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NYT: Crazed Trump Doesn't Understand That Forever Wars Mean Forever
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  1. The Deep State sycophants are out in force. Thanks to our extremely bloated war budget and bellicose nature we have a plethora of dickheads to choose from for replacement of Mattis. You can be sure Mattis’ replacement will be another military ‘genius’ from the pool of losers who haven’t won a war since 1945.

    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @dearieme
    @Realist

    "losers who haven’t won a war since 1945"

    They won the first Iraq war. And their bombing attack on Serbia killed enough civilians that they'd probably count that as victory too.

    This shows that they can win wars as long as the war lasts no longer than a single battle.

    Replies: @Realist

    , @Ibound1
    @Realist

    The only way is to cut the defense budget by 1/3 and tell the generals: this is still the largest defense budget in the world - by far- and your mission is to defend the United States (and only the United States). If they say we cannot do it, find some new generals who can.

    Replies: @Realist, @dfordoom, @Joe Joe

    , @ATBOTL
    @Realist

    Hostility to withdrawl from Syria is all over the movement conservative comment sections. Many boomers are NOT happy with this decision by Trump. Even those boomers who support Trump here often are doing so out only of personal loyalty only.

    Decades of neocon propaganda have made the average older conservative incredibly ignorant of basic facts about the world. Many are still confused about who is fighting who. You still get the "Iran is the main source of terror" and "ISIS only happened because Obummer pulled troops from Iraq" canards.

    Replies: @Realist

  2. Anonymous[369] • Disclaimer says:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/19/opinion/editorials/syria-war-trump.html

    Syria Is Now Mr. Trump’s War

    By The Editorial Board

    Jan. 19, 2018

    As a candidate, Donald Trump warned against foreign wars, not least in Syria. A year into his presidency, he is adding Syria to a list of open-ended conflicts that already includes Afghanistan and Iraq.

    … As of last month, there were about 2,000 American troops in Syria — up from 500 a year ago — a mix of engineering units and Special Operations units that fight and train with local militias in the battle against the Islamic State. Now that we know they will be there indefinitely, who can say the number won’t go higher and the mission won’t creep more?

    • Replies: @Hockamaw
    @Anonymous


    Syria Is Now Mr. Trump’s War

    By The Editorial Board

    Jan. 19, 2018
     
    Chilling to see that. Comparisons to 1984 are overdone, but it really is like "We have always been at war with Eurasia" to see that.
    , @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Whatever Trump decides is bad with the NYT Editorial Board and their crowd. If he decides to send more troops to Syria that's bad - "quagmire" and if he decides to remove troops that's bad too. All decisions that Obama made are OTOH, by definition, good so all Obama Administration policies, foreign and domestic, must be continued indefinitely or at least until the next Democrat President takes office.

    Replies: @istevefan

  3. Yesterday, December 20th, a day that will live in infamy ….

  4. Are the gentile neocons starting to jump ship?

    • Replies: @Neuday
    @Billy Shears

    Considering the number of gentile neocons, they're jumping raft.

    Replies: @snorlax

  5. I don’t know what we should do about Syria or Afghanistan, but don’t you think James Mattis knows what he is talking about? Didn’t Obama’s withdrawal from Iraq allow ISIS to gain territory? It is tempting to wash our hands of the Middle East, but chaos and bloodshed there do lead to more refugees going to Europe and to a lesser extent the U.S..

    Maybe Trump is doing the right thing, but Steve is not making a serious argument.

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Beliavsky


    "...but chaos and bloodshed there do lead to more refugees going to Europe and to a lesser extent the U.S..."
     
    And a little thought will lead to the conclusion that all that "chaos and bloodshed" are the result of Israeli and US aggression in the region.

    The US aggression has been more noticeable for several decades but ultimately has been instigated by Israel's Zionist fifth column in the United States, a group that exerts near absolute control over US policy via their political funding/lobbying/bribery and control of the news media and information industries.

    Trump's recent actions give hope but I suspect that either the Zionist lobby will politically emasculate him, e.g., by a concerted impeachment effort, or Israeli's Ha Mossad, will take him out with an assassination.
    , @Sean
    @Beliavsky

    Iraq was a Sunni state, which fell into the hands of Shia, who started killing the Bathite Sunni and sterrorists. So the Sunnis formed Islamic State, which made them even more of a target. Two generations of Sunni terrorist in Iraq are dead, their supporters and relatives imprisoned and dispossessed. The US can count on the Iraqi government to suppress what is left of the militant Sunnis.

    Afghanistan is completely different, the Taliban cannot be eliminated as Islamic State were because Pakistan wants to keep some Taliban as a counter to Indian influence. Moreover the base population of the Taliban is almost half the country.It would be necessary to kill an awful lot of innocent people to do to the Taliban what has been done to IS. It is best to leave it to Pakistan. "Reports of the US troop reduction are probably meant to give some assurance to the Taliban – assurance that the US does not plan to stay in the country forever".

    , @Hunsdon
    @Beliavsky

    To the extent that we are discussing ISIS in Syria, I think the Syrian armed forces, with some advice and guidance from Russian forces, are quite capable of putting paid to them.

  6. As a Brit my opinion is that US troops first responsibility is to defend their own country. The main threat to Britain comes from our traitorous politicians and not an external enemy.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  7. @Anonymous
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/19/opinion/editorials/syria-war-trump.html

    Syria Is Now Mr. Trump’s War

    By The Editorial Board

    Jan. 19, 2018

    As a candidate, Donald Trump warned against foreign wars, not least in Syria. A year into his presidency, he is adding Syria to a list of open-ended conflicts that already includes Afghanistan and Iraq.

    ... As of last month, there were about 2,000 American troops in Syria — up from 500 a year ago — a mix of engineering units and Special Operations units that fight and train with local militias in the battle against the Islamic State. Now that we know they will be there indefinitely, who can say the number won’t go higher and the mission won’t creep more?

    Replies: @Hockamaw, @Jack D

    Syria Is Now Mr. Trump’s War

    By The Editorial Board

    Jan. 19, 2018

    Chilling to see that. Comparisons to 1984 are overdone, but it really is like “We have always been at war with Eurasia” to see that.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  8. James Mattis was an empty uniform. I remember how happy so-called conservatives were when it revealed he would be SecDef. It was shocking because all of these people, who really believed they were intelligent, based their opinion of the guy on quotes attributed to Mattis in internet memes. They seemed to forget that you don’t get to pin 4 stars on unless you’ve licked every boot and kissed every ass from the pentagon all the way to the Senate Armed Services Committee. Especially coming up in the Clinton/Bush/Obama years? Please.

    Looking into his service record, he was responsible for implementing much of the diversity/sexual harassment policy that is destroying the US military.

    Never married, no kids, suggests no ability to consider the consequences of sending (someone else’s) young men off to die in useless wars.

    Mattis was just another careerist lap dog. Good riddance.

    • Agree: L Woods, Digital Samizdat, Travis
    • Replies: @RVBlake
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    The nickname "Mad Dog" seemed to impress some, which I found staggering.

  9. Our best bet now is a military coup to remove Drumpf from power.

    • Replies: @Digital Samizdat
    @Tiny Duck.


    Our best bet now is a military coup to remove Drumpf from power.
     
    So Gen. Pinochet becomes our next president? Kewl!
  10. The American people have tired of being the world police, but in the time when we have played, or played at, that role we have reshaped and armed the world. Both the Israelis and the Turks are eager to step into the Syrian vacuum while the Iranians are already in up to their necks. The Russians are stirring with a longish spoon.

    I just hope the coming kerfluffle does not turn into a nuclear war.

    Since American youth have less and less appetite for the bit role of uniformed cop, I predict that the offers of citizenship to the hordes of young male “immigrants” will expand in the decades to come when we decide that we cannot afford to lay that burden down and need lots and lots of bit players.

  11. Why is it considered a poor reflection on us when at least one of our leaders finally recognizes that it is not in fact true that inside every Afghani/Syrian/Iraqi, etc. there is an American trying to get out?

    Rather than the narrative being ‘US bails out’, it should be ‘after an extensive period of time of massive cash and military assistance, country X fails to change in any appreciable way.’

    This reminds me of the left’s default reaction to the failure of its various policy prescriptions and trillions of dollars spent over the past half century to close the various gaps we see between whites and blacks (the only yardstick they really care about). It’s always framed as the uncaring and likely racist majority not wanting to ‘invest’ enough money or give up some imaginary privilege rather than an examination of the fact that their favorite victim group refuses to adhere to the social norms (marriage, low levels of criminality, consistent employment) that provide stable communities and the possibility of upward mobility.

    • Replies: @Samuel Skinner
    @Arclight


    This reminds me of the left’s default reaction to the failure of its various policy prescriptions and trillions of dollars spent over the past half century to close the various gaps we see between whites and blacks (the only yardstick they really care about).
     
    They don't care. The goal is money and power; failing to fix the problem insures they continue to receive money and being able to prevent people from stopping them shows they have power.

    rather than an examination of the fact that their favorite victim group refuses to adhere to the social norms (marriage, low levels of criminality, consistent employment) that provide stable communities and the possibility of upward mobility.
     
