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From the New York Times news section:

Oscar Nominations 2020: ‘Joker’ Leads With 11 Nods; Three Others Get 10
“The Irishman,” “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood” and “1917” each received 10 nominations. Black actors and actresses were largely overlooked.

The ongoing Not Enough Plaques for Blacks Crisis continues to mount.

By Brooks Barnes and Nicole Sperling
Jan. 13, 2020

Here’s what happened:
Little diversity in the acting categories.
Antonio Banderas and Florence Pugh are first-time nominees.
The Netflix slate stretches to best animated film.

LOS ANGELES — … Despite a plethora of diverse films competing for Oscar attention this year, the 9,000-member Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences largely maintained its traditional point of view, handing out the most nominations to four very male, very white movies. “Joker” (Warner Bros.), which portrays the DC Comics villain as sharing the psychological traits of real-life mass shooters, led all films with 11 nominations, including ones for best picture, director (Todd Phillips), actor (Joaquin Phoenix) and score (Hildur Gudnadottir).

It’s just a crazy hunch, but I’m betting that composer Hildur Gudnadottir is very white but not very male.

Sam Mendes’s visually dazzling World War I epic “1917” (Universal-Amblin) and Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood (Sony) each received 10, including best picture recognition. “The Irishman” also collected 10, with Martin Scorsese receiving his ninth nomination for best director.

The best-picture category can have as many as 10 or as few as five nominees, depending on how voters spread their support. This year there were nine. Joining “Joker,” “The Irishman,” “Marriage Story,” “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood” and “1917” were “Ford v Ferrari,” “Jojo Rabbit,” “Little Women” and “Parasite.”

Little diversity in the acting categories.
Black actors and actresses were largely sidelined, with the British-Nigerian actress Cynthia Erivo (“Harriet”) as the sole nominee.

The academy has mounted an effort to double female and minority membership, in large part by inviting in more film professionals from overseas. But even after four years of the initiative, the organization remains 68 percent male and 84 percent white. The director’s branch again left out women, bypassing acclaimed work from Lulu Wang (“The Farewell”), Greta Gerwig (“Little Women”) and others.

Best Director, like Best Actor, is a tough category. For example, Ford v Ferrari got one of the nine Best Picture nominations, but James Mangold missed out on one of the five Best Director nods and Christian Bale didn’t get one of the five Best Actor nominations.

… Even so, the academy showed signs of progress with its recognition for Bong Joon Ho’s drama-comedy-horror mash-up “Parasite, which earned six nominations, including its best-picture nomination — the first ever for a South Korean film.

But aren’t South Koreans white-adjacent?

… The academy’s board of governors, alarmed by sharp declines in television ratings, decided in 2018 to move up this year’s ceremony. It will be held on Feb. 9, two weeks earlier than the last go-round, a seemingly small truncation that nonetheless has the movie capital in a tizzy.

They are finally following my 2014 suggestion to move the Oscars up to the Sunday night one week after Super Bowl Sunday.

And from the New York Times opinion section:

J.Lo Was Robbed. Latinas Were Robbed.

Jennifer Lopez didn’t get an Oscar nod for her career-best turn in “Hustlers.” Her snub highlights a larger problem with Hollywood’s Latinx representation.

By Carlos Aguilar
Mr. Aguilar is a film critic.

Jan. 13, 2020.

… Even more dispiriting is what Ms. Lopez’s snub means for Latinx representation more broadly — Ms. Lopez was the only Latinx performer with a real shot of recognition in the major categories this year and seemed to shoulder much of the burden of fending off another #OscarsSoWhite. (A kind reminder that the Spanish-born Antonio Banderas, who earned a deserved nomination for best actor for “Pain and Glory,” is not Latinx.)

The absence of Latinx representation is a longstanding issue for the academy. Had she been nominated, Ms. Lopez would have been the first American Latinx actress singled out by the academy since Rosie Perez, who earned a best supporting actress nod in 1994 for “Fearless.” The magnitude of this quarter-of-a-century gap might be difficult for some to understand at first — the entertainment industry tends to lump together American-born Latinxes, Latin Americans and Hispanics into a monolithic entity, inaccurately plumping numbers in otherwise well-intentioned studies about diversity.

Indeed, the grand total of American Latinx actors ever nominated for film’s highest acting honors totals is four: In addition to Ms. Perez, they are Rita Moreno (who won in 1962), José Ferrer (a winner in 1951) and Edward James Olmos (nominated in 1989).

He is missing the American-born half-Mexican Susan Kohner (mother of the Weitz Brothers of American Pie) who was nominated for Best Actress for Imitation of Life in 1959. Also, Mexican-born and part-Irish part-Mexican Anthony Quinn was in America from adolescence, and he won two Oscars and was a sizable box office star back in the day. In general, actors of Mexican descent (e.g., Ricardo Montalban) were more popular in old time Hollywood, with its Latin Lover archetype, than in modern Hollywood.

If only American-born Latinxes were considered in the data research focused on diversity in studio productions and what types of roles they are offered, calling the results dismal would be an understatement. And then there’s the fact that no American Latinx filmmaker has ever been nominated for the best director Academy Award, in part because they are rarely considered to helm the “prestige” films Oscar voters are usually attracted to.

It’s evident that an illusion of inclusion in relation to Latinx people has permeated Hollywood over the past decade. The heavily decorated Mexican directors Alfonso Cuarón, Alejandro González Iñárritu and Guillermo del Toro — collectively referred to as “the Three Amigos” — have served as a flimsy Band-Aid to an industry that heralds their accomplishments as proof that everyone who matches their idea of Latinx is being celebrated.

… And stateside Latinx creators have been virtually erased both onscreen and behind the camera.

This year, without any of the men in the overachieving trio in the race, the mirage of collective advancement has vanished. While the Mexican cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto received his third nomination, for “The Irishman,”

Prieto’s grandfather was mayor of Mexico City. Good cinematographers come out of Mexico City, like 3 time Oscar-winner Emmanuel Lubetzki.

2019 was a good year for me as a movie reviewer since, mostly through sheer laziness, I managed to avoid wasting my time watching and reviewing insignificant movies, while dragging myself to most of the better ones. Here are my reviews of nominees:

Joker

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

The Irishman

Ford v Ferrari

Knives Out

Little Women

Richard Jewell

Parasite

I’ve also seen Noah Baumbach’s Marriage Story, which is a very good neo-Woody Allen comedy-drama with Adam Driver and Scarlett Johansen, plus oldtimers Laura Dern, Alan Alda, and Ray Liotta as their divorce lawyers. It’s like if Annie Hall and Alvy Singer got married and then got divorced over whether to live in L.A. or N.Y. It’s currently on Netflix.

Uncut Gems, a drama with Adam Sandler as a gem dealer with a sports betting addiction, got shut out. My wife found it extremely engaging but I didn’t like it quite as much. It’s definitely not bad, but it seems to split viewers as to whether its terrific or meh. My impression is that in general individuals either like or don’t like it, depending upon how much they feel sorry for Sandler’s character, and it’s a little hard to predict which ahead of time. So you might give it a try

My review of the war movie 1917 will be in Takimag.com on Wednesday morning

 
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  1. Charon says:

    Everything will soon operate on the basis of a racial spoils system. That’s what our “leaders” want and so that’s what we’ll get.

    • Agree: Patrick in SC
  2. PaceLaw says:

    The best Latino actors and actresses are all in Mexico or other places in South/Central America. Pretty much like how all of the great Indian actors are in Bollywood. It’s really not that hard to figure out.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Etcetera
  3. newrouter says:

    >By Carlos Aguilar
    Mr. Aguilar is a film critic.<

    Or a teen age grrl.

  4. It’s evident that an illusion of inclusion in relation to Latinx people has permeated Hollywood over the past decade. The heavily decorated Mexican directors Alfonso Cuarón, Alejandro González Iñárritu and Guillermo del Toro — collectively referred to as “the Three Amigos” — have served as a flimsy Band-Aid to an industry that heralds their accomplishments as proof that everyone who matches their idea of Latinx is being celebrated.

    Rough translation: “What I’m whining about isn’t real, but I’m feeling kinda pissy because I don’t like people of mostly European ancestry getting any awards, so I’ll say it anyway. Plus I have this Mad Libs template to fill out and it’s 2020.”

