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Here’s the umpty-umpth op-ed I’ve read in the New York Times with the same basic theme:

I’m a Woman of Color, So Let’s All Talk about Me!

From the NYT:

I Don’t Need a DNA Test to Tell Me How Black I Am

Tests like 23andMe are a fad that distracts us from the reality of race in America.

By Erin Aubry Kaplan
Contributing Opinion Writer, April 16, 2019

When my sister called me a few months ago to say, a little breathlessly, that she had gotten back her results from 23andMe, I snapped at her, “I don’t want to know!” …

I’ve never been interested in DNA tests. I have nothing against people discovering they’re 18 percent German or 79 percent Irish, but I think the tests are a fad that distracts us from the harsh realities of race and identity in America. They encourage us to pretend that in terms of shaping who we really are, individual narratives matter more than the narrative of the country as a whole. There is no test for separation and tribalism, and yet they are baked into our cultural DNA.

But that didn’t explain the panic I felt during that phone call. I was a little embarrassed that I couldn’t take the news, whatever that news turned out to be. And then I realized that was it: I didn’t want to “turn out to be” anything more than what I was. I didn’t want my blackness divvied up or deconstructed any more than it has already been, not just in my lifetime but in the history of the Creole people of Louisiana I descend from.

… I always saw Mr. Obama as an honorary Creole, a reminder to all of us black folk along the spectrum — a vast majority of whom have white ancestry — of where we belong.

My own wariness about knowing what my sister had found out never abated. But being a lawyer, she persisted, and I recently learned what the results turned up: slightly less than half African, the rest not. Relatively little French — a mild surprise, given Louisiana’s history. And a dollop Jewish. Interesting, amusing even, but I’m still black in America. What a relief.

Erin Aubry Kaplan, a contributing opinion writer, teaches writing at Antioch University, Los Angeles, and is the author of “Black Talk, Blue Thoughts and Walking the Color Line” and “I Heart Obama.”

 
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  1. Kaplan. Not the sort of name you associate with African-Americans. Very much the sort of surname you associate with NYT writers.

    • Replies: @Lloyd1927
    Kaplan is the name of her late husband:

    https://www.kcet.org/history-society/love-across-the-color-line-remembering-alan-kaplan
    , @Hapalong Cassidy
    “Erin” is not a name you hear among black women either.
  2. [DNA tests] are a fad that distracts us from the reality of race in America.

    So Mother Nature is a fad; and this Erin Kaplan is fully on board with reality.

    Learn something new every day.

  3. … I always saw Mr. Obama as an honorary Creole, a reminder to all of us black folk along the spectrum — a vast majority of whom have white ancestry — of where we belong.

    in Kenya?

    • Replies: @guest
    lol

    Is Creole people's only reference point for mullatoes? Or is this the old French = high culture amongst blacks?
    , @Endgame Napoleon
    No, it was in Hawaii, near the white bank manager and the white furniture salesman who raised Obama and contributed a good portion of his DNA—25%—even though he emphasizes the contribution of the foreign national parent that he rarely saw.
    , @John Irwin Reston
    My Lord Ms. Kaplan, don't you think you're stretching what little fabric of truth that might exist about Kenyan muslim Bh Obama, just a little thin with that remark?

    Please don't take it upon yo'seff to insult French Creoles. They are mix of many nationalities that included S. American Indians, French, Spanish, African black, Islamic and God only knows what else.

    The offspring of casual sex between whites and blacks before or during the American Antebellum period in the Deep South, have nothing in common with anything going on in race today other than a smattering of white blood that won't even get them close to being white.

    Those folks are categorically black and they should always be classified as such. Same with BHO . He's black, he hates whites and he was, is and always shall be black. Whites don't want him or anything to do with him.
  4. By the end of the second sentence, it seemed clear to me that the thing to do was to Google the author’s image to confirm that her article was really about what I thought it was probably about. It was.

    The idea of Obama as a honorary Creole was sort of novel, though.

    • Replies: @David
    Here's some commentary from her blog on the election of Obama:

    what really feels liberating in a very personal way, is the official new prominence of Michelle Obama. Barack's better half not only has stature but is statuesque. She has coruscating intelligence, beauty, style and -- drumroll, please -- a butt. (Yes, you read that right: I'm going to talk about the first lady's butt.)

     

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    Yeah. I wondered if I was seeing that coming as well and sure enough...
    , @Kylie
    I also googled the images of this woman of color. She's a light-skinned mulatta with the same type of freckles that make Meghan Markle's face so unattractive in close-up. No wonder she didn't want to know how black she was.
    , @Dr. X
    By the end of the second sentence, it was clear to me that this is pure fucking nonsense.

    This woman is a college professor, for God's sake? People in this country have no idea whatsoever how debased college has become, and stupidly continue to save their hard-earned money to give to morons like this to "educate" their children.
  5. @black sea
    By the end of the second sentence, it seemed clear to me that the thing to do was to Google the author's image to confirm that her article was really about what I thought it was probably about. It was.

    The idea of Obama as a honorary Creole was sort of novel, though.

    Here’s some commentary from her blog on the election of Obama:

    what really feels liberating in a very personal way, is the official new prominence of Michelle Obama. Barack’s better half not only has stature but is statuesque. She has coruscating intelligence, beauty, style and — drumroll, please — a butt. (Yes, you read that right: I’m going to talk about the first lady’s butt.)

    • Replies: @guest
    Yes, Obama married a black person. No high-yellow so-and-so. That's probably the only sacrifice he's ever made for black people.
    , @Authenticjazzman
    " Not only has stature but is statuesque. She has coruscating intelligence, beauty, style"

    Where can I puke.

    Holy shit, in which alternate universe is this idiot existing.

    Authenticjazzman "Mensa" qualified since 1973, airborne trained US army vet, and pro jazz artist.
  6. I thought being black in America forced her to face some harsh reality. Why is it a relief?

    • Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers
    She's relieved she's not black in Africa.
  7. yeah lets not all discover that only half a percent of whites owned slave some percent of those being jews and 20% of free blacks owned slaves
    Bcause much better to just make aLL WHITES EVIL ALL BLACKS GOOD

  8. I wonder what dollop got her the writing gig?

    Or was it the name?

    Maybe we should all adopt one, like Tim Roth’s dad.

  9. Not real black, I’d say. And isn’t Erin Aubry kind of a Becky name? Was Shaniqua taken?

    • Replies: @anonymous
    Can't resist women with those Abe Vigoda eyebrows.
    , @SunBakedSuburb
    The self-love shines through on this one. Doom befalls us all as black narcissism continues its steady march towards domination of our culture.
    , @Travis
    in Brazil she is too white to be classified as Black. She is certainly whiter than the famed white soccer player, Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior.

    if America does become more like Brazil people like her will be considered white and embrace their white identity.
    , @Neoconned
    I'm from NOLA. I can tell she's culturally not a Creole any more simply by her LA Cheri curl look.

    Nobody in NOLA besides a few black tourists do that style because the humidity and rain another it....
    , @MBlanc46
    Yep, not half African. If I were to guess, I’d say quadroon. Probably more than a dollop if Jewish.
  10. Erin Aubry Kaplan believes in the “one drop” rule.

  11. Does the NYT have an open opinion section or something? The opinions from their freelancers seem especially stupid.

    • Replies: @CCZ
    She seems to be a regular NYT contributor and her anger and narcissism are persistent.

    “Black professor accuses Michelle Obama of putting 'white empathy' above racial justice.”

    Erin Aubry Kaplan, a writing professor at Antioch University, attacked Michelle Obama in a New York Times op-ed for caring more for white opinion than the plight of black Americans.

    "Mrs. Obama still follows the rule of assimilation: It's more important to retain white empathy than to be truly empathetic to ourselves," wrote Kaplan.

    Her criticism centered around two brief sections of Michele Obama's book, where she recalled saying,"for the first time in my adult life ... really proud of my country" during the 2008 campaign, and where she rejected their family's longtime pastor, Jeremiah Wright Jr.

    After reading Obama's reflections on the incidents in the memoir, Kaplan accused her of trying to appease white people while paying lip service to black oppression, believing Obama fears expressing the full discontent of black Americans will cause her to be labeled "anti-American."

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/black-professor-accuses-michelle-obama-of-putting-white-empathy-over-racial-justice
  12. Well, I don’t blame her – with a name like “Erin Aubrey Kaplan” on paper she sounds like the whitest girl imaginable and if in person she looks more diverse, so much the better when it comes to her career prospects. It’s a special kind of privilege that has probably helped her immensely in life.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    >Kaplan

    >Whitest girl alive

    Press "x" to doubt
  13. Is Kaplan her daddy’s name or her husband’s? Is that Kaplan a full Jew or a half or quarter Jew? How much does the 2 millennia of Jewish hatred of white Christians influence her worldview, her daily lived culture?

    My advice to her: dump the names ‘Erin Aubry’ and replace them with something that better marks your blackness.

    My question for her: Why don’t you move to some virtually all black country where all power is in the hands of blacks? The only way Wakanda can be realized is when the vast majority of black professors, physicians, lawyers and judges, elected politicians, journalists, social workers, actors and musicians, soldiers, business owners return to Mother Sub-Saharan Africa and build it.

    • Replies: @John Irwin Reston
    Great comment and I agree with you. Dump the name; I've recently read that Khaleesi is a very popular name with black women who are delivering girls.

    And the Wakanda idea is great. If blacks would GTF out of these hated white countries and go start their own, why, in a few decades we can attempt real conversations with each other. They could call their concept: "Separate But Equal".....how novel is that?
  14. Sailer’s First Law of Mulatto Journalism when?

    The most heartfelt articles by Mulatto journalists tend to be demands that no matter what Revolution may Come, the journalist herself will not lose her Black Privilege.

  15. If you listen to NPR you will see this pattern over and over, “Race” Race” “Race” “Race” “Race” “Race” “We hate Trump!” In their world, there is nothing else going on.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Gotta get the vote out somehow. Luckily they haven’t figured out yet that blacks don’t listen to NPR.
  16. So she’s mostly “white” but can’t bring herself to use that awful word, and she looks white but with the funny nose which qualified her for an affirmative action job that she wants to keep.

    National News!

  17. Perhaps Erin Aubry Kaplan, former Los Angeles Times columnist, wonders why her life is different from that of Erin Kaplan, former MTV reality star and former Teen Vogue public relations manager.


    • Replies: @hhsiii
    Not the most flattering shot of her but Mrs. Kaplan ain’t too shabby for 57 years old.

    Her description of her marriage to Kaplan,who died in 2015, makes it sound like a long harangue against his white privilege. Even though he was all the way down on race politics.

    I doubt she has it bad growing up in the 70s in LA.
    , @Sean
    Even ex con youtuber Lockdown 23 and1 has 23 and me

    https://youtu.be/cNOPKDlb6h8?t=134

    Erin A looks seriously intelligent, she looks a bit like radical 7o lawyer Fay Stender


    http://ilkahartmann.squarespace.com/picture/01_newton_stender_radiant.jpg?pictureId=10070979
    , @Desiderius
    I can see a resemblance.

    See also:

    https://youtu.be/C0XMz7wneZk
    , @James Speaks
    Thank you.
    , @MikeatMikedotMike
    I'm going to need more photos of the latter before I can determine how their lives are different. TIA.
    , @bored identity
    bored identity's lab just run the results for both Kaplans:


    The first Erin reads as : Me and 23 cats.

    The second Erin reads as : Me and 23, and many, many more to come.



    Final verdict:

    Both of their genes were chosen to be social media construct.
    , @AndrewR
    The younger one is hot, I'll give her that. Will she be happy as she ages and she realizes she spent her most fertile, sexiest years making money for a megacorporation??
  18. Those walls of text.

    it is not good to pretend that] individual narratives matter more than the narrative of the country as a whole

    Narratives this, narrative that. What happened to history? I know, that would involve reading.

    There is no test for separation and tribalism, and yet they are baked into our cultural DNA.

    We are talking real DNA, not bad metaphors.

    I didn’t want my blackness divvied up [informal, where is the editor?] or deconstructed any more than it has already been [??], not just in my lifetime [???] but in the history of the Creole people of Louisiana I descend from [????]

    “That’s my narrative and I’m sticking to it.” But what does it mean?

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    "What happened to history?"