    Blacks had substantially higher levels of those in the past. The progs smashed that- after all, the worse a problem is, the more funding you can claim you need to fix it. 1945-1970 was great for blacks because almost no immigration means you can make a living and raise a family on low skilled labor. Get rid of that because it is 'racist' and blacks lose out to newcomers. Welfare directed to single mothers, affirmative action sucking everyone competent out of the black community- there isn't a progressive policy that didn't break down the functioning of the black community.

    Replies: @ben tillman

  12. OT, but in today’s intersectional world being a lesbian tennis champion isn’t enough if you’re not woke.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6521935/Tennis-legend-Martina-Navratilova-accused-transphobic.html

    Martina Navratilova has become embroiled in a row with the transgender community after she claimed that people born male should not compete in women’s sporting events.

    Navratilova, 62, a former Wimbledon champion and LGBT campaigner, was accused of being ‘transphobic’, following her remarks which she made on social media.

    Her comments had come in response to a question from a follower about transgender women in sport. She was forced to delete the comments last night following criticism.

    ‘Clearly that can’t be right. You can’t just proclaim yourself a female and be able to compete against women. There must be some standards, and having a penis and competing as a woman would not fit that standard.

    Her accusers included Dr Rachel McKinnon, a transgender activist and competitive cyclist who won a women’s event at the UCI Masters Track World Championship, earlier this year.

    Dr McKinnon, who was born male, demanded that Navratilova apologise and criticised the comments.

    Dr McKinnon was born male but he can win women’s cycle races. He looks male too.

    Navratilova had originally said in response to the criticism: ‘I am sorry if I said anything anywhere near transphobic – I meant no harm. I will educate myself better on this issue but meantime I will be quiet about it.

    She then clarified: ‘Rachel [Dr McKinnon], you might be an expert on all things trans but you are one nasty human.’

    • Replies: @Digital Samizdat
    @YetAnotherAnon

    They even have an acronym for people like Navratilova, who were once considered bleeding-edge, but are now regarded as reactionaries holding back the forever-revolution: TERF [trans-exclusionary radical feminist].

    https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=TERF

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @YetAnotherAnon

    “In the end the Party would announce that two and two made five, and you would have to believe it.”

    , @dfordoom
    @YetAnotherAnon


    OT, but in today’s intersectional world being a lesbian tennis champion isn’t enough if you’re not woke.
     
    Yes, that's the secret in our Brave New World. It doesn't matter if you're black or homosexual or belong to any other victim group. That counts for nothing. What counts is political reliability. What counts is being absolutely orthodox on every issue.

    If you display even the slightest hint of heresy you lose all your Pokemon Victim Points.

    Navratilova can crawl and grovel as much as she likes but she's now a Nazi.
    , @Hunsdon
    @YetAnotherAnon

    And these are the people that also say "I f*****g love science" and mock ignorant conservatives.

  13. If the Deep State wants a forever war they should start a foreign legion, staff it with double digit IQ losers, preferably Hispanic and Middle East immigrant security guards, equip it with stuff left over from the Vietnam War, and station it permanently in Afghanistan. Let the EEOC and Dept of Education run it.

  14. @Anonymous
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/19/opinion/editorials/syria-war-trump.html

    Syria Is Now Mr. Trump’s War

    By The Editorial Board

    Jan. 19, 2018

    As a candidate, Donald Trump warned against foreign wars, not least in Syria. A year into his presidency, he is adding Syria to a list of open-ended conflicts that already includes Afghanistan and Iraq.

    ... As of last month, there were about 2,000 American troops in Syria — up from 500 a year ago — a mix of engineering units and Special Operations units that fight and train with local militias in the battle against the Islamic State. Now that we know they will be there indefinitely, who can say the number won’t go higher and the mission won’t creep more?

    Replies: @Hockamaw, @Jack D

    Whatever Trump decides is bad with the NYT Editorial Board and their crowd. If he decides to send more troops to Syria that’s bad – “quagmire” and if he decides to remove troops that’s bad too. All decisions that Obama made are OTOH, by definition, good so all Obama Administration policies, foreign and domestic, must be continued indefinitely or at least until the next Democrat President takes office.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @istevefan
    @Jack D


    Whatever Trump decides is bad with the NYT Editorial Board and their crowd.
     
    Which is more the reason why he should no longer try to garner their support, and instead implement the policies for which he was elected. They'll hate him no matter what. Catering to them will only result in a reduction of his base.
  15. Let’s call it the “Damascene Conversion”, or something……..

  16. @Realist
    The Deep State sycophants are out in force. Thanks to our extremely bloated war budget and bellicose nature we have a plethora of dickheads to choose from for replacement of Mattis. You can be sure Mattis' replacement will be another military 'genius' from the pool of losers who haven't won a war since 1945.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Ibound1, @ATBOTL

    “losers who haven’t won a war since 1945”

    They won the first Iraq war. And their bombing attack on Serbia killed enough civilians that they’d probably count that as victory too.

    This shows that they can win wars as long as the war lasts no longer than a single battle.

    • Replies: @Realist
    @dearieme


    They won the first Iraq war.
     
    Really??? Then why did they go back.

    Replies: @Forbes

  17. @Realist
    The Deep State sycophants are out in force. Thanks to our extremely bloated war budget and bellicose nature we have a plethora of dickheads to choose from for replacement of Mattis. You can be sure Mattis' replacement will be another military 'genius' from the pool of losers who haven't won a war since 1945.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Ibound1, @ATBOTL

    The only way is to cut the defense budget by 1/3 and tell the generals: this is still the largest defense budget in the world – by far- and your mission is to defend the United States (and only the United States). If they say we cannot do it, find some new generals who can.

    • Replies: @Realist
    @Ibound1


    The only way is to cut the defense budget by 1/3 and tell the generals: this is still the largest defense budget in the world – by far- and your mission is to defend the United States (and only the United States).
     
    I would cut it by 1/2, but otherwise I agree.
    , @dfordoom
    @Ibound1


    The only way is to cut the defense budget by 1/3
     
    The U.S. could cut its defense budget by nine-tenths without endangering U.S. security.
    , @Joe Joe
    @Ibound1

    yes but Trump boasted about increasing the budget for our "underfunded" military

  18. U.S. Allies fear that traditional ties no longer matter

    Lest we forget, in this holiday season the profound, deep, traditional ties that Middle America White Christians have with Afghanistani Muslims.

    Where to start? There’s the indisputable fact that in 1681 William Penn invited Afghanistani Muslims to heroically help settle Pennsylvania, and that half the signers of the declaration of independence had family ties to Afghanistan. There’s the annual exchange trips dating to the 19th century between the Northern Methodists and the First Mosque of Kabul.

    Then there’s the cultural influence. Who can forget that old American folk song:

    You may talk about your dearest May
    and sing of Rose-Lee
    But the yellow rose of Kandahar
    she’s the only one for me

    And the recently discovered, original lyrics to Yankee Doodle:

    Yankee Doodle went to mosque
    Riding on a pony,
    Stuck a feather in his cap
    And called Afghanistani.

    I mean, come on. These traditional ties are what makes us who we are.

    • Agree: Autochthon
    • LOL: snorlax, ACommenter
    • Replies: @Lot
    @Hail

    Fath'r and I went down to Mosque along with Mullah Omar
    There we saw the men and boys en flagrante as hasty puddin'
    Yankee Doodle keep it up, Yankee Doodle Dandy
    Taliban ban the music and with the goats be handy!

  19. istevefan says:
    @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Whatever Trump decides is bad with the NYT Editorial Board and their crowd. If he decides to send more troops to Syria that's bad - "quagmire" and if he decides to remove troops that's bad too. All decisions that Obama made are OTOH, by definition, good so all Obama Administration policies, foreign and domestic, must be continued indefinitely or at least until the next Democrat President takes office.

    Replies: @istevefan

    Whatever Trump decides is bad with the NYT Editorial Board and their crowd.

    Which is more the reason why he should no longer try to garner their support, and instead implement the policies for which he was elected. They’ll hate him no matter what. Catering to them will only result in a reduction of his base.

  20. @Billy Shears
    Are the gentile neocons starting to jump ship?

    Replies: @Neuday

    Considering the number of gentile neocons, they’re jumping raft.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    @Neuday

    The George W. Bush administration would have been a few thousand people, of whom maybe somewhere between 5 and 15% were Jews.

    Replies: @jbwilson24

  21. “Here at the New York Outlet of Telefono Mexico, we are outraged at the prospect of withdrawing from Syria, Afghanistan, Africa, Central America, South America, the South China Sea, the Crimea, the Korean Peninsula, Eastern Europe and of course, Israel. This phony and uncommitted President has dangerously brought us to the precarious position of possibly addressing domestic issues and voters from the racist tax base. Just look at his unpressed and unimpressive pants!”

    Mr. Brooks, political pundit, slight-right commentator, and trouser press board chair.

    • LOL: RVBlake
  22. @Arclight
    Why is it considered a poor reflection on us when at least one of our leaders finally recognizes that it is not in fact true that inside every Afghani/Syrian/Iraqi, etc. there is an American trying to get out?

    Rather than the narrative being 'US bails out', it should be 'after an extensive period of time of massive cash and military assistance, country X fails to change in any appreciable way.'

