The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
NYT Editor: 1619 Project Is NYT's Plan B for Overthrowing Trump After RussiaGate Flopped
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From my Taki’s Magazine column last summer:

1619: Founding Fallacies
Steve Sailer

August 21, 2019

Last week, Dean Baquet, the executive editor of The New York Times, informed his staffers that due to the collapse of their conspiracy to overthrow the president by disseminating their Russian conspiracy theory, the Times was pivoting to Plan B: to dump Trump by promoting their racism conspiracy theory.

As reassurance that this latest intrigue would not fizzle as ignominiously as the Times’ previous machination, Baquet proudly pointed to their 1619 Project. This commemoration of the first blacks arriving in Virginia 400 years ago megalomaniacally

aims to reframe the country’s history, understanding 1619 as our true founding, and placing the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of the story we tell ourselves about who we are.

How exactly retconning American history will get rid of Trump was left vague, but Baquet was confident that it was all part of the Times’ seamless plot.

By the way, that’s some hilariously shameless boasting about the power of The Narrative to warp minds.

As I’ve pointed out, The Narrative is pushed less by printing fake news or by completely censoring true news than by the power of the prestige press to pick out ideologically convenient items from the vast surfeit of events and declare them the news about which we are all supposed to have a “conversation.”

Did, say, a Catholic schoolboy “smirk” at a “tribal elder”?

Now, that’s national news!

In contrast, in the wake of the vaunted Black Lives Matter protests in Ferguson, did four Teens of Color in St. Louis, shouting “Kill the white people,” hammer a white man to death?

Why are you interested in a local police blotter detail?

And if there is a lot of news for powerful interests to pick and choose amongst, there’s even more history.

Which anniversaries are treated as late-breaking news and which are seen as mere dusty arcana is another exercise in Narrative supremacy.

Consider an example of a dog that has barely been allowed to bark: A number of milestones in Christendom’s heroic struggle to stamp out Islamic slave raiding, such as Thomas Jefferson dispatching the U.S. Marines to “the shores of Tripoli” in 1804 and the Royal Navy freeing 3,000 European slaves from Algiers in 1816, have passed quietly in this century with only minimal 200th-anniversary media commemorations.

“If there is a lot of news for powerful interests to pick and choose amongst, there’s even more history.”
Calling attention to the West’s long, ultimately successful struggle against Muslim slaving is not encouraged because it might be conducive to Islamophobia, which, as the word explains, is bad. On the other hand, obsessing over white American slaving is good, because if it were at all bad then there would exist a word for it ending in “-phobia.” But there doesn’t, so how can you even mention it?

Of course, the Times’ trope that America’s “true founding” was the arrival of blacks in 1619 contradicts another fashionable bit of hype: that America is a Nation of Immigrants instituted by the huddled masses of wretched refuse on Ellis Island.

As we’ve all been instructed in recent decades, immigrants should be “at the very center of the story we tell ourselves about who we are,” much more important than all those boring settlers, founding fathers, frontiersmen, and cowboys, even if, technically speaking, they might have arrived earlier.

But do the descendants of Ellis Island immigrants possess bragging rights over the descendants of slaves?

And do blacks who aren’t the descendants of slaves, such as President Obama, also get Intersectional bonus points from the 1619 Story Line even though their ancestors sold African-Americans into slavery?

None of these conundrums are useful for the fraught unity of the Democratic Party in 2020; so don’t expect them to be brought up terribly often. It’s much more politically profitable for the Coalition of the Fringes to merely lambaste core Americans for the sins of their forefathers.

Here’s is my Unz Review post on the transcript of Baquet’s talk to the NYT staff, as leaked by Slate:

NYT Editor: After Failure of Our Russia Mania Plan A to Get Trump, We’ve Launched Our Racism Mania Plan B
STEVE SAILER • AUGUST 16, 2019 • 1,200 WORDS • 173 COMMENTS

From Slate, a transcription of an internal meeting at the New York Times between top editor Dean Baquet and disgruntled New York Times staffers complaining that the New York Times doesn’t call Trump racist often enough.

Dean Baquet: If we’re really going to be a transparent newsroom that debates these issues among ourselves and not on Twitter, I figured I should talk to the whole newsroom, and hear from the whole newsroom. We had a couple of significant missteps, and I know you’re concerned about them, and I am, too.

