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NYT: "Parasite" Won But Asian-Americans Are Still Oppressed by Not Being in Movies
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From the New York Times opinion page:

‘Parasite’ Won, but Asian-Americans Are Still Losing
The victory for Bong Joon Ho’s film at the Oscars has nothing to do with representation of people like me.

By Walter Chaw
Mr. Chaw is a film critic.

Feb. 10, 2020, 7:43 p.m. ET

… As a child, I was frequently asked if I knew Bruce Lee. For my classmates, there were two Asian people: me and Bruce Lee.

Could be worse than Bruce Lee …

I bet Mr. Chaw has a few unproduced autobiographical screenplays in his desk drawer about growing up Asian-American while not being Bruce Lee, and his unhappiness could be relieved if they were optioned.

 
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  1. Those last observations sound so hurtful to the younger snowflake generation. A bit surprised that Mr. Chaw didn’t take the time to discuss his hair in the article. After all, growing up Asian wouldn’t he have a hair story somewhere? Or perhaps not. Hair discussions does seem relevant to peoples of color these days.

    • Replies: @Pericles
  2. I still can’t believe that Joker lost out to Parasite. Any chance the voting was done in by Russian hackers?

    • LOL: jim jones
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Jim Don Bob
  3. Didn’t watch, don’t care, let’s talk about gold course architecture …

    I will take your movie recommendations into account, Steve.

  4. newrouter says:

    > Walter Chaw<

    Isn't cultural appropriation suppose to be "bad"?

  5. …has nothing to do with representation of people like me.

    Am I wrong to sense a forthcoming legal action here?

    Walter Chaw = Law watcher.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  6. Lot says:

    I think he’s lying about the Bruce Lee thing. Especially his claim he was “frequently” asked if he knew him.

    First, even small children aren’t stupid enough to think their classmates automatically know celebrities of the same race.

    Second, Chaw looks to be about 45. Was Bruce Lee well known among young children in the early to mid 1980s? I doubt it.

    I am not his exact cohort, but within a decade.

    And I don’t think I have

    1. Ever seen a Bruce Lee movie
    2. Ever seen part of one aside from a 15 second clip
    3. Ever met someone who was a fan who recommended his movies

    Third, Chaw writes in another article:

    “ Lee is my hero and has been since I first saw him, more than three decades ago, on a bootleg VHS my family borrowed from a local Asian grocer.”

    So basically confirms that Lee wasn’t some big name during his childhood, but rather a cult B-movie figure.

    Anti-white racist anecdotes are never treated with open skepticism, so they just get less and less plausible.

  7. songbird says:

    I really think this is the most horrendously stupid gibs argument of them all.

    The Chinese domestic film market is probably bigger than America’s market by now. It is close to 100% Han, and it doesn’t virtue signal against Chinese people.

    But heaven forbid that Mr. Chaw should have to watch a dubbed film, or, worse yet, read subtitles. Far better, to play the victim, and agitate against whitey.

  8. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Walter Chaw has a white wife. That sort of answers it. Asians would rather be with and see whites(or blacks) than their own kind. Japan even created a whole anime genre to pretend that they’re white-animated people.

    • Agree: PaceLaw
    • Replies: @I, Libertine
  9. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    He’s a film critic. He should be focused on quality, not identity.

    Also, in this day of easy access to world cinema from all over, Asians anywhere can see Asian movies from China, India, Philippines, Japan, Korea, Vietnam.

    Also, if Chaw wants to see more Asians.. how about STAYING IN ASIA? He’d see Asians on streets and TV all day long.

    Also, if Asians have intrinsic worth, why this need to feel validated by Hollywood? Are a people less worthy if they’re not featured in Hollywood movies that are mostly brainless and dumb?

    This is the worst thing about PARASITE winning. Bong might go from national artist to global panderer(as with SNOW movie). Hollywood validation is a kiss of death. Lina Wertmuller became a sensation with SEVEN BEAUTIES and made a Hollywood movie with Candace Bergen from which she never recovered. Andrei Tarkovsky,the master of SIBERIADE, ended up making some silly movies in Hollywood.

  10. Chaw was an interesting critic (and a lot more critical of left-wing smarm) until about 10 years ago. Not sure what changed for him.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @danand
  11. I guess it’s been an uphill battle from: Charlie Chan seriels, Bitter Tea of General Yen and The Good Earth.

    Even when portrayed as “bad guys and gals” there were still presented as intelligent beings, even asian house servants provided wise and kindly advice. But most importantly, an Asian could go to the cinema and see asians solving crimes, creating a future, family . . . national leaders, etc. The Japanese really did bomb Pearl Harbor, Chinese Communists really did want to bury the US.

    Since the arrival of Bruce Lee, and even before . . . asians fairly positive.

  12. Anon7 says:

    “For my classmates, there were two Asian people: me and Bruce Lee.”

    In the name of God Almighty, I beseech parents around the world to save their children the emotional scars of being the only one of their ethnicity or nationality in a classroom. Parents of color, parents not Christian, stay out of the United States. In God’s name, please. Save the children. I can’t bear the thought of reading yet another story of some poor child forced to be the odd one out in a foreign land.

    • Agree: Dtbb
    • Replies: @Tiny Duck
  13. BenKenobi says:

    I assume Mr. Chaw’s twitter feed was instantly spammed with BradPittThrowsBruceLeeIntoCar.gif?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  14. PaceLaw says:
    @Lot

    Yeah, it does appear that Chaw is trying to be the Asian Jussie Smollett, someone who thinks that being a victim is the highest honor of all.

    • Replies: @TheMediumIsTheMassage
  15. black sea says:

    If it’s any comfort to Mr. Chaw, I also often feel that popular culture “has nothing to do with representation of people like me.” I’ve learned to accept this and don’t expect it to change.

    • Agree: Dissident
  16. PaceLaw says:

    It is frankly bizarre that an Asian, foreign language movie could be well received in the Western world and win a bunch of awards at the Oscars, but an Asian American would still not be satisfied and wants some form of reparations for past (alleged) harms, such as not actually being related to Bruce Lee. Whatevs.

  17. Anonymous[211] • Disclaimer says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Bummer for me too. I was giving ONCE UPON A TIME… IN HOLLYWOOD some thought as I expected it to win. It didn’t and took the air out of the tire. And I don’t even have a ‘hippy’ to punch to relieve stress.

  18. I can find Koreans that speak great English in less than 5 minutes on YouTube:

  19. Ellper says:

    Of equal note is the winner for best animated short:

    Hair Love tells the story of an African American father attempting to do his daughter’s hair for the first time. Cherry said he hoped his award would usher in “more representation in animation” and “normalise black hair”

    https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2020/feb/10/matthew-a-cherry-oscar-animated-short-nfl

    • Replies: @Rob
  20. Anonymous[224] • Disclaimer says:

    Well this blog entry is more proof that multiracial societies positively SEETHE with racial resentment. Not even the doctrine of Jesus of Nazareth can stop the jealousies, insecurities, hatreds, from building up like dry tinder in the forest.

    There are far too many cynical opportunistic a-holes in any human population for a multiracial society to work. The a-holes divide & conquer the masses to INFINITY and the result is you get twisted permanently butthurt victimologists like this guy Chaw.

    Once upon a time Chaw could think straight but the victimology machinery ate his brain like the brain-eating bacteria eats brains.

  21. Wilkey says:

    The cool thing about the increasing politicization of all these awards shows is that it gives us an idea of just what assholes some of the people in Hollywood are. Taika Waititi, who gave the Oscar’s first “land acknowledgement,” unloaded with a slew of other comments at the Oscars and in various other forums that made certain I will never accidentally wander into one of his movies again. Oh, and I eagerly await a “land acknowledgement” at the next BAFTAs.

  22. There’s a Manhattan-based investigative journalist named “Kirby Sommers.” She has done a lot of research into the Jeffrey Epstein case. Recently, she revealed an interesting claim on Twitter.

    The photo below is taken from Leslie Wexner’s (owner of Victoria’s Secret) compound.

    Leslie Wexner gave Jeffrey Epstein around $1 billion and a free mansion in NYC. Apparently, Wexner was helping Epstein and Maxwell run their infamous prostitution ring.

    All these individuals seem to have been linked together in this Israeli Mossad blackmail operation.

    “Kirby Sommers” has a source who claims that there is a “sacrifice pit” on Wexner’s property. The young female prostitutes may have been “sacrificed” there in some type of Occult ritual that’s designed to bring prosperity in the coming year.

    Another photo (below) is taken from Epstein’s ranch in New Mexico, which may have also had a “sacrifice pit.”

    This may explain why the Wexner/Epstein/Maxwell prostitution ring had hundreds of victims, but only a small number have come forward.

    While this may sound strange, keep in mind that human sacrifices (especially of young girls and small children) were common in ancient civilizations. For example, the historians of the Roman Empire have written extensively about the extensive child sacrifices that were performed by their rivals, the Carthaginians.

    Given that Epstein built this strange temple on his island (surrounded by Owls and gremlins), he obviously had some type of lurid interest in the Occult structures and rites of ancient civilizations. So it’s not that far fetched that Epstein, Wexner, and their fellow conspirators may have performed human sacrifices.

  23. Anonymous[211] • Disclaimer says:
    @thinklikea1l

    Not sure what changed for him.

    Yellows follow, they don’t lead.

    The Power sets the template, and Asians just toady along. The current template is Oscarsowhite or some shit, and so, yellows parrot the party line.

    And NYT brings out these dogs once in a while to bark at Whitey as diversion because, after all, who really controls Hollywood?

  24. Anonymous[381] • Disclaimer says:

    As a child, I was frequently asked if I knew Bruce Lee. For my classmates, there were two Asian people: me and Bruce Lee.

    Okay, that means too many Americans only know pop culture. Pop culture is fantasy and full of stereotypes. People should know MORE than pop culture. Pop culture is cartoonish.

    That being the case, why seek validation through pop culture?

    Why not argue for an understanding beyond pop culture? Pop culture is inherently ‘unfair’ because it has little to do with reality. Seeking validation through it is dumb. Who watches Mexican soap operas to learn anything real about Mexico?

  25. Anonymous[381] • Disclaimer says:

    I bet Mr. Chaw has a few unproduced autobiographical screenplays in his desk drawer about growing up Asian-American while not being Bruce Lee, and his unhappiness could be relieved if they were optioned.

    Johnnie Eun done it already.

  26. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Lot

    He could have been asked mockingly if he knew Bruce Lee, but in response to your question if kids in the ’80s knew who Bruce Lee was: absolutely. Despite dying in the early ’70s, Bruce Lee has been on magazine covers every year since. Here’s an example from 2015:

    Here’s one from 2019:

    Und so weiter.

    And kids in the early ’80s saw plenty of martial arts movies from the ’70s on TV, including Bruce Lee’s movies.

    • Agree: Yngvar
    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  27. Tiny Duck says:
    @Anon7

    Or we could let in more immigrants so People of Color are not terrorized

    I wish you conservatives were not so hate filled

    Why are you this way?

    Why do you hate women and People of Color and gays?

    Is it. Ecsuse yiu have small genitals?

  28. Deadite says:

    With the corona virus there will be a lot of very suspenseful drama movies very soon, I suspect.

    It’s horrible.

  29. Lagertha says:

    winning at so-called art…is a fool’s game. Art is always, and will be now, for sure, subjective. Van Gogh was so frustrated at his bad luck, and frustrated over his contemporaries’ fortune.

    I have often thought that Vincent had The Most Amazing Brother. He was too messed up to realize he had his brother, and people who cared about him. My next dog will be named Theo.

  30. I grew up in northern Maine in the 70’s, and we all knew who Bruce Lee was. My parents refused to have a TV, so I never saw one of his movies, but I knew he was super cool. Other kids had seen them. We used to do kung fu on the playground, slapped one another gloriously silly, and it was all thanks to Lee.

    In 2nd and 3rd grade (1978-80) I had a baby sitter, and immediately after school one of the Bangor stations showed Star Blazers (Space Battleship Yamoto), which had to be one of the earliest anime cartoons ever to hit the States (I know nothing about anime beyond this series, so I could be wrong about this) in which aliens from the planet Gamelon attack Earth with radioactive asteroids destroying all life on the surface, forcing people underground. The oceans evaporated, revealing the wreck of the great Japanese battleship Yamoto, which friendly aliens teach us how to refurbish with a warp drive to take the fight to the Gamelons, cruising through the solar system and galaxy, eventually conquering Planet Gamelon. It was epic, must see television for us back then. We ATE it up. I remember being on the icy playground with all the boys ganging up and sliding into and knocking down the girls – we were the Star Blazers, they (unwittingly) were the Gamelons. They never knew what hit them. In life, like cartoons, the Earthlings always win.

