The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
NYT: Blacks Tend to be Anti-Vaxxers, White Men at Fault
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From the New York Times opinion page, some more of the Current Year’s now traditional antiquarianism on race:

How Black People Learned Not to Trust
Concerns about vaccination are unfortunate, but they have historical roots.

By Charles M. Blow
Opinion Columnist

Dec. 6, 2020

It would appear that the people in American hit hardest by Covid-19 — Black people — are also the group most leery about the prospects of a vaccine.

That’s the conventional wisdom, but it appears that Hispanics have more than caught up with blacks. From the CDC:

My vague impression is that urban blacks (and some rural blacks in Georgia) got hit hard in last spring’s first wave, but most journalists haven’t updated their assumptions since then. The second wave in summer smashed sunbelt Latinos, and the current fall third wave that began in the Dakotas is hitting whites and Latinos hard.

… But that same report contained the following: “Black Americans continue to stand out as less inclined to get vaccinated than other racial and ethnic groups: 42 percent would do so, compared with 63 percent of Hispanic and 61 percent of white adults.”

The unfortunate American fact is that Black people in this country have been well-trained, over centuries, to distrust both the government and the medical establishment on the issue of health care.

Furthermore, as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention explains: “In 1932, the Public Health Service, working with the Tuskegee Institute, began a study to record the natural history of syphilis in hopes of justifying treatment programs for blacks. It was called the ‘Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male.’ ”

Hundreds of Black men were told they were being treated for syphilis, but they were not. They were being observed to see how the disease would progress. The men suffered under this experiment for 40 years.

I hope that America can overcome Black people’s trepidations about this vaccine, but it is impossible to say that that trepidation doesn’t have historical merit.

Also, Emmett Till was either up to date on his vaccinations or not up to date on his vaccinations, which, in either case, proves that white men are bad.

And redlining.

Occam’s Razor, on the other hand, would suggest that anti-vaxx ideation is more common among people who aren’t really as smart as they think they are: blacks, with their combination of higher average self-esteem and lower average IQ, are well-represented in those ranks.

The longer the pandemic drags on due to the lack of courage of anti-vaxxers, the more time for elites to carry out the various bad ideas they are entertaining under the justification of The Great Reset.

 
Hide 134 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. (((Coronavirus))) is a hoax. Nuff said.

    • LOL: Jtgw
    • Troll: guest007, IHTG
    • Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Trinity


    (((Coronavirus)))
     
    Does this indicate that you believe the virus to be Jewish? I certainly believe that the Usual Suspects (and I don't mean only Jews) have done everything in their power to leverage the pandemic for political purposes, and moreover that their cynicism in this process exhibits no bounds.

    But do some people believe that the virus itself doesn't exist? Or just that it's not remotely as lethal as we've been told? Because those are two wildly different things, and the first is foolish lunacy.

    PS: I know I shouldn't dive into this, but this 'Coronahoax' post is #1 as of this writing, and we should probably focus on Steve's points about the latest leveraging instead.

    Replies: @Jack D, @U. Ranus, @Bill Jones

    , @guest007
    @Trinity

    So is the claim that no one has really died from Covid-19, that public health departments should not exist, that healthcare workers should not take precautions to keep from getting infected, and that morality in the U.S. had not increased.


    Why are so many Americans working hard to intentionally misunderstand what is being said about Covid-19?

    Replies: @Redman

    , @HA
    @Trinity

    "(((Coronavirus)))"

    Please. Tell me, what do names like Richard Epstein, Michael Levitt or Alex Berenson or that Youtube-star Zelenko have in common? That's right -- all of them are part of the vanguard AGAINST the so-called hysteria over coronavirus. (Not the hysteria over the vaccine mind you -- no, each and every rumour and crazy what-if? raised in objection to vaccines is just an example of folks being sensible, and it's only those trying to limit COVID deaths who are acting hysterical).

    Then there's that French HCQ doctor who isn't a Jew but whose wife and kids are. For all I know, even "only 10,000 dead" Wittkowski might be Jewish or part Jewish himself, but don't hold me to that.

    Regardless, and despite all that, the corona-truthers now want us to believe that Coronavirus is yet another Jewish plot. Yeah, right. Again, if this is how corona-trutherism is supposed to work, then it's no wonder it never got much traction.

    In fact, the Jews can breathe a collective sigh of relief that all these jokers failed so miserably when it came to predicting how thing would play out. (I mean, Epstein certainly had the ear of the White House back when he was predicting that only 500 -- no wait, make that 5,000 -- would die, but eventually, he tucked his tail between his legs and went away. Had he managed to prevail before being made into a laughingstock, the anti-Semites would be screaming for the blood of those sneaky back-stabbing Jews who forced their progressive pussyfooting sit-back-and-enjoy-it government agenda in order to snuff out poor hapless Westerners with COVID even as Israelis get to be led by a ruler who is willing to act in the interest of his people and send out policemen on horseback to enforce the lockdowns -- i.e. the same line that they use in immigration, as in "the Jews keep pushing 'liberty' in the West while keeping their own safe behind walls."

    (And yes, you read that right. In Israel, it is police mounted on horseback who are enforcing the lockdown. (In other words, Jews themselves are invoking heavy-handed Cossack and other Tsarist-bogeyman imagery in order to bring their own corona-truthers into submission -- at least, that's what the headlines would read if anyone tried that on an Orthodox enclave in NYC -- though I'm guessing that isn't going to be featured in Borat III).

    So if you wanted to know if there's anyone dumber than a corona-truther, you know have the answer --- it's the antisemitic corona-truther, and sooner or later they were bound to show up. No matter how hard it is to make this peg fit into that hole, one way or another they'll keep hammering.

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Trinity

    I heard coronavirus only kills first borne children.

    I also heard a rumor that all the Jews were told ahead of time not to show up to work when the 'rona struck.

    The dots are starting to connect.

  2. Isn’t most of the content on this website, including nearly everything written by the owner, arguing that the government constantly lies to us and is untrustworthy? Blow’s dumb boilerplate column aside, we should trust them on a vaccine that was rushed, but the results of which were withheld to influence the results of the Presidential election? I am personally leery of the vaccine because based on what I have read, it sounds 50-50 that the vaccine would cause me to get sicker than Covid-19 would. I plan on taking it when they tell me I have to, but I am not going to fault anyone who chooses not to take it.

    • Agree: Drew
    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    @Barnard

    Well put, Barnard.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Barnard

    Thank you, Barnard! I ran out of "responses", so let me add this too. Mr. Unz, a guy who has been delving into all sorts of American media lies, cover-ups, and revisionism through a century of our history, has fallen hard for the Lyin' Press Infotainment that is going on RIGHT HERE, RIGHT NOW.

    Some people are really good at noticing the trees but not the forest.

    Regarding the anti-vaxxers, I guess I'm an agnostic - I could take it or leave it. Like many others I know, I just don't want to be a part of the stupidity. I've been around the public straight through this whole PanicFest. I have only worn a mask in stores with my wife before she lightened up, and then only when strictly required for work.

    Then, I made the mistake of walking by a TV set recently. All I heard was 2 words - "blah, blah blah ... horrible numbers ... blah, blah" Sheee-it. Go screw yourselves, talking heads!

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    , @Adam Smith
    @Barnard


    I plan on taking it when they tell me I have to...
     
    I plan on taking it when they take my gun from my cold dead hand.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

  3. My vague impression is that urban blacks (and some rural blacks in Georgia) got hit hard in last spring’s first wave…

    Does eating clay have any ameliorative effect?

    We don’t need Magic Dirt, we need Munchy Dirt!

    The unfortunate American fact is that Black people in this country have been well-trained, over centuries, to distrust both the government and the medical establishment on the issue of health care.

    Doesn’t show up at the polls.

    • Replies: @Kibernetika
    @Reg Cæsar

    Does eating clay have any ameliorative effect?

    Let's hope that it's palliative, too.

    , @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Reg Cæsar

    I've read more about the Tuskeegee Experiment in the past two weeks than in my entire life up to now, and I've read a ton about it during my entire life up to now. Unfortunately, it's pretty much the same material over and over, though it's becoming less accurate over time.

    Out among the General Internets, the growing consensus seems to be that Whitey deliberately infected many thousands of black people over many decades--maybe millions because you certainly can't trust Whitey. Many thousands died, we're told.

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Reg Cæsar

    I know we're supposed to believe black women are the goddesses among us but I just can't get with the program.

    , @Clemsnman
    @Reg Cæsar

    Bentonite is beneficial, it adsorbs toxins and carries them out of the body. Studies confirm and it is commonly added to animal feed for that purpose.

    The main reason it isn't promoted for that by clay producers is potential liability.

    But you are also correct, to say blacks don't trust government is absurd. They rely on it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  4. Vaccines are associated with shots, and as anyone who’s ever been or had kids knows, fear of shots is fairly universal.

    Enculturation and general knowledge (which correlates with IQ) make people more positively disposed towards vaccines as they mature.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @Anon

    When working at a research university, I was amazed at the number of graduate students who did not want to get vaccinated for protection against the microbes that they would be using. I used to always tell anyone who was going into biomedical research that if one did not want to get your immunization, then one needed to find another line of work. The equivalent would be airline pilots who are afriad to fly or ship captains who are afraid of the water.

    Conservatives always use the term "Coddling" but then insist on being coddled all of the time.

    , @John Achterhof
    @Anon

    Yeah, I'd guess fear of the needle - which is given a rationale in the novelty of the vaccine - is a more immediate cause of reluctance than 1932 Tuskegee. I'm familiar with that uneasiness.

    Vaccines, and vaccine-derived herd-immunity, have been a godsend in eliminating the threat to public health of deadly viruses, and the free-rider problem is an emerging concern, but with this particular virus the reluctance of half of the population to take it is perhaps not a great concern as would be with a more deadly virus. If, in many measuring their fear of the virus against fear of a shot of novel vaccine, a significant percent of the public at very low risk of requiring hospitalization after infection opt not to take the shot, herd immunity would nevertheless come about more deliberately in the vaccine/natural combination seemingly at little consequence to public health.

  5. What if your child is in a class with a black kid whose parents refuse vaccination? Must all the kids wear a mask? By analogy to a peanut allergy; if one child in a class has an allergy, absolutely no peanut butter sandwiches, etc. are allowed.

    The same would apply to people on a bus, people on a plane, etc.

    • Replies: @unadorned
    @Anon7

    If the vaccination works what is there to worry about?

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Anon7

  6. Modern opinion journalism/punditry is the easiest job in the world – identity a problem or condition you don’t like, blame whites.

  7. I think it was the CDC that released an incredible study showing the Covid-19 virus is spread via weaves. The weave environment allows the virus to hide and the substances used on the weave, coco butter and other products, provides nutrients for the virus.

    I can’t believe this research is not getting the publicity it deserves. Suppose Big Weave, a USD 13 trillion industry is suppressing the news.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Just another serf


    I think it was the CDC that released an incredible study showing the Covid-19 virus is spread via weaves. The weave environment allows the virus to hide and the substances used on the weave, coco butter and other products, provides nutrients for the virus.
     
    Viruses aren't alive, so you can't provide them nutrients. Coco butter is a lipid, and thus it's likely the lipid envelopes of enveloped viruses would stick to it and not let go.

    A much better surface for transmitting it, to the extent this is a mechanism at all (I'm getting the impression this is either not believed to be one for COVID-19, or currently not at all a major one given how well it transmits in the air), is something like polished steel, the virus won't stick to it well, will easily transfer to your fingers where it sticks better, and then you might inoculate yourself by touching your eyes or nose or maybe even mouth if you haven't washed your hands first.

    Here are the scientific details about how this sort of thing works, it's an excellent explanation with pictures.

    Replies: @J S Raggmann, @Just another serf

  8. Concerns about vaccination are unfortunate

    I got this far. Flat-out refusing to take medicine without knowing anything about it is not “unfortunate,” it is “stupid” (cf lyingpress handling of hydroxychloroquine plus zinc). Taking medicine without knowing anything about it is stupid. “Concerns” about medicine (ie, questions which can be answered with a bit of digging or a good doctor) are not unfortunate, they are inevitable, normal, and ethical. Settling such concerns is part of being a doctor, that’s why they talk to you for a bit when they prescribe, they don’t just throw pills at you. These completely worthless uncriticized unedited lefty zhoornullists have settled too comfortably into a smug Nurse Ratched tone.
    I only got that far, has he mentioned highly respected mainstream doctors warning that one of the vaccines might cause infertility? And if it does, does that mean that … oh, I get it. We must do everythimg possible to combat ignorance and control the spread of misinformation in the black community!

    • Agree: Thoughts, Mark G.
    • Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @J.Ross


    highly respected mainstream doctors warning that one of the vaccines might cause infertility
     
    Should I take hope from this? I've about given up on the Asteroid Solution.

    https://cdn.images.express.co.uk/img/dynamic/151/750x445/1176830.jpg
  9. Also, Emmett Till

    Okay, this really pisses me off. You see, I wanted to be the first to mention Emmett Till. Apparently there’s a rule that says you can’t write NYT without mentioning ET. Oh wait, previous thread …

  10. I would bet that the average walking-down-the-street Jew could tell you all about the Tuskegee vaccinations, but that the average black has never heard of it.

  11. Anonymous[504] • Disclaimer says:

    The longer the pandemic drags on due to the lack of courage of anti-vaxxers

    That’s worded imprecisely, but are you hinting that anti-vaxx (both SWPL and urban varieties) are the scheduled appropriate scapegoat if politicians settle on that excuse for more lockdown/power grabs? There is already a folk belief that the dastardly evil wreckers not following mask/COVID precepts religiously enough is the ultimate cause for the current lockdown-without-end (seems quite a few Unz.com commenters fall into that evangelical group also).

    Was just talking today to a nice, early-middle-aged fellow frustrated there is no concertgoing in 2020, a disappointment he unironically blames on “not enough people wearing masks and following the rules”

    • Agree: Thoughts, Old and Grumpy
    • Replies: @Thoughts
    @Anonymous

    Read any liberal girl's instagram stories...

    I gave birth in a mask because all you people just had to go to the Wine Bar on Friday Night! #StayTheFuckHome

    (That was a real comment)

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen

  12. Howard Stern used to have a game where he’d have someone ask blacks on the street a question and then let his studio crew guess if the blacks knew the answer (Jay Leno borrowed this idea but didn’t limit it to black people). I recall a professional black woman in midtown Manhattan who didn’t know what “CIA” stood for.

    When Howard had his correspondent do this in Harlem, he had trouble finding blacks who knew what the 4th of July commemorated.

    The New York Times could borrow this idea and ask blacks on the street if they can say who Emmett Till was or what the Tuskegee Experiment was or what redlining was. I bet most would have no idea.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Dave Pinsen

    But I'll bet that most have some vague notion that the government experiments on black people even though Tuskegee means nothing to them.

    Replies: @Redman

    , @AceDeuce
    @Dave Pinsen

    Actually, it's rather amazing what nuggets of (mostly incorrect or fake) shared "knowledge" kneegrows possess. You wouldn't expect three disparate whites-say, Henry Kissinger, a teenage skater punk, and a 50 year old Mormon housewife in Utah, to have a lot of commonality--but with kneegrows, Condoleeza Rice and some 'bama country snuff dipping black old woman and a 20 year old male Harlem gangbanger all could tell you about the Tuskeegee Experiment, about Willie Lynch, and Dylann Roof's Burger King lunch. It may be distorted or flat out wrong, but they'll tell it.

    Most all know plenty of NOI "facts" It's why I say that, rather than the 50, 000 supposed NOI members, the de facto membership is 98% of the blacks in America.

    , @Gary in Gramercy
    @Dave Pinsen

    Emmett Till? The Tuskegee Experiment? "Redlining"?

    Please, ask them who Ta-Nehisi Coates is. Half will say he's a rapper. The other half will say he's an "aspiring rapper."

    Replies: @black sea

    , @nokangaroos
    @Dave Pinsen

    For the umpteenth time the Tuskegee STUDY was not an "experiment".
    (the same team did purposely infect soldiers and inmates in Guatemala to get a grip on the early stages)
    The reason they used aspiring rappers was that in the dark old days you wanted to study the syph, you went where the syph was; it was not yet de rigueur to pester Norwegian grandmothers (I shudder at the thought of how unenlightened they were).
    No treatments were "withheld" (with the possible exception of Salvarsan, of dubious value in second- and third stage and doubtless now causing screams of "testing chemical weapons on black bodies"; sorry, no peniscillin then - also of dubious value beyond first stage).
    Indeed the study participants had significantly higher life expectancy than the controls (no surprise with free health supervision for poor rural blacks).

    But the Narrative is so much smoother ...

  13. “And then so we look at vaccines, for instance, it’s actually a bit of a complex topic, because if you’re making something that is a drug that’s intended to have long-term effects, as opposed to most small molecule drugs that stop acting after they’ve left your body, could they have long-term consequences? And if we’ve done mostly the studies on individual vaccines, and yet they’re given in schedules with lots of them together, do we really know what the collective effect of that much immune modulation long-term on lots of them together is? And if at the same time that they’ve been going up, polio and whatever’s been going down, but hygiene and antibiotics have also been happening during that time, and then auto-immune disease and other things like that seem to be going up, is the auto-immune disease and the infertility going up because of the vaccines? Or is it going up because of the glyphosate or ubiquitous environmental toxins or stress?
    Those are actually complex topics. And so it’s very easy to say, “All vaccines are bad,” or, “All vaccines are good, anti-vaxxers are stupid,” and neither of those are complex enough to actually make good sense of it. But the need to take a very strong position because the other view is so bad and dangerous we have to fight it ends up being the tribalism confirmation bias. And then people only have a pejorative straw man, or even worse, a villainized version of the other. They can’t even imagine how anyone could be that stupid or bad as to believe that thing. And of course, you can’t have participatory governance when that’s how you think about the other people you’re supposedly part of a republic with, or part of a civilization at all with. So where people start to doubt the institutional authority, there’s something good in that, but then oftentimes what happens is rather than really learn the epistemology needed to make sense of it, they just jump to the new authority, and usually the new authority is whoever it is that’s telling them to doubt the other one.”

    Daniel Schmachtenberger
    from a podcast in September 2020

    • Thanks: Mark G., Gabe Ruth
  14. Well, it sounds better to Chuck Blow than “My people are scared of needles”.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  15. If there hadn’t been historical slavery, oppression and exploitation of Black people, if they hadn’t been used for experimental medical procedures without their knowledge or consent, if Black people weren’t still continuously brutalized and discriminated against, I m sure they would be more than willing to trust the government.

    White atrocities against BIPOC are very much alive and well.. they’re just contemporary, so White people who dominate societal norms haven’t yet accepted that they’re atrocious. Maybe in 150 years you’ll say, oh yea.. I can see why Blacks didn’t want to take the COVID-19 vaccine.

