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My new Taki’s Magazine column starts:

Opinion journalism in the respectable outlets has increasingly come to be dominated during the Great Awokening of the past half-dozen years by young Women of Color with soft major degrees who take whatever topic is in the news—global pandemic, Ukrainegate impeachment, a tribal elder being smirked at—and relate it to how society must learn to idolize more the beauty of women such as, to take a random example, themselves.

And just to validate my perception yet again, the New York Times opinion page today features:

Lockdown Taught Me to Care for My Natural Hair
After years of ignoring and being ashamed of my hair, the coronavirus pandemic is forcin g me to reassess our relationship.

By Maya Phillips
Ms. Phillips is the 2020-21 Times Arts critic fellow.

May 27, 2020, 3:00 p.m. ET

… My entitled white-centric suburban upbringing, in a home where my black parents barely mentioned race except to occasionally cast casual aspersions against other “black folks,” had a profound effect on me: I saw whiteness as a familiar comfort and blackness as enigmatic and foreign, something to be ashamed of. So when I arrived at my predominantly white college, away from home and my salon, I didn’t know where to find a new space for myself, or for my hair.

It was mostly weariness that curbed my relaxer treatments. I hated the scalp burns, which formed irritating scabs, and the panic I felt when I began to feel my roots.

But my natural hair made me uneasy. When I looked at myself, so uncertain in my brown skin, I wondered how I should think of myself. How much of my blackness was defined by the stubborn fact of my hair? I studied it, made a class of it, researching articles and videos featuring women more versed in their hair, whose blackness was not just their hair but their whole selves and who showed no fear in that.

… On those days I was able to quiet the internalized self-hatred which sprung from white-dictated beauty standards, I imagined that my hair — comfortable and confident in its nakedness, cropped up in tiny pops of tight curls — spoke itself loud and lively. A head of hair that is sprightly, enthusiastic and undoubtedly alive: That is me.

I had forgotten this. But the coronavirus has forced me to consider my hair again….

Yet for all of the things my hair is, it is not actually unfathomable, or a mystery, or the woods, or any other metaphor I use to avoid saying that in my hair I see my blackness, and in this America, that sight sometimes makes me afraid. Right now, of course, there are bigger things to fear, and there are countless black women at this very moment washing and combing, twisting and locking, braiding and curling and deep-conditioning their hair, with a plastic cap or satin wrap crowning their head. It’s not necessarily effortless, but it is an act of acknowledgment and care.

When the pandemic dies and stores and shops start to reopen, I’ll return to my salon to get my normal cut and will feel refreshed and familiar. Until then, I’m trying every day, washing and combing and conditioning, each act so terribly small and yet monumental.

 
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  1. Yet for all of the things my hair is, it is not actually unfathomable, or a mystery, or the woods, or any other metaphor…

    Does “the woods” mean “interesting?” If so, I agree.

    • Replies: @ogunsiron
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    It probably means bushy, dark and full of creatures wearing sheets. Not sure if this perception of natural spaces is a particularly african-american thing or if it's something she learned from that cosmopolitan tribe. They're also not too fond of the natural spaces. Too many dull, not too clever hunters out there.


  2. [MORE]

    • Replies: @donut
    @MEH 0910

    Dammn , that is one ubly Negress rightch there . Where"d you get those pictures anyway , from the dark web ? You know what's funny ? White fools used to pay money for some ugly troublesome sh*t like this .
    "Ms. Phillips is the 2020-21 Times Arts critic fellow." I'm WOL , weeping out loud . Rending my hair and beating my man breasts .

    , @Mr McKenna
    @MEH 0910

    These people lecture us endlessly. Endlessly. And everything is about themselves. It would blow their minds to learn that many of us were brought up to consider it bad form to talk about yourself all the time.

    It's impossible to avoid them, no matter how hard you try, no matter where you go. You can run, but you sure can't hide. As Charles Blow (another NYT pet) says: "You may want your country back, but you can't have it."

    This goes for sanity as well, frankly. Clown World from here on in.

    And of course, it wouldn't be a NYT 'think piece' without an outright howler early on:


    I saw whiteness as a familiar comfort and blackness as enigmatic and foreign
     
    If only, Miss Phillips. If only.

    Replies: @donut, @Anonymous

    , @ogunsiron
    @MEH 0910

    Another graduate of the "racist afropunk" school ...

  3. Check your middle-class American suburbanite privilege, Ms. Phillips.

  4. “Reassess” her relationship her hair. Well, make it a meaningfull relationship and fuck your hair. It will love you in the morning.

    • LOL: JMcG, Forbes
  5. It was sunny out on the deck, so today went out there, took my shirt off, and buzzed my head down with the 3mm clip on my new Man Groomer self-haircut tool. Being outside, I could just sweep all that hair over into the yard. It was easy, and it came out perfect.

    I had resisted until now, enjoying all the new hair for the first time in years, but now I may never go back to the barber. No matter, he wanted to retire anyway.

    I recommend this to all hair-oppressed people. If your hair is a problem, just buzz it off and STFU.

    • Agree: Mr McKenna
    • Replies: @jb
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I haven't had a haircut since December. At some point, yes, I'm going to have to trim it all short, but for now it looks kind of shaggy and cool, so I'm going to go with it for a little while longer.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    , @kaganovitch
    @Buzz Mohawk

    It was sunny out on the deck, so today went out there, took my shirt off, and buzzed my head down with the 3mm clip on my new Man Groomer self-haircut tool.

    Did you leave a mohawk? Inquiring minds ....

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Kratoklastes
    @Buzz Mohawk


    buzzed my head down with the 3mm clip
     
    3mm? Hippie.

    Next week I am doing "bare clippers" all over, in order to definitively win World War Hair. (Not actually shaving my scalp is part of the win: 'no comb' shows less fucks given than using a razor)

    There's always a fun 'blood sacrifice' element - I have several easy-to-nick-even-with-clippers nevi on my scalp... they have very little sensation, and I have no patience.

    Trim those sideburns.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gjHOtxCRhnw

    , @denjae
    @Buzz Mohawk


    . . .new Man Groomer self-haircut tool
     
    Sounds nice . . . . but . . .

    I’ll stay with my ANDIS MASTER — Model M
    Used it this AM to self-cut 60+ days of growth.