    The stupidity and rank dishonesty of this Clown World is just depressing

    • Agree: Malcolm X-Lax
  5. Lagertha says:

    weird Finnish Gypsies: https:/youtu.be/ab5muPftyuY

  6. Lagertha says:

    Art is not about the people who make that art.grow the fuck up!

  7. The article says “Joker,” which portrays the comics villain as sharing the same psychological traits as real-life mass shooters…”

    Notice what they did NOT say, they did not mention the singular relevant aspect of the film which brought it so much attention to begin with.

    They did not say “Joker,” which portrays the comics villain as being subjected to, and ground down by, the same nihilistic, suffocating societal pressures experienced by real-life mass shooters…”

    I’ll say one thing for these monsters: they don’t miss a single chance, and they never, ever stop.

  8. Hail says: • Website

    It appears there are two Carlos Aguilar film critics. One is b.1958 from Madrid (wife: Anita Haas of Canada; no children; two cats), a respectable Spanish film scene mover-and-shaker since the 1980s. (Undated pic of this Carlos Aguilar and his wife; late 2000s).

    The second Carlos Aguilar film critic is the author of this “J.Lo Was Robbed! LatinX 4 Life!” masterpiece of journalism and a great credit to the New York Times.

    The second Carlos Aguilar is a minor figure (@carlos_film) who claims to be from/based-in Mexico City and Los Angeles, and looks like this:

    A surprising twist is that this Carlos Aguilar came out as an illegal alien and DACA recipient in 2017. (See “A Film Journalist on DACA Speaks Out: Keep My DREAM Alive,” by Carlos Aguilar, The Wrap, Sept. 5, 2017.) He is a US resident, but only because there was no Wall, or other serious enforcement to prevent illegal crossers and deport illegals once here, back then.

    Carlos illegally entered the US, by his account, at about age 14, seemingly ca.2005 (the Bush bubble) and went to LA where he lived with distant family.

    Despite being sin papeles, Carlos was given a “Roger Ebert Fellowship, organized by the Sundance Institute and IndieWire” in 2014.

    This is how he came to such good fortune:

    One day, Sydney Levine, a well-know figure in the film business, read one of my articles and invited me to write on her blog on IndieWire. Then came the life-changing shot of being part of the first class of Roger Ebert Fellows and attend the Sundance Film Festival. And from that moment on I’ve worked and worked relentlessly. I have been flawed many times, but always thankful.

    Carlos Aguilar with Selma Hayek:

  9. Anonymous[206] • Disclaimer says:

    Media are actually nursing this butthurt grudge against a movie for FAILING to inspire gun violence against theater-goers or public gathering? Clown dimension

  10. ‘…But even after four years of the initiative, the organization remains 68 percent male and 84 percent white….”

    I take this disproportionate representation is undesirable.

    What’s curious about this is that one cannot even find out what percentage of the Academy is Jewish — and after all, presumably disproportion here would be be undesirable as well. After all, if we object to white men in general making the movies, wouldn’t it also be reasonable to object to Jews making the movies?

    So, just what proportion of the academy is Jewish? It seems to be impossible to find out.

    I’ll go out on a flyer here: Jews are certainly more numerous than their proportion among humanity in general (0.05%) would lead one to predict. I’ll even bet that they’re more numerous than than their proportion among Americans (2%).

    In fact, here’s a thought. Given the relatively modest bias in favor of whites in general (84%) and in favor of men (68% rather than 50%), that unknown but almost certainly massive percentage of Jews could lead to a statistical oddity.

    It’s possible white gentile males are underrepresented in the Academy, not over-represented. In fact, I’d guess it’s likely. If we decide the Academy should represent America as a whole, well, white gentile males still make up around 30% of America’s population. Is 30% of the Academy white, male, and gentile?

    • Agree: LondonBob
    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @vinteuil
  11. MEH 0910 says:
    @Hail

    • Replies: @istevefan
    , @Andy
    , @Ano
  12. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:

    The only legit complaint is that the truly deserving didn’t get nominated or win. All other considerations are boring.

  13. Hail says: • Website

    Steve Sailer wrote:

    2019 was a good year for me as a movie reviewer since, mostly through sheer laziness, I managed to avoid wasting my time watching and reviewing insignificant movies, while dragging myself to most of the better ones.

    No time for Man Getting Hit by Football, then.

    Homer Simpson: You know something Marge? It’s not that tough being a film cricket.

  14. Anonymous[294] • Disclaimer says:

    Whatever one thinks of Ebert and Siskel, they are talking about quality of movies, not who should get what on the basis of race or color.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    , @duncsbaby
  15. From the Washington Post:

    The 2020 Oscar nominations didn’t have to look like this

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/01/13/2020-oscar-nominations-didnt-have-look-like-this/

    Franklin Leonard is the founder of the Black List, which tracks the best unproduced screenplays in Hollywood.

    Once again, the Oscar nominees are extremely white, and important categories like best director, extremely male. But it doesn’t have to be that way, especially after a year like 2019 that was full of outstanding work by women and people of color. Let’s imagine an alternate history of the 2020 Academy Award nominations announced this morning.

    The quoted text is an editorial note. It is now okay to say something like “Once again, the Oscar nominees are extremely white”, editorially.

    • Replies: @Neuday
  16. istevefan says:
    @MEH 0910

    “People from Spain are not latinos, they are European.”

    I agree.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    , @ic1000
  17. Jack D says:
    @Colin Wright

    Short answer – yes. The Academy membership includes all the trades that go into filmmaking – costumes and set design and cinematography and film editors and makeup and visual effects and so on. While producing and directing are disproportionately Jewish, they do not dominate many of the subsidiary trades.

    • Replies: @Charon
  18. Anonymous[294] • Disclaimer says:

    Instead of bitching about nominations, these culture critics should complain about MOVIES NOT MADE. That would be far more interesting. Not a single movie has been made about Nakba. Or USS Liberty attack even though that would make a great action movie, tragedy, and political thriller.

    Not a single movie about Libyan War. Or how the Obama/Clinton administration aided Neo-Nazis in Ukraine and ‘moderate rebel’ terrorists in Syria.

    I would love to see such movies. All these nominated-or-not-nominated are about movies made. But what the movies NOT made. There have been movies about McCarthyism. How about a movie about how the Rosenbergs and Morton Sobell sent atomic secrets to the USSR? Or a movie about what Jonathan Pollard really did and how he got out of jail.

    And how about a speculative movie about what happened to Jeffrey Epstein(and why he ended up in jail in the first place)?

    And Knoxville Horror.

    Someone should write a book about MOVIES NOT MADE.

    • Agree: Malcolm X-Lax
  19. My impression is that in general individuals either like or don’t like it, depending upon how much they feel sorry for Sandler’s character, and it’s a little hard to predict which ahead of time. So you might give it a try.

    For those who haven’t seen it, I’d recommend Sandler’s somewhat similar movie Punch-Drunk Love. I think his character in that movie was more sympathetic than his character in Uncut Gems. The one thing Uncut Gems accomplishes (beyond making Jews look bad) is establishing an almost comical level of stress: Sandler’s character isn’t just in debt, but his creditors show up at the most inopportune times. He has debts, bets, medical tests, a looming divorce, deals closing and un-closing, all at the same time.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @ic1000
  20. Andy says:
    @MEH 0910

    From his tweets, he is a run of the mill leftist, but I agree with him that, Spaniards are not latinos. Spaniards are Europeans and while they share a language with Latin Americans, Spanish culture is definitely European and quite different from Latin American culture.

    • Replies: @c matt
  21. newrouter says:

    >Franklin Leonard is the founder of the Black List, which tracks the best unproduced screenplays in Hollywood.<

    Cabal member too.

  22. Anonymous[142] • Disclaimer says:
    @PaceLaw

    Is that really the case? Actors and directors at the top of the heap usually find their way to the US somehow.

    https://m.imdb.com/name/nm0609944/

    https://m.imdb.com/name/nm0868219/

  23. MEH 0910 says:
    @Anonymous

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  24. Charon says:
    @Jack D

    Colin! You used the J word!
    Haven’t we told you about that?

    • Replies: @Shmendrix
  25. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @MEH 0910

    Give us Ebert and Russ Meyer Years.

  26. @Hail

    . . . American-born Latinxes . . .

    TIL, the plural of Latinx is Latinxes. Who knew? I would have thought Latinx doubled as the plural.

    Who makes up the rules for made up words, anyway? Also this guy looks like he’s Hispanic in about the same way that Louis CK is Hispanic.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/louis-c-k-im-an-accidental-white-person-243605/amp/

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Bill Jones
  27. @Charon

    At some point, maybe leading roles will be reserved solely for actors of color. It will be understood that the best supporting actor award will be the white one.

  28. @Charon

    I’m sure the Academy mainly just votes for who they think is best. But I wouldn’t be totally surprised either if it turned out that all this diversity nagging was starting to get counter-productive.

    I mean, even if you’re a big Hollywood liberal, you probably get sick of being called names and told how to vote every year. At some point you have to subconsciously want to do the opposite.

    • Replies: @guest
  29. Anonymous[179] • Disclaimer says:

    I just saw 1917. Please make sure to share your opinion about the lead character happening upon a random pail of milk in a bucket, and how it panned out. It was a glaringly obnoxious move by the screenwriter, imo.

  30. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    Spaniards who are actually Latin, are not Latinx, but full blooded mesoamerican indigenous people are, even if they speak no Spanish (nor any other language descended from Latin).

    Makes perfect sense to me.

  31. Bong Joon Ho and Lulu Wang are lucky they’re not of the other sex, what with those names.

  32. Ano says:
    @MEH 0910

    I for one am relieved Senor Aguilar did not brand Spanish-born Antonio Banderas as white, (phew!), but the actor retains his offical Nuremberg Race Laws classification as Hispanic (in spite of the fact his last name doesn’t end in a vowel).

    This means he can be nominated for future #Oscars no white# awards. (Double phew!)

    Big shout out to all the guys at the Reich Ministry of the Interior, and especially you Heinrich!

    I see Mr Sailer has already ‘noticed’ this wunderbar de-white-ification process re: Spanish film-people in years previous…

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/flight-from-white-nyt-redefines-spanish-movie-royalty-as-minority/?highlight=Penelope+Cruz

  33. @Hail

    Just another white guy getting away from Mexicans.

  34. guest says:

    It is a surprisingly white year for well-regarded movie. I’ve only seen the Joker and Once Upon a Time, and both were worthy in my opinion. Except I wish Once Upon a Time were 1.5 hours shorter.

    1917 looks good. I might assume they threw in a dusky hued colonial or two. They shove blacks in medieval English stories willy-nilly.

    Think how much wasted effort was thrown into torpedoeing Joker. We went from actual terror earnings from the U.S. military to “the three black lady characters weren’t that great” or whatever.

    What is the Official Line on the Clown Prince of Crime these days? Have they settled on “Too juvenile when you think about it…Hangover guy, ya know…?”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  35. guest says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    There is no possible way the Academy doesn’t take Dieversity into account. More than account. Just like there’s no way they don’t think about viewership. Like if there had been a big critical push against Joker being nominated, they’d be constrained by the fact that it’s one of those rare birds these days that’s both popular and worthy of honest critics.

    Just like how there’s no way they could have ignored Avatar years ago.

  36. @Hypnotoad666

    There is Latinx, and there is Latin:

    Mi aerodeslizador está lleno de anguilas

    Navis volitans mihi anguillis plena est

    But it’s all Greek to me.

    Τὸ ἐμὸν αερόστρωμνον ἐγχελείων πλῆρές ἐστιν

  37. a reader says:

    NYT: #OscarsSoNonLatinx

    The French answer/finger.

    • Replies: @a reader
  38. @guest

    In 1917 there is one Sikh soldier. He gets a funny line.

    That seemed reasonable.

  39. I’m confused. Why don’t Latinx simply sneak into the Academy, and vote themselves undocumented Oscars?

    Or maybe a Jewish federal appellate judge could unilaterally invent a law that every time a Latinx wins an Oscar, all their babies get free Academy membership.

  40. @istevefan

    So by this logic, even the ancient Romans weren’t Latino. (I guess they were Latinus, Latina, Latini, Latinae…)

    • LOL: MBlanc46
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Andy
  41. BB753 says:

    Sam Mendes is a Sephardic Jew. Why doesn’t he qualify as “Hispanic”?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  42. The first thing I thought after watching marriage story (which was superbly acted but quite depressing as a movie… plus divorce lawyers, vitriol, and no real psychological closure) was how good a movie Kramer vs Kramer was in every dimension.

  43. “It’s like if Annie Hall and Alvy Singer got married”

    That one was Manhattan Murder Mystery.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  44. eded says:

    Steve,

    How much of minority under representation in Hollywood is the result of artistically talented minorities staying in the their countries of origin and not immigrating because they have opportunities back home? Some Americans seem to talk as though Hollywood is the only movie industry in the world. Why emigrate when you can stay in India and make Bollywood movies or wherever?

    If your talents lie in the STEM fields it may be in your interests to move to the US, but if you are artistically talented why move away from your home country and culture where your art may be better appreciated and understood? My theory is that much more scientific talent migrates to the US than artistic talent.

    In a previous post you you discussed the hereditary nature of the military profession but the arts are a also hereditary. The result is that the children of immigrants are much more like to follow their immigrant parents into STEM careers than rebel and go into the arts and show business. The few that do have to rebel against their parents wishes.

    A notable exception Ravi Shankar and his American born daughter Nora Jones.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Anonymous
  45. @eded

    The #4 director in Mexico stays home and makes political satires about Mexico. But the top 3 make movies in the US or Britain.

    This Korean guy hasn’t yet made a movie in the US but he probably will soon. The tall German guy who made the Lives of Others soon made a Johnny Depp movie that bombed.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  46. @Fluesterwitz

    Annie Hall was filmed as a murder mystery, but then the editor talked Woody Allen into cutting out the entire murder plot, adding some voice overs, and releasing it as a short comedy. It won Best Picture but the editor didn’t win Best Editor.

    The murder plot was later reused in Allen’s Manhattan Murder Mystery.

    • Replies: @Fluesterwitz
  47. @BB753

    The name Mendes is Portuguese.

    Is he Sephardic Jewish? His Portuguese creole grandfather from a wealthy family in Trinidad was named Alfred Hubert Mendes, which doesn’t sound too Jewish. Wikipedia says Sam Mendes’s father was Catholic and his mother Jewish. I didn’t look up what kind of Jewish ethnicity his mother was.

    • Replies: @BB753
    , @Jack D
  48. @Dave Pinsen

    I would have liked Uncut Gems more if they’d made it funnier. I get that it’s a drama, but a lot of the situations are pretty funny, but they didn’t go for laughs.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Dave Pinsen
  49. a reader says:

    … Alfred Hubert Mendes, which doesn’t sound too Jewish

    ahem

  50. Shmendrix says:
    @Charon

    Oops. He meant to say”Zionist”. Because, allegedly, his beef is “political”.

  51. bomag says:
    @Hail

    He embodies a phenomenon of our age: we import people to tell us we need to give more of the country away to their people.

    • Agree: Hail
  52. sb says:

    I’d say that a few Anglos have been given short shrift over the years: – look at Alfred Hitchcock , Charlie Chaplin and Peter O Toole who only ever received honourary Oscars

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
  53. Etcetera says:
    @PaceLaw

    In India, the stereotype is that Bollywood actors are all aspiring to “make it to the big leagues” and transition to Hollywood roles. Then again, this has only happened once or twice, so I wonder if it’s true.

  54. jill says:

    Notice how all of a sudden the Dem candidates no longer spew their anti-white rhetoric as they did just a few short months ago?

  55. Anonymous[371] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hail

    A white-ish Mexican criticizing Gringos for being ray-cist for not recognizing enough “Latinx” (a word never used in Spanish, must be a very sexist and heteronormative language!) in their own entertainment industry is about a galling as one can get.
    This Aguilar must be for “film critics” what fellow Mexican Jorge Ramos is for “journalists;” A fair-skinned Mexican who tries to guilt-trip gullible Gringos into believing they’re a bunch of bigots all-the-while pretending not to notice the much more pervasive prejudice in their own backyards. Unfortunately for Srs. Aguilar and Ramos, most Americans these days can easily see the Euro-centric images emanating out of Latin America’s own entertainment industry by simple turning the dial to a Mexican TV show or doing a little research online.