    This reminds me of the left's default reaction to the failure of its various policy prescriptions and trillions of dollars spent over the past half century to close the various gaps we see between whites and blacks (the only yardstick they really care about). It's always framed as the uncaring and likely racist majority not wanting to 'invest' enough money or give up some imaginary privilege rather than an examination of the fact that their favorite victim group refuses to adhere to the social norms (marriage, low levels of criminality, consistent employment) that provide stable communities and the possibility of upward mobility.

    Replies: @Samuel Skinner

    This reminds me of the left’s default reaction to the failure of its various policy prescriptions and trillions of dollars spent over the past half century to close the various gaps we see between whites and blacks (the only yardstick they really care about).

    They don’t care. The goal is money and power; failing to fix the problem insures they continue to receive money and being able to prevent people from stopping them shows they have power.

    rather than an examination of the fact that their favorite victim group refuses to adhere to the social norms (marriage, low levels of criminality, consistent employment) that provide stable communities and the possibility of upward mobility.

    Blacks had substantially higher levels of those in the past. The progs smashed that- after all, the worse a problem is, the more funding you can claim you need to fix it. 1945-1970 was great for blacks because almost no immigration means you can make a living and raise a family on low skilled labor. Get rid of that because it is ‘racist’ and blacks lose out to newcomers. Welfare directed to single mothers, affirmative action sucking everyone competent out of the black community- there isn’t a progressive policy that didn’t break down the functioning of the black community.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Samuel Skinner


    Blacks had substantially higher levels of those in the past. The progs smashed that- after all, the worse a problem is, the more funding you can claim you need to fix it. 1945-1970 was great for blacks because almost no immigration means you can make a living and raise a family on low skilled labor. Get rid of that because it is ‘racist’ and blacks lose out to newcomers. Welfare directed to single mothers, affirmative action sucking everyone competent out of the black community- there isn’t a progressive policy that didn’t break down the functioning of the black community.
     
    Don't forget "fair housing", which destroyed white communities with black crime and destroyed black communities by allowing the most responsible and successful to move away from their lesser cousins.
  23. The US is now abandoning the US empire for the same reason that the UK abandoned its empire: non possumus. We can’t do it. Maintaining the Cold War coalition this long has cost the US its industrial base and its large cities. Time’s up, we have very little to spend, and the Cold War is over. Moreover, the Cold War coalition has proven counterproductive since 9/11. It givens the US the power to intervene in and disorganize Third World states. Where’s the good in that — where’s the good for anybody?

    Better to do that than continue. Historically, Spain started the 30 years war in what I think was an effort to clear its northern flank before counterattacking the successful Turkish invasion of Eastern Europe. It hit the Dutch Republic and never quite figured out that infantry successfully can’t cross mud filled obstacles and then attack uphill. Then, somehow, it entangled with the Hapsburgs. At the end, Spain tried a series of “one last push” efforts that depopulated Spain, impoverished the survivors, and left Spain with a non-functional government. Better if we don’t emulate Spain.

    Not that the US can just walk away and have everything work out. Walking away and having everything _not_ work out would be better than the Spain scenario, and just maybe if the regions abandoned now turn out to be hostile, there will be some way of living with them as foreign entities. Going in among them and waging attrition on a roughly equal basis isn’t a good idea. “Never get into an arse-kicking contest with a porcupine”.

    Counterinsurgency

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Counterinsurgency

    Nice Latin! And good comment.

    , @Autochthon
    @Counterinsurgency


    Maintaining the Cold War coalition this long has cost the US [sic] its industrial base and its large cities.
     
    Please explaining your reasoning for the causal connection here. I'm also curious for elaboration about large cities. The industrial base has certainly been lost, but I don't large cities are only larger. Are you referring to how they are a lot shittier now?

    Replies: @Counterinsurgency

    , @Counterinsurgency
    @Counterinsurgency

    Well, I've been too optimistic again. Darn.
    Take a look at this, featured top of the page on Drudge:
    Baruch Pletner;
    "The Hi-Tech Traditionalist: Is America’s Military Loyal To Its Commander In Chief?";
    Tsarizm, 2018/12/21;
    https://tsarizm.com/analysis/2018/12/21/the-hi-tech-traditionalist-is-americas-military-loyal-to-its-commander-in-chief/

    It's a plausible analysis of the US Federal strategic situation, and it's consistent with what I know. My optimism has been that Federal officials wouldn't try to treat Trump like a new recruit in the Marine Corps. I should have known better when one of Trump's office managers tried to take Trump's phone away.

    Historically, serving military officers and government employees have often been wrong about the strategic situation. They don't know what to do, so they do what they know (paraphrase of Marshal Saxe).

    I've been blind. Sorry.

    Counterinsurgency

    , @Hunsdon
    @Counterinsurgency

    To quote the Lord Humongous, "Just walk away."

  24. anonymous[166] • Disclaimer says:

    Good riddance to Mattis and anyone else who wants to cling childishly to their beloved wars. He’s a hero of the crushing of Fallujah, sort of like being a hero of the crushing of the Warsaw uprising and should get the Bronislav Kaminski medal for that. A bombed wedding party here and there are also to his credit. Just the man for the war-lovers at NYT and elsewhere.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @anonymous

    Since his appointment, I never liked Mattis. That whole "Mad-Dog" have-a-plan-to-kill-everyone-you-meet bullshit just makes him sound like a wierdo - either a poseur or a psychopath. And lest we forget, Mattis was insubordinate in trying to stall Trump's re-implementation of the tranny-ban. Maybe Kelly would have been a better choice for SecDef.

  25. “Who will persuade Trump not to withdraw from NATO”
    Daniel Shapiro

    i wonder what percentage of Americans know what ethnicity a Daniel Shapiro or a Bret Stephens or a Jake Tapper is

  26. Error correction:
    “Then, somehow, it entangled with the Hapsburgs.” should read: “Then, somehow, it entangled with the French.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Counterinsurgency

    This is off-topic, however the kings of Spain had originally been dukes of Burgundy. The Netherlands was their ancestral homeland, and they were no more going to forget about it and let it go than American Jews today are going to forget about the Middle East.

  27. Anon[202] • Disclaimer says:

    Whomever and whatever the NYT disagrees with should be considered to be good with a strong level of certainty.

    Whomever and whatever the NYT supports should be considered to be useless at best, but probably harmful.

    The only translation that the shrill protests against pulling Johnny Utah out of Syria brings to mind is:

    “Israel prefers to have a goyish army in the region, because it is preferable to putting Jews in harm’s way”.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Anon


    “Israel prefers to have a goyish army in the region, because it is preferable to putting Jews in harm’s way”.
     
    The US is deployed along Syria's border with Turkey, thus nowhere near Israel and in no position to protect Israel even if that were the goal, which it is not.

    If we're protecting anyone there it's the Kurds. And now listen up, white nationalists: the Kurds are an Indo-European people. Aryans like you.

    Replies: @Svigor

  28. @Hail

    U.S. Allies fear that traditional ties no longer matter
     
    Lest we forget, in this holiday season the profound, deep, traditional ties that Middle America White Christians have with Afghanistani Muslims.

    Where to start? There's the indisputable fact that in 1681 William Penn invited Afghanistani Muslims to heroically help settle Pennsylvania, and that half the signers of the declaration of independence had family ties to Afghanistan. There's the annual exchange trips dating to the 19th century between the Northern Methodists and the First Mosque of Kabul.

    Then there's the cultural influence. Who can forget that old American folk song:

    You may talk about your dearest May
    and sing of Rose-Lee
    But the yellow rose of Kandahar
    she's the only one for me
     
    And the recently discovered, original lyrics to Yankee Doodle:

    Yankee Doodle went to mosque
    Riding on a pony,
    Stuck a feather in his cap
    And called Afghanistani.
     
    I mean, come on. These traditional ties are what makes us who we are.

    Replies: @Lot

    Fath’r and I went down to Mosque along with Mullah Omar
    There we saw the men and boys en flagrante as hasty puddin’
    Yankee Doodle keep it up, Yankee Doodle Dandy
    Taliban ban the music and with the goats be handy!

  29. I sincerely mean it when I say I’m not anti-Jewish as a matter of principle, but the heavily Jewish New York Times is freaking out because of their implicit Israel first policy.

  30. Trump needs to begin talking about a peace dividend.

    We haven’t had an honest debate about defence spending/policy since 9/11.

    Time to turn off the auto pilot and start considering other options to endless wars.

  31. @dearieme
    @Realist

    "losers who haven’t won a war since 1945"

    They won the first Iraq war. And their bombing attack on Serbia killed enough civilians that they'd probably count that as victory too.

    This shows that they can win wars as long as the war lasts no longer than a single battle.

    Replies: @Realist

    They won the first Iraq war.

    Really??? Then why did they go back.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @Realist

    Known as the Gulf War--not the first Iraq War--as the US kicked Iraq out of Kuwait. Two different wars, two different missions. No one went back to kick Iraq out of Kuwait a second time.

    Try to keep up.

    Replies: @Realist

  32. @Ibound1
    @Realist

    The only way is to cut the defense budget by 1/3 and tell the generals: this is still the largest defense budget in the world - by far- and your mission is to defend the United States (and only the United States). If they say we cannot do it, find some new generals who can.