    ANDIS CLIPPER CO. Racine, Wisconsin USA
    2-20-23 2-20-23 11-13-23
    8-12-24 9-18-24 4-21-25
    4-21-25 5-31-32 Other Pat’s Pending

    Dad got it new, probably around 1933 - ‘34.
    Which would make it 8 years older than me.
    Will be tough to outlast it, what with COVID.

    Living totally alone now. So hair is no issue.
    My girlfriend from high-school passed in April.

    My other 20-year squeeze is locked in her house.
    Her 24/7 care-givers now the only ones allowed.
    By order of her children, “per the Governor.”

    We phone every day 9AM — 4PM —8PM
    I’m hitting the grocery every 15 days or so.
    And cooking and eating well, thank you Gov.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @denjae
    @Buzz Mohawk


    . . .new Man Groomer self-haircut tool
     
    Sounds nice . . . . but . . .

    I’ll stay with my ANDIS MASTER — Model M
    Used it this AM to self-cut 60+ days of growth.

    ANDIS CLIPPER CO. Racine, Wisconsin USA
    2-20-23 2-20-23 11-13-23
    8-12-24 9-18-24 4-21-25
    4-21-25 5-31-32 Other Pat’s Pending

    Dad got it new, probably around 1933 - ‘34.
    Which would make it 8 years older than me.
    Will be tough to outlast it, what with COVID.

    Living totally alone now. So hair is no issue.
    My girlfriend from high-school passed in April.

    My other 20-year squeeze is locked in her house.
    Her 24/7 care-givers now the only ones allowed.
    By order of her children, “per the Governor.”

    We phone every day 9AM — 4PM —8PM
    I’m hitting the grocery every 15 days or so.
    And cooking and eating well, thank you Gov.
    , @CJ
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Superb illustration. So, you’re now living up to the “Buzz” part of your screen name. What about the “Mohawk”?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  6. A twist on this genre that would make it mildly interesting would be for a black woman to blame Beyoncé, Sarena Williams, etc. for perpetuating “white-centric” beauty standards by wearing weaves and wigs. It was common for attractive black celebrities to wear their natural hair in the ‘70s; there’s no reason they can’t do so today.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
  7. @MEH 0910
    https://nytco-assets.nytimes.com/2020/02/MayaPhillips-VERT.jpg

    https://therumpus.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Maya-Phillips.jpg
    https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/5a6e2fa50abd045521c950d7/1517174319094-Q6X9XTYYXF9J052J7GW7/ke17ZwdGBToddI8pDm48kAvdkb3CNuXChRgEIzwpKrAUqsxRUqqbr1mOJYKfIPR7LoDQ9mXPOjoJoqy81S2I8PaoYXhp6HxIwZIk7-Mi3Tsic-L2IOPH3Dwrhl-Ne3Z2CHkir-BWnn8JnIyn7v-fE5S1T7ENgwaqkmWtynw5yGzvOzbI-NzUQK-lrlmb-Qyr/FullSizeRender%282%29.jpg

    Replies: @donut, @Mr McKenna, @ogunsiron

    Dammn , that is one ubly Negress rightch there . Where”d you get those pictures anyway , from the dark web ? You know what’s funny ? White fools used to pay money for some ugly troublesome sh*t like this .
    “Ms. Phillips is the 2020-21 Times Arts critic fellow.” I’m WOL , weeping out loud . Rending my hair and beating my man breasts .

  8. @Buzz Mohawk
    It was sunny out on the deck, so today went out there, took my shirt off, and buzzed my head down with the 3mm clip on my new Man Groomer self-haircut tool. Being outside, I could just sweep all that hair over into the yard. It was easy, and it came out perfect.

    I had resisted until now, enjoying all the new hair for the first time in years, but now I may never go back to the barber. No matter, he wanted to retire anyway.

    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/S/aplus-media/vc/109af062-d058-4d2f-87e1-0c885c9cb1ab._SR970,300_.png

    I recommend this to all hair-oppressed people. If your hair is a problem, just buzz it off and STFU.

    Replies: @jb, @kaganovitch, @Kratoklastes, @denjae, @denjae, @CJ

    I haven’t had a haircut since December. At some point, yes, I’m going to have to trim it all short, but for now it looks kind of shaggy and cool, so I’m going to go with it for a little while longer.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @jb

    I'm hoping guys will just say "screw it" and 1973-style sideburns will make a comeback

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri

  9. @MEH 0910
    https://nytco-assets.nytimes.com/2020/02/MayaPhillips-VERT.jpg

    https://therumpus.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Maya-Phillips.jpg
    https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/5a6e2fa50abd045521c950d7/1517174319094-Q6X9XTYYXF9J052J7GW7/ke17ZwdGBToddI8pDm48kAvdkb3CNuXChRgEIzwpKrAUqsxRUqqbr1mOJYKfIPR7LoDQ9mXPOjoJoqy81S2I8PaoYXhp6HxIwZIk7-Mi3Tsic-L2IOPH3Dwrhl-Ne3Z2CHkir-BWnn8JnIyn7v-fE5S1T7ENgwaqkmWtynw5yGzvOzbI-NzUQK-lrlmb-Qyr/FullSizeRender%282%29.jpg

    Replies: @donut, @Mr McKenna, @ogunsiron

    These people lecture us endlessly. Endlessly. And everything is about themselves. It would blow their minds to learn that many of us were brought up to consider it bad form to talk about yourself all the time.

    It’s impossible to avoid them, no matter how hard you try, no matter where you go. You can run, but you sure can’t hide. As Charles Blow (another NYT pet) says: “You may want your country back, but you can’t have it.”

    This goes for sanity as well, frankly. Clown World from here on in.

    And of course, it wouldn’t be a NYT ‘think piece’ without an outright howler early on:

    I saw whiteness as a familiar comfort and blackness as enigmatic and foreign

    If only, Miss Phillips. If only.

    • Replies: @donut
    @Mr McKenna

    "lecture" ? You mean "hector" , they hector us endlessly .

    , @Anonymous
    @Mr McKenna


    These people lecture us endlessly. Endlessly. And everything is about themselves.
     
