The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection$
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
NYT Airs the Shaq's Shoe Theory of Mar-a-Lago Documents: They're Memorabilia
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • B
Show CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From the New York Times news section, by Maggie Haberman, the political reporter who knows Trump best:

Another Trump Mystery: Why Did He Resist Returning the Government’s Documents?

As with so much else with the former president, there is not one easy answer as to why he refused and ignited a legal firestorm. But here are some possibilities.

Former President Donald J. Trump, who for decades showed off knickknacks in his overstuffed Trump Tower office, treated the nation’s secrets as similar trinkets to brandish.

By Maggie Haberman
Aug. 18, 2022, 5:00 a.m. ET

Exciting documents

Mr. Trump, a pack rat who for decades showed off knickknacks in his overstuffed Trump Tower office — including a giant shoe that once belonged to the basketball player Shaquille O’Neal — treated the nation’s secrets as similar trinkets to brandish. White House aides described how excited he was to show off all the material he had access to, including letters from the North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, which he routinely waved at visitors, alarming his advisers.

Some of those letters were among the trove that Mr. Trump had with him at Mar-a-Lago.

This would explain the insistence on hanging onto physical rather than digital copies: they’re memorabilia to hang on the wall.

 
Hide 196 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. No mention of the riots that almost destroyed it. This camera shop was looted during the BLM riots https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=490107466450290&set=a.401403125320725

  2. I saw one of Shaw’s shoes at Pete & Shorts in Clearwater. Thing was enormous with or without Trump’s small hands. teehee.

    How does a 6′ plus man have such small hands? Heredity or soft living?

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Trinity

    Heredity. There is no way to "grow" your hands through manual labor.

    Replies: @Trinity

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Trinity


    How does a 6′ plus man have such small hands?
     
    That's just how they are in public. They're growers, not showers.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Trinity

    Joe Rogan has shaken Trump's hand. He says "Not small. Regular-sized hand." Rogan doesn't like Trump so I'll take this as an admission against interest.

    Replies: @Hannah Katz, @Trinity

    , @JR Ewing
    @Trinity


    How does a 6′ plus man have such small hands? Heredity or soft living?
     
    It's all heredity.

    I am about 6-3 and only wear size 12 shoes and have very stubby toes and fingers like Fred Flintsone.

    I wear XXL gloves but only because my hands are thick through the middle. There's usually about 1/2" of slack on the fingers. The girth comes from the weight room and manual outdoor labor over the years but the length of my fingers will never change.

    Luckily the men in my wife's family have bigger hands and feet and that's what my kids inherited. Both are teenagers and both have bigger hands and feet than me already and they tease me for it. The teasing would bother me if I weren't so relieved for their sports careers.

    , @Jack D
    @Trinity

    It's a stupid issue - who cares how big his hands are? It started it the '80 when when Spy magazine (and future Vanity Fair editor ) Graydon Carter took to referring to him as a “short-fingered vulgarian.” His other choice of epithet was "Queens born casino operator" but "short fingered vulgarian" won out. The snobbishness just oozes from these titles. Trump contested it rather than ignoring it. The elites think that "aha, we got to him - we are so cool that we would never acknowledge an insult" but the fact that Trump fights back only endears him more to his base.

    But "short fingered" is a little different than small hands and actually has a element of truth. The truth is that Donald is a bit pudgy and this includes having pudgy, puffy hands. This makes his hands out of proportion and makes his digits appear shorter than they really are because they are partly buried in the fat of his hands.

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan, @hhsiii, @Buzz Mohawk

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Trinity

    "Thing was enormous ... small hands. teehee."

    "... nobody, not even the rain, has such small hands."

    Replies: @D. K.

  3. Aww, so that’s what all the fuss is about.

    Yeah, I always go to the New York Times for answers, especially answers to constitutional questions.

    In all fairness, though, I did do their Super Mega crossword puzzle last Christmas.


    Suitable memorabilia to hang on the wall

  4. As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!

    I mean really. I never.

    • Replies: @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!
     
    Yep, absolutely. This is THE reason people on the left and the deep state elite really really hate him. I move in some elite left wing circles, and when he announced his campaign, the horror over the "unseemliness" was constantly expressed.

    "This guy has gold faucets in his penthouse."
    "The hair! The worst combover ever."
    "My god, a bankrupt real estate guy with a stupid reality TV show"

    Of course the married White chicks in this circle took an instant loathing to him -- philanderer, dumping the old hit-the-wall wife for a shiny new model (with a hint of an escort about her).

    The visceral amygdala driven disgust of these women was beyond palpable--the rich Alpha male who always got the other cuter girl...but never ME! ME!!

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Hangnail Hans, @Thoughts, @Jack D, @Curle, @Currahee, @Muggles, @Ben tillman, @Nicholas Stix

    , @Mr. Anon
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!

    I mean really. I never.
     
    That's a lot of it, at least for the rank-and-file upwardly mobile Democratic voter. Their politics are largely a lifestyle choice. They wish not to be seen with the wrong kind of people or holding unfashionable views. They couldn't possible vote for somebody so vulgar.

    For the moneyed interests that own the Democratic Party (and the Republican Party too, for that matter) - their objection to Trump was more than that. Trump's election was a deviation from their plan - a hiccup in the uniparty con-job. The hoi-polloi are not supposed to get so far as to actually give voice to their actual concerns. They are trying to stamp Trump into the Earth only to stamp on those who support him - to make it plain to them that they don't get what they want. Ever.

    A lot of people (Trump supporters) are taking the line: You're not going to get away with it! He's our guy!

    My line is: He's not our guy anyway - not really. Stamp away! We'll still be here.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @Ben tillman
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    What could be more gauche than telling the emperor he wears no clothes?

