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From the New York Times Upshot data analytics section:

Most Candidates Running on Crime Don’t Have Much Power to Solve It

Your congressman doesn’t control the police budget. Your senator probably doesn’t know where the worst hot spots are.

By Emily Badger
Nov. 4, 2022

Politicians around the country have promised in the closing days of the midterm election to crack down on crime. Would-be governors will crack down on crime. Senators will crack down on crime. Members of Congress will do it, too. Obviously, their opponents won’t.

The law-and-order messaging is often disconnected from the nuance of crime trends (in 2022, homicide is up in some places, but down in others like New York City;

It’s all very complicated!

Yeah, okay, there was a historic change in homicide and traffic fatality rates in the week after George Floyd’s death, but only Steve Sailer is going to show you graphs of that

And he is Bad, so you’ve never seen these graphs (unless you too are Bad, and you wouldn’t want to be Bad, do you? Remember, bad things can happen to Bad People). So we’re just going to continue in the press to vaguely handwave about the pandemic and call attention to “Look, a squirrel!” trivia about small changes between 2021 and 2022 as if there isn’t a post-George Floyd New Normal.

yes, Oklahoma has higher violent crime rates than California). But it’s also devoid of the reality that these offices generally have little power to bend crime trends on the ground tomorrow.

Crime surges and falls for reasons that experts don’t fully understand,

Especially when they don’t want to understand or even think about one of the most stunning changes seen in 21st century social statistics.

and it’s hard for even the most proven ideas to quickly reverse its direction. But the people with ready levers to pull are not sitting in the Senate. And your current sense of order in your community is definitely not controlled by your congressman.

“You’re not going to fix the problems from there,” said Jeff Asher, a crime analyst and consultant with AH Datalytics in New Orleans (and a former Upshot contributor). “If you want to fix the problems, go run for mayor.”

Your governor isn’t going to solve a spike in murder, he added. And it’s generally not the governor who’s been failing to solve it, either. As for Senate candidates who say they will make sure we keep criminals behind bars who don’t belong on our streets?

“U.S. senators don’t determine state prison release policies,” said John MacDonald, a professor of criminology and sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. “Who you elect to Senate is going to have zero impact on state prisons.”

Seriously, according to the latest CDC data on causes of deaths, running from 1999 thru March 2022, both homicides and traffic fatalities, especially among blacks, absolutely exploded following George Floyd’s death on May 25, 2020 and the liberal establishment’s declaration of “the racial reckoning.” Ironically, the triumph of Black Lives Matter got thousands of incremental blacks killed, in large measure due to the craze among the influential for demanding the “depolicing” blacks. When society tells cops to retreat to the donut shop, people tend to drive worse and carry more illegal handguns.

The cause of the historic outbreak of carnage especially among blacks is less that long-term policies were carefully changed as it is that the zeitgeist among the great and the good suddenly went insane in late May 2020.

The institutions who contributed to the mayhem on the streets in 2020 — the Democratic party, academia, the media, etc. — need to be called out and punished so they learn a lesson not to throw out their judgement and sense again the next time they click on a disturbing Youtube video from somewhere in this country of 330 million.

Voting Republican on Tuesday probably won’t have too much impact on law enforcement policy, but it will send a message of rebuke to the permanent establishment.

There needs to be a reckoning over the catastrophic Racial Reckoning.

 
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  1. Also: only racist people discuss inflation.

    Inflation! What even is that?

    • Replies: @Curle
    @Polistra

    If by Americans she means her friends, I believe her.

    Replies: @Polistra

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Polistra

    There are some people so stupid/corrupt/hypocritical that it's not worth getting outraged over the things they say--I'd put Joy Reid, Rob Reiner, and Hillary Clinton at the top of the list. As they say, "What do you expect from a pig but a grunt?"

    , @al gore rhythms
    @Polistra

    "Got a bum education, double-digit inflation
    Can't take the train to the job, there's a strike at the station"

    Someone needs to tell Joy Reid about Grandmaster Flash.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Gandydancer

    , @Prester John
    @Polistra

    Who is "Joy Reid" and who cares what she has to say about anything?

    Replies: @Recently Based

    , @Spud Boy
    @Polistra

    There's something weird about how her head looks on her body. Like a potato with one of those knots sticking out on top.

    , @Muggles
    @Polistra

    Black men all know that the cost of their Colt 45 malt liquor has gone up considerably recently.

    They might not know why, but they know that this is inflation.

    It is Joy Reid who is arguing that Blacks are too dumb to notice. Self hating much?

    , @P.T.
    @Polistra

    Inflation usually means lower unemployment rates and more opportunity for low-income people. Fighting inflation usually means slowing the economy and throwing people out of work. It's Econ 101.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Polistra


    Also: only racist people discuss inflation.

    Inflation! What even is that?
     

    It what make da baww bounce!

    https://cdn.dribbble.com/users/244862/screenshots/2544989/ballbounce-800.gif

    , @CharleszMartel
    @Polistra

    We truly no longer live in a serious country.

    This claim might have made sense in the '70's, when people in the U.S. experienced serious inflation for the first time in over 50 years. Newspaper articles galore explained inflation, but misattributed it to the Arab Oil Embargo. (Much like they are now blaming the war in Ukraine). But to make the claim now, when Reagan broke the back of inflation through brutally high interest rates barely 40 years ago, is simply pathetic. (Interest rates on credit cards were capped at 18 percent by law at the time. When the prime rate went to 21.5 percent, it was cheaper to buy a house on credit cards than a bank mortgage. Rates on cards went to 24.99 percent maximum, and a few years later to 34.99 percent, with fees and other B.S. pushing some rates for the worst risks to 39 percent or so.)

    It's hard to be a citizen of a country whose political class has no concept of history.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @That Would Be Telling, @Ralph L, @That Would Be Telling

  2. Voting Republican on Tuesday probably won’t have too much impact on law enforcement policy, but it will send a message of rebuke to the permanent establishment.

    Exactly!

    Too often, analyses of the sort written into the NYT ignore the secondary and tertiary effects of an action.

    My wife and I plan to vote R on every line. We’ve studied every candidate, local, state and national, and it makes sense for us to do this —

    — even though we both know, as I say, that they are all “scoundrels,” in the words of one great scent of The Unbearable Lightness of Being. All politicians and aparatchiks are scoundrels, but we can send a message by voting for the other scoundrels.

    My mother, a Southern Democrat, used to joke that my father, a died-in-the-wool, California Republican, would vote for Mickey Mouse if Mikey Mouse was the Republican candidate. Well, I plan to vote for Micky Mouse, as my father would have.

    • Replies: @Inverness
    @Buzz Mohawk


    My mother, a Southern Democrat, used to joke that my father, a died-in-the-wool, California Republican, would vote for Mickey Mouse if Mikey Mouse was the Republican candidate. Well, I plan to vote for Micky Mouse, as my father would have.
     
    If he's a write-in candidate you may be in some trouble.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Old Prude
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Micky Mouse? I would vote for the Devil before voting for a Democrat. But since the Devil is a Democrat and the Democrat Party is an arm of Satan, I don't have to worry about it. But, the Republicans are worthless worms, so I don't expect anything from them. Worms. Worthless.

  3. Yeah, okay, there was a historic change in homicide and traffic fatality rates in the week after George Floyd’s death

    When Trump was President.

    If Trump runs again, his opponents can say, “look how much crime increased when Trump was President.”

    Is Ted Cruz ready for round two?

    • Agree: Peter Akuleyev
    • Replies: @Aspiring Rapper and Honor Student
    @Not Raul

    You're right that it's about the Orange Man. I'm surprised Sailer's analysis didn't address this. The establishment went crazy and lost their judgement because of Trump. And they were willing to accept increased homicide and traffic deaths among urban blacks as the cost of ousting him. Like Stalin said, if you want to make an omelette, you gotta break some eggs.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow

    , @Gandydancer
    @Not Raul


    Is Ted Cruz ready for round two?
     
    He wasn't ready for Round One, so why would you imagine he is ready for Round Two?

    Or perhaps you've forgotten that in 2016 Cruz blamed TRUMP for "the violence at his rallies"?

    Yeah, Trump's immigration policy turned into a squishy imitation of Cruz' stated policy, but we knew Cruz would return to approving amnesty if he was elected. My vote for Trump over Cruz was anyway precisely a message vote and I do not regret it at all since, despite Trump's ineptness and disloyalty, his election changed the Overton Window. And kept the worst of the Total Loonies out of the Oval Office for a spell.

    DeSantis' Marthas Vinyard ploy (and promise to continue its like) gives me some hope for something from him, so I hope Trump stays out or keels over before 2024. Of course only a fool trusts a politician. But Cruz has totally passed his sell-by date.

  4. Yes, a Republican victory would send a message, but real change will only come when the Republican Party makes up its mind to stop being the ladies auxiliary of the Democratic Party.

  5. If politicians can’t impact policing and justice, why did Kamala Harris personally weigh in on murderers being held without bail in Minnesota? Why did the Minnesota Freedom Fund thank her for her support after some of them were released? Or maybe the Times meant politicians can’t really stop crime, but they can pull the levers to make sure more crimes are committed.

    Harris’s infamous tweet is still up btw, still getting comments, and the left is seething about it.

    • Replies: @MM
    @Bragadocious

    That is a good point - many times the politician cannot solve the problem, but they do have the power to make it worse through bad policy..

  6. Anonymous[197] • Disclaimer says:

    You know what’s absolutely wild? I’ve been a cop for twenty years. I’m nothing special and my job basically just feels like well-paid service work. I’m just a guy in polyester and a name tag. Never promoted, never will. I just drive a police car around and answer police calls. And I’m surrounded by guys and gals who do the same thing, almost all of whom also will never be more important than sergeants.

    Yet, I feel as though I’m the possessor of this incredible secret knowledge. Like I have the power to see an entire world that the rest of respectable society doesn’t even know exists. A world that everyone, everyone, insists is The Most Important Question Of Our Time. It’s not an exaggeration to say that I know more about this than 99% of society.

    And you know who cares? No one. No reporters come asking. No non-cops I know ask me. I’m not sure what percentage don’t care, or don’t want to know, or just never has occur to them that they don’t actually know.

    It’s not that I actually care anymore. I work in a very liberal city and one of my greatest job benefits is supping on their tears. I really get off on explaining to citizens who didn’t ask just how utterly f’ed their city is (and, oh boy, it is). I don’t have to lie in the least, I just give them both barrels of reality, wrapped in their own BS woke verbiage. But they don’t dig any further. They don’t actually want to know.

    As Steve has pointed out here somewhere, people do awesome breakdowns of sh$t they actually care about. Baseball, medieval sword fighting, dungeons and dragons, whatever. But how law enforcement actually works at the street level? Yawn.

    Sorry if this was largely off topic.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Thanks.

    , @JimDandy
    @Anonymous

    One of the best comments I've read in a long time.

    Replies: @Inverness

    , @Dr. X
    @Anonymous


    I feel as though I’m the possessor of this incredible secret knowledge.
     
    Secret knowledge of... what? How Negroes actually behave in real life as opposed to how they are portrayed in television commercials?
    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Anonymous

    So how many taxpayer dollars do you steal per year?

    100k?

    200k?

    300k?

    More?

    Enquiring taxpayer minds want to know.

    , @BosTex
    @Anonymous

    Thanks for doing what has come to be an utterly thankless task.

    Can you add more detail, typical day to day BS?

    , @Mike Tre
    @Anonymous

    The big secret is you guys are nothing more than enforcers of arbitrary government policy.

    How many normal people did you threaten with fine or imprisonment for not wearing a mask?

    How much money did you take at gunpoint from working class people, for the high crime of running late for work or to pick up their kids?

    You people do not protect anything but your own pensions.

    Replies: @NeoLogick

    , @Muggles
    @Anonymous

    Decades ago I read a book titled something like "What Cops Know".

    It was mostly about cop knowledge about the kind of perps and their behaviors for committing certain types of crimes. How they size up situations in crime scenes and aftermath.

    Thanks, along with others, for your post. Especially in this age of censorship and Orwellian Groupthink, your on-the-ground perspective is very valuable.

    When LEO types try to share that now, it's a ticket to firing or early retirement.

    Some of the truth leaks out anyway Though it remains the kind of "dirty secrets" akin only to certain bizarre sex practices by the Alphabet City groups.

    As you stated, "journalists" aren't interested. That kind of journalism ended by about 1960.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    , @CharleszMartel
    @Anonymous

    Great comment.

    I live in the demi-world of all-night hospitality.....realities that I deal with every day would curl the hair of liberal fuck-wits. A week on my door would melt a liberals' mind. They simply couldn't handle that much stereotypical validation of the truth.

    One of my employees has a liberal attorney father. Polluted by Pepperdine. His son says he no longer discusses political issues with his Dad, as he'd think his son had been kidnapped and brainwashed by Alien Nazis from Space! (what a great title for a Roger Corman A.I.P. flick!)

    When I go to New York Cesspool, I'm usually the most interesting man in the room, due to my genetic obsession with telling the truth. It's very amusing to twist them into babbling morons with a couple sentences. They have literally never had to defend any of their delusions before in their lives.

    I greatly enjoyed your comment.

    You should seriously consider writing a blog (with great attention to remaining anonymous). It could easily catch fire, and lead to bigger things. Is your pension fully vetted?

    There used to be a cop blog, might still be, I can't remember it's name. Had tons of inside info about policing in it's city (Chicago,maybe?). AFAIK, no-one ever outed the author, although with the midget Nazis of today running around, that might not be possible. Maybe set up a fake person first to be the author, so when someone "finds" you, they find the wrong guy. Read up on Brooke Magnanti (sp?) and her Belle du Jour blog in London and the Google Whack methodology used to sniff her out.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Nicholas Stix, @AceDeuce

    , @Nicholas Stix
    @Anonymous


    "Yet, I feel as though I’m the possessor of this incredible secret knowledge."
     
    What, pray tell, might that knowledge be? Your comment was so vague that I got nothing out of it.
    , @anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Normally "empirical street-smarts" is valued over "sentimental wishful thinking", dark gritty realism over Technicolor musicals, but reasons are always found for discrediting empirical street observations when they come from non-elite whites: economic failure blamed on the Other, resentment at loss of privilege, resentment at having to live and work among non-whites, white teachers/cops/paramedics projecting their own hatred and bad intent on the blacks they work among, etc.

    Juror #3 (Lee J. Cobb) in 12 Angry Men was the guy with the first-hand knowledge of urban crime: you people know nothing, let me tell you about your precious juvenile delinquents, I've watched them grow up and it's always the same.... And then under Henry Fonda's questioning he reveals himself to be bigoted and psychologically defective, and we are given to understand that his observations about the life paths of irredeemable JD's can be disregarded because they are really expressions of his issues with his estranged son.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

  7. We do know how to solve this. Rudi showed us how.

    He ended the crack epidemic almost overnight. Must have been a miracle!

    • Agree: Travis, Inverness
    • Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Shouting Thomas

    Recall Bill Clinton also campaigned in 1992 with the promise to put 100,000 more police on the beat nationally...Clinton’s law enforcement strategy was to combat crime with more community policing, longer sentences and increased prosecutions. Clinton often boasted about the success of his crime bill and the resulting increase in incarcerations and his federal initiative to fund increased policing and to increase the number of prosecutors to implement effective community prosecution strategies to compliment the work of community police officers.

    We know that hiring more police and strictly enforcing the laws with tough prosecutors works to reduce crime. In the 1990s Clinton promoted this tough on crime strategy nationally with federal funds. Certainly this was an additional factor in reducing crime from the high levels we experienced in the eighties. Another factor was the decline in the number of young Americans as the boomers turned 40 and the number of Americans under the age of 30 fell significantly after 1994.

    , @American Citizen
    @Shouting Thomas

    Which is one more reason he is currently vilified and persecuted.

    One of the most successful and competent mayors ever for NYC. Led the 9/11 response. Restored law and order to a city that had over 2o00 homicides yearly before he took office.

    Can't have this guy as a role model.

  8. And how much did your public COVID Mania contribute to the climate, Steve? Will there ever be an iSteve COVID Reckoning?

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Frank G

    Did you actually just blame Steve for America's crime problem

    Replies: @Gandydancer

    , @J.Ross
    @Frank G

    Actually, while he still thinks that lab coats are magic and government promises mean that drugs don't have to be tested, Steve has been very clear and consistent about the medically unjustifiable, itself-criminal lockdown having all kinds of predictable side effects, like impelling blacks to drive their cars at the speed of science.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @Corvinus, @Alden

    , @Recently Based
    @Frank G

    The funny thing is, with respect to the substance of this post, that even if you argue that the huge increase in crime starting in May 2020 was due to Covid lockdowns rather than Saint George you racist Bad Person, then it was still caused by policies enacted by people in the exact offices the NYT claims don't affect crime rates.

    , @Jack D
    @Frank G

    Putting aside how much Steve contributed to "Covid Mania" , how much of the increase in crime had to do with Covid Mania and how much had to do with the Great Racial Reckoning. Look at the graphs above. Did Covid Mania suddenly increase in the middle of 2020 (and only among black people) or was it something else?

    My guess is that Covid Mania by itself would have reduced crime. Businesses were closed - no money in the cash register of a closed restaurant. No shoplifting in a closed store. People were home - fewer opportunities for burglary. Schools were closed - every day when largely black school high schools let out, there is a mini-crime wave in the area of the school. No school, no crime wave:

    https://www.fox29.com/news/its-just-not-safe-roxborough-food-cart-owner-closes-an-hour-early-due-to-school-dismissal-concerns

    https://6abc.com/roxborough-businesses-high-school-store-security-vandalism/12291635/

    Sure there were countervailing effects (now everyone gets to wear a mask) but the crime wave was mainly due to the Racial Reckoning and nothing else.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @BB753
    @Frank G

    I guess he wants a COVID amnesty too.
    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2022/10/covid-response-forgiveness/671879/

  9. All indicators are that the Democrats are in for a very bad Tuesday night absent a bonanza of election “fortification” to rival 2020. That reality has finally started to hit them, and so you see this sort of ineffectual flailing at the inevitable.

    • Disagree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Thomas


    All indicators are that the Democrats are in for a very bad Tuesday night absent a bonanza of election “fortification” to rival 2020. That reality has finally started to hit them, and so you see this sort of ineffectual flailing at the inevitable.
     
    Someone is running ads for Joan Ellis Beglinger in the Wisconsin gubernatorial race. She's an independent conservative candidate critical of GOP-endorsed businessman Tim Michels for being squishy on guns and abortion.

    Or was an independent candidate. The wrinkle: She dropped out on Sept 4th and endorsed Michels. The incumbent Democrat, Gov Tony Evers, is Obama-bland and should have had an easy ride to a second term.


    Whoever is behind this ruse is both cynical and desperate. They are afraid!

    Replies: @Brutusale

    , @JR Ewing
    @Thomas


    a bonanza of election “fortification”
     
    This is my main worry and why I can’t get excited about the midterms just yet, especially the statewide senate races.

    A friend of mine who conceits to be a “moderate” commented today in a group email that “election denying nonsense must be stamped out.”

    He and others like him seem to have no clue how much the 2020 shenanigans wrecked people’s faith in our system. The final election results might have been entirely 100% accurate, but the way they went about it - mail in voting, massive counting shifts in the middle of the night, kicking out observers and covering the windows, and all the other irregularities - was corrosive and entirely undermined the idea of a “fair” election.

    Replies: @Gandydancer

    , @Old Prude
    @Thomas

    I turned on the TV for the first time this week to get the weather forecast. Two political ads by Democrats, both featuring big blurbs about "I opposed Biden", and smaller ones "I was for drilling for oil". Running scared? Yeah.

    I hope there is a massive loss and these bums have to pack up their shit and leave town.

  10. There needs to be a reckoning over the catastrophic Racial Reckoning.

    “Catastrophic” might be hyperventilating:

    Nationally, we’re still ‘only’ at Stage 2 of the SSSoR, “This Wheel’s On Fire”.

    Anyway, please enjoy this magnificent Gnarls Barkley cover of Radiohead’s “Reckoner”. (subtitles available)

  11. “Fighting crime” is the wrong way to conceptualize the Negro problem. The correct way is to focus on how society can efficiently control/punish sui generis, dysfunctional Negro behavior. Blacks, unlike nonblacks, are not afraid of prison, so society has to seriously start considering deportation and/or hard labor, as these are the only 2 things blacks fear (beyond capital punishment).

    • Agree: AceDeuce
    • Replies: @Rat City
    @Meretricious

    Snakes!

    Replies: @Inverness

    , @BosTex
    @Meretricious

    Blacks also fear swimming lessons.

    Compulsory swimming lessons as start point of punishment for blacks.

    , @Godfree Roberts
    @Meretricious

    When the Chinese had a violent crime problem in Xinjiang, they jailed a handful after bilingual public trials, then created jobs for everyone else.
    Crickets ever since.

  12. Do police solve crimes anyway?

    Republicans should not be bootlickers to police either.

    At some point, people will have to decide what type of “law enforcement” they want: Either Kyle Rittenhouse-style or the police we have now

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Gore 2004


    At some point, people will have to decide what type of “law enforcement” they want: Either Kyle Rittenhouse-style or the police we have now
     
    Only the truly crazy prefer a Mad Max world to "the police we have now."

    So a fed, Russian/Chinese internet troll or what exactly?

    Replies: @CharleszMartel

    , @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Gore 2004

    I support local cops, in NYC where we used to live, and where we are now. They are one of the few remaining institutions that belong to us.

    But Democrats have targeted local police departments for that reason. When they demoralize them to the point that they chase out the good ones via early retirement or harassment from the DOJ, local police departments will become another leftist, antiwhite, antiAmerican institution like all the rest.

    Just as the left now loves the FBI and CIA all of a sudden, they will become big fans of local police. The evil fcuks destroying our society cannot wait to get local cops cracking heads of the local 'insurrectionists.'

    Why? Take a look at how the cops behaved in places like Australia during the pandemic. Look at what happens to British whites with the temerity to talk back to African invaders or complain about Pakistanis raping their children.

    Replies: @clifford brown

  13. An election won’t replace the people in the media who trumpeted a “reckoning”. And they won’t lose money just because their actions caused their preferred political party to lose elections. So this idiocy can continue indefinitely. As David Schleicher has noted, there isn’t really partisan political competition in cities. We need to change that (he has quixotically suggested prohibiting the national political parties at the local level) in order for elections to matter.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @Curle
    @TGGP

    “ he has quixotically suggested prohibiting the national political parties at the local level”

    That is quixotic plus it won’t work. My state already allows local governments to hold non-partisan elections. Everyone knows the affiliation of all of the candidates.

  14. Conclusion: Both parties lie, cheat, and steal.

    There is no choice in a corrupt two party system.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @SaneClownPosse

    Don't worry, be happy! Look, it's the feel good story of the year!

    Associated Press
    Ukrainians face nuclear threat with grit and dark humor

  15. I guess we’re supposed to vote against whiteness and in favor of more equity?

  16. Sure, the woke-indoctrinated people are aware of which way a wind might be blowing, but at this point it would take a category-100 hurricane wind to effect any significant shift. That’s because their manner of thought has been baked-in for fully three generations. It is a mistake to pay much attention to snapshot events like the Floyd-graph spike or an election “rebuke.” Similarly, Scotus might deliver a rebuke to Harvard, but Harvard will simply develop various brazen, creative, infuriating workarounds, and laugh-off the putative rebuke, because they have been at this for three generations.

    • Agree: Polistra, Kylie, Alden, slumber_j
  17. Reckoning? Never will happen.
    1. A lot of the people most responsible won’t lose elections. Remember, Larry Krasner was re-elected as Philly’s DA last year.

    2. Even if Progressives lose elections, they move on to law firms, universities and media. They’ll get govt. grants to write policy papers about how the real causes of the crime spike were Structural Racism and white supremacy, and how their policies were just about to create utopia but they were stopped because they were voted out of office by the Deplorables.

    Too cynical? I don’t think so.

  18. @Thomas
    All indicators are that the Democrats are in for a very bad Tuesday night absent a bonanza of election "fortification" to rival 2020. That reality has finally started to hit them, and so you see this sort of ineffectual flailing at the inevitable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @JR Ewing, @Old Prude

    All indicators are that the Democrats are in for a very bad Tuesday night absent a bonanza of election “fortification” to rival 2020. That reality has finally started to hit them, and so you see this sort of ineffectual flailing at the inevitable.

    Someone is running ads for Joan Ellis Beglinger in the Wisconsin gubernatorial race. She’s an independent conservative candidate critical of GOP-endorsed businessman Tim Michels for being squishy on guns and abortion.

    Or was an independent candidate. The wrinkle: She dropped out on Sept 4th and endorsed Michels. The incumbent Democrat, Gov Tony Evers, is Obama-bland and should have had an easy ride to a second term.

    Whoever is behind this ruse is both cynical and desperate. They are afraid!

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Reg Cæsar

    I've read that the Cheeseheads are about to elect themselves a veto-proof Republican majority in both houses of the Wisconsin legislature, effectively neutering Evers if he's reelected. True?

  19. If big city governments do not start providing for public safety again, it will be vigilantism and that will NOT be a desirable outcome. For one thing, it will be rival vigilante gangs along ethnic lines.

    It won’t be “frontier justice”, it will be wars of extermination on the neighborhood level.

    • Disagree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @CharleszMartel
    @Joe Magarac

    I think that that is rapidly becoming inevitable.

    Remember when there were white ethnic gangs in big American cities? Italians, Irish, Poles, Greeks, Jews, etc. There were gang wars but not a lot of shootings and most were just to keep others out of their neighborhoods, or dating their women.

    I think that that sort of thing is pretty much the default position in a multicultural multiracial society.

    Anyone remember Lebanon? Cyprus?

  20. Your congressman doesn’t control the police budget. Your senator probably doesn’t know where the worst hot spots are.

    They claim elected politicians are powerless to affect crime even as they cheer on a Congress-schmuck from Florida trying desperately to string-up a boy wonder vigilante from Wisconsin on double-jeopardy Federal charges for neutralizing their AntiFa street muscle goons:

    https://www.fox13news.com/news/can-kyle-rittenhouse-face-federal-charges-house-judiciary-chairman-calls-for-doj-review

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Abe

    Basically it's like this, you see: The government is almighty, omnipresent, and omniscient. It has the power to lower the seas, stop a highly contagious, microscopic virus in its tracks, provide excellent education to 60 million children, provide quality healthcare to 330 million Americans (and illegal immigrants), create perfect equality between men and women and blacks and whites, and invent magical sources of energy that don't rely on fossil fuels.

    But it can't reduce crime by incarcerating known violent offenders, or control illegal invaders coming across a border which is only - yes, only - 2,050 miles long (an utterly minute fraction of the total area of the United States).

    The government has the amazing power to do absolutely anything under the sun when liberals want it to, but it's a limp wristed, 87 pound high school freshman when it's something liberals don't want it to do. It's amazing how that works.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Polistra

  21. Most Candidates Running on Crime Don’t Have Much Power to Solve It…Your congressman doesn’t control the police budget. Your senator probably doesn’t know where the worst hot spots are.

    Local officials set police budgets, but they have to operate within state and federal law. And both state and federal laws are interpreted by the courts. So there is no single point of control.

    Local leaders (the ones who aren’t hardened lefties) may have lots of ideas about how to reduce crime, but in many ways their hands are tied by the feds and the courts, and if local law enforcement does anything to piss off the feds or a random jury of idiots, they can pay a hefty price for it.

    New York City is an outlier because it’s a city with lots of revenue that is dominated by Jewish liberals who think the worst liberal ideas work best when applied to cities other than New York. And the federal courts and bureaucracy, with lots of New Yorkers in the highest positions of power – prior to Scalia’s death, four of the nine justices were from New York (Scalia, Ginsburg, Kagan, Sotomayor) – work to ensure that the government doesn’t come down as hard on NYC as it does on, say, Ferguson, Missouri.

    So true that there is little that voters can do to immediately turn around crime rates. A full scale purging of leftists from positions of power is what is needed, and that starts with what happens on Tuesday.

  22. @Shouting Thomas
    We do know how to solve this. Rudi showed us how.

    He ended the crack epidemic almost overnight. Must have been a miracle!

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @American Citizen

    Recall Bill Clinton also campaigned in 1992 with the promise to put 100,000 more police on the beat nationally…Clinton’s law enforcement strategy was to combat crime with more community policing, longer sentences and increased prosecutions. Clinton often boasted about the success of his crime bill and the resulting increase in incarcerations and his federal initiative to fund increased policing and to increase the number of prosecutors to implement effective community prosecution strategies to compliment the work of community police officers.

    We know that hiring more police and strictly enforcing the laws with tough prosecutors works to reduce crime. In the 1990s Clinton promoted this tough on crime strategy nationally with federal funds. Certainly this was an additional factor in reducing crime from the high levels we experienced in the eighties. Another factor was the decline in the number of young Americans as the boomers turned 40 and the number of Americans under the age of 30 fell significantly after 1994.

  23. @Abe

    Your congressman doesn’t control the police budget. Your senator probably doesn’t know where the worst hot spots are.
     
    They claim elected politicians are powerless to affect crime even as they cheer on a Congress-schmuck from Florida trying desperately to string-up a boy wonder vigilante from Wisconsin on double-jeopardy Federal charges for neutralizing their AntiFa street muscle goons:

    https://www.fox13news.com/news/can-kyle-rittenhouse-face-federal-charges-house-judiciary-chairman-calls-for-doj-review

    Replies: @Wilkey

    Basically it’s like this, you see: The government is almighty, omnipresent, and omniscient. It has the power to lower the seas, stop a highly contagious, microscopic virus in its tracks, provide excellent education to 60 million children, provide quality healthcare to 330 million Americans (and illegal immigrants), create perfect equality between men and women and blacks and whites, and invent magical sources of energy that don’t rely on fossil fuels.

    But it can’t reduce crime by incarcerating known violent offenders, or control illegal invaders coming across a border which is only – yes, only – 2,050 miles long (an utterly minute fraction of the total area of the United States).

    The government has the amazing power to do absolutely anything under the sun when liberals want it to, but it’s a limp wristed, 87 pound high school freshman when it’s something liberals don’t want it to do. It’s amazing how that works.

    • Agree: Coemgen, kaganovitch
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Wilkey


    The government has the amazing power to do absolutely anything under the sun when liberals want it to, but it’s a limp wristed, 87 pound high school freshman when it’s something liberals don’t want it to do. It’s amazing how that works.
     
    And by the same token, Republicans who think that the US Government is too stupid and ham-handed to manage American society and tell Americans how to live their lives, thought that it was eminantly capable of managing foreign societies in places like Afghanistan and Iraq and telling Afghanis and Iraqis how to live their lives.

    Replies: @Mark G., @Gamecock

    , @Polistra
    @Wilkey

    https://vividmaps.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/homicide-border.png

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  24. Any candidate running against Chicago Mayor Lightfoot could electrify voters by promising a Chicago wide Constitutional Carry law and lifting the ban on so-called assault weapons and normal capacity magazines. In addition, they could do the same thing for the ban on concealed weapons in the CTA.

    Simply ORDER the CPD to treat the possessor of an IL FOID card the same as a CCW permit.

    Cops can still arrest the standard thug for felon in possession and go about their merry way.

    After all, judges have let people carrying firearms go who had just the IL FOID, people like Dan Proft could use their S&W MP-15 to open fire on thugs without getting their AR confiscated by the police.

    ALL JUDGES in IL are ANTI-GUN, so ALL ILLEGAL SO-CALLED GUN LAWS passed are upheld.

    This will massively increase the street firepower to kill criminals.

    Mayoral candidates have a chance to make a difference.

    DO IT!

  25. @Shouting Thomas
    We do know how to solve this. Rudi showed us how.

    He ended the crack epidemic almost overnight. Must have been a miracle!

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @American Citizen

    Which is one more reason he is currently vilified and persecuted.

    One of the most successful and competent mayors ever for NYC. Led the 9/11 response. Restored law and order to a city that had over 2o00 homicides yearly before he took office.

    Can’t have this guy as a role model.

    • Agree: Old Prude, tyrone
  26. Well, it’s not that I really think all the Conservative voting in the world is going to solve America’s problems, but that’s not in the same way as the NY Times means. We have already been duly screwed by both the invasion and by the loss of sound money. There’s no getting up from these holes (though ceasing the digging would be nice).

    Steve Sailer here is rightfully proud of his work in analyzing the effect of the racial reckoning. However, what I see more of here from the toilet paper of record is that that they are not shy about lying hypocritically about anything anymore. I mean, come on – Mayors appoint Chief of Polices, Governors appoint lots of officials, State legislators vote on the issues in question, and do we not vote for all these people? Of course, voting for these people affects crime policy. What the hell, man?

