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Back in May, iSteve reported on the biggest story in Hate Crime History since Matthew Yglesias got all worked up over the Greenwich Village Nazi Party drawing cactus-like swastikas inside the locked Women’s Dorm at the New School for Social Research:

The Capitol Hill KKK Hangs Noose at African American Museum on Mall

Now the New York Times as finally caught up to this major news. From the op-ed page:

A Noose at the Smithsonian Brings History Back to Life
By LONNIE G. BUNCH III JUNE 23, 2017

The person who recently left a noose at the National Museum of African American History and Culture clearly intended to intimidate, by deploying one of the most feared symbols in American racial history.

It’s actually not.

Instead, the vandal unintentionally offered a contemporary reminder of one theme of the black experience in America: We continue to believe in the potential of a country that has not always believed in us, and we do this against incredible odds.

The noose — the second of three left on the National Mall in recent weeks — was found late in May in an exhibition that chronicles America’s evolution from the era of Jim Crow through the civil rights movement. Visitors discovered it on the floor in front of a display of artifacts from the Ku Klux Klan, as well as objects belonging to African-American soldiers who fought during World War I. Though these soldiers fought for democracy abroad, they found little when they returned home.

That display, like the museum as a whole, powerfully juxtaposes two visions of America: one shaped by racism, violence and terror, and one shaped by a belief in an America where freedom and fairness reign. I see the nooses as evidence that those visions continue to battle in 2017 and that the struggle for the soul of America continues to this very day.

The people responsible knew that their acts would not be taken lightly.

Indeed.

A noose is a symbol of the racial violence and terror that African-Americans have confronted throughout American history and of the intensity of resistance we’ve faced to any measure of racial equality.

As far as I can tell, the idea that a noose is the equivalent of a burning cross was more or less invented in 2007 during the Jena Fiasco led by the Reverends Jesse and Al. Six black star high school football players in a small town in Louisiana had long been running amok, aided by the usual white male power structure that excuses the violence of strong fast black jocks as long as they score touchdowns. But when the Jena Six beat a white youth into unconsciousness and then continued to put the boot in while he lay inert, they finally were facing some serious jail time.

At that point the national news media started spreading the story that the white kids in the high school deserved it because they were racists. The evidence? The student body had put on a Cowboy-themed social event including, along with many other movie Western tropes, nooses on the Ol’ Hangin’ Tree. Therefore, three months later, six black football stars were entitled to pummel one unconscious white kid.

So, what does it mean to have found three nooses on Smithsonian grounds in 2017? A noose inside a Missouri high school? A noose on the campus of Duke University? Another at American University?

That Hate Hoaxes are a thing?

As a historian, who also happens to be old enough to remember “Whites Only” signs on motels and restaurants that trumpeted the power of laws enforcing segregation, I posit that it means we must lay to rest any notion that racism is not still the great divide. …

The answer is that discrimination is not confined to the past. …

I see the nooses in the same way. They are living history. Viewed through this lens, they are no less a part of the story the museum tells than the Klan robes, the slave shackles small enough to fit a child, the stretch of rope used to lynch a Maryland man in 1931 or the coffin used to bury the brutally murdered Emmett Till.

If you want to know how African-Americans continue to persevere and fight for a better America in the face of this type of hatred, you need only visit the museum, where the noose has been removed but the rest of the remarkable story of our commitment to overcome remains. Anyone who experiences the National Museum of African American History and Culture should leave with that realization, as well as the understanding that this story is continuing. The cowardly act of leaving a symbol of hate in the midst of a tribute to our survival conveyed that message as well as any exhibit ever could.

Lonnie G. Bunch III, a historian, author, curator and educator, is the founding director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture.

So, Lonnie, how is the police investigation coming? You are the curator of a $540 million edifice that opened in 2016, so clearly you must have video cameras everywhere. LeBron James gave you $2.5 million that you could have used on cameras (although, come to think of it, LeBron seems a little under-cameraed himself). It should be simple to catch the malefactor, right? But it’s been over three weeks …

Thanks to commenter Mr. Anon for the title.

 
• Tags: Fake News, Fake Noose 
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  1. anon • Disclaimer says:

    I feel like the Jena 6 thing was a turning point, in a way.

    It was one of the few stories at the time that I heard about first in real life, before I read about it online. I was talking to a girl, and she said something about the Jena 6, and how they should free them.

    It was a pretty mind-boggling conversation, but the gist of it was, I started out thinking that maybe the Jena 6 were like Mumia abu-Jamal, where his defenders at least THOUGHT he was really innocent. But nope. Nobody denied that they were guilty. They should just be set free because the school was racist, apparently.

    I asked if the guy they kicked the crap out of was the guy who hung the noose, and she said she wasn’t sure, but she thought so. It turned out he wasn’t, but, even at the time, it’s apparently OK to kick the crap out of someone if he MIGHT have been the one to hang up a noose.

    And it was always “Free the Jena 6. Not “Justice for the Jena 6” or something like that, which could be taken to mean that their charges should be reduced. It was always “Free the Jena 6”, meaning, apparently, that if a bunch of guys decide to kick the living crap out of you, they should just be allowed to, without any consequences.

    I suppose, back in the seventies, there were people who knew that black radicals really were guilty of crimes, and just wanted to free them anyway, but it was the first time I had ever encountered it as an adult.

  2. There is a list of Hate Crime Hoaxes at Infogalactic:

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Hate_crime_hoaxes

    You won’t find any at Wikipedia, I suspect.

    You also wont find Wikipedia reporting that Bernie Sanders and his wife are being investigated by the FBI for bank fraud … while he calls Donald Trump a fraud.

  3. Steve King should make a request to get the video footage of the tape then leak it to sympathetic websites when it shows the obvious. I’m sure they would initially deny the request, but there is probably some way a member of Congress could force it.

    • Replies: @Another Canadian
    Wouldn't a simple Freedom of Information request do the trick?
  4. Money making opportunity for the AA Museum’s gift shop, little gold noose bling to wear on a chain around your neck. No need to let the past fade, keepin it fresh. And for those AAs into big bling, a gold noose to wear around your neck and gold child size shackles for the kiddies.

  5. The trope that African Americans are terrified by nooses or the “n-word”, when none have faced any institutional racism in 50+ years strains credulity.

    • Replies: @Danindc
    That 15-year old girl takes a punch better than Marvin Hagler.
  6. “in the midst of a tribute to our survival”

    really, ugly gov’t buildings?

  7. I have wondered for some time how the humble noose — which surely sent more white miscreants to their reward than black in its long history — became a “racist” symbol. But I can tell you for a fact that it didn’t begin in 2007 with Jena. In August, 2005, the Durham, NC police arrived at the apartment I was living in looking for my then-roommate, who was not there, but who had had a noose hanging from one of the light fixtures since before I moved in, as a kind of joke (he was/is schizophrenic). The head cop, a black, grew extremely agitated by the sight, talking about how many of “his people” had died swinging from treelimbs and lampposts from such knotty symbols of hate. He asked me if my roommate was white, and I told him truthfully, “He’s a Jew, if you consider that white.”

    Apparently, he didn’t, and from then on, he was very friendly and cordial toward me. I later wondered if he was a member of the Nation of Islam. But the noose-phobia goes back at least to 2005.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    I can document noose phobia to at least 1986. I was in the Army and my roommate had hung a small noose from his desk lamp. My platoon sergeant, a black guy, told me that it was not advisable to have such a thing because the other black soldiers might take my roommate and myself for "bald eagles". He explained how many of his people had been hung and such.

    My roommate was into heavy metal and just thought the noose looked cool. We did not know the noose was that important of a symbol to them, nor that "bald eagle" was a nickname for a klansman.
    , @guest
    Blacks unfairly monopolize hanging symbolism.

    White Lynching Matters.

    , @Buffalo Joe
    H, You're probably too young to remember when you could hardly walk down some Southern streets without bumping into the swinging corpse of some poor black soul hanging from a tree limb or lamp post. I don't remember that either, but I have a book somewhere that relates how frequently lynching was performed in the old west almost exclusively on white criminals who were more often than not dragged from a jail cell where they were awaiting trial. Swifter justice than we are used to, an example, the Supreme Court just reaffirmed the death sentence of an Ohio convict now in his 30th year on death row. He still has other avenues of appeal, just not his most recent one.
  8. @Barnard
    Steve King should make a request to get the video footage of the tape then leak it to sympathetic websites when it shows the obvious. I'm sure they would initially deny the request, but there is probably some way a member of Congress could force it.

    Wouldn’t a simple Freedom of Information request do the trick?

  9. ” The cowardly act of leaving a symbol of hate in the midst of a tribute to our survival conveyed that message as well as any exhibit ever could.

    Lonnie G. Bunch III, a historian, author, curator and educator, is the founding director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. ”

    not much introspection. just projection:

    Chicago Police unable to control thousand-strong gang party lasting hours

    http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2017/06/chicago_police_unable_to_control_thousandstrong_gang_party_lasting_hours.html

  10. So, Lonnie, how is the police investigation coming? You are the curator of a $540 million edifice

    Such a hideous one, too. Just compare it to, say, the Library of Congress’ Jefferson Building:

    Guess that that’s another example of White Privilege at work…..

  11. Anonymous [AKA "Mad Italian"] says:

    And in Oakland they use it as an excuse to stage a walk out / negotiating pressure. Probably safer than a bomb threat.

    http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2017/05/25/port-oakland-longshoremen-walkout-over-nooses/

    Apparently they are applying the same vigor towards their investigation as the Smithsonian.

  12. Doubt they are looking into this too hard – for this kind of thing, the myth is all important and no one wants to take the risk of finding information that runs contrary to the narrative they have constructed.

    Also, that building looks like a stack of the hats Elijah Mohammed used to wear.

  13. All the noose that is fit to print.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    Beat me to it.

    "All the noose that's fit to plant."
  14. Ah, the african american museum. Aka, washingtons least popular attraction that tells white people how awful they are. Good thing they defaced the Mall with this atrocity, boy that was worth it. Whites who signed off on that hideous beast ought to be deeply ashamed. Useless congress reptile hypocrites i expect. It really is barf inducing.

  15. This noose business is all manufactured outrage. Did blacks get lynched? Some, for sure. So did whites. Every old Western I’ve even has a white guy getting hung as part of the plot. If I can’t sleep at night, it’s not because of that.

    And how many deserved it? I’m sure that innocent people have been executed, both black and white. But I’d bet that the vast majority who got the rope did something to that called for it — rape, murder, robbery, etc.

    When’s the last time a black was actually lynched in this country? 1930s or 1940s? Good grief… this is all intentional stirring of the pot for the purpose of manufacturing victimhood, which will then be exchanged into political power and money (cf. Pigford v. Glickman).

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Blacks are lynched every week in America. Many, many more are lynched in Africa.

    Whether it is a Ghanaian mob murdering a supposed black cell phone thief, or an African witch burned to death by a black mob for bad juju, or a drive by shooting by three or more black gangstas in South Chicago makes no difference.

    They are all lynchings by definition.

    Black folks lynching black folks is as common as dirt.
    , @David In TN
    "Every old Western I've even seen has a white guy getting hung as part of the plot."

    The other night on one of the movie channels I saw the James Stewart western, "Bend of the River." At the beginning Stewart rescues Arthur Kennedy from being lynched. It turns out the Stewart character had almost been hung himself.

    Also, I recently saw the 1946 version of "The Virginian." Joel McCrea as the title character hangs his best friend and two others for rustling.
  16. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @H Parnell
    I have wondered for some time how the humble noose -- which surely sent more white miscreants to their reward than black in its long history -- became a "racist" symbol. But I can tell you for a fact that it didn't begin in 2007 with Jena. In August, 2005, the Durham, NC police arrived at the apartment I was living in looking for my then-roommate, who was not there, but who had had a noose hanging from one of the light fixtures since before I moved in, as a kind of joke (he was/is schizophrenic). The head cop, a black, grew extremely agitated by the sight, talking about how many of "his people" had died swinging from treelimbs and lampposts from such knotty symbols of hate. He asked me if my roommate was white, and I told him truthfully, "He's a Jew, if you consider that white."

    Apparently, he didn't, and from then on, he was very friendly and cordial toward me. I later wondered if he was a member of the Nation of Islam. But the noose-phobia goes back at least to 2005.

    I can document noose phobia to at least 1986. I was in the Army and my roommate had hung a small noose from his desk lamp. My platoon sergeant, a black guy, told me that it was not advisable to have such a thing because the other black soldiers might take my roommate and myself for “bald eagles”. He explained how many of his people had been hung and such.

    My roommate was into heavy metal and just thought the noose looked cool. We did not know the noose was that important of a symbol to them, nor that “bald eagle” was a nickname for a klansman.

  17. Almost a month since the LA home of Lebron James was vandalized by racist graffiti.

    No security video.

    No image of the offending words.

    No suspect, named nor described nor depicted in photo nor police drawing.

    No arrest.

  18. As far as I can tell, the idea that a noose is the equivalent of a burning cross was more or less invented in 2007 during the Jena Fiasco

    1989 Young MC lyrics combining the specter of lynching, incel despair, and autoerotic asphyxiation. Who knew back then this bubbly song had such grave undertones?

    From frustration first inclination
    Is to become a monk and leave the situation
    But every dark tunnel has a light of hope
    So don’t hang yourself with a celibate rope

    • Replies: @guest
    Does self-lynching count? Maybe if they're an "Uncle Tom."
    , @Autochthon
    Ah, when hip hop was focused on clever, poetic wordplay, whether emphasing light hearted fun or serious situations. Nowadays, of course, it is 99% "muh genitalz" and "blackety black black."

    Sad.
  19. >> Now the New York Times as finally caught up to this major news.

    This is just the Times trolling for new content, what with gay pride month winding down. Gotta keep the flames fanned.

  20. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    Back in 1995, the President of the student body (a Jewish female) at the large SUNY university that I attended got herself in deep trouble with the Black student body. If I remember correctly, she was being accosted for not doing enough to satisfy their never ending list of demands. As they were surrounding her, she said, “I feel like I’m being lynched here.” Ohhh boy. She got fried. I believe they tried to get her kicked out of office for that one.

    • Replies: @Dr. X

    Back in 1995, the President of the student body (a Jewish female) at the large SUNY university that I attended got herself in deep trouble with the Black student body. If I remember correctly, she was being accosted for not doing enough to satisfy their never ending list of demands. As they were surrounding her, she said, “I feel like I’m being lynched here.” Ohhh boy. She got fried. I believe they tried to get her kicked out of office for that one.
     
    Well, obviously, she should have said "I feel like I'm being gassed" or "I feel like this is Kristallnacht" and it would have been OK. Since she culturally appropriated someone else's precious supply of victimhood-at-the-hands-of-demonic-whites, though, she got into trouble...
  21. Hanging has been popular far longer than blacks have been. That’s some cultural appropriation if I ever did see it.

    Just ask Tuco.

  22. The Jena 6 thing was largely stirred up by a Dallas preacher/s**t disturber Alan Bean (“Alan Beany Baby”).

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    The Jena 6 thing was largely stirred up by a Dallas preacher/s**t disturber Alan Bean (“Alan Beany Baby”).
     
    He wasn't a Dallas preacher. He was a Canadian who had moved to a town 350 miles west of Dallas.
  23. fnn says:

    “Greenwich Village Nazi Party”

    Oddly enough, John Kasper, a right-wing Bohemian and associate of Ezra Pound briefly owned and operated a literary bookshop in Greenwich Village in the early 1950’s:
    http://en.metapedia.org/wiki/John_Kasper#Early_life_and_Greenwich_Village

    Kasper was born near Pennsauken, New Jersey to Frederick and Rose Kasper. His father was a successful engineer. After attending Yankton College in South Dakota, Kasper entered Columbia University later graduating with a bachelors degree in General Studies. At Columbia, Kasper became a devotee of famed poet and fascist propagandist Ezra Pound maintaining correspondence with his hero whilst a student. He opened a bookshop in Greenwich Village called “Make It New” which catered to all races. One reporter wrote the bookstore was “a recognized center for the distribution of pro-Negro books and magazines and was patronized chiefly by Negroes and Negrophile whites” For a time Kasper dated a Black woman.
    Kasper would hold interracial Sunday discussions at the store where he would often focus his attention against Jews and communists. In fact, the eclectic bookstore also sold books that would be considered antisemitic.

    A few years later, Kasper went South and made a name for himself as a prominent anti-desegregation agitator.

    An academic work on the relationship between Kasper and Pound and Kasper’s anti-desegregation activism:

  24. The NYT has been leaving its readers hanging for far too long on such an important issue.

  25. @H Parnell
    I have wondered for some time how the humble noose -- which surely sent more white miscreants to their reward than black in its long history -- became a "racist" symbol. But I can tell you for a fact that it didn't begin in 2007 with Jena. In August, 2005, the Durham, NC police arrived at the apartment I was living in looking for my then-roommate, who was not there, but who had had a noose hanging from one of the light fixtures since before I moved in, as a kind of joke (he was/is schizophrenic). The head cop, a black, grew extremely agitated by the sight, talking about how many of "his people" had died swinging from treelimbs and lampposts from such knotty symbols of hate. He asked me if my roommate was white, and I told him truthfully, "He's a Jew, if you consider that white."

    Apparently, he didn't, and from then on, he was very friendly and cordial toward me. I later wondered if he was a member of the Nation of Islam. But the noose-phobia goes back at least to 2005.

    Blacks unfairly monopolize hanging symbolism.

    White Lynching Matters.

    • Replies: @CCZ
    Of all of the lynchings in the US, the March 14, 1891 New Orleans lynching of 11 Sicilian Italians, accused of the assassination of a popular New Orleans Chief of Police, David Hennessy, was the largest mass lynching in U.S. history.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/March_14,_1891_lynchings
  26. just laugh at them and throw 9 mm casings and tell them to remember Chicago every weekend. because: BLM!

  27. LeBron and the Smithsonian are going into usher in the era of racial hate hoaxes as media promotional devices. Pretty soon anyone that gets hoaxed will get to walk the red carpet at the next marvel movie premier.

  28. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    As far as I can tell, the idea that a noose is the equivalent of a burning cross was more or less invented in 2007 during the Jena Fiasco
     
    1989 Young MC lyrics combining the specter of lynching, incel despair, and autoerotic asphyxiation. Who knew back then this bubbly song had such grave undertones?

    From frustration first inclination
    Is to become a monk and leave the situation
    But every dark tunnel has a light of hope
    So don't hang yourself with a celibate rope
     
    https://youtu.be/6qixMmcXh0E?t=57s

    Does self-lynching count? Maybe if they’re an “Uncle Tom.”

  29. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Dr. X
    This noose business is all manufactured outrage. Did blacks get lynched? Some, for sure. So did whites. Every old Western I've even has a white guy getting hung as part of the plot. If I can't sleep at night, it's not because of that.

    And how many deserved it? I'm sure that innocent people have been executed, both black and white. But I'd bet that the vast majority who got the rope did something to that called for it -- rape, murder, robbery, etc.

    When's the last time a black was actually lynched in this country? 1930s or 1940s? Good grief... this is all intentional stirring of the pot for the purpose of manufacturing victimhood, which will then be exchanged into political power and money (cf. Pigford v. Glickman).

    Blacks are lynched every week in America. Many, many more are lynched in Africa.

    Whether it is a Ghanaian mob murdering a supposed black cell phone thief, or an African witch burned to death by a black mob for bad juju, or a drive by shooting by three or more black gangstas in South Chicago makes no difference.

    They are all lynchings by definition.

    Black folks lynching black folks is as common as dirt.

    • Replies: @fnn
    lynchings in Africa:
    https://www.menofthewest.net/magic-dirt-thinking-western-values/

    During my time spent living as a rafting guide in Uganda I had many unusual and extreme experiences to say the least...Common to many of the crazy situations that I found myself in was the ability of the locals to morph from seemingly normal people going about their daily tasks, to frothing at the mouth and enthusiastic mass murderers. Actually perhaps frothing at the mouth is not quite accurate. They were almost in a state of rapture. Men, women, and children of all ages would throw themselves into the task of murdering whoever was the unfortunate target of their attentions.

    This could happen in many ways. A common event was for someone to cry ‘thief’ in a crowded market and before you could say sam-sam patoke, whoever it was that had been accused, whether justly or not, would have been reduced to a pile of dismembered remnants on the bloody ground.

    The truly disturbing thing would be the calm way that everyone concerned would return to their previous tasks as if nothing untoward had happened.
     
  30. There was indeed a time when lynching of Blacks was something openly celebrated, from around 1880-1910 or so. To be accurate, the body count was less between 1890 and 1980 than ten years of Black deaths from other Blacks in Chicago alone (around 5,000 or so according to the Tuskegee Institute).

    During that time, White dominance was assured. So controlling and dominant were Whites that postcards “celebrating” said lynchings were made and sold as souvenirs.

    Now, some White kid who had nothing to do with anything other than be a defenseless victim is held to “have it coming” … because he was White and lower class.

    And to be fair, this was exactly Martin Luther King Jr’s. Dream. He was quite open about it, people just wanted to believe in fairytales instead of what he actually wanted. To replace a brutal White dominance with a Black one. You might argue that Blacks are not openly lynching Whites the way Whites did Blacks during the period 1880-1910; with postcards printed up and everything. BUT the virulent anti-White crime wave amounts to the same thing. You can’t read the descriptions at Trial of the Knoxville torture rape murders of Channon Christian and Christopher Newsome and not see EXACTLY THE SAME THING.

    So as a practical matter, White men have two choice. Their women will relentlessly and ever so predictably side with whatever group of men is strongest and more dominant. Thus they must have both A. Group cohesion enforced by whatever means are required; and B. Utter dominance of other racial/ethnic groups by whatever means are required. In a multi-racial society one is either the one putting the boot in or getting the boot put in. There is no other alternative. Since I can’t change my skin color and have zero confidence in either the government or law to protect me I’d choose to avoid the latter; though my preference is to simply be left alone.

    Women and gays following their tingles however made that choice impossible decades ago.

  31. @Anon
    Back in 1995, the President of the student body (a Jewish female) at the large SUNY university that I attended got herself in deep trouble with the Black student body. If I remember correctly, she was being accosted for not doing enough to satisfy their never ending list of demands. As they were surrounding her, she said, "I feel like I'm being lynched here." Ohhh boy. She got fried. I believe they tried to get her kicked out of office for that one.

    Back in 1995, the President of the student body (a Jewish female) at the large SUNY university that I attended got herself in deep trouble with the Black student body. If I remember correctly, she was being accosted for not doing enough to satisfy their never ending list of demands. As they were surrounding her, she said, “I feel like I’m being lynched here.” Ohhh boy. She got fried. I believe they tried to get her kicked out of office for that one.

    Well, obviously, she should have said “I feel like I’m being gassed” or “I feel like this is Kristallnacht” and it would have been OK. Since she culturally appropriated someone else’s precious supply of victimhood-at-the-hands-of-demonic-whites, though, she got into trouble…

  32. Late-Nite Theater

    The Twilight Zone

    The Monsters are due on Maple Street -c. 1960

    In this episode we discover the horror of living in an all-white, non-diverse neighborhood and how it is only a matter of time before the whites go on a witch hunt against the Goodman family.

    Written and directed by Rod Serling. Music composed by Bernard Herrmann.

    https://vimeo.com/168014736

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    I remember seeing that episode. It takes on a new meaning when one is aware of certain things. It's a pretty common sentiment among some Jews - we're all just latent storm-troopers. Maybe Jews have historical reasons for thinking that. But I don't. And I don't have to view their f**king neuroses as anything other than an insult and a blood-libel.

    I have a lot less respect for Rod Serling than I used to.

    By the way, the great Bernard Herrman can't be held accountable for that episode. He just provided the theme music for the Twilight Zone.
    , @anon
    I sometimes wonder how I would have reacted to the original Twilight Zone if I had seen it when it was new and fresh, before all the "surprise twists" became common pop culture knowledge.

    Would I have been really impressed with it? Or would it be like when I watch a show today, and I'd roll my eyes and think "Oh, great, here we go. Another metaphor for the Red Scare and how it was all just a bunch of stupid paranoia."?

    In other words, would it be like when I see something now, where I know the terrorist isn't actually going to be the shifty-eyed Muslim, but rather the button-down white guy?

    Some of the episodes are just kind of far out stuff, which is mostly OK, if not particularly surprising anymore, but the ones where they tried to get "topical" were pretty heavy-handed.

  33. @Prof. Woland
    All the noose that is fit to print.

    Beat me to it.

    “All the noose that’s fit to plant.”

  34. @guest
    Blacks unfairly monopolize hanging symbolism.

    White Lynching Matters.

    Of all of the lynchings in the US, the March 14, 1891 New Orleans lynching of 11 Sicilian Italians, accused of the assassination of a popular New Orleans Chief of Police, David Hennessy, was the largest mass lynching in U.S. history.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/March_14,_1891_lynchings

    • Replies: @Lex Corvus
    I think the Chinese massacre of 1871 in Los Angeles may have that beat.
  35. @countenance
    The Jena 6 thing was largely stirred up by a Dallas preacher/s**t disturber Alan Bean ("Alan Beany Baby").

    The Jena 6 thing was largely stirred up by a Dallas preacher/s**t disturber Alan Bean (“Alan Beany Baby”).

    He wasn’t a Dallas preacher. He was a Canadian who had moved to a town 350 miles west of Dallas.

  36. @Trelane
    Late-Nite Theater

    The Twilight Zone

    The Monsters are due on Maple Street -c. 1960

    In this episode we discover the horror of living in an all-white, non-diverse neighborhood and how it is only a matter of time before the whites go on a witch hunt against the Goodman family.

    Written and directed by Rod Serling. Music composed by Bernard Herrmann.

    https://vimeo.com/168014736

    I remember seeing that episode. It takes on a new meaning when one is aware of certain things. It’s a pretty common sentiment among some Jews – we’re all just latent storm-troopers. Maybe Jews have historical reasons for thinking that. But I don’t. And I don’t have to view their f**king neuroses as anything other than an insult and a blood-libel.

    I have a lot less respect for Rod Serling than I used to.

    By the way, the great Bernard Herrman can’t be held accountable for that episode. He just provided the theme music for the Twilight Zone.

    • Agree: Opinionator
    • Replies: @Trelane
    Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar. Maybe this television episode was just a television episode.
  37. @Mr. Anon
    I remember seeing that episode. It takes on a new meaning when one is aware of certain things. It's a pretty common sentiment among some Jews - we're all just latent storm-troopers. Maybe Jews have historical reasons for thinking that. But I don't. And I don't have to view their f**king neuroses as anything other than an insult and a blood-libel.

    I have a lot less respect for Rod Serling than I used to.

    By the way, the great Bernard Herrman can't be held accountable for that episode. He just provided the theme music for the Twilight Zone.

    Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar. Maybe this television episode was just a television episode.

    • Replies: @guest
    It doesn't necessarily carry the meaning Mr. Anon ascribes to it. But that was a Social Message episode among Social Message episodes on an aggressively Social Messagey show.
    , @Mr. Anon

    Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar. Maybe this television episode was just a television episode.
     
    TV is there to sell you things. You think the commercials are intended to influence you, but the programs are not? The Twilight Zone mostly wore its politics on its sleeve, and that was largely Serling's influence. This episode pretty clearly had "a message".
  38. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Trelane
    Late-Nite Theater

    The Twilight Zone

    The Monsters are due on Maple Street -c. 1960

    In this episode we discover the horror of living in an all-white, non-diverse neighborhood and how it is only a matter of time before the whites go on a witch hunt against the Goodman family.

    Written and directed by Rod Serling. Music composed by Bernard Herrmann.

    https://vimeo.com/168014736

    I sometimes wonder how I would have reacted to the original Twilight Zone if I had seen it when it was new and fresh, before all the “surprise twists” became common pop culture knowledge.

    Would I have been really impressed with it? Or would it be like when I watch a show today, and I’d roll my eyes and think “Oh, great, here we go. Another metaphor for the Red Scare and how it was all just a bunch of stupid paranoia.”?

    In other words, would it be like when I see something now, where I know the terrorist isn’t actually going to be the shifty-eyed Muslim, but rather the button-down white guy?

    Some of the episodes are just kind of far out stuff, which is mostly OK, if not particularly surprising anymore, but the ones where they tried to get “topical” were pretty heavy-handed.

    • Replies: @Trelane
    Contemporary material is smirky and knowing. The old stuff is genuine.
  39. No reason to get hung up about this stuff, but beware – al noose-ra.

  40. @anon
    I sometimes wonder how I would have reacted to the original Twilight Zone if I had seen it when it was new and fresh, before all the "surprise twists" became common pop culture knowledge.

    Would I have been really impressed with it? Or would it be like when I watch a show today, and I'd roll my eyes and think "Oh, great, here we go. Another metaphor for the Red Scare and how it was all just a bunch of stupid paranoia."?

    In other words, would it be like when I see something now, where I know the terrorist isn't actually going to be the shifty-eyed Muslim, but rather the button-down white guy?

    Some of the episodes are just kind of far out stuff, which is mostly OK, if not particularly surprising anymore, but the ones where they tried to get "topical" were pretty heavy-handed.

    Contemporary material is smirky and knowing. The old stuff is genuine.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Contemporary material is smirky and knowing. The old stuff is genuine.
     
    Yes, it was genuine agitprop.
    , @Prof. Woland
    Trelane

    The Squire of Gothos did the lynching. Go to 7:35 on the video.

    https://youtu.be/RXV5ciE8ucE?t=281
  41. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    As far as I can tell, the idea that a noose is the equivalent of a burning cross was more or less invented in 2007 during the Jena Fiasco
     
    1989 Young MC lyrics combining the specter of lynching, incel despair, and autoerotic asphyxiation. Who knew back then this bubbly song had such grave undertones?

    From frustration first inclination
    Is to become a monk and leave the situation
    But every dark tunnel has a light of hope
    So don't hang yourself with a celibate rope
     
    https://youtu.be/6qixMmcXh0E?t=57s

    Ah, when hip hop was focused on clever, poetic wordplay, whether emphasing light hearted fun or serious situations. Nowadays, of course, it is 99% “muh genitalz” and “blackety black black.”

    Sad.

    • Replies: @guest
    I enjoy the fact that the lyrics aren't "I'm the greatest ever," like 99% of rap. Instead, it has practical, useful, everyday advice.

    Clever? Okay, but it's a low sort of cleverness . Like your common black writer and Mike Tyson, he uses relatively big words a little loosely. Especially when he jams "sadistic," "materialistic," and "opportunistic" into a couple of lines. Then he says a girl is "perpetrating a tan," and it's too much.

    May be he was a Rhodes scholar before he got in the rap game, I don't know. But blacks at all levels, from Tennessee Coates all the way down to Tennessee Coates, need to put down the thesaurus.

    , @interesting
    I was wondering if somebody was going to write what i was thinking. well said.
  42. @Trelane
    Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar. Maybe this television episode was just a television episode.

    It doesn’t necessarily carry the meaning Mr. Anon ascribes to it. But that was a Social Message episode among Social Message episodes on an aggressively Social Messagey show.

    • Agree: Trelane
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    It doesn’t necessarily carry the meaning Mr. Anon ascribes to it.
     
    No, it very much did. The message was that normal, middle-class, white Americans are just one black-out away from becoming feral savages. It was gratuitously insulting.

    But that was a Social Message episode among Social Message episodes on an aggressively Social Messagey show.
     
    And the social messages always tended in one direction, as indeed they almost always do on television. So can it still just be called "entertainment"? Or is there some purpose to it?
  43. fnn says:
    @Anonymous
    Blacks are lynched every week in America. Many, many more are lynched in Africa.

    Whether it is a Ghanaian mob murdering a supposed black cell phone thief, or an African witch burned to death by a black mob for bad juju, or a drive by shooting by three or more black gangstas in South Chicago makes no difference.

    They are all lynchings by definition.

    Black folks lynching black folks is as common as dirt.

    lynchings in Africa:
    https://www.menofthewest.net/magic-dirt-thinking-western-values/

    During my time spent living as a rafting guide in Uganda I had many unusual and extreme experiences to say the least…Common to many of the crazy situations that I found myself in was the ability of the locals to morph from seemingly normal people going about their daily tasks, to frothing at the mouth and enthusiastic mass murderers. Actually perhaps frothing at the mouth is not quite accurate. They were almost in a state of rapture. Men, women, and children of all ages would throw themselves into the task of murdering whoever was the unfortunate target of their attentions.

    This could happen in many ways. A common event was for someone to cry ‘thief’ in a crowded market and before you could say sam-sam patoke, whoever it was that had been accused, whether justly or not, would have been reduced to a pile of dismembered remnants on the bloody ground.

    The truly disturbing thing would be the calm way that everyone concerned would return to their previous tasks as if nothing untoward had happened.

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome


    The Washington herald., January 14, 1908, Page 6, Image 6
    ...
    A mob of North Carolina negroes lynched the proprietor of a negro theatrical outfit because his show did not come up to the advance agent's promises. Theoretically, this idea may be sound, but its general adoption would soon put the advance agent business all to the bad.

     

  44. @CCZ
    Of all of the lynchings in the US, the March 14, 1891 New Orleans lynching of 11 Sicilian Italians, accused of the assassination of a popular New Orleans Chief of Police, David Hennessy, was the largest mass lynching in U.S. history.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/March_14,_1891_lynchings

    I think the Chinese massacre of 1871 in Los Angeles may have that beat.

    • Replies: @CCZ
    I guess this is how Wikipedia and others can claim that New Orleans 1891 was the “largest mass lynching,” a big caveat of definition.

    Richard Gambino, (2000). Vendetta: The True Story of the Largest Lynching in U.S. History.

    “Gambino notes that it was the largest "as measured by the number of people illegally killed in one place at one time, the victims' identities predetermined for some specific alleged offense." This classification would not include massacres, such as the Chinese massacre of 1871, in which victims are chosen "without regard to their individual identities and in which no specific offense on their part is alleged." [Wikipedia]
  45. @Dave Pinsen
    The trope that African Americans are terrified by nooses or the "n-word", when none have faced any institutional racism in 50+ years strains credulity.

    https://twitter.com/bosnerdley/status/879028414774169600

    That 15-year old girl takes a punch better than Marvin Hagler.

  46. CCZ says:
    @Lex Corvus
    I think the Chinese massacre of 1871 in Los Angeles may have that beat.

    I guess this is how Wikipedia and others can claim that New Orleans 1891 was the “largest mass lynching,” a big caveat of definition.

    Richard Gambino, (2000). Vendetta: The True Story of the Largest Lynching in U.S. History.

    “Gambino notes that it was the largest “as measured by the number of people illegally killed in one place at one time, the victims’ identities predetermined for some specific alleged offense.” This classification would not include massacres, such as the Chinese massacre of 1871, in which victims are chosen “without regard to their individual identities and in which no specific offense on their part is alleged.” [Wikipedia]

  47. @Autochthon
    Ah, when hip hop was focused on clever, poetic wordplay, whether emphasing light hearted fun or serious situations. Nowadays, of course, it is 99% "muh genitalz" and "blackety black black."

    Sad.

    I enjoy the fact that the lyrics aren’t “I’m the greatest ever,” like 99% of rap. Instead, it has practical, useful, everyday advice.

    Clever? Okay, but it’s a low sort of cleverness . Like your common black writer and Mike Tyson, he uses relatively big words a little loosely. Especially when he jams “sadistic,” “materialistic,” and “opportunistic” into a couple of lines. Then he says a girl is “perpetrating a tan,” and it’s too much.

    May be he was a Rhodes scholar before he got in the rap game, I don’t know. But blacks at all levels, from Tennessee Coates all the way down to Tennessee Coates, need to put down the thesaurus.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    You are missing the point of hip hop entirely (or, at any rate, this style of it).

    You had might as well decry Stephen Foster as a moron who doesn't understand English ("It rain'd all night the day I left / The weather it was dry / The sun so hot I froze to death...").

    Or grouse "How stupid; that anvil would have obviously killed the coyote!" whilst watching Looney Tunes.

    You know who else needs to put away the thesaurus: Lewis Carroll and Theodore Geisel; sheesh, those guys....

    Did you know the ancient Anglo-Saxons also didn't kow how to use the language either (and they pretty much invented it!)?

    Oh, and then, more recently, there was this idiot named Cole Porter who could not write a lyric to save his life; because everybody knows there is no educating a flea, and beans (whether from Boston or otherwise) most certainly do not do it....

  48. Oak Tree National had a member put a noose in a tree and it eventually had to get removed. Oak Tree was one of those 70s Pete Dye courses that were supposed to be impossible. The 1988 PGA was held there and the noose was featured heavily in there advertising.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Right, the Oak Tree golf club in Oklahoma hung a noose on the dead tree on the 16th hole as cowboy humor / marketing. Jack Nicklaus made a 9 on that hole during the 1988 PGA Championship.

    Here'a s 2001 Sports Illustrated article about how Oak Tree deserves a US Open:

    https://www.si.com/vault/2001/06/25/306045/hanging-out-at-oak-tree-not-far-from-southern-hills-another-oklahoma-club-tries-to-climb-back-into-championship-contention#

    There's no mention in SI in 2001 of any worries about a noose being racist.

    Then, when a Senior Championship came to Oak Tree in 2004, suddenly it was insensitive and the club took it down. So nobody cared in 1988 or in 2001 and then everybody cared in 2004.

  49. @guest
    I enjoy the fact that the lyrics aren't "I'm the greatest ever," like 99% of rap. Instead, it has practical, useful, everyday advice.

    Clever? Okay, but it's a low sort of cleverness . Like your common black writer and Mike Tyson, he uses relatively big words a little loosely. Especially when he jams "sadistic," "materialistic," and "opportunistic" into a couple of lines. Then he says a girl is "perpetrating a tan," and it's too much.

    May be he was a Rhodes scholar before he got in the rap game, I don't know. But blacks at all levels, from Tennessee Coates all the way down to Tennessee Coates, need to put down the thesaurus.

    You are missing the point of hip hop entirely (or, at any rate, this style of it).

    You had might as well decry Stephen Foster as a moron who doesn’t understand English (“It rain’d all night the day I left / The weather it was dry / The sun so hot I froze to death…”).

    Or grouse “How stupid; that anvil would have obviously killed the coyote!” whilst watching Looney Tunes.

    You know who else needs to put away the thesaurus: Lewis Carroll and Theodore Geisel; sheesh, those guys….

    Did you know the ancient Anglo-Saxons also didn’t kow how to use the language either (and they pretty much invented it!)?

    Oh, and then, more recently, there was this idiot named Cole Porter who could not write a lyric to save his life; because everybody knows there is no educating a flea, and beans (whether from Boston or otherwise) most certainly do not do it….

    • Replies: @guest
    Oh, come off it. There's trying to be clever, then there's actually being clever. If you were to reread my post, you'd see I didn't say he's a moron who didn't know what he was doing. I said the opposite, in fact. I said that he could be Rhodes scholar for all I know, but he was not the master of his words. Not in a straight way, but neither in an ironic, mock-vulgarian, true-vulgarian, mock-sophisticated, truly sophisticated, or any other way.

    He throws out multisyllabic words I presume to hit the rhythm correctly, but with no discernable (by me) feeling for their meaning (or anti-meaning). You didn't tell me exactly what he was aiming at. Was it the joke of walking to the edge of the overly big word abuse? Because I don't find that very clever.

    Just because you play with language doesn't make you Cole Porter. You could just be a hack.
    , @guest
    By the way, that "sun so hot I froze to death" line reminds me of a couple lines I hate from the song Rocket Man, which go, "Mars ain't the kind of place to raise your kids/In fact it's cold as hell." Which may have been an unthinking use of the "[blank] as hell" cliche. Or it may have been an inversion. I don't know. But it doesn't come off, not merely because hell is not understood to be cold. More because it sounds stupid, for lack of a better way to put it.

    Now, if I were to say, for instance, the tv show Jackass is low and trashy partly because of its focus on the scatological, you could retort with, "There are frat jokes in Rabelais," for instance. You'd be correct. But does it matter? Rabelais is not Johnny Knoxville, and Young MC is not Cole Porter.

    I perhaps shouldn't have brought in the low/high distinction for this very reason. I did concede that Young MC was clever in a low way (which is pretty much the most hip-hop can hope for), and there exists what you could call a high-vulgarianism. I don't think Bust a Move rises to that level. It's low in the sense of not very clever, not clever in a low way, like Falstaff or whatever.

    Throw on top of that the fact that Young MC conspicuously resembles what I've noted in too many black writers to recount, as well as the ridiculous Mike Tyson. Namely, a love affair with loosely using relatively big or slightly obscure words. They are tied to purple prose and showy poetry. Coincidence?

    Dr. Seuss is okay, but note he writes for children. I like Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass very much, though the nonsense word thing isn't my cup of tea. Cole Porter was a master of the pop lyric, and I think his songs are the equivalent of 100 Young MCs in cleverness.

    Bust a Move is fun, but when it gets to the "sadistic...materialistic" part, I roll my eyes. "Perpetratin' a tan" I'll concede may be the sort of thing they actually say in day-to-day conversation, so let that pass.

  50. @Hodag
    Oak Tree National had a member put a noose in a tree and it eventually had to get removed. Oak Tree was one of those 70s Pete Dye courses that were supposed to be impossible. The 1988 PGA was held there and the noose was featured heavily in there advertising.

    Right, the Oak Tree golf club in Oklahoma hung a noose on the dead tree on the 16th hole as cowboy humor / marketing. Jack Nicklaus made a 9 on that hole during the 1988 PGA Championship.

    Here’a s 2001 Sports Illustrated article about how Oak Tree deserves a US Open:

    https://www.si.com/vault/2001/06/25/306045/hanging-out-at-oak-tree-not-far-from-southern-hills-another-oklahoma-club-tries-to-climb-back-into-championship-contention#

    There’s no mention in SI in 2001 of any worries about a noose being racist.

    Then, when a Senior Championship came to Oak Tree in 2004, suddenly it was insensitive and the club took it down. So nobody cared in 1988 or in 2001 and then everybody cared in 2004.

  51. @H Parnell
    I have wondered for some time how the humble noose -- which surely sent more white miscreants to their reward than black in its long history -- became a "racist" symbol. But I can tell you for a fact that it didn't begin in 2007 with Jena. In August, 2005, the Durham, NC police arrived at the apartment I was living in looking for my then-roommate, who was not there, but who had had a noose hanging from one of the light fixtures since before I moved in, as a kind of joke (he was/is schizophrenic). The head cop, a black, grew extremely agitated by the sight, talking about how many of "his people" had died swinging from treelimbs and lampposts from such knotty symbols of hate. He asked me if my roommate was white, and I told him truthfully, "He's a Jew, if you consider that white."

    Apparently, he didn't, and from then on, he was very friendly and cordial toward me. I later wondered if he was a member of the Nation of Islam. But the noose-phobia goes back at least to 2005.

    H, You’re probably too young to remember when you could hardly walk down some Southern streets without bumping into the swinging corpse of some poor black soul hanging from a tree limb or lamp post. I don’t remember that either, but I have a book somewhere that relates how frequently lynching was performed in the old west almost exclusively on white criminals who were more often than not dragged from a jail cell where they were awaiting trial. Swifter justice than we are used to, an example, the Supreme Court just reaffirmed the death sentence of an Ohio convict now in his 30th year on death row. He still has other avenues of appeal, just not his most recent one.

    • Replies: @Rob McX

    ...the Supreme Court just reaffirmed the death sentence of an Ohio convict now in his 30th year on death row. He still has other avenues of appeal, just not his most recent one.
     
    If you're from a place like Detroit, getting sentenced to death probably lengthens your life expectancy.
    , @H Parnell
    Having been born in the South in 1954, I well remember all the blacks hanging like fruit from every tree, in season all year round. And that was just in the country -- in the city, they hung from lampposts like Christmas ornaments. Hooded Klansmen prowled the streets and roads, looking for uppity darkies to lynch for such heinous crimes as drinking from the wrong water fountain, or using the wrong bathroom. Why, NC didn't even have transgender bathrooms back then! Look how far we've come.

    On a more serious note, my favorite upset-by-a-noose story comes not from a black but a white man. Back in the late 70s, when I lived on the farm, I leased the barn to a Korean war vet who had been a POW, and who wanted to stable his horses there. A friend of mine and I had hung a noose from the rafters, as we were the kind of people who liked to hang such party decorations for fun (though I did not hang the noose in the apartment years later, I will admit to being a bad influence on my crazy Jewish roommate). But this guy took one look at it and freaked out. He left the barn muttering, "I saw enough of those things in Korea!"

    True story. I don't know what the hell they did to him in Korea, but whatever it was, apparently it involved nooses.
  52. @Trelane
    Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar. Maybe this television episode was just a television episode.

    Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar. Maybe this television episode was just a television episode.

    TV is there to sell you things. You think the commercials are intended to influence you, but the programs are not? The Twilight Zone mostly wore its politics on its sleeve, and that was largely Serling’s influence. This episode pretty clearly had “a message”.

  53. @Dr. X
    This noose business is all manufactured outrage. Did blacks get lynched? Some, for sure. So did whites. Every old Western I've even has a white guy getting hung as part of the plot. If I can't sleep at night, it's not because of that.

    And how many deserved it? I'm sure that innocent people have been executed, both black and white. But I'd bet that the vast majority who got the rope did something to that called for it -- rape, murder, robbery, etc.

    When's the last time a black was actually lynched in this country? 1930s or 1940s? Good grief... this is all intentional stirring of the pot for the purpose of manufacturing victimhood, which will then be exchanged into political power and money (cf. Pigford v. Glickman).

    “Every old Western I’ve even seen has a white guy getting hung as part of the plot.”

    The other night on one of the movie channels I saw the James Stewart western, “Bend of the River.” At the beginning Stewart rescues Arthur Kennedy from being lynched. It turns out the Stewart character had almost been hung himself.

    Also, I recently saw the 1946 version of “The Virginian.” Joel McCrea as the title character hangs his best friend and two others for rustling.

  54. @guest
    It doesn't necessarily carry the meaning Mr. Anon ascribes to it. But that was a Social Message episode among Social Message episodes on an aggressively Social Messagey show.

    It doesn’t necessarily carry the meaning Mr. Anon ascribes to it.

    No, it very much did. The message was that normal, middle-class, white Americans are just one black-out away from becoming feral savages. It was gratuitously insulting.

    But that was a Social Message episode among Social Message episodes on an aggressively Social Messagey show.

    And the social messages always tended in one direction, as indeed they almost always do on television. So can it still just be called “entertainment”? Or is there some purpose to it?

  55. @Trelane
    Contemporary material is smirky and knowing. The old stuff is genuine.

    Contemporary material is smirky and knowing. The old stuff is genuine.

    Yes, it was genuine agitprop.

  56. “As far as I can tell, the idea that a noose is the equivalent of a burning cross was more or less invented in 2007 during the Jena Fiasco”

    I wondered when it flipped myself. Whites have traditionally related nooses and hangings to the Wild West prior to the early 2000’s.

  57. I don’t have any lynching nooz, but I do have some Jane Lynch nooz: She’s playing Janet Reno in Discovery’s Unabomber show. The fun begins on August 1.

    Kaczynski’s mind was warped by his Harvard miseducation:
    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2000/06/harvard-and-the-making-of-the-unabomber/378239/

  58. @Buffalo Joe
    H, You're probably too young to remember when you could hardly walk down some Southern streets without bumping into the swinging corpse of some poor black soul hanging from a tree limb or lamp post. I don't remember that either, but I have a book somewhere that relates how frequently lynching was performed in the old west almost exclusively on white criminals who were more often than not dragged from a jail cell where they were awaiting trial. Swifter justice than we are used to, an example, the Supreme Court just reaffirmed the death sentence of an Ohio convict now in his 30th year on death row. He still has other avenues of appeal, just not his most recent one.

    …the Supreme Court just reaffirmed the death sentence of an Ohio convict now in his 30th year on death row. He still has other avenues of appeal, just not his most recent one.

    If you’re from a place like Detroit, getting sentenced to death probably lengthens your life expectancy.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Rob, that is too funny and sadly too true. Or maybe not sadly.
  59. @fnn
    lynchings in Africa:
    https://www.menofthewest.net/magic-dirt-thinking-western-values/

    During my time spent living as a rafting guide in Uganda I had many unusual and extreme experiences to say the least...Common to many of the crazy situations that I found myself in was the ability of the locals to morph from seemingly normal people going about their daily tasks, to frothing at the mouth and enthusiastic mass murderers. Actually perhaps frothing at the mouth is not quite accurate. They were almost in a state of rapture. Men, women, and children of all ages would throw themselves into the task of murdering whoever was the unfortunate target of their attentions.

    This could happen in many ways. A common event was for someone to cry ‘thief’ in a crowded market and before you could say sam-sam patoke, whoever it was that had been accused, whether justly or not, would have been reduced to a pile of dismembered remnants on the bloody ground.

    The truly disturbing thing would be the calm way that everyone concerned would return to their previous tasks as if nothing untoward had happened.
     

    The Washington herald., January 14, 1908, Page 6, Image 6

    A mob of North Carolina negroes lynched the proprietor of a negro theatrical outfit because his show did not come up to the advance agent’s promises. Theoretically, this idea may be sound, but its general adoption would soon put the advance agent business all to the bad.

  60. @Autochthon
    You are missing the point of hip hop entirely (or, at any rate, this style of it).

    You had might as well decry Stephen Foster as a moron who doesn't understand English ("It rain'd all night the day I left / The weather it was dry / The sun so hot I froze to death...").

    Or grouse "How stupid; that anvil would have obviously killed the coyote!" whilst watching Looney Tunes.

    You know who else needs to put away the thesaurus: Lewis Carroll and Theodore Geisel; sheesh, those guys....

    Did you know the ancient Anglo-Saxons also didn't kow how to use the language either (and they pretty much invented it!)?

    Oh, and then, more recently, there was this idiot named Cole Porter who could not write a lyric to save his life; because everybody knows there is no educating a flea, and beans (whether from Boston or otherwise) most certainly do not do it....

    Oh, come off it. There’s trying to be clever, then there’s actually being clever. If you were to reread my post, you’d see I didn’t say he’s a moron who didn’t know what he was doing. I said the opposite, in fact. I said that he could be Rhodes scholar for all I know, but he was not the master of his words. Not in a straight way, but neither in an ironic, mock-vulgarian, true-vulgarian, mock-sophisticated, truly sophisticated, or any other way.

    He throws out multisyllabic words I presume to hit the rhythm correctly, but with no discernable (by me) feeling for their meaning (or anti-meaning). You didn’t tell me exactly what he was aiming at. Was it the joke of walking to the edge of the overly big word abuse? Because I don’t find that very clever.

    Just because you play with language doesn’t make you Cole Porter. You could just be a hack.

    • Replies: @guest
    "I presume to hit the rhythm correctly"

    Actually, he cheats on rhythm, now that I think about it. I presume they were rather chosen because they rhyme.
  61. @Autochthon
    You are missing the point of hip hop entirely (or, at any rate, this style of it).

    You had might as well decry Stephen Foster as a moron who doesn't understand English ("It rain'd all night the day I left / The weather it was dry / The sun so hot I froze to death...").

    Or grouse "How stupid; that anvil would have obviously killed the coyote!" whilst watching Looney Tunes.

    You know who else needs to put away the thesaurus: Lewis Carroll and Theodore Geisel; sheesh, those guys....

    Did you know the ancient Anglo-Saxons also didn't kow how to use the language either (and they pretty much invented it!)?

    Oh, and then, more recently, there was this idiot named Cole Porter who could not write a lyric to save his life; because everybody knows there is no educating a flea, and beans (whether from Boston or otherwise) most certainly do not do it....

    By the way, that “sun so hot I froze to death” line reminds me of a couple lines I hate from the song Rocket Man, which go, “Mars ain’t the kind of place to raise your kids/In fact it’s cold as hell.” Which may have been an unthinking use of the “[blank] as hell” cliche. Or it may have been an inversion. I don’t know. But it doesn’t come off, not merely because hell is not understood to be cold. More because it sounds stupid, for lack of a better way to put it.

    Now, if I were to say, for instance, the tv show Jackass is low and trashy partly because of its focus on the scatological, you could retort with, “There are frat jokes in Rabelais,” for instance. You’d be correct. But does it matter? Rabelais is not Johnny Knoxville, and Young MC is not Cole Porter.

    I perhaps shouldn’t have brought in the low/high distinction for this very reason. I did concede that Young MC was clever in a low way (which is pretty much the most hip-hop can hope for), and there exists what you could call a high-vulgarianism. I don’t think Bust a Move rises to that level. It’s low in the sense of not very clever, not clever in a low way, like Falstaff or whatever.

    Throw on top of that the fact that Young MC conspicuously resembles what I’ve noted in too many black writers to recount, as well as the ridiculous Mike Tyson. Namely, a love affair with loosely using relatively big or slightly obscure words. They are tied to purple prose and showy poetry. Coincidence?

    Dr. Seuss is okay, but note he writes for children. I like Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass very much, though the nonsense word thing isn’t my cup of tea. Cole Porter was a master of the pop lyric, and I think his songs are the equivalent of 100 Young MCs in cleverness.

    Bust a Move is fun, but when it gets to the “sadistic…materialistic” part, I roll my eyes. “Perpetratin’ a tan” I’ll concede may be the sort of thing they actually say in day-to-day conversation, so let that pass.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Guest, you’re overthinking it. As Autochthon said at 10:52,

    You yourself seem to think it’s a witty, fun piece, yet you seem vexed by it at the same time. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
     
    Admit it, hoss—the tune’s gonna be in your head all week.
  62. @guest
    Oh, come off it. There's trying to be clever, then there's actually being clever. If you were to reread my post, you'd see I didn't say he's a moron who didn't know what he was doing. I said the opposite, in fact. I said that he could be Rhodes scholar for all I know, but he was not the master of his words. Not in a straight way, but neither in an ironic, mock-vulgarian, true-vulgarian, mock-sophisticated, truly sophisticated, or any other way.

    He throws out multisyllabic words I presume to hit the rhythm correctly, but with no discernable (by me) feeling for their meaning (or anti-meaning). You didn't tell me exactly what he was aiming at. Was it the joke of walking to the edge of the overly big word abuse? Because I don't find that very clever.

    Just because you play with language doesn't make you Cole Porter. You could just be a hack.

    “I presume to hit the rhythm correctly”

    Actually, he cheats on rhythm, now that I think about it. I presume they were rather chosen because they rhyme.

  63. The noose became a terrible hate crime in the early 2000s. Ford paid out a million dollars to an employee who claimed a noose was left in his cube. Even down at my level we were seeing a noose “left” every two months or so at various employers, it got so bad even judges started joking about it in status conferences. and state civil rights investigators would even chuckle

  64. Your complaint was that he used the terms “sadistic,” “materialistic,” and “opportunistic” in rapid succession to describe cruel, gold-digging, designing women. Seems like perfectly unobjectionable mastery of the language to me. To “perpetrate” is to “do; carry out; commit [an act].” To “perpetrate a tan” is therefore well within the diegesis of using whimsical language to describe a calculating, unfeeling woman who connives and premeditates her every action to manipulate young men – as, here, her seeking a tan for cosmetic effect, or, possibly, merely feigning sunbathing but indifferent to whether she tans, only wishing to showcase her body to beguile young men like the narrator.

    It’s much less fun and engaging, with a Hell of a lot less economy of language, when I write it thus, precisely because the piece is masterful use of language to construct artful, witty lyrics.

    He’s no Cole Porter, just as Saul Bellow is no Victor Hugo, but it hardly means the lesser artists aren’t quite brilliant in their own right.

    You yourself seem to think it’s a witty, fun piece, yet you seem vexed by it at the same time. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    • Replies: @guest
    Bust a Move is fun, and compared to other rap songs it's like the Ninth Symphony in my estimation.

    The song itself doesn't vex me, but I was a little vexed by the suggestion that it's full of clever, poetic wordplay. Because that's insulting to clever, poetic wordplay.
  65. @Rob McX

    ...the Supreme Court just reaffirmed the death sentence of an Ohio convict now in his 30th year on death row. He still has other avenues of appeal, just not his most recent one.
     
    If you're from a place like Detroit, getting sentenced to death probably lengthens your life expectancy.

    Rob, that is too funny and sadly too true. Or maybe not sadly.

  66. @guest
    By the way, that "sun so hot I froze to death" line reminds me of a couple lines I hate from the song Rocket Man, which go, "Mars ain't the kind of place to raise your kids/In fact it's cold as hell." Which may have been an unthinking use of the "[blank] as hell" cliche. Or it may have been an inversion. I don't know. But it doesn't come off, not merely because hell is not understood to be cold. More because it sounds stupid, for lack of a better way to put it.

    Now, if I were to say, for instance, the tv show Jackass is low and trashy partly because of its focus on the scatological, you could retort with, "There are frat jokes in Rabelais," for instance. You'd be correct. But does it matter? Rabelais is not Johnny Knoxville, and Young MC is not Cole Porter.

    I perhaps shouldn't have brought in the low/high distinction for this very reason. I did concede that Young MC was clever in a low way (which is pretty much the most hip-hop can hope for), and there exists what you could call a high-vulgarianism. I don't think Bust a Move rises to that level. It's low in the sense of not very clever, not clever in a low way, like Falstaff or whatever.

    Throw on top of that the fact that Young MC conspicuously resembles what I've noted in too many black writers to recount, as well as the ridiculous Mike Tyson. Namely, a love affair with loosely using relatively big or slightly obscure words. They are tied to purple prose and showy poetry. Coincidence?

    Dr. Seuss is okay, but note he writes for children. I like Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass very much, though the nonsense word thing isn't my cup of tea. Cole Porter was a master of the pop lyric, and I think his songs are the equivalent of 100 Young MCs in cleverness.

    Bust a Move is fun, but when it gets to the "sadistic...materialistic" part, I roll my eyes. "Perpetratin' a tan" I'll concede may be the sort of thing they actually say in day-to-day conversation, so let that pass.

    Guest, you’re overthinking it. As Autochthon said at 10:52,

    You yourself seem to think it’s a witty, fun piece, yet you seem vexed by it at the same time. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Admit it, hoss—the tune’s gonna be in your head all week.

  67. @Buffalo Joe
    H, You're probably too young to remember when you could hardly walk down some Southern streets without bumping into the swinging corpse of some poor black soul hanging from a tree limb or lamp post. I don't remember that either, but I have a book somewhere that relates how frequently lynching was performed in the old west almost exclusively on white criminals who were more often than not dragged from a jail cell where they were awaiting trial. Swifter justice than we are used to, an example, the Supreme Court just reaffirmed the death sentence of an Ohio convict now in his 30th year on death row. He still has other avenues of appeal, just not his most recent one.

    Having been born in the South in 1954, I well remember all the blacks hanging like fruit from every tree, in season all year round. And that was just in the country — in the city, they hung from lampposts like Christmas ornaments. Hooded Klansmen prowled the streets and roads, looking for uppity darkies to lynch for such heinous crimes as drinking from the wrong water fountain, or using the wrong bathroom. Why, NC didn’t even have transgender bathrooms back then! Look how far we’ve come.

    On a more serious note, my favorite upset-by-a-noose story comes not from a black but a white man. Back in the late 70s, when I lived on the farm, I leased the barn to a Korean war vet who had been a POW, and who wanted to stable his horses there. A friend of mine and I had hung a noose from the rafters, as we were the kind of people who liked to hang such party decorations for fun (though I did not hang the noose in the apartment years later, I will admit to being a bad influence on my crazy Jewish roommate). But this guy took one look at it and freaked out. He left the barn muttering, “I saw enough of those things in Korea!”

    True story. I don’t know what the hell they did to him in Korea, but whatever it was, apparently it involved nooses.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    H, thank you for the humorous reply and I am truly sorry for the POW that had a flashback. In WWII the Allies hanged most of their prisoners and war criminals that were sentenced to death. Remember not too many years back we hanged Saddam Hussein.
  68. @Trelane
    Contemporary material is smirky and knowing. The old stuff is genuine.

    Trelane

    The Squire of Gothos did the lynching. Go to 7:35 on the video.

    • Replies: @Trelane
    I don't know if I like your tone. It's most challenging. That's what you're doing, challenging me?
  69. @Autochthon
    Ah, when hip hop was focused on clever, poetic wordplay, whether emphasing light hearted fun or serious situations. Nowadays, of course, it is 99% "muh genitalz" and "blackety black black."

    Sad.

    I was wondering if somebody was going to write what i was thinking. well said.

  70. @Autochthon
    Your complaint was that he used the terms "sadistic," "materialistic," and "opportunistic" in rapid succession to describe cruel, gold-digging, designing women. Seems like perfectly unobjectionable mastery of the language to me. To "perpetrate" is to "do; carry out; commit [an act]." To "perpetrate a tan" is therefore well within the diegesis of using whimsical language to describe a calculating, unfeeling woman who connives and premeditates her every action to manipulate young men – as, here, her seeking a tan for cosmetic effect, or, possibly, merely feigning sunbathing but indifferent to whether she tans, only wishing to showcase her body to beguile young men like the narrator.

    It's much less fun and engaging, with a Hell of a lot less economy of language, when I write it thus, precisely because the piece is masterful use of language to construct artful, witty lyrics.

    He's no Cole Porter, just as Saul Bellow is no Victor Hugo, but it hardly means the lesser artists aren't quite brilliant in their own right.

    You yourself seem to think it's a witty, fun piece, yet you seem vexed by it at the same time. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Bust a Move is fun, and compared to other rap songs it’s like the Ninth Symphony in my estimation.

    The song itself doesn’t vex me, but I was a little vexed by the suggestion that it’s full of clever, poetic wordplay. Because that’s insulting to clever, poetic wordplay.

  71. @H Parnell
    Having been born in the South in 1954, I well remember all the blacks hanging like fruit from every tree, in season all year round. And that was just in the country -- in the city, they hung from lampposts like Christmas ornaments. Hooded Klansmen prowled the streets and roads, looking for uppity darkies to lynch for such heinous crimes as drinking from the wrong water fountain, or using the wrong bathroom. Why, NC didn't even have transgender bathrooms back then! Look how far we've come.

    On a more serious note, my favorite upset-by-a-noose story comes not from a black but a white man. Back in the late 70s, when I lived on the farm, I leased the barn to a Korean war vet who had been a POW, and who wanted to stable his horses there. A friend of mine and I had hung a noose from the rafters, as we were the kind of people who liked to hang such party decorations for fun (though I did not hang the noose in the apartment years later, I will admit to being a bad influence on my crazy Jewish roommate). But this guy took one look at it and freaked out. He left the barn muttering, "I saw enough of those things in Korea!"

    True story. I don't know what the hell they did to him in Korea, but whatever it was, apparently it involved nooses.

    H, thank you for the humorous reply and I am truly sorry for the POW that had a flashback. In WWII the Allies hanged most of their prisoners and war criminals that were sentenced to death. Remember not too many years back we hanged Saddam Hussein.

  72. One young person recited this to the amusement of other pre-teens.

    One bright day in the middle of night
    Two dead boys stood up to fight.
    Back to back and face to face
    they drew their swords and shot each other.
    The deaf policeman heard the noise
    and came a running to arrest those boys.
    If you don’t believe this lie, it’s true.
    Ask the blind man, he saw it too.

  73. @Prof. Woland
    Trelane

    The Squire of Gothos did the lynching. Go to 7:35 on the video.

    https://youtu.be/RXV5ciE8ucE?t=281

    I don’t know if I like your tone. It’s most challenging. That’s what you’re doing, challenging me?

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