    And to think that many white-privileged Americans have reacted with self-righteous anger at the emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement. Our collective ignorance is breathtaking, and shameful.

    Charles Blow is right on the money here. Mocking him says more about his detractors than anything.

    • LOL: Wade Hampton
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Jeff Blum 77

    I'm glad that blacks don't trust the vaccine. I'm especially glad that Farakhan doesn't like it. More for me and mine. Let them wallow in their ignorance and superstition and fear of needles which are the real reasons. Blacks trust the guberment just fine to reload their EBT card every month.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jeff Blum 77

    https://static-35.sinclairstoryline.com/resources/media/4540c624-74c0-4e3a-be32-0c13a5ea8858-smallScale_20190308_UOvsAZ_Pac12_012.jpg?1552103659122


    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/4cAAAOSwpDdVenWX/s-l300.jpg

    https://dbukjj6eu5tsf.cloudfront.net/sidearm.sites/uoregon.sidearmsports.com/images/2019/6/11/Moore_STAN18_EE.JPG

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Jeff Blum 77

    Suggestion for Ron Unz: Since Tiny Duck has decided to constantly change his pseudonym to evade the "Commenters to Ignore" function, why not an option to ignore commenters with "no recent commenting history," like Jeff Blum 77?

    The price of Steve's success is that there are too many comments on every post for a person to read them all. Anything that could be done to let readers preemptively weed out the junk comments would be helpful.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    , @John Johnson
    @Jeff Blum 77

    White atrocities against BIPOC are very much alive and well.. they’re just contemporary, so White people who dominate societal norms haven’t yet accepted that they’re atrocious.

    White people are atrocious for wanting Blacks to get a vaccine?

    Africans still hunt albinos for their body parts. But here you are complaining about the White man and his medicine.
    https://www.latimes.com/world/africa/la-fg-malawi-albinos-hunted-2017-story.html

    Maybe in 150 years you’ll say, oh yea.. I can see why Blacks didn’t want to take the COVID-19 vaccine

    In 150 years the remaining White people will look back and wonder how everyone could be so stupid to fall for the lie that race doesn't exist. Dopey liberals and Con Inc morons still think that it's all just a grand coincidence that Africans are still looking for witches and chasing albinos.

    And to think that many white-privileged Americans have reacted with self-righteous anger at the emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement.

    Self-righteous anger? It's a BS movement because they only protest when a Black (normally felon) is killed by a White police officer. Clearly they don't care if Black lives matter if they are killed by Black criminals.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Jeff Blum 77

    Duck, i've got no problem with you doing one annoying Jewish minoritarian parody, if that melts your butter. (Personally, i get enough from reading any establishment paper.)

    Your Jeff Blum 77 here is believable in content and attitude. But why the continual churn? Just create one and do it well.

  16. Everything is about race to them!

  17. The Messicans in my ‘hood rarely diaper up – less so than any other ethny – and Messican business owners never harass me when I walk in normal and undiapered. Wypipo, especially white women, absolutely love their facediapers – 95% of hysterical, shrill diaper nazis here are women.

    I’m not surprised Messicans aren’t excited about the fakevax. Maybe they, unlike the innumerates round here, recognize the fakevax is 300 times less effective than their bodies at fending off the sniffles.

    • Agree: Travis, Liza
    • Troll: guest007
    • Replies: @TTSSYF
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen


    Wypipo, especially white women, absolutely love their facediapers – 95% of hysterical, shrill diaper nazis here are women.
     
    Not true, in my experience. In fact, I've been surprised at the number of men who diaper-up with any sign of annoyance. Most men I know don't even like to apply sunscreen. Most recently, I watched as a white man pitched a fit when the checkout clerk at WalMart asked him to briefly remove his face diaper so she could confirm his photo ID (he was buying alcohol). He shouted loudly, "I'm not removing my mask! It's a petri dish in here!" (That's in contrast, of course, to what WalMart would be without COVID around -- no doubt as germ-free as an operating room. )

    It seems to me that it's the Gen X'ers and Millennials who are fully on-board with the face diapers. And they're the ones who tend to be on-board with socialism. After all -- "We're all in this together."

    Replies: @Barnard, @stillCARealist, @John Johnson

    , @anon
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    Wypipo, especially white women, absolutely love their facediapers – 95% of hysterical, shrill diaper nazis here are women.

    Well, you are in Portlandia. Maybe you should move to Houston, Texas to reduce your stress?

    https://www.fox26houston.com/sports/pediatricians-recommend-mask-wearing-for-children-while-playing-sports-to-prevent-covid-19

  18. OT:

    • Replies: @Currahee
    @D. K.

    hey Cole,
    Always read your stuff at Taki. You're OK.

  19. @Just another serf
    I think it was the CDC that released an incredible study showing the Covid-19 virus is spread via weaves. The weave environment allows the virus to hide and the substances used on the weave, coco butter and other products, provides nutrients for the virus.

    I can’t believe this research is not getting the publicity it deserves. Suppose Big Weave, a USD 13 trillion industry is suppressing the news.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    I think it was the CDC that released an incredible study showing the Covid-19 virus is spread via weaves. The weave environment allows the virus to hide and the substances used on the weave, coco butter and other products, provides nutrients for the virus.

    Viruses aren’t alive, so you can’t provide them nutrients. Coco butter is a lipid, and thus it’s likely the lipid envelopes of enveloped viruses would stick to it and not let go.

    A much better surface for transmitting it, to the extent this is a mechanism at all (I’m getting the impression this is either not believed to be one for COVID-19, or currently not at all a major one given how well it transmits in the air), is something like polished steel, the virus won’t stick to it well, will easily transfer to your fingers where it sticks better, and then you might inoculate yourself by touching your eyes or nose or maybe even mouth if you haven’t washed your hands first.

    Here are the scientific details about how this sort of thing works, it’s an excellent explanation with pictures.

    • Replies: @J S Raggmann
    @That Would Be Telling

    I think that "Just Another Serf" was making a joke.

    Making a joke about weaves could be dangerous, though. Could be interpreted as raaacist. Very close to the red line. If he makes another such joke, and the joke next time involves blunts and 40's, the SJW's will definitely be on him like white on rice.

    Sadly, we may soon see Mr. Just Another Serf standing on the side of the road, unshaven and in ragged clothes, with a sign saying "Made a raaacist joke and was driven from gainfull employment. Will do standup comedy for food, please help."

    Replies: @Just another serf

    , @Just another serf
    @That Would Be Telling

    Dang, you are smart. I had to look up lipids. Are you a science graduate? Anyway, you should contact the CDC and set them straight.

  20. @Anonymous

    The longer the pandemic drags on due to the lack of courage of anti-vaxxers
     
    That's worded imprecisely, but are you hinting that anti-vaxx (both SWPL and urban varieties) are the scheduled appropriate scapegoat if politicians settle on that excuse for more lockdown/power grabs? There is already a folk belief that the dastardly evil wreckers not following mask/COVID precepts religiously enough is the ultimate cause for the current lockdown-without-end (seems quite a few Unz.com commenters fall into that evangelical group also).

    Was just talking today to a nice, early-middle-aged fellow frustrated there is no concertgoing in 2020, a disappointment he unironically blames on "not enough people wearing masks and following the rules"

    Replies: @Thoughts

    Read any liberal girl’s instagram stories…

    I gave birth in a mask because all you people just had to go to the Wine Bar on Friday Night! #StayTheFuckHome

    (That was a real comment)

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Thoughts

    "I gave birth in a mask because all you people just had to go to the Wine Bar on Friday Night! #StayTheFuckHome"

    I've heard variants of this from imbeciles and ninnies round here. 'The reason everything is locked down and cases are rising is because a handful of witches won't diaper up!!!!!! BURN THE WITCHES!!!!!'

    Now, if facediapers and lockdowns worked, shouldn't cases go down proportional to diapering? Logics and maffs be hard and sheet.

  21. anti-vaxx ideation is more common among people who aren’t really as smart as they think they are:
    … with their combination of higher average self-esteem and lower average IQ, are well-represented in those ranks.

    … could be either blacks or iSteve commenters.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Justvisiting
    @Jack D

    The "pro vax" and "anti-vax" division of the population is ridiculous.

    I am totally in favor of everybody else getting the vaccine--just stay the Frack away from me with that unproven Big Pharma indemnified money machine garbage.

    Voila--herd immunity, everybody else takes the risk, I (and Big Pharma) get the benefit.

  22. You’d only have to have the head of the CDC or Pfizer announce that whites would have priority for the vaccine to get every black leader in America demanding blacks be vaccinated first.

    • Agree: JimDandy
    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @unit472

    In a sense, the NYT is using very similar psychology for a very similar purpose.

  23. @Reg Cæsar

    My vague impression is that urban blacks (and some rural blacks in Georgia) got hit hard in last spring’s first wave...

     

    Does eating clay have any ameliorative effect?


    https://metro.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/sec_11136809.jpg?quality=90&strip=all


    We don't need Magic Dirt, we need Munchy Dirt!

    The unfortunate American fact is that Black people in this country have been well-trained, over centuries, to distrust both the government and the medical establishment on the issue of health care.

     

    Doesn't show up at the polls.

    Replies: @Kibernetika, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @SunBakedSuburb, @Clemsnman

    Does eating clay have any ameliorative effect?

    Let’s hope that it’s palliative, too.

  24. @Jeff Blum 77
    If there hadn't been historical slavery, oppression and exploitation of Black people, if they hadn't been used for experimental medical procedures without their knowledge or consent, if Black people weren't still continuously brutalized and discriminated against, I m sure they would be more than willing to trust the government.

    White atrocities against BIPOC are very much alive and well.. they're just contemporary, so White people who dominate societal norms haven't yet accepted that they're atrocious. Maybe in 150 years you'll say, oh yea.. I can see why Blacks didn't want to take the COVID-19 vaccine.

    And to think that many white-privileged Americans have reacted with self-righteous anger at the emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement. Our collective ignorance is breathtaking, and shameful.

    Charles Blow is right on the money here. Mocking him says more about his detractors than anything.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Reg Cæsar, @Harry Baldwin, @John Johnson, @AnotherDad

    I’m glad that blacks don’t trust the vaccine. I’m especially glad that Farakhan doesn’t like it. More for me and mine. Let them wallow in their ignorance and superstition and fear of needles which are the real reasons. Blacks trust the guberment just fine to reload their EBT card every month.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Jack D

    https://twitter.com/TheFinalCall/status/1334200974882328577

    https://twitter.com/TheFinalCall/status/1334201268827549697

  25. @D. K.
    OT:

    https://twitter.com/DavidColeStein/status/1336082115721527296

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0H9ceOQK2s

    Replies: @Currahee

    hey Cole,
    Always read your stuff at Taki. You’re OK.

  26. @Dave Pinsen
    Howard Stern used to have a game where he’d have someone ask blacks on the street a question and then let his studio crew guess if the blacks knew the answer (Jay Leno borrowed this idea but didn’t limit it to black people). I recall a professional black woman in midtown Manhattan who didn’t know what “CIA” stood for.

    When Howard had his correspondent do this in Harlem, he had trouble finding blacks who knew what the 4th of July commemorated.

    The New York Times could borrow this idea and ask blacks on the street if they can say who Emmett Till was or what the Tuskegee Experiment was or what redlining was. I bet most would have no idea.

    Replies: @Jack D, @AceDeuce, @Gary in Gramercy, @nokangaroos

    But I’ll bet that most have some vague notion that the government experiments on black people even though Tuskegee means nothing to them.

    • Replies: @Redman
    @Jack D

    Are you saying you think the US government still conducts experiments on black people? I haven't seen any evidence of that.

    If they don't know about Tuskegee then where would they get the notion?

    Replies: @Jack D

  27. @That Would Be Telling
    @Just another serf


    I think it was the CDC that released an incredible study showing the Covid-19 virus is spread via weaves. The weave environment allows the virus to hide and the substances used on the weave, coco butter and other products, provides nutrients for the virus.
     
    Viruses aren't alive, so you can't provide them nutrients. Coco butter is a lipid, and thus it's likely the lipid envelopes of enveloped viruses would stick to it and not let go.

    A much better surface for transmitting it, to the extent this is a mechanism at all (I'm getting the impression this is either not believed to be one for COVID-19, or currently not at all a major one given how well it transmits in the air), is something like polished steel, the virus won't stick to it well, will easily transfer to your fingers where it sticks better, and then you might inoculate yourself by touching your eyes or nose or maybe even mouth if you haven't washed your hands first.

    Here are the scientific details about how this sort of thing works, it's an excellent explanation with pictures.

    Replies: @J S Raggmann, @Just another serf

    I think that “Just Another Serf” was making a joke.

    Making a joke about weaves could be dangerous, though. Could be interpreted as raaacist. Very close to the red line. If he makes another such joke, and the joke next time involves blunts and 40’s, the SJW’s will definitely be on him like white on rice.

    Sadly, we may soon see Mr. Just Another Serf standing on the side of the road, unshaven and in ragged clothes, with a sign saying “Made a raaacist joke and was driven from gainfull employment. Will do standup comedy for food, please help.”

    • LOL: acementhead
    • Replies: @Just another serf
    @J S Raggmann

    Fortunately, financially free. No longer living in the US. Free at last.

    Replies: @TTSSYF

  28. On Dailymail there’s an 87 year old Indian man who is proud to take the vaccine

    I have no problem with that. I think it’s a smart decision for him.

    He’s male, overweight and over 65. He’s not going to have children. He’s also a minority group…though I haven’t seen anything on Indians, Steve mentioned Bangladeshi’s being susceptible to Covid. That’s a genetic risk factor.

    Now Qantas requiring Vaccines or UCSD requiring it for Attendance….yeah….not cool.

    I was required to take the TB vaccine for a job years ago…I was more than happy to take the vaccine, as I was very frightened of TB in that population and my everyday life. The vaccine was invented in 1921, and TB is a nasty, nasty disease.

    Taking the TB vaccine was 100% in my best self interest. Taking the Covid vaccine is being framed as ‘You are Stupid and Only Care about Yourself You Soviet Style USSR Wrecker’

    There’s a nasty ‘protect the minority’ idea at play in everything…Take the Vaccine to protect the few! Allow all Absentee Ballots to Protect the Few (or many)! Protect the few! They are more important!

    We do things now…not because it’s in our self-interest…but because it helps other people…and the smaller, browner and/or crazier the number of people it helps…the More Sanctified it Is.

    Uch

  29. @Trinity
    (((Coronavirus))) is a hoax. Nuff said.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @guest007, @HA, @Hypnotoad666

    (((Coronavirus)))

    Does this indicate that you believe the virus to be Jewish? I certainly believe that the Usual Suspects (and I don’t mean only Jews) have done everything in their power to leverage the pandemic for political purposes, and moreover that their cynicism in this process exhibits no bounds.

    But do some people believe that the virus itself doesn’t exist? Or just that it’s not remotely as lethal as we’ve been told? Because those are two wildly different things, and the first is foolish lunacy.

    PS: I know I shouldn’t dive into this, but this ‘Coronahoax’ post is #1 as of this writing, and we should probably focus on Steve’s points about the latest leveraging instead.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    If I had a nickel for every person (or now, thing) that was wrongly accused of being Jewish on unz, I'd have a lot of nickels. Some people follow the syllogism X is bad, Jews are bad, therefore X must be Jewish.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Mike Tre

    , @U. Ranus
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Some people do believe that the virus doesn't exist. I don't happen to share that belief, but it's certainly not a "foolish lunacy" because for a merely wrong belief to qualify as a "foolish lunacy", acting on it should be seriously self-damaging.

    However, disbelief in the actual existence of SARS-CoV-2 is not self-damaging. There's no behavioral consequence from that belief significantly different from the consequences of believing COVID19 to be no more serious than a case of good old influenza: You'd live your life exactly as afraid or not of upper respiratory infection as you would if you'd never even heard of SARS-CoV-2.

    , @Bill Jones
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    The CDC has admitted that they do not have an isolated Covid19 virus. It's diagnosis is based on symptoms and the presence of antibody's generated by a large number of known Corona Virus's.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Charon, @Hypnotoad666

  30. @Reg Cæsar

    My vague impression is that urban blacks (and some rural blacks in Georgia) got hit hard in last spring’s first wave...

     

    Does eating clay have any ameliorative effect?


    https://metro.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/sec_11136809.jpg?quality=90&strip=all


    We don't need Magic Dirt, we need Munchy Dirt!

    The unfortunate American fact is that Black people in this country have been well-trained, over centuries, to distrust both the government and the medical establishment on the issue of health care.

     

    Doesn't show up at the polls.

    Replies: @Kibernetika, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @SunBakedSuburb, @Clemsnman

    I’ve read more about the Tuskeegee Experiment in the past two weeks than in my entire life up to now, and I’ve read a ton about it during my entire life up to now. Unfortunately, it’s pretty much the same material over and over, though it’s becoming less accurate over time.

    Out among the General Internets, the growing consensus seems to be that Whitey deliberately infected many thousands of black people over many decades–maybe millions because you certainly can’t trust Whitey. Many thousands died, we’re told.

  31. @Jeff Blum 77
    If there hadn't been historical slavery, oppression and exploitation of Black people, if they hadn't been used for experimental medical procedures without their knowledge or consent, if Black people weren't still continuously brutalized and discriminated against, I m sure they would be more than willing to trust the government.

    White atrocities against BIPOC are very much alive and well.. they're just contemporary, so White people who dominate societal norms haven't yet accepted that they're atrocious. Maybe in 150 years you'll say, oh yea.. I can see why Blacks didn't want to take the COVID-19 vaccine.

    And to think that many white-privileged Americans have reacted with self-righteous anger at the emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement. Our collective ignorance is breathtaking, and shameful.

    Charles Blow is right on the money here. Mocking him says more about his detractors than anything.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Reg Cæsar, @Harry Baldwin, @John Johnson, @AnotherDad

  32. @unit472
    You'd only have to have the head of the CDC or Pfizer announce that whites would have priority for the vaccine to get every black leader in America demanding blacks be vaccinated first.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    In a sense, the NYT is using very similar psychology for a very similar purpose.

  33. @J.Ross
    Concerns about vaccination are unfortunate

    I got this far. Flat-out refusing to take medicine without knowing anything about it is not "unfortunate," it is "stupid" (cf lyingpress handling of hydroxychloroquine plus zinc). Taking medicine without knowing anything about it is stupid. "Concerns" about medicine (ie, questions which can be answered with a bit of digging or a good doctor) are not unfortunate, they are inevitable, normal, and ethical. Settling such concerns is part of being a doctor, that's why they talk to you for a bit when they prescribe, they don't just throw pills at you. These completely worthless uncriticized unedited lefty zhoornullists have settled too comfortably into a smug Nurse Ratched tone.
    I only got that far, has he mentioned highly respected mainstream doctors warning that one of the vaccines might cause infertility? And if it does, does that mean that ... oh, I get it. We must do everythimg possible to combat ignorance and control the spread of misinformation in the black community!

