray Cat Blues is much better. And The Band blows dead dogs.

  142. @Trinity

    “Leonard Cohen’s ‘First We Take Manhattan.’”

    Check out REM’s take on that song.

  143. @Muggles

    “Aren’t artists famously good partners?”

    My nine ex-girlfriends and one ex-wife find your sarcasm accurate.

  144. Ray P says:
    @Muggles

    It generally sounds correct but divorced men often complain bitterly and at length about their ex-wives’ actions. I read a memoir by an American prostitute of the nineteen seventies and eighties, thirty years ago, and she refused to take recently divorced men as clients because of their bad feelings over it. Obviously as a woman, even while getting paid for her company, she had no interest in hearing men moan about their ill-treatment at the hands of other women. The current online man-o-sphere has monetized male distress at females even among the non-divorced.

    • Replies: @BB753
    , @ScarletNumber
  145. @Mr Mox

    …and how to bring about a world that is more inclusive and more just.

    To make the world more inclusive and just, we must exclude!

    I believe that what she is saying is that, in order for everyone to be completely equal, she must be elevated to power over the others.

  146. ic1000 says:
    @R.G. Camara

    > Lenin’s train ride becomes more ominous the more you think about it.

    Yeah. One of those Butterfly Effect moments in history.

    The Kaiser’s government got what it wanted, and the whole thing almost worked — as you know, the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk freed millions of troops and unlocked immense resources for the Germans. But, as it turned out, not soon enough to counteract the entry of Doughboys on the Western Front.

    Lots of ways the 20th Century could have been very different. Possibly better (Bolshevism strangled and Naziism stillborn). But maybe worse. Who knows.

  147. @Rex Little

    I’m surprised nobody’s mentioned “Every Breath You Take” by The Police. It pretty much glorifies stalking.

    ‘Can’t Stand Losing You’ seems quite a bit worse. But let’s step it on up:

    Toadies – ‘Possum kingdom’
    I can promise you
    You’ll stay as beautiful
    With dark hair
    And soft skin
    Forever

    Because he murders her.

    Ozzy – ‘No More Tears’
    So now that it’s over, can we just say goodbye?
    I’d like to move on and make the most of the night
    Maybe a kiss before I leave you this way
    Your lips are so cold, I don’t know what else to say

    Because he murdered her.

    Have heard both of these songs on the radio many times.

  148. I liked that anti-GB public education song. That video about schoolteachers who prance around like exotic dancers was good, too. I don’t follow the “Hall of Fame”, but this year’s inductees were complete bozos.

    99% of rock’n roll critics are fakers; I like Crowe. That pop-culture magazine hated Led Zepplin. Did it bestow high praise on cRap? One of its “writers” gave up the job in order to become a one-man, full-time adoration society and puff-piecer for “the Boss” (another genius of primary chords). Blogger, eat your heart out.

    • Replies: @Ray P
  149. CCZ says:
    @OilcanFloyd

    Black hair, back in the news:

    “Learn How to Cut Black Hair or No Job for You, Louisiana Tells New Stylists”

    “The state’s board of cosmetology passed a resolution that requires all aspiring stylists to learn how to cut Black hair—or they won’t get licensed.”

    https://www.vice.com/en/article/v7dgwj/louisiana-board-requires-hairstylist-cut-textured-hair-license

    • LOL: AceDeuce
    • Replies: @OilcanFloyd
  150. BB753 says:

    Sorry Queen, but you’ve just been cancelled!
    Fat shaming AND sexism is too much!

  151. BB753 says:

    A forgotten little gem from the 80’s by Soft Cell. A great song despite the cheesy synthesizer. This is probably the gayest music video in history but the story told is very much heterosexual and sexist. Bizarre.
    “You were a sleep-around, a lost and found and not for me, I feel
    I tried to make it work, you in a cocktail skirt
    And me in a suit but it just wasn’t me
    You’re used to wearing less
    And now your life’s a mess, so insecure you see
    I put up with all the scenes
    And this is one scene that’s goin’ to be played my way

    Take your hands off me, hey
    I don’t belong to you, you see
    And take a look in my face, for the last time,
    I never knew you, you never knew me,
    Say hello goodbye,
    Say hello and wave goodbye

    Under the deep red light
    I can see the make-up slidin’ down
    Hey little girl you will always make up
    So take off that unbecoming frown
    What about me, well, I’ll find someone
    That’s not goin’ cheap in the sales
    A nice little housewife, who’ll give me a steady life
    And won’t keep going off the rails”

    • Replies: @Ray P
    , @Muggles
  152. BB753 says:
    @Brutusale

    Some girls mature faster and are just plain wild. You can’t stop them. On the other hand, Jimmy Page is no choir-boy but a full-blown satanist: “Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law” ( Alesteir Crowley. You can’t hold Jimmy Page to normal standards of decency.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thelema

  153. Mike Tre says:

    “His iconic song still plays on the radio. ”

    I imagine if every rock star that ever beat up his wife/girlfriend/boyfriend had his songs taken off the radio there’d be nothing playing but the sounds of silence.

    I thought the whole idea behind the image of RnR was bad boys living bad boy lifestyles? Guess not anymore.

    But rock n roll will be toppled. They are already changing lyrics to songs written 30-40 years ago because they do not live up to the twisted standards of modern morality.

    Dire Straits’ classic Money for Nothin’ had the word “faggot” removed, even though the context of its usage is not meant to be offensive to homosexuals, but instead to blue collar working men. Just yesterday I heard the song Janie’s Got a Gun by Aerosmith and the lyric “put a bullet in his brain” was traded out for “leave him in the pouring rain.” Everything about the story told in the lyrics to that songs are complete bullshit, BTW.

  154. Pontius says:
    @Mr. Anon

    You always know when the DJ has gone for a dump.

    American Pie or Stairway to Heaven is playing.

    • LOL: Mr. Anon
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    , @Anonymous
  155. JMcG says:
    @Anon

    Mark Knopfler substitutes the word “as**ole” for the word faggot when he performs Money For Nothing this last few years. He does it with kind of a wink and a shrug though.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    , @RAZ
  156. V. Hickel says:

    they better not cancel Island Girl!!

  157. @Steve Sailer

    Her rymes were not so hot either.

  158. @Reg Cæsar

    Given how many pop hits of the 1960’s had the I-IV-V progression commonly known in the record business as “those ‘La Bamba’ changes” (e.g., “Louie, Louie,” “Twist and Shout,” “Hang On Sloopy,” but the list goes on forever), that’s true: you can’t copyright a chord progression. Otherwise, Bert Berns (writer or cowriter of the last two of those songs, who repeatedly went back to that well-worn progression for many of his compositions) would have spent more time in court than in the recording studio, and would have died long before his heart gave out at 38.

    Nonetheless, it ought to be obvious to even the casual listener that “Asshole from El Paso” is a parody of Merle Haggard’s “Okie from Muskogee,” both in its melody — narrow and unadventurous as it is — and its lyrics, which parallel the narrator’s statements in Haggard’s song. (Notably, “Okie from Muskogee” has inspired numerous parodies over the years — see Wikipedia for a partial list.)

    Of course, the real reason country songs are almost never the subject of copyright suits is that most of them are about only three things: drinkin’, cheatin’ and fightin’. Take away those three topics, and there’d be a whole lot of steel guitar instrumentals.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  159. @Corn

    Teenagers are interested in S-E-X? No way! You’re an idiotic moron!!!

    [MORE]

    Stardust Memories

    SANDY (Woody Allen):

    What about you? Did you have a little crush on him [her father] ? You can admit this to me if you like.