    History is a collection of narratives. And narratives usually require reading.
  19. @PiltdownMan
    Perhaps Erin Aubry Kaplan, former Los Angeles Times columnist, wonders why her life is different from that of Erin Kaplan, former MTV reality star and former Teen Vogue public relations manager.


    https://i0.wp.com/www.blackculturalevents.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/avatar.jpg.320x320px-3.jpg


    https://pics.wikifeet.com/Erin-Kaplan-Feet-529391.jpg

    Not the most flattering shot of her but Mrs. Kaplan ain’t too shabby for 57 years old.

    Her description of her marriage to Kaplan,who died in 2015, makes it sound like a long harangue against his white privilege. Even though he was all the way down on race politics.

    I doubt she has it bad growing up in the 70s in LA.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    Fair enough. Here is a picture of Erin Aubry Kaplan taken at a younger age, posed in a competing manner.

    From an article by Erin Aubry Kaplan that celebrates Michelle Obama as her, Aubry Kaplan's, body double in the White House and which analyzes Michelle Obama in the manner Sir Mix-a-Lot would.


    https://rashmanly.com/2008/11/24/25575/

    https://rashmanly.files.wordpress.com/2008/11/erin03.jpg

    , @Escher
    She’s 57 years old, and can’t think of anything better to write (about)?
  20. Ancestry.com Apologizes for Ad Showing Slavery-Era Interracial Couple

    “Ancestry is committed to telling important stories from history,” an Ancestry.com spokeswoman, wrote. “This ad was intended to represent one of those stories. We very much appreciate the feedback we have received and apologize for any offense that the ad may have caused. We are in the process of pulling the ad from television and have removed it from YouTube.”
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/19/us/ancestry-dna-slavery-commercial.html

    Should the New York Times apologize for their article from October 18th depicting an inter-racial couple ? Why is the New York times allowed to publish articles showcasing a marriage between a slave and a confederate soldier which began in 1860 ? They were legally married in 1972, during a brief time when inter-racial marriages were legal. “The love affair could have been lost if not for Paula Wright, a seventh-generation descendant of the couple who inherited vintage photographs that inspired her to document eight generations of her family”
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/21/us/interracial-slavery-love.html?action=click&module=RelatedCoverage&pgtype=Article&region=Footer

    While the NY times is permitted to run articles depicting interracial couples from 1860 , yet ancestry firms are prohibited from depicting such unions ?

    • Replies: @Laugh Track

    While the NY times is permitted to run articles depicting interracial couples from 1860 , yet ancestry firms are prohibited from depicting such unions ?
     
    Probably Ancestry.com's ad agency figured that since it is required to only show interracial couples in every other commercial on TV these days, that it was cool to do so with Ancestry.com, too. They just chose a touchy time period to depict it in.
  21. Erin Aubry Kaplan doesn’t need a DNA test to confirm how black she is because she is clearly possesses some white admixture. The more white a black person is, the harder they must try to appear black. Gotta keep it real, or something.

  22. @black sea
    By the end of the second sentence, it seemed clear to me that the thing to do was to Google the author's image to confirm that her article was really about what I thought it was probably about. It was.

    The idea of Obama as a honorary Creole was sort of novel, though.

    Yeah. I wondered if I was seeing that coming as well and sure enough…

  23. i get to the point that i just don’t care about non-whites any more

    • Replies: @Kylie
    "i get to the point that i just don’t care about non-whites any more"


    Yes, don't care about them and don't care to be around them.
  24. @Ed
    Does the NYT have an open opinion section or something? The opinions from their freelancers seem especially stupid.

    She seems to be a regular NYT contributor and her anger and narcissism are persistent.

    “Black professor accuses Michelle Obama of putting ‘white empathy’ above racial justice.”

    Erin Aubry Kaplan, a writing professor at Antioch University, attacked Michelle Obama in a New York Times op-ed for caring more for white opinion than the plight of black Americans.

    “Mrs. Obama still follows the rule of assimilation: It’s more important to retain white empathy than to be truly empathetic to ourselves,” wrote Kaplan.

    Her criticism centered around two brief sections of Michele Obama’s book, where she recalled saying,”for the first time in my adult life … really proud of my country” during the 2008 campaign, and where she rejected their family’s longtime pastor, Jeremiah Wright Jr.

    After reading Obama’s reflections on the incidents in the memoir, Kaplan accused her of trying to appease white people while paying lip service to black oppression, believing Obama fears expressing the full discontent of black Americans will cause her to be labeled “anti-American.”

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/black-professor-accuses-michelle-obama-of-putting-white-empathy-over-racial-justice

  25. Get me rewrite.

    Tests like 23andMe are a fad reflection of reality that distracts us from the reality hobby of race-based self-promotion in America.

    By Erin Aubry Kaplan

    DNA tests… encourage us to pretend understand that in terms of shaping who we really are, individual narratives matter more than the narrative of the country as a whole.

    Never mind — fixed it.

    • Replies: @bomag
    Nice.

    When I read this Kaplan and others, I'm carrying two questions:

    1) What is the truth?

    2) How is this worldview going to improve anything? Kaplan carries a promise that if we honor her obsessions; if we give her the levers of power, then she will bring forth a better world. I'm not seeing it, and, more likely, she is making things worse.
  26. I have always been confused by the word “Creole.” What does it mean to someone from Louisiana? What would its most common meaning there be? I thought there were white Creoles.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Technically, it means a person born in a colony who is of the nationality of the colonial power.

    A person born in Louisiana when it was French territory who is French nationality ethnicity is a creole.

    A black Indian or non French American or Mexican is not a creole.

    Descendants of French nationality people born in one of the colonies are also creoles.

    The term was only used in Louisiana. Although technically the French ethnic colonists in Canada Minnesota Illinois Missouri etc are also creoles.

    It’s the same word and meaning in Spanish
    , @Federalist
    Originally, Creole meant a person who was born in the New World as opposed to being born in France or Spain.

    In New Orleans after the Louisiana Purchase, Creole referred to the pre-existing French speaking population and their culture. Basically, it meant not American, English speaking, or Protestant. We tend to look at it the Louisiana Purchase from America's perspective, but the people of New Orleans didn't just say, "Yay, we're Americans now." They were very wary of the Americans moving in. The two groups tended to live in separate parts of the city (the French Quarter vs. Uptown). The term "neutral ground" is still used today to refer to a median separating two sides of a boulevard because the original neutral ground separated the Creole/French and "American" sectors of the city.

    Prior to the Louisiana Purchase, the mixed race Gens de Couleur Libre (free people of color) were basically a racial class distinct from both black slaves and whites. These people and their descendants came to be referred to as Creoles of Color or simply Creoles. Even after the end of slavery, there continued to be a social distinction between the lighter-skinned, more prosperous black "Creoles" and other blacks. Maybe it was unintentional on the part of the NYT author, but lighter-skinned blacks often like to talk about their Creole ancestry to set themselves apart from the lower status blacker blacks.

    There was a similar process of the changing meaning of the word outside of New Orleans. At one point, Creole essentially meant non-Acadian French. It is not very well known today, but some parts of "Cajun" Louisiana were primarily settled by French people who were not Acadians (including Evangeline Parish, ironically). Some of the most common "Cajun" surnames in Louisiana are French but not Acadian. In this region today, the French-influenced culture and people claiming French descent are generally referred to as Cajun in the case of whites and Creole in the case of blacks.

    The short version is yes there were white Creoles, meaning the former subjects of France and Spain in New Orleans (as opposed to English speaking Americans) and the non-Acadian French outside of New Orleans. Today, Creole in Louisiana primarily refers to blacks of mixed race descent and/or who relate to their French heritage.
    , @anon
    Cre·ole
    /ˈkrēˌōl/
    noun
    noun: Creole; plural noun: Creoles
    1.
    a person of mixed European and black descent, especially in the Caribbean.
    a descendant of Spanish or other European settlers in the Caribbean or Central or South America.
    a white descendant of French settlers in Louisiana and other parts of the southern US.
    2.
    a mother tongue formed from the contact of two languages through an earlier pidgin stage.
    "a Portuguese-based Creole"
    , @guest
    I don't know what it means to Louisianans in particular. Originally it referred to Europeans born in the Louisiana colony, as opposed to back home. That expanded to cover black slaves and Indians, too.

    Nowadays it primarily means people of mixed European-African origin from the gulf and Carribean region. As well as being a language.
  27. OT:

    From 2002 to 2017, of the roughly 50,000 people who earned Ph.D.s each year, the percentage who were black increased only modestly, from 5.1 percent to 5.4 percent, according to data from the National Science Foundation. In 2017, there were more than a dozen fields—largely subfields within science, technology, engineering, and math—in which not a single doctoral degree was awarded to a black person anywhere in the United States.

    • Replies: @Clyde

    There were more than a dozen disciplines, largely STEM-related sub-fields, where no black students earned doctoral degrees in 2017.
     
    Lazy guess is that education has the most black PhD graduates each year. Maybe most females too, of all races combined.
    , @PiltdownMan
    I’m shocked that our educational institutions hand out so many Ph.Ds every year.
  28. Girls like this have the best of all worlds — light enough to be conventionally pretty, like having a tan, but dark enough to get the Affirmative Action privilege.

    • Agree: Nicholas Stix
  29. She was married to a Jew red diaper baby. They are the epitome of SJWs and activists . She had a weekly column in LA Weekly the local prostitution advertiser.

    Her articles were nothing but musings about herself herself herself occasionally husband and whatever alleged bigotry she could make up about her White in-laws. Maybe a sales clerk looked st me funny because I’m black.

    They lived in Inglewood where LAX is. Inglewood was once s lovely little White town. Them blacks moved in and crime rose and rose schools became crime ridden violent day care center for retards.

    She sometimes wrote about Inglewood disfunction blaming Whites and even the airport. For decades Inglewood thugs roamed the airport parking lots robbing and attacking Whites. Now that Inglewood is becoming Hispanic that’s ended. So has crime gone down and the schools are becoming less violent. It was all Whitey’s fault.

    A constant theme was lack of nice restaurants in Inglewood. We all know why there are no nice restaurants in Inglewood

    1 they never tip
    2 cruel and vicious to servers
    3 demanding and unreasonable example demanding shrimp added to a chef’s salad for no extra cost
    4 aggressive behavior with other customers and staff sometimes leading to fights
    4 robbing attacking and raping staff as they leave restaurant
    5 occasional armed robberies
    6 constant worry about violence and threats
    7 dine and dash

    Many articles were “ my husbands White and some of his relatives don’t cater to my massive ego enough”

    LA Weekly is the local prostitution advertising ultra left Her me me me me me me me me nonsense occasionally appeared in the LATimes.

    Sure wish I could find someone to pay me for my musings about my sister’s 23andme.

    Her fathers some sort of mover and shaker not an activist shakedown artist but a businessman maybe owns the black newspaper.

    • Agree: jim jones
  30. If she’s half-Ashkenazi, odds are she’s only 20 % African.

  31. I suspect the “panic” she felt was related to her (legitimate) fear that Diversity Pokémon Points (to say nothing of the size of potential reparations checks) will increasingly be tied to racial purity (One Drop Rule and all that), hence this FrontLash against the idea that your racial admixture should have anything to say about whether you’re, “really black.”

  32. Erin Kaplan: “I don’t need a DNA test to tell me how Black I am!”

    Rachel Dolezal: “Speak for yourself, Becky.”

    • LOL: Redneck farmer, TWS
  33. @hhsiii
    Not the most flattering shot of her but Mrs. Kaplan ain’t too shabby for 57 years old.

    Her description of her marriage to Kaplan,who died in 2015, makes it sound like a long harangue against his white privilege. Even though he was all the way down on race politics.

    I doubt she has it bad growing up in the 70s in LA.

    Fair enough. Here is a picture of Erin Aubry Kaplan taken at a younger age, posed in a competing manner.

    From an article by Erin Aubry Kaplan that celebrates Michelle Obama as her, Aubry Kaplan’s, body double in the White House and which analyzes Michelle Obama in the manner Sir Mix-a-Lot would.

    https://rashmanly.com/2008/11/24/25575/

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Pilt, yeah, that looks like a Michelle pose from Elle or Glamour.
    , @Bruce County
    Typical "look at me" negro photo..
  34. The real issues of race? Everything they do makes it worse, it’s almost as if they want things to get worse.

    I can’t imagine what they would achieve if they could have what they want.