    With a group IQ of 85 and (since Civil Rights) incomes unrelated to IQ for IQ over 110, talking about themselves is about all they _can_ do. It's the ultimate refuge of the non-participant, a form of Aesop's "sour grapes" story. The Left pays them for Lear like denunciations and selects against Blacks who can do something productive in an industrial society (calling them "Uncle Toms" or "Not Black").

    The Old South reacted to their slaves (back when they had Black slaves) by converting itself into what amounted to a barbarian horde. It was not organized as a military force in the sense that Prussia was, but was an honor culture in which every Southerner was armed and prideful. Patrols for escaped slaves were organized by local leaders, and bad actors (White and Black) were executed unofficially (in several ways). In other words, the White Southerners were a barbarian mob with a nobility of sorts, a nobility that prided itself on an erudition used only for prestige. Given a military confrontation with Northern society, which did not put its essential members on the front lines, the adult Southern barbarians were attrited out of existence, only to return with the same honor framework until the 1960s Civil Rights laws were passed.

    One would hope for a better form of bi-racial society than something so unproductive and fragile as the Old South, but I haven't been able to find one yet. Any suggestions? India's caste system, maybe? That's just the Southern US system after a few thousand years, and has been about as productive.
  10. Truth to power: Fred Sanford speaks for me.

  11. Anon[120] • Disclaimer says:

    Ugly nose ring, ugly tats, big earrings, freaky ear piercings, big ugly glasses. Everything this primitive loon does with her appearance is an attempt to get attention. She’s mad at her hair because it’s nondescript and not pulling its attention-getting weight. What she really wants is a great big fro that makes her look like a lollipop. The problem is, black hair is so tightly corkscrewed that you can grow it forever and it’ll just gain an inch. If you pull a strand out it’ll double its length. This is why black women like hair extensions. They add visible length much faster.

  12. @jb
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I haven't had a haircut since December. At some point, yes, I'm going to have to trim it all short, but for now it looks kind of shaggy and cool, so I'm going to go with it for a little while longer.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    I’m hoping guys will just say “screw it” and 1973-style sideburns will make a comeback

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Known Fact

    It seems to me that this lockdown panic situation is bringing back the 1970s for men's hair. I was there. I have news for you: The 1970s sucked.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfwyVQxaB1o&list=PLLYDomDEwt5j4AQI2YMzx14sd488p683k

    Replies: @Known Fact, @SFG

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Known Fact

    1973? 1873 is where it's at, brother!

    Already dialing in something between Jeremiah Johnson and Grizzly Adams.

    Replies: @Known Fact

  13. @Mr McKenna
    @MEH 0910

    These people lecture us endlessly. Endlessly. And everything is about themselves. It would blow their minds to learn that many of us were brought up to consider it bad form to talk about yourself all the time.

    It's impossible to avoid them, no matter how hard you try, no matter where you go. You can run, but you sure can't hide. As Charles Blow (another NYT pet) says: "You may want your country back, but you can't have it."

    This goes for sanity as well, frankly. Clown World from here on in.

    And of course, it wouldn't be a NYT 'think piece' without an outright howler early on:


    I saw whiteness as a familiar comfort and blackness as enigmatic and foreign
     
    If only, Miss Phillips. If only.

    Replies: @donut, @Anonymous

    “lecture” ? You mean “hector” , they hector us endlessly .

  14. @Known Fact
    @jb

    I'm hoping guys will just say "screw it" and 1973-style sideburns will make a comeback

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri

    It seems to me that this lockdown panic situation is bringing back the 1970s for men’s hair. I was there. I have news for you: The 1970s sucked.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The 70s were cheesy but enjoyable enough. Even with Vietnam I'd put any year from that decade up against the total suck of 2020. Oops, gotta go, time for Mannix!

    , @SFG
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Most men don't want to think too hard about grooming--yes it's coded feminine, but it's ultimately a prisoner's-dilemma type situation where we all benefit if we decide not to put too much effort into it, since women compare us against other men. If everyone is slovenly we have more time for career, sports, outdoor stuff, gadgets, and, let's be honest, video games.

    So, hey, let the hair grow. ;)

    Replies: @Charon

  15. Is there a guide for spectators to get a handle on the black ladies hair care market? One thing that confuses me is the hair-do that the earlier discussed Sabrina Strings is sporting in her yoga instagram selfie. It looks like the color could be natural, but I think it’s a non-flashy dye job. Also the curls she is sporting are far wider than most natural black lady curl geometry and I am pretty sure she has a relaxer job; it just isn’t one of those over-the-top to completely straightened so it’s again tasteful and discreet and almost although not quite natural.

    She doesn’t want to look natural.
    She also does not want to look like she is grossed out by her natural appearance.

    The poor woman really is stuck between a rock and a hard place. I think she spends a lot of money at her beauty parlor trying to look like she hasn’t spent any money there.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Morton's toes

    "I think she spends a lot of money at her beauty parlor trying to look like she hasn’t spent any money there."

    That's a pretty reasonable desire. Unfortunately, attaining it tends to be very expensive.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Rohirrimborn
    @Morton's toes

    "I think she spends a lot of money at her beauty parlor trying to look like she hasn’t spent any money there."

    Reminds me of Dolly Parton's quote speaking of herself: "It costs a lot of money to look this cheap!"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  16. @Known Fact
    @jb

    I'm hoping guys will just say "screw it" and 1973-style sideburns will make a comeback

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri

    1973? 1873 is where it’s at, brother!

    Already dialing in something between Jeremiah Johnson and Grizzly Adams.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Almost Missouri

    Karen says make sure that doesn't disturb the proper fit of your N-98 mask

  17. Title

    My hair is the most important thing in the world

    I washed my hair this morning, brushed and combed it while wet. Then I walked to the post office and back. By the time I got home it was dry.

    The End

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Alden


    I washed my hair this morning, brushed and combed it while wet.
     
    But did you rinse it and repeat? The instructions always say to "rinse and repeat!"

    I've been washing my whole head in the shower with a bar of Ivory soap for years. This is the kind of thing you can do if you just Buzz it off. (I realize you are a lady with beautiful hair and can't do that. In your case, your hair is indeed important. Your salon is an essential business and, in the name of God, should be open for you!)

