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From the New York Times:

Where Has Hillary Clinton Been? Ask the Ultrarich
By AMY CHOZICK and JONATHAN MARTIN SEPT. 3, 2016

At a private fund-raiser Tuesday night at a waterfront Hamptons estate, Hillary Clinton danced alongside Jimmy Buffett, Jon Bon Jovi and Paul McCartney, and joined in a singalong finale to “Hey Jude.”

“I stand between you and the apocalypse,” a confident Mrs. Clinton declared to laughs, exhibiting a flash of self-awareness and humor to a crowd that included Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein and for whom the prospect of a Donald J. Trump presidency is dire.

Mr. Trump has pointed to Mrs. Clinton’s noticeably scant schedule of campaign events this summer to suggest she has been hiding from the public. But Mrs. Clinton has been more than accessible to those who reside in some of the country’s most moneyed enclaves and are willing to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to see her. In the last two weeks of August, Mrs. Clinton raked in roughly $50 million at 22 fund-raising events, averaging around $150,000 an hour, according to a New York Times tally.

And while Mrs. Clinton has faced criticism for her failure to hold a news conference for months, she has fielded hundreds of questions from the ultrarich in places like the Hamptons, Martha’s Vineyard, Beverly Hills and Silicon Valley.

“It’s the old adage, you go to where the money is,” said Jay S. Jacobs, a prominent New York Democrat.

Mrs. Clinton raised about $143 million in August, the campaign’s best month yet. At a single event on Tuesday in Sagaponack, N.Y., 10 people paid at least $250,000 to meet her, raising $2.5 million.

If Mr. Trump appears to be waging his campaign in rallies and network interviews, Mrs. Clinton’s second presidential bid seems to amount to a series of high-dollar fund-raisers with public appearances added to the schedule when they can be fit in. Last week, for example, she diverged just once from her packed fund-raising schedule to deliver a speech. …

The public has gotten used to seeing Mrs. Clinton’s carefully choreographed appearances and her somewhat halting speeches and TV interviews over the course of the long — and sometimes seemingly joyless — campaign, but donors this summer have glimpsed an entirely different person.

It is clear from interviews with more than a dozen attendees of Mrs. Clinton’s finance events this summer and a handful of pictures and videos of her at the closed-press gatherings that Mrs. Clinton, often described as warm and personable in small settings, whoever the audience, can be especially relaxed, candid and even joyous in this company.

… If she feels most at ease around millionaires, within the gilded bubble, it is in part because they are some of her most intimate friends.

“It’s like going to a wedding or a bar mitzvah — you catch up,” explained Mitchell Berger, a Democratic donor in Florida, about the familial nature of the events. …

Mr. Berger, who joined Mrs. Clinton last month at a donor event in Miami Beach, said many of the individual conversations before and after she speaks at the gatherings are centered more on grandchildren than weighty policy matters.

But when she has had a give-and-take this summer about issues, Mrs. Clinton, who has promised to “reshuffle the deck” in favor of the middle class and portrayed Mr. Trump as an out-of-touch billionaire, has almost exclusively been fielding the concerns of the wealthiest Americans. …

Another advantage to choosing private fund-raisers over town halls or other public events is that Mrs. Clinton can bask in an affectionate embrace as hosts try to limit confrontational engagements.

Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild, a backer of Democrats and a friend of the Clintons’, made sure attendees did not grill Mrs. Clinton at the $100,000-per-couple lamb dinner Mrs. Forester de Rothschild hosted under a tent on the lawn of her oceanfront Martha’s Vineyard mansion.

“I said, ‘Let’s make it a nice night for her and show her our love,’” Mrs. Forester de Rothschild said.

Hillary, Sir Evelyn Robert Adrian de Rothschild, Bill, Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild (date unknown)

I can’t think of anything witty to say about Mrs. Forester de Rothschild, but I just wanted to help the reporters out with getting their point across by mentioning Mrs. Forester de Rothschild’s name a fourth and fifth time. And now a sixth: Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild. …

But Mr. and Mrs. Clinton have occupied a particular place in the social fabric of the enclave. Over the past several summers, they have spent the last two weeks of August in a rented 12,000-square-foot home with a heated pool in East Hampton and in a six-bedroom mansion with a private path to the beach in Sagaponack. This year, the former first couple stayed in the guesthouse of Steven Spielberg’s East Hampton compound built on nine acres overlooking Georgica and Lily Ponds.

Mr. Trump’s candidacy has allowed Mrs. Clinton to reach out to a new set of donors in the area who typically give to Republicans but dislike the current nominee. (Mr. Trump feels more at home at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla., than in the Hamptons, where the exclusive Maidstone Club once denied him a full-time membership, according to The New York Post.)

So, is Trump a Golf Nazi or is he a victim of the Golf Nazis? This is all very confusing …

Let’s see if we can up this article’s Rothschild Index without doing too much work. From Wikipedia:

Lynn Forester de Rothschild
Born Lynn Forester
July 2, 1954 (age 62)
Bergen County, New Jersey
Nationality American
Alma mater Pomona College
Columbia Law School
Occupation E.L. Rothschild (CEO)
Title Lady de Rothschild

Spouse(s) Alexander H. Platt (m.1978; div.)
Andrew Stein (m.1983 – div. 1993)
Sir Evelyn de Rothschild (m. 2000)

Children 2

Lynn Forester de Rothschild, Lady de Rothschild (born Lynn Forester; July 2, 1954) is the chief executive officer of E.L. Rothschild, a holding company she owns with her third husband, Sir Evelyn Robert de Rothschild, a member of the Rothschild family.[1] The company manages investments in The Economist Group, owner of The Economist magazine, Congressional Quarterly and the Economist Intelligence Unit, E.L. Rothschild LP, a leading independent wealth management firm in the United States, as well as real estate, agricultural and food interests.[2]

She publicly supports many politicians and is a known early Hillary Clinton supporter.[3] She also rallies for a political movement called Inclusive Capitalism. She led the Conference of Inclusive Capitalism in London in 2014[4] and 2015 and founded the Coalition for Inclusive Capitalism.[5]

Screenshot 2016-09-03 16.03.23

Lady Lynn de Rothschild, Bill, 2015

I think that gets the number of times the name “Rothschild” appears up to 17.

Oh, now the Rothschild Index is 18.

Wait, now the Rothschild Index is 19 …

I hadn’t actually been aware of the Rothschild-Economist magazine link, but now that I am, a lot more things make sense.

By the way, is Sir Evelyn Robert Adrian de Rothschild the last male Evelyn?

 
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  1. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “I stand between you and the apocalypse,” a confident Mrs. Clinton declared to laughs, exhibiting a flash of self-awareness and humor to a crowd that included Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein and for whom the prospect of a Donald J. Trump presidency is dire.

    A Trump presidency would be “dire” for Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein? What is their fear exactly? Presumably, both men lead comfortable lives without a want in the world and it would seem probable they would continue to do so under almost any near-term eventuality.

    Is Klein worried that Trump would impose tariffs on textile imports? What on earth is Weinstein’s concern?

    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Vulgar taste?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @guest

    , @anon930
    @Anonymous

    Perhaps they truly believe they are on the side of the angels.

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Anonymous

    (((Rothschild)))
    (((Klein)))
    (((Weinstein)))

    I wonder what all three have in common. What could be the common factor that makes them dislike Trump?

    Hmmm............

    Replies: @guest, @Corvinus

    , @5371
    @Anonymous

    Maybe Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein know more about what they've been up to than you do, and are more worried about it becoming public knowledge.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @NorthOfTheOneOhOne
    @Anonymous


    A Trump presidency would be “dire” for Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein? What is their fear exactly? Presumably, both men lead comfortable lives without a want in the world and it would seem probable they would continue to do so under almost any near-term eventuality.

    Is Klein worried that Trump would impose tariffs on textile imports? What on earth is Weinstein’s concern?
     

    Wanna take a guess at how many of the attendees owe the IRS money?
    , @Almost Missouri
    @Anonymous


    "A Trump presidency would be “dire” for Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein? What is their fear exactly?"
     
    Haha, yeah I had the same question when I read that part. I think the answer may be that once a certain level of comfort and affluence is attained and one is freed of the constraints of material wants, one's mind tends to wander into idiosyncratic directions. The top of Maslow's pyramid of needs is a remarkably flexible and peculiar place compared to the more rigid and objective requirements at the bottom.

    There also seems to be a strange and unconscious human desire to feel persecuted. Maybe it is a form of egotism, like "I'm so important that others seek my undoing". I don't feel it myself, perhaps because I'm just not important enough, but I see it all the time among others, especially, I have to admit, among a certain ethnic group well represented at Hillary's fundraisers.

    So, you have the freedom bestowed by affluence to explore the upper reaches of Maslow's pyramid combined with the common if unhealthy propensity to feel persecuted, and voila: billionaires worried about the wrong billionaire getting into office.

    Then there's 5371's explanation. Maybe they are all criminals and should be worried. Hillary clearly is a criminal. Birds of a feather and all that.

    , @old okie
    @Anonymous

    When your doing something you know is wrong you live in fear of discovery

  2. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    If she feels most at ease around millionaires, within the gilded bubble, it is in part because they are some of her most intimate friends.

    “It’s like going to a wedding or a bar mitzvah — you catch up,” explained Mitchell Berger, a Democratic donor in Florida, about the familial nature of the events.

    Those paragraphs seem somewhat revealing.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Anonymous

    LOL I'm shocked SHOCKED the word "confirmation" wasn't used by Berger.

    Replies: @Nico, @Hibernian

  3. Steve, wondering if there are any plans in place to do a piece on the Watergate “coup” you mentioned recently. Would fit well with current events. Cheers.

    • Replies: @Lugash
    @eggheadshadhisnumber

    A coup would be the CIA losing control of the government.

  4. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Steve,

    My initial reaction to the Lady Rothschild stuff was similar to what your reaction appears to be. But maybe she actually is a force for good – note the “inclusive capitalism” organization she is involved in. I’m not being sarcastic. This might be someone who deserves the benefit of the doubt until we know more.

    • Replies: @Auntie Analogue
    @Anonymous

    My dear Anonymous, are you just pretending to be, or are you actually a naïf? Rothschild's "inclusive capitalism" is a handy-dandy Globalist euphemism for Open Borders.

    , @eggheadshadhisnumber
    @Anonymous

    It's another corporate public relations initiative. From Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild herself:

    "I think that a lot of kids have neither money nor hope, and that's really bad. Because then they're going to get mad at America. What our hope for this initiative, is that through all the efforts of all of the decent CEOs, all the decent kids without a job feel optimistic."

    "I believe that it is our duty to help make all people believe that the elevator is working for them… that whatever the station of your birth, you can get on that elevator to success,"

    "At the moment, that faith and confidence is under siege in America… As business people, we have a pragmatic reason to get it right for everyone – so that the government does not intervene in unproductive ways with business… I think that it is imperative for us to restore faith in capitalism and in free markets."

    Replies: @Richard, @Patriot

    , @Anatoly Karlin
    @Anonymous

    Open Society Foundation also sounds really nice. I mean what kind of regressive anti-Semitic troglodyte do you have to be to stand against the open society? Time to give Soros some slack as well.

  5. @Anonymous
    “I stand between you and the apocalypse,” a confident Mrs. Clinton declared to laughs, exhibiting a flash of self-awareness and humor to a crowd that included Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein and for whom the prospect of a Donald J. Trump presidency is dire.

    A Trump presidency would be "dire" for Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein? What is their fear exactly? Presumably, both men lead comfortable lives without a want in the world and it would seem probable they would continue to do so under almost any near-term eventuality.

    Is Klein worried that Trump would impose tariffs on textile imports? What on earth is Weinstein's concern?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon930, @JohnnyWalker123, @5371, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @Almost Missouri, @old okie

    Vulgar taste?

    • Agree: NickG
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    "Vulgar taste?"

    Harvey Weinstein? The impresario of Quentin Tarantino's movies is worried about vulgar taste?

    , @guest
    @Steve Sailer

    Have you seen some of his movies? (Not to mention his appearance.)

  6. @Anonymous
    Steve,

    My initial reaction to the Lady Rothschild stuff was similar to what your reaction appears to be. But maybe she actually is a force for good - note the "inclusive capitalism" organization she is involved in. I'm not being sarcastic. This might be someone who deserves the benefit of the doubt until we know more.

    Replies: @Auntie Analogue, @eggheadshadhisnumber, @Anatoly Karlin

    My dear Anonymous, are you just pretending to be, or are you actually a naïf? Rothschild’s “inclusive capitalism” is a handy-dandy Globalist euphemism for Open Borders.

  7. Are the big democrat donors mostly Jewish? Are there any more rich Gentiles in the Hamptons?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Steve Richter

    2/3 of Democratic money comes from Jewish donors. Not to mention that most Democratic policies, talking points, and media and PR are crafted by Jewish intellectuals, policymakers, and journalists. The Democratic Party as present constituted would effectively cease to exist without Jews:

    http://mondoweiss.net/2011/06/jta-reports-that-as-much-as-23-of-democratic-money-comes-from-jewish-donors/

    Replies: @iSteveFan

    , @syonredux
    @Steve Richter


    Are the big democrat donors mostly Jewish? Are there any more rich Gentiles in the Hamptons?
     
    Well, let's use the article as a test-case:

    “I stand between you and the apocalypse,” a confident Mrs. Clinton declared to laughs, exhibiting a flash of self-awareness and humor to a crowd that included Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein

     


    “It’s the old adage, you go to where the money is,” said Jay S. Jacobs, a prominent New York Democrat.
     
    Jacobs is not always a Jewish name, but...

    “It’s like going to a wedding or a bar mitzvah — you catch up,” explained Mitchell Berger, a Democratic donor in Florida, about the familial nature of the events. …
     
    That's some pretty bold signalling on the J-Dar....

    Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild, a backer of Democrats and a friend of the Clintons’, made sure attendees did not grill Mrs. Clinton at the $100,000-per-couple lamb dinner Mrs. Forester de Rothschild hosted under a tent on the lawn of her oceanfront Martha’s Vineyard mansion.

     

    Are the de Rothschilds still Jewish? Did Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild convert? Exercises for the student.

    This year, the former first couple stayed in the guesthouse of Steven Spielberg’s East Hampton compound built on nine acres overlooking Georgica and Lily Ponds.
     

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    , @bored identity
    @Steve Richter

    Does a bear wear a funny hat ? Does the Pope sh.....

    Oh, never mind.

  8. @Anonymous
    Steve,

    My initial reaction to the Lady Rothschild stuff was similar to what your reaction appears to be. But maybe she actually is a force for good - note the "inclusive capitalism" organization she is involved in. I'm not being sarcastic. This might be someone who deserves the benefit of the doubt until we know more.

    Replies: @Auntie Analogue, @eggheadshadhisnumber, @Anatoly Karlin

    It’s another corporate public relations initiative. From Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild herself:

    “I think that a lot of kids have neither money nor hope, and that’s really bad. Because then they’re going to get mad at America. What our hope for this initiative, is that through all the efforts of all of the decent CEOs, all the decent kids without a job feel optimistic.”

    “I believe that it is our duty to help make all people believe that the elevator is working for them… that whatever the station of your birth, you can get on that elevator to success,”

    “At the moment, that faith and confidence is under siege in America… As business people, we have a pragmatic reason to get it right for everyone – so that the government does not intervene in unproductive ways with business… I think that it is imperative for us to restore faith in capitalism and in free markets.”

    • Replies: @Richard
    @eggheadshadhisnumber

    Interesting quotes. Lady de Rothschild seems to have scrubbed her site, so the only place you can still find the full text of the original speech is at a Chinese academic site:

    http://english.ckgsb.edu.cn/news_content/lady-de-rothschild-speaks-inclusive-capitalism-ckgsb

    One unintentionally funny passage you didn't mention is this one:

    "One pathway that we identified as very important is that business leaders require work forces that are educated for what their companies need. McKinsey did a study: the United States has 30 million jobs that cannot be filled because of a lack of people qualified for those jobs. Right now in America, in order to get accepted to Harvard, you have to study and be proficient in trigonometry. Are there any land surveyors in this room? No. That’s what trigonometry is for. Knowledge of probability, on the other hand is not required. However, probability and mathematical engineering skills are what are useful in a high-tech world. They’re not required in American higher education today. The McKinsey study also states that by 2030, there are going to be 85 million jobs that are not going to have people with the right skills. So we, as business leaders, need to step up and participate in educating the work force we need."

    I think Lady de Rothschild is correct to identify poor statistical knowledge among our social-political elite as a major problem in society, but could you find a passage more adept at unwittingly displaying it?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonym, @PiltdownMan, @metoo, @Neil Templeton, @Mr. Anon, @Forbes

    , @Patriot
    @eggheadshadhisnumber

    She also funded The School for Kids Who Can't Read Good and Want to Learn to do Other Things Good Too.

    Replies: @Je Suis Charlie Martel, @Zonie

  9. This reads almost as if one or more members of the NYT staff is subtly but deliberately trying to ensure that Hillary Rodham Clinton will not be our next president. (I’m thinking of the underground propaganda efforts against The Prophet in Heinlein’s novella, “If This Goes on…”) Perhaps these persons have become aware that Hillary is (a) Corrupt (b) Incompetent (c) Physically and mentally incapacitated (d) An alcoholic (e) Demonically possessed (f) All of the above.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    Amy Chozick has called attention to Hard Drinkin' Hillary's love of the hard stuff.

    Replies: @Dennis Dale

    , @Marc
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    This could also be an extreme example of a lack of self-awareness. It's like they don't realize how bad this attempt at showing Hillary's vibrancy comes across outside of the Northeastern Corridor. The actual level of modern leftist snobbery eclipses any fictional portrayal of out-of-touch WASP's in 1980's film/TV. Hillary should resurrect the old "Poverty Sucks" poster for the 2016 campaign.

    , @Hibernian
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    Possibly even some leftists have trouble seeing all five characteristics as features rather than bugs in a POTUS.

  10. @Jus' Sayin'...
    This reads almost as if one or more members of the NYT staff is subtly but deliberately trying to ensure that Hillary Rodham Clinton will not be our next president. (I'm thinking of the underground propaganda efforts against The Prophet in Heinlein's novella, "If This Goes on...") Perhaps these persons have become aware that Hillary is (a) Corrupt (b) Incompetent (c) Physically and mentally incapacitated (d) An alcoholic (e) Demonically possessed (f) All of the above.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Marc, @Hibernian

    Amy Chozick has called attention to Hard Drinkin’ Hillary’s love of the hard stuff.

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
    @Steve Sailer

    And while that piece seemed back-handed praise (she's a jovial drinker!) this one goes beyond that, all but openly mocking her.

  11. Does Paul McCartney really need to make private gigs for the mega-rich to make ends meet? Maybe Jon Bon Jovi does, but Sir Paul?

    • Replies: @eggheadshadhisnumber
    @BB753

    It's for social cachet, I can't imagine anything other than travel expenses and a nominal fee being covered. The admiration of real successes is immeasurable to these hack performers.

    Replies: @SFG, @BB753

    , @Anonym
    @BB753

    Sir Paul never forgot his salad days and remains a notorious tightwad.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @BB753

    , @Neil Templeton
    @BB753

    I'd like to see the tape. Learn some new dance moves.

    , @Jack Highlands
    @BB753

    Beta-indemnities to one-legged celebrities aren't cheap.

    , @Erik L
    @BB753

    I saw a thing on 60 minutes a few years ago which indicated that Bon Jovi was the most successful touring musician of the day (or something like that). It was really counter intuitive to me that of all the 80s acts his would be the one still going strong. I don't think he's hurting for cash

    , @DCThrowback
    @BB753

    JBJ had a bid of $900M+ locked in for my Buffalo Bills. He fell short of drilling magnate Terry Pegula's $1.3Bn bid.

    JBJ was going to move the team to Toronto, so f**k him and his terrible Directv ads.

  12. @Anonymous
    “I stand between you and the apocalypse,” a confident Mrs. Clinton declared to laughs, exhibiting a flash of self-awareness and humor to a crowd that included Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein and for whom the prospect of a Donald J. Trump presidency is dire.

    A Trump presidency would be "dire" for Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein? What is their fear exactly? Presumably, both men lead comfortable lives without a want in the world and it would seem probable they would continue to do so under almost any near-term eventuality.

    Is Klein worried that Trump would impose tariffs on textile imports? What on earth is Weinstein's concern?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon930, @JohnnyWalker123, @5371, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @Almost Missouri, @old okie

    Perhaps they truly believe they are on the side of the angels.

  13. This is the fault of Politico, saying that she was born in Bergen County, NJ, and describing it as a suburb of NYC is a little vague.

    • Replies: @DriesNK
    @ScarletNumber

    Bergen is often called The 6th Borough of NYC. Manhattan is only one bridge away.

    Replies: @Hibernian

  14. Rothschilds – continued – :
    This afternoon I wrote about a German novel by Hermann Peter Piwitt – called: “Rothschilds” (Hamburg, 1972). – From the dust-jacket: Rothschilds is about: “…Paul Ankas ‘Dina’, Baldus’ bicycle, Rebeccas fragrance … and Philosemitism as a form, that enables the public to keep quiet about (…) fascism — and about idividual destiny. If three banks are united, that’s lots of individual destiny.” Tivoli-Kunst (= Theodor W. Adorno) is the big seducer.

    Piwitt was a little bit early – but anyhow – his book is a great short novel and highly recomended to any german speaking readers.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Dieter Kief

    Philosemitism as a form, that enables the public to keep quiet about (…) fascism

    What did he mean by this?

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  15. @Anonymous
    If she feels most at ease around millionaires, within the gilded bubble, it is in part because they are some of her most intimate friends.

    “It’s like going to a wedding or a bar mitzvah — you catch up,” explained Mitchell Berger, a Democratic donor in Florida, about the familial nature of the events.


    Those paragraphs seem somewhat revealing.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    LOL I’m shocked SHOCKED the word “confirmation” wasn’t used by Berger.

    • Replies: @Nico
    @ScarletNumber

    The sorts of people who use the word "confirmation" to describe a family gathering stopped reading the NY Times some while back I think.

    , @Hibernian
    @ScarletNumber

    I don't think confirmation parties are on the same level in Christian culture as Bar Mitzvah parties are in Jewish culture.

  16. @eggheadshadhisnumber
    @Anonymous

    It's another corporate public relations initiative. From Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild herself:

    "I think that a lot of kids have neither money nor hope, and that's really bad. Because then they're going to get mad at America. What our hope for this initiative, is that through all the efforts of all of the decent CEOs, all the decent kids without a job feel optimistic."

    "I believe that it is our duty to help make all people believe that the elevator is working for them… that whatever the station of your birth, you can get on that elevator to success,"

    "At the moment, that faith and confidence is under siege in America… As business people, we have a pragmatic reason to get it right for everyone – so that the government does not intervene in unproductive ways with business… I think that it is imperative for us to restore faith in capitalism and in free markets."

    Replies: @Richard, @Patriot

    Interesting quotes. Lady de Rothschild seems to have scrubbed her site, so the only place you can still find the full text of the original speech is at a Chinese academic site:

    http://english.ckgsb.edu.cn/news_content/lady-de-rothschild-speaks-inclusive-capitalism-ckgsb

    One unintentionally funny passage you didn’t mention is this one:

    “One pathway that we identified as very important is that business leaders require work forces that are educated for what their companies need. McKinsey did a study: the United States has 30 million jobs that cannot be filled because of a lack of people qualified for those jobs. Right now in America, in order to get accepted to Harvard, you have to study and be proficient in trigonometry. Are there any land surveyors in this room? No. That’s what trigonometry is for. Knowledge of probability, on the other hand is not required. However, probability and mathematical engineering skills are what are useful in a high-tech world. They’re not required in American higher education today. The McKinsey study also states that by 2030, there are going to be 85 million jobs that are not going to have people with the right skills. So we, as business leaders, need to step up and participate in educating the work force we need.”

    I think Lady de Rothschild is correct to identify poor statistical knowledge among our social-political elite as a major problem in society, but could you find a passage more adept at unwittingly displaying it?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Richard

    “One pathway that we identified as very important is that business leaders require work forces that are educated for what their companies need. McKinsey did a study: the United States has 30 million jobs that cannot be filled because of a lack of people qualified for those jobs ... there are going to be 85 million jobs that are not going to have people with the right skills. So we, as business leaders, need to step up and participate in educating the work force we need.”

    This is actually great! This is exactly what we citizenists and those of us on the Alt Right want: government, corporations, and the wealthy should be focused on educating Americans for jobs--and not importing more people to fill them.

    Let's cut Lady Rothschild some slack. Perhaps she is still learning. She could be a potential ally.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Buck Turgidson, @L Woods

    , @Anonym
    @Richard

    Lady de Rothschild is in urgent need of reading The Bell Curve. As are, frankly, most politicians. Unfortunately the skills for gaining office are not exactly aligned with governing effectively.

    There needs to be some sort of quick, dumbed down to the max, HBD video primer. It would cover IQ, criminality, GDP/ capita relations, and probably something regarding East Asian negatives (corruption, altruism) so IQ fetishists don't import an East Asian ruling class by the shipload.

    Replies: @snorlax

    , @PiltdownMan
    @Richard


    Right now in America, in order to get accepted to Harvard, you have to study and be proficient in trigonometry. Are there any land surveyors in this room? No. That’s what trigonometry is for. Knowledge of probability, on the other hand is not required. However, probability and mathematical engineering skills are what are useful in a high-tech world.
     
    Mathematical education must have made extraordinary progress since my time if you can acquire mathematical engineering skills by skipping trigonometry.
    , @metoo
    @Richard

    Uh, Ms. de Rothschild, do you mid if I call you DE? You do mind? Good.

    Dear DE,

    Trigonometry is where the ratio of sides in a right triangle are related through transcendental functions (sin(x) = x - x^3/3! + x^5/5! - x^7/7! .... and cos(x) = 1 - x^2/2! + x^4/4! ...)
    and they find to be useful in electronics, physics, engineering, in fact anything that is used to make your exuberant lifestyle possible.

    Go figure. Oh wait, you don't know how to.

    Stupid rich bitch.

    - Me

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Neil Templeton
    @Richard

    Applying the rules of probability to any collection of data that is essentially non-measureable, or highly uncertain and contested, may be worse than useless.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Richard

    She is revealing her ignorance. An understanding of trigonometry is required for physics and engineering.

    , @Forbes
    @Richard

    Her essential problem/challenge is that she read a 'report' from a consulting firm, and concludes the need for better qualified Harvard graduates to fill 30 million unfilled jobs.

    30 million unfilled jobs? Unfilled at what wage? Are the qualifications of Harvard grads a pressing need? Are they wanting for employment?

    And then we're told (unskilled) immigration is necessary for all those jobs Americans won't do...

    The contradictions are massive.

  17. “It’s like going to a wedding or a bar mitzvah — you catch up,” explained Mitchell Berger,

    So was this line just deliberate troll bait, or what?

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    @anon

    It's a form of Jewish passive aggression, similar to when they use Yiddishisms in mixed company with people they know aren't familiar with them. In this case, it's also a sideways boast about their power as financiers of the political parties, particularly the Donkey Club. But then again, Hillary and Web Hubbell's grandchildren are half Jewish ethically and there really hasn't been much discussion about whether they're being raised in Hillary's leftish social justice Methodism or the Margolies-Mesvinskys' leftish social justice reform Judaism so an actual Bar/Bat Mitzvah is still a distinct possibility.

  18. @ScarletNumber
    This is the fault of Politico, saying that she was born in Bergen County, NJ, and describing it as a suburb of NYC is a little vague.

    Replies: @DriesNK

    Bergen is often called The 6th Borough of NYC. Manhattan is only one bridge away.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @DriesNK

    Doesn't it compete for this distinction with Hudson, Westchester, Nassau, and whatever in Jersey's across the Outerbridge Crossing and Goethals Bridge from Staten Island?

  19. I’d just like to issue a shoutout to devoted potted brain-damaged limey, Paul McCartney:

    Paul, you smoked pot every day for at least 30 years. That’s part of the reason you sound like a church cover band for the Beatles. You have brain damage. It’s time to retire from the public eye, instead of spending your final years inspiring pity from the many who used to admire you. Your politics have ways been juvenile, but we overlooked it, until now.

    Essentially, you are fucking up my childhood worse than George Lucas.

    Have some common decency.

    Retire, and spend your last years raising the little girl you had with the one-legged escort.

    • LOL: BB753
    • Replies: @James Kabala
    @Elbin

    I never heard of McCartney's performing at a fund raiser for a specific politician before. This election seems to be bringing out of the woodwork a lot of celebrities that one could have assumed were liberal but who had mostly avoided explicit partisanship - McCartney, Paul Simon, Meryl Streep, Sigourney Weaver, Morgan Freeman.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

  20. @Steve Richter
    Are the big democrat donors mostly Jewish? Are there any more rich Gentiles in the Hamptons?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @syonredux, @bored identity

    2/3 of Democratic money comes from Jewish donors. Not to mention that most Democratic policies, talking points, and media and PR are crafted by Jewish intellectuals, policymakers, and journalists. The Democratic Party as present constituted would effectively cease to exist without Jews:

    http://mondoweiss.net/2011/06/jta-reports-that-as-much-as-23-of-democratic-money-comes-from-jewish-donors/

    • Replies: @iSteveFan
    @Anonymous

    Tell this to commenter Whiskey. He thinks that at 2 percent of the population they have about 2 percent of the influence.

    Replies: @Whiskey

  21. @BB753
    Does Paul McCartney really need to make private gigs for the mega-rich to make ends meet? Maybe Jon Bon Jovi does, but Sir Paul?

    Replies: @eggheadshadhisnumber, @Anonym, @Neil Templeton, @Jack Highlands, @Erik L, @DCThrowback

    It’s for social cachet, I can’t imagine anything other than travel expenses and a nominal fee being covered. The admiration of real successes is immeasurable to these hack performers.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @eggheadshadhisnumber

    I agree he's kissing the butts of the rich and famous, but you're really calling Paul McCartney a hack? One of the best-loved performers of all time? The man responsible for most of the Beatles' mainstream appeal?

    , @BB753
    @eggheadshadhisnumber

    I suppose his last wife left him in dire financial straits for a while.. But this is really debasing yourself for a few shekels. (Bon Jovi probably needs the money but not Sir Paul) I would have expected this sad behavior from Lennon had he been alive but not from McCartney. Lennon was truly a piece of work.

  22. @Dieter Kief
    Rothschilds - continued - :
    This afternoon I wrote about a German novel by Hermann Peter Piwitt - called: "Rothschilds" (Hamburg, 1972). - From the dust-jacket: Rothschilds is about: "...Paul Ankas 'Dina', Baldus' bicycle, Rebeccas fragrance ... and Philosemitism as a form, that enables the public to keep quiet about (...) fascism -- and about idividual destiny. If three banks are united, that's lots of individual destiny." Tivoli-Kunst (= Theodor W. Adorno) is the big seducer.

    Piwitt was a little bit early - but anyhow - his book is a great short novel and highly recomended to any german speaking readers.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Philosemitism as a form, that enables the public to keep quiet about (…) fascism

    What did he mean by this?

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Anonymous

    Plain and simple: If you specialise in philosemitism, you can evade discussing questions like these: How fascism came into power - what this had to do with the Weimar-Republic elites - and their tendency to rather support the big money and Hitler than the republican forces.

    He had a point in this Novel - even tough he drank a lot when he wrote it. It's a fantastic read though for those happy few who dig it...

    Somehting that comes only very very slowly into the realm, where discussions take place: That lots of jews were part of the weimar elite - and made lots of mistakes - just like anybody else - and one thing especially that was a very impotant fact, as far as envy is concerend: Many of the bourgeois jews prospered way above average.
    Now, this is important: You have to make a decent description of a society in order to come to reasonable conclusions. - Those are desriptive attempts - to remark such things means n o t to state, that the jews in Germany caused there destiny in the Gas-Cahmbers or something like this, because they were successful.

    The first, who in Germny wrote in a decent way about these things, was an essayist, Siegfried Kohlhammer, who was for a while visible, because he published in the decent monthly Merkur. He doesn't publish anymore and lives in Japan now, as far as i know.

    Kohlhammer, by the way, broke the ice on the Islamistic-taboo in Germany - together with Hans Magnus Enzensberger.

    Enzensberger was prudent and clear-sighted enough to escape being silenced. Kohlhammer could have gone on on a small scale with his work (Merkur sells less than 10 000 copies), his books sold in the 4 digits realm - but he stopped publishing.

    Then came Sarrazin.

    Sarrazin and Enzensberger respect one another. Kohlhammer and Piwitt are the lone dogs in the field.

  23. @Elbin
    I'd just like to issue a shoutout to devoted potted brain-damaged limey, Paul McCartney:

    Paul, you smoked pot every day for at least 30 years. That's part of the reason you sound like a church cover band for the Beatles. You have brain damage. It's time to retire from the public eye, instead of spending your final years inspiring pity from the many who used to admire you. Your politics have ways been juvenile, but we overlooked it, until now.

    Essentially, you are fucking up my childhood worse than George Lucas.

    Have some common decency.

    Retire, and spend your last years raising the little girl you had with the one-legged escort.

    Replies: @James Kabala

    I never heard of McCartney’s performing at a fund raiser for a specific politician before. This election seems to be bringing out of the woodwork a lot of celebrities that one could have assumed were liberal but who had mostly avoided explicit partisanship – McCartney, Paul Simon, Meryl Streep, Sigourney Weaver, Morgan Freeman.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @James Kabala


    I never heard of McCartney’s performing at a fund raiser for a specific politician before.
     
    Never underestimate what an A-list member of the British upper classes can make happen. Rothschild.

    It’s for social cachet, I can’t imagine anything other than travel expenses and a nominal fee being covered.
     

    McCartney has had all the social cachet he has needed for half a century, and he is pretty close to being a billionaire himself. This runs more along the lines of a favor for a friend, in all likelihood.

    Replies: @James Kabala, @Former Darfur, @Marat

  24. I see, so the story is that she’s really the picture of vibrant good health in these small personal meetings, impressing them with her wit and intellectual sharpness. This is why she chooses not to make public appearances that aren’t carefully stage-managed. Good cover story.

  25. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Richard
    @eggheadshadhisnumber

    Interesting quotes. Lady de Rothschild seems to have scrubbed her site, so the only place you can still find the full text of the original speech is at a Chinese academic site:

    http://english.ckgsb.edu.cn/news_content/lady-de-rothschild-speaks-inclusive-capitalism-ckgsb

    One unintentionally funny passage you didn't mention is this one:

    "One pathway that we identified as very important is that business leaders require work forces that are educated for what their companies need. McKinsey did a study: the United States has 30 million jobs that cannot be filled because of a lack of people qualified for those jobs. Right now in America, in order to get accepted to Harvard, you have to study and be proficient in trigonometry. Are there any land surveyors in this room? No. That’s what trigonometry is for. Knowledge of probability, on the other hand is not required. However, probability and mathematical engineering skills are what are useful in a high-tech world. They’re not required in American higher education today. The McKinsey study also states that by 2030, there are going to be 85 million jobs that are not going to have people with the right skills. So we, as business leaders, need to step up and participate in educating the work force we need."

    I think Lady de Rothschild is correct to identify poor statistical knowledge among our social-political elite as a major problem in society, but could you find a passage more adept at unwittingly displaying it?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonym, @PiltdownMan, @metoo, @Neil Templeton, @Mr. Anon, @Forbes

    “One pathway that we identified as very important is that business leaders require work forces that are educated for what their companies need. McKinsey did a study: the United States has 30 million jobs that cannot be filled because of a lack of people qualified for those jobs … there are going to be 85 million jobs that are not going to have people with the right skills. So we, as business leaders, need to step up and participate in educating the work force we need.”

    This is actually great! This is exactly what we citizenists and those of us on the Alt Right want: government, corporations, and the wealthy should be focused on educating Americans for jobs–and not importing more people to fill them.

    Let’s cut Lady Rothschild some slack. Perhaps she is still learning. She could be a potential ally.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Anonymous

    Anonymous wrote:


    This is actually great! This is exactly what we citizenists and those of us on the Alt Right want: government, corporations, and the wealthy should be focused on educating Americans for jobs...
     
    Gee... and I always thought the purpose of education was to enable a person to perceive the truth -- about the universe, about human nature, about politics, etc.

    Ever read Huxley's Brave New World? Sounds to me as if Lady de Rothschild simply wants enough Epsilons and Deltas around to keep the machines running while she and her pals run the world.

    Dave Miller in Sacramento
    , @Buck Turgidson
    @Anonymous

    I was pleased to read that final sentence. Over the past few decades, a similar passage usually has concluded with, "We therefore must allow the rest of the world to immigrate to the US so that we won't lose to China."

    Replies: @BB753

    , @L Woods
    @Anonymous

    Obsession with "jobs" is a relic of the industrial era. There's no good reason to be going around inventing "jobs" in a near-future in which autonomous machines are providing almost all necessary goods and services. What is the education system supposed to do: offer poodle walking 101?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Hibernian

  26. She managed to snag a rich husband at age 46 even though she had 2 kids.

    College dropout Melania Trump is 46 now, and had no kids when she married her rich husband 11 years ago.

    Take that, foreigners.

    USA! USA!

    • LOL: Almost Missouri
  27. “It’s the old adage, you go to where the money is,” said Jay S. Jacobs, a prominent New York Democrat.

    Right. But that’s an adage about robbing banks.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willie_Sutton

    • LOL: Harold
    • Replies: @guest
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I'm communist America, banks rob you!

  28. Amy Chozick and Jonathan Martin are dead, dead, to the Clintons. And their editors, too.

    There is almost as much on the internet about Amy Chozick covering Hillary as there is by Amy Chozick covering Hillary. There’s less on Jonathan Martin but there is some evidence that some people think he is a fanboy of Hillary, as in the article hyperlinked through his name.

    A reporter doesn’t get to this kind of story without being close to the subject, especially when it comes to the Clintons. The question is, is this latest article a betrayal, or some kind of sophisticated headfake?

    Hillary, Sir Evelyn Robert Adrian de Rothschild, Bill or Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild would certainly know. There you go, Steve. Increased the count by two.

    • Replies: @guest
    @PiltdownMan

    They forgot to mention Lord and Lady Douchebag.

  29. @BB753
    Does Paul McCartney really need to make private gigs for the mega-rich to make ends meet? Maybe Jon Bon Jovi does, but Sir Paul?

    Replies: @eggheadshadhisnumber, @Anonym, @Neil Templeton, @Jack Highlands, @Erik L, @DCThrowback

    Sir Paul never forgot his salad days and remains a notorious tightwad.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonym

    Sir Paul enjoys making money.

    Replies: @Anonym, @D. K., @Father O'Hara

    , @BB753
    @Anonym

    Is that why he chose the one-legged hooker? (you know the joke, don't you? They charge less and are better in bed) If he figured she'd be cheaper, he was really wrong. I wonder if he ever wrote a song about her, before or after being shafted in divorce court.

  30. @James Kabala
    @Elbin

    I never heard of McCartney's performing at a fund raiser for a specific politician before. This election seems to be bringing out of the woodwork a lot of celebrities that one could have assumed were liberal but who had mostly avoided explicit partisanship - McCartney, Paul Simon, Meryl Streep, Sigourney Weaver, Morgan Freeman.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

    I never heard of McCartney’s performing at a fund raiser for a specific politician before.

    Never underestimate what an A-list member of the British upper classes can make happen. Rothschild.

    It’s for social cachet, I can’t imagine anything other than travel expenses and a nominal fee being covered.

    McCartney has had all the social cachet he has needed for half a century, and he is pretty close to being a billionaire himself. This runs more along the lines of a favor for a friend, in all likelihood.

    • Replies: @James Kabala
    @PiltdownMan

    His tweet on the subject is actually cleverly worded (albeit probably written by a flunky, not the man himself):

    https://twitter.com/PaulMcCartney/status/766046537608597505

    Replies: @James Kabala, @sayless, @FactsAreImportant, @Buzz Mohawk, @PiltdownMan, @Buck Turgidson, @Harry Baldwin

    , @Former Darfur
    @PiltdownMan

    In today's world, "almost a billionaire" isn't very impressive considering McCartney's status as the only living half or the most commercially successful songwriting pair in pop music history.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Brutusale

    , @Marat
    @PiltdownMan

    Ditto for Sir Elton John who made two recent appearances at private homes in Silicon Valley. Sans the hubby. These two small groups were far wealthier than he is reported to be. Lots of trophy photographing around the piano. Their favorite political pastime is to bash Trump's bird as being an old, slow guzzler and then speculate on his true net worth.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  31. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynn_Forester_de_Rothschild Not a drop of Jewish blood! What a scam!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Clyde

    Perhaps that explains why she is in favor of helping our domestic workforce (via education), as opposed to importing millions of foreigners.

    Perhaps she has some residual loyalty to our country.

    Replies: @Richard, @Alden

  32. Mr. Trump has pointed to Mrs. Clinton’s noticeably scant schedule of campaign events this summer to suggest she has been hiding from the public. But Mrs. Clinton has been more than accessible to those who reside in some of the country’s most moneyed enclaves and are willing to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to see her….

    ….And while Mrs. Clinton has faced criticism for her failure to hold a news conference for months, she has fielded hundreds of questions from the ultrarich in places like the Hamptons, Martha’s Vineyard, Beverly Hills and Silicon Valley.

    Does the NY Times have any clue how this sounds?

    Honest to God, it’s enough to turn me into a Marxist.

    • Replies: @Dr. X
    @celt darnell


    Honest to God, it’s enough to turn me into a Marxist.
     
    I've gotten to that point myself. As a conservative, I obviously believe Marx was wrong about a lot of things. But he wasn't wrong about everything.

    Today, we don't live under Adam Smith's free market. We live under crony capitalism, nepotism, and the wealthy engaged in rent-seeking and buying favors from the government.

    Karl would have said "Told ya so."

    Replies: @Mr. Blank, @Harry Baldwin

    , @Thea
    @celt darnell

    It's like bat signal that she can be bought.

    Is it trolling for other rich people to pay in while they can or a warning to the Plebes?


    Voter fraud will be so rampant.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @celt darnell

    The wealthy and their lackeys have become rather blatant in describing the neo-feudal world they seek to bring about. They no longer even feel the need to lie about it.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    , @pyrrhus
    @celt darnell

    It's certainly enough to make you want to drop napalm on Martha's Vineyard and the Hamptons...

    , @rod1963
    @celt darnell


    Does the NY Times have any clue how this sounds?
     
    No, they don't. In fact I'd expect nothing less from them. They think giving a giants middle-finger to the people is SOP.

    But yeah they do make her come off as a poster child for why the entire system needs to be destroyed and the elites vanquished.

    Still the fact that she attends fund raisers(most via proxies) is that when she shows up, it's for a very brief speech, some meet and greet with the elites then she disappears. It looks like every place she gives a speech she's either on a couch or stool.

    In fact she is quite sick, the bulky clothes that is hiding some sort of medical device, the bodyguard with the Epipen at the ready, her stove pipe lower legs(which weren't there when she was in the White House with Slick)her need to be helped up steps all points to very sick woman.
    , @Lagertha
    @celt darnell

    Blech! How revolting! I couldn't believe my eyes when reading this! All the Millennials I know say that America is a Plutocracy and there is no hope until all Baby Boomers are dead/or at least incapacitated in nursing homes. They will pry back America from the cold dead fingers of these revolting Plutocrats who cling to their champagne and waterfront real estate (oh, and Maidstone is still very picky who gets in/they don't like any publicity).

    Trump 1, Clinton 0 with this bizarre article - I mean, she can't give press conferences since she is too busy partying, hat -in-hand with billionaires at their summer homes?! Let them eat cake. This article needs to be broadcasted in a big way all over the Rust Belt/Plains/South - some Millennial is gonna go to town with this on Youtube. And, sheesh, she really let southerners know that the North East is still the preferred, "classier" place to summer.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @wren, @Anonymous

  33. The takeaway messages from this article are that Hillary is only comfortable when: 1) she’s liquored-up, and 2) she’s in an elite bubble far away from lumpenproletariat scum.

  34. @Richard
    @eggheadshadhisnumber

    Interesting quotes. Lady de Rothschild seems to have scrubbed her site, so the only place you can still find the full text of the original speech is at a Chinese academic site:

    http://english.ckgsb.edu.cn/news_content/lady-de-rothschild-speaks-inclusive-capitalism-ckgsb

    One unintentionally funny passage you didn't mention is this one:

    "One pathway that we identified as very important is that business leaders require work forces that are educated for what their companies need. McKinsey did a study: the United States has 30 million jobs that cannot be filled because of a lack of people qualified for those jobs. Right now in America, in order to get accepted to Harvard, you have to study and be proficient in trigonometry. Are there any land surveyors in this room? No. That’s what trigonometry is for. Knowledge of probability, on the other hand is not required. However, probability and mathematical engineering skills are what are useful in a high-tech world. They’re not required in American higher education today. The McKinsey study also states that by 2030, there are going to be 85 million jobs that are not going to have people with the right skills. So we, as business leaders, need to step up and participate in educating the work force we need."

    I think Lady de Rothschild is correct to identify poor statistical knowledge among our social-political elite as a major problem in society, but could you find a passage more adept at unwittingly displaying it?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonym, @PiltdownMan, @metoo, @Neil Templeton, @Mr. Anon, @Forbes

    Lady de Rothschild is in urgent need of reading The Bell Curve. As are, frankly, most politicians. Unfortunately the skills for gaining office are not exactly aligned with governing effectively.

    There needs to be some sort of quick, dumbed down to the max, HBD video primer. It would cover IQ, criminality, GDP/ capita relations, and probably something regarding East Asian negatives (corruption, altruism) so IQ fetishists don’t import an East Asian ruling class by the shipload.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    @Anonym


    and probably something regarding East Asian negatives (corruption, altruism) so IQ fetishists don’t import an East Asian ruling class by the shipload.
     
    That would serve no purpose except to make the persuadable conclude that you really are just a racist Nazi xenophobe looking for excuses to hate everyone who isn't white.

    Simple IQ realism would still be an immeasurable improvement. Don't bite off more than you can chew, Rome wasn't built in a day, etc.

    Replies: @Nico

  35. @Steve Richter
    Are the big democrat donors mostly Jewish? Are there any more rich Gentiles in the Hamptons?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @syonredux, @bored identity

    Are the big democrat donors mostly Jewish? Are there any more rich Gentiles in the Hamptons?

    Well, let’s use the article as a test-case:

    “I stand between you and the apocalypse,” a confident Mrs. Clinton declared to laughs, exhibiting a flash of self-awareness and humor to a crowd that included Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein

    “It’s the old adage, you go to where the money is,” said Jay S. Jacobs, a prominent New York Democrat.

    Jacobs is not always a Jewish name, but…

    “It’s like going to a wedding or a bar mitzvah — you catch up,” explained Mitchell Berger, a Democratic donor in Florida, about the familial nature of the events. …

    That’s some pretty bold signalling on the J-Dar….

    Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild, a backer of Democrats and a friend of the Clintons’, made sure attendees did not grill Mrs. Clinton at the $100,000-per-couple lamb dinner Mrs. Forester de Rothschild hosted under a tent on the lawn of her oceanfront Martha’s Vineyard mansion.

    Are the de Rothschilds still Jewish? Did Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild convert? Exercises for the student.

    This year, the former first couple stayed in the guesthouse of Steven Spielberg’s East Hampton compound built on nine acres overlooking Georgica and Lily Ponds.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @syonredux

    Jacobs is not always a Jewish name, but…

    ...it is frequently a jewish name.

    Replies: @Mike Zwick

    , @Anonymous
    @syonredux

    Sir Evelyn de Rothschild is purebred, the son of Anthony Gustav de Rothschild and Yvonne Cahen d'Anvers. However, two of his three wives including Ms. Forester have been non-Jews. His similar age cousin Jacob Rothschild, the holder of the Rothschild family's British peerage dating to the latter part of Queen Victoria's reign, is half-Jewish, son of Victor de Rothschild and Barbara Hutchinson. Jacob's wife, Serena Mary Dunn, is the daughter of Sir Philip Dunn and Lady Mary St. Clair-Erskine, who was herself the daughter of the 5th Earl of Rosslyn. I believe that Jacob Rothschild's wife converted and that their quarter-Jewish children were all raised to consider themselves at least nominally Jewish. Jacob Rothschild had a younger half-brother Amschel who was the product of Victor de Rothschild's second marriage to a non-Jew, Teresa Mayor. Amschel married Anita Patience Guinness, an obvious non-Jew. One of his quarter-Jewish daughters, Kate, married a son of Sir James Goldsmith (half-Jew) by his third wife, Lady Annabel Vane-Tempest-Stewart in a Church of England ceremony, so the children seem to have been raised as Protestants. A few years ago Kate Rothschild had an affair with rapper Jay Electronica and divorced her husband. So in summary, the younger British Rothschilds are not pure Jews, but some of them consider themselves Jewish.

  36. I don’t buy into any of the Jew-hating stuff, but after reading that, even I was like, “Rothschilds? At a swanky plutocrat fundraiser? Come on. The Elders of Zion are really off their game these days.”

  37. @Clyde
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynn_Forester_de_Rothschild Not a drop of Jewish blood! What a scam!

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Perhaps that explains why she is in favor of helping our domestic workforce (via education), as opposed to importing millions of foreigners.

    Perhaps she has some residual loyalty to our country.

    • Replies: @Richard
    @Anonymous


    Perhaps that explains why she is in favor of helping our domestic workforce (via education), as opposed to importing millions of foreigners.
     
    That's isn't at all what she said. It could be interpreted that way, but the fact that she was giving the speech to a crowd of young Chinese students should maybe be taken as a clue as to who she hopes will fill those millions of jobs she believes American companies are going to be offering.

    On her public record, Lady de Rothschild is a transnational low-tax corporate liberal who bizarrely criticized Barack Obama's economic policies on the grounds that they would reduce immigration into this country.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lady-lynn-forester-de-rothschild/barack-obamas-america_b_139762.html

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Whiskey

    , @Alden
    @Anonymous

    She really didn't say that if and when Americans were better educated they would be hired.

    She just claimed that Anericans are uneducated and unable to preform STEM jobs

    That sounds very much like the old excuse for hiring Chinese and Indian immigrants.
    If you have kids in school, take a look at common core math. It's endless gobbledygook and incredibly complicated
    Also memorizing the multiplication tables is frowned upon.

    Replies: @edNels

  38. @syonredux
    @Steve Richter


    Are the big democrat donors mostly Jewish? Are there any more rich Gentiles in the Hamptons?
     
    Well, let's use the article as a test-case:

    “I stand between you and the apocalypse,” a confident Mrs. Clinton declared to laughs, exhibiting a flash of self-awareness and humor to a crowd that included Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein

     


    “It’s the old adage, you go to where the money is,” said Jay S. Jacobs, a prominent New York Democrat.
     
    Jacobs is not always a Jewish name, but...

    “It’s like going to a wedding or a bar mitzvah — you catch up,” explained Mitchell Berger, a Democratic donor in Florida, about the familial nature of the events. …
     
    That's some pretty bold signalling on the J-Dar....

    Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild, a backer of Democrats and a friend of the Clintons’, made sure attendees did not grill Mrs. Clinton at the $100,000-per-couple lamb dinner Mrs. Forester de Rothschild hosted under a tent on the lawn of her oceanfront Martha’s Vineyard mansion.

     

    Are the de Rothschilds still Jewish? Did Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild convert? Exercises for the student.

    This year, the former first couple stayed in the guesthouse of Steven Spielberg’s East Hampton compound built on nine acres overlooking Georgica and Lily Ponds.
     

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Jacobs is not always a Jewish name, but…

    …it is frequently a jewish name.

    • Replies: @Mike Zwick
    @Anonymous

    Many times it is an Anglicized version of Jacoby. Jacobson is the same. Then there is Leo Jacoby who changed his name to Lee J. Cobb and became a famous actor.

  39. @Anonym
    @BB753

    Sir Paul never forgot his salad days and remains a notorious tightwad.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @BB753

    Sir Paul enjoys making money.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @Steve Sailer

    Pennies saved, pennies earned, both are good. There is nothing wrong with that. Although once you have reached a certain level of wealth it can rub some people the wrong way to be seen as overly frugal.