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    highly respected mainstream doctors warning that one of the vaccines might cause infertility

    Should I take hope from this? I’ve about given up on the Asteroid Solution.

  34. @Reg Cæsar

    My vague impression is that urban blacks (and some rural blacks in Georgia) got hit hard in last spring’s first wave...

     

    Does eating clay have any ameliorative effect?


    https://metro.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/sec_11136809.jpg?quality=90&strip=all


    We don't need Magic Dirt, we need Munchy Dirt!

    The unfortunate American fact is that Black people in this country have been well-trained, over centuries, to distrust both the government and the medical establishment on the issue of health care.

     

    Doesn't show up at the polls.

    Replies: @Kibernetika, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @SunBakedSuburb, @Clemsnman

    I know we’re supposed to believe black women are the goddesses among us but I just can’t get with the program.

  35. Anon[899] • Disclaimer says:

    Anti-vaxxers are stupid and cowardly? I am not sure that will change many minds, Steve. There are many people in this country who temperamentally distrust the government and medical authorities. The new strictures designed to prevent the spread of the virus have in many instances been poorly implemented & poorly described; this has, surely, increased people’s distrust [In my area, limited church attendance is allowed, however, kneeling during the service is forbidden. This is an example of a nonsensical stricture that has been enforced with no explanation of its utility.].

    Steve, I have read your comments on the excess death rate for the year 2020. You have referred on a few occasions to a week in April wherein NYC deaths were a significant percentage over the yearly average. At the same time, I remember you writing early on about the misguided over-use of ventilators in NYC at the same time. My question is, have you considered/heard of the possibility that the excess deaths in that time were in part due to wrong treatment of the virus? Is it possible that at least some of those people, and perhaps a significant number, would have survived had our knowledge of proper treatment been as good as it is now?

    • Replies: @Redman
    @Anon

    This is a very salient point. Iatrogenic deaths. One I've raised here before but Steve did not address.

    "A recent Johns Hopkins study claims more than 250,000 people in the U.S. die every year from medical errors." (2018). That was 2 years ago.

    Back in April, there was a plethora of reporting from doctors and nurses in NYC about significant errors in treatment in the hospitals. Wouldn't iatrogenic death rates likely increase in the face of a "novel virus," when doctors were not even aware of what the effects of Coronovirus were much less how to treat them? Of course the MSM has largely ignored the ventilator fiasco for obvious reasons.

    , @Bill Jones
    @Anon

    The other contributor in New York was Cuomo's decision to unleash the infected into nursing homes.
    He's personally responsible for more deaths in America than anybody since Lincoln.

    , @Alden
    @Anon

    OMG. Is there any explanation for forbidding kneeling? I can understand not singing, not sitting close, no communion wafers .

    Please tell us why kneeling is forbidden.

    Replies: @Anon

  36. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Trinity


    (((Coronavirus)))
     
    Does this indicate that you believe the virus to be Jewish? I certainly believe that the Usual Suspects (and I don't mean only Jews) have done everything in their power to leverage the pandemic for political purposes, and moreover that their cynicism in this process exhibits no bounds.

    But do some people believe that the virus itself doesn't exist? Or just that it's not remotely as lethal as we've been told? Because those are two wildly different things, and the first is foolish lunacy.

    PS: I know I shouldn't dive into this, but this 'Coronahoax' post is #1 as of this writing, and we should probably focus on Steve's points about the latest leveraging instead.

    Replies: @Jack D, @U. Ranus, @Bill Jones

    If I had a nickel for every person (or now, thing) that was wrongly accused of being Jewish on unz, I’d have a lot of nickels. Some people follow the syllogism X is bad, Jews are bad, therefore X must be Jewish.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Jack D


    If I had a nickel for every person (or now, thing) that was wrongly accused of being Jewish on unz, I’d have a lot of nickels.

     

    (Hand rubbing intensifies.)
    , @Mike Tre
    @Jack D

    Your apparent lack of self awareness here is amusing.

  37. The “pandemic” is dragging on because those who rule us are not letting its natural course.

  38. @Barnard
    Isn't most of the content on this website, including nearly everything written by the owner, arguing that the government constantly lies to us and is untrustworthy? Blow's dumb boilerplate column aside, we should trust them on a vaccine that was rushed, but the results of which were withheld to influence the results of the Presidential election? I am personally leery of the vaccine because based on what I have read, it sounds 50-50 that the vaccine would cause me to get sicker than Covid-19 would. I plan on taking it when they tell me I have to, but I am not going to fault anyone who chooses not to take it.

    Replies: @MBlanc46, @Achmed E. Newman, @Adam Smith

    Well put, Barnard.

  39. Charles Blow is an opinion columnist, not a Times journalist. The regular articles, if you read the last third of them, are pretty accurate, still, for now at least.

  40. The longer the pandemic drags on due to the lack of courage of anti-vaxxers, the more time for elites to carry out the various bad ideas they are entertaining under the justification of The Great Reset.

    So the people who plan things like The Great Reset — who mean us harm at every turn — they’ve got our back THIS ONE TIME. This corona thing is so serious malevolent globalists will set aside their plans to help out the little people. We all gotta pull together! Kumbaya, and all that.

    If the powers that be establish 1984 it’s my fault for not wearing a mask. Got it, Steve. Hot take.

    Unbelievable.

    • Agree: U. Ranus
    • Replies: @Polite Derelict
    @BenKenobi

    Well put.

  41. The comments on this one ought to be good.

  42. @Dave Pinsen
    Howard Stern used to have a game where he’d have someone ask blacks on the street a question and then let his studio crew guess if the blacks knew the answer (Jay Leno borrowed this idea but didn’t limit it to black people). I recall a professional black woman in midtown Manhattan who didn’t know what “CIA” stood for.

    When Howard had his correspondent do this in Harlem, he had trouble finding blacks who knew what the 4th of July commemorated.

    The New York Times could borrow this idea and ask blacks on the street if they can say who Emmett Till was or what the Tuskegee Experiment was or what redlining was. I bet most would have no idea.

    Replies: @Jack D, @AceDeuce, @Gary in Gramercy, @nokangaroos

    Actually, it’s rather amazing what nuggets of (mostly incorrect or fake) shared “knowledge” kneegrows possess. You wouldn’t expect three disparate whites-say, Henry Kissinger, a teenage skater punk, and a 50 year old Mormon housewife in Utah, to have a lot of commonality–but with kneegrows, Condoleeza Rice and some ‘bama country snuff dipping black old woman and a 20 year old male Harlem gangbanger all could tell you about the Tuskeegee Experiment, about Willie Lynch, and Dylann Roof’s Burger King lunch. It may be distorted or flat out wrong, but they’ll tell it.

    Most all know plenty of NOI “facts” It’s why I say that, rather than the 50, 000 supposed NOI members, the de facto membership is 98% of the blacks in America.

  43. @That Would Be Telling
    @Just another serf


    I think it was the CDC that released an incredible study showing the Covid-19 virus is spread via weaves. The weave environment allows the virus to hide and the substances used on the weave, coco butter and other products, provides nutrients for the virus.
     
    Viruses aren't alive, so you can't provide them nutrients. Coco butter is a lipid, and thus it's likely the lipid envelopes of enveloped viruses would stick to it and not let go.

    A much better surface for transmitting it, to the extent this is a mechanism at all (I'm getting the impression this is either not believed to be one for COVID-19, or currently not at all a major one given how well it transmits in the air), is something like polished steel, the virus won't stick to it well, will easily transfer to your fingers where it sticks better, and then you might inoculate yourself by touching your eyes or nose or maybe even mouth if you haven't washed your hands first.

    Here are the scientific details about how this sort of thing works, it's an excellent explanation with pictures.

    Replies: @J S Raggmann, @Just another serf

    Dang, you are smart. I had to look up lipids. Are you a science graduate? Anyway, you should contact the CDC and set them straight.

    • Agree: Mike Tre
  44. @J S Raggmann
    @That Would Be Telling

    I think that "Just Another Serf" was making a joke.

    Making a joke about weaves could be dangerous, though. Could be interpreted as raaacist. Very close to the red line. If he makes another such joke, and the joke next time involves blunts and 40's, the SJW's will definitely be on him like white on rice.

    Sadly, we may soon see Mr. Just Another Serf standing on the side of the road, unshaven and in ragged clothes, with a sign saying "Made a raaacist joke and was driven from gainfull employment. Will do standup comedy for food, please help."

    Replies: @Just another serf

    Fortunately, financially free. No longer living in the US. Free at last.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
    @Just another serf

    And to where did you relocate?

  45. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Trinity


    (((Coronavirus)))
     
    Does this indicate that you believe the virus to be Jewish? I certainly believe that the Usual Suspects (and I don't mean only Jews) have done everything in their power to leverage the pandemic for political purposes, and moreover that their cynicism in this process exhibits no bounds.

    But do some people believe that the virus itself doesn't exist? Or just that it's not remotely as lethal as we've been told? Because those are two wildly different things, and the first is foolish lunacy.

    PS: I know I shouldn't dive into this, but this 'Coronahoax' post is #1 as of this writing, and we should probably focus on Steve's points about the latest leveraging instead.

    Replies: @Jack D, @U. Ranus, @Bill Jones

    Some people do believe that the virus doesn’t exist. I don’t happen to share that belief, but it’s certainly not a “foolish lunacy” because for a merely wrong belief to qualify as a “foolish lunacy”, acting on it should be seriously self-damaging.

    However, disbelief in the actual existence of SARS-CoV-2 is not self-damaging. There’s no behavioral consequence from that belief significantly different from the consequences of believing COVID19 to be no more serious than a case of good old influenza: You’d live your life exactly as afraid or not of upper respiratory infection as you would if you’d never even heard of SARS-CoV-2.

    • Agree: Redman
  46. Mr Sailer is being intellectualy dishonest on this one.
    Is he not aware of the link between some vaccines and autism? I have direct experience in friends and family
    Yes, Steve, I know about the most important graph in the world. But live not by lies is even more important.
    Covid is a real virus. But all signs point to a manufactured crisis for social control and depopulation. Something that Sailer would approve (with Gates, the UN et al). Be careful what you wish for, Steve.
    Read Mike Whitney on Unz. He is much trustable than Sailer on this.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @DH


    Yes, Steve, I know about the most important graph in the world.
     
    https://twitter.com/NOIResearch/status/1335636417700106240
    , @Polite Derelict
    @DH

    Agreed. It's bizarre how a man who has red-pilled so many people on topics like race can remain so trusting of official narratives on C-19 and vaccines.

  47. @Jeff Blum 77
    If there hadn't been historical slavery, oppression and exploitation of Black people, if they hadn't been used for experimental medical procedures without their knowledge or consent, if Black people weren't still continuously brutalized and discriminated against, I m sure they would be more than willing to trust the government.

    White atrocities against BIPOC are very much alive and well.. they're just contemporary, so White people who dominate societal norms haven't yet accepted that they're atrocious. Maybe in 150 years you'll say, oh yea.. I can see why Blacks didn't want to take the COVID-19 vaccine.

    And to think that many white-privileged Americans have reacted with self-righteous anger at the emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement. Our collective ignorance is breathtaking, and shameful.

    Charles Blow is right on the money here. Mocking him says more about his detractors than anything.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Reg Cæsar, @Harry Baldwin, @John Johnson, @AnotherDad

    Suggestion for Ron Unz: Since Tiny Duck has decided to constantly change his pseudonym to evade the “Commenters to Ignore” function, why not an option to ignore commenters with “no recent commenting history,” like Jeff Blum 77?

    The price of Steve’s success is that there are too many comments on every post for a person to read them all. Anything that could be done to let readers preemptively weed out the junk comments would be helpful.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Harry Baldwin

    https://www.unz.com/announcement/bugs-suggestions/


    This subsequent threads will remain available indefinitely for users to report website bugs and suggestions.
     
  48. @Dave Pinsen
    Howard Stern used to have a game where he’d have someone ask blacks on the street a question and then let his studio crew guess if the blacks knew the answer (Jay Leno borrowed this idea but didn’t limit it to black people). I recall a professional black woman in midtown Manhattan who didn’t know what “CIA” stood for.

    When Howard had his correspondent do this in Harlem, he had trouble finding blacks who knew what the 4th of July commemorated.

    The New York Times could borrow this idea and ask blacks on the street if they can say who Emmett Till was or what the Tuskegee Experiment was or what redlining was. I bet most would have no idea.

    Replies: @Jack D, @AceDeuce, @Gary in Gramercy, @nokangaroos

    Emmett Till? The Tuskegee Experiment? “Redlining”?

    Please, ask them who Ta-Nehisi Coates is. Half will say he’s a rapper. The other half will say he’s an “aspiring rapper.”

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Gary in Gramercy

    They might be right. After all, if Cornell West can bust a rhyme, why not Ta-Nehesi, whose name sounds more rap-like anyway?

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

  49. @Harry Baldwin
    @Jeff Blum 77

    Suggestion for Ron Unz: Since Tiny Duck has decided to constantly change his pseudonym to evade the "Commenters to Ignore" function, why not an option to ignore commenters with "no recent commenting history," like Jeff Blum 77?

    The price of Steve's success is that there are too many comments on every post for a person to read them all. Anything that could be done to let readers preemptively weed out the junk comments would be helpful.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    https://www.unz.com/announcement/bugs-suggestions/

    This subsequent threads will remain available indefinitely for users to report website bugs and suggestions.

  50. @DH
    Mr Sailer is being intellectualy dishonest on this one.
    Is he not aware of the link between some vaccines and autism? I have direct experience in friends and family
    Yes, Steve, I know about the most important graph in the world. But live not by lies is even more important.
    Covid is a real virus. But all signs point to a manufactured crisis for social control and depopulation. Something that Sailer would approve (with Gates, the UN et al). Be careful what you wish for, Steve.
    Read Mike Whitney on Unz. He is much trustable than Sailer on this.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Polite Derelict

    Yes, Steve, I know about the most important graph in the world.

  51. @Gary in Gramercy
    @Dave Pinsen

    Emmett Till? The Tuskegee Experiment? "Redlining"?

    Please, ask them who Ta-Nehisi Coates is. Half will say he's a rapper. The other half will say he's an "aspiring rapper."

    Replies: @black sea

    They might be right. After all, if Cornell West can bust a rhyme, why not Ta-Nehesi, whose name sounds more rap-like anyway?

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @black sea

    Cornel West was briefly a visiting professor in the religion department at my undergraduate college, back in the 1980's. Grandmaster Flash and Afrika Bambaataa had nothing to worry about. (Neither did the actual religion professors, come to think of it.)

    Replies: @Charon

  52. @black sea
    @Gary in Gramercy

    They might be right. After all, if Cornell West can bust a rhyme, why not Ta-Nehesi, whose name sounds more rap-like anyway?

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    Cornel West was briefly a visiting professor in the religion department at my undergraduate college, back in the 1980’s. Grandmaster Flash and Afrika Bambaataa had nothing to worry about. (Neither did the actual religion professors, come to think of it.)

    • Replies: @Charon
    @Gary in Gramercy

    At Cornell University, meanwhile, 40% of the students are white. Cornell announced that they will be the only ones required to be vaccinated. Progress!


    Cornell University is so scared of being seen as racist, it makes vaccines mandatory for WHITES ONLY. Spot the problem here https://www.rt.com/op-ed/509059-cornell-university-vaccine-white-only/
     
    What is RT even talking about. There's no problem here.

    Replies: @John Johnson

  53. In this case, Blacks are right.

    Whites tend to be more trusting and less suspicious than both Backs and Mexicans, but in the end, they are the ones who get more screwed.

    How is “trusting the government, Big Tech and Big Pharma” working out for White People lately?

    But take the vaccine. It’s safe. Mr. Soros and Mr. Schwab said so.

  54. Does relatively large correlation prove that flu vaccines reduce hospitalization? No, too many confounding variables.

    No data about what was the percentage of vaccinated among the hospitalized.

  55. anti-vaxx ideation is more common among people who aren’t really as smart as they think they are

    ….and there was a sharp intake of breath from many an Unz commenter… 😉

  56. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    The Messicans in my 'hood rarely diaper up - less so than any other ethny - and Messican business owners never harass me when I walk in normal and undiapered. Wypipo, especially white women, absolutely love their facediapers - 95% of hysterical, shrill diaper nazis here are women.

    I'm not surprised Messicans aren't excited about the fakevax. Maybe they, unlike the innumerates round here, recognize the fakevax is 300 times less effective than their bodies at fending off the sniffles.

    Replies: @TTSSYF, @anon

    Wypipo, especially white women, absolutely love their facediapers – 95% of hysterical, shrill diaper nazis here are women.

    Not true, in my experience. In fact, I’ve been surprised at the number of men who diaper-up with any sign of annoyance. Most men I know don’t even like to apply sunscreen. Most recently, I watched as a white man pitched a fit when the checkout clerk at WalMart asked him to briefly remove his face diaper so she could confirm his photo ID (he was buying alcohol). He shouted loudly, “I’m not removing my mask! It’s a petri dish in here!” (That’s in contrast, of course, to what WalMart would be without COVID around — no doubt as germ-free as an operating room. )

    It seems to me that it’s the Gen X’ers and Millennials who are fully on-board with the face diapers. And they’re the ones who tend to be on-board with socialism. After all — “We’re all in this together.”

    • Replies: @Barnard
    @TTSSYF

    I am curious how old the man buying alcohol at WalMart looked. Was he obviously under 50? The worker was stuck deciding which worthless corporate policy to enforce.

    Replies: @TTSSYF

    , @stillCARealist
    @TTSSYF

    Operating rooms may be sterile, but the rest of the hospital ain't. Anyway, you made me laugh out loud with the quip about Walmart. I'm there regularly and I never fail to be entertained by the absurd lengths to which humans will go to have the latest and greatest tattoo. Are those things spreading Covid?

    I've said this before, but 80% of the population throws out the masks as soon as they're no longer mandatory, and the other 20% only waits a couple weeks. We all love seeing each others' faces and we all know it.

    Replies: @TTSSYF

    , @John Johnson
    @TTSSYF

    I support wearing masks but most people clearly don't understand that they mostly protect sick people from spreading it. You are still breathing the same air as everyone else.

    I've seen White women wearing them while driving alone.

    The other funny one is people that wear them when jogging. White liberals use them to virtue signal and take selfies while outside. I know this because one such liberal relative sent me some.

    It really doesn't spread outside but even the gov of California doesn't seem to get this. The press at least is finally hammering him on his irrational positions. I guess now that Trump is out they can question their own.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @TTSSYF

  57. @Just another serf
    @J S Raggmann

    Fortunately, financially free. No longer living in the US. Free at last.