    Replies: @Realist, @dfordoom, @Joe Joe

    The only way is to cut the defense budget by 1/3 and tell the generals: this is still the largest defense budget in the world – by far- and your mission is to defend the United States (and only the United States).

    I would cut it by 1/2, but otherwise I agree.

  33. @Neuday
    @Billy Shears

    Considering the number of gentile neocons, they're jumping raft.

    Replies: @snorlax

    The George W. Bush administration would have been a few thousand people, of whom maybe somewhere between 5 and 15% were Jews.

    • Replies: @jbwilson24
    @snorlax

    "The George W. Bush administration would have been a few thousand people, of whom maybe somewhere between 5 and 15% were Jews."

    What a dumb equivocation.

    Being in the GWB admin does not mean you are a neocon.

    Being in the Project for a New American Century makes you a signficant Neocon, and the membership looks like a bar mitzvah invite list.

    Replies: @snorlax

  34. @Beliavsky
    I don't know what we should do about Syria or Afghanistan, but don't you think James Mattis knows what he is talking about? Didn't Obama's withdrawal from Iraq allow ISIS to gain territory? It is tempting to wash our hands of the Middle East, but chaos and bloodshed there do lead to more refugees going to Europe and to a lesser extent the U.S..

    Maybe Trump is doing the right thing, but Steve is not making a serious argument.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Sean, @Hunsdon

    “…but chaos and bloodshed there do lead to more refugees going to Europe and to a lesser extent the U.S…”

    And a little thought will lead to the conclusion that all that “chaos and bloodshed” are the result of Israeli and US aggression in the region.

    The US aggression has been more noticeable for several decades but ultimately has been instigated by Israel’s Zionist fifth column in the United States, a group that exerts near absolute control over US policy via their political funding/lobbying/bribery and control of the news media and information industries.

    Trump’s recent actions give hope but I suspect that either the Zionist lobby will politically emasculate him, e.g., by a concerted impeachment effort, or Israeli’s Ha Mossad, will take him out with an assassination.

  35. @Beliavsky
    I don't know what we should do about Syria or Afghanistan, but don't you think James Mattis knows what he is talking about? Didn't Obama's withdrawal from Iraq allow ISIS to gain territory? It is tempting to wash our hands of the Middle East, but chaos and bloodshed there do lead to more refugees going to Europe and to a lesser extent the U.S..

    Maybe Trump is doing the right thing, but Steve is not making a serious argument.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Sean, @Hunsdon

    Iraq was a Sunni state, which fell into the hands of Shia, who started killing the Bathite Sunni and sterrorists. So the Sunnis formed Islamic State, which made them even more of a target. Two generations of Sunni terrorist in Iraq are dead, their supporters and relatives imprisoned and dispossessed. The US can count on the Iraqi government to suppress what is left of the militant Sunnis.

    Afghanistan is completely different, the Taliban cannot be eliminated as Islamic State were because Pakistan wants to keep some Taliban as a counter to Indian influence. Moreover the base population of the Taliban is almost half the country.It would be necessary to kill an awful lot of innocent people to do to the Taliban what has been done to IS. It is best to leave it to Pakistan. “Reports of the US troop reduction are probably meant to give some assurance to the Taliban – assurance that the US does not plan to stay in the country forever”.

  36. @Samuel Skinner
    @Arclight


    This reminds me of the left’s default reaction to the failure of its various policy prescriptions and trillions of dollars spent over the past half century to close the various gaps we see between whites and blacks (the only yardstick they really care about).
     
    They don't care. The goal is money and power; failing to fix the problem insures they continue to receive money and being able to prevent people from stopping them shows they have power.

    rather than an examination of the fact that their favorite victim group refuses to adhere to the social norms (marriage, low levels of criminality, consistent employment) that provide stable communities and the possibility of upward mobility.
     
    Blacks had substantially higher levels of those in the past. The progs smashed that- after all, the worse a problem is, the more funding you can claim you need to fix it. 1945-1970 was great for blacks because almost no immigration means you can make a living and raise a family on low skilled labor. Get rid of that because it is 'racist' and blacks lose out to newcomers. Welfare directed to single mothers, affirmative action sucking everyone competent out of the black community- there isn't a progressive policy that didn't break down the functioning of the black community.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    Blacks had substantially higher levels of those in the past. The progs smashed that- after all, the worse a problem is, the more funding you can claim you need to fix it. 1945-1970 was great for blacks because almost no immigration means you can make a living and raise a family on low skilled labor. Get rid of that because it is ‘racist’ and blacks lose out to newcomers. Welfare directed to single mothers, affirmative action sucking everyone competent out of the black community- there isn’t a progressive policy that didn’t break down the functioning of the black community.

    Don’t forget “fair housing”, which destroyed white communities with black crime and destroyed black communities by allowing the most responsible and successful to move away from their lesser cousins.

  37. @Counterinsurgency
    The US is now abandoning the US empire for the same reason that the UK abandoned its empire: non possumus. We can't do it. Maintaining the Cold War coalition this long has cost the US its industrial base and its large cities. Time's up, we have very little to spend, and the Cold War is over. Moreover, the Cold War coalition has proven counterproductive since 9/11. It givens the US the power to intervene in and disorganize Third World states. Where's the good in that -- where's the good for anybody?

    Better to do that than continue. Historically, Spain started the 30 years war in what I think was an effort to clear its northern flank before counterattacking the successful Turkish invasion of Eastern Europe. It hit the Dutch Republic and never quite figured out that infantry successfully can't cross mud filled obstacles and then attack uphill. Then, somehow, it entangled with the Hapsburgs. At the end, Spain tried a series of "one last push" efforts that depopulated Spain, impoverished the survivors, and left Spain with a non-functional government. Better if we don't emulate Spain.

    Not that the US can just walk away and have everything work out. Walking away and having everything _not_ work out would be better than the Spain scenario, and just maybe if the regions abandoned now turn out to be hostile, there will be some way of living with them as foreign entities. Going in among them and waging attrition on a roughly equal basis isn't a good idea. "Never get into an arse-kicking contest with a porcupine".

    Counterinsurgency

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Autochthon, @Counterinsurgency, @Hunsdon

    Nice Latin! And good comment.

  38. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT, but in today's intersectional world being a lesbian tennis champion isn't enough if you're not woke.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6521935/Tennis-legend-Martina-Navratilova-accused-transphobic.html

    Martina Navratilova has become embroiled in a row with the transgender community after she claimed that people born male should not compete in women's sporting events.

    Navratilova, 62, a former Wimbledon champion and LGBT campaigner, was accused of being 'transphobic', following her remarks which she made on social media.

    Her comments had come in response to a question from a follower about transgender women in sport. She was forced to delete the comments last night following criticism.

    'Clearly that can't be right. You can't just proclaim yourself a female and be able to compete against women. There must be some standards, and having a penis and competing as a woman would not fit that standard.

    Her accusers included Dr Rachel McKinnon, a transgender activist and competitive cyclist who won a women's event at the UCI Masters Track World Championship, earlier this year.

    Dr McKinnon, who was born male, demanded that Navratilova apologise and criticised the comments.
     
    Dr McKinnon was born male but he can win women's cycle races. He looks male too.

    Navratilova had originally said in response to the criticism: 'I am sorry if I said anything anywhere near transphobic – I meant no harm. I will educate myself better on this issue but meantime I will be quiet about it.

    She then clarified: 'Rachel [Dr McKinnon], you might be an expert on all things trans but you are one nasty human.'
     

    Replies: @Digital Samizdat, @Harry Baldwin, @dfordoom, @Hunsdon

    They even have an acronym for people like Navratilova, who were once considered bleeding-edge, but are now regarded as reactionaries holding back the forever-revolution: TERF [trans-exclusionary radical feminist].

    https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=TERF

  39. @Counterinsurgency
    The US is now abandoning the US empire for the same reason that the UK abandoned its empire: non possumus. We can't do it. Maintaining the Cold War coalition this long has cost the US its industrial base and its large cities. Time's up, we have very little to spend, and the Cold War is over. Moreover, the Cold War coalition has proven counterproductive since 9/11. It givens the US the power to intervene in and disorganize Third World states. Where's the good in that -- where's the good for anybody?

    Better to do that than continue. Historically, Spain started the 30 years war in what I think was an effort to clear its northern flank before counterattacking the successful Turkish invasion of Eastern Europe. It hit the Dutch Republic and never quite figured out that infantry successfully can't cross mud filled obstacles and then attack uphill. Then, somehow, it entangled with the Hapsburgs. At the end, Spain tried a series of "one last push" efforts that depopulated Spain, impoverished the survivors, and left Spain with a non-functional government. Better if we don't emulate Spain.

    Not that the US can just walk away and have everything work out. Walking away and having everything _not_ work out would be better than the Spain scenario, and just maybe if the regions abandoned now turn out to be hostile, there will be some way of living with them as foreign entities. Going in among them and waging attrition on a roughly equal basis isn't a good idea. "Never get into an arse-kicking contest with a porcupine".

    Counterinsurgency

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Autochthon, @Counterinsurgency, @Hunsdon

    Maintaining the Cold War coalition this long has cost the US [sic] its industrial base and its large cities.

    Please explaining your reasoning for the causal connection here. I’m also curious for elaboration about large cities. The industrial base has certainly been lost, but I don’t large cities are only larger. Are you referring to how they are a lot shittier now?

