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From the New York Times, an advice column on how to be an even more insufferable anti-white harpy than you already are, a Karen Against Racism.

How to Be an Active Bystander When You See Casual Racism

Oct. 29, 2020

By Ruth Terry

We’ve all been there.

At a dinner party. In line at the post office. On a Zoom meeting. You can feel it coming: that awful joke your friend likes to tell about immigrants. Questions like “Don’t all lives matter?” or “Did he resist arrest?” The discomfort becomes palpable. Your gut twists. God, I hope someone says something, you think with increasing desperation. And so does everyone else.

Everyone else just hates it too when somebody asks “Did he resist arrest?” thereby violating the Negative First Amendment: “The Black man’s right to resist arrest shall not be abridged nor even questioned.” Asking a basic factual question about whether a Black man resisted arrest is a megaaggression. Of course he resisted arrest. That is his duty in 2020 America.

This phenomenon, in which no one in a group of witnesses chooses to disrupt a problematic event, is called the bystander effect, said Thomas Vance, a national certified counselor and a postdoctoral psychology fellow at the New School for Social Research in New York.

“We like to think that we live in a world where people will jump in,” Dr. Vance said in an email, but “the greater the number of people present, the less likely people are to help a person in need or distress.”

Seriously, I’ve seen this happen, such as when I was one of about 1000 pedestrians to see a woman jump off a bridge into the Chicago River at rush hour, but I was the only one to get the life preserver and drop it to her. But my impression is it’s not exactly true: definitely the more witnesses, the lower the per capita likelihood that anyone will respond, but the higher the likelihood that someone will respond. I happened to be one of the few pedestrians who’d noticed that there was a life ring on a rope behind glass at the northeast end of the bridge. If she’d jumped off the Madison Street bridge at midnight in front of ten pedestrians, the odds that any one of the ten would have known about the life buoy would have been much lower.

But, anyway, research into the Bystander Effect was traditionally about things like rescuing people from drowning, not about punishing people for asking “Did he resist arrest?”

“This happens because being part of a large crowd makes it so no single person has to take responsibility for an action,” he added.

This diffusion of responsibility can make well-intentioned people complicit in whatever acts of violence or discrimination they silently witness.

To avoid that silent complicity, people can learn to become active bystanders: individuals who work to create cultures that actively reject harmful or discriminatory behavior through targeted interventions.

What exactly is an active bystander?

First, let’s talk about the difference between an ally and an active bystander.

An ally is someone who “does not suffer the same oppressions” as you do but who “supports your struggle for rights and freedom,” Micki McElya, a history professor at the University of Connecticut, wrote in the Boston Review.

Absent from that definition is action. Active bystanders see something bad happen and make discreet choices to respond to the concerning behavior, said Monica Reyna, a violence prevention educator at the Advocates, a nonprofit in rural Idaho. That can take many forms, such as recording suspected police brutality or challenging everyday microaggressions like dinner-table racism. It can be leaning into humor to unpack “compliments” — for example, your boss describes a Black colleague as “articulate,” the subtext being that this is somehow exceptional — or educating friends about the problematic origins of commonplace expressions. …

Even your physical presence can be enough to keep someone from being the target of racial violence, said LaVonne Pepe, a social worker and a senior trainer at Alteristic.

A perusal of the federal Bureau of Justice Statistics’ National Criminal Victimization Survey might prove eye-opening to people who assume blacks are in terrible danger of Racial Violence.

… Active bystanders should strive to intervene early and often.

… That said, there is no statute of limitations on stepping up. If you miss your window, follow up with the perpetrator later in a private conversation. Or share resources through email or social media.

So, there’s no statute of limitations on canceling Joe Biden for something he has said during his 48 years as a national political figure? Or at least there wouldn’t be after November 3 (until then, Joe’s history is just a foggy blur).

… I try to do this but it’s so hard. I’m exhausted.

It is hard! The fatigue that we all feel is real and it is normal.

 
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  1. This phenomenon, in which no one in a group of witnesses chooses to disrupt a problematic event, is called the bystander effect

    No, it’s called tact.

    • Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Faraday's Bobcat

    I think you, at least, mean 'cowardice'. Tact hasn't a thing to do with it.

  2. Of course, bystander intervention must not be universally applied. If you see a black acting suspiciously, you’d better be damn sure he’s committing a criminal act before you report him to anyone. People like Kitty Genovese are expendable, after all.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Rob McX


    ... you’d better be damn sure he’s committing a criminal act...
     
    You'd better be careful. "Criminal act" is probably just another white concept created by white people to assert their privilege and control Black People.

    See you in re-education camp. I can help you with critical race class. Let's form a study group here first. We'd better hurry, though. There's a good chance the white man's written language will be forbidden and all further correspondence will be impossible.

    , @Michael S
    @Rob McX

    What's especially ironic here, and maybe this is what you were already hinting at, was that the Bystander Effect was literally conceived as a result of a pretty white girl's victimization by a black man... and now this horrible hag is demanding that white women reference the same Bystander Effect to hector anyone brave or oblivious enough to point out black male violence.

    What's the New York Times's definition of chutzpah? I'm guessing it has something to do with being white.

  3. Steve, no more tired or exhausted articles. I’m, hmmmm, fatigued.

    • Replies: @dvorak
    @Buffalo Joe


    Steve, no more tired or exhausted articles. I’m, hmmmm, fatigued.
     
    Put on a pot of coffee:
    "By Noor Fakih"
    "I’m tired.
    "And I’ve been tired for a long time."
    https://www.stanforddaily.com/2020/10/27/abolish-stanford-greek-life-confessions-from-an-ex-sorority-president/

    Replies: @Pericles

  4. … I was one of about 1000 pedestrians to see a woman jump off a bridge into the Chicago River at rush hour, but I was the only one to get the life preserver and drop it to her.

    As an HBD type, you should realise that that makes you a part of the problem: Suicide is an integral part of natural selection in the great puzzle of life.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @The Alarmist


    Suicide is an integral part of natural selection in the great puzzle of life.
     
    Some people who commit suicide, shouldn't. Their deaths are a loss to us.
  5. Did the woman survive?

    • Replies: @Lot
    @thinklikea1l

    Yes, and over Steve’s (and his wife’s) objections, she insisted on becoming his slave given he saved her life.

    Much hilarity and awkwardness ensued, and at certain points Steve got a little too used to having someone do all his chores, but after 22 minutes both Steve and the failed suicider learned valuable lessons and went on their separate paths.

  6. “It is hard! The fatigue that we all feel is real and it is normal. ”

    Indeed this CNFS is very hard to define, recognize and diagnose. But it is real.

  7. Ah, so the act of asking the question of whether or not he resisted arrest is *itself* racist! Thus, it’s impossible to find out whether someone resisted arrest (unless you’re a racist). Wonderful catch-22 there.