    Replies: @TTSSYF

    And to where did you relocate?

  58. @Dave Pinsen
    Howard Stern used to have a game where he’d have someone ask blacks on the street a question and then let his studio crew guess if the blacks knew the answer (Jay Leno borrowed this idea but didn’t limit it to black people). I recall a professional black woman in midtown Manhattan who didn’t know what “CIA” stood for.

    When Howard had his correspondent do this in Harlem, he had trouble finding blacks who knew what the 4th of July commemorated.

    The New York Times could borrow this idea and ask blacks on the street if they can say who Emmett Till was or what the Tuskegee Experiment was or what redlining was. I bet most would have no idea.

    Replies: @Jack D, @AceDeuce, @Gary in Gramercy, @nokangaroos

    For the umpteenth time the Tuskegee STUDY was not an “experiment”.
    (the same team did purposely infect soldiers and inmates in Guatemala to get a grip on the early stages)
    The reason they used aspiring rappers was that in the dark old days you wanted to study the syph, you went where the syph was; it was not yet de rigueur to pester Norwegian grandmothers (I shudder at the thought of how unenlightened they were).
    No treatments were “withheld” (with the possible exception of Salvarsan, of dubious value in second- and third stage and doubtless now causing screams of “testing chemical weapons on black bodies”; sorry, no peniscillin then – also of dubious value beyond first stage).
    Indeed the study participants had significantly higher life expectancy than the controls (no surprise with free health supervision for poor rural blacks).

    But the Narrative is so much smoother

  59. @Trinity
    (((Coronavirus))) is a hoax. Nuff said.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @guest007, @HA, @Hypnotoad666

    So is the claim that no one has really died from Covid-19, that public health departments should not exist, that healthcare workers should not take precautions to keep from getting infected, and that morality in the U.S. had not increased.

    Why are so many Americans working hard to intentionally misunderstand what is being said about Covid-19?

    • Replies: @Redman
    @guest007

    I completely agree that morality in the US has not increased as a result of Covid. Although I am open minded enough to listen to evidence to the contrary.

  60. @Anon
    Vaccines are associated with shots, and as anyone who's ever been or had kids knows, fear of shots is fairly universal.

    Enculturation and general knowledge (which correlates with IQ) make people more positively disposed towards vaccines as they mature.

    Replies: @guest007, @John Achterhof

    When working at a research university, I was amazed at the number of graduate students who did not want to get vaccinated for protection against the microbes that they would be using. I used to always tell anyone who was going into biomedical research that if one did not want to get your immunization, then one needed to find another line of work. The equivalent would be airline pilots who are afriad to fly or ship captains who are afraid of the water.

    Conservatives always use the term “Coddling” but then insist on being coddled all of the time.

  61. The real problem black people have is that these are TRUMP vaccines.

    Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said Monday on CNN’s “The Situation Room” that African-Americans will have more confidence in the safety of a coronavirus vaccine under the administration of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris.

  62. “ The longer the pandemic drags on due to the lack of courage of anti-vaxxers,”

    Strength is weakness, Steve. 🙄

    • LOL: Redman
    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Mike Tre

    Well, the vaccine is only 95% effective against the 'rona, whereas yout own immune system is 99.97% effective. So there's that.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  63. @Anon
    Vaccines are associated with shots, and as anyone who's ever been or had kids knows, fear of shots is fairly universal.

    Enculturation and general knowledge (which correlates with IQ) make people more positively disposed towards vaccines as they mature.

    Replies: @guest007, @John Achterhof

    Yeah, I’d guess fear of the needle – which is given a rationale in the novelty of the vaccine – is a more immediate cause of reluctance than 1932 Tuskegee. I’m familiar with that uneasiness.

    Vaccines, and vaccine-derived herd-immunity, have been a godsend in eliminating the threat to public health of deadly viruses, and the free-rider problem is an emerging concern, but with this particular virus the reluctance of half of the population to take it is perhaps not a great concern as would be with a more deadly virus. If, in many measuring their fear of the virus against fear of a shot of novel vaccine, a significant percent of the public at very low risk of requiring hospitalization after infection opt not to take the shot, herd immunity would nevertheless come about more deliberately in the vaccine/natural combination seemingly at little consequence to public health.

  64. @Anon7
    What if your child is in a class with a black kid whose parents refuse vaccination? Must all the kids wear a mask? By analogy to a peanut allergy; if one child in a class has an allergy, absolutely no peanut butter sandwiches, etc. are allowed.

    The same would apply to people on a bus, people on a plane, etc.

    Replies: @unadorned

    If the vaccination works what is there to worry about?

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @unadorned


    If the vaccination works what is there to worry about?
     
    As far as I can tell, vaccine efficacies top out at around 95%, and this includes the only two for which we have Phase III efficacy data, the mRNA ones from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. So because adaptive immune systems are foundationally wild things and of course some have defective ones, it won't work for 5% of those who take them. So there will be adults at risk from getting them from children, who we're only now contemplating vaccinating; Moderna has filed for a Phase III for "adolescents," haven't checked how they define them.

    This is where the true herd effect comes into play if you can achieve it. Probably no need need to discuss that concept when it's clear so many won't take any of these vaccines under any circumstances, but look at for example measles where the herd effect has been breaking down in the US.

    Replies: @candid_observer, @John Johnson

    , @Anon7
    @unadorned

    I see you're one of the rational people. You, I'm not worried about.

    Look around, and watch people act irrationally all over the place. I'll bet some people have just gotten used to masks, and will continue to wear them. Some women have made fashion masks a part of their personal statement, and will continue to wear them. Anti-vaxxers will combine with BLM and Antifa (who love wearing masks) and insist that public spaces respect their wish for everyone to wear masks. Teacher's unions will require masks for all students to protect teachers.

    Joe Biden will lead this movement from the basement, appearing by video on his occasional good days, reminding everyone that he, too, has lost loved ones. For the thousandth time.

  65. What if the vaccines are part of the reset? Maybe Covid 19 was the reset trigger?

  66. @Reg Cæsar

    My vague impression is that urban blacks (and some rural blacks in Georgia) got hit hard in last spring’s first wave...

     

    Does eating clay have any ameliorative effect?


    https://metro.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/sec_11136809.jpg?quality=90&strip=all


    We don't need Magic Dirt, we need Munchy Dirt!

    The unfortunate American fact is that Black people in this country have been well-trained, over centuries, to distrust both the government and the medical establishment on the issue of health care.

     

    Doesn't show up at the polls.

    Replies: @Kibernetika, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @SunBakedSuburb, @Clemsnman

    Bentonite is beneficial, it adsorbs toxins and carries them out of the body. Studies confirm and it is commonly added to animal feed for that purpose.

    The main reason it isn’t promoted for that by clay producers is potential liability.

    But you are also correct, to say blacks don’t trust government is absurd. They rely on it.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Clemsnman


    Bentonite is beneficial...

    The main reason it isn’t promoted for that by clay producers is potential liability.
     
    Some say that food-grade diatomaceous earth has nutritional or other health values. That would make a striking banner ad: "Finally: a pesticide you can feed your kids!"
  67. @unadorned
    @Anon7

    If the vaccination works what is there to worry about?

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Anon7

    If the vaccination works what is there to worry about?

    As far as I can tell, vaccine efficacies top out at around 95%, and this includes the only two for which we have Phase III efficacy data, the mRNA ones from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. So because adaptive immune systems are foundationally wild things and of course some have defective ones, it won’t work for 5% of those who take them. So there will be adults at risk from getting them from children, who we’re only now contemplating vaccinating; Moderna has filed for a Phase III for “adolescents,” haven’t checked how they define them.

    This is where the true herd effect comes into play if you can achieve it. Probably no need need to discuss that concept when it’s clear so many won’t take any of these vaccines under any circumstances, but look at for example measles where the herd effect has been breaking down in the US.

    • Replies: @candid_observer
    @That Would Be Telling

    I just generally don't get the concern about anti-vaxxers, at least over the longer run.

    The beauty of having a vaccine that is 95% effective, and especially as applied to a disease like Covid, is that taking the vaccine essentially removes any serious risk for severe consequences of the disease.

    For any person who takes the vaccine, the risk of serious effects of the disease is genuinely on a par with that of a flu. Obviously, this is not true without the vaccine.

    What that implies is a very simple rule: if you're afraid of contracting Covid, you have a very easy solution to your concern: take the vaccine. If, instead, you're more afraid of the vaccine (for whatever reason, however irrational) than you are of Covid, then don't take it. On your own head be the consequences. You may possibly turn out to be one of the thousands of cases of those who refuse the vaccine and die as a consequence -- which of course the media will offer up endlessly -- but, again, you have no one to blame but yourself.

    Another beautiful fact about Covid, unlike other diseases, is that virtually never strikes children, who can't make their own choice about taking the vaccine. Only adults will be making these choices, and only they will suffer the consequences.

    Point is, there's a moral clarity about the decision to take the vaccine. We should not have to worry about who is taking the vaccine. Libertarians should be pleased by this clarity.

    Now of course the media and Dems may well try to play up the exceedingly rare case of a young person in the pitch of health, who has taken the vaccine, but who dies from Covid. This will be the sort of case to make an absurd argument that we must lockdown until we rid ourselves entirely of Covid. But at that point the counterargument, that the downside of a lockdown is vastly greater than the downside of allowing Covid to run its course through the mostly vaccinated population, is an easy winner on any rational grounds. In the end, this is an argument we must have anyway: at some point those tradeoffs will have to be made.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    , @John Johnson
    @That Would Be Telling

    As far as I can tell, vaccine efficacies top out at around 95%, and this includes the only two for which we have Phase III efficacy data, the mRNA ones from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. So because adaptive immune systems are foundationally wild things and of course some have defective ones, it won’t work for 5% of those who take them.

    It is actually showing 100% protection against severe cases.

    So 5% can still get sick but won't end up in the hospital.

    This is where the true herd effect comes into play if you can achieve it. Probably no need need to discuss that concept when it’s clear so many won’t take any of these vaccines under any circumstances, but look at for example measles where the herd effect has been breaking down in the US.

    What the anti-vaxxers don't get is that infants can't get the measles vaccine.

    The same is true for immunocompromised children.

    But these are people that follow around a liberal not good enough for DC (JFK JR) and an MTV VJ.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Nico

  68. @That Would Be Telling
    @unadorned


    If the vaccination works what is there to worry about?
     
    As far as I can tell, vaccine efficacies top out at around 95%, and this includes the only two for which we have Phase III efficacy data, the mRNA ones from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. So because adaptive immune systems are foundationally wild things and of course some have defective ones, it won't work for 5% of those who take them. So there will be adults at risk from getting them from children, who we're only now contemplating vaccinating; Moderna has filed for a Phase III for "adolescents," haven't checked how they define them.

    This is where the true herd effect comes into play if you can achieve it. Probably no need need to discuss that concept when it's clear so many won't take any of these vaccines under any circumstances, but look at for example measles where the herd effect has been breaking down in the US.

    Replies: @candid_observer, @John Johnson

    I just generally don’t get the concern about anti-vaxxers, at least over the longer run.

    The beauty of having a vaccine that is 95% effective, and especially as applied to a disease like Covid, is that taking the vaccine essentially removes any serious risk for severe consequences of the disease.

    For any person who takes the vaccine, the risk of serious effects of the disease is genuinely on a par with that of a flu. Obviously, this is not true without the vaccine.

    What that implies is a very simple rule: if you’re afraid of contracting Covid, you have a very easy solution to your concern: take the vaccine. If, instead, you’re more afraid of the vaccine (for whatever reason, however irrational) than you are of Covid, then don’t take it. On your own head be the consequences. You may possibly turn out to be one of the thousands of cases of those who refuse the vaccine and die as a consequence — which of course the media will offer up endlessly — but, again, you have no one to blame but yourself.

    Another beautiful fact about Covid, unlike other diseases, is that virtually never strikes children, who can’t make their own choice about taking the vaccine. Only adults will be making these choices, and only they will suffer the consequences.

    Point is, there’s a moral clarity about the decision to take the vaccine. We should not have to worry about who is taking the vaccine. Libertarians should be pleased by this clarity.

    Now of course the media and Dems may well try to play up the exceedingly rare case of a young person in the pitch of health, who has taken the vaccine, but who dies from Covid. This will be the sort of case to make an absurd argument that we must lockdown until we rid ourselves entirely of Covid. But at that point the counterargument, that the downside of a lockdown is vastly greater than the downside of allowing Covid to run its course through the mostly vaccinated population, is an easy winner on any rational grounds. In the end, this is an argument we must have anyway: at some point those tradeoffs will have to be made.

    • Agree: John Achterhof
    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @candid_observer

    Point is, there’s a moral clarity about the decision to take the vaccine. We should not have to worry about who is taking the vaccine. Libertarians should be pleased by this clarity.

    It isn't that clear because if enough Blacks refuse to take the vaccine then we could be back to having a Bronx hospital overloaded with patients.

    There is also the problem of mutation.

    The only logical solution is to pay everyone to take it.

    Libertarians should be sent to Haiti where they can prove to us that the "minimal government" is all that matters. They deny basic biology regarding group genetics and US politics already has enough of that.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  69. @TTSSYF
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen


    Wypipo, especially white women, absolutely love their facediapers – 95% of hysterical, shrill diaper nazis here are women.
     
    Not true, in my experience. In fact, I've been surprised at the number of men who diaper-up with any sign of annoyance. Most men I know don't even like to apply sunscreen. Most recently, I watched as a white man pitched a fit when the checkout clerk at WalMart asked him to briefly remove his face diaper so she could confirm his photo ID (he was buying alcohol). He shouted loudly, "I'm not removing my mask! It's a petri dish in here!" (That's in contrast, of course, to what WalMart would be without COVID around -- no doubt as germ-free as an operating room. )

    It seems to me that it's the Gen X'ers and Millennials who are fully on-board with the face diapers. And they're the ones who tend to be on-board with socialism. After all -- "We're all in this together."

    Replies: @Barnard, @stillCARealist, @John Johnson

    I am curious how old the man buying alcohol at WalMart looked. Was he obviously under 50? The worker was stuck deciding which worthless corporate policy to enforce.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
    @Barnard

    No, he was older than 50. I should have told him to simply hold his breath while he pulled his mask down for all of five seconds.

  70. @Jack D
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    If I had a nickel for every person (or now, thing) that was wrongly accused of being Jewish on unz, I'd have a lot of nickels. Some people follow the syllogism X is bad, Jews are bad, therefore X must be Jewish.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Mike Tre

    If I had a nickel for every person (or now, thing) that was wrongly accused of being Jewish on unz, I’d have a lot of nickels.

    (Hand rubbing intensifies.)

    • LOL: Alan Mercer, Polistra
  71. @TTSSYF
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen


    Wypipo, especially white women, absolutely love their facediapers – 95% of hysterical, shrill diaper nazis here are women.
     
    Not true, in my experience. In fact, I've been surprised at the number of men who diaper-up with any sign of annoyance. Most men I know don't even like to apply sunscreen. Most recently, I watched as a white man pitched a fit when the checkout clerk at WalMart asked him to briefly remove his face diaper so she could confirm his photo ID (he was buying alcohol). He shouted loudly, "I'm not removing my mask! It's a petri dish in here!" (That's in contrast, of course, to what WalMart would be without COVID around -- no doubt as germ-free as an operating room. )

    It seems to me that it's the Gen X'ers and Millennials who are fully on-board with the face diapers. And they're the ones who tend to be on-board with socialism. After all -- "We're all in this together."

    Replies: @Barnard, @stillCARealist, @John Johnson

    Operating rooms may be sterile, but the rest of the hospital ain’t. Anyway, you made me laugh out loud with the quip about Walmart. I’m there regularly and I never fail to be entertained by the absurd lengths to which humans will go to have the latest and greatest tattoo. Are those things spreading Covid?

    I’ve said this before, but 80% of the population throws out the masks as soon as they’re no longer mandatory, and the other 20% only waits a couple weeks. We all love seeing each others’ faces and we all know it.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
    @stillCARealist

    Yes, that's why I mentioned operating rooms and not hospitals.

  72. Anonymous[135] • Disclaimer says:

    I expect there are a higher fraction of antivaxers among Blacks because the CDC whistleblower pointed up that the CDC had censored data in their study showing that black boys given MMR before three years of age were three times as likely to get ASD as one’s not. this is certainly what influenced Farakkan to become an antivaxer, and he was probably influential too.

  73. 4329483

    Answer:

    I hope y’all chose (A). 95% is about 36% higher than 70% expressed as a probability.

    99.98% is about 10,050% higher than 95% expressed as a probability.

    I.e., the odds of event X occurring are 36% better when the probability of event X increases from 70% to 95%. The odds of event Y are 10,050% better when probability of event Y increases from 95% to 99.98%.

    The latter, event Y, is a comparison of the fake vax odds (95%) versus my immune system odds (99.98%) of vanquishing the coronasniffles.

    Tldr: no one with a functioning brain will take the fakevax. So we’re talking about maybe 75 Americans, tops.

  74. @Thoughts
    @Anonymous

    Read any liberal girl's instagram stories...

    I gave birth in a mask because all you people just had to go to the Wine Bar on Friday Night! #StayTheFuckHome

    (That was a real comment)

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    “I gave birth in a mask because all you people just had to go to the Wine Bar on Friday Night! #StayTheFuckHome”

    I’ve heard variants of this from imbeciles and ninnies round here. ‘The reason everything is locked down and cases are rising is because a handful of witches won’t diaper up!!!!!! BURN THE WITCHES!!!!!’

    Now, if facediapers and lockdowns worked, shouldn’t cases go down proportional to diapering? Logics and maffs be hard and sheet.

  75. @DH
    Mr Sailer is being intellectualy dishonest on this one.
    Is he not aware of the link between some vaccines and autism? I have direct experience in friends and family
    Yes, Steve, I know about the most important graph in the world. But live not by lies is even more important.
    Covid is a real virus. But all signs point to a manufactured crisis for social control and depopulation. Something that Sailer would approve (with Gates, the UN et al). Be careful what you wish for, Steve.
    Read Mike Whitney on Unz. He is much trustable than Sailer on this.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Polite Derelict

    Agreed. It’s bizarre how a man who has red-pilled so many people on topics like race can remain so trusting of official narratives on C-19 and vaccines.

  76. @BenKenobi

    The longer the pandemic drags on due to the lack of courage of anti-vaxxers, the more time for elites to carry out the various bad ideas they are entertaining under the justification of The Great Reset.
     
    So the people who plan things like The Great Reset — who mean us harm at every turn — they’ve got our back THIS ONE TIME. This corona thing is so serious malevolent globalists will set aside their plans to help out the little people. We all gotta pull together! Kumbaya, and all that.