    , @D. K.
    @Steve Sailer

    Paul, now 74, has been rich (and spectacularly famous) since he was 21 years old. Since the bulk of his wealth comes from intellectual property, in the form of copyrights, he is rather unlikely to suffer any financial setbacks, short of another contentious divorce, between now and his eventual demise-- and his estate's heirs then will have many more years to enjoy the same prerogatives!

    ***

    Jake Gittes: How much are you worth?

    Noah Cross: I have no idea. How much do you want?

    Jake Gittes: I just wanna know what you're worth. More than 10 million?

    Noah Cross: Oh my, yes!

    Jake Gittes: Why are you doing it? How much better can you eat? What could you buy that you can't already afford?

    Noah Cross: The future, Mr. Gittes! The future. Now, where's the girl? I want the only daughter I've got left. As you found out, Evelyn was lost to me a long time ago.

    Jake Gittes: Who do you blame for that? Her?

    Noah Cross: I don't blame myself. You see, Mr. Gittes, most people never have to face the fact that at the right time and the right place, they're capable of ANYTHING.

    --Roman Polanski's "Chinatown" (1974)

    ***

    My father's Puritan namesake (c. 1609-1660) was one of the early settlers of present-day South Hampton, and one of the actual founders of present-day East Hampton, where he served as a magistrate for the last few years of his life. He must be spinning like a top, about what has come of the place, over the past 375 years!?!

    Replies: @Former Darfur

    , @Father O'Hara
    @Steve Sailer

    Funny how these "all you need is love" rock stars wind up as big tycoons demanding "Show me the money"! They don't really have a choice;SOMEBODY is making money off their stuff. Might as well be the artist,as opposed to,say,Evelyn De Rothschild!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  40. Huh. Rather interesting to juxtapose this:

    (Mr. Trump feels more at home at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla., than in the Hamptons, where the exclusive Maidstone Club once denied him a full-time membership, according to The New York Post.)

    With That:

    To the Trumpettes, the candidate’s lack of governing experience is irrelevant. The proof of his ability to make America great again is in his business empire and the properties contained within it, places Trumpettes know well.
    “The reason I love his club and Trump International is because it’s perfection,” Kramer said of Mar-a-Lago, his private Palm Beach club, and Trump’s nearby golf course. “That’s the way he’ll run the country.

    http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/09/donald-trump-2016-trumpettes-bel-air-214206

    Perhaps taste in country clubs is the true cultural fault-line of the 21st century?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @syonredux

    Trump can't take total credit for Mar-a-Lago. Before it was a Trump country club, Mar-a-Lago was an estate designed and built for Marjorie Meriweather Post.

  41. @Richard
    @eggheadshadhisnumber

    Interesting quotes. Lady de Rothschild seems to have scrubbed her site, so the only place you can still find the full text of the original speech is at a Chinese academic site:

    http://english.ckgsb.edu.cn/news_content/lady-de-rothschild-speaks-inclusive-capitalism-ckgsb

    One unintentionally funny passage you didn't mention is this one:

    "One pathway that we identified as very important is that business leaders require work forces that are educated for what their companies need. McKinsey did a study: the United States has 30 million jobs that cannot be filled because of a lack of people qualified for those jobs. Right now in America, in order to get accepted to Harvard, you have to study and be proficient in trigonometry. Are there any land surveyors in this room? No. That’s what trigonometry is for. Knowledge of probability, on the other hand is not required. However, probability and mathematical engineering skills are what are useful in a high-tech world. They’re not required in American higher education today. The McKinsey study also states that by 2030, there are going to be 85 million jobs that are not going to have people with the right skills. So we, as business leaders, need to step up and participate in educating the work force we need."

    I think Lady de Rothschild is correct to identify poor statistical knowledge among our social-political elite as a major problem in society, but could you find a passage more adept at unwittingly displaying it?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonym, @PiltdownMan, @metoo, @Neil Templeton, @Mr. Anon, @Forbes

    Right now in America, in order to get accepted to Harvard, you have to study and be proficient in trigonometry. Are there any land surveyors in this room? No. That’s what trigonometry is for. Knowledge of probability, on the other hand is not required. However, probability and mathematical engineering skills are what are useful in a high-tech world.

    Mathematical education must have made extraordinary progress since my time if you can acquire mathematical engineering skills by skipping trigonometry.

  42. The pro-Hillary Clinton group HRC Super Volunteers have warned New York Times reporter Amy Chozick that she is “on notice” for coded sexism and have issued a list of words they believe the press should avoid.
    “A group called HRC Super Volunteers just warned me ‘We will be watching, reading, listening and protesting coded sexism,’” Miss Chozicktweeted Wednesday to her 16,000 followers.
    “Sexist words, they say, include ‘polarizing, calculating, disingenuous, insincere, ambitious, inevitable, entitled, over confident,’” she wrote in a subsequent tweet.
    “Also sexist, according to HRC Super Volunteers: ‘Secretive’ and ‘will do anything to win, represents the past, out of touch,” Miss Chozickcontinued.
    “‘You are on notice that we will be watching, reading, listening and protesting coded sexism…’ the email reads,” she said.
    The Twitter account belonging to HRC Super Volunteers retweeted all four of Miss Chozick’s messages.

    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/mar/26/pro-hillary-group-puts-female-new-york-times-repor/

    • Replies: @sayless
    @syonredux

    Maenads For Hillary.

  43. From a COSMO profile on Chozick:

    I grew up in San Antonio, Texas, and I thought I wanted to be a poet or maybe write screenplays. Then in high school, I was in this program where you could leave campus for a couple of hours a day and get credit for working. I worked at the San Antonio Express News for a year. I worked with a woman named Beverly Purcell-Guerra, who had just moved from New York where she had worked in magazines. I had gone on a class trip in the sixth grade to New York and all my friends couldn’t understand why you would live there, and I remember thinking, I cannot wait to live here. To me, Beverly was the most interesting, glamorous person I had ever met. She was my first mentor.

    I went to college at UT Austin. I know everyone loves Austin, but I sort of hated it. I felt like you were either a sorority girl or you were smoking pot by the lake. Where I really found refuge was the Daily Texan. I was an entertainment writer, which was super fun in Austin — I remember going to SXSW when it was still a little backwater film festival.

    I was a journalism major for about three weeks. I remember being in this giant seminar class with 200 people, and the professor was teaching us about grammar and what makes a good story, and I was thinking, I don’t need to major in this. So I switched to English and Latin American studies and started writing a lot about Latin America and Mexico.

    I remember working at Mademoiselle and the fashion editor was like, “I need you to go to the belly of Grand Central and fetch me prosciutto and melon.” I didn’t know what prosciutto was — I’m from Texas, we call that “ham.” I wish Twitter existed then, because I used to keep notes of what I overheard in the elevator. I remember a girl got on with a Birkin bag, and her friend goes, “Oh my god, I love your bag, is that new?” and she goes, “No, I got it, like, a week ago.”

    I was laying the groundwork to go to Mexico when an opening in Tokyo came up. I didn’t speak a word of Japanese, but I thought Japan seemed so much more interesting, so I asked to go there.

    I think part of the reason they agreed to send me was because I was 26 and I didn’t have a family. But it was really hard. I had a tutor, bless her heart, she was so patient with me. A Japanese friend of mine was leaving her apartment and it was amazing but in a very Japanese neighborhood, and they didn’t want a gaijin, a foreigner, living there. On the other hand, when I look back at the work I produced in Japan, it includes some of my favorite stories. In politics, people are fighting over the same stories constantly, but in Japan, it was like they grew on trees. I was like, “The toilets play music here, that’s a story!”

    I move back to New York, it’s 2007, and John Bussey calls me and says, “How would you like to go to Iowa with Hillary Clinton?” Iowa was as big a culture shock to me as Japan, and American politics was also totally foreign — I remember not knowing what a caucus was. John Bussey’s theory was that fresh perspective brings a different kind of story. Everyone knows people hook up on the campaign, but no one had written that story. I was in 48 states that election cycle. I was with Hillary when she cried in New Hampshire, I was with her when she came out in Ohio and ranted, “Shame on you, Barack Obama.” What’s great about covering her is she is so disciplined and so on message that when something unexpected happens, it’s really significant. I covered her through May, when it became obvious she wasn’t going to get the nomination, and then they moved me to Obama’s traveling press.

    That was really different. Obama is super charming and charismatic speaking to 50,000 people, and Hillary is charming and charismatic speaking to five. The campaigns were very different because Hillary’s was in turmoil. She gets criticized for having drama in her campaign, but any losing candidate has drama. When I went over to Obama, there was a lot of talk about “no drama Obama” — which wasn’t true, he had plenty of drama, but he knew his message. In 2008 “hope and change” was exactly what the country was looking for, and they stuck with that, and Hillary had to find her own message. When I started covering her in 2007, I was like, “I’m riding this beat to the White House,” and then saw her fall.

    http://www.cosmopolitan.com/career/news/a42193/get-that-life-amy-chozick-new-york-times/

    • Replies: @Dr. X
    @syonredux


    From a COSMO profile on Chozick:
     
    Frightening, how stupid and shallow she really is. "Iowa was a much of a culture shock as Japan" pretty much sums it up.

    And a NYT reporter who says "like" constantly as if she were a Valley Girl? Time for me to pour a bourbon and re-read Nietzsche's "Aphorisms on Woman" in "Beyond Good and Evil."

    Replies: @sayless, @South Texas Guy

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @syonredux

    Hillary is charming and charismatic speaking to five.

    Neither charm nor charisma are virtues. A good person may be charming, but so may a predator, such as a con artist. Manipulative people use charm to achieve their ends. Are there any successful politicians who can't muster up a bit of charm when dealing with people whose money or influence they want? I doubt it.

    As for charisma, most of history's great bad guys had it.

  44. We should do outreach to Lady Rothschild on the H1B issue.

  45. @Steve Sailer
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    Amy Chozick has called attention to Hard Drinkin' Hillary's love of the hard stuff.

    Replies: @Dennis Dale

    And while that piece seemed back-handed praise (she’s a jovial drinker!) this one goes beyond that, all but openly mocking her.

  46. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonym

    Sir Paul enjoys making money.

    Replies: @Anonym, @D. K., @Father O'Hara

    Pennies saved, pennies earned, both are good. There is nothing wrong with that. Although once you have reached a certain level of wealth it can rub some people the wrong way to be seen as overly frugal.

  47. The most interesting part of this piece is the connection between Rothschild and Economist magazine, and the business interests including agricultural land. Now why would the Economist be so concerned about crops rotting in the fields? Or increase demand for real estate?

    And the article seems like the most anti-Hillary article you could write at the NYT without being fired. This is blinking in Morse code type of stuff.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonym

    But it proves Hillary isn't on death's door, so they got it in.

    But it is pretty funny stuff.

    Replies: @Anonym, @Clyde

    , @MEH 0910
    @Anonym


    This is blinking in Morse code type of stuff.
     
    - --- .-. - ..- .-. .
    , @Redneck Republican
    @Anonym

    The Economist Group purchased Business International Corporation 30 years ago. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_International_Corporation

    Business International Corporation employed both Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, but at different times.

    Business International is a little known CIA front company; perhaps it needs to be better known.

    The odds of two different occupants of the Oval Office having worked for the same itty bitty publishing are infinitesimal.

    As for the piece mentioning agricultural land and the Rothschild family, shortages always and everywhere are a function of price. Like shortages of farm workers.

    Except for arable land. Some might consider arable land to be a perfect example of "the tragedy of the commons." http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/tragedy-of-the-commons

    There is a finite amount of arable land on the globe. You can farm this finite amount more intensively, but you cannot create more of it. Yeah, sure, you can farm fallow lands; convert forest to crops; and reclaim land from the sea (think Holland), but all of these choices have extraordinary costs, both environmental and monetary, and involve long time lines.

    So, are the Rothschilds trying to corner the market on arable lands? Or is their interest simply in the long-term returns generated by renewable commodities?

    Replies: @Anonym

  48. When Hillary’s campaign says “she’s fighting for us,” I guess the “us” is her really rich donors.

  49. @Anonym
    The most interesting part of this piece is the connection between Rothschild and Economist magazine, and the business interests including agricultural land. Now why would the Economist be so concerned about crops rotting in the fields? Or increase demand for real estate?

    And the article seems like the most anti-Hillary article you could write at the NYT without being fired. This is blinking in Morse code type of stuff.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @MEH 0910, @Redneck Republican

    But it proves Hillary isn’t on death’s door, so they got it in.

    But it is pretty funny stuff.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @Steve Sailer

    But it proves Hillary isn’t on death’s door, so they got it in.

    But it is pretty funny stuff.


    Ah, I see. "Look boss, Breitbart is saying that Hillary hasn't had a press conference for nearly 300 days. There are youtube videos mocking her seizures. We had to prove that Hillary is healthy. It's the best we could come up with."

    Replies: @Dennis Dale

    , @Clyde
    @Steve Sailer


    But it proves Hillary isn’t on death’s door, so they got it in.
     
    The New York Times publishing a proof of life communique. Take that you conspiracy theory Trumpsters! Hillary is fit as a fiddle.
  50. @Anonymous
    @Steve Richter

    2/3 of Democratic money comes from Jewish donors. Not to mention that most Democratic policies, talking points, and media and PR are crafted by Jewish intellectuals, policymakers, and journalists. The Democratic Party as present constituted would effectively cease to exist without Jews:

    http://mondoweiss.net/2011/06/jta-reports-that-as-much-as-23-of-democratic-money-comes-from-jewish-donors/

    Replies: @iSteveFan

    Tell this to commenter Whiskey. He thinks that at 2 percent of the population they have about 2 percent of the influence.

    • Replies: @Whiskey
    @iSteveFan

    How Jewish is Sir Paul McCartney, or Warren Buffett, or Bill Gates, or Carlos Slim? Heck how Jewish is Lady Rothschild? [Answer, not much.]

    You're focusing on the WRONG THING. For every Jacobs there is a Howard Stern. Don't forget, Donald Trump LOVES LOVES LOVES Jews. He made a commercial for Bibi Netanyahu. Heck he *IS* Bibi as much as anyone else can be. After all, you could make a legit argument that TRUMP likes Jews and has more around him than Hillary does -- his entire staff is Jewish, while Hillary's seems to be old witchy WASP types and well, Huma. Who is not very Jewish.

    How many times was Hillary Grand Marshall of the Israel Day parade? None. Trump was twice. He's got twice the number of Jewish grand kids and is pretty much a cross between Rodney Dangerfield and Don Rickles.

    And how Jewish is the Hamptons? Do they serve Gefilte Fish there? Potato latkes? How Jewish is Ralph Lauren? Or Harvey Weinstein? Compared to say, Jerry Seinfeld or Howard Stern or Adam Sandler?

    Again missing the point; Jews are divided as every other White people on class and gender lines. Hillary is running as Marie Antoinette letting them eat cake while she cavorts with the ultra rich. She doesn't care how bad it looks because she knows that most College Educated White women love that stuff; and that America is run for the benefit to steal SBLD's Paul Kersey's line, Black people and ... White College Educated Women.

    Last I checked, the Hamptons were not exactly the Catskills as a traditionally Jewish place; but a rich place for rich White ladies, yes definitely.

    Replies: @iStevefan, @Marcus

  51. iSteveFan says:

    I thought American citizens were not supposed to have titles. Is this the case? If so, did she have to give up her American citizenship to get that title? If so, why is she allowed to donate to our political campaigns?

    Second, how are these people able to donate $250K? I thought there was a $2.7K limit. Are they just donating to PACs?

    Third, where the f**k is the occupy wall street crowd? Where are the bernie supporters? If this story doesn’t cause them to not vote for Hillary, then they never believed in their philosophy to begin with. They don’t have to vote Trump. They can vote Jill Stein. But if they vote Hillary, they are hypocrites.

    • Replies: @James Kabala
    @iSteveFan

    No, although a ban almost was passed (and some claim it actually was): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titles_of_Nobility_Amendment

    Even if this amendment had been adopted, I think it would have applied only to those given titles in their own right, not to someone who married a titleholder. (Wives of knights are indeed called Lady, but that is not a title directly from the monarch.)

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @Name Withheld, @frayed_thread, @Anonymous

    , @guest
    @iSteveFan

    There's no law against U.S. citizens possessing titles of nobility. We just don't have our own nobility is all.

    "where the f**k is the occupy wall street crowd?"

    In their defense the other side is a New York real estate mogul, and we have a two-party system. Also, it is (was) a confused movement. Ever talk to one of them? The ones who aren't plants, I mean.

    , @rod1963
    @iSteveFan

    You ever see pictures of a Hillary rally?

    She's lucky to draw a crowd of 500. Her American Legion speech was in front of maybe 200 people. I suspect it's one reason she stopped doing rallies.

    And I don't think Bernie supporters want anything to do with her now. She's lost them. I suspect it's the reason the MSM has ceased mentioning them, even though they are still pissed at her.

    The point is she's not anywhere near as popular as the MSM makes her out to be. Fact is Democratic participation this time around is down 20% from 2008.

    People don't want Hillary.

    Replies: @Lurker

  52. @Anonymous
    “I stand between you and the apocalypse,” a confident Mrs. Clinton declared to laughs, exhibiting a flash of self-awareness and humor to a crowd that included Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein and for whom the prospect of a Donald J. Trump presidency is dire.

    A Trump presidency would be "dire" for Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein? What is their fear exactly? Presumably, both men lead comfortable lives without a want in the world and it would seem probable they would continue to do so under almost any near-term eventuality.

    Is Klein worried that Trump would impose tariffs on textile imports? What on earth is Weinstein's concern?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon930, @JohnnyWalker123, @5371, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @Almost Missouri, @old okie

    (((Rothschild)))
    (((Klein)))
    (((Weinstein)))

    I wonder what all three have in common. What could be the common factor that makes them dislike Trump?

    Hmmm…………

    • Replies: @guest
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Despite the fact the Trump is quite Jewsome.

    , @Corvinus
    @JohnnyWalker123

    "I wonder what all three have in common. What could be the common factor that makes them dislike Trump?"

    It's a rich vs. rich thing. They get all sorts of special treatment.

    From March 31, 2016...

    In an MSBNC town hall on Wednesday night, Donald Trump said that a lot of people like him for his proposal to ban all Muslims from the country — but he also admitted that there may be some exceptions to the ban.

    “I think banning until we figure out what’s going on is an important thing, and I take a lot of heat for it, and a lot of people like me for it to be honest with you,” Trump said when asked about the proposal.

    “I have been called by more Muslims saying what you are doing is a great thing, not a bad thing,” he continued. “Believe it or not, I have a lot of friends that are Muslim, and they call me, and in most cases, they’re very rich Muslims.”

    Pressed by MSNBC’s Chris Matthews whether Trump’s friends could even get into the country with a ban on Muslims, Trump conceded. “They’ll come in,” he said. “They’ll come in, and you’ll have exceptions.”

    BOTH Hillary and Trump have little patience for commoners. They cater to their wealthy friends for donations while taking populist positions. For anyone to suggest otherwise, that one or the other has the monopoly on rich friends or one or the other has contempt for regular folk, is a fool.

    Replies: @anon

  53. @PiltdownMan
    @James Kabala


    I never heard of McCartney’s performing at a fund raiser for a specific politician before.
     
    Never underestimate what an A-list member of the British upper classes can make happen. Rothschild.

    It’s for social cachet, I can’t imagine anything other than travel expenses and a nominal fee being covered.
     

    McCartney has had all the social cachet he has needed for half a century, and he is pretty close to being a billionaire himself. This runs more along the lines of a favor for a friend, in all likelihood.

    Replies: @James Kabala, @Former Darfur, @Marat

    His tweet on the subject is actually cleverly worded (albeit probably written by a flunky, not the man himself):

    • Replies: @James Kabala
    @James Kabala

    Sorry - I just meant for that to be a link. It is not a very pleasant picture!

    , @sayless
    @James Kabala

    Photographs of the young Hillary have always disturbed me a bit, and I couldn't understand why, until I realized, She looks like Alfred E. Neuman: Ruthless.

    , @FactsAreImportant
    @James Kabala

    Check out the crazy eyes.

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @James Kabala

    The Sixties never left us. They just got old.

    Man this is one bad acid trip.

    , @PiltdownMan
    @James Kabala


    His tweet on the subject is actually cleverly worded (albeit probably written by a flunky, not the man himself):
     
    On the other hand, given Paul McCartney's early reputation for lightning quick wit, it's also possible that he wrote it himself.
    , @Buck Turgidson
    @James Kabala

    Behold the world's most evil, forced, phony, unnatural, ungenuine smile. As soon as the cameras are gone she is back to being a b***h on wheels, yelling at her inferiors, cursing like trooper, and telling someone to get her a beer. Read the accounts of the SS agents who have had to work in her orbit. That smile creeps me out.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @James Kabala

    He looks rather disengaged. Or out of it.

  54. She was a McCain supporter

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Marcus

    She was a die-hard Hillary supporter who turned to McCain when the Dems chose the Magical Negro.

    Part of what was then called the PUMA movement ("Party Unity My Ass!")

  55. @iSteveFan
    I thought American citizens were not supposed to have titles. Is this the case? If so, did she have to give up her American citizenship to get that title? If so, why is she allowed to donate to our political campaigns?


    Second, how are these people able to donate $250K? I thought there was a $2.7K limit. Are they just donating to PACs?

    Third, where the f**k is the occupy wall street crowd? Where are the bernie supporters? If this story doesn't cause them to not vote for Hillary, then they never believed in their philosophy to begin with. They don't have to vote Trump. They can vote Jill Stein. But if they vote Hillary, they are hypocrites.

    Replies: @James Kabala, @guest, @rod1963

    No, although a ban almost was passed (and some claim it actually was): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titles_of_Nobility_Amendment

    Even if this amendment had been adopted, I think it would have applied only to those given titles in their own right, not to someone who married a titleholder. (Wives of knights are indeed called Lady, but that is not a title directly from the monarch.)

    • Replies: @iSteveFan
    @James Kabala

    From your link:


    On two occasions between 1812 and 1816 it was within two states of the number needed to become a valid part of the Constitution. Congress did not set a time limit for its ratification, so the amendment is still pending before the states. Ratification by an additional 26 states is needed for this amendment to be adopted.
     
    I wonder why they don't go ahead and pass it. Who would oppose it? I think this amendment needs to be passed.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Richard

    , @Name Withheld
    @James Kabala

    The Titles of Nobility Amendment did not pass, but it almost implicit in the US Constitution (Article 1, Section 9, Clause 8), and US culture/history that foreign titles not be observed. I think the US press started doing this with the Kennedy's and all their cohorts. I can remember Parade magazine and others going crazy over titles back in the 1980's.

    Replies: @James Kabala

    , @frayed_thread
    @James Kabala

    Hmm at my naturalization a few years ago I had to renounce my title as the Padishah Emperor of the Known Universe.

    , @Anonymous
    @James Kabala

    Sir Evelyn de Rothschild was knighted by the Queen before he was even married to Lynn Forester. She is styled "Lady Evelyn de Rothschild" by courtesy only. If she were to divorce him, it would presumably be correct to cease calling her Lady, but observance of those rules has become lax.

  56. @James Kabala
    @PiltdownMan

    His tweet on the subject is actually cleverly worded (albeit probably written by a flunky, not the man himself):

    https://twitter.com/PaulMcCartney/status/766046537608597505

    Replies: @James Kabala, @sayless, @FactsAreImportant, @Buzz Mohawk, @PiltdownMan, @Buck Turgidson, @Harry Baldwin

    Sorry – I just meant for that to be a link. It is not a very pleasant picture!

    • LOL: 415 reasons
  57. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonym

    But it proves Hillary isn't on death's door, so they got it in.

    But it is pretty funny stuff.

    Replies: @Anonym, @Clyde

    But it proves Hillary isn’t on death’s door, so they got it in.

    But it is pretty funny stuff.

    Ah, I see. “Look boss, Breitbart is saying that Hillary hasn’t had a press conference for nearly 300 days. There are youtube videos mocking her seizures. We had to prove that Hillary is healthy. It’s the best we could come up with.”

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
    @Anonym

    It's as if any criticism of Hillary requires a chaperone of equal or greater positive analysis. This one pushes it, but she needs all the help she can get on the health issue right now so maybe, in the implied negotiations between rogue writers and more politically pressured editors, any help on that is earning a premium right now.

  58. @eggheadshadhisnumber
    @Anonymous

    It's another corporate public relations initiative. From Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild herself:

    "I think that a lot of kids have neither money nor hope, and that's really bad. Because then they're going to get mad at America. What our hope for this initiative, is that through all the efforts of all of the decent CEOs, all the decent kids without a job feel optimistic."

    "I believe that it is our duty to help make all people believe that the elevator is working for them… that whatever the station of your birth, you can get on that elevator to success,"

    "At the moment, that faith and confidence is under siege in America… As business people, we have a pragmatic reason to get it right for everyone – so that the government does not intervene in unproductive ways with business… I think that it is imperative for us to restore faith in capitalism and in free markets."

    Replies: @Richard, @Patriot

    She also funded The School for Kids Who Can’t Read Good and Want to Learn to do Other Things Good Too.

    • Replies: @Je Suis Charlie Martel
    @Patriot

    For Ants!

    , @Zonie
    @Patriot

    Ha! I was also thinking Zoolander when I read Lady de Rothschild's quote. She really exudes patronizing plutocratic do-gooder ignorance. She seems very enthused with mathematics, but somehow I doubt this enthusiasm extends to her having focused on trigonometry or probability in her own schooling, or to her persuading her children to major in STEM subjects in college. These are subjects for middle-class strivers, not leaders and rulers. Master businessman and salesman Steve Jobs was supremely bored by engineering details and the Aspergery dweebs who made the gadgets work, but he loved design, aesthetics, and marketing.

    Replies: @Hibernian

  59. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    It’s interesting that Pearson, a big Common Core publisher, owned The Financial Times and The Economist up until fairly recently. Below are looking his to a couple of other articles about Pearson and its interesting history. At one point it owned a controlling no interest in Lazards, the merchant bank.

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/01/21/exclusive-former-pearson-exec-reveals-anti-american-agenda-in-common-core-on-constitution-guns-christianity/

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2015/09/23/common-core-the-gift-that-pearson-counts-on-to-keep-giving/

  60. @Richard
    @eggheadshadhisnumber

    Interesting quotes. Lady de Rothschild seems to have scrubbed her site, so the only place you can still find the full text of the original speech is at a Chinese academic site:

    http://english.ckgsb.edu.cn/news_content/lady-de-rothschild-speaks-inclusive-capitalism-ckgsb

    One unintentionally funny passage you didn't mention is this one:

    "One pathway that we identified as very important is that business leaders require work forces that are educated for what their companies need. McKinsey did a study: the United States has 30 million jobs that cannot be filled because of a lack of people qualified for those jobs. Right now in America, in order to get accepted to Harvard, you have to study and be proficient in trigonometry. Are there any land surveyors in this room? No. That’s what trigonometry is for. Knowledge of probability, on the other hand is not required. However, probability and mathematical engineering skills are what are useful in a high-tech world. They’re not required in American higher education today. The McKinsey study also states that by 2030, there are going to be 85 million jobs that are not going to have people with the right skills. So we, as business leaders, need to step up and participate in educating the work force we need."

    I think Lady de Rothschild is correct to identify poor statistical knowledge among our social-political elite as a major problem in society, but could you find a passage more adept at unwittingly displaying it?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonym, @PiltdownMan, @metoo, @Neil Templeton, @Mr. Anon, @Forbes

    Uh, Ms. de Rothschild, do you mid if I call you DE? You do mind? Good.

    Dear DE,

    Trigonometry is where the ratio of sides in a right triangle are related through transcendental functions (sin(x) = x – x^3/3! + x^5/5! – x^7/7! …. and cos(x) = 1 – x^2/2! + x^4/4! …)
    and they find to be useful in electronics, physics, engineering, in fact anything that is used to make your exuberant lifestyle possible.

    Go figure. Oh wait, you don’t know how to.

    Stupid rich bitch.

    – Me

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @metoo

    "Stupid rich bitch."

    U mad bro? That's not good mindset.

  61. @Anonymous
    @Clyde

    Perhaps that explains why she is in favor of helping our domestic workforce (via education), as opposed to importing millions of foreigners.

    Perhaps she has some residual loyalty to our country.

    Replies: @Richard, @Alden

    Perhaps that explains why she is in favor of helping our domestic workforce (via education), as opposed to importing millions of foreigners.

    That’s isn’t at all what she said. It could be interpreted that way, but the fact that she was giving the speech to a crowd of young Chinese students should maybe be taken as a clue as to who she hopes will fill those millions of jobs she believes American companies are going to be offering.

    On her public record, Lady de Rothschild is a transnational low-tax corporate liberal who bizarrely criticized Barack Obama’s economic policies on the grounds that they would reduce immigration into this country.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lady-lynn-forester-de-rothschild/barack-obamas-america_b_139762.html

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Richard

    If her heart is in the right place, perhaps we can educate her.

    Replies: @Richard

    , @Whiskey
    @Richard

    And multiply Lady de Rothschild by a million other Nice White Ladies who never did anything but marry some rich and powerful guy; or who have ambitions to do so. And resent their compatriots, the lower classes, and want to replace them with "superior" foreigners.

    TL:DR; the true enemy of ordinary White people is not Jews. Its Nice White Ladies. Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David and Howard Stern don't want to import 30 million Chinese to fill corporate jobs. Lady De Rothschild does. So does no doubt the NYT reporter Choznick.

    Remember, Nice White Ladies are not judged on accomplishment, or achievement, or anything production related. But rather how they look and how many Mean Girls exclusive cliques they can form. Why would you expect them to act in any other way? Mean Girls don't care about anything other than exclusion of near-peers. Its how they are Mean Girls.

    On a broader note, if the US were male dominated, it would exclude foreigners on the theory that patronage networks have to produce, actual real patronage and spoils for the boys, otherwise there will be a bloody revolution. A female dominated society produces a Lady de Rothschild (I kind of forgot there how Jewish the title Lady is, why pretty much all the Medieval Monarchs and Dukes and Earls and Knights of course were Jewish) intent on replacing American workers with foreign ones; and a candidate who avoids ordinary people for a few rich people.

  62. @celt darnell

    Mr. Trump has pointed to Mrs. Clinton’s noticeably scant schedule of campaign events this summer to suggest she has been hiding from the public. But Mrs. Clinton has been more than accessible to those who reside in some of the country’s most moneyed enclaves and are willing to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to see her....

    ....And while Mrs. Clinton has faced criticism for her failure to hold a news conference for months, she has fielded hundreds of questions from the ultrarich in places like the Hamptons, Martha’s Vineyard, Beverly Hills and Silicon Valley.
     
    Does the NY Times have any clue how this sounds?

    Honest to God, it's enough to turn me into a Marxist.

    Replies: @Dr. X, @Thea, @Mr. Anon, @pyrrhus, @rod1963, @Lagertha

    Honest to God, it’s enough to turn me into a Marxist.

    I’ve gotten to that point myself. As a conservative, I obviously believe Marx was wrong about a lot of things. But he wasn’t wrong about everything.

    Today, we don’t live under Adam Smith’s free market. We live under crony capitalism, nepotism, and the wealthy engaged in rent-seeking and buying favors from the government.

    Karl would have said “Told ya so.”

    • Replies: @Mr. Blank
    @Dr. X

    Hear, hear. My friends all know me as a knee-jerk conservative and a fan of free markets, so it has been little disorienting to them in recent years whenever talk turns to the economy and suddenly I'm the guy saying we need to hang all the bankers and loot the palaces of the rich. They're all like, "when do you break out the hammer and sickle, comrade?"

    My explanation is the same: "I'm a fan of the free market. This isn't the free market."

    Replies: @Thea

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Dr. X

    Marx was certainly right about how capitalism demands a reserve army of the unemployed.

    Replies: @guest, @Anonymous

  63. I must say, for all her faults, Hillary sure seems to have the jewish vote locked down.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Anonymous

    So does every Democrat. Mitt only got about 30%, we'll see how Trump does.

  64. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonym

    But it proves Hillary isn't on death's door, so they got it in.

    But it is pretty funny stuff.

    Replies: @Anonym, @Clyde

    But it proves Hillary isn’t on death’s door, so they got it in.

    The New York Times publishing a proof of life communique. Take that you conspiracy theory Trumpsters! Hillary is fit as a fiddle.

  65. The most deplorable one [AKA "The Fourth Political Theory"] says:

    Well, its Breitbart, but:

    http://www.breitbart.com/2016-presidential-race/2016/09/03/donald-trump-meet-harry-truman-hillary-clinton-meet-tom-dewey/

    And if Hillary doesn’t want to hear any bad news—or answer any questions—it’s a safe bet that nobody on her campaign staff wants to tell her any bad news, or urge her, actually, to hold a press conference. And besides, there’s plenty of good news to talk about: Why, she raised $143 million, just in August! She is beloved from the Hamptons to the Hollywood Hills!

    Yet amidst all the lavish partying, some observers are offering a grimmer assessment, appearing like the ghost of the murdered Banquo crashing Macbeth’s celebratory feast.

    A few days after the Politico story, on August 28, election analyst Nate Silver headlined his piece at FiveThirtyEight, “It’s Too Soon For Clinton To Run Out The Clock.” He observed, “It’s August, and the number of undecided voters is high, and so the outcome remains fairly uncertain.” MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough then added on August 31, “She needs to wake up and understand she could still lose.”

    Indeed, the polls have been tightening: The latest Real Clear Politics polling average shows the four-way race—and it is a four-way race; the Libertarian candidate, Gary Johnson, is on the ballot in all 50 states, and the Green candidate, Jill Stein, is on the ballot in at least 37 states—as being neck-and-neck: Clinton leads by just 3.2 percent. And her overall total is a less-than-commanding 41.4 percent.

    We might add that the general rule for incumbents—and Hillary is certainly a quasi-incumbent—is that undecideds will break against the incumbent on Election Day. Still, it’s a four-way race, and so we can’t know for whom those late-deciders will break. And yet can say with almost certainly, they won’t break for Clinton.

    In the face of this obvious weakness, other observers, too, are expressing skepticism: Here’s The Hill, on September 3: “Clinton’s ‘run-out-the-clock’ strategy under fire.” As the piece noted,

    The Democratic nominee nearly vanished from the campaign trail in August to attend high-end private fundraisers and to prepare for the first presidential debate on Sept. 26.

  66. @syonredux
    From a COSMO profile on Chozick:

    I grew up in San Antonio, Texas, and I thought I wanted to be a poet or maybe write screenplays. Then in high school, I was in this program where you could leave campus for a couple of hours a day and get credit for working. I worked at the San Antonio Express News for a year. I worked with a woman named Beverly Purcell-Guerra, who had just moved from New York where she had worked in magazines. I had gone on a class trip in the sixth grade to New York and all my friends couldn't understand why you would live there, and I remember thinking, I cannot wait to live here. To me, Beverly was the most interesting, glamorous person I had ever met. She was my first mentor.

    I went to college at UT Austin. I know everyone loves Austin, but I sort of hated it. I felt like you were either a sorority girl or you were smoking pot by the lake. Where I really found refuge was the Daily Texan. I was an entertainment writer, which was super fun in Austin — I remember going to SXSW when it was still a little backwater film festival.
     

    I was a journalism major for about three weeks. I remember being in this giant seminar class with 200 people, and the professor was teaching us about grammar and what makes a good story, and I was thinking, I don't need to major in this. So I switched to English and Latin American studies and started writing a lot about Latin America and Mexico.
     

    I remember working at Mademoiselle and the fashion editor was like, "I need you to go to the belly of Grand Central and fetch me prosciutto and melon." I didn't know what prosciutto was — I'm from Texas, we call that "ham." I wish Twitter existed then, because I used to keep notes of what I overheard in the elevator. I remember a girl got on with a Birkin bag, and her friend goes, "Oh my god, I love your bag, is that new?" and she goes, "No, I got it, like, a week ago."
     

    I was laying the groundwork to go to Mexico when an opening in Tokyo came up. I didn't speak a word of Japanese, but I thought Japan seemed so much more interesting, so I asked to go there.

    I think part of the reason they agreed to send me was because I was 26 and I didn't have a family. But it was really hard. I had a tutor, bless her heart, she was so patient with me. A Japanese friend of mine was leaving her apartment and it was amazing but in a very Japanese neighborhood, and they didn't want a gaijin, a foreigner, living there. On the other hand, when I look back at the work I produced in Japan, it includes some of my favorite stories. In politics, people are fighting over the same stories constantly, but in Japan, it was like they grew on trees. I was like, "The toilets play music here, that's a story!"

     


    I move back to New York, it's 2007, and John Bussey calls me and says, "How would you like to go to Iowa with Hillary Clinton?" Iowa was as big a culture shock to me as Japan, and American politics was also totally foreign — I remember not knowing what a caucus was. John Bussey's theory was that fresh perspective brings a different kind of story. Everyone knows people hook up on the campaign, but no one had written that story. I was in 48 states that election cycle. I was with Hillary when she cried in New Hampshire, I was with her when she came out in Ohio and ranted, "Shame on you, Barack Obama." What's great about covering her is she is so disciplined and so on message that when something unexpected happens, it's really significant. I covered her through May, when it became obvious she wasn't going to get the nomination, and then they moved me to Obama's traveling press.

     


    That was really different. Obama is super charming and charismatic speaking to 50,000 people, and Hillary is charming and charismatic speaking to five. The campaigns were very different because Hillary's was in turmoil. She gets criticized for having drama in her campaign, but any losing candidate has drama. When I went over to Obama, there was a lot of talk about "no drama Obama" — which wasn't true, he had plenty of drama, but he knew his message. In 2008 "hope and change" was exactly what the country was looking for, and they stuck with that, and Hillary had to find her own message. When I started covering her in 2007, I was like, "I'm riding this beat to the White House," and then saw her fall.
     
    http://www.cosmopolitan.com/career/news/a42193/get-that-life-amy-chozick-new-york-times/

    Replies: @Dr. X, @Harry Baldwin

    From a COSMO profile on Chozick:

    Frightening, how stupid and shallow she really is. “Iowa was a much of a culture shock as Japan” pretty much sums it up.

    And a NYT reporter who says “like” constantly as if she were a Valley Girl? Time for me to pour a bourbon and re-read Nietzsche’s “Aphorisms on Woman” in “Beyond Good and Evil.”

    • Replies: @sayless
    @Dr. X

    Agree. That, and the "I" at the beginning of every other sentence.

    , @South Texas Guy
    @Dr. X

    I've never seen Ms. Chozick's picture, but I'd bet she's fairly good looking. There is a long and ignoble tradition in publishing of hiring cute chicks that might possibly have sex with their middle aged bosses. That's how they get their foot in the door. I've known many myself who weren't cut out for either the job itself, or the beat they had, but they somehow got it.

    As far as Iowa being a culture shock, if she went to a San Antonio high school, Iowa wouldn't seem to be all that much different. She reminds me of people I grew up with who were embarrassed by the location they grew up and couldn't wait to shake the dust off their shoes and head for the big city.

    BTW, I've been to Iowa many times, so I have a basis for comparison.

    Replies: @epebble

  67. At $20 billon, Evelyn de Rothschild is worth about 5 times more than Trump.

  68. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonym

    Sir Paul enjoys making money.

    Replies: @Anonym, @D. K., @Father O'Hara

    Paul, now 74, has been rich (and spectacularly famous) since he was 21 years old. Since the bulk of his wealth comes from intellectual property, in the form of copyrights, he is rather unlikely to suffer any financial setbacks, short of another contentious divorce, between now and his eventual demise– and his estate’s heirs then will have many more years to enjoy the same prerogatives!

    ***

    Jake Gittes: How much are you worth?

    Noah Cross: I have no idea. How much do you want?

    Jake Gittes: I just wanna know what you’re worth. More than 10 million?

    Noah Cross: Oh my, yes!

    Jake Gittes: Why are you doing it? How much better can you eat? What could you buy that you can’t already afford?

    Noah Cross: The future, Mr. Gittes! The future. Now, where’s the girl? I want the only daughter I’ve got left. As you found out, Evelyn was lost to me a long time ago.

    Jake Gittes: Who do you blame for that? Her?

    Noah Cross: I don’t blame myself. You see, Mr. Gittes, most people never have to face the fact that at the right time and the right place, they’re capable of ANYTHING.

    –Roman Polanski’s “Chinatown” (1974)

    ***

    My father’s Puritan namesake (c. 1609-1660) was one of the early settlers of present-day South Hampton, and one of the actual founders of present-day East Hampton, where he served as a magistrate for the last few years of his life. He must be spinning like a top, about what has come of the place, over the past 375 years!?!

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    @D. K.

    Under the current insane life-plus-90 year copyright duration, McCartney's oeuvre might not go public domain until 2120-2130, meaning the earliest Beatles compositions might have 150+ years of protection. That's two average lifetimes.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  69. iSteveFan says:
    @James Kabala
    @iSteveFan

    No, although a ban almost was passed (and some claim it actually was): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titles_of_Nobility_Amendment

    Even if this amendment had been adopted, I think it would have applied only to those given titles in their own right, not to someone who married a titleholder. (Wives of knights are indeed called Lady, but that is not a title directly from the monarch.)

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @Name Withheld, @frayed_thread, @Anonymous

    From your link:

    On two occasions between 1812 and 1816 it was within two states of the number needed to become a valid part of the Constitution. Congress did not set a time limit for its ratification, so the amendment is still pending before the states. Ratification by an additional 26 states is needed for this amendment to be adopted.

    I wonder why they don’t go ahead and pass it. Who would oppose it? I think this amendment needs to be passed.

    • Replies: @newrouter
    @iSteveFan

    if we are doing amendments, how about an Art V conv. of states to remove the authority to raise the debt ceiling from the fed govt. and giving it to 3/4 of state legislatures. this topic is little more important than titles of nobility. yo citizens: find your inner dave ramsey and cut up the fed gov't's credit card.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    , @Richard
    @iSteveFan


    I wonder why they don’t go ahead and pass it. Who would oppose it? I think this amendment needs to be passed.
     
    Just looking at the text of the amendment, it's poorly worded (although Congress could allow a U.S. citizen to receive a "present", it's not clear whether any foreign "honour" could likewise be approved by Congress), and overbroad: stripping the citizenship of someone who accepted a European dukedom might make sense, but under the amendment it would appear to be illegal for an American to accept an academic appointment at a public university in Canada.

    Replies: @guest

  70. @iSteveFan
    @James Kabala

    From your link:


    On two occasions between 1812 and 1816 it was within two states of the number needed to become a valid part of the Constitution. Congress did not set a time limit for its ratification, so the amendment is still pending before the states. Ratification by an additional 26 states is needed for this amendment to be adopted.
     
    I wonder why they don't go ahead and pass it. Who would oppose it? I think this amendment needs to be passed.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Richard

    if we are doing amendments, how about an Art V conv. of states to remove the authority to raise the debt ceiling from the fed govt. and giving it to 3/4 of state legislatures. this topic is little more important than titles of nobility. yo citizens: find your inner dave ramsey and cut up the fed gov’t’s credit card.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @newrouter

    " find your inner dave ramsey "
    And worship at the altar of a war-mongering neocon militaristic zionist?

    Nah.

  71. The most deplorable one [AKA "The Fourth Political Theory"] says:

    Because Clinton supports the global warming nonsense, this is relevant:

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2016/09/02/urbane-legends/

  72. @James Kabala
    @PiltdownMan

    His tweet on the subject is actually cleverly worded (albeit probably written by a flunky, not the man himself):

    https://twitter.com/PaulMcCartney/status/766046537608597505

    Replies: @James Kabala, @sayless, @FactsAreImportant, @Buzz Mohawk, @PiltdownMan, @Buck Turgidson, @Harry Baldwin

    Photographs of the young Hillary have always disturbed me a bit, and I couldn’t understand why, until I realized, She looks like Alfred E. Neuman: Ruthless.

  73. win or lose in nov 2016, this should be what the alt right should be planning for the 2018 mid terms. grab as much power back to the states as quickly as possible. the control of fed debt limit is the way.

  74. @James Kabala
    @iSteveFan

    No, although a ban almost was passed (and some claim it actually was): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titles_of_Nobility_Amendment

    Even if this amendment had been adopted, I think it would have applied only to those given titles in their own right, not to someone who married a titleholder. (Wives of knights are indeed called Lady, but that is not a title directly from the monarch.)

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @Name Withheld, @frayed_thread, @Anonymous

    The Titles of Nobility Amendment did not pass, but it almost implicit in the US Constitution (Article 1, Section 9, Clause 8), and US culture/history that foreign titles not be observed. I think the US press started doing this with the Kennedy’s and all their cohorts. I can remember Parade magazine and others going crazy over titles back in the 1980’s.

    • Replies: @James Kabala
    @Name Withheld

    It actually happened quite a bit in the nineteenth century. The fictional Countess Cora in Downton Abbey is representative of a real trend. To paraphrase the old joke about Astaire and Rogers, he gave her class and she gave him money. If I recall correctly, all three granddaughters of Charles Carroll (the last signer of the Declaration to die) married English noblemen - and that was the early nineteenth century, not the late.

  75. @James Kabala
    @PiltdownMan

    His tweet on the subject is actually cleverly worded (albeit probably written by a flunky, not the man himself):

    https://twitter.com/PaulMcCartney/status/766046537608597505

    Replies: @James Kabala, @sayless, @FactsAreImportant, @Buzz Mohawk, @PiltdownMan, @Buck Turgidson, @Harry Baldwin

    Check out the crazy eyes.

  76. @iSteveFan
    @James Kabala

    From your link:


    On two occasions between 1812 and 1816 it was within two states of the number needed to become a valid part of the Constitution. Congress did not set a time limit for its ratification, so the amendment is still pending before the states. Ratification by an additional 26 states is needed for this amendment to be adopted.
     
    I wonder why they don't go ahead and pass it. Who would oppose it? I think this amendment needs to be passed.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Richard

    I wonder why they don’t go ahead and pass it. Who would oppose it? I think this amendment needs to be passed.

    Just looking at the text of the amendment, it’s poorly worded (although Congress could allow a U.S. citizen to receive a “present”, it’s not clear whether any foreign “honour” could likewise be approved by Congress), and overbroad: stripping the citizenship of someone who accepted a European dukedom might make sense, but under the amendment it would appear to be illegal for an American to accept an academic appointment at a public university in Canada.

    • Replies: @guest
    @Richard

    That wouldn't be in the spirit of the amendment, but what's the difference? We cut off the historic string of Canadian academics that aren't enriching our culture?

  77. @metoo
    @Richard

    Uh, Ms. de Rothschild, do you mid if I call you DE? You do mind? Good.

    Dear DE,

    Trigonometry is where the ratio of sides in a right triangle are related through transcendental functions (sin(x) = x - x^3/3! + x^5/5! - x^7/7! .... and cos(x) = 1 - x^2/2! + x^4/4! ...)
    and they find to be useful in electronics, physics, engineering, in fact anything that is used to make your exuberant lifestyle possible.

    Go figure. Oh wait, you don't know how to.

    Stupid rich bitch.

    - Me

    Replies: @Anonymous

    “Stupid rich bitch.”

    U mad bro? That’s not good mindset.

  78. @Richard
    @Anonymous


    Perhaps that explains why she is in favor of helping our domestic workforce (via education), as opposed to importing millions of foreigners.
     
    That's isn't at all what she said. It could be interpreted that way, but the fact that she was giving the speech to a crowd of young Chinese students should maybe be taken as a clue as to who she hopes will fill those millions of jobs she believes American companies are going to be offering.

    On her public record, Lady de Rothschild is a transnational low-tax corporate liberal who bizarrely criticized Barack Obama's economic policies on the grounds that they would reduce immigration into this country.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lady-lynn-forester-de-rothschild/barack-obamas-america_b_139762.html

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Whiskey

    If her heart is in the right place, perhaps we can educate her.

    • Replies: @Richard
    @Anonymous


    If her heart is in the right place, perhaps we can educate her.
     
    Be careful. In a 1999 puff piece about Lynn Forester de Rothschild's ability to attract investors to her new venture FirstMark, Vernon Jordan said, "She has the ability to make you feel like this company cannot go forward without you."

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB945126668772522001

    Two years later:

    http://nypost.com/2001/05/18/firstmark-reeling-star-investors-in-telecom-co-want-out/

    L.R.: Well, most of all I learned that it's better to be lucky than to be smart. I say that because I sold that company in June 2000. That was when the billion dollars came in, and the market fell apart in October 2000. So that company rode a frenzy, which I actually, at the time, wasn't comfortable with. But it's pretty hard to turn down that kind of money when it's rushing in at you. I was really lucky to get out of it with that billion-dollar financing. I certainly didn't think it was going to crash in the next three months. You know, bubbles are very dangerous things, and I was fortunate enough to get off before the bubble burst. But the investors in that company believed they would buy for a billion and, within six months, sell it for a billion and a half. I knew, and actually they were told —they just had to look at our business plan —that the business needed $5 billion. So when the new investors panicked and didn't put in the 5 billion-and I don't blame them for not doing it; it wasn't my call and it wasn't my money-there was no way that company could go on. If people still had those licenses that we sold them, they would have made a lot of money because we had 15 countries with 100 megahertz of bandwidth in each of those countries, and we had 15,000 kilometers of fiber that all went to waste. But if anyone had held on, it would've been a great investment. But for me, it turned out to be okay, because I was lucky.

    L.G.: When you run into people who committed their companies' money to the enterprise and didn't do so well, is it awkward? Or do they just understand it's business and, you know, you win some, you lose some, and it's all okay?

    L.R.: Well, they were all big boys. They can't, you know, blame me for their investment decisions. I sold, and I left immediately, so I don't know. Some of them remain friends; some of them I don't see. You know, I want everybody to make money.

    http://upstart.bizjournals.com/views/columns/the-world-according-to/2007/10/05/An-interview-with-Lady-de-Rothschild.html?page=all

    Although Lynn Forester de Rothschild gives lots of speeches about being a capitalist, it doesn't appear that she's been a working capitalist since FirstMark went bankrupt 15 years ago. She just sits on a lot of boards and fundraises for politicians.

    It turns out the trick to making money is never investing any of your own. She's had four big payoffs in her career: a Puerto Rican telephone company (which she sweet-talked Motorola into funding then buying back from her), selling wireless broadband frequencies she somehow acquired "for free", the FirstMark sale, and then marrying a de Rothschild.

    She's real good at making people believe that teaming up with her is in their best interest.

    Replies: @Lurker

  79. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “Right now in America, in order to get accepted to Harvard, you have to study and be proficient in trigonometry. Are there any land surveyors in this room? No. That’s what trigonometry is for.”

    Well, we learn something new everyday. Today we learn that you can be a Rothschild and CEO of the Rothschild’s holding company and still have no clue about the deep basic importance of trigonometry and how trigonometry is actually used; no clue about how the circular functions are elemental to learning math past about where it got to around maybe the mid-to-late 1600s.

    It’s actually kind of unsettling that the CEO of E.L Rothschild thinks like this. Of what else are they ignorant?

    Although trig is about the simplest thinking you can do about triangles—essentially about 3 points—much of the importance of trig is its power to capture the essence of repetitive patterns. Trig is important because it is the fundamental tool to work with vibrations, rotations, and periodic phenomena of all kinds, such as light, sound, alternating electric current, oscillating electric circuits, and the orbits of planets around their sun. (I stole the essence of this last line from a good text-book.)

    The wikipedia entry for trig functions puts it thus: “Trigonometric functions are important in the study of triangles and modeling periodic phenomena, among many other applications.”

    Circular Functions, mathworld.wolfram.com:

    “Circular functions are also called trigonometric functions, and the study of circular functions is called trigonometry.”

    I suppose when you run an enterprise of that size and are responsible for that much money, almost all you have time to do is some form of politics. As we see here, that can leave one blind to important truths. Oh well, no human is that smart, really.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @anonymous

    Very few people, even among people who took trig in grade school and did well in it, have that sort of understanding of trig.

    Replies: @middle aged vet

    , @RationalExpressions
    @anonymous

    Maybe she didn't elegantly phrase her math remarks, but I took it as the Lady saying that for the majority of people the study of statistics has much more lifelong benefit than the study of trigonometry. And it would be hard to argue with that.

    Replies: @a Newsreader

    , @Perplexed
    @anonymous

    Thank you for the explanation. I took a year of trigonometry in the early sixties and never understood what it was for. Just endless pre-calculator long division.