  8. BLM has come out against bodycams, citing increased surveillance of communities of color and increased money spent on police. They are actually upset that they show offenders aggressively resisting arrest or attacking officers (of course).

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @Anon

    These demented freaks don't even try to make any sense or apply logic. The fault is ours for listening and complying with their idiotic rantings.

  9. I just early voted. Standing in a long line with my wife, I loudly discussed the Philly riots and the reason for them, with her. No one took the bait unfortunately.

    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @WJ

    After Trump was elected one began to hear heard/read stories about "I was standing in line to vote with these two Maga-hatted jocks who began to talk about how they were going out to beat up some Hispanics and shouting "Trump, bitches!" Somehow this always took place at a largely nonwhite precinct, leaving rational people with questions like, would jocks to this, and is it at all likely they would be registered to vote in such a precinct anyway?

    I guess it goes back to the Duke lacrosse thing, but it's the sort of story Tennessee Coates made his own, and we've seen with Jussie and others. It's a kind of anecdotal virtue signalling.

    This op-ed takes it up a notch, giving training in how to provoke and orchestrate such incidents yourself, for fun and profit. (It also serves the echo chamber function of providing "confirmation" along the lines of "I remember reading about how this these incidents occur all the time": thus "normalizing" them)

  10. @Rob McX
    Of course, bystander intervention must not be universally applied. If you see a black acting suspiciously, you'd better be damn sure he's committing a criminal act before you report him to anyone. People like Kitty Genovese are expendable, after all.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Michael S

    … you’d better be damn sure he’s committing a criminal act…

    You’d better be careful. “Criminal act” is probably just another white concept created by white people to assert their privilege and control Black People.

    See you in re-education camp. I can help you with critical race class. Let’s form a study group here first. We’d better hurry, though. There’s a good chance the white man’s written language will be forbidden and all further correspondence will be impossible.

    • Agree: V. Hickel
  11. Seriously, I’ve seen this happen, such as when I was one of about 1000 pedestrians to see a woman jump off a bridge into the Chicago River at rush hour, but I was the only one to get the life preserver and drop it to her.

    Nice job being a hero Steve. To hell with the sheeple!

  12. It can be leaning into humor to unpack “compliments” — for example, your boss describes a Black colleague as “articulate,” the subtext being that this is somehow exceptional — …

    For example?? Are you sure this wasn’t a true story, Miss Terry? I don’t mean to pry or nothing, but was your old boss a man named Joe Biden, by any chance?

    • Thanks: Some Guy
  13. Micki McElya, a history professor at the University of Connecticut

    Micki McElya, I tell ya… Is she husky?

    Evidently not. She looks surprisingly good for an American female academic of 48 years, older than Biden’s public service:

    Still, she’d look more at home on the back cover of a 1960s’ Manfred Mann or Zombies album.

    Micki McElya = Mimic lackey. “Me claim ‘icky!’ Mice may lick.”

    • Replies: @D. K.
    @Reg Cæsar

    I recommend:

    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-eTru7B-JSXw/TVuDmY8FnkI/AAAAAAAABFY/P9hf91s35t8/s1600/DSCF3789.JPG

    . . . which I bought in December 1977, just before heading home for Christmas break, my senior year.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Reg Cæsar

    She just looks like a garden-variety affirmative-action dyke.

    You will please now purchase this phrase after actively bystanding me for me luxurious dinner-table conversation.

    , @duncsbaby
    @Reg Cæsar

    She looks a bit more Husky in this pic:

    https://d279m997dpfwgl.cloudfront.net/wp/2018/10/2I0A1997-2.jpg

    Somehow, I am reminded of this song when I see her pic.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63stLm1Rw_U

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  14. I try to do this but it’s so hard. I’m exhausted.

    It is hard! The fatigue that we all feel is real and it is normal.

    Translation: I am SUCH A NOBLE PERSON. Most of you are deplorable. Look on this noble person, ye deplorables, and despair.

  15. I agree that the author brings up an interesting psychological phenomenon, or whatever, but her example of dinner party conversation is not the best example. For one thing, it doesn’t involve any actual ACTION. Anyone can run his (or HER) mouth. Secondly, I believe the reason nobody speaks up sometime at her events is that there often is no logical rebuttal. Even lefties don’t like to look stupid. I mean, they don’t like to look stupid on purpose.

    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Indeed. Lest such a situation then become a "teachable moment" as the Left likes to say, where someone might get a chance to question themselves, this gives them an action plan. Sort of like Donald Sutherland at the end of Invasion of the Body-snatchers.

  16. @Reg Cæsar

    Micki McElya, a history professor at the University of Connecticut
     
    Micki McElya, I tell ya... Is she husky?

    Evidently not. She looks surprisingly good for an American female academic of 48 years, older than Biden's public service:


    https://history.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/36/2016/08/McElya-Micki-image-08222016-v1.jpg

    Still, she'd look more at home on the back cover of a 1960s' Manfred Mann or Zombies album.


    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/bd/2b/11/bd2b113e97ae198cd6f3b902c16668c7.jpg


    https://pisces.bbystatic.com/image2/BestBuy_US/images/products/3498/34989382_sa.jpg



    Micki McElya = Mimic lackey. "Me claim 'icky!' Mice may lick."

    Replies: @D. K., @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @duncsbaby

    I recommend:

    . . . which I bought in December 1977, just before heading home for Christmas break, my senior year.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @D. K.

    I bought it in 1973. My favorite lyric line: "This will be our year; took a long time to come..."

    I saw them on their reunion tour years ago, and was annoyed when Colin Blunstone announced "'Summertime', by George Gershwin". It's George and Ira, dammit!

    The Zombies must have their star on the First Avenue wall for playing there, like everyone else. But this year's new, breakout pop star has his name affixed. I want to see the setlist!


    https://images.foxtv.com/static.fox9.com/www.fox9.com/content/uploads/2020/06/764/432/george-floyd-star-first-avenue.jpg?ve=1&tl=1

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FmuswTEGF-U

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @D. K.

  17. @Faraday's Bobcat

    This phenomenon, in which no one in a group of witnesses chooses to disrupt a problematic event, is called the bystander effect
     
    No, it's called tact.

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    I think you, at least, mean ‘cowardice’. Tact hasn’t a thing to do with it.

  18. Jewish men go to show BLM support, get roughed up and called Synagogue of Satan.

    https://nypost.com/2020/10/29/blm-mob-violently-chases-jewish-men-at-philadelphia-protest/

  19. @Reg Cæsar

    Micki McElya, a history professor at the University of Connecticut
     
    Micki McElya, I tell ya... Is she husky?