  35. Wait, so this woman would tell Henry Louis “Skip” Gates, PBS and NPR’s expert on all things black in America, to shove his “Roots” program where he tells celebs about their ancestory? I never understood how some one else’s joy should diminish yours. She doesn’t want to know about her heritage, fine. Her sister does, fine too.

  36. @PiltdownMan
    Fair enough. Here is a picture of Erin Aubry Kaplan taken at a younger age, posed in a competing manner.

    From an article by Erin Aubry Kaplan that celebrates Michelle Obama as her, Aubry Kaplan's, body double in the White House and which analyzes Michelle Obama in the manner Sir Mix-a-Lot would.


    https://rashmanly.com/2008/11/24/25575/

    https://rashmanly.files.wordpress.com/2008/11/erin03.jpg

    Pilt, yeah, that looks like a Michelle pose from Elle or Glamour.

  37. It would be nice if we could start calling out people like this for their virulent racism. If being blatantly racist in a national publication is bad for white men then it’s bad for everyone else.

  38. @ic1000
    Get me rewrite.

    Tests like 23andMe are a fad reflection of reality that distracts us from the reality hobby of race-based self-promotion in America.

    By Erin Aubry Kaplan

    DNA tests... encourage us to pretend understand that in terms of shaping who we really are, individual narratives matter more than the narrative of the country as a whole.

    Never mind -- fixed it.

    Nice.

    When I read this Kaplan and others, I’m carrying two questions:

    1) What is the truth?

    2) How is this worldview going to improve anything? Kaplan carries a promise that if we honor her obsessions; if we give her the levers of power, then she will bring forth a better world. I’m not seeing it, and, more likely, she is making things worse.

  39. Unlike many mixed ancestry people, Kaplan actually does look nonwhite.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    Right. There is a growing population of mulattos in the Deep South due to mixed marriages and most of them look kinda Puerto Rican or Brazilian, because the black parent has substantial white ancestry, meaning the kid is probably only 25-33 percent SSA or so.

    She actually looks more than half SSA in phenotype. She’s ok for her late 50s.
  40. @PiltdownMan
    Perhaps Erin Aubry Kaplan, former Los Angeles Times columnist, wonders why her life is different from that of Erin Kaplan, former MTV reality star and former Teen Vogue public relations manager.


    https://i0.wp.com/www.blackculturalevents.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/avatar.jpg.320x320px-3.jpg


    https://pics.wikifeet.com/Erin-Kaplan-Feet-529391.jpg

    Even ex con youtuber Lockdown 23 and1 has 23 and me

    Erin A looks seriously intelligent, she looks a bit like radical 7o lawyer Fay Stender

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Who is he and why did I watch four minutes of that video??
    , @Alden
    We had a party to celebrate when one of her Black Guerilla Family clients shot but didn’t kill Faye. Instead she was totally handicapped including some brain damage. In addition to wearing diapers she couldn’t walk had to be in a wheel chair plus lengthy hospital nursing home and therapy sessions.

    She and her law partner Charles Garry were involved helping Jackson, Angela Davis etc in the Marin county shootout that murdered 11 people But being lawyers they were careful to do nothing to incriminate themselves. The media and liberals of course blamed the deputies for returning fire after Jackson killed the judge

    The Stender Garry Prison Law Project was responsible for flooding San Francisco criminal courts and San Quentin with Red diaper baby Ivy League mostly Jews determined to foment a black revolution in America.

    It could have happened. But it was only postponed till now after 50 years of affirmative action with prison reform and 24/7 anti White rhetoric.

    Her diabolical coterie of Jewish women lawyers succeed in the Alameda County district attorney policy of never ever never ever charging blacks with rape of White women. For a couple years they staged riots. The main criminal courthouse is in Oakland and the activists including Stender and Garry has the activists and thugs ready. That policy lasted a good 12 years.

    Ironically, it was the commie feminazis who had defended black on White rape since the 1930s whose anti rape crusade made it possible to start charging Alameda county rapists again.

    During the Stender/Garry reign of rape terror a White Berkeley cop was suspended and the police chief had to go on TV to apologize for police brutality The cop heard screaming in a park and found a black rapist on top of the victim. The rapist refused to get off her. So the cop pounded on his head and pulled him off his White victim.

    Uproar and threats of riot ensued. Riot averted. Chief groveled on TV. Another liberal success

    Faye was worse than Bernadette Dohrn Kathy Boudin and the rest of the weather underground crew. Her and Garry’s Prison Law Project was probably the most influential thing in the radicalization of the Bay Area., at least in the criminal justice system.

    Off topic There’s a movie version of Les Miserables. Inspector Joubert and some others is of course black.

  41. @hhsiii
    Not the most flattering shot of her but Mrs. Kaplan ain’t too shabby for 57 years old.

    Her description of her marriage to Kaplan,who died in 2015, makes it sound like a long harangue against his white privilege. Even though he was all the way down on race politics.

    I doubt she has it bad growing up in the 70s in LA.

    She’s 57 years old, and can’t think of anything better to write (about)?

  42. @Arclight
    Well, I don't blame her - with a name like "Erin Aubrey Kaplan" on paper she sounds like the whitest girl imaginable and if in person she looks more diverse, so much the better when it comes to her career prospects. It's a special kind of privilege that has probably helped her immensely in life.

    >Kaplan

    >Whitest girl alive

    Press “x” to doubt

    • Replies: @Arclight
    Erin Aubrey is pretty white girl.
  43. The last name is a giveaway, you know right away she’s a black Jewess, it’s where the narcissism came from.

  44. I wonder, will it ever become woke to decry the privilege of “white blacks.”

    They are obviously soaking up a vastly disproportionate amount of the elite positions and opportunities within the “black community.” This has to get slightly annoying to really dark skinned blacks at some point.

    I had that thought the other day when I saw a still shot of Trevor Noah interviewing Kamala Harris about how she thinks New Hampshire is racist or something.

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    I do recall some terms they have bandied about in the past which,oddly, I don't seem to hear much these days ,those being "house" people and "field" people.
    , @sj
    The Paper Bag rule.
  45. By committing fully to political Blackness, she gets all the benefits thereof, and her peers (might) gracefully ignore her ineradicable Whiteness.

    i.e. “I’m Black Y’all”

  46. @black sea
    By the end of the second sentence, it seemed clear to me that the thing to do was to Google the author's image to confirm that her article was really about what I thought it was probably about. It was.

    The idea of Obama as a honorary Creole was sort of novel, though.

    I also googled the images of this woman of color. She’s a light-skinned mulatta with the same type of freckles that make Meghan Markle’s face so unattractive in close-up. No wonder she didn’t want to know how black she was.

  47. @PiltdownMan
    Perhaps Erin Aubry Kaplan, former Los Angeles Times columnist, wonders why her life is different from that of Erin Kaplan, former MTV reality star and former Teen Vogue public relations manager.


    https://i0.wp.com/www.blackculturalevents.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/avatar.jpg.320x320px-3.jpg


    https://pics.wikifeet.com/Erin-Kaplan-Feet-529391.jpg

    I can see a resemblance.

    See also:

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I would have never been able to come up with the artist - one hit wonder, I guess. Thanks for the memory, Desi. I like this one.
  48. ‘..Relatively little French — a mild surprise, given Louisiana’s history. And a dollop Jewish…’

    Given the last name — Kaplan — and the venue in which this piece appears, one immediately wonders just how big a ‘dollop.’

    I’ll put my money on a quarter — and I’ll go out on a limb here and assert that far from being a victim of anything, Ms. Kaplan has been a beneficiary of mulatto privilege supercharged with a Jew-bonus.

    …being a woman doesn’t hurt, either.

    ‘…but I’m still black in America. What a relief.’

    It’s comic here to imagine her waking up tomorrow to look in the mirror and discover she had really become black — full-on, 100%, simian black. Sarcastic ‘relief’ would not be her emotion.

    This is all of a piece with that bit about some actress deciding to raise her adopted boy as a girl. We’ve descended into collective lunacy. People advance patent nonsense — and the more nonsensical it is, the louder the applause.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Kaplan’s her married name.
    , @Authenticjazzman
    Deleted due to duplication.
    , @Authenticjazzman
    " We've descended into collective lunacy"

    Speak for yourself pal. I am not crazy.

    The Democrats/leftists have fallen into lunacy, not my friends and family.

    Authenticjazzman " Mensa " qualified since 1973, airborne trained US Army vet, and pro jazz musician.
  49. @prosa123
    Unlike many mixed ancestry people, Kaplan actually does look nonwhite.

    Right. There is a growing population of mulattos in the Deep South due to mixed marriages and most of them look kinda Puerto Rican or Brazilian, because the black parent has substantial white ancestry, meaning the kid is probably only 25-33 percent SSA or so.

    She actually looks more than half SSA in phenotype. She’s ok for her late 50s.

  50. @PiltdownMan
    Perhaps Erin Aubry Kaplan, former Los Angeles Times columnist, wonders why her life is different from that of Erin Kaplan, former MTV reality star and former Teen Vogue public relations manager.


    https://i0.wp.com/www.blackculturalevents.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/avatar.jpg.320x320px-3.jpg


    https://pics.wikifeet.com/Erin-Kaplan-Feet-529391.jpg

    Thank you.

  51. This reminds me of the old joke about pilots, but substitute ‘Person-of-Colour’ for ‘pilot.’:

    Q: How can you tell if someone is a pilot?
    A: You don’t have to, they will tell you.

  52. The cognitive dissonance displayed in articles like this is mind blowing. We are to believe that the windowless box of “black identity” forced upon those of African descent is inescapable, oppressive, and filled with despair and deprivation. And “society” offers no way out. In the same paragraph the writer insists that she doesn’t want to nuance the black-white line, because to do so would obscure or even detract from the single most cherished thing she has, her blackness. Because the most important thing is that America remains a black-white society, regardless of actual genetic realities, I suppose, even though that cruel dichotomy is supposedly the source of all oppression. It makes no sense.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    Cognitive dissonance--don't let the facts get in the way of a good story.

    Or the current vernacular--My Narrative.
    , @Nicholas Stix
    "but I think the tests are a fad that distracts us from the harsh realities of race and identity in America....

    "Interesting, amusing even, but I’m still black in America. What a relief."

    That's one aspect of what I call the Black School of Rhetorical Bombast. Facts, logic, law, morality, or other principles--none of it matters. Being recognized as "black" gives one carte blanche.

  53. @Hypnotoad666
    I wonder, will it ever become woke to decry the privilege of "white blacks."

    They are obviously soaking up a vastly disproportionate amount of the elite positions and opportunities within the "black community." This has to get slightly annoying to really dark skinned blacks at some point.

    I had that thought the other day when I saw a still shot of Trevor Noah interviewing Kamala Harris about how she thinks New Hampshire is racist or something.

    I do recall some terms they have bandied about in the past which,oddly, I don’t seem to hear much these days ,those being “house” people and “field” people.

    • Replies: @njguy73
    In a 1991 New York magazine piece entitled "Don't Blame Me!," John Taylor criticized the "new culture of victimization," from cancer patients suing tobacco companies to talk shows guest blaming "sex addiction" for their cheating. At one point it was noted that a Frontline audience member called Colin Powell "the house [slur] sending the field [slurs] to die"


    https://books.google.com/books?id=cOkCAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA26&lpg=PA26&dq=new+york+magazine+victimology+colin+powell&source=bl&ots=pIVv-iLPTW&sig=ACfU3U2vg5QCMN_2lAvbumsM2NDRVCarzA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwif35a_1d_hAhUPWN8KHc6qCVYQ6AEwFXoECAwQAQ#v=onepage&q=colin%20powell&f=false
  54. syonredux [AKA "dr syon"] says:

    I’ve never been interested in DNA tests. I have nothing against people discovering they’re 18 percent German or 79 percent Irish, but I think the tests are a fad that distracts us from the harsh realities of race and identity in America. They encourage us to pretend that in terms of shaping who we really are, individual narratives matter more than the narrative of the country as a whole. There is no test for separation and tribalism, and yet they are baked into our cultural DNA.

    Bit too either/or, dear lady. The proper equation is DNA +Culture. Looking only at either half of the equation results in an incomplete portrait.

  55. @william munny
    I thought being black in America forced her to face some harsh reality. Why is it a relief?

    She’s relieved she’s not black in Africa.

  56. Can’t wait for all the Kardashian/Jenner/Rapper hybrids to grow up and tell us how relieved they are to be black in 2045 and not some despised minority.