    Then, there were the re-runs of Kung Fu, that classic Western with David Carradine as a Shinto Buddhist (I think?) monk, wandering the Old West. I only got to see that show at my Grammy and Gramp’s place during our summers there, where my parents let us binge TV. Carradine wasn’t ethnically Asian (I can’t remember if his character was supposed to be) but he was spiritually Asian for sure, and he rocked. I loved that show.

    All of which is merely to say that Walter’s (Walter’s!) adult inferiority complex is complete bullshit. Asians were definitely cool back in the 70’s. Legends of Kung Fu and Kamikazes, early anime. What’s not to dig?

    It gets so tiresome when people who have every reason to have pride and swagger just moan and bitch and pull the victim card. I know it sucks sometimes to be “different” (do I ever) but it also gives me pride that I’m not just like all those other schmucks. I may not be Asian, but I know what it means to be a cut above, set apart. They may hate you for it, but they’ll envy you too.

    Enjoy it, Walter. Have some self respect and pride. No monk or samurai ever simpered like this. Grow up. Stop being such a .. pussy. Snap out of it man. Get yourself some yellow pride.

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
  31. @BenKenobi

    Brad Pitt throwing Bruce Lee into the side of a car, leaving an enormous dent, was unrealistic. In the 1960s cars didn’t dent as easily as they do today.

    • LOL: Mr McKenna
    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  32. “Parasite”

    Literal unironic Communist propaganda.

  33. @JohnnyWalker123

    Epstein’s island was full of “devilish idols” and “gargoyles.” See below.

    Epstein’s model jet had his initials on it. The initials were positioned together to create the image of a pitchfork. A red pitchfork. Hmmm….. Who carries a red pitchfork? Who?

    Demonic red hallway. What the heck?

    Horned mask. This is normal.

    Epstein kept a giant Crucifix chained to the wall of his New Mexico mansion. The Crucifix was positioned next to a shower that was large enough to hold several people. Why would Epstein keep a Crucifix on his property? Was he trying to defile Christianity?

    Epstein had a “human chessboard” of his staff members. Also, see kept this interesting picture of a Demonic woman on the wall.

    According to Ron Unz, some religious Jews “pray to Satan.”

    Furthermore, religious Jews apparently pray to Satan almost as readily as they pray to God, and depending upon the various rabbinical schools, the particular rituals and sacrifices they practice may be aimed at enlisting the support of the one or the other.

    According to Ron Unz’s research, Jews used to consider Christian blood to have “magical properties.”

    It appears that a considerable number of Ashkenazi Jews traditionally regarded Christian blood as having powerful magical properties and considered it a very valuable component of certain important ritual observances at particular religious holidays.

    “ritualistic murder and human sacrifice”

    Judaism did involve a very widespread emphasis on magical rituals, spells, charms, and similar things, providing a context in which ritualistic murder and human sacrifice would hardly be totally unexpected.

    Obviously, the ritual murder of Christian children for their blood was viewed with enormous disfavor by the local Gentile population, and the widespread belief in its existence remained a source of bitter tension between the two communities

    So is it really that hard to believe that Epstein was conducting human sacrifices on various properties?

    When you examine all the Occult symbols on Epstein’s properties and the specific religious traditions of certain Jews, it’s plausible that Epstein was conducting human sacrifices. There needs to be more proof before we come to a definite conclusion, but at least it sounds plausible.

    • Agree: Hippopotamusdrome
    • LOL: IHTG
    • Replies: @moshe
    , @Nicholas Stix
  34. danand says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Mr. Walker, now that candy man Epstein is gone, maybe Leslie’s come to the conclusion that it’s time for other sacrifices?

    “Parent company of Victoria’s Secret, L Brands, is likely to be sold in a few days to private-equity investor, Sycamore Partners.”

    https://yen.com.gh/146815-victorias-secret-attracts-attention-private-equity-investor-sold.html

  35. Anonymous[305] • Disclaimer says:

    Of course, PARASITE is not a good argument as to why people would want to see more Asians.

    It is an unpleasant film(with some repellent characters) because it is art cinema in seek of truth than fantasy. Bong obviously drew a lot from Shohei Imamura, one of the all-time greats, some of whose films aren’t exactly pleasant, to say the least. Truth means digging for discomfiting facets of life. VENGEANCE IS MINE and BALLAD OF NARAYAMA are great films but not for those with weak stomachs.
    PARASITE is exactly the sort of movie that will put off most people to Asian cinema… just like something like AMOUR(by Haneke), as stark European art cinema, isn’t going to win popularity contests with the public. There may be just enough suspense and thrills in PARASITE to engage a somewhat larger audience than most art films, but it’s not for most people.

    Indeed, its win is surely the biggest outlier in Oscar history.

    The first big outlier was maybe MIDNIGHT COWBOY, then rated X. But still, it was an English-language movie and very much part of the Zeitgeist, so it wasn’t totally surprising.
    And then, maybe the next sort-of outliers were SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE and THE ARTIST.
    SLUM was in foreign language and set in India. Still, it was directed by an Englishman, and one could how the uplifting message could appeal to Hollywood. THE ARTIST was also a foreign film, but as a silent movie, it had ‘universal’ charm, the lost innocence of the silents when the coming of talkies Babel-ized world cinema. Other outliers might be 12 YRS A SLAVE, a grim art film than something more formulaic like MISSISSIPPI BURNING, and MOONLIGHT. But given the pressure on Academy to be more sensitive to blacks, their wins made sense. Blacks are sacred objects after all. Also, MOONLIGHT killed two birds with one stone. It was black but also homo.

    But just how did PARASITE win? It’s not uplifting. It doesn’t feature a sacred group. Many viewers remain perplexed about it still. There have been so many great foreign films over the years, so why didn’t any of them win(or was even nominated) while PARASITE get red carpet treatment? It is a puzzle. Some might argue it’s a terrific or even great work, but since when did the Oscars care about quality? Its long list of Best Pic winners were anything but. So, what happened here?

    Did the buzz carry over from the Cannes win? But Cannes winners usually don’t become Oscar winners(or vice versa). With the passing of old guard, are younger voters more hip to foreign cinema? Did South Korea, upon being surprised by the win at Cannes, put forth a major campaign to create a buzz about PARASITE in Hollywood? Was there pressure by the Deep State to toss a bone at South Korea to keep it happy as part of empire?

    It had to have been the buzz about the movie. Minus the buzz, I can’t imagine most academy voters watching PARASITE(or any foreign art film) and thinking, “Oh yeah, that must win Best Director and Best Picture”). Rather, there must have been growing buzz among voters that it might be ‘cool’ for something totally out of the left field to win.

    The other reasons may have been the problems with other movies. IRISHMAN is Netflix, and Hollywood isn’t happy with rise of streaming. JOKER is too blockbusterish. The Academy wants to be more respectable than award a big hit with the fanboys. Also, it seems to have angered many progs. 1917 was in the running, but serious war movies are now old hat. If SAVING PRIVATE RYAN, THIN RED LINE, DUNKIRK, FLAGS OF FATHERS/LETTERS IWO JIMA, and AMERICAN SNIPER didn’t win, what chance for 1917, esp as its premise was a technical gimmick? A win for ONCE UPON A HOLLYWOOD might have seemed too narcissistic, Hollywood awarding a tribute to itself. Or maybe many in Hollywood were a bit turned off by the movie for stirring up bad memories of Polanski(who ended up in exile), Sharon Tate, and the Mansons. It’s nostalgic but also irreverent. And MARRIAGE STORY and LITTLE WOMEN were too ‘small’. And that may have given PARASITE an opening.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  36. @Tiny Duck

    That’s pure Titania McGrath in the last line. Fabulous.

  37. Anon[102] • Disclaimer says:

    I didn’t think “Parasite” was that great, although I thought it was better than the other nominees. I was hoping “1917” would be good but besides the cinematography it was disappointing.

    I didn’t get the appeal of “Once Upon…” at all. I’m guessing a lot of it is a boomer nostalgia thing? It had a retarded climax/ending, which “Parasite” had also.

    I was surprised “Parasite” got nominated in the first place, as I thought the main Best Film category was reserved for domestically produced English language movies. Especially since it was also nominated and won in the Foreign Film category.

    I think this is more of an award for Bong’s ouevre, particularly his older movies “Memories of Murder” and “Mother” than “Parasite” specifically. Lots of Academy member types are into Korean movies and foreign movies in general, which is partly why “Parasite” was so hyped in the first place. They basically wanted to award Bong’s older movies, and the other nominees were relatively weak enough that they could have an excuse to give it to “Parasite”.

    • Replies: @Simon
  38. black sea says:
    @Tiny Duck

    Ecsuse yiu

    Is this supposed to be an Asian actor?

  39. @JohnnyWalker123

    Back several years ago, Rachel Chandler (who trafficked girls to Epstein) posted this on her Instagram account.

    There are various images from different rooms, which all appear to be monitored by a security camera system. Oddly enough, there are security cameras installed in various bedrooms. Why would there be security cameras in bedrooms?

    In one of the images, you see various adolescents.

    Some people believe that these are video surveillance images from the underground of Epstein’s Occult temple.

    Remember that Epstein used to place hidden cameras in the bedrooms of his various facilities, so he could obtain video blackmail on his various powerful friends.

  40. Anonymous[362] • Disclaimer says:

    Speaking of oppression, Chaw should write in New York Times about how Hollywood hasn’t made a single movie about Nakba or Intifadah or about the current apartheid in W. Bank. Or he could bitch about how Hollywood hasn’t made a movie what a mess Obama and Hillary made of Libya and Syria to appease the Tribe. And since the 80s, few people have been as vilified by Hollywood as the ‘muzzies’, mostly depicted as terrorists.

    But the silly twerp wanna whine about ‘me and bruce lee’.

  41. Anonymous[362] • Disclaimer says:

    Something has to be done about the White Addiction or White Fix.

    Non-whites are addicted to whites as the fix to their problems. So, whites don’t exist in their own right but to right the problems of non-whites who can barely stand their own kind and wanna move to white nations for the White Fix. This addiction to whites is almost like addiction to a drug.

    If you take away heroin from a junkie, he goes nuts.
    Likewise, if you take away the white fix from non-whites, they go nuts. It’s like they can’t fix their own problems in their own nations among their own kind. They must run from their own kind and look to White Fix as the savior, the high, the solution.

    Instead of being autonomous organisms, non-whites now feel parasitic. They feel as leeches than as fishes. They must attach themselves to the white fish for dear life. This mindset will destroy both whites and non-whites. And what began this was allowing non-whites to move to the West.

  42. Simon says:
    @Anon

    I’ve seen four of his films (Parasite included), and the only one I liked was the giant-monster movie The Host. It’s quite unusual, and a lot of fun.

    • Replies: @Stebbing Heuer
  43. Cato says:

    I watched the first half (had work the next day, went to bed). The most surprising thing to me was the number of blacks — greeters on the red carpet, sprinkled in the audience, performing the musical numbers, announcing the awards, and — most surprising of all — in the commercials! Every commercial seemed to have blacks, and almost always they were in the center as the most cool and aware people. A foreigner watching this would think that America is more than half black, and that blacks are the best people in it.

    • Agree: Clyde
    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    , @Muggles
  44. @PaceLaw

    Asian Americans in the media have been trying to play the victim and align themselves with “oppressed minorities” for at least half a decade now. Of course their claim to victimhood is a bit more tenouous….no lynchings or immigrant cages they can show off. They really try hard with the Japanese internment camps.

  45. Lagertha says:

    Asians, in my opinion, have never liked commenting about Western Movies , even if they are about Eastern vibe ( Crouching Tiger….) because it always makes them feel that they have something to lose, or something that would make them feel ridiculous..

  46. anon[853] • Disclaimer says:

    As a child, I was frequently asked if I knew Bruce Lee

    Be cooler if he was asked if he knew Kwai Chang Caine, the whitest Kung Fu ching chong in TV history.

  47. Lagertha says:

    Asians, in my opinion, have never liked commenting about Western Movies , even if they care about Eastern vibe about Western movies ( Crouching Tiger….) because it always makes them feel that they have something to lose. East Asians are insecure and dangerously resentful.

  48. @Lot

    Anti-white racist anecdotes are never treated with open skepticism, so they just get less and less plausible.

    I consider this to be their one saving grace.

  49. By the way, how is the architecture in Parasite?

    • LOL: Paleo Liberal
  50. What’s the problem? Aren’t Korean-Koreans just another variety of pre-Americans and therefore just as American as the all the Korean-Americans who have never won an Oscar? Mr. Chaw comes off as a bit xenophobic and unwoke, and is a prime candidate for cultural sensitivity training.

  51. syonredux says:
    @Anonymous

    but since when did the Oscars care about quality?

    As I always like to point out, Gordon Willis wasn’t even nominated for his brilliant cinematography in The Godfather and The Godfather Part II……

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  52. Twinkie says:
    @Anonymous

    This.

    Add Wolfgang Petersen to the list of directors that Hollywood made mediocre.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  53. only 23 million viewers, the lowest rating since they’ve been measuring. still higher than anything other than NFL or MLB (maybe), but on it’s way down, and on the verge of no longer being a thing. the time of movie stars has probably passed, at least the peak of movie star prestige and glamour certainly has passed. youtubers get more views.

  54. Twinkie says:

    Here is my concise reaction: This kind of whining is grating and doubly so coming from those who have done so well in this country.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Aldon
  55. syonredux says:
    @Anonymous

    He’s a film critic. He should be focused on quality, not identity.

    That’s un-WOKE. Contemporary film criticism is all about how films are supposed to make POC / LGBTQs happy about being POC /LGBTQ.

    So, in Mr Chaw’s ideal world, Occidental schlock would be replaced with East Asian Schlock:

  56. moshe says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    You are absolutely insane.

    I mean there is literally something wrong with your head and its ability to make sense of the world.

    —-

    Question: What the hell is wrong with )))you people((( ?

    • Disagree: Peterike
  57. I’m confused as to how Parasite won Best Film and Best Foreign Film (sorry, International Feature) – I thought the latter category was restricted to films not commercially released in the US.

    Sam Mendes ought to consider a sequel called 1918, where two Americans – one black, one Jewish, one transgender – run to the Allied rescue.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  58. syonredux says:
    @Anonymous

    Hollywood validation is a kiss of death.

    Lubitsch made some really great films in Hollywood…..Of course, Lubitsch coped with his exile by creating a cinematic “Lubitschland”….

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  59. moshe says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Wow, there’s more of you!

    I knew you were a nut from your earlier comment but you’re worse than a nut.

    Back to blood.

    You antisemites never change. You’re always low people who assume that the darkness within your own souls also exists in the souls of others and that your own crimes are just preemptive defensive measures.

    As for Ron Unz, I have no doubt that His Autistckness would worship “the devil” as quickly as he would worship “god” because he has no innate understanding of either. He’s the Bobby Fischer of the blogging world. His inability to understand the meanings of others around concepts such as God or Love or Normal lead him to attempt to ascertain these things via algorithms and formulas.

    • Replies: @Dr Van Nostrand
    , @HA
  60. Anonymous[242] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    Lubitsch, one of a kind.

    But he was an entertainer than a personal artist(though he certainly developed a personal style). He could make an easy transition, especially as he was Jewish and moved to Jewish Hollywood. It was half-exile but also half-home-coming to be with fellow Jews. Jewish ‘home’ was never fixed.

    Emigres like Fred Zinnemann also made smooth transition because they were professionals than artists. Superb craftsman who could work on any genre.

    But imagine someone like Ingmar Bergman or Bresson going Hollywood. Bergman did make two English-language movies, but they were soon forgotten. Antonioni did make ZABRISKIE POINT but it was panned by Americans(though praised by Italians oddly enough). Fascinating work but fish-out-water thing.

    The cultural leap would be bigger with non-Western film artists. Germany and white US are closer to each other than, say, Japan and US. Good thing none of the great Japanese directors sought work in Hollywood. Kurosawa had an American project in mind, but nothing came of it. It was eventually made by Konchalovsky funded by Golan-Globus Israelis, and along with SHY PEOPLE, it was one of his better movies in Hollywood.
    John Woo could make a few hits in Hollywood because action formula is universal, but I can’t imagine someone like Jia Zhangke adapting to Hollywood, nor would Hollywood want him.
    Also, there is the problem of cultural cues. Takeshi Kitano is a personal artist of genre films and knows Japan. But his BROTHER set in US about gang war among blacks, Mexicans, and Italians was ludicrous.

    Tarkovsky also had problems outside Russia. NOSTALGHIA dealt with the problem of exile. SACRIFICE is strained.
    Tarkovsky’s case and Polish film COLD WAR suggest psychological exile grows out of repression. The man who flees Poland and settles in France feels pangs of nostalgia precisely because it’s so difficult to return. He wouldn’t have felt thus without the Iron Curtain. If he could easily move back and forth between Poland and France, he would hardly miss Poland while in France because he could return whenever he wishes. But in the film, his exile in France means the possibility of never seeing Poland again. Tarkovsky must have felt likewise during the Cold War. He really was kicked out of Russia.

    Freedom and ease of movement destroyed nostalgia. After all, anyone in point B who dreams of point A can just buy a plane ticket and go back. But in the past when travel was expensive and time-consuming or when leaving one realm could mean permanent exile, the uprooted felt pangs of nostalgia for a place he might never return to.
    Also, prior to rise of electronic media, one’s identity and cultural sense developed in conjunction with heritage, family, folklore, and community. Now, kids’s cultural formative experience is watching TV that is globo-fantasy. They don’t develop a sense of place.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  61. Anon[374] • Disclaimer says:

    A modern koan:

    When it becomes axiomatic that whatever the opposite, of the NYT’s complaints or advice, is healthy for the entire nation;

    will the NYT then start printing the truth?

  62. But what about his hair?

    Did the other kids try to touch his hair?

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  63. @Anonymous

    Oh, I dunno. Mike Kertesz (Curtiz) did o.k. in Hollywood, as did Fred Zinnemann.

  64. @Anonymous

    The homesickness invades one’s dreams.

  65. @fitzhamilton

    Also Ultraman, Johnny Socko and his Flying Robot on TV and Godzilla movies. Speed Racer was also awesome if you were 7 years old but I doubt I made the connection between that and Japan at that age.

  66. I read somewhere recently that Bruce Lee’s mother was probably 3/4 white.

  67. @Dave Pinsen

    I agree with Lot and call bullshit on Walter Chaw. He is too young to have Bruce Lee be the only representation of Asian people to his classmates. Hell, Brendan Lee would be more appropriate. Also, Jackie Chan was well-known at this time.

    Anyway, showing his commitment to the Asian race, Chaw dedicated a post on Mothers Day to his wife instead of his mother.

  68. Pericles says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Asian hair must be difficult seeing that it’s cut off and sold to blacks. Probably too early to bring this up, though.

    • Replies: @TelfoedJohn
  69. Anonymous[377] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve,

    Did you like the movie Parasite?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  70. You can agree with Lot about Chaw lying, but Bruce Lee was about a million times better known in America in the early ‘80s than Jackie Chan, who didn’t really breakthrough in Hollywood until the mid-‘90s. The same is true of Brandon Lee.

  71. @Anonymous

    It’s lucid, looks nice, and has a fun plot twist in the middle. I certainly didn’t get much out of it, but whether that’s because I’m an ignorant round eye who doesn’t understand the Korean class system or because it’s just a pretty thin movie, I couldn’t tell you.

  72. @ScarletNumber

    Wow did that Becky ever marry down!

    • Agree: Ian Smith
  73. In many ways, Parasite is a reactionary film. It’s an old-school leftie study of class, contrasting the poor Kim family with the rich Park family. It makes a good Bernie Sanders-type case for South Korea imposing much higher taxes on wealth and luxuries. But on cultural politics, Bong Joon-Ho is apparently a lot closer to Peter Hitchens than to bell hooks. Here are a few clues (they’re not full-on plot-spoilers, but don’t read further if these sorts of secondary revelations might lower your first-time enjoyment of the film):

    1. Parasite displays South Korea’s mono-ethnic, mono-cultural non-diversity in every frame. There’s even the implication that such non-diversity is a necessary precondition to the film’s discussion of class. South Korea is apparently sufficiently monocultural that rich elites and their domestic servants still tend to be ethnically identical. Remake the film in America and the Kims will probably be made Latinx; the Parks will be made WASP, even though making them Ashkenazim or Indian Brahmin would be both more accurate and more interesting. The result will be to overpower the narrative of class conflict with one of ethnic conflict.

    2. The film celebrates intact families, almost to the point of being a manifesto for G.K. Chesterton-style Distributism. It’s clear that the only reason the poor Kims are able to play the rich Parks and raise themselves out of poverty is because of deep family loyalty and connection. Without that strong bond, they’d be crushed. At least on this issue, Bong Joon-Ho is probably to the right of the current hierarchy of the Catholic Church.

    2. On gender roles, the film is anti-woke. It’s not advocating Victorian values, but it quietly takes traditional gender roles for granted. Mr Park is the breadwinner, Mrs Park the trophy wife, the Park’s teenage daughter is obsessed with boys, and their young son likes to sleep the night in wigwams. Mr Kim gets a job as chauffeur, while Mrs Kim gets a job as cook. None of this is questioned. There are no gay or trans characters.

    3. The wealthy Parks are shown to be both frivolous and losing touch with their society, because of their obsession with foreign novelties. In their shopping and holiday habits, they think foreign is always higher status than Korean, especially if it’s more expensive. This could just be a running gag, but it feels like more than that – like an attack on wealthy Koreans’ lack of patriotism.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  74. Anonymous[670] • Disclaimer says:

    Whites, especially Anglo whites, are a minority who still have delusions of being a majority. Most believe all this so called “minorities need more representation” stuff because they genuinely believe that they are a privileged majority.

  75. GSR says:

    They wouldn’t be oppressed or a minority back in their home countries. Something for many, many “oppressed” people to consider.

  76. Walter Chaw somewhat resembles Bolo Yeung, one of Bruce Lee’s opponents in Enter the Dragon:

    Bolo:

    • LOL: Twinkie
    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  77. dearieme says:

    I’m still laughing! A Person of Colour has just cleaned up in the Oscars. But – wot larks – he’s a Korean. Better yet, I gather that his film is so good that it deserved the Oscars it won.

    Hats off to the Oscar voters. Quelle délicatesse. And to think people say that Americans don’t do irony.

  78. @Pericles

    Perhaps Asians can get higher on the oppression ladder based on the Asian hair wigs that Blacks wear?

    Headline – “My Asian mother sold her hair to Afro beauty shop to fund my Ivy League education and now I’m oppressed because people want to touch her hair (on someone else’s head) and mistake me for Bruce Lee”

    BTW does African hair ever get sold to other races? Imagine the response if it was.

  79. @Lot

    Bruce Lee – B grade actor is reasonably fair. However, I think he was fairly famous back in the 70’s. Perhaps famous in a more “cult” film sense. There’s no doubt that martial arts became popular in the 70’s & that Lee was probably its most famous practitioner.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
  80. JMcG says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I wish I found this to be ridiculous, but I no longer do.What a broken world it is.

  81. Thea says:

    A century or so ago entertainers enjoyed a status just above prostitutes.

    • Replies: @Aldon
  82. @Lot

    Bruce Lee was really famous without his movies being seen a lot in the US. I was a fan of his about 1966 with “Green Hornet.”

    Martial arts appeal to little boys. I can remember my school friends around 1970 going to Chuck Norris’s studio to learn martial arts. And Bruce Lee was always the ultimate martial artist. Somebody would tell you that sure Chuck was good but he wasn’t Bruce Lee.

  83. @Anonymous

    Parasite is a great term to describe it, actually.

    I’m at the point where I no longer even talk to non whites. I grunt at them. If they ask me for help or any questions I flat out ignore them.

    • Replies: @Anonloc
  84. Ian Smith says:
    @Anonymous

    Siberiade was made by Konchalovsky, not Tarkovsky.

    I rather like Paul Verhoeven’s American films (Robocop, Starship Troopers.)

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @fnn
  85. @Steve Sailer

    Somebody would tell you that sure Chuck was good but he wasn’t Bruce Lee.

    This is hard to know since Lee never fought competitively while Norris had a long, successful competitive martial arts career.

  86. Arclight says:

    His beef is really with the white left, which controls most of the entertainment world but doesn’t find Asians or Latinos particularly interesting, although it has a full on fetish with black history in America and black culture.

    The result is every year we have an ‘important’ movie or two about blacks that everyone is supposed to take seriously even if it’s just OK, so they get a lot of press but when the rubber hits the road the Academy’s membership doesn’t really think are strong enough for nominations or awards. This of course in turns makes blacks angry since they are constantly told by their allies how important these stories are, only to find out their friends secretly like other stuff better.

  87. anecdeedy says:

    Whiny Walter should be an embarrassment to Asian Americans.

  88. @Steve Sailer

    On the subject of ignorant round eyes; I read a comment once about the Jardine House building in Hong Kong that had round windows. The round eyes referred to it as “The House of a Thousand Eyes”. Hong Kong Chinese called it “The House of a Thousand Assholes”.

    http://www.aviewoncities.com/hongkong/jardinehouse.htm

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  89. The reasons for Asian success in the United States are not difficult to discern. They have illegitimacy rates under twenty percent. They finish college. They don’t get in trouble with the law. They keep their heads down and work hard. They stay married. I doubt that most Asians give a damn about the Oscars because the intangible rewards seem to be much more important to them than being rewarded for a movie which is fleeting in the long-run.

    • Replies: @Sol
  90. @animalogic

    That’s true, though hard core fans of the flicks might prefer Sonny Chiba to Bruce Lee.

  91. Anonymous[369] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    No, not da Chaw, da Chaw!

  92. AceDeuce says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Lee’s very white martial arts contemporary, the great Joe Lewis, to name one non-Asian person, would have whipped Lee’s ass any day of the week.

  93. “Second, Chaw looks to be about 45. Was Bruce Lee well known among young children in the early to mid 1980s?”

    I would need to know what you mean by young child. I was a young child at 12 and my room was loaded with posters of motorcycles I could never ride. I was reading Asimov, and Heinlein . . . I wasn’t into martial arts, but I suspect for children who were — they knew the name Bruce Lee very well.

  94. Peterike says:

    “ has nothing to do with representation of people like me.”

    Oh yeah? Try being German-American. See how Hollywood treats you then.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    , @1661er
  95. Pentheus says:

    Dear Steve – Would you please disallow OT thread-jacking by Mr. JW123? (and others too). This kind of thing really wrecks a good on-topic comment section. E.g. Chateau Heartiste. Thank you.

  96. @ScarletNumber

    I will spend my life to deserve her.

    “Announcement, everybody—

    I score average white American lady! She have mercy on Walter Mr. Potato Head!

    Look my family—we normal American!”

    • LOL: Jim Don Bob
  97. @newrouter

    East Asians have fair skin, so you can technically delude yourself into thinking they are White people. I think they know this which is why some many East Asians seem to have Anglo forenames, it aids the delusions.

    Hong Kongers are notorious for this practice, a great many HK’ers give their kids Anglo forenames.

  98. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ian Smith

    Siberiade was made by Konchalovsky, not Tarkovsky.

    Right

    I rather like Paul Verhoeven’s American films (Robocop, Starship Troopers.)

    I don’t. At any rate, he was working beneath his talent, churning out schlock(disingenuously rationalized as ‘satire’) made with contempt for the audience. His European movies, only he could have made. His Hollywood movies, anyone could have made.

    While it’s true that foreign directors can be successful in Hollywood, they usually give up what they know best on the personal level and become slick professionals.

    Jews do better in ‘exile’ than others because rootlessness is a feature of their outlook. So, when Polanski left Poland, he wasn’t really leaving his country. He’d already felt as exile in a majority Catholic and ‘antisemitic’ country. Jews carry their culture in a suitcase and learned to be adaptive in a Zeligish way to different cultures. No wonder Polanski and Forman not only thrived in exile but managed to retain something personal and unique.

    But someone like Wajda was deeply attached to his country, and he would have sacrificed much if he’d just aspired to be another Hollywood professional.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    , @Anon 2
  99. @Twodees Partain

    Jardine House just strikes me as meh. Not particularly attractive, not particularly offensive.

    I think it would be a vastly better building if the windows were larger. There is way too much material between the windows, making the building look unnecessarily heavy and ponderous.

  100. Travis says:
    @Lot

    In 1982 all the boys in my middle school knew who Bruce Lee was. But we also all knew he was dead. There was one Korean kid in my school, doubtful anyone asked him if he knew Bruce Lee but we certainly asked him if he knew Kung Fu.

    Back in the early eighties there were 2 second run movie theaters in Upper Darby. My best friend dragged me to see a Bruce Lee film which was playing at the local theatre. Was a double feature with Good Guys wear Black as the main feature this was back in 1982 when I was 12 years-old.

    There was also a weekly program on the local UHF channel here in Philly called Black Belt Theatre which aired martial arts movies every saturday. Another channel ran the Kung Fu series every Saturday evening. Few people had cable TV in Philly back then, so we had just 6 channels to watch and on Saturday one of the 6 channels was showing a martial arts film every Saturday. So it was near impossible not to know who Bruce Lee was in 1983.

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Paleo Liberal
  101. As a child, I was frequently asked if I knew Bruce Lee. For my classmates, there were two Asian people: me and Bruce Lee.

    Too late now but if he wanted to fit in he could have been raised in Asia. There are a lot of Asians there.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    , @Dissident
  102. @Anonymous

    “He’s a film critic.”

    That’s the problem. Film crickets are parasites, leeching off the life force of better humans. And what kind of human would consider film cricketism a worthy pursuit?

    • Replies: @J1234
    , @Paleo Liberal
  103. @syonredux

    Cinematographers Gordon Willis and his contemporary Owen Roizman painted with light and shadow. The films they shot are beautiful, and cannot be replicated in the deadening digital age.

  104. @Anonymous

    Also, Walter Chaw’s first name is Walter.

  105. @Twinkie

    Yep. Quite the creative tumble from Das Boot (1981) to Air Force One (1997).

  106. @Cato

    I watched the first half (had work the next day, went to bed). The most surprising thing to me was the number of blacks — greeters on the red carpet, sprinkled in the audience, performing the musical numbers, announcing the awards, and — most surprising of all — in the commercials! Every commercial seemed to have blacks, and almost always they were in the center as the most cool and aware people.

    Since you appear to have woken from an extended slumber, let me the first to tell you ; Carthage has been destroyed!

  107. J1234 says:
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Yes, I think that film critics are often untalented actors, writers or directors. I think the great hostility between Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel first arose when Siskel would chuckle or smile every time Ebert mentioned his involvement in his one (self-perceived) serious film effort, Beyond the Valley of the Dolls.

    Ebert was involved in two later films that were even trashier, yet as a critic, he routinely trashed films that were far better than his own. Hard to take someone like that very seriously.

  108. Sol says:
    @woody weaver

    The FOB parents are more likely to consume media produced in their home countries or domestic equivalents. Their children are increasingly pulled into the direction of identity politics.

  109. How that a non-English language movie got the best film award, while I thought it was reserved for English-language movies only, while other films were treated as a separate category (Mizoguchi, Wajda, Kurosawa, Tarkovsky, Kieslowski, Bergman, Bunuel, Fellini, Kiarostami, Godard, Almodavar, …)?

    Did they change the rules?

  110. @Pentheus

    Disagree. OT thread-jacking produces grist for the iSteve mill.

  111. Lot says:
    @Travis

    I think Lee was more famous for being famous like Marilyn Monroe than his actual movies. He was also the official token “famous Asian.”

    As for Kung Fu movies, I can see kids liking them in the 70s, but the 1980s were a golden age of quality action movies. A Tarantino film geek or martial arts superfan might like them still by the 1980s, but production values, dialog, plot, pacing, and special effects were so much better by the early 1980s compared to Lee’s early 70s. I just don’t remember any Kung Fu movies at all playing on TV when I was a kid in the late 80s/90s. Tons of Stallone, Steven Segal, Van Damme, Arnold reruns however.

    Likewise, I remember MacGyver and A Team reruns, but never Lee’s Green Hornet.

    • Replies: @Travis
    , @anon
    , @Dave Pinsen
  112. anon[414] • Disclaimer says:

    I wanted to be Bruce Lee when I was a kid, wish I knew him. I used to go watch Bruce Lee movies in this old theater for a dollar. Me my sister, my friend and her brother. I’m not Asian or a boy, I guess i wanted to be Brushetta Lee or something. My sister loved Bruce Lee too, had posters all over the wall. No one could afford Kempo Karate or whatever it was called, late 70’s time frame. But we liked World Wide Wrestling too.
    We had all kinds of weapons we bought from the Chinese store dowtown in the city. Another friend of mine had this peachy idea (don’t do it) to use the telephone pole as a stand-in for a bad character and we would practice using our nunchucks hitting the pole. This is a really bad idea we all ended up with knots in our forheads and black eyes. You can get good at it but it only takes one wrong hit. And yes we liked Bruce into the 80’s.

    • Replies: @anon
  113. fnn says:
    @Ian Smith

    Verhoven’s Soldier of Orange is very good.

  114. Anon[226] • Disclaimer says:

    Only 23 million watched the Oscars. In the early 00’s, 45 million once watched. People really arent enamored of Hollywood anymore.

  115. Rob says:
    @Ellper

    I think Hair Love won because goodthinker whites love seeing blacks giving even the tiniest shits about their offspring. Those goodthinkers include liberal, conservatives and moderates. Everyone but the dissidents who think culture is downstream of genes.

  116. Travis says:
    @Lot

    My references are to an earlier time, the early 80s were different from the late 80s. Most of the notable action films of the 80s came out after 1985. By the late 80s most people had a VCR and cable TV in their homes. In 1981 just 25% had cable TV and fewer had a VCR. But by 1989 everyone we knew had a VCR and more than half had cable TV.

    I was not a big fan of Black Belt theater, but in the early eighties these martial arts films were on TV every Saturday so I sometimes watched them because we had just 6 TV stations in Philadelphia at the time so it was difficult to avoid seeing them. Back in the early 80s fewer people had Cable TV, so we had far fewer choices. With less viewing options, and less than half of us even had a VCR, we were stuck watching local TV or going to the second run theaters. But I was able to enjoy plenty of films at the second run theaters since they often ran double features of the older films.

    Steven Segal and Van Damme made their first films in 1988. This 7 years after the time when Bruce Lee films were being shown in the local theatre. By 1989 both second run theaters in my town were closed because of the VCR and cable TV.

  117. @Anonymous

    Jews do better in ‘exile’ than others because rootlessness is a feature of their outlook. So, when Polanski left Poland, he wasn’t really leaving his country. He’d already felt as exile in a majority Catholic and ‘antisemitic’ country. Jews carry their culture in a suitcase and learned to be adaptive in a Zeligish way to different cultures. No wonder Polanski and Forman not only thrived in exile but managed to retain something personal and unique.

    But someone like Wajda was deeply attached to his country, and he would have sacrificed much if he’d just aspired to be another Hollywood professional.

    This is interesting & there may be something to it. Just, I can’t remember many non-Jewish directors working in Hollywood.

    Billy Wilder & Lubitsch performed great in Hollywood; Jean Renoir- miserably.

    On the other hand, non-Jewish Michelangelo Antonioni was very, very successful.

    Perhaps it has something to do with rootlessness, nihilism & alienation. Food for thought….

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  118. danand says:
    @thinklikea1l

    “Not sure what changed for him.”

    thinklikea1l, I think he was more optimistic early on, clearly from Chaw’s writings over the years his aspiration has been to become the next generation Roger Ebert. My thought is that he sees hope of that slipping away, as time passes he’s becoming more morose. In his own words “I have a lot of thoughts. I’m trapped in here with them and I’m sick to my soul from listening to them. I write about depression a lot. It’s kind of like therapy, and kind of like torture.”

    Of course Chaw could just be upset that he did not predict Parasite for the win, heck it was not even in this 2019 top ten. He was going with “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”. In any event, I wish him and his family well/peace.

    Steve writes: “I bet Mr. Chaw has a few unproduced autobiographical screenplays in his desk drawer about growing up Asian-American while not being Bruce Lee, and his unhappiness could be relieved if they were optioned.”

    Seems Chaw may have only started making an attempt at becoming a POC as it came to have value. I guess you’ve got to take every advantage? This is what he wrote about himself early on in his career:

    “I was born and raised in Wheat Ridge, Colorado, where I went to school with the children of Denver Broncos and Coors. They called it “White Rich”, my high school. I was one of three Asians in the building, I think, [during] my three years there. I like to say that I didn’t even know that I was Asian until freshman year of college.”

    I admit to watch a fair chunk of the Academy Awards show. Unfortunately Brad Pitt soured it right off the bat with his opening comment. I was disappointed as his other award acceptance speeches for his Once Upon a Time… performance were apolitical, and for lack of a less sappy term “endearing”. He went just about the worst way possible, with war monger Bolton: better if feeling the need, simply go with “orange man bad”. I’m guessing Brad was little miffed that his fellow trophy recipients did not follow his lead, he was kind-of left “holding the bag” by the end of the show. Could be others with “venom” speeches didn’t make the stage?

    “They told me I only have 45 seconds up here. Which is 45 seconds more than the Senate gave John Bolton this week. I’m thinking Quentin does a movie about in the end the adults do the right thing.”

    “I think it’s time to disappear for a little while now, and get back to making things.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Anonymous
  119. @J1234

    Yes, I think that film critics are often untalented actors, writers or directors.

    This is something similar to what I’ve heard from my friends painters, and I completely disagree.

    In other words, critics (film, painting, music, literature) are failed creative artists who strive to compensate. It’s monumentally wrong.

    Simply because there is a gulf between critical & creative mind, so to speak. Critics- any arts & entertainment area – are, when they’re good or great, frequently more interesting than their subject-matter. Criticism is, basically, a sort of wisdom literature, a readable “philosophy”.

    For instance, Arnold Hauser, Northrop Frye, Mikhail Bakhtin, Elie Faure … are- at least to me- more intriguing than their topics (Rabelais, Velazquez,..). The same goes for better film critics like Andre Bazin or Jonathan Rosenbaum.

    • Replies: @J1234
  120. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    The didn’t want to get any s**t for giving it to a white guy again, so they gave it to a Korean to keep the blacks from bitching. No good deed goes unpunished.

  121. I’m told that Chinamen can now produce their own movies, and even have their own movie awards. Don’t believe me – here’s Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Chinese_film_awards

  122. anon[414] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    Arnold re-runs in the 80’s, Stallone? Now your crazy? Which movie, Rambo came out in 82, Terminator in 84, Rocky was in 78.
    We only got a couple of channels still in the 80’s, creature double feature on Saturday and religious programs on Sunday during the morning. We watched wrestling and wide world of sports and Trucker movies fast cars and Burt Reynolds were hot. I was never the big star wars fan although I used to think that Mark Hammil was cute he played in Corvette Summer too.

  123. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:

    As for Kung Fu movies, I can see kids liking them in the 70s, but the 1980s were a golden age of quality action movies.

    It was in Hong Kong where a new dynamic kind of action developed in the 80s that was later incorporated by Hollywood, esp via Wachowski brothers. Brilliant use of editing and rhythm, but not to everyone’s taste. Too cartoony and unrealistic. Still, often ingenious and very influential.

    American action suffered in the 80s because of Stallone and Schwarzenegger. Stallone’s ROCKY and RAMBO sequels were just dumb. Schwarzenegger movies were mostly retarded with the exception of the superb TERMINATOR. Milius wasn’t really a skilled director, but his CONAN looks great with perfect casting of Arnold.

    While Hong Kong action was relying more on wit and ingenuity, Hollywood action in the 80s mostly got lazy and heavy. It was just big guns blowing things up or big muscle smashing into one another in WWF fashion. Paul Verhoeven kind of violence. Just dumb. Smash em, bash em.

    There were exceptions, of course. DePalma’s far-out SCARFACE and Friedkin’s superb TO LIVE AND DIE IN LA. And of course, Spielberg with RAIDERS. But for most of the 80s, Spielberg seemed to be lost. And though I don’t for Cameron apart from TERMINATOR and first 1/3 of TERMINATOR, he could certainly engineer action in movies like ALIENS. And though PREDATOR and DIE HARD aren’t much as scripts, McTiernan was more talented than most. George Miller made a mindless movie in ROAD WARRIOR, but that really was one of the amazing.

    Of course, there is action and there is action. Most people think of ‘action movie’ as those with lots of fights, chase scenes, explosions, and badass heroes. The action genre.

    But some of the most interesting uses of action/violence were found in non-action-genre works such as FULL METAL JACKET, BLADE RUNNER, RAGING BULL, KAGEMUSHA/RAN, DAS BOOT, THE THING, EMPIRE OF THE SUN, PLATOON, BLOW OUT, THE RIGHT STUFF, TRON, SOUTHERN COMFORT, COME AND SEE, THE NATURAL, EXCALIBUR/EMERALD FOREST, DIVA, THE SICILIAN.

    I like use of action/violence in 70s cinema because things had yet to get so slick and hyperbolic as so often in the 80s. I prefer the fight scene in ROCKY to that in ROCKY III(and IV). I prefer the kind of violence in DIRTY HARRY to what so often happened in 80s cinema. (To be sure, Eastwood kept with the classic style despite changing fashions.) There was more grit to Spielberg’s use of action/violence in DUEL, JAW, and CLOSE ENCOUNTERS than in his later works. Boorman, Peckinpah, and Aldrich did excellent work. As impressive as EMERALD FOREST, it pales next to DELIVERANCE which did much more with far less.

  124. anon[414] • Disclaimer says:

    And the Green Hornet sucked. Those old out of sync movies were classic, no one went to hear them specak anyway. Wilt Chamberlain and some other personalities were trying to bust their way into his movies.

  125. @The Wild Geese Howard

    Uh, I know. Not sure, uh, why you felt the need to comment as if I had stated otherwise.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  126. @Federalist

    As a child, I was frequently asked if I knew Bruce Lee. For my classmates, there were two Asian people: me and Bruce Lee.

    I lived in NYC for a while. Later, people would ask me, “Did you know So-and-So?”

  127. @JohnnyWalker123

    Is something wrong with my browser? You refer to photos you posted, but I can’t see them.

    Is something wrong with my credulity? You refer to leaps upon leaps upon leaps of faith, each of which is beyond my abilities.

    At this point, I believe virtually nothing I read about Jeffrey Epstein.

    “Nicholas Stix”

    • Agree: Dissident
    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  128. @J1234

    I used to also look down on Ebert, based on his performances on his show with Siskel, and his increasingly annoying public liberalism. Then, after his death, I discovered his Website. The man wrote brilliant, beautiful movie reviews, at least the ones I’ve so far read.

    https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-the-birth-of-a-nation-1915

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  129. Anonymous[269] • Disclaimer says:
    @Nicholas Stix

    Ebert was at his best on TV, especially with real chemistry with Siskel. It wasn’t deep criticism but entertaining, and they got their points across. In the 70s and early 80s on SNEAK PREVIEWS, they had more time without the commercials on PBS and also devoted more time to less popular movies.

    As print critics, or reviewers, they were limited because they wrote for newspaper with strict deadlines, space, and advertising/populist pressure. But unlike Siskel for whom film reviewing was essentially a profession(though he certainly loved movies), Ebert devoted full time to understanding the medium. So, when he found time to write longer pieces on the films he loved, he really showed his erudition and insight. But, he was not a seminal critic who changed the way people see movies(as Kael and Sarris had done). He was more a trend-follower than setter. Ebert’s dog-mentality was obvious in his choice with PULP FICTION. He said the movie would end up on either his worst of year list or best of year list. Surely a critic would spine would have known and chosen which. But he went with the buzz that it was the coolest thing. But of course, he says BIRTH OF A NATION is an ‘evil’ movie(albeit an important one). Why is it evil? Because it was honest about fears of a black planet?

    Also, his was essentially a middlebrow sensibility that too easily fell for stuff like SOPHIE’S CHOICE, of which Siskel was right. It’s heavy sanctimonious dreck. Also, he got too personal at times. Because he has a drinking problem, he would give 4 stars to any ‘important’ movie about a drunk: UNDER THE VOLCANO, BARFLY, and LEAVING LAS VEGAS, which he picked as best movie of the year. Not a wino myself, I wished I’d die of alcoholism than sit through that self-pitying nonsense.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  130. Anonymous[269] • Disclaimer says:
    @georgesdelatour

    In many ways, Parasite is a reactionary film. It’s an old-school leftie study of class, contrasting the poor Kim family with the rich Park family. It makes a good Bernie Sanders-type case for South Korea imposing much higher taxes on wealth and luxuries.

    It seems to be more about history and memory than class and money. After all, what is most irritating thing about the rich folks isn’t their wealth. It’s their outlook, their attitude, their indifference, their amnesia. Their house is nice but also cold and sterile. It might seem more at place in zen-Japan where order and neatness are part of national character. Koreans, like Chinese, are known to be messier and more disorganized. So, the house begins to look more ‘organic’ and ‘authentic’ when the family messes it up a bit with food and stuff.

    And the people in the basement turns the film from satire to allegory. History hidden and buried by elites who don’t want to be inconvenienced by the fact that just a generation or two ago, they were dirt-poor people struggling in farms, factories, etc. Their attitude is they are now part of the global rich. They mainly identify with Elysium. Their party at the end is so totally globo-western. Even the chef is a foreigner making foreign food.

    In Wertmuller’s SWEPT AWAY, the class antagonism is more obvious(and funny) because of the north-south divide. Also, one of the rich men on the yacht is a communist, at least ideologically. He’s one of the haute bourgeois who pretends to be ‘radical’. As for the swarthy southern Italian hired hand, he claims to be communist but when he gets his chance on the island with the woman, he loves being king-patriarch-stud. When I first saw this film on PBS(back when Wertmuller was a darling of the cultural elites, though she soon became persona non grata with rise of PC attitudes), I I missed all the nuances. And I got more of THE LEOPARD after I read the novel it was based on. On my first viewing, I didn’t really get the political angle of what was happening with Tancredi and the bourgeoisie. (I didn’t get the nuances of class and neighborhoods in SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER either when I first saw it, and ANNIE HALL went totally over my head. Didn’t get any of the references.) But SWEPT AWAY made more sense over the years. Same with movies like HEARTBREAK KID and LOST IN AMERICA, whose Jewish angles slipped by me upon first viewing.
    The question is how much did members of the Academy know about PARASITE before voting for it? It may be the most misunderstood win in movie history.

  131. J.Ross says:

    Over the past few hours, one by one, all the prosecutors in the Roger Stone case have quit. Completely insane.


    Also happening:
    Jussie Smollett indicted.
    Flynn’s sentencing suspended until court order.
    FBI confirms that the Russia hoax was a hoax.
    Grassley going after fake whistleblower Eric Ciaramella. Numerous other signals from congress that the good guys are fighting back.
    Rand Paul tears into John Brennan on Twitter.
    Graham says on Fox that half the people involved in the Russia investigation are going to jail.
    McConnell cuts fake impeachment short, signalling that even establishment guys see that it’s fake. No exoneration to be earned by examining every last witness, just cut it short.
    Released documents demonstrating that the Obama-FBI lied under oath about Seth Rich.

  132. @Travis

    I went to college in the Philly suburbs. I remember the Sunday Bruce Lee movies on UHF.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  133. @SunBakedSuburb

    There are exceptions to every rule.

    Back in the late 1800s, the leading British theater critic decided to show those idiots how it was done.

    I am referring, of course: to George Bernard Shaw.

    Fun fact: Shaw would extensively review his own plays. I used to read books of Shaw plays, and his book about the play was sometimes as long as the play itself.

    The longest Shaw book included:
    1. His longest play (Man and Superman)
    2. A play within the play (Don Juan in Hell)
    3. A book about the play
    4. A book supposedly written by one of the play’s character (The Revolutionists Handbook)

    The Revolutionists Handbook included a sort of thoughts by Chairman Mao, long before Mao, and one of the sayings was his famous line: “Those who can, do. Those who can’t, teach.”

  134. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    That just increased Lee’s mystique. I remember a martial arts magazine in the ’80s speculating on how a real match between Lee and Norris would have gone (they fought each other on film in The Way of The Dragon).

  135. Anon 2 says:
    @Anonymous

    Re: “When Polanski left Poland”

    Polanski visits Poland constantly. He was there recently to promote his latest
    movie, “An Officer and A Spy,” and was interviewed in Polish on national
    television. He has many friends in Poland to this day, and it’s not like Poland
    is very far from France. Europe worships its writers and filmmakers so
    Poland has been protecting him all these years.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  136. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Lot

    You do realize that there’s a lag before theatrical movies appear on TV (particularly on non-network local channels)? In the early ’80s you had lots of cult martial arts movies from the mid-to-late ’70s (The Five Deadly Venoms, The Master of the Flying Guillotine) aired on TV. Bruce Lee wasn’t in either of those movies, as he’d died before they were made, but he was still the best known movie martial artist in the early ’80s, probably because he was always on the cover of martial arts magazines. And production values were never a big concern for kung fu movies: the schlock was part of the fun.

    Steven Segal and Van Damme didn’t really break through until the late ’80s, with Above The Law and Bloodsport, respectively, in 1988.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  137. MEH 0910 says:
    @Tiny Duck

    • Replies: @wren
    , @danand
  138. wren says:

    I saw “Birds of Prey” in the theater last Friday, which was directed by a Chinese, Chinese-American woman, and written by a Taiwanese-British woman.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathy_Yan

    (Born in China, but then moved to America, then moved back to Hong Kong at age 14, then went back to America for university.)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christina_Hodson

    (Sexier than many of the actresses in the movie, especially the Asian actress.)

    This was a fun movie, BUT I don’t think there was a single guy who was a good guy, and I don’t think any of the bad guys were ladies.

    The bad guys were really bad, too.

  139. wren says:
    @MEH 0910

    Smollett’s sister was in the movie Birds of Prey too.

    She was the only one with supernatural powers that showed up all of the sudden.

  140. Corvinus says:
    @Anonymous

    “He’s a film critic. He should be focused on quality, not identity.”

    Chaw is just following Mr. Sailer’s lead.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  141. Muggles says:
    @Cato

    In Woke Hollywood, you can’t be too blackity-black-black. At least on TV awards shows. In the back offices, script rooms, movie unions and the like, not so much.

    Black talent only goes so far and while some black targeted films do quite well at the box office (there is an entire black film production subculture that thrives) organic black roles are not more common than any other minority group has.

    Even so, all of the black presenters, winners and many of the whites were also whining about “lack of blacks” etc. Of course women were also lauded and lionized and underused “victims.” As Steve pointed out elsewhere, it’s all about “who gets paid.”

    Asians and Koreans, Japanese, Thai, Vietnamese, etc. don’t have any special victim category. Sorry, Bruce Lee comparisons are compliments, not slurs. How many American films win the Chinese/Korean/Japanese version of their Oscars? Any?

    Funniest presenter by far: Spike Lee, who looked small and grateful he got a tiny paying gig. He was dressed in what I thought was an homage to 1935 era Chicago bus drivers uniform. Maybe a doorman forced to wear a goofy outfit. Funny no? But instead he had it custom made (in purple though it looked brown to me) as an homage to the late Kobe Bryant. With a little billed milkman hat to match. Wow, talk about missing the mark. Kobe had dignity and was like most black athletes, a pretty sharp dresser. Pathetic tiny Spike just looked foolish. Time to find real employment…

  142. Muggles says:
    @Peterike

    >>Oh yeah? Try being German-American. See how Hollywood treats you then.<<

    Lots of roles for villains and heavies. The more Teutonic the better.

  143. Anonymous[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus

    Big difference between social critic analyzing the politics of movies, and a film critic turning movies into politics.
    Is Chaw primarily a sociologist or a film critic? Also, what does he expect in a nation where East Asians are like what? 3% of the population? I’m sure East Asians get at least 3% of the roles.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  144. danand says:
    @MEH 0910

    MEH 0910, according to the FBI: “Hate crimes are the highest priority of the FBI’s Civil Rights program due to the devastating impact they have on families and communities.”

    I wonder if Jussie will be sentenced under the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act of 2009 guidelines. If so, he could go down for a double decade, plus.

  145. Twinkie says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    UHF

    Ah, the dial with many numbers – click, click, click, click, click.

  146. Twinkie says:
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Maybe Norris was being gracious, but he said that Lee would have beaten him. Norris got into grappling late in his life (trained under the Machado brothers, cousins to the Gracies, and the same family that taught Keanu Reeves for the John Wick movies).

    Lee was, in real life, a true mixed martial artist. He was dissatisfied with the practical ineffectiveness of Wing Chun he learned as a young man, and researched and trained in boxing, Karate, Tae Kwon Do, wrestling, and Judo among others. Even fencing(!) for the footwork.* He associated and cross-trained with many noted martial artists of the day.

    *If you see someone like Junior Dos Santos (in his prime) using a lunging jab to the body from a staggered stance, it looks uncannily like what fencers do and how Lee envisioned using the body jab.

  147. No mention of whether he has worked half as hard as Bruce Lee did to master martial arts and make it in television and film.

    Kind of like all the angry Negroes and mestizos who purport to be great novelists but have not bothered to master mythopoeia and learn seven languages as Tolkien (a South African) did, or even develop ideas as compelling as those of Achebe, Coehlo, García Márquez, or Cervantes….

    Funny how it works out. Must be all about The Man keeping them down, though.

  148. Sad thing is Chaw was actually a good film critic until identity politics rotted his brain. He didn’t write polished prose but he understood Hitchcock and Lynch and the classics better than most.

  149. @newrouter

    I feel so guilty I’m going to watch a Charlie Chan movie on YouTube and get some real Asian Wisdom.

  150. @ScarletNumber

    This pudding shares his name (周瑜 – Zhou Yu) with a Chinese general now remembered mainly for his role in the Battle of Red Cliffs (the subject of a two-part film – Red Cliff – directed by John Woo). Hong Kong actor Tony Leung played Zhou Yu in the film, and two different-looking Chinese types I can’t imagine.

  151. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Actually, the main appeal of 70s Kung Fu movies is the English dubbing.

    The greatest is in the INCREDIBLE KUNG FU MISSION at 55:20 of the movie

  152. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon 2

    He has many friends in Poland to this day, and it’s not like Poland
    is very far from France.

    Nowadays, it’s no problem. Even Africans can easily migrate to Europe in droves!
    Despite tensions with Russia, it’s easy for anyone to move back and forth between EU and Russia.

    But during the Cold War, going from East to West or West to East could have momentous consequences. Most obvious with the Berlin Wall. An East German who left for the West might not see his family and friends again. Or he might be deemed a traitor. Or those foolish enough to go from West to East found out the hard way. The French film EAST-WEST told this sad tale.

    Now, not everyone left under a cloud. They were allowed to move to the West. Konchalovsky, for one, freely chose to work in the West with permission from the Soviet Union. In contrast, Tarkovsky was essentially banished.

    I don’t know under what circumstances Polanski left Poland. Most likely, it was amiable as Polanski became an international sensation with KNIFE IN THE WATER.

    But some artists, like Baryshnikov, risked a lot by going from East to West. And he couldn’t go back during the Cold War because he would have been arrested.

    Once the Cold War ended, all this became moot. It was for the good but with every gain there is a loss. With the fading of the epic sense of divide between East and West, a lot of nostalgia was lost.

  153. Anonymous[102] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Billy Wilder & Lubitsch performed great in Hollywood; Jean Renoir- miserably.
    On the other hand, non-Jewish Michelangelo Antonioni was very, very successful.

    Perhaps that had less to do with ethnicity than approach.

    Wilder and Lubitsch were essentially entertainers, and what entertains people is nearly universal. People love comedies, thrillers, star vehicles. Wilder sometimes worked in serious mode, but he always had his ears on the audience. He was a crowd-pleaser. Renoir, in contrast, had his own view of life, and it couldn’t just transposed to another culture and setting.

    Antonioni had one big hit outside Italy, BLOW-UP, made in UK. It was a sensation. His next film, ZABRISKIE POINT in the US was a flop with critics and audience in the US. Along with ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST, it was a huge disappointment for Hollywood that sought to cash in on European chic. (Oddly enough, the ending of ZABRISKIE is the reverse of Tarantino’s ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD. In ZABRISKIE, there is no terror attack but the girl imagines it as a revolutionary act. In ONCE UPON A HOLLYWOOD, a actual murder that happened is undone by Tarantino’s imagination. It might also be an allusion to CHINATOWN. Robert Towne wrote a happy ending, but Polanski altered it into tragedy. If Sharon Tate hadn’t been murdered, would Polanski have kept with the happy ending? Did his alteration reflect his own sense of tragedy? We’ll never know.)

    Oddly enough, Antonioni’s Italian films were admired in UK and US but not so much in Italy. BLOW-UP was admired in Italy and US but not in UK. ZABRISKIE was praised in UK and Italy but loathed in the US.

    Anyway, Antonioni didn’t make it in Hollywood. After ZABRISKIE, he did THE PASSENGER with Nicholson and the woman in LAST TANGO, but his star had mostly fallen by then. And though he made few more films, he was finished as a force in cinema.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  154. J1234 says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I said:

    Yes, I think that film critics are often untalented actors, writers or directors.

    You sad:

    In other words, critics (film, painting, music, literature) are failed creative artists who strive to compensate. It’s monumentally wrong.

    Simply because there is a gulf between critical & creative mind, so to speak. Critics- any arts & entertainment area – are, when they’re good or great, frequently more interesting than their subject-matter. Criticism is, basically, a sort of wisdom literature, a readable “philosophy”.

    We aren’t that far apart in our assessment of Roger Ebert. He wasn’t a failed movie reviewer who became a screenwriter by default. It was the other way around. I’m saying the movie projects he worked on sucked, big time. His work sucked big time. I’m not wrong. Had he succeeded in screenwriting it’s doubtful he would’ve become a reviewer.

    I remember that Roger and Gene had a segment on their PBS show called “Dogs of the Week,” featuring typically low budget bad movies that were generally (but not always) given a thumbs down. The movies he worked on were in that category or below.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  155. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    (Oddly enough, the ending of ZABRISKIE is the reverse of Tarantino’s ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD. In ZABRISKIE, there is no terror attack but the girl imagines it as a revolutionary act. In ONCE UPON A HOLLYWOOD, a actual murder that happened is undone by Tarantino’s imagination. It might also be an allusion to CHINATOWN. Robert Towne wrote a happy ending, but Polanski altered it into tragedy.

    Interestingly, Tarantino’s original script for True Romance had Clarence dying at the end, but Tony Scott gave it a happy ending.

  156. Anonymous[324] • Disclaimer says:
    @danand

    I think he was more optimistic early on, clearly from Chaw’s writings over the years his aspiration has been to become the next generation Roger Ebert. My thought is that he sees hope of that slipping away, as time passes he’s becoming more morose.

    Did he really think that? A new Ebert is impossible because the game has changed so much due to the internet. There can’t be another Kael or Sarris either. There are, I’m sure, many critics who are smart and insightful, but they can’t command the authority of critics in the past who had near-monopoly on film discussion. If Ebert and Siskel came of age as millennials, they would have likely had youtube channels, and there are so many such channels discussing movies. Indeed, the fact that people at Ebert site are writing under his banner suggests there can’t be another Ebert. (And McLaughlin Group is still called that even though McLaughlin died.)

    So, even if the powers-that-be made Chaw the new Ebert, no one would care.

    Even another Harry Knowles is impossible. He was pre-social-network and could draw many people to his website. It’s close to impossible for anyone to draw that much attention to one’s own website cuz so much of the talk is on ‘platforms’.

  157. @moshe

    This is a pagan bashing Christian anti semite. I can understand the anti semitism of say ancient Egyptians and Babylonians: it’s just garden variety contempt for the outsider and the conquered. But Christian anti semitism is rather funny because it’s core essence is” we are better Jews than you”.

    Now mind you lots of satanists have misappropriated harmless pagan dieties. But that’s only because for Christian EVERY diety apart from the manic depressive Yawheh is a demon.

    • Replies: @moshe
  158. Anonymous[324] • Disclaimer says:
    @J1234

    Yes, I think that film critics are often untalented actors, writers or directors.

    In France, film criticism is seen as stepping stone to becoming a film-maker, at least since the days of New Wave when, indeed, former critics became directors. In film at least, it’s usually not the case that critics are failed artists. Anyone who wants to write or paint can do so. Even an architect who can’t get his project built can create designs and concepts. But unless you got financial backing, you can’t make movies. So, certain film critics weren’t so much failed artists as artistic types who had no chance of making movies… and so they chose to discuss them. Tarantino said if he couldn’t make films, he’d like to be a critic and talk about them.

    And given how so many movies suck, I can’t imagine movies would be much worse if current film-critics made their own movies.

    That said, most people go into criticism with full knowledge of their strengths and limitations. They know they aren’t creative and better with analysis, and they are happy to fill the critical niche. I don’t think Sarris, Kael, Simon, Kauffmann, MacDonald, Vernon Young, etc wrote with bitterness as failed artists. They delighted in praising talent and took pride in discerning worth from the worthless. Pauline Kael did go to Hollywood in late 70s but only as adviser, not artist. It was a terrible experience for all involved, not least Warren Beatty whose REDS was later panned by her.

    I would think a bitter critic(as failed artist) would attack great works(out of envy) while leaving the bad ones alone. But that’s not the case. Most critics praise what they deem good.

    Now, creativity is clearly a more mysterious thing than criticism, but critics helped to elucidate the mystery. As such, they think for the readers as well who sense something of the work but can’t really put a finger on why it works or doesn’t.

    And when the work is bad, critics are more entertaining than the work itself.

    Simply because there is a gulf between critical & creative mind, so to speak. Critics- any arts & entertainment area – are, when they’re good or great, frequently more interesting than their subject-matter.

    This is when the work is fundamentally flawed or just plain bad. Then, criticism is more engaging than the work, esp if critic has a sense of humor. Dwight Macdonald was brilliant at dissecting bad movies. But when a work is truly great, criticism cannot be more interesting than the work. Criticism can be penetrating and trenchant, but it still cannot match the work in richness and mystery. No amount of ink spilled on MULHOLLAND DR is gonna match its greatness. But ink spilled on Lynch’s lesser or failed works is preferable to watching the stupid thing… like WILD AT HEART.

    Roger Ebert. He wasn’t a failed movie reviewer who became a screenwriter by default. It was the other way around. I’m saying the movie projects he worked on sucked, big time.

    Roger Ebert didn’t work on many film projects. He took part in a few with Russ Meyer, and it was meant to be tongue-in-cheek.

    Ebert was always more journalist than artist. He majored in journalism and approached art/culture with the instinct with a journalist. He only dabbled in creativity as a side gig, more out of fun than anything else.

    If any film ‘critic’ really wanted to be a star, it was maybe REX REED who was in the awful MYRA BRECKINRIDGE. But Reed really was a dummy.

    https://mikelynchcartoons.blogspot.com/2015/08/roger-ebert-remembers-mike-royko-and.html

    As for the age of critics, that’s over. There are many fine critics and will be many more, but they no longer have the authority or command the attention.
    But another problem is young people grew up in a time with less cultural dignity and hierarchy, and many tend to be vulgar or trashy in their outlook. Or, they grew up with dumb PC and end up bitching up about dumb things like ‘black hair’ or ‘not enough yellow face’. At least Marxist critics of old had maturity and seriousness of tone. They would have been embarrassed to yammer about trivialities.

    https://www.vanityfair.com/culture/2012/06/Sarris-and-Simon

    Still, there must be lots of fine criticism if one looks for it.

    This review of AMOUR by Haneke is, I think, spot on.

    https://www.slantmagazine.com/film/amour-2/

    • Replies: @J1234
  159. J.Ross says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    No Retreat, No Surrender is a joyfully awful film: although aggressively hokey (and saddled with a racial harmony subplot straight out of mid-sixties television), it has the very sincerity normally absent in le Oucquei. It was Jean-Claude Van Damme’s first movie, the Walloon having failed to survive the helmeted heavy rubber suit in a Central American jungle which would place him in Predator. It also has explicit worship of Bruce Lee, including prayers and grave visits, culminating in a spectral master class which emphasized Lee’s focus on flexibility in the moment. Not exactly Lot’s time frame but close. Also, the 90s Tarentino-credited phenomenon of embracing 70s pulp culture meant a revival of interest beyond ethnic or martial arts lines.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  160. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @J.Ross

    I remember that one. JCVD was the heavy in it. “Joyfully awful” is a good description of it.

    A couple of years later, JCVD starred with Sho Kosugi in some forgettable movie that was sort of a passing of the torch. Kosugi was one of the big star of ninja movies. Ninjas were a big deal for some reason in the early to mid ’80s – maybe something to do with Japan’s ascendance.

  161. 1661er says:
    @Peterike

    Sandra Bullock, inter alia, seems to have done pretty well.

  162. Anonymous[262] • Disclaimer says:

    Eastwood’s strange turn in Italy

  163. @Anonymous

    You’ve cut me to the quick. Apparently, there were two, or even three Roger Eberts.

  164. Dissident says:
    @Anonymous

    And what began this was allowing non-whites to move to the West.

    Especially all those Africans that were allowed to come here to labor as slaves on the plantations of the American colonists. What were they thinking?

    (In all seriousness, it seems if nothing else/morality aside, incredibly short-sighted.)
    ~ ~ ~
    Random cute adorable Japanese boy:

  165. Dissident says:
    @Federalist

    Too late now but if he wanted to fit in he could have been raised in Asia. There are a lot of Asians there.

    Great point! Walter Chow certainly could have chosen to be born to a different pair of Asian parents– ones who were firmly settled upon Asian soil and would remain so. From his NYT piece:

    in the early 1970s, my parents came to the United States, where I was born not long after.

    @Scarlet Number:

    Anyway, showing his commitment to the Asian race, Chaw dedicated a post on Mothers Day to his wife instead of his mother.

    Do you know that his mother is still living?

    @The Wild Geese Howard:

    Wow did that Becky ever marry down!

    How so? How much do you know about Mr. Chaw’s wife, or even Mr. Chaw himself, for that matter, that you can make such a judgement?

    Or were you judging based soley on their respective visual appearances? (As if that’s all that matters in a marriage…)

    @MBlanc46:

    He sure is homely.

    Perhaps you could explain how your opinion of Mr. Chaw’s appearance is of any relevance here.
    ~ ~ ~
    I have no interest in defending Walter Chaw’s Op-Ed or the attitudes exhibited therein. I simply find the kind of gratuitous, petty piling-on that is exhibited in comments such as the ones I responded-to above to be ugly and to detract from the many valid and compelling criticisms, arguments and causes that are expressed both by Mr. Sailer as well as many of those who comment here.

  166. Corvinus says:
    @Anonymous

    Both are using their film critic platform to be a social critic who analyzes the politics of movies and turning movies into politics.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  167. Aldon says:
    @Twinkie

    The Model Minority Meme is just that. Yellows not wanting to be around Negroes and Pablos doesn’t mean they aren’t hostile to Whitey. They just are cunning enough to to not chimpout on Whitey and get shot/jailed, rather they look up Whitey’s blueprints and mail them back to the motherland.

  168. Aldon says:
    @Thea

    That speaks well of how degenerated post-1400s Earth is.

  169. Aldon says:

    These say all you really need to know about Parasite after watching it:

  170. @MikeatMikedotMike

    Because your statement made it sound like he was just a stunt guy in one film.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
  171. @Dissident

    How so? How much do you know about Mr. Chaw’s wife, or even Mr. Chaw himself, for that matter, that you can make such a judgement?

    Judgement was based purely on physical appearance and it is correct.

  172. Anonymous[102] • Disclaimer says:

    East Asians are being lined up as the new ruling elite in the US/Western world. I find it sad how whites are mostly always subservient to some high IQ non-white race, be it Jews, East Asians, Indians, etc.

    Whitey is always getting ordered around or lorded over by some high IQ non-white.

  173. @Dissident

    … the many valid and compelling criticisms, arguments and causes that are expressed both by Mr. Sailer as well as many of those who comment here.

    • Thanks: Jenner Ickham Errican

  174. anon[357] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    There was theatre in Upper Darby, at 69th street, which was showing double martial arts films back in 1983, which is where I first saw Enter The Dragon. The Eric Terminal theater closed around 1987. A friend of mine worked at the theater as an usher so I could get into the theater for free.

    One of the reasons the Karate Kid was a hit film was due to all the teenagers having been exposed to the many martial arts films during the early 80s.

  175. Travis says:

    Philadelphia, April 1985- There were numerous theories about what caused the Easter melee, which involved as many as 5,000 teen-agers and young adults. The disturbance started about 4 p.m. and was under control by about 6 p.m., as mounted police and officers with K-9 dogs forced the crowds to disperse. Chestnut Street was closed to traffic until 8 p.m., and its theaters and arcades were closed for the night.

    but it has been traced to the Duke and Duchess movie theater on Chestnut near 16th, where a long line of youths was waiting to see “The Last Dragon,” a martial-arts film. “Apparently they come out and all want to be kung fu masters,” Police Commissioner Gregore Sambor said Sunday. “Every year it gets a little worse,” said an employee of Space Port, an arcade on Chestnut near 15th. “But there was never looting before, just fighting and maybe a shooting or two. ”

    https://www.inquirer.com/philly/blogs/clout/On_this_day_in_Philly_in1985.html

  176. Anonymous[269] • Disclaimer says:
    @danand

    I like to say that I didn’t even know that I was Asian until freshman year of college.”

    So, what did he think he was? A white boy with downs syndrome with rather high IQ?

    He should blame his parents who not only brought him to a white country but didn’t even tell him of his identity.

  177. J1234 says:
    @Anonymous

    Thanks for that.

    Just to be clear, despite his movie reviews, Steve Sailer isn’t the type of reviewer that I have a low regard for.

  178. Not Raul says:

    They named a movie with Asians in it “Parasite”. That tells you all you need to know.

  179. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus

    Both are using their film critic platform to be a social critic who analyzes the politics of movies and turning movies into politics.

    LOL. How many movies does Sailer discuss per year? He focuses on movies with strong political content or cultural implications.

    Chaw, on the other hand, is a full-time critic who should be focused on aesthetics of cinema.
    Sure, film critics are people and citizens, and it’s impossible to dismiss politics in art and culture.
    Sarris, Simon, Kael, and etc all discussed politics. But the way to do that is to see the larger picture than being namby-pamby about ‘me, me, me’.

    Sarris and Simon didn’t whine, “boo hoo, how come movies don’t feature us intellectual types as the coolest people in the world?” Sarris didn’t whine about lack of Greek actors in American movies. That sort of stuff is baby talk.

    Now, if the US had many many Asians, one might really wonder why there aren’t many Asians. But in a nation where East Asians are a tiny minority? Also, he complains about ‘people like me’, but why did people-like-him move away from people-like-them and decide to live as minorities in a nation that is overwhelmingly non-Asian?
    It’s all babytalk.

    • Replies: @Dissident
  180. Corvinus says:

    “LOL. How many movies does Sailer discuss per year?”

    He refers to himself as a film critic.

    “He focuses on movies with strong political content or cultural implications.”

    And as I corrected stated, both are using their film critic platform to be a social critic who analyzes the politics of movies and turning movies into politics.

  181. @Corvinus

    I reviewed in Taki’s Magazine nine movies this year, including six of the year’s Best Picture nominees, with a write-up or two of “Parasite” on this blog and a brief mention of “Marriage Story.” (I never saw “Jojo Rabbit”). The other three were “Knives Out” and “Richard Jewell,” both of which got other Oscar nominations, plus “Midway.” I think I did a particularly good job last year of reviewing important/interesting movies and avoiding the ho-hum. (E.g., I saw “Toy Story 4,” which wasn’t bad, but it wasn’t as good as the first 3 and there wasn’t too much of interest to say about it that I haven’t said already over the years about this historic franchise.)

    I managed to avoid writing about movies that weren’t widely viewed as at least pretty good. I returned to “Parasite” recently to link to Robin Hanson’s excellent compare and contrast essay of class aspects of “Parasite” vs. “Joker.”

    I tend to review movies that are popular with critics or audiences or, usually, both. There are a lot of forgettable movies made each year, so why bother with them?

    I try to write about movies that are of interest to people who don’t go to see a lot of movies, so I lean toward historical and biopic movies, or ones based on famous books, or are remakes of famous movies of the past. E.g., “Midway” wasn’t a great movie, but it wasn’t bad, and the Battle of Midway is highly interesting both to me and a sizable fraction of my readers. “Ford v Ferrari” was quite good and it’s of interest to readers who are car guys.

    I tend to write more about the factual aspects of movies rather than the aesthetic aspects because the former can be of much interest to people who haven’t seen the movie yet and might never see it, while the latter is more specialized in its appeal. I wrote a lot about the aesthetics of “1917” because there wasn’t too much about the movie that said anything knew or arguable about the well known topic of the Western Front, while the self-imposed aesthetics of the director’s choice to make it look like one shot were more germane.

    I tend to avoid writing much about movies that are part of long comic book sagas where it’s important to know about the previous plot in earlier installments. I don’t mind standalone or first installment comic book movies like “Joker” or “Wonder Woman” or “Iron Man” or “Black Panther,” but I skipped writing about the latest Avengers movies because there was too much water under the bridge.

    I have old favorites, like the Coen Brothers, although some of their movies have stumped me on first viewing so I don’t always review their movies at full length in Taki’s, but will at least write them up on the blog.

    I don’t like reviewing movies that would require writing up a lot of the plot. I’m not particularly good at it, and I don’t find many other critics good at it, especially the ones who insist on using the names of the characters rather than the movies stars playing the characters.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  182. @Corvinus

    I reviewed in Taki’s Magazine nine movies this year, including six of the year’s Best Picture nominees, with a write-up or two of “Parasite” on this blog and a brief mention of “Marriage Story.” (I never saw “Jojo Rabbit”). The other three were “Knives Out” and “Richard Jewell,” both of which got other Oscar nominations, plus “Midway.” I think I did a particularly good job last year of reviewing important/interesting movies and avoiding the ho-hum. (E.g., I saw “Toy Story 4,” which wasn’t bad, but it wasn’t as good as the first 3 and there wasn’t too much of interest to say about it that I haven’t said already over the years about this historic franchise.)

    I managed to avoid writing about movies that weren’t widely viewed as at least pretty good. I returned to “Parasite” recently to link to Robin Hanson’s excellent compare and contrast essay of class aspects of “Parasite” vs. “Joker.”

    I tend to review movies that are popular with critics or audiences or, usually, both. There are a lot of forgettable movies made each year, so why bother with them?

    I try to write about movies that are of interest to people who don’t go to see a lot of movies, so I lean toward historical and biopic movies, or ones based on famous books, or are remakes of famous movies of the past. E.g., “Midway” wasn’t a great movie, but it wasn’t bad, and the Battle of Midway is highly interesting both to me and a sizable fraction of my readers. “Ford v Ferrari” was quite good and it’s of interest to readers who are car guys.

    I tend to write more about the factual aspects of movies rather than the aesthetic aspects because the former can be of much interest to people who haven’t seen the movie yet and might never see it, while the latter is more specialized in its appeal. I wrote a lot about the aesthetics of “1917” because there wasn’t too much about the movie that said anything new or arguable about the well known topic of the Western Front, while the self-imposed aesthetics of the director’s choice to make it look like one shot were more germane.

    I tend to avoid writing much about movies that are part of long comic book sagas where it’s important to know about the previous plot in earlier installments. I don’t mind standalone or first installment comic book movies like “Joker” or “Wonder Woman” or “Iron Man” or “Black Panther,” but I skipped writing about the latest Avengers movies because there was too much water under the bridge.

    I have old favorites, like the Coen Brothers, although some of their movies have stumped me on first viewing so I don’t always review their movies at full length in Taki’s, but will at least write them up on the blog.

    I don’t like reviewing movies that would require writing up a lot of the plot. I’m not particularly good at it, and I don’t find many other critics good at it either, especially the ones who insist on using the names of the characters rather than the movies stars playing the characters. Because my target audience, unlike that of a lot of critics who write for people very interested in new movies, is people who aren’t necessarily going to see this movie in the near future, I find lengthy (and usually confusing) plot descriptions the most obvious standard element to leave out.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    , @Corvinus
  183. @Nicholas Stix

    N.S. II: It turns out, the problem viewing the photos is on my end.

    When I backpaged to @JohnnyWalker123’s comments, twits momentarily appeared, which just as suddenly disappeared. When I copied and pasted them, I saw their coding.

    I believe this is the result of Jack Dorsey having de-platformed me for the 2020 election, as of June 26, 2019. However, I don’t have this problem viewing re-posted twits at VDARE.

  184. Dissident says:
    @Steve Sailer

    This appeared at first glance to be a duplicate of your comment just above it but skimming through this one (after reading through the first), I see that it appears to be a more refined version that you apparently intended to replace the earlier one. Assuming this is correct, I would suggest removing the previous one.

    I appreciate the points you made.

  185. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    the ones who insist on using the names of the characters rather than the movies stars playing the characters.

    But how does that work?

    “In THE EMPIRES STRIKES BACK, James Earl Jones tells Mark Hamill that he’s the father.”

    That sounds weird… though Hamill’s scream makes even more sense.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  186. @Anonymous

    Stuntman Brad Pitt drives fading TV star Leonardo DiCaprio around since he lost his license for too many drunk driving crashes.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  187. Dissident says:
    @Anonymous

    Also, he complains about ‘people like me’, but why did people-like-him move away from people-like-them and decide to live as minorities in a nation that is overwhelmingly non-Asian?

    As I pointed-out in one of my previous comments, Walter Chaw was born in the U.S. to immigrant parents and raised here. That may not excuse his attitude but surely you cannot place someone like that– someone born or even merely raised from a young enough age here– in the same category as someone who voluntarily, as an adult, immigrates to a foreign land and then presumes to lecture, scold and castigate the majority population of his new chosen home.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  188. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Leonardo DiCaprio

    But ‘Dalton looks down on Italian Westerns’ makes more sense than ‘DiCaprio looks down on Italian Westerns’. Why would a guy with an Italian name be so averse to trying his luck in Italy?
    It’s amusing because All-American boy Dalton, who looks down on hippies and Italian Westerns, gets his second wind by playing a hippie-heavy and then starring in Italian Westerns and even returning with an Italian wife.

    And then, what about Polanski and Tate in the movie? Do we call them by their movie roles or actors’ names?

    And then what of roles where Jews played Nazis? “Isaac Rabinowicz agreed to the Fuhrer’s plan to invade Poland.”

    I think there are cases where the use of the actor’s name is warranted. Woody Allen for example. Allen is so very much Allen in all his movies that it doesn’t matter.

    But Brando is Don Corleone in the Godfather. He disappeared into that role. And Hoffman was Ratso in Midnight Cowboy.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  189. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dissident

    As I pointed-out in one of my previous comments, Walter Chaw was born in the U.S. to immigrant parents and raised here. That may not excuse his attitude but surely you cannot place someone like that– someone born or even merely raised from a young enough age here–

    I don’t buy that. His parents were born in China and grew up there. But they didn’t like it there and decided to move to another country and start anew.

    So, if Chaw has all these problems with America, he should do what his parents did. Move his ass to another country where he can be around people who look just like him.

    We are told day in and day out how great immigration is. So, even though non-whites were born in their own nations and have deep roots there, it’s totally great, simple, and easy to relocate to the West. If that’s so, then all the complainers in the US should relocate to other nations. Why, it’s so easy. And this goes for whites too. All those PC whites who say it’s great for whites to be minorities. Well, just move to a non-white nation and enjoy your instant-minority status.

    Btw, Chaw should count his blessings. Imagine if he’d grown up in a community with lots of POOR white people or with a lot of blacks. He grew up with rich white people who treated him nicely, and he’s bitching because they confused him with bruce lee or something? He sounds spoiled. I mean other people have REAL problems. Making mountains out of molehills is not cool.

    There was some news story about some Asian kids in Ohio who didn’t go back to school cuz black kids beat them up everyday. That’s real problem. Chaw is just like that princess with the pea in bed. I mean gimme a break. His ‘bruce lee’ bitching is like parody of oppression.

  190. @Anonymous

    For maybe three or five movies per year, the characters’ names will become well known over the next year or two. Most readers of new movie reviews, however, have never heard of these characters. But they do know the names of the stars and can picture them in descriptions of the plot.

    Biopics about famous people, of course, are different.

  191. @Dissident

    I don’t know if you are autistic or just a virtue signaling troll. But I’m aware that he didn’t choose to be born to these parents. But when a grown man is still complaining about being asked as a child from China living in the United States by other children if he knew Bruce Lee, he is choosing to be a whiny bitch.

  192. Corvinus says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Thanks for the response. Although, I cannot help but NOTICE that you remain cagey as to why you outright refuse to offer commentary on the Trump Presidency and the numerous investigations that are ongoing. Maybe someday you’ll come clean, perhaps in your memoirs.

    “I think I did a particularly good job last year of reviewing important/interesting movies and avoiding the ho-hum.”

    Right, important/interesting that enables you to be a social critic to analyze the politics of movies and the turning of movies into politics.

    “I don’t mind standalone or first installment comic book movies like “Joker” or “Wonder Woman” or “Iron Man” or “Black Panther”…”

    Especially if you are able to pen such lines like “Wakanda is a sort of black Zion mixed with the governmental structure of Israel’s new best friend forever, Saudi Arabia, augmented by the xenophobic policies of Japan during the Tokugawa shogunate”.

    • Replies: @Anon
  193. @The Wild Geese Howard

    That’s a stretch. I was pointing out the irony of Chaw resembling an opponent (co-star really) of Bruce Lee, based on Chaw’s reference to Lee. The first movie I ever saw Bolo in was actually Bloodsport. His nonchalant brutality made him a great “villain”.

    • Disagree: The Wild Geese Howard
    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  194. HA says:
    @moshe

    “You’re always low people who assume that the darkness within your own souls also exists in the souls of others and that your own crimes are just preemptive defensive measures.”

    As someone who has himself objected to the nutjob nonsense that @JohnnyWalker123 spouts (despite having the facts painstakingly pointed out to him), I might remind you that you’d be a more convincing opponent of those who assume Jews get a thrill out of desecrating Christianity if you didn’t yourself admit to getting a thrill out of doing exactly that:

    About 3 years ago I attended Midnight Mass outwest and received a communion wafer but rather than let the literal Body of Christ melt in my mouth…It was pretty funny as I video[taped] crumpling Jesus into a toilet and flushing him down into the sewers.

    Yeah, you’re a real riot, funny guy. Look, you’re not going to dissuade @JohnnyWalker123 from his nutty conspiracies theories about Jews. But consider the possibility that trashy low-lifes like you and nutjobs like him probably deserve each other.

    • Agree: black sea
    • Replies: @HA
    , @moshe
  195. Anon[305] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus

    why you outright refuse to offer commentary on the Trump Presidency and the numerous investigations that are ongoing. Maybe someday you’ll come clean, perhaps in your memoirs.

    Shhhh. It’s because he is a conduit between Trump and Putin. Yes, you’ll be able to read all about it twenty yrs hence in a memoir.

  196. moshe says:
    @Dr Van Nostrand

    Your descrip of yahweh gave me an inner chuckle. It may have been accompanied by an outward happy mini-snicker. There ought to be a shorthand way to congratulate someone for online phrasing that made you smile. But anyway, it did.

    gods and demons aside, the idiotic OP is mainly guilty of being a mentally ill fool who can’t think straight but it bothered me personally because he’s just a few leaps and bounds ahead of locally popular misreasonings regarding jews and sex that makes men lose their shit and is (correctly or otherwise) associated with antisemitic mass murders in the past.

    but yeah, christian antisems who feel the need to incorporate sex and sacrifices into their views make for a funny lot. If judaism was about anything it was about the social contract and law supplanting magical gods and tribes. as such, jews made their all powerful god invisible and zealous about his solitaryness as a deity. it’s facepalming to watch jews fill in the magical mad lib spaces in their theology with angels and demons but hilarious when low iq goyim do it. christianities are often very cool but christianities based upon rabbi unz’s reports about magical christian blood and the like have got to be as facepalming for intelligent christians as kabbala water is to intelligent jews.

    to reiterate, anyone who read the idiotic OP’s first tweet and didn’t immediately realize that he is mentally ill should forevermore doubt their own ability to understand anything about the world around them.

  197. moshe says:
    @HA

    desecrating christianity?

    jw is an insane nutjob for thinking that jews kill and burn virgin white wymins and drink the blood of virgin boys.

    having a private laugh at one or another if the stupidities of some religion or other is…just a teeny tiny tad different.

    way to misunderstand the point.

    then again, maybe you think crumpling a wafer is actually making God Almighty cry?

    in that case you’re off your rocker of course.

    i assure you that i was not intending to cause pain to either the man or the god part of jesus. or to any good folk who believe that flushing a wafer down the toilet accomplishes that.

    regardless, even if i do believe that, and i, with a cadre of fellow devil worshippers, stalk catholic churches every morn and eve to collect hosts to burn, it still wouldn’t quite imply sacrifice pits for the murder of people who look like people rather than like wafers or of drinking blood that tastes like blood rather than like wine.

    • Replies: @HA
  198. HA says:
    @moshe

    “jw is an insane nutjob for thinking that jews kill and burn virgin white wymins and drink the blood of virgin boys. having a private laugh at one or another if the stupidities of some religion or other is…just a teeny tiny tad different.

    The point is that assuring the world that Jews DON’T get a thrill out of mocking and defiling that which one or another group of gentiles regard as holy is that much more difficult once you’ve gleefully outed yourself as someone who DOES get a thrill out of doing precisely that, to the point where you feel a need to not only videotape it but then post it in comments here months later. You say you resisted any temptation to drink the blood of virgin boys this time? Swell, but don’t act like you deserve a cookie. To the extent that all that defiling and desecrating and transgressing boundaries is something that gives some Jews a thrill — and clearly it is — it’s only a matter of time before one of them decides to up the ante.

    If you can’t see that, then you’re an idiot (in addition to being a scumbag, which at this point is well established), so that again, to accuse other people of being off their rockers is a tad hypocritical.

    How does someone so utterly lacking in self-awareness even function?

  199. @MikeatMikedotMike

    No, it’s not a stretch. There is nothing in your original statement indicating Bolo starred in many other films.

    Yes, Bolo was great in Bloodsport, and it was also my first exposure to him.

  200. moshe says:

    Hot damn. I misspoke. Of course I drank some blood. Just no more than the rabbinic requirement

    Now listen up spunky, taking every word or action anyone ever did in any temperament of mind or to any audience and pitting it in a massive search engine is gotchaism at its finest.

    So lemme clarify for ya.

    I don’t antagonize people and am about as christian as i am jewish. i have respectfully attended more church services than you have unless you’re a solid twice a week christian.

    I have no interest in antagonizing either good people or pareve people (neutral people) and would probably be more welcomed than you (see abive exception) as a member of the community in almost any church in the world.

    that said, i highly doubt that god lives in a cracker.

    so when it happened that I had unobtrusively pocketed christ and found him in my trousers upon my return home i got a private little chuckle out of the historical significance of doing something no jew had ever done back when they were accused of doing it and pogromed for it.

    and while the matter is so meaningless to me that i can’t swear that this is the case (because, after all, god is not a wafer) i don’t think I mentioned the thing to anyone at any point until about five years afterwards when I mentioned it on this blog.

    and I did mention it on this blog with the absolute clear and definitive intent and interest of antagonizing.

    I thought, and still think, that some antagonizing locally is warranted.

    no one but POS get a kick out of antagonizing innocent people for fun

    it could very well be that i am a POS but writing what i did on unz.com is no evidence of that

    i haven’t bothered to read thru your comments. had i done so i’d either be more clearly explanatory and with an aim to unruffle any feathers of yours i may have ruffled or, far more likely (depending on who your commenting persona is), i would find that you deserve the antagonism and either ignore you or have fun doing more of it.

    in any case, my primary issue with retard OP is that he’s a retard. the fact that his swollen brain leads him in the direction of beliefs that got many of my close relatives killed is why it stuck out to me. but i’ve been harsher on whiskey for his retardedness than i’ve ever been on antisems.

    Literacy among the muddleheaded is a greater annoyance to me than a few mass murders here and there.

    enough.

  201. @The Wild Geese Howard

    “There is nothing in your original statement indicating Bolo starred in many other films.”

    So what? If I state that Mel Gibson was in Lethal Weapon does that indicate to you that he never appeared in any other movies?

    There is nothing in my original statement indicating Bolo didn’t star in other films, only that he had starred with Lee in Enter the Dragon.

    By your logic, there is nothing in my original statement indicating Bolo is from planet Earth. Are you to assume that means I think he is from whatever planet you currently call home?

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