    Replies: @Alden

  18. @Morton's toes
    Is there a guide for spectators to get a handle on the black ladies hair care market? One thing that confuses me is the hair-do that the earlier discussed Sabrina Strings is sporting in her yoga instagram selfie. It looks like the color could be natural, but I think it's a non-flashy dye job. Also the curls she is sporting are far wider than most natural black lady curl geometry and I am pretty sure she has a relaxer job; it just isn't one of those over-the-top to completely straightened so it's again tasteful and discreet and almost although not quite natural.

    She doesn't want to look natural.
    She also does not want to look like she is grossed out by her natural appearance.

    The poor woman really is stuck between a rock and a hard place. I think she spends a lot of money at her beauty parlor trying to look like she hasn't spent any money there.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Rohirrimborn

    “I think she spends a lot of money at her beauty parlor trying to look like she hasn’t spent any money there.”

    That’s a pretty reasonable desire. Unfortunately, attaining it tends to be very expensive.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Steve Sailer

    It's the same thing with plastic surgery. The best work appears natural, goes unnoticed, and helps your neighbors in the movie industry appear healthier and younger than they really are. It is shocking how many people where you are get terrible, obvious work from apparently unscrupulous doctors.

    Replies: @black sea

  19. @Almost Missouri
    @Known Fact

    1973? 1873 is where it's at, brother!

    Already dialing in something between Jeremiah Johnson and Grizzly Adams.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    Karen says make sure that doesn’t disturb the proper fit of your N-98 mask

  20. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Known Fact

    It seems to me that this lockdown panic situation is bringing back the 1970s for men's hair. I was there. I have news for you: The 1970s sucked.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfwyVQxaB1o&list=PLLYDomDEwt5j4AQI2YMzx14sd488p683k

    Replies: @Known Fact, @SFG

    The 70s were cheesy but enjoyable enough. Even with Vietnam I’d put any year from that decade up against the total suck of 2020. Oops, gotta go, time for Mannix!

  21. @Buzz Mohawk
    It was sunny out on the deck, so today went out there, took my shirt off, and buzzed my head down with the 3mm clip on my new Man Groomer self-haircut tool. Being outside, I could just sweep all that hair over into the yard. It was easy, and it came out perfect.

    I had resisted until now, enjoying all the new hair for the first time in years, but now I may never go back to the barber. No matter, he wanted to retire anyway.

    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/S/aplus-media/vc/109af062-d058-4d2f-87e1-0c885c9cb1ab._SR970,300_.png

    I recommend this to all hair-oppressed people. If your hair is a problem, just buzz it off and STFU.

    Replies: @jb, @kaganovitch, @Kratoklastes, @denjae, @denjae, @CJ

    It was sunny out on the deck, so today went out there, took my shirt off, and buzzed my head down with the 3mm clip on my new Man Groomer self-haircut tool.

    Did you leave a mohawk? Inquiring minds ….

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @kaganovitch

    LOL. Alas, there is not enough on top to do that. Otherwise I would have been tempted, considering how much fun (and embarrassment) I experience here under that pseudonym. The thinness on top is the reason I adopted the Buzz cut a few years ago. The Buzz Mohawk goes way back to a haircut stunt in college that earned the nickname. Oh the hair was beautiful then!

  22. @kaganovitch
    @Buzz Mohawk

    It was sunny out on the deck, so today went out there, took my shirt off, and buzzed my head down with the 3mm clip on my new Man Groomer self-haircut tool.

    Did you leave a mohawk? Inquiring minds ....

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    LOL. Alas, there is not enough on top to do that. Otherwise I would have been tempted, considering how much fun (and embarrassment) I experience here under that pseudonym. The thinness on top is the reason I adopted the Buzz cut a few years ago. The Buzz Mohawk goes way back to a haircut stunt in college that earned the nickname. Oh the hair was beautiful then!

  23. @Steve Sailer
    @Morton's toes

    "I think she spends a lot of money at her beauty parlor trying to look like she hasn’t spent any money there."

    That's a pretty reasonable desire. Unfortunately, attaining it tends to be very expensive.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    It’s the same thing with plastic surgery. The best work appears natural, goes unnoticed, and helps your neighbors in the movie industry appear healthier and younger than they really are. It is shocking how many people where you are get terrible, obvious work from apparently unscrupulous doctors.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I read someplace that the best plastic surgery can do is shave about 10 years off of your appearance. But people get greedy -- the patients, I mean -- and want to look 40 at the age of 70. Of course, there are also plenty of surgeons greedy enough to try to accommodate them.

  24. @Alden
    Title

    My hair is the most important thing in the world

    I washed my hair this morning, brushed and combed it while wet. Then I walked to the post office and back. By the time I got home it was dry.

    The End

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    I washed my hair this morning, brushed and combed it while wet.

    But did you rinse it and repeat? The instructions always say to “rinse and repeat!”

    I’ve been washing my whole head in the shower with a bar of Ivory soap for years. This is the kind of thing you can do if you just Buzz it off. (I realize you are a lady with beautiful hair and can’t do that. In your case, your hair is indeed important. Your salon is an essential business and, in the name of God, should be open for you!)

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I wash my hair in the bathroom sink. The faucet is high above the sink so it’s easy to get my head under it. Should have mentioned that I suppose. This is a windy neighborhood. The wind fluffs it around like a blow dryer.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  25. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Alden


    I washed my hair this morning, brushed and combed it while wet.
     
    But did you rinse it and repeat? The instructions always say to "rinse and repeat!"

    I've been washing my whole head in the shower with a bar of Ivory soap for years. This is the kind of thing you can do if you just Buzz it off. (I realize you are a lady with beautiful hair and can't do that. In your case, your hair is indeed important. Your salon is an essential business and, in the name of God, should be open for you!)

    Replies: @Alden

    I wash my hair in the bathroom sink. The faucet is high above the sink so it’s easy to get my head under it. Should have mentioned that I suppose. This is a windy neighborhood. The wind fluffs it around like a blow dryer.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Alden

    They were going to open my wife's salon and then the governor delayed it. Blue state, don't you know. Anyway, her salon announced via email that there would be no blow drying when they re-open, because that spreads viruses in the air.

    That's okay, because they charge extra for blow drying, don't you know. It costs something like $35 but I don't exactly remember right now. I just remember kind of, oh, losing my temper one day when I saw the receipt.