    If the powers that be establish 1984 it’s my fault for not wearing a mask. Got it, Steve. Hot take.

    Unbelievable.

    Replies: @Polite Derelict

    Well put.

  77. @Jeff Blum 77
    If there hadn't been historical slavery, oppression and exploitation of Black people, if they hadn't been used for experimental medical procedures without their knowledge or consent, if Black people weren't still continuously brutalized and discriminated against, I m sure they would be more than willing to trust the government.

    White atrocities against BIPOC are very much alive and well.. they're just contemporary, so White people who dominate societal norms haven't yet accepted that they're atrocious. Maybe in 150 years you'll say, oh yea.. I can see why Blacks didn't want to take the COVID-19 vaccine.

    And to think that many white-privileged Americans have reacted with self-righteous anger at the emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement. Our collective ignorance is breathtaking, and shameful.

    Charles Blow is right on the money here. Mocking him says more about his detractors than anything.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Reg Cæsar, @Harry Baldwin, @John Johnson, @AnotherDad

    White atrocities against BIPOC are very much alive and well.. they’re just contemporary, so White people who dominate societal norms haven’t yet accepted that they’re atrocious.

    White people are atrocious for wanting Blacks to get a vaccine?

    Africans still hunt albinos for their body parts. But here you are complaining about the White man and his medicine.
    https://www.latimes.com/world/africa/la-fg-malawi-albinos-hunted-2017-story.html

    Maybe in 150 years you’ll say, oh yea.. I can see why Blacks didn’t want to take the COVID-19 vaccine

    In 150 years the remaining White people will look back and wonder how everyone could be so stupid to fall for the lie that race doesn’t exist. Dopey liberals and Con Inc morons still think that it’s all just a grand coincidence that Africans are still looking for witches and chasing albinos.

    And to think that many white-privileged Americans have reacted with self-righteous anger at the emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement.

    Self-righteous anger? It’s a BS movement because they only protest when a Black (normally felon) is killed by a White police officer. Clearly they don’t care if Black lives matter if they are killed by Black criminals.

  78. “Occam’s Razor, on the other hand, would suggest that anti-vaxx ideation is more common among people who aren’t really as smart as they think they are.”

    I have a tested IQ > 150 and multiple degrees in relevant fields and will not take this vaccine under any circumstances, precisely because I grasp the risk/reward tradeoffs involved.

    If you want to take an experimental, first-of-its-kind mRNA vaccine and trust the “95%” claims of big pharma corporations, then go right ahead. No need to be smug about it.

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • LOL: Yngvar
  79. @Jack D
    @Dave Pinsen

    But I'll bet that most have some vague notion that the government experiments on black people even though Tuskegee means nothing to them.

    Replies: @Redman

    Are you saying you think the US government still conducts experiments on black people? I haven’t seen any evidence of that.

    If they don’t know about Tuskegee then where would they get the notion?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Redman

    No it doesn't but I'd wager that at least half of blacks THINK that it still does (the same half that won't take the vaccine). Folk notions get filtered down to the masses. They know that the government once did something bad involving medical experiments on black people but they could not give you any (correct) details.

    Blacks are still stuck in magical thinking. I just heard the new mayor of Baltimore complaining about how Baltimore blacks today are poor because of redlining 80 years ago. Never mind that since then they have taken over numerous formerly white neighborhood in Baltimore that were never redlined and have proceeded to turn those neighborhoods into crime ridden shitholes indistinguishable from the formerly redlined black neighborhoods.

  80. @Anon
    Anti-vaxxers are stupid and cowardly? I am not sure that will change many minds, Steve. There are many people in this country who temperamentally distrust the government and medical authorities. The new strictures designed to prevent the spread of the virus have in many instances been poorly implemented & poorly described; this has, surely, increased people's distrust [In my area, limited church attendance is allowed, however, kneeling during the service is forbidden. This is an example of a nonsensical stricture that has been enforced with no explanation of its utility.].

    Steve, I have read your comments on the excess death rate for the year 2020. You have referred on a few occasions to a week in April wherein NYC deaths were a significant percentage over the yearly average. At the same time, I remember you writing early on about the misguided over-use of ventilators in NYC at the same time. My question is, have you considered/heard of the possibility that the excess deaths in that time were in part due to wrong treatment of the virus? Is it possible that at least some of those people, and perhaps a significant number, would have survived had our knowledge of proper treatment been as good as it is now?

    Replies: @Redman, @Bill Jones, @Alden

    This is a very salient point. Iatrogenic deaths. One I’ve raised here before but Steve did not address.

    “A recent Johns Hopkins study claims more than 250,000 people in the U.S. die every year from medical errors.” (2018). That was 2 years ago.

    Back in April, there was a plethora of reporting from doctors and nurses in NYC about significant errors in treatment in the hospitals. Wouldn’t iatrogenic death rates likely increase in the face of a “novel virus,” when doctors were not even aware of what the effects of Coronovirus were much less how to treat them? Of course the MSM has largely ignored the ventilator fiasco for obvious reasons.

  81. How many people die from snake bites each year? How many die from automobile crashes? Would those be listed as “coronavirus deaths as well? teehee. Hell, there have been people who have died being beaned by a hard hit foul ball at a baseball game. How many people die each year falling in their bathtub?

    Hey, people are attacked by bears and mountain lions each year as well, but do you think I am going to stop hiking in the woods. No mountain lions where I live but maybe if I wear my mask it will protect me from a black bear. hehe. Should I wear a diaper on my hiking boots as well just in case a rattlesnake or copperhead wants to give me a bite? Oh, wait, I can’t get behind the wheel of my car because people die every day from automobile crashes.

    IF you are under 70 years of age and you are reasonably healthy, your chances of surviving from said, “coronavirus” is greater than 99.5%. Go ahead and be skeered of this horseshit. You run a greater risk of being attacked by a bear while hiking or you have a better shot at winning the Powerball Jackpot if you are healthy and below 70 than you have of dying from the coronarona. smdh and lol.

  82. I was at work Saturday night waiting for a patient to come up from the ED. Our entire floor is now nothing but Covid patients. 57-year-old non-English speaking Hispanic woman, tested pos for Covid in ER. Obese, ESRD, hemodialysis three days a week. Asthma. Diabetes etc. A familiar medical history. At any rate, after two hours waiting for this patient to arrive, I began to wonder what was up. So I took a quick look at the ER nurse’s notes (usually I just review the ER MD notes, labs, vital signs, radiology, orders, meds). Turns out the patient went home AMA (against medical advice). In the note the nurse documented that not only did the patent refuse to believe she really had Covid, but her family members refused to believe she had Covid, too. Of course, when they make the movie, this woman will be a white Trump supporter.

    • Thanks: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Malcolm X-Lax

    I was at work Saturday night waiting for a patient to come up from the ED. Our entire floor is now nothing but Covid patients. 57-year-old non-English speaking Hispanic woman, tested pos for Covid in ER. Obese, ESRD, hemodialysis three days a week.

    Are you seeing any patterns with the patients that the MSM and possibly local health departments are not reporting? Just wondering.

    Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax

  83. @That Would Be Telling
    @unadorned


    If the vaccination works what is there to worry about?
     
    As far as I can tell, vaccine efficacies top out at around 95%, and this includes the only two for which we have Phase III efficacy data, the mRNA ones from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. So because adaptive immune systems are foundationally wild things and of course some have defective ones, it won't work for 5% of those who take them. So there will be adults at risk from getting them from children, who we're only now contemplating vaccinating; Moderna has filed for a Phase III for "adolescents," haven't checked how they define them.

    This is where the true herd effect comes into play if you can achieve it. Probably no need need to discuss that concept when it's clear so many won't take any of these vaccines under any circumstances, but look at for example measles where the herd effect has been breaking down in the US.

    Replies: @candid_observer, @John Johnson

    As far as I can tell, vaccine efficacies top out at around 95%, and this includes the only two for which we have Phase III efficacy data, the mRNA ones from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. So because adaptive immune systems are foundationally wild things and of course some have defective ones, it won’t work for 5% of those who take them.

    It is actually showing 100% protection against severe cases.

    So 5% can still get sick but won’t end up in the hospital.

    This is where the true herd effect comes into play if you can achieve it. Probably no need need to discuss that concept when it’s clear so many won’t take any of these vaccines under any circumstances, but look at for example measles where the herd effect has been breaking down in the US.

    What the anti-vaxxers don’t get is that infants can’t get the measles vaccine.

    The same is true for immunocompromised children.

    But these are people that follow around a liberal not good enough for DC (JFK JR) and an MTV VJ.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @John Johnson


    As far as I can tell, vaccine efficacies top out at around 95%, and this includes the only two for which we have Phase III efficacy data, the mRNA ones from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. So because adaptive immune systems are foundationally wild things and of course some have defective ones, it won’t work for 5% of those who take them.

    It is actually showing 100% protection against severe cases.

    So 5% can still get sick but won’t end up in the hospital.
     
    That data for Moderna was maybe starting to get close to statistically significant at the last report of 30 severe cases, going from memory of the FDA originally saying 32 cases of COVID-19 for the entire population of Pfizer/BioNTech's larger trial would be where it would start to be interesting. But I'm willing to cross my fingers and expect the data will continue to follow this trend. Pfizer/BioNTech testing protocol for Phases I-III is here, page 11 starts the table of endpoints for their blended Phase 2/3 trial. Nothing about transmission of course, but contrary to previous reports here, they too are looking for severe cases, which they define starting on page 51 as:

    Confirmed severe COVID-19: confirmed COVID-19 and presence of at least 1 of the following:
    • Clinical signs at rest indicative of severe systemic illness (RR ≥30 breaths per minute, HR ≥125 beats per minute, SpO 2 ≤93% on room air at sea level, or PaO 2 /FiO 2 <300 mm Hg);
    • Respiratory failure (defined as needing high-flow oxygen, noninvasive ventilation, mechanical ventilation, or ECMO);
    • Evidence of shock (SBP <90 mm Hg, DBP <60 mm Hg, or requiring vasopressors);
    • Significant acute renal, hepatic, or neurologic dysfunction*;
    • Admission to an ICU;
    • Death.

    [...]

    * Three blinded case reviewers (medically qualified Pfizer staff members) will review all potential COVID-19 illness events. If a NAAT-confirmed case in Phase 2/3 may be considered severe, or not, solely on the basis of this criterion, the blinded data will be reviewed by the case reviewers to assess whether the criterion is met; the majority opinion will prevail.
     
    According to the FDA briefing document as dropped by ZeroHedge, page 30 bottom, Pfizer/BioNTech has seen 4 cases of severe disease, one from the vaccine arm (one each were borderline SpO2). If what's been said about their not taking effort to enroll the elderly etc. is correct, it could explain the difference in totals between the two company's trials, I'll look for that data in the briefing(s) in due course.

    This is where the true herd effect comes into play if you can achieve it. Probably no need need to discuss that concept when it’s clear so many won’t take any of these vaccines under any circumstances, but look at for example measles where the herd effect has been breaking down in the US.

    What the anti-vaxxers don’t get is that infants can’t get the measles vaccine.

    The same is true for immunocompromised children.
     
    A lot of them are selfish sociopaths, their alpha and omega is what's in it for them. BTW, in case anyone wonders, an infant, or neonate in medical speak is a child up to 4 weeks or 30 days old. Here's the CDC's recommended vaccine schedules for children and adolescents. First MMR dose is recommended for 12-15 months of age.

    On the other hand, the Merck Manual says "An infant whose mother has immunity to measles (eg, because of previous illness or vaccination) receives antibodies transplacentally; these antibodies are protective for most of the first 6 to 12 months of life," so ideally infants aren't totally unprotected in that period. But it still matters that they as well as the immunocompromised get protected by herd immunity.

    Now this is interesting, it's well cited but I haven't dug into it and probably won't, from Wikipedia:

    The measles virus can kill cells that make antibodies, and thus weakens the immune system which can cause deaths from other diseases.[38][39][40] Suppression of the immune system by measles lasts about two years and has been epidemiologically implicated in up to 90% of childhood deaths in third world countries, and historically may have caused rather more deaths in the United States, the UK and Denmark than were directly caused by measles.[86]
     
    , @Nico
    @John Johnson


    It is actually showing 100% protection against severe cases.
     
    I wonder whom they are testing in that case? Nearly 9 in 10 hospitalized COVID-19 patients lead a Fast Food Lifestyle.
  84. @guest007
    @Trinity

    So is the claim that no one has really died from Covid-19, that public health departments should not exist, that healthcare workers should not take precautions to keep from getting infected, and that morality in the U.S. had not increased.


    Why are so many Americans working hard to intentionally misunderstand what is being said about Covid-19?

    Replies: @Redman

    I completely agree that morality in the US has not increased as a result of Covid. Although I am open minded enough to listen to evidence to the contrary.

  85. @TTSSYF
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen


    Wypipo, especially white women, absolutely love their facediapers – 95% of hysterical, shrill diaper nazis here are women.
     
    Not true, in my experience. In fact, I've been surprised at the number of men who diaper-up with any sign of annoyance. Most men I know don't even like to apply sunscreen. Most recently, I watched as a white man pitched a fit when the checkout clerk at WalMart asked him to briefly remove his face diaper so she could confirm his photo ID (he was buying alcohol). He shouted loudly, "I'm not removing my mask! It's a petri dish in here!" (That's in contrast, of course, to what WalMart would be without COVID around -- no doubt as germ-free as an operating room. )

    It seems to me that it's the Gen X'ers and Millennials who are fully on-board with the face diapers. And they're the ones who tend to be on-board with socialism. After all -- "We're all in this together."

    Replies: @Barnard, @stillCARealist, @John Johnson

    I support wearing masks but most people clearly don’t understand that they mostly protect sick people from spreading it. You are still breathing the same air as everyone else.

    I’ve seen White women wearing them while driving alone.

    The other funny one is people that wear them when jogging. White liberals use them to virtue signal and take selfies while outside. I know this because one such liberal relative sent me some.

    It really doesn’t spread outside but even the gov of California doesn’t seem to get this. The press at least is finally hammering him on his irrational positions. I guess now that Trump is out they can question their own.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @John Johnson


    The other funny one is people that wear them when jogging. White liberals use them to virtue signal and take selfies while outside. I know this because one such liberal relative sent me some.
     
    Yes, when Trump refused to wear a mask this became a blue-team tribal marker. Next day, lefty-libs were all posting masked-up pictures of themselves on social media.
    , @TTSSYF
    @John Johnson

    I think some people forget they are wearing them or, with women, once the mask is on, they don't want to mess up their hair or makeup with repeatedly putting it on and taking it off -- it's become an accessory of sorts. A lot of them match or complement their attire.

    It surprises me that more men don't outwardly complain about wearing a mask. At the risk of generalizing, most men I've known (including siblings) don't like complication when it comes to grooming. I mean, there is a reason why they make "Just for Men."

  86. @candid_observer
    @That Would Be Telling

    I just generally don't get the concern about anti-vaxxers, at least over the longer run.

    The beauty of having a vaccine that is 95% effective, and especially as applied to a disease like Covid, is that taking the vaccine essentially removes any serious risk for severe consequences of the disease.

    For any person who takes the vaccine, the risk of serious effects of the disease is genuinely on a par with that of a flu. Obviously, this is not true without the vaccine.

    What that implies is a very simple rule: if you're afraid of contracting Covid, you have a very easy solution to your concern: take the vaccine. If, instead, you're more afraid of the vaccine (for whatever reason, however irrational) than you are of Covid, then don't take it. On your own head be the consequences. You may possibly turn out to be one of the thousands of cases of those who refuse the vaccine and die as a consequence -- which of course the media will offer up endlessly -- but, again, you have no one to blame but yourself.

    Another beautiful fact about Covid, unlike other diseases, is that virtually never strikes children, who can't make their own choice about taking the vaccine. Only adults will be making these choices, and only they will suffer the consequences.

    Point is, there's a moral clarity about the decision to take the vaccine. We should not have to worry about who is taking the vaccine. Libertarians should be pleased by this clarity.

    Now of course the media and Dems may well try to play up the exceedingly rare case of a young person in the pitch of health, who has taken the vaccine, but who dies from Covid. This will be the sort of case to make an absurd argument that we must lockdown until we rid ourselves entirely of Covid. But at that point the counterargument, that the downside of a lockdown is vastly greater than the downside of allowing Covid to run its course through the mostly vaccinated population, is an easy winner on any rational grounds. In the end, this is an argument we must have anyway: at some point those tradeoffs will have to be made.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    Point is, there’s a moral clarity about the decision to take the vaccine. We should not have to worry about who is taking the vaccine. Libertarians should be pleased by this clarity.

    It isn’t that clear because if enough Blacks refuse to take the vaccine then we could be back to having a Bronx hospital overloaded with patients.

    There is also the problem of mutation.

    The only logical solution is to pay everyone to take it.

    Libertarians should be sent to Haiti where they can prove to us that the “minimal government” is all that matters. They deny basic biology regarding group genetics and US politics already has enough of that.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @John Johnson


    There is also the problem of mutation.
     
    We're going to have that problem unless we try to eradicate the disease before it can, which is some years down the road. For example Janssen's very ambitious, long term high gain plan is to take their time in R&D and testing to create a single dose vaccine, and then vaccinate one billion people by the end of 2021.

    The only logical solution is to pay everyone to take it.

    Libertarians should be sent to Haiti where they can prove to us that the “minimal government” is all that matters. They deny basic biology regarding group genetics and US politics already has enough of that.
     
    Works for me, and I've been to Haiti with a French speaking relative many decades ago. Now, after Papa and Baby Doc are out of the picture, the earthquake, the UN importing cholera, the US Left using it as a looting opportunity (you have to be very, very low to loot Haitians)....

    Replies: @John Johnson

  87. @Barnard
    Isn't most of the content on this website, including nearly everything written by the owner, arguing that the government constantly lies to us and is untrustworthy? Blow's dumb boilerplate column aside, we should trust them on a vaccine that was rushed, but the results of which were withheld to influence the results of the Presidential election? I am personally leery of the vaccine because based on what I have read, it sounds 50-50 that the vaccine would cause me to get sicker than Covid-19 would. I plan on taking it when they tell me I have to, but I am not going to fault anyone who chooses not to take it.

    Replies: @MBlanc46, @Achmed E. Newman, @Adam Smith

    Thank you, Barnard! I ran out of “responses”, so let me add this too. Mr. Unz, a guy who has been delving into all sorts of American media lies, cover-ups, and revisionism through a century of our history, has fallen hard for the Lyin’ Press Infotainment that is going on RIGHT HERE, RIGHT NOW.

    Some people are really good at noticing the trees but not the forest.

    Regarding the anti-vaxxers, I guess I’m an agnostic – I could take it or leave it. Like many others I know, I just don’t want to be a part of the stupidity. I’ve been around the public straight through this whole PanicFest. I have only worn a mask in stores with my wife before she lightened up, and then only when strictly required for work.