    Case in point: LAST YEAR an Indigenous Indian Actress named Yalitza Aparacio was nominated for an Oscar for her performance in the Mexican film Roma, a story about maid in 1970s Mexico. The response: she was subjecting to “crude, racially-charged language” by many of her fellow colleagues, with one (undoubtedly white) Mexican actor dismissing her as a effing Indian.

    As the Good Book says, why look at the spec in someone else’s eye while ignoring the plank in your own.

    https://www.eluniversal.com.mx/english/yalitza-aparicio-forces-mexico-acknowledge-racism-and-class-division

  56. ic1000 says:
    @istevefan

    So does Carlos Aguilar want to play the Nuremburg Laws Game by Brazilian rules (“if you look [whatever], then you are”) or not? Of course, for the Woke, the current Motte-and-Bailey (heh) rules are best.

    Sr. Aguilar’s birth certificate says “Mexico, D.F.;” is that an absolute trump card? Some Respectable Press organization ought to insist that hx take a DNA test and discuss the results. Does, say, the New York Times know who this guy is?

  57. ic1000 says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    > The one thing Uncut Gems accomplishes (beyond making Jews look bad) is establishing an almost comical level of stress.

    The other thing was to establish Sandler as a Serious Actor. At least for a non-moviegoer like me, who knew him only from SNL appearances and lowbrow comedies.

    Uncut Gems worked at those two levels, Stress and ‘Sandler Acting Seriously’ but that was about it. It’s a grim little picture of people making life miserable for themselves and those around them.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Dave Pinsen
  58. Meanwhile, I think even the left media is tiring of this as they reach for less and less important objects. I heard this one this morning; the reporter as well as the experts and spokesman all seemed lethargic.
    First of all, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is a marketing gimmick, not an important institution. Treating the induction process as something important to our culture just tends to reiffy the premise. Who has the energy to either fight for or defend against this crap?
    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.npr.org/2020/01/14/796012607/women-make-up-less-than-8-of-rock-and-roll-hall-of-fame-inductees&ved=2ahUKEwiJ96aRqIPnAhUKwosBHd1qANsQFjAAegQIAxAB&usg=AOvVaw0rDUiHicOGMu8GsoYRYtGN

  59. I liked Uncut Gems but it is heavily New York and heavily Jewish, so it may not be everyone’s cup of tea. Adam Sandler was very convincing.

  60. Neuday says:
    @PiltdownMan

    They could just as easily say, “Once again, all the best movies, like all the best countries, are filled with White people, and because I’m White/not White/Jewish, I feel guilty/envious/hatred about it.”

  61. Possumman says:

    Maybe Cheech and Chong can make another movie.

    • LOL: black sea
  62. @Hail

    If Trump does one useful thing in his Presidency, let it be deporting Carlos

  63. AceDeuce says:

    Gee, with how prevalent they are, you’d think that Wypipo INVENTED movies or something…

    Oh wait. They did.

    “Yoga’s too Indian!”

    “Tae Kwon Do is too Korean”

    “Blues and jazz are too black”

  64. AceDeuce says:
    @sb

    Cary Grant, as well.

    Hell people of the caliber of Jackie Gleason, Michael Landon, and Steve Carrell never won an Emmy.

  65. @Steve Sailer

    Tragedies are supposed to be cathartic, not funny. If one can’t feel sympathy (literally “suffering together”) for Sandler’s character that’s a major self-awareness problem.

    Amazing how many layers of meaning in that title. And of course it’s the Cossack in the end who delivers his fate Sopranos style.

    Uncut indeed.

  66. @ic1000

    If all you saw was misery in that movie you weren’t paying attention.

    His father-in-law, his mistress, and his boys all loved him. Took him awhile to get to misery, and he didn’t stay there long.

  67. keypusher says:

    So does “Latinx” mean “hispanic resident in US, singular” now?

    There was a splash on Twitter a few weeks ago where someone pointed out that 98% of Hispanics didn’t like/use “latinx.” But so what? Our betters continue to spread it, and in three years using any other word for hispanics will be roughly as improper as an Anglo using the term “negro” to refer to blacks. African-Americans, sorry.

  68. @International Jew

    Logic?

    It’s bathos all the way down.

  69. @Hail

    It’s so silly how upset people get by the word/concept “Latinx.”

    He must be talking about his own people. We’re not upset by it; we’re having a jolly good laugh!

  70. BB753 says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Well, Mendes could either be a misspelling of Spanish Mendez (Also Melendez) , or Portuguese ( from Germanic “Ermin-hild” Melendo >Mendo + – ez (<Latin genitive – is))
    But since Portuguese aren't legally Hispanic (though strangely Spaniards are), Sam Mendes cannot apply for A. A.
    I don't know about his grandfather, but the Dutch and English Caribbean Islands had an old and numerous Sephardic population.

    • Replies: @guest
  71. L8917 says:

    I watched The Irishman over Thanksgiving and I agree with Ana DuVernay [Selma], perhaps the genesis of the OscarsSoWhite nonsense-‘it is a film by someone with talent and the 3hour+ run time flew by’

    The masses are looking to roast some StephenKing over his diversity comment. Considering his usual Twitter leftist comments, that might be a good thing.

  72. syonredux says:

    In general, actors of Mexican descent (e.g., Ricardo Montalban)

    Pure Iberian descent:

    Birth Name: Ricardo Gonzalo Pedro Montalbán y Merino

    Date of Birth: November 25, 1920

    Place of Birth: Mexico City, Mexico

    Date of Death: January 14, 2009

    Place of Death: Los Angeles, California, U.S.

    Ethnicity: Spanish [Castilian, remote Galician]

    Ricardo was born in Mexico City, Mexico, the son of Ricarda Merino Vda. (Merino Jiménez) and Genaro Balbino Montalbán Busano. His parents were Spanish, his father from Valladolid, Valladolid, Castilla y León and his mother from Soria, Soria, Castilla y León.

    https://ethnicelebs.com/ricardo-montalban

  73. @Reg Cæsar

    Once again, all roads lead to Python. (But can you say it in the original Hungarian?)

    “I will not buy this tobacconist. It is scratched.”

  74. syonredux says:

    Speaking of WOKE-ness:

    7/n As I’ve suggested in earlier threads, the acknowledgment of white privilege, and ‘wokeness’ more generally, affects white political attitudes and behavior in ways that it doesn’t for non-whites. Some evidence for this provided below.

    8/n As shown, with one exception, the predicted odds for each political engagement item are largely the same for whites/nonwhite dems until we get to those who ‘strongly agree’ to the white privilege statement. At that point, white dems become significantly more likely than..

    9/n non-white dems to report engaging in the listed activity. Importantly, the gap is greatest for the most impactful of political activities: campaign donations and contacting public officials.

    10/n A recent MTurk study (https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/for.2019.17.issue-3/for-2019-0028/for-2019-0028.xml?lang=en …) found that roughly 1 in 2 white liberals indicated that their awareness of privilege influences their political behavior. Similarly, I argue that…

    11/n privilege awareness–and the moral emotions (guilt, shame, anger etc.) and perceived responsibility that often attends it–serves as an added ‘fuel’ for white dem/liberal political engagement (as well as the adoption of progressive policy positions).

    • Replies: @GoRedWings!
  75. Andy says:
    @International Jew

    Latins originally meant those who are from the Italian region of Latium (today’s Lazio, where Rome is located). “Latin America” as a term was an invention by the French when they briefly conquered Mexico in the 1860s. Since both French and Spanish descend from Latin, the term Latin America gave to the French in their minds a tenous claim over the rest of the countries in the Americas that had become independent from Spain.

    • Agree: BB753
  76. Escher says:

    Latinx peoples and Blacks could just create their own awards, since Oscars are so white.

  77. It’s evident that an illusion of inclusion in relation to Latinx people has permeated Hollywood over the past decade. The heavily decorated Mexican directors Alfonso Cuarón, Alejandro González Iñárritu and Guillermo del Toro — collectively referred to as “the Three Amigos” — have served as a flimsy Band-Aid to an industry that heralds their accomplishments as proof that everyone who matches their idea of Latinx is being celebrated.

    So, giving 5 of the last 6 awards for Best Director to people from Mexico is merely an illusion? This award is the most prestigious for any individual in Hollywood. It would be like someone from Mexico winning the US presidency.

    Also, let’s not forget that Hattie McDaniel won Best Supporting Actress for her role in Gone with the Wind…

  78. @jill

    Notice how all of a sudden the Dem candidates no longer spew their anti-white rhetoric as they did just a few short months ago?

    The Trump campaign presumably has saved the video of the best bits.

    Only question is, is Trump willing to make a strong, principled defense of “whiteness”, which is really what is required to use it.

  79. Jack D says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Mendes is an old Portuguese Jewish name but after 1492 there were a lot of Jews who stayed and converted so there are non-Jewish Mendes’s also. And a lot of Sephardim ended up in the Caribbean.

    It’s very hard for a Jewish population to maintain its religion if it is a small community that lacks critical mass. By the time the Eastern Jews started showing up, most of the small original colonial ( mostly Sephardic) Jewish community (especially outside of NY) had assimilated into America. The “Jewish” Confederates such as Judah Benjamin mostly had Christian wives and children who were raised as Christian and were no longer practicing Jews.

    http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/10667-mendes

    • Replies: @BB753
  80. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @eded

    How much of minority under representation in Hollywood is the result of artistically talented minorities staying in the their countries of origin and not immigrating because they have opportunities back home?

    It depends. Many directors aspire to be global, like Michael Bay. If you wanna be the next Michael Bay, it makes to be in Hollywood, the capital of blockbuster movie-making. No matter how big you are in India or Hong Kong, it doesn’t compare to Hollywood.

    But directors who aspire to be artistic know Hollywood is about money uber alles and their visions don’t translate well to another cultural or to a global setting. So, they must learn to make Hollywood movies or water down their artistic vision to make it more American(with global appeal) or generic. Trying to transpose their culturally distinct artistic vision to America can have disastrous consequences. Like ARIZONA DREAMS by Kusterica. It just doesn’t work. Milos Forman made it work, as did Fritz Lang, but maybe Jews are more zeligish in adapting to new cultures because of a long history of exile and wandering. Still, the Hollywood movies of Jewish emigre directors(from Germany and Eastern Europe) were never quite personal with a few exceptions. Lang’s best films are still his German ones. While Polanski’s best film may be CHINATOWN, his KNIFE IN THE WATER is more personal. TENANT is personal too but is more a Europeansrt film than Hollywood. The saddest is Konchalovsky who made SIBERIADE in Russia. He was reduced to making stuff like TANGO AND CASH and worse. His SHY PEOPLE and RUNAWAY TRAIN are good works but culturally confused.

    To succeed in Hollywood, one must become a Hollywood-ish director. For some, this is not a problem because they make Hollywood-ish movies in their own country. Luc Besson was Hollywood-ish from the beginning. So was Roland Emmerich, the German Michael Bay.

    https://www.dw.com/en/german-directors-the-new-toast-of-hollywood/a-2823025

    Interesting cases are Wolfgang Petersen and Paul Verhoeven. Both began with personal art films in their own countries but adapted successfully to the Hollywood style though they ended up making far inferior movies.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    , @syonredux
  81. Isn’t “Women Snubbed for Best Director” going to be a more annoying and persistent gripe?

  82. On the hand- long live Mexican feminism..Although, it may be harmful to your health…

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7882957/Female-assassin-21-struggles-breath-dying-following-gun-battle-Mexican-military.html

    Last moments of Mexico’s most deadly female cartel boss: Ruthless drug lord called ‘La Catrina’, 21, who led the nation’s most powerful hit squad is killed in shootout

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  83. Funny the company I work for, Telecom/Media behemoth sent an email out proudly proclaming we won 6 Golden Globes, more than any other media company. Failed to mention they were all white folks. No doubt if they were POC’s, that would have been heralded.

  84. @Steve Sailer

    Yeah, PT Anderson did a better job of that in Punch-Drunk Love.

  85. @ic1000

    Punch-Drunk Love established him as a serious actor. Watch that.

  86. Latinx isn’t a word. It was made up by marxists in the past decade to control the grievance narrative. We should not let the Herbert Marcuse/Angela Davis crowd control the language we use.

    This is why mexican spanish (as opposed to castilian) is bastardized spanish. Mexico has no formal language academy.

    Latino or latina is a linguistic term. Spanish, French and Italian are latin languages. The french are latins as much as the italians are.

    Hispanic means “from the Iberic peninsula,” a geographic term. Madrid, Havana and D.F. are full of hispanics.

    This grievance class are mexicans/mestizos. Every one of them has a white person/european in the family woodpile.

  87. I think that J-lo should have gotten an Oscar long ago for having the finest Latina butt in films, maybe for her role in “Anaconda”. Nowadays, her butt is too droopy, and she can’t act, so she hasn’t been robbed of any Oscars lately.

    Is there a butt category? Is that even a thing?

  88. @jill

    No, I haven’t noticed, but then again, I wouldn’t have noticed if they had all set themselves on fire, either.

  89. Uncut Gems sounds like a Steve Sailer story from several years ago.

  90. @Reg Cæsar

    I don’t buy Latinx. It’s too expensive.

  91. BB753 says:
    @Jack D

    Mendes is no more Jewish than Lopes or Silva. I guess Portuguese Jews just adopted gentile surnames. As I said, Mendes is derived from a Germanic name, like Rodrigues.

  92. @Anonymous

    Anyone who even offered a script about the USS Liberty massacre would be silently blacklisted forever and ever. They want the story shoved down the memory hole for good.

  93. It was nice to hear Armond White mention that Dragged Across Concrete was his favorite film of 2019. It wasn’t as good as Bone Tomahawk, but it was better than Brawl in Cell Block 99. Of course, Zahler gets criticized for showing a couple of “racist” cops (Mel Gibson and Vince Vaughn) as actual multidimensional human beings in a world where that’s not allowed. But I give the movie two thumbs up just for showing a scene in which a bunch of black thugs harass (and assault) without any provocation whatsoever a young white girl on her way home from school and the stress that creates for her also white police officer parents. That’s the real world millions of working-class white Americans live in. And showing the real world in a movie in 2019 takes balls.

  94. Muggles says:

    One thing which is unavoidably noticeable is how over time, in the US, names for different “races” or even ethnicities are changed every few years or so.

    “Colored” became “people of color” an awkward replacement which means very little. Colored meant only black. Black of course was what replaced Negro. POC means non-white.

    Hispanic replaced “Mexican” and now we have the horrible “Latinx” which means nothing at all. Sounds like something made up at a drag show. Not using that term of course = racism.

    “White people” is being used by the commie elite as a curse phrase. Soon to replace “Nazi” which too few poorly educated Americanos can even recall much any longer. Who were they? Weren’t they white? But only in Germany? Well, that’s not enough…

    The SJW elites (low IQ/info Twitterers mainly) will continue to try to mangle the English language until they fade away. As much as they are self hating White folks, they will never actually leave the USA. Canada is too cold, Australia too distant. So they will continue to make up silly words and terms like small children. Eventually we will all tire of that.

  95. Anonymous[382] • Disclaimer says:

    Latin takeover of American culture is never happening.

    They lack the verbal IQ.

    They lack the math/science IQ.

    They lack the charisma factor that enables blacks to punch above their weight in music and entertainment.

    They lack any special athletic inheritance.

    They lack a grinder/workaholic culture that could close the IQ gaps slightly.

    Latin cultural takeover is never gonna happen even if whites drop to say 10% of the population……so look for increasing Latino anger in the future over their perceived lack of representation as leaders in American society .

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  96. J.Ross says:

    Remember that chick who wanted to know why a British university had a mural of white men receiving diplomas, and it turned out they were students who never graduated because they had volunteered for WWI after coordinated mainstream newsmedia lying?
    https://postimg.cc/vDctjvhf
    (Unless I’m misreading her tweets and she’s actually asking for late imperial or WWI era femdom, the role Antje Traue was born to play. In that period there was a fad of crossdressing women in either military uniforms, or in feminine dresses stylized to look military. Recruitment posters featured this [“Gee, I wish I were a man, I’d join the Navy!”] and women in the high nobility were photographed like this as a patriotic gesture. As far as I know this is an unexploited style.)

  97. Wilkey says:

    There was a lot to like about “Marriage Story,” but it all falls apart since the only real conflict is New York vs. LA. A couple that clearly loves each other divorces over that. It does remind you that Adam Driver really is a superb actor, and I did like the Sondheim number he sings near the end. But there just really wasn’t much there. It was Kramer vs Kramer meets Seinfeld – a divorce about nothing.