    DORRIE (Charlotte Rampling):

    Sure, we had a little flirting.

    SANDY:

    A little small flirt? Mother away getting shock treatment, and the only beautiful daughter home. Long lingering breakfasts with Dad.

    In a later scene, Sandy and Dorrie have the following argument, while in the background a large newspaper headline on a wall reads “Incest between father’s…”

    SANDY:

    I’m not attracted to her. What are you talking about?

    DORRIE:

    Staring at her all through dinner. Giving each other looks.

    SANDY:

    Stop it. She’s fourteen. She’s not even fourteen. She’s thirteen and a half.

    DORRIE:

    I don’t care. I used to play those games with my father, so I know. I’ve been through all that.

    SANDY:

    What games? You think I’m flirting with your kid cousin?

    DORRIE:

    You smile at her.

    SANDY:

    Yeah, I smile at her. I’m a friendly person. What do you want? She’s a kid. This is stupid. I don’t want to have this conversation.

    DORRIE:

    Don’t tell me it’s stupid. I used to do that with my father across the table. All those private jokes. I know.

    https://hips.hearstapps.com/esq.h-cdn.co/assets/cm/15/06/54d3ddff5219a_-_esq-allen-stardust-circle.jpg?resize=768:*

    https://www.esquire.com/entertainment/movies/a27233/dylan-farrow-woody-allen-movies/

  160. @The Wild Geese Howard

    The immense damage done to Western women by Sex And the City being exhibit 1A.

    Plenty of damage has been done to Western women but Sex and the City is female fantasy.

    Both men and women like to pretend that women are actually men in female bodies. The show was based on a book about gay men in the city.

    I have been around women in the city. Most are boring and would like to get married. A lot of that city single pride is just a façade. The idea of a modern city woman banging a doctor and then dumping him because she wants to be single is about as realistic as a show about aliens.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  161. Ray P says:
    @Rex Little

    Don’t stand so close to me – ‘This girl is half his age’

  162. @Muggles

    In my limited experience, men tend to stay silent about old wrongs (well, other than the Holocaust, which gets endlessly mentioned often for some reason) but females never seem to forget any perceived negative past experience or slight.

    Whoever said “time heals all wounds” has never been around women.

    Events can trigger negative memories in them and they will act like it was yesterday.

    Slights by other women seem to be the worst. They all have some story about a hairdresser or grocery store incident with a random woman that happened YEARS ago.

  163. Voltarde says:
    @Joe Joe

    Very good point, sorry for being ignorant of the controversy. Thanks for correcting me.

    The best reference that I could find (there may be others) is the autobiography:

    This Wheel’s on Fire: Levon Helm and the Story of the Band

  164. S Johnson says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Dylan referred to the song in a recent interview when he said it took on a new meaning for him when he realized that Liverpool still had hangings in John Lennon’s childhood. So “nothing to get hung about” might have been something Lennon replied to his mom or aunt: “what have you been up to, John?” “Nothing to get hung about.”

  165. Anonymous[220] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    speculated upon how many descendants the Beatles left behind in Australia after their 1964 tour.

    But with all the genetic tests these days shouldn’t there be a record of that now? 23andme and all that.

    • Replies: @ic1000
  166. @OilcanFloyd

    Some Girls was heavily targeted by Jesse Jackson and other race hustling pimps when it first came out. But it’s not like he didn’t have an argument. The offending lyric below.

    “Black girls just wanna get fucked all night, I just don’t have that much jam”

  167. CCZ says:
    @the one they call Desanex

    Neil Young: Down by the river / I shot my baby

    I wonder if the victim was his “cinnamon girl”????

    Neil Young: “Cinnamon Girl”

    I wanna live
    With a cinnamon girl
    I could be happy
    The rest of my life
    With a cinnamon girl

    Is “cinnamon girl” offensive to Amer-Indians????

  168. I find it funny that the people who are always going on about making the world more inclusive are also the same people who want to exclude as many people as possible.

  169. JMcG says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    There are only seven basic chords in a key, one of which-the diminished, is rarely used. There are only so many ways to arrange six chords, so no copywriting a chord progression. I’m obviously vastly oversimplifying here, but that’s the elevator version.

  170. @Steve Sailer

    On the Ya-Ya’s version, the girl was 13!

  171. @Rex Little

    I read once this song was played at a lot of weddings.

  172. The Grateful Dead might be coming under scrutiny for Jack Straw.”We can share the women, we can share the wine.

  173. Moses says:
    @Old Prude

    I have some sympathy with the idea of not listening to music if the artist is unlikeable for some reason.

    These people put all White musicians in that category. That’s the standard.

    The wife-beating/whatever is just a pretext for cancelling Whites. It never is used to cancel Blacks no matter what.

    That’s all this is.

  174. frankie p says:
    @Pixo

    Van Morrison! Are you sure he’s still on that list. (((They))) have done their best to cancel old Van, though he is such an icon it may be impossible. Too many people love his art, and his perseverance.
    (((They))) have labeled him an ex-megastar, though, for his 2021 double album release ‘Latest Record Project: Volume 1’ his 42nd record release. Yes, you read that correctly, it says 42.

    Steven Thomas Erlewine reviewed it on allmusic dot com. Here’s an excerpt:

    “He takes dead aim at his irritants with song titles that convey as much as his full set of lyrics: “Where Have All the Rebels Gone,” “No Good Deed Goes Unpunished,” “Stop Bitching, Do Something,” “Why Are You on Facebook,” and “They Own the Media.” The latter song thankfully doesn’t descend into conspiracy tropes — a justifiable worry considering how Van wrote a series of anti-lockdown singles during the Covid-19 pandemic — but it does show how Morrison’s crankiness has calcified into nastiness.”

    “doesn’t descend into consipracy tropes”?!?!?!?! Not according to (((them)))

    We’ll let you decide, but I have to say. Great job, Van. The truth is much more important than staying in the good graces of the powers that be, bit tech, and big media:

    “They Own The Media”

    They tell us that ignorance is bliss
    I guess by those that control the media, it is
    They own the media, they control the stories we are told
    If you ever try to go against them, you will be ignored

    ‘Cause they control
    They control
    They control

    They control the narrative, they perpetuate the myth
    Keep on telling you lies, tell you ignorance is bliss
    Believe it all and you’ll never get, never get wise
    To the truth, ’cause they control everything you do

    Everything you do
    Everything you do
    Everything you do

    They control the narrative, they perpetuate the myth
    Keep on telling you lies, tell you ignorance is bliss
    Believe it all and you’ll never get the truth
    Never get wise, wise through their lies

    Through their lies
    Through their lies
    They control the media
    They control the media
    They control the media

  175. @MEH 0910

    I’m more into the White trash hillbilly side of the Stones from Beggars Banquet. (My bride to be is a bow-legged sow.)

    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=dear+doctor+rolling+stones+youtube&view=detail&mid=55D5D3505942ACD3D0BE55D5D3505942ACD3D0BE&FORM=VIRE

    • Replies: @L. Guapo
  176. @Gary in Gramercy

    Parodies still owe royalties to the creator(s) of the original.

  177. @S Johnson

    “Nothing to get hanged about.”

    [MORE]

  178. Curle says:
    @Flying Dutchman

    Then there’s the cover art for the original Blind Faith album.

  179. Curle says:
    @MEH 0910

    This part is hilarious given how many books/movies under the Fifty Shades of Grey title women purchased.

    “ The 1976 advert triggered an outcry: Women Against Violence Against Women (WAVAW) wrote in the newsletter Breakthrough that the ad campaign “exploits and sensationalises violence against a woman for the purpose of increased record sales” and “contributes to the myth that women like to be beaten”

    The Myth? Notice these folks never get called on their BS.