    Then, I made the mistake of walking by a TV set recently. All I heard was 2 words – “blah, blah blah … horrible numbers … blah, blah” Sheee-it. Go screw yourselves, talking heads!

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "Go screw yourselves, talking heads!"

    Now, now, Achmed, their first four albums still hold up nicely, even after all these years. The first side (on the original LP) of Remain In Light -- "Born Under Punches (The Heat Goes On)"; "Cross-eyed and Painless"; "The Great Curve" -- still floors me, four full decades later.

    I read drummer Chris Frantz's recent memoir, Remain In Love, and it's a fine, unpretentious piece of work, remarkably detailed (apparently his wife, bassist Tina Weymouth, kept a day-by-day calendar of the band's activities that came in handy) and candid about his own overindulgence in the rock-and-roll lifestyle. Frantz is also unsparing about former lead singer David Byrne's eccentricities, coldness and reluctance to share credit, suggesting that for all the frontman's talent, it must have been difficult to be in a band with him.

    Frantz himself comes off as a decent guy, a WASP mensch from upper middle class surroundings, who, when keyboardist-guitarist Jerry Harrison is going through a bad patch (missing rehearsals or showing up hungover; Frantz notes that Harrison's mother was battling cancer at the time), and David Byrne wanted to dismiss Harrison from the band, has a better idea. Frantz calls his father, a lawyer and partner in a Pittsburgh law firm, and a retired Army general, to ask Dad's advice "about how they would handle a situation like this at his law firm." The result: Frantz has a heart-to-heart with Harrison, tells him he has to straighten up and fly right, and if that requires a leave of absence so he can get outside help, fine. "[Jerry said] he would get straightened out. He did. He began arriving at rehearsals on time and clearheaded and we all went back to work."

    For a dose of the band at its best -- live and in concert -- skip Stop Making Sense, the soundtrack to their Jonathan Demme-directed concert movie, which relied mostly on songs from 1983's Speaking in Tongues, a frankly pop-oriented album made after they had ditched producer Brian Eno (Byrne loved him, the other Heads not so much). Go for the expanded, 2xCD version of The Name of This Band is Talking Heads (Sire/Rhino, 2004). One of the few live albums that reminds you what all the fuss over some band was really about.

    And, of course, don't make the mistake of walking by a TV set anytime in the near future.

    Replies: @Charon, @Achmed E. Newman

  88. @Anon
    Anti-vaxxers are stupid and cowardly? I am not sure that will change many minds, Steve. There are many people in this country who temperamentally distrust the government and medical authorities. The new strictures designed to prevent the spread of the virus have in many instances been poorly implemented & poorly described; this has, surely, increased people's distrust [In my area, limited church attendance is allowed, however, kneeling during the service is forbidden. This is an example of a nonsensical stricture that has been enforced with no explanation of its utility.].

    Steve, I have read your comments on the excess death rate for the year 2020. You have referred on a few occasions to a week in April wherein NYC deaths were a significant percentage over the yearly average. At the same time, I remember you writing early on about the misguided over-use of ventilators in NYC at the same time. My question is, have you considered/heard of the possibility that the excess deaths in that time were in part due to wrong treatment of the virus? Is it possible that at least some of those people, and perhaps a significant number, would have survived had our knowledge of proper treatment been as good as it is now?

    Replies: @Redman, @Bill Jones, @Alden

    The other contributor in New York was Cuomo’s decision to unleash the infected into nursing homes.
    He’s personally responsible for more deaths in America than anybody since Lincoln.

  89. Anonymous[411] • Disclaimer says:
    @John Johnson
    @TTSSYF

    I support wearing masks but most people clearly don't understand that they mostly protect sick people from spreading it. You are still breathing the same air as everyone else.

    I've seen White women wearing them while driving alone.

    The other funny one is people that wear them when jogging. White liberals use them to virtue signal and take selfies while outside. I know this because one such liberal relative sent me some.

    It really doesn't spread outside but even the gov of California doesn't seem to get this. The press at least is finally hammering him on his irrational positions. I guess now that Trump is out they can question their own.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @TTSSYF

    The other funny one is people that wear them when jogging. White liberals use them to virtue signal and take selfies while outside. I know this because one such liberal relative sent me some.

    Yes, when Trump refused to wear a mask this became a blue-team tribal marker. Next day, lefty-libs were all posting masked-up pictures of themselves on social media.

  90. MB says: • Website

    The longer the pandemic drags on due to the lack of courage of anti-vaxxers, the more time for elites to carry out the various bad ideas they are entertaining under the justification of The Great Reset.

    Well, even Homer Sailer Simpson nods jumps the shark at times.
    Anti-vaxxers are definitely the reason the panic pandemic continues.
    Hmmm.

    One, the panic pandemic – not the virus, mind you – is the Great Reset. The actual implementation of the Great Ripoff will be just mopping up. I have never seen so much abject fear in people and fear mongering from the presstitutes and politicians.

    Two, there are vaccines and then there are vaccines.
    A rush job for something that is what?, no more proportionately than the ’58 asian and ’68 hong kong flu which was survived without all the mask hysteria and anti social distancing of the New Abnormal. Delivered by the military? I don’t think so.

    The whole unconstitutional ‘guilty until proven innocent/infected until proven healthy’ mindset has got to be euthanized. Put down like the mad dog stupidity that it is.

    But three, Occam’s razor. Long story short, why a vaccine when we already have ivermectin (as well as Vit, D, C & B1) according to these doctors as well as others?

    Not be Hegelian, but maybe there is a position half way between the vaxxers and the anti vaxxers.

    You know. Sort of like the despicables situated between Ronald Grump’s deplorables and those Riding With Biden in his wheelchair being pushed by ummm . . . Willy B’s consort.

    • Replies: @MB
    @MB

    Ooops. Better link to ivermectin protocol at Frontline Covid-19
    Critical Care Alliance's website.

  91. @Gary in Gramercy
    @black sea

    Cornel West was briefly a visiting professor in the religion department at my undergraduate college, back in the 1980's. Grandmaster Flash and Afrika Bambaataa had nothing to worry about. (Neither did the actual religion professors, come to think of it.)

    Replies: @Charon

    At Cornell University, meanwhile, 40% of the students are white. Cornell announced that they will be the only ones required to be vaccinated. Progress!

    Cornell University is so scared of being seen as racist, it makes vaccines mandatory for WHITES ONLY. Spot the problem here https://www.rt.com/op-ed/509059-cornell-university-vaccine-white-only/

    What is RT even talking about. There’s no problem here.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Charon

    So Blacks are offered to opt out of access to a vaccine because of unequal access to health care.

    Yea that makes a lot of sense.

    I'd say there is a good chance of the left eventually destroying itself by chasing out White liberals.

    The deluded fools running the circus don't know how many Whites behind the scenes are doing all sorts of boring technical jobs for the left.

    Most left-wing organizations have mulattos in front and Whites in the back.

    If we could find a new religion for these liberal Whites the left would collapse overnight.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

  92. @MB

    The longer the pandemic drags on due to the lack of courage of anti-vaxxers, the more time for elites to carry out the various bad ideas they are entertaining under the justification of The Great Reset.
     
    Well, even Homer Sailer Simpson nods jumps the shark at times.
    Anti-vaxxers are definitely the reason the panic pandemic continues.
    Hmmm.

    One, the panic pandemic - not the virus, mind you - is the Great Reset. The actual implementation of the Great Ripoff will be just mopping up. I have never seen so much abject fear in people and fear mongering from the presstitutes and politicians.

    Two, there are vaccines and then there are vaccines.
    A rush job for something that is what?, no more proportionately than the '58 asian and '68 hong kong flu which was survived without all the mask hysteria and anti social distancing of the New Abnormal. Delivered by the military? I don't think so.

    The whole unconstitutional 'guilty until proven innocent/infected until proven healthy' mindset has got to be euthanized. Put down like the mad dog stupidity that it is.

    But three, Occam's razor. Long story short, why a vaccine when we already have ivermectin (as well as Vit, D, C & B1) according to these doctors as well as others?

    Not be Hegelian, but maybe there is a position half way between the vaxxers and the anti vaxxers.

    You know. Sort of like the despicables situated between Ronald Grump's deplorables and those Riding With Biden in his wheelchair being pushed by ummm . . . Willy B's consort.

    Replies: @MB

    Ooops. Better link to ivermectin protocol at Frontline Covid-19
    Critical Care Alliance’s website.

  93. @Malcolm X-Lax
    I was at work Saturday night waiting for a patient to come up from the ED. Our entire floor is now nothing but Covid patients. 57-year-old non-English speaking Hispanic woman, tested pos for Covid in ER. Obese, ESRD, hemodialysis three days a week. Asthma. Diabetes etc. A familiar medical history. At any rate, after two hours waiting for this patient to arrive, I began to wonder what was up. So I took a quick look at the ER nurse's notes (usually I just review the ER MD notes, labs, vital signs, radiology, orders, meds). Turns out the patient went home AMA (against medical advice). In the note the nurse documented that not only did the patent refuse to believe she really had Covid, but her family members refused to believe she had Covid, too. Of course, when they make the movie, this woman will be a white Trump supporter.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    I was at work Saturday night waiting for a patient to come up from the ED. Our entire floor is now nothing but Covid patients. 57-year-old non-English speaking Hispanic woman, tested pos for Covid in ER. Obese, ESRD, hemodialysis three days a week.

    Are you seeing any patterns with the patients that the MSM and possibly local health departments are not reporting? Just wondering.

    • Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax
    @John Johnson

    The media loves reporting on young people who have gotten sick or died from the infection. My experience has been: Out of maybe 150-200 Covid patients I've had in the past 8 months, less than 5 were under 50. I remember one was in her 30's and she was very obese. Most are exactly what you'd expect: 70 - 90 years old with serious co-morbidities.

  94. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Trinity


    (((Coronavirus)))
     
    Does this indicate that you believe the virus to be Jewish? I certainly believe that the Usual Suspects (and I don't mean only Jews) have done everything in their power to leverage the pandemic for political purposes, and moreover that their cynicism in this process exhibits no bounds.

    But do some people believe that the virus itself doesn't exist? Or just that it's not remotely as lethal as we've been told? Because those are two wildly different things, and the first is foolish lunacy.

    PS: I know I shouldn't dive into this, but this 'Coronahoax' post is #1 as of this writing, and we should probably focus on Steve's points about the latest leveraging instead.

    Replies: @Jack D, @U. Ranus, @Bill Jones

    The CDC has admitted that they do not have an isolated Covid19 virus. It’s diagnosis is based on symptoms and the presence of antibody’s generated by a large number of known Corona Virus’s.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Bill Jones


    The CDC has admitted that they do not have an isolated Covid19 virus.
     
    This is a lie.

    It’s diagnosis is based on symptoms and the presence of antibody’s generated by a large number of known Corona Virus’s.
     
    For clinical purposes, this is also a lie, for the RT-PCR test is used because it detects bits of the virus, whereas you have to wait a week or more before the body starts producing antibodies. And by then an antibody test, which is less accurate, and as you say might show cross reactivity with other coronaviruses, is gratuitous for every purpose except public health and other sorts of research.

    Replies: @Charon

    , @Charon
    @Bill Jones

    An impressive number of language errors packed into just one sentence! Or is that deliberate spoofing on your part, and I'm missing the joke?

    Your first sentence is another matter.

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Bill Jones


    The CDC has admitted that they do not have an isolated Covid19 virus.
     
    I have heard that this is basically a semantic argument because you can never technically "isolate" a virus. This is because a virus is never quite independently alive to begin with. Rather, a virus exists as scraps of RNA code that can only parasitically replicate through the operation of other more complex cells.

    My understanding is that the "isolated" virus they use for vaccine development and whatnot is actually just a list of its amino acid sequences. Pretty much exactly the same way a computer virus can only be rendered in its binary or other computer code language sequence.

    You can't hold a static biological virus in a petri dish any more than you could hold computer code in a petri dish.

    This is all hearsay. But it sort of makes sense to me.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  95. @Charon
    @Gary in Gramercy

    At Cornell University, meanwhile, 40% of the students are white. Cornell announced that they will be the only ones required to be vaccinated. Progress!


    Cornell University is so scared of being seen as racist, it makes vaccines mandatory for WHITES ONLY. Spot the problem here https://www.rt.com/op-ed/509059-cornell-university-vaccine-white-only/
     
    What is RT even talking about. There's no problem here.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    So Blacks are offered to opt out of access to a vaccine because of unequal access to health care.

    Yea that makes a lot of sense.

    I’d say there is a good chance of the left eventually destroying itself by chasing out White liberals.

    The deluded fools running the circus don’t know how many Whites behind the scenes are doing all sorts of boring technical jobs for the left.

    Most left-wing organizations have mulattos in front and Whites in the back.

    If we could find a new religion for these liberal Whites the left would collapse overnight.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @John Johnson


    If we could find a new religion for these liberal Whites the left would collapse overnight.

     

    They don't need a new one; they need to repent and turn back to their old one. But you are exactly right: 2020 leftism/SJWism/Wokism is deeply, essentially religious.

    Replies: @John Johnson

  96. The ghost-riders of the Tuskegee STUDY ride again.

  97. @Jack D
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    If I had a nickel for every person (or now, thing) that was wrongly accused of being Jewish on unz, I'd have a lot of nickels. Some people follow the syllogism X is bad, Jews are bad, therefore X must be Jewish.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Mike Tre

    Your apparent lack of self awareness here is amusing.

  98. @John Johnson
    @That Would Be Telling

    As far as I can tell, vaccine efficacies top out at around 95%, and this includes the only two for which we have Phase III efficacy data, the mRNA ones from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. So because adaptive immune systems are foundationally wild things and of course some have defective ones, it won’t work for 5% of those who take them.

    It is actually showing 100% protection against severe cases.

    So 5% can still get sick but won't end up in the hospital.

    This is where the true herd effect comes into play if you can achieve it. Probably no need need to discuss that concept when it’s clear so many won’t take any of these vaccines under any circumstances, but look at for example measles where the herd effect has been breaking down in the US.

    What the anti-vaxxers don't get is that infants can't get the measles vaccine.

    The same is true for immunocompromised children.

    But these are people that follow around a liberal not good enough for DC (JFK JR) and an MTV VJ.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Nico

    As far as I can tell, vaccine efficacies top out at around 95%, and this includes the only two for which we have Phase III efficacy data, the mRNA ones from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. So because adaptive immune systems are foundationally wild things and of course some have defective ones, it won’t work for 5% of those who take them.

    It is actually showing 100% protection against severe cases.

    So 5% can still get sick but won’t end up in the hospital.

    That data for Moderna was maybe starting to get close to statistically significant at the last report of 30 severe cases, going from memory of the FDA originally saying 32 cases of COVID-19 for the entire population of Pfizer/BioNTech’s larger trial would be where it would start to be interesting. But I’m willing to cross my fingers and expect the data will continue to follow this trend. Pfizer/BioNTech testing protocol for Phases I-III is here, page 11 starts the table of endpoints for their blended Phase 2/3 trial. Nothing about transmission of course, but contrary to previous reports here, they too are looking for severe cases, which they define starting on page 51 as:

    Confirmed severe COVID-19: confirmed COVID-19 and presence of at least 1 of the following:
    • Clinical signs at rest indicative of severe systemic illness (RR ≥30 breaths per minute, HR ≥125 beats per minute, SpO 2 ≤93% on room air at sea level, or PaO 2 /FiO 2 <300 mm Hg);
    • Respiratory failure (defined as needing high-flow oxygen, noninvasive ventilation, mechanical ventilation, or ECMO);
    • Evidence of shock (SBP <90 mm Hg, DBP <60 mm Hg, or requiring vasopressors);
    • Significant acute renal, hepatic, or neurologic dysfunction*;
    • Admission to an ICU;
    • Death.

    […]

    * Three blinded case reviewers (medically qualified Pfizer staff members) will review all potential COVID-19 illness events. If a NAAT-confirmed case in Phase 2/3 may be considered severe, or not, solely on the basis of this criterion, the blinded data will be reviewed by the case reviewers to assess whether the criterion is met; the majority opinion will prevail.

    According to the FDA briefing document as dropped by ZeroHedge, page 30 bottom, Pfizer/BioNTech has seen 4 cases of severe disease, one from the vaccine arm (one each were borderline SpO2). If what’s been said about their not taking effort to enroll the elderly etc. is correct, it could explain the difference in totals between the two company’s trials, I’ll look for that data in the briefing(s) in due course.

    This is where the true herd effect comes into play if you can achieve it. Probably no need need to discuss that concept when it’s clear so many won’t take any of these vaccines under any circumstances, but look at for example measles where the herd effect has been breaking down in the US.

    What the anti-vaxxers don’t get is that infants can’t get the measles vaccine.

    The same is true for immunocompromised children.

    A lot of them are selfish sociopaths, their alpha and omega is what’s in it for them. BTW, in case anyone wonders, an infant, or neonate in medical speak is a child up to 4 weeks or 30 days old. Here’s the CDC’s recommended vaccine schedules for children and adolescents. First MMR dose is recommended for 12-15 months of age.

    On the other hand, the Merck Manual says “An infant whose mother has immunity to measles (eg, because of previous illness or vaccination) receives antibodies transplacentally; these antibodies are protective for most of the first 6 to 12 months of life,” so ideally infants aren’t totally unprotected in that period. But it still matters that they as well as the immunocompromised get protected by herd immunity.

    Now this is interesting, it’s well cited but I haven’t dug into it and probably won’t, from Wikipedia:

    The measles virus can kill cells that make antibodies, and thus weakens the immune system which can cause deaths from other diseases.[38][39][40] Suppression of the immune system by measles lasts about two years and has been epidemiologically implicated in up to 90% of childhood deaths in third world countries, and historically may have caused rather more deaths in the United States, the UK and Denmark than were directly caused by measles.[86]

    • Thanks: John Achterhof
  99. @Bill Jones
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    The CDC has admitted that they do not have an isolated Covid19 virus. It's diagnosis is based on symptoms and the presence of antibody's generated by a large number of known Corona Virus's.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Charon, @Hypnotoad666

    The CDC has admitted that they do not have an isolated Covid19 virus.

    This is a lie.

    It’s diagnosis is based on symptoms and the presence of antibody’s generated by a large number of known Corona Virus’s.

    For clinical purposes, this is also a lie, for the RT-PCR test is used because it detects bits of the virus, whereas you have to wait a week or more before the body starts producing antibodies. And by then an antibody test, which is less accurate, and as you say might show cross reactivity with other coronaviruses, is gratuitous for every purpose except public health and other sorts of research.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @That Would Be Telling

    Much incisive and intelligent commentary from you recently. However you would profit from using the word error more often and lie less often. Calling people liars is needlessly inflammatory and disrespectful besides; moreover it detracts from your arguments.