    • Replies: @guest
  98. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Latin takeover of American culture is never happening.

    The main push-back against this ‘Latin’ thing need to be about sowing divisions between Latin Whites and Pseudo-Latin browns. Browns were in Mexico and South America for over 10,000 yrs before European Latins came. They have their own identity and history. And yet, their identity has been replaced with ‘latin’. Imagine if Mongols who ruled over Russia made Russians take on ‘Mongol’ identity. Imagine if Greeks under Turks came to regard themselves as ‘Turks’.

    The great injustice is browns being called ‘Latin’, the identity of the very people who conquered and erased them.

    Also, ‘Latinx’ is not only Latin imperialism but Jewish globo-homo imperialism. It’s bad enough that browns must be ‘Latins’, but they are now even associated with ‘gay’ crap. It’s more cultural imperialism against browns. They should be called IMA or Inca-Maya-Aztec.

    The real problem with POC is not that they themselves will take over top slots. Rather, they supply the votes for the Globalist Party that will forever be ruled by globo-homo Jews. Democratic Party is a brown-yellow-black-cuck body and a Jewish-homo head.

  99. guest says:
    @BB753

    Hispanic is a stupid term invented by stupid people, so there’s nothing strange about that.

  100. syonredux says:
    @Anonymous

    . It just doesn’t work. Milos Forman made it work, as did Fritz Lang, but maybe Jews are more zeligish in adapting to new cultures because of a long history of exile and wandering. Still, the Hollywood movies of Jewish emigre directors(from Germany and Eastern Europe) were never quite personal with a few exceptions.

    Of course, a “personal” film can also be quite bad……

    And Continental Hollywood talents have made a lot of great films: The Shop Around the Corner
    , Sunset Boulevard , The Apartment , Ninotchka, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931 version by Rouben Mamoulian), Anatomy of a Murder, etc

    Lang’s best films are still his German ones.

    I dunno….Fritz made some awfully good films in Hollywood: The Woman in the Window, The Big Heat, Ministry of Fear, etc……M is a classic, but some of Lang’s other German work is half-great, half-terrible….Metropolis, for example, has great visuals but is as dumb as a box of rocks….

    And then there’s the complicated case of non-American Anglophone talent in the USA…..Do they count as foreigners or not? Maybe semi-foreign?Half-American? They certainly seem to adapt well to American cinema.Many of Hitchcock’s best films (Vertigo, Psycho, Rear Window, Strangers on a Train, The Birds, Shadow of a Doubt) were made in Hollywood….

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  101. guest says:
    @Wilkey

    No, they divorce over the wife suddenly deciding she’s unhappy. Which is in fact how most marriages end.

    The New York/LA conflict is mostly played out dramatically in a fashion that doesn’t interest me. “Serious” theatah! vs t.v. Ambition versus artistic sacrifice, blah, blah. But mostly as part of custody battle.

    It is funny, though, to see bicoastalism come back to bite these people. The movie presents them as straight NYC despite her family being LA and the fact that they were married there. She takes the kid with her when she moves, and suddenly they’re bicoastal.

    Which would be a total non-issue if they lived in Oklahoma City for 10 years before the wife moved back home to Cincinnati. But judges are apt to swallow mutable homebase when the NYC/LA is involved.

    • Replies: @guest
  102. guest says:

    By the way, I saw Marriage Story after watching some clips of the Last Jedi, and it’s jarring to remember that Laura Dern is actually a good actress.

    Adam Driver as Kyle Ben was obviously wasted, but I want to see him win an Oscar for this SNL sketch:

  103. syonredux says:
    @Anonymous

    Interesting cases are Wolfgang Petersen and Paul Verhoeven. Both began with personal art films in their own countries but adapted successfully to the Hollywood style though they ended up making far inferior movies.

    Nah. Verhoeven always had a Euro-schlock sensibility:

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  104. I know all those movies suck and I don’t even have to watch them.

    It’s like knowing Stephen King sucks without having to read him.

    It’s simple. Anyone with a lick of sense just knows.

  105. c matt says:
    @Andy

    Well, to be fair then, there is no such thing as “Latin American” culture. There are several different cultures in various countries throughout south and part of north America. Even Spanish culture is an amalgamation of several sub-cultures. Which goes to show, most countries are organized on too large a scale for decently meaningful existence.

    • Replies: @Andy
  106. @syonredux

    Correlation does not eqal causation.

    Just because the most activist Democrats also happen to be the wokest doesn’t mean wokeness is the driving force. These people were probably always contacting officials and donating to campaigns, way before the current fad. (Does anyone still bring up ‘cultural appropriation’? Not after even the slowest have realized who is really appropriating whose culture.)

    Wokeness is a power-game in media and politics, not a functioning cult or ideology.

  107. syonredux says:
    @Steve Sailer

    The #4 director in Mexico stays home and makes political satires about Mexico. But the top 3 make movies in the US or Britain.

    This Korean guy hasn’t yet made a movie in the US but he probably will soon. The tall German guy who made the Lives of Others soon made a Johnny Depp movie that bombed.

    The kidnapping problem in Mexico makes that country something of a special case, though.

  108. I don’t care if they give every one of these awards to POC transwomen if they would only STFU.

  109. @Hypnotoad666

    And the biologically and culturally female plural?

    Lantinxesses?

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  110. guest says:
    @guest

    “how most marriages end”

    Not counting the ones that end in death.

  111. @Bill Jones

    And the biologically and culturally female plural?

    Lantinxesses?

    Or Latinxettes?

    Although that is starting to sound more like a new prescription laxative: “Ask your doctor if Latinxettes might be right for you.”

  112. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    Not a single movie has been made about Nakba.

    There was a movie made about it – by Israelis: Al-Nabka.

    Or USS Liberty attack even though that would make a great action movie, tragedy, and political thriller.

    You want one? Donate here.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  113. vinteuil says:
    @Colin Wright

    It’s possible white gentile males are underrepresented in the Academy, not over-represented.

    Last time I ran the numbers, white gentile males are not only under-represented in Academia, they are more under-represented than blacks or hispanics.

  114. notsaying says:

    Most of the people who get nominated work behind the scenes.

    Nowadays they come from middle class families and above, for the most part. It costs money or it takes connections to get the training and/or experience to get these jobs so we don’t see a lot of blacks and Hispanics in these jobs because there’s less blacks and Hispanics who are middle class and above in America and not many have connections to the film or TV industry.

    Acting may be easier to get into but most of the parts are still for white people because that’s who’s writing and directing and financing and producing these movies. I know that Hispanics see a lot of movies but obviously they are willing to see movies with lots of white people in them. I don’t see any of this changing soon unless minorities stop being willing to see white people in movies or unless a lot of minorities start writing and directing and financing and producing movies.

    By the way, there’s a lot of white people who’d like to work in movies too but they don’t have a way to get in, either. Like so many other things in America that are tied to class and money, people see mostly whites do something and think that all whites have the same opportunities to do that too but that’s often not the case and nobody seems to notice that or care. I think that’s too bad.

  115. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    Of course, a “personal” film can also be quite bad……

    Yep, but it’s still an effort to be special, different than sticking to the formula. Generally, the best Hollywood movies tend to be those that are half-personal and half-genre, like VERTIGO and GODFATHER. If it’s too personal like CONVERSATION or KING OF MARVIN GARDENS, the ‘auteur’ tends to fall into navel-gazing or excessive artiness. Mamet understands this. The genre element provides some structure, form, and pattern to the material. It’s like even personal poems need some structure. A great work has to be more than genre but it provides the backbone and mythos with which and against which the personal vision can operate. Early Godard understood this in his best works before he went mad. BREATHLESS uses as well as subverts genre conventions of noir and crime thriller.

    And Continental Hollywood talents have made a lot of great films

    True, but people like Billy Wilder and Fred Zinnemann were never artist-artists. They were terrific technicians. They could do art if need be but that wasn’t their main thing. So, they fit in pretty well in Hollywood. But I can’t imagine someone like Bergman, Antonioni, or Bresson fitting into Hollywood. Kusterica is a true artist, and his attempt to Americanize his peculiar Serbian sensibility was disastrous in ARIZONA DREAMS.