But there’s something larger at play here. This is a really hard story, newsrooms haven’t confronted one like this since the 1960s. It got trickier after [inaudible] … went from being a story about whether the Trump campaign had colluded with Russia and obstruction of justice to being a more head-on story about the president’s character.

In other words, the New York Times went all in on RussiaGate and that exploded in their faces, so now they’ve had to shift their Main Narrative to denouncing Trump as racist:

We built our newsroom to cover one story, and we did it truly well. Now we have to regroup, and shift resources and emphasis to take on a different story. I’d love your help with that.

As Audra Burch said when I talked to her this weekend, this one is a story about what it means to be an American in 2019. It is a story that requires deep investigation into people who peddle hatred

Not us of course, we only peddle hatred of those who deserve to be hated, not like those hateful people we all hate.

, but it is also a story that requires imaginative use of all our muscles to write about race and class in a deeper way than we have in years. In the coming weeks, we’ll be assigning some new people to politics who can offer different ways of looking at the world. We’ll also ask reporters to write more deeply about the country, race, and other divisions. I really want your help in navigating this story.

My guess is this means that instead of mentioning Emmett Till once or twice per week, the NYT will be mentiong Emmett Till once or twice per day.

… Baquet: OK. I mean, let me go back a little bit for one second to just repeat what I said in my in my short preamble about coverage. Chapter 1 of the story of Donald Trump, not only for our newsroom but, frankly, for our readers, was: Did Donald Trump have untoward relationships with the Russians, and was there obstruction of justice? That was a really hard story, by the way, let’s not forget that. We set ourselves up to cover that story. I’m going to say it. We won two Pulitzer Prizes covering that story. And I think we covered that story better than anybody else.

The day Bob Mueller walked off that witness stand, two things happened. Our readers who want Donald Trump to go away suddenly thought, “Holy shit, Bob Mueller is not going to do it.” And Donald Trump got a little emboldened politically, I think. Because, you know, for obvious reasons. And I think that the story changed. A lot of the stuff we’re talking about started to emerge like six or seven weeks ago. We’re a little tiny bit flat-footed. I mean, that’s what happens when a story looks a certain way for two years. Right?

I think that we’ve got to change. I mean, the vision for coverage for the next two years is what I talked about earlier: How do we cover a guy who makes these kinds of remarks? How do we cover the world’s reaction to him? How do we do that while continuing to cover his policies? How do we cover America, that’s become so divided by Donald Trump? How do we grapple with all the stuff you all are talking about? How do we write about race in a thoughtful way, something we haven’t done in a large way in a long time? That, to me, is the vision for coverage. You all are going to have to help us shape that vision. But I think that’s what we’re going to have to do for the rest of the next two years.

This is no longer a story where the Washington bureau every week nails some giant story by [Washington correspondent] Mike Schmidt that says that Donald Trump or Don McGahn did this. That will remain part of the story, but this is a different story now. This is a story that’s going to call on different muscles for us. The next few weeks, we’re gonna have to figure out what those muscles are.

In other words, the current Racism Mania is the NYT’s Plan B after the spectacular failure of their Plan A: Russia Mania.

Shifting some of the excerpts in different order:

Staffer: Hello, I have another question about racism. I’m wondering to what extent you think that the fact of racism and white supremacy being sort of the foundation of this country should play into our reporting. Just because it feels to me like it should be a starting point, you know? Like these conversations about what is racist, what isn’t racist. I just feel like racism is in everything. It should be considered in our science reporting, in our culture reporting, in our national reporting. And so, to me, it’s less about the individual instances of racism, and sort of how we’re thinking about racism and white supremacy as the foundation of all of the systems in the country. And I think particularly as we are launching a 1619 Project, I feel like that’s going to open us up to even more criticism from people who are like, “OK, well you’re saying this, and you’re producing this big project about this. But are you guys actually considering this in your daily reporting?”

At this point I’m starting to feel a little sorry for Baquet who at least comes across as a grown-up. In contrast, much of the Great Awokening seems like a Schoolgirl Snit by young women on staff.

 
Hide 56 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. bomag says:

    How do we write about race in a thoughtful way, something we haven’t done in a large way in a long time?

    A well trained comrade: self-realizes that he hasn’t been fanatical enough to the cause.

    • Replies: @Joe Magarac
  2. Hhsiii says:

    Plan B is working a bit better, it seems.

    • Replies: @J1234
  3. Alfa158 says:

    Steve, just be hyper precise about it, Africans did not sell African-Americans into slavery, they sold Africans into slavery.
    Additionally, Obama’s ancestors were in Kenya and sold Africans into slavery to Arabs, not to Americans.

    • Replies: @Ancient Briton
  4. anonymous[712] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s not at all clear to me how there is any intention to use 1619 as a means of defeating Trump. I doubt that was the expectation of anyone at the NYT in 2019.

  5. the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans

    What contributions? What evidence is there of them adding a dime of value?

    We really should get reparations a refund from those West African chieftains. Did anybody keep the receipt?

  6. Boethiuss says:

    All these machinations, all these theories, all of them are interesting and some of them are probably true, but how much good are they doing us?

    I think at least part of the problem is that we’re looking back to 2005 or 1995 or thereabouts where Steve first formalized and quantified the affordable family formation theory (AFF). My recollection is, whereas tenure-track assistant professors in sociology or the like try to find correlations on the order of .2 and have to make do with .07, the correlation for AFF was .7 or .8 straight out of the box.

    In other words, affordable family formation, and the things related to it, was the overwhelmingly dominant controlling factor of which places aligned where politically. And if it was taboo back then, it’s basically common knowledge now, even if Steve is not attributed or given appropriate credit.

    More recently, Steve has thrown around a bunch of well-informed speculations. A week ago, Steve thought that the Floyd riots were about other public sector employees targeting municipal police for budget cuts when the Coronavirus bill comes due (in cute bankshot self-preservation play). Or the current post, where the NYT is running the 1619 project as Plan B for dumping Trump once the Mueller investigation petered out.

    For these two things (and there are several more where they came from) they are all interesting, some of them are very likely true, but they are mostly unknowable one way or the other, and worst of all they’re not compelling. It feels like the populist Right version of an assistant professor at Rutgers trying to get tenure, hoping to scrape out correlations and confidence intervals big enough to be worth publishing.

    What is compelling, at least right now, is Donald Trump and the desire of the American people not to be associated with him. Any decision that might be good for us, forces the American people to associate with Trump and that’s not going to happen, so we can’t have nice things. For example, you would think that a lot of Americans, at least by instinct, would tend to oppose looters and arsonists. And so, in a situation where looting and arson are occurring, that they would be strongly agitating in our political debates for the authorities to stop the arson and looting.

    It would very likely be happening that way, except that’s what Trump is saying, so anyone else who says that is associating themselves with Trump. So instead of stopping the arson and looting, it’s all about Black Lives Matter, criminal justice reform, defunding the police, and so on.

    Of course this is way simpler than Steve’s theories, and ultimately very depressing. But still, that’s where we are.

    • Replies: @Whiskey
    , @Stan d Mute
  7. Dr. X says:

    At this point I’m starting to feel a little sorry for Baquet

    I’m not.

    • Agree: AnotherDad, sayless
  8. At this point I’m starting to feel a little sorry for Baquet who at least comes across as a grown-up. In contrast, much of the Great Awokening seems like a Schoolgirl Snit by young women on staff.

    Yes, but these schoolgirls have the power to ruin your life, make you unemployable and basically crap on any art form that exists that is still art, i.e. not polluted by their dumbed down mindless drivel. Don’t forget, either, their young, black male boyfriends commit murders at 7.9 times the rate of whites.

    Disgusting, dangerous and stupid.

  9. Whiskey says: • Website
    @Boethiuss

    Trump had a tiny turnout in Tulsa so yes you are right. Technically Joe Biden passed away a year ago and it’s Weekend at Bidens.

  10. Plan B for overthrowing Trump? More like plan L, M, N, O, or P.

    • Agree: Corn
  11. @Reg Cæsar

    What contributions? What evidence is there of them adding a dime of value?

    Son, I like you.

  12. syonredux says:

    I don’t agree with everything that Eric Kaufmann says in this review, but this is good stuff:

    A final sore spot is that the book drastically underplays the complicity of America’s conservative establishment in the progressive cultural revolution. The American right between the 1970s and 2010s came to fixate on the neoconservative trinity of tax cuts, foreign adventurism and evangelical enthusiasms like faith-based charity. These were all “safe,” in that they avoided challenging the identity left’s sacred cows of race and gender. Where they didn’t actively assist identity politics—as with Nixon and affirmative action—they turned a blind eye to illegal immigration and the rewriting of American history. Instead of cheap talk about cutting the state, conservatives should have spent those decades figuring out how to reform and recapture it.

    This is going to require a passionate political campaign to rally the electorate, claims Gonzalez, as it will be ferociously resisted by the education establishment. All of which brings to mind historian Robert Conquest’s Second Law of Politics, that “Any organization not explicitly and constitutionally right-wing will sooner or later become left-wing.” With the electoral earthquakes of 2016, conservative politicians have begun to understand that focusing only on the material sphere while trying to stay on the PC left’s good side can only lead to the fulfillment of Conquest’s Second Law. </blockquote

    https://lawliberty.org/book-review/an-american-cultural-revolution/

    • Replies: @Ganderson
  13. @anonymous

    You can’t be serious.

    1619 is the narrative of BLM.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    , @Anon
  14. epebble says:

    On the topic of overthrowing, there is this intrigue:

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/jun/18/john-bolton-urged-to-elaborate-on-trump-erdogan-claims

    This would have been yet another attempt at scandal making gone dud; but suddenly, A.G. Barr took great effort to dash to NYC to persuade U.S. Attorney Berman for SDNY, who was prosecuting the case to leave his job. When that failed, Barr got Berman fired by Trump. This now obviously smells of a scandal. What is it that Erdogan would have promised Trump to indulge in this high wire act?

  15. @anonymous

    It’s not at all clear to me how there is any intention to use 1619 as a means of defeating Trump. I doubt that was the expectation of anyone at the NYT in 2019.

    It seems more likely that the leftards put all their chips on Russiagate for the win. When it imploded they were buffaloed into focusing on diversity hair trends by the golem they (their ilk anyway) created in the Grievance Studies department. Said golem comprise a significant and very loud number of its staff.

    That the blackifuckation of the enterprise will result is a given whether the nation survives or not. What organization has survived blackifuckation absent swift reassertion of order? Right now it’s just about the group that literally makes the most noise (and violence).

  16. @Reg Cæsar

    What contributions? What evidence is there of them adding a dime of value?

    Doesn’t it depend on your views on economics? They’ve created millions of jobs in policing, jail keeping, jail construction, jail food service, private security electronic and personal, and who knows how many jobs today in the DIE sector of the economy. And think of how they drive property development, why just in Southeast Michigan they’ve been the driving force in development of Oakland, Macomb, Monroe, and Livingston counties – probably trillions of dollars in development all due entirely to the Bantu tribesmen..

    How much more can you demand from these people?

    • Thanks: Charon
  17. no, 1619 Project is yet another jewish campaign to recon US history. it has little to do with Trump and everything to do with conditioning the citizens long term to hate America, just like their many previous successful propaganda retcon campaigns, which are working great as we see today.

    i hate to be one note, i hate to be That Guy, but that’s what’s happening here.

    as for it being historically inaccurate, even according to other leftist history professors – so what? when did that ever stop any of the other jewish propaganda campaigns?

    “The Right”, which can now very clearly be defined biologically as the English/Dutch/Scots/German core of America, no longer write the history books or teach the public schools. so what do people expect the foreign alien groups to do after capturing these resources? they will use them to destroy their biological enemies, of course.

    Ann Coulter just wrote an article about this. other than naming (you know who), it was pretty much on the money.

  18. @Boethiuss

    Of course this is way simpler than Steve’s theories, and ultimately very depressing.

    More depressing still would be the thought that the Africans just saw the entire country prostrate itself in terror over a bad cold/flu virus. Back home, remember, they think little of the restrictions to constrain the Ebola virus. Their behavior (and subsequent death toll) during this outbreak attests to their cavalier approach to the white devil’s germ theory of disease. So, given that they see themselves now in the vast majority of media (and it’s difficult to find any that doesn’t portray them as at least morally superior to whites), the most opportunistic of them felt enabled to demonstrate their power openly and in mockery of our cowardice. Those bold leaders were richly rewarded by obsequious whites and millions of their kinsmen joined in for the attention and goodies. Still finding only obsequiousness, they’re emboldened to keep going further.

    This is simply the golem the Jews have created with the loving help of their devoted Christian brothers. In a news vacuum with nothing but COVID hysteria 24/7, this legendarily loud and violent golem got loose. It’s off the leash and I’m just wondering when and whom will get it back behaving on the plantation.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  19. Ed says:

    Trump is ahead in a recent poll of N.C., I’m just hoping some polls come out soon that show Trump improving. That will be the only thing that will bring this nonsense to an end. As long as polls keep showing Biden ahead comfortably the craziness will go on.

    I’m really baffled by the white voters that watch what’s going on and think rewarding Dems is a good idea.

    • Replies: @Prof. Woland
  20. J1234 says:
    @Hhsiii

    We aren’t very far into plan B. Plans really have to work in the long-term to be successful.

    • Replies: @Hhsiii
  21. Anonymous[415] • Disclaimer says:

    Important Celebrities chime in:

  22. anonymous[229] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ben tillman

    There is already a lot of rhetoric against Trump as a racist. How do you think the 1619 project would have added more coals to the fire against Trump along the he’s a racist line?

    Given the school curriculum goals of the 1619 project I think clearly the aim was much longer term to shape the minds of Generation Z rather than anything to do with the 2020 election.

  23. Now it is white people who want to be free.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
  24. @Ed

    The polls, like the MSM, want Trump to lose. Period. Anticipate every poll saying Trump is 10-15 points behind. Just like Brexit.

  25. Not Raul says:

    Thomas Jefferson dispatching the U.S. Marines to “the shores of Tripoli” in 1804 and the Royal Navy freeing 3,000 European slaves from Algiers in 1816, sound like great movie ideas for Eastwood, Gibson, or Bigelow.

    • Agree: Smithsonian
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @syonredux
  26. @James Speaks

    I think the Jacobin takeover at the NYT will be a good thing. The old guard understood that their (always false) reputation as the “paper of record” was invaluable to their propaganda project.

    Good propaganda has to have at least a patina of objectivity. But the new regime has now torn the mask off and stated explicitly and on the record that they will not “present both sides,” and will not allow counter-narrative perspectives.

    They have thus needlessly thrown away their best propaganda asset. And that’s a good thing.

    • Replies: @gfhändel
  27. @Not Raul

    Thomas Monahan (“The Departed”) wrote a famous unproduced screenplay about the War with the Barbary Pirates.

    • Replies: @Hhsiii
    , @Joe Stalin
  28. Speaking of the shores of Tripoli…three ‘middle aged men’ ( I think this means white men) have been stabbed to death in a park in Reading, England, by a Libyan man.

    The funny thing is, this happened just after there had been a BLM protest in the park. I would be tempted to draw a comparison with the hammer attack you mention, and wonder if these BLM protests are fanning the flames of anti-white racism…but no, Reading Police have already issued a statement saying there is no connection to those protests. So that’s all right then.

    File under ‘random attacks’ and forget I mentioned it.

    • Thanks: Charon
  29. @Stan d Mute

    As David Cole has pointed out, it’s not going to happen. Too late, Jewish supporters of BLM are going to find out blacks hate Jews.

  30. Hhsiii says:
    @J1234

    Steve’s premise to me suggests we will know in November. Whether that works out for the winners in the long run is a different question. And true, it may backfire.

  31. Charon says:
    @Hhsiii

    Haven’s Dad, right? Wow, small world.

    • LOL: kaganovitch, hhsiii
  32. Do we still have a sleeping giant to be awoken?

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
  33. anon[204] • Disclaimer says:

    The other side, unfortunately, does much to contribute to the narrative’s effectiveness. They do this by cooperating with the enemy: the controlled press — interviews, scoops, op-eds, comments. This lends those outfits undue legitimacy no matter how well-intended or how fair they promise to treat the opposition. So when that same outfit then pushes a false narrative, the public will tend to accept it because they assume it comes from a place of common authority. Cooperating with the enemy is a huge mistake. One important rule of any resistance to an occupying force is to refuse cooperation. Hold out for as long as possible and undermine as much as is feasible. So, the next time any republican cooperates with the New York Times, make them pay for it. Ostracize them, vote against them, label them a collaborator, refuse service to them with your business (example: kick them out of your restaurant, including their family). Every time a republican does this (or really anyone) they empower this racist nonsense. You lend your support by cooperating with them. Don’t.

  34. slumber_j says:
    @anonymous

    I literally have no idea who you are.

  35. @bomag

    Indirection. It’s not about slavery at all.
    I am absolutely not just kidding around like I sometimes do.

    This is revenge for the way the Cold War turned out.

    Just exactly that.

  36. Ganderson says:
    @syonredux

    Schools are gearing up for a ferocious round of anti-racism education in the fall assuming they open, which here in MA is not a safe assumption, as Corona Panic reigns supreme here. My retirement this spring will prevent me from getting fired in the fall. (not really, because when you lookup “keyboard warrior” in the dictionary it has my picture)

  37. @James Speaks

    Lol, they don’t date Black dudes. Certainly not one of the ghetto homicidal Blacks of the ilk who commit most of those murders (although those may be cousins or even brothers). They didn’t get to where they are to turn around and date that kind of person, even if the job requires them to act as if they aren’t faintly repulsed by their violent (not to mention QUEERPHOBIC) coethnics.

  38. slumber_j says:
    @Hhsiii

    William Monahan is a really great writer. Back in the day he wrote a series of fictional epistolary columns for New York Press called Dining Late with Claude La Badarian that was one of the best things I’ve ever read.

    Tragically they seem to have been wiped from the Web, but here at least is an essay on them: https://nypress-studies.blogspot.com/2010/03/autobiographical-elements-in-dining.html

    An excerpt:

    Example 2: Mr. Monahan’s childhood

    Claude La Badarian writes in letter 12:

    [T]he term “American” is a fiction for simpletons, foreigners and federals: the USA is a lot of countries unnaturally related. Claude is a member of the New England civilization. Poor Claude, literate little boy, fond of drawing, diffidence, solitude, beans on toast, “r” unknown in the La Badarian household, never saw himself on tv–not on Gilligan, not in cowboy films–until he saw David Hemmings in the cheapo early-60s seaside musical comedy Be My Guest.

    Mr. Monahan writes in a 2007 Variety essay:

    Growing up in Boston and environs in the ’60s and ’70s was very strange, because we, perhaps the primary American civilization, had no representation in art, anywhere. When I was a kid I used to watch television and you’d see an “American” family living in an “American” house having “American” problems, and I’d think, right, but where do they put their books? Why are they talking openly rather than metaphorically? On top of that, why don’t they realize that what bothers them doesn’t matter? Why isn’t it raining and why is no one actually funny? Why do they think that a doctor has social status? Why doesn’t anyone die?
    Television and most films, granted, are under no obligation to be a mirror to nature — Sherwood Schwartz was not required to be Flaubert — but I literally didn’t see anyone like myself, or anything like my own environment or condition or family, until I started to read books such as “The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner” and see movies set in the north of England, which were usually about reassuringly paradoxical people who made terrible, negative decisions.

    • Thanks: Jenner Ickham Errican
    • Replies: @res
    , @hhsiii
  39. @Stan d Mute

    Doesn’t it depend on your views on economics? They’ve created millions of jobs in policing, jail keeping, jail construction, jail food service, private security electronic and personal, and who knows how many jobs today in the DIE sector of the economy. And think of how they drive property development, why just in Southeast Michigan they’ve been the driving force in development of Oakland, Macomb, Monroe, and Livingston counties – probably trillions of dollars in development all due entirely to the Bantu tribesmen..

    How much more can you demand from these people?

    The opportunity cost is rather high though. The same money could yield better returns for society if invested elsewhere.

    BTW Bantus are distinct from West Africans like Kunta Kinte the late Alex Haley’s alleged ancestor.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
  40. @Stan d Mute

    ” They’ve created millions of jobs in policing, jail keeping, jail construction, jail food service, private security electronic and personal, and who knows how many jobs today in the DIE sector of the economy. ”

    Think of how how RARE it was to see a security guard anywhere outside a financial institution pre-1965. Now they are everywhere. An unspoken of cost of Diversity.

  41. Huisache says: • Website

    Recently re read Cabeza de Vaca’s account of his journey through Texas and Mexico after being shipwrecked on Galveston Island. Most of the Spaniards were killed and/or eaten by Karankawas and other Indigenous Americans. The handful who survived were enslaved. This all happened before 1619

  42. @Steve Sailer

    Just have someone colorize this fine, old movie and create a soundtrack.

  43. @The Alarmist

    You’re going to break the faith people have in “Authority” before something explodes. The US Supreme Court is doing a good job reminding people of just how useless the Rule of Law is when it comes to gun rights, immigration and so forth.

    https://tubitv.com/movies/438054/compliance

  44. @Alfa158

    In both cases NYT reported women and minorities hardest hit.

  45. Anon[368] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ben tillman

    Leftists don’t really do the whole “logic and evidence” thing, because they always get shredded in honest debates. That’s why they much prefer deception and chaos.

    Look at the Dems’ 2020 strategy: hide their odious candidate in a basement and do as much as possible to plunge the country into chaos. Like a bunch of recalcitrant children, they don’t care if the whole country burns down if they can’t have THEIR way.

  46. the power of the prestige press to pick out ideologically convenient items .. and declare them the news about which we are all supposed to have a “conversation.”

    Hey, Marshall McLuhan!

    When politicians, 24-hr snooze networks, bloggers, etc. embrace the “prestige” press’ conversation points, I simply press the [ignore] button.

  47. res says:
    @slumber_j

    William Monahan is a really great writer. Back in the day he wrote a series of fictional epistolary columns for New York Press called Dining Late with Claude La Badarian that was one of the best things I’ve ever read.

    Tragically they seem to have been wiped from the Web

    You can get to at least some of them using the Internet Archive. Here are some.
    https://web.archive.org/web/20071014183126/http://www.nypress.com/14/33/news&columns/claude.cfm
    https://web.archive.org/web/20071015200615/http://www.nypress.com/14/32/news&columns/claude.cfm

    It looks like a good way to get all 12 of the columns is to go to this archive page:

    Tuesday, August 14,2001
    Seazed by Hindoos
    https://web.archive.org/web/20100503160850/http://www.nypress.com/article-4664-seazed-by-hindoos.html

    Then click on the author link which brings up a popup. Going to the link directly gives a list of columns, but it is not formatted as nicely as the popup window is.

    https://web.archive.org/web/20100503160850/http://www.nypress.com/articles.by.Author-660.html

    P.S. If you are motivated, this might not be a bad time to squirrel away copies given the possibility of the Internet Archive being cancelled.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
  48. syonredux says:
    @Not Raul

    Thomas Jefferson dispatching the U.S. Marines to “the shores of Tripoli” in 1804 and the Royal Navy freeing 3,000 European slaves from Algiers in 1816, sound like great movie ideas for Eastwood, Gibson, or Bigelow.

    This would make one hell of a scene:

    On October 31, 1803, Philadelphia, under the command of Commodore William Bainbridge, ran aground on an uncharted reef (known as Kaliusa reef) near Tripoli’s harbor. After desperate and failed attempts to refloat the ship she was subsequently captured and her crew imprisoned by Tripolitan forces. After coming up with an elaborate plan,[50] Decatur sailed for Tripoli with 80 volunteers (most of them being U.S. Marines) intending to enter the harbor with Intrepid without suspicion to board and set ablaze the frigate Philadelphia, denying its use to the corsairs. USS Syren,[b] commanded by Lieutenant Charles Stewart, accompanied Intrepid to provide supporting fire during and after the assault. Before entering the harbor eight sailors from Syren boarded Intrepid, including Thomas Macdonough who had recently served aboard Philadelphia and knew the ship’s layout intimately.[52] Decatur established a close friendship with Macdonough and became his mentor during the course of their careers.[53]

    On February 16, 1804, at seven o’clock in the evening under the dim light of a waxing crescent moon, Intrepid slowly sailed into Tripoli harbor. Decatur’s vessel was made to look like a common merchant ship from Malta and was outfitted with British colours. To further avoid suspicion, on board were five Sicilian volunteers including the pilot Salvatore Catalano, who spoke Arabic. The boarding party remained hidden below in position, prepared to board the captured Philadelphia. The men were divided into several groups, each assigned to secure given areas of the ship, with the additional explicit instruction of refraining from the use of firearms unless it proved absolutely necessary.[54] As Decatur’s ship came closer to Philadelphia, Catalano called out to the harbor personnel in Arabic that their ship had lost its anchors during a recent storm and was seeking refuge at Tripoli for repairs.[55] By 9:30 p.m. Decatur’s ship was within 200 yards of Philadelphia, whose lower yards were now resting on the deck with her foremast missing, as Bainbridge had ordered it cut away and had also jettisoned some of her guns in a futile effort to refloat the ship by lightening her load.[56]

    As Decatur approached the berthed Philadelphia he encountered a light wind that made his approach tedious. He had to casually position his ship close enough to Philadelphia to allow his men to board while not creating any suspicion. When the two vessels were finally close enough, Catalano obtained permission for Decatur to tie Intrepid to the captured Philadelphia. Decatur surprised the few Tripolitans on board when he shouted the order “board!”, signaling to the hidden crew below to emerge and storm the captured ship.[57] Without losing a single man, Decatur and 60 of his men, dressed as Maltese sailors or Arab seamen and armed with swords and boarding pikes, boarded and reclaimed Philadelphia in less than 10 minutes, killing at least 20 of the Tripolitan crew, capturing one wounded crewman, and forcing the rest to flee by jumping overboard. Only one of Decatur’s men was slightly wounded by a saber blade. There was hope that the small boarding crew could launch the captured ship, but the vessel was in no condition to set sail for the open sea. Decatur soon realized that the small Intrepid could not tow the larger and heavier warship out of the harbor. Commodore Preble’s order to Decatur was to destroy the ship where she berthed as a last resort, if Philadelphia was unseaworthy. With the ship secure, Decatur’s crew began placing combustibles about Philadelphia with orders to set her ablaze. After making sure the fire was large enough to sustain itself, Decatur ordered his men to abandon the ship and was the last man to leave Philadelphia.[58] As the flames intensified, the guns aboard Philadelphia, all loaded and ready for battle, became heated and began discharging, some firing into the town and shore batteries, while the ropes securing the ship burned off, allowing the vessel to drift into the rocks at the western entrance of the harbor.[59]

    While Intrepid was under fire from the Tripolitans who were now gathering along the shore and in small boats, the larger Syren was nearby providing covering fire at the Tripolitan shore batteries and gunboats. Decatur and his men left the burning vessel in Tripoli’s harbor and set sail for the open sea, barely escaping in the confusion. With the cover of night helping to obscure the enemy gunfire, Intrepid and Syren made their way back to Syracuse, arriving February 18.[60][61] After learning of Decatur’s daring capture and destruction of Philadelphia without suffering a single fatality, British Vice Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson, who at the time was blockading the French port at Toulon, is said to have stated it was “the most bold and daring act of the Age.”[62][63][64] Decatur’s daring and successful burning of Philadelphia made him an immediate national hero in the US.[51][65] Appreciation for the efforts of Preble and Decatur were not limited to their peers and countrymen. At Naples, Decatur was praised and dubbed “Terror of the Foe” by the local media. Upon hearing the news of their victory in Tripoli, Pope Pius VII publicly declared that “the United States, though in their infancy, had done more to humble and humiliate the anti-Christian barbarians on the African coast in one night than all the European states had done for a long period of time.”[66] Upon his return to Syracuse, Decatur resumed command of Enterprise.[67]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Decatur#Burning_of_USS_Philadelphia

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  49. @syonredux

    “Where do we get such men?”
    – Fredric March as RADM George Tarrant in The Bridges at Toko-Ri.

  50. @Prof. Woland

    Now it is white people who want to be free.

    Other than the reprehensible slavers, whites have always wanted to be free of the African.

  51. gfhändel says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    THE JACOBIN TAKEOVER. The Age has a name.

  52. did four Teens of Color in St. Louis, shouting “Kill the white people,” hammer a white man to death?

    No, a xenophobic mob murdered a poor innocent immigrant. Don’t you read, Sailer?

  53. hhsiii says:
    @slumber_j

    I read that stuff back in the day (and Mugger, lol).

    My old roommate used to manage a band called The Unband, or was friends with them. They knew Monahan from Massachussetts.

Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments have been licensed to The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
Our Reigning Political Puppets, Dancing to Invisible Strings
The unspoken statistical reality of urban crime over the last quarter century.
Talk TV sensationalists and axe-grinding ideologues have fallen for a myth of immigrant lawlessness.