  100. @John Johnson
    @candid_observer

    Point is, there’s a moral clarity about the decision to take the vaccine. We should not have to worry about who is taking the vaccine. Libertarians should be pleased by this clarity.

    It isn't that clear because if enough Blacks refuse to take the vaccine then we could be back to having a Bronx hospital overloaded with patients.

    There is also the problem of mutation.

    The only logical solution is to pay everyone to take it.

    Libertarians should be sent to Haiti where they can prove to us that the "minimal government" is all that matters. They deny basic biology regarding group genetics and US politics already has enough of that.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    There is also the problem of mutation.

    We’re going to have that problem unless we try to eradicate the disease before it can, which is some years down the road. For example Janssen’s very ambitious, long term high gain plan is to take their time in R&D and testing to create a single dose vaccine, and then vaccinate one billion people by the end of 2021.

    The only logical solution is to pay everyone to take it.

    Libertarians should be sent to Haiti where they can prove to us that the “minimal government” is all that matters. They deny basic biology regarding group genetics and US politics already has enough of that.

    Works for me, and I’ve been to Haiti with a French speaking relative many decades ago. Now, after Papa and Baby Doc are out of the picture, the earthquake, the UN importing cholera, the US Left using it as a looting opportunity (you have to be very, very low to loot Haitians)….

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @That Would Be Telling

    We’re going to have that problem unless we try to eradicate the disease before it can, which is some years down the road.

    Well risk of mutation is proportionate to number of cases in the wild. Just another reason why I side with the 1k plan.

    Works for me, and I’ve been to Haiti with a French speaking relative many decades ago. Now, after Papa and Baby Doc are out of the picture, the earthquake, the UN importing cholera, the US Left using
    it as a looting opportunity (you have to be very, very low to loot Haitians)….

    Well technically it was the Red Cross and the Clintons via Roger that looted Haitian Aid.

    But I doubt you would last more than a month. You would be like the White liberal woman that went down there to help and got raped. Instead of re-assessing her beliefs she actually blamed the rape on White men and wrote an article about it.

    If the libertarian ideology was correct then numerous African countries would have surpassed "big government" Sweden decades ago. It's just a load of bulls--t led by a woman who claimed to be a rationalist and then said that we should lie about race if it in fact exists.

    Even more amusing it that she said it would be wrong for the US or Europe to not have open borders because that would be collectivist but Israel was granted an exemption and could exclude Arabs. Here she is on Israel and Arabs:
    The Arabs are one of the least developed cultures. They are typically nomads. Their culture is primitive, and they resent Israel because it’s the sole beachhead of modern science and civilization on their continent. When you have civilized men fighting savages, you support the civilized men, no matter who they are.

    That contradicts here entire "individualist" philosophy. Arabs are no longer individuals but instead savages and Israel can exclude them.

    So she didn't even live by her own words so I really have no idea as to why anyone follows this crazy cult lady. Open borders for the West but Israel gets an exemption. Funny that.

  101. @John Johnson
    @That Would Be Telling

    As far as I can tell, vaccine efficacies top out at around 95%, and this includes the only two for which we have Phase III efficacy data, the mRNA ones from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. So because adaptive immune systems are foundationally wild things and of course some have defective ones, it won’t work for 5% of those who take them.

    It is actually showing 100% protection against severe cases.

    So 5% can still get sick but won't end up in the hospital.

    This is where the true herd effect comes into play if you can achieve it. Probably no need need to discuss that concept when it’s clear so many won’t take any of these vaccines under any circumstances, but look at for example measles where the herd effect has been breaking down in the US.

    What the anti-vaxxers don't get is that infants can't get the measles vaccine.

    The same is true for immunocompromised children.

    But these are people that follow around a liberal not good enough for DC (JFK JR) and an MTV VJ.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Nico

    It is actually showing 100% protection against severe cases.

    I wonder whom they are testing in that case? Nearly 9 in 10 hospitalized COVID-19 patients lead a Fast Food Lifestyle.

  102. @Clemsnman
    @Reg Cæsar

    Bentonite is beneficial, it adsorbs toxins and carries them out of the body. Studies confirm and it is commonly added to animal feed for that purpose.

    The main reason it isn't promoted for that by clay producers is potential liability.

    But you are also correct, to say blacks don't trust government is absurd. They rely on it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Bentonite is beneficial…

    The main reason it isn’t promoted for that by clay producers is potential liability.

    Some say that food-grade diatomaceous earth has nutritional or other health values. That would make a striking banner ad: “Finally: a pesticide you can feed your kids!”

  103. @Jack D
    @Jeff Blum 77

    I'm glad that blacks don't trust the vaccine. I'm especially glad that Farakhan doesn't like it. More for me and mine. Let them wallow in their ignorance and superstition and fear of needles which are the real reasons. Blacks trust the guberment just fine to reload their EBT card every month.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  104. @unadorned
    @Anon7

    If the vaccination works what is there to worry about?

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Anon7

    I see you’re one of the rational people. You, I’m not worried about.

    Look around, and watch people act irrationally all over the place. I’ll bet some people have just gotten used to masks, and will continue to wear them. Some women have made fashion masks a part of their personal statement, and will continue to wear them. Anti-vaxxers will combine with BLM and Antifa (who love wearing masks) and insist that public spaces respect their wish for everyone to wear masks. Teacher’s unions will require masks for all students to protect teachers.

    Joe Biden will lead this movement from the basement, appearing by video on his occasional good days, reminding everyone that he, too, has lost loved ones. For the thousandth time.

  105. @Trinity
    (((Coronavirus))) is a hoax. Nuff said.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @guest007, @HA, @Hypnotoad666

    “(((Coronavirus)))”

    Please. Tell me, what do names like Richard Epstein, Michael Levitt or Alex Berenson or that Youtube-star Zelenko have in common? That’s right — all of them are part of the vanguard AGAINST the so-called hysteria over coronavirus. (Not the hysteria over the vaccine mind you — no, each and every rumour and crazy what-if? raised in objection to vaccines is just an example of folks being sensible, and it’s only those trying to limit COVID deaths who are acting hysterical).

    Then there’s that French HCQ doctor who isn’t a Jew but whose wife and kids are. For all I know, even “only 10,000 dead” Wittkowski might be Jewish or part Jewish himself, but don’t hold me to that.

    Regardless, and despite all that, the corona-truthers now want us to believe that Coronavirus is yet another Jewish plot. Yeah, right. Again, if this is how corona-trutherism is supposed to work, then it’s no wonder it never got much traction.

    [MORE]

    In fact, the Jews can breathe a collective sigh of relief that all these jokers failed so miserably when it came to predicting how thing would play out. (I mean, Epstein certainly had the ear of the White House back when he was predicting that only 500 — no wait, make that 5,000 — would die, but eventually, he tucked his tail between his legs and went away. Had he managed to prevail before being made into a laughingstock, the anti-Semites would be screaming for the blood of those sneaky back-stabbing Jews who forced their progressive pussyfooting sit-back-and-enjoy-it government agenda in order to snuff out poor hapless Westerners with COVID even as Israelis get to be led by a ruler who is willing to act in the interest of his people and send out policemen on horseback to enforce the lockdowns — i.e. the same line that they use in immigration, as in “the Jews keep pushing ‘liberty’ in the West while keeping their own safe behind walls.”

    (And yes, you read that right. In Israel, it is police mounted on horseback who are enforcing the lockdown. (In other words, Jews themselves are invoking heavy-handed Cossack and other Tsarist-bogeyman imagery in order to bring their own corona-truthers into submission — at least, that’s what the headlines would read if anyone tried that on an Orthodox enclave in NYC — though I’m guessing that isn’t going to be featured in Borat III).

    So if you wanted to know if there’s anyone dumber than a corona-truther, you know have the answer — it’s the antisemitic corona-truther, and sooner or later they were bound to show up. No matter how hard it is to make this peg fit into that hole, one way or another they’ll keep hammering.

    • LOL: Trinity
  106. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Barnard

    Thank you, Barnard! I ran out of "responses", so let me add this too. Mr. Unz, a guy who has been delving into all sorts of American media lies, cover-ups, and revisionism through a century of our history, has fallen hard for the Lyin' Press Infotainment that is going on RIGHT HERE, RIGHT NOW.

    Some people are really good at noticing the trees but not the forest.

    Regarding the anti-vaxxers, I guess I'm an agnostic - I could take it or leave it. Like many others I know, I just don't want to be a part of the stupidity. I've been around the public straight through this whole PanicFest. I have only worn a mask in stores with my wife before she lightened up, and then only when strictly required for work.

    Then, I made the mistake of walking by a TV set recently. All I heard was 2 words - "blah, blah blah ... horrible numbers ... blah, blah" Sheee-it. Go screw yourselves, talking heads!

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    “Go screw yourselves, talking heads!”

    Now, now, Achmed, their first four albums still hold up nicely, even after all these years. The first side (on the original LP) of Remain In Light — “Born Under Punches (The Heat Goes On)”; “Cross-eyed and Painless”; “The Great Curve” — still floors me, four full decades later.

    I read drummer Chris Frantz’s recent memoir, Remain In Love, and it’s a fine, unpretentious piece of work, remarkably detailed (apparently his wife, bassist Tina Weymouth, kept a day-by-day calendar of the band’s activities that came in handy) and candid about his own overindulgence in the rock-and-roll lifestyle. Frantz is also unsparing about former lead singer David Byrne’s eccentricities, coldness and reluctance to share credit, suggesting that for all the frontman’s talent, it must have been difficult to be in a band with him.

    Frantz himself comes off as a decent guy, a WASP mensch from upper middle class surroundings, who, when keyboardist-guitarist Jerry Harrison is going through a bad patch (missing rehearsals or showing up hungover; Frantz notes that Harrison’s mother was battling cancer at the time), and David Byrne wanted to dismiss Harrison from the band, has a better idea. Frantz calls his father, a lawyer and partner in a Pittsburgh law firm, and a retired Army general, to ask Dad’s advice “about how they would handle a situation like this at his law firm.” The result: Frantz has a heart-to-heart with Harrison, tells him he has to straighten up and fly right, and if that requires a leave of absence so he can get outside help, fine. “[Jerry said] he would get straightened out. He did. He began arriving at rehearsals on time and clearheaded and we all went back to work.”

    For a dose of the band at its best — live and in concert — skip Stop Making Sense, the soundtrack to their Jonathan Demme-directed concert movie, which relied mostly on songs from 1983’s Speaking in Tongues, a frankly pop-oriented album made after they had ditched producer Brian Eno (Byrne loved him, the other Heads not so much). Go for the expanded, 2xCD version of The Name of This Band is Talking Heads (Sire/Rhino, 2004). One of the few live albums that reminds you what all the fuss over some band was really about.

    And, of course, don’t make the mistake of walking by a TV set anytime in the near future.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @Gary in Gramercy

    Entertaining, long-winded polemic / music review. But it leaves one wondering if you know from where the band took its name. Mr Newman certainly wasn't talking about the band.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Gary in Gramercy

    I am so, so, so sorry that this was taken wrong by a Talking Heads fan!

    ;-}

    I will have to disagree with you on Stop Making Sense, but that's because you are obviously a bigger fan than me. I really liked the movie, meaning the soundtrack, as it was nothing by a live concert movie.

    I will Head to youtube soon and try to listen to some of that album. BTW, Gary, I've been meaning to write a version of Life During Wartime that applies to the conditions today. It's kind of a prepper song, come to think of it.

  107. @That Would Be Telling
    @John Johnson


    There is also the problem of mutation.
     
    We're going to have that problem unless we try to eradicate the disease before it can, which is some years down the road. For example Janssen's very ambitious, long term high gain plan is to take their time in R&D and testing to create a single dose vaccine, and then vaccinate one billion people by the end of 2021.

    The only logical solution is to pay everyone to take it.

    Libertarians should be sent to Haiti where they can prove to us that the “minimal government” is all that matters. They deny basic biology regarding group genetics and US politics already has enough of that.
     
    Works for me, and I've been to Haiti with a French speaking relative many decades ago. Now, after Papa and Baby Doc are out of the picture, the earthquake, the UN importing cholera, the US Left using it as a looting opportunity (you have to be very, very low to loot Haitians)....

    Replies: @John Johnson

    We’re going to have that problem unless we try to eradicate the disease before it can, which is some years down the road.

    Well risk of mutation is proportionate to number of cases in the wild. Just another reason why I side with the 1k plan.

    Works for me, and I’ve been to Haiti with a French speaking relative many decades ago. Now, after Papa and Baby Doc are out of the picture, the earthquake, the UN importing cholera, the US Left using
    it as a looting opportunity (you have to be very, very low to loot Haitians)….

    Well technically it was the Red Cross and the Clintons via Roger that looted Haitian Aid.

    But I doubt you would last more than a month. You would be like the White liberal woman that went down there to help and got raped. Instead of re-assessing her beliefs she actually blamed the rape on White men and wrote an article about it.

    If the libertarian ideology was correct then numerous African countries would have surpassed “big government” Sweden decades ago. It’s just a load of bulls–t led by a woman who claimed to be a rationalist and then said that we should lie about race if it in fact exists.

    Even more amusing it that she said it would be wrong for the US or Europe to not have open borders because that would be collectivist but Israel was granted an exemption and could exclude Arabs. Here she is on Israel and Arabs:
    The Arabs are one of the least developed cultures. They are typically nomads. Their culture is primitive, and they resent Israel because it’s the sole beachhead of modern science and civilization on their continent. When you have civilized men fighting savages, you support the civilized men, no matter who they are.

    That contradicts here entire “individualist” philosophy. Arabs are no longer individuals but instead savages and Israel can exclude them.

    So she didn’t even live by her own words so I really have no idea as to why anyone follows this crazy cult lady. Open borders for the West but Israel gets an exemption. Funny that.

  108. @That Would Be Telling
    @Bill Jones


    The CDC has admitted that they do not have an isolated Covid19 virus.
     
    This is a lie.

    It’s diagnosis is based on symptoms and the presence of antibody’s generated by a large number of known Corona Virus’s.
     
    For clinical purposes, this is also a lie, for the RT-PCR test is used because it detects bits of the virus, whereas you have to wait a week or more before the body starts producing antibodies. And by then an antibody test, which is less accurate, and as you say might show cross reactivity with other coronaviruses, is gratuitous for every purpose except public health and other sorts of research.

    Replies: @Charon

    Much incisive and intelligent commentary from you recently. However you would profit from using the word error more often and lie less often. Calling people liars is needlessly inflammatory and disrespectful besides; moreover it detracts from your arguments.

  109. @Gary in Gramercy
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "Go screw yourselves, talking heads!"

    Now, now, Achmed, their first four albums still hold up nicely, even after all these years. The first side (on the original LP) of Remain In Light -- "Born Under Punches (The Heat Goes On)"; "Cross-eyed and Painless"; "The Great Curve" -- still floors me, four full decades later.

    I read drummer Chris Frantz's recent memoir, Remain In Love, and it's a fine, unpretentious piece of work, remarkably detailed (apparently his wife, bassist Tina Weymouth, kept a day-by-day calendar of the band's activities that came in handy) and candid about his own overindulgence in the rock-and-roll lifestyle. Frantz is also unsparing about former lead singer David Byrne's eccentricities, coldness and reluctance to share credit, suggesting that for all the frontman's talent, it must have been difficult to be in a band with him.

    Frantz himself comes off as a decent guy, a WASP mensch from upper middle class surroundings, who, when keyboardist-guitarist Jerry Harrison is going through a bad patch (missing rehearsals or showing up hungover; Frantz notes that Harrison's mother was battling cancer at the time), and David Byrne wanted to dismiss Harrison from the band, has a better idea. Frantz calls his father, a lawyer and partner in a Pittsburgh law firm, and a retired Army general, to ask Dad's advice "about how they would handle a situation like this at his law firm." The result: Frantz has a heart-to-heart with Harrison, tells him he has to straighten up and fly right, and if that requires a leave of absence so he can get outside help, fine. "[Jerry said] he would get straightened out. He did. He began arriving at rehearsals on time and clearheaded and we all went back to work."

    For a dose of the band at its best -- live and in concert -- skip Stop Making Sense, the soundtrack to their Jonathan Demme-directed concert movie, which relied mostly on songs from 1983's Speaking in Tongues, a frankly pop-oriented album made after they had ditched producer Brian Eno (Byrne loved him, the other Heads not so much). Go for the expanded, 2xCD version of The Name of This Band is Talking Heads (Sire/Rhino, 2004). One of the few live albums that reminds you what all the fuss over some band was really about.

    And, of course, don't make the mistake of walking by a TV set anytime in the near future.

    Replies: @Charon, @Achmed E. Newman

    Entertaining, long-winded polemic / music review. But it leaves one wondering if you know from where the band took its name. Mr Newman certainly wasn’t talking about the band.

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Charon

    See Frantz, ibid., pp. 88-89.

  110. @Bill Jones
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    The CDC has admitted that they do not have an isolated Covid19 virus. It's diagnosis is based on symptoms and the presence of antibody's generated by a large number of known Corona Virus's.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Charon, @Hypnotoad666

    An impressive number of language errors packed into just one sentence! Or is that deliberate spoofing on your part, and I’m missing the joke?

    Your first sentence is another matter.

  111. @Gary in Gramercy
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "Go screw yourselves, talking heads!"

    Now, now, Achmed, their first four albums still hold up nicely, even after all these years. The first side (on the original LP) of Remain In Light -- "Born Under Punches (The Heat Goes On)"; "Cross-eyed and Painless"; "The Great Curve" -- still floors me, four full decades later.

    I read drummer Chris Frantz's recent memoir, Remain In Love, and it's a fine, unpretentious piece of work, remarkably detailed (apparently his wife, bassist Tina Weymouth, kept a day-by-day calendar of the band's activities that came in handy) and candid about his own overindulgence in the rock-and-roll lifestyle. Frantz is also unsparing about former lead singer David Byrne's eccentricities, coldness and reluctance to share credit, suggesting that for all the frontman's talent, it must have been difficult to be in a band with him.

    Frantz himself comes off as a decent guy, a WASP mensch from upper middle class surroundings, who, when keyboardist-guitarist Jerry Harrison is going through a bad patch (missing rehearsals or showing up hungover; Frantz notes that Harrison's mother was battling cancer at the time), and David Byrne wanted to dismiss Harrison from the band, has a better idea. Frantz calls his father, a lawyer and partner in a Pittsburgh law firm, and a retired Army general, to ask Dad's advice "about how they would handle a situation like this at his law firm." The result: Frantz has a heart-to-heart with Harrison, tells him he has to straighten up and fly right, and if that requires a leave of absence so he can get outside help, fine. "[Jerry said] he would get straightened out. He did. He began arriving at rehearsals on time and clearheaded and we all went back to work."