    .Fritz made some awfully good films in Hollywood

    He had an outstanding career in Hollywood, but nothing he did there comes anywhere near M, TESTAMENT OF DR. MABUSE, and NIBELUNGEN SAGA. Also, he really altered the course of cinema as a German director. As a Hollywood director, he was among the best but hardly a seminal figure. But then, Hollywood generally suppressed a truly eccentric approach, which is why Welles didn’t last long there. CITIZEN KANE was essentially an accident. Welles made a name in theater, and Hollywood decided to give the whiz kid a chance, prolly mainly out of amusement. It had no idea he would make the ‘greatest movie ever’ on first try.
    Welles great success proved to be inconvenient for Hollywood and a negative influence on later directors. Hollywood’s predictable(and reliable) studio system would be threatened if the Welles approach became a thing. But, CITIZEN KANE was almost an impossible work. What are the odds that someone who never made a feature film would go on to make the ‘greatest film’ on his first try? Because of the myth of Kane, so many later directors thought that if only they were given the freedom of Welles to do their thing, they could make their own Kane. In fact, most directors would do much better following some guideline and structure provided by the system. Coppola did his best work with GODFATHER, worst work with ONE FROM THE HEART and RUMBLE FISH.
    70s cinema is much mythologized as a time when directors became auteurs and got to do their own thing, but the result was, more often than not, something as rotten as ALEX IN WONDERLAND. And someone tell Gilliam he’s no Welles. Gilliam could have a string of decent films, but he always shot over the mark with his ‘misunderstood genius’ shtick. Lesson is don’t pretend to be visionary and genius unless you really have the talent of Welles or Kubrick.

    And then there’s the complicated case of non-American Anglophone talent in the USA

    Laurence Oliver was better actor than director, for which he was leaden and dull. His HAMLET is dreary. It would have been much better directed by someone else.
    The great thing about Hitchcock was he knew his strengths and weaknesses. He knew his forte wasn’t personal art, but as a man of ideas, he loved to slip in suggestions between the layers of plot. So, his movies are great fun but also something to think about.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    , @syonredux
  116. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    Nah. Verhoeven always had a Euro-schlock sensibility:

    But compare SOLDIER OF ORANGE and BLACK BOOK with mindless trash like ROBOCOP, TOTAL RECALL, and STARSHIP TROOPERS. His European films are meant for an intelligent audience whereas his Hollywood works are premised “You dumb Americans are such globo-fascists addicted to violence as entertainment that you don’t even know I’m insulting your stupid ass.” True, some of his European films, like TURKISH DELIGHT and 4TH MAN, are on the sensationalist and sleazy side, but they are still many times more sophisticated than utter trash like BASIC STINK.

    The most obvious case of European contempt for American sensibility was with remake of THE VANISHING. It was remade the director of the original, and its awfulness had to have been intentional. “You Americans are too dumb to appreciate my original, so here’s a really retarded dumb-down version for you, with a happy ending added.”

    • Replies: @syonredux
  117. to me, “hispanic”, in the american context, is just an euphemism for mixed race.

    spaniards or white mexicans calling themselves “latinos” or “Hispanic” is non-sense.

    the majority of “hispanics” in usa consider themselves white. but this is, of course, very unreliable, so they ended being a separated category in any social research because researchers dont think they’re white even if they called themselves that way. which may makes sense.
    (56% of “mexican-americans” call themselves white – in the census, of course, not on university enrollment forms – but even high estimate s say that the number of whites in mexico is no higher than 20%. and those whites stay there. btw, the media, though, is more white than usa tv there)

  118. syonredux says:
    @Anonymous

    Nah. Verhoeven always had a Euro-schlock sensibility:

    But compare SOLDIER OF ORANGE and BLACK BOOK with mindless trash like ROBOCOP, TOTAL RECALL, and STARSHIP TROOPERS. His European films are meant for an intelligent audience whereas his Hollywood works are premised “You dumb Americans are such globo-fascists addicted to violence as entertainment that you don’t even know I’m insulting your stupid ass.”

    My take: PV loves the violence in Robocop , Total Recall, and Starship Troopers ; the irony is just gloss, a protective layer to misguide prole-tier critics. PV is simply a Euro version of QT.

    True, some of his European films, like TURKISH DELIGHT and 4TH MAN, are on the sensationalist and sleazy side, but they are still many times more sophisticated than utter trash like BASIC STINK.

    My take: Basic Instinct is The 4th Man….which means that The 4th Man is just tarted-up Euro-schlock.

  119. syonredux says:
    @Anonymous

    And then there’s the complicated case of non-American Anglophone talent in the USA

    Laurence Oliver was better actor than director, for which he was leaden and dull. His HAMLET is dreary. It would have been much better directed by someone else.
    The great thing about Hitchcock was he knew his strengths and weaknesses. He knew his forte wasn’t personal art, but as a man of ideas, he loved to slip in suggestions between the layers of plot. So, his movies are great fun but also something to think about.

    There’s a lot of “personal art” in Vertigo and Marnie…..Almost too personal….as though Hitch removed the veil and let us see the darkness within….It’s probably not a coincidence that the post-Marnie work was second-tier, with only Frenzy marking a partial return to form….

    He had an outstanding career in Hollywood, but nothing he did there comes anywhere near M, TESTAMENT OF DR. MABUSE, and NIBELUNGEN SAGA.

    I think that the best of his Hollywood stuff came pretty close…..

    As a Hollywood director, he was among the best but hardly a seminal figure.

    He had a lot of influence on film noir…..

    True, but people like Billy Wilder and Fred Zinnemann were never artist-artists. They were terrific technicians.

    I think that artist-technician would be apt for Wilder. We are, after all, talking about the man who directed Double Indemnity , Sunset Boulevard , and The Apartment….

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  120. syonredux says:
    @Anonymous

    It’s funny. In Germany, Lang did important work in the nascent science fiction genre (Metropolis, Woman in the Moon), and he was a lifelong science fiction fan*, owning every issue of Astounding from 1933 to 1957, plus runs of Weird Tales (1935 on) and Galaxy (1950-57), but he never made an SF film while he was in Hollywood. Imagine what he might have done with, say, Forbidden Planet? And allow me to dream big for a moment. Lange doubtless read Lovecraft’s Shadow Out of Time and At the Mountains of Madness (both were serialized in Astounding in the ’30s). What if he had made a Lovecraft adaptation? That would have been something to see….

    *
    https://archive.org/stream/galaxymagazine-1959-12/Galaxy_1959_12#page/n5/mode/2up

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  121. Anonymous[286] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    There’s a lot of “personal art” in Vertigo and Marnie….

    True, but if one didn’t know anything about Hitchcock and his hangups, they could still be admired as genre works in romance and mystery. We know of the personal angle because Hitchcock has become such a giant in cinema. Lots of books and essays have been written about him. In contrast, even if one knew nothing about Bergman or Bresson, one would have to say the director did his own thing.

    Marnie is heavily Hitchcock, but VERTIGO would have been a dark brooding movie by any director. Just comes with the territory. Like RED HOUSE with Edward G. Robinson. I don’t know about its director, but this gets pretty demented and intense.

    I think that artist-technician would be apt for Wilder. We are, after all, talking about the man who directed Double Indemnity , Sunset Boulevard , and The Apartment….

    I recall Sarris categorized Billy Wilder and William Wyler as ‘less than meets the eye’ in his book American Cinema but in the 80s wrote an article about them ‘more than less than meets the eye’. He came around to appreciating them more.

    I never really liked Wilder. Very talented, yes, and brilliant at times. STALAG 17 is solid and SUNSET BOULEVARD is maybe great. But there was always something about his middlecult sensibility.

    Simon said it best:

    https://www.enotes.com/topics/billy-wilder/critical-essays/john-simon

  122. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    I mean a major feature film, not some obscure documentary.

    Few people watch documentaries that are screened at a few film festivals.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benny_Brunner#Al-Nakba:_The_Palestinian_Catastrophe_1948_(1996)

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  123. Andy says:
    @c matt

    There is something akin to Latin American culture, in terms of its cuisine, customs, music, pastimes. It is mostly a combination of White Spanish, Amerindian and African culture (depending on the country the contribution of each of these is different; the amerindian component is signifcantly higher in Mexico and Peru than in Argentina). Spanish culture is far more homogeneous. There is not much of a meaningful difference between a Castilian, a Catalan and a Basque.