  57. @Mike Zwick
    If you listen to NPR you will see this pattern over and over, "Race" Race" "Race" "Race" "Race" "Race" "We hate Trump!" In their world, there is nothing else going on.

    Gotta get the vote out somehow. Luckily they haven’t figured out yet that blacks don’t listen to NPR.

    • Replies: @Mike Zwick
    More like an echo chamber of smug progressives.
  58. These mulattos do too have overflowing black pride articles are just more of the same flight from white.

  59. @anon
    i get to the point that i just don't care about non-whites any more

    “i get to the point that i just don’t care about non-whites any more”

    Yes, don’t care about them and don’t care to be around them.

  60. @Humbles
    The cognitive dissonance displayed in articles like this is mind blowing. We are to believe that the windowless box of “black identity” forced upon those of African descent is inescapable, oppressive, and filled with despair and deprivation. And “society” offers no way out. In the same paragraph the writer insists that she doesn’t want to nuance the black-white line, because to do so would obscure or even detract from the single most cherished thing she has, her blackness. Because the most important thing is that America remains a black-white society, regardless of actual genetic realities, I suppose, even though that cruel dichotomy is supposedly the source of all oppression. It makes no sense.

    Cognitive dissonance–don’t let the facts get in the way of a good story.

    Or the current vernacular–My Narrative.

  61. @Colin Wright
    '..Relatively little French — a mild surprise, given Louisiana’s history. And a dollop Jewish...'

    Given the last name -- Kaplan -- and the venue in which this piece appears, one immediately wonders just how big a 'dollop.'

    I'll put my money on a quarter -- and I'll go out on a limb here and assert that far from being a victim of anything, Ms. Kaplan has been a beneficiary of mulatto privilege supercharged with a Jew-bonus.

    ...being a woman doesn't hurt, either.

    ...

    '...but I’m still black in America. What a relief.'

    It's comic here to imagine her waking up tomorrow to look in the mirror and discover she had really become black -- full-on, 100%, simian black. Sarcastic 'relief' would not be her emotion.

    This is all of a piece with that bit about some actress deciding to raise her adopted boy as a girl. We've descended into collective lunacy. People advance patent nonsense -- and the more nonsensical it is, the louder the applause.

    Kaplan’s her married name.

  62. I am constantly astonished at how much MORE racist we have become over the last 40 years.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    We, kimosabe?
  63. @Verymuchalive
    Kaplan. Not the sort of name you associate with African-Americans. Very much the sort of surname you associate with NYT writers.
  64. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @songbird
    I have always been confused by the word "Creole." What does it mean to someone from Louisiana? What would its most common meaning there be? I thought there were white Creoles.

    Technically, it means a person born in a colony who is of the nationality of the colonial power.

    A person born in Louisiana when it was French territory who is French nationality ethnicity is a creole.

    A black Indian or non French American or Mexican is not a creole.

    Descendants of French nationality people born in one of the colonies are also creoles.

    The term was only used in Louisiana. Although technically the French ethnic colonists in Canada Minnesota Illinois Missouri etc are also creoles.

    It’s the same word and meaning in Spanish

    • Agree: Travis
  65. @AndrewR
    >Kaplan

    >Whitest girl alive

    Press "x" to doubt

    Erin Aubrey is pretty white girl.

    • Replies: @guest
    Yes. But the Kaplan ruins it.
  66. anonymous[191] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jim Don Bob
    Not real black, I'd say. And isn't Erin Aubry kind of a Becky name? Was Shaniqua taken?

    https://www.kcet.org/sites/kl/files/atoms/article_atoms/www.kcet.org/socal/voices/assets/images/Erin_Aubry_Kaplan.jpg

    Can’t resist women with those Abe Vigoda eyebrows.

  67. @Verymuchalive
    Kaplan. Not the sort of name you associate with African-Americans. Very much the sort of surname you associate with NYT writers.

    “Erin” is not a name you hear among black women either.

  68. Uh-oh, the Times has wised up and now detects that you’ve browsed over in Incognito Mode.

  69. @songbird
    I have always been confused by the word "Creole." What does it mean to someone from Louisiana? What would its most common meaning there be? I thought there were white Creoles.

    Originally, Creole meant a person who was born in the New World as opposed to being born in France or Spain.

    In New Orleans after the Louisiana Purchase, Creole referred to the pre-existing French speaking population and their culture. Basically, it meant not American, English speaking, or Protestant. We tend to look at it the Louisiana Purchase from America’s perspective, but the people of New Orleans didn’t just say, “Yay, we’re Americans now.” They were very wary of the Americans moving in. The two groups tended to live in separate parts of the city (the French Quarter vs. Uptown). The term “neutral ground” is still used today to refer to a median separating two sides of a boulevard because the original neutral ground separated the Creole/French and “American” sectors of the city.

    Prior to the Louisiana Purchase, the mixed race Gens de Couleur Libre (free people of color) were basically a racial class distinct from both black slaves and whites. These people and their descendants came to be referred to as Creoles of Color or simply Creoles. Even after the end of slavery, there continued to be a social distinction between the lighter-skinned, more prosperous black “Creoles” and other blacks. Maybe it was unintentional on the part of the NYT author, but lighter-skinned blacks often like to talk about their Creole ancestry to set themselves apart from the lower status blacker blacks.

    There was a similar process of the changing meaning of the word outside of New Orleans. At one point, Creole essentially meant non-Acadian French. It is not very well known today, but some parts of “Cajun” Louisiana were primarily settled by French people who were not Acadians (including Evangeline Parish, ironically). Some of the most common “Cajun” surnames in Louisiana are French but not Acadian. In this region today, the French-influenced culture and people claiming French descent are generally referred to as Cajun in the case of whites and Creole in the case of blacks.

    The short version is yes there were white Creoles, meaning the former subjects of France and Spain in New Orleans (as opposed to English speaking Americans) and the non-Acadian French outside of New Orleans. Today, Creole in Louisiana primarily refers to blacks of mixed race descent and/or who relate to their French heritage.

    • Replies: @Corn
    “The two groups tended to live in separate parts of the city (the French Quarter vs. Uptown). The term “neutral ground” is still used today to refer to a median separating two sides of a boulevard because the original neutral ground separated the Creole/French and “American” sectors of the city.”

    I believe the neutral ground is Canal Street correct? After the Purchase the French stayed on one side of Canal and the Americans stayed on the other.
    , @songbird
    That is quite curious how it basically came to mean mulatto. I suppose it must have something to do with language. Like maybe, the native French became more conversant in English earlier or else spoke a more proper version of French than the mulatto-French. This would probably say something about how separate they were.
  70. @El Dato
    Those walls of text.

    it is not good to pretend that] individual narratives matter more than the narrative of the country as a whole
     
    Narratives this, narrative that. What happened to history? I know, that would involve reading.

    There is no test for separation and tribalism, and yet they are baked into our cultural DNA.
     
    We are talking real DNA, not bad metaphors.

    I didn’t want my blackness divvied up [informal, where is the editor?] or deconstructed any more than it has already been [??], not just in my lifetime [???] but in the history of the Creole people of Louisiana I descend from [????]

     

    "That's my narrative and I'm sticking to it." But what does it mean?

    “What happened to history?”

    History is a collection of narratives. And narratives usually require reading.

  71. @Jim Don Bob
    Not real black, I'd say. And isn't Erin Aubry kind of a Becky name? Was Shaniqua taken?

    https://www.kcet.org/sites/kl/files/atoms/article_atoms/www.kcet.org/socal/voices/assets/images/Erin_Aubry_Kaplan.jpg

    The self-love shines through on this one. Doom befalls us all as black narcissism continues its steady march towards domination of our culture.

  72. @PiltdownMan
    Fair enough. Here is a picture of Erin Aubry Kaplan taken at a younger age, posed in a competing manner.

    From an article by Erin Aubry Kaplan that celebrates Michelle Obama as her, Aubry Kaplan's, body double in the White House and which analyzes Michelle Obama in the manner Sir Mix-a-Lot would.


    https://rashmanly.com/2008/11/24/25575/

    https://rashmanly.files.wordpress.com/2008/11/erin03.jpg

    Typical “look at me” negro photo..

  73. @Jim Don Bob
    Not real black, I'd say. And isn't Erin Aubry kind of a Becky name? Was Shaniqua taken?

    https://www.kcet.org/sites/kl/files/atoms/article_atoms/www.kcet.org/socal/voices/assets/images/Erin_Aubry_Kaplan.jpg

    in Brazil she is too white to be classified as Black. She is certainly whiter than the famed white soccer player, Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior.

    if America does become more like Brazil people like her will be considered white and embrace their white identity.

  74. @PiltdownMan
    Perhaps Erin Aubry Kaplan, former Los Angeles Times columnist, wonders why her life is different from that of Erin Kaplan, former MTV reality star and former Teen Vogue public relations manager.


    https://i0.wp.com/www.blackculturalevents.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/avatar.jpg.320x320px-3.jpg


    https://pics.wikifeet.com/Erin-Kaplan-Feet-529391.jpg

    I’m going to need more photos of the latter before I can determine how their lives are different. TIA.

  75. Someone tell this fool about the one-drop rule.

  76. @Curious Person

    … I always saw Mr. Obama as an honorary Creole, a reminder to all of us black folk along the spectrum — a vast majority of whom have white ancestry — of where we belong.

     

    in Kenya?

    lol

    Is Creole people’s only reference point for mullatoes? Or is this the old French = high culture amongst blacks?

  77. @David
    Here's some commentary from her blog on the election of Obama:

    what really feels liberating in a very personal way, is the official new prominence of Michelle Obama. Barack's better half not only has stature but is statuesque. She has coruscating intelligence, beauty, style and -- drumroll, please -- a butt. (Yes, you read that right: I'm going to talk about the first lady's butt.)

     

    Yes, Obama married a black person. No high-yellow so-and-so. That’s probably the only sacrifice he’s ever made for black people.

  78. @MEH 0910
    OT:
    https://twitter.com/AdamHSays/status/1119201543176237056

    From 2002 to 2017, of the roughly 50,000 people who earned Ph.D.s each year, the percentage who were black increased only modestly, from 5.1 percent to 5.4 percent, according to data from the National Science Foundation. In 2017, there were more than a dozen fields—largely subfields within science, technology, engineering, and math—in which not a single doctoral degree was awarded to a black person anywhere in the United States.
     

    There were more than a dozen disciplines, largely STEM-related sub-fields, where no black students earned doctoral degrees in 2017.

    Lazy guess is that education has the most black PhD graduates each year. Maybe most females too, of all races combined.

    • Replies: @res

    Lazy guess is that education has the most black PhD graduates each year.
     
    Your guess is on target. I looked at some data in this comment: http://www.unz.com/isteve/black-math-prof-discovers-he-made-bad-career-choice-campaigns-to-get-more-blacks-to-make-same-bad-choice/?highlight=doctorate#comment-3052339

    24.7% of black doctorates were in Education (10.7% for whites).

    P.S. I believe this was from the same data MEH 0910 linked.
  79. @Arclight
    Erin Aubrey is pretty white girl.

    Yes. But the Kaplan ruins it.

  80. anon[148] • Disclaimer says:
    @songbird
    I have always been confused by the word "Creole." What does it mean to someone from Louisiana? What would its most common meaning there be? I thought there were white Creoles.

    Cre·ole
    /ˈkrēˌōl/
    noun
    noun: Creole; plural noun: Creoles
    1.
    a person of mixed European and black descent, especially in the Caribbean.
    a descendant of Spanish or other European settlers in the Caribbean or Central or South America.
    a white descendant of French settlers in Louisiana and other parts of the southern US.
    2.
    a mother tongue formed from the contact of two languages through an earlier pidgin stage.
    “a Portuguese-based Creole”

  81. @songbird
    I have always been confused by the word "Creole." What does it mean to someone from Louisiana? What would its most common meaning there be? I thought there were white Creoles.

    I don’t know what it means to Louisianans in particular. Originally it referred to Europeans born in the Louisiana colony, as opposed to back home. That expanded to cover black slaves and Indians, too.

    Nowadays it primarily means people of mixed European-African origin from the gulf and Carribean region. As well as being a language.

  82. That reminds me of that Youtuber named Nia Hope when she learned then she had white ancenstry.

    And I saw that video where a white nationalism discover then he have black ancestry and take some advantages of this situation.

  83. individual narratives matter more than the narrative of the country as a whole

    Another White Privilege: self-awareness.

    a fad that distracts us from the harsh realities of race and identity in America

    To be fair, Steve, as long as you’re talking endlessly and exclusively about black oppression, you don’t necessarily need to be talking specifically about her. Just exercise caution and throw her a bone every once in a while.

  84. @Jim Don Bob
    Not real black, I'd say. And isn't Erin Aubry kind of a Becky name? Was Shaniqua taken?

    https://www.kcet.org/sites/kl/files/atoms/article_atoms/www.kcet.org/socal/voices/assets/images/Erin_Aubry_Kaplan.jpg

    I’m from NOLA. I can tell she’s culturally not a Creole any more simply by her LA Cheri curl look.

    Nobody in NOLA besides a few black tourists do that style because the humidity and rain another it….

    • Replies: @Federalist

    Nobody in NOLA besides a few black tourists do that style because the humidity and rain another it….
     
    Are you black and are you a woman? I would have never noticed something like that in a million years.
  85. “And a dollop Jewish.”

    And a dollop of Jewish slaveowner.

  86. Doesn’t her sister know that DNA testing is only for Nazis?

  87. I Don’t Need a DNA Test to Tell Me How Black I Am.

    AGREED.

    Being a person of color, you probably can’t seem to accumulate a lot of money, so, instead of spending all that on the DNA testing, I’d recommend going to Home Depot and putting your forearm up to the paint-matching machine. Those things are pretty damn good. See if you can get just a pint mixed, get a used mannequin or crash-test dummy off of ebay or a yard sale, and paint it. That’s pretty much how black you are.

    • Replies: @Oleaginous Outrager
    Why even leave the house?

    https://www.w3schools.com/colors/colors_picker.asp
    , @Anonymous
    Sounds like the genesis of a smooth new R&B chestnut,

    "That's How Black You Are"
  88. @Father O'Hara
    I do recall some terms they have bandied about in the past which,oddly, I don't seem to hear much these days ,those being "house" people and "field" people.

    In a 1991 New York magazine piece entitled “Don’t Blame Me!,” John Taylor criticized the “new culture of victimization,” from cancer patients suing tobacco companies to talk shows guest blaming “sex addiction” for their cheating. At one point it was noted that a Frontline audience member called Colin Powell “the house [slur] sending the field [slurs] to die”

    https://books.google.com/books?id=cOkCAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA26&lpg=PA26&dq=new+york+magazine+victimology+colin+powell&source=bl&ots=pIVv-iLPTW&sig=ACfU3U2vg5QCMN_2lAvbumsM2NDRVCarzA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwif35a_1d_hAhUPWN8KHc6qCVYQ6AEwFXoECAwQAQ#v=onepage&q=colin%20powell&f=false

  89. @PiltdownMan
    Perhaps Erin Aubry Kaplan, former Los Angeles Times columnist, wonders why her life is different from that of Erin Kaplan, former MTV reality star and former Teen Vogue public relations manager.


    https://i0.wp.com/www.blackculturalevents.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/avatar.jpg.320x320px-3.jpg


    https://pics.wikifeet.com/Erin-Kaplan-Feet-529391.jpg

    bored identity’s lab just run the results for both Kaplans:

    The first Erin reads as : Me and 23 cats.

    The second Erin reads as : Me and 23, and many, many more to come.

    Final verdict:

    Both of their genes were chosen to be social media construct.

  90. MB says: • Website

    Race is a social justice construct.
    Kind of like the Erector sets you played with as a kid, if you are an old enough boy to remember.
    Only in this case what is constructed is whatever is convenient, which is also discarded at will.

    I’m waiting to get/shoplift/liberate my set when the new version comes out at the local Liars R Us store.
    In the meantime, it’s all I can do to keep from turning green with envy at her NYT privilege.

    Dunno, something’s wrong with the rose colored glasses that came in the Wheaties box.
    More and more they’re starting to look like Ray Charles’s sunglasses.
    Maybe Erin Aubry will trade with me.

  91. @Federalist
    Originally, Creole meant a person who was born in the New World as opposed to being born in France or Spain.

    In New Orleans after the Louisiana Purchase, Creole referred to the pre-existing French speaking population and their culture. Basically, it meant not American, English speaking, or Protestant. We tend to look at it the Louisiana Purchase from America's perspective, but the people of New Orleans didn't just say, "Yay, we're Americans now." They were very wary of the Americans moving in. The two groups tended to live in separate parts of the city (the French Quarter vs. Uptown). The term "neutral ground" is still used today to refer to a median separating two sides of a boulevard because the original neutral ground separated the Creole/French and "American" sectors of the city.

    Prior to the Louisiana Purchase, the mixed race Gens de Couleur Libre (free people of color) were basically a racial class distinct from both black slaves and whites. These people and their descendants came to be referred to as Creoles of Color or simply Creoles. Even after the end of slavery, there continued to be a social distinction between the lighter-skinned, more prosperous black "Creoles" and other blacks. Maybe it was unintentional on the part of the NYT author, but lighter-skinned blacks often like to talk about their Creole ancestry to set themselves apart from the lower status blacker blacks.

    There was a similar process of the changing meaning of the word outside of New Orleans. At one point, Creole essentially meant non-Acadian French. It is not very well known today, but some parts of "Cajun" Louisiana were primarily settled by French people who were not Acadians (including Evangeline Parish, ironically). Some of the most common "Cajun" surnames in Louisiana are French but not Acadian. In this region today, the French-influenced culture and people claiming French descent are generally referred to as Cajun in the case of whites and Creole in the case of blacks.

    The short version is yes there were white Creoles, meaning the former subjects of France and Spain in New Orleans (as opposed to English speaking Americans) and the non-Acadian French outside of New Orleans. Today, Creole in Louisiana primarily refers to blacks of mixed race descent and/or who relate to their French heritage.

    “The two groups tended to live in separate parts of the city (the French Quarter vs. Uptown). The term “neutral ground” is still used today to refer to a median separating two sides of a boulevard because the original neutral ground separated the Creole/French and “American” sectors of the city.”

    I believe the neutral ground is Canal Street correct? After the Purchase the French stayed on one side of Canal and the Americans stayed on the other.

    • Replies: @Federalist
    Yes. The French were primarily in the oldest pary of the city, the Vieux Carre (Old Square) or French Quarter on one side of Cansl Street and the Americans mostly settled on the other side, Uptown. The funny thing is that the architecture in the French Quarter is almost all Spanish.
  92. @Clyde

    There were more than a dozen disciplines, largely STEM-related sub-fields, where no black students earned doctoral degrees in 2017.
     
    Lazy guess is that education has the most black PhD graduates each year. Maybe most females too, of all races combined.

    Lazy guess is that education has the most black PhD graduates each year.

    Your guess is on target. I looked at some data in this comment: http://www.unz.com/isteve/black-math-prof-discovers-he-made-bad-career-choice-campaigns-to-get-more-blacks-to-make-same-bad-choice/?highlight=doctorate#comment-3052339

    24.7% of black doctorates were in Education (10.7% for whites).

    P.S. I believe this was from the same data MEH 0910 linked.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    Thanks for finding the numbers. Blacks love the public school education racket. It's a gov't job with good bennies, with more and more slots open for minorities as nice white ladies (young and old) find it impossible to teach in urban schools. Many have found out already through the years.
    Plus nice white females will need to know Spanish if they want to teach in schools with many Mexicans and Central American children. Not an absolute must, depends on the school. These "Spanish" kids are more teachable than the black kids. Less of a discipline problem.

    Alleged blacks love the University teaching racket. More and more are in it. Teaching mostly useless courses, but it's a good gig. Hounding out the "racist Becky"professors and more slots opening up for them. Though these allegedly black women are usually mulattoes on down. Meaning 50% African at best, and usually lower. And most growing up nice and middle class, but now are in the racial grievance industry.

  93. @Desiderius
    I can see a resemblance.

    See also:

    https://youtu.be/C0XMz7wneZk

    I would have never been able to come up with the artist – one hit wonder, I guess. Thanks for the memory, Desi. I like this one.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Yeah, me too.

    To give you a sense of how old the people who support PBS are, they like to run that Oldies reunion concert from 1999 during fundraising week. In 2019.
    , @üeljang
    Apparently, she married a Japanese actor and stage director whom she had met while working in a stage musical in Germany and had a daughter. On December 20, 1997, her daughter married the son of Alexander Treadwell (Secretary of State of New York from January 4, 1995 – April 12, 2001 and also former Chairman of New York State Republican Party).

    https://www.nytimes.com/1997/12/21/style/weddings-mr-treadwell-ms-domberger.html
  94. @Bryan
    I am constantly astonished at how much MORE racist we have become over the last 40 years.

    We, kimosabe?

  95. @Curious Person

    … I always saw Mr. Obama as an honorary Creole, a reminder to all of us black folk along the spectrum — a vast majority of whom have white ancestry — of where we belong.

     

    in Kenya?

    No, it was in Hawaii, near the white bank manager and the white furniture salesman who raised Obama and contributed a good portion of his DNA—25%—even though he emphasizes the contribution of the foreign national parent that he rarely saw.

  96. @Neoconned
    I'm from NOLA. I can tell she's culturally not a Creole any more simply by her LA Cheri curl look.

    Nobody in NOLA besides a few black tourists do that style because the humidity and rain another it....

    Nobody in NOLA besides a few black tourists do that style because the humidity and rain another it….

    Are you black and are you a woman? I would have never noticed something like that in a million years.

  97. “I Don’t Need a DNA Test to Tell Me How Black I Am”

    More likely, her DNA will come back as 70% white, thereby losing a large part of her black cred that served her so well.

    In other words, she would get exposed like Elizabeth Warren and Benjamin Jealous.

    At least she is smart enough to not take the bait the way Elizabeth Warren did.

  98. More “violence” aimed at black and brown bodies:

    The (Springfield, MA) Republican, April 12, 2019

    Daniel Hect, police chief for both Smith College and Mount Holyoke College, was placed on administrative leave Wednesday, according to a statements by the presidents of both schools that referred to questions of trust.

    Smith’s student newspaper, The Sophian, earlier published a story that says Mount Holyoke students found that Hect, using his Twitter account, had liked tweets that were “almost exclusively in response to President Trump’s tweets and included anti-immigrant, pro-gun rights and racist sentiments.” Hect’s Twitter account has since been deleted, The Sophian reported.

    “Over the past few weeks, members of our community have expressed concerns about the ability of Chief Daniel Hect to develop the level of trust required to engage in community policing,” Mount Holyoke President Sonya Stephens wrote.

    Smith President Kathleen McCartney issued a similar statement: “In recent weeks, members of our campus community have voiced a lack of trust in recently appointed Campus Police Chief Daniel Hect.”

  99. @MEH 0910
    OT:
    https://twitter.com/AdamHSays/status/1119201543176237056

    From 2002 to 2017, of the roughly 50,000 people who earned Ph.D.s each year, the percentage who were black increased only modestly, from 5.1 percent to 5.4 percent, according to data from the National Science Foundation. In 2017, there were more than a dozen fields—largely subfields within science, technology, engineering, and math—in which not a single doctoral degree was awarded to a black person anywhere in the United States.
     

    I’m shocked that our educational institutions hand out so many Ph.Ds every year.

  100. @Corn
    “The two groups tended to live in separate parts of the city (the French Quarter vs. Uptown). The term “neutral ground” is still used today to refer to a median separating two sides of a boulevard because the original neutral ground separated the Creole/French and “American” sectors of the city.”

    I believe the neutral ground is Canal Street correct? After the Purchase the French stayed on one side of Canal and the Americans stayed on the other.

    Yes. The French were primarily in the oldest pary of the city, the Vieux Carre (Old Square) or French Quarter on one side of Cansl Street and the Americans mostly settled on the other side, Uptown. The funny thing is that the architecture in the French Quarter is almost all Spanish.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The funny thing is that the architecture in the French Quarter is almost all Spanish.
     
    They don't call the nearby county equivalents the "Florida parishes" for nothing.


    Folklife in the Florida Parishes


    http://www.louisianafolklife.org/LT/Articles_Essays/images/FloridaParishesMap-e.gif

  101. @black sea
    By the end of the second sentence, it seemed clear to me that the thing to do was to Google the author's image to confirm that her article was really about what I thought it was probably about. It was.

    The idea of Obama as a honorary Creole was sort of novel, though.

    By the end of the second sentence, it was clear to me that this is pure fucking nonsense.

    This woman is a college professor, for God’s sake? People in this country have no idea whatsoever how debased college has become, and stupidly continue to save their hard-earned money to give to morons like this to “educate” their children.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    People in this country have no idea whatsoever how debased college has become...
     
    ...as its cost has trebled, in real terms.
  102. @Achmed E. Newman
    I would have never been able to come up with the artist - one hit wonder, I guess. Thanks for the memory, Desi. I like this one.

    Yeah, me too.

    To give you a sense of how old the people who support PBS are, they like to run that Oldies reunion concert from 1999 during fundraising week. In 2019.

  103. @Achmed E. Newman

    I Don’t Need a DNA Test to Tell Me How Black I Am.
     
    AGREED.

    Being a person of color, you probably can't seem to accumulate a lot of money, so, instead of spending all that on the DNA testing, I'd recommend going to Home Depot and putting your forearm up to the paint-matching machine. Those things are pretty damn good. See if you can get just a pint mixed, get a used mannequin or crash-test dummy off of ebay or a yard sale, and paint it. That's pretty much how black you are.
  104. @Jim Don Bob
    Not real black, I'd say. And isn't Erin Aubry kind of a Becky name? Was Shaniqua taken?

    https://www.kcet.org/sites/kl/files/atoms/article_atoms/www.kcet.org/socal/voices/assets/images/Erin_Aubry_Kaplan.jpg

    Yep, not half African. If I were to guess, I’d say quadroon. Probably more than a dollop if Jewish.

  105. @Achmed E. Newman
    I would have never been able to come up with the artist - one hit wonder, I guess. Thanks for the memory, Desi. I like this one.

    Apparently, she married a Japanese actor and stage director whom she had met while working in a stage musical in Germany and had a daughter. On December 20, 1997, her daughter married the son of Alexander Treadwell (Secretary of State of New York from January 4, 1995 – April 12, 2001 and also former Chairman of New York State Republican Party).

    https://www.nytimes.com/1997/12/21/style/weddings-mr-treadwell-ms-domberger.html

  106. A more interesting point than the race point :

    The article has the woman saying ‘I’ about 20 times, which comes out to more than one instance per sentence.

    No man could possibly be so self-absorbed, but this is extremely common in women, particularly lefty women.

    The race angle is just the conduit. As Steve points out, her ultimate goal is ‘me, me, me!!!!’.

    She could write exactly the same article about gender rather than race. Little would change.

  107. @Federalist
    Originally, Creole meant a person who was born in the New World as opposed to being born in France or Spain.

    In New Orleans after the Louisiana Purchase, Creole referred to the pre-existing French speaking population and their culture. Basically, it meant not American, English speaking, or Protestant. We tend to look at it the Louisiana Purchase from America's perspective, but the people of New Orleans didn't just say, "Yay, we're Americans now." They were very wary of the Americans moving in. The two groups tended to live in separate parts of the city (the French Quarter vs. Uptown). The term "neutral ground" is still used today to refer to a median separating two sides of a boulevard because the original neutral ground separated the Creole/French and "American" sectors of the city.

    Prior to the Louisiana Purchase, the mixed race Gens de Couleur Libre (free people of color) were basically a racial class distinct from both black slaves and whites. These people and their descendants came to be referred to as Creoles of Color or simply Creoles. Even after the end of slavery, there continued to be a social distinction between the lighter-skinned, more prosperous black "Creoles" and other blacks. Maybe it was unintentional on the part of the NYT author, but lighter-skinned blacks often like to talk about their Creole ancestry to set themselves apart from the lower status blacker blacks.

    There was a similar process of the changing meaning of the word outside of New Orleans. At one point, Creole essentially meant non-Acadian French. It is not very well known today, but some parts of "Cajun" Louisiana were primarily settled by French people who were not Acadians (including Evangeline Parish, ironically). Some of the most common "Cajun" surnames in Louisiana are French but not Acadian. In this region today, the French-influenced culture and people claiming French descent are generally referred to as Cajun in the case of whites and Creole in the case of blacks.

    The short version is yes there were white Creoles, meaning the former subjects of France and Spain in New Orleans (as opposed to English speaking Americans) and the non-Acadian French outside of New Orleans. Today, Creole in Louisiana primarily refers to blacks of mixed race descent and/or who relate to their French heritage.

    That is quite curious how it basically came to mean mulatto. I suppose it must have something to do with language. Like maybe, the native French became more conversant in English earlier or else spoke a more proper version of French than the mulatto-French. This would probably say something about how separate they were.

  108. @Hypnotoad666
    I wonder, will it ever become woke to decry the privilege of "white blacks."

    They are obviously soaking up a vastly disproportionate amount of the elite positions and opportunities within the "black community." This has to get slightly annoying to really dark skinned blacks at some point.

    I had that thought the other day when I saw a still shot of Trevor Noah interviewing Kamala Harris about how she thinks New Hampshire is racist or something.

    The Paper Bag rule.

  109. @Dr. X
    By the end of the second sentence, it was clear to me that this is pure fucking nonsense.

    This woman is a college professor, for God's sake? People in this country have no idea whatsoever how debased college has become, and stupidly continue to save their hard-earned money to give to morons like this to "educate" their children.

    People in this country have no idea whatsoever how debased college has become…

    …as its cost has trebled, in real terms.

  110. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I Don’t Need a DNA Test to Tell Me How Black I Am.
     
    AGREED.

    Being a person of color, you probably can't seem to accumulate a lot of money, so, instead of spending all that on the DNA testing, I'd recommend going to Home Depot and putting your forearm up to the paint-matching machine. Those things are pretty damn good. See if you can get just a pint mixed, get a used mannequin or crash-test dummy off of ebay or a yard sale, and paint it. That's pretty much how black you are.

    Sounds like the genesis of a smooth new R&B chestnut,

    “That’s How Black You Are”

  111. @Federalist
    Yes. The French were primarily in the oldest pary of the city, the Vieux Carre (Old Square) or French Quarter on one side of Cansl Street and the Americans mostly settled on the other side, Uptown. The funny thing is that the architecture in the French Quarter is almost all Spanish.

    The funny thing is that the architecture in the French Quarter is almost all Spanish.

    They don’t call the nearby county equivalents the “Florida parishes” for nothing.

    Folklife in the Florida Parishes

    • Replies: @Federalist
    The buildings in the French Quarter were rebuilt after a major fire while the city was under Spanish control.

    The Florida Parishes were part of Spanish West Florida. This part of Louisiana (including the present day capital, Baton Rouge) was not part of the Louisiana Purchase. This area was sparsely settled but the people that were there were largely American. They actually gained their independence for a very short time as the West Florida Republic before being incorporated into the United States. While the Florida Parishes were under Spanish control before becoming part of the U.S., they were and are mostly Angl0-American.

    Spaniards did settle in other parts of the state, such as in Iberia Parish. Also, Spanish Canary Islanders (the Islenos) settled in areas such as St. Bernard Parish. There was some Spanish settlement in New Orleans prior to the Louisiana Purchase but primarily it was French.
  112. After years of reading the epic that is Erin’s racial anguish in the LA Times, I simply don’t know how she has enough strength to get up in the morning and face the oppressive monolith of White America. Now that she has discovered that, other than being Jewish by injection, she was probably named Erin for some good reason as there is probably some Leprechaun in the Woodpile in her genetic past. Time to get over it and have a Guinness!

  113. “in terms of shaping who we really are,” What the heck does that clause even mean?

  114. NYT: “I’m a Woman of Color, So Let’s All Talk About Me!”

    Walt Whitman must be the patron saint of woke POC SJWs: Song of Myself.

  115. @Reg Cæsar

    The funny thing is that the architecture in the French Quarter is almost all Spanish.
     
    They don't call the nearby county equivalents the "Florida parishes" for nothing.


    Folklife in the Florida Parishes


    http://www.louisianafolklife.org/LT/Articles_Essays/images/FloridaParishesMap-e.gif

    The buildings in the French Quarter were rebuilt after a major fire while the city was under Spanish control.

    The Florida Parishes were part of Spanish West Florida. This part of Louisiana (including the present day capital, Baton Rouge) was not part of the Louisiana Purchase. This area was sparsely settled but the people that were there were largely American. They actually gained their independence for a very short time as the West Florida Republic before being incorporated into the United States. While the Florida Parishes were under Spanish control before becoming part of the U.S., they were and are mostly Angl0-American.

    Spaniards did settle in other parts of the state, such as in Iberia Parish. Also, Spanish Canary Islanders (the Islenos) settled in areas such as St. Bernard Parish. There was some Spanish settlement in New Orleans prior to the Louisiana Purchase but primarily it was French.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Also, Spanish Canary Islanders (the Islenos) settled in areas such as St. Bernard Parish.
     
    The ukulele was invented by Madeirenses who came to the Kingdom of Hawaii to pick sugar or pineapple or whatever.

    Do these Islenos have any similar claim to fame?
  116. @Humbles
    The cognitive dissonance displayed in articles like this is mind blowing. We are to believe that the windowless box of “black identity” forced upon those of African descent is inescapable, oppressive, and filled with despair and deprivation. And “society” offers no way out. In the same paragraph the writer insists that she doesn’t want to nuance the black-white line, because to do so would obscure or even detract from the single most cherished thing she has, her blackness. Because the most important thing is that America remains a black-white society, regardless of actual genetic realities, I suppose, even though that cruel dichotomy is supposedly the source of all oppression. It makes no sense.

    “but I think the tests are a fad that distracts us from the harsh realities of race and identity in America….

    “Interesting, amusing even, but I’m still black in America. What a relief.”

    That’s one aspect of what I call the Black School of Rhetorical Bombast. Facts, logic, law, morality, or other principles–none of it matters. Being recognized as “black” gives one carte blanche.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    That’s one aspect of what I call the Black School of Rhetorical Bombast. Facts, logic, law, morality, or other principles–none of it matters. Being recognized as “black” gives one carte blanche.

    'What if Jussie is telling the truth?': Jussie Smollett's brother calls hoax accusations 'ludicrous' and says the Empire star is suffering night terrors over the 'attack' Jojo Smollett said his sibling's 'life has been turned upside down' by his arrest
    'To define this experience as unjust would be an understatement' Jojo says
    Actor Smollett, 36, was accused of staging the attack to get a raise on Empire
    But his brother says claims he did it to boost 'a sagging career are ludicrous'
    Jojo says he has seen his brother 'violently awakening from night terrors'
    Jussie has spent time with his family in Hawaii after the charges were dropped
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6943927/Jussie-Smolletts-brother-calls-hoax-accusations-ludicrous-says-suffering-night-terrors.html#comments
     
  117. “Erin Kaplan”

    It’s like Matter and Anti-matter colliding.

  118. “Don’t Believe Everything You Think.”
    Remembering Teacher Alan Kaplan

    Published on September 23, 2015
    By Vivian Rothstein

    “We’re not here because Mr. Kaplan helped us do better on standardized tests,” said one of the nearly one thousand students, former students, teachers, and friends gathered Sunday in the auditorium of Hamilton High School on Robertson to honor the beloved teacher Alan Kaplan who died August 29th.

    Mr. Kaplan taught history and psychology in Hamilton’s Humanities Magnet program for 33 years. Through his teaching Kaplan was determined to do something about the achievement gap between white students and students of color. “He was devoted to helping students understand the process, the psychology and the history of racism in our country, believing it would be therapeutic,” said a colleague. Using “The Peoples’ History of the United States” by Howard Zinn as his history text, Kaplan’s lesson plans connected students to what was happening beyond the school walls. “He opened up the world to us” was how a former student, now a teacher at the school, described it.

    ******
    A few miles from Hamilton High, on the same day as Kaplan’s Sunday memorial, multi-millionaire Eli Broad opened the new, self-funded modern art museum that bears his name. This is the same multi-millionaire who has donated a reported $144 million from his family foundation to “reform” the nation’s public schools by promoting standardized testing, data-driven teacher evaluations, and the establishment of privately-run charter schools. Together with other corporate leaders, Broad has helped promote the notion that current teachers are a major cause of our students’ achievement gap.

    Needless to say, Alan Kaplan and Eli Broad did not see eye to eye on what students, teachers, and schools need to produce the next generation of Americans. Standardization, conformity, and privatization were not principles that played well with Kaplan’s irreverent and challenging pedagogy. As an intellect with a social justice commitment, Alan cared about his student’s success in life, “not as professionals but as worthwhile human beings and informed citizens,” wrote his wife Erin Aubrey Kaplan. Sadly we’ve lost Al Kaplan, and Eli Broad remains to wield his influence on the LAUSD.

  119. Why hundreds of students dropped everything to pay tribute to a Hamilton High teacher
    By Steve Lopez
    Sep 26, 2015

    ******
    “People don’t show up 20 and 30 years later to pay tribute to teachers who helped them do better on standardized tests,” fellow Hamilton High teacher Barry Smolin said at the service, a tape of which was made available to me. “We are here because Alan Kaplan did what all great teachers do. He clarified, he inspired, he awakened, he worked in ways that are unquantifiable.”

    As I watched the tributes, I was reminded that from Los Angeles to New York, we have endured years of bare-knuckle battles but reached no consensus on how to improve public schools. Public education is shamefully underfunded, some say, while others insist money is not the answer. You can find equally rabid supporters and critics of charter schools, and the new Common Core curriculum is either a breakthrough or a curse.

    But wherever you stand on any of that, we can all go to school on how a teacher managed to touch so many lives in such profound ways, loyal to both his convictions and his students even as his stubborn independence drew critics and even landed him in trouble at times.

    Some students were intimidated by Kaplan. Some administrators and fellow teachers found him irritating.

    He flat-out refused to teach Advanced Placement history, arguing that the curriculum was a memorization drill that allowed for neither true teaching nor learning.

    His text was a manifesto — Howard Zinn’s “A People’s History of the United States,” a fist to the face of robber barons and exploitative institutions.

    And some black parents thought he was out of line with his provocations on race, so much so that they wanted something done about it.

    And yet when Kaplan passed away, more than 500 students — from classes dating back to at least 1999 — dropped what they were doing. They came from near and far to pay tribute in the auditorium of the school where Kaplan implored them not to believe everything they thought they knew about one another, the world or themselves.

    “I knew he was a force to be reckoned with,” said Camila Lacques-Zapien, whose older brother warned her there was no sliding and no hiding in Mr. Kaplan’s classroom. The guy was dead serious.

    But even that didn’t prepare her. Kaplan confronted and cajoled. He knocked students off-balance, forcing them to find some truth to hold onto. He called on students randomly and put them on the spot, all the while holding forth, part preacher and part performer, on race, class, power and justice.

    ******
    The comments were from students of all colors, which is worth noting because in 1999, administrators and the media investigated claims by some black parents that Kaplan was a racist. They said he degraded black students by asking why no one sympathized with the slave masters.

    The L.A. Weekly assigned a young African American reporter to check out this menace to public education, and she found an entirely different man than the one described by critics.

    “Alan was teaching in his own way, very in your face, challenging everybody — black and white,” says the reporter.

    She understood the concerns among parents, because Kaplan was blunt about race. He would tell students, for instance, that statistically speaking, “All you black kids are going to do worse than white kids.”

    But the reporter, who went by the name Erin Aubry at the time, reported the story deeply enough to understand what Kaplan, a Jewish kid from the San Fernando Valley, was doing.

    He was challenging students of all colors to be honest and open about race and about history itself. He had been shocked into a permanent state of moral outrage by the inequalities he witnessed in his first job at a middle school in a poor neighborhood, Kaplan said, and he taught with urgency and conviction.

    That reporter not only understood Kaplan, she married him, and Erin Aubry Kaplan was with her husband to the end. In an essay after his death, she wrote that while they knew love across the color line, “race was always present,” and getting along sometimes meant negotiating with history.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://www.kcet.org/history-society/love-across-the-color-line-remembering-alan-kaplan
  120. @MEH 0910

    Why hundreds of students dropped everything to pay tribute to a Hamilton High teacher
    By Steve Lopez
    Sep 26, 2015

    ******
    "People don't show up 20 and 30 years later to pay tribute to teachers who helped them do better on standardized tests," fellow Hamilton High teacher Barry Smolin said at the service, a tape of which was made available to me. "We are here because Alan Kaplan did what all great teachers do. He clarified, he inspired, he awakened, he worked in ways that are unquantifiable."

    As I watched the tributes, I was reminded that from Los Angeles to New York, we have endured years of bare-knuckle battles but reached no consensus on how to improve public schools. Public education is shamefully underfunded, some say, while others insist money is not the answer. You can find equally rabid supporters and critics of charter schools, and the new Common Core curriculum is either a breakthrough or a curse.

    But wherever you stand on any of that, we can all go to school on how a teacher managed to touch so many lives in such profound ways, loyal to both his convictions and his students even as his stubborn independence drew critics and even landed him in trouble at times.

    Some students were intimidated by Kaplan. Some administrators and fellow teachers found him irritating.

    He flat-out refused to teach Advanced Placement history, arguing that the curriculum was a memorization drill that allowed for neither true teaching nor learning.

    His text was a manifesto — Howard Zinn's "A People's History of the United States," a fist to the face of robber barons and exploitative institutions.

    And some black parents thought he was out of line with his provocations on race, so much so that they wanted something done about it.

    And yet when Kaplan passed away, more than 500 students — from classes dating back to at least 1999 — dropped what they were doing. They came from near and far to pay tribute in the auditorium of the school where Kaplan implored them not to believe everything they thought they knew about one another, the world or themselves.

    "I knew he was a force to be reckoned with," said Camila Lacques-Zapien, whose older brother warned her there was no sliding and no hiding in Mr. Kaplan's classroom. The guy was dead serious.

    But even that didn't prepare her. Kaplan confronted and cajoled. He knocked students off-balance, forcing them to find some truth to hold onto. He called on students randomly and put them on the spot, all the while holding forth, part preacher and part performer, on race, class, power and justice.

    ******
    The comments were from students of all colors, which is worth noting because in 1999, administrators and the media investigated claims by some black parents that Kaplan was a racist. They said he degraded black students by asking why no one sympathized with the slave masters.

    The L.A. Weekly assigned a young African American reporter to check out this menace to public education, and she found an entirely different man than the one described by critics.

    "Alan was teaching in his own way, very in your face, challenging everybody — black and white," says the reporter.

    She understood the concerns among parents, because Kaplan was blunt about race. He would tell students, for instance, that statistically speaking, "All you black kids are going to do worse than white kids."

    But the reporter, who went by the name Erin Aubry at the time, reported the story deeply enough to understand what Kaplan, a Jewish kid from the San Fernando Valley, was doing.

    He was challenging students of all colors to be honest and open about race and about history itself. He had been shocked into a permanent state of moral outrage by the inequalities he witnessed in his first job at a middle school in a poor neighborhood, Kaplan said, and he taught with urgency and conviction.

    That reporter not only understood Kaplan, she married him, and Erin Aubry Kaplan was with her husband to the end. In an essay after his death, she wrote that while they knew love across the color line, "race was always present," and getting along sometimes meant negotiating with history.

     

  121. Based on her fugly, mannish pictures, she should get tested to see what gender she actually is….

  122. @Sean
    Even ex con youtuber Lockdown 23 and1 has 23 and me

    https://youtu.be/cNOPKDlb6h8?t=134

    Erin A looks seriously intelligent, she looks a bit like radical 7o lawyer Fay Stender


    http://ilkahartmann.squarespace.com/picture/01_newton_stender_radiant.jpg?pictureId=10070979

    Who is he and why did I watch four minutes of that video??

    • Replies: @Sean
    He is a heavily tatted ex con with a part German ancestry Columbian mother who in a couple of his countless youtube vids explains that there is no such thing as white prison gangs in east coast state prisons, and where white gangs do exist as in California and Federal prisons it is because in those there are a lot of Hispanic prisoners--so the blacks do not dominate.

    His name refers to 23 hours a day in cell and i for exercise. I think it is quite significant that someone like that is getting DNA tests saying they are 60% Welsh, while Ms Kaplan thinks "cultural DNA" is more important--although her brainpower (journalism is the most competitive occupation there is) is likely due to her father having some good genes. The Aryan Brotherhood leader Tyler Bingham is part Jewish.
  123. @PiltdownMan
    Perhaps Erin Aubry Kaplan, former Los Angeles Times columnist, wonders why her life is different from that of Erin Kaplan, former MTV reality star and former Teen Vogue public relations manager.


    https://i0.wp.com/www.blackculturalevents.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/avatar.jpg.320x320px-3.jpg


    https://pics.wikifeet.com/Erin-Kaplan-Feet-529391.jpg

    The younger one is hot, I’ll give her that. Will she be happy as she ages and she realizes she spent her most fertile, sexiest years making money for a megacorporation??

  124. @David
    Here's some commentary from her blog on the election of Obama:

    what really feels liberating in a very personal way, is the official new prominence of Michelle Obama. Barack's better half not only has stature but is statuesque. She has coruscating intelligence, beauty, style and -- drumroll, please -- a butt. (Yes, you read that right: I'm going to talk about the first lady's butt.)

     

    ” Not only has stature but is statuesque. She has coruscating intelligence, beauty, style”

    Where can I puke.

    Holy shit, in which alternate universe is this idiot existing.

    Authenticjazzman “Mensa” qualified since 1973, airborne trained US army vet, and pro jazz artist.

  125. @Colin Wright
    '..Relatively little French — a mild surprise, given Louisiana’s history. And a dollop Jewish...'

    Given the last name -- Kaplan -- and the venue in which this piece appears, one immediately wonders just how big a 'dollop.'

    I'll put my money on a quarter -- and I'll go out on a limb here and assert that far from being a victim of anything, Ms. Kaplan has been a beneficiary of mulatto privilege supercharged with a Jew-bonus.

    ...being a woman doesn't hurt, either.

    ...

    '...but I’m still black in America. What a relief.'

    It's comic here to imagine her waking up tomorrow to look in the mirror and discover she had really become black -- full-on, 100%, simian black. Sarcastic 'relief' would not be her emotion.

    This is all of a piece with that bit about some actress deciding to raise her adopted boy as a girl. We've descended into collective lunacy. People advance patent nonsense -- and the more nonsensical it is, the louder the applause.

    Deleted due to duplication.

  126. @Colin Wright
    '..Relatively little French — a mild surprise, given Louisiana’s history. And a dollop Jewish...'

    Given the last name -- Kaplan -- and the venue in which this piece appears, one immediately wonders just how big a 'dollop.'

    I'll put my money on a quarter -- and I'll go out on a limb here and assert that far from being a victim of anything, Ms. Kaplan has been a beneficiary of mulatto privilege supercharged with a Jew-bonus.

    ...being a woman doesn't hurt, either.

    ...

    '...but I’m still black in America. What a relief.'

    It's comic here to imagine her waking up tomorrow to look in the mirror and discover she had really become black -- full-on, 100%, simian black. Sarcastic 'relief' would not be her emotion.

    This is all of a piece with that bit about some actress deciding to raise her adopted boy as a girl. We've descended into collective lunacy. People advance patent nonsense -- and the more nonsensical it is, the louder the applause.

    ” We’ve descended into collective lunacy”

    Speak for yourself pal. I am not crazy.

    The Democrats/leftists have fallen into lunacy, not my friends and family.

    Authenticjazzman ” Mensa ” qualified since 1973, airborne trained US Army vet, and pro jazz musician.

  127. @Federalist
    The buildings in the French Quarter were rebuilt after a major fire while the city was under Spanish control.

    The Florida Parishes were part of Spanish West Florida. This part of Louisiana (including the present day capital, Baton Rouge) was not part of the Louisiana Purchase. This area was sparsely settled but the people that were there were largely American. They actually gained their independence for a very short time as the West Florida Republic before being incorporated into the United States. While the Florida Parishes were under Spanish control before becoming part of the U.S., they were and are mostly Angl0-American.

    Spaniards did settle in other parts of the state, such as in Iberia Parish. Also, Spanish Canary Islanders (the Islenos) settled in areas such as St. Bernard Parish. There was some Spanish settlement in New Orleans prior to the Louisiana Purchase but primarily it was French.

    Also, Spanish Canary Islanders (the Islenos) settled in areas such as St. Bernard Parish.

    The ukulele was invented by Madeirenses who came to the Kingdom of Hawaii to pick sugar or pineapple or whatever.

    Do these Islenos have any similar claim to fame?

    • Replies: @Federalist
    Nothing like that I can think of.
  128. @res

    Lazy guess is that education has the most black PhD graduates each year.
     
    Your guess is on target. I looked at some data in this comment: http://www.unz.com/isteve/black-math-prof-discovers-he-made-bad-career-choice-campaigns-to-get-more-blacks-to-make-same-bad-choice/?highlight=doctorate#comment-3052339

    24.7% of black doctorates were in Education (10.7% for whites).

    P.S. I believe this was from the same data MEH 0910 linked.

    Thanks for finding the numbers. Blacks love the public school education racket. It’s a gov’t job with good bennies, with more and more slots open for minorities as nice white ladies (young and old) find it impossible to teach in urban schools. Many have found out already through the years.
    Plus nice white females will need to know Spanish if they want to teach in schools with many Mexicans and Central American children. Not an absolute must, depends on the school. These “Spanish” kids are more teachable than the black kids. Less of a discipline problem.

    Alleged blacks love the University teaching racket. More and more are in it. Teaching mostly useless courses, but it’s a good gig. Hounding out the “racist Becky”professors and more slots opening up for them. Though these allegedly black women are usually mulattoes on down. Meaning 50% African at best, and usually lower. And most growing up nice and middle class, but now are in the racial grievance industry.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Indios are largely ineducable but are quiet and don't cause much trouble, they simply go away at some point. Mestizos vary wildly, some are quite educable, some violent and stupid, some stupid and quiet. Can't always go by appearance.

    On average mestizos are preferable to the lower class blacks, but when you get into Latin gang issues they can be more dangerous than blacks because more intelligent.

    Learning to speak proper Spanish well is a mixed asset because many of them do not speak Spanish very well and a fair proportion incapable of learning, or resentful at the gringa who is trying to teach them "their own language".

    The teacher union and the School of Education racket keep out the blacks you really want in a black school: retired black rmy dril sergeants and Marine DI's.

    Kansas is supercucked. Charlie Wheeler, famed long time KCMO mayor, pointed out to me he couldn't teach high school in Kansas, and he was a MD and JD before that was a thing.
  129. @Nicholas Stix
    "but I think the tests are a fad that distracts us from the harsh realities of race and identity in America....

    "Interesting, amusing even, but I’m still black in America. What a relief."

    That's one aspect of what I call the Black School of Rhetorical Bombast. Facts, logic, law, morality, or other principles--none of it matters. Being recognized as "black" gives one carte blanche.

    That’s one aspect of what I call the Black School of Rhetorical Bombast. Facts, logic, law, morality, or other principles–none of it matters. Being recognized as “black” gives one carte blanche.

    ‘What if Jussie is telling the truth?’: Jussie Smollett’s brother calls hoax accusations ‘ludicrous’ and says the Empire star is suffering night terrors over the ‘attack’ Jojo Smollett said his sibling’s ‘life has been turned upside down’ by his arrest
    ‘To define this experience as unjust would be an understatement’ Jojo says
    Actor Smollett, 36, was accused of staging the attack to get a raise on Empire
    But his brother says claims he did it to boost ‘a sagging career are ludicrous’
    Jojo says he has seen his brother ‘violently awakening from night terrors’
    Jussie has spent time with his family in Hawaii after the charges were dropped
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6943927/Jussie-Smolletts-brother-calls-hoax-accusations-ludicrous-says-suffering-night-terrors.html#comments

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    Thanks.
  130. @Reg Cæsar

    Also, Spanish Canary Islanders (the Islenos) settled in areas such as St. Bernard Parish.
     
    The ukulele was invented by Madeirenses who came to the Kingdom of Hawaii to pick sugar or pineapple or whatever.

    Do these Islenos have any similar claim to fame?

    Nothing like that I can think of.

  131. @Curious Person

    … I always saw Mr. Obama as an honorary Creole, a reminder to all of us black folk along the spectrum — a vast majority of whom have white ancestry — of where we belong.

     

    in Kenya?

    My Lord Ms. Kaplan, don’t you think you’re stretching what little fabric of truth that might exist about Kenyan muslim Bh Obama, just a little thin with that remark?

    Please don’t take it upon yo’seff to insult French Creoles. They are mix of many nationalities that included S. American Indians, French, Spanish, African black, Islamic and God only knows what else.

    The offspring of casual sex between whites and blacks before or during the American Antebellum period in the Deep South, have nothing in common with anything going on in race today other than a smattering of white blood that won’t even get them close to being white.

    Those folks are categorically black and they should always be classified as such. Same with BHO . He’s black, he hates whites and he was, is and always shall be black. Whites don’t want him or anything to do with him.

  132. @Jake
    Is Kaplan her daddy's name or her husband's? Is that Kaplan a full Jew or a half or quarter Jew? How much does the 2 millennia of Jewish hatred of white Christians influence her worldview, her daily lived culture?

    My advice to her: dump the names 'Erin Aubry' and replace them with something that better marks your blackness.

    My question for her: Why don't you move to some virtually all black country where all power is in the hands of blacks? The only way Wakanda can be realized is when the vast majority of black professors, physicians, lawyers and judges, elected politicians, journalists, social workers, actors and musicians, soldiers, business owners return to Mother Sub-Saharan Africa and build it.

    Great comment and I agree with you. Dump the name; I’ve recently read that Khaleesi is a very popular name with black women who are delivering girls.

    And the Wakanda idea is great. If blacks would GTF out of these hated white countries and go start their own, why, in a few decades we can attempt real conversations with each other. They could call their concept: “Separate But Equal”…..how novel is that?

  133. @AndrewR
    Who is he and why did I watch four minutes of that video??

    He is a heavily tatted ex con with a part German ancestry Columbian mother who in a couple of his countless youtube vids explains that there is no such thing as white prison gangs in east coast state prisons, and where white gangs do exist as in California and Federal prisons it is because in those there are a lot of Hispanic prisoners–so the blacks do not dominate.

    His name refers to 23 hours a day in cell and i for exercise. I think it is quite significant that someone like that is getting DNA tests saying they are 60% Welsh, while Ms Kaplan thinks “cultural DNA” is more important–although her brainpower (journalism is the most competitive occupation there is) is likely due to her father having some good genes. The Aryan Brotherhood leader Tyler Bingham is part Jewish.

  134. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Clyde
    Thanks for finding the numbers. Blacks love the public school education racket. It's a gov't job with good bennies, with more and more slots open for minorities as nice white ladies (young and old) find it impossible to teach in urban schools. Many have found out already through the years.
    Plus nice white females will need to know Spanish if they want to teach in schools with many Mexicans and Central American children. Not an absolute must, depends on the school. These "Spanish" kids are more teachable than the black kids. Less of a discipline problem.

    Alleged blacks love the University teaching racket. More and more are in it. Teaching mostly useless courses, but it's a good gig. Hounding out the "racist Becky"professors and more slots opening up for them. Though these allegedly black women are usually mulattoes on down. Meaning 50% African at best, and usually lower. And most growing up nice and middle class, but now are in the racial grievance industry.

    Indios are largely ineducable but are quiet and don’t cause much trouble, they simply go away at some point. Mestizos vary wildly, some are quite educable, some violent and stupid, some stupid and quiet. Can’t always go by appearance.

    On average mestizos are preferable to the lower class blacks, but when you get into Latin gang issues they can be more dangerous than blacks because more intelligent.

    Learning to speak proper Spanish well is a mixed asset because many of them do not speak Spanish very well and a fair proportion incapable of learning, or resentful at the gringa who is trying to teach them “their own language”.

    The teacher union and the School of Education racket keep out the blacks you really want in a black school: retired black rmy dril sergeants and Marine DI’s.

    Kansas is supercucked. Charlie Wheeler, famed long time KCMO mayor, pointed out to me he couldn’t teach high school in Kansas, and he was a MD and JD before that was a thing.

  135. @Travis
    Ancestry.com Apologizes for Ad Showing Slavery-Era Interracial Couple

    “Ancestry is committed to telling important stories from history,” an Ancestry.com spokeswoman, wrote. “This ad was intended to represent one of those stories. We very much appreciate the feedback we have received and apologize for any offense that the ad may have caused. We are in the process of pulling the ad from television and have removed it from YouTube.”
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/19/us/ancestry-dna-slavery-commercial.html

    Should the New York Times apologize for their article from October 18th depicting an inter-racial couple ? Why is the New York times allowed to publish articles showcasing a marriage between a slave and a confederate soldier which began in 1860 ? They were legally married in 1972, during a brief time when inter-racial marriages were legal. "The love affair could have been lost if not for Paula Wright, a seventh-generation descendant of the couple who inherited vintage photographs that inspired her to document eight generations of her family"
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/21/us/interracial-slavery-love.html?action=click&module=RelatedCoverage&pgtype=Article&region=Footer

    While the NY times is permitted to run articles depicting interracial couples from 1860 , yet ancestry firms are prohibited from depicting such unions ?

    While the NY times is permitted to run articles depicting interracial couples from 1860 , yet ancestry firms are prohibited from depicting such unions ?

    Probably Ancestry.com’s ad agency figured that since it is required to only show interracial couples in every other commercial on TV these days, that it was cool to do so with Ancestry.com, too. They just chose a touchy time period to depict it in.

  136. @Sean
    Even ex con youtuber Lockdown 23 and1 has 23 and me

    https://youtu.be/cNOPKDlb6h8?t=134

    Erin A looks seriously intelligent, she looks a bit like radical 7o lawyer Fay Stender


    http://ilkahartmann.squarespace.com/picture/01_newton_stender_radiant.jpg?pictureId=10070979

    We had a party to celebrate when one of her Black Guerilla Family clients shot but didn’t kill Faye. Instead she was totally handicapped including some brain damage. In addition to wearing diapers she couldn’t walk had to be in a wheel chair plus lengthy hospital nursing home and therapy sessions.

    She and her law partner Charles Garry were involved helping Jackson, Angela Davis etc in the Marin county shootout that murdered 11 people But being lawyers they were careful to do nothing to incriminate themselves. The media and liberals of course blamed the deputies for returning fire after Jackson killed the judge

    The Stender Garry Prison Law Project was responsible for flooding San Francisco criminal courts and San Quentin with Red diaper baby Ivy League mostly Jews determined to foment a black revolution in America.

    It could have happened. But it was only postponed till now after 50 years of affirmative action with prison reform and 24/7 anti White rhetoric.

    Her diabolical coterie of Jewish women lawyers succeed in the Alameda County district attorney policy of never ever never ever charging blacks with rape of White women. For a couple years they staged riots. The main criminal courthouse is in Oakland and the activists including Stender and Garry has the activists and thugs ready. That policy lasted a good 12 years.

    Ironically, it was the commie feminazis who had defended black on White rape since the 1930s whose anti rape crusade made it possible to start charging Alameda county rapists again.

    During the Stender/Garry reign of rape terror a White Berkeley cop was suspended and the police chief had to go on TV to apologize for police brutality The cop heard screaming in a park and found a black rapist on top of the victim. The rapist refused to get off her. So the cop pounded on his head and pulled him off his White victim.

    Uproar and threats of riot ensued. Riot averted. Chief groveled on TV. Another liberal success

    Faye was worse than Bernadette Dohrn Kathy Boudin and the rest of the weather underground crew. Her and Garry’s Prison Law Project was probably the most influential thing in the radicalization of the Bay Area., at least in the criminal justice system.

    Off topic There’s a movie version of Les Miserables. Inspector Joubert and some others is of course black.

  137. @Clyde
    That’s one aspect of what I call the Black School of Rhetorical Bombast. Facts, logic, law, morality, or other principles–none of it matters. Being recognized as “black” gives one carte blanche.

    'What if Jussie is telling the truth?': Jussie Smollett's brother calls hoax accusations 'ludicrous' and says the Empire star is suffering night terrors over the 'attack' Jojo Smollett said his sibling's 'life has been turned upside down' by his arrest
    'To define this experience as unjust would be an understatement' Jojo says
    Actor Smollett, 36, was accused of staging the attack to get a raise on Empire
    But his brother says claims he did it to boost 'a sagging career are ludicrous'
    Jojo says he has seen his brother 'violently awakening from night terrors'
    Jussie has spent time with his family in Hawaii after the charges were dropped
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6943927/Jussie-Smolletts-brother-calls-hoax-accusations-ludicrous-says-suffering-night-terrors.html#comments
     

    Thanks.

  138. @Desiderius
    Gotta get the vote out somehow. Luckily they haven’t figured out yet that blacks don’t listen to NPR.

    More like an echo chamber of smug progressives.

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