  80. One point to remember about these people. The European royalty all got taken in by Bernard Madoff much more than the average large investor.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Name Withheld

    Really? The average investor has access to the Madoff fund?

    , @Anonymous
    @Name Withheld

    Why Were So Many Madoff Victims Jewish?

    The trust people tend to feel toward others in the same ethnic, racial, and political groups makes them easy targets for scammers.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/02/madoff-jewish-affinity-fraud/460446/

    Replies: @Alden

  81. Anonymous [AKA "Bell Rock Jacky"] says:
    @Marcus
    She was a McCain supporter

    Replies: @Anonymous

    She was a die-hard Hillary supporter who turned to McCain when the Dems chose the Magical Negro.

    Part of what was then called the PUMA movement (“Party Unity My Ass!”)

  82. @Name Withheld
    One point to remember about these people. The European royalty all got taken in by Bernard Madoff much more than the average large investor.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Really? The average investor has access to the Madoff fund?

  83. > Are there any land surveyors in this room? No. That’s what trigonometry is for.”<

    to state that in public is cringe inducing. idiocy and big money doesn't last

  84. @Anonymous
    “I stand between you and the apocalypse,” a confident Mrs. Clinton declared to laughs, exhibiting a flash of self-awareness and humor to a crowd that included Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein and for whom the prospect of a Donald J. Trump presidency is dire.

    A Trump presidency would be "dire" for Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein? What is their fear exactly? Presumably, both men lead comfortable lives without a want in the world and it would seem probable they would continue to do so under almost any near-term eventuality.

    Is Klein worried that Trump would impose tariffs on textile imports? What on earth is Weinstein's concern?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon930, @JohnnyWalker123, @5371, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @Almost Missouri, @old okie

    Maybe Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein know more about what they’ve been up to than you do, and are more worried about it becoming public knowledge.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @5371

    Like what?

    Replies: @5371, @Monopthalmus

  85. Would a Jewish woman get a name like “Lynn Forester”? Sure, it’s possible, but…

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Svigor


    Would a Jewish woman get a name like “Lynn Forester”? Sure, it’s possible, but…
     
    Conversion to Judaism is always a possibility.
    , @Anonymous
    @Svigor

    Lynn Forester wasn't born Jewish. Her parents were Annabelle, née Hewitt, and John Kenneth Forester. She may not even have converted, but I think it's likely that she did given that both her second and third husbands are Jewish.

  86. @PiltdownMan
    @James Kabala


    I never heard of McCartney’s performing at a fund raiser for a specific politician before.
     
    Never underestimate what an A-list member of the British upper classes can make happen. Rothschild.

    It’s for social cachet, I can’t imagine anything other than travel expenses and a nominal fee being covered.
     

    McCartney has had all the social cachet he has needed for half a century, and he is pretty close to being a billionaire himself. This runs more along the lines of a favor for a friend, in all likelihood.

    Replies: @James Kabala, @Former Darfur, @Marat

    In today’s world, “almost a billionaire” isn’t very impressive considering McCartney’s status as the only living half or the most commercially successful songwriting pair in pop music history.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Former Darfur

    Didn't Lennon & McCartney sell the right to their songs when they were young and naive? To be as rich as Sir Paul is now is due to a lot of hard work since the Beatles broke up.

    Replies: @Forbes

    , @Brutusale
    @Former Darfur

    He didn't even retain the rights to his own songs.

    http://ultimateclassicrock.com/paul-mccartney-michael-jackson-beatles-catalog/

    He may have been a bit clever and wrote a few catchy tunes, but let's refrain from thinking MaCartney to be some sort of Dirac.

    Replies: @D. K.

  87. @Anonym
    The most interesting part of this piece is the connection between Rothschild and Economist magazine, and the business interests including agricultural land. Now why would the Economist be so concerned about crops rotting in the fields? Or increase demand for real estate?

    And the article seems like the most anti-Hillary article you could write at the NYT without being fired. This is blinking in Morse code type of stuff.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @MEH 0910, @Redneck Republican

    This is blinking in Morse code type of stuff.

    – — .-. – ..- .-. .

  88. @anonymous
    "Right now in America, in order to get accepted to Harvard, you have to study and be proficient in trigonometry. Are there any land surveyors in this room? No. That’s what trigonometry is for."

    Well, we learn something new everyday. Today we learn that you can be a Rothschild and CEO of the Rothschild's holding company and still have no clue about the deep basic importance of trigonometry and how trigonometry is actually used; no clue about how the circular functions are elemental to learning math past about where it got to around maybe the mid-to-late 1600s.

    It's actually kind of unsettling that the CEO of E.L Rothschild thinks like this. Of what else are they ignorant?

    Although trig is about the simplest thinking you can do about triangles---essentially about 3 points---much of the importance of trig is its power to capture the essence of repetitive patterns. Trig is important because it is the fundamental tool to work with vibrations, rotations, and periodic phenomena of all kinds, such as light, sound, alternating electric current, oscillating electric circuits, and the orbits of planets around their sun. (I stole the essence of this last line from a good text-book.)

    The wikipedia entry for trig functions puts it thus: "Trigonometric functions are important in the study of triangles and modeling periodic phenomena, among many other applications."


    Circular Functions, mathworld.wolfram.com:


    "Circular functions are also called trigonometric functions, and the study of circular functions is called trigonometry."

     

    I suppose when you run an enterprise of that size and are responsible for that much money, almost all you have time to do is some form of politics. As we see here, that can leave one blind to important truths. Oh well, no human is that smart, really.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @RationalExpressions, @Perplexed

    Very few people, even among people who took trig in grade school and did well in it, have that sort of understanding of trig.

    • Replies: @middle aged vet
    @Anonymous

    Eli Maor wrote a book called "Trigonometric Delights", which sets forth the real trigonometry behind the cheap version of trigonometry that poor ambitious AP high school students work so hard at. It is worth the ten or twenty bucks Princeton Press wants you to pay for it, if you care about that sort of thing. Anyway, if you key into trigonometric concepts early enough in life, most of the math that has been discovered - even the over-praised recent stuff, like poor Grothendieck's narcissistic reductions, Tao's sub-Nabokovian tricks, and Penrose's wallpaper fantasies, can be expressed in trigonometric terms. In this sense, trigonometry is the ukulele of mathematics (check youtube for ukulele versions of the most technically complex instrumentals you can imagine). Of course, "number theory" and "PDEs" and "Lie algebras" are also, just as much as "trigonometry", misleadingly impressive to those who are happy to settle for less than they should. I suggest the natural sciences as a corrective. (Just kidding, Terry and Roger, if you are reading this - but not completely...the lepidoptera and Kolmogorov's Pushkin await, my friends).

    Replies: @Anonymous

  89. @Former Darfur
    @PiltdownMan

    In today's world, "almost a billionaire" isn't very impressive considering McCartney's status as the only living half or the most commercially successful songwriting pair in pop music history.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Brutusale

    Didn’t Lennon & McCartney sell the right to their songs when they were young and naive? To be as rich as Sir Paul is now is due to a lot of hard work since the Beatles broke up.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @Steve Sailer

    Yes, they did sell, long before anyone thought Rock & Roll was other than a passing, youthful fashion. Michael Jackson owned the L & M songbook for a while. McCartney re-aquired it at some point.

  90. @D. K.
    @Steve Sailer

    Paul, now 74, has been rich (and spectacularly famous) since he was 21 years old. Since the bulk of his wealth comes from intellectual property, in the form of copyrights, he is rather unlikely to suffer any financial setbacks, short of another contentious divorce, between now and his eventual demise-- and his estate's heirs then will have many more years to enjoy the same prerogatives!

    ***

    Jake Gittes: How much are you worth?

    Noah Cross: I have no idea. How much do you want?

    Jake Gittes: I just wanna know what you're worth. More than 10 million?

    Noah Cross: Oh my, yes!

    Jake Gittes: Why are you doing it? How much better can you eat? What could you buy that you can't already afford?

    Noah Cross: The future, Mr. Gittes! The future. Now, where's the girl? I want the only daughter I've got left. As you found out, Evelyn was lost to me a long time ago.

    Jake Gittes: Who do you blame for that? Her?

    Noah Cross: I don't blame myself. You see, Mr. Gittes, most people never have to face the fact that at the right time and the right place, they're capable of ANYTHING.

    --Roman Polanski's "Chinatown" (1974)

    ***

    My father's Puritan namesake (c. 1609-1660) was one of the early settlers of present-day South Hampton, and one of the actual founders of present-day East Hampton, where he served as a magistrate for the last few years of his life. He must be spinning like a top, about what has come of the place, over the past 375 years!?!

    Replies: @Former Darfur

    Under the current insane life-plus-90 year copyright duration, McCartney’s oeuvre might not go public domain until 2120-2130, meaning the earliest Beatles compositions might have 150+ years of protection. That’s two average lifetimes.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Former Darfur

    McCartney can reclaim the rights to his portion of Lennon-McCartney songs after two 28 year terms, or starting in 2018 for Love Me Do. He's filed the paperwork.

    I suspect he's fairly motivated to live long enough to get "Yesterday" back.

  91. @anonymous
    "Right now in America, in order to get accepted to Harvard, you have to study and be proficient in trigonometry. Are there any land surveyors in this room? No. That’s what trigonometry is for."

    Well, we learn something new everyday. Today we learn that you can be a Rothschild and CEO of the Rothschild's holding company and still have no clue about the deep basic importance of trigonometry and how trigonometry is actually used; no clue about how the circular functions are elemental to learning math past about where it got to around maybe the mid-to-late 1600s.

    It's actually kind of unsettling that the CEO of E.L Rothschild thinks like this. Of what else are they ignorant?

    Although trig is about the simplest thinking you can do about triangles---essentially about 3 points---much of the importance of trig is its power to capture the essence of repetitive patterns. Trig is important because it is the fundamental tool to work with vibrations, rotations, and periodic phenomena of all kinds, such as light, sound, alternating electric current, oscillating electric circuits, and the orbits of planets around their sun. (I stole the essence of this last line from a good text-book.)

    The wikipedia entry for trig functions puts it thus: "Trigonometric functions are important in the study of triangles and modeling periodic phenomena, among many other applications."


    Circular Functions, mathworld.wolfram.com:


    "Circular functions are also called trigonometric functions, and the study of circular functions is called trigonometry."

     

    I suppose when you run an enterprise of that size and are responsible for that much money, almost all you have time to do is some form of politics. As we see here, that can leave one blind to important truths. Oh well, no human is that smart, really.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @RationalExpressions, @Perplexed

    Maybe she didn’t elegantly phrase her math remarks, but I took it as the Lady saying that for the majority of people the study of statistics has much more lifelong benefit than the study of trigonometry. And it would be hard to argue with that.

    • Replies: @a Newsreader
    @RationalExpressions

    You can learn statistics at a superficial level without knowing much about trigonometry, but to be proficient enough in statistics to understand what it means to apply statistical reasoning to real data sets you need to understand calculus. And to understand calculus, you really need to know your trigonometry.

  92. @Former Darfur
    @D. K.

    Under the current insane life-plus-90 year copyright duration, McCartney's oeuvre might not go public domain until 2120-2130, meaning the earliest Beatles compositions might have 150+ years of protection. That's two average lifetimes.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    McCartney can reclaim the rights to his portion of Lennon-McCartney songs after two 28 year terms, or starting in 2018 for Love Me Do. He’s filed the paperwork.

    I suspect he’s fairly motivated to live long enough to get “Yesterday” back.

  93. @Anonymous
    @Richard

    If her heart is in the right place, perhaps we can educate her.

    Replies: @Richard

    If her heart is in the right place, perhaps we can educate her.

    Be careful. In a 1999 puff piece about Lynn Forester de Rothschild’s ability to attract investors to her new venture FirstMark, Vernon Jordan said, “She has the ability to make you feel like this company cannot go forward without you.”

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB945126668772522001

    Two years later:

    http://nypost.com/2001/05/18/firstmark-reeling-star-investors-in-telecom-co-want-out/

    L.R.: Well, most of all I learned that it’s better to be lucky than to be smart. I say that because I sold that company in June 2000. That was when the billion dollars came in, and the market fell apart in October 2000. So that company rode a frenzy, which I actually, at the time, wasn’t comfortable with. But it’s pretty hard to turn down that kind of money when it’s rushing in at you. I was really lucky to get out of it with that billion-dollar financing. I certainly didn’t think it was going to crash in the next three months. You know, bubbles are very dangerous things, and I was fortunate enough to get off before the bubble burst. But the investors in that company believed they would buy for a billion and, within six months, sell it for a billion and a half. I knew, and actually they were told —they just had to look at our business plan —that the business needed $5 billion. So when the new investors panicked and didn’t put in the 5 billion-and I don’t blame them for not doing it; it wasn’t my call and it wasn’t my money-there was no way that company could go on. If people still had those licenses that we sold them, they would have made a lot of money because we had 15 countries with 100 megahertz of bandwidth in each of those countries, and we had 15,000 kilometers of fiber that all went to waste. But if anyone had held on, it would’ve been a great investment. But for me, it turned out to be okay, because I was lucky.

    L.G.: When you run into people who committed their companies’ money to the enterprise and didn’t do so well, is it awkward? Or do they just understand it’s business and, you know, you win some, you lose some, and it’s all okay?

    L.R.: Well, they were all big boys. They can’t, you know, blame me for their investment decisions. I sold, and I left immediately, so I don’t know. Some of them remain friends; some of them I don’t see. You know, I want everybody to make money.

    http://upstart.bizjournals.com/views/columns/the-world-according-to/2007/10/05/An-interview-with-Lady-de-Rothschild.html?page=all

    Although Lynn Forester de Rothschild gives lots of speeches about being a capitalist, it doesn’t appear that she’s been a working capitalist since FirstMark went bankrupt 15 years ago. She just sits on a lot of boards and fundraises for politicians.

    It turns out the trick to making money is never investing any of your own. She’s had four big payoffs in her career: a Puerto Rican telephone company (which she sweet-talked Motorola into funding then buying back from her), selling wireless broadband frequencies she somehow acquired “for free”, the FirstMark sale, and then marrying a de Rothschild.

    She’s real good at making people believe that teaming up with her is in their best interest.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @Richard

    She’s real good at making people believe that teaming up with her is in their best interest.

    Presumably her first two husbands saw things in much the same way?

  94. @Anonymous
    @anonymous

    Very few people, even among people who took trig in grade school and did well in it, have that sort of understanding of trig.

    Replies: @middle aged vet

    Eli Maor wrote a book called “Trigonometric Delights”, which sets forth the real trigonometry behind the cheap version of trigonometry that poor ambitious AP high school students work so hard at. It is worth the ten or twenty bucks Princeton Press wants you to pay for it, if you care about that sort of thing. Anyway, if you key into trigonometric concepts early enough in life, most of the math that has been discovered – even the over-praised recent stuff, like poor Grothendieck’s narcissistic reductions, Tao’s sub-Nabokovian tricks, and Penrose’s wallpaper fantasies, can be expressed in trigonometric terms. In this sense, trigonometry is the ukulele of mathematics (check youtube for ukulele versions of the most technically complex instrumentals you can imagine). Of course, “number theory” and “PDEs” and “Lie algebras” are also, just as much as “trigonometry”, misleadingly impressive to those who are happy to settle for less than they should. I suggest the natural sciences as a corrective. (Just kidding, Terry and Roger, if you are reading this – but not completely…the lepidoptera and Kolmogorov’s Pushkin await, my friends).

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @middle aged vet

    Thank you so much. I plan to look it up. V Are there additional books I might study to re-learn (to really learn) Trig, Algebra, Pre-Calc, and Calc. Is the one you have recommended probably the most important?

    Replies: @newrouter

  95. @iSteveFan
    @Anonymous

    Tell this to commenter Whiskey. He thinks that at 2 percent of the population they have about 2 percent of the influence.

    Replies: @Whiskey

    How Jewish is Sir Paul McCartney, or Warren Buffett, or Bill Gates, or Carlos Slim? Heck how Jewish is Lady Rothschild? [Answer, not much.]

    You’re focusing on the WRONG THING. For every Jacobs there is a Howard Stern. Don’t forget, Donald Trump LOVES LOVES LOVES Jews. He made a commercial for Bibi Netanyahu. Heck he *IS* Bibi as much as anyone else can be. After all, you could make a legit argument that TRUMP likes Jews and has more around him than Hillary does — his entire staff is Jewish, while Hillary’s seems to be old witchy WASP types and well, Huma. Who is not very Jewish.

    How many times was Hillary Grand Marshall of the Israel Day parade? None. Trump was twice. He’s got twice the number of Jewish grand kids and is pretty much a cross between Rodney Dangerfield and Don Rickles.

    And how Jewish is the Hamptons? Do they serve Gefilte Fish there? Potato latkes? How Jewish is Ralph Lauren? Or Harvey Weinstein? Compared to say, Jerry Seinfeld or Howard Stern or Adam Sandler?

    Again missing the point; Jews are divided as every other White people on class and gender lines. Hillary is running as Marie Antoinette letting them eat cake while she cavorts with the ultra rich. She doesn’t care how bad it looks because she knows that most College Educated White women love that stuff; and that America is run for the benefit to steal SBLD’s Paul Kersey’s line, Black people and … White College Educated Women.

    Last I checked, the Hamptons were not exactly the Catskills as a traditionally Jewish place; but a rich place for rich White ladies, yes definitely.

    • Replies: @iStevefan
    @Whiskey

    What part of 60 percent do you not understand? You can list Warren Buffett, Bill Gates, and Paul McCartney all day long. But at the end of the day 60 percent of the democrat's campaign funds come from one group. And it ain't white women.

    , @Marcus
    @Whiskey

    IIRC Netanyahu decried the proposed Muslim ban. Even hardcore Zionists tend to be liberals when it comes to immigration.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Forbes

  96. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “Very few people, even among people who took trig in grade school and did well in it, have that sort of understanding of trig.”

    Perhaps so… and yet that sort of understanding is why trig is really important. It is one of the necessary “basic windows” that need to be well understood, from this viewpoint, if one is to go further into the math that makes the modern world go round. Like algebra or geometry, solidly understanding how to work mathematically with “periodic phenomena” (anything wave-like) is a fundamental requirement if one wants to go further (calculus, differential equations, and so on—and if you study statistics and probability you will need calculus).

    Heck, you can’t even pretend to do any work in things like ecology and “climate change” without a good grounding in trig. Those things are all about periodic phenomena.

    The problem could be that most grade school trig classes today usually do not get very far. (I really don’t know.) Perhaps many students never learn what the subject is about, why it is important, that sort of thing. Perhaps the schools or teachers really have gone to Hades. But whatever the reason, it doesn’t really change anything. “Real” trig is as necessary as ever, if you are ever going to do this sort of work yourself or develop a strong intuition around it.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @anonymous

    Thank you for this perspective.

    I am interested in getting a good grounding in these "basic windows" and understanding how things work mathematically. Would that include Algebra, Geometry, Trig? I took all in grade school, did fine, but haven't retained much and reading your comments and the other commenters make me feel that I didn't really learn them or get an intuitive grasp of why they were important and how they function in the world.)

    Would you recommend I work with certain texts? Should I take a class, or can I self study? Any recs would be greatly appreciated.

    Replies: @Peter Lund, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    , @newrouter
    @anonymous

    >The problem could be that most grade school trig classes<

    trig ain't taught in grade school. maybe hs. idiot america

    , @guest
    @anonymous

    I don't think ecology is even a thing.

  97. @middle aged vet
    @Anonymous

    Eli Maor wrote a book called "Trigonometric Delights", which sets forth the real trigonometry behind the cheap version of trigonometry that poor ambitious AP high school students work so hard at. It is worth the ten or twenty bucks Princeton Press wants you to pay for it, if you care about that sort of thing. Anyway, if you key into trigonometric concepts early enough in life, most of the math that has been discovered - even the over-praised recent stuff, like poor Grothendieck's narcissistic reductions, Tao's sub-Nabokovian tricks, and Penrose's wallpaper fantasies, can be expressed in trigonometric terms. In this sense, trigonometry is the ukulele of mathematics (check youtube for ukulele versions of the most technically complex instrumentals you can imagine). Of course, "number theory" and "PDEs" and "Lie algebras" are also, just as much as "trigonometry", misleadingly impressive to those who are happy to settle for less than they should. I suggest the natural sciences as a corrective. (Just kidding, Terry and Roger, if you are reading this - but not completely...the lepidoptera and Kolmogorov's Pushkin await, my friends).

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Thank you so much. I plan to look it up. V Are there additional books I might study to re-learn (to really learn) Trig, Algebra, Pre-Calc, and Calc. Is the one you have recommended probably the most important?

    • Replies: @newrouter
    @Anonymous

    >Is the one you have recommended probably the most important?<

    3-4 =5 triangle. square laying flooring. also good with sinusoidal waves & bunch of other stuff .

    idiot america

  98. From the NY Daily News – Wednesday, December 24, 2008.
    RE: Thierry de la Villehuchet – Madoff Scandal

    “The lonely death of the tormented 65-year-old money manager who invested the fortunes of the Rothschilds, Bettencourts and other high-born European grandees sent shock waves around the globe.”

    Madoff Scandal – Rothschilds

    Hmmm… I wonder if B. Madoff might have given money to the Clinton Foundation?

  99. @Svigor
    Would a Jewish woman get a name like "Lynn Forester"? Sure, it's possible, but...

    Replies: @syonredux, @Anonymous

    Would a Jewish woman get a name like “Lynn Forester”? Sure, it’s possible, but…

    Conversion to Judaism is always a possibility.

  100. @5371
    @Anonymous

    Maybe Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein know more about what they've been up to than you do, and are more worried about it becoming public knowledge.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Like what?

    • Replies: @5371
    @Anonymous

    Use your imagination.

    , @Monopthalmus
    @Anonymous

    Volunteering at Jeffrey Epsteins Day-Care, maybe?

  101. @BB753
    Does Paul McCartney really need to make private gigs for the mega-rich to make ends meet? Maybe Jon Bon Jovi does, but Sir Paul?

    Replies: @eggheadshadhisnumber, @Anonym, @Neil Templeton, @Jack Highlands, @Erik L, @DCThrowback

    I’d like to see the tape. Learn some new dance moves.

  102. @eggheadshadhisnumber
    Steve, wondering if there are any plans in place to do a piece on the Watergate "coup" you mentioned recently. Would fit well with current events. Cheers.

    Replies: @Lugash

    A coup would be the CIA losing control of the government.

  103. @Richard
    @Anonymous


    Perhaps that explains why she is in favor of helping our domestic workforce (via education), as opposed to importing millions of foreigners.
     
    That's isn't at all what she said. It could be interpreted that way, but the fact that she was giving the speech to a crowd of young Chinese students should maybe be taken as a clue as to who she hopes will fill those millions of jobs she believes American companies are going to be offering.

    On her public record, Lady de Rothschild is a transnational low-tax corporate liberal who bizarrely criticized Barack Obama's economic policies on the grounds that they would reduce immigration into this country.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lady-lynn-forester-de-rothschild/barack-obamas-america_b_139762.html

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Whiskey

    And multiply Lady de Rothschild by a million other Nice White Ladies who never did anything but marry some rich and powerful guy; or who have ambitions to do so. And resent their compatriots, the lower classes, and want to replace them with “superior” foreigners.

    TL:DR; the true enemy of ordinary White people is not Jews. Its Nice White Ladies. Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David and Howard Stern don’t want to import 30 million Chinese to fill corporate jobs. Lady De Rothschild does. So does no doubt the NYT reporter Choznick.

    Remember, Nice White Ladies are not judged on accomplishment, or achievement, or anything production related. But rather how they look and how many Mean Girls exclusive cliques they can form. Why would you expect them to act in any other way? Mean Girls don’t care about anything other than exclusion of near-peers. Its how they are Mean Girls.

    On a broader note, if the US were male dominated, it would exclude foreigners on the theory that patronage networks have to produce, actual real patronage and spoils for the boys, otherwise there will be a bloody revolution. A female dominated society produces a Lady de Rothschild (I kind of forgot there how Jewish the title Lady is, why pretty much all the Medieval Monarchs and Dukes and Earls and Knights of course were Jewish) intent on replacing American workers with foreign ones; and a candidate who avoids ordinary people for a few rich people.

  104. @Steve Richter
    Are the big democrat donors mostly Jewish? Are there any more rich Gentiles in the Hamptons?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @syonredux, @bored identity

    Does a bear wear a funny hat ? Does the Pope sh…..

    Oh, never mind.

  105. @James Kabala
    @PiltdownMan

    His tweet on the subject is actually cleverly worded (albeit probably written by a flunky, not the man himself):

    https://twitter.com/PaulMcCartney/status/766046537608597505

    Replies: @James Kabala, @sayless, @FactsAreImportant, @Buzz Mohawk, @PiltdownMan, @Buck Turgidson, @Harry Baldwin

    The Sixties never left us. They just got old.

    Man this is one bad acid trip.

  106. @Anonymous
    @middle aged vet

    Thank you so much. I plan to look it up. V Are there additional books I might study to re-learn (to really learn) Trig, Algebra, Pre-Calc, and Calc. Is the one you have recommended probably the most important?

    Replies: @newrouter

    >Is the one you have recommended probably the most important?<

    3-4 =5 triangle. square laying flooring. also good with sinusoidal waves & bunch of other stuff .

    idiot america

  107. @Whiskey
    @iSteveFan

    How Jewish is Sir Paul McCartney, or Warren Buffett, or Bill Gates, or Carlos Slim? Heck how Jewish is Lady Rothschild? [Answer, not much.]

    You're focusing on the WRONG THING. For every Jacobs there is a Howard Stern. Don't forget, Donald Trump LOVES LOVES LOVES Jews. He made a commercial for Bibi Netanyahu. Heck he *IS* Bibi as much as anyone else can be. After all, you could make a legit argument that TRUMP likes Jews and has more around him than Hillary does -- his entire staff is Jewish, while Hillary's seems to be old witchy WASP types and well, Huma. Who is not very Jewish.

    How many times was Hillary Grand Marshall of the Israel Day parade? None. Trump was twice. He's got twice the number of Jewish grand kids and is pretty much a cross between Rodney Dangerfield and Don Rickles.

    And how Jewish is the Hamptons? Do they serve Gefilte Fish there? Potato latkes? How Jewish is Ralph Lauren? Or Harvey Weinstein? Compared to say, Jerry Seinfeld or Howard Stern or Adam Sandler?

    Again missing the point; Jews are divided as every other White people on class and gender lines. Hillary is running as Marie Antoinette letting them eat cake while she cavorts with the ultra rich. She doesn't care how bad it looks because she knows that most College Educated White women love that stuff; and that America is run for the benefit to steal SBLD's Paul Kersey's line, Black people and ... White College Educated Women.

    Last I checked, the Hamptons were not exactly the Catskills as a traditionally Jewish place; but a rich place for rich White ladies, yes definitely.

    Replies: @iStevefan, @Marcus

    What part of 60 percent do you not understand? You can list Warren Buffett, Bill Gates, and Paul McCartney all day long. But at the end of the day 60 percent of the democrat’s campaign funds come from one group. And it ain’t white women.

  108. @Anonymous
    “I stand between you and the apocalypse,” a confident Mrs. Clinton declared to laughs, exhibiting a flash of self-awareness and humor to a crowd that included Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein and for whom the prospect of a Donald J. Trump presidency is dire.

    A Trump presidency would be "dire" for Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein? What is their fear exactly? Presumably, both men lead comfortable lives without a want in the world and it would seem probable they would continue to do so under almost any near-term eventuality.

    Is Klein worried that Trump would impose tariffs on textile imports? What on earth is Weinstein's concern?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon930, @JohnnyWalker123, @5371, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @Almost Missouri, @old okie

    A Trump presidency would be “dire” for Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein? What is their fear exactly? Presumably, both men lead comfortable lives without a want in the world and it would seem probable they would continue to do so under almost any near-term eventuality.

    Is Klein worried that Trump would impose tariffs on textile imports? What on earth is Weinstein’s concern?

    Wanna take a guess at how many of the attendees owe the IRS money?

  109. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous
    "Very few people, even among people who took trig in grade school and did well in it, have that sort of understanding of trig."

    Perhaps so... and yet that sort of understanding is why trig is really important. It is one of the necessary "basic windows" that need to be well understood, from this viewpoint, if one is to go further into the math that makes the modern world go round. Like algebra or geometry, solidly understanding how to work mathematically with "periodic phenomena" (anything wave-like) is a fundamental requirement if one wants to go further (calculus, differential equations, and so on---and if you study statistics and probability you will need calculus).

    Heck, you can't even pretend to do any work in things like ecology and "climate change" without a good grounding in trig. Those things are all about periodic phenomena.

    The problem could be that most grade school trig classes today usually do not get very far. (I really don't know.) Perhaps many students never learn what the subject is about, why it is important, that sort of thing. Perhaps the schools or teachers really have gone to Hades. But whatever the reason, it doesn't really change anything. "Real" trig is as necessary as ever, if you are ever going to do this sort of work yourself or develop a strong intuition around it.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @newrouter, @guest

    Thank you for this perspective.

    I am interested in getting a good grounding in these “basic windows” and understanding how things work mathematically. Would that include Algebra, Geometry, Trig? I took all in grade school, did fine, but haven’t retained much and reading your comments and the other commenters make me feel that I didn’t really learn them or get an intuitive grasp of why they were important and how they function in the world.)

    Would you recommend I work with certain texts? Should I take a class, or can I self study? Any recs would be greatly appreciated.

    • Replies: @Peter Lund
    @Anonymous

    https://betterexplained.com/ is a good place to start.
    Numberphile on youtube ( https://www.youtube.com/user/numberphile ) is good for learning about some of highlights of relatively accessible math.
    3blue1brown on youtube ( https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYO_jab_esuFRV4b17AJtAw ) has lots of high-quality animations. He works for Khan Academy now.

    If you want to know what kinds of math are "out there" then there are these two books:

    https://www.amazon.com/All-Mathematics-You-Missed-Graduate/dp/0521797071
    https://www.amazon.com/Princeton-Companion-Mathematics-Timothy-Gowers/dp/0691118809
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Princeton_Companion_to_Mathematics

    The former has a one-chapter overview of a series of interesting mathematical topics written so that they don't require much prior knowledge. It is of course far from rigorous or complete but it'll make you go "so *that's* what that is all about." The latter is a beautiful coffee table book that doesn't try to teach you any math per se but it has a really good overview of modern mathematics. Think of an encyclopedia about math written by people who know what they are talking about (and these guys do!) AND written in extremely clear English. It'll look ever so good on your Mies van der Rohe coffee table next to the Bodum French press and the Stelton thermos as seen from your Barcelona chair.


    If you are interested in "how things work", then control theory might interest you. Most of the books I could find where either awfully written books by engineers (why are engineers generally bad writers?) or they had pretty pictures but were rather dumbed down. This is the best one I could find:

    “Control System Design”, Graham C. Goodwin/Stefan F. Graebe/Mario E. Salgado

    You will probably only be able to understand the introduction and the first 3 or 4 chapters because then they start using math: linear algebra and differential equations. It's not *hard* linear algebra or *hard* differential equations, though.



    "Visual Complex Analysis"

    https://www.amazon.com/Visual-Complex-Analysis-Tristan-Needham/dp/0198534469


    Complex numbers are generally much nicer numbers than the real ones. They also unify and make sense of things you probably think are different parts of mathematics: they show us how sin and cos are *really* the same thing, they show us how roots of negative numbers make sense, they show us how multiplications are really rotations (multiplying by -1 is *exactly* the same as a 180° rotation, which is why it makes sense that the sign behaves the way it does when you multiply positive/negative numbers), etc.

    Complex analysis is what happens when you take the complex numbers seriously and redo everything in analysis with that in mind. It tells you a better story of what is going on with the weird infinities in functions like 1/x or tan.

    This book is not the most rigorous but it is very good at building intuition, which is probably what you want.




    "An Imaginary Tale: The Story of √-1"

    https://www.amazon.com/Imaginary-Tale-Princeton-Science-Library/dp/0691146004

    Not my favourite book but lots of other people liked it. It is much more historical and much less mathematical than "Visual Complex Analysis". Doesn't give you a lot of intuition. Teaches you almost no math. On the other hand, there are no scary cliffs to scale, no slippery parts where you can slide off the path and tumble down.




    You might also want to look at graph theory, differential equations (hugely important in practice!), and logic/computation/information/grammars.

    "Gödel, Escher, Bach" is good for appreciation of logic/computation/information/grammars and you'll actually learn something along the way.

    https://www.amazon.com/G%C3%B6del-Escher-Bach-Eternal-Golden/dp/0465026567
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%B6del,_Escher,_Bach

    There is also a set of GEB lectures on youtube.



    There are also "The Shape of Space" (Jeffrey R. Weeks) and "Topology without Tears" (Sidney A. Morris) for topology.

    "Convex Optimization", Stephen Boyd and Lieven Vandenberghe on, well, convex optimization. Not everything in the book is about *convex* optimization. There is also something about simpler (but less general) kinds of optimization and there is a lot of motivating text. It is also good at building intuition.

    "Linear Algebra done Wrong" (Sergei Tril) is good at building intuition + it's quite rigorous without being harsh and sterile. "Matrix Analysis and Applied Linear Algebra" (Carl D. Meyer) is another way of looking at linear algebra, namely from an applied perspective. We learn what it is used for and how to do calculations with matrices in practice. Very intuitive and rigorous enough without being as abstract as Tril's book.

    “Partial Differential Equations, An Introduction” by Walter A. Strauss is the best simple introduction to PDE's I have found.

    Let's see... what's left? Group theory? "Visual Group Theory" by Nathan Carter, "A Friendly Introduction to Number Theory" by Joseph H. Silverman, "Term Rewriting and all that", "Measure Theory" by Ernst Hansen, "Fourier Analysis" by Tom Leinster (there's a lot you won't understand but he is good on intuition building -- and that works surprisingly well anyway). Something about manifolds but I don't know of a nice, accessible text. Something about analysis, but again I don't know of a nice, accessible text. Something about probability and statistics -- but almost all the books I have seen are messy and treat the subject as a long series of tricks or as stamp collecting. The problem is that much of probability and statistics is really about integration and manifolds and it is hard to see why the results are obvious without knowing a lot about those subjects.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Lang: Basic Mathematics

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Oh and after the Lang, maybe a first book in discrete mathematics, even though that is not a step in your direction towards application (except for CS). Knowing much less than your other advisors (so add salt) but to me, getting comfortable with proofs is crucial to understanding, and better introduced this way. Scheinerman: Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction good for self-study (babies you). Velleman: How to Prove It. https://www.coursera.org/learn/mathematical-thinking

    Replies: @Anonymous

  110. @anonymous
    "Very few people, even among people who took trig in grade school and did well in it, have that sort of understanding of trig."

    Perhaps so... and yet that sort of understanding is why trig is really important. It is one of the necessary "basic windows" that need to be well understood, from this viewpoint, if one is to go further into the math that makes the modern world go round. Like algebra or geometry, solidly understanding how to work mathematically with "periodic phenomena" (anything wave-like) is a fundamental requirement if one wants to go further (calculus, differential equations, and so on---and if you study statistics and probability you will need calculus).

    Heck, you can't even pretend to do any work in things like ecology and "climate change" without a good grounding in trig. Those things are all about periodic phenomena.

    The problem could be that most grade school trig classes today usually do not get very far. (I really don't know.) Perhaps many students never learn what the subject is about, why it is important, that sort of thing. Perhaps the schools or teachers really have gone to Hades. But whatever the reason, it doesn't really change anything. "Real" trig is as necessary as ever, if you are ever going to do this sort of work yourself or develop a strong intuition around it.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @newrouter, @guest

    >The problem could be that most grade school trig classes<

    trig ain't taught in grade school. maybe hs. idiot america

  111. Hillary Clinton is our Marie Antoinette.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Hillary Clinton is our Marie Antoinette.
     
    One doubts that Burke would agree:

    It is now sixteen or seventeen years since I saw the queen of France, then the dauphiness, at Versailles; and surely never lighted on this orb, which she hardly seemed to touch, a more delightful vision. I saw her just above the horizon, decorating and cheering the elevated sphere she just began to move in,—glittering like the morning-star, full of life, and splendour, and joy. Oh! what a revolution! and what a heart must I have to contemplate without emotion that elevation and that fall! Little did I dream when she added titles of veneration to those of enthusiastic, distant, respectful love, that she should ever be obliged to carry the sharp antidote against disgrace concealed in that bosom; little did I dream that I should have lived to see such disasters fallen upon her in a nation of gallant men, in a nation of men of honour, and of cavaliers. I thought ten thousand swords must have leaped from their scabbards to avenge even a look that threatened her with insult. But the age of chivalry is gone. That of sophisters, economists, and calculators, has succeeded; and the glory of Europe is extinguished for ever. Never, never more shall we behold that generous loyalty to rank and sex, that proud submission, that dignified obedience, that subordination of the heart, which kept alive, even in servitude itself, the spirit of an exalted freedom. The unbought grace of life, the cheap defence of nations, the nurse of manly sentiment and heroic enterprise, is gone! It is gone, that sensibility of principle, that charity of honor, which felt a stain like a wound, which inspired courage whilst it mitigated ferocity, which ennobled whatever it touched, and under which vice itself lost half its evil, by losing all its grossness.
     

    Replies: @David In TN, @dcite

  112. @Richard
    @eggheadshadhisnumber

    Interesting quotes. Lady de Rothschild seems to have scrubbed her site, so the only place you can still find the full text of the original speech is at a Chinese academic site:

    http://english.ckgsb.edu.cn/news_content/lady-de-rothschild-speaks-inclusive-capitalism-ckgsb

    One unintentionally funny passage you didn't mention is this one:

    "One pathway that we identified as very important is that business leaders require work forces that are educated for what their companies need. McKinsey did a study: the United States has 30 million jobs that cannot be filled because of a lack of people qualified for those jobs. Right now in America, in order to get accepted to Harvard, you have to study and be proficient in trigonometry. Are there any land surveyors in this room? No. That’s what trigonometry is for. Knowledge of probability, on the other hand is not required. However, probability and mathematical engineering skills are what are useful in a high-tech world. They’re not required in American higher education today. The McKinsey study also states that by 2030, there are going to be 85 million jobs that are not going to have people with the right skills. So we, as business leaders, need to step up and participate in educating the work force we need."

    I think Lady de Rothschild is correct to identify poor statistical knowledge among our social-political elite as a major problem in society, but could you find a passage more adept at unwittingly displaying it?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonym, @PiltdownMan, @metoo, @Neil Templeton, @Mr. Anon, @Forbes

    Applying the rules of probability to any collection of data that is essentially non-measureable, or highly uncertain and contested, may be worse than useless.

  113. @Buzz Mohawk
    Hillary Clinton is our Marie Antoinette.

    Replies: @syonredux

    Hillary Clinton is our Marie Antoinette.

    One doubts that Burke would agree:

    It is now sixteen or seventeen years since I saw the queen of France, then the dauphiness, at Versailles; and surely never lighted on this orb, which she hardly seemed to touch, a more delightful vision. I saw her just above the horizon, decorating and cheering the elevated sphere she just began to move in,—glittering like the morning-star, full of life, and splendour, and joy. Oh! what a revolution! and what a heart must I have to contemplate without emotion that elevation and that fall! Little did I dream when she added titles of veneration to those of enthusiastic, distant, respectful love, that she should ever be obliged to carry the sharp antidote against disgrace concealed in that bosom; little did I dream that I should have lived to see such disasters fallen upon her in a nation of gallant men, in a nation of men of honour, and of cavaliers. I thought ten thousand swords must have leaped from their scabbards to avenge even a look that threatened her with insult. But the age of chivalry is gone. That of sophisters, economists, and calculators, has succeeded; and the glory of Europe is extinguished for ever. Never, never more shall we behold that generous loyalty to rank and sex, that proud submission, that dignified obedience, that subordination of the heart, which kept alive, even in servitude itself, the spirit of an exalted freedom. The unbought grace of life, the cheap defence of nations, the nurse of manly sentiment and heroic enterprise, is gone! It is gone, that sensibility of principle, that charity of honor, which felt a stain like a wound, which inspired courage whilst it mitigated ferocity, which ennobled whatever it touched, and under which vice itself lost half its evil, by losing all its grossness.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    @syonredux

    A while back I was watching Norma Shearer as Marie Antoinette on TCM. In the final scene as she is riding the cart to the guillotine, I wondered what did Marie Antoinette do to deserve this compared to present-day rulers in Europe and America.

    Frau Merkel for example.

    Replies: @SFG

    , @dcite
    @syonredux

    For some reason, Marie Antoinette was taken to the guillotine in wooden cart, hands tied behind her -- why? When she stumbled on the platform, as you might expect with her hands tied behind, she asked the executioner's pardon when she stepped on his foot. But during executions, those sorts of civilities occurred in Christian Europe, for the executed to forgive the executioner his duty. They also had to pay the executioner, usually on the spot. Of course that's if the execution was to be fairly quick.
    At least they took the King to the guillotine inside a horse drawn carriage.
    Country of gallants indeed.
    HRC -- who might deserve such a fate -- will probably die in a hospital and get a state funeral. We may even get stuck with a HRC holliday.

  114. @Name Withheld
    One point to remember about these people. The European royalty all got taken in by Bernard Madoff much more than the average large investor.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Why Were So Many Madoff Victims Jewish?

    The trust people tend to feel toward others in the same ethnic, racial, and political groups makes them easy targets for scammers.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/02/madoff-jewish-affinity-fraud/460446/

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Anonymous

    Most of his victims were not Jewish individual investors
    Most were municipal endowments, hospital endowments and huge pension funds

    After he was exposed the Jews went on their typical victim mode. The Jewish owned newspapers featured little old widows in Palm Beach and the upper west side of NYC. But they were less than one percent. For decades Madoff went after pension funds and endowments.

  115. @celt darnell

    Mr. Trump has pointed to Mrs. Clinton’s noticeably scant schedule of campaign events this summer to suggest she has been hiding from the public. But Mrs. Clinton has been more than accessible to those who reside in some of the country’s most moneyed enclaves and are willing to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to see her....

    ....And while Mrs. Clinton has faced criticism for her failure to hold a news conference for months, she has fielded hundreds of questions from the ultrarich in places like the Hamptons, Martha’s Vineyard, Beverly Hills and Silicon Valley.
     
    Does the NY Times have any clue how this sounds?

    Honest to God, it's enough to turn me into a Marxist.

    Replies: @Dr. X, @Thea, @Mr. Anon, @pyrrhus, @rod1963, @Lagertha

    It’s like bat signal that she can be bought.

    Is it trolling for other rich people to pay in while they can or a warning to the Plebes?

    Voter fraud will be so rampant.

  116. Interesting.

    “On 30 November 2000, Sir Evelyn married the American lawyer and entrepreneur Lynn Forester, who was the head of the Luxembourg-based wireless broadband venture FirstMark Communications Europe and the former wife of Andrew Stein, a New York City political figure who served as the last president of the New York City Council. ”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evelyn_de_Rothschild

  117. @James Kabala
    @PiltdownMan

    His tweet on the subject is actually cleverly worded (albeit probably written by a flunky, not the man himself):

    https://twitter.com/PaulMcCartney/status/766046537608597505

    Replies: @James Kabala, @sayless, @FactsAreImportant, @Buzz Mohawk, @PiltdownMan, @Buck Turgidson, @Harry Baldwin

    His tweet on the subject is actually cleverly worded (albeit probably written by a flunky, not the man himself):

    On the other hand, given Paul McCartney’s early reputation for lightning quick wit, it’s also possible that he wrote it himself.

  118. And Henry Kissinger. as the matchmaker.

    “Her third husband is Sir Evelyn de Rothschild (born August 29, 1931), who she was introduced to by Henry Kissinger at the 1998 Bilderberg Group conference in Scotland.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynn_Forester_de_Rothschil

  119. for whom the prospect of a Donald J. Trump presidency is dire

  120. @Anonymous
    @5371

    Like what?

    Replies: @5371, @Monopthalmus

    Use your imagination.

  121. The contrast could not be more obvious:

    Here too, across the sound from Long Island, Clintons and Obamas have repeatedly lunched and dined for donations at the beachfront homes of Weinstein and others. We’ve seen Marine One and the Secret Service come and go since Bill was president. It’s always been for a party of rich donors at some local mogul’s home.

    Donald Trump, on the other hand, recently helicoptered into my neighborhood on his own dime and spoke in a sweaty gymnasium to a packed house of ordinary citizens. Even if a cynic might claim it’s all for show, it’s a show of respect and it matters a great deal.

    Which candidate, and which party, do you really think has any chance of representing the American people?

    I’ve said before that leaders on the Right tend to be a lot nicer and accessible than those on the Left, and it’s true. The Left’s show of care for common citizens has always been a charade.

  122. @Anonym
    @Richard

    Lady de Rothschild is in urgent need of reading The Bell Curve. As are, frankly, most politicians. Unfortunately the skills for gaining office are not exactly aligned with governing effectively.

    There needs to be some sort of quick, dumbed down to the max, HBD video primer. It would cover IQ, criminality, GDP/ capita relations, and probably something regarding East Asian negatives (corruption, altruism) so IQ fetishists don't import an East Asian ruling class by the shipload.

    Replies: @snorlax

    and probably something regarding East Asian negatives (corruption, altruism) so IQ fetishists don’t import an East Asian ruling class by the shipload.

    That would serve no purpose except to make the persuadable conclude that you really are just a racist Nazi xenophobe looking for excuses to hate everyone who isn’t white.

    Simple IQ realism would still be an immeasurable improvement. Don’t bite off more than you can chew, Rome wasn’t built in a day, etc.

    • Replies: @Nico
    @snorlax

    Unfortunately recruiting whites to the cause of ethnic ingroup consciousness and imperviousness to charges of racism is the more difficult task but we don't have time to pass by the other stages if it means several decades more of Mongol Hordes pouring in.

  123. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Stein

    Andrew Stein (born Andrew J. Finkelstein; March 4, 1945) is an American Democratic politician who served on the New York City Council and was its last president, and as Manhattan Borough President.[1] Stein’s father, Jerry Finkelstein, was the multi-millionaire publisher of the New York Law Journal, among other publications.[2] Andrew Stein shortened his name when he entered politics.

    Stein has been married twice: He and his first wife have one daughter named Paige. Stein’s second marriage to attorney, Lynn Forester,[2] lasted from 1983 to 1993 with the couple having two sons: Ben and Jake Stein. He is often ridiculed in the media for wearing what is widely considered to be an excessively luxurious toupee.[6]

    According to a report in the New York Post on October 10, 2007, Stein had begun dating the conservative writer Ann Coulter. When asked about the relationship, Stein told the paper, “She’s attacked a lot of my friends, but what can I say, opposites attract!”[citation needed] On January 7, 2008, Stein told the Post that the relationship was over, citing irreconcilable differences.[7]

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @MEH 0910

    Do jews tend to change their names more often than other groups?

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Brutusale

  124. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Vulgar taste?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @guest

    “Vulgar taste?”

    Harvey Weinstein? The impresario of Quentin Tarantino’s movies is worried about vulgar taste?

  125. @Anonymous
    “I stand between you and the apocalypse,” a confident Mrs. Clinton declared to laughs, exhibiting a flash of self-awareness and humor to a crowd that included Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein and for whom the prospect of a Donald J. Trump presidency is dire.

    A Trump presidency would be "dire" for Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein? What is their fear exactly? Presumably, both men lead comfortable lives without a want in the world and it would seem probable they would continue to do so under almost any near-term eventuality.

    Is Klein worried that Trump would impose tariffs on textile imports? What on earth is Weinstein's concern?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon930, @JohnnyWalker123, @5371, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @Almost Missouri, @old okie

    “A Trump presidency would be “dire” for Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein? What is their fear exactly?”

    Haha, yeah I had the same question when I read that part. I think the answer may be that once a certain level of comfort and affluence is attained and one is freed of the constraints of material wants, one’s mind tends to wander into idiosyncratic directions. The top of Maslow’s pyramid of needs is a remarkably flexible and peculiar place compared to the more rigid and objective requirements at the bottom.

    There also seems to be a strange and unconscious human desire to feel persecuted. Maybe it is a form of egotism, like “I’m so important that others seek my undoing”. I don’t feel it myself, perhaps because I’m just not important enough, but I see it all the time among others, especially, I have to admit, among a certain ethnic group well represented at Hillary’s fundraisers.

    So, you have the freedom bestowed by affluence to explore the upper reaches of Maslow’s pyramid combined with the common if unhealthy propensity to feel persecuted, and voila: billionaires worried about the wrong billionaire getting into office.

    Then there’s 5371’s explanation. Maybe they are all criminals and should be worried. Hillary clearly is a criminal. Birds of a feather and all that.

  126. @Richard
    @eggheadshadhisnumber

    Interesting quotes. Lady de Rothschild seems to have scrubbed her site, so the only place you can still find the full text of the original speech is at a Chinese academic site:

    http://english.ckgsb.edu.cn/news_content/lady-de-rothschild-speaks-inclusive-capitalism-ckgsb

    One unintentionally funny passage you didn't mention is this one:

    "One pathway that we identified as very important is that business leaders require work forces that are educated for what their companies need. McKinsey did a study: the United States has 30 million jobs that cannot be filled because of a lack of people qualified for those jobs. Right now in America, in order to get accepted to Harvard, you have to study and be proficient in trigonometry. Are there any land surveyors in this room? No. That’s what trigonometry is for. Knowledge of probability, on the other hand is not required. However, probability and mathematical engineering skills are what are useful in a high-tech world. They’re not required in American higher education today. The McKinsey study also states that by 2030, there are going to be 85 million jobs that are not going to have people with the right skills. So we, as business leaders, need to step up and participate in educating the work force we need."

    I think Lady de Rothschild is correct to identify poor statistical knowledge among our social-political elite as a major problem in society, but could you find a passage more adept at unwittingly displaying it?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonym, @PiltdownMan, @metoo, @Neil Templeton, @Mr. Anon, @Forbes

    She is revealing her ignorance. An understanding of trigonometry is required for physics and engineering.

  127. @Dr. X
    @celt darnell


    Honest to God, it’s enough to turn me into a Marxist.
     
    I've gotten to that point myself. As a conservative, I obviously believe Marx was wrong about a lot of things. But he wasn't wrong about everything.

    Today, we don't live under Adam Smith's free market. We live under crony capitalism, nepotism, and the wealthy engaged in rent-seeking and buying favors from the government.

    Karl would have said "Told ya so."

    Replies: @Mr. Blank, @Harry Baldwin

    Hear, hear. My friends all know me as a knee-jerk conservative and a fan of free markets, so it has been little disorienting to them in recent years whenever talk turns to the economy and suddenly I’m the guy saying we need to hang all the bankers and loot the palaces of the rich. They’re all like, “when do you break out the hammer and sickle, comrade?”

    My explanation is the same: “I’m a fan of the free market. This isn’t the free market.”

    • Replies: @Thea
    @Mr. Blank

    Apparently some Burners agree. They just vandalized a luxury "plug & play" camp that used hired labor.

  128. @celt darnell

    Mr. Trump has pointed to Mrs. Clinton’s noticeably scant schedule of campaign events this summer to suggest she has been hiding from the public. But Mrs. Clinton has been more than accessible to those who reside in some of the country’s most moneyed enclaves and are willing to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to see her....

    ....And while Mrs. Clinton has faced criticism for her failure to hold a news conference for months, she has fielded hundreds of questions from the ultrarich in places like the Hamptons, Martha’s Vineyard, Beverly Hills and Silicon Valley.
     
    Does the NY Times have any clue how this sounds?

    Honest to God, it's enough to turn me into a Marxist.

    Replies: @Dr. X, @Thea, @Mr. Anon, @pyrrhus, @rod1963, @Lagertha

    The wealthy and their lackeys have become rather blatant in describing the neo-feudal world they seek to bring about. They no longer even feel the need to lie about it.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Mr. Anon

    "The wealthy and their lackeys have become rather blatant in describing the neo-feudal world they seek to bring about. They no longer even feel the need to lie about it."

    Are you including Trump in your jealous rant? Moreover, is it not in their best interest according to capitalist principles to use their power and influence to make all the money they are able to earn based on their inherent abilities?