    Evidently not. She looks surprisingly good for an American female academic of 48 years, older than Biden's public service:


    https://history.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/36/2016/08/McElya-Micki-image-08222016-v1.jpg

    Still, she'd look more at home on the back cover of a 1960s' Manfred Mann or Zombies album.


    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/bd/2b/11/bd2b113e97ae198cd6f3b902c16668c7.jpg


    https://pisces.bbystatic.com/image2/BestBuy_US/images/products/3498/34989382_sa.jpg



    Micki McElya = Mimic lackey. "Me claim 'icky!' Mice may lick."

    Replies: @D. K., @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @duncsbaby

    She just looks like a garden-variety affirmative-action dyke.

    You will please now purchase this phrase after actively bystanding me for me luxurious dinner-table conversation.

  20. @thinklikea1l
    Did the woman survive?

    Replies: @Lot

    Yes, and over Steve’s (and his wife’s) objections, she insisted on becoming his slave given he saved her life.

    Much hilarity and awkwardness ensued, and at certain points Steve got a little too used to having someone do all his chores, but after 22 minutes both Steve and the failed suicider learned valuable lessons and went on their separate paths.

  21. It can be leaning into humor to unpack “compliments” — for example, your boss describes a Black colleague as “articulate,” the subtext being that this is somehow exceptional — or educating friends about the problematic origins of commonplace expressions. …

    Especially since it is always exceptional.

    What chic dinner parties we have to look forward to in this brave luminous future! Even the food will be ‘too White’, and we’ll have to be sure that Sweet Potato Pie is always served and Thanksgiving is quickly made verboten (if not this year, then when?), because the former is white people only being ‘anti-racist’ and not ‘anti-white’ enough as they must be (sort of like white people wearing hideous dreadlocks which look almost as bad on blacks), the latter for being just plain ray-ciss by proclaiming #AmericanIndiansLivesMatter, which is as bad as #AllLivesMatter. The subject can never be changed, so you might as well be violently silent, since the point is to breed all the money out of whites for purses and Prada bags.

  22. @WJ
    I just early voted. Standing in a long line with my wife, I loudly discussed the Philly riots and the reason for them, with her. No one took the bait unfortunately.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

    After Trump was elected one began to hear heard/read stories about “I was standing in line to vote with these two Maga-hatted jocks who began to talk about how they were going out to beat up some Hispanics and shouting “Trump, bitches!” Somehow this always took place at a largely nonwhite precinct, leaving rational people with questions like, would jocks to this, and is it at all likely they would be registered to vote in such a precinct anyway?

    I guess it goes back to the Duke lacrosse thing, but it’s the sort of story Tennessee Coates made his own, and we’ve seen with Jussie and others. It’s a kind of anecdotal virtue signalling.

    This op-ed takes it up a notch, giving training in how to provoke and orchestrate such incidents yourself, for fun and profit. (It also serves the echo chamber function of providing “confirmation” along the lines of “I remember reading about how this these incidents occur all the time”: thus “normalizing” them)

  23. @D. K.
    @Reg Cæsar

    I recommend:

    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-eTru7B-JSXw/TVuDmY8FnkI/AAAAAAAABFY/P9hf91s35t8/s1600/DSCF3789.JPG

    . . . which I bought in December 1977, just before heading home for Christmas break, my senior year.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I bought it in 1973. My favorite lyric line: “This will be our year; took a long time to come…”

    I saw them on their reunion tour years ago, and was annoyed when Colin Blunstone announced “‘Summertime’, by George Gershwin”. It’s George and Ira, dammit!

    The Zombies must have their star on the First Avenue wall for playing there, like everyone else. But this year’s new, breakout pop star has his name affixed. I want to see the setlist!

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @Reg Cæsar

    ".....was annoyed when Colin Blunstone announced “‘Summertime’, by George Gershwin”. It’s George and Ira, dammit!"

    LOL-true. That reminds me of the supposedly true story of a big NYC party that had Rodgers and Hammerstein - and their wives- among the guests. Dorothy Hammerstein overheard another guest, talking about Rodgers' wife (also named Dorothy) "Her husband is the one who wrote 'Some Enchanted Evening'." Mrs Hammerstein interrupted to clarify: "My husband wrote 'Some Enchanted Evening'. Mrs Rodgers' husband wrote 'Dum-dee dum-dee dum-dum'."

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    , @D. K.
    @Reg Cæsar

    I first saw the (latter-day) Zombies "in the wee, small hours of the morning" of Wednesday, August 3, 2005:

    http://www.kvideodvd.com/index.php?dispatch=products.view&product_id=31731

    I had a ticket for the second show, on Tuesday night, but that show did not even get started until about 1 a.m. The Zombies had been stranded in Toronto, due to an airplane crash there, so David Letterman chartered a plane to fly them into Teterboro, New Jersey. The first show, which was supposed to start at 7:30 p.m., was delayed until the Zombies had arrived. I did not get back home to Staten Island, that Wednesday morning, until about 6 a.m. Early that Wednesday evening, I saw Ronnie Spector, singing in a park in Lower Manhattan. The next night, the fourth, I was at a free Coney Island concert:

    https://www.brooklynvegan.com/2005-seaside-su/

    I saw the Zombies, again, at another free Coney Island concert, in 2007:

    https://www.soundchronicle.com/concert-news/hippiefest-will-tour-us-in-july-and-august-2007

  24. @Achmed E. Newman
    I agree that the author brings up an interesting psychological phenomenon, or whatever, but her example of dinner party conversation is not the best example. For one thing, it doesn't involve any actual ACTION. Anyone can run his (or HER) mouth. Secondly, I believe the reason nobody speaks up sometime at her events is that there often is no logical rebuttal. Even lefties don't like to look stupid. I mean, they don't like to look stupid on purpose.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

    Indeed. Lest such a situation then become a “teachable moment” as the Left likes to say, where someone might get a chance to question themselves, this gives them an action plan. Sort of like Donald Sutherland at the end of Invasion of the Body-snatchers.

  25. @Anon
    BLM has come out against bodycams, citing increased surveillance of communities of color and increased money spent on police. They are actually upset that they show offenders aggressively resisting arrest or attacking officers (of course).

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    These demented freaks don’t even try to make any sense or apply logic. The fault is ours for listening and complying with their idiotic rantings.

  26. @Reg Cæsar
    @D. K.

    I bought it in 1973. My favorite lyric line: "This will be our year; took a long time to come..."

    I saw them on their reunion tour years ago, and was annoyed when Colin Blunstone announced "'Summertime', by George Gershwin". It's George and Ira, dammit!