  180. @Obstinate Cymric

    “Just as ‘busting a cap’ in some ‘n***** ass’ when you’d been ‘dissed’ was normalised in the 90s.”

    Correct me if I’m wrong, but I recall hearing the Robert Duvall character threaten to “bust a cap” in someone in the Western masterpiece True Grit, back in ’69 in the previous millennium.

    I also recall a character in a Western speak of a gun as a “gat.” Talk about cultural appropriation, with blacks stealing those lines.

    • Replies: @Hereward
  181. Curle says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Oh please, S & G had two great songs and a lot of well orchestrated mediocre tunes. Of the two ‘Sound of Silence’ and ‘Scarborough Fair’, the latter was a copy of a Dylan copy of a Martin Carthy version of a traditional tune. Dylan had amazing repertoire of great songs he authored ‘I Want You’ and ‘One of Us Must Know’ just being two off the Blonde on Blonde album alone.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Jim Don Bob
  182. @Anon

    Steve Miller sanitized Jet Airliner by changing the line “Funky sh*t going down in the city” to “Funky kicks going down in the city”; Guns-n-Roses just removed the line “Police and n*iggers-that’s right-get outta my way” outright from the song One in a Million on the EP Lies (‘88). The song also has xenophobic small-town white boy references to Iranians in LA, which is unlikely to have survived Typhoon Woke of the past decade. The list must be long at this point. Editing is not difficult.

  183. @Lagertha

    Happy Thanksgiving, Everyone.

    Kiitos, but you’re weeks early for the US and weeks late for Canada.

    When’s the harvest festival in the original land of lakes? July is “hay month” and August “crop month”, but those sound disturbingly early.

    But what would I know? I’m at the 45th parallel.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    , @Lagertha
  184. @Tono Bungay

    The nation’s only mature adults are those raised with rock music.

    • Replies: @Muggles
  185. Anon[132] • Disclaimer says:

    I agree with her that classic rock is white supremacist and I have direct evidence. Tonight, 11/5/21, I attended a sold-out Billy Joel concert at Madison Square Garden in Manhattan. As we know, the racial demographics of NYC are 43% white, 24% black, 14% Asian, 14% Hispanic. Yet at this Billy Joel concert, not a single person of the 20,000+ crowd was anything but white. And I am not kidding. As far as I can tell, except for some ushers and food service workers, the only black person in the arena during the concert was musician Crystal Taliefero in Joel’s backing band. If ever there was a haven of white supremacy—in the heart of multicultural liberal New York—it was this concert.

    I enjoyed every minute of it.

    • LOL: bomag
    • Replies: @Muggles
    , @Prester John
  186. @Lagertha

    By the way, is the “vile” product she describes really that common in Sweden? (5:19)

    ‘Countries that have not had the same historical and cultural relationship with fragrance that France and Italy have had are getting involved and bringing a new spirit to the industry.’ —Ben Gorham, Canadian parfumeur based in Stockholm

    To say the least!! They’d go nuts here:

    [MORE]

  187. Hereward says:
    @Nicholas Stix

    You are correct – the phrase was used in the John Wayne “True Grit.” I’ve read it in Old West narratives from the 1880’s, and lawman Frank Hamer used it in his account of his ambush of Bonnie and Clyde. It presumably derives from the use of early revolvers that were loaded with loose powder, ball, and percussion caps.

    • Thanks: Nicholas Stix
  188. Mr. Anon says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Huh? Who “underrates” Rodgers? True, his Hammerstein tunes are less well-regarded than his earlier edgier Hart stuff,………

    All I know of his work is his Hammerstein stuff. That, and Victory at Sea. What I meant is that Rodger’s music is very good and stands by itself as music, regardless of who put words to it.

  189. Anonymous[248] • Disclaimer says:

    I’m using the second meaning, a representation, with a touch of “An important and enduring symbol”. I’d expand the definition to say that the representation has to be easy to remember (as in computer icons, or “Let’s go, Brandon”) and should have some relation to the object it represents, but that the mapping from icon to item represented should not be deducible. That is, the representation must be obvious, but only after it has been described.

    That being the case, a person may be “iconic”. Example: C. J. Caesar, an astonishingly talented man who came to a bad end, and whose name became synonymous with “ruler” or even “society”, which are also similarly talented and, similarly, often come to a bad end. See https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Caesar

    By the same sort of generalization, “American Pie” is an icon for a lost society.

  190. @R.G. Camara

    You are quite correct to state that in the aggregate that “popular” culture is largely degenerate.
    All I can add is that dis-aggregated, some pop-culture is more or less degenerate.
    For example – Abby Road is probably less degenerate.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  191. @Curle

    You seem to be carrying the late Lawrence Auster’s torch for the man. I’ll stick with my reply to Mr Anon, that Connie Evingson is the best singer ever to come out of Hibbing. No, she doesn’t write songs, but she sure knows how to pick them. Imagine Peggy Lee, but with a more stable life.

  192. @animalogic

    You are replying to someone who claims Thriller is the peak of musical art in recent decades. Probably has vitiligo, too.

  193. Clyde says:
    @Jack Armstrong

    You are correct on the rejected Beggar’s Banquet cover. The Stones could dress as women and nurses on a single’s sleeve in the 60s. But in Nazi uniforms, this was way, way beyond their drug stressed minds. Same for their manager and record label.

    • Thanks: Jack Armstrong
  194. How about The Sensational Alex Harvey Band’s “Gangbang” from 1973 (Ain’t nothing like a gangbang to blow away the blues)?

    Lyrics below:

    [MORE]

    There once was a woman with wings
    Happy with the simple things
    She had silk suspenders and high heeled stockinged thighs
    Helping me in my need
    She was a friend, indeed
    She was my baby until the day she died.

    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    To blow away the blues.

    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    To blow away the blues.

    She was a woman who was twice my size
    She looked into my eyes
    She said “Only you can blow my blues away.”
    She said “I’ll tell you what to do.
    Bring all your friends with you,
    And you can come up and see me any ole time of day.”

    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    To blow away the blues.

    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    To blow away the blues.

    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    To blow away the blues.

    There were twenty-seven guys
    An unexpected surprise
    She just kept on rockin’ til the night was gone.
    She was smilin’ through the tears
    For a hundred and fifty years
    Just lickin’ her lips and helpin’ me along.

    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    To blow away the blues.

    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    Ain’t nothin’ like a gangbang
    To blow away the blues.

    Once more…

  195. Anon[266] • Disclaimer says:

    Musical toppling of a different sort: maybe Steve will comment on the scores of rap concert attendees who fell and were trampled tonight in Houston. The news reports are remarkably detail-free, suggesting an intent to not publicize misbehavior by the sacred pets.

  196. AceDeuce says:
    @CCZ

    Hendrix was a notorious woman beater.

  197. ic1000 says:
    @Anonymous

    > But with all the genetic tests these days shouldn’t there be a record of [the Beatles’ many Australian offspring by] now?

    From page 3 of The Rockstar Handbook: “If you don’t submit a sample, it can’t be matched. No 23andMe.”

  198. “Jennifer” Finney Boylan is still married to the mother of his children.

    Jennifer Finney O’Boylan:
    A natural marriage you’re spoilin’.
    Your wife had your tykes;
    Now you’ve made her a dyke,
    And that’s why from your kiss she’s recoilin’.