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
    @Autochthon

    The "losing the large cities" comment comes from Copley's _Uncivilization_.

    The basic argument is that, worldwide, increases in population tend to accumulate in cities. Cities have had an increasing fraction of national population for quite some time (Typical article: "Percentage of global population living in cities, by continent"; _ The Guardian_, 2016; https://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2009/aug/18/percentage-population-living-cities ). Countries whose fertility rate is above replacement (Mexico, Nigeria) tend to have cities whose population is recruited from the territory that surrounds them. Countries whose fertility rate is below replacement (USA, France) tend to have cities whose population is _not_ supported from surrounding territory, although there are some exceptions.
    In the USA, cities cannot maintain their political importance from natural increase (never could, cities have historically been population sinks). Worse, cities are not important manufacturing centers today, haven't been since containerized shipping became dominant (see: Marc Levinson, _
    The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger_, Second Edition; various publishers, 2007). Cities are important only financially and politically. Everything else has been dispersed to cheaper areas. And finance could probably disperse also if it wanted to do so. I actually saw this transformation back in the 1960s, when NYC newspapers were constantly complaining about the exodus of manufacturing and NYC almost went bankrupt.
    This leaves the cities with politics as their primary sustenance. Political power comes from population and votes. _But the cities, with no reliable economic base, should be depopulating!_ Once started, depopulation would reduce their political power, perhaps starting a 'death spiral' as less political power drove further depopulation.

    Take NYC as a standard case. NCY's depopulation was well underway in the 1960s, as the "middle class" fled and the "ethnic neighborhoods" moved to the suburbs (some say were driven out, and that was likely a cause also). So how is NYC still large today? Well, immigration. It was no mistake that Trump's strength is not in the cities: the cities are largely first generation immigrants ("The Many Languages of New York City"; https://www.wnyc.org/story/255668-blog-census-languages-new-yorkers-speak/), and they vote in the city's interest. Cities know that they are dependent on immigration for their political power and hence their very existence. That's why they refuse to identify foreign residents that are in violation of Federal laws.

    OK, so the above is background, not really Copley. Now we start on Copley's thesis ( as I understand it):
    Cities, worldwide, have grown so large that they not only are politically influential, but so large that they _are_ politics, as Paris was at the time of the French Revolution. At one time NYC had a Supreme Court Justice for each of its boroughs (the _NY Times_ bragged about that). This looks like a strength, but is not one. Copley points out that the cities have made enemies of the countryside (this is worldwide, mind you) and therefore the countries (comprised of cities _and_ countryside) lack autarky. The US and the USSR had autarky (could support themselves without trade) in WW II, whereas the Third Reich could not, and that was a substantial advantage to the Allies.
    Should bad times come -- say, some group of idiots shuts down all the airports with drones while another group of idiots attacks transformers and a third group hacks the SCADA systems -- the cities _could_ survive _if_ the countryside unreservedly supported the cities. Political domination, without economic function, however, has left the cities with very little support in the countryside. The situation in France just now is a fair example.
    So: cities are essentially lost to the US Federal government. They are settled with foreigners, have very little economic importance, and their port facilities aren't used anymore (container ports are very seldom in cities as the containers need considerable room). They are both vulnerable to attack and lack a sympathetic rural population. They aren't assets anymore. Moreover, the success of immigration in retaining political power has made city officials and their Federal representatives into arrogant fools (on a good day), so they lack intelligent leadership.
    Other than that, they're in great shape.

    This is also linked to the Cold War "niceness offensive", in which we were told that we had to be nice to everybody (and they did not have to be nice to us) or they would go Communist and we would all die in a nuclear holocaust.

    Counterinsurgency

    Replies: @Counterinsurgency

  40. The managerial class lives stuff like Syria because the get paid to love it. By Soros types looking to wreck already bad third world nations on the cheap to acquire and flip assets.

    Soros wants Assad gone so he can buy and flip Syrian offshore gas fields which are substantial.

    That is what this is all about.

  41. @Realist
    @dearieme


    They won the first Iraq war.
     
    Really??? Then why did they go back.

    Replies: @Forbes

    Known as the Gulf War–not the first Iraq War–as the US kicked Iraq out of Kuwait. Two different wars, two different missions. No one went back to kick Iraq out of Kuwait a second time.

    Try to keep up.

    • Replies: @Realist
    @Forbes


    Known as the Gulf War–not the first Iraq War–as the US kicked Iraq out of Kuwait.
     
    I didn't call it the first Iraq war the person I was responding to did. Iraq left Kuwait before the US got there.

    You are the one that needs to keep up.

  42. @Autochthon
    @Counterinsurgency


    Maintaining the Cold War coalition this long has cost the US [sic] its industrial base and its large cities.
     
    Please explaining your reasoning for the causal connection here. I'm also curious for elaboration about large cities. The industrial base has certainly been lost, but I don't large cities are only larger. Are you referring to how they are a lot shittier now?

    Replies: @Counterinsurgency

    The “losing the large cities” comment comes from Copley’s _Uncivilization_.

    The basic argument is that, worldwide, increases in population tend to accumulate in cities. Cities have had an increasing fraction of national population for quite some time (Typical article: “Percentage of global population living in cities, by continent”; _ The Guardian_, 2016; https://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2009/aug/18/percentage-population-living-cities ). Countries whose fertility rate is above replacement (Mexico, Nigeria) tend to have cities whose population is recruited from the territory that surrounds them. Countries whose fertility rate is below replacement (USA, France) tend to have cities whose population is _not_ supported from surrounding territory, although there are some exceptions.
    In the USA, cities cannot maintain their political importance from natural increase (never could, cities have historically been population sinks). Worse, cities are not important manufacturing centers today, haven’t been since containerized shipping became dominant (see: Marc Levinson, _
    The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger_, Second Edition; various publishers, 2007). Cities are important only financially and politically. Everything else has been dispersed to cheaper areas. And finance could probably disperse also if it wanted to do so. I actually saw this transformation back in the 1960s, when NYC newspapers were constantly complaining about the exodus of manufacturing and NYC almost went bankrupt.
    This leaves the cities with politics as their primary sustenance. Political power comes from population and votes. _But the cities, with no reliable economic base, should be depopulating!_ Once started, depopulation would reduce their political power, perhaps starting a ‘death spiral’ as less political power drove further depopulation.

    Take NYC as a standard case. NCY’s depopulation was well underway in the 1960s, as the “middle class” fled and the “ethnic neighborhoods” moved to the suburbs (some say were driven out, and that was likely a cause also). So how is NYC still large today? Well, immigration. It was no mistake that Trump’s strength is not in the cities: the cities are largely first generation immigrants (“The Many Languages of New York City”; https://www.wnyc.org/story/255668-blog-census-languages-new-yorkers-speak/), and they vote in the city’s interest. Cities know that they are dependent on immigration for their political power and hence their very existence. That’s why they refuse to identify foreign residents that are in violation of Federal laws.

    OK, so the above is background, not really Copley. Now we start on Copley’s thesis ( as I understand it):
    Cities, worldwide, have grown so large that they not only are politically influential, but so large that they _are_ politics, as Paris was at the time of the French Revolution. At one time NYC had a Supreme Court Justice for each of its boroughs (the _NY Times_ bragged about that). This looks like a strength, but is not one. Copley points out that the cities have made enemies of the countryside (this is worldwide, mind you) and therefore the countries (comprised of cities _and_ countryside) lack autarky. The US and the USSR had autarky (could support themselves without trade) in WW II, whereas the Third Reich could not, and that was a substantial advantage to the Allies.
    Should bad times come — say, some group of idiots shuts down all the airports with drones while another group of idiots attacks transformers and a third group hacks the SCADA systems — the cities _could_ survive _if_ the countryside unreservedly supported the cities. Political domination, without economic function, however, has left the cities with very little support in the countryside. The situation in France just now is a fair example.
    So: cities are essentially lost to the US Federal government. They are settled with foreigners, have very little economic importance, and their port facilities aren’t used anymore (container ports are very seldom in cities as the containers need considerable room). They are both vulnerable to attack and lack a sympathetic rural population. They aren’t assets anymore. Moreover, the success of immigration in retaining political power has made city officials and their Federal representatives into arrogant fools (on a good day), so they lack intelligent leadership.
    Other than that, they’re in great shape.

    This is also linked to the Cold War “niceness offensive”, in which we were told that we had to be nice to everybody (and they did not have to be nice to us) or they would go Communist and we would all die in a nuclear holocaust.

    Counterinsurgency

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
    @Counterinsurgency

    Copley is a professional strategist, a student of Luttwak, and so tends to think in terms of inter-state conflict, which is all I mentioned.
    To extend Copley's work a very little bit, autarky is important during societal crises as well as during conflicts with foreign States. The US Great Depression (1930s through early 1940s) was a societal crisis, and US cohesion preserved an autarky that reduced suffering and subsequently won WW II. Cities are vulnerable to economic failures that leave their populations unable to support themselves just as they are vulnerable to organized attacks from foreign States.
    Think of the Los Angeles riots without external funds to patch up the damage. Heck, think about Illinois when the pension shortfall really hits.