    The Zombies must have their star on the First Avenue wall for playing there, like everyone else. But this year's new, breakout pop star has his name affixed. I want to see the setlist!


    https://images.foxtv.com/static.fox9.com/www.fox9.com/content/uploads/2020/06/764/432/george-floyd-star-first-avenue.jpg?ve=1&tl=1

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FmuswTEGF-U

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @D. K.

    …..was annoyed when Colin Blunstone announced “‘Summertime’, by George Gershwin”. It’s George and Ira, dammit!

    LOL-true. That reminds me of the supposedly true story of a big NYC party that had Rodgers and Hammerstein – and their wives- among the guests. Dorothy Hammerstein overheard another guest, talking about Rodgers’ wife (also named Dorothy) “Her husband is the one who wrote ‘Some Enchanted Evening’.” Mrs Hammerstein interrupted to clarify: “My husband wrote ‘Some Enchanted Evening’. Mrs Rodgers’ husband wrote ‘Dum-dee dum-dee dum-dum’.”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @AceDeuce

    The lyrics for "Summertime" appear to be more by DuBose Heyward, who wrote the novel "Porgy," than by Ira Gershwin.

    Stephen Sondheim loves the first line "Summertime, and the living is easy"

    "That "and" is worth a great deal of attention. I would write "Summertime when" but that "and" sets up a tone, a whole poetic tone, not to mention a whole kind of diction that is going to be used in the play; an informal, uneducated diction and a stream of consciousness, as in many of the songs like "My Man's Gone Now". It's the exact right word, and that word is worth its weight in gold. "Summertime when the livin' is easy" is a boring line compared to "Summertime and". The choices of "ands" [and] "buts" become almost traumatic as you are writing a lyric – or should, anyway – because each one weighs so much."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @AceDeuce


    the supposedly true story of a big NYC party that had Rodgers and Hammerstein
     
    No, it was a true story, but with Mrs Hammerstein and another guest at a party. She mentioned Jerome Kern, and the woman said, "Oh, he wrote 'Old Man River'". She replied, "No, Jerry wrote "dum-dum-dum-dum'. My husband wrote 'Old Man River'".

    You got most of it, but were just ca. 30 years off.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @AceDeuce

    Okay, you were about 20 years off. Show Boat premiered in 1927, South Pacific in 1949.

    To get back to this season, South Pacific is based on stories by James Michener, who had served there in the late unpleasantness. The Navy had a program to ensure that all serving sailors could vote, and Michener was in charge of this on his particular island. He went full-bore on encouraging his mates to vote.

    Then a Navy bureaucrat visited, and was outraged. Michener had misunderstood. The Navy wanted everyone eligible to be able to vote. They sure as hell didn't want everybody, or even anybody, actually to vote. It was a CYA effort to prevent angry letters from servicemen's relatives asking, "Why couldn't my boy vote?" which they had received in the past.

    Michener was a Humphrey elector in his native Pennsylvania, and wrote a book about it, the source of the above story. He knew more about the subject than does Paul Craig Roberts, who seems to have made a huge blunder in a recent column:


    If enough confusion can be sown, an “investigation” can be demanded and/or Democrats can demand the outcome be put in the hands of the House of Representatives where the Democrats have a majority...

    https://www.unz.com/proberts/will-the-presidential-election-bring-chaos-and-an-irredeemably-torn-american-political-fabric/
     

    They do not have a majority. They have a majority of seats. But the contingency process prescribes a vote by delegation. The Republicans lead there, 26-22, with two split.

    For now. Any such vote will be in the new House.

    Replies: @Muggles

  27. @Reg Cæsar
    @D. K.

    I bought it in 1973. My favorite lyric line: "This will be our year; took a long time to come..."

    I saw them on their reunion tour years ago, and was annoyed when Colin Blunstone announced "'Summertime', by George Gershwin". It's George and Ira, dammit!

    The Zombies must have their star on the First Avenue wall for playing there, like everyone else. But this year's new, breakout pop star has his name affixed. I want to see the setlist!


    https://images.foxtv.com/static.fox9.com/www.fox9.com/content/uploads/2020/06/764/432/george-floyd-star-first-avenue.jpg?ve=1&tl=1

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FmuswTEGF-U

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @D. K.

    I first saw the (latter-day) Zombies “in the wee, small hours of the morning” of Wednesday, August 3, 2005:

    http://www.kvideodvd.com/index.php?dispatch=products.view&product_id=31731

    I had a ticket for the second show, on Tuesday night, but that show did not even get started until about 1 a.m. The Zombies had been stranded in Toronto, due to an airplane crash there, so David Letterman chartered a plane to fly them into Teterboro, New Jersey. The first show, which was supposed to start at 7:30 p.m., was delayed until the Zombies had arrived. I did not get back home to Staten Island, that Wednesday morning, until about 6 a.m. Early that Wednesday evening, I saw Ronnie Spector, singing in a park in Lower Manhattan. The next night, the fourth, I was at a free Coney Island concert:

    https://www.brooklynvegan.com/2005-seaside-su/

    I saw the Zombies, again, at another free Coney Island concert, in 2007:

    https://www.soundchronicle.com/concert-news/hippiefest-will-tour-us-in-july-and-august-2007

  28. Absent from that definition is action. Active bystanders see something bad happen and make discreet choices to respond to the concerning behavior, said Monica Reyna, a violence prevention educator at the Advocates, a nonprofit in rural Idaho. That can take many forms, such as recording suspected police brutality or challenging everyday microaggressions like dinner-table racism. It can be leaning into humor to unpack “compliments” — for example, your boss describes a Black colleague as “articulate,” the subtext being that this is somehow exceptional — or educating friends about the problematic origins of commonplace expressions. …

    It’s the 2020 version of works-righteousness for white sinners who are anxious about their places amongst the elect.

    The heretical/theological foundations of wokism are blatant.

    • Agree: ic1000
    • Replies: @Muggles
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    The heretical/theological foundations of wokism are blatant.
     
    Thanks. You are correct.

    But that should be "Wokeism" not wokism. Capital W like Christianity or Islam.

    But no worries. Soon it will be renamed something else, as the crazed progressive Left is wont to do. Every few years new names are given or old ones spelled differently.

    It makes heretic spotting easier.

    "Keep Up Or Go Down!"
  29. I was expecting to see them mention the Kitty Genovese incident (canonical version thereof), but they didn’t.

  30. @AceDeuce
    @Reg Cæsar

    ".....was annoyed when Colin Blunstone announced “‘Summertime’, by George Gershwin”. It’s George and Ira, dammit!"

    LOL-true. That reminds me of the supposedly true story of a big NYC party that had Rodgers and Hammerstein - and their wives- among the guests. Dorothy Hammerstein overheard another guest, talking about Rodgers' wife (also named Dorothy) "Her husband is the one who wrote 'Some Enchanted Evening'." Mrs Hammerstein interrupted to clarify: "My husband wrote 'Some Enchanted Evening'. Mrs Rodgers' husband wrote 'Dum-dee dum-dee dum-dum'."

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    The lyrics for “Summertime” appear to be more by DuBose Heyward, who wrote the novel “Porgy,” than by Ira Gershwin.

    Stephen Sondheim loves the first line “Summertime, and the living is easy”

    “That “and” is worth a great deal of attention. I would write “Summertime when” but that “and” sets up a tone, a whole poetic tone, not to mention a whole kind of diction that is going to be used in the play; an informal, uneducated diction and a stream of consciousness, as in many of the songs like “My Man’s Gone Now”. It’s the exact right word, and that word is worth its weight in gold. “Summertime when the livin’ is easy” is a boring line compared to “Summertime and”. The choices of “ands” [and] “buts” become almost traumatic as you are writing a lyric – or should, anyway – because each one weighs so much.”

    • Agree: Dissident
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer

    Sondheim kicks himself for the line in West Side Story "It's alarming how charming I feel". Looking back, he thought it all wrong for a Nuyorican girl. But I've known enough such proletarian types that an occasional foray into high-tone diction is just the right touch. Stephen should get out more.

    (If I'm wrong, Mark Steyn will correct me.)

    Another time Sondheim said that Frank Loesser deserved a medal for fitting the line "some irresponsible dress manufacturer" smoothly into a song.

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    , @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Steve Sailer

    That's very interesting and clever to have thought of--I hadn't ever. It does very much make a huge difference, and then commenters were responding to you and got to Showboat, Jerome Kern. I think it was Sondheim also talking about how Kern had also this uncanny ability in the first couple of lines of "All the Things You Are" to go to F instead of F# followed immediately with the tritone to B Natural with 'that makes the lonely winter seem long' (when sung in A Flat. That comes after "You are the promised gift of Springtime" if anyone doesn't know the song.) Exactly the same, except the music. Lots of times Sondheim gets things like that exactly right, but his music started getting a 'sick sound' to it that was weak.

  31. I was the only one to get the life preserver and drop it to her

    If iSteve’s Mom were Mrs. Emanuel, she would have had him build his resume from there, all the way to the top of his field, (emergency management?).
    https://www.upi.com/News_Photos/view/upi/c410246bd26f18450d8b10ab807a47bc/Emanuels-parents-watch-inauguration-Chicago/

  32. @Rob McX
    Of course, bystander intervention must not be universally applied. If you see a black acting suspiciously, you'd better be damn sure he's committing a criminal act before you report him to anyone. People like Kitty Genovese are expendable, after all.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Michael S

    What’s especially ironic here, and maybe this is what you were already hinting at, was that the Bystander Effect was literally conceived as a result of a pretty white girl’s victimization by a black man… and now this horrible hag is demanding that white women reference the same Bystander Effect to hector anyone brave or oblivious enough to point out black male violence.

    What’s the New York Times’s definition of chutzpah? I’m guessing it has something to do with being white.

  33. @Buffalo Joe
    Steve, no more tired or exhausted articles. I'm, hmmmm, fatigued.

    Replies: @dvorak

    Steve, no more tired or exhausted articles. I’m, hmmmm, fatigued.

    Put on a pot of coffee:
    “By Noor Fakih”
    “I’m tired.
    “And I’ve been tired for a long time.”
    https://www.stanforddaily.com/2020/10/27/abolish-stanford-greek-life-confessions-from-an-ex-sorority-president/

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @dvorak

    Lay down on your bed of nails and relax, here is Noor Fakih complaining about Western elite education while denying the Westerners a spot.

  34. @AceDeuce
    @Reg Cæsar

    ".....was annoyed when Colin Blunstone announced “‘Summertime’, by George Gershwin”. It’s George and Ira, dammit!"

    LOL-true. That reminds me of the supposedly true story of a big NYC party that had Rodgers and Hammerstein - and their wives- among the guests. Dorothy Hammerstein overheard another guest, talking about Rodgers' wife (also named Dorothy) "Her husband is the one who wrote 'Some Enchanted Evening'." Mrs Hammerstein interrupted to clarify: "My husband wrote 'Some Enchanted Evening'. Mrs Rodgers' husband wrote 'Dum-dee dum-dee dum-dum'."

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    the supposedly true story of a big NYC party that had Rodgers and Hammerstein

    No, it was a true story, but with Mrs Hammerstein and another guest at a party. She mentioned Jerome Kern, and the woman said, “Oh, he wrote ‘Old Man River’”. She replied, “No, Jerry wrote “dum-dum-dum-dum’. My husband wrote ‘Old Man River’”.

    You got most of it, but were just ca. 30 years off.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Reg Cæsar


    No, it was a true story, but with Mrs Hammerstein and another guest at a party. She mentioned Jerome Kern, and the woman said, “Oh, he wrote ‘Old Man River’”. She replied, “No, Jerry wrote “dum-dum-dum-dum’. My husband wrote ‘Old Man River’”.
     
    Doesn't matter.

    Show Boat is chock full of racist macroaggressions. It's over. Passes into history like America. No one is going to have to hear or see it again.

    ... Unless some Chinese decide to stage it.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  35. @Steve Sailer
    @AceDeuce

    The lyrics for "Summertime" appear to be more by DuBose Heyward, who wrote the novel "Porgy," than by Ira Gershwin.

    Stephen Sondheim loves the first line "Summertime, and the living is easy"

    "That "and" is worth a great deal of attention. I would write "Summertime when" but that "and" sets up a tone, a whole poetic tone, not to mention a whole kind of diction that is going to be used in the play; an informal, uneducated diction and a stream of consciousness, as in many of the songs like "My Man's Gone Now". It's the exact right word, and that word is worth its weight in gold. "Summertime when the livin' is easy" is a boring line compared to "Summertime and". The choices of "ands" [and] "buts" become almost traumatic as you are writing a lyric – or should, anyway – because each one weighs so much."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Sondheim kicks himself for the line in West Side Story “It’s alarming how charming I feel”. Looking back, he thought it all wrong for a Nuyorican girl. But I’ve known enough such proletarian types that an occasional foray into high-tone diction is just the right touch. Stephen should get out more.

    (If I’m wrong, Mark Steyn will correct me.)

    Another time Sondheim said that Frank Loesser deserved a medal for fitting the line “some irresponsible dress manufacturer” smoothly into a song.

    • Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Reg Cæsar

    Sondheim criticizes Lorenz Hart a good deal too. But did Sondheim every write anything as outrageous as "I've sinned a lot...I'm mean a lot...and suddenly I'm sweet seventeen a lot.." and "Men are not a new sensation...I've done pretty well I think"....from 'Bewitched, Bothered, and Bewildered'. I think his lyrics are much better than all that CORN Oscar Hammerstein wrote.

    Sondheim is universally, though, condemned for another line in West Side Story: "Today, the world was just and address...a place for me to live in...no better than all right.." Oh my god that's a howler.

    He was usually better as a lyricist though, especially Gypsy with the 3 strippers: "I'm electrifyin'...and I'm not even tryin'....I nevah have to sweat to get paid...."

    I don't really like his music except in Company (and you had to be here right in its milieu to really 'get it') and Follies. Everybody talks about Sweeney Todd, as if somebody selling human meat pies should inspire sympathy. He gets more and more pretentious beginning with A Little Night Music.

  36. leaning into humor to unpack “compliments”

    Yeah, everyone just loves that coworker who leans into humor to unpack compliments! How else would they know when something “bad” happens?

  37. @Reg Cæsar
    @AceDeuce


    the supposedly true story of a big NYC party that had Rodgers and Hammerstein
     
    No, it was a true story, but with Mrs Hammerstein and another guest at a party. She mentioned Jerome Kern, and the woman said, "Oh, he wrote 'Old Man River'". She replied, "No, Jerry wrote "dum-dum-dum-dum'. My husband wrote 'Old Man River'".

    You got most of it, but were just ca. 30 years off.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    No, it was a true story, but with Mrs Hammerstein and another guest at a party. She mentioned Jerome Kern, and the woman said, “Oh, he wrote ‘Old Man River’”. She replied, “No, Jerry wrote “dum-dum-dum-dum’. My husband wrote ‘Old Man River’”.

    Doesn’t matter.

    Show Boat is chock full of racist macroaggressions. It’s over. Passes into history like America. No one is going to have to hear or see it again.

    … Unless some Chinese decide to stage it.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @AnotherDad


    Show Boat is chock full of racist macroaggressions. It’s over. Passes into history like America. No one is going to have to hear or see it again.

    … Unless some Chinese decide to stage it.
     
    Ol' man liverrrrr. That ol' man liverrrr.......
  38. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer

    Sondheim kicks himself for the line in West Side Story "It's alarming how charming I feel". Looking back, he thought it all wrong for a Nuyorican girl. But I've known enough such proletarian types that an occasional foray into high-tone diction is just the right touch. Stephen should get out more.

    (If I'm wrong, Mark Steyn will correct me.)

    Another time Sondheim said that Frank Loesser deserved a medal for fitting the line "some irresponsible dress manufacturer" smoothly into a song.

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Sondheim criticizes Lorenz Hart a good deal too. But did Sondheim every write anything as outrageous as “I’ve sinned a lot…I’m mean a lot…and suddenly I’m sweet seventeen a lot..” and “Men are not a new sensation…I’ve done pretty well I think”….from ‘Bewitched, Bothered, and Bewildered’. I think his lyrics are much better than all that CORN Oscar Hammerstein wrote.

    Sondheim is universally, though, condemned for another line in West Side Story: “Today, the world was just and address…a place for me to live in…no better than all right..” Oh my god that’s a howler.

    He was usually better as a lyricist though, especially Gypsy with the 3 strippers: “I’m electrifyin’…and I’m not even tryin’….I nevah have to sweat to get paid….”

    I don’t really like his music except in Company (and you had to be here right in its milieu to really ‘get it’) and Follies. Everybody talks about Sweeney Todd, as if somebody selling human meat pies should inspire sympathy. He gets more and more pretentious beginning with A Little Night Music.

  39. @AceDeuce
    @Reg Cæsar

    ".....was annoyed when Colin Blunstone announced “‘Summertime’, by George Gershwin”. It’s George and Ira, dammit!"

    LOL-true. That reminds me of the supposedly true story of a big NYC party that had Rodgers and Hammerstein - and their wives- among the guests. Dorothy Hammerstein overheard another guest, talking about Rodgers' wife (also named Dorothy) "Her husband is the one who wrote 'Some Enchanted Evening'." Mrs Hammerstein interrupted to clarify: "My husband wrote 'Some Enchanted Evening'. Mrs Rodgers' husband wrote 'Dum-dee dum-dee dum-dum'."

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    Okay, you were about 20 years off. Show Boat premiered in 1927, South Pacific in 1949.

    To get back to this season, South Pacific is based on stories by James Michener, who had served there in the late unpleasantness. The Navy had a program to ensure that all serving sailors could vote, and Michener was in charge of this on his particular island. He went full-bore on encouraging his mates to vote.

    Then a Navy bureaucrat visited, and was outraged. Michener had misunderstood. The Navy wanted everyone eligible to be able to vote. They sure as hell didn’t want everybody, or even anybody, actually to vote. It was a CYA effort to prevent angry letters from servicemen’s relatives asking, “Why couldn’t my boy vote?” which they had received in the past.

    Michener was a Humphrey elector in his native Pennsylvania, and wrote a book about it, the source of the above story. He knew more about the subject than does Paul Craig Roberts, who seems to have made a huge blunder in a recent column:

    If enough confusion can be sown, an “investigation” can be demanded and/or Democrats can demand the outcome be put in the hands of the House of Representatives where the Democrats have a majority…

    https://www.unz.com/proberts/will-the-presidential-election-bring-chaos-and-an-irredeemably-torn-american-political-fabric/

    They do not have a majority. They have a majority of seats. But the contingency process prescribes a vote by delegation. The Republicans lead there, 26-22, with two split.

    For now. Any such vote will be in the new House.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Reg Cæsar


    They do not have a majority. They have a majority of seats. But the contingency process prescribes a vote by delegation. The Republicans lead there, 26-22, with two split.

    For now. Any such vote will be in the new House.
     

    I hate to contradict such an stalwart iSteve commentator like Reg Caesar here, but according to our new Deity Google:

    Pursuant to the 12th Amendment, the House of Representatives is required to go into session immediately after the counting of the electoral votes to vote for president if no candidate for the office receives a majority of the electoral votes.

    Since the Electoral College votes in December, it is the existing House delegations which will decide, not the ones elected next month and start serving in 2021. A number of Democrat "strategists" have noted that this process doesn't favor them in that situation. Poor babies.

  40. @Steve Sailer
    @AceDeuce

    The lyrics for "Summertime" appear to be more by DuBose Heyward, who wrote the novel "Porgy," than by Ira Gershwin.

    Stephen Sondheim loves the first line "Summertime, and the living is easy"

    "That "and" is worth a great deal of attention. I would write "Summertime when" but that "and" sets up a tone, a whole poetic tone, not to mention a whole kind of diction that is going to be used in the play; an informal, uneducated diction and a stream of consciousness, as in many of the songs like "My Man's Gone Now". It's the exact right word, and that word is worth its weight in gold. "Summertime when the livin' is easy" is a boring line compared to "Summertime and". The choices of "ands" [and] "buts" become almost traumatic as you are writing a lyric – or should, anyway – because each one weighs so much."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    That’s very interesting and clever to have thought of–I hadn’t ever. It does very much make a huge difference, and then commenters were responding to you and got to Showboat, Jerome Kern. I think it was Sondheim also talking about how Kern had also this uncanny ability in the first couple of lines of “All the Things You Are” to go to F instead of F# followed immediately with the tritone to B Natural with ‘that makes the lonely winter seem long’ (when sung in A Flat. That comes after “You are the promised gift of Springtime” if anyone doesn’t know the song.) Exactly the same, except the music. Lots of times Sondheim gets things like that exactly right, but his music started getting a ‘sick sound’ to it that was weak.

  41. Anon[380] • Disclaimer says:

    Let’s say that you were at a a “dinner party” (I think I’ve seen some old movies that had those; don’t they involve “hostesses”?) and someone mentions a new shooting that just popped up on his cell phone:

    You say: “I read an article about the bystander effect, and I just have to jump in here because nobody else is going to say it: Can you please put away the fucking phone? We all see you constantly checking it. That’s rude. There’s a side table over there. Turn off the phone and place it there.”

    Still you: “Oh, also, was the deceased black guy resisting arrest?”

    A bydiner: “That’s racist.”

    You: “Watch it … calling me racist is slander and defamation. Dr. Kendi’s theories have not yet worked their way into the common law.”

    Still you: “And the fact of whether he was resisting arrest is important to determine because there is zero disparity between police shootings by race when the victim is resisting arrest. Non-Hispanic whites are shot and killed at the same rate as blacks in such circumstances. Were you aware of that? Have you read Roland Fryer’s research?”

    Bydiner: “My best friend is black, and he had a store detective stop him and ask to touch his hair last week.”

    You: “This lack of disparity exists despite the fact that blacks are massively more violent than whites, committing half of solved murders despite only comprising an eighth or so of the population. And it’s 7 to 12 times more likely for a murderer to be black than white. Are you familiar with the Bureaus of Crime Statistics, the Uniform Crime Reporting System, and the National Incident-Based Reporting System? For that matter, are you familiar with the police shooting databases of the Washington Post and the Guardian?”

    Still you: “Why do blacks resist arrest and provoke cops to shoot them? Could it be that misreporting of the facts, such as the disproportionaliaty of resisting arrest and the consequences of resisting arrest and the unlikelihood of succeeding in avoiding arrest provokes blacks to behave in irrational ways that only increase the danger to themselves and to law enforcement and bystanders? If so, then the bystander effect dictates that we mention the role of resisting arrest every opportunity we get. It’s a moral imperitive.”

    • Thanks: Dissident
  42. @Reg Cæsar

    Micki McElya, a history professor at the University of Connecticut
     
    Micki McElya, I tell ya... Is she husky?

    Evidently not. She looks surprisingly good for an American female academic of 48 years, older than Biden's public service:


    https://history.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/36/2016/08/McElya-Micki-image-08222016-v1.jpg

    Still, she'd look more at home on the back cover of a 1960s' Manfred Mann or Zombies album.


    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/bd/2b/11/bd2b113e97ae198cd6f3b902c16668c7.jpg


    https://pisces.bbystatic.com/image2/BestBuy_US/images/products/3498/34989382_sa.jpg



    Micki McElya = Mimic lackey. "Me claim 'icky!' Mice may lick."

    Replies: @D. K., @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @duncsbaby

    She looks a bit more Husky in this pic:

    Somehow, I am reminded of this song when I see her pic.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @duncsbaby

    I saw Jonathan (not for the first time) at First Avenue in Minneapolis. I sure hope his star is painted on the exterior wall, because George Floyd's now is. How high did "I Can't Breathe" chart?


    https://images.foxtv.com/static.fox9.com/www.fox9.com/content/uploads/2020/06/764/432/george-floyd-star-first-avenue.jpg?ve=1&tl=1


    And now that CUP Foods' 38th and Cedar corner is the new CHAZ, what will happen to all those 78 rpms at Vintage Music?


    http://vintagemusiccompany.com/uploads/3/5/9/5/35957458/editor/sitepic_1.png?1497547020


    This was another gunfire death at that same corner, three weeks before Floyd's, which the MSM might not have brought to your attention:


    An Indigenous woman named Arionna Buckanaga was shot and killed in early May, just two months before her nineteenth birthday. She was the mother of a little boy and had been busy finishing up her last year of high school while planning a birthday party for her child.

    Buckanaga was driving in South Minneapolis when someone shot into her car, apparently aiming at her male companion. She was struck by a bullet, which caused her to veer off the road and hit a tree. Days later, her family had her removed from life support when it became clear she wasn’t going to recover.

    https://progressive.org/dispatches/fireworks-or-gunshots-lahm-200714/


    "Male companion"?

    https://static.fox9.com/www.fox9.com/content/uploads/2020/05/mpls-teen-shot-Arionna-Buckanaga.jpg


    Vigil held for woman shot in vehicle in south Minneapolis

    https://twitter.com/stribjany/status/1258415561811341312
     

  43. Even your physical presence can be enough to keep someone from being the target of racial violence, said LaVonne Pepe, a social worker and a senior trainer at Alteristic.

    God, I hope Trump wins, so that these people – these DIE parasites – can be driven into the wilderness.

    If the government stops doing the CRT BS, corporations might stop doing it too.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @Mr. Anon


    Even your physical presence can be enough to keep someone from being the target of racial violence
     
    Since most racial violence is committed by blacks against whites (about 9:1), what or whose "physical presence" deters blacks from committing violence against whites?

    Apparently LaVonne Pepe has a circumscribe definition of racial violence...
  44. @The Alarmist

    ... I was one of about 1000 pedestrians to see a woman jump off a bridge into the Chicago River at rush hour, but I was the only one to get the life preserver and drop it to her.
     
    As an HBD type, you should realise that that makes you a part of the problem: Suicide is an integral part of natural selection in the great puzzle of life.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Suicide is an integral part of natural selection in the great puzzle of life.

    Some people who commit suicide, shouldn’t. Their deaths are a loss to us.

  45. @AnotherDad
    @Reg Cæsar


    No, it was a true story, but with Mrs Hammerstein and another guest at a party. She mentioned Jerome Kern, and the woman said, “Oh, he wrote ‘Old Man River’”. She replied, “No, Jerry wrote “dum-dum-dum-dum’. My husband wrote ‘Old Man River’”.
     
    Doesn't matter.

    Show Boat is chock full of racist macroaggressions. It's over. Passes into history like America. No one is going to have to hear or see it again.

    ... Unless some Chinese decide to stage it.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Show Boat is chock full of racist macroaggressions. It’s over. Passes into history like America. No one is going to have to hear or see it again.

    … Unless some Chinese decide to stage it.

    Ol’ man liverrrrr. That ol’ man liverrrr…….

    • LOL: Rob McX
  46. “Did he resist arrest?”

    Right on time for Halloween:

    https://twitter.com/stone_toss/status/1321814043800276992?s=20

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Thomas

    Shouldn't that cartoon caption read: "Why were you resisting?"

  47. @dvorak
    @Buffalo Joe


    Steve, no more tired or exhausted articles. I’m, hmmmm, fatigued.
     
    Put on a pot of coffee:
    "By Noor Fakih"
    "I’m tired.
    "And I’ve been tired for a long time."
    https://www.stanforddaily.com/2020/10/27/abolish-stanford-greek-life-confessions-from-an-ex-sorority-president/

    Replies: @Pericles

    Lay down on your bed of nails and relax, here is Noor Fakih complaining about Western elite education while denying the Westerners a spot.

  48. @Mr. Anon

    Even your physical presence can be enough to keep someone from being the target of racial violence, said LaVonne Pepe, a social worker and a senior trainer at Alteristic.
     
    God, I hope Trump wins, so that these people - these DIE parasites - can be driven into the wilderness.

    If the government stops doing the CRT BS, corporations might stop doing it too.

    Replies: @Forbes

    Even your physical presence can be enough to keep someone from being the target of racial violence

    Since most racial violence is committed by blacks against whites (about 9:1), what or whose “physical presence” deters blacks from committing violence against whites?

    Apparently LaVonne Pepe has a circumscribe definition of racial violence…

  49. Anyone considering asking this woman to dinner is surely having second thoughts.

  50. @duncsbaby
    @Reg Cæsar

    She looks a bit more Husky in this pic:

    https://d279m997dpfwgl.cloudfront.net/wp/2018/10/2I0A1997-2.jpg

    Somehow, I am reminded of this song when I see her pic.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63stLm1Rw_U

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I saw Jonathan (not for the first time) at First Avenue in Minneapolis. I sure hope his star is painted on the exterior wall, because George Floyd’s now is. How high did “I Can’t Breathe” chart?

    And now that CUP Foods’ 38th and Cedar corner is the new CHAZ, what will happen to all those 78 rpms at Vintage Music?

    This was another gunfire death at that same corner, three weeks before Floyd’s, which the MSM might not have brought to your attention:

    An Indigenous woman named Arionna Buckanaga was shot and killed in early May, just two months before her nineteenth birthday. She was the mother of a little boy and had been busy finishing up her last year of high school while planning a birthday party for her child.

    Buckanaga was driving in South Minneapolis when someone shot into her car, apparently aiming at her male companion. She was struck by a bullet, which caused her to veer off the road and hit a tree. Days later, her family had her removed from life support when it became clear she wasn’t going to recover.

    https://progressive.org/dispatches/fireworks-or-gunshots-lahm-200714/

    “Male companion”?

    Vigil held for woman shot in vehicle in south Minneapolis

    https://twitter.com/stribjany/status/1258415561811341312

  51. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Absent from that definition is action. Active bystanders see something bad happen and make discreet choices to respond to the concerning behavior, said Monica Reyna, a violence prevention educator at the Advocates, a nonprofit in rural Idaho. That can take many forms, such as recording suspected police brutality or challenging everyday microaggressions like dinner-table racism. It can be leaning into humor to unpack “compliments” — for example, your boss describes a Black colleague as “articulate,” the subtext being that this is somehow exceptional — or educating friends about the problematic origins of commonplace expressions. …

     

    It's the 2020 version of works-righteousness for white sinners who are anxious about their places amongst the elect.

    The heretical/theological foundations of wokism are blatant.

    Replies: @Muggles

    The heretical/theological foundations of wokism are blatant.

    Thanks. You are correct.

    But that should be “Wokeism” not wokism. Capital W like Christianity or Islam.

    But no worries. Soon it will be renamed something else, as the crazed progressive Left is wont to do. Every few years new names are given or old ones spelled differently.

    It makes heretic spotting easier.

    “Keep Up Or Go Down!”

  52. @Reg Cæsar
    @AceDeuce

    Okay, you were about 20 years off. Show Boat premiered in 1927, South Pacific in 1949.

    To get back to this season, South Pacific is based on stories by James Michener, who had served there in the late unpleasantness. The Navy had a program to ensure that all serving sailors could vote, and Michener was in charge of this on his particular island. He went full-bore on encouraging his mates to vote.

    Then a Navy bureaucrat visited, and was outraged. Michener had misunderstood. The Navy wanted everyone eligible to be able to vote. They sure as hell didn't want everybody, or even anybody, actually to vote. It was a CYA effort to prevent angry letters from servicemen's relatives asking, "Why couldn't my boy vote?" which they had received in the past.

    Michener was a Humphrey elector in his native Pennsylvania, and wrote a book about it, the source of the above story. He knew more about the subject than does Paul Craig Roberts, who seems to have made a huge blunder in a recent column:


    If enough confusion can be sown, an “investigation” can be demanded and/or Democrats can demand the outcome be put in the hands of the House of Representatives where the Democrats have a majority...

    https://www.unz.com/proberts/will-the-presidential-election-bring-chaos-and-an-irredeemably-torn-american-political-fabric/
     

    They do not have a majority. They have a majority of seats. But the contingency process prescribes a vote by delegation. The Republicans lead there, 26-22, with two split.

    For now. Any such vote will be in the new House.

    Replies: @Muggles

    They do not have a majority. They have a majority of seats. But the contingency process prescribes a vote by delegation. The Republicans lead there, 26-22, with two split.

    For now. Any such vote will be in the new House.

    I hate to contradict such an stalwart iSteve commentator like Reg Caesar here, but according to our new Deity Google:

    Pursuant to the 12th Amendment, the House of Representatives is required to go into session immediately after the counting of the electoral votes to vote for president if no candidate for the office receives a majority of the electoral votes.

    Since the Electoral College votes in December, it is the existing House delegations which will decide, not the ones elected next month and start serving in 2021. A number of Democrat “strategists” have noted that this process doesn’t favor them in that situation. Poor babies.

  53. @Thomas
    "Did he resist arrest?"

    Right on time for Halloween:

    https://twitter.com/stone_toss/status/1321814043800276992?s=20

    Replies: @Muggles

    Shouldn’t that cartoon caption read: “Why were you resisting?”

  54. “This happens because being part of a large crowd makes it so no single person has to take responsibility for an action,” he added.

    Is that like when antifa tries to burn a police station down with occupants inside it?

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