  199. @Emil Nikola Richard

    You’re forgetting Shostakovich, the last and one of the greatest

    • Agree: Kylie, Peter Akuleyev
  200. bomag says:
    @Curle

    The Heritage dictionary offers four definitions:

    2.An important and enduring symbol: “The disposable lighter is an icon of the throwaway mentality that began to take shape in the years following World War II” (Susan Freinkel).
    3. One who is the object of great attention and devotion; an idol: “He is … a pop icon designed and manufactured for the video generation” (Harry F. Waters).
    4. Computers A picture on a screen that represents a specific file, directory, window, option, or program.

    I suppose it is definition creep as you mention, but I wouldn’t blame just advertisers. It’s a language thing.

  201. BB753 says:
    @Ray P

    “I read a memoir by an American prostitute of the nineteen seventies and eighties, thirty years ago, and she refused to take recently divorced men as clients because of their bad feelings over it.”

    So unprofessional! Why not charge them double and put up with their misery?

    • Replies: @bomag
  202. I never understood why this one song has evaded controversy. When I heard Me and Julio down by the schoolyard in 1972 I knew what to was about. It was a happy cheerful song celebrating a gang rape by the narrator and Julio. It implies that the victim was an underage white girl, possible mentally retarded. A woman witnessed it and called the police. The narrator knows he will be arrested. He has no regrets. The problem is that he will have is that he will not have his favorite beer in prison.
    This is one of the most disgusting sangs I have ever heard. It has never been canceled or Paul Simon cancelled. I remember at the time, feminists did not complain. Hence I lost any respect for feminists.

  203. @Anonymous

    You could argue that the fight for popular culture is the fight for the country. Politics is downstream from culture.

    • Agree: bomag
  204. Pericles says:
    @Steve Sailer

    It should also be noted that the rap includes a short discussion of her hair.

    • Replies: @Jack Armstrong
  205. @Ray P

    Women have never had an interest in our problems. They want us to make money and be witty and charming but otherwise just shut the F up. Even prostitutes prefer to think that their clients are seeing them purely because they aren’t being paid for the sex; they are merely being paid to go away after. They don’t want to think of their clients as acting out of desperation.

    • Replies: @Ray P
    , @Obstinate Cymric
  206. Ray P says:
    @Abolish_public_education

    Pink Floyd released the song when I was at an English state middle-school. The teachers didn’t appreciate us singing it to them – “We don’t need no education/Teacher leave those kids alone!”

  207. Ray P says:
    @ScarletNumber

    Desperation isn’t a good look. Even with a prostitute it’s preferable to act cool The one who ‘wrote’ the memoir I read said most of her clients were ordinary guys who had girlfriends or wives who were not offering as much sex as the man wanted. They weren’t exactly hard-up but simply wanted more. She really disliked clients who messed her about and kept changing their mind over what they wanted to do even if they had a lot of money (many of these guys were on drugs though). I guess that’s a female preference for male decisiveness and seeing-the-job-through-to-the-end.

  208. @Reg Cæsar

    Bob shoots back …

    I’m just gonna let you pass
    Yes, and I’ll go last
    Then time will tell who fell
    And who’s been left behind
    When you go your way and I go mine

  209. @Pericles

    Worth noting.

    When my hair was cropped, I craved covering,
    But now my hair itself is a veil,
    And the scalp inside is a scalp of
    A crazy and sleepy Comanche
    Lies beneath this netting of the skin

    Lice? Dandruff? … The heartbreak of psoriasis?

  210. @Flying Dutchman

    Follow the link it’s right there.

  211. @JMcG

    In a similar vein, Mick Jagger was forced by Ed Sullivan to change the lyric to Let’s spend some time together.

    • Replies: @Ancient Briton
  212. bomag says:
    @BB753

    LOL and agree.

    Seems that would be a significant share of the market.

    • LOL: BB753
    • Replies: @Ray P
  213. @ScarletNumber

    Isn’t the “paid to go away” thing at the high end, where the punter has plenty of options but prefers the convenience of paying, knowing that it comes without any risk of the “where is this relationship going” conversation?

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  214. Anonymous[366] • Disclaimer says:

    I listen to a lot of music from the 50’s and 60’s. Always curious about what happened to the artist. I’m stunned by how many black singers from that era have died by drug overdoses or shootings. Lots of drama surrounding the black entertainers. Cancel culture run amok. Happy to be old, with more years behind than ahead.

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
  215. @J.Ross

    Bonnie Raitt has covered “Under My Thumb” and I heard her say once that it was among the greatest rock songs ever written.

    As you might imagine, when a female sings its — especially a female of immense talent like Bonnie — it takes on a whole new meaning.

    She has performed with the RS, IIRC.

  216. Ray P says:
    @bomag

    There’s also the question of how the prostitute raises the subject of the john’s marital status during negotiation. I suppose a lot of men wouldn’t care too much but it may seem odd if she asks. The woman whose memoir I read had gotten into the game through her job at a radio station – I think an older woman who ran a call girl service out of an apartment in the city was interviewed at the station and they got to talking and this typically liberated seventies girl fancied trying out the life on a moonlighting basis. So her clients were initially telephone contacts whom the older woman vetted in some unspecified way to weed out undesirables (and she already had a register of regulars). However the newbie quickly branched into independently picking up clients in local shopping malls and did the full streetwalker thing in the end (after moving on) as well as working in a Caribbean brothel. Perhaps she developed a nose for recent divorcees (which meant within the last two years) and could smell their male anguished desperation and bitter resentment. She found these men too unpleasant. I’ve no idea if this is the general attitude of prostitutes. It seems quite hard on divorcees – the wife rejects the guy and then the prostitutes as well. Like Travis Bickle noted women are cold and distant – it’s like they are in a union. One out, all out.

    • Thanks: BB753
  217. @Muggles

    No, you’re not wrong. But, this is because of…. the nature. Richard Burton (a drunk who sometimes acted) said: Woman’s whole world is her man. Man’s whole world is- the world.

    He was just paraphrasing Lord Byron, https://www.bartleby.com/337/992.html:

    Man’s love is of man’s life a thing apart,
    ’Tis woman’s whole existence

    And when this part of a man’s life crumbles, he goes on to other things. Women, with rare exceptions- not.

  218. Art Deco says:
    @flyingtiger

    It was a happy cheerful song celebrating a gang rape by the narrator and Julio.

    Thanks for the issue of your imagination.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Johann Ricke
  219. Ray P says:
    @BB753

    On Marc Almond as the gayest – I remember the story went around in the eighties that he was rushed to hospital and had his stomach pumped because he’d swallowed too much l’essence de l’homme. He also said in a documentary looking back on himself as an eighties’ pop star that, like many of his critics at the time, he’d quite like to punch his old self too.

    • LOL: BB753
  220. Muggles says:
    @BB753

    I like the David Gray version.

    • Thanks: BB753
  221. I don’t recall where I was,but I was somewhere A million years ago,when Brown Sugar was played. My first thought,aside from “this is an awesome song,” of course,was “Uhm,can they say that?”
    Now,so many years later, I have an answer.
    The Stones at that time,the early 70s,seemed to be promoting black women as sex objects. This song,as well as the black lady singing,”Rape! Murder!” on Gimme Shelter,and a woman named Claudia Somebody who sang on stage with them, gave that impression.
    At least to a horny,lonely HS guy.
    Maybe this was the time when Mick was making biracial babies?

  222. @flyingtiger

    I thought Paul said it was about marijuana use.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  223. Muggles says:
    @Eric Novak

    Wait until today’s Zoomer and Millennial morons are assaulted with rap “music” in elevators (will they still exist?) and in grocery stores. Say about 2040-50.

    Thumpa-thumpa…

    Of course most will be deaf by then. Or dead. Certainly a majority of those “artists” will be.

    None of those ‘tunes’ will be distinguishable from each other.

    Of course, I’m no expert…

  224. Muggles says:
    @Anon

    Yes, now you have let out Our Secret.

    The Klan has gotten soft on Jews in recent years…

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  225. @Pontius

    You always know when the DJ has gone for a dump.

    Actually the long version of the Doors Light My Fire was the first song where DJs didn’t have to hurry back.

  226. @Curle

    Stole this from Powerline:

  227. @flyingtiger

    When I heard “Me and Julio down by the schoolyard” in 1972 I knew what to was about. It was a happy cheerful song celebrating a gang rape by the narrator and Julio.

    We know where you’re eating next time you’re in Hastings, Minnesota.

    Actually, Julio, the narrator, and Rosie were superspreaders ahead of their time:

    Goodbye to Rosie, the queen of Corona

    What was “Kodachrome” really about? And “Red Rubber Ball”? (Also Simon’s.) What really went on on the 59th St Bridge??

    Was “Eli’s Coming” (not Simon’s) about premature ejaculation?

    • LOL: bomag
  228. @Art Deco

    Someone here recently nailed me for daring to suggest that Paul Simon is more listenable than Bob Dylan. Evidently it’s a shocking thought for some:

    NBC THINK ON PAUL SIMON: JUST A ‘FOOTNOTE’ NEXT TO DYLAN …
    When It’s All Said & Done

    Simon has a novelty-song voice, like Randy Newman’s or Ringo Starr’s. Garfunkel’s voice inspired him to write to a higher standard. Just like Southside Johnny got Springsteen and Van Zandt (75% Italian and maybe 2% Dutch) to surpass their usual stuff. He deserved better!

    The illustration illustrates why so many notable Jews die at or around 60– this is what they look like when they don’t:

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Curle
  229. @Muggles

    The Klan has gotten soft on Jews in recent years…

    They can get the robes wholesale.

    [MORE]

  230. @Rex Little

    I’m surprised nobody’s mentioned “Every Breath You Take” by The Police. It pretty much glorifies stalking.

    In the way “Short People” glorifies bigotry– to mock it. Or, for that matter, “Money For Nothing”. That had a bigotry of its own, though.

    In happier music news, rap now has a Nixon-in-Dallas moment of its own. Kylie Jenner was backstage at the Calgary Houston stampede:

    Pregnant Kylie Jenner & Stormi, 3, caught up in Astroworld horror as star shared videos before fatal crush killed eight

    Oh, Stormi… bring back that sunny day…

    • Replies: @anonymous
    , @Feryl
  231. Ted Plank says:

    Keith Richards wore a Wehrmacht field blouse on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1966, a racy move on his part, with TV watching World War ll veterans and victims then in robust middle age.

    Alongside the success of Mel Brooks “The Producers” and the largely Jewish operated sitcom “Hogan’s Heroes” (complete with Colonel Klink and Sgt. Schultz being actual Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany, and French character Louis LaBeau played by Robert Cary, a Jewish inmate at Buchenwald concentration camp, nyuk nyuk nyuk!), we must assume it was an entirely different universe back then.

  232. Not to mention contour sheets for the Grand Dragon…

  233. Anonymous[222] • Disclaimer says:
    @Pontius

    Hey Jude is another one.

  234. Charlotte says:
    @Muggles

    Here’s my take.

    A man rambling on, trashing his ex wife or girlfriend looks weak and silly: he couldn’t control her when he had her, now he can’t move on because she still dominates his thoughts.

    A woman trashing her ex presents a picture of strength: she’s out from under his thumb, not his property anymore, she’s taken charge of her life.

    It’s interesting how both these attitudes stem from archetypes of the masculine and feminine roles in marriage. Progressive women love to hear about strong women leaving bad relationships, and they think that’s a blow against the patriarchy, but they don’t see it’s just a riff on an old theme.

    • Thanks: Muggles
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  235. Lagertha says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Hay was super early…green houses make the rest of the world easy.

  236. Lagertha says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Hay was super early…green houses make the rest of the world easy.

    I miss your humor very much, darlin’. I have gone deep down into physics/little words, so, I grew tired of the usual bs politics of the fucking assholes of the world – still! so fucking tired of people, asshole – status conscious people. Who cares about diamonds, cars and private planes! – children are sold as sex objects and for their blood. Believe in something…tick tock. I do not understand people who would fuck or wound children, slice them up like meat? Why is this happening and why has it been going on for 60+ years?????????? Why are the Fortune 5 exes and 2nd, 3rd, 4th level people not arrested?

  237. @John Milton's Ghost

    Well, alright. Costello is no Sam Cooke, but he has a strong voice, usually on key, and has written many, many original songs, at least a dozen or so of them classics.

    Roth, according to my female acquaintances, was cute and had good stage moves.
    As a singer, he could not hold a tune in a bucket.

  238. anonymous[950] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    In the way “Short People” glorifies bigotry– to mock it. Or, for that matter, “Money For Nothing”. That had a bigotry of its own, though.

    I always said, though Newman was claiming to be “making a point about bigotry,” he chose as his song’s archetype a group of people least likely to wind up physically or monetarily confronting him about it, and a confrontation that would be most survivable, if they ever did.

    That’s why it was “short people,” rather than “black people,” or even “jew people.”

    Speaking up to denounce Newman for “short people” would be about the same as standing up against him publicly if he had written the same song about “small penis people.” You might get public sympathy, but not outraged support.

  239. @Jack Armstrong

    A rare Charlie Watts vocal contribution too.

    With all due process respect to Charlie, Ringo, Phil, and Karen, the most striking vocal performance by drummer has to be Brummie Bev Bevan’s:

    How about a supergroup made up of Brit guys with girly names?

    Vivian Stanshall † Lead vocals
    Vivian Campbell Vocals, guitar
    Laurie Wisefield Lead guitar
    Kimberly Rew Rhythm guitar
    Nicky Hopkins † Keyboards
    Christy Moore ☘ Bodhrán
    Bev(erly) Bevan Drums

    Bev’s still looking good:

    [MORE]

  240. @Jack Armstrong

    A rare Charlie Watts vocal contribution too.

    They say that the only time Manfred Mann’s voice appears (?) on a recording is in “Blinded By the Light”. He replaced a background singer who didn’t show for the session.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  241. @Larry, San Francisco

    They played Staitway to Heaven with the lyrics from Freebird. They called it “Stairway to Freebird”

    When a landscaper thinks he’s the best with the links,
    He’ll be building a Fairway to Steven.
    There’s this feeling Steve gets when he hooks to the west
    And he knows he won’t break 87…

    And it makes me bogie…
    If there’s a Titleist in your hedgerow, don’t be alarmed now
    It’s just a cue to install netting
    In my thoughts I have seen rings of smoke through the trees
    And the voices of grillers tailgating.

    • Thanks: Jack Armstrong
  242. @Art Deco

    Thanks for the issue of your imagination.

    In a Rolling Stone interview, Simon described it as doggerel. I have a feeling song lyrics are typically vignettes – impressions dashed off so the cadences or rhymes are pleasing to the ear. To attach a deeper meaning, to the extent typically drug- or alcohol-fueled songwriters are capable of meaningful introspection, even when they’re sober, is asking too much of the people in the trade. That’s why I’ve never bothered with lyrics, and don’t know the ones to some of my favorite songs.

  243. L. Guapo says:
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    I love the Stones’ country stuff

  244. @Reg Cæsar

    If the lead vocalist on “Zing, Went the Strings…” is Bev, that’s amazing: all five of them could sing. I had always thought that was Carl Wayne, but you learn something new every day.

    Now that the Small Faces have been properly canonized (getting into the R&RHoF, as part of “the Small Faces/Faces”), the Move is the last great British group of the ’60’s that never got its due in the U.S. I have the 4xCD box set Anthology that came out on Salvo in 2008, and it’s a revelation: among the gems within are a restored Something Else, the live EP at the Marquee, and two lengthy tracks from the band’s 1969 shows at Fillmore East. (One is their take on the Nazz’s “Open My Eyes,” one of those Nuggets that barely made a dent in the charts on its release; Roy Wood — or someone — must have been one of those music obsessives who scoured the record shops, looking for obscure imports…) Highly recommended to those who want to know more than just the band’s hits.

    Since you mentioned Kimberley Rew among those Brit rockers with feminine names, I’m surprised you left out his former bandmate (in the Soft Boys) Robyn Hitchcock. Underwater Moonlight is a tremendous, largely unsung album; I think Peter Buck once said it had more influence on his guitar playing than anything by the Byrds.

    Thanks for the Bev.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  245. @Gary in Gramercy

    I had always thought that was Carl Wayne, but you learn something new every day.

    It might be for the high notes.

    Robyn Hitchcock

    Robin (or Robyn) as a girl’s name is a Yank thing. So Hitchcock doesn’t qualify. Interestingly, I did not misspell “Kimberley”, autocorrect did. It usually leaves proper nouns alone.

    …the Move is the last great British group of the ’60’s that never got its due in the U.S.

    There is also Grapefruit, John Lennon’s favorite group. They sounded quite ’65 in ’69. Unfortunately, for their second album they switched from being wannabe Beatles to wannabe Cream.

    • Replies: @Curle
  246. JMcG says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Christy Moore a Brit?! Good Lord, man- have you no decency?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  247. Anonymous[141] • Disclaimer says:
    @Charlotte

    In both cases, they look resentful and weak. I never thought a woman complaining about a man looked strong, whether or not she left him. But I wouldn’t listen to stuff like that or hang with a woman who wanted that kind of talk.

  248. AceDeuce says:
    @Larry, San Francisco

    “Dash Riprock”, of course was the name of the character in the Beverly Hillbillies who courted Elly May in several episodes– a handsome Hollywood actor, based on, and an obvious send up of, the then-current Rock Hudson/Tab Hunter types.

  249. MEH 0910 says:

    Rick Beato’s 2nd YouTube channel:
    My Uber driver said: “Paul McCartney? Never Heard of Him”

    This video is about my conversation with my Uber driver when returning from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame show in Cleveland.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  250. @Obstinate Cymric

    I’m sure most ladies of the evening would prefer to think of their clientele as high end.

  251. @Reg Cæsar

    Amazingly, this recording of Blinded by the Light was Bruce Springsteen’s only number 1 song as a writer, and he never had one as a performer.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
  252. Of course Don McLean was abusive. Imagine how frustrating it must have been to write a hit that iconic and never do anything else even close. To taste superstardom and then have the world tell you “no thanks, you actually don’t have talent”. I am sure he felt like a fraud and took that out on those around him. Would be far better to have a career of consistent mediocrity than be a one -hit wonder like that.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    , @Steve Sailer
    , @duncsbaby
  253. Curle says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Here’s the track list from S & G’s ‘classic’ album Sounds of Silence. I rate the meat to filler ratio at
    three out of ten only because I recognize that some people find ‘I am a Rock’ and ‘Richard Cory’ moving though neither does much for me and the latter sounds like a rip off of the biographical songs the Kinks, Dylan and the Beatles did better (Eleanor Rigby?). Sound of Silence is indisputably good. Why not enlighten us as to the overlooked wonders present here that elevate this band in your eyes?

    1. “The Sound of Silence”
    2. “Leaves That Are Green”
    3. “Blessed”
    4. “Kathy’s Song”
    5. “Somewhere They Can’t Find Me”
    6. “Anji”
    1. “Richard Cory”
    2. “A Most Peculiar Man”
    3. “April Come She Will”
    4. “We’ve Got a Groovey Thing Goin’”
    5. “I Am a Rock”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  254. Ragno says:
    @Pontius

    Forget ‘cancel’…..they’ll have to vaporize Motorhead.

    Seeing “classic rock”, or any of its whiter permutations, discussed in a Shitlib Media op-ed is a self-cancelling phenomenon as far as I’m concerned: they cease to exist even before I’m done reading them (if I even bother to give ’em a glance).

    And that goes double for societal prescriptions written by Dr Tranny.

  255. Trinity says:

    Can’t believe “Midnight Rambler” by the Stooooooooones has not been brought up.

    Pyscho Kller by Talking Heads.

  256. AceDeuce says:
    @ScarletNumber

    As a writer, the Pointer Sisters reached #2 with his “Fire”. As a performer, his highest was also #2 with the title cut from Dancing in the Dark.

    He has, impressively, had 9 #1 albums.

    Technically, as a performer, he did hit #1 once–He sang on “We are the World” in 1985, which hit #1.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  257. Curle says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    What about Scott Walker, American big in UK but never here?

  258. Brutusale says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Uh, no. Queen’s drummer is a better singer than 90% of the lead vocalists in rock.

    None of them have his range.

    He’s still at it.

    https://www.express.co.uk/entertainment/music/1511192/Brian-May-Roger-Taylor-solo-tour-Queen-drummer

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  259. @JMcG

    Christy Moore a Brit?! Good Lord, man- have you no decency?

    The daggers meant “deceased” and the shamrock I thought was obvious. Perhaps it didn’t show on your browser?

    I couldn’t find a British Christy or Christie, though in a pinch Christie Davies † could have done their liner notes.

    What Vivian Campbell considers himself I have no idea, but legally he was born a British subject.

  260. @Curle

    “Sound of Silence” suffers from the same atrocious scansion as “Star-Spangled Banner”, weirdly stressing -ing. The best track is “April Come She Will”, which I’ve posted here for Steve’s spring appeal once or twice.

    The point wasn’t that S&G were that great, only that Simon could recognize the limitations of his own voice and write more seriously for Garfunkel’s much better pipes, and that they were better than Dylan. A low standard, to be sure.

    Also, they weren’t a “band”, but a duo.

    • Replies: @Curle
  261. @Curle

    As Paul Simon did, he’d have to share his name with a politician.

  262. @Brutusale

    None of them have his range.

    Okay, he’s the Yma Sumac of rock. Note, though, that no matter who of the four wrote the song, Mercury did almost all the lead singing on their singles. Were there other bands that took turns writing the songs but giving them all to one lead singer? The Guess Who at times; Burton Cummings would sing Kurt Winter’s work.

    My list of singing drummers was deliberately ironic, including novelty singers Bevan and Starr along with the serious Collins and Carpenter. Taylor may have operatic lungs, but he appears to belong to the former group, and by choice. Karen, nearly four decades gone, is still on top.

  263. Curle says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    “ only that Simon could recognize the limitations of his own voice and write more seriously for Garfunkel’s much better pipes, and that they were better than Dylan.”

    Dylan was, arguably, a songwriter first and a performer second. He’s alleged to be the second most covered songwriter next to the Beatles. It is generally known that pushing covers was part of his agent Albert Grossman’s strategy and it seems to have worked, Hendrix and the Byrds being notable examples.

    The strength of Dylan’s music is their lyricism and melodies. On this point I think the sheer scale of the qualitative gap between the two artists as established by the cover gap speaks for itself. That Dylan as a performer may have left something to be desired by audiences who prefer music drenched in strings or Simon’s moodiness doesn’t take away from the emotional resonance so many find in the songs themselves. The song ‘My Back Pages’ reflects a level of insight about false certitude in young people that has never been matched. It is tough imagining Simon being capable of writing such a song. Nor can I think of a single great Simon penned love song though he does write good loneliness songs.

  264. @Curle

    Good point, although Walker is sui generis. Generally, when British bands huge in the U.K. can’t get arrested Stateside, it’s because they’re “too English.” This was true, to a greater or lesser extent, of the Small Faces before Steve Marriott left, and Rod Stewart and Ron Wood joined up (at which point the reconstituted Faces resembled a more good-time Rolling Stones, and for a while at least, cleaned up in America), the Move, the Jam and the Smiths (modest sales here, but nothing approaching their status in the U.K., where 18 singles made the Top 40 and three made the Top 10).

    Nothing about Scott Walker’s career made sense: he started out as one-third of the Walker Brothers (none were actually named Walker, and they weren’t related), a group of Americans who were striking out in the music business in California, and decided that English girls would go for good looking guys with long hair and tans, even if they were Yanks. They were right: for about 18 months, the Walkers were huge in the U.K., just behind the Beatles and Stones in generating pandemonium among teen girls. Musically, they were no great shakes: a pale copy of the Righteous Brothers (particularly their work with Phil Spector), with a budding Jean-Paul Sartre — Scott — on brooding baritone lead vocals most of the time. But they had long hair and tans, and in late 1965, that counted for something in Great Britain.

    Unfortunately, Scott hated stardom and the loss of his privacy, and tensions in the group caused a split in April 1967 — just as their records were starting to curl around the edges anyway. Scott commenced a solo career, in which he essayed perfectly the role of the Moody Bastard. His first three albums (two of which made the Top Three on U.K. album charts) included nine songs of Belgian singer-songwriter Jacques Brel (in translation by former Doc Pomus writing partner Mort Shuman), but his own songs from the first four albums remain his greatest legacy. After Scott 4 — his masterpiece — bombed on its release at the end of 1969, he took several odd detours, including one singing bland pop covers on his own TV show in Britain, and, from the 1980’s on, made infrequent, forbidding and impenetrable avant-garde albums until his passing in 2019.

    Too English? More like “too Continental” or “too strange.” (Not that there’s anything wrong with that.)

  265. @John Johnson

    You underestimate the influence of Sex and the City in Europe.

  266. JMcG says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    I thought he had another hit about Vincent Van Gogh. Starry Night, I think. I can’t stand American Pie.

  267. JMcG says:
    @Curle

    Hearts and Bones is a great love song by Paul Simon.

  268. Brown Sugar is a song celebrating miscegenation and encouraging it. This was written after Mick Jagger father a bastard child with a black woman. Hence I am surprised it has not been banned before. I guess the woke are against miscegenation.

  269. @Curle

    Nor can I think of a single great Simon penned love song though he does write good loneliness songs.

    In which category does “Red Rubber Ball” land? He wrote that with Bruce Woodley of the Seekers and it was a big hit for the Cyrkle.

    That Dylan as a performer may have left something to be desired by audiences who prefer music drenched in strings or Simon’s moodiness…

    …or a listenable voice. Dylan’s better songs get covered because people want to hear them sung by anybody but Bob.

    (Some of my Minnesota neighbors’ “cut down the tall trees” attitude toward local stars seems to have rubbed off on me. Keillor, Prince, and Loni Anderson are other victims.

    (Mike Myers recounts a story about John Candy, who was asked by a rank-and-file Canadian why all the country’s stars sold out and moved to the States. Candy replied that he lived an hour north of Toronto. The guy countered with, “Ha! I thought you said you made it!”)

    On this point I think the sheer scale of the qualitative gap between the two artists as established by the cover gap speaks for itself.

    This list of most-covered songs is all over the map qualitatively– and Simon, not Dylan, is on it! Just the Beatles are represented by the solid (“Blackbird”, “And I Love Her”), the okay-but-overrated (“Yesterday”, “Eleanor Rigby”), and dreck (“Imagine”).

    https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/20811/most-covered-songs-in-music-history

    Several are in the public domain, and three share titles with earlier classics. “Time after Time” and “Hallelujah” are good enough, but compared to the Cahn/Styne and Youmans/Robin/Grey standards of the same names? The latter was a giant hit across Europe 90 years ago:

    Cohen’s cover count is heavily beefed up by a Christian rewrite not his:

    • Replies: @Curle
  270. abrookes says:

    Music journalists are some of the lamest liberals on the planet. No one who actually likes hip hop would put Public Enemy anywhere on that list, let alone in the top 5. But it’s exactly the kind of rap that is non-threatening to a boring, liberal, middle-aged music critic. They like to think that White conservatives were shaking in their boots when Fear of a Black Planet came out, but I don’t think anyone cared. It just doesn’t seem like it would have been that controversial. It’s all vaguely Civil Rights themed with none of Public Enemy’s actually controversial beliefs: That White people are not merely oppressors but are subhuman, that the Palestinians should exterminate the Jews, and that homosexuality is evil and that God destroying Sodom and Gomorrah was a real historical event.

  271. @anon

    I think that this phenomenon may date back even further. Reading between the lines of “Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville harbored more than a little skepticism about the long term effects of a democratic system based upon equality (even back then de Tocqueville noted how materialistic Americans seemed to be). Like John Adams, he had no illusions that this thing of ours would last.

    If he were alive today, de Tocqueville would not be at all surprised at what you have described.

  272. @Curle

    “The strength of Dylan’s music is their lyricism and melodies.”

    And a good thing too, because as a singer he is, as per the title of the Lennon/McCartney song, a “Nowhere Man.”

  273. Curle says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Here’s the list of most covered artists not most covered songs. It speaks for itself.

    http://music3point0.blogspot.com/2014/03/who-are-most-covered-artists.html

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  274. @Anon

    On the other hand, do you really think that a Nice Jewish Boy like Billy Joel is going to appeal to some shuckin’ and jivin’ denizen of “de ‘hood?”

  275. @S Johnson

    Last execution (by hanging) in Britain was at Walton prison, Liverpool 13 August 1964. [Wiki]

  276. @Reg Cæsar

    Hung was common Liverpool (Scouse) usage for hanged.

  277. @MEH 0910

    And this guy never heard of The Great American Songbook. 3:35 was enough.

    BTW, I didn’t learn of WNEW-AM, NY’s Sinatra Station, via a recommendation. I just stumbled onto it. My mom’s station was WOR-AM.

  278. @ScarletNumber

    The Kinks changed coco cola to cherry cola in Lola so the BBC would play it (no product placement allowed).

  279. @Peter Akuleyev

    McClean’s Van Gogh song was huge in Europe.

  280. @Curle

    Nobody’s covering “Sinatra”, just doing their renditions of the same standards, many written in his childhood.

    No. 20 on your song list is “Killing Me Softly With His Song”, with words by Norman Gimbel. That makes a nice full circle, with Hibbing, Minnesota’s real musical talent, Connie Evingson, having done a tribute album to him. Gimbel, considered a BMI hack (but that’s redundant), is most famous for telescoping Olha que coisa, mais linda, mais cheia de graça… into Tall and tan and young and lovely…, which shouldn’t have worked but somehow did.

    We have to find better ways to spend our Sunday nights. I’ll leave everyone with a riddle:

    Q: What is the difference between Paul Simon and Lana Clarkson?

  281. @AceDeuce

    Dancing in the Dark was song B5 on Born in the U.S.A.

    Bruce released two albums simultaneously on March 31, 1992: Human Touch and Lucky Town. The former reached 2 and the latter reached 3. They were kept out of the top spot by Adrenalize by Def Leppard. If Bruce had just released one album at a time they may have both hit number 1. As it stands, his Greatest Hits album and his Live album both hit number 1 as well, giving him 11 in total.

    If Bruce Springsteen gets credit for a number 1 single for “We are the World”, then I was Time Man of the Year in 2006.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    , @Reg Cæsar
  282. AceDeuce says:
    @ScarletNumber

    #1-LOL. Sorry. Of course, I knew that it was Born in the USA. I got it when it first came out. (I no longer care for BS or most of his music, but I used to like him) It’s just that Dancing…. was his best selling single from the album. That’s what I get for posting in a hurry when I was late to get somewhere. Thanks. I’m embarrassed.

    Also, you’re right about the other two albums. I saw that and should have included those. I was surprised how many actual “album” albums (no greatest hits/anthologies) that he’s had as #1. I would have guessed five or six maximum. It was also a surprise to see how his early stuff charted–I thought that Born to Run might have hit #1, but no. (My favorite album of his is Darkness on the Edge of Town.)

    Regarding We are the World–I’m just sayin’

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  283. @ScarletNumber

    “Dancing in the Dark” was song B5 on Born in the U.S.A.

    Yet another rocker which is a pale shadow of a Golden Age standard of the same name. May the Schwartz (Arthur) be with you:

  284. @Trinity

    It was never an idle boast to call the Stones “the World’s Greatest Rock n Roll Band.” I am a youngster so I was only able to catch their Steel Wheels tours in ’89. It was pretty much the crown jewel of concerts for me. Surprisingly Mccartney was kind of a dud the following year in the same stadium during his Flowers in the Dirt tour. I agree that Gimme Shelter is one of, if not the, best Stones song. Still not as perfect as Sympathy for the Devil or evocative as You Can’t Always Get What You Want. And I’d throw in Angie, because that song can still pull at my heartstrings.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  285. duncsbaby says:
    @Curle

    The bassist, Jackie Fox, went to Harvard w/Barack Obama. She once wrote about the two people she personally knew that had a definite will to power: Barack and Joan Jett.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackie_Fox

    • Thanks: Curle
  286. duncsbaby says:
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    See the little faggot with the earring and the make-up
    Yeah buddy that’s his own hair
    That little faggot got his own jet airplane
    That little faggot he’s a millionaire

    Everyone knew back in ’85 that in that song that was a character saying those words, not Dire Straits. It was understood that they were parodying a working class guy who was criticizing rock stars. It’s funny, Dire Straits didn’t remove those lyrics because they were slanderous to working class types but because they didn’t want to get tarred w/the homophobic brush.

  287. duncsbaby says:
    @duncsbaby

    Anyway I just watched “UHF” last week which is a bad late 80’s Weird Al Yankovic movie but it did have a parody of Dire Straits’ “Money For Nothing,” which was funny.

  288. duncsbaby says:
    @Anonymous

    I’m stunned by how many black singers from that era have died by drug overdoses or shootings. Lots of drama surrounding the black entertainers.

    Even Arthur Lee of the band Love who wrote such great soaring psychedelic pop from the mid ’60’s descended into drug use and was later imprisoned for gun charges.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Lee_(musician)#Prison

  289. duncsbaby says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Woman beaters don’t usually have “one-hit wonder” as their excuse but perhaps I’m missing the nuance in your perhaps intended sarcasm.

  290. @duncsbaby

    Everyone knew back in ’85 that in that song that was a character saying those words, not Dire Straits. It was understood that they were parodying a working class guy who was criticizing rock stars. It’s funny, Dire Straits didn’t remove those lyrics because they were slanderous to working class types but because they didn’t want to get tarred w/the homophobic brush.

    Did Dire Straits remove it? I recall hearing the song on the radio with that part excised. I think I heard that later on Knopfler ceased playing that part in live performances. So it seems like the edit was made by others and then the ball was in Knopfler’s court to make a stand on it and he demurred.

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
  291. @AceDeuce

    Also, you’re right about the other two albums. I saw that and should have included those.

    No, I wasn’t trying to correct you. I wouldn’t have included them either. I just thought it was an interesting piece of trivia. Many Bruce fans aren’t fans of those two albums as they were recorded without the assistance of most of the E Street Band. Bruce used Jeff Porcaro from Toto on drums and used Randy Jackson on bass. Jackson is best known now as one of the original judges of American Idol. Bruce only kept “The Professor” Roy Bittan to play keyboard.

  292. @Jefferson Temple

    I am a youngster so I was only able to catch their Steel Wheels tours in ’89

    This album produced Mixed Emotions and Rock and a Hard Place, the last two hit songs by the Rolling Stones. Given it was 32 years ago, but the last hit song by any of the Beatles was Got My Mind Set on You by George Harrison in 1987, and Paul McCartney had Spies Like Us in 1985.

  293. Marat says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Funnily enough, Kinky went on to write quite a few mystery novels.

  294. RAZ says:
    @JMcG

    The Who’s “Helpless Dancer” from Quadrophenia has the line “if you complain you disappear just like the lesbians and queers”. In concert going back about 15 years ago when playing the song Pete Townshend dropped “queers”. The term has actually gotten more acceptable over time. Unlike basically everything else. Could it be used in concert today?

  295. @Reg Cæsar

    Pete Ham was murdered, he didn’t commit suicide. Tom Evans was likely murdered too.

  296. @J.Ross

    Brian Jones makes that song.

  297. @Father O'Hara

    If he said that, he lied. The “radical priest” and “the cover of Newsweek” say it was gang-rape and/or murder.

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
  298. duncsbaby says:
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Did Dire Straits remove it? I recall hearing the song on the radio with that part excised.

    I have no idea whether it was the band or record label that removed the lyrics. I was just reacting to your comment. I’m not surprised they removed the lyrics because of the great fear that is out there now of not being sufficiently enlightened. TBH, I don’t think I would’ve noticed anyway. It was a good song of it’s time but to me became overplayed pretty fast.

  299. @Nicholas Stix

    Ill look into that. I always assumed the radical priest was a joke,that a minor infraction would draw one of the Berrigan Brothers!

  300. @CCZ

    I guess it’s assumed that black barbers and hairdressers automatically understand how to cut and style white hair? My guess is that black barbers and stylists aren’t going to welcome the competition.

  301. Feryl says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Besides “Short People” being annoying (which it certainly is), it is a ridiculous and unconvincing satire of prejudice. The best satire is based in reality. Newman I suppose couldn’t mention scary looking blacks, greedy Jews, Italian mama’s boys, snotty French people, or whoever because he didn’t want his song cancelled. For that matter he didn’t ( or couldn’t) even reference some of the popular stereotypes of short people (e.g. they are insecure or physically weak).

    It ended up getting airplay precisely because short people are acceptable to pick on, in spite of the song being lame and having stupid lyrics. Ironic, huh?

  302. @duncsbaby

    It was understood that they were parodying a working class guy who was criticizing rock stars.

    I’d say this was ( – well: is…) no parody, but role prose. Just the way people were talking in these days.
    and it is not wrong either. Rather matter of factly.

    Oh – and thanks for the clip from the Al Yankovich movie. – I love the surrealism in it.
    (It’s interesting to hear that their versin doesn’t – move/ swing musically. Optically the little spot is well done & impressive.)

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