    How can one read something like this and not see the Lyin’ Press as nothing but an arm of the Potomac Regime government at this point? We need out!

    Yes, I’m still going to vote, and we’re going to get down to the GOP office tomorrow and help out a bit. Think of it as therapy.

    • Replies: @tyrone
    @Achmed E. Newman


    they are not shy about lying hypocritically about anything anymore.
     
    .......they think we are on the same mental level as Fetterman or Biden or maybe a psycho like Kati Hobbs.
    , @Adam Smith
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Chief of Polices. 🙂 ☮

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  27. @Anonymous
    You know what's absolutely wild? I've been a cop for twenty years. I'm nothing special and my job basically just feels like well-paid service work. I'm just a guy in polyester and a name tag. Never promoted, never will. I just drive a police car around and answer police calls. And I'm surrounded by guys and gals who do the same thing, almost all of whom also will never be more important than sergeants.

    Yet, I feel as though I'm the possessor of this incredible secret knowledge. Like I have the power to see an entire world that the rest of respectable society doesn't even know exists. A world that everyone, everyone, insists is The Most Important Question Of Our Time. It's not an exaggeration to say that I know more about this than 99% of society.

    And you know who cares? No one. No reporters come asking. No non-cops I know ask me. I'm not sure what percentage don't care, or don't want to know, or just never has occur to them that they don't actually know.

    It's not that I actually care anymore. I work in a very liberal city and one of my greatest job benefits is supping on their tears. I really get off on explaining to citizens who didn't ask just how utterly f'ed their city is (and, oh boy, it is). I don't have to lie in the least, I just give them both barrels of reality, wrapped in their own BS woke verbiage. But they don't dig any further. They don't actually want to know.

    As Steve has pointed out here somewhere, people do awesome breakdowns of sh$t they actually care about. Baseball, medieval sword fighting, dungeons and dragons, whatever. But how law enforcement actually works at the street level? Yawn.

    Sorry if this was largely off topic.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimDandy, @Dr. X, @The Wild Geese Howard, @BosTex, @Mike Tre, @Muggles, @CharleszMartel, @Nicholas Stix, @anonymous

    Thanks.

  28. Ukrainian short on Sky War.

  29. Anon[130] • Disclaimer says:

    Concrete things that could be done:

    1. Stop and frisk. Wouldn’t this be on a mayor/city council/police commission/police department level? Maybe the governor could promise to run interference. Main problem …

    2. Pressure Soros DAs and Soros-inspired DAs. I just cannot believe that there is nothing that other government officials could do about these clowns. Obviously prosecutors have some discretion in what they focus on, but why aren’t there court cases challenging prosecutors who decide to not only not focus on certain crimes, but to wholly refuse to prosecute 100 percent of the perps, and to publicly announce that to would-be perps. This is beyond the prosecutors discretionary power. They do not make the laws. Get some court cases going against them! Heck, could citizens get standing based on the effect of these policies on them? Even cases that get thrown out of court get publicity.

    3. Get rid of Soros prosecutors via recall or the electoral process. Politicians could lead here.

    4. Judges that get in the way of bulldozing homeless camps. Personalize it in a Saul Alinsky way: Name and shame a select number of judges. Aggressively ask them to publicly explain what they are doing. A politician could do a press conference on the sidewalk in front of judges’ houses. Copy the other side. Don’t bring a knife to a gunfight. Make life really uncomfortable for these guys. Politicians could do this.

    • Agree: BosTex, Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anon

    About your point (4), Anon #130, Americans don't realize how much power they have been given (allowed?) per the US and State Constitutions. Judges and all kinds of other officials can be impeached or recalled. It takes some organization, yes, Alinsky-like, I suppose, to do these things.

    That's one of the things that pissed me off about Pres. Trump's (non)leadership. Instead of tweeting back to celebrities and Joe Biden about "I could kick your ass", he could have had someone on the ball gather together names of the worst of the judges striking down policy and gotten tweets out to the millions of Americans in these location to get out and do something about these officials. Believe me, people WOULD have gotten out and done something, given some coherent direction. They still would.

    Replies: @JR Ewing

    , @BosTex
    @Anon

    Fight fire with fire. We have been too gentle.

    Take what the other side does and throw back much harder.

    I think DeSantis and Abbott were on the right track: bringing the border disaster direct to the decision makers and letting them feel what this looks like to American elsewhere.

    More is needed.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Anon


    3. Get rid of Soros prosecutors via recall or the electoral process.
     
    First get rid of the Soros secretaries of state! He bought those before he did the DAs, and they count the votes.
    , @slumber_j
    @Anon

    I'd say that whatever one thinks of the Terry decision, stop-and-frisk strikes me as contrary to the spirit of the constitutional prohibition on unreasonable search. If I were stopped and frisked, I'd be pretty pissed-off, I can tell you that, and I think I'd be right to feel that way.

    Busting people for low-level offenses and then reasonably searching them seems to me to be a much better way to go about it, for a number of reasons. Low-lifes who are packing heat are very likely to commit actual offenses like fare-beating etc., at which point you've got them dead to rights.

    Replies: @William Badwhite

  30. @Anonymous
    You know what's absolutely wild? I've been a cop for twenty years. I'm nothing special and my job basically just feels like well-paid service work. I'm just a guy in polyester and a name tag. Never promoted, never will. I just drive a police car around and answer police calls. And I'm surrounded by guys and gals who do the same thing, almost all of whom also will never be more important than sergeants.

    Yet, I feel as though I'm the possessor of this incredible secret knowledge. Like I have the power to see an entire world that the rest of respectable society doesn't even know exists. A world that everyone, everyone, insists is The Most Important Question Of Our Time. It's not an exaggeration to say that I know more about this than 99% of society.

    And you know who cares? No one. No reporters come asking. No non-cops I know ask me. I'm not sure what percentage don't care, or don't want to know, or just never has occur to them that they don't actually know.

    It's not that I actually care anymore. I work in a very liberal city and one of my greatest job benefits is supping on their tears. I really get off on explaining to citizens who didn't ask just how utterly f'ed their city is (and, oh boy, it is). I don't have to lie in the least, I just give them both barrels of reality, wrapped in their own BS woke verbiage. But they don't dig any further. They don't actually want to know.

    As Steve has pointed out here somewhere, people do awesome breakdowns of sh$t they actually care about. Baseball, medieval sword fighting, dungeons and dragons, whatever. But how law enforcement actually works at the street level? Yawn.

    Sorry if this was largely off topic.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimDandy, @Dr. X, @The Wild Geese Howard, @BosTex, @Mike Tre, @Muggles, @CharleszMartel, @Nicholas Stix, @anonymous

    One of the best comments I’ve read in a long time.

    • Replies: @Inverness
    @JimDandy

    Don't miss Rockaboatus and Blue Juice on this very website.

    Or are they the same guy? I haven't seen Officer Juice in a good while. I sure hope he didn't get in trouble for contributing here.

  31. @SaneClownPosse
    Conclusion: Both parties lie, cheat, and steal.

    There is no choice in a corrupt two party system.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Don’t worry, be happy! Look, it’s the feel good story of the year!

    Associated Press
    Ukrainians face nuclear threat with grit and dark humor

  32. @Polistra
    Also: only racist people discuss inflation.

    Inflation! What even is that?


    https://i.ibb.co/804Jtxt/Screenshot-20221104-183242-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @Curle, @Harry Baldwin, @al gore rhythms, @Prester John, @Spud Boy, @Muggles, @P.T., @Reg Cæsar, @CharleszMartel

    If by Americans she means her friends, I believe her.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Curle

    https://i.ibb.co/mXNt2NT/Nov-4-2022-11-25-32.jpg

    https://i.ibb.co/TRCLBNT/Screenshot-20221104-232830-NYPost-modified.jpg

    Replies: @Recently Based, @Sick n' Tired

  33. yes, Oklahoma has higher violent crime rates than California

    See? It’s those white supremacist/domestic terrorist MAGA semi-fascists! You know, the ones behind the 1921 Tulsa race riot!

    Not to mention the white pro-life criminals demonstrating against abortion:

    https://nypost.com/2022/09/29/wife-of-pro-life-activist-mark-houck-speaks-out-after-fbi-arrest/

    https://www.dailysignal.com/2022/10/07/fbi-arrests-father-of-11-in-front-of-his-children-for-pro-life-work/

    Your elected officials sure know how to crack down on those criminals, Yes siree Bob!

  34. @Anonymous
    You know what's absolutely wild? I've been a cop for twenty years. I'm nothing special and my job basically just feels like well-paid service work. I'm just a guy in polyester and a name tag. Never promoted, never will. I just drive a police car around and answer police calls. And I'm surrounded by guys and gals who do the same thing, almost all of whom also will never be more important than sergeants.

    Yet, I feel as though I'm the possessor of this incredible secret knowledge. Like I have the power to see an entire world that the rest of respectable society doesn't even know exists. A world that everyone, everyone, insists is The Most Important Question Of Our Time. It's not an exaggeration to say that I know more about this than 99% of society.

    And you know who cares? No one. No reporters come asking. No non-cops I know ask me. I'm not sure what percentage don't care, or don't want to know, or just never has occur to them that they don't actually know.

    It's not that I actually care anymore. I work in a very liberal city and one of my greatest job benefits is supping on their tears. I really get off on explaining to citizens who didn't ask just how utterly f'ed their city is (and, oh boy, it is). I don't have to lie in the least, I just give them both barrels of reality, wrapped in their own BS woke verbiage. But they don't dig any further. They don't actually want to know.

    As Steve has pointed out here somewhere, people do awesome breakdowns of sh$t they actually care about. Baseball, medieval sword fighting, dungeons and dragons, whatever. But how law enforcement actually works at the street level? Yawn.

    Sorry if this was largely off topic.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimDandy, @Dr. X, @The Wild Geese Howard, @BosTex, @Mike Tre, @Muggles, @CharleszMartel, @Nicholas Stix, @anonymous

    I feel as though I’m the possessor of this incredible secret knowledge.

    Secret knowledge of… what? How Negroes actually behave in real life as opposed to how they are portrayed in television commercials?

    • Agree: CharleszMartel
  35. @Anonymous
    You know what's absolutely wild? I've been a cop for twenty years. I'm nothing special and my job basically just feels like well-paid service work. I'm just a guy in polyester and a name tag. Never promoted, never will. I just drive a police car around and answer police calls. And I'm surrounded by guys and gals who do the same thing, almost all of whom also will never be more important than sergeants.

    Yet, I feel as though I'm the possessor of this incredible secret knowledge. Like I have the power to see an entire world that the rest of respectable society doesn't even know exists. A world that everyone, everyone, insists is The Most Important Question Of Our Time. It's not an exaggeration to say that I know more about this than 99% of society.

    And you know who cares? No one. No reporters come asking. No non-cops I know ask me. I'm not sure what percentage don't care, or don't want to know, or just never has occur to them that they don't actually know.

    It's not that I actually care anymore. I work in a very liberal city and one of my greatest job benefits is supping on their tears. I really get off on explaining to citizens who didn't ask just how utterly f'ed their city is (and, oh boy, it is). I don't have to lie in the least, I just give them both barrels of reality, wrapped in their own BS woke verbiage. But they don't dig any further. They don't actually want to know.

    As Steve has pointed out here somewhere, people do awesome breakdowns of sh$t they actually care about. Baseball, medieval sword fighting, dungeons and dragons, whatever. But how law enforcement actually works at the street level? Yawn.

    Sorry if this was largely off topic.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimDandy, @Dr. X, @The Wild Geese Howard, @BosTex, @Mike Tre, @Muggles, @CharleszMartel, @Nicholas Stix, @anonymous

    So how many taxpayer dollars do you steal per year?

    100k?

    200k?

    300k?

    More?

    Enquiring taxpayer minds want to know.

  36. Black crime and black savagery, tacitly encouraged by black DA’s & black Magic Negro Mayor, is just a distraction from something so huge that it dwarfs the field of vision of anyone but Health Care Fraud investigators. Black savagery can be stopped by ANY armed Noo Yawker. And this Noo Yawker will not even be arrested if he bothers to watch all five “Death Wish” movies and learns something useful.

    The biggest crime in NYC is health care fraud. LA & Miami come in distant 2nd & 3rd.
    We are watching this scam since early 70’s, courtesy of LBJ’s Great Society Act. It did 1000x times more for Kosher Nostra than Volstead Act did to Italian Cosa Nostra.

    Meet the Health Care Fraud Pioneer – Rabbi Bernard Bergman aka “Medicare Rabbi”:

    https://nymag.com/news/features/scandals/bernard-bergman-2012-4/

    Rabbi Bernie was sentenced to 1 year, spent in prison only 4 months.It was 1976.

    Fast forward 35 years. Another Rabbi – David Cohen.Felt the heat around the corner and stepped down as CEO of Hatzalah Ambulance:

    https://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/chevra-hatzalah-ceo-quits-article-1.1472237

    He and his pal Raffenspenger ( CEO of MetLife – nursing homes network) defrauded Medicare of $100M. Later Rabbi Cohen was sentenced to 1 year ( did 3 months) and Raffenspenger got 10 year sentence (did only 9 months).

    Don’t expect more cases like this because now they have FBI on the take:

    FBI destroys evidence linked to Medicare fraud among Orthodox Jewish community in New York

    https://m.jpost.com/diaspora/fbi-destroys-evidence-linked-to-medicare-fraud-among-orthodox-jewish-community-in-new-york-419757

    Kosher Nostra won hands down. And health care costs in the US skyrocketed last year by 23%.Oy vavoy ! Oy vey ist mir ! $800 per month individual Silver Health Care plan with $15,000 deductible, anyone ?

  37. @Thomas
    All indicators are that the Democrats are in for a very bad Tuesday night absent a bonanza of election "fortification" to rival 2020. That reality has finally started to hit them, and so you see this sort of ineffectual flailing at the inevitable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @JR Ewing, @Old Prude

    a bonanza of election “fortification”

    This is my main worry and why I can’t get excited about the midterms just yet, especially the statewide senate races.

    A friend of mine who conceits to be a “moderate” commented today in a group email that “election denying nonsense must be stamped out.”

    He and others like him seem to have no clue how much the 2020 shenanigans wrecked people’s faith in our system. The final election results might have been entirely 100% accurate, but the way they went about it – mail in voting, massive counting shifts in the middle of the night, kicking out observers and covering the windows, and all the other irregularities – was corrosive and entirely undermined the idea of a “fair” election.

    • Agree: Renard
    • Troll: Corvinus
    • Replies: @Gandydancer
    @JR Ewing


    The final election results might have been entirely 100% accurate...
     
    You mean "might have been" in the multiverse sense?

    Because in this world I saw video of a van load of "ballots" trucked into Cobo hall after midnight and who knows how many times they were counted, all the anyway-rendered-ineffective "observers" having been sent home. And, voila, Trump's lead in Michigan disappeared.

    I didn't pay that mich attention, Trump being so ineffective as to render any advocacy of his complaints ineffective, but I saw what I saw and don't tell me I didn't.
  38. @Anonymous
    You know what's absolutely wild? I've been a cop for twenty years. I'm nothing special and my job basically just feels like well-paid service work. I'm just a guy in polyester and a name tag. Never promoted, never will. I just drive a police car around and answer police calls. And I'm surrounded by guys and gals who do the same thing, almost all of whom also will never be more important than sergeants.

    Yet, I feel as though I'm the possessor of this incredible secret knowledge. Like I have the power to see an entire world that the rest of respectable society doesn't even know exists. A world that everyone, everyone, insists is The Most Important Question Of Our Time. It's not an exaggeration to say that I know more about this than 99% of society.

    And you know who cares? No one. No reporters come asking. No non-cops I know ask me. I'm not sure what percentage don't care, or don't want to know, or just never has occur to them that they don't actually know.

    It's not that I actually care anymore. I work in a very liberal city and one of my greatest job benefits is supping on their tears. I really get off on explaining to citizens who didn't ask just how utterly f'ed their city is (and, oh boy, it is). I don't have to lie in the least, I just give them both barrels of reality, wrapped in their own BS woke verbiage. But they don't dig any further. They don't actually want to know.

    As Steve has pointed out here somewhere, people do awesome breakdowns of sh$t they actually care about. Baseball, medieval sword fighting, dungeons and dragons, whatever. But how law enforcement actually works at the street level? Yawn.

    Sorry if this was largely off topic.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimDandy, @Dr. X, @The Wild Geese Howard, @BosTex, @Mike Tre, @Muggles, @CharleszMartel, @Nicholas Stix, @anonymous

    Thanks for doing what has come to be an utterly thankless task.

    Can you add more detail, typical day to day BS?

    • Agree: AKAHorace
  39. Check out that big spike on 9/11. So Mohammed Atta and his chums are white now?

    Or is that due to Dick Cheney?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Anon

    It's victims, not perps, so it's 9/11 victims.

  40. @Curle
    @Polistra

    If by Americans she means her friends, I believe her.

    Replies: @Polistra

    • Replies: @Recently Based
    @Polistra

    Thanks. I googled this, and what Michelle Singletary said in the discussion was priceless:


    “You know, I’m just gonna say this, and if I get banged for it, I don’t care,” Singletary said. “There is a great deal of Americans where it is uncomfortable that they are spending more, but they’re not gonna go under. You know, you’ve got to stop complaining when there’s so many people who literally the inflation rate means they may only have two meals instead of three.”
     
    1. Lady, learn verb-tense agreement before you go on national television providing advice.

    2. WTF?

    3. Here she is the same week telling people to buy I-Bonds to protect against inflation: https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2022/06/22/step-by-step-guide-to-buy-i-bonds/
    , @Sick n' Tired
    @Polistra

    Take 1/2 of her 401k and see how quickly she changes her tune or writes a story about how inflation is hurting POC and negatively affecting da community.

  41. @Wilkey
    @Abe

    Basically it's like this, you see: The government is almighty, omnipresent, and omniscient. It has the power to lower the seas, stop a highly contagious, microscopic virus in its tracks, provide excellent education to 60 million children, provide quality healthcare to 330 million Americans (and illegal immigrants), create perfect equality between men and women and blacks and whites, and invent magical sources of energy that don't rely on fossil fuels.

    But it can't reduce crime by incarcerating known violent offenders, or control illegal invaders coming across a border which is only - yes, only - 2,050 miles long (an utterly minute fraction of the total area of the United States).

    The government has the amazing power to do absolutely anything under the sun when liberals want it to, but it's a limp wristed, 87 pound high school freshman when it's something liberals don't want it to do. It's amazing how that works.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Polistra

    The government has the amazing power to do absolutely anything under the sun when liberals want it to, but it’s a limp wristed, 87 pound high school freshman when it’s something liberals don’t want it to do. It’s amazing how that works.

    And by the same token, Republicans who think that the US Government is too stupid and ham-handed to manage American society and tell Americans how to live their lives, thought that it was eminantly capable of managing foreign societies in places like Afghanistan and Iraq and telling Afghanis and Iraqis how to live their lives.

    • Replies: @Mark G.
    @Mr. Anon


    And by the same token, Republicans who think that the US Government is too stupid and ham-handed to manage American society and tell Americans how to live their lives, thought that it was eminently capable of managing foreign societies in places like Afghanistan and Iraq and telling Afghanis and Iraqis how to live their lives.
     
    I've worked for the civilian part of the military for forty years. Conservatives often seem oblivious that the military is just another corrupt, incompetent government bureaucracy. People were surprised by the failure in Afghanistan and the bungled withdrawal, but I wasn't surprised. I just thought "so typical".

    It's always been like this. Commonly used military acronyms like FUBAR (fouled up beyond all repair) and SNAFU (situation normal all fouled up) have been around since World War II. We won that war because the German military leaders were even more incompetent than ours and our free enterprise system generated more wealth to pay for a larger and better equipped military.

    When we had the draft and more Americans had served in the military, making fun of military incompetence was commonly seen in novels, films and tv shows like F Troop, McHale's Navy, Hogan's Heroes and M*A*S*H. Now that we have a volunteer military many Americans have no idea what the military is like. When I tell people in the comment section here at unz.com stories about military incompetence they don't even believe me, say I'm a liar and have never worked for the military. I just laugh at that.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Peter Akuleyev, @Mr. Anon, @Mike Tre, @Zero Philosopher

    , @Gamecock
    @Mr. Anon

    It's impossible to get colonialism out of the Western psyche.

    Replies: @Wilkey

  42. @Meretricious
    "Fighting crime" is the wrong way to conceptualize the Negro problem. The correct way is to focus on how society can efficiently control/punish sui generis, dysfunctional Negro behavior. Blacks, unlike nonblacks, are not afraid of prison, so society has to seriously start considering deportation and/or hard labor, as these are the only 2 things blacks fear (beyond capital punishment).

    Replies: @Rat City, @BosTex, @Godfree Roberts

    Snakes!

    • Replies: @Inverness
    @Rat City

    Ghosts! And Dogs! And Certified Mail!

    Imagine if "The Wiz" (black version of the Wizard of Oz) had them singing that instead of "Lions and Tigers and Bears!"

  43. If anyone took this twaddle seriously, then the logical answer to politicians being completely unable to try to guarantee the general public order would be revolution.
    “Oh come on, how is anyone (almost thirty years after Giuliani made Times Square safe) supposed to be able to somehow deal with crime?”
    [BANG!]
    But at the same time, the morons who can’t figure out how not attacking and hamstringing your own police works, will protect you from Vladimir Putin.

  44. @Frank G
    And how much did your public COVID Mania contribute to the climate, Steve? Will there ever be an iSteve COVID Reckoning?

    Replies: @Polistra, @J.Ross, @Recently Based, @Jack D, @BB753

    Did you actually just blame Steve for America’s crime problem

    • Replies: @Gandydancer
    @Polistra

    No, he's blaming Steve and his ilk for contributing to the enablement of the COVID hoax and all the diminishment of our liberties and economy derived therefrom..

    I would have thought that that was obvious. What's the matter with you?

  45. @Wilkey
    @Abe

    Basically it's like this, you see: The government is almighty, omnipresent, and omniscient. It has the power to lower the seas, stop a highly contagious, microscopic virus in its tracks, provide excellent education to 60 million children, provide quality healthcare to 330 million Americans (and illegal immigrants), create perfect equality between men and women and blacks and whites, and invent magical sources of energy that don't rely on fossil fuels.

    But it can't reduce crime by incarcerating known violent offenders, or control illegal invaders coming across a border which is only - yes, only - 2,050 miles long (an utterly minute fraction of the total area of the United States).

    The government has the amazing power to do absolutely anything under the sun when liberals want it to, but it's a limp wristed, 87 pound high school freshman when it's something liberals don't want it to do. It's amazing how that works.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Polistra

    • Thanks: That Would Be Telling
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Polistra

    Thanks.

    A reader from New Mexico suggests the high Hispanic homicide numbers in Albuquerque have to do with spillover from the cartel in Chihuahua. The cartels evidently have some kind of arrangement to keep their killings on the Mexican sides of the borders with Texas and California, but not the New Mexico border, so it sounds kind of like "No Country for Old Men."

  46. @Polistra
    @Wilkey

    https://vividmaps.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/homicide-border.png

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Thanks.

    A reader from New Mexico suggests the high Hispanic homicide numbers in Albuquerque have to do with spillover from the cartel in Chihuahua. The cartels evidently have some kind of arrangement to keep their killings on the Mexican sides of the borders with Texas and California, but not the New Mexico border, so it sounds kind of like “No Country for Old Men.”

  47. Your governor isn’t going to solve a spike in murder, he added. And it’s generally not the governor who’s been failing to solve it, either.

    New York’s governor is currently Kathy “Why is crime such a big deal to you?” Hochul. She has the power to get rid of Manhattan’s Soros-funded, criminal-loving DA Alvin Bragg. She also has the power to suspend NY’s no-cash bail policy. Those two things would reduce crime in her state yet she refuses to do either.

    We have a friend, a 60-ish Jewish woman, who lives in New York City. A few days ago she was sitting on a bench in Union Square park when a homeless lunatic threw a rock and hit her squarely in the forehead. She went to the hospital. The injury was not serious, but it has made her terrified of walking the streets of her city. Will she help to vote out Hochul? Can she tie cause and effect? She’s a dyed-in-the-wool liberal, so I’m not sure, but maybe.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Harry Baldwin


    Can she tie cause and effect? She’s a dyed-in-the-wool liberal, so I’m not sure, but maybe.
     
    Ed Koch used to tell a story about a liberal NYC judge who was mugged and his mugging made the newspapers. It just so happened that he was in the midst of a criminal trial of anotha brotha. When the trial resumed, the judge announced from the bench that the fact that he had been a victim of a crime would in no way influence his rulings in the subject case. A little old lady in the back of the courtroom shouted out , "Then mug him again!"

    If your friend doesn't "get it" yet, she will after the 2nd time she is assaulted.
  48. @Mr. Anon
    Check out that big spike on 9/11. So Mohammed Atta and his chums are white now?

    Or is that due to Dick Cheney?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    It’s victims, not perps, so it’s 9/11 victims.

  49. @Polistra
    Also: only racist people discuss inflation.

    Inflation! What even is that?


    https://i.ibb.co/804Jtxt/Screenshot-20221104-183242-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @Curle, @Harry Baldwin, @al gore rhythms, @Prester John, @Spud Boy, @Muggles, @P.T., @Reg Cæsar, @CharleszMartel

    There are some people so stupid/corrupt/hypocritical that it’s not worth getting outraged over the things they say–I’d put Joy Reid, Rob Reiner, and Hillary Clinton at the top of the list. As they say, “What do you expect from a pig but a grunt?”

    • Thanks: Old Prude, tyrone
  50. @Meretricious
    "Fighting crime" is the wrong way to conceptualize the Negro problem. The correct way is to focus on how society can efficiently control/punish sui generis, dysfunctional Negro behavior. Blacks, unlike nonblacks, are not afraid of prison, so society has to seriously start considering deportation and/or hard labor, as these are the only 2 things blacks fear (beyond capital punishment).

    Replies: @Rat City, @BosTex, @Godfree Roberts

    Blacks also fear swimming lessons.

    Compulsory swimming lessons as start point of punishment for blacks.

  51. @Buzz Mohawk

    Voting Republican on Tuesday probably won’t have too much impact on law enforcement policy, but it will send a message of rebuke to the permanent establishment.
     
    Exactly!

    Too often, analyses of the sort written into the NYT ignore the secondary and tertiary effects of an action.

    My wife and I plan to vote R on every line. We've studied every candidate, local, state and national, and it makes sense for us to do this --

    -- even though we both know, as I say, that they are all "scoundrels," in the words of one great scent of The Unbearable Lightness of Being. All politicians and aparatchiks are scoundrels, but we can send a message by voting for the other scoundrels.

    My mother, a Southern Democrat, used to joke that my father, a died-in-the-wool, California Republican, would vote for Mickey Mouse if Mikey Mouse was the Republican candidate. Well, I plan to vote for Micky Mouse, as my father would have.

    Replies: @Inverness, @Old Prude

    My mother, a Southern Democrat, used to joke that my father, a died-in-the-wool, California Republican, would vote for Mickey Mouse if Mikey Mouse was the Republican candidate. Well, I plan to vote for Micky Mouse, as my father would have.

    If he’s a write-in candidate you may be in some trouble.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Inverness

    LOL. Congratulations. You win the Pedant of the Day award.

  52. @Mr. Anon
    @Wilkey


    The government has the amazing power to do absolutely anything under the sun when liberals want it to, but it’s a limp wristed, 87 pound high school freshman when it’s something liberals don’t want it to do. It’s amazing how that works.
     
    And by the same token, Republicans who think that the US Government is too stupid and ham-handed to manage American society and tell Americans how to live their lives, thought that it was eminantly capable of managing foreign societies in places like Afghanistan and Iraq and telling Afghanis and Iraqis how to live their lives.

    Replies: @Mark G., @Gamecock

    And by the same token, Republicans who think that the US Government is too stupid and ham-handed to manage American society and tell Americans how to live their lives, thought that it was eminently capable of managing foreign societies in places like Afghanistan and Iraq and telling Afghanis and Iraqis how to live their lives.

    I’ve worked for the civilian part of the military for forty years. Conservatives often seem oblivious that the military is just another corrupt, incompetent government bureaucracy. People were surprised by the failure in Afghanistan and the bungled withdrawal, but I wasn’t surprised. I just thought “so typical”.

    It’s always been like this. Commonly used military acronyms like FUBAR (fouled up beyond all repair) and SNAFU (situation normal all fouled up) have been around since World War II. We won that war because the German military leaders were even more incompetent than ours and our free enterprise system generated more wealth to pay for a larger and better equipped military.

    When we had the draft and more Americans had served in the military, making fun of military incompetence was commonly seen in novels, films and tv shows like F Troop, McHale’s Navy, Hogan’s Heroes and M*A*S*H. Now that we have a volunteer military many Americans have no idea what the military is like. When I tell people in the comment section here at unz.com stories about military incompetence they don’t even believe me, say I’m a liar and have never worked for the military. I just laugh at that.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Thanks: J.Ross, Mr. Anon
    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @Mark G.

    When I was in the Army everyone would say "This crap would never pass muster in private sector". We knew the military was screwed up. I alway figured we would do OK because the commies were probably more screwed up than we were.

    I've been working in private industry for thirty years now. It is only marginally less screwed up than the military. Human affairs are messy.

    , @Peter Akuleyev
    @Mark G.

    This is why Russian military incompetence is both not surprising and perhaps not as great a sign of weakness as people like to believe. Even the vaunted Wehrmacht was corrupt and often surprisingly incompetent. Militaries generally are. Tolstoy was telling us this 150 years ago.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Mark G.


    When we had the draft and more Americans had served in the military, making fun of military incompetence was commonly seen in novels, films and tv shows like F Troop, McHale’s Navy, Hogan’s Heroes and M*A*S*H. Now that we have a volunteer military many Americans have no idea what the military is like.
     
    Good Point.

    Steve has often claimed that the younger generations, the Millennials and the Gen-Z's are much more authoritarian in outlook than their elders. Although, to be fair, the Boomers seem to have gotten a lot more authoritarian as they have aged.

    I remember when it used to be pretty common to question the motives and abilities of the authorities - the military, the CIA, the FBI, the courts - and it was reflected in popular culture, at least in books and movies (not so much on TV). Remember the laughably gung-ho and reckless FBI agents in Die Hard - agents Johnson and Johnson ("No, the other one")?

    Now, as far as I can tell, portrayals of the FBI and CIA are almost all hagiographic. If there is a bad government official, it's just a lone-wolf bad-apple, and in no way reflective of the whole organization. Of course, that may have something to do with the fact that the military, FBI, and CIA all offer technical advice and assistance to Hollywood productions, in exchange for some editorial control of course.

    , @Mike Tre
    @Mark G.

    " We won that war because the German military leaders were even more incompetent than ours"

    That's not why we won that war.

    , @Zero Philosopher
    @Mark G.

    "We won that war because the German military leaders were even more incompetent than ours and our free enterprise system generated more wealth to pay for a larger and better equipped military"

    This is a very ignorant comment. German military officers were definitely not more incompetent than American ones. Quite the contrary. The second part of your comment is more correct, but still partially wrong, and certainly wrong in it's conclusions. It's true that American industrila production was larger, which allowed the American Military to have a greater total number of planes, ships and tanks compared to the Germans. But of superior "quality"? Hell no. German tanks and planes were superior to American ones one-on-one.

    And the reason why your concluson is wrong is because America didn't win WW2: the Russians did. When "D Day" happened, Germany was already defeated. If D Day never happened, the Reich would have fallen anyway. America, at best, hestened the defeat of Germany by 6 months.

    Replies: @BosTex

  53. @Rat City
    @Meretricious

    Snakes!

    Replies: @Inverness

    Ghosts! And Dogs! And Certified Mail!

    Imagine if “The Wiz” (black version of the Wizard of Oz) had them singing that instead of “Lions and Tigers and Bears!”

  54. The guy running to be California Attorney General claimed on Hugh Hewitt’s radio program that, while he cannot just fire George Gascogne on day one, he does have the power to effectively fire local DAs (including Gascogne), because he can send his own State AG lawyers into lower level offices and take over any case he wants. So he’s promising to be in LA on day one neutering Gascogne with his own subordinate lawyers. That would seem to be the strongest reply to Emily Badger so far. Yes, we can solve this, we did it before several times.

    • Agree: Gandydancer
  55. @JimDandy
    @Anonymous

    One of the best comments I've read in a long time.

    Replies: @Inverness

    Don’t miss Rockaboatus and Blue Juice on this very website.

    Or are they the same guy? I haven’t seen Officer Juice in a good while. I sure hope he didn’t get in trouble for contributing here.

    • Thanks: JimDandy
  56. @Frank G
    And how much did your public COVID Mania contribute to the climate, Steve? Will there ever be an iSteve COVID Reckoning?

    Replies: @Polistra, @J.Ross, @Recently Based, @Jack D, @BB753

    Actually, while he still thinks that lab coats are magic and government promises mean that drugs don’t have to be tested, Steve has been very clear and consistent about the medically unjustifiable, itself-criminal lockdown having all kinds of predictable side effects, like impelling blacks to drive their cars at the speed of science.

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @J.Ross

    Uh no he hasn't. Steve has categorically refused to address massive psychological damage done by the lockdowns to normal Americans, including school children, those lower class whites more prone to being manipulated into getting themselves addicted to prescription drugs, suicide rates, unemployment, masks mandates, turning fast food cashiers into enforcers of state mask policy. Steve celebrated the opening of golf courses so old white men could entertain themselves while parks and schools remained closed.

    The fact that low IQ negroes ended up killing themselves in greater numbers during the lockdowns was less to do with the lockdowns than the complete retreat of urban law enforcement in the wake of the Floyd suicide. I don't personally don't remember Sailer saying one critical thing of any of the ludicrous kovid policies, and certainly not in the midst of them during 2020.

    anyone is certainly welcome to dig up his comments where he does so.

    , @Corvinus
    @J.Ross

    “Steve has been very clear and consistent about the medically unjustifiable, itself-criminal lockdown having all kinds of predictable side effects”

    You mean the medically justifiable, in the interest of the general welfare shutdowns.

    , @Alden
    @J.Ross

    Are you brand new to UNZ? Steve has preached covid hoax exponential increase in covid infections and we’re all gonna die since February 2020. Endless clip and pastes from lying CDC, big pharma bullied and intimidated Drs and bullying buttinsky busybodies.

    One thing I really really hope Steve doesn’t do. Clip and paste the endless articles claiming that low test scores of black and Hispanic kids are caused by the unnecessary hysterical school lockdowns. Maybe it wasn’t such a good idea after all? These articles are by the same teachers and education non experts who insisted on closing the schools for two and a half years.

    I’m sure we’ll be seeing these articles for the next 15 years. Until the last of the 3 year olds who missed nursery school turn 18.

  57. The Times thinks high officials can’t affect crime because the Times thinks crime-fighting is about organizing midnight basketball or painting peace murals.

    It doesn’t cross their mind that the governor of Minnesota could have pardoned Derek Chauvin, and in so doing greatly improved policemen’s motivation to stay on the job and do their job.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @International Jew


    It doesn’t cross their mind that the governor of Minnesota could have pardoned Derek Chauvin, and in so doing greatly improved policemen’s motivation to stay on the job and do their job.
     
    Afraid not, the Feds couldn't help but pile on and continue their Civil Rights era violation of the prohibition of double jeopardy (although they found another claimed victim from 2017, fourteen years old then). So one way or another he was going to prison and the police nationwide would be encouraged to not do all the things our host is reporting statistically.
  58. As they say, politics is downstream from culture.

    People who live in low-crime communities don’t refrain from crime because they fear the police; they don’t do crime because they were raised right, and they know crime is wrong. I don’t rob banks; it’s not because I fear the governor’s new anti-bank-robber policy, but because I have no desire to rob a bank. If however your home culture is insane, then insanity and chaos is what you’ll get, no matter the law or the policy or who is the governor. Play insane games, win insane prizes.

    You’re not going to solve black crime by locking up more blacks, because there’s always more crooks where the crooks came from. Either get their culture to see the futility and wrongness of it (good luck), or else give them their own isolated communities, far far away from everyone else, where they can do whatever they like without bothering normal people. The problem with ghettos and housing projects is the existence of buses and subways and highways that can ferry the crooks to where the targets are. They need to be sent to places where the only reachable target is themselves.

    • Replies: @Curle
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “ You’re not going to solve black crime by locking up more blacks, because there’s always more crooks where the crooks came from.”

    No. Giving frequent offenders long sentences absolutely reduces crime rates.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    , @Meretricious
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    couldn't agree with you more

    , @Gandydancer
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    You’re not going to solve black crime by locking up more blacks, because there’s always more crooks where the crooks came from.
     
    It's pointless to tamp down black crime because you can't "solve" it? Strawman argument. No black criminal actually in jail is going to mug anyone on the outside. And it's not like there's a limited number of mugger slots so that future muggers have to wait until a slot opens up. Why is your brain broken in this way?

    Replies: @Renard

    , @Recently Based
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    If that's true, then how do you explain NYC driving the number of annual murders by almost 90% between 1990 and 2015?

    It's not magic, just serious policing, criminal prosecution, schools and welfare policies.

  59. @Polistra
    Also: only racist people discuss inflation.

    Inflation! What even is that?


    https://i.ibb.co/804Jtxt/Screenshot-20221104-183242-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @Curle, @Harry Baldwin, @al gore rhythms, @Prester John, @Spud Boy, @Muggles, @P.T., @Reg Cæsar, @CharleszMartel

    “Got a bum education, double-digit inflation
    Can’t take the train to the job, there’s a strike at the station”

    Someone needs to tell Joy Reid about Grandmaster Flash.

    • Thanks: Ian Smith
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @al gore rhythms

    It's tough getting someone to understand something when their salary depends on them NOT understanding it.

    Guess what, if Trump was still the President and the governor of NY and the mayor of NYC were Republican, and Congress was controlled by Republicans, the NYTimes and Joy Reid and everyone in the Democrat/Media establishment would be wailing about crime and inflation and blaming it on them.

    But since the above are all under Democrat control, nothing to see here folks, move along. Inflation - I don't even know what that word means. Crime - there's nothing the government can do to reduce crime. All we can do is let people out without bail and shorten their sentences and have the police stop pulling people over for warrant checks, but that has nothing to do with crime.

    PA Senate Candidate John Fetterman (and this was BEFORE his stroke):


    We could reduce our prison population by 1/3 and not make anyone less safe.”

    👉 2/3 of those condemned to die in PA’s prison are African American.

    We have the power to rectify this now + we absolutely must.

     

    May 30, 2020 - note the date.

    https://twitter.com/johnfetterman/status/1266733985608151042?lang=en

    The boldface is mine but Fetterman put in the Caucasian finger pointing emoji himself.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon

    , @Gandydancer
    @al gore rhythms

    It's not hard to believe that Joy Reid is more illiterate than Grandmaster Flash was in 1982.

  60. Crime surges and falls for reasons that experts don’t fully understand..

    Yes, of course, the obligatory (usually) anonymous “experts”, and when they don’t understand, then, you, stupid reader — don’t even try!

    • Replies: @Gamecock
    @Stephen Paul Foster

    One would think some understanding would be required to become an 'expert.'

  61. Ironically, the triumph of Black Lives Matter got thousands of incremental blacks killed, in large measure due to the craze among the influential for demanding the “depolicing” blacks.

    It doesn’t matter. For blacks, ferality means much more than fulfilled human life according to any civilized society’s standards.

    • Replies: @tyrone
    @Bardon Kaldian


    For blacks, ferality means much more than fulfilled human life according to any civilized society’s standards.

     

    ......wow ,for a second there I read "fertility" rather than "ferality"....I suppose either could work.
  62. @Buzz Mohawk

    Voting Republican on Tuesday probably won’t have too much impact on law enforcement policy, but it will send a message of rebuke to the permanent establishment.
     
    Exactly!

    Too often, analyses of the sort written into the NYT ignore the secondary and tertiary effects of an action.

    My wife and I plan to vote R on every line. We've studied every candidate, local, state and national, and it makes sense for us to do this --

    -- even though we both know, as I say, that they are all "scoundrels," in the words of one great scent of The Unbearable Lightness of Being. All politicians and aparatchiks are scoundrels, but we can send a message by voting for the other scoundrels.

    My mother, a Southern Democrat, used to joke that my father, a died-in-the-wool, California Republican, would vote for Mickey Mouse if Mikey Mouse was the Republican candidate. Well, I plan to vote for Micky Mouse, as my father would have.

    Replies: @Inverness, @Old Prude

    Micky Mouse? I would vote for the Devil before voting for a Democrat. But since the Devil is a Democrat and the Democrat Party is an arm of Satan, I don’t have to worry about it. But, the Republicans are worthless worms, so I don’t expect anything from them. Worms. Worthless.

    • Agree: Gandydancer
  63. @Thomas
    All indicators are that the Democrats are in for a very bad Tuesday night absent a bonanza of election "fortification" to rival 2020. That reality has finally started to hit them, and so you see this sort of ineffectual flailing at the inevitable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @JR Ewing, @Old Prude

    I turned on the TV for the first time this week to get the weather forecast. Two political ads by Democrats, both featuring big blurbs about “I opposed Biden”, and smaller ones “I was for drilling for oil”. Running scared? Yeah.

    I hope there is a massive loss and these bums have to pack up their shit and leave town.

    • Agree: Curle
  64. @Mark G.
    @Mr. Anon


    And by the same token, Republicans who think that the US Government is too stupid and ham-handed to manage American society and tell Americans how to live their lives, thought that it was eminently capable of managing foreign societies in places like Afghanistan and Iraq and telling Afghanis and Iraqis how to live their lives.
     
    I've worked for the civilian part of the military for forty years. Conservatives often seem oblivious that the military is just another corrupt, incompetent government bureaucracy. People were surprised by the failure in Afghanistan and the bungled withdrawal, but I wasn't surprised. I just thought "so typical".

    It's always been like this. Commonly used military acronyms like FUBAR (fouled up beyond all repair) and SNAFU (situation normal all fouled up) have been around since World War II. We won that war because the German military leaders were even more incompetent than ours and our free enterprise system generated more wealth to pay for a larger and better equipped military.

    When we had the draft and more Americans had served in the military, making fun of military incompetence was commonly seen in novels, films and tv shows like F Troop, McHale's Navy, Hogan's Heroes and M*A*S*H. Now that we have a volunteer military many Americans have no idea what the military is like. When I tell people in the comment section here at unz.com stories about military incompetence they don't even believe me, say I'm a liar and have never worked for the military. I just laugh at that.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Peter Akuleyev, @Mr. Anon, @Mike Tre, @Zero Philosopher

    When I was in the Army everyone would say “This crap would never pass muster in private sector”. We knew the military was screwed up. I alway figured we would do OK because the commies were probably more screwed up than we were.

    I’ve been working in private industry for thirty years now. It is only marginally less screwed up than the military. Human affairs are messy.

  65. @Anon
    Concrete things that could be done:

    1. Stop and frisk. Wouldn't this be on a mayor/city council/police commission/police department level? Maybe the governor could promise to run interference. Main problem ...

    2. Pressure Soros DAs and Soros-inspired DAs. I just cannot believe that there is nothing that other government officials could do about these clowns. Obviously prosecutors have some discretion in what they focus on, but why aren't there court cases challenging prosecutors who decide to not only not focus on certain crimes, but to wholly refuse to prosecute 100 percent of the perps, and to publicly announce that to would-be perps. This is beyond the prosecutors discretionary power. They do not make the laws. Get some court cases going against them! Heck, could citizens get standing based on the effect of these policies on them? Even cases that get thrown out of court get publicity.

    3. Get rid of Soros prosecutors via recall or the electoral process. Politicians could lead here.

    4. Judges that get in the way of bulldozing homeless camps. Personalize it in a Saul Alinsky way: Name and shame a select number of judges. Aggressively ask them to publicly explain what they are doing. A politician could do a press conference on the sidewalk in front of judges' houses. Copy the other side. Don't bring a knife to a gunfight. Make life really uncomfortable for these guys. Politicians could do this.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @BosTex, @Reg Cæsar, @slumber_j

    About your point (4), Anon #130, Americans don’t realize how much power they have been given (allowed?) per the US and State Constitutions. Judges and all kinds of other officials can be impeached or recalled. It takes some organization, yes, Alinsky-like, I suppose, to do these things.

    That’s one of the things that pissed me off about Pres. Trump’s (non)leadership. Instead of tweeting back to celebrities and Joe Biden about “I could kick your ass”, he could have had someone on the ball gather together names of the worst of the judges striking down policy and gotten tweets out to the millions of Americans in these location to get out and do something about these officials. Believe me, people WOULD have gotten out and done something, given some coherent direction. They still would.

    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Yes, quite often I feel like the bigger problem isn’t bad politicians and policies, it’s apathetic citizens who put up with all the crap. Those in charge know this and they know they can get away with a lot because most people just don’t care and won’t ever do anything in response, anyway.

    We get the politicians (and judges) we deserve.

  66. There needs to be a reckoning over the catastrophic Racial Reckoning.

    ….THANKYOU!!!………now let’s hope they can’t steal the mid terms.

  67. @Bardon Kaldian

    Ironically, the triumph of Black Lives Matter got thousands of incremental blacks killed, in large measure due to the craze among the influential for demanding the “depolicing” blacks.
     
    It doesn't matter. For blacks, ferality means much more than fulfilled human life according to any civilized society's standards.

    Replies: @tyrone

    For blacks, ferality means much more than fulfilled human life according to any civilized society’s standards.

    ……wow ,for a second there I read “fertility” rather than “ferality”….I suppose either could work.

  68. @Achmed E. Newman
    Well, it's not that I really think all the Conservative voting in the world is going to solve America's problems, but that's not in the same way as the NY Times means. We have already been duly screwed by both the invasion and by the loss of sound money. There's no getting up from these holes (though ceasing the digging would be nice).

    Steve Sailer here is rightfully proud of his work in analyzing the effect of the racial reckoning. However, what I see more of here from the toilet paper of record is that that they are not shy about lying hypocritically about anything anymore. I mean, come on - Mayors appoint Chief of Polices, Governors appoint lots of officials, State legislators vote on the issues in question, and do we not vote for all these people? Of course, voting for these people affects crime policy. What the hell, man?

    How can one read something like this and not see the Lyin' Press as nothing but an arm of the Potomac Regime government at this point? We need out!

    Yes, I'm still going to vote, and we're going to get down to the GOP office tomorrow and help out a bit. Think of it as therapy.

    Replies: @tyrone, @Adam Smith

    they are not shy about lying hypocritically about anything anymore.

    …….they think we are on the same mental level as Fetterman or Biden or maybe a psycho like Kati Hobbs.

  69. @Polistra
    Also: only racist people discuss inflation.

    Inflation! What even is that?


    https://i.ibb.co/804Jtxt/Screenshot-20221104-183242-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @Curle, @Harry Baldwin, @al gore rhythms, @Prester John, @Spud Boy, @Muggles, @P.T., @Reg Cæsar, @CharleszMartel

    Who is “Joy Reid” and who cares what she has to say about anything?

    • Agree: fish
    • Replies: @Recently Based
    @Prester John

    Someone who gets to be on TV, influencing millions (well, it's CNBC, so thousands) of people.

    I don't watch much TV at all, and certainly not cable news, and like most people who know how to read, find most American entertainment culture to be pretty childish, but I do think that the strain of thought that says "who cares what these people say" to be a lot of cope. When people who are deeply opposed to everything that you believe have effective control of what your children see and hear on TV, TikTok, streaming services, in their classrooms from pre-K to graduate school, on Spotify and at school functions, it should matter to you because it's going to have a huge effect on how they think, and ultimately live.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  70. I guess it’s up to the Paul Kerseys of this world to solve that?

  71. @Bragadocious
    If politicians can't impact policing and justice, why did Kamala Harris personally weigh in on murderers being held without bail in Minnesota? Why did the Minnesota Freedom Fund thank her for her support after some of them were released? Or maybe the Times meant politicians can't really stop crime, but they can pull the levers to make sure more crimes are committed.

    Harris's infamous tweet is still up btw, still getting comments, and the left is seething about it.

    Replies: @MM

    That is a good point – many times the politician cannot solve the problem, but they do have the power to make it worse through bad policy..

  72. @Polistra
    Also: only racist people discuss inflation.

    Inflation! What even is that?


    https://i.ibb.co/804Jtxt/Screenshot-20221104-183242-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @Curle, @Harry Baldwin, @al gore rhythms, @Prester John, @Spud Boy, @Muggles, @P.T., @Reg Cæsar, @CharleszMartel

    There’s something weird about how her head looks on her body. Like a potato with one of those knots sticking out on top.

  73. The fact that governors and congressmen can’t influence the crime stats hasn’t prevented prominent Democrats from tweeting that many high crime cities are in red states–as if that means anything.

    It’s about the mayors, not the governors. And the mayors are all Democrats.

  74. @Frank G
    And how much did your public COVID Mania contribute to the climate, Steve? Will there ever be an iSteve COVID Reckoning?

    Replies: @Polistra, @J.Ross, @Recently Based, @Jack D, @BB753

    The funny thing is, with respect to the substance of this post, that even if you argue that the huge increase in crime starting in May 2020 was due to Covid lockdowns rather than Saint George you racist Bad Person, then it was still caused by policies enacted by people in the exact offices the NYT claims don’t affect crime rates.

  75. I’m not sure the term “Racial Reckoning” adequately and clearly captures what happened in the wake of the George Floyd incident. iSteve readers know what it means, but if I said “racial reckoning” to the average person the street, they’d have no idea what I was talking about.

    I don’t have a better shorthand description at the moment. Floyd’s death was basically a local story which likely had nothing do do with race being amplified 1000x and turned into a referendum on race relations and policing in America.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Spud Boy

    “iSteve readers know what it means, but if I said “racial reckoning” to the average person the street, they’d have no idea what I was talking about.“

    Indeed, because this is an Alt Right talking point.

  76. @Polistra
    @Curle

    https://i.ibb.co/mXNt2NT/Nov-4-2022-11-25-32.jpg

    https://i.ibb.co/TRCLBNT/Screenshot-20221104-232830-NYPost-modified.jpg

    Replies: @Recently Based, @Sick n' Tired

    Thanks. I googled this, and what Michelle Singletary said in the discussion was priceless:

    “You know, I’m just gonna say this, and if I get banged for it, I don’t care,” Singletary said. “There is a great deal of Americans where it is uncomfortable that they are spending more, but they’re not gonna go under. You know, you’ve got to stop complaining when there’s so many people who literally the inflation rate means they may only have two meals instead of three.”

    1. Lady, learn verb-tense agreement before you go on national television providing advice.

    2. WTF?

    3. Here she is the same week telling people to buy I-Bonds to protect against inflation: https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2022/06/22/step-by-step-guide-to-buy-i-bonds/

    • Thanks: Polistra
  77. @Mark G.
    @Mr. Anon


    And by the same token, Republicans who think that the US Government is too stupid and ham-handed to manage American society and tell Americans how to live their lives, thought that it was eminently capable of managing foreign societies in places like Afghanistan and Iraq and telling Afghanis and Iraqis how to live their lives.
     
    I've worked for the civilian part of the military for forty years. Conservatives often seem oblivious that the military is just another corrupt, incompetent government bureaucracy. People were surprised by the failure in Afghanistan and the bungled withdrawal, but I wasn't surprised. I just thought "so typical".

    It's always been like this. Commonly used military acronyms like FUBAR (fouled up beyond all repair) and SNAFU (situation normal all fouled up) have been around since World War II. We won that war because the German military leaders were even more incompetent than ours and our free enterprise system generated more wealth to pay for a larger and better equipped military.

    When we had the draft and more Americans had served in the military, making fun of military incompetence was commonly seen in novels, films and tv shows like F Troop, McHale's Navy, Hogan's Heroes and M*A*S*H. Now that we have a volunteer military many Americans have no idea what the military is like. When I tell people in the comment section here at unz.com stories about military incompetence they don't even believe me, say I'm a liar and have never worked for the military. I just laugh at that.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Peter Akuleyev, @Mr. Anon, @Mike Tre, @Zero Philosopher

    This is why Russian military incompetence is both not surprising and perhaps not as great a sign of weakness as people like to believe. Even the vaunted Wehrmacht was corrupt and often surprisingly incompetent. Militaries generally are. Tolstoy was telling us this 150 years ago.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Stalin said that "quantity has its own quality". When you are comparing Russia to the US (or the Wehrmacht or the Ukrainian Army or anyone else) this cuts both ways.

    OTOH, Russia, at least at the start of this war, had vast quantities of war materiel - thousand upon thousands of tanks stored after the end of the Cold War, warehouses full of artillery shells, etc. Far more than anyone else. So the Ukrainians can capture or destroy a bunch of Russian armor and the Russians have even more.

    OTOH, these quantities are not infinite. And the tanks that exist in paper often don't work in real life and the ones that do work are ancient and highly vulnerable to modern anti-tank weapons.

    And every lost tank means a lost tank crew. And the people who are replacing them are not as well trained as the first wave - often barely trained at all. The Russian military was always willing to take high levels of casualties among the enlisted men but in this war they have been forced to send officers to the front and have had HQ locations that are well behind the front hit by HIMARS. And low birth rate modern Russia doesn't have millions of young men to send into the meat grinder. In the recent mobilization, as many men fled from Russia as were mobilized. And the ones that fled were higher quality than the losers who stayed behind.

    The Russian Army is a top down army (where NCOs are considered worthless). Of course the Czarist Army had a class system but the Soviets made it even worse because their system was based on not telling people the truth about anything (and this continues today). Russian troops often don't even know they are being sent to Ukraine until their convoy passes the border.

    Remember that one of the reasons that the Red Army prevailed against the Germans is that the Americans were arming them. Now they are arming "the Nazis" that they are fighting against.

    Things in Russia are just on a different scale. Yes, we have incompetence, corruption, drunkenness, lying, etc. but the Russian versions of these things are on a completely different level. The Russians are losing in 1 week the number of troops that we lost in 20 years in Afghanistan.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Graveldips

  78. @Anonymous
    You know what's absolutely wild? I've been a cop for twenty years. I'm nothing special and my job basically just feels like well-paid service work. I'm just a guy in polyester and a name tag. Never promoted, never will. I just drive a police car around and answer police calls. And I'm surrounded by guys and gals who do the same thing, almost all of whom also will never be more important than sergeants.

    Yet, I feel as though I'm the possessor of this incredible secret knowledge. Like I have the power to see an entire world that the rest of respectable society doesn't even know exists. A world that everyone, everyone, insists is The Most Important Question Of Our Time. It's not an exaggeration to say that I know more about this than 99% of society.

    And you know who cares? No one. No reporters come asking. No non-cops I know ask me. I'm not sure what percentage don't care, or don't want to know, or just never has occur to them that they don't actually know.

    It's not that I actually care anymore. I work in a very liberal city and one of my greatest job benefits is supping on their tears. I really get off on explaining to citizens who didn't ask just how utterly f'ed their city is (and, oh boy, it is). I don't have to lie in the least, I just give them both barrels of reality, wrapped in their own BS woke verbiage. But they don't dig any further. They don't actually want to know.

    As Steve has pointed out here somewhere, people do awesome breakdowns of sh$t they actually care about. Baseball, medieval sword fighting, dungeons and dragons, whatever. But how law enforcement actually works at the street level? Yawn.

    Sorry if this was largely off topic.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimDandy, @Dr. X, @The Wild Geese Howard, @BosTex, @Mike Tre, @Muggles, @CharleszMartel, @Nicholas Stix, @anonymous

    The big secret is you guys are nothing more than enforcers of arbitrary government policy.

    How many normal people did you threaten with fine or imprisonment for not wearing a mask?

    How much money did you take at gunpoint from working class people, for the high crime of running late for work or to pick up their kids?

    You people do not protect anything but your own pensions.

    • Replies: @NeoLogick
    @Mike Tre

    It always strikes me as unreasonably absurd as to those who cast blame solely upon the officers who simply carry on with their orders instead of their direct superiors and those who legislate their duties. You seem to have a bone to pick with an imaginary caricature of law enforcement instead those who issue their orders, I reccomend putting blame where it is most deserved.

  79. @Harry Baldwin
    Your governor isn’t going to solve a spike in murder, he added. And it’s generally not the governor who’s been failing to solve it, either.

    New York's governor is currently Kathy "Why is crime such a big deal to you?" Hochul. She has the power to get rid of Manhattan's Soros-funded, criminal-loving DA Alvin Bragg. She also has the power to suspend NY's no-cash bail policy. Those two things would reduce crime in her state yet she refuses to do either.

    We have a friend, a 60-ish Jewish woman, who lives in New York City. A few days ago she was sitting on a bench in Union Square park when a homeless lunatic threw a rock and hit her squarely in the forehead. She went to the hospital. The injury was not serious, but it has made her terrified of walking the streets of her city. Will she help to vote out Hochul? Can she tie cause and effect? She's a dyed-in-the-wool liberal, so I'm not sure, but maybe.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Can she tie cause and effect? She’s a dyed-in-the-wool liberal, so I’m not sure, but maybe.

    Ed Koch used to tell a story about a liberal NYC judge who was mugged and his mugging made the newspapers. It just so happened that he was in the midst of a criminal trial of anotha brotha. When the trial resumed, the judge announced from the bench that the fact that he had been a victim of a crime would in no way influence his rulings in the subject case. A little old lady in the back of the courtroom shouted out , “Then mug him again!”

    If your friend doesn’t “get it” yet, she will after the 2nd time she is assaulted.

  80. The conditions for a major and prolonged swing from the leftist political hegemony of recent years are all there, but the biggest obstacle to this coming to pass is the GOP itself. The majority of politicians of both parties are utter mediocrities and there are plenty of Republican time-servers in state and federal office whose only interest is making sure their do with them to keep their donors happy enough to maintain their sinecures. This means the usual paeans to marginal tax rates, deregulation, etc. and desperately hoping to avoid any cultural topics.

    What is needed is to totally hammer the left on economic matters, illegal immigration, crime, and the sexualization/mutilation of children not just until the next presidential cycle but for years. Make them defend *not* acting on these issues cycle after cycle until they buckle – these are all issues that are actually centrist positions despite the media gaslighting about it being far right.

  81. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Mark G.

    This is why Russian military incompetence is both not surprising and perhaps not as great a sign of weakness as people like to believe. Even the vaunted Wehrmacht was corrupt and often surprisingly incompetent. Militaries generally are. Tolstoy was telling us this 150 years ago.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Stalin said that “quantity has its own quality”. When you are comparing Russia to the US (or the Wehrmacht or the Ukrainian Army or anyone else) this cuts both ways.

    OTOH, Russia, at least at the start of this war, had vast quantities of war materiel – thousand upon thousands of tanks stored after the end of the Cold War, warehouses full of artillery shells, etc. Far more than anyone else. So the Ukrainians can capture or destroy a bunch of Russian armor and the Russians have even more.

    OTOH, these quantities are not infinite. And the tanks that exist in paper often don’t work in real life and the ones that do work are ancient and highly vulnerable to modern anti-tank weapons.

    And every lost tank means a lost tank crew. And the people who are replacing them are not as well trained as the first wave – often barely trained at all. The Russian military was always willing to take high levels of casualties among the enlisted men but in this war they have been forced to send officers to the front and have had HQ locations that are well behind the front hit by HIMARS. And low birth rate modern Russia doesn’t have millions of young men to send into the meat grinder. In the recent mobilization, as many men fled from Russia as were mobilized. And the ones that fled were higher quality than the losers who stayed behind.

    The Russian Army is a top down army (where NCOs are considered worthless). Of course the Czarist Army had a class system but the Soviets made it even worse because their system was based on not telling people the truth about anything (and this continues today). Russian troops often don’t even know they are being sent to Ukraine until their convoy passes the border.

    Remember that one of the reasons that the Red Army prevailed against the Germans is that the Americans were arming them. Now they are arming “the Nazis” that they are fighting against.

    Things in Russia are just on a different scale. Yes, we have incompetence, corruption, drunkenness, lying, etc. but the Russian versions of these things are on a completely different level. The Russians are losing in 1 week the number of troops that we lost in 20 years in Afghanistan.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Jack D


    And the tanks that exist in paper often don’t work in real life...
     
    Also true to a lesser extent of the ammo. Any chemical, including explosives and propellants, degrades over time.
    , @Graveldips
    @Jack D

    Every lost tank is not a lost tank crew. According to Nicholas Moran, the US lost less than one man for every tank destroyed during WW2. The British lost twice as many, likely due to their tankers wearing berets instead of fiberglass helmets. An unconscious man has a hard time bailing out of a burning tank. BTW, the Russians during WW2 also wore padded helmets.

    And I seriously doubt that the Russians are losing 15,000 men per week. Isn't that how many Americans died in Afghanistan?

  82. @Stephen Paul Foster

    Crime surges and falls for reasons that experts don’t fully understand..
     
    Yes, of course, the obligatory (usually) anonymous "experts", and when they don't understand, then, you, stupid reader -- don't even try!

    Replies: @Gamecock

    One would think some understanding would be required to become an ‘expert.’

  83. @Polistra
    @Curle

    https://i.ibb.co/mXNt2NT/Nov-4-2022-11-25-32.jpg

    https://i.ibb.co/TRCLBNT/Screenshot-20221104-232830-NYPost-modified.jpg

    Replies: @Recently Based, @Sick n' Tired

    Take 1/2 of her 401k and see how quickly she changes her tune or writes a story about how inflation is hurting POC and negatively affecting da community.

    • Agree: Renard
  84. @Mr. Anon
    @Wilkey


    The government has the amazing power to do absolutely anything under the sun when liberals want it to, but it’s a limp wristed, 87 pound high school freshman when it’s something liberals don’t want it to do. It’s amazing how that works.
     
    And by the same token, Republicans who think that the US Government is too stupid and ham-handed to manage American society and tell Americans how to live their lives, thought that it was eminantly capable of managing foreign societies in places like Afghanistan and Iraq and telling Afghanis and Iraqis how to live their lives.

    Replies: @Mark G., @Gamecock

    It’s impossible to get colonialism out of the Western psyche.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Gamecock


    It’s impossible to get colonialism out of the Western psyche.
     
    Well George W. Bush's tragic, pathetic failures have done a pretty good job of it. I think the West is now closer to abandoning the "white man's burden" than it's ever been.

    Let the savages be savages. The ones who want to fix their own countries will have to show the will to do it themselves.

    Replies: @Gamecock

  85. Most Candidates Running on Crime Don’t Have Much Power to Solve It

    Resistance is futile!

  86. @TGGP
    An election won't replace the people in the media who trumpeted a "reckoning". And they won't lose money just because their actions caused their preferred political party to lose elections. So this idiocy can continue indefinitely. As David Schleicher has noted, there isn't really partisan political competition in cities. We need to change that (he has quixotically suggested prohibiting the national political parties at the local level) in order for elections to matter.

    Replies: @Curle

    “ he has quixotically suggested prohibiting the national political parties at the local level”

    That is quixotic plus it won’t work. My state already allows local governments to hold non-partisan elections. Everyone knows the affiliation of all of the candidates.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon
  87. “Crime surges and falls for reasons that experts don’t fully understand”

    In his 2014 paper, “Crime and Inflation in Cross-National Perspective” published in Crime and Justice, Richard Rosenfeld, an American criminologist at the University of Missouri- St. Louis, reevaluated the predictive efficacy of economic indicators, concluding that inflation is the most powerful economic predictor of crime.

    https://pinkerton.com/our-insights/blog/inflation-and-crime

  88. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    As they say, politics is downstream from culture.

    People who live in low-crime communities don't refrain from crime because they fear the police; they don't do crime because they were raised right, and they know crime is wrong. I don't rob banks; it's not because I fear the governor's new anti-bank-robber policy, but because I have no desire to rob a bank. If however your home culture is insane, then insanity and chaos is what you'll get, no matter the law or the policy or who is the governor. Play insane games, win insane prizes.

    You're not going to solve black crime by locking up more blacks, because there's always more crooks where the crooks came from. Either get their culture to see the futility and wrongness of it (good luck), or else give them their own isolated communities, far far away from everyone else, where they can do whatever they like without bothering normal people. The problem with ghettos and housing projects is the existence of buses and subways and highways that can ferry the crooks to where the targets are. They need to be sent to places where the only reachable target is themselves.

    Replies: @Curle, @Meretricious, @Gandydancer, @Recently Based

    “ You’re not going to solve black crime by locking up more blacks, because there’s always more crooks where the crooks came from.”

    No. Giving frequent offenders long sentences absolutely reduces crime rates.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Curle

    How so?

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Mr. Anon

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Curle

    Your Giuliani-esque point is well taken, and quite correct.

    It's just that I wasn't talking about overall crime rates as a whole, I was talking about black crime and its cultural fountainheads.

  89. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anon

    About your point (4), Anon #130, Americans don't realize how much power they have been given (allowed?) per the US and State Constitutions. Judges and all kinds of other officials can be impeached or recalled. It takes some organization, yes, Alinsky-like, I suppose, to do these things.

    That's one of the things that pissed me off about Pres. Trump's (non)leadership. Instead of tweeting back to celebrities and Joe Biden about "I could kick your ass", he could have had someone on the ball gather together names of the worst of the judges striking down policy and gotten tweets out to the millions of Americans in these location to get out and do something about these officials. Believe me, people WOULD have gotten out and done something, given some coherent direction. They still would.

    Replies: @JR Ewing

    Yes, quite often I feel like the bigger problem isn’t bad politicians and policies, it’s apathetic citizens who put up with all the crap. Those in charge know this and they know they can get away with a lot because most people just don’t care and won’t ever do anything in response, anyway.

    We get the politicians (and judges) we deserve.

    • Agree: Yngvar
  90. @Frank G
    And how much did your public COVID Mania contribute to the climate, Steve? Will there ever be an iSteve COVID Reckoning?

    Replies: @Polistra, @J.Ross, @Recently Based, @Jack D, @BB753

    Putting aside how much Steve contributed to “Covid Mania” , how much of the increase in crime had to do with Covid Mania and how much had to do with the Great Racial Reckoning. Look at the graphs above. Did Covid Mania suddenly increase in the middle of 2020 (and only among black people) or was it something else?

    My guess is that Covid Mania by itself would have reduced crime. Businesses were closed – no money in the cash register of a closed restaurant. No shoplifting in a closed store. People were home – fewer opportunities for burglary. Schools were closed – every day when largely black school high schools let out, there is a mini-crime wave in the area of the school. No school, no crime wave:

    https://www.fox29.com/news/its-just-not-safe-roxborough-food-cart-owner-closes-an-hour-early-due-to-school-dismissal-concerns

    https://6abc.com/roxborough-businesses-high-school-store-security-vandalism/12291635/

    Sure there were countervailing effects (now everyone gets to wear a mask) but the crime wave was mainly due to the Racial Reckoning and nothing else.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Jack D


    Putting aside how much Steve contributed to “Covid Mania” , how much of the increase in crime had to do with Covid Mania and how much had to do with the Great Racial Reckoning. Look at the graphs above. Did Covid Mania suddenly increase in the middle of 2020 (and only among black people) or was it something else?
     
    The Summer of George started a mere 10 weeks after Covid Mania began in the US (it began earlier elsewhere). Perhaps there was a lot of pent-up frustration due to the lockdowns and the pervasive weirdness of it all. I don't imagine that the lockdown-regime contributed all that much to black crime, but it did massively contribute to the huge turn out in support of BLM protests by brainwashed white millennials and Gen-Zers who, thanks to the World being shut down, had nothing better to do. It might have also contributed to a general sense among that same cohort that this was a great turning (why, one might even call it a "Great Reset") where everything that came before would be swept away.

    BLM by itself would not have changed much by itself. It was society's almost complete capitulation to the demands of BLM that led to the ensuing craziness in 2020.

    Replies: @Alden

  91. Amazing that on television all the news networks bend over backwards to avoid stating the obvious: Blacks are causing a great deal of mayhem around the country and are the ones responsible for the massive increase in crime rates.

    Sure the Democrats made all of this possible with their defund the police strategy and support of BLM madness, but the crime problem is largely due to black people behaving badly.

    I love all the efforts of the media whores to avoid discussing what is obvious.

    Clown world.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @lavoisier

    Give them credit though, they keep coming up with new ways to skip out on restaurant bills


    A woman having dinner at Ruth’s Chris Steak House in Manhattan stabbed a male patron after becoming enraged by his arguing with an employee Friday night, police said.

    The 24-year-old man began squabbling with a worker at the upmarket Midtown steakhouse just after 10 p.m. — and made such a scene that it disturbed diners at nearby tables, including two women enjoying a meal together who told him to quiet down, according to cops and sources.

    When he didn’t, one of the ladies grabbed a steak knife and stabbed him in the back, the law-enforcement sources said.

    She and her friend then fled on foot — without paying their bill.
     

    https://nypost.com/2022/11/05/nycs-ruths-chris-steak-house-stabbing-leaves-patron-hurt-nypd-seek-female-attacker

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Gandydancer

  92. @al gore rhythms
    @Polistra

    "Got a bum education, double-digit inflation
    Can't take the train to the job, there's a strike at the station"

    Someone needs to tell Joy Reid about Grandmaster Flash.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Gandydancer

    It’s tough getting someone to understand something when their salary depends on them NOT understanding it.

    Guess what, if Trump was still the President and the governor of NY and the mayor of NYC were Republican, and Congress was controlled by Republicans, the NYTimes and Joy Reid and everyone in the Democrat/Media establishment would be wailing about crime and inflation and blaming it on them.

    But since the above are all under Democrat control, nothing to see here folks, move along. Inflation – I don’t even know what that word means. Crime – there’s nothing the government can do to reduce crime. All we can do is let people out without bail and shorten their sentences and have the police stop pulling people over for warrant checks, but that has nothing to do with crime.

    PA Senate Candidate John Fetterman (and this was BEFORE his stroke):

    We could reduce our prison population by 1/3 and not make anyone less safe.”

    👉 2/3 of those condemned to die in PA’s prison are African American.

    We have the power to rectify this now + we absolutely must.

    May 30, 2020 – note the date.

    The boldface is mine but Fetterman put in the Caucasian finger pointing emoji himself.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    PA Senate Candidate John Fetterman (and this was BEFORE his stroke):

    "We could reduce our prison population by 1/3 and not make anyone less safe.”
     

    Wisc. Senate candidate Mandela Barnes (sound of body and mind, if not sense):

    "Reducing prison populations is now sexy."


    But look who's running for state Senate, unopposed. Would you oppose someone with that name?

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @BB753

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Jack D


    Guess what, if Trump was still the President and the governor of NY and the mayor of NYC were Republican, and Congress was controlled by Republicans, the NYTimes and Joy Reid and everyone in the Democrat/Media establishment would be wailing about crime and inflation and blaming it on them.
     
    Do Democrats ever make a big deal about crime? I don't recall them ever doing so. When they do mention it, it's usually the "Centrist" ones like Bill Clinton and the old (meaning, the younger) Joe Biden and it's done when they realize that the more left-leaning members of their party have so completely alienated normal people that it's hurting them at the polls. But I don't think the Joy Reid types can ever really harp about it.

    Making it a central focus of their campaigns risks turning off large portions of their base. If Democrats were to make a big deal about crime now, they would blame it all on white hicks in flyover country. That's kind of what they do when forced to mention it at all.

    Replies: @Gandydancer

  93. @J.Ross
    @Frank G

    Actually, while he still thinks that lab coats are magic and government promises mean that drugs don't have to be tested, Steve has been very clear and consistent about the medically unjustifiable, itself-criminal lockdown having all kinds of predictable side effects, like impelling blacks to drive their cars at the speed of science.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @Corvinus, @Alden

    Uh no he hasn’t. Steve has categorically refused to address massive psychological damage done by the lockdowns to normal Americans, including school children, those lower class whites more prone to being manipulated into getting themselves addicted to prescription drugs, suicide rates, unemployment, masks mandates, turning fast food cashiers into enforcers of state mask policy. Steve celebrated the opening of golf courses so old white men could entertain themselves while parks and schools remained closed.

    The fact that low IQ negroes ended up killing themselves in greater numbers during the lockdowns was less to do with the lockdowns than the complete retreat of urban law enforcement in the wake of the Floyd suicide. I don’t personally don’t remember Sailer saying one critical thing of any of the ludicrous kovid policies, and certainly not in the midst of them during 2020.

    anyone is certainly welcome to dig up his comments where he does so.

  94. @Not Raul

    Yeah, okay, there was a historic change in homicide and traffic fatality rates in the week after George Floyd’s death
     
    When Trump was President.

    If Trump runs again, his opponents can say, “look how much crime increased when Trump was President.”

    Is Ted Cruz ready for round two?

    Replies: @Aspiring Rapper and Honor Student, @Gandydancer

    You’re right that it’s about the Orange Man. I’m surprised Sailer’s analysis didn’t address this. The establishment went crazy and lost their judgement because of Trump. And they were willing to accept increased homicide and traffic deaths among urban blacks as the cost of ousting him. Like Stalin said, if you want to make an omelette, you gotta break some eggs.

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    @Aspiring Rapper and Honor Student

    Wasn't that Robspierre during the French Revolution?

  95. @Anon
    Concrete things that could be done:

    1. Stop and frisk. Wouldn't this be on a mayor/city council/police commission/police department level? Maybe the governor could promise to run interference. Main problem ...

    2. Pressure Soros DAs and Soros-inspired DAs. I just cannot believe that there is nothing that other government officials could do about these clowns. Obviously prosecutors have some discretion in what they focus on, but why aren't there court cases challenging prosecutors who decide to not only not focus on certain crimes, but to wholly refuse to prosecute 100 percent of the perps, and to publicly announce that to would-be perps. This is beyond the prosecutors discretionary power. They do not make the laws. Get some court cases going against them! Heck, could citizens get standing based on the effect of these policies on them? Even cases that get thrown out of court get publicity.

    3. Get rid of Soros prosecutors via recall or the electoral process. Politicians could lead here.

    4. Judges that get in the way of bulldozing homeless camps. Personalize it in a Saul Alinsky way: Name and shame a select number of judges. Aggressively ask them to publicly explain what they are doing. A politician could do a press conference on the sidewalk in front of judges' houses. Copy the other side. Don't bring a knife to a gunfight. Make life really uncomfortable for these guys. Politicians could do this.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @BosTex, @Reg Cæsar, @slumber_j

    Fight fire with fire. We have been too gentle.

    Take what the other side does and throw back much harder.

    I think DeSantis and Abbott were on the right track: bringing the border disaster direct to the decision makers and letting them feel what this looks like to American elsewhere.

    More is needed.

  96. both homicides and traffic fatalities, especially among blacks, absolutely exploded following George Floyd’s death on May 25, 2020 and the liberal establishment’s declaration of “the racial reckoning.” Ironically, the triumph of Black Lives Matter got thousands of incremental blacks killed

    I wonder how much irony Sherlock Holmes would detect here.

    It might be ironic if the blacks making up that explosion (and a significant chunk of COVID deaths) increased property values or were a net positive to the national balance sheet, or if the people pushing it didn’t own that property or foot the burden of funding those liabilities…

    But they’re not. And they do. There was a reckoning alright, a dead reckoning.

  97. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    As they say, politics is downstream from culture.

    People who live in low-crime communities don't refrain from crime because they fear the police; they don't do crime because they were raised right, and they know crime is wrong. I don't rob banks; it's not because I fear the governor's new anti-bank-robber policy, but because I have no desire to rob a bank. If however your home culture is insane, then insanity and chaos is what you'll get, no matter the law or the policy or who is the governor. Play insane games, win insane prizes.

    You're not going to solve black crime by locking up more blacks, because there's always more crooks where the crooks came from. Either get their culture to see the futility and wrongness of it (good luck), or else give them their own isolated communities, far far away from everyone else, where they can do whatever they like without bothering normal people. The problem with ghettos and housing projects is the existence of buses and subways and highways that can ferry the crooks to where the targets are. They need to be sent to places where the only reachable target is themselves.

    Replies: @Curle, @Meretricious, @Gandydancer, @Recently Based

    couldn’t agree with you more

  98. Emily Badger. LOL.

    Let me outta here!

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @AnotherDad

    Entire NY Time, LOL.

    I'm outta here!

  99. @Mark G.
    @Mr. Anon


    And by the same token, Republicans who think that the US Government is too stupid and ham-handed to manage American society and tell Americans how to live their lives, thought that it was eminently capable of managing foreign societies in places like Afghanistan and Iraq and telling Afghanis and Iraqis how to live their lives.
     
    I've worked for the civilian part of the military for forty years. Conservatives often seem oblivious that the military is just another corrupt, incompetent government bureaucracy. People were surprised by the failure in Afghanistan and the bungled withdrawal, but I wasn't surprised. I just thought "so typical".

    It's always been like this. Commonly used military acronyms like FUBAR (fouled up beyond all repair) and SNAFU (situation normal all fouled up) have been around since World War II. We won that war because the German military leaders were even more incompetent than ours and our free enterprise system generated more wealth to pay for a larger and better equipped military.

    When we had the draft and more Americans had served in the military, making fun of military incompetence was commonly seen in novels, films and tv shows like F Troop, McHale's Navy, Hogan's Heroes and M*A*S*H. Now that we have a volunteer military many Americans have no idea what the military is like. When I tell people in the comment section here at unz.com stories about military incompetence they don't even believe me, say I'm a liar and have never worked for the military. I just laugh at that.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Peter Akuleyev, @Mr. Anon, @Mike Tre, @Zero Philosopher

    When we had the draft and more Americans had served in the military, making fun of military incompetence was commonly seen in novels, films and tv shows like F Troop, McHale’s Navy, Hogan’s Heroes and M*A*S*H. Now that we have a volunteer military many Americans have no idea what the military is like.

    Good Point.

    Steve has often claimed that the younger generations, the Millennials and the Gen-Z’s are much more authoritarian in outlook than their elders. Although, to be fair, the Boomers seem to have gotten a lot more authoritarian as they have aged.

    I remember when it used to be pretty common to question the motives and abilities of the authorities – the military, the CIA, the FBI, the courts – and it was reflected in popular culture, at least in books and movies (not so much on TV). Remember the laughably gung-ho and reckless FBI agents in Die Hard – agents Johnson and Johnson (“No, the other one”)?

    Now, as far as I can tell, portrayals of the FBI and CIA are almost all hagiographic. If there is a bad government official, it’s just a lone-wolf bad-apple, and in no way reflective of the whole organization. Of course, that may have something to do with the fact that the military, FBI, and CIA all offer technical advice and assistance to Hollywood productions, in exchange for some editorial control of course.

  100. @Jack D
    @al gore rhythms

    It's tough getting someone to understand something when their salary depends on them NOT understanding it.

    Guess what, if Trump was still the President and the governor of NY and the mayor of NYC were Republican, and Congress was controlled by Republicans, the NYTimes and Joy Reid and everyone in the Democrat/Media establishment would be wailing about crime and inflation and blaming it on them.

    But since the above are all under Democrat control, nothing to see here folks, move along. Inflation - I don't even know what that word means. Crime - there's nothing the government can do to reduce crime. All we can do is let people out without bail and shorten their sentences and have the police stop pulling people over for warrant checks, but that has nothing to do with crime.

    PA Senate Candidate John Fetterman (and this was BEFORE his stroke):


    We could reduce our prison population by 1/3 and not make anyone less safe.”

    👉 2/3 of those condemned to die in PA’s prison are African American.

    We have the power to rectify this now + we absolutely must.

     

    May 30, 2020 - note the date.

    https://twitter.com/johnfetterman/status/1266733985608151042?lang=en

    The boldface is mine but Fetterman put in the Caucasian finger pointing emoji himself.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon

    PA Senate Candidate John Fetterman (and this was BEFORE his stroke):

    “We could reduce our prison population by 1/3 and not make anyone less safe.”

    Wisc. Senate candidate Mandela Barnes (sound of body and mind, if not sense):

    “Reducing prison populations is now sexy.”

    But look who’s running for state Senate, unopposed. Would you oppose someone with that name?

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Reg Cæsar

    Only if my name was Robert Ford.

    , @BB753
    @Reg Cæsar

    Mandela Barnes, lol! Named after Nelson Mandela!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  101. @Jack D
    @al gore rhythms

    It's tough getting someone to understand something when their salary depends on them NOT understanding it.

    Guess what, if Trump was still the President and the governor of NY and the mayor of NYC were Republican, and Congress was controlled by Republicans, the NYTimes and Joy Reid and everyone in the Democrat/Media establishment would be wailing about crime and inflation and blaming it on them.

    But since the above are all under Democrat control, nothing to see here folks, move along. Inflation - I don't even know what that word means. Crime - there's nothing the government can do to reduce crime. All we can do is let people out without bail and shorten their sentences and have the police stop pulling people over for warrant checks, but that has nothing to do with crime.

    PA Senate Candidate John Fetterman (and this was BEFORE his stroke):


    We could reduce our prison population by 1/3 and not make anyone less safe.”

    👉 2/3 of those condemned to die in PA’s prison are African American.

    We have the power to rectify this now + we absolutely must.

     

    May 30, 2020 - note the date.

    https://twitter.com/johnfetterman/status/1266733985608151042?lang=en

    The boldface is mine but Fetterman put in the Caucasian finger pointing emoji himself.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon

    Guess what, if Trump was still the President and the governor of NY and the mayor of NYC were Republican, and Congress was controlled by Republicans, the NYTimes and Joy Reid and everyone in the Democrat/Media establishment would be wailing about crime and inflation and blaming it on them.

    Do Democrats ever make a big deal about crime? I don’t recall them ever doing so. When they do mention it, it’s usually the “Centrist” ones like Bill Clinton and the old (meaning, the younger) Joe Biden and it’s done when they realize that the more left-leaning members of their party have so completely alienated normal people that it’s hurting them at the polls. But I don’t think the Joy Reid types can ever really harp about it.

    Making it a central focus of their campaigns risks turning off large portions of their base. If Democrats were to make a big deal about crime now, they would blame it all on white hicks in flyover country. That’s kind of what they do when forced to mention it at all.

    • Replies: @Gandydancer
    @Mr. Anon


    If Democrats were to make a big deal about crime now, they would blame it all on white hicks in flyover country.
     
    No "if" about it.
    https://www.salon.com/2022/03/16/democrats-for--but-new-data-shows-higher-rates-in-red-states/
  102. @Jack D
    @Frank G

    Putting aside how much Steve contributed to "Covid Mania" , how much of the increase in crime had to do with Covid Mania and how much had to do with the Great Racial Reckoning. Look at the graphs above. Did Covid Mania suddenly increase in the middle of 2020 (and only among black people) or was it something else?

    My guess is that Covid Mania by itself would have reduced crime. Businesses were closed - no money in the cash register of a closed restaurant. No shoplifting in a closed store. People were home - fewer opportunities for burglary. Schools were closed - every day when largely black school high schools let out, there is a mini-crime wave in the area of the school. No school, no crime wave:

    https://www.fox29.com/news/its-just-not-safe-roxborough-food-cart-owner-closes-an-hour-early-due-to-school-dismissal-concerns

    https://6abc.com/roxborough-businesses-high-school-store-security-vandalism/12291635/

    Sure there were countervailing effects (now everyone gets to wear a mask) but the crime wave was mainly due to the Racial Reckoning and nothing else.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Putting aside how much Steve contributed to “Covid Mania” , how much of the increase in crime had to do with Covid Mania and how much had to do with the Great Racial Reckoning. Look at the graphs above. Did Covid Mania suddenly increase in the middle of 2020 (and only among black people) or was it something else?

    The Summer of George started a mere 10 weeks after Covid Mania began in the US (it began earlier elsewhere). Perhaps there was a lot of pent-up frustration due to the lockdowns and the pervasive weirdness of it all. I don’t imagine that the lockdown-regime contributed all that much to black crime, but it did massively contribute to the huge turn out in support of BLM protests by brainwashed white millennials and Gen-Zers who, thanks to the World being shut down, had nothing better to do. It might have also contributed to a general sense among that same cohort that this was a great turning (why, one might even call it a “Great Reset”) where everything that came before would be swept away.

    BLM by itself would not have changed much by itself. It was society’s almost complete capitulation to the demands of BLM that led to the ensuing craziness in 2020.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Alden
    @Mr. Anon

    The summer of George had absolutely nothing to do with covid.

    It was no different from the Mike Brown, Trayvon Martin and even Rodney King riots and going back to the famous Watts riots in the 1960s.

    These riots are not spontaneous at all. There is a very well organized operation that creates and directs the riots. The US department of justice, wealthy communists like George Soros and Stanley Sheinbaum all the revuns and community activists.

    The US department of justice has a civil rights division. Basically dedicated to backing all black criminals against police and law enforcement. CRDofDOJ has 800 numbers emails and chat rooms manned 24 hours a day.

    To take calls from ACLU SPLC black and (( )) activists democrat black and (( )) officials such as Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley during the Rodney King riots and Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey during the St Floyd riots. The district attorneys who filed charges against George Zimmerman and Kyle Rittenhouse. The CRD jumps in to take down every White who resists black criminals.

    And that’s just the civil rights division of the justice department.

    Then there’s numerous organizations many many more than ACLU SPLC ADL That jump in to pay money to trouble makers. Like paying Chicago blacks $15 an hour and providing buses hotels and meals to riot in Ferguson MO.

    We all know about the anti White racist (((media))) that exonerates black criminals and attacks police. It’s extremely obvious. We know about the Soros funded pro criminal anti White district attorneys.

    Nothing new; a generation before Chesa Boudin San Francisco had third generation communist Terrence Hallinan as district attorney for 8 years. He was far far worse than Boudin. First week in office he fired all the senior attorneys everyone of them. These are the ones who were promoted because they had a good win record in felony trials. The attorneys that remained we’re basically apprentice prosecutors . And Hallinan hired militant criminal defense & civil rights attorneys to replace the ones he fired.,

    It’s not always a George Soros or a Stanley Sheinbaum who finds all these pro criminal organizations and riots.

    It’s the non profit charities and great foundations. Even the ridiculous United Appeal and of course the churches and the Jewish charities. The big foundations fund smaller NGOS. Small charities con idiots into giving them money for the tax breaks. The money is transferred from NGO to NGO till it ends up paying for riots.

    That method was perfected in Russia in the 1870s and migrated to America. It’s nothing new. The masons were experts at revolutions and organized the American, French, S American and 1848 revolutions in Europe.

    I needn’t go into the way the ((media)) comes out with the same lies about every police incident. The men of UNZ are very familiar with that. Remember Matthew Shepherd? A gay retail drug dealer cheated the gsy wholesalers of the illegal drugs he sold on commission. Several times. The gays who gave him the illegal drugs to sell got mad . The gay drug dealers, one of whom had had sex with Matthew killed him because he cheated them. A common crime that usually isn’t broadcast to the world for years.

    But the local ADL AJC agents jumped in the ordinary drug dealer murder. Because ADL AJC had been trying to get a federal hate crime law through congress for a long time. National ADL AJC SPLC ACLU and CRD of the DOJ were notified of the great opportunity. The ((media)) created a false tale of total lies and kept it up till Matthews coffin was taken to DC ala George Floyd and buried in some heretic Protestant cathedral in DC.

    That’s how a gay drug dealer criminal killed by other gay drug dealer criminals became a martyr. And how ADL AJC ACLU SPLC got their KGB hate crime law passed.

    President Clinton saw that Americans were angry about 30 years of soft in crime. Took the opportunity and was elected because of his tough on crime policies. So did Mayor Rudy Guillani of NYC And Mayor Brown of San Francisco Probably a few others I don’t know about.

    Affirmative action doesn’t help. As every big city in the country is run by pro crime black democrats and their White servile accomplices. And behind them the media the big foundations and the wealthiest corporations in America.

    Recent example. Last week LA Times ran a huge piece about some Black Guerrilla Family thug convict who killed a prison guard. Black Guerrilla Family wasn’t just a group of ordinary black street criminals like the Black Panthers. They were highly political and tied in with Weather Underground, Vencermos Brugade abd a lot of elderly Marxist’s.

    Do the BGF convict killed a prison guard decades ago. And was sentenced to life without parole. Murder happened in San Quentin 400 miles from Los Angeles about 30 years ago.

    What possible interest is this murder and parole hearing to the residents of Los Angeles. It’s a heavily immigrant town. Who have no interest in the story.

    Yet the LA Times had a quarter page on the front page and the biggest headline for this story. And inside two full pages advocating for parole and forgiveness for the black murderer of a White man. A young man with a small child. A black convict who wasn’t an ordinary felon but tied in with Charles Garry Faye Stender Angela Davis and a nationwide network of insurrectionists and communist with a multimillion dollar war chest.
    Those are just examples of what has been going on since the 1880s. The commies won in the 1960s Its just been a mopping up and consolidation ever since.

    Remember every word in the ((media)) is a lie. Read Epoch Times, amren and watch Fox News if you want. But it’s like fighting a tidal wave.

    Replies: @Gandydancer

  103. @Not Raul

    Yeah, okay, there was a historic change in homicide and traffic fatality rates in the week after George Floyd’s death
     
    When Trump was President.

    If Trump runs again, his opponents can say, “look how much crime increased when Trump was President.”

    Is Ted Cruz ready for round two?

    Replies: @Aspiring Rapper and Honor Student, @Gandydancer

    Is Ted Cruz ready for round two?

    He wasn’t ready for Round One, so why would you imagine he is ready for Round Two?

    Or perhaps you’ve forgotten that in 2016 Cruz blamed TRUMP for “the violence at his rallies”?

    Yeah, Trump’s immigration policy turned into a squishy imitation of Cruz’ stated policy, but we knew Cruz would return to approving amnesty if he was elected. My vote for Trump over Cruz was anyway precisely a message vote and I do not regret it at all since, despite Trump’s ineptness and disloyalty, his election changed the Overton Window. And kept the worst of the Total Loonies out of the Oval Office for a spell.

    DeSantis’ Marthas Vinyard ploy (and promise to continue its like) gives me some hope for something from him, so I hope Trump stays out or keels over before 2024. Of course only a fool trusts a politician. But Cruz has totally passed his sell-by date.

    • Agree: Old Prude
  104. @International Jew
    The Times thinks high officials can't affect crime because the Times thinks crime-fighting is about organizing midnight basketball or painting peace murals.

    It doesn't cross their mind that the governor of Minnesota could have pardoned Derek Chauvin, and in so doing greatly improved policemen's motivation to stay on the job and do their job.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    It doesn’t cross their mind that the governor of Minnesota could have pardoned Derek Chauvin, and in so doing greatly improved policemen’s motivation to stay on the job and do their job.

    Afraid not, the Feds couldn’t help but pile on and continue their Civil Rights era violation of the prohibition of double jeopardy (although they found another claimed victim from 2017, fourteen years old then). So one way or another he was going to prison and the police nationwide would be encouraged to not do all the things our host is reporting statistically.

    • Disagree: Gandydancer
  105. @Polistra
    Also: only racist people discuss inflation.

    Inflation! What even is that?


    https://i.ibb.co/804Jtxt/Screenshot-20221104-183242-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @Curle, @Harry Baldwin, @al gore rhythms, @Prester John, @Spud Boy, @Muggles, @P.T., @Reg Cæsar, @CharleszMartel

    Black men all know that the cost of their Colt 45 malt liquor has gone up considerably recently.

    They might not know why, but they know that this is inflation.

    It is Joy Reid who is arguing that Blacks are too dumb to notice. Self hating much?

  106. @Anonymous
    You know what's absolutely wild? I've been a cop for twenty years. I'm nothing special and my job basically just feels like well-paid service work. I'm just a guy in polyester and a name tag. Never promoted, never will. I just drive a police car around and answer police calls. And I'm surrounded by guys and gals who do the same thing, almost all of whom also will never be more important than sergeants.

    Yet, I feel as though I'm the possessor of this incredible secret knowledge. Like I have the power to see an entire world that the rest of respectable society doesn't even know exists. A world that everyone, everyone, insists is The Most Important Question Of Our Time. It's not an exaggeration to say that I know more about this than 99% of society.

    And you know who cares? No one. No reporters come asking. No non-cops I know ask me. I'm not sure what percentage don't care, or don't want to know, or just never has occur to them that they don't actually know.

    It's not that I actually care anymore. I work in a very liberal city and one of my greatest job benefits is supping on their tears. I really get off on explaining to citizens who didn't ask just how utterly f'ed their city is (and, oh boy, it is). I don't have to lie in the least, I just give them both barrels of reality, wrapped in their own BS woke verbiage. But they don't dig any further. They don't actually want to know.

    As Steve has pointed out here somewhere, people do awesome breakdowns of sh$t they actually care about. Baseball, medieval sword fighting, dungeons and dragons, whatever. But how law enforcement actually works at the street level? Yawn.

    Sorry if this was largely off topic.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimDandy, @Dr. X, @The Wild Geese Howard, @BosTex, @Mike Tre, @Muggles, @CharleszMartel, @Nicholas Stix, @anonymous

    Decades ago I read a book titled something like “What Cops Know”.

    It was mostly about cop knowledge about the kind of perps and their behaviors for committing certain types of crimes. How they size up situations in crime scenes and aftermath.

    Thanks, along with others, for your post. Especially in this age of censorship and Orwellian Groupthink, your on-the-ground perspective is very valuable.

    When LEO types try to share that now, it’s a ticket to firing or early retirement.

    Some of the truth leaks out anyway Though it remains the kind of “dirty secrets” akin only to certain bizarre sex practices by the Alphabet City groups.

    As you stated, “journalists” aren’t interested. That kind of journalism ended by about 1960.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Muggles

    What Cops Know: Cops Talk About What They Do, How They Do It and What It Does to Them, by Connie Fletcher, is an eye-opener. I would recommend it to anyone. Also Cops by Mark Baker. Both books were written 30+ years, ago so not infected by wokeness.

  107. @Gore 2004
    Do police solve crimes anyway?

    Republicans should not be bootlickers to police either.

    At some point, people will have to decide what type of "law enforcement" they want: Either Kyle Rittenhouse-style or the police we have now

    Replies: @Muggles, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    At some point, people will have to decide what type of “law enforcement” they want: Either Kyle Rittenhouse-style or the police we have now

    Only the truly crazy prefer a Mad Max world to “the police we have now.”

    So a fed, Russian/Chinese internet troll or what exactly?

    • Replies: @CharleszMartel
    @Muggles

    No. Not the crazy.

    The crazy are the ones who think it's possible to have one set of Police Behavioral Standards for different races. What would be effective for blacks would be unnecessary for Chinese and intolerable for Whites.

    Live through a major American riot. They usually end when the people start blowing away the miscreants. That ends the festivities real quick. Look up Koreans after L.A., Whites after Miami, and Palestinians after Caribbean hurricanes.

    I lived through Hurricane Andrew in Miami as well as the McDuffy Riots in 1980. I know what really happened.

    After Andrew, the police had to rent refrigerated semi-trailers to store the bodies of unknown Hispanics who had been mysteriously shot attempting to loot rich white neighborhoods. No media, no investigations, no I.D's.

    No questions, no problems. Just random unknown hurricane victims.

    Nice and easy.

    Remember the weekly campus riots in the latte 60's? Four students ventilated at Kent State and "Voila"! No more campus riots.

    Easy-Peazy.

  108. Evelyn Waugh is kicking himself he didn’t think to name a reporter’Emily Badger’

    • LOL: Recently Based, Gordo
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Ghost of Bull Moose


    Evelyn Waugh is kicking himself he didn’t think to name a reporter ’Emily Badger’
     
    Not to mention The Onion, once based in the Badger capital.
  109. @JR Ewing
    @Thomas


    a bonanza of election “fortification”
     
    This is my main worry and why I can’t get excited about the midterms just yet, especially the statewide senate races.

    A friend of mine who conceits to be a “moderate” commented today in a group email that “election denying nonsense must be stamped out.”

    He and others like him seem to have no clue how much the 2020 shenanigans wrecked people’s faith in our system. The final election results might have been entirely 100% accurate, but the way they went about it - mail in voting, massive counting shifts in the middle of the night, kicking out observers and covering the windows, and all the other irregularities - was corrosive and entirely undermined the idea of a “fair” election.

    Replies: @Gandydancer

    The final election results might have been entirely 100% accurate…

    You mean “might have been” in the multiverse sense?

    Because in this world I saw video of a van load of “ballots” trucked into Cobo hall after midnight and who knows how many times they were counted, all the anyway-rendered-ineffective “observers” having been sent home. And, voila, Trump’s lead in Michigan disappeared.

    I didn’t pay that mich attention, Trump being so ineffective as to render any advocacy of his complaints ineffective, but I saw what I saw and don’t tell me I didn’t.

    • Agree: Old Prude, Nicholas Stix
  110. @Muggles
    @Anonymous

    Decades ago I read a book titled something like "What Cops Know".

    It was mostly about cop knowledge about the kind of perps and their behaviors for committing certain types of crimes. How they size up situations in crime scenes and aftermath.

    Thanks, along with others, for your post. Especially in this age of censorship and Orwellian Groupthink, your on-the-ground perspective is very valuable.

    When LEO types try to share that now, it's a ticket to firing or early retirement.

    Some of the truth leaks out anyway Though it remains the kind of "dirty secrets" akin only to certain bizarre sex practices by the Alphabet City groups.

    As you stated, "journalists" aren't interested. That kind of journalism ended by about 1960.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    What Cops Know: Cops Talk About What They Do, How They Do It and What It Does to Them, by Connie Fletcher, is an eye-opener. I would recommend it to anyone. Also Cops by Mark Baker. Both books were written 30+ years, ago so not infected by wokeness.

  111. @Polistra
    @Frank G

    Did you actually just blame Steve for America's crime problem

    Replies: @Gandydancer

    No, he’s blaming Steve and his ilk for contributing to the enablement of the COVID hoax and all the diminishment of our liberties and economy derived therefrom..

    I would have thought that that was obvious. What’s the matter with you?

  112. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    As they say, politics is downstream from culture.

    People who live in low-crime communities don't refrain from crime because they fear the police; they don't do crime because they were raised right, and they know crime is wrong. I don't rob banks; it's not because I fear the governor's new anti-bank-robber policy, but because I have no desire to rob a bank. If however your home culture is insane, then insanity and chaos is what you'll get, no matter the law or the policy or who is the governor. Play insane games, win insane prizes.

    You're not going to solve black crime by locking up more blacks, because there's always more crooks where the crooks came from. Either get their culture to see the futility and wrongness of it (good luck), or else give them their own isolated communities, far far away from everyone else, where they can do whatever they like without bothering normal people. The problem with ghettos and housing projects is the existence of buses and subways and highways that can ferry the crooks to where the targets are. They need to be sent to places where the only reachable target is themselves.

    Replies: @Curle, @Meretricious, @Gandydancer, @Recently Based

    You’re not going to solve black crime by locking up more blacks, because there’s always more crooks where the crooks came from.

    It’s pointless to tamp down black crime because you can’t “solve” it? Strawman argument. No black criminal actually in jail is going to mug anyone on the outside. And it’s not like there’s a limited number of mugger slots so that future muggers have to wait until a slot opens up. Why is your brain broken in this way?

    • Replies: @Renard
    @Gandydancer


    What’s the matter with you?
     

    Why is your brain broken in this way?
     
    You need a time out. Adults are talking here.

    Replies: @Gandydancer

  113. @Achmed E. Newman
    Well, it's not that I really think all the Conservative voting in the world is going to solve America's problems, but that's not in the same way as the NY Times means. We have already been duly screwed by both the invasion and by the loss of sound money. There's no getting up from these holes (though ceasing the digging would be nice).

    Steve Sailer here is rightfully proud of his work in analyzing the effect of the racial reckoning. However, what I see more of here from the toilet paper of record is that that they are not shy about lying hypocritically about anything anymore. I mean, come on - Mayors appoint Chief of Polices, Governors appoint lots of officials, State legislators vote on the issues in question, and do we not vote for all these people? Of course, voting for these people affects crime policy. What the hell, man?

    How can one read something like this and not see the Lyin' Press as nothing but an arm of the Potomac Regime government at this point? We need out!

    Yes, I'm still going to vote, and we're going to get down to the GOP office tomorrow and help out a bit. Think of it as therapy.

    Replies: @tyrone, @Adam Smith

    Chief of Polices. 🙂 ☮

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Adam Smith

    Haha, Adam, I wanted to see if Reg Caesar would catch it. Or maybe he did and just got disgusted.

    ;-}

  114. @Inverness
    @Buzz Mohawk


    My mother, a Southern Democrat, used to joke that my father, a died-in-the-wool, California Republican, would vote for Mickey Mouse if Mikey Mouse was the Republican candidate. Well, I plan to vote for Micky Mouse, as my father would have.
     
    If he's a write-in candidate you may be in some trouble.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    LOL. Congratulations. You win the Pedant of the Day award.

  115. @Jack D
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Stalin said that "quantity has its own quality". When you are comparing Russia to the US (or the Wehrmacht or the Ukrainian Army or anyone else) this cuts both ways.

    OTOH, Russia, at least at the start of this war, had vast quantities of war materiel - thousand upon thousands of tanks stored after the end of the Cold War, warehouses full of artillery shells, etc. Far more than anyone else. So the Ukrainians can capture or destroy a bunch of Russian armor and the Russians have even more.

    OTOH, these quantities are not infinite. And the tanks that exist in paper often don't work in real life and the ones that do work are ancient and highly vulnerable to modern anti-tank weapons.

    And every lost tank means a lost tank crew. And the people who are replacing them are not as well trained as the first wave - often barely trained at all. The Russian military was always willing to take high levels of casualties among the enlisted men but in this war they have been forced to send officers to the front and have had HQ locations that are well behind the front hit by HIMARS. And low birth rate modern Russia doesn't have millions of young men to send into the meat grinder. In the recent mobilization, as many men fled from Russia as were mobilized. And the ones that fled were higher quality than the losers who stayed behind.

    The Russian Army is a top down army (where NCOs are considered worthless). Of course the Czarist Army had a class system but the Soviets made it even worse because their system was based on not telling people the truth about anything (and this continues today). Russian troops often don't even know they are being sent to Ukraine until their convoy passes the border.

    Remember that one of the reasons that the Red Army prevailed against the Germans is that the Americans were arming them. Now they are arming "the Nazis" that they are fighting against.

    Things in Russia are just on a different scale. Yes, we have incompetence, corruption, drunkenness, lying, etc. but the Russian versions of these things are on a completely different level. The Russians are losing in 1 week the number of troops that we lost in 20 years in Afghanistan.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Graveldips

    And the tanks that exist in paper often don’t work in real life…

    Also true to a lesser extent of the ammo. Any chemical, including explosives and propellants, degrades over time.

  116. @Spud Boy
    I'm not sure the term "Racial Reckoning" adequately and clearly captures what happened in the wake of the George Floyd incident. iSteve readers know what it means, but if I said "racial reckoning" to the average person the street, they'd have no idea what I was talking about.

    I don't have a better shorthand description at the moment. Floyd's death was basically a local story which likely had nothing do do with race being amplified 1000x and turned into a referendum on race relations and policing in America.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “iSteve readers know what it means, but if I said “racial reckoning” to the average person the street, they’d have no idea what I was talking about.“

    Indeed, because this is an Alt Right talking point.

  117. @J.Ross
    @Frank G

    Actually, while he still thinks that lab coats are magic and government promises mean that drugs don't have to be tested, Steve has been very clear and consistent about the medically unjustifiable, itself-criminal lockdown having all kinds of predictable side effects, like impelling blacks to drive their cars at the speed of science.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @Corvinus, @Alden

    “Steve has been very clear and consistent about the medically unjustifiable, itself-criminal lockdown having all kinds of predictable side effects”

    You mean the medically justifiable, in the interest of the general welfare shutdowns.

    • LOL: Desiderius
  118. @Curle
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “ You’re not going to solve black crime by locking up more blacks, because there’s always more crooks where the crooks came from.”

    No. Giving frequent offenders long sentences absolutely reduces crime rates.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    How so?

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @Corvinus

    Don't be dense, Corvo.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Corvinus



    No. Giving frequent offenders long sentences absolutely reduces crime rates.
     
    How so?
     
    Let me explain it to you, dips**t. Locking up violet offenders for a long time means that they can't commit crimes out in society.

    You are a f**king idiot.
  119. @Reg Cæsar
    @Thomas


    All indicators are that the Democrats are in for a very bad Tuesday night absent a bonanza of election “fortification” to rival 2020. That reality has finally started to hit them, and so you see this sort of ineffectual flailing at the inevitable.
     
    Someone is running ads for Joan Ellis Beglinger in the Wisconsin gubernatorial race. She's an independent conservative candidate critical of GOP-endorsed businessman Tim Michels for being squishy on guns and abortion.

    Or was an independent candidate. The wrinkle: She dropped out on Sept 4th and endorsed Michels. The incumbent Democrat, Gov Tony Evers, is Obama-bland and should have had an easy ride to a second term.


    Whoever is behind this ruse is both cynical and desperate. They are afraid!

    Replies: @Brutusale

    I’ve read that the Cheeseheads are about to elect themselves a veto-proof Republican majority in both houses of the Wisconsin legislature, effectively neutering Evers if he’s reelected. True?

  120. My White neighbor favors depolicing heavily black parts of cities since allowing black criminals to kill each other would make things better for everybody else.

  121. @Polistra
    Also: only racist people discuss inflation.

    Inflation! What even is that?


    https://i.ibb.co/804Jtxt/Screenshot-20221104-183242-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @Curle, @Harry Baldwin, @al gore rhythms, @Prester John, @Spud Boy, @Muggles, @P.T., @Reg Cæsar, @CharleszMartel

    Inflation usually means lower unemployment rates and more opportunity for low-income people. Fighting inflation usually means slowing the economy and throwing people out of work. It’s Econ 101.

    • Disagree: Gandydancer
  122. @Corvinus
    @Curle

    How so?

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Mr. Anon

    Don’t be dense, Corvo.

  123. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    PA Senate Candidate John Fetterman (and this was BEFORE his stroke):

    "We could reduce our prison population by 1/3 and not make anyone less safe.”
     

    Wisc. Senate candidate Mandela Barnes (sound of body and mind, if not sense):

    "Reducing prison populations is now sexy."


    But look who's running for state Senate, unopposed. Would you oppose someone with that name?

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @BB753

    Only if my name was Robert Ford.

  124. @Frank G
    And how much did your public COVID Mania contribute to the climate, Steve? Will there ever be an iSteve COVID Reckoning?

    Replies: @Polistra, @J.Ross, @Recently Based, @Jack D, @BB753

  125. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    PA Senate Candidate John Fetterman (and this was BEFORE his stroke):

    "We could reduce our prison population by 1/3 and not make anyone less safe.”
     

    Wisc. Senate candidate Mandela Barnes (sound of body and mind, if not sense):

    "Reducing prison populations is now sexy."


    But look who's running for state Senate, unopposed. Would you oppose someone with that name?

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @BB753

    Mandela Barnes, lol! Named after Nelson Mandela!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @BB753


    Mandela Barnes, lol! Named after Nelson Mandela!
     
    Jesse Mandela Barnes. Named after... Helms?
  126. @Mr. Anon
    @Jack D


    Putting aside how much Steve contributed to “Covid Mania” , how much of the increase in crime had to do with Covid Mania and how much had to do with the Great Racial Reckoning. Look at the graphs above. Did Covid Mania suddenly increase in the middle of 2020 (and only among black people) or was it something else?
     
    The Summer of George started a mere 10 weeks after Covid Mania began in the US (it began earlier elsewhere). Perhaps there was a lot of pent-up frustration due to the lockdowns and the pervasive weirdness of it all. I don't imagine that the lockdown-regime contributed all that much to black crime, but it did massively contribute to the huge turn out in support of BLM protests by brainwashed white millennials and Gen-Zers who, thanks to the World being shut down, had nothing better to do. It might have also contributed to a general sense among that same cohort that this was a great turning (why, one might even call it a "Great Reset") where everything that came before would be swept away.

    BLM by itself would not have changed much by itself. It was society's almost complete capitulation to the demands of BLM that led to the ensuing craziness in 2020.

    Replies: @Alden

    The summer of George had absolutely nothing to do with covid.

    It was no different from the Mike Brown, Trayvon Martin and even Rodney King riots and going back to the famous Watts riots in the 1960s.

    These riots are not spontaneous at all. There is a very well organized operation that creates and directs the riots. The US department of justice, wealthy communists like George Soros and Stanley Sheinbaum all the revuns and community activists.

    The US department of justice has a civil rights division. Basically dedicated to backing all black criminals against police and law enforcement. CRDofDOJ has 800 numbers emails and chat rooms manned 24 hours a day.

    To take calls from ACLU SPLC black and (( )) activists democrat black and (( )) officials such as Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley during the Rodney King riots and Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey during the St Floyd riots. The district attorneys who filed charges against George Zimmerman and Kyle Rittenhouse. The CRD jumps in to take down every White who resists black criminals.

    And that’s just the civil rights division of the justice department.

    Then there’s numerous organizations many many more than ACLU SPLC ADL That jump in to pay money to trouble makers. Like paying Chicago blacks $15 an hour and providing buses hotels and meals to riot in Ferguson MO.

    We all know about the anti White racist (((media))) that exonerates black criminals and attacks police. It’s extremely obvious. We know about the Soros funded pro criminal anti White district attorneys.

    Nothing new; a generation before Chesa Boudin San Francisco had third generation communist Terrence Hallinan as district attorney for 8 years. He was far far worse than Boudin. First week in office he fired all the senior attorneys everyone of them. These are the ones who were promoted because they had a good win record in felony trials. The attorneys that remained we’re basically apprentice prosecutors . And Hallinan hired militant criminal defense & civil rights attorneys to replace the ones he fired.,

    It’s not always a George Soros or a Stanley Sheinbaum who finds all these pro criminal organizations and riots.

    It’s the non profit charities and great foundations. Even the ridiculous United Appeal and of course the churches and the Jewish charities. The big foundations fund smaller NGOS. Small charities con idiots into giving them money for the tax breaks. The money is transferred from NGO to NGO till it ends up paying for riots.

    That method was perfected in Russia in the 1870s and migrated to America. It’s nothing new. The masons were experts at revolutions and organized the American, French, S American and 1848 revolutions in Europe.

    I needn’t go into the way the ((media)) comes out with the same lies about every police incident. The men of UNZ are very familiar with that. Remember Matthew Shepherd? A gay retail drug dealer cheated the gsy wholesalers of the illegal drugs he sold on commission. Several times. The gays who gave him the illegal drugs to sell got mad . The gay drug dealers, one of whom had had sex with Matthew killed him because he cheated them. A common crime that usually isn’t broadcast to the world for years.

    But the local ADL AJC agents jumped in the ordinary drug dealer murder. Because ADL AJC had been trying to get a federal hate crime law through congress for a long time. National ADL AJC SPLC ACLU and CRD of the DOJ were notified of the great opportunity. The ((media)) created a false tale of total lies and kept it up till Matthews coffin was taken to DC ala George Floyd and buried in some heretic Protestant cathedral in DC.

    That’s how a gay drug dealer criminal killed by other gay drug dealer criminals became a martyr. And how ADL AJC ACLU SPLC got their KGB hate crime law passed.

    President Clinton saw that Americans were angry about 30 years of soft in crime. Took the opportunity and was elected because of his tough on crime policies. So did Mayor Rudy Guillani of NYC And Mayor Brown of San Francisco Probably a few others I don’t know about.

    Affirmative action doesn’t help. As every big city in the country is run by pro crime black democrats and their White servile accomplices. And behind them the media the big foundations and the wealthiest corporations in America.

    Recent example. Last week LA Times ran a huge piece about some Black Guerrilla Family thug convict who killed a prison guard. Black Guerrilla Family wasn’t just a group of ordinary black street criminals like the Black Panthers. They were highly political and tied in with Weather Underground, Vencermos Brugade abd a lot of elderly Marxist’s.

    Do the BGF convict killed a prison guard decades ago. And was sentenced to life without parole. Murder happened in San Quentin 400 miles from Los Angeles about 30 years ago.

    What possible interest is this murder and parole hearing to the residents of Los Angeles. It’s a heavily immigrant town. Who have no interest in the story.

    Yet the LA Times had a quarter page on the front page and the biggest headline for this story. And inside two full pages advocating for parole and forgiveness for the black murderer of a White man. A young man with a small child. A black convict who wasn’t an ordinary felon but tied in with Charles Garry Faye Stender Angela Davis and a nationwide network of insurrectionists and communist with a multimillion dollar war chest.
    Those are just examples of what has been going on since the 1880s. The commies won in the 1960s Its just been a mopping up and consolidation ever since.

    Remember every word in the ((media)) is a lie. Read Epoch Times, amren and watch Fox News if you want. But it’s like fighting a tidal wave.

    • Replies: @Gandydancer
    @Alden


    ...ACLU SPLC black and (( )) activists democrat black and (( )) officials such as Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley
     

    ...The district attorneys who filed charges against George Zimmerman and Kyle Rittenhouse. The CRD jumps in to take down every White who resists black criminals.
     
    I couldn't be bothered to read that wall of text, since the mentality of people who write "(( ))" isn't worth examining, but these two sentences sort of jumped out at me.

    Bradley was of course black, not " black [or] (( ))".

    And the criminals who Rittenhouse ventilated weren't black.

    You need to ask yourself why your brain is broken.

    Also you need to learn the use of the comma.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  127. OT,but this just in: When the police got to the Pelosi house,they heard a very loud stereo. Song playing? ” Hit Me With Your Best Shot.”

  128. @J.Ross
    @Frank G

    Actually, while he still thinks that lab coats are magic and government promises mean that drugs don't have to be tested, Steve has been very clear and consistent about the medically unjustifiable, itself-criminal lockdown having all kinds of predictable side effects, like impelling blacks to drive their cars at the speed of science.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @Corvinus, @Alden

    Are you brand new to UNZ? Steve has preached covid hoax exponential increase in covid infections and we’re all gonna die since February 2020. Endless clip and pastes from lying CDC, big pharma bullied and intimidated Drs and bullying buttinsky busybodies.

    One thing I really really hope Steve doesn’t do. Clip and paste the endless articles claiming that low test scores of black and Hispanic kids are caused by the unnecessary hysterical school lockdowns. Maybe it wasn’t such a good idea after all? These articles are by the same teachers and education non experts who insisted on closing the schools for two and a half years.

    I’m sure we’ll be seeing these articles for the next 15 years. Until the last of the 3 year olds who missed nursery school turn 18.

  129. @Gore 2004
    Do police solve crimes anyway?

    Republicans should not be bootlickers to police either.

    At some point, people will have to decide what type of "law enforcement" they want: Either Kyle Rittenhouse-style or the police we have now

    Replies: @Muggles, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I support local cops, in NYC where we used to live, and where we are now. They are one of the few remaining institutions that belong to us.

    But Democrats have targeted local police departments for that reason. When they demoralize them to the point that they chase out the good ones via early retirement or harassment from the DOJ, local police departments will become another leftist, antiwhite, antiAmerican institution like all the rest.

    Just as the left now loves the FBI and CIA all of a sudden, they will become big fans of local police. The evil fcuks destroying our society cannot wait to get local cops cracking heads of the local ‘insurrectionists.’

    Why? Take a look at how the cops behaved in places like Australia during the pandemic. Look at what happens to British whites with the temerity to talk back to African invaders or complain about Pakistanis raping their children.

    • Replies: @clifford brown
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Exactly.

    Police unions were the last conservative, even reactionary, institution in the country. The military and the FBI have been lost for some time. A critical goal of the 2020 Revolution was to dismantle and replace police unions as a conservative institution. The last step in the long march through the institutions. There is literally not one institution left in America that is not overtly radical leftist.

  130. @Mark G.
    @Mr. Anon


    And by the same token, Republicans who think that the US Government is too stupid and ham-handed to manage American society and tell Americans how to live their lives, thought that it was eminently capable of managing foreign societies in places like Afghanistan and Iraq and telling Afghanis and Iraqis how to live their lives.
     
    I've worked for the civilian part of the military for forty years. Conservatives often seem oblivious that the military is just another corrupt, incompetent government bureaucracy. People were surprised by the failure in Afghanistan and the bungled withdrawal, but I wasn't surprised. I just thought "so typical".

    It's always been like this. Commonly used military acronyms like FUBAR (fouled up beyond all repair) and SNAFU (situation normal all fouled up) have been around since World War II. We won that war because the German military leaders were even more incompetent than ours and our free enterprise system generated more wealth to pay for a larger and better equipped military.

    When we had the draft and more Americans had served in the military, making fun of military incompetence was commonly seen in novels, films and tv shows like F Troop, McHale's Navy, Hogan's Heroes and M*A*S*H. Now that we have a volunteer military many Americans have no idea what the military is like. When I tell people in the comment section here at unz.com stories about military incompetence they don't even believe me, say I'm a liar and have never worked for the military. I just laugh at that.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Peter Akuleyev, @Mr. Anon, @Mike Tre, @Zero Philosopher

    ” We won that war because the German military leaders were even more incompetent than ours”

    That’s not why we won that war.

  131. @Adam Smith
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Chief of Polices. 🙂 ☮

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Haha, Adam, I wanted to see if Reg Caesar would catch it. Or maybe he did and just got disgusted.

    ;-}

  132. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Gore 2004

    I support local cops, in NYC where we used to live, and where we are now. They are one of the few remaining institutions that belong to us.

    But Democrats have targeted local police departments for that reason. When they demoralize them to the point that they chase out the good ones via early retirement or harassment from the DOJ, local police departments will become another leftist, antiwhite, antiAmerican institution like all the rest.

    Just as the left now loves the FBI and CIA all of a sudden, they will become big fans of local police. The evil fcuks destroying our society cannot wait to get local cops cracking heads of the local 'insurrectionists.'

    Why? Take a look at how the cops behaved in places like Australia during the pandemic. Look at what happens to British whites with the temerity to talk back to African invaders or complain about Pakistanis raping their children.

    Replies: @clifford brown

    Exactly.

    Police unions were the last conservative, even reactionary, institution in the country. The military and the FBI have been lost for some time. A critical goal of the 2020 Revolution was to dismantle and replace police unions as a conservative institution. The last step in the long march through the institutions. There is literally not one institution left in America that is not overtly radical leftist.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  133. @AnotherDad
    Emily Badger. LOL.

    Let me outta here!

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Entire NY Time, LOL.

    I’m outta here!

  134. @BB753
    @Reg Cæsar

    Mandela Barnes, lol! Named after Nelson Mandela!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Mandela Barnes, lol! Named after Nelson Mandela!

    Jesse Mandela Barnes. Named after… Helms?

    • LOL: BB753
  135. @Anon
    Concrete things that could be done:

    1. Stop and frisk. Wouldn't this be on a mayor/city council/police commission/police department level? Maybe the governor could promise to run interference. Main problem ...

    2. Pressure Soros DAs and Soros-inspired DAs. I just cannot believe that there is nothing that other government officials could do about these clowns. Obviously prosecutors have some discretion in what they focus on, but why aren't there court cases challenging prosecutors who decide to not only not focus on certain crimes, but to wholly refuse to prosecute 100 percent of the perps, and to publicly announce that to would-be perps. This is beyond the prosecutors discretionary power. They do not make the laws. Get some court cases going against them! Heck, could citizens get standing based on the effect of these policies on them? Even cases that get thrown out of court get publicity.

    3. Get rid of Soros prosecutors via recall or the electoral process. Politicians could lead here.

    4. Judges that get in the way of bulldozing homeless camps. Personalize it in a Saul Alinsky way: Name and shame a select number of judges. Aggressively ask them to publicly explain what they are doing. A politician could do a press conference on the sidewalk in front of judges' houses. Copy the other side. Don't bring a knife to a gunfight. Make life really uncomfortable for these guys. Politicians could do this.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @BosTex, @Reg Cæsar, @slumber_j

    3. Get rid of Soros prosecutors via recall or the electoral process.

    First get rid of the Soros secretaries of state! He bought those before he did the DAs, and they count the votes.

  136. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    As they say, politics is downstream from culture.

    People who live in low-crime communities don't refrain from crime because they fear the police; they don't do crime because they were raised right, and they know crime is wrong. I don't rob banks; it's not because I fear the governor's new anti-bank-robber policy, but because I have no desire to rob a bank. If however your home culture is insane, then insanity and chaos is what you'll get, no matter the law or the policy or who is the governor. Play insane games, win insane prizes.

    You're not going to solve black crime by locking up more blacks, because there's always more crooks where the crooks came from. Either get their culture to see the futility and wrongness of it (good luck), or else give them their own isolated communities, far far away from everyone else, where they can do whatever they like without bothering normal people. The problem with ghettos and housing projects is the existence of buses and subways and highways that can ferry the crooks to where the targets are. They need to be sent to places where the only reachable target is themselves.

    Replies: @Curle, @Meretricious, @Gandydancer, @Recently Based

    If that’s true, then how do you explain NYC driving the number of annual murders by almost 90% between 1990 and 2015?

    It’s not magic, just serious policing, criminal prosecution, schools and welfare policies.

  137. @Polistra
    Also: only racist people discuss inflation.

    Inflation! What even is that?


    https://i.ibb.co/804Jtxt/Screenshot-20221104-183242-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @Curle, @Harry Baldwin, @al gore rhythms, @Prester John, @Spud Boy, @Muggles, @P.T., @Reg Cæsar, @CharleszMartel

    Also: only racist people discuss inflation.

    Inflation! What even is that?

    It what make da baww bounce!

    • LOL: Renard
  138. @Prester John
    @Polistra

    Who is "Joy Reid" and who cares what she has to say about anything?

    Replies: @Recently Based

    Someone who gets to be on TV, influencing millions (well, it’s CNBC, so thousands) of people.

    I don’t watch much TV at all, and certainly not cable news, and like most people who know how to read, find most American entertainment culture to be pretty childish, but I do think that the strain of thought that says “who cares what these people say” to be a lot of cope. When people who are deeply opposed to everything that you believe have effective control of what your children see and hear on TV, TikTok, streaming services, in their classrooms from pre-K to graduate school, on Spotify and at school functions, it should matter to you because it’s going to have a huge effect on how they think, and ultimately live.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Recently Based


    When people who are deeply opposed to everything that you believe have effective control of what your children see and hear on TV, TikTok, streaming services, in their classrooms from pre-K to graduate school, on Spotify and at school functions, it should matter to you because it’s going to have a huge effect on how they think, and ultimately live.
     
    Not if they DON'T (get to) use TikTock, TV, and streaming services, it doesn't. During college and grad school, yeah, you've still got to keep teaching.

    Don't be a friend to your kid - be a a parent and lay down the rules. There will be none of that crap in our house - that goes for the wife too. (At this point, she's more based than me! She was only "Recently Based" too.)

    Replies: @Recently Based

  139. @Gamecock
    @Mr. Anon

    It's impossible to get colonialism out of the Western psyche.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    It’s impossible to get colonialism out of the Western psyche.

    Well George W. Bush’s tragic, pathetic failures have done a pretty good job of it. I think the West is now closer to abandoning the “white man’s burden” than it’s ever been.

    Let the savages be savages. The ones who want to fix their own countries will have to show the will to do it themselves.

    • Replies: @Gamecock
    @Wilkey


    Well George W. Bush’s tragic, pathetic failures have done a pretty good job of it. I think the West is now closer to abandoning the “white man’s burden” than it’s ever been.

    Let the savages be savages. The ones who want to fix their own countries will have to show the will to do it themselves.
     
    Spoken like a true colonialist. Indigenous people don't need fixing. "White man's burden" summarizes colonialism - we have no such duty. "Savages" is in the eye of the beholder. Sentient beings who have evolved their culture over centuries have the right to be left alone.

    "Will" isn't the problem. Their problem is perpetual interference from Western countries.

    You can't develop businesses when the West is flooding you with "aid." E.g., you can't build a textile industry when you are getting shiploads of clothing every week.

    Replies: @Wilkey

  140. Here is a very enlightening glimpse into workings of Homicide Unit, Baltimore PD, early 90’s – how some homicide cases are solved (once in a blue moon 😁). But most of the time those cases grow cold.

    Many Cops (Detectives 2nd Grade and up who work cases) regard this book as sound. I don’t mean beat cops – nowadays majority of them are fat dimwits (especially females) who dose off in their patrol cars, then wake up and check their 3 favorite apps:

    1.Number of seconds left till retirement
    2.Overtime Calculator
    3.Google Maps to find nearest cheap eatery and take extended 2+ hours long lunch/breakfast/dinner.

    Also – here is a great opportunity for you, budding Snake Plisskens & Paul Kerseys !!!

    Check out the crime scene addresses from this book on Google Street View and Zillow. Center of Baltimore, 30 miles from Washington, DC, solid brick row houses are selling for $5K-$10K. Who would not want to buy a beautiful row house with $1K down and Build Back Better ?

  141. @Gandydancer
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    You’re not going to solve black crime by locking up more blacks, because there’s always more crooks where the crooks came from.
     
    It's pointless to tamp down black crime because you can't "solve" it? Strawman argument. No black criminal actually in jail is going to mug anyone on the outside. And it's not like there's a limited number of mugger slots so that future muggers have to wait until a slot opens up. Why is your brain broken in this way?

    Replies: @Renard

    What’s the matter with you?

    Why is your brain broken in this way?

    You need a time out. Adults are talking here.

    • Replies: @Gandydancer
    @Renard


    You need a time out. Adults are talking here.
     
    Not when you're typing, Karen.
  142. @Anon
    Concrete things that could be done:

    1. Stop and frisk. Wouldn't this be on a mayor/city council/police commission/police department level? Maybe the governor could promise to run interference. Main problem ...

    2. Pressure Soros DAs and Soros-inspired DAs. I just cannot believe that there is nothing that other government officials could do about these clowns. Obviously prosecutors have some discretion in what they focus on, but why aren't there court cases challenging prosecutors who decide to not only not focus on certain crimes, but to wholly refuse to prosecute 100 percent of the perps, and to publicly announce that to would-be perps. This is beyond the prosecutors discretionary power. They do not make the laws. Get some court cases going against them! Heck, could citizens get standing based on the effect of these policies on them? Even cases that get thrown out of court get publicity.

    3. Get rid of Soros prosecutors via recall or the electoral process. Politicians could lead here.

    4. Judges that get in the way of bulldozing homeless camps. Personalize it in a Saul Alinsky way: Name and shame a select number of judges. Aggressively ask them to publicly explain what they are doing. A politician could do a press conference on the sidewalk in front of judges' houses. Copy the other side. Don't bring a knife to a gunfight. Make life really uncomfortable for these guys. Politicians could do this.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @BosTex, @Reg Cæsar, @slumber_j

    I’d say that whatever one thinks of the Terry decision, stop-and-frisk strikes me as contrary to the spirit of the constitutional prohibition on unreasonable search. If I were stopped and frisked, I’d be pretty pissed-off, I can tell you that, and I think I’d be right to feel that way.

    Busting people for low-level offenses and then reasonably searching them seems to me to be a much better way to go about it, for a number of reasons. Low-lifes who are packing heat are very likely to commit actual offenses like fare-beating etc., at which point you’ve got them dead to rights.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    @slumber_j


    Busting people for low-level offenses and then reasonably searching them seems to me to be a much better way to go about it...
     
    This is what most stop-and-frisk was: Low-lifes jumping turnstiles, smoking weed in public, throwing trash on the ground, jaywalking, etc. IOW, committing minor crimes, which gave the cops the probably cause they needed to see if there was also a major crime.

    You'd think that if you a) wanted to carry a gun around NY you'd avoid committing minor crimes thus drawing attention to yourself or b) if you wanted to commit minor crimes you'd leave the gun at home. However apparently carrying a gun AND committing minor crimes is a civil right now.

    The media has perpetuated the lie that stop-and-frisk was NYPD stopping random blacks for no reason at all, nice folks who were out minding their own business, obeying the law just like everyone else. It appears you've bought into that lie.

  143. @Aspiring Rapper and Honor Student
    @Not Raul

    You're right that it's about the Orange Man. I'm surprised Sailer's analysis didn't address this. The establishment went crazy and lost their judgement because of Trump. And they were willing to accept increased homicide and traffic deaths among urban blacks as the cost of ousting him. Like Stalin said, if you want to make an omelette, you gotta break some eggs.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow

    Wasn’t that Robspierre during the French Revolution?

  144. Voting Republican on Tuesday probably won’t have too much impact on law enforcement policy, but it will send a message of rebuke to the permanent establishment.

    Voting for the party opposite of the party that cynically unleashed crime for electoral advantage and which then proceeded to curse your lying eyes assigns a substantial and just penalty to that party for engaging in such behavior. It also brands them the pro-crime party for several successive electoral cycles, which they fully deserve – they seem to just be awakening to the idea that they’re plausibly the pro-crime party in the minds of swing voters for the foreseeable future despite their media arm attempting to bail them out.

    They’ll either come to heel or continue to pay the price in future elections.

  145. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Evelyn Waugh is kicking himself he didn’t think to name a reporter’Emily Badger’

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Evelyn Waugh is kicking himself he didn’t think to name a reporter ’Emily Badger’

    Not to mention The Onion, once based in the Badger capital.

  146. “You’re not going to fix the problems from there,” said Jeff Asher, a crime analyst and consultant with AH Datalytics in New Orleans (and a former Upshot contributor). “If you want to fix the problems, go run for mayor.”

    Your governor isn’t going to solve a spike in murder, he added. And it’s generally not the governor who’s been failing to solve it, either.

    I know. That’s why it is foolish to claim that Republican leadership is the reason that “red” states have higher crime rates than “blue” states. I’m sure the NY Times will be refuting this claim made ad nauseum by Hillary Clinton and countless other politicians very soon.

  147. @lavoisier
    Amazing that on television all the news networks bend over backwards to avoid stating the obvious: Blacks are causing a great deal of mayhem around the country and are the ones responsible for the massive increase in crime rates.

    Sure the Democrats made all of this possible with their defund the police strategy and support of BLM madness, but the crime problem is largely due to black people behaving badly.

    I love all the efforts of the media whores to avoid discussing what is obvious.

    Clown world.

    Replies: @Polistra

    Give them credit though, they keep coming up with new ways to skip out on restaurant bills

    A woman having dinner at Ruth’s Chris Steak House in Manhattan stabbed a male patron after becoming enraged by his arguing with an employee Friday night, police said.

    The 24-year-old man began squabbling with a worker at the upmarket Midtown steakhouse just after 10 p.m. — and made such a scene that it disturbed diners at nearby tables, including two women enjoying a meal together who told him to quiet down, according to cops and sources.

    When he didn’t, one of the ladies grabbed a steak knife and stabbed him in the back, the law-enforcement sources said.

    She and her friend then fled on foot — without paying their bill.

    https://nypost.com/2022/11/05/nycs-ruths-chris-steak-house-stabbing-leaves-patron-hurt-nypd-seek-female-attacker

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Polistra


    Give them credit though, they keep coming up with new ways to skip out on restaurant bills
     
    I’ll let it slide in this instance; they stepped up and did some needed community service.

    I chuck’ld at the Post headline:


    Major beef: Man arguing with staff stabbed by another patron at NYC’s Ruth’s Chris Steak House
     
    , @Gandydancer
    @Polistra


    Police were looking for the alleged stabber, who was described as black with a light complexion and wearing a black jumpsuit.
     
    The only surprise is that the Post manned up and specified the race of the attacker, albeit not until the last line of the piece. One of only two you left out. (I'm not necessarily attaching any significance to that last -- just noting it.)
  148. “When society tells cops to retreat to the donut shop, people tend to drive worse and carry more illegal handguns….”

    When society tells cops to retreat to the donut shop, blacks tend to drive worse and carry more illegal handguns.

    “The institutions who contributed to the mayhem on the streets in 2020 — the Democratic party, academia, the media, etc. — need to be called out and punished so they learn a lesson not to throw out their judgement and sense again the next time they click on a disturbing Youtube video from somewhere in this country of 330 million.”

    The institutions who contributed to the mayhem on the streets in 2020 — the Democratic party, academia, the media, etc. — need to be called out and punished so they learn a lesson not to go extreme evil again the next time they click on a disturbing Youtube video from somewhere in this country of 330 million. FIFY

    And what does the punishment look like?

  149. @Polistra
    Also: only racist people discuss inflation.

    Inflation! What even is that?


    https://i.ibb.co/804Jtxt/Screenshot-20221104-183242-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @Curle, @Harry Baldwin, @al gore rhythms, @Prester John, @Spud Boy, @Muggles, @P.T., @Reg Cæsar, @CharleszMartel

    We truly no longer live in a serious country.

    This claim might have made sense in the ’70’s, when people in the U.S. experienced serious inflation for the first time in over 50 years. Newspaper articles galore explained inflation, but misattributed it to the Arab Oil Embargo. (Much like they are now blaming the war in Ukraine). But to make the claim now, when Reagan broke the back of inflation through brutally high interest rates barely 40 years ago, is simply pathetic. (Interest rates on credit cards were capped at 18 percent by law at the time. When the prime rate went to 21.5 percent, it was cheaper to buy a house on credit cards than a bank mortgage. Rates on cards went to 24.99 percent maximum, and a few years later to 34.99 percent, with fees and other B.S. pushing some rates for the worst risks to 39 percent or so.)

    It’s hard to be a citizen of a country whose political class has no concept of history.

    • Agree: Old Prude, Kylie
    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @CharleszMartel

    "We truly no longer live in a serious country."

    You know, I'd almost settle for a "non-serious country" but the plain fact is, we no longer even live in a country.

    Replies: @CharleszMartel

    , @That Would Be Telling
    @CharleszMartel


    when Reagan broke the back of inflation through brutally high interest rates barely 40 years ago
     
    Perhaps worth pointing out Jimmy Carter had a partial return to sanity, too little too late to for example save him in the 1980s election, and one aspect was making making Paul Volcker Chairman of the Fed on per Wikipedia August 6th, 1979. A massive change from Arthur Burns who was in that position 1970-1978 (there was a businessman in the slot for a short period of time between the two and he didn't do well...).

    So Reagan gets credit for supporting Volcker's painful policies, as well as addressing supply side economic bottlenecks like, surprise surprise, the the visible foot of the government on the neck of the oil and gas industries which as we're seeing again can mightily contribute to inflation. Energy poverty and bad management were signature policies of Jimmy Carter, in some ways even worse than today in the US so far because bureaucrats in D.C. decided where every gallon of Diesel and gasoline were sent to. Although not as evil as we'd expect today, they made very sure farming regions had enough.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @CharleszMartel, @HammerJack

    , @Ralph L
    @CharleszMartel

    There was a burst of inflation in 1948 to reduce the value of everyone's war bonds. They were also trying to get Truman reelected, and it worked.

    , @That Would Be Telling
    @CharleszMartel

    Any discussion of US WWII tanks, really just the M4 Sherman ignoring some incremental improvements, that ignores it was never intended to fight other tanks is sorely lacking (although the insight of weight for logistics in this discussion from Graveldips is invaluable). That was the job of our tank destroyers which had significantly more capable guns.

    That whole story is weird, ugly, and corrupt. The major thing you can say in its favor is that at the time US tank destroyer doctrine was conceived no one had ever stopped a Wehrmacht blitzkrieg. Unfortunately it was all but set in stone through bogus rules in The U.S. Army GHQ Maneuvers of 1941 which for example without any basis made anti-tank guns much more effective than tanks.

    The Official tank destroyer employment doctrine was abandoned in the field when they went to war and they were also very effectively used as direct fire support for the infantry, and of course Shermans didn't do so well when faced with Panthers and Tigers. Haven't looked for a while to see if anything new has been published, but the best I found a while ago on US tank destroyers is The Tank Killers: A History of America's World War II Tank Destroyer Force by Harry Yeide.

    Replies: @Graveldips, @Graveldips

  150. @Anonymous
    You know what's absolutely wild? I've been a cop for twenty years. I'm nothing special and my job basically just feels like well-paid service work. I'm just a guy in polyester and a name tag. Never promoted, never will. I just drive a police car around and answer police calls. And I'm surrounded by guys and gals who do the same thing, almost all of whom also will never be more important than sergeants.

    Yet, I feel as though I'm the possessor of this incredible secret knowledge. Like I have the power to see an entire world that the rest of respectable society doesn't even know exists. A world that everyone, everyone, insists is The Most Important Question Of Our Time. It's not an exaggeration to say that I know more about this than 99% of society.

    And you know who cares? No one. No reporters come asking. No non-cops I know ask me. I'm not sure what percentage don't care, or don't want to know, or just never has occur to them that they don't actually know.

    It's not that I actually care anymore. I work in a very liberal city and one of my greatest job benefits is supping on their tears. I really get off on explaining to citizens who didn't ask just how utterly f'ed their city is (and, oh boy, it is). I don't have to lie in the least, I just give them both barrels of reality, wrapped in their own BS woke verbiage. But they don't dig any further. They don't actually want to know.

    As Steve has pointed out here somewhere, people do awesome breakdowns of sh$t they actually care about. Baseball, medieval sword fighting, dungeons and dragons, whatever. But how law enforcement actually works at the street level? Yawn.

    Sorry if this was largely off topic.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimDandy, @Dr. X, @The Wild Geese Howard, @BosTex, @Mike Tre, @Muggles, @CharleszMartel, @Nicholas Stix, @anonymous

    Great comment.

    I live in the demi-world of all-night hospitality…..realities that I deal with every day would curl the hair of liberal fuck-wits. A week on my door would melt a liberals’ mind. They simply couldn’t handle that much stereotypical validation of the truth.

    One of my employees has a liberal attorney father. Polluted by Pepperdine. His son says he no longer discusses political issues with his Dad, as he’d think his son had been kidnapped and brainwashed by Alien Nazis from Space! (what a great title for a Roger Corman A.I.P. flick!)

    When I go to New York Cesspool, I’m usually the most interesting man in the room, due to my genetic obsession with telling the truth. It’s very amusing to twist them into babbling morons with a couple sentences. They have literally never had to defend any of their delusions before in their lives.

    I greatly enjoyed your comment.

    You should seriously consider writing a blog (with great attention to remaining anonymous). It could easily catch fire, and lead to bigger things. Is your pension fully vetted?

    There used to be a cop blog, might still be, I can’t remember it’s name. Had tons of inside info about policing in it’s city (Chicago,maybe?). AFAIK, no-one ever outed the author, although with the midget Nazis of today running around, that might not be possible. Maybe set up a fake person first to be the author, so when someone “finds” you, they find the wrong guy. Read up on Brooke Magnanti (sp?) and her Belle du Jour blog in London and the Google Whack methodology used to sniff her out.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @CharleszMartel

    LAPD detective Joe Wambaugh made some money from writing. There's a market for a cop with a good prose style.

    , @Nicholas Stix
    @CharleszMartel

    There were, I believe, three brilliant crime blogs put out by Chicago cops. Then the authorities used various subterfuges (getting an alleged non-partisan non-profit to out the publisher of one) and threats to shut them down. One was called Second City Cop, another had an obscene name that started Detective, and continued with the male sexual organ, and I can't recall the third one's name. All gone.

    , @AceDeuce
    @CharleszMartel

    I think one of the Chicongo cop blogs was called Hey Jackass.

  151. @Muggles
    @Gore 2004


    At some point, people will have to decide what type of “law enforcement” they want: Either Kyle Rittenhouse-style or the police we have now
     
    Only the truly crazy prefer a Mad Max world to "the police we have now."

    So a fed, Russian/Chinese internet troll or what exactly?

    Replies: @CharleszMartel

    No. Not the crazy.

    The crazy are the ones who think it’s possible to have one set of Police Behavioral Standards for different races. What would be effective for blacks would be unnecessary for Chinese and intolerable for Whites.

    Live through a major American riot. They usually end when the people start blowing away the miscreants. That ends the festivities real quick. Look up Koreans after L.A., Whites after Miami, and Palestinians after Caribbean hurricanes.

    I lived through Hurricane Andrew in Miami as well as the McDuffy Riots in 1980. I know what really happened.

    After Andrew, the police had to rent refrigerated semi-trailers to store the bodies of unknown Hispanics who had been mysteriously shot attempting to loot rich white neighborhoods. No media, no investigations, no I.D’s.

    No questions, no problems. Just random unknown hurricane victims.

    Nice and easy.

    Remember the weekly campus riots in the latte 60’s? Four students ventilated at Kent State and “Voila”! No more campus riots.

    Easy-Peazy.

  152. @CharleszMartel
    @Polistra

    We truly no longer live in a serious country.

    This claim might have made sense in the '70's, when people in the U.S. experienced serious inflation for the first time in over 50 years. Newspaper articles galore explained inflation, but misattributed it to the Arab Oil Embargo. (Much like they are now blaming the war in Ukraine). But to make the claim now, when Reagan broke the back of inflation through brutally high interest rates barely 40 years ago, is simply pathetic. (Interest rates on credit cards were capped at 18 percent by law at the time. When the prime rate went to 21.5 percent, it was cheaper to buy a house on credit cards than a bank mortgage. Rates on cards went to 24.99 percent maximum, and a few years later to 34.99 percent, with fees and other B.S. pushing some rates for the worst risks to 39 percent or so.)

    It's hard to be a citizen of a country whose political class has no concept of history.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @That Would Be Telling, @Ralph L, @That Would Be Telling

    “We truly no longer live in a serious country.”

    You know, I’d almost settle for a “non-serious country” but the plain fact is, we no longer even live in a country.

    • Agree: Nicholas Stix
    • Replies: @CharleszMartel
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Very true. We live in a marketplace, with various groups fighting for the best pieces of real estate to use to sell their wares to each other.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

  153. @Corvinus
    @Curle

    How so?

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Mr. Anon

    No. Giving frequent offenders long sentences absolutely reduces crime rates.

    How so?

    Let me explain it to you, dips**t. Locking up violet offenders for a long time means that they can’t commit crimes out in society.

    You are a f**king idiot.

    • Agree: Gandydancer
  154. @CharleszMartel
    @Anonymous

    Great comment.

    I live in the demi-world of all-night hospitality.....realities that I deal with every day would curl the hair of liberal fuck-wits. A week on my door would melt a liberals' mind. They simply couldn't handle that much stereotypical validation of the truth.

    One of my employees has a liberal attorney father. Polluted by Pepperdine. His son says he no longer discusses political issues with his Dad, as he'd think his son had been kidnapped and brainwashed by Alien Nazis from Space! (what a great title for a Roger Corman A.I.P. flick!)

    When I go to New York Cesspool, I'm usually the most interesting man in the room, due to my genetic obsession with telling the truth. It's very amusing to twist them into babbling morons with a couple sentences. They have literally never had to defend any of their delusions before in their lives.

    I greatly enjoyed your comment.

    You should seriously consider writing a blog (with great attention to remaining anonymous). It could easily catch fire, and lead to bigger things. Is your pension fully vetted?

    There used to be a cop blog, might still be, I can't remember it's name. Had tons of inside info about policing in it's city (Chicago,maybe?). AFAIK, no-one ever outed the author, although with the midget Nazis of today running around, that might not be possible. Maybe set up a fake person first to be the author, so when someone "finds" you, they find the wrong guy. Read up on Brooke Magnanti (sp?) and her Belle du Jour blog in London and the Google Whack methodology used to sniff her out.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Nicholas Stix, @AceDeuce

    LAPD detective Joe Wambaugh made some money from writing. There’s a market for a cop with a good prose style.

  155. I think that that is rapidly becoming inevitable.

    Remember when there were white ethnic gangs in big American cities? Italians, Irish, Poles, Greeks, Jews, etc. There were gang wars but not a lot of shootings and most were just to keep others out of their neighborhoods, or dating their women.

    I think that that sort of thing is pretty much the default position in a multicultural multiracial society.

    Anyone remember Lebanon? Cyprus?

  156. @Anonymous
    You know what's absolutely wild? I've been a cop for twenty years. I'm nothing special and my job basically just feels like well-paid service work. I'm just a guy in polyester and a name tag. Never promoted, never will. I just drive a police car around and answer police calls. And I'm surrounded by guys and gals who do the same thing, almost all of whom also will never be more important than sergeants.

    Yet, I feel as though I'm the possessor of this incredible secret knowledge. Like I have the power to see an entire world that the rest of respectable society doesn't even know exists. A world that everyone, everyone, insists is The Most Important Question Of Our Time. It's not an exaggeration to say that I know more about this than 99% of society.

    And you know who cares? No one. No reporters come asking. No non-cops I know ask me. I'm not sure what percentage don't care, or don't want to know, or just never has occur to them that they don't actually know.

    It's not that I actually care anymore. I work in a very liberal city and one of my greatest job benefits is supping on their tears. I really get off on explaining to citizens who didn't ask just how utterly f'ed their city is (and, oh boy, it is). I don't have to lie in the least, I just give them both barrels of reality, wrapped in their own BS woke verbiage. But they don't dig any further. They don't actually want to know.

    As Steve has pointed out here somewhere, people do awesome breakdowns of sh$t they actually care about. Baseball, medieval sword fighting, dungeons and dragons, whatever. But how law enforcement actually works at the street level? Yawn.

    Sorry if this was largely off topic.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimDandy, @Dr. X, @The Wild Geese Howard, @BosTex, @Mike Tre, @Muggles, @CharleszMartel, @Nicholas Stix, @anonymous

    “Yet, I feel as though I’m the possessor of this incredible secret knowledge.”

    What, pray tell, might that knowledge be? Your comment was so vague that I got nothing out of it.

  157. @CharleszMartel
    @Anonymous

    Great comment.

    I live in the demi-world of all-night hospitality.....realities that I deal with every day would curl the hair of liberal fuck-wits. A week on my door would melt a liberals' mind. They simply couldn't handle that much stereotypical validation of the truth.

    One of my employees has a liberal attorney father. Polluted by Pepperdine. His son says he no longer discusses political issues with his Dad, as he'd think his son had been kidnapped and brainwashed by Alien Nazis from Space! (what a great title for a Roger Corman A.I.P. flick!)

    When I go to New York Cesspool, I'm usually the most interesting man in the room, due to my genetic obsession with telling the truth. It's very amusing to twist them into babbling morons with a couple sentences. They have literally never had to defend any of their delusions before in their lives.

    I greatly enjoyed your comment.

    You should seriously consider writing a blog (with great attention to remaining anonymous). It could easily catch fire, and lead to bigger things. Is your pension fully vetted?

    There used to be a cop blog, might still be, I can't remember it's name. Had tons of inside info about policing in it's city (Chicago,maybe?). AFAIK, no-one ever outed the author, although with the midget Nazis of today running around, that might not be possible. Maybe set up a fake person first to be the author, so when someone "finds" you, they find the wrong guy. Read up on Brooke Magnanti (sp?) and her Belle du Jour blog in London and the Google Whack methodology used to sniff her out.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Nicholas Stix, @AceDeuce

    There were, I believe, three brilliant crime blogs put out by Chicago cops. Then the authorities used various subterfuges (getting an alleged non-partisan non-profit to out the publisher of one) and threats to shut them down. One was called Second City Cop, another had an obscene name that started Detective, and continued with the male sexual organ, and I can’t recall the third one’s name. All gone.

  158. @Joe Magarac
    If big city governments do not start providing for public safety again, it will be vigilantism and that will NOT be a desirable outcome. For one thing, it will be rival vigilante gangs along ethnic lines.

    It won't be "frontier justice", it will be wars of extermination on the neighborhood level.

    Replies: @CharleszMartel

    I think that that is rapidly becoming inevitable.

    Remember when there were white ethnic gangs in big American cities? Italians, Irish, Poles, Greeks, Jews, etc. There were gang wars but not a lot of shootings and most were just to keep others out of their neighborhoods, or dating their women.

    I think that that sort of thing is pretty much the default position in a multicultural multiracial society.

    Anyone remember Lebanon? Cyprus?

  159. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @CharleszMartel

    "We truly no longer live in a serious country."

    You know, I'd almost settle for a "non-serious country" but the plain fact is, we no longer even live in a country.

    Replies: @CharleszMartel

    Very true. We live in a marketplace, with various groups fighting for the best pieces of real estate to use to sell their wares to each other.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @CharleszMartel

    "We live in a marketplace, with various groups fighting for the best pieces of real estate"

    Well, "marketplace" is a rather polite way of putting it. As I see it, we live in a combination parking lot / hotel lobby / battered womens shelter / international breadline. I believe it was Teddy Roosevelt who wanted to prevent America from becoming a "polyglot boarding-house".

    But that is exactly what the Tribe wanted, and they ran rings around ole Ted. So, here's your room key. Sorry about the stains on the mattress. And the carpet. And the bathtub. Rent is due on the first of every week, cash only.

    Replies: @CharleszMartel

  160. @CharleszMartel
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Very true. We live in a marketplace, with various groups fighting for the best pieces of real estate to use to sell their wares to each other.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “We live in a marketplace, with various groups fighting for the best pieces of real estate”

    Well, “marketplace” is a rather polite way of putting it. As I see it, we live in a combination parking lot / hotel lobby / battered womens shelter / international breadline. I believe it was Teddy Roosevelt who wanted to prevent America from becoming a “polyglot boarding-house”.

    But that is exactly what the Tribe wanted, and they ran rings around ole Ted. So, here’s your room key. Sorry about the stains on the mattress. And the carpet. And the bathtub. Rent is due on the first of every week, cash only.

    • Agree: CharleszMartel
    • Replies: @CharleszMartel
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Essentially, America is the world's largest open-air insane asylum.

  161. anonymous[279] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    You know what's absolutely wild? I've been a cop for twenty years. I'm nothing special and my job basically just feels like well-paid service work. I'm just a guy in polyester and a name tag. Never promoted, never will. I just drive a police car around and answer police calls. And I'm surrounded by guys and gals who do the same thing, almost all of whom also will never be more important than sergeants.

    Yet, I feel as though I'm the possessor of this incredible secret knowledge. Like I have the power to see an entire world that the rest of respectable society doesn't even know exists. A world that everyone, everyone, insists is The Most Important Question Of Our Time. It's not an exaggeration to say that I know more about this than 99% of society.

    And you know who cares? No one. No reporters come asking. No non-cops I know ask me. I'm not sure what percentage don't care, or don't want to know, or just never has occur to them that they don't actually know.

    It's not that I actually care anymore. I work in a very liberal city and one of my greatest job benefits is supping on their tears. I really get off on explaining to citizens who didn't ask just how utterly f'ed their city is (and, oh boy, it is). I don't have to lie in the least, I just give them both barrels of reality, wrapped in their own BS woke verbiage. But they don't dig any further. They don't actually want to know.

    As Steve has pointed out here somewhere, people do awesome breakdowns of sh$t they actually care about. Baseball, medieval sword fighting, dungeons and dragons, whatever. But how law enforcement actually works at the street level? Yawn.

    Sorry if this was largely off topic.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimDandy, @Dr. X, @The Wild Geese Howard, @BosTex, @Mike Tre, @Muggles, @CharleszMartel, @Nicholas Stix, @anonymous

    Normally “empirical street-smarts” is valued over “sentimental wishful thinking”, dark gritty realism over Technicolor musicals, but reasons are always found for discrediting empirical street observations when they come from non-elite whites: economic failure blamed on the Other, resentment at loss of privilege, resentment at having to live and work among non-whites, white teachers/cops/paramedics projecting their own hatred and bad intent on the blacks they work among, etc.

    Juror #3 (Lee J. Cobb) in 12 Angry Men was the guy with the first-hand knowledge of urban crime: you people know nothing, let me tell you about your precious juvenile delinquents, I’ve watched them grow up and it’s always the same…. And then under Henry Fonda’s questioning he reveals himself to be bigoted and psychologically defective, and we are given to understand that his observations about the life paths of irredeemable JD’s can be disregarded because they are really expressions of his issues with his estranged son.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @anonymous


    reasons are always found for discrediting empirical street observations when they come from non-elite whites: economic failure blamed on the Other, resentment at loss of privilege, resentment at having to live and work among non-whites, white teachers/cops/paramedics projecting their own hatred and bad intent on the blacks they work among, etc.
     
    Good point. I've noticed a similar pattern in all types of media/"entertainment" liberal propaganda. They always manipulate the narrative to make normal Whites not just "wrong" but fatally flawed and figures of scorn or ridicule.

    BTW, I first read the play 12 Angry Men in jr. high, and I've always thought it was Grade A propaganda horseschitt.
  162. @Curle
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “ You’re not going to solve black crime by locking up more blacks, because there’s always more crooks where the crooks came from.”

    No. Giving frequent offenders long sentences absolutely reduces crime rates.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Your Giuliani-esque point is well taken, and quite correct.

    It’s just that I wasn’t talking about overall crime rates as a whole, I was talking about black crime and its cultural fountainheads.

  163. @Wilkey
    @Gamecock


    It’s impossible to get colonialism out of the Western psyche.
     
    Well George W. Bush's tragic, pathetic failures have done a pretty good job of it. I think the West is now closer to abandoning the "white man's burden" than it's ever been.

    Let the savages be savages. The ones who want to fix their own countries will have to show the will to do it themselves.

    Replies: @Gamecock

    Well George W. Bush’s tragic, pathetic failures have done a pretty good job of it. I think the West is now closer to abandoning the “white man’s burden” than it’s ever been.

    Let the savages be savages. The ones who want to fix their own countries will have to show the will to do it themselves.

    Spoken like a true colonialist. Indigenous people don’t need fixing. “White man’s burden” summarizes colonialism – we have no such duty. “Savages” is in the eye of the beholder. Sentient beings who have evolved their culture over centuries have the right to be left alone.

    “Will” isn’t the problem. Their problem is perpetual interference from Western countries.

    You can’t develop businesses when the West is flooding you with “aid.” E.g., you can’t build a textile industry when you are getting shiploads of clothing every week.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Gamecock

    Spoken like someone who didn't read my comment, or who struggles with reading comprehension.

    Cheers.

  164. @CharleszMartel
    @Polistra

    We truly no longer live in a serious country.

    This claim might have made sense in the '70's, when people in the U.S. experienced serious inflation for the first time in over 50 years. Newspaper articles galore explained inflation, but misattributed it to the Arab Oil Embargo. (Much like they are now blaming the war in Ukraine). But to make the claim now, when Reagan broke the back of inflation through brutally high interest rates barely 40 years ago, is simply pathetic. (Interest rates on credit cards were capped at 18 percent by law at the time. When the prime rate went to 21.5 percent, it was cheaper to buy a house on credit cards than a bank mortgage. Rates on cards went to 24.99 percent maximum, and a few years later to 34.99 percent, with fees and other B.S. pushing some rates for the worst risks to 39 percent or so.)

    It's hard to be a citizen of a country whose political class has no concept of history.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @That Would Be Telling, @Ralph L, @That Would Be Telling

    when Reagan broke the back of inflation through brutally high interest rates barely 40 years ago

    Perhaps worth pointing out Jimmy Carter had a partial return to sanity, too little too late to for example save him in the 1980s election, and one aspect was making making Paul Volcker Chairman of the Fed on per Wikipedia August 6th, 1979. A massive change from Arthur Burns who was in that position 1970-1978 (there was a businessman in the slot for a short period of time between the two and he didn’t do well…).

    So Reagan gets credit for supporting Volcker’s painful policies, as well as addressing supply side economic bottlenecks like, surprise surprise, the the visible foot of the government on the neck of the oil and gas industries which as we’re seeing again can mightily contribute to inflation. Energy poverty and bad management were signature policies of Jimmy Carter, in some ways even worse than today in the US so far because bureaucrats in D.C. decided where every gallon of Diesel and gasoline were sent to. Although not as evil as we’d expect today, they made very sure farming regions had enough.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @That Would Be Telling

    I had a summer job after freshman year in '79 with the Economic Regulatory Administration of the DoE. The guy who created the forms that diesel wholesalers had to fill out for their emergency allocation went on vacation for two weeks, so we clerks would transfer calls from confused wholesalers around the building until they gave up. The Administrator wore sandals with a suit and road the bus to work, but had a car with phone for work use. In August, he made a nationwide rule that gas retailers could charge $0.154 per gallon over their wholesale price. I've no idea how or if it was enforced, but Carter had to appear to prevent price rationing gouging.

    , @CharleszMartel
    @That Would Be Telling

    I remember when Volker sold half this country's gold at $33 an ounce in an attempt to demonetize gold.
    All he managed to do was demonetize the dollar.

    I remember reading the phrase
    "Putting Paul Volker in charge of the Fed is like putting Dracula in charge of the blood bank!" in a financial newsletter of my Dad's....

    But by being brutal enough, he broke the back of inflation until this latest round...

    , @HammerJack
    @That Would Be Telling

    PCR has a piece right here on Unz regarding the Fed's manipulation of the money supply, emphasizing one spectacular example of when it failed to exercise its own mandate.


    https://www.unz.com/proberts/an-incompetent-federal-reserve-board-caused-the-great-depression-and-the-new-deal-that-gave-congress-power-to-new-executive-branch-regulatory-agencies/

    Indirectly putting into place the justification for the New Deal and subsequent intrusions into what had been the personal affairs of the citizenry.

    I'd never heard of Farmer Filburn before.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  165. @CharleszMartel
    @Anonymous

    Great comment.

    I live in the demi-world of all-night hospitality.....realities that I deal with every day would curl the hair of liberal fuck-wits. A week on my door would melt a liberals' mind. They simply couldn't handle that much stereotypical validation of the truth.

    One of my employees has a liberal attorney father. Polluted by Pepperdine. His son says he no longer discusses political issues with his Dad, as he'd think his son had been kidnapped and brainwashed by Alien Nazis from Space! (what a great title for a Roger Corman A.I.P. flick!)

    When I go to New York Cesspool, I'm usually the most interesting man in the room, due to my genetic obsession with telling the truth. It's very amusing to twist them into babbling morons with a couple sentences. They have literally never had to defend any of their delusions before in their lives.

    I greatly enjoyed your comment.

    You should seriously consider writing a blog (with great attention to remaining anonymous). It could easily catch fire, and lead to bigger things. Is your pension fully vetted?

    There used to be a cop blog, might still be, I can't remember it's name. Had tons of inside info about policing in it's city (Chicago,maybe?). AFAIK, no-one ever outed the author, although with the midget Nazis of today running around, that might not be possible. Maybe set up a fake person first to be the author, so when someone "finds" you, they find the wrong guy. Read up on Brooke Magnanti (sp?) and her Belle du Jour blog in London and the Google Whack methodology used to sniff her out.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Nicholas Stix, @AceDeuce

    I think one of the Chicongo cop blogs was called Hey Jackass.

  166. @Recently Based
    @Prester John

    Someone who gets to be on TV, influencing millions (well, it's CNBC, so thousands) of people.

    I don't watch much TV at all, and certainly not cable news, and like most people who know how to read, find most American entertainment culture to be pretty childish, but I do think that the strain of thought that says "who cares what these people say" to be a lot of cope. When people who are deeply opposed to everything that you believe have effective control of what your children see and hear on TV, TikTok, streaming services, in their classrooms from pre-K to graduate school, on Spotify and at school functions, it should matter to you because it's going to have a huge effect on how they think, and ultimately live.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    When people who are deeply opposed to everything that you believe have effective control of what your children see and hear on TV, TikTok, streaming services, in their classrooms from pre-K to graduate school, on Spotify and at school functions, it should matter to you because it’s going to have a huge effect on how they think, and ultimately live.

    Not if they DON’T (get to) use TikTock, TV, and streaming services, it doesn’t. During college and grad school, yeah, you’ve still got to keep teaching.

    Don’t be a friend to your kid – be a a parent and lay down the rules. There will be none of that crap in our house – that goes for the wife too. (At this point, she’s more based than me! She was only “Recently Based” too.)

    • Replies: @Recently Based
    @Achmed E. Newman

    100% on the bulk of this.

    I'm in the tech industry, and it's mind-blowing to me that otherwise responsible people let their 12-year-old kids have unrestricted smartphones, for example. I suspect it's analogous to when drugs first started getting widespread in the US the 60s/70s, and lots of people didn't understand how terrible it was for your high school kid to start smoking pot.

    The other rule for our daughter is "no dating in high school." Lots of wine moms tell me how unrealistic this is, but it's worked so far and she's almost finished high school. I just tell them straight up that having been a 17 year-old male, I understand that the only reason any guy that age is hanging out with your daughter is because they want to bang her. And what, exactly, does my daughter get out of that at age 17? All it would be is extra mileage and heartbreak early in her life.

    The wine mom pearl-clutching when I say this is hilarious. Every guy I know thinks it's awesome. My wife, who is very liberal politically in theory, is totally on board when it comes to our kids.

    Replies: @CharleszMartel, @ADL Pyramid of Hate

  167. @CharleszMartel
    @Polistra

    We truly no longer live in a serious country.

    This claim might have made sense in the '70's, when people in the U.S. experienced serious inflation for the first time in over 50 years. Newspaper articles galore explained inflation, but misattributed it to the Arab Oil Embargo. (Much like they are now blaming the war in Ukraine). But to make the claim now, when Reagan broke the back of inflation through brutally high interest rates barely 40 years ago, is simply pathetic. (Interest rates on credit cards were capped at 18 percent by law at the time. When the prime rate went to 21.5 percent, it was cheaper to buy a house on credit cards than a bank mortgage. Rates on cards went to 24.99 percent maximum, and a few years later to 34.99 percent, with fees and other B.S. pushing some rates for the worst risks to 39 percent or so.)

    It's hard to be a citizen of a country whose political class has no concept of history.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @That Would Be Telling, @Ralph L, @That Would Be Telling

    There was a burst of inflation in 1948 to reduce the value of everyone’s war bonds. They were also trying to get Truman reelected, and it worked.

  168. @That Would Be Telling
    @CharleszMartel


    when Reagan broke the back of inflation through brutally high interest rates barely 40 years ago
     
    Perhaps worth pointing out Jimmy Carter had a partial return to sanity, too little too late to for example save him in the 1980s election, and one aspect was making making Paul Volcker Chairman of the Fed on per Wikipedia August 6th, 1979. A massive change from Arthur Burns who was in that position 1970-1978 (there was a businessman in the slot for a short period of time between the two and he didn't do well...).

    So Reagan gets credit for supporting Volcker's painful policies, as well as addressing supply side economic bottlenecks like, surprise surprise, the the visible foot of the government on the neck of the oil and gas industries which as we're seeing again can mightily contribute to inflation. Energy poverty and bad management were signature policies of Jimmy Carter, in some ways even worse than today in the US so far because bureaucrats in D.C. decided where every gallon of Diesel and gasoline were sent to. Although not as evil as we'd expect today, they made very sure farming regions had enough.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @CharleszMartel, @HammerJack

    I had a summer job after freshman year in ’79 with the Economic Regulatory Administration of the DoE. The guy who created the forms that diesel wholesalers had to fill out for their emergency allocation went on vacation for two weeks, so we clerks would transfer calls from confused wholesalers around the building until they gave up. The Administrator wore sandals with a suit and road the bus to work, but had a car with phone for work use. In August, he made a nationwide rule that gas retailers could charge $0.154 per gallon over their wholesale price. I’ve no idea how or if it was enforced, but Carter had to appear to prevent price rationing gouging.