    For a dose of the band at its best -- live and in concert -- skip Stop Making Sense, the soundtrack to their Jonathan Demme-directed concert movie, which relied mostly on songs from 1983's Speaking in Tongues, a frankly pop-oriented album made after they had ditched producer Brian Eno (Byrne loved him, the other Heads not so much). Go for the expanded, 2xCD version of The Name of This Band is Talking Heads (Sire/Rhino, 2004). One of the few live albums that reminds you what all the fuss over some band was really about.

    And, of course, don't make the mistake of walking by a TV set anytime in the near future.

    Replies: @Charon, @Achmed E. Newman

    I am so, so, so sorry that this was taken wrong by a Talking Heads fan!

    ;-}

    I will have to disagree with you on Stop Making Sense, but that’s because you are obviously a bigger fan than me. I really liked the movie, meaning the soundtrack, as it was nothing by a live concert movie.

    I will Head to youtube soon and try to listen to some of that album. BTW, Gary, I’ve been meaning to write a version of Life During Wartime that applies to the conditions today. It’s kind of a prepper song, come to think of it.

  112. @Redman
    @Jack D

    Are you saying you think the US government still conducts experiments on black people? I haven't seen any evidence of that.

    If they don't know about Tuskegee then where would they get the notion?

    Replies: @Jack D

    No it doesn’t but I’d wager that at least half of blacks THINK that it still does (the same half that won’t take the vaccine). Folk notions get filtered down to the masses. They know that the government once did something bad involving medical experiments on black people but they could not give you any (correct) details.

    Blacks are still stuck in magical thinking. I just heard the new mayor of Baltimore complaining about how Baltimore blacks today are poor because of redlining 80 years ago. Never mind that since then they have taken over numerous formerly white neighborhood in Baltimore that were never redlined and have proceeded to turn those neighborhoods into crime ridden shitholes indistinguishable from the formerly redlined black neighborhoods.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
  113. @Jeff Blum 77
    If there hadn't been historical slavery, oppression and exploitation of Black people, if they hadn't been used for experimental medical procedures without their knowledge or consent, if Black people weren't still continuously brutalized and discriminated against, I m sure they would be more than willing to trust the government.

    White atrocities against BIPOC are very much alive and well.. they're just contemporary, so White people who dominate societal norms haven't yet accepted that they're atrocious. Maybe in 150 years you'll say, oh yea.. I can see why Blacks didn't want to take the COVID-19 vaccine.

    And to think that many white-privileged Americans have reacted with self-righteous anger at the emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement. Our collective ignorance is breathtaking, and shameful.

    Charles Blow is right on the money here. Mocking him says more about his detractors than anything.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Reg Cæsar, @Harry Baldwin, @John Johnson, @AnotherDad

    Duck, i’ve got no problem with you doing one annoying Jewish minoritarian parody, if that melts your butter. (Personally, i get enough from reading any establishment paper.)

    Your Jeff Blum 77 here is believable in content and attitude. But why the continual churn? Just create one and do it well.

  114. @Bill Jones
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    The CDC has admitted that they do not have an isolated Covid19 virus. It's diagnosis is based on symptoms and the presence of antibody's generated by a large number of known Corona Virus's.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Charon, @Hypnotoad666

    The CDC has admitted that they do not have an isolated Covid19 virus.

    I have heard that this is basically a semantic argument because you can never technically “isolate” a virus. This is because a virus is never quite independently alive to begin with. Rather, a virus exists as scraps of RNA code that can only parasitically replicate through the operation of other more complex cells.

    My understanding is that the “isolated” virus they use for vaccine development and whatnot is actually just a list of its amino acid sequences. Pretty much exactly the same way a computer virus can only be rendered in its binary or other computer code language sequence.

    You can’t hold a static biological virus in a petri dish any more than you could hold computer code in a petri dish.

    This is all hearsay. But it sort of makes sense to me.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Hypnotoad666


    I have heard that this is basically a semantic argument because you can never technically “isolate” a virus. This is because a virus is never quite independently alive to begin with. Rather, a virus exists as scraps of RNA code that can only parasitically replicate through the operation of other more complex cells.
     
    Indeed, with the nits that I believe it's not called a cell, and DNA can also be used, the adenovirus vector vaccine use that instead of RNA. And are probably more robust as a result. The viral nucleotide sequence, a sequence of DNA or RNA that's a code for making proteins, is generally (or always??) protected by some structural proteins that make up the "nucleocapsid," and in enveloped viruses like the coronaviruses and say the flu, also has a bit of cell membrane that's stolen as a virus buds off a cell (which I'm almost certain makes them much less robust).

    My understanding is that the “isolated” virus they use for vaccine development and whatnot is actually just a list of its amino acid sequences. Pretty much exactly the same way a computer virus can only be rendered in its binary or other computer code language sequence.
     
    Close. The fundamental paradigm of molecular genetics is DNA gets copied to mRNA which is then decoded into a string of amino acids, AKA one or more proteins. So, say, source code to object code to machine code, which must have a CPU to run on. At each stage, you have a complete code for the virus, although plenty skip the DNA step, and retroviruses like HIV first use reverse transcriptase to go from RNA to DNA.

    You can’t hold a static biological virus in a petri dish any more than you could hold computer code in a petri dish.

    This is all hearsay. But it sort of makes sense to me.
     
    Indeed with the computer code analogy, and it does make sense, especially the more you learn about it.
  115. @Trinity
    (((Coronavirus))) is a hoax. Nuff said.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @guest007, @HA, @Hypnotoad666

    I heard coronavirus only kills first borne children.

    I also heard a rumor that all the Jews were told ahead of time not to show up to work when the ‘rona struck.

    The dots are starting to connect.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
  116. @Mike Tre
    “ The longer the pandemic drags on due to the lack of courage of anti-vaxxers,”

    Strength is weakness, Steve. 🙄

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    Well, the vaccine is only 95% effective against the ‘rona, whereas yout own immune system is 99.97% effective. So there’s that.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Hypnotoad666


    Well, the vaccine is only 95% effective against the ‘rona, whereas yout own immune system is 99.97% effective.
     
    Except, you know, when you die from it. More specifically, I've read some researchers and/or doctors believe some people fight it off with only their innate immune systems. I wonder if the vaccine failures are from either an adaptive immune system failure, or one that works with many more viruses and virus producing cells AKA unacceptable side effects for a vaccine, or that fails with the spike protein, but manages with the nucleocapsid protein that's been noticed to also be in general COVID-19 wild type immune system responses, and/or perhaps another protein. Given what I know about how the the adaptive immune system response works (not much, so complicated I decided in the mid-1970s to only learn about it as needed), the latter is a distinct possibility.
  117. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    The Messicans in my 'hood rarely diaper up - less so than any other ethny - and Messican business owners never harass me when I walk in normal and undiapered. Wypipo, especially white women, absolutely love their facediapers - 95% of hysterical, shrill diaper nazis here are women.

    I'm not surprised Messicans aren't excited about the fakevax. Maybe they, unlike the innumerates round here, recognize the fakevax is 300 times less effective than their bodies at fending off the sniffles.

    Replies: @TTSSYF, @anon

    Wypipo, especially white women, absolutely love their facediapers – 95% of hysterical, shrill diaper nazis here are women.

    Well, you are in Portlandia. Maybe you should move to Houston, Texas to reduce your stress?

    https://www.fox26houston.com/sports/pediatricians-recommend-mask-wearing-for-children-while-playing-sports-to-prevent-covid-19

  118. @Charon
    @Gary in Gramercy

    Entertaining, long-winded polemic / music review. But it leaves one wondering if you know from where the band took its name. Mr Newman certainly wasn't talking about the band.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    See Frantz, ibid., pp. 88-89.

  119. @John Johnson
    @Charon

    So Blacks are offered to opt out of access to a vaccine because of unequal access to health care.

    Yea that makes a lot of sense.

    I'd say there is a good chance of the left eventually destroying itself by chasing out White liberals.

    The deluded fools running the circus don't know how many Whites behind the scenes are doing all sorts of boring technical jobs for the left.

    Most left-wing organizations have mulattos in front and Whites in the back.

    If we could find a new religion for these liberal Whites the left would collapse overnight.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    If we could find a new religion for these liberal Whites the left would collapse overnight.

    They don’t need a new one; they need to repent and turn back to their old one. But you are exactly right: 2020 leftism/SJWism/Wokism is deeply, essentially religious.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    They don’t need a new one; they need to repent and turn back to their old one. But you are exactly right: 2020 leftism/SJWism/Wokism is deeply, essentially religious.

    Do you really think that a liberal feminist steeped in Darwinism* is going to go Calvinist?

    I don't have a problem with Christianity but liberalism is not going to be defeated through passive means like asking people to go back to church. A Christian solution would only work through a Franco type government which has its own problems and not to mention completely unfeasible in the current environment.

    Christianity also has flaws that are exploited by liberalism. In fact I could imagine a scenario where liberalism completely infiltrates Christianity in an effort to stave off a populist right.

    The great weakness of the left is race and the Christian right isn't willing to poke a stick in that sore. If Christian conservatism was the answer then the left would have been defeated decades ago.

    * a censored version with racial genetics excluded

  120. @Anon
    Anti-vaxxers are stupid and cowardly? I am not sure that will change many minds, Steve. There are many people in this country who temperamentally distrust the government and medical authorities. The new strictures designed to prevent the spread of the virus have in many instances been poorly implemented & poorly described; this has, surely, increased people's distrust [In my area, limited church attendance is allowed, however, kneeling during the service is forbidden. This is an example of a nonsensical stricture that has been enforced with no explanation of its utility.].

    Steve, I have read your comments on the excess death rate for the year 2020. You have referred on a few occasions to a week in April wherein NYC deaths were a significant percentage over the yearly average. At the same time, I remember you writing early on about the misguided over-use of ventilators in NYC at the same time. My question is, have you considered/heard of the possibility that the excess deaths in that time were in part due to wrong treatment of the virus? Is it possible that at least some of those people, and perhaps a significant number, would have survived had our knowledge of proper treatment been as good as it is now?

    Replies: @Redman, @Bill Jones, @Alden

    OMG. Is there any explanation for forbidding kneeling? I can understand not singing, not sitting close, no communion wafers .

    Please tell us why kneeling is forbidden.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Alden

    There has been no explanation given; the [redacted] city Board of Health simply designated standing & kneeling during religious services as "unnecessary movement". I've since discovered that kneeling during a religious service has been banned throughout the county.

  121. @stillCARealist
    @TTSSYF

    Operating rooms may be sterile, but the rest of the hospital ain't. Anyway, you made me laugh out loud with the quip about Walmart. I'm there regularly and I never fail to be entertained by the absurd lengths to which humans will go to have the latest and greatest tattoo. Are those things spreading Covid?

    I've said this before, but 80% of the population throws out the masks as soon as they're no longer mandatory, and the other 20% only waits a couple weeks. We all love seeing each others' faces and we all know it.

    Replies: @TTSSYF

    Yes, that’s why I mentioned operating rooms and not hospitals.

  122. @Barnard
    @TTSSYF

    I am curious how old the man buying alcohol at WalMart looked. Was he obviously under 50? The worker was stuck deciding which worthless corporate policy to enforce.

    Replies: @TTSSYF

    No, he was older than 50. I should have told him to simply hold his breath while he pulled his mask down for all of five seconds.

  123. @John Johnson
    @TTSSYF

    I support wearing masks but most people clearly don't understand that they mostly protect sick people from spreading it. You are still breathing the same air as everyone else.

    I've seen White women wearing them while driving alone.

    The other funny one is people that wear them when jogging. White liberals use them to virtue signal and take selfies while outside. I know this because one such liberal relative sent me some.

    It really doesn't spread outside but even the gov of California doesn't seem to get this. The press at least is finally hammering him on his irrational positions. I guess now that Trump is out they can question their own.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @TTSSYF

    I think some people forget they are wearing them or, with women, once the mask is on, they don’t want to mess up their hair or makeup with repeatedly putting it on and taking it off — it’s become an accessory of sorts. A lot of them match or complement their attire.

    It surprises me that more men don’t outwardly complain about wearing a mask. At the risk of generalizing, most men I’ve known (including siblings) don’t like complication when it comes to grooming. I mean, there is a reason why they make “Just for Men.”

  124. @Hypnotoad666
    @Mike Tre

    Well, the vaccine is only 95% effective against the 'rona, whereas yout own immune system is 99.97% effective. So there's that.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    Well, the vaccine is only 95% effective against the ‘rona, whereas yout own immune system is 99.97% effective.

    Except, you know, when you die from it. More specifically, I’ve read some researchers and/or doctors believe some people fight it off with only their innate immune systems. I wonder if the vaccine failures are from either an adaptive immune system failure, or one that works with many more viruses and virus producing cells AKA unacceptable side effects for a vaccine, or that fails with the spike protein, but manages with the nucleocapsid protein that’s been noticed to also be in general COVID-19 wild type immune system responses, and/or perhaps another protein. Given what I know about how the the adaptive immune system response works (not much, so complicated I decided in the mid-1970s to only learn about it as needed), the latter is a distinct possibility.

  125. @Hypnotoad666
    @Bill Jones


    The CDC has admitted that they do not have an isolated Covid19 virus.
     
    I have heard that this is basically a semantic argument because you can never technically "isolate" a virus. This is because a virus is never quite independently alive to begin with. Rather, a virus exists as scraps of RNA code that can only parasitically replicate through the operation of other more complex cells.

    My understanding is that the "isolated" virus they use for vaccine development and whatnot is actually just a list of its amino acid sequences. Pretty much exactly the same way a computer virus can only be rendered in its binary or other computer code language sequence.

    You can't hold a static biological virus in a petri dish any more than you could hold computer code in a petri dish.

    This is all hearsay. But it sort of makes sense to me.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    I have heard that this is basically a semantic argument because you can never technically “isolate” a virus. This is because a virus is never quite independently alive to begin with. Rather, a virus exists as scraps of RNA code that can only parasitically replicate through the operation of other more complex cells.

    Indeed, with the nits that I believe it’s not called a cell, and DNA can also be used, the adenovirus vector vaccine use that instead of RNA. And are probably more robust as a result. The viral nucleotide sequence, a sequence of DNA or RNA that’s a code for making proteins, is generally (or always??) protected by some structural proteins that make up the “nucleocapsid,” and in enveloped viruses like the coronaviruses and say the flu, also has a bit of cell membrane that’s stolen as a virus buds off a cell (which I’m almost certain makes them much less robust).

    My understanding is that the “isolated” virus they use for vaccine development and whatnot is actually just a list of its amino acid sequences. Pretty much exactly the same way a computer virus can only be rendered in its binary or other computer code language sequence.

    Close. The fundamental paradigm of molecular genetics is DNA gets copied to mRNA which is then decoded into a string of amino acids, AKA one or more proteins. So, say, source code to object code to machine code, which must have a CPU to run on. At each stage, you have a complete code for the virus, although plenty skip the DNA step, and retroviruses like HIV first use reverse transcriptase to go from RNA to DNA.

    You can’t hold a static biological virus in a petri dish any more than you could hold computer code in a petri dish.

    This is all hearsay. But it sort of makes sense to me.

    Indeed with the computer code analogy, and it does make sense, especially the more you learn about it.

  126. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @John Johnson


    If we could find a new religion for these liberal Whites the left would collapse overnight.

     

    They don't need a new one; they need to repent and turn back to their old one. But you are exactly right: 2020 leftism/SJWism/Wokism is deeply, essentially religious.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    They don’t need a new one; they need to repent and turn back to their old one. But you are exactly right: 2020 leftism/SJWism/Wokism is deeply, essentially religious.

    Do you really think that a liberal feminist steeped in Darwinism* is going to go Calvinist?

    I don’t have a problem with Christianity but liberalism is not going to be defeated through passive means like asking people to go back to church. A Christian solution would only work through a Franco type government which has its own problems and not to mention completely unfeasible in the current environment.

    Christianity also has flaws that are exploited by liberalism. In fact I could imagine a scenario where liberalism completely infiltrates Christianity in an effort to stave off a populist right.

    The great weakness of the left is race and the Christian right isn’t willing to poke a stick in that sore. If Christian conservatism was the answer then the left would have been defeated decades ago.

    * a censored version with racial genetics excluded

  127. @Barnard
    Isn't most of the content on this website, including nearly everything written by the owner, arguing that the government constantly lies to us and is untrustworthy? Blow's dumb boilerplate column aside, we should trust them on a vaccine that was rushed, but the results of which were withheld to influence the results of the Presidential election? I am personally leery of the vaccine because based on what I have read, it sounds 50-50 that the vaccine would cause me to get sicker than Covid-19 would. I plan on taking it when they tell me I have to, but I am not going to fault anyone who chooses not to take it.

    Replies: @MBlanc46, @Achmed E. Newman, @Adam Smith

    I plan on taking it when they tell me I have to…

    I plan on taking it when they take my gun from my cold dead hand.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Adam Smith

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-8CUulWqPA

  128. @Jack D
    anti-vaxx ideation is more common among people who aren’t really as smart as they think they are:
    ... with their combination of higher average self-esteem and lower average IQ, are well-represented in those ranks.

    ... could be either blacks or iSteve commenters.

    Replies: @Justvisiting

    The “pro vax” and “anti-vax” division of the population is ridiculous.

    I am totally in favor of everybody else getting the vaccine–just stay the Frack away from me with that unproven Big Pharma indemnified money machine garbage.

    Voila–herd immunity, everybody else takes the risk, I (and Big Pharma) get the benefit.

  129. @John Johnson
    @Malcolm X-Lax

    I was at work Saturday night waiting for a patient to come up from the ED. Our entire floor is now nothing but Covid patients. 57-year-old non-English speaking Hispanic woman, tested pos for Covid in ER. Obese, ESRD, hemodialysis three days a week.

    Are you seeing any patterns with the patients that the MSM and possibly local health departments are not reporting? Just wondering.

    Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax

    The media loves reporting on young people who have gotten sick or died from the infection. My experience has been: Out of maybe 150-200 Covid patients I’ve had in the past 8 months, less than 5 were under 50. I remember one was in her 30’s and she was very obese. Most are exactly what you’d expect: 70 – 90 years old with serious co-morbidities.

  130. @Adam Smith
    @Barnard


    I plan on taking it when they tell me I have to...
     
    I plan on taking it when they take my gun from my cold dead hand.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

  131. @Alden
    @Anon

    OMG. Is there any explanation for forbidding kneeling? I can understand not singing, not sitting close, no communion wafers .

    Please tell us why kneeling is forbidden.

    Replies: @Anon

    There has been no explanation given; the [redacted] city Board of Health simply designated standing & kneeling during religious services as “unnecessary movement”. I’ve since discovered that kneeling during a religious service has been banned throughout the county.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS