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NYT: Critics Pounce on Naomi Osaka After Loss, Denting Japan’s Claim to Diversity
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From the New York Times news section:

Critics Pounce on Naomi Osaka After Loss, Denting Japan’s Claim to Diversity

The tennis star, who lit the Olympic cauldron, took a drubbing on social media, with some questioning her identity or right to represent the country.

By Motoko Rich

“Motoko Rich” would be a good name for a villainess in a James Bond movie.

July 27, 2021

TOKYO — Just four days after Naomi Osaka mounted the stairs to light the Olympic cauldron, presented as a symbol of a new, more inclusive Japan, that image was undermined on Tuesday by a backlash that followed her surprise defeat in Tokyo.

Many Japanese were stunned by Ms. Osaka’s third-round loss to Marketa Vondrousova of the Czech Republic after she had been favored to take the women’s tennis gold medal on home soil.

But as the face of a Summer Games riddled with scandal and anxiety over an unstinting pandemic — Tokyo posted a record number of new coronavirus cases on Tuesday — Ms. Osaka took a drubbing on Japanese social media, with some questioning her identity or right to represent the country at all.

“I still can’t understand why she was the final torchbearer,” one commenter wrote on a Yahoo News story about her loss. “Although she says she is Japanese, she cannot speak Japanese very much.” Several comments like that one that were harshly critical of Ms. Osaka were given “thumbs up” by 10,000 or more other Yahoo users.

As the Japanese-born daughter of a Haitian American father and a Japanese mother, Ms. Osaka has helped to challenge Japan’s longstanding sense of racial and cultural identity.

She has been enormously popular in Japan, and some online commenters voiced support for her on Tuesday. The news media covers her victories extensively, and her face appears on advertisements for Japanese products ranging from Citizen watches to Shiseido makeup to Nissin Cup Noodles.

But

Her selection as the final torchbearer at the opening ceremony on Friday demonstrated how eager the Olympic organizers were to promote Japan as a diverse culture. The Washington Wizards star Rui Hachimura, who is of Japanese and Beninese descent, also featured prominently as a flag-bearer for the Japanese Olympic team. But in some corners of society, people remain xenophobic and refuse to accept those who don’t conform to a very narrow definition of what it means to be Japanese.

And they must be hunted down and dealt with.

Ms. Osaka may have also touched some nerves when she pulled out of the French Open in May after a dispute with tennis officials over her decision not to appear at a news conference. She then revealed on Instagram that she had struggled with depression and anxiety.

Many of the online comments in Japan following her loss on Tuesday referred disparagingly to her mental health.

“She conveniently became ‘depressed,’ conveniently healed, and was given the honor of being the final torchbearer,” wrote one commenter on Twitter. “And then she loses an important game just like that. I can only say that she is making light of sports.”

Mental health is still something of a taboo subject in Japan. Naoko Imoto, an education specialist at UNICEF who is an adviser on gender equality to the Tokyo organizing committee and a former Olympian who swam for Japan, said in a news briefing on Monday that mental health was not yet well understood in Japan.

Whereas in the United States, we understand mental health perfectly, which is why the mental health of young women has gotten worse during the Great Awokening.

… Some of the comments about Ms. Osaka seemed to echo conservative criticism in the United States of the movement for racial justice, which the tennis star has vocally supported.

“Her selection as the final torchbearer was wrong,” wrote another commenter on the Yahoo News story about Ms Osaka’s loss. “Was the theme of the Tokyo Games human rights issues? Is it to show Japan’s recovery and show appreciation to the many countries which supported Japan? BLM is not the theme. I don’t think she was able to concentrate on the match, and she deserved her defeat.”

Nathaniel M. Smith, an anthropologist at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto who studies right-wing movements in Japan, said that online critics could now copy from a global pool of commentary.

“A Japanese online right-winger is aware from being in the Twitter environment of both Black Lives Matter but also how white people critique Black Lives on Twitter,” Mr. Smith said. “So there is this shared digital repertoire of how to attack.”

Whew, it turns out that white people are to blame after all. I was worried their that the article was criticizing non-white people. But now it appears that whites are at the root of the mean tweets about Naomi Osaka’s flop.

By the way, why did the press decide that the verb to describe what conservatives do is “pounce?” Are conservatives really known for their cat-like agility? Seems rather complimentary…

 
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  1. Wow, I actually thought that was an iSteve parody headline… it’s not. The NYT actually wrote that.

  2. Japan chose those two out of an awareness of the West’s current obsession with blacks. They sometimes do things like that to appear more ‘international’ on the world stage. Now they’re learning the lesson whites have learned: you can never bow low enough.
    Funny to think that if Japan had prominently featured a half-white athlete to appear international, it would have backfired in a predictable way. ‘White supremacy!’
    It had to be black or nothing.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @Nikolai Vladivostok

    There's one black guy who's a regular on Japanese TV as a talk show guest and has been for decades. He moved to Japan and is basically a celebrity for acting like a stupid black and mispronouncing Japanese words and being goofy. The Japanese have accepted him; he married a Japanese woman and had kids.

    But he's the exception that proves the rule.

    Replies: @Nikolai Vladivostok, @Nigerian Nationalist

  3. Everyone is jumping over each other to defend Simone Biles from all of the critics, yet I have yet to hear anybody actually criticize her.

    • Replies: @Morton's toes
    @Anon

    Jason Whitlock called her a quitter and an unworthy representative of the United States of America.

    There was a hilarious comment under his video:

    Al Bundy: we Bundys are losers; we are not quitters.

    Michael Jordan who was proud he missed the winning shot a hundred times not available for comment.

    , @anon
    @Anon

    https://twitter.com/jasonscampbell/status/1420122875323985920?s=21

    And Charlie Kirk is an idiot. This is Rush Limbaugh 'own da libs' style stuff-- it just doesn't play well with this generation. Does he call Vets w/ PTSD pussies? Or the cop that shot because he was "scared for his life": does he call him a pussy and deserving of murder charges?

    , @AceDeuce
    @Anon

    Regarding Biles, if that was the only White girl on a team full of boonies, and she pulled the same stunt during the Olympics-exactly the same way as Biles did--you'd never hear the end of it. The knigg "teammates" would be wall to wall dogging her over this, and the knigro "kuh-mooh-natty" would be spinning conspiracy tales of how the White girl sabotaged the team, and "ain't dat jus' like wypio?" and the media and White sheep would dutifully follow suit.

    Replies: @Truth

  4. A couple of rejoinders here to the NYT. First, almost no Japanese speak English, even fewer read it, and the NYT might as well be the jabbering of crows for how much Japanese understand it, much less care.

    Then, there are very scary types still around, the Ultranationalists. The Deep Ocean Society, Black Dragon Society. They are not capable of mounting coups. They are capable and willing to conduct assassinations of those they deem threatening Japan, and their is some intermingling with the Yakuza.

    Also, blacks are roundly disliked for their role as the main rapists and killers of young Japanese women in Okinawa. This is not discussed in the US but is in Japan, though in the usual oblique Japanese way.

    Finally, the Japanese are Japanese. Their religion, their way of being, their purpose in life is to be Japanese. Very few really emigrate, and then only under economic hardship. They have 700 year old cooking schools, and some flower arranging schools nearly as old. They seem modern and Western, and in some way (use of technology, urban living, etc) they are. In many ways, very much not. The government of Japan spends lots of money supporting traditional crafts of paper making, ceramics, sword making, and other stuff that no other nation does. The Imperial family is still untouchable in the way that European royals are not.

    Globohomo will not have its way with Japan. It just can’t — the people are Japanese. simple as that.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Whiskey

    Much the same is true, but for the modern and Western part, of the Chinese, the Indians, the Arabs, the Persians, and perhaps the Russians, too.

    Our chattering class elites who read the New York Times are colossally unaware of how effective and complete a barrier language can be, and how completely different a mindspace most peoples of the world outside of the West occupy.

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Whiskey

    As far as I can consider, Japan appears to be the only country on the planet with a serious world-class literature, which does not have a significant international diaspora.

    Lady Murasaki is a world writer in the same way that Chaucer is; but Chaucer has a world-wide diaspora, as do Cervantes, Dante, Moliere, Pushkin, Confucius, the Ramayana poet, Homer, Catullus, you get the idea.

    Maybe the Persians prove me wrong, not sure about that. Experts? Your opinions please.

    Replies: @PaceLaw, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @Hibiscu

    , @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @Whiskey

    One more unique aspect, China is the PRC, America is USA, Germany is BRD, France is République Française.

    Japan is simply — Japan, Nihon. Signifying continuity from antiquity.

    , @J.Ross
    @Whiskey

    I want to believe.

    , @Colin Wright
    @Whiskey

    'A couple of rejoinders here to the NYT. First, almost no Japanese speak English, even fewer read it'

    This bit I'll quibble with. My understanding (and we spent three weeks in Japan) is that while Japanese can rarely speak English, it's more common for them to be able to read it. We cetainly found it possible to communicate on a very rudimentary level ('where is a mail box,' etc).

  5. >negroes not competant, non-negreoes to blame

    • LOL: Almost Missouri
  6. Let me add, Osaka’s failure to speak Japanese and adopt a Japanese name like Mongolian wrestlers do for Sumo, is going to rankle people. As long as she won, she could get away with it. First big loss — well no Japanese politician is going to rake his own people over the coals for what amounts to a foreigner and the NYT. They probably share the attitude.

    Even the most connected, respected, Japanese speaking foreigner, will never really be Japanese. That’s just the way it is.

    • Replies: @Gimeiyo
    @Whiskey


    Let me add, Osaka’s failure to speak Japanese and adopt a Japanese name like Mongolian wrestlers do for Sumo, is going to rankle people.
     
    Naomi Osaka sounds like a pretty Japanese name to me. 大阪なおみ. She could pick Kanji for her given name, like 奈緒美 or 尚美 or whatever, but I don't think she has done.

    But as you say, her limited Japanese and, frankly, lack of experience with Japanese culture is what makes her an awkward representative of Japan. She was raised in the US, and her sense of being "Japanese" growing up was an Americanised version of Japanese-ness.

    You could contrast her with another part-Black celebrity of years past -- the enka singer Jero. Unlike Osaka, his Japanese was excellent, and he was intimately familiar with Japanese culture, mores, attitudes, etc. But perhaps because he was so fluent in Japanese language and culture, he never presented himself as "Japanese."

    I'm half-Korean myself, and while I feel a deep affinity for Korea, I would never presume to represent "Korea." No Korean would ever consider me Korean -- not really. And it's the same with the Japanese.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @3g4me

  7. NYT is infamous for “conservative pounce” headlines: when some news event happens that looks bad for the political left, rather than run a story about the event that looks bad for the political left, they focus the story on the right-wing reaction to the event.

    Here: the story isn’t some stunning upset win by some Czech girl named Vondrousova, it’s the critics reaction to NYT’s darling favorite.

    • Agree: El Dato
  8. This started out as merely interesting and has become highly topical:
    https://thecritic.co.uk/issues/august-september-2021/breaking-the-knee/

    The article is about Shun Fujimoto, a member of the Japanese gymnastics team at the 1976 Olympics.

    The men had won the team all-round event for the last four Games, with the USSR finishing second on each occasion. “We were anxious,” Fujimoto said. “We knew that we couldn’t break the legacy of our predecessors. That pressure was heavy.”

    Living up to the hard work of your predecessors is important. Imagine that. In pursuit of this, Fujimoto breaks his kneecap as a result of a hard landing in his floor routine.

    So again the question: what to do? He can’t tell the team doctor, who will demand that he goes to hospital and has the fracture reset. He can’t tell his team-mates for fear that it will break their concentration and diminish their performances. There’s only one thing he can do, insane though it sounds. He can pass it off as a twinge and keep going. So that’s exactly what he does.

    So the insanely focused gymnast does a pommel horse routine, which is not too demanding on the legs, followed by the rings, where he has the problem of executing a successful landing.

    His kneecap’s already fractured, but now the impact dislocates it too, tearing bone from ligaments like a wolf ripping at a carcass. The pain is an all-consuming explosion, a river which rushes and spills over every part of him. But he can’t succumb. His sole concession to the agony is to lift his leg slightly after landing, but other than that he holds the position as he’s practised time and again, body straight and arms high, because if he doesn’t he’ll lose marks, and after what seems like aeons but is only actually a few seconds the judges nod and it’s over.

    The Japanese finish with 576.85 points, the Soviets with 576.45. Four-tenths of a point: a winning margin of less than one-tenth of one per cent.

    I have zero interest in sports, but this isn’t really about sport at all. The man stifled his pain, did what was necessary on the day, and took a couple for the team that had no doubt provided support and encouragement for him in the past. If the Olympics have any reason to exist it is surely for episodes like this.

    The article was written as speculation on who would light the Olympic flame in Tokyo and the author states that it was completed before the opening ceremony, so it was not produced as a commentary on l’affaire Biles or the antics of Osaka. Then again, sucking it up and succeeding is no doubt an artefact of the patriarchy and expecting the same of women is misogyny. Or something. In any case, we can all see who the chickenshits are in this game, and it isn’t the guy with the bad knee.

    • Replies: @JosephB
    @rational actor


    Then again, sucking it up and succeeding is no doubt an artefact of the patriarchy and expecting the same of women is misogyny.
     
    Kerri Strug.
    , @Captain Tripps
    @rational actor

    You may be able to still find a couple of old Marines, Soldiers and Sailors who could tell you about the willpower and focus of Japanese men in extreme adversity.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    , @Anonymous
    @rational actor

    OT. I recently saw the 1969 movie "Marooned" about a crew of astronauts stranded in space in a damaged ship. It's not very good. It's overlong and boring. However it does provide an interesting view of mid-1960s social attitudes.

    The most interesting scene is when the three astronauts realize they don't have enough air to get back to earth. After debating what to do, and being unable to decide, the commander exits the vehicle and dies, saving the lives of his crewmates.

    I'm trying to think of a similar scene in a modern movie but nothing comes to mind. Hollywood generally tries to avoid putting its heroes in "no-win" situations like this.

    (There is that scene in "Underwater" (2020) where the lady protagonist kills two of her male crewmates to save the lives of the rest of the crew, but that's not quite the same.)

  9. “Motoko Rich” would be a good name for a villainess in a James Bond movie. Or a common dat,hip-hop artist. The appeal to fast, big money and foreign appeal/attractiveness is s it all really takes. sad.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @PaceLaw

    “Motoko Rich” would be a good name for a villainess in a James Bond movie.

    There was that villain Marc Rich who got a controversial pardon from Bill Clinton:


    Marc Rich, a fugitive who had fled the U.S. during his prosecution, was residing in Switzerland. Rich owed $48 million in taxes and was charged with 51 counts for tax fraud, was pardoned of tax evasion. He was required to pay a $1 million fine and waive any use of the pardon as a defense against any future civil charges that were filed against him in the same case. Critics complained that Denise Eisenberg Rich, his former wife, had made substantial donations to both the Clinton library and to Mrs. Clinton's senate campaign. According to Paul Volcker's independent investigation of Iraqi Oil-for-Food kickback schemes, Marc Rich was a middleman for several suspect Iraqi oil deals involving over 4 million barrels (640,000 m3) of oil.
     
    BTW, there's also this:

    Federal prosecutor Mary Jo White was appointed to investigate the pardon of Marc Rich. She was later replaced by Republican James Comey, who found no illegality on Clinton's part.
     
    That should be "Swamp Guardian" James Comey.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    , @AceDeuce
    @PaceLaw

    “Motoko Rich”? I knew her cousin "Mocha-Chocolata-Ya Ya" (AKA "Creole Lady Marmalade")

    Small world

  10. OT: David French literally endorsed “bloodguilt” for white people. “bloodguilt” is David French’s word choice.

    How did Steve Sailer miss that one? I would expect Steve Sailer to have a field day with that.

    Gee, maybe “bloodguilt for white people” can be the tag line for the new principled conservative movement? Maybe David French can run for President of the US again with the campaign slogan “David French: bloodguilt for white people”. How about National Review can make that their subheading: “National Review: Bloodguilt for whites!”

    I’m not normally a fan of cancel culture, but maybe any serious political movement and news outlets should face intense pressure to thoroughly divorce themselves from “bloodguilt for white people” advocacy in the same way Republicans are expected to divorce themselves from several degrees of connection from anyone advocating for white nationalism.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Hi There

    https://americanmind.org/salvo/david-french-and-the-conservative-case-for-hereditary-bloodguilt/

    It sounds like satire...

    ...but it's the current year.

    Replies: @El Dato

  11. @Anon
    Everyone is jumping over each other to defend Simone Biles from all of the critics, yet I have yet to hear anybody actually criticize her.

    Replies: @Morton's toes, @anon, @AceDeuce

    Jason Whitlock called her a quitter and an unworthy representative of the United States of America.

    There was a hilarious comment under his video:

    Al Bundy: we Bundys are losers; we are not quitters.

    Michael Jordan who was proud he missed the winning shot a hundred times not available for comment.

  12. You racists make me sick with your hatred of minorities and ridiculous conspiracy theories of the untermensch swamping your countries.

    Thankfully demographics are changing

    • LOL: Gaspar DeLaFunk
    • Replies: @notsaying
    @Anon

    Why should we be happy that our nation has been transformed by a tidal wave of immigration?

    We were doing great as a mostly white/some blacks country with a sprinkling of Asians and Hispanics. Had we stayed pretty much the same, as other countries have done who are not part of the First World, I think we would continued to do great.

    What has been done cannot be undone. But don't try to tell me we needed all these people. We did not. They needed us. They are still pouring in.

    If we are such bad people, please explain that.

    Replies: @0, @Bardon Kaldian

    , @AnotherDad
    @Anon


    Thankfully demographics are changing
     
    Why is it so important to you--or anyone--to change the demographics i live around?

    Seems to indicate poor character.

    , @pnumatic
    @Anon

    Is the feeling of sickness strong? Is it getting worse?

    Don't worry, I'm not asking out of compassion.

    , @Spect3r
    @Anon

    Try again, but with feeling this time.

  13. We can see lots of the traits of Wokeness in this article:

    1. Diversity = hate your own country
    They got a Japanese woman to write an article critical of Japan.

    2. Blur the facts
    “ Many of the online comments… referred disparagingly…” What does that mean? A majority of the comments? 10% of the comments? My bet: the author picked the first couple of negative comments she could find, ignoring all supportive comments, so she could create the propaganda piece her editors instructed her to write.

    3. Paranoia

    “A Japanese online right-winger is aware from being in the Twitter environment of both Black Lives Matter but also how white people critique Black Lives on Twitter,” Mr. Smith said. “So there is this shared digital repertoire of how to attack.”

    Does a university professor really believe that people making random posts about Naomi Osaka are taking the time to do research, in a foreign language, about how to critique BLM? Shows how far academia has fallen.

    • Agree: ArthurinCali
  14. “Motoko Rich” would be a good name for a villainess in a James Bond movie.

    Or a trendy espresso.

    By the way, why did the press decide that the verb to describe what conservatives do is “pounce?” Are conservatives really known for their cat-like agility?

    Many feline species are threatened with extinction, and all the rest* are shrinking, mostly due to loss of habitat. So the comparison is in some ways apt.

    who is of Japanese and Beninese descent

    Once you’ve Benin one West African country, you don’t want Togo to another.

    *All the rest, that is, except for one.

    • LOL: PiltdownMan
  15. @Whiskey
    A couple of rejoinders here to the NYT. First, almost no Japanese speak English, even fewer read it, and the NYT might as well be the jabbering of crows for how much Japanese understand it, much less care.

    Then, there are very scary types still around, the Ultranationalists. The Deep Ocean Society, Black Dragon Society. They are not capable of mounting coups. They are capable and willing to conduct assassinations of those they deem threatening Japan, and their is some intermingling with the Yakuza.

    Also, blacks are roundly disliked for their role as the main rapists and killers of young Japanese women in Okinawa. This is not discussed in the US but is in Japan, though in the usual oblique Japanese way.

    Finally, the Japanese are Japanese. Their religion, their way of being, their purpose in life is to be Japanese. Very few really emigrate, and then only under economic hardship. They have 700 year old cooking schools, and some flower arranging schools nearly as old. They seem modern and Western, and in some way (use of technology, urban living, etc) they are. In many ways, very much not. The government of Japan spends lots of money supporting traditional crafts of paper making, ceramics, sword making, and other stuff that no other nation does. The Imperial family is still untouchable in the way that European royals are not.

    Globohomo will not have its way with Japan. It just can't -- the people are Japanese. simple as that.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @J.Ross, @Colin Wright

    Much the same is true, but for the modern and Western part, of the Chinese, the Indians, the Arabs, the Persians, and perhaps the Russians, too.

    Our chattering class elites who read the New York Times are colossally unaware of how effective and complete a barrier language can be, and how completely different a mindspace most peoples of the world outside of the West occupy.

  16. Anon[311] • Disclaimer says:

    There are a lot of examples of citizenship monkey business in exchange for Olympic participation. A Japanese figure skater took Russian citizenship to partner with a top-level pairs partner. She graduated from a Russian University and there are impressive interviews of her online in Russian, and she seems fairly fluent. There is at least one American skater who took Japanese citizenship for pairs or dance, can’t remember. A Japanese comedian decided he wanted to run the marathon in the Olympics, but his time was nowhere near fast enough. He took citizenship in a southeast Asian country (Thailand?), renounced his Japanese citizenship, and then didn’t qualify. There are a ton of Americans and others who are not good enough for American teams, but who have an immigrant parent and become the representative for a small foreign country. Some of these people are the only Olympian for those countries, which you think would be embarrassing.

    Osaka can’t speak Japanese to any practical degree, doesn’t live in Japan, and doesn’t understand Japanese culture. She should have apologized when she withdrew from the French thing, which seems silly, but that’s the way they do things here. The only out for that is to be hospitalized with a “diagnosed” nervous condition, which is considered the only valid reason to forego the public apology. But you still have to at least do an apology on the street in front of the media when you leave the hospital. Yeah, I know this sounds stupid, why does she owe anybody an apology?, but not behaving this way is a pretty major gaffe in Japan. The news shows on the night that she withdrew from the French Open completely ignored the story except for one network. Since the Japanese had generally decided to adopt Naomi in a positive light, it was just awkwardly embarrassing to them the way she behaved. After she lost her final Olympics match, the television show I was watching did the traditional thing of reading faxes from the viewers (yes, everyone still has fax machines in Japan). They read two faxes. That was all that had been sent in. Usually there would have been a big board with all the faxes posted (various messages and manga portraits) and a selected few of them would have been read.

    But as long as she starts winning again and doesn’t get involved in drugs I think she can rehabilitate her image in Japan. She needs some sort of cultural advisor though. She needs to do the tour of all the television networks and tell her teary tale.

  17. @Whiskey
    A couple of rejoinders here to the NYT. First, almost no Japanese speak English, even fewer read it, and the NYT might as well be the jabbering of crows for how much Japanese understand it, much less care.

    Then, there are very scary types still around, the Ultranationalists. The Deep Ocean Society, Black Dragon Society. They are not capable of mounting coups. They are capable and willing to conduct assassinations of those they deem threatening Japan, and their is some intermingling with the Yakuza.

    Also, blacks are roundly disliked for their role as the main rapists and killers of young Japanese women in Okinawa. This is not discussed in the US but is in Japan, though in the usual oblique Japanese way.

    Finally, the Japanese are Japanese. Their religion, their way of being, their purpose in life is to be Japanese. Very few really emigrate, and then only under economic hardship. They have 700 year old cooking schools, and some flower arranging schools nearly as old. They seem modern and Western, and in some way (use of technology, urban living, etc) they are. In many ways, very much not. The government of Japan spends lots of money supporting traditional crafts of paper making, ceramics, sword making, and other stuff that no other nation does. The Imperial family is still untouchable in the way that European royals are not.

    Globohomo will not have its way with Japan. It just can't -- the people are Japanese. simple as that.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @J.Ross, @Colin Wright

    As far as I can consider, Japan appears to be the only country on the planet with a serious world-class literature, which does not have a significant international diaspora.

    Lady Murasaki is a world writer in the same way that Chaucer is; but Chaucer has a world-wide diaspora, as do Cervantes, Dante, Moliere, Pushkin, Confucius, the Ramayana poet, Homer, Catullus, you get the idea.

    Maybe the Persians prove me wrong, not sure about that. Experts? Your opinions please.

    • Replies: @PaceLaw
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Well, there is this guy. Lol! https://m.imdb.com/title/tt0465316/

    , @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    The caveat being that 漢詩 かんし kanshi Classical Chinese poetry was heavily favored by the Samurais, Nogi Maresuke 乃木 希典 and Saigō Takamori 西郷 隆盛 (Mishima not so much)

    From Nogi this shichigon-zekku 七言絶句 seven character quatrain, 凱旋 Triumph

    皇師百萬征強虜 (皇師百萬強虜を征す)
    野戰攻城屍作山 (野戦攻城屍山を作(な)す)
    愧我何顔看父老 (愧(は)ず我何の顔(かんばせ)あって父老に看(まみ)えん)
    凱歌今日幾人還 (凱歌今日幾人か還る)

    Imperial Army million strong expedites formidable barbarians
    Field battles and sieges corpses form mountains
    Ashamed am I with what face to see father and elders
    Triumphant songs today but how many men returned

    This form in Chinese is called 七绝 Qijue, and is typically on more lighthearted topics.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qijue

    , @Hibiscu
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Sei Shonagan who ended up a member of the Empress' court in 10th century Japan wrote a famous "pillow book". The pages were kept in the wooden "pillows" they slept on. It is an absolutely fascinating look at the court, at religious rites and family relations and village life. Daughter of a Samurai is another wonderful glimpse into Japanese life and the self-denial and loyalty they practice.

  18. @Hi There
    OT: David French literally endorsed "bloodguilt" for white people. "bloodguilt" is David French's word choice.

    How did Steve Sailer miss that one? I would expect Steve Sailer to have a field day with that.

    Gee, maybe "bloodguilt for white people" can be the tag line for the new principled conservative movement? Maybe David French can run for President of the US again with the campaign slogan "David French: bloodguilt for white people". How about National Review can make that their subheading: "National Review: Bloodguilt for whites!"

    I'm not normally a fan of cancel culture, but maybe any serious political movement and news outlets should face intense pressure to thoroughly divorce themselves from "bloodguilt for white people" advocacy in the same way Republicans are expected to divorce themselves from several degrees of connection from anyone advocating for white nationalism.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Almost Missouri

    Invoking Jehovah to call for forced reparations and redemptive slavery is certainly showing True Colors.

    The alternative hypothesis to being a Jehovahist is that David French is just a flytrap at the center of an FBI string trying to flush out excitable right-wingers. Who knows.

  19. anonymous[409] • Disclaimer says:

    Coming round to the view that BLM-racial-reckoning initiatives have been extremely tough on black people, and Naomi and Simone are only the most visible. It leaves them essentially responsible and answering for the views of only the pycho-negro 1 per cent. They see through it completely, and it shames them to think that most white people believe that’s thc A-A core belief these days. It makes them exceedingly self-conscious and paranoid. Yet at the same time most fo them are as cowed and bent before it as our liberal eunuch-class. not good. Most blacks, believe it or not, actually want to be LIKED by white people.

    • Replies: @0
    @anonymous

    Your comment's unclear to me, but I think this sentiment is true. And then there's the idea that having resentment--which is what the racial reckoning is all about--is very unhealthy and unhappy. This is all making blacks miserable.

    , @pnumatic
    @anonymous


    Most blacks, believe it or not, actually want to be LIKED by white people.
     
    They sure have funny ways of articulating this hidden desire.
  20. Imagine hating the Japanese for simply being Japanese.

    Literally, the Left hates them for their race.

    Racism…..

    I suppose it was inevitable. I mean, any decent white nationalist was always quick to point out Japan as a non-white nation they admired for preserving their ethnicity and was racially aware and yet was 1st-world wonderful. FFS, Jared Taylor grew up there. And many white nationalists grew into such by having yellow gfs and hearing their open racial talk and their family’s talk.

    Japan had to be next on the ((list)).

  21. @PaceLaw
    “Motoko Rich” would be a good name for a villainess in a James Bond movie. Or a common dat,hip-hop artist. The appeal to fast, big money and foreign appeal/attractiveness is s it all really takes. sad.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @AceDeuce

    “Motoko Rich” would be a good name for a villainess in a James Bond movie.

    There was that villain Marc Rich who got a controversial pardon from Bill Clinton:

    Marc Rich, a fugitive who had fled the U.S. during his prosecution, was residing in Switzerland. Rich owed $48 million in taxes and was charged with 51 counts for tax fraud, was pardoned of tax evasion. He was required to pay a $1 million fine and waive any use of the pardon as a defense against any future civil charges that were filed against him in the same case. Critics complained that Denise Eisenberg Rich, his former wife, had made substantial donations to both the Clinton library and to Mrs. Clinton’s senate campaign. According to Paul Volcker’s independent investigation of Iraqi Oil-for-Food kickback schemes, Marc Rich was a middleman for several suspect Iraqi oil deals involving over 4 million barrels (640,000 m3) of oil.

    BTW, there’s also this:

    Federal prosecutor Mary Jo White was appointed to investigate the pardon of Marc Rich. She was later replaced by Republican James Comey, who found no illegality on Clinton’s part.

    That should be “Swamp Guardian” James Comey.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @Harry Baldwin

    I remember even the Clinton-defending pedophiles at Salon.com being upset at the Marc Rich pardon; one of their writers even asked, "Could Bill Clinton really be as bad as those wingnut conspiracy theorists say he is?"

    It was a pre-cursor to the Clinton charity being a front for people to pay for influence with Hillary as Senator and Secretary of State.

    I also remember learning that Eric Holder was one of the errand-boy go-betweens on the pardon.

  22. But in some corners of society, people remain xenophobic and refuse to accept those who don’t conform to a very narrow definition of what it means to be Japanese.

    Being a crowded country, Japan may have more corners than open spaces.

    I.e., those in the “corners” are probably the majority. They’re also probably right.

    That Osaka doesn’t even speak Japanese is a huge marker of the fraudulence of her claim to Japaneseness. I know Japanese whose Japanese language has merely atrophied slightly from living abroad for a few years. (Japanese is a difficult language even for Japanese.) Even such homeborn and purebred Japanese get heightened scrutiny and skepticism from other Japanese for being slightly out of synch in speech and manners. Naomi Osaka doesn’t even speak the freakin’ language. If she’s not bringing huge honor to the table, the Japanese have zero reason to take her and her myriad “issues” seriously.

    • Agree: PaceLaw
    • LOL: Paul Jolliffe
  23. @Nikolai Vladivostok
    Japan chose those two out of an awareness of the West's current obsession with blacks. They sometimes do things like that to appear more 'international' on the world stage. Now they're learning the lesson whites have learned: you can never bow low enough.
    Funny to think that if Japan had prominently featured a half-white athlete to appear international, it would have backfired in a predictable way. 'White supremacy!'
    It had to be black or nothing.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    There’s one black guy who’s a regular on Japanese TV as a talk show guest and has been for decades. He moved to Japan and is basically a celebrity for acting like a stupid black and mispronouncing Japanese words and being goofy. The Japanese have accepted him; he married a Japanese woman and had kids.

    But he’s the exception that proves the rule.

    • Replies: @Nikolai Vladivostok
    @R.G. Camara

    The Nigerian? I saw a comedy skit where he'd go to random Japanese people's houses, ask to come in for a cup of tea and see who'd let him.
    There was also the black guy who did the Softbank ads who wasn't treated as a buffoon but he got in trouble for not transferring his driver's license.

    , @Nigerian Nationalist
    @R.G. Camara

    There is another black guy who is fairly regular in JAV. The Japanese have accepted him too...intimately.

    Who wouldn't want to be that exception?

  24. @Harry Baldwin
    @PaceLaw

    “Motoko Rich” would be a good name for a villainess in a James Bond movie.

    There was that villain Marc Rich who got a controversial pardon from Bill Clinton:


    Marc Rich, a fugitive who had fled the U.S. during his prosecution, was residing in Switzerland. Rich owed $48 million in taxes and was charged with 51 counts for tax fraud, was pardoned of tax evasion. He was required to pay a $1 million fine and waive any use of the pardon as a defense against any future civil charges that were filed against him in the same case. Critics complained that Denise Eisenberg Rich, his former wife, had made substantial donations to both the Clinton library and to Mrs. Clinton's senate campaign. According to Paul Volcker's independent investigation of Iraqi Oil-for-Food kickback schemes, Marc Rich was a middleman for several suspect Iraqi oil deals involving over 4 million barrels (640,000 m3) of oil.
     
    BTW, there's also this:

    Federal prosecutor Mary Jo White was appointed to investigate the pardon of Marc Rich. She was later replaced by Republican James Comey, who found no illegality on Clinton's part.
     
    That should be "Swamp Guardian" James Comey.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    I remember even the Clinton-defending pedophiles at Salon.com being upset at the Marc Rich pardon; one of their writers even asked, “Could Bill Clinton really be as bad as those wingnut conspiracy theorists say he is?”

    It was a pre-cursor to the Clinton charity being a front for people to pay for influence with Hillary as Senator and Secretary of State.

    I also remember learning that Eric Holder was one of the errand-boy go-betweens on the pardon.

  25. anon[272] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    Everyone is jumping over each other to defend Simone Biles from all of the critics, yet I have yet to hear anybody actually criticize her.

    Replies: @Morton's toes, @anon, @AceDeuce

    And Charlie Kirk is an idiot. This is Rush Limbaugh ‘own da libs’ style stuff– it just doesn’t play well with this generation. Does he call Vets w/ PTSD pussies? Or the cop that shot because he was “scared for his life”: does he call him a pussy and deserving of murder charges?

  26. @Anon
    You racists make me sick with your hatred of minorities and ridiculous conspiracy theories of the untermensch swamping your countries.

    Thankfully demographics are changing

    Replies: @notsaying, @AnotherDad, @pnumatic, @Spect3r

    Why should we be happy that our nation has been transformed by a tidal wave of immigration?

    We were doing great as a mostly white/some blacks country with a sprinkling of Asians and Hispanics. Had we stayed pretty much the same, as other countries have done who are not part of the First World, I think we would continued to do great.

    What has been done cannot be undone. But don’t try to tell me we needed all these people. We did not. They needed us. They are still pouring in.

    If we are such bad people, please explain that.

    • Replies: @0
    @notsaying

    Stop arguing with trolls lol

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @notsaying


    What has been done cannot be undone.
     
    https://thumbs.gfycat.com/BlindSnivelingAmericanpainthorse-size_restricted.gif
  27. @Whiskey
    Let me add, Osaka's failure to speak Japanese and adopt a Japanese name like Mongolian wrestlers do for Sumo, is going to rankle people. As long as she won, she could get away with it. First big loss -- well no Japanese politician is going to rake his own people over the coals for what amounts to a foreigner and the NYT. They probably share the attitude.

    Even the most connected, respected, Japanese speaking foreigner, will never really be Japanese. That's just the way it is.

    Replies: @Gimeiyo

    Let me add, Osaka’s failure to speak Japanese and adopt a Japanese name like Mongolian wrestlers do for Sumo, is going to rankle people.

    Naomi Osaka sounds like a pretty Japanese name to me. 大阪なおみ. She could pick Kanji for her given name, like 奈緒美 or 尚美 or whatever, but I don’t think she has done.

    But as you say, her limited Japanese and, frankly, lack of experience with Japanese culture is what makes her an awkward representative of Japan. She was raised in the US, and her sense of being “Japanese” growing up was an Americanised version of Japanese-ness.

    You could contrast her with another part-Black celebrity of years past — the enka singer Jero. Unlike Osaka, his Japanese was excellent, and he was intimately familiar with Japanese culture, mores, attitudes, etc. But perhaps because he was so fluent in Japanese language and culture, he never presented himself as “Japanese.”

    I’m half-Korean myself, and while I feel a deep affinity for Korea, I would never presume to represent “Korea.” No Korean would ever consider me Korean — not really. And it’s the same with the Japanese.

    • Agree: SOL
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Gimeiyo

    This apparently will come as news to you, but the Olympics is an international competition that only happens to be based in Japan this year. Few Japanese people may consider Naomi Osaka to be "really Japanese," but that obviously is not the point. She is one of the faces that the Japanese Olympic Committee chose to represent Japan to the world, aka the 98.4% of the human population not residing in Japan.

    Why did they do this? I suspect we may never get the full story, although readers of this blog can make some pretty educated guesses. But while Japan has been able to preserve its culture and its people better than other developed countries, they're still human and, for better or worse, are susceptible to the same mindworms as European peoples are. If a half black half English person said "no English person will ever consider me English" they would be lying through their teeth. And while the Japanese and Koreans may be considerably more ethnocentric and xenophobic than the English are, this is not necessarily a permanent state of affairs. And it's absurd to say that not one person out of tens of millions of people would consider you "really" Korean.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Gimeiyo

    , @3g4me
    @Gimeiyo

    @27 Gimeiyo: "I’m half-Korean myself, and while I feel a deep affinity for Korea, I would never presume to represent “Korea.” No Korean would ever consider me Korean — not really."

    Yet I bet you would feel perfectly comfortable presenting yourself as American due to magic dirt and because White Americans 'don't have a culture.' You're a chip off the founding fathers' blocks, amirite?

    Replies: @Gimeiyo, @Alden

  28. So again the question: what to do? He can’t tell the team doctor, who will demand that he goes to hospital and has the fracture reset. He can’t tell his team-mates for fear that it will break their concentration and diminish their performances. There’s only one thing he can do, insane though it sounds. He can pass it off as a twinge and keep going. So that’s exactly what he does.

    That stoicism has a dark side. In WW2 Japanese officers used to waste massive numbers of their troops because they could never push back on more senior level commanders. They would just say, “yes sir”, and then order their troops to fight to the death, even when the situation was hopeless. Because the senior brass was never wrong and it was the fault of ordinary soldiers who just were not fighting with enough spirit or heart they would continue with failed plans and strategies long after catastrophic defeat. Eventually it would be up to the most senior level general to tell the emperor and he would promptly kill himself making way for the next ass lick who would be even more savage.

  29. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Whiskey

    As far as I can consider, Japan appears to be the only country on the planet with a serious world-class literature, which does not have a significant international diaspora.

    Lady Murasaki is a world writer in the same way that Chaucer is; but Chaucer has a world-wide diaspora, as do Cervantes, Dante, Moliere, Pushkin, Confucius, the Ramayana poet, Homer, Catullus, you get the idea.

    Maybe the Persians prove me wrong, not sure about that. Experts? Your opinions please.

    Replies: @PaceLaw, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @Hibiscu

    Well, there is this guy. Lol! https://m.imdb.com/title/tt0465316/

  30. @R.G. Camara
    @Nikolai Vladivostok

    There's one black guy who's a regular on Japanese TV as a talk show guest and has been for decades. He moved to Japan and is basically a celebrity for acting like a stupid black and mispronouncing Japanese words and being goofy. The Japanese have accepted him; he married a Japanese woman and had kids.

    But he's the exception that proves the rule.

    Replies: @Nikolai Vladivostok, @Nigerian Nationalist

    The Nigerian? I saw a comedy skit where he’d go to random Japanese people’s houses, ask to come in for a cup of tea and see who’d let him.
    There was also the black guy who did the Softbank ads who wasn’t treated as a buffoon but he got in trouble for not transferring his driver’s license.

  31. “I still can’t understand why she was the final torchbearer,” one commenter wrote on a Yahoo News story about her loss. “Although she says she is Japanese, she cannot speak Japanese very much.” Several comments like that one that were harshly critical of Ms. Osaka were given “thumbs up” by 10,000 or more other Yahoo users.

    These commenters are disgusting.

    Naomi Osaka was born in the Osaka Prefecture, and grew up in the Florida Prefecture.

    What can be more Japanese than that?

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @AnotherDad

    You are not in the correct timeline! Also, Florida belongs to the Reich.

    , @Known Fact
    @AnotherDad

    I'd love to see America adopt prefectures instead of boring old counties and townships. (Although parishes are pretty cool). Prefecture sounds mildly exotic, like something out of an Ernest Bramah fantasy. "Ah yes, mysterious mushroom come from forest in distant prefecture."

  32. @Anon
    You racists make me sick with your hatred of minorities and ridiculous conspiracy theories of the untermensch swamping your countries.

    Thankfully demographics are changing

    Replies: @notsaying, @AnotherDad, @pnumatic, @Spect3r

    Thankfully demographics are changing

    Why is it so important to you–or anyone–to change the demographics i live around?

    Seems to indicate poor character.

  33. @Almost Missouri
    @Hi There

    https://americanmind.org/salvo/david-french-and-the-conservative-case-for-hereditary-bloodguilt/

    It sounds like satire...

    ...but it's the current year.

    Replies: @El Dato

    Invoking Jehovah to call for forced reparations and redemptive slavery is certainly showing True Colors.

    The alternative hypothesis to being a Jehovahist is that David French is just a flytrap at the center of an FBI string trying to flush out excitable right-wingers. Who knows.

  34. @AnotherDad

    “I still can’t understand why she was the final torchbearer,” one commenter wrote on a Yahoo News story about her loss. “Although she says she is Japanese, she cannot speak Japanese very much.” Several comments like that one that were harshly critical of Ms. Osaka were given “thumbs up” by 10,000 or more other Yahoo users.
     
    These commenters are disgusting.

    Naomi Osaka was born in the Osaka Prefecture, and grew up in the Florida Prefecture.

    What can be more Japanese than that?

    Replies: @El Dato, @Known Fact

    You are not in the correct timeline! Also, Florida belongs to the Reich.

    • LOL: SOL
  35. I think race themed articles are treated as easy work by reporters. It’s something that doesn’t require much thought or effort, you can just peruse online message boards. They type up some words on structural racism and presto they’ve met their deadline with time to spare.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Ed


    I think race themed articles are treated as easy work by reporters.
     
    Absotootly! But you'd better choose your words very carefully and have a couple of paranoid editors reading carefully behind you -- because one little slip of taste or nuance and the next race-themed article will be about you and the end of your career.
  36. @Gimeiyo
    @Whiskey


    Let me add, Osaka’s failure to speak Japanese and adopt a Japanese name like Mongolian wrestlers do for Sumo, is going to rankle people.
     
    Naomi Osaka sounds like a pretty Japanese name to me. 大阪なおみ. She could pick Kanji for her given name, like 奈緒美 or 尚美 or whatever, but I don't think she has done.

    But as you say, her limited Japanese and, frankly, lack of experience with Japanese culture is what makes her an awkward representative of Japan. She was raised in the US, and her sense of being "Japanese" growing up was an Americanised version of Japanese-ness.

    You could contrast her with another part-Black celebrity of years past -- the enka singer Jero. Unlike Osaka, his Japanese was excellent, and he was intimately familiar with Japanese culture, mores, attitudes, etc. But perhaps because he was so fluent in Japanese language and culture, he never presented himself as "Japanese."

    I'm half-Korean myself, and while I feel a deep affinity for Korea, I would never presume to represent "Korea." No Korean would ever consider me Korean -- not really. And it's the same with the Japanese.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @3g4me

    This apparently will come as news to you, but the Olympics is an international competition that only happens to be based in Japan this year. Few Japanese people may consider Naomi Osaka to be “really Japanese,” but that obviously is not the point. She is one of the faces that the Japanese Olympic Committee chose to represent Japan to the world, aka the 98.4% of the human population not residing in Japan.

    Why did they do this? I suspect we may never get the full story, although readers of this blog can make some pretty educated guesses. But while Japan has been able to preserve its culture and its people better than other developed countries, they’re still human and, for better or worse, are susceptible to the same mindworms as European peoples are. If a half black half English person said “no English person will ever consider me English” they would be lying through their teeth. And while the Japanese and Koreans may be considerably more ethnocentric and xenophobic than the English are, this is not necessarily a permanent state of affairs. And it’s absurd to say that not one person out of tens of millions of people would consider you “really” Korean.

    • Disagree: 3g4me
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @AndrewR

    In 2008 in Beijing, the Chinese flag was carried by 7.5' tall NBA star Yao Ming, the most internationally famous Chinese athlete, and 3' tall Hero Boy who dug his classmates out of the big earthquake a few years before: a memorable choice.

    The two top Japanese athletes in international sports at present are Naomi Osaka in tennis and Shohei Ohtani in baseball.

    But MLB doesn't shut down its season to participate in the Olympics, so using a baseball player as its torchbearer endorses MLB sitting out the Olympics. And the Angels might not have been happy giving up their two-way superstar for about 4 games. So Osaka was a reasonable choice.

    I wonder if the Japanese male gymnast who stuck the landing with a broken leg to win the team championship gold for Japan can still jog. Maybe he's been disabled from then on. They should have had him light the torch in his wheelchair.

    , @Gimeiyo
    @AndrewR


    And while the Japanese and Koreans may be considerably more ethnocentric and xenophobic than the English are, this is not necessarily a permanent state of affairs. And it’s absurd to say that not one person out of tens of millions of people would consider you “really” Korean.
     
    Fair enough -- out of 80 million Koreans I could probably find at least a couple who believe I'm the Tsar of all the Russias. With enough people, you can find someone who will believe anything. But it's an extremely marginal belief.

    I think, though, that it's a fundamental error to conflate a strong sense of national/cultural identity with "xenophobia." Korean society is somewhat xenophobic compared to the Japanese, in my experience, but they both have strong xenophilic elements as well. But liking foreign things and foreigners doesn't mean you have to accept foreigners as one of you, any more than liking women means you need to accept female-to-male transgenders as men. Or, in the reverse, that liking African Americans means you can make people accept you as Black. It's a basic confusion of terms.

    Not going to dispute ethnocentric, though.
  37. @AndrewR
    @Gimeiyo

    This apparently will come as news to you, but the Olympics is an international competition that only happens to be based in Japan this year. Few Japanese people may consider Naomi Osaka to be "really Japanese," but that obviously is not the point. She is one of the faces that the Japanese Olympic Committee chose to represent Japan to the world, aka the 98.4% of the human population not residing in Japan.

    Why did they do this? I suspect we may never get the full story, although readers of this blog can make some pretty educated guesses. But while Japan has been able to preserve its culture and its people better than other developed countries, they're still human and, for better or worse, are susceptible to the same mindworms as European peoples are. If a half black half English person said "no English person will ever consider me English" they would be lying through their teeth. And while the Japanese and Koreans may be considerably more ethnocentric and xenophobic than the English are, this is not necessarily a permanent state of affairs. And it's absurd to say that not one person out of tens of millions of people would consider you "really" Korean.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Gimeiyo

    In 2008 in Beijing, the Chinese flag was carried by 7.5′ tall NBA star Yao Ming, the most internationally famous Chinese athlete, and 3′ tall Hero Boy who dug his classmates out of the big earthquake a few years before: a memorable choice.

    The two top Japanese athletes in international sports at present are Naomi Osaka in tennis and Shohei Ohtani in baseball.

    But MLB doesn’t shut down its season to participate in the Olympics, so using a baseball player as its torchbearer endorses MLB sitting out the Olympics. And the Angels might not have been happy giving up their two-way superstar for about 4 games. So Osaka was a reasonable choice.

    I wonder if the Japanese male gymnast who stuck the landing with a broken leg to win the team championship gold for Japan can still jog. Maybe he’s been disabled from then on. They should have had him light the torch in his wheelchair.

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian
  38. @anonymous
    Coming round to the view that BLM-racial-reckoning initiatives have been extremely tough on black people, and Naomi and Simone are only the most visible. It leaves them essentially responsible and answering for the views of only the pycho-negro 1 per cent. They see through it completely, and it shames them to think that most white people believe that's thc A-A core belief these days. It makes them exceedingly self-conscious and paranoid. Yet at the same time most fo them are as cowed and bent before it as our liberal eunuch-class. not good. Most blacks, believe it or not, actually want to be LIKED by white people.

    Replies: @0, @pnumatic

    Your comment’s unclear to me, but I think this sentiment is true. And then there’s the idea that having resentment–which is what the racial reckoning is all about–is very unhealthy and unhappy. This is all making blacks miserable.

  39. @notsaying
    @Anon

    Why should we be happy that our nation has been transformed by a tidal wave of immigration?

    We were doing great as a mostly white/some blacks country with a sprinkling of Asians and Hispanics. Had we stayed pretty much the same, as other countries have done who are not part of the First World, I think we would continued to do great.

    What has been done cannot be undone. But don't try to tell me we needed all these people. We did not. They needed us. They are still pouring in.

    If we are such bad people, please explain that.

    Replies: @0, @Bardon Kaldian

    Stop arguing with trolls lol

  40. @rational actor
    This started out as merely interesting and has become highly topical:
    https://thecritic.co.uk/issues/august-september-2021/breaking-the-knee/

    The article is about Shun Fujimoto, a member of the Japanese gymnastics team at the 1976 Olympics.

    The men had won the team all-round event for the last four Games, with the USSR finishing second on each occasion. “We were anxious,” Fujimoto said. “We knew that we couldn’t break the legacy of our predecessors. That pressure was heavy.”

     

    Living up to the hard work of your predecessors is important. Imagine that. In pursuit of this, Fujimoto breaks his kneecap as a result of a hard landing in his floor routine.

    So again the question: what to do? He can’t tell the team doctor, who will demand that he goes to hospital and has the fracture reset. He can’t tell his team-mates for fear that it will break their concentration and diminish their performances. There’s only one thing he can do, insane though it sounds. He can pass it off as a twinge and keep going. So that’s exactly what he does.
     
    So the insanely focused gymnast does a pommel horse routine, which is not too demanding on the legs, followed by the rings, where he has the problem of executing a successful landing.

    His kneecap’s already fractured, but now the impact dislocates it too, tearing bone from ligaments like a wolf ripping at a carcass. The pain is an all-consuming explosion, a river which rushes and spills over every part of him. But he can’t succumb. His sole concession to the agony is to lift his leg slightly after landing, but other than that he holds the position as he’s practised time and again, body straight and arms high, because if he doesn’t he’ll lose marks, and after what seems like aeons but is only actually a few seconds the judges nod and it’s over.

    The Japanese finish with 576.85 points, the Soviets with 576.45. Four-tenths of a point: a winning margin of less than one-tenth of one per cent.
     
    I have zero interest in sports, but this isn't really about sport at all. The man stifled his pain, did what was necessary on the day, and took a couple for the team that had no doubt provided support and encouragement for him in the past. If the Olympics have any reason to exist it is surely for episodes like this.

    The article was written as speculation on who would light the Olympic flame in Tokyo and the author states that it was completed before the opening ceremony, so it was not produced as a commentary on l'affaire Biles or the antics of Osaka. Then again, sucking it up and succeeding is no doubt an artefact of the patriarchy and expecting the same of women is misogyny. Or something. In any case, we can all see who the chickenshits are in this game, and it isn't the guy with the bad knee.

    Replies: @JosephB, @Captain Tripps, @Anonymous

    Then again, sucking it up and succeeding is no doubt an artefact of the patriarchy and expecting the same of women is misogyny.

    Kerri Strug.

    • Agree: gandydancer
  41. Nissin Noodles is not going to be able to claim to be the noodle of champions this time around, but I guess that these days being the noodle of mentally ill people is still a valuable claim.

    I honestly don’t blame these athletes like Biles and Osaka full withdrawing from competitions for various reasons, but it is a whole infrastructure of sponsorship, advertising, image rights, TV, cable, agents and massive earnings that takes the fun out of sport and puts profit over people.

    Athletes enter into a Faustian bargain initially so that they can just dedicate themselves to the sport they love and maybe get good enough to go to the Olympics or even win a medal, but then find that they are trapped and have to pay back with their souls.

    Social media make things worse, and in many cases athletes make the mistake, just like certain members of the British royal family, of reading their own press instead of being regally above it all.

    But for every world-famous winner there are innumerable athletes who fall by the wayside and are never heard of again.

  42. @rational actor
    This started out as merely interesting and has become highly topical:
    https://thecritic.co.uk/issues/august-september-2021/breaking-the-knee/

    The article is about Shun Fujimoto, a member of the Japanese gymnastics team at the 1976 Olympics.

    The men had won the team all-round event for the last four Games, with the USSR finishing second on each occasion. “We were anxious,” Fujimoto said. “We knew that we couldn’t break the legacy of our predecessors. That pressure was heavy.”

     

    Living up to the hard work of your predecessors is important. Imagine that. In pursuit of this, Fujimoto breaks his kneecap as a result of a hard landing in his floor routine.

    So again the question: what to do? He can’t tell the team doctor, who will demand that he goes to hospital and has the fracture reset. He can’t tell his team-mates for fear that it will break their concentration and diminish their performances. There’s only one thing he can do, insane though it sounds. He can pass it off as a twinge and keep going. So that’s exactly what he does.
     
    So the insanely focused gymnast does a pommel horse routine, which is not too demanding on the legs, followed by the rings, where he has the problem of executing a successful landing.

    His kneecap’s already fractured, but now the impact dislocates it too, tearing bone from ligaments like a wolf ripping at a carcass. The pain is an all-consuming explosion, a river which rushes and spills over every part of him. But he can’t succumb. His sole concession to the agony is to lift his leg slightly after landing, but other than that he holds the position as he’s practised time and again, body straight and arms high, because if he doesn’t he’ll lose marks, and after what seems like aeons but is only actually a few seconds the judges nod and it’s over.

    The Japanese finish with 576.85 points, the Soviets with 576.45. Four-tenths of a point: a winning margin of less than one-tenth of one per cent.
     
    I have zero interest in sports, but this isn't really about sport at all. The man stifled his pain, did what was necessary on the day, and took a couple for the team that had no doubt provided support and encouragement for him in the past. If the Olympics have any reason to exist it is surely for episodes like this.

    The article was written as speculation on who would light the Olympic flame in Tokyo and the author states that it was completed before the opening ceremony, so it was not produced as a commentary on l'affaire Biles or the antics of Osaka. Then again, sucking it up and succeeding is no doubt an artefact of the patriarchy and expecting the same of women is misogyny. Or something. In any case, we can all see who the chickenshits are in this game, and it isn't the guy with the bad knee.

    Replies: @JosephB, @Captain Tripps, @Anonymous

    You may be able to still find a couple of old Marines, Soldiers and Sailors who could tell you about the willpower and focus of Japanese men in extreme adversity.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Captain Tripps

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lk9R2TCwC4c

  43. @notsaying
    @Anon

    Why should we be happy that our nation has been transformed by a tidal wave of immigration?

    We were doing great as a mostly white/some blacks country with a sprinkling of Asians and Hispanics. Had we stayed pretty much the same, as other countries have done who are not part of the First World, I think we would continued to do great.

    What has been done cannot be undone. But don't try to tell me we needed all these people. We did not. They needed us. They are still pouring in.

    If we are such bad people, please explain that.

    Replies: @0, @Bardon Kaldian

    What has been done cannot be undone.

  44. @Anon
    You racists make me sick with your hatred of minorities and ridiculous conspiracy theories of the untermensch swamping your countries.

    Thankfully demographics are changing

    Replies: @notsaying, @AnotherDad, @pnumatic, @Spect3r

    Is the feeling of sickness strong? Is it getting worse?

    Don’t worry, I’m not asking out of compassion.

  45. @anonymous
    Coming round to the view that BLM-racial-reckoning initiatives have been extremely tough on black people, and Naomi and Simone are only the most visible. It leaves them essentially responsible and answering for the views of only the pycho-negro 1 per cent. They see through it completely, and it shames them to think that most white people believe that's thc A-A core belief these days. It makes them exceedingly self-conscious and paranoid. Yet at the same time most fo them are as cowed and bent before it as our liberal eunuch-class. not good. Most blacks, believe it or not, actually want to be LIKED by white people.

    Replies: @0, @pnumatic

    Most blacks, believe it or not, actually want to be LIKED by white people.

    They sure have funny ways of articulating this hidden desire.

  46. @Anon
    Everyone is jumping over each other to defend Simone Biles from all of the critics, yet I have yet to hear anybody actually criticize her.

    Replies: @Morton's toes, @anon, @AceDeuce

    Regarding Biles, if that was the only White girl on a team full of boonies, and she pulled the same stunt during the Olympics-exactly the same way as Biles did–you’d never hear the end of it. The knigg “teammates” would be wall to wall dogging her over this, and the knigro “kuh-mooh-natty” would be spinning conspiracy tales of how the White girl sabotaged the team, and “ain’t dat jus’ like wypio?” and the media and White sheep would dutifully follow suit.

    • Replies: @Truth
    @AceDeuce

    ...Oh, kinda like you do on a daily basis?

  47. The nerve of those Japs, preferring racial homogeneity and preserving their traditions and culture!

    Who do they think they are, Israel?

    • Agree: 3g4me
  48. @PaceLaw
    “Motoko Rich” would be a good name for a villainess in a James Bond movie. Or a common dat,hip-hop artist. The appeal to fast, big money and foreign appeal/attractiveness is s it all really takes. sad.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @AceDeuce

    “Motoko Rich”? I knew her cousin “Mocha-Chocolata-Ya Ya” (AKA “Creole Lady Marmalade”)

    Small world

  49. Naomi Osaka can be Japanese for all I care, but I don’t think she’s the kind of Japanese that would have kept on fighting in the Philipine jungles even after the Emperor surrendered.

    • Replies: @Gimeiyo
    @International Jew


    Naomi Osaka can be Japanese for all I care, but I don’t think she’s the kind of Japanese that would have kept on fighting in the Philipine jungles even after the Emperor surrendered.
     
    The last of whom was, ironically, native Taiwanese: Teruo Nakamura aka Attun Palalin aka Kuang-hui Lee.
    , @Dennis Dale
    @International Jew

    Indeed. When Serena Williams threw her tantrum on losing to Osaka I felt nothing but sympathy for her. Like the Biles affair, the whole thing was a perverse expression of black privilege.
    Then, I see her a couple of years later and the 'fro is teased out, she's playing up her black heritage and her and Serena are said to be best buds.

    Japan is better off without her--not that's she's a bad person, but she's confused. And not at all Japanese.

  50. If she can’t even speak Japanese properly…..

  51. From what I’ve seen her behavior on the court is appropriate, she doesn’t go smashing racquets and showing the rage that Serena would on occasion. I just cannot stand the opportunism coupled with the total ingratitude to the country in which she grew up. One of the risks of her gambit is that it means fans have less loyalty as well – she will never be the star her handlers intended because they don’t identify with her the same way and frankly she doesn’t seem to have much of a personality either.

    I am not a fan of the politics of Martina Navratilova, but I always appreciated her work ethic and the fact that she is grateful to the United States for what it has given her.

  52. “In some corners of Japanese society.”

    Well, if they are to be hunted down they are right where you want’em.

  53. @AndrewR
    @Gimeiyo

    This apparently will come as news to you, but the Olympics is an international competition that only happens to be based in Japan this year. Few Japanese people may consider Naomi Osaka to be "really Japanese," but that obviously is not the point. She is one of the faces that the Japanese Olympic Committee chose to represent Japan to the world, aka the 98.4% of the human population not residing in Japan.

    Why did they do this? I suspect we may never get the full story, although readers of this blog can make some pretty educated guesses. But while Japan has been able to preserve its culture and its people better than other developed countries, they're still human and, for better or worse, are susceptible to the same mindworms as European peoples are. If a half black half English person said "no English person will ever consider me English" they would be lying through their teeth. And while the Japanese and Koreans may be considerably more ethnocentric and xenophobic than the English are, this is not necessarily a permanent state of affairs. And it's absurd to say that not one person out of tens of millions of people would consider you "really" Korean.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Gimeiyo

    And while the Japanese and Koreans may be considerably more ethnocentric and xenophobic than the English are, this is not necessarily a permanent state of affairs. And it’s absurd to say that not one person out of tens of millions of people would consider you “really” Korean.

    Fair enough — out of 80 million Koreans I could probably find at least a couple who believe I’m the Tsar of all the Russias. With enough people, you can find someone who will believe anything. But it’s an extremely marginal belief.

    I think, though, that it’s a fundamental error to conflate a strong sense of national/cultural identity with “xenophobia.” Korean society is somewhat xenophobic compared to the Japanese, in my experience, but they both have strong xenophilic elements as well. But liking foreign things and foreigners doesn’t mean you have to accept foreigners as one of you, any more than liking women means you need to accept female-to-male transgenders as men. Or, in the reverse, that liking African Americans means you can make people accept you as Black. It’s a basic confusion of terms.

    Not going to dispute ethnocentric, though.

  54. @International Jew
    Naomi Osaka can be Japanese for all I care, but I don't think she's the kind of Japanese that would have kept on fighting in the Philipine jungles even after the Emperor surrendered.

    Replies: @Gimeiyo, @Dennis Dale

    Naomi Osaka can be Japanese for all I care, but I don’t think she’s the kind of Japanese that would have kept on fighting in the Philipine jungles even after the Emperor surrendered.

    The last of whom was, ironically, native Taiwanese: Teruo Nakamura aka Attun Palalin aka Kuang-hui Lee.

    • Thanks: PaceLaw
  55. @Gimeiyo
    @Whiskey


    Let me add, Osaka’s failure to speak Japanese and adopt a Japanese name like Mongolian wrestlers do for Sumo, is going to rankle people.
     
    Naomi Osaka sounds like a pretty Japanese name to me. 大阪なおみ. She could pick Kanji for her given name, like 奈緒美 or 尚美 or whatever, but I don't think she has done.

    But as you say, her limited Japanese and, frankly, lack of experience with Japanese culture is what makes her an awkward representative of Japan. She was raised in the US, and her sense of being "Japanese" growing up was an Americanised version of Japanese-ness.

    You could contrast her with another part-Black celebrity of years past -- the enka singer Jero. Unlike Osaka, his Japanese was excellent, and he was intimately familiar with Japanese culture, mores, attitudes, etc. But perhaps because he was so fluent in Japanese language and culture, he never presented himself as "Japanese."

    I'm half-Korean myself, and while I feel a deep affinity for Korea, I would never presume to represent "Korea." No Korean would ever consider me Korean -- not really. And it's the same with the Japanese.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @3g4me

    @27 Gimeiyo: “I’m half-Korean myself, and while I feel a deep affinity for Korea, I would never presume to represent “Korea.” No Korean would ever consider me Korean — not really.”

    Yet I bet you would feel perfectly comfortable presenting yourself as American due to magic dirt and because White Americans ‘don’t have a culture.’ You’re a chip off the founding fathers’ blocks, amirite?

    • Replies: @Gimeiyo
    @3g4me


    Yet I bet you would feel perfectly comfortable presenting yourself as American due to magic dirt and because White Americans ‘don’t have a culture.’ You’re a chip off the founding fathers’ blocks, amirite?
     
    I mean, my nationality is, in fact American. But at the same time, none of my ancestors -- even my White ancestors -- were in the US before 1900. They might not even have arrived until after the Great War. And if we think about the key historical events that shaped "American" identity, whether it's the Revolutionary War, or the Civil War, or what have you, we arrived long after most of those events took place. So they're part of the national history I've inherited -- along with 1066 and Magna Carta and all that -- but they're not part of my family's history. Thus, while I'm "American," I'm also conscious of the fact that there's a deeper American identity -- primarily shared by descendants of the Black slaves and descendants of the early pre-Civil War Whites -- that I don't share. Candidly, this does inform my thinking on political issues quite a bit. If the US doesn't work out, well, I or my future descendants could settle elsewhere. Korea or Japan, for example (although their immigration requirements are both extremely strict and strictly enforced). But as for those people whose ancestors have been in the US for 250 years, they have nowhere else to go, nowhere to retreat to if they lose the US. What ties they had to foreign lands are long gone, other than perhaps as a matter of genealogical or gastronomical curiosity. So their interests, frankly, weigh a little heavier than mine, or ought to.

    But my view is a bit different from most people who are half, I expect. Most of them probably feel a stronger attachment to the US than I do.
    , @Alden
    @3g4me

    It depends on the American parent. For instance, I know a couple who have 3 half Korean grand children.

    The father and the grand father are direct verified descendants of one of the founders of NY state and city or New Amsterdam as it was called when the first ancestor arrived in Albany NY state even before the city that’s now New York was founded in 1625. There are several streets parks etc in NY city named after those ancestors.

    It would be nice if blue eyed old stock American men married blue eyed old stock American women. But many marry Asians.

    Asian women chase White men for these reasons.

    1 Height. Being shorter than the norm is a humiliating disgrace in Asia. It means you come from generations of starving lowest class coolies
    2 Fair skin. In Asia the fairest skin indicates you come from generations of wealth that didn’t have to go out in the sun to do hard coolie labor.
    3 Green card not just for the wife but her entire extended family because of chain migration.

    I see a lot of asian women White men couples in this university neighborhood.

    Despite that many White men in this town are dark Persian and Armenian types, Ive never seen an asian women with a dark White man I always see asian women with fair skin light brown hair blue eyed N European type men. Always.

    Whites have a lot more to worry about than the marriages of strangers. Like first and foremost affirmative action. Nearly 60 years of reducing Whites, especially White men to unemployable untouchable caste. Next is the massive outpouring of vicious hatred that’s the standard prelude to genocide of Whites.

    And White men worry about mixed race people and outlawing abortion Which is the only thing that’s kept every city and nearby suburb from turning into Detroit.

    Replies: @gandydancer

  56. @Whiskey
    A couple of rejoinders here to the NYT. First, almost no Japanese speak English, even fewer read it, and the NYT might as well be the jabbering of crows for how much Japanese understand it, much less care.

    Then, there are very scary types still around, the Ultranationalists. The Deep Ocean Society, Black Dragon Society. They are not capable of mounting coups. They are capable and willing to conduct assassinations of those they deem threatening Japan, and their is some intermingling with the Yakuza.

    Also, blacks are roundly disliked for their role as the main rapists and killers of young Japanese women in Okinawa. This is not discussed in the US but is in Japan, though in the usual oblique Japanese way.

    Finally, the Japanese are Japanese. Their religion, their way of being, their purpose in life is to be Japanese. Very few really emigrate, and then only under economic hardship. They have 700 year old cooking schools, and some flower arranging schools nearly as old. They seem modern and Western, and in some way (use of technology, urban living, etc) they are. In many ways, very much not. The government of Japan spends lots of money supporting traditional crafts of paper making, ceramics, sword making, and other stuff that no other nation does. The Imperial family is still untouchable in the way that European royals are not.

    Globohomo will not have its way with Japan. It just can't -- the people are Japanese. simple as that.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @J.Ross, @Colin Wright

    One more unique aspect, China is the PRC, America is USA, Germany is BRD, France is République Française.

    Japan is simply — Japan, Nihon. Signifying continuity from antiquity.

  57. On Olympic topic, Team UK’s East German rowing coach left last year and performances have nosedived. Somewhat confusing subediting at the Mail, but the overall picture’s clear.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9844051/Ex-Team-GB-rowing-coach-Jurgen-Grobler-attacked-worst-Tokyo-2020.html

    The fearsome and ‘ruthless’ German, 74, raised in East Germany after the Second World War, became Team GB’s head coach in 1991 and is the most successful Olympic rowing trainer in history helping 20 British Olympic champions to 33 gold medals. Mr Grobler, who famously forced athletes to swap their Full English breakfasts for prunes and made them train so hard some were sick in their boats, left his job during the pandemic after the Olympics were postponed by a year. The legendary rowing coach was accused of ‘destroying’ his athletes in the bloodletting that followed Britain’s worst Olympic regatta since 1976. The team – funded by £24.6 million of Lottery money over the last five-year cycle – managed just two medals, a silver and a bronze, to finish 14th in the medal table. This week the coxless fours failed to win gold in the class for Team GB for the first time in 21 years, and they missed out on a medal when a member of the crew ‘forgot to steer’. This disastrous return is a massive hit after topping the table in both London and Rio, when Grobler was still chief coach. And Sir Steve Redgrave fears that standards may have dropped since he left.

    The UK won a lot of cycling medals, not to mention the odd Tour de France in the last ten-fifteen years. I wonder if their coach has left too?

  58. Japan is making the same mistakes we Europeans did by not defending our ethnicities & our race. If Japanese People do not wake up to the globalist agenda, then, Japan, its People, its Culture will b destroyed, not unlike many of the European homelands today whose ppl accepted the genocidal pill called diversity.

  59. @Whiskey
    A couple of rejoinders here to the NYT. First, almost no Japanese speak English, even fewer read it, and the NYT might as well be the jabbering of crows for how much Japanese understand it, much less care.

    Then, there are very scary types still around, the Ultranationalists. The Deep Ocean Society, Black Dragon Society. They are not capable of mounting coups. They are capable and willing to conduct assassinations of those they deem threatening Japan, and their is some intermingling with the Yakuza.

    Also, blacks are roundly disliked for their role as the main rapists and killers of young Japanese women in Okinawa. This is not discussed in the US but is in Japan, though in the usual oblique Japanese way.

    Finally, the Japanese are Japanese. Their religion, their way of being, their purpose in life is to be Japanese. Very few really emigrate, and then only under economic hardship. They have 700 year old cooking schools, and some flower arranging schools nearly as old. They seem modern and Western, and in some way (use of technology, urban living, etc) they are. In many ways, very much not. The government of Japan spends lots of money supporting traditional crafts of paper making, ceramics, sword making, and other stuff that no other nation does. The Imperial family is still untouchable in the way that European royals are not.

    Globohomo will not have its way with Japan. It just can't -- the people are Japanese. simple as that.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @J.Ross, @Colin Wright

    I want to believe.

  60. …a very narrow definition of what it means to be Japanese.

    That definition? Japanese.

  61. @International Jew
    Naomi Osaka can be Japanese for all I care, but I don't think she's the kind of Japanese that would have kept on fighting in the Philipine jungles even after the Emperor surrendered.

    Replies: @Gimeiyo, @Dennis Dale

    Indeed. When Serena Williams threw her tantrum on losing to Osaka I felt nothing but sympathy for her. Like the Biles affair, the whole thing was a perverse expression of black privilege.
    Then, I see her a couple of years later and the ‘fro is teased out, she’s playing up her black heritage and her and Serena are said to be best buds.

    Japan is better off without her–not that’s she’s a bad person, but she’s confused. And not at all Japanese.

  62. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Whiskey

    As far as I can consider, Japan appears to be the only country on the planet with a serious world-class literature, which does not have a significant international diaspora.

    Lady Murasaki is a world writer in the same way that Chaucer is; but Chaucer has a world-wide diaspora, as do Cervantes, Dante, Moliere, Pushkin, Confucius, the Ramayana poet, Homer, Catullus, you get the idea.

    Maybe the Persians prove me wrong, not sure about that. Experts? Your opinions please.

    Replies: @PaceLaw, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @Hibiscu

    The caveat being that 漢詩 かんし kanshi Classical Chinese poetry was heavily favored by the Samurais, Nogi Maresuke 乃木 希典 and Saigō Takamori 西郷 隆盛 (Mishima not so much)

    From Nogi this shichigon-zekku 七言絶句 seven character quatrain, 凱旋 Triumph

    皇師百萬征強虜 (皇師百萬強虜を征す)
    野戰攻城屍作山 (野戦攻城屍山を作(な)す)
    愧我何顔看父老 (愧(は)ず我何の顔(かんばせ)あって父老に看(まみ)えん)
    凱歌今日幾人還 (凱歌今日幾人か還る)

    Imperial Army million strong expedites formidable barbarians
    Field battles and sieges corpses form mountains
    Ashamed am I with what face to see father and elders
    Triumphant songs today but how many men returned

    This form in Chinese is called 七绝 Qijue, and is typically on more lighthearted topics.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qijue

  63. @Captain Tripps
    @rational actor

    You may be able to still find a couple of old Marines, Soldiers and Sailors who could tell you about the willpower and focus of Japanese men in extreme adversity.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

  64. Has anyone done a study of Japan? It seems like such an outlier. Virtually 100% ethnic Japanese, they still managed to industrialize. How? Did they have a large African minority that supplied the necessary flavah, and the ungrateful Japanese kicked them out? That really seems like the only possibility.

  65. @3g4me
    @Gimeiyo

    @27 Gimeiyo: "I’m half-Korean myself, and while I feel a deep affinity for Korea, I would never presume to represent “Korea.” No Korean would ever consider me Korean — not really."

    Yet I bet you would feel perfectly comfortable presenting yourself as American due to magic dirt and because White Americans 'don't have a culture.' You're a chip off the founding fathers' blocks, amirite?

    Replies: @Gimeiyo, @Alden

    Yet I bet you would feel perfectly comfortable presenting yourself as American due to magic dirt and because White Americans ‘don’t have a culture.’ You’re a chip off the founding fathers’ blocks, amirite?

    I mean, my nationality is, in fact American. But at the same time, none of my ancestors — even my White ancestors — were in the US before 1900. They might not even have arrived until after the Great War. And if we think about the key historical events that shaped “American” identity, whether it’s the Revolutionary War, or the Civil War, or what have you, we arrived long after most of those events took place. So they’re part of the national history I’ve inherited — along with 1066 and Magna Carta and all that — but they’re not part of my family’s history. Thus, while I’m “American,” I’m also conscious of the fact that there’s a deeper American identity — primarily shared by descendants of the Black slaves and descendants of the early pre-Civil War Whites — that I don’t share. Candidly, this does inform my thinking on political issues quite a bit. If the US doesn’t work out, well, I or my future descendants could settle elsewhere. Korea or Japan, for example (although their immigration requirements are both extremely strict and strictly enforced). But as for those people whose ancestors have been in the US for 250 years, they have nowhere else to go, nowhere to retreat to if they lose the US. What ties they had to foreign lands are long gone, other than perhaps as a matter of genealogical or gastronomical curiosity. So their interests, frankly, weigh a little heavier than mine, or ought to.

    But my view is a bit different from most people who are half, I expect. Most of them probably feel a stronger attachment to the US than I do.

    • Thanks: SOL, 3g4me
  66. @3g4me
    @Gimeiyo

    @27 Gimeiyo: "I’m half-Korean myself, and while I feel a deep affinity for Korea, I would never presume to represent “Korea.” No Korean would ever consider me Korean — not really."

    Yet I bet you would feel perfectly comfortable presenting yourself as American due to magic dirt and because White Americans 'don't have a culture.' You're a chip off the founding fathers' blocks, amirite?

    Replies: @Gimeiyo, @Alden

    It depends on the American parent. For instance, I know a couple who have 3 half Korean grand children.

    The father and the grand father are direct verified descendants of one of the founders of NY state and city or New Amsterdam as it was called when the first ancestor arrived in Albany NY state even before the city that’s now New York was founded in 1625. There are several streets parks etc in NY city named after those ancestors.

    It would be nice if blue eyed old stock American men married blue eyed old stock American women. But many marry Asians.

    Asian women chase White men for these reasons.

    1 Height. Being shorter than the norm is a humiliating disgrace in Asia. It means you come from generations of starving lowest class coolies
    2 Fair skin. In Asia the fairest skin indicates you come from generations of wealth that didn’t have to go out in the sun to do hard coolie labor.
    3 Green card not just for the wife but her entire extended family because of chain migration.

    I see a lot of asian women White men couples in this university neighborhood.

    Despite that many White men in this town are dark Persian and Armenian types, Ive never seen an asian women with a dark White man I always see asian women with fair skin light brown hair blue eyed N European type men. Always.

    Whites have a lot more to worry about than the marriages of strangers. Like first and foremost affirmative action. Nearly 60 years of reducing Whites, especially White men to unemployable untouchable caste. Next is the massive outpouring of vicious hatred that’s the standard prelude to genocide of Whites.

    And White men worry about mixed race people and outlawing abortion Which is the only thing that’s kept every city and nearby suburb from turning into Detroit.

    • Replies: @gandydancer
    @Alden


    Asian women chase White men for these reasons.

    1 Height. Being shorter than the norm is a humiliating disgrace in Asia. It means you come from generations of starving lowest class coolies
    2 Fair skin. In Asia the fairest skin indicates you come from generations of wealth that didn’t have to go out in the sun to do hard coolie labor.
     
    Do you have a Darwinean explanation for these claims? Lamarckianism has been thoroughly discredited.
  67. Anonymous[165] • Disclaimer says:
    @rational actor
    This started out as merely interesting and has become highly topical:
    https://thecritic.co.uk/issues/august-september-2021/breaking-the-knee/

    The article is about Shun Fujimoto, a member of the Japanese gymnastics team at the 1976 Olympics.

    The men had won the team all-round event for the last four Games, with the USSR finishing second on each occasion. “We were anxious,” Fujimoto said. “We knew that we couldn’t break the legacy of our predecessors. That pressure was heavy.”

     

    Living up to the hard work of your predecessors is important. Imagine that. In pursuit of this, Fujimoto breaks his kneecap as a result of a hard landing in his floor routine.