    • Thanks: That Would Be Telling
  169. Speaking of the Paul Pelosi “attack”, well, it’s called Hammer Time for a reason…

    No, seriously, where is the reporting on the mysterious website Mr. Hippie Dip (Canadian fence jumper, no less) supposedly set up. That was said to be dormant since August until the very day of the attack, when it populated with cliche MAGA spouting, not very believable.

    So that’s lead # 1. Someone did that and should be knowable. Was it our renegade Canuk or a pre planned smear job, a few days prior to election? To discredit the GOP of course. Someone is thinking longer term, and likely not Mr. Stoned Nudist.

    Of course Tucker has been on why Mr. Paul, when cops eventually arrived (Thanks Capital Cops, for letting my “friend” come by…) he didn’t rush out for help, but went back inside for his friend to clobber him. Confused and old? Or trying to make the “tryst’ seem normal?

    No videos yet on cop cams, body cams or transit cams. Is this another case of the Jeffrey Epstein camera failure pandemic? Why are not the Comrade Media complex more insistent on full disclosure?

    Mr. Hippie Dip in underwear? My, my. No curiousity about that from Enquiring Minds?

    We are left with a half told, half baked (!) story about some crazy guy looking for Mme Nancy.

    And some shaky story about searching for a phone for half an hour where intruder does nothing bad to Mr. Paul.

    Also, where is perp’s police record? None? Or some?

    Well, if crime is the topic, we should all want this on some reality TV crime show.

    “Stop hitting Mr. Paul, you Canadian BLM loving nudist! Always the worst, you guys…”

    Bonus question: How many federal and local cops does it take to prevent dangerous hammer violence in wealthy enclaves in San Francisco? Monitored by a dozen cameras 24-7?”

    • Replies: @Gandydancer
    @Muggles

    About the "BLM flag" bit, I read in an otherwise worthless Yahoo piece (it left out the dispatcher's "friend" statement while lambasting the suspicious for inventing it, iirc) that the BLM & LBGQT flags were on David DePape's former residence in Richmond, not on his school bus crash pad in Berkeley. Tucker keeps repeating the opposite, but election fever is affecting his reliability. (E.g., his conflation of having a 30-day supply of diesel on hand with the prospect of running out in 30 days.)

    Putting the kibosh on his MAGA cred, it seems DePapa was registered as a SF Green Party member. https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2022/oct/28/paul-pelosi-nancy-pelosi-attack-david-depape

    Here's an interesting USA Today article title: "Fact check: Paul Pelosi and alleged attacker were both clothed when police arrived". "Clothed" turns out to be a term of art: "DePape was wearing shorts while Pelosi was wearing a pajama shirt and boxer shorts, police said." Whether those "boxer shorts" had a slit to pee out of isn't specified. Also, it's getting a bit cold in SF for DePape to be wearing shorts.
    https://news.yahoo.com/fact-check-paul-pelosi-alleged-185254979.html?fr=yhssrp_catchall (Different Yahoo piece, I believe.)

    Anyway... over-claiming can be an embarrassment for the embarrassable, and if that's you you might want to have these facts on hand.

  170. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Recently Based


    When people who are deeply opposed to everything that you believe have effective control of what your children see and hear on TV, TikTok, streaming services, in their classrooms from pre-K to graduate school, on Spotify and at school functions, it should matter to you because it’s going to have a huge effect on how they think, and ultimately live.
     
    Not if they DON'T (get to) use TikTock, TV, and streaming services, it doesn't. During college and grad school, yeah, you've still got to keep teaching.

    Don't be a friend to your kid - be a a parent and lay down the rules. There will be none of that crap in our house - that goes for the wife too. (At this point, she's more based than me! She was only "Recently Based" too.)

    Replies: @Recently Based

    100% on the bulk of this.

    I’m in the tech industry, and it’s mind-blowing to me that otherwise responsible people let their 12-year-old kids have unrestricted smartphones, for example. I suspect it’s analogous to when drugs first started getting widespread in the US the 60s/70s, and lots of people didn’t understand how terrible it was for your high school kid to start smoking pot.

    The other rule for our daughter is “no dating in high school.” Lots of wine moms tell me how unrealistic this is, but it’s worked so far and she’s almost finished high school. I just tell them straight up that having been a 17 year-old male, I understand that the only reason any guy that age is hanging out with your daughter is because they want to bang her. And what, exactly, does my daughter get out of that at age 17? All it would be is extra mileage and heartbreak early in her life.

    The wine mom pearl-clutching when I say this is hilarious. Every guy I know thinks it’s awesome. My wife, who is very liberal politically in theory, is totally on board when it comes to our kids.

    • Replies: @CharleszMartel
    @Recently Based

    As Malcolm X said in his autobiography:

    "Never let your enemies educate your children".

    , @ADL Pyramid of Hate
    @Recently Based

    Totally untrue. I was 17 not too long ago (some commenters have iSteve/Unz archives dating back to then), and I remember that sometimes I would hang out with a girl so my friend could schtup her (and later I could schtup her friend).

  171. @anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Normally "empirical street-smarts" is valued over "sentimental wishful thinking", dark gritty realism over Technicolor musicals, but reasons are always found for discrediting empirical street observations when they come from non-elite whites: economic failure blamed on the Other, resentment at loss of privilege, resentment at having to live and work among non-whites, white teachers/cops/paramedics projecting their own hatred and bad intent on the blacks they work among, etc.

    Juror #3 (Lee J. Cobb) in 12 Angry Men was the guy with the first-hand knowledge of urban crime: you people know nothing, let me tell you about your precious juvenile delinquents, I've watched them grow up and it's always the same.... And then under Henry Fonda's questioning he reveals himself to be bigoted and psychologically defective, and we are given to understand that his observations about the life paths of irredeemable JD's can be disregarded because they are really expressions of his issues with his estranged son.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    reasons are always found for discrediting empirical street observations when they come from non-elite whites: economic failure blamed on the Other, resentment at loss of privilege, resentment at having to live and work among non-whites, white teachers/cops/paramedics projecting their own hatred and bad intent on the blacks they work among, etc.

    Good point. I’ve noticed a similar pattern in all types of media/”entertainment” liberal propaganda. They always manipulate the narrative to make normal Whites not just “wrong” but fatally flawed and figures of scorn or ridicule.

    BTW, I first read the play 12 Angry Men in jr. high, and I’ve always thought it was Grade A propaganda horseschitt.

  172. @Mike Tre
    @Anonymous

    The big secret is you guys are nothing more than enforcers of arbitrary government policy.

    How many normal people did you threaten with fine or imprisonment for not wearing a mask?

    How much money did you take at gunpoint from working class people, for the high crime of running late for work or to pick up their kids?

    You people do not protect anything but your own pensions.

    Replies: @NeoLogick

    It always strikes me as unreasonably absurd as to those who cast blame solely upon the officers who simply carry on with their orders instead of their direct superiors and those who legislate their duties. You seem to have a bone to pick with an imaginary caricature of law enforcement instead those who issue their orders, I reccomend putting blame where it is most deserved.

  173. @Polistra
    @lavoisier

    Give them credit though, they keep coming up with new ways to skip out on restaurant bills


    A woman having dinner at Ruth’s Chris Steak House in Manhattan stabbed a male patron after becoming enraged by his arguing with an employee Friday night, police said.

    The 24-year-old man began squabbling with a worker at the upmarket Midtown steakhouse just after 10 p.m. — and made such a scene that it disturbed diners at nearby tables, including two women enjoying a meal together who told him to quiet down, according to cops and sources.

    When he didn’t, one of the ladies grabbed a steak knife and stabbed him in the back, the law-enforcement sources said.

    She and her friend then fled on foot — without paying their bill.
     

    https://nypost.com/2022/11/05/nycs-ruths-chris-steak-house-stabbing-leaves-patron-hurt-nypd-seek-female-attacker

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Gandydancer

    Give them credit though, they keep coming up with new ways to skip out on restaurant bills

    I’ll let it slide in this instance; they stepped up and did some needed community service.

    I chuck’ld at the Post headline:

    Major beef: Man arguing with staff stabbed by another patron at NYC’s Ruth’s Chris Steak House

  174. @Gamecock
    @Wilkey


    Well George W. Bush’s tragic, pathetic failures have done a pretty good job of it. I think the West is now closer to abandoning the “white man’s burden” than it’s ever been.

    Let the savages be savages. The ones who want to fix their own countries will have to show the will to do it themselves.
     
    Spoken like a true colonialist. Indigenous people don't need fixing. "White man's burden" summarizes colonialism - we have no such duty. "Savages" is in the eye of the beholder. Sentient beings who have evolved their culture over centuries have the right to be left alone.

    "Will" isn't the problem. Their problem is perpetual interference from Western countries.

    You can't develop businesses when the West is flooding you with "aid." E.g., you can't build a textile industry when you are getting shiploads of clothing every week.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    Spoken like someone who didn’t read my comment, or who struggles with reading comprehension.

    Cheers.

  175. @al gore rhythms
    @Polistra

    "Got a bum education, double-digit inflation
    Can't take the train to the job, there's a strike at the station"

    Someone needs to tell Joy Reid about Grandmaster Flash.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Gandydancer

    It’s not hard to believe that Joy Reid is more illiterate than Grandmaster Flash was in 1982.

  176. @Mr. Anon
    @Jack D


    Guess what, if Trump was still the President and the governor of NY and the mayor of NYC were Republican, and Congress was controlled by Republicans, the NYTimes and Joy Reid and everyone in the Democrat/Media establishment would be wailing about crime and inflation and blaming it on them.
     
    Do Democrats ever make a big deal about crime? I don't recall them ever doing so. When they do mention it, it's usually the "Centrist" ones like Bill Clinton and the old (meaning, the younger) Joe Biden and it's done when they realize that the more left-leaning members of their party have so completely alienated normal people that it's hurting them at the polls. But I don't think the Joy Reid types can ever really harp about it.

    Making it a central focus of their campaigns risks turning off large portions of their base. If Democrats were to make a big deal about crime now, they would blame it all on white hicks in flyover country. That's kind of what they do when forced to mention it at all.

    Replies: @Gandydancer

    If Democrats were to make a big deal about crime now, they would blame it all on white hicks in flyover country.

    No “if” about it.
    https://www.salon.com/2022/03/16/democrats-for--but-new-data-shows-higher-rates-in-red-states/

  177. @Alden
    @Mr. Anon

    The summer of George had absolutely nothing to do with covid.

    It was no different from the Mike Brown, Trayvon Martin and even Rodney King riots and going back to the famous Watts riots in the 1960s.

    These riots are not spontaneous at all. There is a very well organized operation that creates and directs the riots. The US department of justice, wealthy communists like George Soros and Stanley Sheinbaum all the revuns and community activists.

    The US department of justice has a civil rights division. Basically dedicated to backing all black criminals against police and law enforcement. CRDofDOJ has 800 numbers emails and chat rooms manned 24 hours a day.

    To take calls from ACLU SPLC black and (( )) activists democrat black and (( )) officials such as Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley during the Rodney King riots and Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey during the St Floyd riots. The district attorneys who filed charges against George Zimmerman and Kyle Rittenhouse. The CRD jumps in to take down every White who resists black criminals.

    And that’s just the civil rights division of the justice department.

    Then there’s numerous organizations many many more than ACLU SPLC ADL That jump in to pay money to trouble makers. Like paying Chicago blacks $15 an hour and providing buses hotels and meals to riot in Ferguson MO.

    We all know about the anti White racist (((media))) that exonerates black criminals and attacks police. It’s extremely obvious. We know about the Soros funded pro criminal anti White district attorneys.

    Nothing new; a generation before Chesa Boudin San Francisco had third generation communist Terrence Hallinan as district attorney for 8 years. He was far far worse than Boudin. First week in office he fired all the senior attorneys everyone of them. These are the ones who were promoted because they had a good win record in felony trials. The attorneys that remained we’re basically apprentice prosecutors . And Hallinan hired militant criminal defense & civil rights attorneys to replace the ones he fired.,

    It’s not always a George Soros or a Stanley Sheinbaum who finds all these pro criminal organizations and riots.

    It’s the non profit charities and great foundations. Even the ridiculous United Appeal and of course the churches and the Jewish charities. The big foundations fund smaller NGOS. Small charities con idiots into giving them money for the tax breaks. The money is transferred from NGO to NGO till it ends up paying for riots.

    That method was perfected in Russia in the 1870s and migrated to America. It’s nothing new. The masons were experts at revolutions and organized the American, French, S American and 1848 revolutions in Europe.

    I needn’t go into the way the ((media)) comes out with the same lies about every police incident. The men of UNZ are very familiar with that. Remember Matthew Shepherd? A gay retail drug dealer cheated the gsy wholesalers of the illegal drugs he sold on commission. Several times. The gays who gave him the illegal drugs to sell got mad . The gay drug dealers, one of whom had had sex with Matthew killed him because he cheated them. A common crime that usually isn’t broadcast to the world for years.

    But the local ADL AJC agents jumped in the ordinary drug dealer murder. Because ADL AJC had been trying to get a federal hate crime law through congress for a long time. National ADL AJC SPLC ACLU and CRD of the DOJ were notified of the great opportunity. The ((media)) created a false tale of total lies and kept it up till Matthews coffin was taken to DC ala George Floyd and buried in some heretic Protestant cathedral in DC.

    That’s how a gay drug dealer criminal killed by other gay drug dealer criminals became a martyr. And how ADL AJC ACLU SPLC got their KGB hate crime law passed.

    President Clinton saw that Americans were angry about 30 years of soft in crime. Took the opportunity and was elected because of his tough on crime policies. So did Mayor Rudy Guillani of NYC And Mayor Brown of San Francisco Probably a few others I don’t know about.

    Affirmative action doesn’t help. As every big city in the country is run by pro crime black democrats and their White servile accomplices. And behind them the media the big foundations and the wealthiest corporations in America.

    Recent example. Last week LA Times ran a huge piece about some Black Guerrilla Family thug convict who killed a prison guard. Black Guerrilla Family wasn’t just a group of ordinary black street criminals like the Black Panthers. They were highly political and tied in with Weather Underground, Vencermos Brugade abd a lot of elderly Marxist’s.

    Do the BGF convict killed a prison guard decades ago. And was sentenced to life without parole. Murder happened in San Quentin 400 miles from Los Angeles about 30 years ago.

    What possible interest is this murder and parole hearing to the residents of Los Angeles. It’s a heavily immigrant town. Who have no interest in the story.

    Yet the LA Times had a quarter page on the front page and the biggest headline for this story. And inside two full pages advocating for parole and forgiveness for the black murderer of a White man. A young man with a small child. A black convict who wasn’t an ordinary felon but tied in with Charles Garry Faye Stender Angela Davis and a nationwide network of insurrectionists and communist with a multimillion dollar war chest.
    Those are just examples of what has been going on since the 1880s. The commies won in the 1960s Its just been a mopping up and consolidation ever since.

    Remember every word in the ((media)) is a lie. Read Epoch Times, amren and watch Fox News if you want. But it’s like fighting a tidal wave.

    Replies: @Gandydancer

    …ACLU SPLC black and (( )) activists democrat black and (( )) officials such as Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley

    …The district attorneys who filed charges against George Zimmerman and Kyle Rittenhouse. The CRD jumps in to take down every White who resists black criminals.

    I couldn’t be bothered to read that wall of text, since the mentality of people who write “(( ))” isn’t worth examining, but these two sentences sort of jumped out at me.

    Bradley was of course black, not ” black [or] (( ))”.

    And the criminals who Rittenhouse ventilated weren’t black.

    You need to ask yourself why your brain is broken.

    Also you need to learn the use of the comma.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Gandydancer

    Ignoring Alden, but:


    The district attorneys who filed charges against George Zimmerman and Kyle Rittenhouse. The CRD jumps in to take down every White who resists black criminals.
     
    is so very wrong it's perhaps worth correcting. Zimmerman and the jogger case show problems that can arise with ones that become notorious, including that they can come from the GOPe. In the first the local DA didn't charge Zimmerman, in the latter the DA herself was charged for not charging the trio fast enough.

    In both it took action at the state level; didn't follow the jogger case closely enough, but for Zimmerman the GOPe governor who was later rewarded by a Senate seat appointed a corrupt special prosecutor to try to get Zimmerman. Who was saved by details of the case like his proactivity not extending past the implicit request of the dispatcher to get out of his vehicle to see where Martin had run off to, and it not being done under the now very sharp threat of Antifa and BLM rioting.

    There are also so very many cases of self-defense against black criminals that the blanket "every White" claim is patently false. It's of course a lot more dangerous now, so proactivity should be off the table which suits our ruling trash just fine.
  178. @Renard
    @Gandydancer


    What’s the matter with you?
     

    Why is your brain broken in this way?
     
    You need a time out. Adults are talking here.

    Replies: @Gandydancer

    You need a time out. Adults are talking here.

    Not when you’re typing, Karen.

  179. @Polistra
    @lavoisier

    Give them credit though, they keep coming up with new ways to skip out on restaurant bills


    A woman having dinner at Ruth’s Chris Steak House in Manhattan stabbed a male patron after becoming enraged by his arguing with an employee Friday night, police said.

    The 24-year-old man began squabbling with a worker at the upmarket Midtown steakhouse just after 10 p.m. — and made such a scene that it disturbed diners at nearby tables, including two women enjoying a meal together who told him to quiet down, according to cops and sources.

    When he didn’t, one of the ladies grabbed a steak knife and stabbed him in the back, the law-enforcement sources said.

    She and her friend then fled on foot — without paying their bill.
     

    https://nypost.com/2022/11/05/nycs-ruths-chris-steak-house-stabbing-leaves-patron-hurt-nypd-seek-female-attacker

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Gandydancer

    Police were looking for the alleged stabber, who was described as black with a light complexion and wearing a black jumpsuit.

    The only surprise is that the Post manned up and specified the race of the attacker, albeit not until the last line of the piece. One of only two you left out. (I’m not necessarily attaching any significance to that last — just noting it.)

  180. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @CharleszMartel

    "We live in a marketplace, with various groups fighting for the best pieces of real estate"

    Well, "marketplace" is a rather polite way of putting it. As I see it, we live in a combination parking lot / hotel lobby / battered womens shelter / international breadline. I believe it was Teddy Roosevelt who wanted to prevent America from becoming a "polyglot boarding-house".

    But that is exactly what the Tribe wanted, and they ran rings around ole Ted. So, here's your room key. Sorry about the stains on the mattress. And the carpet. And the bathtub. Rent is due on the first of every week, cash only.

    Replies: @CharleszMartel

    Essentially, America is the world’s largest open-air insane asylum.

  181. @Recently Based
    @Achmed E. Newman

    100% on the bulk of this.

    I'm in the tech industry, and it's mind-blowing to me that otherwise responsible people let their 12-year-old kids have unrestricted smartphones, for example. I suspect it's analogous to when drugs first started getting widespread in the US the 60s/70s, and lots of people didn't understand how terrible it was for your high school kid to start smoking pot.

    The other rule for our daughter is "no dating in high school." Lots of wine moms tell me how unrealistic this is, but it's worked so far and she's almost finished high school. I just tell them straight up that having been a 17 year-old male, I understand that the only reason any guy that age is hanging out with your daughter is because they want to bang her. And what, exactly, does my daughter get out of that at age 17? All it would be is extra mileage and heartbreak early in her life.

    The wine mom pearl-clutching when I say this is hilarious. Every guy I know thinks it's awesome. My wife, who is very liberal politically in theory, is totally on board when it comes to our kids.

    Replies: @CharleszMartel, @ADL Pyramid of Hate

    As Malcolm X said in his autobiography:

    “Never let your enemies educate your children”.

  182. @slumber_j
    @Anon

    I'd say that whatever one thinks of the Terry decision, stop-and-frisk strikes me as contrary to the spirit of the constitutional prohibition on unreasonable search. If I were stopped and frisked, I'd be pretty pissed-off, I can tell you that, and I think I'd be right to feel that way.

    Busting people for low-level offenses and then reasonably searching them seems to me to be a much better way to go about it, for a number of reasons. Low-lifes who are packing heat are very likely to commit actual offenses like fare-beating etc., at which point you've got them dead to rights.

    Replies: @William Badwhite

    Busting people for low-level offenses and then reasonably searching them seems to me to be a much better way to go about it…

    This is what most stop-and-frisk was: Low-lifes jumping turnstiles, smoking weed in public, throwing trash on the ground, jaywalking, etc. IOW, committing minor crimes, which gave the cops the probably cause they needed to see if there was also a major crime.

    You’d think that if you a) wanted to carry a gun around NY you’d avoid committing minor crimes thus drawing attention to yourself or b) if you wanted to commit minor crimes you’d leave the gun at home. However apparently carrying a gun AND committing minor crimes is a civil right now.

    The media has perpetuated the lie that stop-and-frisk was NYPD stopping random blacks for no reason at all, nice folks who were out minding their own business, obeying the law just like everyone else. It appears you’ve bought into that lie.

  183. @That Would Be Telling
    @CharleszMartel


    when Reagan broke the back of inflation through brutally high interest rates barely 40 years ago
     
    Perhaps worth pointing out Jimmy Carter had a partial return to sanity, too little too late to for example save him in the 1980s election, and one aspect was making making Paul Volcker Chairman of the Fed on per Wikipedia August 6th, 1979. A massive change from Arthur Burns who was in that position 1970-1978 (there was a businessman in the slot for a short period of time between the two and he didn't do well...).

    So Reagan gets credit for supporting Volcker's painful policies, as well as addressing supply side economic bottlenecks like, surprise surprise, the the visible foot of the government on the neck of the oil and gas industries which as we're seeing again can mightily contribute to inflation. Energy poverty and bad management were signature policies of Jimmy Carter, in some ways even worse than today in the US so far because bureaucrats in D.C. decided where every gallon of Diesel and gasoline were sent to. Although not as evil as we'd expect today, they made very sure farming regions had enough.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @CharleszMartel, @HammerJack

    I remember when Volker sold half this country’s gold at $33 an ounce in an attempt to demonetize gold.
    All he managed to do was demonetize the dollar.

    I remember reading the phrase
    “Putting Paul Volker in charge of the Fed is like putting Dracula in charge of the blood bank!” in a financial newsletter of my Dad’s….

    But by being brutal enough, he broke the back of inflation until this latest round…

    • Agree: Polistra
  184. @Muggles
    Speaking of the Paul Pelosi "attack", well, it's called Hammer Time for a reason...

    No, seriously, where is the reporting on the mysterious website Mr. Hippie Dip (Canadian fence jumper, no less) supposedly set up. That was said to be dormant since August until the very day of the attack, when it populated with cliche MAGA spouting, not very believable.

    So that's lead # 1. Someone did that and should be knowable. Was it our renegade Canuk or a pre planned smear job, a few days prior to election? To discredit the GOP of course. Someone is thinking longer term, and likely not Mr. Stoned Nudist.

    Of course Tucker has been on why Mr. Paul, when cops eventually arrived (Thanks Capital Cops, for letting my "friend" come by...) he didn't rush out for help, but went back inside for his friend to clobber him. Confused and old? Or trying to make the "tryst' seem normal?

    No videos yet on cop cams, body cams or transit cams. Is this another case of the Jeffrey Epstein camera failure pandemic? Why are not the Comrade Media complex more insistent on full disclosure?

    Mr. Hippie Dip in underwear? My, my. No curiousity about that from Enquiring Minds?

    We are left with a half told, half baked (!) story about some crazy guy looking for Mme Nancy.

    And some shaky story about searching for a phone for half an hour where intruder does nothing bad to Mr. Paul.

    Also, where is perp's police record? None? Or some?

    Well, if crime is the topic, we should all want this on some reality TV crime show.

    "Stop hitting Mr. Paul, you Canadian BLM loving nudist! Always the worst, you guys..."

    Bonus question: How many federal and local cops does it take to prevent dangerous hammer violence in wealthy enclaves in San Francisco? Monitored by a dozen cameras 24-7?"

    Replies: @Gandydancer

    About the “BLM flag” bit, I read in an otherwise worthless Yahoo piece (it left out the dispatcher’s “friend” statement while lambasting the suspicious for inventing it, iirc) that the BLM & LBGQT flags were on David DePape’s former residence in Richmond, not on his school bus crash pad in Berkeley. Tucker keeps repeating the opposite, but election fever is affecting his reliability. (E.g., his conflation of having a 30-day supply of diesel on hand with the prospect of running out in 30 days.)

    Putting the kibosh on his MAGA cred, it seems DePapa was registered as a SF Green Party member. https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2022/oct/28/paul-pelosi-nancy-pelosi-attack-david-depape

    Here’s an interesting USA Today article title: “Fact check: Paul Pelosi and alleged attacker were both clothed when police arrived”. “Clothed” turns out to be a term of art: “DePape was wearing shorts while Pelosi was wearing a pajama shirt and boxer shorts, police said.” Whether those “boxer shorts” had a slit to pee out of isn’t specified. Also, it’s getting a bit cold in SF for DePape to be wearing shorts.
    https://news.yahoo.com/fact-check-paul-pelosi-alleged-185254979.html?fr=yhssrp_catchall (Different Yahoo piece, I believe.)

    Anyway… over-claiming can be an embarrassment for the embarrassable, and if that’s you you might want to have these facts on hand.

  185. @Recently Based
    @Achmed E. Newman

    100% on the bulk of this.

    I'm in the tech industry, and it's mind-blowing to me that otherwise responsible people let their 12-year-old kids have unrestricted smartphones, for example. I suspect it's analogous to when drugs first started getting widespread in the US the 60s/70s, and lots of people didn't understand how terrible it was for your high school kid to start smoking pot.

    The other rule for our daughter is "no dating in high school." Lots of wine moms tell me how unrealistic this is, but it's worked so far and she's almost finished high school. I just tell them straight up that having been a 17 year-old male, I understand that the only reason any guy that age is hanging out with your daughter is because they want to bang her. And what, exactly, does my daughter get out of that at age 17? All it would be is extra mileage and heartbreak early in her life.

    The wine mom pearl-clutching when I say this is hilarious. Every guy I know thinks it's awesome. My wife, who is very liberal politically in theory, is totally on board when it comes to our kids.

    Replies: @CharleszMartel, @ADL Pyramid of Hate

    Totally untrue. I was 17 not too long ago (some commenters have iSteve/Unz archives dating back to then), and I remember that sometimes I would hang out with a girl so my friend could schtup her (and later I could schtup her friend).

  186. @Jack D
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Stalin said that "quantity has its own quality". When you are comparing Russia to the US (or the Wehrmacht or the Ukrainian Army or anyone else) this cuts both ways.

    OTOH, Russia, at least at the start of this war, had vast quantities of war materiel - thousand upon thousands of tanks stored after the end of the Cold War, warehouses full of artillery shells, etc. Far more than anyone else. So the Ukrainians can capture or destroy a bunch of Russian armor and the Russians have even more.

    OTOH, these quantities are not infinite. And the tanks that exist in paper often don't work in real life and the ones that do work are ancient and highly vulnerable to modern anti-tank weapons.

    And every lost tank means a lost tank crew. And the people who are replacing them are not as well trained as the first wave - often barely trained at all. The Russian military was always willing to take high levels of casualties among the enlisted men but in this war they have been forced to send officers to the front and have had HQ locations that are well behind the front hit by HIMARS. And low birth rate modern Russia doesn't have millions of young men to send into the meat grinder. In the recent mobilization, as many men fled from Russia as were mobilized. And the ones that fled were higher quality than the losers who stayed behind.

    The Russian Army is a top down army (where NCOs are considered worthless). Of course the Czarist Army had a class system but the Soviets made it even worse because their system was based on not telling people the truth about anything (and this continues today). Russian troops often don't even know they are being sent to Ukraine until their convoy passes the border.

    Remember that one of the reasons that the Red Army prevailed against the Germans is that the Americans were arming them. Now they are arming "the Nazis" that they are fighting against.

    Things in Russia are just on a different scale. Yes, we have incompetence, corruption, drunkenness, lying, etc. but the Russian versions of these things are on a completely different level. The Russians are losing in 1 week the number of troops that we lost in 20 years in Afghanistan.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Graveldips

    Every lost tank is not a lost tank crew. According to Nicholas Moran, the US lost less than one man for every tank destroyed during WW2. The British lost twice as many, likely due to their tankers wearing berets instead of fiberglass helmets. An unconscious man has a hard time bailing out of a burning tank. BTW, the Russians during WW2 also wore padded helmets.

    And I seriously doubt that the Russians are losing 15,000 men per week. Isn’t that how many Americans died in Afghanistan?

  187. @Mark G.
    @Mr. Anon


    And by the same token, Republicans who think that the US Government is too stupid and ham-handed to manage American society and tell Americans how to live their lives, thought that it was eminently capable of managing foreign societies in places like Afghanistan and Iraq and telling Afghanis and Iraqis how to live their lives.
     
    I've worked for the civilian part of the military for forty years. Conservatives often seem oblivious that the military is just another corrupt, incompetent government bureaucracy. People were surprised by the failure in Afghanistan and the bungled withdrawal, but I wasn't surprised. I just thought "so typical".

    It's always been like this. Commonly used military acronyms like FUBAR (fouled up beyond all repair) and SNAFU (situation normal all fouled up) have been around since World War II. We won that war because the German military leaders were even more incompetent than ours and our free enterprise system generated more wealth to pay for a larger and better equipped military.

    When we had the draft and more Americans had served in the military, making fun of military incompetence was commonly seen in novels, films and tv shows like F Troop, McHale's Navy, Hogan's Heroes and M*A*S*H. Now that we have a volunteer military many Americans have no idea what the military is like. When I tell people in the comment section here at unz.com stories about military incompetence they don't even believe me, say I'm a liar and have never worked for the military. I just laugh at that.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Peter Akuleyev, @Mr. Anon, @Mike Tre, @Zero Philosopher

    “We won that war because the German military leaders were even more incompetent than ours and our free enterprise system generated more wealth to pay for a larger and better equipped military”

    This is a very ignorant comment. German military officers were definitely not more incompetent than American ones. Quite the contrary. The second part of your comment is more correct, but still partially wrong, and certainly wrong in it’s conclusions. It’s true that American industrila production was larger, which allowed the American Military to have a greater total number of planes, ships and tanks compared to the Germans. But of superior “quality”? Hell no. German tanks and planes were superior to American ones one-on-one.

    And the reason why your concluson is wrong is because America didn’t win WW2: the Russians did. When “D Day” happened, Germany was already defeated. If D Day never happened, the Reich would have fallen anyway. America, at best, hestened the defeat of Germany by 6 months.

    • Agree: BosTex
    • Replies: @BosTex
    @Zero Philosopher

    Thanks Zero. I mostly agree.

    It is pretty clear that Hitler had seriously excellent military guidance and leadership: Manstein, Jodl, Rommel, Model, etc all of these men (and many more) were heavyweight professionals.

    At highest military level: the Germans were well led.

    Hitler’s strategic vision was exceedingly deficient, but that’s a different story. Hitler was loathe to listen to his senior leaders. If you have great advisors, but don’t listen to them….)

    I think the general consensus is that both US and British senior military leadership: pretty mediocre:

    Bradley, Montgomery, etc I think suffer by comparison to the German leadership, above.

    You are quite right to point to the Soviet Union as the leading military power:

    Soviet senior military leadership was on par or better than the senior German leadership (Zhukov, Rokossovsky, Konev, etc) all quite good (though incredibly ruthless in how they treated their men, possibly Rokossovsky excepted).

    —————————————————————————-

    Equipment wise: our tanks ranged from mediocre to awful for both the British and American armies (I think the British nicknamed the Sherman the ‘Ronson’ since it ignited so easily): just awful equipment.

    By comparison: the Soviets had the T34, which was a really great tank.

    I’ll disagree about our aircraft: the Hawker Hurricane, the P51 Mustang the P47 Thunderbolt were the equal or better of any of the German aircraft. We had great machinery in the air and our pilots were first rate.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Graveldips, @Zero Philosopher

  188. @Zero Philosopher
    @Mark G.

    "We won that war because the German military leaders were even more incompetent than ours and our free enterprise system generated more wealth to pay for a larger and better equipped military"

    This is a very ignorant comment. German military officers were definitely not more incompetent than American ones. Quite the contrary. The second part of your comment is more correct, but still partially wrong, and certainly wrong in it's conclusions. It's true that American industrila production was larger, which allowed the American Military to have a greater total number of planes, ships and tanks compared to the Germans. But of superior "quality"? Hell no. German tanks and planes were superior to American ones one-on-one.