    Yesterday, we received via our home email a hold harmless agreement that every customer like my wife must sign before going back to the salon that still isn't open yet. The document is of a type I have used for business and also have had to sign in the past: it relieves her salon of any litigation if she catches the Xi Jinping Flu while being beautified in their salon.

    This is the world we live in now. My wife can't go to the beauty salon that can't even open yet unless she signs a legal agreement not to sue the salon.

    I keep telling my wife that she looks great with the box hair color I picked out for her: ash blonde, lightest. Her stylist advised her, by email of course, to use that color, because it was closest to what she already had from the salon, if she absolutely needed to color her hair, and I found it at a drug store. L'Oréal.

    My wife is very nice to me, more then I deserve, so she gives me credit for finding the color. Every time she colors her own hair from a box, we will save $200, because that is what her salon charges for that, so I am in no hurry for her to go back to the salon. After all, they won't blow dry her hair now!

    Replies: @Alden

  26. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Steve Sailer

    It's the same thing with plastic surgery. The best work appears natural, goes unnoticed, and helps your neighbors in the movie industry appear healthier and younger than they really are. It is shocking how many people where you are get terrible, obvious work from apparently unscrupulous doctors.

    Replies: @black sea

    I read someplace that the best plastic surgery can do is shave about 10 years off of your appearance. But people get greedy — the patients, I mean — and want to look 40 at the age of 70. Of course, there are also plenty of surgeons greedy enough to try to accommodate them.

  27. @Alden
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I wash my hair in the bathroom sink. The faucet is high above the sink so it’s easy to get my head under it. Should have mentioned that I suppose. This is a windy neighborhood. The wind fluffs it around like a blow dryer.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    They were going to open my wife’s salon and then the governor delayed it. Blue state, don’t you know. Anyway, her salon announced via email that there would be no blow drying when they re-open, because that spreads viruses in the air.

    That’s okay, because they charge extra for blow drying, don’t you know. It costs something like $35 but I don’t exactly remember right now. I just remember kind of, oh, losing my temper one day when I saw the receipt.

    Yesterday, we received via our home email a hold harmless agreement that every customer like my wife must sign before going back to the salon that still isn’t open yet. The document is of a type I have used for business and also have had to sign in the past: it relieves her salon of any litigation if she catches the Xi Jinping Flu while being beautified in their salon.

    This is the world we live in now. My wife can’t go to the beauty salon that can’t even open yet unless she signs a legal agreement not to sue the salon.

    I keep telling my wife that she looks great with the box hair color I picked out for her: ash blonde, lightest. Her stylist advised her, by email of course, to use that color, because it was closest to what she already had from the salon, if she absolutely needed to color her hair, and I found it at a drug store. L’Oréal.

    My wife is very nice to me, more then I deserve, so she gives me credit for finding the color. Every time she colors her own hair from a box, we will save $200, because that is what her salon charges for that, so I am in no hurry for her to go back to the salon. After all, they won’t blow dry her hair now!

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Buzz Mohawk

    L’Oreal’s the the best of the drug store brands.

    It’s terrible that hair dressers and barbers were closed. They’re the epitome of a self sufficient tradesman. Just scissors, combs and brushes and they can make a living. Lots of old houses have a hairdressers barber sink in the basement where someone had a little shop st home. Some go around to assisted living and nursing homes. Lots of college girls make money cutting friends hair. In S America some set up in the Plaza or weekly market.

    I don’t see how restaurants can survive with social distancing. Half the revenue with the same expenses. And half the tips. Plus organizing the food, how much to buy, how long will it stay reasonably fresh, how many customers will come ?

    The closures sure make city living less desirable. My Los Angeles neighborhood is very pedestrian friendly. Every need from medical to food markets to 2 artsy movie theaters , used book stores good antique stores , Apple phone store where the do everything, TV electronic repair shop , the beach all within about 2 miles.

    The Los Angeles public schools will open in September probably, possibly, maybe. But everyone masked at all times , one way halls, only 16 in each room, and lunch in the classrooms which will attract rats and cockroaches and make more work for the janitors. Teaching is talking all day. They’ll get Co2 poisoning

  28. Recently, my daughter texted a friend of mixed parentage and asked the girl if she wanted to join her in playing an online game. The girl replied wearily, “I can’t right now; my mom is showing me pictures of mixed kids and forcing me to like my hair.”

    I of course laughed when I heard this story, and immediately thought of iSteve.

  29. @Buzz Mohawk
    It was sunny out on the deck, so today went out there, took my shirt off, and buzzed my head down with the 3mm clip on my new Man Groomer self-haircut tool. Being outside, I could just sweep all that hair over into the yard. It was easy, and it came out perfect.

    I had resisted until now, enjoying all the new hair for the first time in years, but now I may never go back to the barber. No matter, he wanted to retire anyway.

    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/S/aplus-media/vc/109af062-d058-4d2f-87e1-0c885c9cb1ab._SR970,300_.png

    I recommend this to all hair-oppressed people. If your hair is a problem, just buzz it off and STFU.

    Replies: @jb, @kaganovitch, @Kratoklastes, @denjae, @denjae, @CJ

    buzzed my head down with the 3mm clip

    3mm? Hippie.

    Next week I am doing “bare clippers” all over, in order to definitively win World War Hair. (Not actually shaving my scalp is part of the win: ‘no comb’ shows less fucks given than using a razor)

    There’s always a fun ‘blood sacrifice’ element – I have several easy-to-nick-even-with-clippers nevi on my scalp… they have very little sensation, and I have no patience.

    Trim those sideburns.

  30. You laugh, but thanks to the doom porn, my wife is so afraid to go to the hair dresser that she asked me to cut her hair. What’s scary is that I did a good enough job that a couple of her friends want me to do theirs too.

  31. @Morton's toes
    Is there a guide for spectators to get a handle on the black ladies hair care market? One thing that confuses me is the hair-do that the earlier discussed Sabrina Strings is sporting in her yoga instagram selfie. It looks like the color could be natural, but I think it's a non-flashy dye job. Also the curls she is sporting are far wider than most natural black lady curl geometry and I am pretty sure she has a relaxer job; it just isn't one of those over-the-top to completely straightened so it's again tasteful and discreet and almost although not quite natural.

    She doesn't want to look natural.
    She also does not want to look like she is grossed out by her natural appearance.