    SpoonApia

    Replies: @Romanian

  43. @Counterinsurgency
    The US is now abandoning the US empire for the same reason that the UK abandoned its empire: non possumus. We can't do it. Maintaining the Cold War coalition this long has cost the US its industrial base and its large cities. Time's up, we have very little to spend, and the Cold War is over. Moreover, the Cold War coalition has proven counterproductive since 9/11. It givens the US the power to intervene in and disorganize Third World states. Where's the good in that -- where's the good for anybody?

    Better to do that than continue. Historically, Spain started the 30 years war in what I think was an effort to clear its northern flank before counterattacking the successful Turkish invasion of Eastern Europe. It hit the Dutch Republic and never quite figured out that infantry successfully can't cross mud filled obstacles and then attack uphill. Then, somehow, it entangled with the Hapsburgs. At the end, Spain tried a series of "one last push" efforts that depopulated Spain, impoverished the survivors, and left Spain with a non-functional government. Better if we don't emulate Spain.

    Not that the US can just walk away and have everything work out. Walking away and having everything _not_ work out would be better than the Spain scenario, and just maybe if the regions abandoned now turn out to be hostile, there will be some way of living with them as foreign entities. Going in among them and waging attrition on a roughly equal basis isn't a good idea. "Never get into an arse-kicking contest with a porcupine".

    Counterinsurgency

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Autochthon, @Counterinsurgency, @Hunsdon

    Well, I’ve been too optimistic again. Darn.
    Take a look at this, featured top of the page on Drudge:
    Baruch Pletner;
    “The Hi-Tech Traditionalist: Is America’s Military Loyal To Its Commander In Chief?”;
    Tsarizm, 2018/12/21;
    https://tsarizm.com/analysis/2018/12/21/the-hi-tech-traditionalist-is-americas-military-loyal-to-its-commander-in-chief/

    It’s a plausible analysis of the US Federal strategic situation, and it’s consistent with what I know. My optimism has been that Federal officials wouldn’t try to treat Trump like a new recruit in the Marine Corps. I should have known better when one of Trump’s office managers tried to take Trump’s phone away.

    Historically, serving military officers and government employees have often been wrong about the strategic situation. They don’t know what to do, so they do what they know (paraphrase of Marshal Saxe).

    I’ve been blind. Sorry.

    Counterinsurgency

  44. @Tiny Duck.
    Our best bet now is a military coup to remove Drumpf from power.

    Replies: @Digital Samizdat

    Our best bet now is a military coup to remove Drumpf from power.

    So Gen. Pinochet becomes our next president? Kewl!

    • Agree: International Jew
  45. @Forbes
    @Realist

    Known as the Gulf War--not the first Iraq War--as the US kicked Iraq out of Kuwait. Two different wars, two different missions. No one went back to kick Iraq out of Kuwait a second time.

    Try to keep up.

    Replies: @Realist

    Known as the Gulf War–not the first Iraq War–as the US kicked Iraq out of Kuwait.

    I didn’t call it the first Iraq war the person I was responding to did. Iraq left Kuwait before the US got there.

    You are the one that needs to keep up.

  46. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT, but in today's intersectional world being a lesbian tennis champion isn't enough if you're not woke.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6521935/Tennis-legend-Martina-Navratilova-accused-transphobic.html

    Martina Navratilova has become embroiled in a row with the transgender community after she claimed that people born male should not compete in women's sporting events.

    Navratilova, 62, a former Wimbledon champion and LGBT campaigner, was accused of being 'transphobic', following her remarks which she made on social media.

    Her comments had come in response to a question from a follower about transgender women in sport. She was forced to delete the comments last night following criticism.

    'Clearly that can't be right. You can't just proclaim yourself a female and be able to compete against women. There must be some standards, and having a penis and competing as a woman would not fit that standard.

    Her accusers included Dr Rachel McKinnon, a transgender activist and competitive cyclist who won a women's event at the UCI Masters Track World Championship, earlier this year.

    Dr McKinnon, who was born male, demanded that Navratilova apologise and criticised the comments.
     
    Dr McKinnon was born male but he can win women's cycle races. He looks male too.

    Navratilova had originally said in response to the criticism: 'I am sorry if I said anything anywhere near transphobic – I meant no harm. I will educate myself better on this issue but meantime I will be quiet about it.

    She then clarified: 'Rachel [Dr McKinnon], you might be an expert on all things trans but you are one nasty human.'
     

    Replies: @Digital Samizdat, @Harry Baldwin, @dfordoom, @Hunsdon

    “In the end the Party would announce that two and two made five, and you would have to believe it.”

  47. @Anon
    Whomever and whatever the NYT disagrees with should be considered to be good with a strong level of certainty.

    Whomever and whatever the NYT supports should be considered to be useless at best, but probably harmful.

    The only translation that the shrill protests against pulling Johnny Utah out of Syria brings to mind is:

    "Israel prefers to have a goyish army in the region, because it is preferable to putting Jews in harm's way".

    Replies: @International Jew

    “Israel prefers to have a goyish army in the region, because it is preferable to putting Jews in harm’s way”.

    The US is deployed along Syria’s border with Turkey, thus nowhere near Israel and in no position to protect Israel even if that were the goal, which it is not.

    If we’re protecting anyone there it’s the Kurds. And now listen up, white nationalists: the Kurds are an Indo-European people. Aryans like you.

    • Replies: @Svigor
    @International Jew

    Thx for ur deep gonzern.

    Replies: @International Jew

  48. @snorlax
    @Neuday

    The George W. Bush administration would have been a few thousand people, of whom maybe somewhere between 5 and 15% were Jews.

    Replies: @jbwilson24

    “The George W. Bush administration would have been a few thousand people, of whom maybe somewhere between 5 and 15% were Jews.”

    What a dumb equivocation.

    Being in the GWB admin does not mean you are a neocon.

    Being in the Project for a New American Century makes you a signficant Neocon, and the membership looks like a bar mitzvah invite list.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    @jbwilson24

    Being in the GWB admin means you were almost certainly a supporter of the GWB administration's policies, at least at the time.

    But, even if we use your preferred definition of "neocon," PNAC membership, gentiles are still the majority.

    14 Jews: Abrams, Cohen, Decter, Friedberg, Gerecht, Gerson, Goldfarb, Kagan, Kagan, Kristol, Lehmann, Libby, Podhoretz, Wolfowitz

    22 gentiles: Bauer, Bennett, Bork, Bush, Cheney, Dobriansky, Donnelly, Forbes, Fukuyama, Gaffney, Ikle, Jackson, Khalilzad, McKivergan, Quayle, Rodman, Rosen,* Rowen, Rumsfeld, Schmitt, Weber, Weigel

    *"Rosen" is often but not always a Jewish surname; I'm guessing not in this case because he's named "Stephen Peter" and this is his picture:

    https://www.americaabroadmedia.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/picture-61-1309997385.jpg

    But you can move 0.5 to the other column if you want.

  49. @Counterinsurgency
    @Autochthon

    The "losing the large cities" comment comes from Copley's _Uncivilization_.

    The basic argument is that, worldwide, increases in population tend to accumulate in cities. Cities have had an increasing fraction of national population for quite some time (Typical article: "Percentage of global population living in cities, by continent"; _ The Guardian_, 2016; https://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2009/aug/18/percentage-population-living-cities ). Countries whose fertility rate is above replacement (Mexico, Nigeria) tend to have cities whose population is recruited from the territory that surrounds them. Countries whose fertility rate is below replacement (USA, France) tend to have cities whose population is _not_ supported from surrounding territory, although there are some exceptions.
    In the USA, cities cannot maintain their political importance from natural increase (never could, cities have historically been population sinks). Worse, cities are not important manufacturing centers today, haven't been since containerized shipping became dominant (see: Marc Levinson, _
    The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger_, Second Edition; various publishers, 2007). Cities are important only financially and politically. Everything else has been dispersed to cheaper areas. And finance could probably disperse also if it wanted to do so. I actually saw this transformation back in the 1960s, when NYC newspapers were constantly complaining about the exodus of manufacturing and NYC almost went bankrupt.
    This leaves the cities with politics as their primary sustenance. Political power comes from population and votes. _But the cities, with no reliable economic base, should be depopulating!_ Once started, depopulation would reduce their political power, perhaps starting a 'death spiral' as less political power drove further depopulation.

    Take NYC as a standard case. NCY's depopulation was well underway in the 1960s, as the "middle class" fled and the "ethnic neighborhoods" moved to the suburbs (some say were driven out, and that was likely a cause also). So how is NYC still large today? Well, immigration. It was no mistake that Trump's strength is not in the cities: the cities are largely first generation immigrants ("The Many Languages of New York City"; https://www.wnyc.org/story/255668-blog-census-languages-new-yorkers-speak/), and they vote in the city's interest. Cities know that they are dependent on immigration for their political power and hence their very existence. That's why they refuse to identify foreign residents that are in violation of Federal laws.

    OK, so the above is background, not really Copley. Now we start on Copley's thesis ( as I understand it):
    Cities, worldwide, have grown so large that they not only are politically influential, but so large that they _are_ politics, as Paris was at the time of the French Revolution. At one time NYC had a Supreme Court Justice for each of its boroughs (the _NY Times_ bragged about that). This looks like a strength, but is not one. Copley points out that the cities have made enemies of the countryside (this is worldwide, mind you) and therefore the countries (comprised of cities _and_ countryside) lack autarky. The US and the USSR had autarky (could support themselves without trade) in WW II, whereas the Third Reich could not, and that was a substantial advantage to the Allies.
    Should bad times come -- say, some group of idiots shuts down all the airports with drones while another group of idiots attacks transformers and a third group hacks the SCADA systems -- the cities _could_ survive _if_ the countryside unreservedly supported the cities. Political domination, without economic function, however, has left the cities with very little support in the countryside. The situation in France just now is a fair example.
    So: cities are essentially lost to the US Federal government. They are settled with foreigners, have very little economic importance, and their port facilities aren't used anymore (container ports are very seldom in cities as the containers need considerable room). They are both vulnerable to attack and lack a sympathetic rural population. They aren't assets anymore. Moreover, the success of immigration in retaining political power has made city officials and their Federal representatives into arrogant fools (on a good day), so they lack intelligent leadership.
    Other than that, they're in great shape.

    This is also linked to the Cold War "niceness offensive", in which we were told that we had to be nice to everybody (and they did not have to be nice to us) or they would go Communist and we would all die in a nuclear holocaust.

    Counterinsurgency

    Replies: @Counterinsurgency

    Copley is a professional strategist, a student of Luttwak, and so tends to think in terms of inter-state conflict, which is all I mentioned.
    To extend Copley’s work a very little bit, autarky is important during societal crises as well as during conflicts with foreign States. The US Great Depression (1930s through early 1940s) was a societal crisis, and US cohesion preserved an autarky that reduced suffering and subsequently won WW II. Cities are vulnerable to economic failures that leave their populations unable to support themselves just as they are vulnerable to organized attacks from foreign States.
    Think of the Los Angeles riots without external funds to patch up the damage. Heck, think about Illinois when the pension shortfall really hits.

    SpoonApia

    • Replies: @Romanian
    @Counterinsurgency

    Your posts have been very interesting! Thanks for the food for thought!

  50. @International Jew
    @Anon


    “Israel prefers to have a goyish army in the region, because it is preferable to putting Jews in harm’s way”.
     
    The US is deployed along Syria's border with Turkey, thus nowhere near Israel and in no position to protect Israel even if that were the goal, which it is not.

    If we're protecting anyone there it's the Kurds. And now listen up, white nationalists: the Kurds are an Indo-European people. Aryans like you.

    Replies: @Svigor

    Thx for ur deep gonzern.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Svigor

    I'm always looking for the win-win.

    But besides that, I just have a lot of sympathy for the Kurds. They've been abused forever by the Turks and the Arabs, and they deserve to have their own country.

    Replies: @Svigor

  51. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT, but in today's intersectional world being a lesbian tennis champion isn't enough if you're not woke.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6521935/Tennis-legend-Martina-Navratilova-accused-transphobic.html

    Martina Navratilova has become embroiled in a row with the transgender community after she claimed that people born male should not compete in women's sporting events.

    Navratilova, 62, a former Wimbledon champion and LGBT campaigner, was accused of being 'transphobic', following her remarks which she made on social media.

    Her comments had come in response to a question from a follower about transgender women in sport. She was forced to delete the comments last night following criticism.

    'Clearly that can't be right. You can't just proclaim yourself a female and be able to compete against women. There must be some standards, and having a penis and competing as a woman would not fit that standard.

    Her accusers included Dr Rachel McKinnon, a transgender activist and competitive cyclist who won a women's event at the UCI Masters Track World Championship, earlier this year.

    Dr McKinnon, who was born male, demanded that Navratilova apologise and criticised the comments.
     
    Dr McKinnon was born male but he can win women's cycle races. He looks male too.

    Navratilova had originally said in response to the criticism: 'I am sorry if I said anything anywhere near transphobic – I meant no harm. I will educate myself better on this issue but meantime I will be quiet about it.

    She then clarified: 'Rachel [Dr McKinnon], you might be an expert on all things trans but you are one nasty human.'
     

    Replies: @Digital Samizdat, @Harry Baldwin, @dfordoom, @Hunsdon

    OT, but in today’s intersectional world being a lesbian tennis champion isn’t enough if you’re not woke.

    Yes, that’s the secret in our Brave New World. It doesn’t matter if you’re black or homosexual or belong to any other victim group. That counts for nothing. What counts is political reliability. What counts is being absolutely orthodox on every issue.

    If you display even the slightest hint of heresy you lose all your Pokemon Victim Points.

    Navratilova can crawl and grovel as much as she likes but she’s now a Nazi.

  52. @Ibound1
    @Realist

    The only way is to cut the defense budget by 1/3 and tell the generals: this is still the largest defense budget in the world - by far- and your mission is to defend the United States (and only the United States). If they say we cannot do it, find some new generals who can.

    Replies: @Realist, @dfordoom, @Joe Joe

    The only way is to cut the defense budget by 1/3

    The U.S. could cut its defense budget by nine-tenths without endangering U.S. security.

  53. @Beliavsky
    I don't know what we should do about Syria or Afghanistan, but don't you think James Mattis knows what he is talking about? Didn't Obama's withdrawal from Iraq allow ISIS to gain territory? It is tempting to wash our hands of the Middle East, but chaos and bloodshed there do lead to more refugees going to Europe and to a lesser extent the U.S..

    Maybe Trump is doing the right thing, but Steve is not making a serious argument.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Sean, @Hunsdon

    To the extent that we are discussing ISIS in Syria, I think the Syrian armed forces, with some advice and guidance from Russian forces, are quite capable of putting paid to them.

  54. @Svigor
    @International Jew

    Thx for ur deep gonzern.

    Replies: @International Jew

    I’m always looking for the win-win.

    But besides that, I just have a lot of sympathy for the Kurds. They’ve been abused forever by the Turks and the Arabs, and they deserve to have their own country.

    • Replies: @Svigor
    @International Jew

    I agree; I stated recently in this thread or another that I support all peoples in their struggles for self-determination. On the other hand, I doubt the Kurds would lift one pinky finger to reciprocate, so the support doesn't go far in this case.

    Replies: @International Jew

  55. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT, but in today's intersectional world being a lesbian tennis champion isn't enough if you're not woke.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6521935/Tennis-legend-Martina-Navratilova-accused-transphobic.html

    Martina Navratilova has become embroiled in a row with the transgender community after she claimed that people born male should not compete in women's sporting events.

    Navratilova, 62, a former Wimbledon champion and LGBT campaigner, was accused of being 'transphobic', following her remarks which she made on social media.

    Her comments had come in response to a question from a follower about transgender women in sport. She was forced to delete the comments last night following criticism.

    'Clearly that can't be right. You can't just proclaim yourself a female and be able to compete against women. There must be some standards, and having a penis and competing as a woman would not fit that standard.

    Her accusers included Dr Rachel McKinnon, a transgender activist and competitive cyclist who won a women's event at the UCI Masters Track World Championship, earlier this year.

    Dr McKinnon, who was born male, demanded that Navratilova apologise and criticised the comments.
     
    Dr McKinnon was born male but he can win women's cycle races. He looks male too.

    Navratilova had originally said in response to the criticism: 'I am sorry if I said anything anywhere near transphobic – I meant no harm. I will educate myself better on this issue but meantime I will be quiet about it.

    She then clarified: 'Rachel [Dr McKinnon], you might be an expert on all things trans but you are one nasty human.'
     

    Replies: @Digital Samizdat, @Harry Baldwin, @dfordoom, @Hunsdon

    And these are the people that also say “I f*****g love science” and mock ignorant conservatives.

  56. @Counterinsurgency
    The US is now abandoning the US empire for the same reason that the UK abandoned its empire: non possumus. We can't do it. Maintaining the Cold War coalition this long has cost the US its industrial base and its large cities. Time's up, we have very little to spend, and the Cold War is over. Moreover, the Cold War coalition has proven counterproductive since 9/11. It givens the US the power to intervene in and disorganize Third World states. Where's the good in that -- where's the good for anybody?

    Better to do that than continue. Historically, Spain started the 30 years war in what I think was an effort to clear its northern flank before counterattacking the successful Turkish invasion of Eastern Europe. It hit the Dutch Republic and never quite figured out that infantry successfully can't cross mud filled obstacles and then attack uphill. Then, somehow, it entangled with the Hapsburgs. At the end, Spain tried a series of "one last push" efforts that depopulated Spain, impoverished the survivors, and left Spain with a non-functional government. Better if we don't emulate Spain.

    Not that the US can just walk away and have everything work out. Walking away and having everything _not_ work out would be better than the Spain scenario, and just maybe if the regions abandoned now turn out to be hostile, there will be some way of living with them as foreign entities. Going in among them and waging attrition on a roughly equal basis isn't a good idea. "Never get into an arse-kicking contest with a porcupine".

    Counterinsurgency

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Autochthon, @Counterinsurgency, @Hunsdon

    To quote the Lord Humongous, “Just walk away.”

  57. @jbwilson24
    @snorlax

    "The George W. Bush administration would have been a few thousand people, of whom maybe somewhere between 5 and 15% were Jews."

    What a dumb equivocation.

    Being in the GWB admin does not mean you are a neocon.

    Being in the Project for a New American Century makes you a signficant Neocon, and the membership looks like a bar mitzvah invite list.

    Replies: @snorlax

    Being in the GWB admin means you were almost certainly a supporter of the GWB administration’s policies, at least at the time.

    But, even if we use your preferred definition of “neocon,” PNAC membership, gentiles are still the majority.

    14 Jews: Abrams, Cohen, Decter, Friedberg, Gerecht, Gerson, Goldfarb, Kagan, Kagan, Kristol, Lehmann, Libby, Podhoretz, Wolfowitz

    22 gentiles: Bauer, Bennett, Bork, Bush, Cheney, Dobriansky, Donnelly, Forbes, Fukuyama, Gaffney, Ikle, Jackson, Khalilzad, McKivergan, Quayle, Rodman, Rosen,* Rowen, Rumsfeld, Schmitt, Weber, Weigel

    *”Rosen” is often but not always a Jewish surname; I’m guessing not in this case because he’s named “Stephen Peter” and this is his picture:

    But you can move 0.5 to the other column if you want.

  58. @anonymous
    Good riddance to Mattis and anyone else who wants to cling childishly to their beloved wars. He's a hero of the crushing of Fallujah, sort of like being a hero of the crushing of the Warsaw uprising and should get the Bronislav Kaminski medal for that. A bombed wedding party here and there are also to his credit. Just the man for the war-lovers at NYT and elsewhere.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Since his appointment, I never liked Mattis. That whole “Mad-Dog” have-a-plan-to-kill-everyone-you-meet bullshit just makes him sound like a wierdo – either a poseur or a psychopath. And lest we forget, Mattis was insubordinate in trying to stall Trump’s re-implementation of the tranny-ban. Maybe Kelly would have been a better choice for SecDef.

  59. I think I can make this simple.

    Given the success of the peace talks that did not involve the US in any major way (unfortunately) the need to a US presence in Syria in violation of Syria’s sovereignty, meant that the US military mission to support the overthrow Pres Assad was not going to be successful.

  60. I am not opposed to US military presence overseas, But it has to serve some unique interests to the US.

    We still have plenty of military presence And i think it is safe to say that the previous admin have effectively made Russia more of a problem than need have been by constantly antagonizing her.

  61. @MikeatMikedotMike
    James Mattis was an empty uniform. I remember how happy so-called conservatives were when it revealed he would be SecDef. It was shocking because all of these people, who really believed they were intelligent, based their opinion of the guy on quotes attributed to Mattis in internet memes. They seemed to forget that you don't get to pin 4 stars on unless you've licked every boot and kissed every ass from the pentagon all the way to the Senate Armed Services Committee. Especially coming up in the Clinton/Bush/Obama years? Please.

    Looking into his service record, he was responsible for implementing much of the diversity/sexual harassment policy that is destroying the US military.

    Never married, no kids, suggests no ability to consider the consequences of sending (someone else's) young men off to die in useless wars.

    Mattis was just another careerist lap dog. Good riddance.

    Replies: @RVBlake

    The nickname “Mad Dog” seemed to impress some, which I found staggering.

  62. @Counterinsurgency
    Error correction:
    "Then, somehow, it entangled with the Hapsburgs." should read: "Then, somehow, it entangled with the French."

    Replies: @Anonymous

    This is off-topic, however the kings of Spain had originally been dukes of Burgundy. The Netherlands was their ancestral homeland, and they were no more going to forget about it and let it go than American Jews today are going to forget about the Middle East.

  63. @Ibound1
    @Realist

    The only way is to cut the defense budget by 1/3 and tell the generals: this is still the largest defense budget in the world - by far- and your mission is to defend the United States (and only the United States). If they say we cannot do it, find some new generals who can.

    Replies: @Realist, @dfordoom, @Joe Joe

    yes but Trump boasted about increasing the budget for our “underfunded” military

  64. @Counterinsurgency
    @Counterinsurgency

    Copley is a professional strategist, a student of Luttwak, and so tends to think in terms of inter-state conflict, which is all I mentioned.
    To extend Copley's work a very little bit, autarky is important during societal crises as well as during conflicts with foreign States. The US Great Depression (1930s through early 1940s) was a societal crisis, and US cohesion preserved an autarky that reduced suffering and subsequently won WW II. Cities are vulnerable to economic failures that leave their populations unable to support themselves just as they are vulnerable to organized attacks from foreign States.
    Think of the Los Angeles riots without external funds to patch up the damage. Heck, think about Illinois when the pension shortfall really hits.

    SpoonApia

    Replies: @Romanian

    Your posts have been very interesting! Thanks for the food for thought!

  65. And it appears that the process is entering a new stage:

    John Aidan Byrne.
    “The exodus of New York City’s endangered middle class”;
    _New York Post_, 2018/12/23;
    https://nypost.com/2018/12/22/the-exodus-of-new-york-citys-endangered-middle-class/

    Funny, that, since the mass media says that the cities are undergoing “gentrification”. Gentrification should gentrify. One definition: “Gentrification is a process of renovating deteriorated urban neighborhoods by means of the influx of more affluent residents.”. OK, so a couple of questions.
    Q: If gentrification dominates city housing, why isn’t income rising?
    Q: If gentrification does not dominate city housing, then the mass media’s assertion that it does is propaganda favoring the gentry. Why should the Left favor the gentry? Perhaps the gentry is being used as a bloody flag to increase voter turnout of the Left’s base?

    Neglecting the epiphenomena, the end game of relying on immigration from different ethnicities or cultures is the _almost_ complete replacement of the natives (native to a certain place:: born in a certain place, and ancestors born in that same place). This was more or less standard in Eastern Europe, especially the Austro-Hungarian Empire and Russia.
    The problem is that the replaced city populations tend to see themselves as in opposition to the natives, and vice versa. That pattern can be maintained for a long time (see: Amy Chua, _World on Fire: How Exporting Free Market Democracy Breeds Ethnic Hatred and Global Instability_, various publishers, first publication 2003) but are always dependent on political protection of the minority and can destabilize badly.
    During WW I and WW II, political protection failed in Eastern Europe, and at the end of those wars, the market dominant minorities were pretty much gone – some dead, some fled, some forcibly relocated. This was the end result of the French Revolution’s liberalism, which put all groups in direct economic competition that favored the market dominant minority. It favored the market dominant minority enough that the natives were forced to leave the land (1890s immigration wave to the US, largely eastern and southern European). This led to hard feelings, which were expressed at the first opportunity.

    Could it happen in the West also? Gonna find out, aren’t we.

    And that’s also what I meant by “losing the cities”.

  66. @Realist
    The Deep State sycophants are out in force. Thanks to our extremely bloated war budget and bellicose nature we have a plethora of dickheads to choose from for replacement of Mattis. You can be sure Mattis' replacement will be another military 'genius' from the pool of losers who haven't won a war since 1945.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Ibound1, @ATBOTL

    Hostility to withdrawl from Syria is all over the movement conservative comment sections. Many boomers are NOT happy with this decision by Trump. Even those boomers who support Trump here often are doing so out only of personal loyalty only.

    Decades of neocon propaganda have made the average older conservative incredibly ignorant of basic facts about the world. Many are still confused about who is fighting who. You still get the “Iran is the main source of terror” and “ISIS only happened because Obummer pulled troops from Iraq” canards.

    • Replies: @Realist
    @ATBOTL


    Decades of neocon propaganda have made the average older conservative incredibly ignorant of basic facts about the world.
     
    Those who can not think for themselves are sad indeed.
  67. @ATBOTL
    @Realist

    Hostility to withdrawl from Syria is all over the movement conservative comment sections. Many boomers are NOT happy with this decision by Trump. Even those boomers who support Trump here often are doing so out only of personal loyalty only.

    Decades of neocon propaganda have made the average older conservative incredibly ignorant of basic facts about the world. Many are still confused about who is fighting who. You still get the "Iran is the main source of terror" and "ISIS only happened because Obummer pulled troops from Iraq" canards.

    Replies: @Realist

    Decades of neocon propaganda have made the average older conservative incredibly ignorant of basic facts about the world.

    Those who can not think for themselves are sad indeed.

  68. @International Jew
    @Svigor

    I'm always looking for the win-win.

    But besides that, I just have a lot of sympathy for the Kurds. They've been abused forever by the Turks and the Arabs, and they deserve to have their own country.

    Replies: @Svigor

    I agree; I stated recently in this thread or another that I support all peoples in their struggles for self-determination. On the other hand, I doubt the Kurds would lift one pinky finger to reciprocate, so the support doesn’t go far in this case.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Svigor

    "[The USA] goes not abroad in search of monsters to destroy. She is the well-wisher to the freedom and independence of all. She is the champion and vindicator only of her own."
    - John Quincy Adams

  69. @Svigor
    @International Jew

    I agree; I stated recently in this thread or another that I support all peoples in their struggles for self-determination. On the other hand, I doubt the Kurds would lift one pinky finger to reciprocate, so the support doesn't go far in this case.

    Replies: @International Jew

    “[The USA] goes not abroad in search of monsters to destroy. She is the well-wisher to the freedom and independence of all. She is the champion and vindicator only of her own.”
    – John Quincy Adams

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