    And the reason why your concluson is wrong is because America didn't win WW2: the Russians did. When "D Day" happened, Germany was already defeated. If D Day never happened, the Reich would have fallen anyway. America, at best, hestened the defeat of Germany by 6 months.

    Replies: @BosTex

    Thanks Zero. I mostly agree.

    It is pretty clear that Hitler had seriously excellent military guidance and leadership: Manstein, Jodl, Rommel, Model, etc all of these men (and many more) were heavyweight professionals.

    At highest military level: the Germans were well led.

    Hitler’s strategic vision was exceedingly deficient, but that’s a different story. Hitler was loathe to listen to his senior leaders. If you have great advisors, but don’t listen to them….)

    I think the general consensus is that both US and British senior military leadership: pretty mediocre:

    Bradley, Montgomery, etc I think suffer by comparison to the German leadership, above.

    You are quite right to point to the Soviet Union as the leading military power:

    Soviet senior military leadership was on par or better than the senior German leadership (Zhukov, Rokossovsky, Konev, etc) all quite good (though incredibly ruthless in how they treated their men, possibly Rokossovsky excepted).

    —————————————————————————-

    Equipment wise: our tanks ranged from mediocre to awful for both the British and American armies (I think the British nicknamed the Sherman the ‘Ronson’ since it ignited so easily): just awful equipment.

    By comparison: the Soviets had the T34, which was a really great tank.

    I’ll disagree about our aircraft: the Hawker Hurricane, the P51 Mustang the P47 Thunderbolt were the equal or better of any of the German aircraft. We had great machinery in the air and our pilots were first rate.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @BosTex

    German WWII technology was like German automobiles today: brilliant and magnificent, but expensive and hard to fix.

    The P-38 my dad worked on was like a lot of German weapons: awesome for its time but a pain to keep flying.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    , @Graveldips
    @BosTex

    Our tanks were excellent, given the constraints imposed by the shipping infrastructure of the time. Most flatcars could not carry a 45 ton tank, nor could most port cranes lift one. 30 tons or so was the practical weight limit if you were going to ship tanks overseas by the thousands. We did manage to send the 45 ton M-26 with a 90mm gun to Europe by the end of the war, but only 20 of them.

    The alleged propensity of M-4 tanks to burn was more due to the German practice of firing repeatedly into a damaged tank than any deficiency in the Sherman. If you're retreating, a damaged enemy tank can be repaired, so it makes sense to burn it. If you're advancing, you capture an abandoned tank, no need to waste shells burning it.

    And I'm almost sure that you did not intend to say that the Hawker Hurricane was the equal of the German fighters. The Spitfire, perhaps?

    , @Zero Philosopher
    @BosTex

    "I’ll disagree about our aircraft: the Hawker Hurricane, the P51 Mustang the P47 Thunderbolt were the equal or better of any of the German aircraft. We had great machinery in the air and our pilots were first rate."

    German planes were superior.For starter, they are the ones that invented super-sonic flight. The Me-262 was the first supersonic fighter in the World.

  189. @BosTex
    @Zero Philosopher

    Thanks Zero. I mostly agree.

    It is pretty clear that Hitler had seriously excellent military guidance and leadership: Manstein, Jodl, Rommel, Model, etc all of these men (and many more) were heavyweight professionals.

    At highest military level: the Germans were well led.

    Hitler’s strategic vision was exceedingly deficient, but that’s a different story. Hitler was loathe to listen to his senior leaders. If you have great advisors, but don’t listen to them….)

    I think the general consensus is that both US and British senior military leadership: pretty mediocre:

    Bradley, Montgomery, etc I think suffer by comparison to the German leadership, above.

    You are quite right to point to the Soviet Union as the leading military power:

    Soviet senior military leadership was on par or better than the senior German leadership (Zhukov, Rokossovsky, Konev, etc) all quite good (though incredibly ruthless in how they treated their men, possibly Rokossovsky excepted).

    —————————————————————————-

    Equipment wise: our tanks ranged from mediocre to awful for both the British and American armies (I think the British nicknamed the Sherman the ‘Ronson’ since it ignited so easily): just awful equipment.

    By comparison: the Soviets had the T34, which was a really great tank.

    I’ll disagree about our aircraft: the Hawker Hurricane, the P51 Mustang the P47 Thunderbolt were the equal or better of any of the German aircraft. We had great machinery in the air and our pilots were first rate.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Graveldips, @Zero Philosopher

    German WWII technology was like German automobiles today: brilliant and magnificent, but expensive and hard to fix.

    The P-38 my dad worked on was like a lot of German weapons: awesome for its time but a pain to keep flying.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Steve Sailer


    The P-38 my dad worked on was like a lot of German weapons: awesome for its time but a pain to keep flying.
     
    Given that the P-38 was our only front line regular fighter with two engines it might be forgiven for the extra maintenance burden given its unique capabilities until we developed the P-51 Mustang and Jug/Thunderbolt/P-47 for the USAAF and the Hellcat and Corsair for the Navy and Marines.

    For that matter the three latter all used versions of the Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp radial engine, as far as I can tell ~2,000 hp/~1,500 kW versions. The P-38 and Mustang used liquid cooled inline engines, the former the only one developed in the US that made it into the field, and with only ~1,400 hp/~1,000 kW output. (Note depending on how high they are etc. there's different ways to measure their output, without a deep dive I think these are the most comparable numbers).

    So for the P-38 not just a unique engine but also a unique at the time design with a shorter and less intense lineage than the Wasp (for that matter the first and last models of the M4 Sherman tank also used aircraft radial engines...), and they did have issues, some of which were addressed from what I've read in passing. Then again this type of engine was and still is bog standard for land vehicles.

    And now reading a bit more, there were at least three variables in play, the engine, the essential turbocharger, and the air intakes. One model for example had a turbocharger that could deliver hotter air than the engine was rated for, so there were troubles when a pilot did that for too long. And the original air intake system was for earlier, less hungry engines. I read several mentions of "this improvement was not allowed because it would cost 2-3 weeks of production time," so desperate were we for our most capable and only really all around competitive fighter in the first part of the war. Was the only one with the range to escort long range bombing attacks or to take out Admiral Yamamoto.

    Also note that having the redundancy of two engines meant more of them made it back to your father's base for him to work on....
  190. @Meretricious
    "Fighting crime" is the wrong way to conceptualize the Negro problem. The correct way is to focus on how society can efficiently control/punish sui generis, dysfunctional Negro behavior. Blacks, unlike nonblacks, are not afraid of prison, so society has to seriously start considering deportation and/or hard labor, as these are the only 2 things blacks fear (beyond capital punishment).

    Replies: @Rat City, @BosTex, @Godfree Roberts

    When the Chinese had a violent crime problem in Xinjiang, they jailed a handful after bilingual public trials, then created jobs for everyone else.
    Crickets ever since.

  191. @BosTex
    @Zero Philosopher

    Thanks Zero. I mostly agree.

    It is pretty clear that Hitler had seriously excellent military guidance and leadership: Manstein, Jodl, Rommel, Model, etc all of these men (and many more) were heavyweight professionals.

    At highest military level: the Germans were well led.

    Hitler’s strategic vision was exceedingly deficient, but that’s a different story. Hitler was loathe to listen to his senior leaders. If you have great advisors, but don’t listen to them….)

    I think the general consensus is that both US and British senior military leadership: pretty mediocre:

    Bradley, Montgomery, etc I think suffer by comparison to the German leadership, above.

    You are quite right to point to the Soviet Union as the leading military power:

    Soviet senior military leadership was on par or better than the senior German leadership (Zhukov, Rokossovsky, Konev, etc) all quite good (though incredibly ruthless in how they treated their men, possibly Rokossovsky excepted).

    —————————————————————————-

    Equipment wise: our tanks ranged from mediocre to awful for both the British and American armies (I think the British nicknamed the Sherman the ‘Ronson’ since it ignited so easily): just awful equipment.

    By comparison: the Soviets had the T34, which was a really great tank.

    I’ll disagree about our aircraft: the Hawker Hurricane, the P51 Mustang the P47 Thunderbolt were the equal or better of any of the German aircraft. We had great machinery in the air and our pilots were first rate.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Graveldips, @Zero Philosopher

    Our tanks were excellent, given the constraints imposed by the shipping infrastructure of the time. Most flatcars could not carry a 45 ton tank, nor could most port cranes lift one. 30 tons or so was the practical weight limit if you were going to ship tanks overseas by the thousands. We did manage to send the 45 ton M-26 with a 90mm gun to Europe by the end of the war, but only 20 of them.

    The alleged propensity of M-4 tanks to burn was more due to the German practice of firing repeatedly into a damaged tank than any deficiency in the Sherman. If you’re retreating, a damaged enemy tank can be repaired, so it makes sense to burn it. If you’re advancing, you capture an abandoned tank, no need to waste shells burning it.

    And I’m almost sure that you did not intend to say that the Hawker Hurricane was the equal of the German fighters. The Spitfire, perhaps?

  192. It’s my understanding that the Hawker Hurricane actually did most of the fighting in World war II for the British, although the Spitfire gets the glory because it was a much more advanced airplane- I mean the Hurricane had fabric covered wings when it first entered service! But I believe in terms of the total of them produced and the amount of years spent in actual service that the Hurricane was actually the primary fighter of the British in that war.

    Pilots who flew both considered the Hurricane the better gun platform, although the Spitfire was faster and more nimble. But in warfare, it’s not the best weapons that always win- it’s how many can you build and how fast can you build them? And repair them? The Spitfire took 50% longer to build than the Hurricane, something like an extra 5,000 hours per airframe. In fact, the majority of German aircraft lost to British fighters in the Battle of Britain were downed by Hurricanes.

    We tend to think of the P-51 Mustang as the dominant U S. Fighter plane of WW2. In fact, most pilots considered the P-38 Lightning a better aircraft. It had an 11-1 kill ratio in the Pacific Theater!

    I’ve conjectured that the reason for this was model airplanes- most American boys in the post war years either built or saw model planes as a staple toy of their youth, flying or not. Building a rubber-powered model of a Lightning is very tricky, as it’s a twin engine design- where do you put the rubber bands? (I’m referring to models for kids, not grown men). So you build and see lots of Mustang models, and very few, if any, Lightnings.🌩️

  193. Thanks GL for the logistical detail.

    Doesn’t matter how good or bad a tank is: if you can’t get it to the battlefield it won’t get a chance to make a difference.

    That said, logistical problems: just one more problem to be solved.

    The Sherman was inferior relative to the Panther, The Tiger and the T-34. The Sherman was inferior in both firepower (perhaps the up gunned Fire Fly excepted) and armor.

    Max Hastings and John Keegan cover this inferiority pretty well in their books on the Normandy campaign.

    From the perspective of a tank crew: has to be crushing to think about the fact that you can drill a tiger 5 or 10 times, yet the Tiger can still wheel, fire and incinerate you and your entire crew with a single shot.

    ————————————————————————————

    The Hawker Hurricane was an excellent aircraft. Inflicted about 60% of the German losses during the Battle of Britain

    Additionally: The Hurricane, ably, played a role in CAS, which became more important as the war ground on and the Luftwaffe had been crushed. It was more robust and could take more punishment than the Spitfire.

    The Spitfire was definitely a more beautiful, better performing aircraft, but the Hurricane was there, performing well, when most needed at each stage of the war.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @BosTex

    Re: the Hurricane and Spitfire, "embrace the healing power of 'and'?"

    Rather interestingly, both used the same inline liquid cooled Merlin engine, a later version of which was used by the US Mustang, with vastly different construction techniques, the Hurricane's was conventional for the time and took 2/3rds the manpower.

    Most interesting story to me about the Spitfire's development was how they determined which rivets could be round and stick up from the skin producing more drag, and which the more difficult to install flat ones, they took a plane with all flat rivets and glued split peas to them. Then subtracted and added the peas to find the best compromise between labor and performance.

    And in that it excelled, while as you note the Hurricane could take more punishment, but both had the more vulnerable type of engine, radials have no coolant to lose and the individual cylinders can take more punishment. So when possible the division of labor for the Battle of Brittan was for the Hurricanes to attack the bombers and the Spitfires to support that by attacking their escort fighters.

  194. @CharleszMartel
    @Polistra

    We truly no longer live in a serious country.

    This claim might have made sense in the '70's, when people in the U.S. experienced serious inflation for the first time in over 50 years. Newspaper articles galore explained inflation, but misattributed it to the Arab Oil Embargo. (Much like they are now blaming the war in Ukraine). But to make the claim now, when Reagan broke the back of inflation through brutally high interest rates barely 40 years ago, is simply pathetic. (Interest rates on credit cards were capped at 18 percent by law at the time. When the prime rate went to 21.5 percent, it was cheaper to buy a house on credit cards than a bank mortgage. Rates on cards went to 24.99 percent maximum, and a few years later to 34.99 percent, with fees and other B.S. pushing some rates for the worst risks to 39 percent or so.)

    It's hard to be a citizen of a country whose political class has no concept of history.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @That Would Be Telling, @Ralph L, @That Would Be Telling

    Any discussion of US WWII tanks, really just the M4 Sherman ignoring some incremental improvements, that ignores it was never intended to fight other tanks is sorely lacking (although the insight of weight for logistics in this discussion from Graveldips is invaluable). That was the job of our tank destroyers which had significantly more capable guns.

    That whole story is weird, ugly, and corrupt. The major thing you can say in its favor is that at the time US tank destroyer doctrine was conceived no one had ever stopped a Wehrmacht blitzkrieg. Unfortunately it was all but set in stone through bogus rules in The U.S. Army GHQ Maneuvers of 1941 which for example without any basis made anti-tank guns much more effective than tanks.

    The Official tank destroyer employment doctrine was abandoned in the field when they went to war and they were also very effectively used as direct fire support for the infantry, and of course Shermans didn’t do so well when faced with Panthers and Tigers. Haven’t looked for a while to see if anything new has been published, but the best I found a while ago on US tank destroyers is The Tank Killers: A History of America’s World War II Tank Destroyer Force by Harry Yeide.

    • Replies: @Graveldips
    @That Would Be Telling

    I have read that the head of fighter command, Leigh-Mallory, was very reluctant to allow Spitfires to leave Britain, so the Hurricanes went to the Mediterranean theater and saw more action.

    The better plane is not necessarily the better weapon.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    , @Graveldips
    @That Would Be Telling

    I recommend Nicholas Moran (The Chieftain) on youtube for all things tankish.

  195. @Steve Sailer
    @BosTex

    German WWII technology was like German automobiles today: brilliant and magnificent, but expensive and hard to fix.

    The P-38 my dad worked on was like a lot of German weapons: awesome for its time but a pain to keep flying.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    The P-38 my dad worked on was like a lot of German weapons: awesome for its time but a pain to keep flying.

    Given that the P-38 was our only front line regular fighter with two engines it might be forgiven for the extra maintenance burden given its unique capabilities until we developed the P-51 Mustang and Jug/Thunderbolt/P-47 for the USAAF and the Hellcat and Corsair for the Navy and Marines.

    For that matter the three latter all used versions of the Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp radial engine, as far as I can tell ~2,000 hp/~1,500 kW versions. The P-38 and Mustang used liquid cooled inline engines, the former the only one developed in the US that made it into the field, and with only ~1,400 hp/~1,000 kW output. (Note depending on how high they are etc. there’s different ways to measure their output, without a deep dive I think these are the most comparable numbers).

    So for the P-38 not just a unique engine but also a unique at the time design with a shorter and less intense lineage than the Wasp (for that matter the first and last models of the M4 Sherman tank also used aircraft radial engines…), and they did have issues, some of which were addressed from what I’ve read in passing. Then again this type of engine was and still is bog standard for land vehicles.

    And now reading a bit more, there were at least three variables in play, the engine, the essential turbocharger, and the air intakes. One model for example had a turbocharger that could deliver hotter air than the engine was rated for, so there were troubles when a pilot did that for too long. And the original air intake system was for earlier, less hungry engines. I read several mentions of “this improvement was not allowed because it would cost 2-3 weeks of production time,” so desperate were we for our most capable and only really all around competitive fighter in the first part of the war. Was the only one with the range to escort long range bombing attacks or to take out Admiral Yamamoto.

    Also note that having the redundancy of two engines meant more of them made it back to your father’s base for him to work on….

  196. Anonymous[113] • Disclaimer says:

    The Hurricane had the same engine and armament as the Spitfire but was made of wood/fabric instead of metal and so was slower and less manoverable.

    (It was basically the final iteration of the ancient Hawker Hart biplane. You can still see the resemblance between the latest models of Hurricane and the earliest Harts from 10+ years earlier.)

    OTOH, the Hurricane was cheaper and quicker to build, more robust, and easier to repair. The Spitfire was a fussier plane. The Hurricane finally found its niche as a ground attack aircraft where its toughness and low speed compared to the Spitfire were advantages.

    That said, the British had many more Hurricanes in the Battle of Britain than Spitfires. It’s funny how this has been forgotten. And this amnesia started early: the 1942 movie “First of the Few” (released in America as “Spitfire!”) features actual BoB veterans in the cast – however most of them would have flown Hurricanes not Spitfires in the battle.

  197. @BosTex
    Thanks GL for the logistical detail.

    Doesn’t matter how good or bad a tank is: if you can’t get it to the battlefield it won’t get a chance to make a difference.

    That said, logistical problems: just one more problem to be solved.

    The Sherman was inferior relative to the Panther, The Tiger and the T-34. The Sherman was inferior in both firepower (perhaps the up gunned Fire Fly excepted) and armor.

    Max Hastings and John Keegan cover this inferiority pretty well in their books on the Normandy campaign.

    From the perspective of a tank crew: has to be crushing to think about the fact that you can drill a tiger 5 or 10 times, yet the Tiger can still wheel, fire and incinerate you and your entire crew with a single shot.

    ————————————————————————————

    The Hawker Hurricane was an excellent aircraft. Inflicted about 60% of the German losses during the Battle of Britain



    Additionally: The Hurricane, ably, played a role in CAS, which became more important as the war ground on and the Luftwaffe had been crushed. It was more robust and could take more punishment than the Spitfire.

    The Spitfire was definitely a more beautiful, better performing aircraft, but the Hurricane was there, performing well, when most needed at each stage of the war.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    Re: the Hurricane and Spitfire, “embrace the healing power of ‘and’?”

    Rather interestingly, both used the same inline liquid cooled Merlin engine, a later version of which was used by the US Mustang, with vastly different construction techniques, the Hurricane’s was conventional for the time and took 2/3rds the manpower.

    Most interesting story to me about the Spitfire’s development was how they determined which rivets could be round and stick up from the skin producing more drag, and which the more difficult to install flat ones, they took a plane with all flat rivets and glued split peas to them. Then subtracted and added the peas to find the best compromise between labor and performance.

    And in that it excelled, while as you note the Hurricane could take more punishment, but both had the more vulnerable type of engine, radials have no coolant to lose and the individual cylinders can take more punishment. So when possible the division of labor for the Battle of Brittan was for the Hurricanes to attack the bombers and the Spitfires to support that by attacking their escort fighters.

  198. Anonymous[113] • Disclaimer says:

    Germany’s biggest failure was not taking the war seriously until 1943. Only after the fall of Stalingrad did they realize the danger they were in and fully mobilize for war.

    This is why Germany’s most advanced weapons only appeared in 1944/1945, and in small numbers. Jet aircraft, ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, assault rifles, electric U-boats – despite many of these things being in development since the 1930s. (Plus the nuclear program was abandoned in 1942 and never restarted.)

    Hitler remembered all the civilian hardship of the previous war and wanted to avoid the same happening again. He wanted guns and butter. The swift victories of 1939-40 convinced him that this was possible. There was no need for exertion. Then they attacked Russia and paid the price.

    (How would D-Day have played out if by 1944 the Germans had thousands of jet fighters and bombers armed with ship killing missiles, and the landing zone was under continual bombardment by ballistic missiles?)

  199. Thanks Mr. Telling. Nice addition.

    Shermans: no matter the intent of use, actual use ended up having them go, toe to toe v. Panthers and Tigers.

    Just a complete mismatch which I am sure killed thousands of young British and American men.

    Given that a lot of our equipment was superior, just tragic that we had a signal failure with a key armored vehicle.

  200. @That Would Be Telling
    @CharleszMartel

    Any discussion of US WWII tanks, really just the M4 Sherman ignoring some incremental improvements, that ignores it was never intended to fight other tanks is sorely lacking (although the insight of weight for logistics in this discussion from Graveldips is invaluable). That was the job of our tank destroyers which had significantly more capable guns.

    That whole story is weird, ugly, and corrupt. The major thing you can say in its favor is that at the time US tank destroyer doctrine was conceived no one had ever stopped a Wehrmacht blitzkrieg. Unfortunately it was all but set in stone through bogus rules in The U.S. Army GHQ Maneuvers of 1941 which for example without any basis made anti-tank guns much more effective than tanks.

    The Official tank destroyer employment doctrine was abandoned in the field when they went to war and they were also very effectively used as direct fire support for the infantry, and of course Shermans didn't do so well when faced with Panthers and Tigers. Haven't looked for a while to see if anything new has been published, but the best I found a while ago on US tank destroyers is The Tank Killers: A History of America's World War II Tank Destroyer Force by Harry Yeide.

    Replies: @Graveldips, @Graveldips

    I have read that the head of fighter command, Leigh-Mallory, was very reluctant to allow Spitfires to leave Britain, so the Hurricanes went to the Mediterranean theater and saw more action.

    The better plane is not necessarily the better weapon.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Graveldips


    I have read that the head of fighter command, Leigh-Mallory, was very reluctant to allow Spitfires to leave Britain, so the Hurricanes went to the Mediterranean theater and saw more action.

    The better plane is not necessarily the better weapon.
     
    Depends on the role. Note what Anonymous[113] said about the Hurricane finding it's niche, I'll add after the fighter competition got a lot harder per my reading and common sense, it did very well as a ground attack aircraft. Which was very much needed in the Mediterranean theater vs. the pure air one of the Battle of Brittan. Don't know if the forces in the former got seriously insufficient quantities of Spitfires, that wouldn't be good except of course for the need to keep the home island safe and productive.
  201. @That Would Be Telling
    @CharleszMartel

    Any discussion of US WWII tanks, really just the M4 Sherman ignoring some incremental improvements, that ignores it was never intended to fight other tanks is sorely lacking (although the insight of weight for logistics in this discussion from Graveldips is invaluable). That was the job of our tank destroyers which had significantly more capable guns.

    That whole story is weird, ugly, and corrupt. The major thing you can say in its favor is that at the time US tank destroyer doctrine was conceived no one had ever stopped a Wehrmacht blitzkrieg. Unfortunately it was all but set in stone through bogus rules in The U.S. Army GHQ Maneuvers of 1941 which for example without any basis made anti-tank guns much more effective than tanks.

    The Official tank destroyer employment doctrine was abandoned in the field when they went to war and they were also very effectively used as direct fire support for the infantry, and of course Shermans didn't do so well when faced with Panthers and Tigers. Haven't looked for a while to see if anything new has been published, but the best I found a while ago on US tank destroyers is The Tank Killers: A History of America's World War II Tank Destroyer Force by Harry Yeide.

    Replies: @Graveldips, @Graveldips

    I recommend Nicholas Moran (The Chieftain) on youtube for all things tankish.

    • Thanks: That Would Be Telling
  202. @Gandydancer
    @Alden


    ...ACLU SPLC black and (( )) activists democrat black and (( )) officials such as Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley
     

    ...The district attorneys who filed charges against George Zimmerman and Kyle Rittenhouse. The CRD jumps in to take down every White who resists black criminals.
     
    I couldn't be bothered to read that wall of text, since the mentality of people who write "(( ))" isn't worth examining, but these two sentences sort of jumped out at me.

    Bradley was of course black, not " black [or] (( ))".

    And the criminals who Rittenhouse ventilated weren't black.

    You need to ask yourself why your brain is broken.

    Also you need to learn the use of the comma.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    Ignoring Alden, but:

    The district attorneys who filed charges against George Zimmerman and Kyle Rittenhouse. The CRD jumps in to take down every White who resists black criminals.

    is so very wrong it’s perhaps worth correcting. Zimmerman and the jogger case show problems that can arise with ones that become notorious, including that they can come from the GOPe. In the first the local DA didn’t charge Zimmerman, in the latter the DA herself was charged for not charging the trio fast enough.

    In both it took action at the state level; didn’t follow the jogger case closely enough, but for Zimmerman the GOPe governor who was later rewarded by a Senate seat appointed a corrupt special prosecutor to try to get Zimmerman. Who was saved by details of the case like his proactivity not extending past the implicit request of the dispatcher to get out of his vehicle to see where Martin had run off to, and it not being done under the now very sharp threat of Antifa and BLM rioting.

    There are also so very many cases of self-defense against black criminals that the blanket “every White” claim is patently false. It’s of course a lot more dangerous now, so proactivity should be off the table which suits our ruling trash just fine.

  203. @Graveldips
    @That Would Be Telling

    I have read that the head of fighter command, Leigh-Mallory, was very reluctant to allow Spitfires to leave Britain, so the Hurricanes went to the Mediterranean theater and saw more action.

    The better plane is not necessarily the better weapon.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    I have read that the head of fighter command, Leigh-Mallory, was very reluctant to allow Spitfires to leave Britain, so the Hurricanes went to the Mediterranean theater and saw more action.

    The better plane is not necessarily the better weapon.

    Depends on the role. Note what Anonymous[113] said about the Hurricane finding it’s niche, I’ll add after the fighter competition got a lot harder per my reading and common sense, it did very well as a ground attack aircraft. Which was very much needed in the Mediterranean theater vs. the pure air one of the Battle of Brittan. Don’t know if the forces in the former got seriously insufficient quantities of Spitfires, that wouldn’t be good except of course for the need to keep the home island safe and productive.

  204. @BosTex
    @Zero Philosopher

    Thanks Zero. I mostly agree.

    It is pretty clear that Hitler had seriously excellent military guidance and leadership: Manstein, Jodl, Rommel, Model, etc all of these men (and many more) were heavyweight professionals.

    At highest military level: the Germans were well led.

    Hitler’s strategic vision was exceedingly deficient, but that’s a different story. Hitler was loathe to listen to his senior leaders. If you have great advisors, but don’t listen to them….)

    I think the general consensus is that both US and British senior military leadership: pretty mediocre:

    Bradley, Montgomery, etc I think suffer by comparison to the German leadership, above.

    You are quite right to point to the Soviet Union as the leading military power:

    Soviet senior military leadership was on par or better than the senior German leadership (Zhukov, Rokossovsky, Konev, etc) all quite good (though incredibly ruthless in how they treated their men, possibly Rokossovsky excepted).

    —————————————————————————-

    Equipment wise: our tanks ranged from mediocre to awful for both the British and American armies (I think the British nicknamed the Sherman the ‘Ronson’ since it ignited so easily): just awful equipment.

    By comparison: the Soviets had the T34, which was a really great tank.

    I’ll disagree about our aircraft: the Hawker Hurricane, the P51 Mustang the P47 Thunderbolt were the equal or better of any of the German aircraft. We had great machinery in the air and our pilots were first rate.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Graveldips, @Zero Philosopher

    “I’ll disagree about our aircraft: the Hawker Hurricane, the P51 Mustang the P47 Thunderbolt were the equal or better of any of the German aircraft. We had great machinery in the air and our pilots were first rate.”

    German planes were superior.For starter, they are the ones that invented super-sonic flight. The Me-262 was the first supersonic fighter in the World.

  205. @That Would Be Telling
    @CharleszMartel


    when Reagan broke the back of inflation through brutally high interest rates barely 40 years ago
     
    Perhaps worth pointing out Jimmy Carter had a partial return to sanity, too little too late to for example save him in the 1980s election, and one aspect was making making Paul Volcker Chairman of the Fed on per Wikipedia August 6th, 1979. A massive change from Arthur Burns who was in that position 1970-1978 (there was a businessman in the slot for a short period of time between the two and he didn't do well...).

    So Reagan gets credit for supporting Volcker's painful policies, as well as addressing supply side economic bottlenecks like, surprise surprise, the the visible foot of the government on the neck of the oil and gas industries which as we're seeing again can mightily contribute to inflation. Energy poverty and bad management were signature policies of Jimmy Carter, in some ways even worse than today in the US so far because bureaucrats in D.C. decided where every gallon of Diesel and gasoline were sent to. Although not as evil as we'd expect today, they made very sure farming regions had enough.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @CharleszMartel, @HammerJack

    PCR has a piece right here on Unz regarding the Fed’s manipulation of the money supply, emphasizing one spectacular example of when it failed to exercise its own mandate.

    https://www.unz.com/proberts/an-incompetent-federal-reserve-board-caused-the-great-depression-and-the-new-deal-that-gave-congress-power-to-new-executive-branch-regulatory-agencies/

    Indirectly putting into place the justification for the New Deal and subsequent intrusions into what had been the personal affairs of the citizenry.

    I’d never heard of Farmer Filburn before.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @HammerJack


    I’d never heard of Farmer Filburn before.
     
    I consider Wickard v. Filburn to be one of the most decisive events in US 20th Century political history. Here we have the FDR administration which as I keep hammering on was deliberately starving a quarter of the US population before WWII getting a decision which allows them in Soviet style to with complete legality implement a terror famine, preventing farmers from growing grain on their own property for their own use. From Wikipedia, accurately as far as I know (admission against interest after all):

    An Ohio farmer, Roscoe Filburn, was growing wheat to feed animals on his own farm. The U.S. government had established limits on wheat production, based on the acreage owned by a farmer, to stabilize wheat prices and supplies. Filburn grew more than was permitted and so was ordered to pay a penalty. In response, he said that because his wheat was not sold....

    The Court decided that Filburn's wheat-growing activities reduced the amount of wheat he would buy for animal feed on the open market, which is traded nationally, is thus interstate, and is therefore within the scope of the Commerce Clause.
     

    Replies: @HammerJack

  206. @HammerJack
    @That Would Be Telling

    PCR has a piece right here on Unz regarding the Fed's manipulation of the money supply, emphasizing one spectacular example of when it failed to exercise its own mandate.


    https://www.unz.com/proberts/an-incompetent-federal-reserve-board-caused-the-great-depression-and-the-new-deal-that-gave-congress-power-to-new-executive-branch-regulatory-agencies/

    Indirectly putting into place the justification for the New Deal and subsequent intrusions into what had been the personal affairs of the citizenry.

    I'd never heard of Farmer Filburn before.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    I’d never heard of Farmer Filburn before.

    I consider Wickard v. Filburn to be one of the most decisive events in US 20th Century political history. Here we have the FDR administration which as I keep hammering on was deliberately starving a quarter of the US population before WWII getting a decision which allows them in Soviet style to with complete legality implement a terror famine, preventing farmers from growing grain on their own property for their own use. From Wikipedia, accurately as far as I know (admission against interest after all):

    An Ohio farmer, Roscoe Filburn, was growing wheat to feed animals on his own farm. The U.S. government had established limits on wheat production, based on the acreage owned by a farmer, to stabilize wheat prices and supplies. Filburn grew more than was permitted and so was ordered to pay a penalty. In response, he said that because his wheat was not sold….

    The Court decided that Filburn’s wheat-growing activities reduced the amount of wheat he would buy for animal feed on the open market, which is traded nationally, is thus interstate, and is therefore within the scope of the Commerce Clause.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @That Would Be Telling

    Thanks, and yes, strange how this isn't taught in school, innit? I breathe air, and air crosses state boundaries; moreover oxygen and nitrogen are sold commercially. Commerce Clause!

  207. @That Would Be Telling
    @HammerJack


    I’d never heard of Farmer Filburn before.
     
    I consider Wickard v. Filburn to be one of the most decisive events in US 20th Century political history. Here we have the FDR administration which as I keep hammering on was deliberately starving a quarter of the US population before WWII getting a decision which allows them in Soviet style to with complete legality implement a terror famine, preventing farmers from growing grain on their own property for their own use. From Wikipedia, accurately as far as I know (admission against interest after all):

    An Ohio farmer, Roscoe Filburn, was growing wheat to feed animals on his own farm. The U.S. government had established limits on wheat production, based on the acreage owned by a farmer, to stabilize wheat prices and supplies. Filburn grew more than was permitted and so was ordered to pay a penalty. In response, he said that because his wheat was not sold....

    The Court decided that Filburn's wheat-growing activities reduced the amount of wheat he would buy for animal feed on the open market, which is traded nationally, is thus interstate, and is therefore within the scope of the Commerce Clause.
     

    Replies: @HammerJack

    Thanks, and yes, strange how this isn’t taught in school, innit? I breathe air, and air crosses state boundaries; moreover oxygen and nitrogen are sold commercially. Commerce Clause!

    • Thanks: That Would Be Telling

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