    The poor woman really is stuck between a rock and a hard place. I think she spends a lot of money at her beauty parlor trying to look like she hasn't spent any money there.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Rohirrimborn

    “I think she spends a lot of money at her beauty parlor trying to look like she hasn’t spent any money there.”

    Reminds me of Dolly Parton’s quote speaking of herself: “It costs a lot of money to look this cheap!”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Rohirrimborn

    "Dolly Parton's Guide to Winning at Life" would be a bestseller.

    Replies: @G. Poulin

  32. Wig review. It’s a thing.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Yngvar

    At the end of the day, the best move for a Black woman is to crop her hair short and wear wigs, like Beyoncé and 60 % of mature Black ladies.
    If they keep relaxing their hair with chemicals and burning their curls, they'll end up bald anyway.

  33. @Buzz Mohawk
    It was sunny out on the deck, so today went out there, took my shirt off, and buzzed my head down with the 3mm clip on my new Man Groomer self-haircut tool. Being outside, I could just sweep all that hair over into the yard. It was easy, and it came out perfect.

    I had resisted until now, enjoying all the new hair for the first time in years, but now I may never go back to the barber. No matter, he wanted to retire anyway.

    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/S/aplus-media/vc/109af062-d058-4d2f-87e1-0c885c9cb1ab._SR970,300_.png

    I recommend this to all hair-oppressed people. If your hair is a problem, just buzz it off and STFU.

    Replies: @jb, @kaganovitch, @Kratoklastes, @denjae, @denjae, @CJ

    . . .new Man Groomer self-haircut tool

    Sounds nice . . . . but . . .

    I’ll stay with my ANDIS MASTER — Model M
    Used it this AM to self-cut 60+ days of growth.

    ANDIS CLIPPER CO. Racine, Wisconsin USA
    2-20-23 2-20-23 11-13-23
    8-12-24 9-18-24 4-21-25
    4-21-25 5-31-32 Other Pat’s Pending

    Dad got it new, probably around 1933 – ‘34.
    Which would make it 8 years older than me.
    Will be tough to outlast it, what with COVID.

    Living totally alone now. So hair is no issue.
    My girlfriend from high-school passed in April.

    My other 20-year squeeze is locked in her house.
    Her 24/7 care-givers now the only ones allowed.
    By order of her children, “per the Governor.”

    We phone every day 9AM — 4PM —8PM
    I’m hitting the grocery every 15 days or so.
    And cooking and eating well, thank you Gov.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @denjae

    I was in CVS a few days ago. They had a whole new section of men’s hair cutting things.

  34. @Buzz Mohawk
    It was sunny out on the deck, so today went out there, took my shirt off, and buzzed my head down with the 3mm clip on my new Man Groomer self-haircut tool. Being outside, I could just sweep all that hair over into the yard. It was easy, and it came out perfect.

    I had resisted until now, enjoying all the new hair for the first time in years, but now I may never go back to the barber. No matter, he wanted to retire anyway.

    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/S/aplus-media/vc/109af062-d058-4d2f-87e1-0c885c9cb1ab._SR970,300_.png

    I recommend this to all hair-oppressed people. If your hair is a problem, just buzz it off and STFU.

    Replies: @jb, @kaganovitch, @Kratoklastes, @denjae, @denjae, @CJ

    . . .new Man Groomer self-haircut tool

    Sounds nice . . . . but . . .

    I’ll stay with my ANDIS MASTER — Model M
    Used it this AM to self-cut 60+ days of growth.

    ANDIS CLIPPER CO. Racine, Wisconsin USA
    2-20-23 2-20-23 11-13-23
    8-12-24 9-18-24 4-21-25
    4-21-25 5-31-32 Other Pat’s Pending

    Dad got it new, probably around 1933 – ‘34.
    Which would make it 8 years older than me.
    Will be tough to outlast it, what with COVID.

    Living totally alone now. So hair is no issue.
    My girlfriend from high-school passed in April.

    My other 20-year squeeze is locked in her house.
    Her 24/7 care-givers now the only ones allowed.
    By order of her children, “per the Governor.”

    We phone every day 9AM — 4PM —8PM
    I’m hitting the grocery every 15 days or so.
    And cooking and eating well, thank you Gov.

  35. @Rohirrimborn
    @Morton's toes

    "I think she spends a lot of money at her beauty parlor trying to look like she hasn’t spent any money there."

    Reminds me of Dolly Parton's quote speaking of herself: "It costs a lot of money to look this cheap!"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    “Dolly Parton’s Guide to Winning at Life” would be a bestseller.

    • Agree: Dave Pinsen
    • Replies: @G. Poulin
    @Steve Sailer

    I'd buy two copies. No, all kidding aside, I think Dolly's great.

  36. Anonymous[322] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr McKenna
    @MEH 0910

    These people lecture us endlessly. Endlessly. And everything is about themselves. It would blow their minds to learn that many of us were brought up to consider it bad form to talk about yourself all the time.

    It's impossible to avoid them, no matter how hard you try, no matter where you go. You can run, but you sure can't hide. As Charles Blow (another NYT pet) says: "You may want your country back, but you can't have it."

    This goes for sanity as well, frankly. Clown World from here on in.

    And of course, it wouldn't be a NYT 'think piece' without an outright howler early on:


    I saw whiteness as a familiar comfort and blackness as enigmatic and foreign
     
    If only, Miss Phillips. If only.

    Replies: @donut, @Anonymous

    These people lecture us endlessly. Endlessly. And everything is about themselves.

    With a group IQ of 85 and (since Civil Rights) incomes unrelated to IQ for IQ over 110, talking about themselves is about all they _can_ do. It’s the ultimate refuge of the non-participant, a form of Aesop’s “sour grapes” story. The Left pays them for Lear like denunciations and selects against Blacks who can do something productive in an industrial society (calling them “Uncle Toms” or “Not Black”).

    The Old South reacted to their slaves (back when they had Black slaves) by converting itself into what amounted to a barbarian horde. It was not organized as a military force in the sense that Prussia was, but was an honor culture in which every Southerner was armed and prideful. Patrols for escaped slaves were organized by local leaders, and bad actors (White and Black) were executed unofficially (in several ways). In other words, the White Southerners were a barbarian mob with a nobility of sorts, a nobility that prided itself on an erudition used only for prestige. Given a military confrontation with Northern society, which did not put its essential members on the front lines, the adult Southern barbarians were attrited out of existence, only to return with the same honor framework until the 1960s Civil Rights laws were passed.