    Replies: @guest, @Mr. Anon

  129. I would consider that NYT article misleading. The fact that Clinton can be engaging in a social setting with sycophantic supporters is not indicative of her capacity to handle the demands of the presidency of the US.

  130. @celt darnell

    Mr. Trump has pointed to Mrs. Clinton’s noticeably scant schedule of campaign events this summer to suggest she has been hiding from the public. But Mrs. Clinton has been more than accessible to those who reside in some of the country’s most moneyed enclaves and are willing to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to see her....

    ....And while Mrs. Clinton has faced criticism for her failure to hold a news conference for months, she has fielded hundreds of questions from the ultrarich in places like the Hamptons, Martha’s Vineyard, Beverly Hills and Silicon Valley.
     
    Does the NY Times have any clue how this sounds?

    Honest to God, it's enough to turn me into a Marxist.

    Replies: @Dr. X, @Thea, @Mr. Anon, @pyrrhus, @rod1963, @Lagertha

    It’s certainly enough to make you want to drop napalm on Martha’s Vineyard and the Hamptons…

  131. Anonymous at 4:04 AM – Thanks for reading my comment! Keeping in mind that math is more about practice and experience than it is about reading books, I would recommend these two as a minimum – George Simmons – Precalculus Math in a Nutshell – covers high school math with the goal of not overdoing it. Richard Silverman – Essential calculus with applications. This is the only math book I have ever read that reads like a novel – that is, read every word, and there is a complete story (it is basically Calc One , but from the point of view of someone who wants to understand the concepts). Those are, if not the most important, the most central. Once you are past that rigorous minimum, you might be interested in Posamentier on triangles (covering high school geometry but with the precision of art), and Maor, who I mentioned earlier, on trig. Derbyshire’s book on the Riemann hypothesis is one of the most amazing books I have ever read. If you want to have an idea of what college math is really about after the first year, try Havil on the Gamma function (basically a pleasant way to understand Calculus 2, but don’t expect to understand all of this this book, or for that matter, all of any of the books recommended here except for the first two), E, the story of a number by Maor (again) for an interesting look at the basics of analysis and the reasons why calc 1 makes sense, and any of the hundreds of well-written books on recreational math (also, the Khan academy, free online, is fantastic at helping people picture what things like linear algebra are really about). If you are satisfied, as almost all of us need to be, with sympathetically understanding mathematicians without necessarily knowing too much about math, Hardy’s A Mathematician’s Apology is great. That being said, I do not like to recommend books on math – understanding math is, for me, more like the sense of knowing that you are dreaming when you are dreaming (really) than it is like giving a book report on the last book I read.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @middle aged vet

    Thank you, middle aged vet!

    Just to clarify, do I need to acquire and study regular textbooks on these subjects in addition to these books? (I am interested in developing at least a rudimentary knowledge so as to be able apply these tools to non-math subjects, such as in the natural sciences (physics, chemistry, bio), or Econ, or CS, or perhaps even areas I hadn't imagined they would have application to.) If so, do you know of particular titles/authors?

    Also, if I may, where does the subject of Statistics fit into all this?

    Replies: @middle aged vet

    , @RudyM
    @middle aged vet

    Appreciate these off-topic recommendations, since I too would like to brush up on my math, significantly. The older I get, the more I see its significance and inherent interest. Unfortunately, it will have to wait until my overall health is better and I'm better able to focus on challenging material, if that time ever comes. I might try to force the issue within the next year. I think I will need a class setting of some sort to really get me started though, but that's not an obstacle since I have free access to classes of various sorts.

  132. Bed death or deathbed?

    One of the untold stories of this election is that Trump and Clinton are both perfect examples of unrestrained male and female behavior. In corner #1 you have Hillary who is the proverbial one-and-done mom who milked her husband for everything she could. There is no question who got the better of that deal. We are supposed to pity her but the reason Bill Clinton was flying from flower to flower is that he was chewing ice his entire marriage. He was the most alpha guy imaginable with a hyper sex drive and all he has to show for it are two grand kids that materialized very late in the game.

    In corner #2 you have a guy who is a serial monogamist. He has lots of money. He builds things. He dates beautiful women and always on his terms. All of his wives have signed pre-nups. He can have a dozen gorgeous women wrapped around his arm and yet he is the one who sucks the oxygen out of the room.

    There is a reason every short haired post menopausal shrew wants Hillary elected.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Prof. Woland

    It's possible he benefited somehow. He did need a wife who would put up with his philandering. My opinion is that it's an open marriage and they support each other with what really counts--their political ambitions. Worked out pretty well for them--two presidencies or at least a presidency and a senatorship--don't you think?

    Replies: @Lagertha, @Prof. Woland

    , @dcite
    @Prof. Woland

    good god, make up your minds. Either she is a man in drag, a dyke, or she's some uber-female force sucking the masculinity out of comparatively noble Bill. No pun intended in that sentence.
    She's your idea of unrestrained "female" behavior? Her behavior is pretty standard for Machiavellians. The sexes just have different tools to work with. Her indifference to the psychologically interesting and vile insults constantly bandied about (don't think they are not aware), suggests to me a fundamentally male way of viewing things. She doesn't care. To win and rule is the best revenge.

    Like most of the people who want to rule us, neither candidate is to be trusted. Anyone who really wants to be president, you have to ask "what's in it for him/her?"
    Trump is an outlier because of wealth and indifference to certain Powers That Be, and to insults. There are not many like that, who also run for president. He's saying the things that the vast majority know are true, and he's entertaining to boot, providing us and himself with lots of female eye candy -- and after 8 yrs of M.O., thank god. He's also muddled and emotive. Actually both these candidates display extreme behavior, but there's no clear Manichean division of types.

  133. @Anonym
    @Steve Sailer

    But it proves Hillary isn’t on death’s door, so they got it in.

    But it is pretty funny stuff.


    Ah, I see. "Look boss, Breitbart is saying that Hillary hasn't had a press conference for nearly 300 days. There are youtube videos mocking her seizures. We had to prove that Hillary is healthy. It's the best we could come up with."

    Replies: @Dennis Dale

    It’s as if any criticism of Hillary requires a chaperone of equal or greater positive analysis. This one pushes it, but she needs all the help she can get on the health issue right now so maybe, in the implied negotiations between rogue writers and more politically pressured editors, any help on that is earning a premium right now.

  134. It was quite a pleasant surprise to read this in the New York Times. I guess it would be too much to ask for the reporter to note that in order to attend that Rothschild fundraiser, Ms. Clinton had to board her private jet to fly all of 20 miles.

    I hope someone on the Trump campaign makes a nice video comparing and contrasting the candidates’ August events.

    • Replies: @guest
    @wren

    Also, big name celebrities don't count as rich people in the eyes of plebs. Society ladies are for the elite to read about. The whole thing reeks of the last days of Gotham City before Bane took over in the last Batman movie. But they can't help themselves, sometimes. Hillary is in High Society, baby! And High Society must be talked about occasionally, or it's not high society anymore.

  135. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Vulgar taste?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @guest

    Have you seen some of his movies? (Not to mention his appearance.)

  136. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Anonymous

    (((Rothschild)))
    (((Klein)))
    (((Weinstein)))

    I wonder what all three have in common. What could be the common factor that makes them dislike Trump?

    Hmmm............

    Replies: @guest, @Corvinus

    Despite the fact the Trump is quite Jewsome.

  137. Schools for journalism ought to use this article as a model for aesopean speech: walking the fine line between ultra-naivety and blunt sarcasm. I mean: if Cozick is questioned by her superiors she can always pose as a true admirer of the ultra-rich, Lin-Miranda-style. But in this case, would she really have used the epithet “gilded”, reminding the educated reader to Twain and Mencken?

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
  138. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    “It’s the old adage, you go to where the money is,” said Jay S. Jacobs, a prominent New York Democrat.

    Right. But that's an adage about robbing banks.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willie_Sutton

    Replies: @guest

    I’m communist America, banks rob you!

  139. @PiltdownMan
    Amy Chozick and Jonathan Martin are dead, dead, to the Clintons. And their editors, too.

    There is almost as much on the internet about Amy Chozick covering Hillary as there is by Amy Chozick covering Hillary. There's less on Jonathan Martin but there is some evidence that some people think he is a fanboy of Hillary, as in the article hyperlinked through his name.

    A reporter doesn't get to this kind of story without being close to the subject, especially when it comes to the Clintons. The question is, is this latest article a betrayal, or some kind of sophisticated headfake?

    Hillary, Sir Evelyn Robert Adrian de Rothschild, Bill or Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild would certainly know. There you go, Steve. Increased the count by two.

    Replies: @guest

    They forgot to mention Lord and Lady Douchebag.

  140. Wikipedia has it right and the NYT is wrong. “Lady de Rothschild” is correct. Putting her given name between title and surname – “Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild” – is wrong.

    When you read articles like this, you begin to see that the two-party system is just a cartel to keep the cost of running for office artificially high, rather than a contest between people of opposing ideologies. Deep-pocketed donors feed millions into the campaigns of candidates who don’t differ from each other on the vital issues like immigration. It ensures that no honest man can break up the racket unless he’s as rich as Donald Trump. But the very rich are happy with the status quo. I doubt if any American billionaire loses a minute’s sleep over which party wins an election.

    • Agree: Thea
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Rob McX

    "When you read articles like this, you begin to see that the two-party system is just a cartel to keep the cost of running for office artificially high, rather than a contest between people of opposing ideologies. "

    Well said. I think there's a lot of truth to that.

  141. @iSteveFan
    I thought American citizens were not supposed to have titles. Is this the case? If so, did she have to give up her American citizenship to get that title? If so, why is she allowed to donate to our political campaigns?


    Second, how are these people able to donate $250K? I thought there was a $2.7K limit. Are they just donating to PACs?

    Third, where the f**k is the occupy wall street crowd? Where are the bernie supporters? If this story doesn't cause them to not vote for Hillary, then they never believed in their philosophy to begin with. They don't have to vote Trump. They can vote Jill Stein. But if they vote Hillary, they are hypocrites.

    Replies: @James Kabala, @guest, @rod1963

    There’s no law against U.S. citizens possessing titles of nobility. We just don’t have our own nobility is all.

    “where the f**k is the occupy wall street crowd?”

    In their defense the other side is a New York real estate mogul, and we have a two-party system. Also, it is (was) a confused movement. Ever talk to one of them? The ones who aren’t plants, I mean.

  142. @Richard
    @iSteveFan


    I wonder why they don’t go ahead and pass it. Who would oppose it? I think this amendment needs to be passed.
     
    Just looking at the text of the amendment, it's poorly worded (although Congress could allow a U.S. citizen to receive a "present", it's not clear whether any foreign "honour" could likewise be approved by Congress), and overbroad: stripping the citizenship of someone who accepted a European dukedom might make sense, but under the amendment it would appear to be illegal for an American to accept an academic appointment at a public university in Canada.

    Replies: @guest

    That wouldn’t be in the spirit of the amendment, but what’s the difference? We cut off the historic string of Canadian academics that aren’t enriching our culture?

  143. @wren
    It was quite a pleasant surprise to read this in the New York Times. I guess it would be too much to ask for the reporter to note that in order to attend that Rothschild fundraiser, Ms. Clinton had to board her private jet to fly all of 20 miles.

    I hope someone on the Trump campaign makes a nice video comparing and contrasting the candidates' August events.

    Replies: @guest

    Also, big name celebrities don’t count as rich people in the eyes of plebs. Society ladies are for the elite to read about. The whole thing reeks of the last days of Gotham City before Bane took over in the last Batman movie. But they can’t help themselves, sometimes. Hillary is in High Society, baby! And High Society must be talked about occasionally, or it’s not high society anymore.

  144. @anonymous
    "Very few people, even among people who took trig in grade school and did well in it, have that sort of understanding of trig."

    Perhaps so... and yet that sort of understanding is why trig is really important. It is one of the necessary "basic windows" that need to be well understood, from this viewpoint, if one is to go further into the math that makes the modern world go round. Like algebra or geometry, solidly understanding how to work mathematically with "periodic phenomena" (anything wave-like) is a fundamental requirement if one wants to go further (calculus, differential equations, and so on---and if you study statistics and probability you will need calculus).

    Heck, you can't even pretend to do any work in things like ecology and "climate change" without a good grounding in trig. Those things are all about periodic phenomena.

    The problem could be that most grade school trig classes today usually do not get very far. (I really don't know.) Perhaps many students never learn what the subject is about, why it is important, that sort of thing. Perhaps the schools or teachers really have gone to Hades. But whatever the reason, it doesn't really change anything. "Real" trig is as necessary as ever, if you are ever going to do this sort of work yourself or develop a strong intuition around it.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @newrouter, @guest

    I don’t think ecology is even a thing.

  145. @Anonymous
    @Richard

    “One pathway that we identified as very important is that business leaders require work forces that are educated for what their companies need. McKinsey did a study: the United States has 30 million jobs that cannot be filled because of a lack of people qualified for those jobs ... there are going to be 85 million jobs that are not going to have people with the right skills. So we, as business leaders, need to step up and participate in educating the work force we need.”

    This is actually great! This is exactly what we citizenists and those of us on the Alt Right want: government, corporations, and the wealthy should be focused on educating Americans for jobs--and not importing more people to fill them.

    Let's cut Lady Rothschild some slack. Perhaps she is still learning. She could be a potential ally.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Buck Turgidson, @L Woods

    Anonymous wrote:

    This is actually great! This is exactly what we citizenists and those of us on the Alt Right want: government, corporations, and the wealthy should be focused on educating Americans for jobs…

    Gee… and I always thought the purpose of education was to enable a person to perceive the truth — about the universe, about human nature, about politics, etc.

    Ever read Huxley’s Brave New World? Sounds to me as if Lady de Rothschild simply wants enough Epsilons and Deltas around to keep the machines running while she and her pals run the world.

    Dave Miller in Sacramento

    • Agree: L Woods, Forbes
  146. @PiltdownMan
    @James Kabala


    I never heard of McCartney’s performing at a fund raiser for a specific politician before.
     
    Never underestimate what an A-list member of the British upper classes can make happen. Rothschild.

    It’s for social cachet, I can’t imagine anything other than travel expenses and a nominal fee being covered.
     

    McCartney has had all the social cachet he has needed for half a century, and he is pretty close to being a billionaire himself. This runs more along the lines of a favor for a friend, in all likelihood.

    Replies: @James Kabala, @Former Darfur, @Marat

    Ditto for Sir Elton John who made two recent appearances at private homes in Silicon Valley. Sans the hubby. These two small groups were far wealthier than he is reported to be. Lots of trophy photographing around the piano. Their favorite political pastime is to bash Trump’s bird as being an old, slow guzzler and then speculate on his true net worth.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Marat


    Their favorite political pastime is to bash Trump’s bird as being an old, slow guzzler
     
    What jerks. Melania looks great for her age.

    Replies: @onlyonegirlforbarry

  147. @ScarletNumber
    @Anonymous

    LOL I'm shocked SHOCKED the word "confirmation" wasn't used by Berger.

    Replies: @Nico, @Hibernian

    The sorts of people who use the word “confirmation” to describe a family gathering stopped reading the NY Times some while back I think.

  148. @syonredux

    The pro-Hillary Clinton group HRC Super Volunteers have warned New York Times reporter Amy Chozick that she is “on notice” for coded sexism and have issued a list of words they believe the press should avoid.
    “A group called HRC Super Volunteers just warned me ‘We will be watching, reading, listening and protesting coded sexism,’” Miss Chozicktweeted Wednesday to her 16,000 followers.
    “Sexist words, they say, include ‘polarizing, calculating, disingenuous, insincere, ambitious, inevitable, entitled, over confident,’” she wrote in a subsequent tweet.
    “Also sexist, according to HRC Super Volunteers: ‘Secretive’ and ‘will do anything to win, represents the past, out of touch,” Miss Chozickcontinued.
    “‘You are on notice that we will be watching, reading, listening and protesting coded sexism…’ the email reads,” she said.
    The Twitter account belonging to HRC Super Volunteers retweeted all four of Miss Chozick’s messages.
     
    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/mar/26/pro-hillary-group-puts-female-new-york-times-repor/

    Replies: @sayless

    Maenads For Hillary.

  149. @snorlax
    @Anonym


    and probably something regarding East Asian negatives (corruption, altruism) so IQ fetishists don’t import an East Asian ruling class by the shipload.
     
    That would serve no purpose except to make the persuadable conclude that you really are just a racist Nazi xenophobe looking for excuses to hate everyone who isn't white.

    Simple IQ realism would still be an immeasurable improvement. Don't bite off more than you can chew, Rome wasn't built in a day, etc.

    Replies: @Nico

    Unfortunately recruiting whites to the cause of ethnic ingroup consciousness and imperviousness to charges of racism is the more difficult task but we don’t have time to pass by the other stages if it means several decades more of Mongol Hordes pouring in.

  150. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonym

    Sir Paul enjoys making money.

    Replies: @Anonym, @D. K., @Father O'Hara

    Funny how these “all you need is love” rock stars wind up as big tycoons demanding “Show me the money”! They don’t really have a choice;SOMEBODY is making money off their stuff. Might as well be the artist,as opposed to,say,Evelyn De Rothschild!

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Father O'Hara

    Yes, the notion that over the next eight years, Paul McCartney will finally start to make money off Yesterday and Hey Jude, as opposed to all the other wheeler dealers who have made money off McCartney's songs for the last 56 years is not something that will bother me much.

    Replies: @pepperinmono, @Yngvar

  151. There must be at least a little cognitive dissonance going on with Hillary and her liberal goodie two shoes supporters regarding these fundraising tours, the new excuses for emails, and her warmongering against Russia, right? Trump supporters know he’s a liar and an ass, but also realize he may be the only stop to a Merkel Boner happening here again, and again.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Spyder


    Trump supporters know he’s a liar and an ass, but also realize he may be the only stop to a Merkel Boner happening here again, and again.
     
    Bullshit. His children love and respect him and his billionaire business competitors for three decades (Icahn, Beal, Barrack, Ruffin, Hirschfeld) respect and endorse him.
  152. @Dr. X
    @syonredux


    From a COSMO profile on Chozick:
     
    Frightening, how stupid and shallow she really is. "Iowa was a much of a culture shock as Japan" pretty much sums it up.

    And a NYT reporter who says "like" constantly as if she were a Valley Girl? Time for me to pour a bourbon and re-read Nietzsche's "Aphorisms on Woman" in "Beyond Good and Evil."

    Replies: @sayless, @South Texas Guy

    Agree. That, and the “I” at the beginning of every other sentence.

  153. @Father O'Hara
    @Steve Sailer

    Funny how these "all you need is love" rock stars wind up as big tycoons demanding "Show me the money"! They don't really have a choice;SOMEBODY is making money off their stuff. Might as well be the artist,as opposed to,say,Evelyn De Rothschild!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Yes, the notion that over the next eight years, Paul McCartney will finally start to make money off Yesterday and Hey Jude, as opposed to all the other wheeler dealers who have made money off McCartney’s songs for the last 56 years is not something that will bother me much.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @pepperinmono
    @Steve Sailer

    While I agree that McCartney deserves to be much, much richer if not for the taxes and the ripoffs, it is not about the money for him.
    From all the various Beatle biographies, he has a clear hangup that people see Lennon as the hipper SJW type than he.
    In reality, the idea that either is anything more than a member of the greatest songwriting team ever(nothing to scoff at, that) is absurd.
    His postLennon attempts at rejuvenating that image and staying relevant are embarrassing.
    You're Paul fucking McCartney, dude !
    Ain't that enough?
    Stop it already!

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Yngvar
    @Steve Sailer

    It's pretty funny that Paul McCartney has to get permission and pay royalties for performing his own songs.

    Replies: @D. K.

  154. @Anonymous
    @Dieter Kief

    Philosemitism as a form, that enables the public to keep quiet about (…) fascism

    What did he mean by this?

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Plain and simple: If you specialise in philosemitism, you can evade discussing questions like these: How fascism came into power – what this had to do with the Weimar-Republic elites – and their tendency to rather support the big money and Hitler than the republican forces.

    He had a point in this Novel – even tough he drank a lot when he wrote it. It’s a fantastic read though for those happy few who dig it…

    Somehting that comes only very very slowly into the realm, where discussions take place: That lots of jews were part of the weimar elite – and made lots of mistakes – just like anybody else – and one thing especially that was a very impotant fact, as far as envy is concerend: Many of the bourgeois jews prospered way above average.
    Now, this is important: You have to make a decent description of a society in order to come to reasonable conclusions. – Those are desriptive attempts – to remark such things means n o t to state, that the jews in Germany caused there destiny in the Gas-Cahmbers or something like this, because they were successful.

    The first, who in Germny wrote in a decent way about these things, was an essayist, Siegfried Kohlhammer, who was for a while visible, because he published in the decent monthly Merkur. He doesn’t publish anymore and lives in Japan now, as far as i know.

    Kohlhammer, by the way, broke the ice on the Islamistic-taboo in Germany – together with Hans Magnus Enzensberger.

    Enzensberger was prudent and clear-sighted enough to escape being silenced. Kohlhammer could have gone on on a small scale with his work (Merkur sells less than 10 000 copies), his books sold in the 4 digits realm – but he stopped publishing.

    Then came Sarrazin.

    Sarrazin and Enzensberger respect one another. Kohlhammer and Piwitt are the lone dogs in the field.

  155. @Anonymous
    @anonymous

    Thank you for this perspective.

    I am interested in getting a good grounding in these "basic windows" and understanding how things work mathematically. Would that include Algebra, Geometry, Trig? I took all in grade school, did fine, but haven't retained much and reading your comments and the other commenters make me feel that I didn't really learn them or get an intuitive grasp of why they were important and how they function in the world.)

    Would you recommend I work with certain texts? Should I take a class, or can I self study? Any recs would be greatly appreciated.

    Replies: @Peter Lund, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    https://betterexplained.com/ is a good place to start.
    Numberphile on youtube ( https://www.youtube.com/user/numberphile ) is good for learning about some of highlights of relatively accessible math.
    3blue1brown on youtube ( https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYO_jab_esuFRV4b17AJtAw ) has lots of high-quality animations. He works for Khan Academy now.

    If you want to know what kinds of math are “out there” then there are these two books:



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Princeton_Companion_to_Mathematics

    The former has a one-chapter overview of a series of interesting mathematical topics written so that they don’t require much prior knowledge. It is of course far from rigorous or complete but it’ll make you go “so *that’s* what that is all about.” The latter is a beautiful coffee table book that doesn’t try to teach you any math per se but it has a really good overview of modern mathematics. Think of an encyclopedia about math written by people who know what they are talking about (and these guys do!) AND written in extremely clear English. It’ll look ever so good on your Mies van der Rohe coffee table next to the Bodum French press and the Stelton thermos as seen from your Barcelona chair.

    If you are interested in “how things work”, then control theory might interest you. Most of the books I could find where either awfully written books by engineers (why are engineers generally bad writers?) or they had pretty pictures but were rather dumbed down. This is the best one I could find:

    “Control System Design”, Graham C. Goodwin/Stefan F. Graebe/Mario E. Salgado

    You will probably only be able to understand the introduction and the first 3 or 4 chapters because then they start using math: linear algebra and differential equations. It’s not *hard* linear algebra or *hard* differential equations, though.

    “Visual Complex Analysis”

    Complex numbers are generally much nicer numbers than the real ones. They also unify and make sense of things you probably think are different parts of mathematics: they show us how sin and cos are *really* the same thing, they show us how roots of negative numbers make sense, they show us how multiplications are really rotations (multiplying by -1 is *exactly* the same as a 180° rotation, which is why it makes sense that the sign behaves the way it does when you multiply positive/negative numbers), etc.

    Complex analysis is what happens when you take the complex numbers seriously and redo everything in analysis with that in mind. It tells you a better story of what is going on with the weird infinities in functions like 1/x or tan.

    This book is not the most rigorous but it is very good at building intuition, which is probably what you want.

    “An Imaginary Tale: The Story of √-1”

    Not my favourite book but lots of other people liked it. It is much more historical and much less mathematical than “Visual Complex Analysis”. Doesn’t give you a lot of intuition. Teaches you almost no math. On the other hand, there are no scary cliffs to scale, no slippery parts where you can slide off the path and tumble down.

    You might also want to look at graph theory, differential equations (hugely important in practice!), and logic/computation/information/grammars.

    “Gödel, Escher, Bach” is good for appreciation of logic/computation/information/grammars and you’ll actually learn something along the way.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%B6del,_Escher,_Bach

    There is also a set of GEB lectures on youtube.

    There are also “The Shape of Space” (Jeffrey R. Weeks) and “Topology without Tears” (Sidney A. Morris) for topology.

    “Convex Optimization”, Stephen Boyd and Lieven Vandenberghe on, well, convex optimization. Not everything in the book is about *convex* optimization. There is also something about simpler (but less general) kinds of optimization and there is a lot of motivating text. It is also good at building intuition.

    “Linear Algebra done Wrong” (Sergei Tril) is good at building intuition + it’s quite rigorous without being harsh and sterile. “Matrix Analysis and Applied Linear Algebra” (Carl D. Meyer) is another way of looking at linear algebra, namely from an applied perspective. We learn what it is used for and how to do calculations with matrices in practice. Very intuitive and rigorous enough without being as abstract as Tril’s book.

    “Partial Differential Equations, An Introduction” by Walter A. Strauss is the best simple introduction to PDE’s I have found.

    Let’s see… what’s left? Group theory? “Visual Group Theory” by Nathan Carter, “A Friendly Introduction to Number Theory” by Joseph H. Silverman, “Term Rewriting and all that”, “Measure Theory” by Ernst Hansen, “Fourier Analysis” by Tom Leinster (there’s a lot you won’t understand but he is good on intuition building — and that works surprisingly well anyway). Something about manifolds but I don’t know of a nice, accessible text. Something about analysis, but again I don’t know of a nice, accessible text. Something about probability and statistics — but almost all the books I have seen are messy and treat the subject as a long series of tricks or as stamp collecting. The problem is that much of probability and statistics is really about integration and manifolds and it is hard to see why the results are obvious without knowing a lot about those subjects.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Peter Lund

    Thank you, Peter

  156. @Anonymous
    @Richard

    “One pathway that we identified as very important is that business leaders require work forces that are educated for what their companies need. McKinsey did a study: the United States has 30 million jobs that cannot be filled because of a lack of people qualified for those jobs ... there are going to be 85 million jobs that are not going to have people with the right skills. So we, as business leaders, need to step up and participate in educating the work force we need.”

    This is actually great! This is exactly what we citizenists and those of us on the Alt Right want: government, corporations, and the wealthy should be focused on educating Americans for jobs--and not importing more people to fill them.

    Let's cut Lady Rothschild some slack. Perhaps she is still learning. She could be a potential ally.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Buck Turgidson, @L Woods

    I was pleased to read that final sentence. Over the past few decades, a similar passage usually has concluded with, “We therefore must allow the rest of the world to immigrate to the US so that we won’t lose to China.”

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Buck Turgidson

    On the contrary, in essence what she was saying was: let's import millions of Chinese and South Asian students so they can be educated here and have them replace our native citizens, our loser country bumbkins either studying or doing STEM now. Because they are such uppity and ingrate bastards.
    Our current elites are more evil than Gengis Khan.

  157. @James Kabala
    @PiltdownMan

    His tweet on the subject is actually cleverly worded (albeit probably written by a flunky, not the man himself):

    https://twitter.com/PaulMcCartney/status/766046537608597505

    Replies: @James Kabala, @sayless, @FactsAreImportant, @Buzz Mohawk, @PiltdownMan, @Buck Turgidson, @Harry Baldwin

    Behold the world’s most evil, forced, phony, unnatural, ungenuine smile. As soon as the cameras are gone she is back to being a b***h on wheels, yelling at her inferiors, cursing like trooper, and telling someone to get her a beer. Read the accounts of the SS agents who have had to work in her orbit. That smile creeps me out.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Buck Turgidson

    I have talked with a couple of people who personally know or who have worked with secret-service agents who have been detailed to protect Hillary and have talked about it with them. They all despise her.

  158. @Anonymous
    @syonredux

    Jacobs is not always a Jewish name, but…

    ...it is frequently a jewish name.

    Replies: @Mike Zwick

    Many times it is an Anglicized version of Jacoby. Jacobson is the same. Then there is Leo Jacoby who changed his name to Lee J. Cobb and became a famous actor.

  159. @RationalExpressions
    @anonymous

    Maybe she didn't elegantly phrase her math remarks, but I took it as the Lady saying that for the majority of people the study of statistics has much more lifelong benefit than the study of trigonometry. And it would be hard to argue with that.

    Replies: @a Newsreader

    You can learn statistics at a superficial level without knowing much about trigonometry, but to be proficient enough in statistics to understand what it means to apply statistical reasoning to real data sets you need to understand calculus. And to understand calculus, you really need to know your trigonometry.

  160. @Anonymous
    @anonymous

    Thank you for this perspective.

    I am interested in getting a good grounding in these "basic windows" and understanding how things work mathematically. Would that include Algebra, Geometry, Trig? I took all in grade school, did fine, but haven't retained much and reading your comments and the other commenters make me feel that I didn't really learn them or get an intuitive grasp of why they were important and how they function in the world.)

    Would you recommend I work with certain texts? Should I take a class, or can I self study? Any recs would be greatly appreciated.

    Replies: @Peter Lund, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Lang: Basic Mathematics

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Thank you

  161. @Name Withheld
    @James Kabala

    The Titles of Nobility Amendment did not pass, but it almost implicit in the US Constitution (Article 1, Section 9, Clause 8), and US culture/history that foreign titles not be observed. I think the US press started doing this with the Kennedy's and all their cohorts. I can remember Parade magazine and others going crazy over titles back in the 1980's.

    Replies: @James Kabala

    It actually happened quite a bit in the nineteenth century. The fictional Countess Cora in Downton Abbey is representative of a real trend. To paraphrase the old joke about Astaire and Rogers, he gave her class and she gave him money. If I recall correctly, all three granddaughters of Charles Carroll (the last signer of the Declaration to die) married English noblemen – and that was the early nineteenth century, not the late.

  162. @Mr. Blank
    @Dr. X

    Hear, hear. My friends all know me as a knee-jerk conservative and a fan of free markets, so it has been little disorienting to them in recent years whenever talk turns to the economy and suddenly I'm the guy saying we need to hang all the bankers and loot the palaces of the rich. They're all like, "when do you break out the hammer and sickle, comrade?"

    My explanation is the same: "I'm a fan of the free market. This isn't the free market."

    Replies: @Thea

    Apparently some Burners agree. They just vandalized a luxury “plug & play” camp that used hired labor.

  163. @eggheadshadhisnumber
    @BB753

    It's for social cachet, I can't imagine anything other than travel expenses and a nominal fee being covered. The admiration of real successes is immeasurable to these hack performers.

    Replies: @SFG, @BB753

    I agree he’s kissing the butts of the rich and famous, but you’re really calling Paul McCartney a hack? One of the best-loved performers of all time? The man responsible for most of the Beatles’ mainstream appeal?

  164. @Prof. Woland
    Bed death or deathbed?

    One of the untold stories of this election is that Trump and Clinton are both perfect examples of unrestrained male and female behavior. In corner #1 you have Hillary who is the proverbial one-and-done mom who milked her husband for everything she could. There is no question who got the better of that deal. We are supposed to pity her but the reason Bill Clinton was flying from flower to flower is that he was chewing ice his entire marriage. He was the most alpha guy imaginable with a hyper sex drive and all he has to show for it are two grand kids that materialized very late in the game.

    In corner #2 you have a guy who is a serial monogamist. He has lots of money. He builds things. He dates beautiful women and always on his terms. All of his wives have signed pre-nups. He can have a dozen gorgeous women wrapped around his arm and yet he is the one who sucks the oxygen out of the room.

    There is a reason every short haired post menopausal shrew wants Hillary elected.

    Replies: @SFG, @dcite

    It’s possible he benefited somehow. He did need a wife who would put up with his philandering. My opinion is that it’s an open marriage and they support each other with what really counts–their political ambitions. Worked out pretty well for them–two presidencies or at least a presidency and a senatorship–don’t you think?

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    @SFG

    I still can't get the image of Bill shoving a cigar up Monica's vag in the Oval Office. My husband would be dead after such a revolting, sociopathic stunt stunt.

    Replies: @SFG, @Expletive Deleted, @larry lurker, @Harry Baldwin, @Brutusale

    , @Prof. Woland
    @SFG

    Hillary needed Bill Clinton much more than the other way around. In effect, both of them were 'beards' for the other but for Bill it was only because we live in a culture where single sexually active men are not really allowed to run for higher office yet; and maybe never (paging whiskey). Being married is like a brand or seal of approval (collar) on a male politician. Any wife would have served that purpose, including an attractive younger fertile one like trump. In effect, Hillary was hiding her lack of sex drive behind the marriage as well and all Bill got out of it was very little pleasure and one daughter.

    With the Trump candidacy we are finally witnessing a man possibly getting elected who has always sexually done things on his terms without groveling to women. We are not just getting comfortable with increased female roles in society but men's as well, something which is causing die hard feminists to become spitting mad. I am sure this is one big reason so many older women hate hate hate Trump. Women still need men for money and power but not so much the other way around and they all know it.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Marat

  165. @MEH 0910
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Stein

    Andrew Stein (born Andrew J. Finkelstein; March 4, 1945) is an American Democratic politician who served on the New York City Council and was its last president, and as Manhattan Borough President.[1] Stein's father, Jerry Finkelstein, was the multi-millionaire publisher of the New York Law Journal, among other publications.[2] Andrew Stein shortened his name when he entered politics.
     

    Stein has been married twice: He and his first wife have one daughter named Paige. Stein's second marriage to attorney, Lynn Forester,[2] lasted from 1983 to 1993 with the couple having two sons: Ben and Jake Stein. He is often ridiculed in the media for wearing what is widely considered to be an excessively luxurious toupee.[6]

    According to a report in the New York Post on October 10, 2007, Stein had begun dating the conservative writer Ann Coulter. When asked about the relationship, Stein told the paper, "She's attacked a lot of my friends, but what can I say, opposites attract!"[citation needed] On January 7, 2008, Stein told the Post that the relationship was over, citing irreconcilable differences.[7]
     

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Do jews tend to change their names more often than other groups?

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Anonymous

    I wonder if within Jews that it's Finkelstein's that change their names the most.

    Replies: @Ivy

    , @Brutusale
    @Anonymous

    My first two jobs involved working for guys named Burke (((Berkowitz))) and Winston (((Weinburg))).

    Replies: @Anonymous

  166. @Richard
    @Anonymous


    If her heart is in the right place, perhaps we can educate her.
     
    Be careful. In a 1999 puff piece about Lynn Forester de Rothschild's ability to attract investors to her new venture FirstMark, Vernon Jordan said, "She has the ability to make you feel like this company cannot go forward without you."

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB945126668772522001

    Two years later:

    http://nypost.com/2001/05/18/firstmark-reeling-star-investors-in-telecom-co-want-out/

    L.R.: Well, most of all I learned that it's better to be lucky than to be smart. I say that because I sold that company in June 2000. That was when the billion dollars came in, and the market fell apart in October 2000. So that company rode a frenzy, which I actually, at the time, wasn't comfortable with. But it's pretty hard to turn down that kind of money when it's rushing in at you. I was really lucky to get out of it with that billion-dollar financing. I certainly didn't think it was going to crash in the next three months. You know, bubbles are very dangerous things, and I was fortunate enough to get off before the bubble burst. But the investors in that company believed they would buy for a billion and, within six months, sell it for a billion and a half. I knew, and actually they were told —they just had to look at our business plan —that the business needed $5 billion. So when the new investors panicked and didn't put in the 5 billion-and I don't blame them for not doing it; it wasn't my call and it wasn't my money-there was no way that company could go on. If people still had those licenses that we sold them, they would have made a lot of money because we had 15 countries with 100 megahertz of bandwidth in each of those countries, and we had 15,000 kilometers of fiber that all went to waste. But if anyone had held on, it would've been a great investment. But for me, it turned out to be okay, because I was lucky.

    L.G.: When you run into people who committed their companies' money to the enterprise and didn't do so well, is it awkward? Or do they just understand it's business and, you know, you win some, you lose some, and it's all okay?

    L.R.: Well, they were all big boys. They can't, you know, blame me for their investment decisions. I sold, and I left immediately, so I don't know. Some of them remain friends; some of them I don't see. You know, I want everybody to make money.

    http://upstart.bizjournals.com/views/columns/the-world-according-to/2007/10/05/An-interview-with-Lady-de-Rothschild.html?page=all

    Although Lynn Forester de Rothschild gives lots of speeches about being a capitalist, it doesn't appear that she's been a working capitalist since FirstMark went bankrupt 15 years ago. She just sits on a lot of boards and fundraises for politicians.

    It turns out the trick to making money is never investing any of your own. She's had four big payoffs in her career: a Puerto Rican telephone company (which she sweet-talked Motorola into funding then buying back from her), selling wireless broadband frequencies she somehow acquired "for free", the FirstMark sale, and then marrying a de Rothschild.

    She's real good at making people believe that teaming up with her is in their best interest.

    Replies: @Lurker

    She’s real good at making people believe that teaming up with her is in their best interest.

    Presumably her first two husbands saw things in much the same way?

  167. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Spyder
    There must be at least a little cognitive dissonance going on with Hillary and her liberal goodie two shoes supporters regarding these fundraising tours, the new excuses for emails, and her warmongering against Russia, right? Trump supporters know he's a liar and an ass, but also realize he may be the only stop to a Merkel Boner happening here again, and again.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Trump supporters know he’s a liar and an ass, but also realize he may be the only stop to a Merkel Boner happening here again, and again.

    Bullshit. His children love and respect him and his billionaire business competitors for three decades (Icahn, Beal, Barrack, Ruffin, Hirschfeld) respect and endorse him.

  168. @Anonymous
    I must say, for all her faults, Hillary sure seems to have the jewish vote locked down.

    Replies: @SFG

    So does every Democrat. Mitt only got about 30%, we’ll see how Trump does.

  169. @anonymous
    "Right now in America, in order to get accepted to Harvard, you have to study and be proficient in trigonometry. Are there any land surveyors in this room? No. That’s what trigonometry is for."

    Well, we learn something new everyday. Today we learn that you can be a Rothschild and CEO of the Rothschild's holding company and still have no clue about the deep basic importance of trigonometry and how trigonometry is actually used; no clue about how the circular functions are elemental to learning math past about where it got to around maybe the mid-to-late 1600s.

    It's actually kind of unsettling that the CEO of E.L Rothschild thinks like this. Of what else are they ignorant?

    Although trig is about the simplest thinking you can do about triangles---essentially about 3 points---much of the importance of trig is its power to capture the essence of repetitive patterns. Trig is important because it is the fundamental tool to work with vibrations, rotations, and periodic phenomena of all kinds, such as light, sound, alternating electric current, oscillating electric circuits, and the orbits of planets around their sun. (I stole the essence of this last line from a good text-book.)

    The wikipedia entry for trig functions puts it thus: "Trigonometric functions are important in the study of triangles and modeling periodic phenomena, among many other applications."


    Circular Functions, mathworld.wolfram.com:


    "Circular functions are also called trigonometric functions, and the study of circular functions is called trigonometry."

     

    I suppose when you run an enterprise of that size and are responsible for that much money, almost all you have time to do is some form of politics. As we see here, that can leave one blind to important truths. Oh well, no human is that smart, really.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @RationalExpressions, @Perplexed

    Thank you for the explanation. I took a year of trigonometry in the early sixties and never understood what it was for. Just endless pre-calculator long division.

  170. @Steve Sailer
    @Father O'Hara

    Yes, the notion that over the next eight years, Paul McCartney will finally start to make money off Yesterday and Hey Jude, as opposed to all the other wheeler dealers who have made money off McCartney's songs for the last 56 years is not something that will bother me much.

    Replies: @pepperinmono, @Yngvar

    While I agree that McCartney deserves to be much, much richer if not for the taxes and the ripoffs, it is not about the money for him.
    From all the various Beatle biographies, he has a clear hangup that people see Lennon as the hipper SJW type than he.
    In reality, the idea that either is anything more than a member of the greatest songwriting team ever(nothing to scoff at, that) is absurd.
    His postLennon attempts at rejuvenating that image and staying relevant are embarrassing.
    You’re Paul fucking McCartney, dude !
    Ain’t that enough?
    Stop it already!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @pepperinmono


    His post Lennon attempts at rejuvenating that image and staying relevant are embarrassing.
     
    Bullshit. McCartney wrote and recorded more and better songs post-Lennon than Lennon did in his entire lifetime without McCartney. This is true even if restricted to the time of John's death - some of the Wings output is spectacular and is being looked down only because people can't get over the whole Beatles thing.

    Replies: @pepperinmono

  171. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @middle aged vet
    Anonymous at 4:04 AM - Thanks for reading my comment! Keeping in mind that math is more about practice and experience than it is about reading books, I would recommend these two as a minimum - George Simmons - Precalculus Math in a Nutshell - covers high school math with the goal of not overdoing it. Richard Silverman - Essential calculus with applications. This is the only math book I have ever read that reads like a novel - that is, read every word, and there is a complete story (it is basically Calc One , but from the point of view of someone who wants to understand the concepts). Those are, if not the most important, the most central. Once you are past that rigorous minimum, you might be interested in Posamentier on triangles (covering high school geometry but with the precision of art), and Maor, who I mentioned earlier, on trig. Derbyshire's book on the Riemann hypothesis is one of the most amazing books I have ever read. If you want to have an idea of what college math is really about after the first year, try Havil on the Gamma function (basically a pleasant way to understand Calculus 2, but don't expect to understand all of this this book, or for that matter, all of any of the books recommended here except for the first two), E, the story of a number by Maor (again) for an interesting look at the basics of analysis and the reasons why calc 1 makes sense, and any of the hundreds of well-written books on recreational math (also, the Khan academy, free online, is fantastic at helping people picture what things like linear algebra are really about). If you are satisfied, as almost all of us need to be, with sympathetically understanding mathematicians without necessarily knowing too much about math, Hardy's A Mathematician's Apology is great. That being said, I do not like to recommend books on math - understanding math is, for me, more like the sense of knowing that you are dreaming when you are dreaming (really) than it is like giving a book report on the last book I read.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @RudyM

    Thank you, middle aged vet!

    Just to clarify, do I need to acquire and study regular textbooks on these subjects in addition to these books? (I am interested in developing at least a rudimentary knowledge so as to be able apply these tools to non-math subjects, such as in the natural sciences (physics, chemistry, bio), or Econ, or CS, or perhaps even areas I hadn’t imagined they would have application to.) If so, do you know of particular titles/authors?

    Also, if I may, where does the subject of Statistics fit into all this?

    • Replies: @middle aged vet
    @Anonymous

    Anonymous at sep 4 - 1:09 - You have been getting much better advice than I can give. To clarify my positive assessment of the books I listed , 99.99 percent of people cannot progress at all in math without doing and understanding many solved problems; none of the books I mentioned have enough solved problems for this purpose. Solved problems are available everywhere, both in print and on line. Other commenters have made great recommendations.
    I don't have a good answer on where statistics fits in - statisticians can adapt pure calculus techniques, but they also use unexpected (or expected) aspects of biology and history that are not subject to being reduced to equations, and they also use complex logic and natural law.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  172. @syonredux
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Hillary Clinton is our Marie Antoinette.
     
    One doubts that Burke would agree:

    It is now sixteen or seventeen years since I saw the queen of France, then the dauphiness, at Versailles; and surely never lighted on this orb, which she hardly seemed to touch, a more delightful vision. I saw her just above the horizon, decorating and cheering the elevated sphere she just began to move in,—glittering like the morning-star, full of life, and splendour, and joy. Oh! what a revolution! and what a heart must I have to contemplate without emotion that elevation and that fall! Little did I dream when she added titles of veneration to those of enthusiastic, distant, respectful love, that she should ever be obliged to carry the sharp antidote against disgrace concealed in that bosom; little did I dream that I should have lived to see such disasters fallen upon her in a nation of gallant men, in a nation of men of honour, and of cavaliers. I thought ten thousand swords must have leaped from their scabbards to avenge even a look that threatened her with insult. But the age of chivalry is gone. That of sophisters, economists, and calculators, has succeeded; and the glory of Europe is extinguished for ever. Never, never more shall we behold that generous loyalty to rank and sex, that proud submission, that dignified obedience, that subordination of the heart, which kept alive, even in servitude itself, the spirit of an exalted freedom. The unbought grace of life, the cheap defence of nations, the nurse of manly sentiment and heroic enterprise, is gone! It is gone, that sensibility of principle, that charity of honor, which felt a stain like a wound, which inspired courage whilst it mitigated ferocity, which ennobled whatever it touched, and under which vice itself lost half its evil, by losing all its grossness.
     

    Replies: @David In TN, @dcite

    A while back I was watching Norma Shearer as Marie Antoinette on TCM. In the final scene as she is riding the cart to the guillotine, I wondered what did Marie Antoinette do to deserve this compared to present-day rulers in Europe and America.

    Frau Merkel for example.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @David In TN

    Got married to the wrong guy and was born Austrian, from what I remember.

  173. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Anonymous

    (((Rothschild)))
    (((Klein)))
    (((Weinstein)))

    I wonder what all three have in common. What could be the common factor that makes them dislike Trump?

    Hmmm............

    Replies: @guest, @Corvinus

    “I wonder what all three have in common. What could be the common factor that makes them dislike Trump?”

    It’s a rich vs. rich thing. They get all sorts of special treatment.

    From March 31, 2016…

    In an MSBNC town hall on Wednesday night, Donald Trump said that a lot of people like him for his proposal to ban all Muslims from the country — but he also admitted that there may be some exceptions to the ban.

    “I think banning until we figure out what’s going on is an important thing, and I take a lot of heat for it, and a lot of people like me for it to be honest with you,” Trump said when asked about the proposal.

    “I have been called by more Muslims saying what you are doing is a great thing, not a bad thing,” he continued. “Believe it or not, I have a lot of friends that are Muslim, and they call me, and in most cases, they’re very rich Muslims.”

    Pressed by MSNBC’s Chris Matthews whether Trump’s friends could even get into the country with a ban on Muslims, Trump conceded. “They’ll come in,” he said. “They’ll come in, and you’ll have exceptions.”

    BOTH Hillary and Trump have little patience for commoners. They cater to their wealthy friends for donations while taking populist positions. For anyone to suggest otherwise, that one or the other has the monopoly on rich friends or one or the other has contempt for regular folk, is a fool.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Corvinus

    BOTH Hillary and Trump have little patience for commoners.

    Trump has spent part of almost every day in the past few months flying around the country to be around commoners. I'd say that takes a fair amount of patience.

    "They cater to their wealthy friends for donations while taking populist positions."

    Does Hillary even go to the pretense of taking populist positions anymore? It hasn't seemed like it.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  174. @Anonymous
    @5371

    Like what?

    Replies: @5371, @Monopthalmus

    Volunteering at Jeffrey Epsteins Day-Care, maybe?

  175. @Mr. Anon
    @celt darnell

    The wealthy and their lackeys have become rather blatant in describing the neo-feudal world they seek to bring about. They no longer even feel the need to lie about it.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “The wealthy and their lackeys have become rather blatant in describing the neo-feudal world they seek to bring about. They no longer even feel the need to lie about it.”

    Are you including Trump in your jealous rant? Moreover, is it not in their best interest according to capitalist principles to use their power and influence to make all the money they are able to earn based on their inherent abilities?

    • Replies: @guest
    @Corvinus

    "is it not in their best interest according to capitalist principles to use their power and influence to make all the money they are able to earn based on their inherent abilities?"

    No. That has nothing to do with capitalist principles in particular. For instance, say I'm really good with a knife and my mother has an attractive inheritance waiting for me. Do "capitalist principles" dictate that I slit her throat?

    Replies: @epebble

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Corvinus

    "Are you including Trump in your jealous rant? Moreover, is it not in their best interest according to capitalist principles to use their power and influence to make all the money they are able to earn based on their inherent abilities?"

    It wasn't a "jealous rant" - but I guess that's the only way a liberal can see it, motivated as you are by envy, and incapable of any rhetoric short of ranting.

    You are too stupid to have noticed that Trump is the only candidate who is not (apparently) in the pocket of oligarchs and who expresses any interest in the economic well-being of ordinary people. He may or may not deliver on that, but at least he is saying it. All Hillary has promised to do is to execute the globalist agenda of her oligarch masters. She is the candidate of Wall Street. I don't care for parasites, whether they are wealthy, influential parasites............or obscure and powerless parasites like you.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  176. @David In TN
    @syonredux

    A while back I was watching Norma Shearer as Marie Antoinette on TCM. In the final scene as she is riding the cart to the guillotine, I wondered what did Marie Antoinette do to deserve this compared to present-day rulers in Europe and America.

    Frau Merkel for example.

    Replies: @SFG

    Got married to the wrong guy and was born Austrian, from what I remember.

  177. Hillary is a fascist and not a few entertainers admire them and seek their company in the hopes they will not be among the first sent to prison or stood against a wall

    Simple Definition of fascism

    : a way of organizing a society in which a government ruled by a dictator controls the lives of the people and in which people are not allowed to disagree with the government

    : very harsh control or authority

    • Replies: @guest
    @Mick Jagger gathers no Mosque

    Those are ridiculous definitions.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Mick Jagger gathers no Mosque

    As "guest" pointed out, those definitions are simply incorrect. What you are referring to is dictatorship - which is not synonomous with fascism.

  178. @James Kabala
    @PiltdownMan

    His tweet on the subject is actually cleverly worded (albeit probably written by a flunky, not the man himself):

    https://twitter.com/PaulMcCartney/status/766046537608597505

    Replies: @James Kabala, @sayless, @FactsAreImportant, @Buzz Mohawk, @PiltdownMan, @Buck Turgidson, @Harry Baldwin

    He looks rather disengaged. Or out of it.

  179. @Dr. X
    @celt darnell


    Honest to God, it’s enough to turn me into a Marxist.
     
    I've gotten to that point myself. As a conservative, I obviously believe Marx was wrong about a lot of things. But he wasn't wrong about everything.

    Today, we don't live under Adam Smith's free market. We live under crony capitalism, nepotism, and the wealthy engaged in rent-seeking and buying favors from the government.

    Karl would have said "Told ya so."

    Replies: @Mr. Blank, @Harry Baldwin

    Marx was certainly right about how capitalism demands a reserve army of the unemployed.

    • Replies: @guest
    @Harry Baldwin

    Nature put them there, not capitalism.

    , @Anonymous
    @Harry Baldwin

    He was wrong about that because it isn't true.

  180. @Patriot
    @eggheadshadhisnumber

    She also funded The School for Kids Who Can't Read Good and Want to Learn to do Other Things Good Too.

    Replies: @Je Suis Charlie Martel, @Zonie

    For Ants!

  181. “I stand between you and the apocalypse,” a confident Mrs. Clinton declared

    …As a facilitator.

  182. I have a degree in mathematics. I spent a chunk of my life teaching, tutoring or editing textbooks.

    It is with great lament that I realized the depth of math illiteracy and outright dislike in the world.

    If we can’t teach most of these kids basic algebra, and have them understand it then probability & statistics in high school isn’t going to work either.

    Teaching trigonometry in high school, to the better students, is necessary to prepare students for calculus. which I open the audience here realizes is a very important subject indeed.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Thea

    Teaching trigonometry in high school, to the better students, is necessary to prepare students for calculus. which I open the audience here realizes is a very important subject indeed.

    Generally speaking, I think math people overestimate how important math is to most people in their lives. The vast majority of adult survive just fine without calculus.

    Replies: @Thea

    , @Dieter Kief
    @Thea

    Do you know the youth-book "The Number-Devil" by Hans Magnus Enzensberger?
    Just curious.

  183. @Anonymous
    @Richard

    “One pathway that we identified as very important is that business leaders require work forces that are educated for what their companies need. McKinsey did a study: the United States has 30 million jobs that cannot be filled because of a lack of people qualified for those jobs ... there are going to be 85 million jobs that are not going to have people with the right skills. So we, as business leaders, need to step up and participate in educating the work force we need.”

    This is actually great! This is exactly what we citizenists and those of us on the Alt Right want: government, corporations, and the wealthy should be focused on educating Americans for jobs--and not importing more people to fill them.

    Let's cut Lady Rothschild some slack. Perhaps she is still learning. She could be a potential ally.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Buck Turgidson, @L Woods

    Obsession with “jobs” is a relic of the industrial era. There’s no good reason to be going around inventing “jobs” in a near-future in which autonomous machines are providing almost all necessary goods and services. What is the education system supposed to do: offer poodle walking 101?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @L Woods

    We aren't necessarily inventing jobs, mate. We're talking about filling the ones that have been stolen by aliens.

    , @Anonymous
    @L Woods

    Idle hands are the devil's workshop. That's a good reason to invent make-work jobs for a future where autonomous machines do most of the real work.

    Replies: @L Woods, @ScarletNumber

    , @Hibernian
    @L Woods

    Try robotizing construction and maintenance.

  184. @Dr. X
    @syonredux


    From a COSMO profile on Chozick:
     
    Frightening, how stupid and shallow she really is. "Iowa was a much of a culture shock as Japan" pretty much sums it up.

    And a NYT reporter who says "like" constantly as if she were a Valley Girl? Time for me to pour a bourbon and re-read Nietzsche's "Aphorisms on Woman" in "Beyond Good and Evil."

    Replies: @sayless, @South Texas Guy

    I’ve never seen Ms. Chozick’s picture, but I’d bet she’s fairly good looking. There is a long and ignoble tradition in publishing of hiring cute chicks that might possibly have sex with their middle aged bosses. That’s how they get their foot in the door. I’ve known many myself who weren’t cut out for either the job itself, or the beat they had, but they somehow got it.

    As far as Iowa being a culture shock, if she went to a San Antonio high school, Iowa wouldn’t seem to be all that much different. She reminds me of people I grew up with who were embarrassed by the location they grew up and couldn’t wait to shake the dust off their shoes and head for the big city.

    BTW, I’ve been to Iowa many times, so I have a basis for comparison.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @South Texas Guy

    Her picture https://twitter.com/amychozick

  185. @Anonym
    The most interesting part of this piece is the connection between Rothschild and Economist magazine, and the business interests including agricultural land. Now why would the Economist be so concerned about crops rotting in the fields? Or increase demand for real estate?

    And the article seems like the most anti-Hillary article you could write at the NYT without being fired. This is blinking in Morse code type of stuff.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @MEH 0910, @Redneck Republican

    The Economist Group purchased Business International Corporation 30 years ago. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_International_Corporation

    Business International Corporation employed both Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, but at different times.

    Business International is a little known CIA front company; perhaps it needs to be better known.

    The odds of two different occupants of the Oval Office having worked for the same itty bitty publishing are infinitesimal.

    As for the piece mentioning agricultural land and the Rothschild family, shortages always and everywhere are a function of price. Like shortages of farm workers.

    Except for arable land. Some might consider arable land to be a perfect example of “the tragedy of the commons.” http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/tragedy-of-the-commons

    There is a finite amount of arable land on the globe. You can farm this finite amount more intensively, but you cannot create more of it. Yeah, sure, you can farm fallow lands; convert forest to crops; and reclaim land from the sea (think Holland), but all of these choices have extraordinary costs, both environmental and monetary, and involve long time lines.

    So, are the Rothschilds trying to corner the market on arable lands? Or is their interest simply in the long-term returns generated by renewable commodities?

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @Redneck Republican

    That's a very interesting comment. I hope you stick around.

  186. @Buck Turgidson
    @Anonymous

    I was pleased to read that final sentence. Over the past few decades, a similar passage usually has concluded with, "We therefore must allow the rest of the world to immigrate to the US so that we won't lose to China."

    Replies: @BB753

    On the contrary, in essence what she was saying was: let’s import millions of Chinese and South Asian students so they can be educated here and have them replace our native citizens, our loser country bumbkins either studying or doing STEM now. Because they are such uppity and ingrate bastards.
    Our current elites are more evil than Gengis Khan.

  187. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus
    @JohnnyWalker123

    "I wonder what all three have in common. What could be the common factor that makes them dislike Trump?"

    It's a rich vs. rich thing. They get all sorts of special treatment.

    From March 31, 2016...

    In an MSBNC town hall on Wednesday night, Donald Trump said that a lot of people like him for his proposal to ban all Muslims from the country — but he also admitted that there may be some exceptions to the ban.

    “I think banning until we figure out what’s going on is an important thing, and I take a lot of heat for it, and a lot of people like me for it to be honest with you,” Trump said when asked about the proposal.

    “I have been called by more Muslims saying what you are doing is a great thing, not a bad thing,” he continued. “Believe it or not, I have a lot of friends that are Muslim, and they call me, and in most cases, they’re very rich Muslims.”

    Pressed by MSNBC’s Chris Matthews whether Trump’s friends could even get into the country with a ban on Muslims, Trump conceded. “They’ll come in,” he said. “They’ll come in, and you’ll have exceptions.”

    BOTH Hillary and Trump have little patience for commoners. They cater to their wealthy friends for donations while taking populist positions. For anyone to suggest otherwise, that one or the other has the monopoly on rich friends or one or the other has contempt for regular folk, is a fool.

    Replies: @anon

    BOTH Hillary and Trump have little patience for commoners.

    Trump has spent part of almost every day in the past few months flying around the country to be around commoners. I’d say that takes a fair amount of patience.

    “They cater to their wealthy friends for donations while taking populist positions.”

    Does Hillary even go to the pretense of taking populist positions anymore? It hasn’t seemed like it.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @anon

    "Trump has spent part of almost every day in the past few months flying around the country to be around commoners. I’d say that takes a fair amount of patience."

    Yes, he and Hillary are running for the Oval Office. Both have to be front and center of the "peasants".

    "Does Hillary even go to the pretense of taking populist positions anymore? It hasn’t seemed like it."

    Yes, she is taking populist positions. Whether it be out of necessity, you be the judge.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/wp/2015/04/21/is-hillary-a-populist-of-convenience/?utm_term=.b22790cb7055

  188. @Corvinus
    @Mr. Anon

    "The wealthy and their lackeys have become rather blatant in describing the neo-feudal world they seek to bring about. They no longer even feel the need to lie about it."

    Are you including Trump in your jealous rant? Moreover, is it not in their best interest according to capitalist principles to use their power and influence to make all the money they are able to earn based on their inherent abilities?

    Replies: @guest, @Mr. Anon

    “is it not in their best interest according to capitalist principles to use their power and influence to make all the money they are able to earn based on their inherent abilities?”

    No. That has nothing to do with capitalist principles in particular. For instance, say I’m really good with a knife and my mother has an attractive inheritance waiting for me. Do “capitalist principles” dictate that I slit her throat?

    • Replies: @epebble
    @guest

    No; because it is illegal. You may go to jail/be executed. However, you can encourage her to "Die with dignity" where it is legal.

    On the other hand; it is perfectly acceptable to kill any number of animals, even endangered ones, if not illegal. Pollute the planet if it is not illegal, employ foreigners in preference to natives, as long as you follow the law, move business to lower cost locales, following all laws, contribute to politicians and policy makers to get favorable and profitable policies.

    If it is not illegal, it is OK. If it is illegal, work to get it to be not illegal.

  189. @eggheadshadhisnumber
    @BB753

    It's for social cachet, I can't imagine anything other than travel expenses and a nominal fee being covered. The admiration of real successes is immeasurable to these hack performers.

    Replies: @SFG, @BB753

    I suppose his last wife left him in dire financial straits for a while.. But this is really debasing yourself for a few shekels. (Bon Jovi probably needs the money but not Sir Paul) I would have expected this sad behavior from Lennon had he been alive but not from McCartney. Lennon was truly a piece of work.

  190. @Mick Jagger gathers no Mosque
    Hillary is a fascist and not a few entertainers admire them and seek their company in the hopes they will not be among the first sent to prison or stood against a wall



    Simple Definition of fascism

    : a way of organizing a society in which a government ruled by a dictator controls the lives of the people and in which people are not allowed to disagree with the government

    : very harsh control or authority

    Replies: @guest, @Mr. Anon

    Those are ridiculous definitions.

  191. Israeli occupied territory, which extends far beyond The Levant and directly into the halls of the US Congress, will soon to extend into the White House, judging from the kind of people to whom the Clintons have become indebted.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Connecticut Famer

    Those inroads were already made in the Bill Clinton and, later, the GWB administrations.

  192. @Harry Baldwin
    @Dr. X

    Marx was certainly right about how capitalism demands a reserve army of the unemployed.

    Replies: @guest, @Anonymous

    Nature put them there, not capitalism.

  193. @Anonymous
    @Clyde

    Perhaps that explains why she is in favor of helping our domestic workforce (via education), as opposed to importing millions of foreigners.

    Perhaps she has some residual loyalty to our country.

    Replies: @Richard, @Alden

    She really didn’t say that if and when Americans were better educated they would be hired.

    She just claimed that Anericans are uneducated and unable to preform STEM jobs

    That sounds very much like the old excuse for hiring Chinese and Indian immigrants.
    If you have kids in school, take a look at common core math. It’s endless gobbledygook and incredibly complicated
    Also memorizing the multiplication tables is frowned upon.

    • Replies: @edNels
    @Alden



    Remember the New Math? I do, because my high school placement test was just a little shakey and got me into ''basic math review, while the rest of my class went into algebra taught conventionally until 1961, in '62 +/-, New Math very hastily printed I think at Stanford U, on wire bound books, it was a rush job and an expericment of radically attempting to push theory first and move slowly if ever to practical applicantion. I personally couldn't not understand or remain awake in that course.

    Well most of our state text books were sleep inducing crap too. One good book, I read was John Tayler Gatto's book where he makes pretty convincing argurments about the intentional plan that's been in the works since the Prussians founded compulsory education in 1700's for the purpose of having a more docile and obedient population. Not for for their better mental development.

    Now they are dumbing it down to the max.

    The New Math was such a disaster that it was discontiniued, it was everthing that they wanted, but the kids didn't learn math, the basic prerequisite to higher learning, what a crime that was.

    Learning algebra is fun and easy, facinating when applied to word problems that defy other solutions, it's functional and enables complicated notation to assist in forming up a solution. A first year chemistry course lays out some practial algebra to do mole wts. and stuff, and it isn't that heard to learn.

    There always is some nerd kid who really thrives in these classrooms, knows everything evey day raises their hand incessantly to answer teachers questions, so if they're so smart why don't they take a more advanced level class? : Because they are learning how to behave with their inferiors, that is what they are there for to learn.. how to deflect hostility or to handle being little f'n faux geniouses, they go into classes way below there stage of development to further the differential between them selves and the lunch bucket crowd . I finally got it what was going on...

    Smart parents with money, put their kids into early preschool where they get a good jump on the others socially, and even to get on first names with the same teachers they will later encounter, then, even some parents hold their brats a year, so additional advantage can be had in physcal age maturation, to be not dumb, but more mature at the starting line.

    Replies: @Alden

  194. @Whiskey
    @iSteveFan

    How Jewish is Sir Paul McCartney, or Warren Buffett, or Bill Gates, or Carlos Slim? Heck how Jewish is Lady Rothschild? [Answer, not much.]

    You're focusing on the WRONG THING. For every Jacobs there is a Howard Stern. Don't forget, Donald Trump LOVES LOVES LOVES Jews. He made a commercial for Bibi Netanyahu. Heck he *IS* Bibi as much as anyone else can be. After all, you could make a legit argument that TRUMP likes Jews and has more around him than Hillary does -- his entire staff is Jewish, while Hillary's seems to be old witchy WASP types and well, Huma. Who is not very Jewish.

    How many times was Hillary Grand Marshall of the Israel Day parade? None. Trump was twice. He's got twice the number of Jewish grand kids and is pretty much a cross between Rodney Dangerfield and Don Rickles.

    And how Jewish is the Hamptons? Do they serve Gefilte Fish there? Potato latkes? How Jewish is Ralph Lauren? Or Harvey Weinstein? Compared to say, Jerry Seinfeld or Howard Stern or Adam Sandler?

    Again missing the point; Jews are divided as every other White people on class and gender lines. Hillary is running as Marie Antoinette letting them eat cake while she cavorts with the ultra rich. She doesn't care how bad it looks because she knows that most College Educated White women love that stuff; and that America is run for the benefit to steal SBLD's Paul Kersey's line, Black people and ... White College Educated Women.

    Last I checked, the Hamptons were not exactly the Catskills as a traditionally Jewish place; but a rich place for rich White ladies, yes definitely.

    Replies: @iStevefan, @Marcus

    IIRC Netanyahu decried the proposed Muslim ban. Even hardcore Zionists tend to be liberals when it comes to immigration.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Marcus

    Why would a hardcore Zionist like Netanyahu want the U.S. to impose a Muslim immigration ban? If more Middle Eastern Muslims emigrate to the U.S. and misbehave, more American Jews will make aliyah to Israel, and the American public will have greater sympathy for Israel's plight dealing with hostile Muslims.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Forbes
    @Marcus

    A US ban on Muslim immigration would shut off the relief valve, which likely increases Muslim contretemps in the Israeli neighborhood. Troublemakers located in the US will mean less trouble for Israel. Netanyahu's reaction looks rational for Israel, even if not in the US's best interest.

    Replies: @Marcus

  195. In which Lady Lynn arranges a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist’s Parade puff piece with Hillary:

    cringe

  196. @Peter Lund
    @Anonymous

    https://betterexplained.com/ is a good place to start.
    Numberphile on youtube ( https://www.youtube.com/user/numberphile ) is good for learning about some of highlights of relatively accessible math.
    3blue1brown on youtube ( https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYO_jab_esuFRV4b17AJtAw ) has lots of high-quality animations. He works for Khan Academy now.

    If you want to know what kinds of math are "out there" then there are these two books:

    https://www.amazon.com/All-Mathematics-You-Missed-Graduate/dp/0521797071
    https://www.amazon.com/Princeton-Companion-Mathematics-Timothy-Gowers/dp/0691118809
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Princeton_Companion_to_Mathematics

    The former has a one-chapter overview of a series of interesting mathematical topics written so that they don't require much prior knowledge. It is of course far from rigorous or complete but it'll make you go "so *that's* what that is all about." The latter is a beautiful coffee table book that doesn't try to teach you any math per se but it has a really good overview of modern mathematics. Think of an encyclopedia about math written by people who know what they are talking about (and these guys do!) AND written in extremely clear English. It'll look ever so good on your Mies van der Rohe coffee table next to the Bodum French press and the Stelton thermos as seen from your Barcelona chair.


    If you are interested in "how things work", then control theory might interest you. Most of the books I could find where either awfully written books by engineers (why are engineers generally bad writers?) or they had pretty pictures but were rather dumbed down. This is the best one I could find:

    “Control System Design”, Graham C. Goodwin/Stefan F. Graebe/Mario E. Salgado

    You will probably only be able to understand the introduction and the first 3 or 4 chapters because then they start using math: linear algebra and differential equations. It's not *hard* linear algebra or *hard* differential equations, though.



    "Visual Complex Analysis"

    https://www.amazon.com/Visual-Complex-Analysis-Tristan-Needham/dp/0198534469


    Complex numbers are generally much nicer numbers than the real ones. They also unify and make sense of things you probably think are different parts of mathematics: they show us how sin and cos are *really* the same thing, they show us how roots of negative numbers make sense, they show us how multiplications are really rotations (multiplying by -1 is *exactly* the same as a 180° rotation, which is why it makes sense that the sign behaves the way it does when you multiply positive/negative numbers), etc.

    Complex analysis is what happens when you take the complex numbers seriously and redo everything in analysis with that in mind. It tells you a better story of what is going on with the weird infinities in functions like 1/x or tan.

    This book is not the most rigorous but it is very good at building intuition, which is probably what you want.




    "An Imaginary Tale: The Story of √-1"

    https://www.amazon.com/Imaginary-Tale-Princeton-Science-Library/dp/0691146004

    Not my favourite book but lots of other people liked it. It is much more historical and much less mathematical than "Visual Complex Analysis". Doesn't give you a lot of intuition. Teaches you almost no math. On the other hand, there are no scary cliffs to scale, no slippery parts where you can slide off the path and tumble down.




    You might also want to look at graph theory, differential equations (hugely important in practice!), and logic/computation/information/grammars.

    "Gödel, Escher, Bach" is good for appreciation of logic/computation/information/grammars and you'll actually learn something along the way.

    https://www.amazon.com/G%C3%B6del-Escher-Bach-Eternal-Golden/dp/0465026567
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%B6del,_Escher,_Bach

    There is also a set of GEB lectures on youtube.



    There are also "The Shape of Space" (Jeffrey R. Weeks) and "Topology without Tears" (Sidney A. Morris) for topology.

    "Convex Optimization", Stephen Boyd and Lieven Vandenberghe on, well, convex optimization. Not everything in the book is about *convex* optimization. There is also something about simpler (but less general) kinds of optimization and there is a lot of motivating text. It is also good at building intuition.

    "Linear Algebra done Wrong" (Sergei Tril) is good at building intuition + it's quite rigorous without being harsh and sterile. "Matrix Analysis and Applied Linear Algebra" (Carl D. Meyer) is another way of looking at linear algebra, namely from an applied perspective. We learn what it is used for and how to do calculations with matrices in practice. Very intuitive and rigorous enough without being as abstract as Tril's book.

    “Partial Differential Equations, An Introduction” by Walter A. Strauss is the best simple introduction to PDE's I have found.

    Let's see... what's left? Group theory? "Visual Group Theory" by Nathan Carter, "A Friendly Introduction to Number Theory" by Joseph H. Silverman, "Term Rewriting and all that", "Measure Theory" by Ernst Hansen, "Fourier Analysis" by Tom Leinster (there's a lot you won't understand but he is good on intuition building -- and that works surprisingly well anyway). Something about manifolds but I don't know of a nice, accessible text. Something about analysis, but again I don't know of a nice, accessible text. Something about probability and statistics -- but almost all the books I have seen are messy and treat the subject as a long series of tricks or as stamp collecting. The problem is that much of probability and statistics is really about integration and manifolds and it is hard to see why the results are obvious without knowing a lot about those subjects.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Thank you, Peter

  197. @Corvinus
    @Mr. Anon

    "The wealthy and their lackeys have become rather blatant in describing the neo-feudal world they seek to bring about. They no longer even feel the need to lie about it."

    Are you including Trump in your jealous rant? Moreover, is it not in their best interest according to capitalist principles to use their power and influence to make all the money they are able to earn based on their inherent abilities?

    Replies: @guest, @Mr. Anon

    “Are you including Trump in your jealous rant? Moreover, is it not in their best interest according to capitalist principles to use their power and influence to make all the money they are able to earn based on their inherent abilities?”

    It wasn’t a “jealous rant” – but I guess that’s the only way a liberal can see it, motivated as you are by envy, and incapable of any rhetoric short of ranting.

    You are too stupid to have noticed that Trump is the only candidate who is not (apparently) in the pocket of oligarchs and who expresses any interest in the economic well-being of ordinary people. He may or may not deliver on that, but at least he is saying it. All Hillary has promised to do is to execute the globalist agenda of her oligarch masters. She is the candidate of Wall Street. I don’t care for parasites, whether they are wealthy, influential parasites…………or obscure and powerless parasites like you.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Mr. Anon

    As I stated before, I am not a liberal, I am an American. I make my own political decisions and are not beholden to parties. But if you have to characterize me as a liberal to make you feel better about yourself, go right ahead.

    "You are too stupid to have noticed that Trump is the only candidate who is not (apparently) in the pocket of oligarchs and who expresses any interest in the economic well-being of ordinary people."

    Trump is an oligarch, a business magnate who has used his political connections for his own personal well-being.

    His Grand Hyatt Hotel in Manhattan was built with the benefit of a decades-long tax abatement obtained through government connections.

    He circumvented New York State campaign-finance laws by making a $30,000 donation to Andrew Stein (Jewish?), who on the New York City Board of Estimate, the body then responsible for land-use decisions in New York.

    In 2014, Trump made millions when he agreed to bring the Miss Universe pageant to Moscow. At the time, Trump mingled with the Russian business elite at a swanky after-party. “Almost all of the oligarchs were in the room,” Trump bragged on returning home.

    Trump is front and center at Wall Street. Why do you lie to yourself?

    "He may or may not deliver on that, but at least he is saying it. All Hillary has promised to do is to execute the globalist agenda of her oligarch masters. She is the candidate of Wall Street. I don’t care for parasites, whether they are wealthy, influential parasites…………or obscure and powerless parasites like you."

    Refrain from consuming large amounts of rot gut whiskey for once. Let us assume that she plans on executing this "globalist agenda" of her "oligarch masters". Are you not obscure and powerless yourself to stop them? Or, do you have the guts to do something about it rather than lament on a blog about Jews and elites?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Mr. Anon

  198. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Lang: Basic Mathematics

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Thank you

  199. @Harry Baldwin
    @Dr. X

    Marx was certainly right about how capitalism demands a reserve army of the unemployed.

    Replies: @guest, @Anonymous

    He was wrong about that because it isn’t true.

  200. @Buck Turgidson
    @James Kabala

    Behold the world's most evil, forced, phony, unnatural, ungenuine smile. As soon as the cameras are gone she is back to being a b***h on wheels, yelling at her inferiors, cursing like trooper, and telling someone to get her a beer. Read the accounts of the SS agents who have had to work in her orbit. That smile creeps me out.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I have talked with a couple of people who personally know or who have worked with secret-service agents who have been detailed to protect Hillary and have talked about it with them. They all despise her.

  201. @Rob McX
    Wikipedia has it right and the NYT is wrong. "Lady de Rothschild" is correct. Putting her given name between title and surname - "Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild" - is wrong.

    When you read articles like this, you begin to see that the two-party system is just a cartel to keep the cost of running for office artificially high, rather than a contest between people of opposing ideologies. Deep-pocketed donors feed millions into the campaigns of candidates who don't differ from each other on the vital issues like immigration. It ensures that no honest man can break up the racket unless he's as rich as Donald Trump. But the very rich are happy with the status quo. I doubt if any American billionaire loses a minute's sleep over which party wins an election.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    “When you read articles like this, you begin to see that the two-party system is just a cartel to keep the cost of running for office artificially high, rather than a contest between people of opposing ideologies. ”

    Well said. I think there’s a lot of truth to that.

  202. My godfather also couldn’t get a membership at Maidstone. But he could get people a round if they were visiting. I gave up a spot at the National for my brother-in-law (who is Jewish) this year. He’s much more the golfer in the family. He said my acquaintance that got him in immediately starting asking him questions on ask he first tee about immigration, the changing national culture etc. 🙂

    Sir Paul is married to Nancy Shevell, wealthy in her own right (and quite the looker for 57 or so, and seems a step up from the one legged gold digger he married before) and already a Hamptons fixture. He’s out there all summer and from what I hear a great guy.

  203. @Anonymous
    @Name Withheld

    Why Were So Many Madoff Victims Jewish?

    The trust people tend to feel toward others in the same ethnic, racial, and political groups makes them easy targets for scammers.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/02/madoff-jewish-affinity-fraud/460446/

    Replies: @Alden

    Most of his victims were not Jewish individual investors
    Most were municipal endowments, hospital endowments and huge pension funds

    After he was exposed the Jews went on their typical victim mode. The Jewish owned newspapers featured little old widows in Palm Beach and the upper west side of NYC. But they were less than one percent. For decades Madoff went after pension funds and endowments.

  204. @BB753
    Does Paul McCartney really need to make private gigs for the mega-rich to make ends meet? Maybe Jon Bon Jovi does, but Sir Paul?

    Replies: @eggheadshadhisnumber, @Anonym, @Neil Templeton, @Jack Highlands, @Erik L, @DCThrowback

    Beta-indemnities to one-legged celebrities aren’t cheap.

  205. @Jus' Sayin'...
    This reads almost as if one or more members of the NYT staff is subtly but deliberately trying to ensure that Hillary Rodham Clinton will not be our next president. (I'm thinking of the underground propaganda efforts against The Prophet in Heinlein's novella, "If This Goes on...") Perhaps these persons have become aware that Hillary is (a) Corrupt (b) Incompetent (c) Physically and mentally incapacitated (d) An alcoholic (e) Demonically possessed (f) All of the above.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Marc, @Hibernian

    This could also be an extreme example of a lack of self-awareness. It’s like they don’t realize how bad this attempt at showing Hillary’s vibrancy comes across outside of the Northeastern Corridor. The actual level of modern leftist snobbery eclipses any fictional portrayal of out-of-touch WASP’s in 1980’s film/TV. Hillary should resurrect the old “Poverty Sucks” poster for the 2016 campaign.

  206. Not to keep beating the dead McCartney horse, but is Paul really that stupid not to see that getting his picture taken with HRC would be like Lennon having a selfie with Nixon?
    Though Elvis did have a photo with Nixon, so the analogy doesn’t entirely hold.
    The point is that these celebs pretend they are cutting edge, career riskers as they take the safe choices. Have some hormones like Clint or James Woods or Alveda King.

  207. @celt darnell

    Mr. Trump has pointed to Mrs. Clinton’s noticeably scant schedule of campaign events this summer to suggest she has been hiding from the public. But Mrs. Clinton has been more than accessible to those who reside in some of the country’s most moneyed enclaves and are willing to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to see her....

    ....And while Mrs. Clinton has faced criticism for her failure to hold a news conference for months, she has fielded hundreds of questions from the ultrarich in places like the Hamptons, Martha’s Vineyard, Beverly Hills and Silicon Valley.
     
    Does the NY Times have any clue how this sounds?

    Honest to God, it's enough to turn me into a Marxist.

    Replies: @Dr. X, @Thea, @Mr. Anon, @pyrrhus, @rod1963, @Lagertha

    Does the NY Times have any clue how this sounds?

    No, they don’t. In fact I’d expect nothing less from them. They think giving a giants middle-finger to the people is SOP.

    But yeah they do make her come off as a poster child for why the entire system needs to be destroyed and the elites vanquished.

    Still the fact that she attends fund raisers(most via proxies) is that when she shows up, it’s for a very brief speech, some meet and greet with the elites then she disappears. It looks like every place she gives a speech she’s either on a couch or stool.

    In fact she is quite sick, the bulky clothes that is hiding some sort of medical device, the bodyguard with the Epipen at the ready, her stove pipe lower legs(which weren’t there when she was in the White House with Slick)her need to be helped up steps all points to very sick woman.

  208. The most deplorable one [AKA "The Fourth Political Theory"] says:

    I just discovered Walt Bismark:

    This brings a whole new meaning to Disney Propaganda.

  209. OT but I have had a eureka moment. Progressivism is dead into open borders and no countries because people used to own their countries and their borders, and these idiots do not believe in such a right of ownership. They actually prefer Zuck to have his billions than Bob to have his share in America as they see Zuck as having earnt his cash and Bob merely inherited his citizenship.

    Progressisvism is nothing if not that the elect must somehow be entirely soi disant and fully deserving of all of the virtue which might be recognised in them. It is every progressive trying to our signal Jesus. It is bizarre.

  210. @BB753
    Does Paul McCartney really need to make private gigs for the mega-rich to make ends meet? Maybe Jon Bon Jovi does, but Sir Paul?

    Replies: @eggheadshadhisnumber, @Anonym, @Neil Templeton, @Jack Highlands, @Erik L, @DCThrowback

    I saw a thing on 60 minutes a few years ago which indicated that Bon Jovi was the most successful touring musician of the day (or something like that). It was really counter intuitive to me that of all the 80s acts his would be the one still going strong. I don’t think he’s hurting for cash

  211. @anon

    “It’s like going to a wedding or a bar mitzvah — you catch up,” explained Mitchell Berger,
     
    So was this line just deliberate troll bait, or what?

    Replies: @Alec Leamas

    It’s a form of Jewish passive aggression, similar to when they use Yiddishisms in mixed company with people they know aren’t familiar with them. In this case, it’s also a sideways boast about their power as financiers of the political parties, particularly the Donkey Club. But then again, Hillary and Web Hubbell’s grandchildren are half Jewish ethically and there really hasn’t been much discussion about whether they’re being raised in Hillary’s leftish social justice Methodism or the Margolies-Mesvinskys’ leftish social justice reform Judaism so an actual Bar/Bat Mitzvah is still a distinct possibility.

  212. @Marat
    @PiltdownMan

    Ditto for Sir Elton John who made two recent appearances at private homes in Silicon Valley. Sans the hubby. These two small groups were far wealthier than he is reported to be. Lots of trophy photographing around the piano. Their favorite political pastime is to bash Trump's bird as being an old, slow guzzler and then speculate on his true net worth.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Their favorite political pastime is to bash Trump’s bird as being an old, slow guzzler

    What jerks. Melania looks great for her age.

    • Replies: @onlyonegirlforbarry
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    He's talking about the Trump airplane. Trendies buy the latest Gulfstreams, more than a used airliner, but they use a lot less fuel.

    Replies: @Lurker, @Jenner Ickham Errican

  213. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    Hillary’s polls have been slipping, and I think she really hurt herself with a combination of the alt-right speech and the bad reports about her health. The average American doesn’t follow politics closely, and when Hillary devoted a major political speech to carrying on about an enemy they’ve never heard of, that makes the average voter think, ‘Crazy, paranoid old lady,’ and look more closely at the reports about her hitting her head and her poor health.

    It hasn’t helped that a TV show was cancelled for talking about Hillary’s health, because the average American does watch TV, and they’ll notice that. It comes across as dictatorial, high-handed, and vindictive. Most Americans have enough horse sense to conclude that where there’s smoke, there’s fire. The fact that Hillary’s campaign has announced that she’s taking weekends off (real presidents don’t truly take weekends off, because they’re always ‘on call’ like doctors, and the average voter expects that), and the fact that she’s dodging press conferences, only reinforce the narrative that her health is bad, and she is not up to the stain of handling the presidency.

    Back when Hillary had to take a ‘bathroom break’ during that debate, I doubt it was an actual bathroom break. Hardcore politicians have ways of dealing with this. They just stick on a pair of Depends before the debate and keeping plugging away, because they know the appearance of weakness on the stand is a career-destroyer. Hillary almost certainly was having a dizzy spell.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Anon

    Well, maybe those Depends needed changing?

    , @Marat
    @Anon

    Dizzy spell rather than bathroom tardiness makes a lot of sense. She's not in front of the camera that much, yet something "short-circuits" in high enough instances that it is hard not to notice.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Anon

    reinforce the narrative that her health is bad, and she is not up to the stain of handling the presidency.

    When it comes to the presidency, Bill handles the stains.

  214. @iSteveFan
    I thought American citizens were not supposed to have titles. Is this the case? If so, did she have to give up her American citizenship to get that title? If so, why is she allowed to donate to our political campaigns?


    Second, how are these people able to donate $250K? I thought there was a $2.7K limit. Are they just donating to PACs?

    Third, where the f**k is the occupy wall street crowd? Where are the bernie supporters? If this story doesn't cause them to not vote for Hillary, then they never believed in their philosophy to begin with. They don't have to vote Trump. They can vote Jill Stein. But if they vote Hillary, they are hypocrites.

    Replies: @James Kabala, @guest, @rod1963

    You ever see pictures of a Hillary rally?

    She’s lucky to draw a crowd of 500. Her American Legion speech was in front of maybe 200 people. I suspect it’s one reason she stopped doing rallies.

    And I don’t think Bernie supporters want anything to do with her now. She’s lost them. I suspect it’s the reason the MSM has ceased mentioning them, even though they are still pissed at her.

    The point is she’s not anywhere near as popular as the MSM makes her out to be. Fact is Democratic participation this time around is down 20% from 2008.

    People don’t want Hillary.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @rod1963


    She’s lucky to draw a crowd of 500. Her American Legion speech was in front of maybe 200 people. I suspect it’s one reason she stopped doing rallies.
     
    I've been looking on YouTube for videos of this and, other than the DNC, she plays to tiny crowds. Even to call them rallies is to debase the word. Trump has rallies, she has intimate gatherings.

    Replies: @mobi

  215. On the far right side of history the AfD beat Merkel’s party in a recent regional election in former East Germany, but the SPD (Merkel’s coalition partners) got even more votes, so they are only second. It’s still something to cheer about, since at least AfD’s chances of becoming a contender for the main rightist party just grew stronger.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @reiner Tor

    I can't see the Germans allowing a far right party to become the dominant partner--too many bad memories.

    They might cut down on immigration though. And that might be enough.

    Replies: @guest, @reiner Tor

  216. @syonredux
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Hillary Clinton is our Marie Antoinette.
     
    One doubts that Burke would agree:

    It is now sixteen or seventeen years since I saw the queen of France, then the dauphiness, at Versailles; and surely never lighted on this orb, which she hardly seemed to touch, a more delightful vision. I saw her just above the horizon, decorating and cheering the elevated sphere she just began to move in,—glittering like the morning-star, full of life, and splendour, and joy. Oh! what a revolution! and what a heart must I have to contemplate without emotion that elevation and that fall! Little did I dream when she added titles of veneration to those of enthusiastic, distant, respectful love, that she should ever be obliged to carry the sharp antidote against disgrace concealed in that bosom; little did I dream that I should have lived to see such disasters fallen upon her in a nation of gallant men, in a nation of men of honour, and of cavaliers. I thought ten thousand swords must have leaped from their scabbards to avenge even a look that threatened her with insult. But the age of chivalry is gone. That of sophisters, economists, and calculators, has succeeded; and the glory of Europe is extinguished for ever. Never, never more shall we behold that generous loyalty to rank and sex, that proud submission, that dignified obedience, that subordination of the heart, which kept alive, even in servitude itself, the spirit of an exalted freedom. The unbought grace of life, the cheap defence of nations, the nurse of manly sentiment and heroic enterprise, is gone! It is gone, that sensibility of principle, that charity of honor, which felt a stain like a wound, which inspired courage whilst it mitigated ferocity, which ennobled whatever it touched, and under which vice itself lost half its evil, by losing all its grossness.
     

    Replies: @David In TN, @dcite

    For some reason, Marie Antoinette was taken to the guillotine in wooden cart, hands tied behind her — why? When she stumbled on the platform, as you might expect with her hands tied behind, she asked the executioner’s pardon when she stepped on his foot. But during executions, those sorts of civilities occurred in Christian Europe, for the executed to forgive the executioner his duty. They also had to pay the executioner, usually on the spot. Of course that’s if the execution was to be fairly quick.
    At least they took the King to the guillotine inside a horse drawn carriage.
    Country of gallants indeed.
    HRC — who might deserve such a fate — will probably die in a hospital and get a state funeral. We may even get stuck with a HRC holliday.

  217. The most deplorable one [AKA "The Fourth Political Theory"] says:

    Steve makes an appearance in the following video:

    There are some skills out there when it comes to taking existing songs and changing them.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @The most deplorable one

    Ramz now has a verified account from Twitter.

  218. @Anonymous
    “I stand between you and the apocalypse,” a confident Mrs. Clinton declared to laughs, exhibiting a flash of self-awareness and humor to a crowd that included Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein and for whom the prospect of a Donald J. Trump presidency is dire.

    A Trump presidency would be "dire" for Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein? What is their fear exactly? Presumably, both men lead comfortable lives without a want in the world and it would seem probable they would continue to do so under almost any near-term eventuality.

    Is Klein worried that Trump would impose tariffs on textile imports? What on earth is Weinstein's concern?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon930, @JohnnyWalker123, @5371, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @Almost Missouri, @old okie

    When your doing something you know is wrong you live in fear of discovery

  219. @Patriot
    @eggheadshadhisnumber

    She also funded The School for Kids Who Can't Read Good and Want to Learn to do Other Things Good Too.

    Replies: @Je Suis Charlie Martel, @Zonie

    Ha! I was also thinking Zoolander when I read Lady de Rothschild’s quote. She really exudes patronizing plutocratic do-gooder ignorance. She seems very enthused with mathematics, but somehow I doubt this enthusiasm extends to her having focused on trigonometry or probability in her own schooling, or to her persuading her children to major in STEM subjects in college. These are subjects for middle-class strivers, not leaders and rulers. Master businessman and salesman Steve Jobs was supremely bored by engineering details and the Aspergery dweebs who made the gadgets work, but he loved design, aesthetics, and marketing.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Zonie

    Didn't Jobs start by figuring out how to cheat the telephone company through reverse engineering? Most technical companies are headed (and startups founded) by engineer managers.

    Replies: @Former Darfur

  220. @celt darnell

    Mr. Trump has pointed to Mrs. Clinton’s noticeably scant schedule of campaign events this summer to suggest she has been hiding from the public. But Mrs. Clinton has been more than accessible to those who reside in some of the country’s most moneyed enclaves and are willing to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to see her....

    ....And while Mrs. Clinton has faced criticism for her failure to hold a news conference for months, she has fielded hundreds of questions from the ultrarich in places like the Hamptons, Martha’s Vineyard, Beverly Hills and Silicon Valley.
     
    Does the NY Times have any clue how this sounds?

    Honest to God, it's enough to turn me into a Marxist.

    Replies: @Dr. X, @Thea, @Mr. Anon, @pyrrhus, @rod1963, @Lagertha

    Blech! How revolting! I couldn’t believe my eyes when reading this! All the Millennials I know say that America is a Plutocracy and there is no hope until all Baby Boomers are dead/or at least incapacitated in nursing homes. They will pry back America from the cold dead fingers of these revolting Plutocrats who cling to their champagne and waterfront real estate (oh, and Maidstone is still very picky who gets in/they don’t like any publicity).

    Trump 1, Clinton 0 with this bizarre article – I mean, she can’t give press conferences since she is too busy partying, hat -in-hand with billionaires at their summer homes?! Let them eat cake. This article needs to be broadcasted in a big way all over the Rust Belt/Plains/South – some Millennial is gonna go to town with this on Youtube. And, sheesh, she really let southerners know that the North East is still the preferred, “classier” place to summer.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Lagertha

    "All the Millennials I know say that America is a Plutocracy and there is no hope until all Baby Boomers are dead/or at least incapacitated in nursing homes."

    I don't think that pitting Americans of different generations against each other is helpful and wishing for the death of any particular generation is a helpful strategy to making our country better. It's divisive. Most baby boomers are not plutocrats, and among baby boomers there is great variation. Instead, we'd be better off on focusing on the individuals who truly are damaging our country.

    Replies: @Lagertha

    , @wren
    @Lagertha

    I am really puzzled over the contortions anyone who supported bernie needs to go through to support Hillary.

    Look at this:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3773358/Welcome-lavish-life-investor-George-Soros-little-known-playboy-son.html

    Material for about ten Steve posts in that article. Jewish Dionysus, according to his Ph.D. thesis. Posing with Hillary.

    Sick!

    As an aside, I didn't know George Soros was married to someone named Tamiko.

    Replies: @wren, @guest, @Marat

    , @Anonymous
    @Lagertha

    No, the Millennials you know will get older and try to secure plutocrat status for themselves.

  221. @Prof. Woland
    Bed death or deathbed?

    One of the untold stories of this election is that Trump and Clinton are both perfect examples of unrestrained male and female behavior. In corner #1 you have Hillary who is the proverbial one-and-done mom who milked her husband for everything she could. There is no question who got the better of that deal. We are supposed to pity her but the reason Bill Clinton was flying from flower to flower is that he was chewing ice his entire marriage. He was the most alpha guy imaginable with a hyper sex drive and all he has to show for it are two grand kids that materialized very late in the game.

    In corner #2 you have a guy who is a serial monogamist. He has lots of money. He builds things. He dates beautiful women and always on his terms. All of his wives have signed pre-nups. He can have a dozen gorgeous women wrapped around his arm and yet he is the one who sucks the oxygen out of the room.

    There is a reason every short haired post menopausal shrew wants Hillary elected.

    Replies: @SFG, @dcite

    good god, make up your minds. Either she is a man in drag, a dyke, or she’s some uber-female force sucking the masculinity out of comparatively noble Bill. No pun intended in that sentence.
    She’s your idea of unrestrained “female” behavior? Her behavior is pretty standard for Machiavellians. The sexes just have different tools to work with. Her indifference to the psychologically interesting and vile insults constantly bandied about (don’t think they are not aware), suggests to me a fundamentally male way of viewing things. She doesn’t care. To win and rule is the best revenge.

    Like most of the people who want to rule us, neither candidate is to be trusted. Anyone who really wants to be president, you have to ask “what’s in it for him/her?”
    Trump is an outlier because of wealth and indifference to certain Powers That Be, and to insults. There are not many like that, who also run for president. He’s saying the things that the vast majority know are true, and he’s entertaining to boot, providing us and himself with lots of female eye candy — and after 8 yrs of M.O., thank god. He’s also muddled and emotive. Actually both these candidates display extreme behavior, but there’s no clear Manichean division of types.

  222. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @pepperinmono
    @Steve Sailer

    While I agree that McCartney deserves to be much, much richer if not for the taxes and the ripoffs, it is not about the money for him.
    From all the various Beatle biographies, he has a clear hangup that people see Lennon as the hipper SJW type than he.
    In reality, the idea that either is anything more than a member of the greatest songwriting team ever(nothing to scoff at, that) is absurd.
    His postLennon attempts at rejuvenating that image and staying relevant are embarrassing.
    You're Paul fucking McCartney, dude !
    Ain't that enough?
    Stop it already!

    Replies: @Anonymous

    His post Lennon attempts at rejuvenating that image and staying relevant are embarrassing.

    Bullshit. McCartney wrote and recorded more and better songs post-Lennon than Lennon did in his entire lifetime without McCartney. This is true even if restricted to the time of John’s death – some of the Wings output is spectacular and is being looked down only because people can’t get over the whole Beatles thing.

    • Replies: @pepperinmono
    @Anonymous

    Not talking about the music. McCartney ' s post Beatles stuff is way better than Lennon's and is really good, except past few years .

    Replies: @Brutusale

  223. @SFG
    @Prof. Woland

    It's possible he benefited somehow. He did need a wife who would put up with his philandering. My opinion is that it's an open marriage and they support each other with what really counts--their political ambitions. Worked out pretty well for them--two presidencies or at least a presidency and a senatorship--don't you think?

    Replies: @Lagertha, @Prof. Woland

    I still can’t get the image of Bill shoving a cigar up Monica’s vag in the Oval Office. My husband would be dead after such a revolting, sociopathic stunt stunt.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Lagertha

    My mom couldn't get over the idea of starting a war for personal gain. But people do it, obviously.

    , @Expletive Deleted
    @Lagertha

    I'll bet you can't do smoke-rings.

    Replies: @Lagertha

    , @larry lurker
    @Lagertha

    "It tastes good."

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Lagertha

    There's worse, you know, in the Starr report. She tossed his salad, as the gays say.

    Replies: @5371, @BB753

    , @Brutusale
    @Lagertha

    I only got through 2 pages of my girlfriend's notes on the various and sundry foreign objects patients have had removed from their orifices in her hospital's emergency room. You really can't plumb the depths of humanity's perversions.

  224. @James Kabala
    @iSteveFan

    No, although a ban almost was passed (and some claim it actually was): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titles_of_Nobility_Amendment

    Even if this amendment had been adopted, I think it would have applied only to those given titles in their own right, not to someone who married a titleholder. (Wives of knights are indeed called Lady, but that is not a title directly from the monarch.)

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @Name Withheld, @frayed_thread, @Anonymous

    Hmm at my naturalization a few years ago I had to renounce my title as the Padishah Emperor of the Known Universe.

  225. @SFG
    @Prof. Woland

    It's possible he benefited somehow. He did need a wife who would put up with his philandering. My opinion is that it's an open marriage and they support each other with what really counts--their political ambitions. Worked out pretty well for them--two presidencies or at least a presidency and a senatorship--don't you think?

    Replies: @Lagertha, @Prof. Woland

    Hillary needed Bill Clinton much more than the other way around. In effect, both of them were ‘beards’ for the other but for Bill it was only because we live in a culture where single sexually active men are not really allowed to run for higher office yet; and maybe never (paging whiskey). Being married is like a brand or seal of approval (collar) on a male politician. Any wife would have served that purpose, including an attractive younger fertile one like trump. In effect, Hillary was hiding her lack of sex drive behind the marriage as well and all Bill got out of it was very little pleasure and one daughter.

    With the Trump candidacy we are finally witnessing a man possibly getting elected who has always sexually done things on his terms without groveling to women. We are not just getting comfortable with increased female roles in society but men’s as well, something which is causing die hard feminists to become spitting mad. I am sure this is one big reason so many older women hate hate hate Trump. Women still need men for money and power but not so much the other way around and they all know it.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Prof. Woland


    we live in a culture where single sexually active men are not really allowed to run for higher office yet
     
    Jerry Brown

    Replies: @Hibernian

    , @Marat
    @Prof. Woland

    Any opinion on how average married women would react if they were told Hillary and Bill were in an open marriage? That's a different case than the assumption that Hillary soldiered on with Bill's perpetual zipper problem.

    Replies: @BB753

  226. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Lagertha
    @celt darnell

    Blech! How revolting! I couldn't believe my eyes when reading this! All the Millennials I know say that America is a Plutocracy and there is no hope until all Baby Boomers are dead/or at least incapacitated in nursing homes. They will pry back America from the cold dead fingers of these revolting Plutocrats who cling to their champagne and waterfront real estate (oh, and Maidstone is still very picky who gets in/they don't like any publicity).

    Trump 1, Clinton 0 with this bizarre article - I mean, she can't give press conferences since she is too busy partying, hat -in-hand with billionaires at their summer homes?! Let them eat cake. This article needs to be broadcasted in a big way all over the Rust Belt/Plains/South - some Millennial is gonna go to town with this on Youtube. And, sheesh, she really let southerners know that the North East is still the preferred, "classier" place to summer.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @wren, @Anonymous

    “All the Millennials I know say that America is a Plutocracy and there is no hope until all Baby Boomers are dead/or at least incapacitated in nursing homes.”

    I don’t think that pitting Americans of different generations against each other is helpful and wishing for the death of any particular generation is a helpful strategy to making our country better. It’s divisive. Most baby boomers are not plutocrats, and among baby boomers there is great variation. Instead, we’d be better off on focusing on the individuals who truly are damaging our country.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    @Anonymous

    yeah, I know. But "a divisive country" is what it has been for many decades now. I'm just "telling it like it is." I am a Boomer.

    And, the Neocons, politicians, CEOs, Wall Street, the "society" & celebrity people in this article, are Boomers...and the "focusing" part isn't stopping this large group of Plutocrats and sycophants. Millennials can't be controlled. They have realized that The Dems & GOP don't care about them, and that they get stuck with a life of debt. That's not "pitting"; that's just pitiful. Millennials are not optimistic, and lecturing to them won't help anymore - something needs to happen for them to feel that the "U.S. government" is not a bunch of grifters.

  227. What strikes me today about the Left and the Cucks is that they keep believing that, eventually, their billionaire donors will save them, and this angry rabble supporting Trump will go right back to being good little unwoke stooges for their globalistic plans once they calm down.

    For the Left/Cucks, agitation must be organized, artificial, minority-based, and run by Mr. Soros. This groundswell, individualistic rage by whites is cognitive dissonance to their worldview and religion. Hence why the Left/Cucks are doubling-down on ignoring the complaints and adhering to the donors; its much like when any true believer is first given information that undercuts their beliefs, they tend to become more radical in believing their beliefs, not less.

    Trump is refreshingly honest about not being a member of the working class or middle class but yet not condescending to them; he respects your lifestyle even if he thinks his is better. He finds common ground with you that he can honestly share. Hillary, like the rest of the Left/Cucks, condescends to pretend she’s one of you, when really she’s a 1%er and doesn’t respect you at all.

    Ultimately, Trump’s respect-without-pretention-or-condescencion works better diplomatically. When president, Trump’s not going to go to France or Hungary and pretend to be Mexican or Hungarian. But he will find common ground they can all agree on, and respect them for their differences. As he just showed with Mexico, he found common ground with the Mexican President and Mexican politics without losing his own beliefs or condescension. Mexico wants strong borders, and the U.S. wants strong borders, all to keep Mexico Mexican and the U.S. American.

    Hillary probably tried to pretend with each nation/ambassador/head of state that she was just like them and their people. And failed utterly. Hence the “Russian Reset Button” fiasco. It’s why we’re in antagonistic relations with Russia, China is acting aggressively, and she completely missed the Muslim migration backlash. Phoniness never works long-term.

  228. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “…do I need to acquire and study regular textbooks on these subjects in addition to these books?”

    Other responders have better advice than I could give… but about “standard textbooks”… often you do not need these as much as you might think. They often seem to have been written to take all the beauty out of things and be as big as possible. It can really help understanding for things to be concise. Sometimes these ponderous texts make good reference books.

    Maybe somebody pays the committees that writes standard ugrad and high school math textbooks by the inch or the pound. They often seem like Stalinist architecture.

    Just jump in, look around, see where things start to click, then do stuff. If nothing else “write your own book to yourself” on an area as you explore books in that field. Also, when you are really reading math to understand, don’t skip anything. Students so often seem to leverage speed-reading effectively in other areas that they try to speed-read math, with bad consequences. Speed-reading is important when you’re search for what math to read, but a lot of the secret of reading math is just to go slow (and don’t give up; keep backing up if you have to until things make sense).

    I’ve seen it written that there are 3 ways to study mathematics (sort of extemporaneously making this up):

    (1) Theoretical (what a mathematician would study, the subject as a sort of minimized tree of the most careful thought about the simplest representation of problems that one can conceive);

    (2) Applied (what an engineer would study, the subject as a set of recognizable problems and approaches known to work to find solutions in that problem space);

    (3) Historical (following the evolution of a particular field or problem). When the other two approaches don’t work, this is the fallback. Because the human mind seems to glom onto stories well, this can also be a good approach when jumping into math for your own ends.

    Also, don’t overlook online resources. Wikipedia seems to have a table of contents for all their math articles: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Mathematics.

    I also just discovered that Wikipedia seems to have an effort to do what they call Wikipeda Books. These seems to be organized collections of wikipedia articles that make the equivalent of an e-book. I imagine this is an attempt to provide a coherent overview to a large bunch of related articles. They probably still don’t “flow” as well as a good book, of course, but they can be read online, are free, and the ability to follow all the links “back” could be helpful. This is what they have on math: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Wikipedia_books_on_mathematics. For instance, they have a book on statistics: “Statistics review:
    Including a probability theory background”
    . No idea what these “books” are like; probably feel too cyclopediaish but a good way to explore odd corners.

    If you think of math as the most careful thinking you can do about the simplest form of the problem, you can see that it is an immense open-ended subject. Don’t let that bother you, clear thinking is always helpful.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @anonymous

    sort of minimized tree of the most careful thought about the simplest representation of problems that one can conceive);

    Could you explicate, elaborate on this idea, which you also may have returned to in the last sentence of your post? I don't know that I quite grasp what you mean.

    Thank you very much for that post, in any event.

  229. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux
    @Steve Richter


    Are the big democrat donors mostly Jewish? Are there any more rich Gentiles in the Hamptons?
     
    Well, let's use the article as a test-case:

    “I stand between you and the apocalypse,” a confident Mrs. Clinton declared to laughs, exhibiting a flash of self-awareness and humor to a crowd that included Calvin Klein and Harvey Weinstein

     


    “It’s the old adage, you go to where the money is,” said Jay S. Jacobs, a prominent New York Democrat.
     
    Jacobs is not always a Jewish name, but...

    “It’s like going to a wedding or a bar mitzvah — you catch up,” explained Mitchell Berger, a Democratic donor in Florida, about the familial nature of the events. …
     
    That's some pretty bold signalling on the J-Dar....

    Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild, a backer of Democrats and a friend of the Clintons’, made sure attendees did not grill Mrs. Clinton at the $100,000-per-couple lamb dinner Mrs. Forester de Rothschild hosted under a tent on the lawn of her oceanfront Martha’s Vineyard mansion.

     

    Are the de Rothschilds still Jewish? Did Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild convert? Exercises for the student.

    This year, the former first couple stayed in the guesthouse of Steven Spielberg’s East Hampton compound built on nine acres overlooking Georgica and Lily Ponds.
     

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Sir Evelyn de Rothschild is purebred, the son of Anthony Gustav de Rothschild and Yvonne Cahen d’Anvers. However, two of his three wives including Ms. Forester have been non-Jews. His similar age cousin Jacob Rothschild, the holder of the Rothschild family’s British peerage dating to the latter part of Queen Victoria’s reign, is half-Jewish, son of Victor de Rothschild and Barbara Hutchinson. Jacob’s wife, Serena Mary Dunn, is the daughter of Sir Philip Dunn and Lady Mary St. Clair-Erskine, who was herself the daughter of the 5th Earl of Rosslyn. I believe that Jacob Rothschild’s wife converted and that their quarter-Jewish children were all raised to consider themselves at least nominally Jewish. Jacob Rothschild had a younger half-brother Amschel who was the product of Victor de Rothschild’s second marriage to a non-Jew, Teresa Mayor. Amschel married Anita Patience Guinness, an obvious non-Jew. One of his quarter-Jewish daughters, Kate, married a son of Sir James Goldsmith (half-Jew) by his third wife, Lady Annabel Vane-Tempest-Stewart in a Church of England ceremony, so the children seem to have been raised as Protestants. A few years ago Kate Rothschild had an affair with rapper Jay Electronica and divorced her husband. So in summary, the younger British Rothschilds are not pure Jews, but some of them consider themselves Jewish.

  230. @Lagertha
    @celt darnell

    Blech! How revolting! I couldn't believe my eyes when reading this! All the Millennials I know say that America is a Plutocracy and there is no hope until all Baby Boomers are dead/or at least incapacitated in nursing homes. They will pry back America from the cold dead fingers of these revolting Plutocrats who cling to their champagne and waterfront real estate (oh, and Maidstone is still very picky who gets in/they don't like any publicity).

    Trump 1, Clinton 0 with this bizarre article - I mean, she can't give press conferences since she is too busy partying, hat -in-hand with billionaires at their summer homes?! Let them eat cake. This article needs to be broadcasted in a big way all over the Rust Belt/Plains/South - some Millennial is gonna go to town with this on Youtube. And, sheesh, she really let southerners know that the North East is still the preferred, "classier" place to summer.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @wren, @Anonymous

    I am really puzzled over the contortions anyone who supported bernie needs to go through to support Hillary.

    Look at this:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3773358/Welcome-lavish-life-investor-George-Soros-little-known-playboy-son.html

    Material for about ten Steve posts in that article. Jewish Dionysus, according to his Ph.D. thesis. Posing with Hillary.

    Sick!

    As an aside, I didn’t know George Soros was married to someone named Tamiko.

    • Replies: @wren
    @wren

    The top photo in the article is Soros' son next to the girl from Pussy Riot who was jailed by Putin for two years. I think.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pussy_Riot

    , @guest
    @wren

    I don't think it requires contortions. Our two party system is simple. That's why it's lasted. They only have to prefer her to the other guy.

    Replies: @wren

    , @Marat
    @wren

    The sudden coverage looks like a PR campaign to keep Soros juju going long term. Getting junior off to a good start with Millenials (whose children he will eventually hope to influence).

  231. @newrouter
    @iSteveFan

    if we are doing amendments, how about an Art V conv. of states to remove the authority to raise the debt ceiling from the fed govt. and giving it to 3/4 of state legislatures. this topic is little more important than titles of nobility. yo citizens: find your inner dave ramsey and cut up the fed gov't's credit card.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    ” find your inner dave ramsey ”
    And worship at the altar of a war-mongering neocon militaristic zionist?

    Nah.

  232. @wren
    @Lagertha

    I am really puzzled over the contortions anyone who supported bernie needs to go through to support Hillary.

    Look at this:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3773358/Welcome-lavish-life-investor-George-Soros-little-known-playboy-son.html

    Material for about ten Steve posts in that article. Jewish Dionysus, according to his Ph.D. thesis. Posing with Hillary.

    Sick!

    As an aside, I didn't know George Soros was married to someone named Tamiko.

    Replies: @wren, @guest, @Marat

    The top photo in the article is Soros’ son next to the girl from Pussy Riot who was jailed by Putin for two years. I think.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pussy_Riot

  233. @middle aged vet
    Anonymous at 4:04 AM - Thanks for reading my comment! Keeping in mind that math is more about practice and experience than it is about reading books, I would recommend these two as a minimum - George Simmons - Precalculus Math in a Nutshell - covers high school math with the goal of not overdoing it. Richard Silverman - Essential calculus with applications. This is the only math book I have ever read that reads like a novel - that is, read every word, and there is a complete story (it is basically Calc One , but from the point of view of someone who wants to understand the concepts). Those are, if not the most important, the most central. Once you are past that rigorous minimum, you might be interested in Posamentier on triangles (covering high school geometry but with the precision of art), and Maor, who I mentioned earlier, on trig. Derbyshire's book on the Riemann hypothesis is one of the most amazing books I have ever read. If you want to have an idea of what college math is really about after the first year, try Havil on the Gamma function (basically a pleasant way to understand Calculus 2, but don't expect to understand all of this this book, or for that matter, all of any of the books recommended here except for the first two), E, the story of a number by Maor (again) for an interesting look at the basics of analysis and the reasons why calc 1 makes sense, and any of the hundreds of well-written books on recreational math (also, the Khan academy, free online, is fantastic at helping people picture what things like linear algebra are really about). If you are satisfied, as almost all of us need to be, with sympathetically understanding mathematicians without necessarily knowing too much about math, Hardy's A Mathematician's Apology is great. That being said, I do not like to recommend books on math - understanding math is, for me, more like the sense of knowing that you are dreaming when you are dreaming (really) than it is like giving a book report on the last book I read.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @RudyM

    Appreciate these off-topic recommendations, since I too would like to brush up on my math, significantly. The older I get, the more I see its significance and inherent interest. Unfortunately, it will have to wait until my overall health is better and I’m better able to focus on challenging material, if that time ever comes. I might try to force the issue within the next year. I think I will need a class setting of some sort to really get me started though, but that’s not an obstacle since I have free access to classes of various sorts.

  234. @syonredux
    Huh. Rather interesting to juxtapose this:

    (Mr. Trump feels more at home at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla., than in the Hamptons, where the exclusive Maidstone Club once denied him a full-time membership, according to The New York Post.)
     
    With That:

    To the Trumpettes, the candidate’s lack of governing experience is irrelevant. The proof of his ability to make America great again is in his business empire and the properties contained within it, places Trumpettes know well.
    “The reason I love his club and Trump International is because it’s perfection,” Kramer said of Mar-a-Lago, his private Palm Beach club, and Trump’s nearby golf course. “That’s the way he’ll run the country.
     
    http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/09/donald-trump-2016-trumpettes-bel-air-214206

    Perhaps taste in country clubs is the true cultural fault-line of the 21st century?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Trump can’t take total credit for Mar-a-Lago. Before it was a Trump country club, Mar-a-Lago was an estate designed and built for Marjorie Meriweather Post.

  235. @Richard
    @eggheadshadhisnumber

    Interesting quotes. Lady de Rothschild seems to have scrubbed her site, so the only place you can still find the full text of the original speech is at a Chinese academic site:

    http://english.ckgsb.edu.cn/news_content/lady-de-rothschild-speaks-inclusive-capitalism-ckgsb

    One unintentionally funny passage you didn't mention is this one:

    "One pathway that we identified as very important is that business leaders require work forces that are educated for what their companies need. McKinsey did a study: the United States has 30 million jobs that cannot be filled because of a lack of people qualified for those jobs. Right now in America, in order to get accepted to Harvard, you have to study and be proficient in trigonometry. Are there any land surveyors in this room? No. That’s what trigonometry is for. Knowledge of probability, on the other hand is not required. However, probability and mathematical engineering skills are what are useful in a high-tech world. They’re not required in American higher education today. The McKinsey study also states that by 2030, there are going to be 85 million jobs that are not going to have people with the right skills. So we, as business leaders, need to step up and participate in educating the work force we need."

    I think Lady de Rothschild is correct to identify poor statistical knowledge among our social-political elite as a major problem in society, but could you find a passage more adept at unwittingly displaying it?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonym, @PiltdownMan, @metoo, @Neil Templeton, @Mr. Anon, @Forbes

    Her essential problem/challenge is that she read a ‘report’ from a consulting firm, and concludes the need for better qualified Harvard graduates to fill 30 million unfilled jobs.

    30 million unfilled jobs? Unfilled at what wage? Are the qualifications of Harvard grads a pressing need? Are they wanting for employment?

    And then we’re told (unskilled) immigration is necessary for all those jobs Americans won’t do…

    The contradictions are massive.

  236. @Lagertha
    @SFG

    I still can't get the image of Bill shoving a cigar up Monica's vag in the Oval Office. My husband would be dead after such a revolting, sociopathic stunt stunt.

    Replies: @SFG, @Expletive Deleted, @larry lurker, @Harry Baldwin, @Brutusale

    My mom couldn’t get over the idea of starting a war for personal gain. But people do it, obviously.

  237. @reiner Tor
    On the far right side of history the AfD beat Merkel's party in a recent regional election in former East Germany, but the SPD (Merkel's coalition partners) got even more votes, so they are only second. It's still something to cheer about, since at least AfD's chances of becoming a contender for the main rightist party just grew stronger.

    Replies: @SFG

    I can’t see the Germans allowing a far right party to become the dominant partner–too many bad memories.

    They might cut down on immigration though. And that might be enough.

    • Replies: @guest
    @SFG

    People with those memories will die.

    Replies: @reiner Tor

    , @reiner Tor
    @SFG

    Just one minor point: the AfD is only "far right" by the distorted optics of this age; in the 1960s it would've been centrist or perhaps centre-right.

  238. @James Kabala
    @iSteveFan

    No, although a ban almost was passed (and some claim it actually was): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titles_of_Nobility_Amendment

    Even if this amendment had been adopted, I think it would have applied only to those given titles in their own right, not to someone who married a titleholder. (Wives of knights are indeed called Lady, but that is not a title directly from the monarch.)

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @Name Withheld, @frayed_thread, @Anonymous

    Sir Evelyn de Rothschild was knighted by the Queen before he was even married to Lynn Forester. She is styled “Lady Evelyn de Rothschild” by courtesy only. If she were to divorce him, it would presumably be correct to cease calling her Lady, but observance of those rules has become lax.

  239. @wren
    @Lagertha

    I am really puzzled over the contortions anyone who supported bernie needs to go through to support Hillary.

    Look at this:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3773358/Welcome-lavish-life-investor-George-Soros-little-known-playboy-son.html

    Material for about ten Steve posts in that article. Jewish Dionysus, according to his Ph.D. thesis. Posing with Hillary.

    Sick!

    As an aside, I didn't know George Soros was married to someone named Tamiko.

    Replies: @wren, @guest, @Marat

    I don’t think it requires contortions. Our two party system is simple. That’s why it’s lasted. They only have to prefer her to the other guy.

    • Replies: @wren
    @guest

    I guess it doesn't require any cognitive dissonance if your level of PC thinking has hit orwell-level doublethink standards. And it has. The NYT reporter herself tweets that Clinton spent the whole summer with the 1%.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/amychozick/status/772122510360018945

    Replies: @guest

  240. @Anonymous
    @Lagertha

    "All the Millennials I know say that America is a Plutocracy and there is no hope until all Baby Boomers are dead/or at least incapacitated in nursing homes."

    I don't think that pitting Americans of different generations against each other is helpful and wishing for the death of any particular generation is a helpful strategy to making our country better. It's divisive. Most baby boomers are not plutocrats, and among baby boomers there is great variation. Instead, we'd be better off on focusing on the individuals who truly are damaging our country.

    Replies: @Lagertha

    yeah, I know. But “a divisive country” is what it has been for many decades now. I’m just “telling it like it is.” I am a Boomer.

    And, the Neocons, politicians, CEOs, Wall Street, the “society” & celebrity people in this article, are Boomers…and the “focusing” part isn’t stopping this large group of Plutocrats and sycophants. Millennials can’t be controlled. They have realized that The Dems & GOP don’t care about them, and that they get stuck with a life of debt. That’s not “pitting”; that’s just pitiful. Millennials are not optimistic, and lecturing to them won’t help anymore – something needs to happen for them to feel that the “U.S. government” is not a bunch of grifters.

  241. Given Clinton’s preferences, and shameless pursuit of them, Democrats just can’t possibly say with a straight face that the Republicans are more in the elite bubble than are they.

    Remember the punishment Romney took over his 47% remark? How can Clinton pretend to be more sympathetic to average working class voters than was he?

    And how can a so-called “progressive” defend her attitudes? Where’s the anger against the “1%” they profess to feel to be found in her activities? If they support Clinton, what is the point of their existence?

    And Clinton knows that her media supporters won’t give her any kind of real problem over her unabashed worship of the rich–that’s why she feels free to engage in it.

    The separation of the political and chattering class and that of working and middle class Americans has now become complete.

  242. @Svigor
    Would a Jewish woman get a name like "Lynn Forester"? Sure, it's possible, but...

    Replies: @syonredux, @Anonymous

    Lynn Forester wasn’t born Jewish. Her parents were Annabelle, née Hewitt, and John Kenneth Forester. She may not even have converted, but I think it’s likely that she did given that both her second and third husbands are Jewish.

  243. @Anonymous
    @pepperinmono


    His post Lennon attempts at rejuvenating that image and staying relevant are embarrassing.
     
    Bullshit. McCartney wrote and recorded more and better songs post-Lennon than Lennon did in his entire lifetime without McCartney. This is true even if restricted to the time of John's death - some of the Wings output is spectacular and is being looked down only because people can't get over the whole Beatles thing.

    Replies: @pepperinmono

    Not talking about the music. McCartney ‘ s post Beatles stuff is way better than Lennon’s and is really good, except past few years .

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @pepperinmono

    Two giants of their industry, yet neither was man enough to tell their respective wives to STFU. That Yoko's and Linda's caterwauling found space on record grooves is appalling.

  244. @SFG
    @reiner Tor

    I can't see the Germans allowing a far right party to become the dominant partner--too many bad memories.

    They might cut down on immigration though. And that might be enough.

    Replies: @guest, @reiner Tor

    People with those memories will die.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    @guest

    They are already dead, mostly. The memories are not of actual events, they are of the Hollywood movies and German movies and TV shows loosely based on those events, and people holding these memories aren't going to die out as long as the Megaphone is in the hands of those who want to keep these memories alive.

    Replies: @Lurker

  245. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Marcus
    @Whiskey

    IIRC Netanyahu decried the proposed Muslim ban. Even hardcore Zionists tend to be liberals when it comes to immigration.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Forbes

    Why would a hardcore Zionist like Netanyahu want the U.S. to impose a Muslim immigration ban? If more Middle Eastern Muslims emigrate to the U.S. and misbehave, more American Jews will make aliyah to Israel, and the American public will have greater sympathy for Israel’s plight dealing with hostile Muslims.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    The big picture is even more far reaching:

    The Jews are giving the Arabs land in America and Europe in exchange for the land of Palestine/Israel (and eventually some of its surroundings). Very smart of the Jews to try to clear Arabs out of the Levant, especially young Arab men.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  246. @Mr. Anon
    @Corvinus

    "Are you including Trump in your jealous rant? Moreover, is it not in their best interest according to capitalist principles to use their power and influence to make all the money they are able to earn based on their inherent abilities?"

    It wasn't a "jealous rant" - but I guess that's the only way a liberal can see it, motivated as you are by envy, and incapable of any rhetoric short of ranting.

    You are too stupid to have noticed that Trump is the only candidate who is not (apparently) in the pocket of oligarchs and who expresses any interest in the economic well-being of ordinary people. He may or may not deliver on that, but at least he is saying it. All Hillary has promised to do is to execute the globalist agenda of her oligarch masters. She is the candidate of Wall Street. I don't care for parasites, whether they are wealthy, influential parasites............or obscure and powerless parasites like you.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    As I stated before, I am not a liberal, I am an American. I make my own political decisions and are not beholden to parties. But if you have to characterize me as a liberal to make you feel better about yourself, go right ahead.

    “You are too stupid to have noticed that Trump is the only candidate who is not (apparently) in the pocket of oligarchs and who expresses any interest in the economic well-being of ordinary people.”

    Trump is an oligarch, a business magnate who has used his political connections for his own personal well-being.

    His Grand Hyatt Hotel in Manhattan was built with the benefit of a decades-long tax abatement obtained through government connections.

    He circumvented New York State campaign-finance laws by making a $30,000 donation to Andrew Stein (Jewish?), who on the New York City Board of Estimate, the body then responsible for land-use decisions in New York.

    In 2014, Trump made millions when he agreed to bring the Miss Universe pageant to Moscow. At the time, Trump mingled with the Russian business elite at a swanky after-party. “Almost all of the oligarchs were in the room,” Trump bragged on returning home.

    Trump is front and center at Wall Street. Why do you lie to yourself?

    “He may or may not deliver on that, but at least he is saying it. All Hillary has promised to do is to execute the globalist agenda of her oligarch masters. She is the candidate of Wall Street. I don’t care for parasites, whether they are wealthy, influential parasites…………or obscure and powerless parasites like you.”

    Refrain from consuming large amounts of rot gut whiskey for once. Let us assume that she plans on executing this “globalist agenda” of her “oligarch masters”. Are you not obscure and powerless yourself to stop them? Or, do you have the guts to do something about it rather than lament on a blog about Jews and elites?

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Corvinus

    "Trump is front and center at Wall Street. Why do you lie to yourself?"

    Then why do they almost exclusively favor his opponent. You are the one engaging in self-delusion, nitwit.

    "Refrain from consuming large amounts of rot gut whiskey for once."

    I take it that was supposed to be funny. You might include a notice to that effect in future.

    "Let us assume that she plans on executing this “globalist agenda” of her “oligarch masters”."

    You don't think that is exactly what she has done, and will do?

    "Are you not obscure and powerless yourself to stop them?"

    Obscure and powerless? Yes. Most people are. As I said, the distinguishing factor is that I - unlike you - am not a parasite.

    So, tell us, since you are obviously carrying water for Hillary, what is it about her that induces you to support her, as you clearly are here. Assuming for the sake of argument that anyone here gives a damn what you thing (we don't), what is the case for Hillary?

    Replies: @Corvinus

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Corvinus

    "As I stated before, I am not a liberal, I am an American. I make my own political decisions and are not beholden to parties."

    Who cares what you say? You clearly only ever espouse liberal points of view, of a kind most of us here have come to find all too tedious and predictable. You could be close caption of an MSNBC broadcast. You are not a fearless truth-teller. You have never said anything original or interesting here. You are a dull hack who parrots the conventional wisdom of the establishment.

    I don't consider you to be an American either - not in the sense of being my countryman - you clearly aren't.

  247. @Steve Sailer
    @Former Darfur

    Didn't Lennon & McCartney sell the right to their songs when they were young and naive? To be as rich as Sir Paul is now is due to a lot of hard work since the Beatles broke up.

    Replies: @Forbes

    Yes, they did sell, long before anyone thought Rock & Roll was other than a passing, youthful fashion. Michael Jackson owned the L & M songbook for a while. McCartney re-aquired it at some point.

  248. @South Texas Guy
    @Dr. X

    I've never seen Ms. Chozick's picture, but I'd bet she's fairly good looking. There is a long and ignoble tradition in publishing of hiring cute chicks that might possibly have sex with their middle aged bosses. That's how they get their foot in the door. I've known many myself who weren't cut out for either the job itself, or the beat they had, but they somehow got it.

    As far as Iowa being a culture shock, if she went to a San Antonio high school, Iowa wouldn't seem to be all that much different. She reminds me of people I grew up with who were embarrassed by the location they grew up and couldn't wait to shake the dust off their shoes and head for the big city.

    BTW, I've been to Iowa many times, so I have a basis for comparison.

    Replies: @epebble

  249. “Mrs. Clinton raked in roughly $50 million ”

    Makes me want to send The Donald another $100, or buy some Trump hats.

  250. @Anon
    Hillary's polls have been slipping, and I think she really hurt herself with a combination of the alt-right speech and the bad reports about her health. The average American doesn't follow politics closely, and when Hillary devoted a major political speech to carrying on about an enemy they've never heard of, that makes the average voter think, 'Crazy, paranoid old lady,' and look more closely at the reports about her hitting her head and her poor health.

    It hasn't helped that a TV show was cancelled for talking about Hillary's health, because the average American does watch TV, and they'll notice that. It comes across as dictatorial, high-handed, and vindictive. Most Americans have enough horse sense to conclude that where there's smoke, there's fire. The fact that Hillary's campaign has announced that she's taking weekends off (real presidents don't truly take weekends off, because they're always 'on call' like doctors, and the average voter expects that), and the fact that she's dodging press conferences, only reinforce the narrative that her health is bad, and she is not up to the stain of handling the presidency.

    Back when Hillary had to take a 'bathroom break' during that debate, I doubt it was an actual bathroom break. Hardcore politicians have ways of dealing with this. They just stick on a pair of Depends before the debate and keeping plugging away, because they know the appearance of weakness on the stand is a career-destroyer. Hillary almost certainly was having a dizzy spell.

    Replies: @BB753, @Marat, @Harry Baldwin

    Well, maybe those Depends needed changing?

  251. @L Woods
    @Anonymous

    Obsession with "jobs" is a relic of the industrial era. There's no good reason to be going around inventing "jobs" in a near-future in which autonomous machines are providing almost all necessary goods and services. What is the education system supposed to do: offer poodle walking 101?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Hibernian

    We aren’t necessarily inventing jobs, mate. We’re talking about filling the ones that have been stolen by aliens.

  252. @rod1963
    @iSteveFan

    You ever see pictures of a Hillary rally?

    She's lucky to draw a crowd of 500. Her American Legion speech was in front of maybe 200 people. I suspect it's one reason she stopped doing rallies.

    And I don't think Bernie supporters want anything to do with her now. She's lost them. I suspect it's the reason the MSM has ceased mentioning them, even though they are still pissed at her.

    The point is she's not anywhere near as popular as the MSM makes her out to be. Fact is Democratic participation this time around is down 20% from 2008.

    People don't want Hillary.

    Replies: @Lurker

    She’s lucky to draw a crowd of 500. Her American Legion speech was in front of maybe 200 people. I suspect it’s one reason she stopped doing rallies.

    I’ve been looking on YouTube for videos of this and, other than the DNC, she plays to tiny crowds. Even to call them rallies is to debase the word. Trump has rallies, she has intimate gatherings.

    • Replies: @mobi
    @Lurker


    I’ve been looking on YouTube for videos of this and, other than the DNC, she plays to tiny crowds. Even to call them rallies is to debase the word. Trump has rallies, she has intimate gatherings.
     
    But she has plenty of supporters, true believers even, and resourceful handlers.

    So I wonder why her crowds are so small. Can't be because she can't fill a larger venue.

    She's wary of appearing before a big group.

    Replies: @Lurker

  253. @Connecticut Famer
    Israeli occupied territory, which extends far beyond The Levant and directly into the halls of the US Congress, will soon to extend into the White House, judging from the kind of people to whom the Clintons have become indebted.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Those inroads were already made in the Bill Clinton and, later, the GWB administrations.

  254. @guest
    @wren

    I don't think it requires contortions. Our two party system is simple. That's why it's lasted. They only have to prefer her to the other guy.

    Replies: @wren

    I guess it doesn’t require any cognitive dissonance if your level of PC thinking has hit orwell-level doublethink standards. And it has. The NYT reporter herself tweets that Clinton spent the whole summer with the 1%.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/amychozick/status/772122510360018945

    • Replies: @guest
    @wren

    There are no high levels required. Voting for one of the two is basic, barebones, entry-level mind prison stuff.

    Replies: @wren

  255. @The most deplorable one
    Steve makes an appearance in the following video:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tpA8lnFG8o

    There are some skills out there when it comes to taking existing songs and changing them.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Ramz now has a verified account from Twitter.

  256. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    @Marcus

    Why would a hardcore Zionist like Netanyahu want the U.S. to impose a Muslim immigration ban? If more Middle Eastern Muslims emigrate to the U.S. and misbehave, more American Jews will make aliyah to Israel, and the American public will have greater sympathy for Israel's plight dealing with hostile Muslims.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    The big picture is even more far reaching:

    The Jews are giving the Arabs land in America and Europe in exchange for the land of Palestine/Israel (and eventually some of its surroundings). Very smart of the Jews to try to clear Arabs out of the Levant, especially young Arab men.

    • Agree: BB753, reiner Tor
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    The current levels of Muslim immigration to Europe and the Americas barely make a dent in the Muslim population of the Middle East. The Syrian civil war has probably reduced the population of young Muslim men by at least as much. And the Israelis haven't been able to displace the Muslims that matter most to them, the ones in the West Bank and Gaza. In Gaza, the population has been growing rapidly, which also illustrates that the Middle Eastern Muslims are capable of replenishing their numbers to make up for the people who emigrate.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  257. @wren
    @guest

    I guess it doesn't require any cognitive dissonance if your level of PC thinking has hit orwell-level doublethink standards. And it has. The NYT reporter herself tweets that Clinton spent the whole summer with the 1%.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/amychozick/status/772122510360018945

    Replies: @guest

    There are no high levels required. Voting for one of the two is basic, barebones, entry-level mind prison stuff.

    • Replies: @wren
    @guest

    Okay, Zen mastery doublethink equates to no doublethink required, I guess.

    To watch the occupy folks support someone who spends the whole summer proudly catering exclusively to the 1% is pretty funny.

    Replies: @guest

  258. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous
    "...do I need to acquire and study regular textbooks on these subjects in addition to these books?"

    Other responders have better advice than I could give... but about "standard textbooks"... often you do not need these as much as you might think. They often seem to have been written to take all the beauty out of things and be as big as possible. It can really help understanding for things to be concise. Sometimes these ponderous texts make good reference books.

    Maybe somebody pays the committees that writes standard ugrad and high school math textbooks by the inch or the pound. They often seem like Stalinist architecture.

    Just jump in, look around, see where things start to click, then do stuff. If nothing else "write your own book to yourself" on an area as you explore books in that field. Also, when you are really reading math to understand, don't skip anything. Students so often seem to leverage speed-reading effectively in other areas that they try to speed-read math, with bad consequences. Speed-reading is important when you're search for what math to read, but a lot of the secret of reading math is just to go slow (and don't give up; keep backing up if you have to until things make sense).

    I've seen it written that there are 3 ways to study mathematics (sort of extemporaneously making this up):

    (1) Theoretical (what a mathematician would study, the subject as a sort of minimized tree of the most careful thought about the simplest representation of problems that one can conceive);

    (2) Applied (what an engineer would study, the subject as a set of recognizable problems and approaches known to work to find solutions in that problem space);

    (3) Historical (following the evolution of a particular field or problem). When the other two approaches don't work, this is the fallback. Because the human mind seems to glom onto stories well, this can also be a good approach when jumping into math for your own ends.

    Also, don't overlook online resources. Wikipedia seems to have a table of contents for all their math articles: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Mathematics.

    I also just discovered that Wikipedia seems to have an effort to do what they call Wikipeda Books. These seems to be organized collections of wikipedia articles that make the equivalent of an e-book. I imagine this is an attempt to provide a coherent overview to a large bunch of related articles. They probably still don't "flow" as well as a good book, of course, but they can be read online, are free, and the ability to follow all the links "back" could be helpful. This is what they have on math: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Wikipedia_books_on_mathematics. For instance, they have a book on statistics: "Statistics review:
    Including a probability theory background"
    . No idea what these "books" are like; probably feel too cyclopediaish but a good way to explore odd corners.


    If you think of math as the most careful thinking you can do about the simplest form of the problem, you can see that it is an immense open-ended subject. Don't let that bother you, clear thinking is always helpful.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    sort of minimized tree of the most careful thought about the simplest representation of problems that one can conceive);

    Could you explicate, elaborate on this idea, which you also may have returned to in the last sentence of your post? I don’t know that I quite grasp what you mean.

    Thank you very much for that post, in any event.

  259. @SFG
    @reiner Tor

    I can't see the Germans allowing a far right party to become the dominant partner--too many bad memories.

    They might cut down on immigration though. And that might be enough.

    Replies: @guest, @reiner Tor

    Just one minor point: the AfD is only “far right” by the distorted optics of this age; in the 1960s it would’ve been centrist or perhaps centre-right.

  260. @Marcus
    @Whiskey

    IIRC Netanyahu decried the proposed Muslim ban. Even hardcore Zionists tend to be liberals when it comes to immigration.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Forbes

    A US ban on Muslim immigration would shut off the relief valve, which likely increases Muslim contretemps in the Israeli neighborhood. Troublemakers located in the US will mean less trouble for Israel. Netanyahu’s reaction looks rational for Israel, even if not in the US’s best interest.

    • Replies: @Marcus
    @Forbes

    Yeah, my point is that there is little to no common ground for the Western and Zionist "right wing"

  261. Steve,

    Great video here of Trump in Detroit yesterday

    https://mobile.twitter.com/DanScavino/status/772101762287333376/video/1

  262. @Thea
    I have a degree in mathematics. I spent a chunk of my life teaching, tutoring or editing textbooks.

    It is with great lament that I realized the depth of math illiteracy and outright dislike in the world.

    If we can't teach most of these kids basic algebra, and have them understand it then probability & statistics in high school isn't going to work either.

    Teaching trigonometry in high school, to the better students, is necessary to prepare students for calculus. which I open the audience here realizes is a very important subject indeed.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Dieter Kief

    Teaching trigonometry in high school, to the better students, is necessary to prepare students for calculus. which I open the audience here realizes is a very important subject indeed.

    Generally speaking, I think math people overestimate how important math is to most people in their lives. The vast majority of adult survive just fine without calculus.

    • Replies: @Thea
    @ScarletNumber

    The general public does not need calculus but engineers & scientists do. Only the college bound should bother with algebra and higher. Statistics in high school is a waste.

  263. @Forbes
    @Marcus

    A US ban on Muslim immigration would shut off the relief valve, which likely increases Muslim contretemps in the Israeli neighborhood. Troublemakers located in the US will mean less trouble for Israel. Netanyahu's reaction looks rational for Israel, even if not in the US's best interest.

    Replies: @Marcus

    Yeah, my point is that there is little to no common ground for the Western and Zionist “right wing”

  264. @guest
    @SFG

    People with those memories will die.

    Replies: @reiner Tor

    They are already dead, mostly. The memories are not of actual events, they are of the Hollywood movies and German movies and TV shows loosely based on those events, and people holding these memories aren’t going to die out as long as the Megaphone is in the hands of those who want to keep these memories alive.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @reiner Tor

    The memories are being hyped more and more as 1945 recedes from living memory.

    Tiny data point follows . . .

    I used to like to making model aircraft kits (would still like to!) Kits of WW2 German aircraft sold in Britain and elsewhere would include swastika on the box art and swastika decals. I knew this was not the case in Germany and took the trouble to check and confirm when in a model shop when first in Germany in the early 2000s. (Same for rail models of 1933-45).

    A few weeks ago I stopped to look at some aircraft kits (in England) in a shop window and what did I note? That, now, none of the German aircraft on sale are depicted with swastikas.

  265. @Prof. Woland
    @SFG

    Hillary needed Bill Clinton much more than the other way around. In effect, both of them were 'beards' for the other but for Bill it was only because we live in a culture where single sexually active men are not really allowed to run for higher office yet; and maybe never (paging whiskey). Being married is like a brand or seal of approval (collar) on a male politician. Any wife would have served that purpose, including an attractive younger fertile one like trump. In effect, Hillary was hiding her lack of sex drive behind the marriage as well and all Bill got out of it was very little pleasure and one daughter.

    With the Trump candidacy we are finally witnessing a man possibly getting elected who has always sexually done things on his terms without groveling to women. We are not just getting comfortable with increased female roles in society but men's as well, something which is causing die hard feminists to become spitting mad. I am sure this is one big reason so many older women hate hate hate Trump. Women still need men for money and power but not so much the other way around and they all know it.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Marat

    we live in a culture where single sexually active men are not really allowed to run for higher office yet

    Jerry Brown

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @ScarletNumber

    In California. The exception that proves the rule.

  266. @guest
    @wren

    There are no high levels required. Voting for one of the two is basic, barebones, entry-level mind prison stuff.

    Replies: @wren

    Okay, Zen mastery doublethink equates to no doublethink required, I guess.

    To watch the occupy folks support someone who spends the whole summer proudly catering exclusively to the 1% is pretty funny.

    • Replies: @guest
    @wren

    The OWS crowd will probably just stay home. Or do what they're paid to do.

  267. The name Amy Chozick reminds me of the woman teacher on South Park.

  268. @wren
    @guest

    Okay, Zen mastery doublethink equates to no doublethink required, I guess.

    To watch the occupy folks support someone who spends the whole summer proudly catering exclusively to the 1% is pretty funny.

    Replies: @guest

    The OWS crowd will probably just stay home. Or do what they’re paid to do.

  269. @Lagertha
    @SFG

    I still can't get the image of Bill shoving a cigar up Monica's vag in the Oval Office. My husband would be dead after such a revolting, sociopathic stunt stunt.

    Replies: @SFG, @Expletive Deleted, @larry lurker, @Harry Baldwin, @Brutusale

    I’ll bet you can’t do smoke-rings.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    @Expletive Deleted

    from which orifice?

  270. @L Woods
    @Anonymous

    Obsession with "jobs" is a relic of the industrial era. There's no good reason to be going around inventing "jobs" in a near-future in which autonomous machines are providing almost all necessary goods and services. What is the education system supposed to do: offer poodle walking 101?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Hibernian

    Idle hands are the devil’s workshop. That’s a good reason to invent make-work jobs for a future where autonomous machines do most of the real work.

    • Replies: @L Woods
    @Anonymous

    I'd rather not be forced into being a dog walker for some plutocrat on the basis of a Victorian platitude, thanks. You enjoy that though. Most Americans do indeed seem to be lost without their particular niche of servile banality.

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Anonymous

    Especially for those with low future-time orientation.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  271. @ScarletNumber
    @Thea

    Teaching trigonometry in high school, to the better students, is necessary to prepare students for calculus. which I open the audience here realizes is a very important subject indeed.

    Generally speaking, I think math people overestimate how important math is to most people in their lives. The vast majority of adult survive just fine without calculus.

    Replies: @Thea

    The general public does not need calculus but engineers & scientists do. Only the college bound should bother with algebra and higher. Statistics in high school is a waste.

  272. @guest
    @Corvinus

    "is it not in their best interest according to capitalist principles to use their power and influence to make all the money they are able to earn based on their inherent abilities?"

    No. That has nothing to do with capitalist principles in particular. For instance, say I'm really good with a knife and my mother has an attractive inheritance waiting for me. Do "capitalist principles" dictate that I slit her throat?

    Replies: @epebble

    No; because it is illegal. You may go to jail/be executed. However, you can encourage her to “Die with dignity” where it is legal.

    On the other hand; it is perfectly acceptable to kill any number of animals, even endangered ones, if not illegal. Pollute the planet if it is not illegal, employ foreigners in preference to natives, as long as you follow the law, move business to lower cost locales, following all laws, contribute to politicians and policy makers to get favorable and profitable policies.

    If it is not illegal, it is OK. If it is illegal, work to get it to be not illegal.

  273. @Lagertha
    @celt darnell

    Blech! How revolting! I couldn't believe my eyes when reading this! All the Millennials I know say that America is a Plutocracy and there is no hope until all Baby Boomers are dead/or at least incapacitated in nursing homes. They will pry back America from the cold dead fingers of these revolting Plutocrats who cling to their champagne and waterfront real estate (oh, and Maidstone is still very picky who gets in/they don't like any publicity).

    Trump 1, Clinton 0 with this bizarre article - I mean, she can't give press conferences since she is too busy partying, hat -in-hand with billionaires at their summer homes?! Let them eat cake. This article needs to be broadcasted in a big way all over the Rust Belt/Plains/South - some Millennial is gonna go to town with this on Youtube. And, sheesh, she really let southerners know that the North East is still the preferred, "classier" place to summer.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @wren, @Anonymous

    No, the Millennials you know will get older and try to secure plutocrat status for themselves.

  274. @wren
    @Lagertha

    I am really puzzled over the contortions anyone who supported bernie needs to go through to support Hillary.

    Look at this:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3773358/Welcome-lavish-life-investor-George-Soros-little-known-playboy-son.html

    Material for about ten Steve posts in that article. Jewish Dionysus, according to his Ph.D. thesis. Posing with Hillary.

    Sick!

    As an aside, I didn't know George Soros was married to someone named Tamiko.

    Replies: @wren, @guest, @Marat

    The sudden coverage looks like a PR campaign to keep Soros juju going long term. Getting junior off to a good start with Millenials (whose children he will eventually hope to influence).

  275. @Anon
    Hillary's polls have been slipping, and I think she really hurt herself with a combination of the alt-right speech and the bad reports about her health. The average American doesn't follow politics closely, and when Hillary devoted a major political speech to carrying on about an enemy they've never heard of, that makes the average voter think, 'Crazy, paranoid old lady,' and look more closely at the reports about her hitting her head and her poor health.

    It hasn't helped that a TV show was cancelled for talking about Hillary's health, because the average American does watch TV, and they'll notice that. It comes across as dictatorial, high-handed, and vindictive. Most Americans have enough horse sense to conclude that where there's smoke, there's fire. The fact that Hillary's campaign has announced that she's taking weekends off (real presidents don't truly take weekends off, because they're always 'on call' like doctors, and the average voter expects that), and the fact that she's dodging press conferences, only reinforce the narrative that her health is bad, and she is not up to the stain of handling the presidency.

    Back when Hillary had to take a 'bathroom break' during that debate, I doubt it was an actual bathroom break. Hardcore politicians have ways of dealing with this. They just stick on a pair of Depends before the debate and keeping plugging away, because they know the appearance of weakness on the stand is a career-destroyer. Hillary almost certainly was having a dizzy spell.

    Replies: @BB753, @Marat, @Harry Baldwin

    Dizzy spell rather than bathroom tardiness makes a lot of sense. She’s not in front of the camera that much, yet something “short-circuits” in high enough instances that it is hard not to notice.

  276. @Anonymous
    @L Woods

    Idle hands are the devil's workshop. That's a good reason to invent make-work jobs for a future where autonomous machines do most of the real work.

    Replies: @L Woods, @ScarletNumber

    I’d rather not be forced into being a dog walker for some plutocrat on the basis of a Victorian platitude, thanks. You enjoy that though. Most Americans do indeed seem to be lost without their particular niche of servile banality.

  277. @Anonymous
    @L Woods

    Idle hands are the devil's workshop. That's a good reason to invent make-work jobs for a future where autonomous machines do most of the real work.

    Replies: @L Woods, @ScarletNumber

    Especially for those with low future-time orientation.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @ScarletNumber

    That really was my point. I'm not so worried about how people with high IQ's and high future time orientation will spend their extensive leisure time in the automated future, but I am worried about what will happen when society has to handle an even larger number of dumb, obnoxious people with low future time orientation than it faces now. I think the robocops will have plenty to do.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  278. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    The big picture is even more far reaching:

    The Jews are giving the Arabs land in America and Europe in exchange for the land of Palestine/Israel (and eventually some of its surroundings). Very smart of the Jews to try to clear Arabs out of the Levant, especially young Arab men.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    The current levels of Muslim immigration to Europe and the Americas barely make a dent in the Muslim population of the Middle East. The Syrian civil war has probably reduced the population of young Muslim men by at least as much. And the Israelis haven’t been able to displace the Muslims that matter most to them, the ones in the West Bank and Gaza. In Gaza, the population has been growing rapidly, which also illustrates that the Middle Eastern Muslims are capable of replenishing their numbers to make up for the people who emigrate.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    It's a process. Give it time.

    In any event, removing 1.5 million mostly fighting- and reproductive-age Arabs in a mere two year period represents a huge escape valve in demographics.

    Israel really liked what is going on.

  279. @Lurker
    @rod1963


    She’s lucky to draw a crowd of 500. Her American Legion speech was in front of maybe 200 people. I suspect it’s one reason she stopped doing rallies.
     
    I've been looking on YouTube for videos of this and, other than the DNC, she plays to tiny crowds. Even to call them rallies is to debase the word. Trump has rallies, she has intimate gatherings.

    Replies: @mobi

    I’ve been looking on YouTube for videos of this and, other than the DNC, she plays to tiny crowds. Even to call them rallies is to debase the word. Trump has rallies, she has intimate gatherings.

    But she has plenty of supporters, true believers even, and resourceful handlers.

    So I wonder why her crowds are so small. Can’t be because she can’t fill a larger venue.

    She’s wary of appearing before a big group.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @mobi


    But she has plenty of supporters, true believers even
     
    But maybe not as many as we've been lead to believe?

    She’s wary of appearing before a big group.
     
    Maybe both are true to some extent? She's wary and there aren't that many anyway?

    Perhaps its also about controlling exactly who sees her? Vetted groups of true believers small enough that her handlers can be assured that no one will report odd responses, weirdness?

    Looking on YouTube there's little sign of phone footage of her events, unlike Trump's. Is that to cover up the low numbers, her behaviour or both?
  280. @Prof. Woland
    @SFG

    Hillary needed Bill Clinton much more than the other way around. In effect, both of them were 'beards' for the other but for Bill it was only because we live in a culture where single sexually active men are not really allowed to run for higher office yet; and maybe never (paging whiskey). Being married is like a brand or seal of approval (collar) on a male politician. Any wife would have served that purpose, including an attractive younger fertile one like trump. In effect, Hillary was hiding her lack of sex drive behind the marriage as well and all Bill got out of it was very little pleasure and one daughter.

    With the Trump candidacy we are finally witnessing a man possibly getting elected who has always sexually done things on his terms without groveling to women. We are not just getting comfortable with increased female roles in society but men's as well, something which is causing die hard feminists to become spitting mad. I am sure this is one big reason so many older women hate hate hate Trump. Women still need men for money and power but not so much the other way around and they all know it.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Marat

    Any opinion on how average married women would react if they were told Hillary and Bill were in an open marriage? That’s a different case than the assumption that Hillary soldiered on with Bill’s perpetual zipper problem.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Marat

    The revelation would only hurt her if it was revealed that Bill was given freedom only because he was bearding for Hillary all these years. Only if Hillary was exposed as a lesbian in a mock marriage would it hurt her, in other words. If I was Trump I'd release whatever evidence of her carpet-munching ways, particularly with Huma. It could make Hillary lose a good number of straight female voters.

    Replies: @onlyonegirlforbarry

  281. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Generally speaking, I think math people overestimate how important math is to most people in their lives. The vast majority of adult survive just fine without calculus.

    I’m not suggesting that most adults need to know calculus, and I don’t think the others who responded “in the defense of math” are either. For one thing, it’s clear if you’ve spent some time teaching that a lot of students just aren’t going to get that much out of it. It’s never really going to come together for them. So when things do light-up for someone, you want to help.

    What is important is that if you want to learn much of the STEM stuff that has happened since about the late 1600s to the level where you can use it and you can build on it yourself, you will need a basic grounding in calculus, whatever direction you go in. You can’t get that without a solid grounding in the things calculus is built on, which include trig, algebra, and geometry. It’s just the way it is. There’s no royal road around it, as goes the famous remark to Alexander the Great. Like being able to read before being able to profit from a library.

    Most people don’t need “real math”. But civilization and society absolutely do need some sufficient number of people who are up to speed on it to keep moving the dial forward. And believe me, you might be shocked at how many people working on the core technology of this internet that we are using right now are up to their eyebrows in real math. Network route optimization, data compression, encryption for computer security, communication codes, hidden markov models to detect performance problems and do signal processing, … etc., etc.. And I haven’t even gotten to all that big data and machine learning stuff, which is mostly a socially more warm/fuzzy name for some areas of applied math and statistics. Isn’t big data and analytics one of the hottest growing job markets? I think so, and it’s all about real math.

    So most adults survive fine without “doing” calculus, but they are “using” calculus constantly. Like when flying on a modern airliner.

    In areas today that use a lot of math (like modern finance) you often run into situations in which people who don’t really know much math need to make management decisions about math-related things. Also, because math is so large, no one really “knows math”. So having an “intuition” about how things are likely to work, or at least what the “shape” of a field is, even if you don’t know the field, is important (sort of “knowing where to look”). Thus it’s a bit surprising that Lynn Rothschild doesn’t even seem to know what trig is for. (Or maybe she does, she is speaking about Harvard, and she knows that you can teach them, but you can’t teach them much… 😉

    Tangentially, I’d guess that the way math is taught today (which might be as best as can be done) in universal public school systems like the US, reflects the way Prussia (in particular) and France selected for artillery officers way back in the day. The problem was NOT to make everyone in a class (from the entire nation) a capable mathematician. The problem was to identify those students (out of all those in the nation) with sufficient native math ability to be worth the investment of a couple of years of math education (relatively much more expensive at the time) after which they could be trained as artillery officers and drop shells on Napoleon’s nose. Or land on the north pole of Mars. (Calculus and its prerequisites are about as core to these problems as it gets.)

    First hit on a quick google (the Prussians had been soundly beaten by that artilleryman Napoleon and decided that they would get organized to compete with someone like him… to graduate from the École Militaire in a year Napoleon was examined by Laplace!):

    “The British cyclopaedia of the arts and sciences”, 1835, p. 813, in the “Military Schools and Academies” section:

    “Since 1815, the standard of scientific eduction of officers has been much raised in several armies; in none, however, so much as in the Prussian, in which no person can be promoted without a severe examination. … every division has its school…

    Mathematics, history, geography, statistics, the applied mathematics, modern languages (particularly French), and the military sciences are the chief subjects of study. The artillery corps and engineer corps have their separate schools… every regiment is allowed to send a few of it young officers, who must have shown great diligence, talent… to the general military school in Berlin… Here the highest branches of mathematics, geology and mineralogy, chemistry… are taught…

    Math, very prominent, naturally, as much of artillery is a math problem. That’s also why the ENIAC computer (and a number of others) got built in WWII.

    An HBD-related reason why it might not be worth stressing-out about every child learning pre-calc:

    “Parents’ math skills ‘rub off’ on their children: Findings of newly released Pitt study show the first evidence of intergenerational transmission of an unlearned, nonverbal competence in mathematics”, EurekAlert!, AAAS, 1-Sep-2016:

    “…Parents who excel at math produce children who excel at math…

    …”Our findings suggest an intuitive sense for numbers has been passed down–knowingly or unknowingly–from parent to child… significant ramifications for… teaching children in classrooms.” …

    …such close result parallels could not have been produced through similar institutional learning backgrounds…

    …evidence of intergenerational transmission of unlearned, nonverbal numerical competence from parents to children.” …

    “We believe… some combination of hereditary and environmental transmission,”…”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @anonymous

    Network route optimization, data compression, encryption for computer security, communication codes, hidden markov models to detect performance problems and do signal processing, … etc., etc.. And I haven’t even gotten to all that big data and machine learning stuff, which is mostly a socially more warm/fuzzy name for some areas of applied math and statistics. Isn’t big data and analytics one of the hottest growing job markets? I think so, and it’s all about real math.

    How could someone considering a career change learn enough about these areas to make a decision:

    1) What do the jobs entail?
    2) What is the market like?
    3) Does he have enough native intelligence for it?
    4) How much education, if starting from close to scratch?

    , @onlyonegirlforbarry
    @anonymous

    The Navy nuclear power program does a pretty good job of teaching engineering level math to blue collar kids, if they have the IQ to pass the AFQT.

  282. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @ScarletNumber
    @Anonymous

    Especially for those with low future-time orientation.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    That really was my point. I’m not so worried about how people with high IQ’s and high future time orientation will spend their extensive leisure time in the automated future, but I am worried about what will happen when society has to handle an even larger number of dumb, obnoxious people with low future time orientation than it faces now. I think the robocops will have plenty to do.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Anonymous

    Yes, I agree ;)

  283. @Marat
    @Prof. Woland

    Any opinion on how average married women would react if they were told Hillary and Bill were in an open marriage? That's a different case than the assumption that Hillary soldiered on with Bill's perpetual zipper problem.

    Replies: @BB753

    The revelation would only hurt her if it was revealed that Bill was given freedom only because he was bearding for Hillary all these years. Only if Hillary was exposed as a lesbian in a mock marriage would it hurt her, in other words. If I was Trump I’d release whatever evidence of her carpet-munching ways, particularly with Huma. It could make Hillary lose a good number of straight female voters.

    • Replies: @onlyonegirlforbarry
    @BB753

    Without video of actual snapper lapping on Hill's part, it isn't going to happen, and she's smarter than that.

    Replies: @BB753

  284. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    The current levels of Muslim immigration to Europe and the Americas barely make a dent in the Muslim population of the Middle East. The Syrian civil war has probably reduced the population of young Muslim men by at least as much. And the Israelis haven't been able to displace the Muslims that matter most to them, the ones in the West Bank and Gaza. In Gaza, the population has been growing rapidly, which also illustrates that the Middle Eastern Muslims are capable of replenishing their numbers to make up for the people who emigrate.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    It’s a process. Give it time.

    In any event, removing 1.5 million mostly fighting- and reproductive-age Arabs in a mere two year period represents a huge escape valve in demographics.

    Israel really liked what is going on.

  285. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous
    Generally speaking, I think math people overestimate how important math is to most people in their lives. The vast majority of adult survive just fine without calculus.

    I'm not suggesting that most adults need to know calculus, and I don't think the others who responded "in the defense of math" are either. For one thing, it's clear if you've spent some time teaching that a lot of students just aren't going to get that much out of it. It's never really going to come together for them. So when things do light-up for someone, you want to help.

    What is important is that if you want to learn much of the STEM stuff that has happened since about the late 1600s to the level where you can use it and you can build on it yourself, you will need a basic grounding in calculus, whatever direction you go in. You can't get that without a solid grounding in the things calculus is built on, which include trig, algebra, and geometry. It's just the way it is. There's no royal road around it, as goes the famous remark to Alexander the Great. Like being able to read before being able to profit from a library.

    Most people don't need "real math". But civilization and society absolutely do need some sufficient number of people who are up to speed on it to keep moving the dial forward. And believe me, you might be shocked at how many people working on the core technology of this internet that we are using right now are up to their eyebrows in real math. Network route optimization, data compression, encryption for computer security, communication codes, hidden markov models to detect performance problems and do signal processing, ... etc., etc.. And I haven't even gotten to all that big data and machine learning stuff, which is mostly a socially more warm/fuzzy name for some areas of applied math and statistics. Isn't big data and analytics one of the hottest growing job markets? I think so, and it's all about real math.

    So most adults survive fine without "doing" calculus, but they are "using" calculus constantly. Like when flying on a modern airliner.

    In areas today that use a lot of math (like modern finance) you often run into situations in which people who don't really know much math need to make management decisions about math-related things. Also, because math is so large, no one really "knows math". So having an "intuition" about how things are likely to work, or at least what the "shape" of a field is, even if you don't know the field, is important (sort of "knowing where to look"). Thus it's a bit surprising that Lynn Rothschild doesn't even seem to know what trig is for. (Or maybe she does, she is speaking about Harvard, and she knows that you can teach them, but you can't teach them much... ;)

    Tangentially, I'd guess that the way math is taught today (which might be as best as can be done) in universal public school systems like the US, reflects the way Prussia (in particular) and France selected for artillery officers way back in the day. The problem was NOT to make everyone in a class (from the entire nation) a capable mathematician. The problem was to identify those students (out of all those in the nation) with sufficient native math ability to be worth the investment of a couple of years of math education (relatively much more expensive at the time) after which they could be trained as artillery officers and drop shells on Napoleon's nose. Or land on the north pole of Mars. (Calculus and its prerequisites are about as core to these problems as it gets.)

    First hit on a quick google (the Prussians had been soundly beaten by that artilleryman Napoleon and decided that they would get organized to compete with someone like him... to graduate from the École Militaire in a year Napoleon was examined by Laplace!):


    "The British cyclopaedia of the arts and sciences", 1835, p. 813, in the "Military Schools and Academies" section:


    "Since 1815, the standard of scientific eduction of officers has been much raised in several armies; in none, however, so much as in the Prussian, in which no person can be promoted without a severe examination. ... every division has its school...

    ...Mathematics, history, geography, statistics, the applied mathematics, modern languages (particularly French), and the military sciences are the chief subjects of study. The artillery corps and engineer corps have their separate schools... every regiment is allowed to send a few of it young officers, who must have shown great diligence, talent... to the general military school in Berlin... Here the highest branches of mathematics, geology and mineralogy, chemistry... are taught...

     

    Math, very prominent, naturally, as much of artillery is a math problem. That's also why the ENIAC computer (and a number of others) got built in WWII.

    An HBD-related reason why it might not be worth stressing-out about every child learning pre-calc:

    "Parents' math skills 'rub off' on their children: Findings of newly released Pitt study show the first evidence of intergenerational transmission of an unlearned, nonverbal competence in mathematics", EurekAlert!, AAAS, 1-Sep-2016:


    "...Parents who excel at math produce children who excel at math...

    ..."Our findings suggest an intuitive sense for numbers has been passed down--knowingly or unknowingly--from parent to child... significant ramifications for... teaching children in classrooms." ...

    ...such close result parallels could not have been produced through similar institutional learning backgrounds...

    ...evidence of intergenerational transmission of unlearned, nonverbal numerical competence from parents to children." ...

    "We believe... some combination of hereditary and environmental transmission,"..."

     

    Replies: @Anonymous, @onlyonegirlforbarry

    Network route optimization, data compression, encryption for computer security, communication codes, hidden markov models to detect performance problems and do signal processing, … etc., etc.. And I haven’t even gotten to all that big data and machine learning stuff, which is mostly a socially more warm/fuzzy name for some areas of applied math and statistics. Isn’t big data and analytics one of the hottest growing job markets? I think so, and it’s all about real math.

    How could someone considering a career change learn enough about these areas to make a decision:

    1) What do the jobs entail?
    2) What is the market like?
    3) Does he have enough native intelligence for it?
    4) How much education, if starting from close to scratch?

  286. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Marat


    Their favorite political pastime is to bash Trump’s bird as being an old, slow guzzler
     
    What jerks. Melania looks great for her age.

    Replies: @onlyonegirlforbarry

    He’s talking about the Trump airplane. Trendies buy the latest Gulfstreams, more than a used airliner, but they use a lot less fuel.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @onlyonegirlforbarry

    But Trump's jet can move a lot more people around and that can be useful too.

    And he does have other aircraft.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/24/us/politics/donald-trumps-aging-air-fleet-gives-his-bid-and-his-brand-a-lift.html?_r=0

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @onlyonegirlforbarry


    He’s talking about the Trump airplane.
     
    Yes, that’s the joke.

    Replies: @Former Darfur

  287. @anonymous
    Generally speaking, I think math people overestimate how important math is to most people in their lives. The vast majority of adult survive just fine without calculus.

    I'm not suggesting that most adults need to know calculus, and I don't think the others who responded "in the defense of math" are either. For one thing, it's clear if you've spent some time teaching that a lot of students just aren't going to get that much out of it. It's never really going to come together for them. So when things do light-up for someone, you want to help.

    What is important is that if you want to learn much of the STEM stuff that has happened since about the late 1600s to the level where you can use it and you can build on it yourself, you will need a basic grounding in calculus, whatever direction you go in. You can't get that without a solid grounding in the things calculus is built on, which include trig, algebra, and geometry. It's just the way it is. There's no royal road around it, as goes the famous remark to Alexander the Great. Like being able to read before being able to profit from a library.

    Most people don't need "real math". But civilization and society absolutely do need some sufficient number of people who are up to speed on it to keep moving the dial forward. And believe me, you might be shocked at how many people working on the core technology of this internet that we are using right now are up to their eyebrows in real math. Network route optimization, data compression, encryption for computer security, communication codes, hidden markov models to detect performance problems and do signal processing, ... etc., etc.. And I haven't even gotten to all that big data and machine learning stuff, which is mostly a socially more warm/fuzzy name for some areas of applied math and statistics. Isn't big data and analytics one of the hottest growing job markets? I think so, and it's all about real math.

    So most adults survive fine without "doing" calculus, but they are "using" calculus constantly. Like when flying on a modern airliner.

    In areas today that use a lot of math (like modern finance) you often run into situations in which people who don't really know much math need to make management decisions about math-related things. Also, because math is so large, no one really "knows math". So having an "intuition" about how things are likely to work, or at least what the "shape" of a field is, even if you don't know the field, is important (sort of "knowing where to look"). Thus it's a bit surprising that Lynn Rothschild doesn't even seem to know what trig is for. (Or maybe she does, she is speaking about Harvard, and she knows that you can teach them, but you can't teach them much... ;)

    Tangentially, I'd guess that the way math is taught today (which might be as best as can be done) in universal public school systems like the US, reflects the way Prussia (in particular) and France selected for artillery officers way back in the day. The problem was NOT to make everyone in a class (from the entire nation) a capable mathematician. The problem was to identify those students (out of all those in the nation) with sufficient native math ability to be worth the investment of a couple of years of math education (relatively much more expensive at the time) after which they could be trained as artillery officers and drop shells on Napoleon's nose. Or land on the north pole of Mars. (Calculus and its prerequisites are about as core to these problems as it gets.)

    First hit on a quick google (the Prussians had been soundly beaten by that artilleryman Napoleon and decided that they would get organized to compete with someone like him... to graduate from the École Militaire in a year Napoleon was examined by Laplace!):


    "The British cyclopaedia of the arts and sciences", 1835, p. 813, in the "Military Schools and Academies" section:


    "Since 1815, the standard of scientific eduction of officers has been much raised in several armies; in none, however, so much as in the Prussian, in which no person can be promoted without a severe examination. ... every division has its school...

    ...Mathematics, history, geography, statistics, the applied mathematics, modern languages (particularly French), and the military sciences are the chief subjects of study. The artillery corps and engineer corps have their separate schools... every regiment is allowed to send a few of it young officers, who must have shown great diligence, talent... to the general military school in Berlin... Here the highest branches of mathematics, geology and mineralogy, chemistry... are taught...

     

    Math, very prominent, naturally, as much of artillery is a math problem. That's also why the ENIAC computer (and a number of others) got built in WWII.

    An HBD-related reason why it might not be worth stressing-out about every child learning pre-calc:

    "Parents' math skills 'rub off' on their children: Findings of newly released Pitt study show the first evidence of intergenerational transmission of an unlearned, nonverbal competence in mathematics", EurekAlert!, AAAS, 1-Sep-2016:


    "...Parents who excel at math produce children who excel at math...

    ..."Our findings suggest an intuitive sense for numbers has been passed down--knowingly or unknowingly--from parent to child... significant ramifications for... teaching children in classrooms." ...

    ...such close result parallels could not have been produced through similar institutional learning backgrounds...

    ...evidence of intergenerational transmission of unlearned, nonverbal numerical competence from parents to children." ...

    "We believe... some combination of hereditary and environmental transmission,"..."

     

    Replies: @Anonymous, @onlyonegirlforbarry

    The Navy nuclear power program does a pretty good job of teaching engineering level math to blue collar kids, if they have the IQ to pass the AFQT.

  288. @BB753
    @Marat

    The revelation would only hurt her if it was revealed that Bill was given freedom only because he was bearding for Hillary all these years. Only if Hillary was exposed as a lesbian in a mock marriage would it hurt her, in other words. If I was Trump I'd release whatever evidence of her carpet-munching ways, particularly with Huma. It could make Hillary lose a good number of straight female voters.

    Replies: @onlyonegirlforbarry

    Without video of actual snapper lapping on Hill’s part, it isn’t going to happen, and she’s smarter than that.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @onlyonegirlforbarry

    Why not? Everybody and his dog knows of Hillary's lesbianism. Somebody ought to be sitting on some graphic evidence.
    What's actually lacking is evidence of Hillary's intelligence.

  289. @onlyonegirlforbarry
    @BB753

    Without video of actual snapper lapping on Hill's part, it isn't going to happen, and she's smarter than that.

    Replies: @BB753

    Why not? Everybody and his dog knows of Hillary’s lesbianism. Somebody ought to be sitting on some graphic evidence.
    What’s actually lacking is evidence of Hillary’s intelligence.

  290. @Corvinus
    @Mr. Anon

    As I stated before, I am not a liberal, I am an American. I make my own political decisions and are not beholden to parties. But if you have to characterize me as a liberal to make you feel better about yourself, go right ahead.

    "You are too stupid to have noticed that Trump is the only candidate who is not (apparently) in the pocket of oligarchs and who expresses any interest in the economic well-being of ordinary people."

    Trump is an oligarch, a business magnate who has used his political connections for his own personal well-being.

    His Grand Hyatt Hotel in Manhattan was built with the benefit of a decades-long tax abatement obtained through government connections.

    He circumvented New York State campaign-finance laws by making a $30,000 donation to Andrew Stein (Jewish?), who on the New York City Board of Estimate, the body then responsible for land-use decisions in New York.

    In 2014, Trump made millions when he agreed to bring the Miss Universe pageant to Moscow. At the time, Trump mingled with the Russian business elite at a swanky after-party. “Almost all of the oligarchs were in the room,” Trump bragged on returning home.

    Trump is front and center at Wall Street. Why do you lie to yourself?

    "He may or may not deliver on that, but at least he is saying it. All Hillary has promised to do is to execute the globalist agenda of her oligarch masters. She is the candidate of Wall Street. I don’t care for parasites, whether they are wealthy, influential parasites…………or obscure and powerless parasites like you."

    Refrain from consuming large amounts of rot gut whiskey for once. Let us assume that she plans on executing this "globalist agenda" of her "oligarch masters". Are you not obscure and powerless yourself to stop them? Or, do you have the guts to do something about it rather than lament on a blog about Jews and elites?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Mr. Anon

    “Trump is front and center at Wall Street. Why do you lie to yourself?”

    Then why do they almost exclusively favor his opponent. You are the one engaging in self-delusion, nitwit.

    “Refrain from consuming large amounts of rot gut whiskey for once.”

    I take it that was supposed to be funny. You might include a notice to that effect in future.

    “Let us assume that she plans on executing this “globalist agenda” of her “oligarch masters”.”

    You don’t think that is exactly what she has done, and will do?

    “Are you not obscure and powerless yourself to stop them?”

    Obscure and powerless? Yes. Most people are. As I said, the distinguishing factor is that I – unlike you – am not a parasite.

    So, tell us, since you are obviously carrying water for Hillary, what is it about her that induces you to support her, as you clearly are here. Assuming for the sake of argument that anyone here gives a damn what you thing (we don’t), what is the case for Hillary?

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Mr. Anon

    "Then why do they almost exclusively favor his opponent. You are the one engaging in self-delusion, nitwit."

    Trump is a capitalist. He is part and parcel to Wall Street. That was the point I was making, not the extent of his fundraising capabilities.

    "Obscure and powerless? Yes. Most people are. As I said, the distinguishing factor is that I – unlike you – am not a parasite."

    If you choose not to become heavily invested in stopping Hillary and her Jew friends, you are a parasite.

    "So, tell us, since you are obviously carrying water for Hillary..."

    I'm voting Libertarian. There is no case for Hillary or the Donald.

    "Who cares what you say?"

    Obviously, you do, since you respond to my posts.

    "You clearly only ever espouse liberal points of view, of a kind most of us here have come to find all too tedious and predictable."

    I espouse views that run counter to the Alt-Right, which are liberal and conservative in nature.

    "You could be close caption of an MSNBC broadcast. You are not a fearless truth-teller. You have never said anything original or interesting here. You are a dull hack who parrots the conventional wisdom of the establishment."

    Then don't respond to my posts anymore.

    "I don't consider you to be an American either - not in the sense of being my countryman - you clearly aren't."

    We are both Americans and countrymen. It says right here in our citizenship papers.

  291. @Lagertha
    @SFG

    I still can't get the image of Bill shoving a cigar up Monica's vag in the Oval Office. My husband would be dead after such a revolting, sociopathic stunt stunt.

    Replies: @SFG, @Expletive Deleted, @larry lurker, @Harry Baldwin, @Brutusale

    “It tastes good.”

  292. @Corvinus
    @Mr. Anon

    As I stated before, I am not a liberal, I am an American. I make my own political decisions and are not beholden to parties. But if you have to characterize me as a liberal to make you feel better about yourself, go right ahead.

    "You are too stupid to have noticed that Trump is the only candidate who is not (apparently) in the pocket of oligarchs and who expresses any interest in the economic well-being of ordinary people."

    Trump is an oligarch, a business magnate who has used his political connections for his own personal well-being.

    His Grand Hyatt Hotel in Manhattan was built with the benefit of a decades-long tax abatement obtained through government connections.

    He circumvented New York State campaign-finance laws by making a $30,000 donation to Andrew Stein (Jewish?), who on the New York City Board of Estimate, the body then responsible for land-use decisions in New York.

    In 2014, Trump made millions when he agreed to bring the Miss Universe pageant to Moscow. At the time, Trump mingled with the Russian business elite at a swanky after-party. “Almost all of the oligarchs were in the room,” Trump bragged on returning home.

    Trump is front and center at Wall Street. Why do you lie to yourself?

    "He may or may not deliver on that, but at least he is saying it. All Hillary has promised to do is to execute the globalist agenda of her oligarch masters. She is the candidate of Wall Street. I don’t care for parasites, whether they are wealthy, influential parasites…………or obscure and powerless parasites like you."

    Refrain from consuming large amounts of rot gut whiskey for once. Let us assume that she plans on executing this "globalist agenda" of her "oligarch masters". Are you not obscure and powerless yourself to stop them? Or, do you have the guts to do something about it rather than lament on a blog about Jews and elites?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Mr. Anon

    “As I stated before, I am not a liberal, I am an American. I make my own political decisions and are not beholden to parties.”

    Who cares what you say? You clearly only ever espouse liberal points of view, of a kind most of us here have come to find all too tedious and predictable. You could be close caption of an MSNBC broadcast. You are not a fearless truth-teller. You have never said anything original or interesting here. You are a dull hack who parrots the conventional wisdom of the establishment.

    I don’t consider you to be an American either – not in the sense of being my countryman – you clearly aren’t.

  293. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    @anonymous

    Thank you for this perspective.

    I am interested in getting a good grounding in these "basic windows" and understanding how things work mathematically. Would that include Algebra, Geometry, Trig? I took all in grade school, did fine, but haven't retained much and reading your comments and the other commenters make me feel that I didn't really learn them or get an intuitive grasp of why they were important and how they function in the world.)

    Would you recommend I work with certain texts? Should I take a class, or can I self study? Any recs would be greatly appreciated.

    Replies: @Peter Lund, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Oh and after the Lang, maybe a first book in discrete mathematics, even though that is not a step in your direction towards application (except for CS). Knowing much less than your other advisors (so add salt) but to me, getting comfortable with proofs is crucial to understanding, and better introduced this way. Scheinerman: Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction good for self-study (babies you). Velleman: How to Prove It. https://www.coursera.org/learn/mathematical-thinking

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Thank you.

    Thanks for the Coursera course link. How does the course relate to the two books? Are you just recommending it as, in its own right, a good first course for the study of mathematics?

    Replies: @Anonymous

  294. @Expletive Deleted
    @Lagertha

    I'll bet you can't do smoke-rings.

    Replies: @Lagertha

    from which orifice?

  295. @Mick Jagger gathers no Mosque
    Hillary is a fascist and not a few entertainers admire them and seek their company in the hopes they will not be among the first sent to prison or stood against a wall



    Simple Definition of fascism

    : a way of organizing a society in which a government ruled by a dictator controls the lives of the people and in which people are not allowed to disagree with the government

    : very harsh control or authority

    Replies: @guest, @Mr. Anon

    As “guest” pointed out, those definitions are simply incorrect. What you are referring to is dictatorship – which is not synonomous with fascism.

  296. @Anonymous
    @ScarletNumber

    That really was my point. I'm not so worried about how people with high IQ's and high future time orientation will spend their extensive leisure time in the automated future, but I am worried about what will happen when society has to handle an even larger number of dumb, obnoxious people with low future time orientation than it faces now. I think the robocops will have plenty to do.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Yes, I agree 😉

  297. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Oh and after the Lang, maybe a first book in discrete mathematics, even though that is not a step in your direction towards application (except for CS). Knowing much less than your other advisors (so add salt) but to me, getting comfortable with proofs is crucial to understanding, and better introduced this way. Scheinerman: Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction good for self-study (babies you). Velleman: How to Prove It. https://www.coursera.org/learn/mathematical-thinking

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Thank you.

    Thanks for the Coursera course link. How does the course relate to the two books? Are you just recommending it as, in its own right, a good first course for the study of mathematics?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Thinking about it I unrecommend Velleman. It got me bogged down. Scheinerman didn't. Scheinerman starts with a much breezier look at how to prove things, then uses that to give a taste of some branches of mathematics. That makes it more likely to hold one's interest, but those branches don't show up in much in engineering or the sciences (except CS) so I was thinking of a book that's just about proofs. Hence Velleman. Then I remembered Devlin's course, and that it has a book, which looks like Velleman but shorter and less tedious. Read http://online.stanford.edu/courses/mathematical-thinking-winter-2014 and the book's blurb on Amazon to see where it's situated. I haven't read or done it myself.

    All these say they presuppose high school algebra, i.e. the Lang, but I'm betting the opening chapters of Scheinerman can be profitably read without Lang and might actually help with it. Knowing how to do proofs (getting clear about language and understanding when a proposition logically "follows" from another) is a prerequisite for doing "pure" math. Yet it isn't officially a prerequisite for a typical calculus and linear algebra and statistics sequence geared towards science/engineering/business. Engineers apparently do engineering without it and (according to a math prof I had) may even struggle with it. I just think that without a grounding in proving things you end up drilling yourself in mechanical procedures without understanding the logic grounding them, and that practice with logical thinking is best acquired with simple, abstract structures, not with sexy applications of calculus.

    What I'm also trying to suggest is that if you start looking into all the fancy stuff you're going to give up. My recommendations are not going to give you a bird's eye view or a historical or philosophical perspective. But if you want to know if you can't do math then fail at attempts at Lang and Devlin and Scheinerman before calling it quits.

    I have heard good things about Polya's How to Solve It. Again, high school math probably a prerequisite.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  298. @onlyonegirlforbarry
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    He's talking about the Trump airplane. Trendies buy the latest Gulfstreams, more than a used airliner, but they use a lot less fuel.

    Replies: @Lurker, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    But Trump’s jet can move a lot more people around and that can be useful too.

    And he does have other aircraft.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/24/us/politics/donald-trumps-aging-air-fleet-gives-his-bid-and-his-brand-a-lift.html?_r=0

  299. @Anonymous
    Steve,

    My initial reaction to the Lady Rothschild stuff was similar to what your reaction appears to be. But maybe she actually is a force for good - note the "inclusive capitalism" organization she is involved in. I'm not being sarcastic. This might be someone who deserves the benefit of the doubt until we know more.

    Replies: @Auntie Analogue, @eggheadshadhisnumber, @Anatoly Karlin

    Open Society Foundation also sounds really nice. I mean what kind of regressive anti-Semitic troglodyte do you have to be to stand against the open society? Time to give Soros some slack as well.

  300. @mobi
    @Lurker


    I’ve been looking on YouTube for videos of this and, other than the DNC, she plays to tiny crowds. Even to call them rallies is to debase the word. Trump has rallies, she has intimate gatherings.
     
    But she has plenty of supporters, true believers even, and resourceful handlers.

    So I wonder why her crowds are so small. Can't be because she can't fill a larger venue.

    She's wary of appearing before a big group.

    Replies: @Lurker

    But she has plenty of supporters, true believers even

    But maybe not as many as we’ve been lead to believe?

    She’s wary of appearing before a big group.

    Maybe both are true to some extent? She’s wary and there aren’t that many anyway?

    Perhaps its also about controlling exactly who sees her? Vetted groups of true believers small enough that her handlers can be assured that no one will report odd responses, weirdness?

    Looking on YouTube there’s little sign of phone footage of her events, unlike Trump’s. Is that to cover up the low numbers, her behaviour or both?

  301. @reiner Tor
    @guest

    They are already dead, mostly. The memories are not of actual events, they are of the Hollywood movies and German movies and TV shows loosely based on those events, and people holding these memories aren't going to die out as long as the Megaphone is in the hands of those who want to keep these memories alive.

    Replies: @Lurker

    The memories are being hyped more and more as 1945 recedes from living memory.

    Tiny data point follows . . .

    I used to like to making model aircraft kits (would still like to!) Kits of WW2 German aircraft sold in Britain and elsewhere would include swastika on the box art and swastika decals. I knew this was not the case in Germany and took the trouble to check and confirm when in a model shop when first in Germany in the early 2000s. (Same for rail models of 1933-45).

    A few weeks ago I stopped to look at some aircraft kits (in England) in a shop window and what did I note? That, now, none of the German aircraft on sale are depicted with swastikas.

  302. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “…sort of minimized tree of the most careful thought about the simplest representation of problems that one can conceive);

    Could you explicate, elaborate on this idea, which you also may have returned to in the last sentence of your post?

    Thanks for asking about this, I butchered the sentence. That bold “the” should not be there. I’ll have to give my typing license back to Kmart. And what happened to Steve’s highly-paid copy-editor?

    The notion is that, over something like 2500 years, people have been taking various problems, reducing them to their most bare essentials, and then slowly and carefully thinking through how to solve this simplest form of the problem, with each step of the solution being simple, understandable, repeatable, and a step that is “trusted”. You record your “thinking” of course, so others can keep you honest by checking that your mind didn’t take magic steps to please you.

    “The clearest thinking about the simplest form of the problem.” If you can’t solve the simple and “clean” version of the problem, you don’t want to waste time on messy versions. That’s why it can often be helpful to draw a picture and “solve the picture”, rather than directly work with a problem as described. Or invent a “picture language”…

    Over time a huge “library” of known problems and solutions has been built up. Like learning language, the more the these you know, the more you can do, the more new problems you can tackle, using solutions you already know as steps in solving the new problem. But 2500 years is a long time, it can be hard to tell the forest for the trees.

    How could someone considering a career change learn enough about these areas to make a decision

    I don’t know, but it sounds like it might be worthwhile for you to wander by the Math or CS department of your local community college, or equivalent, and talk to somebody in person. You’re probably paying their salary in taxes. As others have pointed out, the actual classes that cover a lot of what you need are now online courses taught by some of the best profs in the world. Some are free. The problem with these, as I understand it, is that the completion and pass rate on these courses is something like 5%. People get excited and jump into that class on, say, Baysian Networks, but find they lack the basics. A good bit of the trick is to know where to start to make the effort worthwhile; the starting point depends on your specific background.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @anonymous


    The notion is that, over something like 2500 years, people have been taking various problems, reducing them to their most bare essentials, and then slowly and carefully thinking through how to solve this simplest form of the problem, with each step of the solution being simple, understandable, repeatable, and a step that is “trusted”. You record your “thinking” of course, so others can keep you honest by checking that your mind didn’t take magic steps to please you.
     
    Thank you, once again. The process you describe is quite interesting. Does it received further description in any of the books that have been cited here? (If you care to give an example, too, I would read it with interest, to better understand. Don't worry, I won't keep asking questions.)

    I'm suddenly intrigued with whether this process has--or at least should have--application to my current area of work. One wouldn't think so at first glance, but it might be interesting to think about...

    “The clearest thinking about the simplest form of the problem.” If you can’t solve the simple and “clean” version of the problem, you don’t want to waste time on messy versions. That’s why it can often be helpful to draw a picture and “solve the picture”, rather than directly work with a problem as described. Or invent a “picture language”…
     
    Same comment here, I guess. Is this idea of drawing a picture and solving a picture described elsewhere? (I am trying not to burden you.) Could you offer an example?
  303. @Anonymous
    @MEH 0910

    Do jews tend to change their names more often than other groups?

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Brutusale

    I wonder if within Jews that it’s Finkelstein’s that change their names the most.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    @MEH 0910

    Second place: Garfinkel
    Honorable mentions: Scheissekopf; Putzman; Dumkopf

  304. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous
    "...sort of minimized tree of the most careful thought about the simplest representation of problems that one can conceive);

    Could you explicate, elaborate on this idea, which you also may have returned to in the last sentence of your post?


    Thanks for asking about this, I butchered the sentence. That bold "the" should not be there. I'll have to give my typing license back to Kmart. And what happened to Steve's highly-paid copy-editor?

    The notion is that, over something like 2500 years, people have been taking various problems, reducing them to their most bare essentials, and then slowly and carefully thinking through how to solve this simplest form of the problem, with each step of the solution being simple, understandable, repeatable, and a step that is "trusted". You record your "thinking" of course, so others can keep you honest by checking that your mind didn't take magic steps to please you.

    "The clearest thinking about the simplest form of the problem." If you can't solve the simple and "clean" version of the problem, you don't want to waste time on messy versions. That's why it can often be helpful to draw a picture and "solve the picture", rather than directly work with a problem as described. Or invent a "picture language"...

    Over time a huge "library" of known problems and solutions has been built up. Like learning language, the more the these you know, the more you can do, the more new problems you can tackle, using solutions you already know as steps in solving the new problem. But 2500 years is a long time, it can be hard to tell the forest for the trees.


    How could someone considering a career change learn enough about these areas to make a decision

    I don't know, but it sounds like it might be worthwhile for you to wander by the Math or CS department of your local community college, or equivalent, and talk to somebody in person. You're probably paying their salary in taxes. As others have pointed out, the actual classes that cover a lot of what you need are now online courses taught by some of the best profs in the world. Some are free. The problem with these, as I understand it, is that the completion and pass rate on these courses is something like 5%. People get excited and jump into that class on, say, Baysian Networks, but find they lack the basics. A good bit of the trick is to know where to start to make the effort worthwhile; the starting point depends on your specific background.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    The notion is that, over something like 2500 years, people have been taking various problems, reducing them to their most bare essentials, and then slowly and carefully thinking through how to solve this simplest form of the problem, with each step of the solution being simple, understandable, repeatable, and a step that is “trusted”. You record your “thinking” of course, so others can keep you honest by checking that your mind didn’t take magic steps to please you.

    Thank you, once again. The process you describe is quite interesting. Does it received further description in any of the books that have been cited here? (If you care to give an example, too, I would read it with interest, to better understand. Don’t worry, I won’t keep asking questions.)

    I’m suddenly intrigued with whether this process has–or at least should have–application to my current area of work. One wouldn’t think so at first glance, but it might be interesting to think about…

    “The clearest thinking about the simplest form of the problem.” If you can’t solve the simple and “clean” version of the problem, you don’t want to waste time on messy versions. That’s why it can often be helpful to draw a picture and “solve the picture”, rather than directly work with a problem as described. Or invent a “picture language”…

    Same comment here, I guess. Is this idea of drawing a picture and solving a picture described elsewhere? (I am trying not to burden you.) Could you offer an example?

  305. @MEH 0910
    @Anonymous

    I wonder if within Jews that it's Finkelstein's that change their names the most.

    Replies: @Ivy

    Second place: Garfinkel
    Honorable mentions: Scheissekopf; Putzman; Dumkopf

  306. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “The Navy nuclear power program does a pretty good job of teaching engineering level math to blue collar kids, if they have the IQ to pass the AFQT.”

    The Prussian system (and public eduction to this day) likewise cast a big net. The Prussians didn’t have IQ tests, but could find who would do well in a subject by teaching some of it to the entire nation and seeing what stuck to whom. Brute force. By the time they did this the idea that some of your best potential mathematicans were probably poor farm boys with little access to education was probably accepted by many.

    Gauss, one of the foremost mathematicians in the history of the world, was the child of a gardner and brick-layer:

    “…Sometimes referred to as the Princeps mathematicorum (Latin, “the foremost of mathematicians”) and “greatest mathematician since antiquity” … ranked as one of history’s most influential mathematicians….

    …the son of poor working-class parents. His mother was illiterate and never recorded the date of his birth…”

    • Replies: @neon2
    @anonymous

    Another and very striking example of the truth that genius is not predictable, and is precisely never simply the result of good genes.
    It is a blitz from heaven, and to be revered rather than analysed.

  307. @onlyonegirlforbarry
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    He's talking about the Trump airplane. Trendies buy the latest Gulfstreams, more than a used airliner, but they use a lot less fuel.

    Replies: @Lurker, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    He’s talking about the Trump airplane.

    Yes, that’s the joke.

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Using the term "bird" nearly got me in a fight in England once. I was talking to a former RAF person and referring to an airplane, he thought I insulted his girlfriend. Calling an "aeroplane" a "bird" was something they'd never thought of.

  308. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Thank you.

    Thanks for the Coursera course link. How does the course relate to the two books? Are you just recommending it as, in its own right, a good first course for the study of mathematics?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Thinking about it I unrecommend Velleman. It got me bogged down. Scheinerman didn’t. Scheinerman starts with a much breezier look at how to prove things, then uses that to give a taste of some branches of mathematics. That makes it more likely to hold one’s interest, but those branches don’t show up in much in engineering or the sciences (except CS) so I was thinking of a book that’s just about proofs. Hence Velleman. Then I remembered Devlin’s course, and that it has a book, which looks like Velleman but shorter and less tedious. Read http://online.stanford.edu/courses/mathematical-thinking-winter-2014 and the book’s blurb on Amazon to see where it’s situated. I haven’t read or done it myself.

    All these say they presuppose high school algebra, i.e. the Lang, but I’m betting the opening chapters of Scheinerman can be profitably read without Lang and might actually help with it. Knowing how to do proofs (getting clear about language and understanding when a proposition logically “follows” from another) is a prerequisite for doing “pure” math. Yet it isn’t officially a prerequisite for a typical calculus and linear algebra and statistics sequence geared towards science/engineering/business. Engineers apparently do engineering without it and (according to a math prof I had) may even struggle with it. I just think that without a grounding in proving things you end up drilling yourself in mechanical procedures without understanding the logic grounding them, and that practice with logical thinking is best acquired with simple, abstract structures, not with sexy applications of calculus.

    What I’m also trying to suggest is that if you start looking into all the fancy stuff you’re going to give up. My recommendations are not going to give you a bird’s eye view or a historical or philosophical perspective. But if you want to know if you can’t do math then fail at attempts at Lang and Devlin and Scheinerman before calling it quits.

    I have heard good things about Polya’s How to Solve It. Again, high school math probably a prerequisite.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    This is great. Thank you so much. I appreciate the thoughtfulness.

    I've actually had an insecurity about "proofs," an inkling (without fully understanding how they work) they might be important in a fundamental way to getting the bigger picture. Your comments help affirm and clarify that pathway.

    Many interesting comments in your post.

  309. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Thinking about it I unrecommend Velleman. It got me bogged down. Scheinerman didn't. Scheinerman starts with a much breezier look at how to prove things, then uses that to give a taste of some branches of mathematics. That makes it more likely to hold one's interest, but those branches don't show up in much in engineering or the sciences (except CS) so I was thinking of a book that's just about proofs. Hence Velleman. Then I remembered Devlin's course, and that it has a book, which looks like Velleman but shorter and less tedious. Read http://online.stanford.edu/courses/mathematical-thinking-winter-2014 and the book's blurb on Amazon to see where it's situated. I haven't read or done it myself.

    All these say they presuppose high school algebra, i.e. the Lang, but I'm betting the opening chapters of Scheinerman can be profitably read without Lang and might actually help with it. Knowing how to do proofs (getting clear about language and understanding when a proposition logically "follows" from another) is a prerequisite for doing "pure" math. Yet it isn't officially a prerequisite for a typical calculus and linear algebra and statistics sequence geared towards science/engineering/business. Engineers apparently do engineering without it and (according to a math prof I had) may even struggle with it. I just think that without a grounding in proving things you end up drilling yourself in mechanical procedures without understanding the logic grounding them, and that practice with logical thinking is best acquired with simple, abstract structures, not with sexy applications of calculus.

    What I'm also trying to suggest is that if you start looking into all the fancy stuff you're going to give up. My recommendations are not going to give you a bird's eye view or a historical or philosophical perspective. But if you want to know if you can't do math then fail at attempts at Lang and Devlin and Scheinerman before calling it quits.

    I have heard good things about Polya's How to Solve It. Again, high school math probably a prerequisite.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    This is great. Thank you so much. I appreciate the thoughtfulness.

    I’ve actually had an insecurity about “proofs,” an inkling (without fully understanding how they work) they might be important in a fundamental way to getting the bigger picture. Your comments help affirm and clarify that pathway.

    Many interesting comments in your post.

  310. @Anon
    Hillary's polls have been slipping, and I think she really hurt herself with a combination of the alt-right speech and the bad reports about her health. The average American doesn't follow politics closely, and when Hillary devoted a major political speech to carrying on about an enemy they've never heard of, that makes the average voter think, 'Crazy, paranoid old lady,' and look more closely at the reports about her hitting her head and her poor health.

    It hasn't helped that a TV show was cancelled for talking about Hillary's health, because the average American does watch TV, and they'll notice that. It comes across as dictatorial, high-handed, and vindictive. Most Americans have enough horse sense to conclude that where there's smoke, there's fire. The fact that Hillary's campaign has announced that she's taking weekends off (real presidents don't truly take weekends off, because they're always 'on call' like doctors, and the average voter expects that), and the fact that she's dodging press conferences, only reinforce the narrative that her health is bad, and she is not up to the stain of handling the presidency.

    Back when Hillary had to take a 'bathroom break' during that debate, I doubt it was an actual bathroom break. Hardcore politicians have ways of dealing with this. They just stick on a pair of Depends before the debate and keeping plugging away, because they know the appearance of weakness on the stand is a career-destroyer. Hillary almost certainly was having a dizzy spell.

    Replies: @BB753, @Marat, @Harry Baldwin

    reinforce the narrative that her health is bad, and she is not up to the stain of handling the presidency.

    When it comes to the presidency, Bill handles the stains.

  311. @Lagertha
    @SFG

    I still can't get the image of Bill shoving a cigar up Monica's vag in the Oval Office. My husband would be dead after such a revolting, sociopathic stunt stunt.

    Replies: @SFG, @Expletive Deleted, @larry lurker, @Harry Baldwin, @Brutusale

    There’s worse, you know, in the Starr report. She tossed his salad, as the gays say.

    • Replies: @5371
    @Harry Baldwin

    At least that way he didn't have to look at Monica.

    , @BB753
    @Harry Baldwin

    Bill probably couldn't get it up. Hence the cigar. He couldn't do the deed with that woman. Remember, those were pre-Viagra days, interns had to master more than one trick to have their older masters perform. It was probably in the job description. JFK famously deflowered a young white house intern. Had it been Nixon, it would have been rape.

  312. I have heard good things about Polya’s How to Solve It.

    Polya’s book is great if you are already using a lot of math with fluency, at any level at or beyond high school, and want insight into what exactly you are doing, as you do it—how the key opens the lock, so to speak.

    It’s not a way to learn math, especially if you are returning to the subject later in life.

    Two major problems with modern applied math textbooks at the college introductory level is their gaseous lack of brevity, with many running unnecessarily into the hundreds of pages, and an insistence on formality of notation and proof that is quite unnecessary for those who simply seek to be users of math, and who are not looking to be mathematicians, as such.

    In 2016, some of the best math instruction is to be found online, starting with Khan Academy. Many of our top universities, as well as the usual MOOC sites, are also a good way for the interested student in later adult life to return to learning math.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @PiltdownMan

    those who simply seek to be users of math, and who are not looking to be mathematicians, as such.

    What is the distinction between the two? I don't wish to sound dense, but I also don't want to assume. You seem to be getting at something beyond just level of aptitude.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @PiltdownMan

    , @Anonymous
    @PiltdownMan

    I am reading correctly your critique of the presence of formal proofs in contemp textbooks as slightly at odds with the advice of Anon 309, who encouraged a grounding in proofs?

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

    , @Anonymous
    @PiltdownMan

    What's the opinion of the Stewart Calculus text?

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

  313. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @PiltdownMan

    I have heard good things about Polya’s How to Solve It.
     
    Polya's book is great if you are already using a lot of math with fluency, at any level at or beyond high school, and want insight into what exactly you are doing, as you do it—how the key opens the lock, so to speak.

    It's not a way to learn math, especially if you are returning to the subject later in life.

    Two major problems with modern applied math textbooks at the college introductory level is their gaseous lack of brevity, with many running unnecessarily into the hundreds of pages, and an insistence on formality of notation and proof that is quite unnecessary for those who simply seek to be users of math, and who are not looking to be mathematicians, as such.

    In 2016, some of the best math instruction is to be found online, starting with Khan Academy. Many of our top universities, as well as the usual MOOC sites, are also a good way for the interested student in later adult life to return to learning math.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    those who simply seek to be users of math, and who are not looking to be mathematicians, as such.

    What is the distinction between the two? I don’t wish to sound dense, but I also don’t want to assume. You seem to be getting at something beyond just level of aptitude.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Anonymous


    What is the distinction between the two?
     
    I was imprecise, but the distinction is that between the users of tools and the inventors and builders of tools. Mathematicians are the latter and seek to be creators of mathematics and mathematical methods. For them, rigor and formal proof are indispensable to not just understanding, but certifying that what they learn is indubitable and solid. Proven, to be precise. Problems and examples from outside of mathematics do not matter at all-what matters is that the mathematics is internally consistent and justifiable on its own terms.

    But there is a whole class of users of mathematics, from physicists to engineers and economists and so on, who use the tools of mathematics to further the study of their own subjects. The math that they use is generally called applied mathematics, and for them, utility is everything. They learn how the math works, and how to apply it, but do not "invent" any new mathematical techniques. The vast majority of students of math fall into this latter category.

    It is an unfortunate trend in undergraduate math education (and high school education, too) these days that math is taught or presented in a manner more suited to the former category of student than the latter, i.e. with an excess of emphasis on formalism and proofs, rather than techniques and applications.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    , @PiltdownMan
    @Anonymous

    Having read your earlier comment, I second the recommendation of Scheinerman's
    "Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction" for covering a wholly different side to mathematics not captured by studying the typical introductory calculus course, but that is increasingly relevant in the modern world. Study both, and you will know more than many smart people.

    A caveat, though, if you are returning to mathematics after a decade or two, as I did. I was a math major and thought I had kept my quantitative wits about me to some degree, and decided to dip my toes back into the university level math I thought I already knew. I discovered two things.

    1) It requires close attention and hard work and the monthly time commitment is no different from taking up running or working out. Mathematical fitness is time consuming and requires steady practice.

    2) For me, mathematical ability has ebbed away with age, and leaps of insight and logic come much more slowly, and sometimes not at all. Expect a certain amount of frustration. It's not necessarily going to be recreational, at least for some time.

    The reward, of course, is the huge sense of personal intellectual accomplishment that ensues.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  314. @PiltdownMan

    I have heard good things about Polya’s How to Solve It.
     
    Polya's book is great if you are already using a lot of math with fluency, at any level at or beyond high school, and want insight into what exactly you are doing, as you do it—how the key opens the lock, so to speak.

    It's not a way to learn math, especially if you are returning to the subject later in life.

    Two major problems with modern applied math textbooks at the college introductory level is their gaseous lack of brevity, with many running unnecessarily into the hundreds of pages, and an insistence on formality of notation and proof that is quite unnecessary for those who simply seek to be users of math, and who are not looking to be mathematicians, as such.

    In 2016, some of the best math instruction is to be found online, starting with Khan Academy. Many of our top universities, as well as the usual MOOC sites, are also a good way for the interested student in later adult life to return to learning math.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    I am reading correctly your critique of the presence of formal proofs in contemp textbooks as slightly at odds with the advice of Anon 309, who encouraged a grounding in proofs?

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Anonymous


    I am reading correctly your critique of the presence of formal proofs in contemp textbooks as slightly at odds with the advice of Anon 309, who encouraged a grounding in proofs?
     
    Yes. I do believe that there is, in recent decades, an emphasis and certain level of fetishization of formal rigor in mathematical pedagogy at the university level, which is inappropriate and counterproductive when it is imposed on those who are not math majors.
  315. @PiltdownMan

    I have heard good things about Polya’s How to Solve It.
     
    Polya's book is great if you are already using a lot of math with fluency, at any level at or beyond high school, and want insight into what exactly you are doing, as you do it—how the key opens the lock, so to speak.

    It's not a way to learn math, especially if you are returning to the subject later in life.

    Two major problems with modern applied math textbooks at the college introductory level is their gaseous lack of brevity, with many running unnecessarily into the hundreds of pages, and an insistence on formality of notation and proof that is quite unnecessary for those who simply seek to be users of math, and who are not looking to be mathematicians, as such.

    In 2016, some of the best math instruction is to be found online, starting with Khan Academy. Many of our top universities, as well as the usual MOOC sites, are also a good way for the interested student in later adult life to return to learning math.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    What’s the opinion of the Stewart Calculus text?

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Anonymous

    The Stewart text is absurdly expensive, a perfect example of how textbook publishers are nowadays squeezing out every dollar from the student pocket. I can't recommend it for that reason alone, but as a self-study book, it may well be a put off for the reasons I previously listed.

    I can recommend the following, which I think are quite good.

    Adrian Banner's Calculus Lifesaver, in addition to being sensibly priced, is accompanied online by his lectures. The exposition is good, and the examples many, which aid understanding.

    Morris Kline's much older book, Calculus: An Intuitive and Physical Approach is also well grounded in actual examples and applications.

  316. @Harry Baldwin
    @Lagertha

    There's worse, you know, in the Starr report. She tossed his salad, as the gays say.

    Replies: @5371, @BB753

    At least that way he didn’t have to look at Monica.

  317. @Harry Baldwin
    @Lagertha

    There's worse, you know, in the Starr report. She tossed his salad, as the gays say.

    Replies: @5371, @BB753

    Bill probably couldn’t get it up. Hence the cigar. He couldn’t do the deed with that woman. Remember, those were pre-Viagra days, interns had to master more than one trick to have their older masters perform. It was probably in the job description. JFK famously deflowered a young white house intern. Had it been Nixon, it would have been rape.

  318. @Steve Sailer
    @Father O'Hara

    Yes, the notion that over the next eight years, Paul McCartney will finally start to make money off Yesterday and Hey Jude, as opposed to all the other wheeler dealers who have made money off McCartney's songs for the last 56 years is not something that will bother me much.

    Replies: @pepperinmono, @Yngvar

    It’s pretty funny that Paul McCartney has to get permission and pay royalties for performing his own songs.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    @Yngvar

    It is typical for musical artists who write their own songs to sign with music publishers-- e.g., Northern Songs for Lennon and McCartney, back in the day-- the same as songwriters who do not perform usually do. This is not a mindless giveaway by the songwriters; their music publishers are expected to perform valuable services, in return for their assignments of publishing rights by the copyright holders. From BMI's Web site:

    ***

    "Wherever royalty rates are indicated in this document, the amount shown is the 200% royalty. In the typical case where all songwriters or composers have assigned their copyright in a work to publishers, half of the amount listed is paid to the songwriters or composers and half to the publishers."

    [ http://www.bmi.com/creators/royalty/general_information/ ]

    ***

    So, Paul McCartney has not been getting stiffed on royalties, for over half a century, just because the Beatles' then-manager, Brian Epstein, had McCartney and John Lennon sign a publishing agreement with the newly created Northern Songs for their "joint" output as songwriters. (If anything, Paul got screwed by his being tied to John, even when Paul wrote a song alone-- like "Yesterday"-- because Paul turned out to be much better at crafting popular hits, on his own, then was John!)

    Replies: @Former Darfur, @D. K.

  319. @Redneck Republican
    @Anonym

    The Economist Group purchased Business International Corporation 30 years ago. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_International_Corporation

    Business International Corporation employed both Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, but at different times.

    Business International is a little known CIA front company; perhaps it needs to be better known.

    The odds of two different occupants of the Oval Office having worked for the same itty bitty publishing are infinitesimal.

    As for the piece mentioning agricultural land and the Rothschild family, shortages always and everywhere are a function of price. Like shortages of farm workers.

    Except for arable land. Some might consider arable land to be a perfect example of "the tragedy of the commons." http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/tragedy-of-the-commons

    There is a finite amount of arable land on the globe. You can farm this finite amount more intensively, but you cannot create more of it. Yeah, sure, you can farm fallow lands; convert forest to crops; and reclaim land from the sea (think Holland), but all of these choices have extraordinary costs, both environmental and monetary, and involve long time lines.

    So, are the Rothschilds trying to corner the market on arable lands? Or is their interest simply in the long-term returns generated by renewable commodities?

    Replies: @Anonym

    That’s a very interesting comment. I hope you stick around.

  320. @Anonymous
    @PiltdownMan

    What's the opinion of the Stewart Calculus text?

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

    The Stewart text is absurdly expensive, a perfect example of how textbook publishers are nowadays squeezing out every dollar from the student pocket. I can’t recommend it for that reason alone, but as a self-study book, it may well be a put off for the reasons I previously listed.

    I can recommend the following, which I think are quite good.

    Adrian Banner’s Calculus Lifesaver, in addition to being sensibly priced, is accompanied online by his lectures. The exposition is good, and the examples many, which aid understanding.

    Morris Kline’s much older book, Calculus: An Intuitive and Physical Approach is also well grounded in actual examples and applications.

  321. @Anonym
    @BB753

    Sir Paul never forgot his salad days and remains a notorious tightwad.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @BB753

    Is that why he chose the one-legged hooker? (you know the joke, don’t you? They charge less and are better in bed) If he figured she’d be cheaper, he was really wrong. I wonder if he ever wrote a song about her, before or after being shafted in divorce court.

  322. @Anonymous
    @PiltdownMan

    I am reading correctly your critique of the presence of formal proofs in contemp textbooks as slightly at odds with the advice of Anon 309, who encouraged a grounding in proofs?

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

    I am reading correctly your critique of the presence of formal proofs in contemp textbooks as slightly at odds with the advice of Anon 309, who encouraged a grounding in proofs?

    Yes. I do believe that there is, in recent decades, an emphasis and certain level of fetishization of formal rigor in mathematical pedagogy at the university level, which is inappropriate and counterproductive when it is imposed on those who are not math majors.

  323. @Anonymous
    @PiltdownMan

    those who simply seek to be users of math, and who are not looking to be mathematicians, as such.

    What is the distinction between the two? I don't wish to sound dense, but I also don't want to assume. You seem to be getting at something beyond just level of aptitude.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @PiltdownMan

    What is the distinction between the two?

    I was imprecise, but the distinction is that between the users of tools and the inventors and builders of tools. Mathematicians are the latter and seek to be creators of mathematics and mathematical methods. For them, rigor and formal proof are indispensable to not just understanding, but certifying that what they learn is indubitable and solid. Proven, to be precise. Problems and examples from outside of mathematics do not matter at all-what matters is that the mathematics is internally consistent and justifiable on its own terms.

    But there is a whole class of users of mathematics, from physicists to engineers and economists and so on, who use the tools of mathematics to further the study of their own subjects. The math that they use is generally called applied mathematics, and for them, utility is everything. They learn how the math works, and how to apply it, but do not “invent” any new mathematical techniques. The vast majority of students of math fall into this latter category.

    It is an unfortunate trend in undergraduate math education (and high school education, too) these days that math is taught or presented in a manner more suited to the former category of student than the latter, i.e. with an excess of emphasis on formalism and proofs, rather than techniques and applications.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @PiltdownMan


    It is an unfortunate trend in undergraduate math education (and high school education, too) these days that math is taught or presented in a manner more suited to the former category of student than the latter, i.e. with an excess of emphasis on formalism and proofs, rather than techniques and applications.
     
    Yes, the religious belief in the equal ability of all students gets expressed as the equal capacity for abstract thought, since the test-writers (math professors) got where they are on their demonstration of that particular capacity.

    Not requiring the abstract approach for all then feels somehow racist.
  324. @Mr. Anon
    @Corvinus

    "Trump is front and center at Wall Street. Why do you lie to yourself?"

    Then why do they almost exclusively favor his opponent. You are the one engaging in self-delusion, nitwit.

    "Refrain from consuming large amounts of rot gut whiskey for once."

    I take it that was supposed to be funny. You might include a notice to that effect in future.

    "Let us assume that she plans on executing this “globalist agenda” of her “oligarch masters”."

    You don't think that is exactly what she has done, and will do?

    "Are you not obscure and powerless yourself to stop them?"

    Obscure and powerless? Yes. Most people are. As I said, the distinguishing factor is that I - unlike you - am not a parasite.

    So, tell us, since you are obviously carrying water for Hillary, what is it about her that induces you to support her, as you clearly are here. Assuming for the sake of argument that anyone here gives a damn what you thing (we don't), what is the case for Hillary?

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “Then why do they almost exclusively favor his opponent. You are the one engaging in self-delusion, nitwit.”

    Trump is a capitalist. He is part and parcel to Wall Street. That was the point I was making, not the extent of his fundraising capabilities.

    “Obscure and powerless? Yes. Most people are. As I said, the distinguishing factor is that I – unlike you – am not a parasite.”

    If you choose not to become heavily invested in stopping Hillary and her Jew friends, you are a parasite.

    “So, tell us, since you are obviously carrying water for Hillary…”

    I’m voting Libertarian. There is no case for Hillary or the Donald.

    “Who cares what you say?”

    Obviously, you do, since you respond to my posts.

    “You clearly only ever espouse liberal points of view, of a kind most of us here have come to find all too tedious and predictable.”

    I espouse views that run counter to the Alt-Right, which are liberal and conservative in nature.

    “You could be close caption of an MSNBC broadcast. You are not a fearless truth-teller. You have never said anything original or interesting here. You are a dull hack who parrots the conventional wisdom of the establishment.”

    Then don’t respond to my posts anymore.

    “I don’t consider you to be an American either – not in the sense of being my countryman – you clearly aren’t.”

    We are both Americans and countrymen. It says right here in our citizenship papers.

  325. @Anonymous
    @PiltdownMan

    those who simply seek to be users of math, and who are not looking to be mathematicians, as such.

    What is the distinction between the two? I don't wish to sound dense, but I also don't want to assume. You seem to be getting at something beyond just level of aptitude.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @PiltdownMan

    Having read your earlier comment, I second the recommendation of Scheinerman’s
    “Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction” for covering a wholly different side to mathematics not captured by studying the typical introductory calculus course, but that is increasingly relevant in the modern world. Study both, and you will know more than many smart people.

    A caveat, though, if you are returning to mathematics after a decade or two, as I did. I was a math major and thought I had kept my quantitative wits about me to some degree, and decided to dip my toes back into the university level math I thought I already knew. I discovered two things.

    1) It requires close attention and hard work and the monthly time commitment is no different from taking up running or working out. Mathematical fitness is time consuming and requires steady practice.

    2) For me, mathematical ability has ebbed away with age, and leaps of insight and logic come much more slowly, and sometimes not at all. Expect a certain amount of frustration. It’s not necessarily going to be recreational, at least for some time.

    The reward, of course, is the huge sense of personal intellectual accomplishment that ensues.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @PiltdownMan

    Thanks again for another instructive comment. In what way is the Schneierman material increasingly relevant to the modern world? (One could be surprised by that comment given that some of your comments might be described as valuing applied math.)

    Why do you think that math study results in a huge sense of personal intellectual accomplishment? Is it that one feel wiser in terms of having a better understanding of the world and more tools to decipher it with, perhaps even just smarter (like having a stronger muscle that is potentially useful)? Or is it more like a peak summited for recreation, a challenge met?

    Would you recommend I try to take the Coursera course this Fall?

    Thanks for the insights!

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

  326. @anon
    @Corvinus

    BOTH Hillary and Trump have little patience for commoners.

    Trump has spent part of almost every day in the past few months flying around the country to be around commoners. I'd say that takes a fair amount of patience.

    "They cater to their wealthy friends for donations while taking populist positions."

    Does Hillary even go to the pretense of taking populist positions anymore? It hasn't seemed like it.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “Trump has spent part of almost every day in the past few months flying around the country to be around commoners. I’d say that takes a fair amount of patience.”

    Yes, he and Hillary are running for the Oval Office. Both have to be front and center of the “peasants”.

    “Does Hillary even go to the pretense of taking populist positions anymore? It hasn’t seemed like it.”

    Yes, she is taking populist positions. Whether it be out of necessity, you be the judge.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/wp/2015/04/21/is-hillary-a-populist-of-convenience/?utm_term=.b22790cb7055

  327. @Anonymous
    @middle aged vet

    Thank you, middle aged vet!

    Just to clarify, do I need to acquire and study regular textbooks on these subjects in addition to these books? (I am interested in developing at least a rudimentary knowledge so as to be able apply these tools to non-math subjects, such as in the natural sciences (physics, chemistry, bio), or Econ, or CS, or perhaps even areas I hadn't imagined they would have application to.) If so, do you know of particular titles/authors?

    Also, if I may, where does the subject of Statistics fit into all this?

    Replies: @middle aged vet

    Anonymous at sep 4 – 1:09 – You have been getting much better advice than I can give. To clarify my positive assessment of the books I listed , 99.99 percent of people cannot progress at all in math without doing and understanding many solved problems; none of the books I mentioned have enough solved problems for this purpose. Solved problems are available everywhere, both in print and on line. Other commenters have made great recommendations.
    I don’t have a good answer on where statistics fits in – statisticians can adapt pure calculus techniques, but they also use unexpected (or expected) aspects of biology and history that are not subject to being reduced to equations, and they also use complex logic and natural law.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @middle aged vet

    Thanks. Regards

  328. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @PiltdownMan
    @Anonymous

    Having read your earlier comment, I second the recommendation of Scheinerman's
    "Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction" for covering a wholly different side to mathematics not captured by studying the typical introductory calculus course, but that is increasingly relevant in the modern world. Study both, and you will know more than many smart people.

    A caveat, though, if you are returning to mathematics after a decade or two, as I did. I was a math major and thought I had kept my quantitative wits about me to some degree, and decided to dip my toes back into the university level math I thought I already knew. I discovered two things.

    1) It requires close attention and hard work and the monthly time commitment is no different from taking up running or working out. Mathematical fitness is time consuming and requires steady practice.

    2) For me, mathematical ability has ebbed away with age, and leaps of insight and logic come much more slowly, and sometimes not at all. Expect a certain amount of frustration. It's not necessarily going to be recreational, at least for some time.

    The reward, of course, is the huge sense of personal intellectual accomplishment that ensues.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Thanks again for another instructive comment. In what way is the Schneierman material increasingly relevant to the modern world? (One could be surprised by that comment given that some of your comments might be described as valuing applied math.)

    Why do you think that math study results in a huge sense of personal intellectual accomplishment? Is it that one feel wiser in terms of having a better understanding of the world and more tools to decipher it with, perhaps even just smarter (like having a stronger muscle that is potentially useful)? Or is it more like a peak summited for recreation, a challenge met?

    Would you recommend I try to take the Coursera course this Fall?

    Thanks for the insights!

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Anonymous


    Why do you think that math study results in a huge sense of personal intellectual accomplishment? Is it that one feel wiser in terms of having a better understanding of the world and more tools to decipher it with, perhaps even just smarter (like having a stronger muscle that is potentially useful)? Or is it more like a peak summited for recreation, a challenge met?
     
    I think the former—the feeling of finding that you have stronger muscles and that lifting luggage is suddenly a snap, whenever you need to do it.

    In what way is the Schneierman material increasingly relevant to the modern world? (One could be surprised by that comment given that some of your comments might be described as valuing applied math.)
     
    Much of discrete math, when I first learned it four decades ago, was considered to be abstract pure math, with a few applications, such as in particle physics. There are many more now, 70 years into the computer age, and so it is worth being acquainted with, at some point in your journey.


    Would you recommend I try to take the Coursera course this Fall?
     
    Sure, why not? Especially if you are determined to make the time commitment.

    My only humble caveat? Pick a small, narrow area to focus on for the first few months.

    A review of high-school algebra, trigonometry or co-ordinate geometry (better know as analytic or Cartesian geometry these days). The elements of differential or integral calculus.
    Or if you are already up to speed, ordinary differential equations, or vector analysis.

    A single small portion, to last a few to several months, depending on your time commitment. It's easy to lose one's way or one's mid-life motivation with excess.

    But on a more positive note...

    ...you are to be commended. Go for it!

    Replies: @Anonymous

  329. @syonredux
    From a COSMO profile on Chozick:

    I grew up in San Antonio, Texas, and I thought I wanted to be a poet or maybe write screenplays. Then in high school, I was in this program where you could leave campus for a couple of hours a day and get credit for working. I worked at the San Antonio Express News for a year. I worked with a woman named Beverly Purcell-Guerra, who had just moved from New York where she had worked in magazines. I had gone on a class trip in the sixth grade to New York and all my friends couldn't understand why you would live there, and I remember thinking, I cannot wait to live here. To me, Beverly was the most interesting, glamorous person I had ever met. She was my first mentor.

    I went to college at UT Austin. I know everyone loves Austin, but I sort of hated it. I felt like you were either a sorority girl or you were smoking pot by the lake. Where I really found refuge was the Daily Texan. I was an entertainment writer, which was super fun in Austin — I remember going to SXSW when it was still a little backwater film festival.
     

    I was a journalism major for about three weeks. I remember being in this giant seminar class with 200 people, and the professor was teaching us about grammar and what makes a good story, and I was thinking, I don't need to major in this. So I switched to English and Latin American studies and started writing a lot about Latin America and Mexico.
     

    I remember working at Mademoiselle and the fashion editor was like, "I need you to go to the belly of Grand Central and fetch me prosciutto and melon." I didn't know what prosciutto was — I'm from Texas, we call that "ham." I wish Twitter existed then, because I used to keep notes of what I overheard in the elevator. I remember a girl got on with a Birkin bag, and her friend goes, "Oh my god, I love your bag, is that new?" and she goes, "No, I got it, like, a week ago."
     

    I was laying the groundwork to go to Mexico when an opening in Tokyo came up. I didn't speak a word of Japanese, but I thought Japan seemed so much more interesting, so I asked to go there.

    I think part of the reason they agreed to send me was because I was 26 and I didn't have a family. But it was really hard. I had a tutor, bless her heart, she was so patient with me. A Japanese friend of mine was leaving her apartment and it was amazing but in a very Japanese neighborhood, and they didn't want a gaijin, a foreigner, living there. On the other hand, when I look back at the work I produced in Japan, it includes some of my favorite stories. In politics, people are fighting over the same stories constantly, but in Japan, it was like they grew on trees. I was like, "The toilets play music here, that's a story!"

     


    I move back to New York, it's 2007, and John Bussey calls me and says, "How would you like to go to Iowa with Hillary Clinton?" Iowa was as big a culture shock to me as Japan, and American politics was also totally foreign — I remember not knowing what a caucus was. John Bussey's theory was that fresh perspective brings a different kind of story. Everyone knows people hook up on the campaign, but no one had written that story. I was in 48 states that election cycle. I was with Hillary when she cried in New Hampshire, I was with her when she came out in Ohio and ranted, "Shame on you, Barack Obama." What's great about covering her is she is so disciplined and so on message that when something unexpected happens, it's really significant. I covered her through May, when it became obvious she wasn't going to get the nomination, and then they moved me to Obama's traveling press.

     


    That was really different. Obama is super charming and charismatic speaking to 50,000 people, and Hillary is charming and charismatic speaking to five. The campaigns were very different because Hillary's was in turmoil. She gets criticized for having drama in her campaign, but any losing candidate has drama. When I went over to Obama, there was a lot of talk about "no drama Obama" — which wasn't true, he had plenty of drama, but he knew his message. In 2008 "hope and change" was exactly what the country was looking for, and they stuck with that, and Hillary had to find her own message. When I started covering her in 2007, I was like, "I'm riding this beat to the White House," and then saw her fall.
     
    http://www.cosmopolitan.com/career/news/a42193/get-that-life-amy-chozick-new-york-times/

    Replies: @Dr. X, @Harry Baldwin

    Hillary is charming and charismatic speaking to five.

    Neither charm nor charisma are virtues. A good person may be charming, but so may a predator, such as a con artist. Manipulative people use charm to achieve their ends. Are there any successful politicians who can’t muster up a bit of charm when dealing with people whose money or influence they want? I doubt it.

    As for charisma, most of history’s great bad guys had it.

  330. Hey globalists, we’re coming for ya. It may not be this year, but we’re coming. If Hillary wins, our 2020 candidate will make you wish for Trump back.

  331. @PiltdownMan
    @Anonymous


    What is the distinction between the two?
     
    I was imprecise, but the distinction is that between the users of tools and the inventors and builders of tools. Mathematicians are the latter and seek to be creators of mathematics and mathematical methods. For them, rigor and formal proof are indispensable to not just understanding, but certifying that what they learn is indubitable and solid. Proven, to be precise. Problems and examples from outside of mathematics do not matter at all-what matters is that the mathematics is internally consistent and justifiable on its own terms.

    But there is a whole class of users of mathematics, from physicists to engineers and economists and so on, who use the tools of mathematics to further the study of their own subjects. The math that they use is generally called applied mathematics, and for them, utility is everything. They learn how the math works, and how to apply it, but do not "invent" any new mathematical techniques. The vast majority of students of math fall into this latter category.

    It is an unfortunate trend in undergraduate math education (and high school education, too) these days that math is taught or presented in a manner more suited to the former category of student than the latter, i.e. with an excess of emphasis on formalism and proofs, rather than techniques and applications.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    It is an unfortunate trend in undergraduate math education (and high school education, too) these days that math is taught or presented in a manner more suited to the former category of student than the latter, i.e. with an excess of emphasis on formalism and proofs, rather than techniques and applications.

    Yes, the religious belief in the equal ability of all students gets expressed as the equal capacity for abstract thought, since the test-writers (math professors) got where they are on their demonstration of that particular capacity.

    Not requiring the abstract approach for all then feels somehow racist.

  332. @Jus' Sayin'...
    This reads almost as if one or more members of the NYT staff is subtly but deliberately trying to ensure that Hillary Rodham Clinton will not be our next president. (I'm thinking of the underground propaganda efforts against The Prophet in Heinlein's novella, "If This Goes on...") Perhaps these persons have become aware that Hillary is (a) Corrupt (b) Incompetent (c) Physically and mentally incapacitated (d) An alcoholic (e) Demonically possessed (f) All of the above.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Marc, @Hibernian

    Possibly even some leftists have trouble seeing all five characteristics as features rather than bugs in a POTUS.

  333. @ScarletNumber
    @Anonymous

    LOL I'm shocked SHOCKED the word "confirmation" wasn't used by Berger.

    Replies: @Nico, @Hibernian

    I don’t think confirmation parties are on the same level in Christian culture as Bar Mitzvah parties are in Jewish culture.

  334. @DriesNK
    @ScarletNumber

    Bergen is often called The 6th Borough of NYC. Manhattan is only one bridge away.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Doesn’t it compete for this distinction with Hudson, Westchester, Nassau, and whatever in Jersey’s across the Outerbridge Crossing and Goethals Bridge from Staten Island?

  335. edNels [AKA "geoshmoe"] says:
    @Alden
    @Anonymous

    She really didn't say that if and when Americans were better educated they would be hired.

    She just claimed that Anericans are uneducated and unable to preform STEM jobs

    That sounds very much like the old excuse for hiring Chinese and Indian immigrants.
    If you have kids in school, take a look at common core math. It's endless gobbledygook and incredibly complicated
    Also memorizing the multiplication tables is frowned upon.

    Replies: @edNels

    Remember the New Math? I do, because my high school placement test was just a little shakey and got me into ”basic math review, while the rest of my class went into algebra taught conventionally until 1961, in ’62 +/-, New Math very hastily printed I think at Stanford U, on wire bound books, it was a rush job and an expericment of radically attempting to push theory first and move slowly if ever to practical applicantion. I personally couldn’t not understand or remain awake in that course.

    Well most of our state text books were sleep inducing crap too. One good book, I read was John Tayler Gatto’s book where he makes pretty convincing argurments about the intentional plan that’s been in the works since the Prussians founded compulsory education in 1700’s for the purpose of having a more docile and obedient population. Not for for their better mental development.

    Now they are dumbing it down to the max.

    The New Math was such a disaster that it was discontiniued, it was everthing that they wanted, but the kids didn’t learn math, the basic prerequisite to higher learning, what a crime that was.

    Learning algebra is fun and easy, facinating when applied to word problems that defy other solutions, it’s functional and enables complicated notation to assist in forming up a solution. A first year chemistry course lays out some practial algebra to do mole wts. and stuff, and it isn’t that heard to learn.

    There always is some nerd kid who really thrives in these classrooms, knows everything evey day raises their hand incessantly to answer teachers questions, so if they’re so smart why don’t they take a more advanced level class? : Because they are learning how to behave with their inferiors, that is what they are there for to learn.. how to deflect hostility or to handle being little f’n faux geniouses, they go into classes way below there stage of development to further the differential between them selves and the lunch bucket crowd . I finally got it what was going on…

    Smart parents with money, put their kids into early preschool where they get a good jump on the others socially, and even to get on first names with the same teachers they will later encounter, then, even some parents hold their brats a year, so additional advantage can be had in physcal age maturation, to be not dumb, but more mature at the starting line.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @edNels

    The latest fad of common core math is weird The reason for the constant curriculum changes is to give non White and immigrant women the hundreds of thousands of affirmative action jobs in the teacher training college departments, federal and state departments of education, the big city school districts and the endless re training of the teachers

  336. @Yngvar
    @Steve Sailer

    It's pretty funny that Paul McCartney has to get permission and pay royalties for performing his own songs.

    Replies: @D. K.

    It is typical for musical artists who write their own songs to sign with music publishers– e.g., Northern Songs for Lennon and McCartney, back in the day– the same as songwriters who do not perform usually do. This is not a mindless giveaway by the songwriters; their music publishers are expected to perform valuable services, in return for their assignments of publishing rights by the copyright holders. From BMI’s Web site:

    ***

    “Wherever royalty rates are indicated in this document, the amount shown is the 200% royalty. In the typical case where all songwriters or composers have assigned their copyright in a work to publishers, half of the amount listed is paid to the songwriters or composers and half to the publishers.”

    (http://www.bmi.com/creators/royalty/general_information/ ]

    ***

    So, Paul McCartney has not been getting stiffed on royalties, for over half a century, just because the Beatles’ then-manager, Brian Epstein, had McCartney and John Lennon sign a publishing agreement with the newly created Northern Songs for their “joint” output as songwriters. (If anything, Paul got screwed by his being tied to John, even when Paul wrote a song alone– like “Yesterday”– because Paul turned out to be much better at crafting popular hits, on his own, then was John!)

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    @D. K.

    It varies. One school of thought is, all other things being the same, the artist who primarily performs his/her/their own material and who expects to be the primary performer of those songs should create their own publishing company and self-publish.

    The other school of thought: if you want other people to perform your songs, sign with a publisher that will aggressively promote your catalog. Half of a song that gets on a few other albums and one of which goes platinum might be several times what all of a song that doesn't pays.

    Many a songwriter has bought a house, or a second house, a big boat or a plane on one song that was added to fill out an album by someone else that went platinum. The same is true of estates of deceased successful artists: a lot of people cover them, put them on albums, and even if their version stinks it's on the album. Or the living: Emmylou did Diamonds on an album that did well and Styne and Robin got, perhaps, fifty thousand each for doing nothing (except perhaps the distress of having to listen to that bodge). (Both were still alive when the album was released, which is not to say either ever heard it.)

    The other angle is that with fluffy pop artists or marginal signs, a record deal might be unofficially contingent on the artist publishing, or at least copublishing, with the house publishing arm.

    There are many Beatles songs that have been on many, many, many albums by artists in every imaginable genre as filler or as fluff in addition to many, many very serious versions-I'd guess there are a hundred albums of exclusively Beatles songs by other artists. Apparently, "Yesterday" alone has been covered over 1600 times (that was as of 1986, I'm sure a few more since then, but probably a small number as compared to previously.)

    Replies: @middle aged vet

    , @D. K.
    @D. K.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Songs

    Replies: @BB753

  337. @L Woods
    @Anonymous

    Obsession with "jobs" is a relic of the industrial era. There's no good reason to be going around inventing "jobs" in a near-future in which autonomous machines are providing almost all necessary goods and services. What is the education system supposed to do: offer poodle walking 101?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Hibernian

    Try robotizing construction and maintenance.

  338. @Zonie
    @Patriot

    Ha! I was also thinking Zoolander when I read Lady de Rothschild's quote. She really exudes patronizing plutocratic do-gooder ignorance. She seems very enthused with mathematics, but somehow I doubt this enthusiasm extends to her having focused on trigonometry or probability in her own schooling, or to her persuading her children to major in STEM subjects in college. These are subjects for middle-class strivers, not leaders and rulers. Master businessman and salesman Steve Jobs was supremely bored by engineering details and the Aspergery dweebs who made the gadgets work, but he loved design, aesthetics, and marketing.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Didn’t Jobs start by figuring out how to cheat the telephone company through reverse engineering? Most technical companies are headed (and startups founded) by engineer managers.

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    @Hibernian

    No, Steve Jobs did not figure out how to "bluebox": several people independently figured it out, including two different blind kids who did it entirely by whistling the MF and handoff tones. It was in the public literature by 1973 or thereabouts: I did it myself towards the very end of the time when it was technically possible.

    The most famous such person was John Draper, known as "Captain Crunch" because he discovered that the plastic whistle in boxes of Captain Crunch cereal had a 2600 hz tone, which is what was needed to "hand off" a WATS trunkline. From there you had to be able to use what were called "MF" (as distinct from and different than DTMF tones, which are what your push button phone generates when you press a number button. DTMF pairs are orthogonal, whereas MF pairs are not, making MF more challenging to generate.)

    Of course the system depended on the MF tones being secret. However, Bell published them in the Bell Labs Tech Journal in the fifties, and never changed them: ham radio and liberal left political magazines republished them several times, though by then the systems that used them were on the way out. (Had they not done so, they would have been figured out by taping crosstalk and using frequency counters or optically viewing the period of the sine waves on the tapes with mag viewing fluid.)

    What Steve Jobs DID attempt to do was to build blueboxes and sell them for substantial sums to unethical businessmen who wanted to make free calls. Most "phone phreaks" regarded this as unethical and were not interested in making money "defrauding" Bell: they were "landline hams" or "phone foamers" who wanted to know how the system works and harmlessly play around with it a little. Most phreaks loved the phone system itself (as distinct from the people that owned and ran it) more than Ma Bell itself did and resisted the temptation to cause major outages and other issues when they fully well knew how to and could have in retaliation to the occasionally goonish tactics of Bell against them.

    That Jobs was so inclined says a lot about Jobs.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  339. @ScarletNumber
    @Prof. Woland


    we live in a culture where single sexually active men are not really allowed to run for higher office yet
     
    Jerry Brown

    Replies: @Hibernian

    In California. The exception that proves the rule.

  340. @anonymous
    "The Navy nuclear power program does a pretty good job of teaching engineering level math to blue collar kids, if they have the IQ to pass the AFQT."

    The Prussian system (and public eduction to this day) likewise cast a big net. The Prussians didn't have IQ tests, but could find who would do well in a subject by teaching some of it to the entire nation and seeing what stuck to whom. Brute force. By the time they did this the idea that some of your best potential mathematicans were probably poor farm boys with little access to education was probably accepted by many.

    Gauss, one of the foremost mathematicians in the history of the world, was the child of a gardner and brick-layer:


    "...Sometimes referred to as the Princeps mathematicorum (Latin, "the foremost of mathematicians") and "greatest mathematician since antiquity" ... ranked as one of history's most influential mathematicians....

    ...the son of poor working-class parents. His mother was illiterate and never recorded the date of his birth..."

     

    Replies: @neon2

    Another and very striking example of the truth that genius is not predictable, and is precisely never simply the result of good genes.
    It is a blitz from heaven, and to be revered rather than analysed.

  341. @D. K.
    @Yngvar

    It is typical for musical artists who write their own songs to sign with music publishers-- e.g., Northern Songs for Lennon and McCartney, back in the day-- the same as songwriters who do not perform usually do. This is not a mindless giveaway by the songwriters; their music publishers are expected to perform valuable services, in return for their assignments of publishing rights by the copyright holders. From BMI's Web site:

    ***

    "Wherever royalty rates are indicated in this document, the amount shown is the 200% royalty. In the typical case where all songwriters or composers have assigned their copyright in a work to publishers, half of the amount listed is paid to the songwriters or composers and half to the publishers."

    [ http://www.bmi.com/creators/royalty/general_information/ ]

    ***

    So, Paul McCartney has not been getting stiffed on royalties, for over half a century, just because the Beatles' then-manager, Brian Epstein, had McCartney and John Lennon sign a publishing agreement with the newly created Northern Songs for their "joint" output as songwriters. (If anything, Paul got screwed by his being tied to John, even when Paul wrote a song alone-- like "Yesterday"-- because Paul turned out to be much better at crafting popular hits, on his own, then was John!)

    Replies: @Former Darfur, @D. K.

    It varies. One school of thought is, all other things being the same, the artist who primarily performs his/her/their own material and who expects to be the primary performer of those songs should create their own publishing company and self-publish.

    The other school of thought: if you want other people to perform your songs, sign with a publisher that will aggressively promote your catalog. Half of a song that gets on a few other albums and one of which goes platinum might be several times what all of a song that doesn’t pays.

    Many a songwriter has bought a house, or a second house, a big boat or a plane on one song that was added to fill out an album by someone else that went platinum. The same is true of estates of deceased successful artists: a lot of people cover them, put them on albums, and even if their version stinks it’s on the album. Or the living: Emmylou did Diamonds on an album that did well and Styne and Robin got, perhaps, fifty thousand each for doing nothing (except perhaps the distress of having to listen to that bodge). (Both were still alive when the album was released, which is not to say either ever heard it.)

    The other angle is that with fluffy pop artists or marginal signs, a record deal might be unofficially contingent on the artist publishing, or at least copublishing, with the house publishing arm.

    There are many Beatles songs that have been on many, many, many albums by artists in every imaginable genre as filler or as fluff in addition to many, many very serious versions-I’d guess there are a hundred albums of exclusively Beatles songs by other artists. Apparently, “Yesterday” alone has been covered over 1600 times (that was as of 1986, I’m sure a few more since then, but probably a small number as compared to previously.)

    • Replies: @middle aged vet
    @Former Darfur

    Former Darfur - interesting comment.
    If copyright laws were in the 1960s what they are now, several composers (or their estates) could have taken from Paul McCartney - albeit he was a real musician, but not as good as his father had been - every cent he made on Yesterday. To me it sounds as if the chord changes and the main melody and bridge melody are a slightly updated arrangement of an averaged out Rachmaninoff tune combined with an averaged out Elgar tune.
    Would he get away with that in 2016? If you have no opinion, that is fine, as for me, I think copyright laws were more humane back then.

    Replies: @Former Darfur

  342. @D. K.
    @Yngvar

    It is typical for musical artists who write their own songs to sign with music publishers-- e.g., Northern Songs for Lennon and McCartney, back in the day-- the same as songwriters who do not perform usually do. This is not a mindless giveaway by the songwriters; their music publishers are expected to perform valuable services, in return for their assignments of publishing rights by the copyright holders. From BMI's Web site:

    ***

    "Wherever royalty rates are indicated in this document, the amount shown is the 200% royalty. In the typical case where all songwriters or composers have assigned their copyright in a work to publishers, half of the amount listed is paid to the songwriters or composers and half to the publishers."

    [ http://www.bmi.com/creators/royalty/general_information/ ]

    ***

    So, Paul McCartney has not been getting stiffed on royalties, for over half a century, just because the Beatles' then-manager, Brian Epstein, had McCartney and John Lennon sign a publishing agreement with the newly created Northern Songs for their "joint" output as songwriters. (If anything, Paul got screwed by his being tied to John, even when Paul wrote a song alone-- like "Yesterday"-- because Paul turned out to be much better at crafting popular hits, on his own, then was John!)

    Replies: @Former Darfur, @D. K.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @D. K.

    http://youtu.be/FDOzTvfWsk4

    "Harrison wrote "Only a Northern Song" out of dissatisfaction with his status as a junior songwriter with the Beatles' publishing company, Northern Songs. The lyrics and music convey his disenchantment at how the company retained the copyright for the songs it published, and at how, following its public listing in 1965, the major shareholders profited more from his compositions than he did"(Wikipedia)

  343. @Hibernian
    @Zonie

    Didn't Jobs start by figuring out how to cheat the telephone company through reverse engineering? Most technical companies are headed (and startups founded) by engineer managers.

    Replies: @Former Darfur

    No, Steve Jobs did not figure out how to “bluebox”: several people independently figured it out, including two different blind kids who did it entirely by whistling the MF and handoff tones. It was in the public literature by 1973 or thereabouts: I did it myself towards the very end of the time when it was technically possible.

    The most famous such person was John Draper, known as “Captain Crunch” because he discovered that the plastic whistle in boxes of Captain Crunch cereal had a 2600 hz tone, which is what was needed to “hand off” a WATS trunkline. From there you had to be able to use what were called “MF” (as distinct from and different than DTMF tones, which are what your push button phone generates when you press a number button. DTMF pairs are orthogonal, whereas MF pairs are not, making MF more challenging to generate.)

    Of course the system depended on the MF tones being secret. However, Bell published them in the Bell Labs Tech Journal in the fifties, and never changed them: ham radio and liberal left political magazines republished them several times, though by then the systems that used them were on the way out. (Had they not done so, they would have been figured out by taping crosstalk and using frequency counters or optically viewing the period of the sine waves on the tapes with mag viewing fluid.)

    What Steve Jobs DID attempt to do was to build blueboxes and sell them for substantial sums to unethical businessmen who wanted to make free calls. Most “phone phreaks” regarded this as unethical and were not interested in making money “defrauding” Bell: they were “landline hams” or “phone foamers” who wanted to know how the system works and harmlessly play around with it a little. Most phreaks loved the phone system itself (as distinct from the people that owned and ran it) more than Ma Bell itself did and resisted the temptation to cause major outages and other issues when they fully well knew how to and could have in retaliation to the occasionally goonish tactics of Bell against them.

    That Jobs was so inclined says a lot about Jobs.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Former Darfur

    Spurred by your post, I just went and read the Wikipedia entry for Draper and Blue Boxing. Thanks for that introduction to the phone phreaking phenomenon/sub-culture. Interesting.

  344. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @onlyonegirlforbarry


    He’s talking about the Trump airplane.
     
    Yes, that’s the joke.

    Replies: @Former Darfur

    Using the term “bird” nearly got me in a fight in England once. I was talking to a former RAF person and referring to an airplane, he thought I insulted his girlfriend. Calling an “aeroplane” a “bird” was something they’d never thought of.

  345. @Former Darfur
    @Hibernian

    No, Steve Jobs did not figure out how to "bluebox": several people independently figured it out, including two different blind kids who did it entirely by whistling the MF and handoff tones. It was in the public literature by 1973 or thereabouts: I did it myself towards the very end of the time when it was technically possible.

    The most famous such person was John Draper, known as "Captain Crunch" because he discovered that the plastic whistle in boxes of Captain Crunch cereal had a 2600 hz tone, which is what was needed to "hand off" a WATS trunkline. From there you had to be able to use what were called "MF" (as distinct from and different than DTMF tones, which are what your push button phone generates when you press a number button. DTMF pairs are orthogonal, whereas MF pairs are not, making MF more challenging to generate.)

    Of course the system depended on the MF tones being secret. However, Bell published them in the Bell Labs Tech Journal in the fifties, and never changed them: ham radio and liberal left political magazines republished them several times, though by then the systems that used them were on the way out. (Had they not done so, they would have been figured out by taping crosstalk and using frequency counters or optically viewing the period of the sine waves on the tapes with mag viewing fluid.)

    What Steve Jobs DID attempt to do was to build blueboxes and sell them for substantial sums to unethical businessmen who wanted to make free calls. Most "phone phreaks" regarded this as unethical and were not interested in making money "defrauding" Bell: they were "landline hams" or "phone foamers" who wanted to know how the system works and harmlessly play around with it a little. Most phreaks loved the phone system itself (as distinct from the people that owned and ran it) more than Ma Bell itself did and resisted the temptation to cause major outages and other issues when they fully well knew how to and could have in retaliation to the occasionally goonish tactics of Bell against them.

    That Jobs was so inclined says a lot about Jobs.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Spurred by your post, I just went and read the Wikipedia entry for Draper and Blue Boxing. Thanks for that introduction to the phone phreaking phenomenon/sub-culture. Interesting.

  346. @Thea
    I have a degree in mathematics. I spent a chunk of my life teaching, tutoring or editing textbooks.

    It is with great lament that I realized the depth of math illiteracy and outright dislike in the world.

    If we can't teach most of these kids basic algebra, and have them understand it then probability & statistics in high school isn't going to work either.

    Teaching trigonometry in high school, to the better students, is necessary to prepare students for calculus. which I open the audience here realizes is a very important subject indeed.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Dieter Kief

    Do you know the youth-book “The Number-Devil” by Hans Magnus Enzensberger?
    Just curious.

  347. @D. K.
    @D. K.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Songs

    Replies: @BB753

    http://youtu.be/FDOzTvfWsk4

    “Harrison wrote “Only a Northern Song” out of dissatisfaction with his status as a junior songwriter with the Beatles’ publishing company, Northern Songs. The lyrics and music convey his disenchantment at how the company retained the copyright for the songs it published, and at how, following its public listing in 1965, the major shareholders profited more from his compositions than he did”(Wikipedia)

  348. @Former Darfur
    @D. K.

    It varies. One school of thought is, all other things being the same, the artist who primarily performs his/her/their own material and who expects to be the primary performer of those songs should create their own publishing company and self-publish.

    The other school of thought: if you want other people to perform your songs, sign with a publisher that will aggressively promote your catalog. Half of a song that gets on a few other albums and one of which goes platinum might be several times what all of a song that doesn't pays.

    Many a songwriter has bought a house, or a second house, a big boat or a plane on one song that was added to fill out an album by someone else that went platinum. The same is true of estates of deceased successful artists: a lot of people cover them, put them on albums, and even if their version stinks it's on the album. Or the living: Emmylou did Diamonds on an album that did well and Styne and Robin got, perhaps, fifty thousand each for doing nothing (except perhaps the distress of having to listen to that bodge). (Both were still alive when the album was released, which is not to say either ever heard it.)

    The other angle is that with fluffy pop artists or marginal signs, a record deal might be unofficially contingent on the artist publishing, or at least copublishing, with the house publishing arm.

    There are many Beatles songs that have been on many, many, many albums by artists in every imaginable genre as filler or as fluff in addition to many, many very serious versions-I'd guess there are a hundred albums of exclusively Beatles songs by other artists. Apparently, "Yesterday" alone has been covered over 1600 times (that was as of 1986, I'm sure a few more since then, but probably a small number as compared to previously.)

    Replies: @middle aged vet

    Former Darfur – interesting comment.
    If copyright laws were in the 1960s what they are now, several composers (or their estates) could have taken from Paul McCartney – albeit he was a real musician, but not as good as his father had been – every cent he made on Yesterday. To me it sounds as if the chord changes and the main melody and bridge melody are a slightly updated arrangement of an averaged out Rachmaninoff tune combined with an averaged out Elgar tune.
    Would he get away with that in 2016? If you have no opinion, that is fine, as for me, I think copyright laws were more humane back then.

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    @middle aged vet

    I'm no musicologist, but basically, all popular songs are copies of other popular songs, traditional folk and liturgical tunes, or something else-to some degree. There are many recent court cases: George Harrison was sued because "My Sweet Lord" was similar to the Chiffons' "He's So Fine", etc.

    Chris Stein told me Blondie's "Dreaming" was his rework of Abba's "Dancing Queen"-Abba apparently has not objected, it was changed around enough. Eric Clapton and Elton John both did hack reworks of the Jerome Kern ballad "The Way You Look Tonight" which copied the lyrics and reworked the melody so anyone can recognize they are quite connected and neither was bothered by the Kern estate. Joe Raposo's "There Used To Be A Ballpark" pretty well became Madonna's "This Used to Be My Playground" and I've never heard anyone mention that one yet.

    I think lawsuits are predicated on the deep convenient pockets theory most of the time.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Stan Adams

  349. @Former Darfur
    @PiltdownMan

    In today's world, "almost a billionaire" isn't very impressive considering McCartney's status as the only living half or the most commercially successful songwriting pair in pop music history.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Brutusale

    He didn’t even retain the rights to his own songs.

    http://ultimateclassicrock.com/paul-mccartney-michael-jackson-beatles-catalog/

    He may have been a bit clever and wrote a few catchy tunes, but let’s refrain from thinking MaCartney to be some sort of Dirac.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    @Brutusale

    As the Wikipedia.org article on Norther Songs, Ltd. [now defunct] explains, Paul McCartney had a couple of opportunities to buy the bulk of the Beatles' catalog by himself, and he chose not to do so, for whatever reason(s). It was only after Michael Jackson went ahead and bought those publishing rights, instead, that Paul decided to take umbrage, and to act as if his old Northern Songs titles had been stolen out from underneath his upturned nose, by an unscrupulous friend. Of course, since the real Paul McCartney actually was killed in a road accident, almost fifty years ago now, his long-lived double should be very happy with what he has gotten out of his long-running subterfuge!

  350. @Brutusale
    @Former Darfur

    He didn't even retain the rights to his own songs.

    http://ultimateclassicrock.com/paul-mccartney-michael-jackson-beatles-catalog/

    He may have been a bit clever and wrote a few catchy tunes, but let's refrain from thinking MaCartney to be some sort of Dirac.

    Replies: @D. K.

    As the Wikipedia.org article on Norther Songs, Ltd. [now defunct] explains, Paul McCartney had a couple of opportunities to buy the bulk of the Beatles’ catalog by himself, and he chose not to do so, for whatever reason(s). It was only after Michael Jackson went ahead and bought those publishing rights, instead, that Paul decided to take umbrage, and to act as if his old Northern Songs titles had been stolen out from underneath his upturned nose, by an unscrupulous friend. Of course, since the real Paul McCartney actually was killed in a road accident, almost fifty years ago now, his long-lived double should be very happy with what he has gotten out of his long-running subterfuge!

  351. @Anonymous
    @MEH 0910

    Do jews tend to change their names more often than other groups?

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Brutusale

    My first two jobs involved working for guys named Burke (((Berkowitz))) and Winston (((Weinburg))).

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Brutusale

    British gentry and aristocrats also used to change their surnames when they received an inheritance from a distant relative who required it or when they married up. One of the most well-known examples is the 1st Duke of Northumberland of the title's third (non-Jacobite) creation, who was born Hugh Smithson but changed his name to Percy. The Percy family had held the earldom of Northumberland but died out in the male line. Smithson married the last Percy earl's great-granddaughter and came into ownership of many of the Percy family's former estates through her. There are other similar examples.

    Replies: @Brutusale

  352. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Brutusale
    @Anonymous

    My first two jobs involved working for guys named Burke (((Berkowitz))) and Winston (((Weinburg))).

    Replies: @Anonymous

    British gentry and aristocrats also used to change their surnames when they received an inheritance from a distant relative who required it or when they married up. One of the most well-known examples is the 1st Duke of Northumberland of the title’s third (non-Jacobite) creation, who was born Hugh Smithson but changed his name to Percy. The Percy family had held the earldom of Northumberland but died out in the male line. Smithson married the last Percy earl’s great-granddaughter and came into ownership of many of the Percy family’s former estates through her. There are other similar examples.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Anonymous

    Or, like the two I mentioned, to help a Jewish gent do business in WASP/Irish Boston.

    Replies: @syonredux

  353. @Lagertha
    @SFG

    I still can't get the image of Bill shoving a cigar up Monica's vag in the Oval Office. My husband would be dead after such a revolting, sociopathic stunt stunt.

    Replies: @SFG, @Expletive Deleted, @larry lurker, @Harry Baldwin, @Brutusale

    I only got through 2 pages of my girlfriend’s notes on the various and sundry foreign objects patients have had removed from their orifices in her hospital’s emergency room. You really can’t plumb the depths of humanity’s perversions.

  354. @pepperinmono
    @Anonymous

    Not talking about the music. McCartney ' s post Beatles stuff is way better than Lennon's and is really good, except past few years .

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Two giants of their industry, yet neither was man enough to tell their respective wives to STFU. That Yoko’s and Linda’s caterwauling found space on record grooves is appalling.

  355. @Anonymous
    @Brutusale

    British gentry and aristocrats also used to change their surnames when they received an inheritance from a distant relative who required it or when they married up. One of the most well-known examples is the 1st Duke of Northumberland of the title's third (non-Jacobite) creation, who was born Hugh Smithson but changed his name to Percy. The Percy family had held the earldom of Northumberland but died out in the male line. Smithson married the last Percy earl's great-granddaughter and came into ownership of many of the Percy family's former estates through her. There are other similar examples.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Or, like the two I mentioned, to help a Jewish gent do business in WASP/Irish Boston.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Brutusale

    Speaking of Boston:


    Race/ethnicity composition
    Race/ethnicity 2013[124] 1990[120] 1970[120] 1940[120]
    White (includes White Hispanics) 52.9% 62.8% 81.8% 96.7%
    Black 24.1% 25.6% 16.3% 3.1%
    Asian 9.0% 5.3% 1.3% 0.2%
    Native American 0.4% 0.3% 0.2% –
    Two or more races 4.5% – – –
    Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 18.8% 10.8% 2.8% [125] 0.1%
    Non-Hispanic Whites 45.9% 59.0% 79.5% [125] 96.6%

     

    Anglo Whites down to 45.9% of the population.....

    Replies: @Brutusale

  356. @Anonymous
    @PiltdownMan

    Thanks again for another instructive comment. In what way is the Schneierman material increasingly relevant to the modern world? (One could be surprised by that comment given that some of your comments might be described as valuing applied math.)

    Why do you think that math study results in a huge sense of personal intellectual accomplishment? Is it that one feel wiser in terms of having a better understanding of the world and more tools to decipher it with, perhaps even just smarter (like having a stronger muscle that is potentially useful)? Or is it more like a peak summited for recreation, a challenge met?

    Would you recommend I try to take the Coursera course this Fall?

    Thanks for the insights!

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

    Why do you think that math study results in a huge sense of personal intellectual accomplishment? Is it that one feel wiser in terms of having a better understanding of the world and more tools to decipher it with, perhaps even just smarter (like having a stronger muscle that is potentially useful)? Or is it more like a peak summited for recreation, a challenge met?

    I think the former—the feeling of finding that you have stronger muscles and that lifting luggage is suddenly a snap, whenever you need to do it.

    In what way is the Schneierman material increasingly relevant to the modern world? (One could be surprised by that comment given that some of your comments might be described as valuing applied math.)

    Much of discrete math, when I first learned it four decades ago, was considered to be abstract pure math, with a few applications, such as in particle physics. There are many more now, 70 years into the computer age, and so it is worth being acquainted with, at some point in your journey.

    Would you recommend I try to take the Coursera course this Fall?

    Sure, why not? Especially if you are determined to make the time commitment.

    My only humble caveat? Pick a small, narrow area to focus on for the first few months.

    A review of high-school algebra, trigonometry or co-ordinate geometry (better know as analytic or Cartesian geometry these days). The elements of differential or integral calculus.
    Or if you are already up to speed, ordinary differential equations, or vector analysis.

    A single small portion, to last a few to several months, depending on your time commitment. It’s easy to lose one’s way or one’s mid-life motivation with excess.

    But on a more positive note…

    …you are to be commended. Go for it!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @PiltdownMan

    Thank you. Regards

  357. @Brutusale
    @Anonymous

    Or, like the two I mentioned, to help a Jewish gent do business in WASP/Irish Boston.

    Replies: @syonredux

    Speaking of Boston:

    Race/ethnicity composition
    Race/ethnicity 2013[124] 1990[120] 1970[120] 1940[120]
    White (includes White Hispanics) 52.9% 62.8% 81.8% 96.7%
    Black 24.1% 25.6% 16.3% 3.1%
    Asian 9.0% 5.3% 1.3% 0.2%
    Native American 0.4% 0.3% 0.2% –
    Two or more races 4.5% – – –
    Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 18.8% 10.8% 2.8% [125] 0.1%
    Non-Hispanic Whites 45.9% 59.0% 79.5% [125] 96.6%

    Anglo Whites down to 45.9% of the population…..

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @syonredux

    Google "Massachusetts welfare benefits".

    The next mayor is a guy named Tito Jackson. You read it here first.

  358. @PiltdownMan
    @Anonymous


    Why do you think that math study results in a huge sense of personal intellectual accomplishment? Is it that one feel wiser in terms of having a better understanding of the world and more tools to decipher it with, perhaps even just smarter (like having a stronger muscle that is potentially useful)? Or is it more like a peak summited for recreation, a challenge met?
     
    I think the former—the feeling of finding that you have stronger muscles and that lifting luggage is suddenly a snap, whenever you need to do it.

    In what way is the Schneierman material increasingly relevant to the modern world? (One could be surprised by that comment given that some of your comments might be described as valuing applied math.)
     
    Much of discrete math, when I first learned it four decades ago, was considered to be abstract pure math, with a few applications, such as in particle physics. There are many more now, 70 years into the computer age, and so it is worth being acquainted with, at some point in your journey.


    Would you recommend I try to take the Coursera course this Fall?
     
    Sure, why not? Especially if you are determined to make the time commitment.

    My only humble caveat? Pick a small, narrow area to focus on for the first few months.

    A review of high-school algebra, trigonometry or co-ordinate geometry (better know as analytic or Cartesian geometry these days). The elements of differential or integral calculus.
    Or if you are already up to speed, ordinary differential equations, or vector analysis.

    A single small portion, to last a few to several months, depending on your time commitment. It's easy to lose one's way or one's mid-life motivation with excess.

    But on a more positive note...

    ...you are to be commended. Go for it!

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Thank you. Regards

  359. @middle aged vet
    @Anonymous

    Anonymous at sep 4 - 1:09 - You have been getting much better advice than I can give. To clarify my positive assessment of the books I listed , 99.99 percent of people cannot progress at all in math without doing and understanding many solved problems; none of the books I mentioned have enough solved problems for this purpose. Solved problems are available everywhere, both in print and on line. Other commenters have made great recommendations.
    I don't have a good answer on where statistics fits in - statisticians can adapt pure calculus techniques, but they also use unexpected (or expected) aspects of biology and history that are not subject to being reduced to equations, and they also use complex logic and natural law.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Thanks. Regards

  360. @middle aged vet
    @Former Darfur

    Former Darfur - interesting comment.
    If copyright laws were in the 1960s what they are now, several composers (or their estates) could have taken from Paul McCartney - albeit he was a real musician, but not as good as his father had been - every cent he made on Yesterday. To me it sounds as if the chord changes and the main melody and bridge melody are a slightly updated arrangement of an averaged out Rachmaninoff tune combined with an averaged out Elgar tune.
    Would he get away with that in 2016? If you have no opinion, that is fine, as for me, I think copyright laws were more humane back then.

    Replies: @Former Darfur

    I’m no musicologist, but basically, all popular songs are copies of other popular songs, traditional folk and liturgical tunes, or something else-to some degree. There are many recent court cases: George Harrison was sued because “My Sweet Lord” was similar to the Chiffons’ “He’s So Fine”, etc.

    Chris Stein told me Blondie’s “Dreaming” was his rework of Abba’s “Dancing Queen”-Abba apparently has not objected, it was changed around enough. Eric Clapton and Elton John both did hack reworks of the Jerome Kern ballad “The Way You Look Tonight” which copied the lyrics and reworked the melody so anyone can recognize they are quite connected and neither was bothered by the Kern estate. Joe Raposo’s “There Used To Be A Ballpark” pretty well became Madonna’s “This Used to Be My Playground” and I’ve never heard anyone mention that one yet.

    I think lawsuits are predicated on the deep convenient pockets theory most of the time.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Former Darfur

    Pharrell lost a huge judgment a couple of years ago to Marvin Gaye's family for writing a hit single that was intended to be a tribute to the style of an early 1970s Marvin Gaye hit. Pharrell wrote a different melody but he still got stuck with a giant bill for copying the general sound. The music industry wants the precedent overturned because people thought they understood the old system -- e.g., the hook from "My Sweet Lord" was too identical to "He's So Fine" but "Dreaming" is different enough from "Dancing Queen."

    But the Pharrell case has everybody confused.

    Replies: @guest

    , @Stan Adams
    @Former Darfur


    Chris Stein told me Blondie’s “Dreaming” was his rework of Abba’s “Dancing Queen”-Abba apparently has not objected, it was changed around enough
     
    Madonna begged Benny and Björn for the right to use an instrumental sample from ABBA's "Gimme! Gimme! Gimme!" in one of her songs ("Hung Up"). They agreed, after she wrote them a groveling letter. It was only the second time they had ever given anyone such permission.

    Replies: @Sean

  361. @Former Darfur
    @middle aged vet

    I'm no musicologist, but basically, all popular songs are copies of other popular songs, traditional folk and liturgical tunes, or something else-to some degree. There are many recent court cases: George Harrison was sued because "My Sweet Lord" was similar to the Chiffons' "He's So Fine", etc.

    Chris Stein told me Blondie's "Dreaming" was his rework of Abba's "Dancing Queen"-Abba apparently has not objected, it was changed around enough. Eric Clapton and Elton John both did hack reworks of the Jerome Kern ballad "The Way You Look Tonight" which copied the lyrics and reworked the melody so anyone can recognize they are quite connected and neither was bothered by the Kern estate. Joe Raposo's "There Used To Be A Ballpark" pretty well became Madonna's "This Used to Be My Playground" and I've never heard anyone mention that one yet.

    I think lawsuits are predicated on the deep convenient pockets theory most of the time.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Stan Adams

    Pharrell lost a huge judgment a couple of years ago to Marvin Gaye’s family for writing a hit single that was intended to be a tribute to the style of an early 1970s Marvin Gaye hit. Pharrell wrote a different melody but he still got stuck with a giant bill for copying the general sound. The music industry wants the precedent overturned because people thought they understood the old system — e.g., the hook from “My Sweet Lord” was too identical to “He’s So Fine” but “Dreaming” is different enough from “Dancing Queen.”

    But the Pharrell case has everybody confused.

    • Replies: @guest
    @Steve Sailer

    My favorite such case was when John Fogerty was sued for plagiarizing John Fogerty. He didn't have the rights to his old songs anymore, and "Run Through the Jungle," I think it was, sounded a lot like "Old Man Down the Road." Fogerty played the songs on the witness stand to demonstrate the finer differences.

  362. @Former Darfur
    @middle aged vet

    I'm no musicologist, but basically, all popular songs are copies of other popular songs, traditional folk and liturgical tunes, or something else-to some degree. There are many recent court cases: George Harrison was sued because "My Sweet Lord" was similar to the Chiffons' "He's So Fine", etc.

    Chris Stein told me Blondie's "Dreaming" was his rework of Abba's "Dancing Queen"-Abba apparently has not objected, it was changed around enough. Eric Clapton and Elton John both did hack reworks of the Jerome Kern ballad "The Way You Look Tonight" which copied the lyrics and reworked the melody so anyone can recognize they are quite connected and neither was bothered by the Kern estate. Joe Raposo's "There Used To Be A Ballpark" pretty well became Madonna's "This Used to Be My Playground" and I've never heard anyone mention that one yet.

    I think lawsuits are predicated on the deep convenient pockets theory most of the time.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Stan Adams

    Chris Stein told me Blondie’s “Dreaming” was his rework of Abba’s “Dancing Queen”-Abba apparently has not objected, it was changed around enough

    Madonna begged Benny and Björn for the right to use an instrumental sample from ABBA’s “Gimme! Gimme! Gimme!” in one of her songs (“Hung Up”). They agreed, after she wrote them a groveling letter. It was only the second time they had ever given anyone such permission.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @Stan Adams

    Abba had already ripped off their own music more than anyone. Only the lyrics are different on most of their hit songs.

  363. @BB753
    Does Paul McCartney really need to make private gigs for the mega-rich to make ends meet? Maybe Jon Bon Jovi does, but Sir Paul?

    Replies: @eggheadshadhisnumber, @Anonym, @Neil Templeton, @Jack Highlands, @Erik L, @DCThrowback

    JBJ had a bid of $900M+ locked in for my Buffalo Bills. He fell short of drilling magnate Terry Pegula’s $1.3Bn bid.

    JBJ was going to move the team to Toronto, so f**k him and his terrible Directv ads.

  364. @syonredux
    @Brutusale

    Speaking of Boston:


    Race/ethnicity composition
    Race/ethnicity 2013[124] 1990[120] 1970[120] 1940[120]
    White (includes White Hispanics) 52.9% 62.8% 81.8% 96.7%
    Black 24.1% 25.6% 16.3% 3.1%
    Asian 9.0% 5.3% 1.3% 0.2%
    Native American 0.4% 0.3% 0.2% –
    Two or more races 4.5% – – –
    Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 18.8% 10.8% 2.8% [125] 0.1%
    Non-Hispanic Whites 45.9% 59.0% 79.5% [125] 96.6%

     

    Anglo Whites down to 45.9% of the population.....

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Google “Massachusetts welfare benefits”.

    The next mayor is a guy named Tito Jackson. You read it here first.

  365. @Steve Sailer
    @Former Darfur

    Pharrell lost a huge judgment a couple of years ago to Marvin Gaye's family for writing a hit single that was intended to be a tribute to the style of an early 1970s Marvin Gaye hit. Pharrell wrote a different melody but he still got stuck with a giant bill for copying the general sound. The music industry wants the precedent overturned because people thought they understood the old system -- e.g., the hook from "My Sweet Lord" was too identical to "He's So Fine" but "Dreaming" is different enough from "Dancing Queen."

    But the Pharrell case has everybody confused.

    Replies: @guest

    My favorite such case was when John Fogerty was sued for plagiarizing John Fogerty. He didn’t have the rights to his old songs anymore, and “Run Through the Jungle,” I think it was, sounded a lot like “Old Man Down the Road.” Fogerty played the songs on the witness stand to demonstrate the finer differences.

  366. @edNels
    @Alden



    Remember the New Math? I do, because my high school placement test was just a little shakey and got me into ''basic math review, while the rest of my class went into algebra taught conventionally until 1961, in '62 +/-, New Math very hastily printed I think at Stanford U, on wire bound books, it was a rush job and an expericment of radically attempting to push theory first and move slowly if ever to practical applicantion. I personally couldn't not understand or remain awake in that course.

    Well most of our state text books were sleep inducing crap too. One good book, I read was John Tayler Gatto's book where he makes pretty convincing argurments about the intentional plan that's been in the works since the Prussians founded compulsory education in 1700's for the purpose of having a more docile and obedient population. Not for for their better mental development.

    Now they are dumbing it down to the max.

    The New Math was such a disaster that it was discontiniued, it was everthing that they wanted, but the kids didn't learn math, the basic prerequisite to higher learning, what a crime that was.

    Learning algebra is fun and easy, facinating when applied to word problems that defy other solutions, it's functional and enables complicated notation to assist in forming up a solution. A first year chemistry course lays out some practial algebra to do mole wts. and stuff, and it isn't that heard to learn.

    There always is some nerd kid who really thrives in these classrooms, knows everything evey day raises their hand incessantly to answer teachers questions, so if they're so smart why don't they take a more advanced level class? : Because they are learning how to behave with their inferiors, that is what they are there for to learn.. how to deflect hostility or to handle being little f'n faux geniouses, they go into classes way below there stage of development to further the differential between them selves and the lunch bucket crowd . I finally got it what was going on...

    Smart parents with money, put their kids into early preschool where they get a good jump on the others socially, and even to get on first names with the same teachers they will later encounter, then, even some parents hold their brats a year, so additional advantage can be had in physcal age maturation, to be not dumb, but more mature at the starting line.

    Replies: @Alden

    The latest fad of common core math is weird The reason for the constant curriculum changes is to give non White and immigrant women the hundreds of thousands of affirmative action jobs in the teacher training college departments, federal and state departments of education, the big city school districts and the endless re training of the teachers

  367. Her name is Lynn, and she married into the family via one of a couple who is independently wealthy. The real Rothschild wealth is in a trust, whose value is anyone guess (10-100 billion)) and controlled by an arrangement whose workings are not understood outside the Rothschild family. The actual Rothschilds have some unstable characters

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3585800/Why-18m-Rothschild-heiress-hooked-bad-boy-rappers-FEMAIL-explores-Kate-s-relationship-latest-beau.html

  368. @Stan Adams
    @Former Darfur


    Chris Stein told me Blondie’s “Dreaming” was his rework of Abba’s “Dancing Queen”-Abba apparently has not objected, it was changed around enough
     
    Madonna begged Benny and Björn for the right to use an instrumental sample from ABBA's "Gimme! Gimme! Gimme!" in one of her songs ("Hung Up"). They agreed, after she wrote them a groveling letter. It was only the second time they had ever given anyone such permission.

    Replies: @Sean

    Abba had already ripped off their own music more than anyone. Only the lyrics are different on most of their hit songs.

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