  124. @Anonymous

    There’s a billion Muslims in the world, millions of self-described Palestinians, and hundreds of millions of Arabs. If they cared, they could have made that documentary a huge hit. Other Arabs could also fund a lavish feature film with their oil money. Why haven’t they?

    If one white guy, Mel Gibson, could make The Passion of The Christ, why can’t millions of Palestinians or hundreds of millions of Arabs make a movie that’s important to them?

    There seem to be two possibilities: it’s not that important to them, or it is and they’re incompetent. Either way, if you’re not Palestinian, I don’t get why you would care.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  125. Anonymous[378] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    If one white guy, Mel Gibson, could make The Passion of The Christ, why can’t millions of Palestinians or hundreds of millions of Arabs make a movie that’s important to them?

    Good question, but maybe they did, but the work was not distributed in the West.
    Granted, Arab cinema has been pretty lackluster. Iranian cinema has won lots of accolades, but they’re mostly about some guy taking 10 hrs to do what usually takes an hour.

    But the thing about cinema is the industry is concentrated, especially because it’s so expensive.
    Country music is just songs, so there can be Nashville. But movie-making needs much more money and technology. So, only a few centers can pull together the resources and suck in all the talent.

    Cons often bitch about how Hollywood doesn’t make their movies, but there are 50 American states, and each state has plenty of conservatives. So, why haven’t they been able to make movies and TV shows that truly resonate with red-blooded Americans? I guess same reason why Arabs haven’t been able to. The industry is concentrated in one or two cities, LA and NY, and most talents who flock there have to do as the moguls say. Besides, most cons are into guns than pen and camera.

    As for Gibson, he was an outlier. He was a big star, gained considerable influence with hits as actor and director, winning best pic with BRAVEHEART. Otherwise, no way he could have made PASSION. He had to play the game for a long time before he finally got to do his project… which wasn’t all that good or all that Christian. “I love Jesus because he got beat up real bad.”

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  126. Anonymous[378] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    Imagine what he might have done with, say, Forbidden Planet?

    That’s the one with the Quantum Mechanic. Hardly more impressive than LOST IN SPACE the TV show.

    I don’t know about Lang as sci-fi director. METROPOLIS, as you say, has some peak moments, but it’s a ridiculous movie. About 10% of it is awesome. Rest is laughable or boring. Also, did Hollywood make any great sci-fi prior to 2001? Some were decent, like WHEN WORLDS COLLIDE, WAR OF WORLDS, THE THING, THE DAY EARTH STOOD STILL, TIME MACHINE, and etc. but they didn’t look too good and were often preachy or melodramatic. As rotten as STAR TREK was, many were probably drawn to it because it was still more advanced that Hollywood sci-fi movies. Prior to 2001, the best sci-fi works were European, esp with ALPHAVILLE, FAHRENHEIT 451, TIME MACHINE, and esp LA JETEE. One could argue stuff like DR. STRANGELOVE is sci-fi, but it’d be a stretch.

    Sci-Fi has been a piss-poor genre for the most part until the coming of CGI. While most sci-fi movies in the past 10 or 20 yrs have also been on the stupid side, at least they look pretty good. Most old sci-fi are stupid and look crappy. Ironically enough, it’s arguable that the best American visual sci-fi prior to 2001 was cheapie stuff on TWILIGHT ZONE and OUTER LIMITS. Because the budgets were so low, they had to emphasize idea over effects. I never watched OUTER LIMITS prior to Rob Ager including an episode in his list of best sci-fi films, and the idea is fascinating even though the production is bare-bones. (OUTER LIMITS surely had an effect on Lynch.)

    Prior to advanced special effects, no amount of production values could make a sci-fi movie look good. And even after 2001, it took some time for STAR WARS and CLOSE ENCOUNTERS to come along, and even then, it wasn’t until TERMINATOR 2 and CGI that good-looking sci-fi movies became a staple of Hollywood. BLADE RUNNER was one of the few good-looking sci-fi works of the 80s. Prior to 2001 and STAR WARS, higher budget usually meant more gaudy effects and less attention to ideas, whereas lower budgets meant focus on the idea for lack of effects. Even with Lucas, his best sci-fi work is THX 1138, the film he’s probably most proud of, as BLADE RUNNER to Scott. It is conceptual than effect-driven. Brilliant use of existing architecture, editing, and sound.

    Though Lang has a very strong career in Hollywood, I’m not sure he made anything near the importance of NIBELUNGEN, M, DR. MABUSE and even METROPOLIS, the best moments of which are among the best in cinema. Movies like FURY, SCARLET STREET, MAN HUNT, RETURN OF HENRY JAMES, and etc all fine, but did they truly stand out from what other fine directors were doing in Hollywood?
    In contrast, M changed the history of cinema. The silent NIBELUNGEN was up there with the best of Griffith, Eisenstein, Pudovkin. There have been many excellent and even great movies, but only a handful are truly startling. They have something beyond greatness. They leave you wondering, “Is this really possible?” or “Only in cinema.” Even most great films don’t have this. Lang in Germany made such films. Even now, M and TESTAMENT OF DR. MABUSE seem ahead of their time. It’s the kind of feeling I got with THE WILD BUNCH, TO LIVE AND DIE IN LA, MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE, and some others. It’s like they have an extra-dimensionality of greatness.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  127. duncsbaby says:
    @Anonymous

    I remember watching them on PBS long before they came up w/their “Two Thumbs Up” schtick they are remembered for now. That was back when I was young, serious and thought movies were high art. This year I think I’ve only seen one movie on the Best Of list, Once Upon A Time In Hollywood, and was lukewarm to that. I might get around to watching Joker and the Irishman, but I’m in no hurry.

  128. @Anonymous

    Ronald Reagan would have made a good actor in sci-fi films, except there weren’t many in his day.

    I saw “2001” at the Cinerama Dome on Sunset in 1968 when I was nine, and it was far and away the greatest sci-fi movie ever made up to that point.

    And you are right that Twilight Zone, (to a lesser extent) Outer Limits, and Star Trek were major leaps forward in sci-fi on screen. There was a German starship TV show the same autumn as Star Trek, so the time was ripe. Still, Kubrick probably moved sci-fi in movies ahead a half decade with 2001. Offhand, 2001 might be the largest leap forward for any genre. For example, The Maltese Falcon was a huge leap forward in hard boiled private eye film noir, but I doubt if it was more than a year ahead of its time (not counting WWII). But 2001 …

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  129. @Bardon Kaldian

    OMG I’m in love.

    What a tragic waste of a fine carmelita!

  130. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Ronald Reagan would have made a good actor in sci-fi films, except there weren’t many in his day.

    Reagan as Taylor and Bonzo as Cornelius in PLANET OF THE APES. “Get your stinking paws off for the gipper.”

    Reagan as Bowman in 2001. Stargate scene. “Damn hippies must have spiked the water with lsd.”

  131. If you want to see a good Latinx movie, go see the Spanish film Pain and Glory (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pain_and_Glory) with Antonio Banderas and Penelope Cruz (still a babe at 44).

  132. J.Ross says:
    @Anonymous

    This is true, incidentally have you seen Slingshot Hip-Hop?

  133. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    Cons often bitch about how Hollywood doesn’t make their movies, but there are 50 American states, and each state has plenty of conservatives. So, why haven’t they been able to make movies and TV shows that truly resonate with red-blooded Americans?

    They have been able to make TV shows and movies. Steve blogged about some examples in a recent thread (e.g,, King Of The Hill). Others include The Alamo, Dragged Across Concrete.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  134. @Dave Pinsen

    Baylor Grad John Lee Hancock has directed six mid-budget Hollywood movies that are distinctly Red State oriented:

    2019 The Highwaymen
    2016 The Founder
    2013 Saving Mr. Banks
    2009 The Blind Side
    2004 The Alamo
    2002 The Rookie

    https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0359387/?ref_=tt_ov_dr#director

  135. There really isn’t much to say about the Joker.

    it’s a seedy film . . . and they reek on one’s sense of appropriateness.

    And Mr. Juaquin Pheonix’s performances absolutely makes it work, the supporting cast does their job well.

    But Mr Pheonix is just this side of stunning in creating a sympathetic dysfunctional coming of age tale of a villain.

    I thought I had seen as many Jokers as was possible . . . wonderful and wonderful existence …

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