    One would hope for a better form of bi-racial society than something so unproductive and fragile as the Old South, but I haven’t been able to find one yet. Any suggestions? India’s caste system, maybe? That’s just the Southern US system after a few thousand years, and has been about as productive.

  37. @Steve Sailer
    @Rohirrimborn

    "Dolly Parton's Guide to Winning at Life" would be a bestseller.

    Replies: @G. Poulin

    I’d buy two copies. No, all kidding aside, I think Dolly’s great.

  38. SFG says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    @Known Fact

    It seems to me that this lockdown panic situation is bringing back the 1970s for men's hair. I was there. I have news for you: The 1970s sucked.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfwyVQxaB1o&list=PLLYDomDEwt5j4AQI2YMzx14sd488p683k

    Replies: @Known Fact, @SFG

    Most men don’t want to think too hard about grooming–yes it’s coded feminine, but it’s ultimately a prisoner’s-dilemma type situation where we all benefit if we decide not to put too much effort into it, since women compare us against other men. If everyone is slovenly we have more time for career, sports, outdoor stuff, gadgets, and, let’s be honest, video games.

    So, hey, let the hair grow. 😉

    • Replies: @Charon
    @SFG

    Do real men really play video games? I've never known any that did. About the hair? If it's long enough to require any sort of attention, it's too long.

  39. @SFG
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Most men don't want to think too hard about grooming--yes it's coded feminine, but it's ultimately a prisoner's-dilemma type situation where we all benefit if we decide not to put too much effort into it, since women compare us against other men. If everyone is slovenly we have more time for career, sports, outdoor stuff, gadgets, and, let's be honest, video games.

    So, hey, let the hair grow. ;)

    Replies: @Charon

    Do real men really play video games? I’ve never known any that did. About the hair? If it’s long enough to require any sort of attention, it’s too long.

  40. Joe Biden must love these “Let’s Talk about my Hair” articles.

  41. Someone found a way to mash up World War H and Covid-19.

  42. “…women more versed in their hair…” lol child

    • LOL: Dieter Kief
  43. Paul says:

    “But my natural hair made me uneasy. When I looked at myself, so uncertain in my brown skin, I wondered how I should think of myself.”

    Maya, pause to consider how uneasy we whites feel on having to endure the cultural appropriation occasioned by your straightened hair. It’s not all about you!

  44. I’m more sympathetic than most. Racial consciousness will come, no matter what you do. And, if you’ve been raised in a mostly (not your race) environmental, and have a visible percentage of (not your race), then you’re going to both want to engage with that group of (your race) you see over there, and miss a lot of the community subtleties. How that mostly manifests is overcompensation.

    For example:

    N. Hannah Smith: at least 60% white

    Obama’s reverend: God, at least 90% white.

    Henry Louis Gates: 53% white, from genetic records.

    Jamele Hill: seems to have been raised white, went to a white college, married a black man, and went into a mostly white profession. Spends most of her time trying desperately to bond with racially and culturally black women, who find her…odd.

    (I’m not mentioning Shaun King here, because dude is whiter than I am. He’s 100% white. Nor people like Kamala Harris. Active fraud doesn’t count, just sincere grappling with your identity.)

    Look at any of the most vocal blackety black black black folks given any sort of platform, and you’ll find someone who, on some level, has to prove their own blackness. And that’s deliberate – someone with a healthy racial conscious will not be cowed out of class based politics if someone calls them a Tom.

    A kinder thing would be to take these folks aside, and give them non political training into how to interact with their own race.

  45. The 1970’s had the best hairstyles IMO for men and women. I would still wear my hair that way if I had the hair to do it with. I am just about ready to come on home and give myself the Kojak look. I did it as a prank back when I had a full head of hair in the 1980’s and I have the right head for it, especially if I trim my full beard to a goatee. I never could understand guys who had a good full head of hair who then would buzz it off. I would be wearing my hair down to my shoulders even at my advanced age if I could. Oh well, I think next time, I’m going chrome dome for good.

  46. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Alden

    They were going to open my wife's salon and then the governor delayed it. Blue state, don't you know. Anyway, her salon announced via email that there would be no blow drying when they re-open, because that spreads viruses in the air.

    That's okay, because they charge extra for blow drying, don't you know. It costs something like $35 but I don't exactly remember right now. I just remember kind of, oh, losing my temper one day when I saw the receipt.

    Yesterday, we received via our home email a hold harmless agreement that every customer like my wife must sign before going back to the salon that still isn't open yet. The document is of a type I have used for business and also have had to sign in the past: it relieves her salon of any litigation if she catches the Xi Jinping Flu while being beautified in their salon.

    This is the world we live in now. My wife can't go to the beauty salon that can't even open yet unless she signs a legal agreement not to sue the salon.

    I keep telling my wife that she looks great with the box hair color I picked out for her: ash blonde, lightest. Her stylist advised her, by email of course, to use that color, because it was closest to what she already had from the salon, if she absolutely needed to color her hair, and I found it at a drug store. L'Oréal.

    My wife is very nice to me, more then I deserve, so she gives me credit for finding the color. Every time she colors her own hair from a box, we will save $200, because that is what her salon charges for that, so I am in no hurry for her to go back to the salon. After all, they won't blow dry her hair now!

    Replies: @Alden

    L’Oreal’s the the best of the drug store brands.

    It’s terrible that hair dressers and barbers were closed. They’re the epitome of a self sufficient tradesman. Just scissors, combs and brushes and they can make a living. Lots of old houses have a hairdressers barber sink in the basement where someone had a little shop st home. Some go around to assisted living and nursing homes. Lots of college girls make money cutting friends hair. In S America some set up in the Plaza or weekly market.

    I don’t see how restaurants can survive with social distancing. Half the revenue with the same expenses. And half the tips. Plus organizing the food, how much to buy, how long will it stay reasonably fresh, how many customers will come ?

    The closures sure make city living less desirable. My Los Angeles neighborhood is very pedestrian friendly. Every need from medical to food markets to 2 artsy movie theaters , used book stores good antique stores , Apple phone store where the do everything, TV electronic repair shop , the beach all within about 2 miles.