    So again the question: what to do? He can’t tell the team doctor, who will demand that he goes to hospital and has the fracture reset. He can’t tell his team-mates for fear that it will break their concentration and diminish their performances. There’s only one thing he can do, insane though it sounds. He can pass it off as a twinge and keep going. So that’s exactly what he does.
     
    So the insanely focused gymnast does a pommel horse routine, which is not too demanding on the legs, followed by the rings, where he has the problem of executing a successful landing.

    His kneecap’s already fractured, but now the impact dislocates it too, tearing bone from ligaments like a wolf ripping at a carcass. The pain is an all-consuming explosion, a river which rushes and spills over every part of him. But he can’t succumb. His sole concession to the agony is to lift his leg slightly after landing, but other than that he holds the position as he’s practised time and again, body straight and arms high, because if he doesn’t he’ll lose marks, and after what seems like aeons but is only actually a few seconds the judges nod and it’s over.

    The Japanese finish with 576.85 points, the Soviets with 576.45. Four-tenths of a point: a winning margin of less than one-tenth of one per cent.
     
    I have zero interest in sports, but this isn't really about sport at all. The man stifled his pain, did what was necessary on the day, and took a couple for the team that had no doubt provided support and encouragement for him in the past. If the Olympics have any reason to exist it is surely for episodes like this.

    The article was written as speculation on who would light the Olympic flame in Tokyo and the author states that it was completed before the opening ceremony, so it was not produced as a commentary on l'affaire Biles or the antics of Osaka. Then again, sucking it up and succeeding is no doubt an artefact of the patriarchy and expecting the same of women is misogyny. Or something. In any case, we can all see who the chickenshits are in this game, and it isn't the guy with the bad knee.

    Replies: @JosephB, @Captain Tripps, @Anonymous

    OT. I recently saw the 1969 movie “Marooned” about a crew of astronauts stranded in space in a damaged ship. It’s not very good. It’s overlong and boring. However it does provide an interesting view of mid-1960s social attitudes.

    The most interesting scene is when the three astronauts realize they don’t have enough air to get back to earth. After debating what to do, and being unable to decide, the commander exits the vehicle and dies, saving the lives of his crewmates.

    I’m trying to think of a similar scene in a modern movie but nothing comes to mind. Hollywood generally tries to avoid putting its heroes in “no-win” situations like this.

    (There is that scene in “Underwater” (2020) where the lady protagonist kills two of her male crewmates to save the lives of the rest of the crew, but that’s not quite the same.)

  68. @Ed
    I think race themed articles are treated as easy work by reporters. It’s something that doesn’t require much thought or effort, you can just peruse online message boards. They type up some words on structural racism and presto they’ve met their deadline with time to spare.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    I think race themed articles are treated as easy work by reporters.

    Absotootly! But you’d better choose your words very carefully and have a couple of paranoid editors reading carefully behind you — because one little slip of taste or nuance and the next race-themed article will be about you and the end of your career.

  69. @AnotherDad

    “I still can’t understand why she was the final torchbearer,” one commenter wrote on a Yahoo News story about her loss. “Although she says she is Japanese, she cannot speak Japanese very much.” Several comments like that one that were harshly critical of Ms. Osaka were given “thumbs up” by 10,000 or more other Yahoo users.
     
    These commenters are disgusting.

    Naomi Osaka was born in the Osaka Prefecture, and grew up in the Florida Prefecture.

    What can be more Japanese than that?

    Replies: @El Dato, @Known Fact

    I’d love to see America adopt prefectures instead of boring old counties and townships. (Although parishes are pretty cool). Prefecture sounds mildly exotic, like something out of an Ernest Bramah fantasy. “Ah yes, mysterious mushroom come from forest in distant prefecture.”

  70. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Whiskey

    As far as I can consider, Japan appears to be the only country on the planet with a serious world-class literature, which does not have a significant international diaspora.

    Lady Murasaki is a world writer in the same way that Chaucer is; but Chaucer has a world-wide diaspora, as do Cervantes, Dante, Moliere, Pushkin, Confucius, the Ramayana poet, Homer, Catullus, you get the idea.

    Maybe the Persians prove me wrong, not sure about that. Experts? Your opinions please.

    Replies: @PaceLaw, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @Hibiscu

    Sei Shonagan who ended up a member of the Empress’ court in 10th century Japan wrote a famous “pillow book”. The pages were kept in the wooden “pillows” they slept on. It is an absolutely fascinating look at the court, at religious rites and family relations and village life. Daughter of a Samurai is another wonderful glimpse into Japanese life and the self-denial and loyalty they practice.

  71. Steve’s Love is Colorblind from a Sinosphere perspective. This Chinese Vlogger DEBUNKs the trope that Eastern European women are miso horny for Chinese guys.

    Basically, the veins of Slavic women seethe with noble Viking and Mongol warrior blood. If you are beta, have no game and language skills you have no better chance with E. Euro white girls than Western ones.

    Starting at 9:08 there’s an English part. The Russian girl goes like: “Russian women think that Asian men… [giggle]”

    OTOH, there was this Nip,

    His “broodingly handsome”[2] good looks and typecasting as a sexually dominant villain made him a heartthrob among American women during a time of racial discrimination, and he became one of the first male sex symbols of Hollywood.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sessue_Hayakawa

    Which supports the conjecture that sexual market in US has always been more or less meritocratic.

  72. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/mattyglesias/status/1420919543053029377

    Replies: @SOL

    wth is he doing in TX.

  73. @AceDeuce
    @Anon

    Regarding Biles, if that was the only White girl on a team full of boonies, and she pulled the same stunt during the Olympics-exactly the same way as Biles did--you'd never hear the end of it. The knigg "teammates" would be wall to wall dogging her over this, and the knigro "kuh-mooh-natty" would be spinning conspiracy tales of how the White girl sabotaged the team, and "ain't dat jus' like wypio?" and the media and White sheep would dutifully follow suit.

    Replies: @Truth

    …Oh, kinda like you do on a daily basis?

  74. By the way, why did the press decide that the verb to describe what conservatives do is “pounce?”

    Tom Cat is a conservative’s conservative.
    https://images.app.goo.gl/i4kfbu86RUtPQxGu9

  75. Get with the program people

    Not being able to speak the language of the country you purport to represent should be viewed as a positive and as a homage to diversity

  76. @Anon
    You racists make me sick with your hatred of minorities and ridiculous conspiracy theories of the untermensch swamping your countries.

    Thankfully demographics are changing

    Replies: @notsaying, @AnotherDad, @pnumatic, @Spect3r

    Try again, but with feeling this time.

  77. @Alden
    @3g4me

    It depends on the American parent. For instance, I know a couple who have 3 half Korean grand children.

    The father and the grand father are direct verified descendants of one of the founders of NY state and city or New Amsterdam as it was called when the first ancestor arrived in Albany NY state even before the city that’s now New York was founded in 1625. There are several streets parks etc in NY city named after those ancestors.

    It would be nice if blue eyed old stock American men married blue eyed old stock American women. But many marry Asians.

    Asian women chase White men for these reasons.

    1 Height. Being shorter than the norm is a humiliating disgrace in Asia. It means you come from generations of starving lowest class coolies
    2 Fair skin. In Asia the fairest skin indicates you come from generations of wealth that didn’t have to go out in the sun to do hard coolie labor.
    3 Green card not just for the wife but her entire extended family because of chain migration.

    I see a lot of asian women White men couples in this university neighborhood.

    Despite that many White men in this town are dark Persian and Armenian types, Ive never seen an asian women with a dark White man I always see asian women with fair skin light brown hair blue eyed N European type men. Always.

    Whites have a lot more to worry about than the marriages of strangers. Like first and foremost affirmative action. Nearly 60 years of reducing Whites, especially White men to unemployable untouchable caste. Next is the massive outpouring of vicious hatred that’s the standard prelude to genocide of Whites.

    And White men worry about mixed race people and outlawing abortion Which is the only thing that’s kept every city and nearby suburb from turning into Detroit.

    Replies: @gandydancer

    Asian women chase White men for these reasons.

    1 Height. Being shorter than the norm is a humiliating disgrace in Asia. It means you come from generations of starving lowest class coolies
    2 Fair skin. In Asia the fairest skin indicates you come from generations of wealth that didn’t have to go out in the sun to do hard coolie labor.

    Do you have a Darwinean explanation for these claims? Lamarckianism has been thoroughly discredited.

  78. The Zman described the central political theme of the West since WWII in one sentence yesterday

    That assumption is that it is inherently immoral for European societies to organize themselves in the best interest of the people who make up the society.

    https://thezman.com/wordpress/

    When I saw who Japan had selected for that starring torch bearing role I regretfully acknowledged that Japan is succumbing to the same malaise.

  79. @Whiskey
    A couple of rejoinders here to the NYT. First, almost no Japanese speak English, even fewer read it, and the NYT might as well be the jabbering of crows for how much Japanese understand it, much less care.

    Then, there are very scary types still around, the Ultranationalists. The Deep Ocean Society, Black Dragon Society. They are not capable of mounting coups. They are capable and willing to conduct assassinations of those they deem threatening Japan, and their is some intermingling with the Yakuza.

    Also, blacks are roundly disliked for their role as the main rapists and killers of young Japanese women in Okinawa. This is not discussed in the US but is in Japan, though in the usual oblique Japanese way.

    Finally, the Japanese are Japanese. Their religion, their way of being, their purpose in life is to be Japanese. Very few really emigrate, and then only under economic hardship. They have 700 year old cooking schools, and some flower arranging schools nearly as old. They seem modern and Western, and in some way (use of technology, urban living, etc) they are. In many ways, very much not. The government of Japan spends lots of money supporting traditional crafts of paper making, ceramics, sword making, and other stuff that no other nation does. The Imperial family is still untouchable in the way that European royals are not.

    Globohomo will not have its way with Japan. It just can't -- the people are Japanese. simple as that.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @J.Ross, @Colin Wright

    ‘A couple of rejoinders here to the NYT. First, almost no Japanese speak English, even fewer read it’

    This bit I’ll quibble with. My understanding (and we spent three weeks in Japan) is that while Japanese can rarely speak English, it’s more common for them to be able to read it. We cetainly found it possible to communicate on a very rudimentary level (‘where is a mail box,’ etc).

  80. anon[225] • Disclaimer says:

    By the way, why did the press decide that the verb to describe what conservatives do is “pounce?” Are conservatives really known for their cat-like agility? Seems rather complimentary…

    Why, its The Eye Of The Tiger!!

    Thank you, Rocky Balboa !!!
    Except your last name ends in a vowel like Mario Cuomo and that’s why racist WASPs would not vote for an Italian whose last names ends with a vowel except for Rudy Giuliani … uh, ooops

  81. @R.G. Camara
    @Nikolai Vladivostok

    There's one black guy who's a regular on Japanese TV as a talk show guest and has been for decades. He moved to Japan and is basically a celebrity for acting like a stupid black and mispronouncing Japanese words and being goofy. The Japanese have accepted him; he married a Japanese woman and had kids.

    But he's the exception that proves the rule.

    Replies: @Nikolai Vladivostok, @Nigerian Nationalist

    There is another black guy who is fairly regular in JAV. The Japanese have accepted him too…intimately.

    Who wouldn’t want to be that exception?

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Analyzing the History of a Controversial Movement