    The Los Angeles public schools will open in September probably, possibly, maybe. But everyone masked at all times , one way halls, only 16 in each room, and lunch in the classrooms which will attract rats and cockroaches and make more work for the janitors. Teaching is talking all day. They’ll get Co2 poisoning

  47. @denjae
    @Buzz Mohawk


    . . .new Man Groomer self-haircut tool
     
    Sounds nice . . . . but . . .

    I’ll stay with my ANDIS MASTER — Model M
    Used it this AM to self-cut 60+ days of growth.

    ANDIS CLIPPER CO. Racine, Wisconsin USA
    2-20-23 2-20-23 11-13-23
    8-12-24 9-18-24 4-21-25
    4-21-25 5-31-32 Other Pat’s Pending

    Dad got it new, probably around 1933 - ‘34.
    Which would make it 8 years older than me.
    Will be tough to outlast it, what with COVID.

    Living totally alone now. So hair is no issue.
    My girlfriend from high-school passed in April.

    My other 20-year squeeze is locked in her house.
    Her 24/7 care-givers now the only ones allowed.
    By order of her children, “per the Governor.”

    We phone every day 9AM — 4PM —8PM
    I’m hitting the grocery every 15 days or so.
    And cooking and eating well, thank you Gov.

    Replies: @Alden

    I was in CVS a few days ago. They had a whole new section of men’s hair cutting things.

  48. Anonymous[128] • Disclaimer says:

    All the Hair That’s Fit to Share

  49. Next week I might drive 4+ hours each way to the nearest open barbershops.

  50. Somehow the progressive establishment decided this hair topic is an enormously important theme of our day. Something we must remember to talk about during the covid19 era. Now it’s harder for black women to spend inordinate amount of time and money on their hair.

    Internets actually tells me that there is a rift in black female opinion on this matter that the progressive narrative doesn’t want to acknowledge. It seems a great many of the black women who wear weaves and use straighteners think of the natural hair movement as some kind of cult which seeks to brand them as race traitors or something. But I guess we won’t be hearing from them in the NYT. I mean, that opinion is just silly talk about hair. Not a momentous sociopolitical reckoning.

  51. @MEH 0910
    https://nytco-assets.nytimes.com/2020/02/MayaPhillips-VERT.jpg

    https://therumpus.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Maya-Phillips.jpg
    https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/5a6e2fa50abd045521c950d7/1517174319094-Q6X9XTYYXF9J052J7GW7/ke17ZwdGBToddI8pDm48kAvdkb3CNuXChRgEIzwpKrAUqsxRUqqbr1mOJYKfIPR7LoDQ9mXPOjoJoqy81S2I8PaoYXhp6HxIwZIk7-Mi3Tsic-L2IOPH3Dwrhl-Ne3Z2CHkir-BWnn8JnIyn7v-fE5S1T7ENgwaqkmWtynw5yGzvOzbI-NzUQK-lrlmb-Qyr/FullSizeRender%282%29.jpg

    Replies: @donut, @Mr McKenna, @ogunsiron

    Another graduate of the “racist afropunk” school …

  52. @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Yet for all of the things my hair is, it is not actually unfathomable, or a mystery, or the woods, or any other metaphor...
     
    Does "the woods" mean "interesting?" If so, I agree.

    Replies: @ogunsiron

    It probably means bushy, dark and full of creatures wearing sheets. Not sure if this perception of natural spaces is a particularly african-american thing or if it’s something she learned from that cosmopolitan tribe. They’re also not too fond of the natural spaces. Too many dull, not too clever hunters out there.

  53. NYT Opinon section, as per iSteve:

    blackety-black-blackety-blac-hair-blackety-black-black-racism-blackety-black-Emmett Till-noose-blackety-black-black-natural hair-blackety-black-white supremacist-blak-blackity

    How many subscribers want to read this?

  54. She’s just irked because being indoors so much means all them oh-so-jealous white women can’t oooh and ahhhh over her hair and cluster around begging to “touch” it as they constantly claim we do.

  55. The black hair thing is so deja vu. It began about 1965 with the puffy natural hair style. They blathered about that about 10 years. Then they just dealt with their hair like normal people instead of ego maniacs or whatever

    And now it’s back worse than ever. I was born into endless black problems in the media and it will still be going on when I die. I used to pick up the afternoon paper and mail which included magazines. I could barely read but the Emmet Till thing was going on. I remember headlines and magazine covers. And it’s still going on, every few months.

  56. @Yngvar
    Wig review. It's a thing.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kc176k6nlyA

    Replies: @BB753

    At the end of the day, the best move for a Black woman is to crop her hair short and wear wigs, like Beyoncé and 60 % of mature Black ladies.
    If they keep relaxing their hair with chemicals and burning their curls, they’ll end up bald anyway.

  57. @Buzz Mohawk
    It was sunny out on the deck, so today went out there, took my shirt off, and buzzed my head down with the 3mm clip on my new Man Groomer self-haircut tool. Being outside, I could just sweep all that hair over into the yard. It was easy, and it came out perfect.

    I had resisted until now, enjoying all the new hair for the first time in years, but now I may never go back to the barber. No matter, he wanted to retire anyway.

    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/S/aplus-media/vc/109af062-d058-4d2f-87e1-0c885c9cb1ab._SR970,300_.png

    I recommend this to all hair-oppressed people. If your hair is a problem, just buzz it off and STFU.

    Replies: @jb, @kaganovitch, @Kratoklastes, @denjae, @denjae, @CJ

    Superb illustration. So, you’re now living up to the “Buzz” part of your screen name. What about the “Mohawk”?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @CJ

    Too thin on top to do that now. The Buzz Mohawk was a college stunt a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away...

  58. Black lady, if you’re reading this, please know that you are insufferably boring & narcissistic.

    So your hair looks like a used Brillo pad. Get over it.

    Neil deGrasse Tyson’s intellectual horizons extend far beyond your tedious myopic anti-White racism.

    Do you even know who he is?

  59. @CJ
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Superb illustration. So, you’re now living up to the “Buzz” part of your screen name. What about the “Mohawk”?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Too thin on top to do that now. The Buzz Mohawk was a college stunt a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away…

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