  5. @The Anti-Gnostic
    As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!

    I mean really. I never.

    Replies: @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Mr. Anon, @Ben tillman

    As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!

    Yep, absolutely. This is THE reason people on the left and the deep state elite really really hate him. I move in some elite left wing circles, and when he announced his campaign, the horror over the “unseemliness” was constantly expressed.

    “This guy has gold faucets in his penthouse.”
    “The hair! The worst combover ever.”
    “My god, a bankrupt real estate guy with a stupid reality TV show”

    Of course the married White chicks in this circle took an instant loathing to him — philanderer, dumping the old hit-the-wall wife for a shiny new model (with a hint of an escort about her).

    The visceral amygdala driven disgust of these women was beyond palpable–the rich Alpha male who always got the other cuter girl…but never ME! ME!!

    • Thanks: Bill Jones
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    KPK. I think you and TAG nailed it.

    But what happens when someone who is not Trump, runs with Trump's soft-nationalism--immigration restrictionism, building the wall, America first.

    They feel--know--that Trump's opinions are so unseemly.


    We are simply separate peoples now. We have this post-sanity contingent of verbalist overclass parasites who simply do not believe in--find unseemly--the core requirements of maintaining civilization--keeping invaders out, eugenic fertility, the rule-of-law, marriage, producing what you consume, heck even that there are hard biological categories like "men" and "women".

    I just do not even see the point. Let them have what they want.... just not with us.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Prester John

    , @Hangnail Hans
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia


    Yep, absolutely. This is THE reason people on the left and the deep state elite really really hate him.
     
    I think it's an excuse to hate him; one of many. And he supplied many, and still does.

    But the real reason they "really really" hate him is that he represented a potential wrench in their works, and even worse he stood a chance of uniting a fair number of the remaining patriots in this country.

    Sadly, that chance was squandered. Partly by the "forces of reaction" but largely because of his own stupidity. Even sadder, I still don't see anyone much better on the horizon.

    , @Thoughts
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    No it was the 1990s cheating [and not the pornstar 2000s cheating the media was going on about...that was hysterical b.s. that made Trump more likeable because it was such b.s.]

    I'm a Trump fan, a Trump voter

    But anyone who wasn't worried about the Cheating is a fool. No one wants another Bill/Hillary Clinton.

    Marriage is a contract, and if you can't honor the contract then how do you honor any other contract?

    But Trump won me over after my initial doubts

    That's his job...to convince me that he's semi-trustworthy...and he did so

    , @Jack D
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    As opposed to Joe Biden, who was a really classy dude who did NOT have a comb over or a coke sniffing, hooker loving son.

    No one really had a problem with Trump before he got into politics. Democrats practice the politics of personal destruction - if someone is "bad" politically then they are "bad" on a personal level. They practice Beria's maxim - show me the man and I'll show you the crime. Trump could have been a choir boy and once he embraced these political positions they would have found a way to hate him anyway.

    Dr. Oz was once upon a time a perfectly acceptable member of the Hollywood crowd, hanging around with Oprah, etc. But now that control of the Senate is in the balance, he is the most evil carpet bagger dude every, as if Democrats had anything against carpetbaggers (see Hillary).

    Replies: @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Jonathan Mason

    , @Curle
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    Yea. Same reaction to Andrew Jackson.

    , @Currahee
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    Trump impressed me as a character left out of Bonfire of the Vanities.

    , @Muggles
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    Great post.

    Somehow, though, the Dem sycophants never utter a word about obviously senile Joe, a known pervert (just read his daughter's diary) and enabler of his son's coke/hooker habit while strong arming dear defenseless Ukraine a few years back so sonny boy could get paid -- mafia style - for doing zero work.

    And the Big Guy China slice. The FBI works at glacial speed on Hunter's laptop and other corrupt indicators. Too busy fussing over souvenirs Trump might have kept.. The Dems love the Police State when they get to run it.

    Of course Biden was loathed by St. Obama and was long a corrupt Credit Card Industry stooge for decades.

    Now he can barely say a coherent sentence and we will eventually (not yet! Dems fear Kamala more!) learn just how complicit the MSM and DC Elites are in covering up for this creep.

    Trump Derangement Syndrome is still strong and St. Fauci has yet to unleash the CDC to cure it.

    "TrumpPox" is the thus far incurable disease of our Oligarchic elites.

    Replies: @Ben tillman

    , @Ben tillman
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    I have to laugh at the part about the reality TV show. Can you really be a snob if you even know of the show’s existence?

    , @Nicholas Stix
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    Your observations are brilliant, but things are even worse than that, when you count people who claim to embrace Trump’s policy positions, but who still find him “unseemly,” and refused to vote for him.

    I showed up Charles Murray at a Center for Immigration Studies mini-conference, at which he, Jason Richwine, and Amy Wax spoke on unskilled immigration on the eve of the 2016 election. Murray said that he agreed with Trump’s policy positions, but hated his “temperament,” and thus refused to vote for him. I said, “There’s a law in ethics: If you desire the ends, you desire the means. Trump is the means” (that’s not a paraphrase).

    I wrote: The choice is between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, and the only chance of achieving the goal Murray seeks, is if Trump is elected president.

    Murray: “I’m not going to argue with you about whether I am right in thinking that, but that’s what I think.”

    I threw up my hands in despair.

    I wrote: Millions of citizens are willing to end the American experiment in self-government—merely because they don’t like the style (or “affect”) of the only man standing between us and oblivion.

    “Let’s hope that substance wins out.”

    The video of the exchange was up for years, but the guys that run CIS, Steve Camarota and Mark Krikorian, hate my guts (and Murray is hardly a fan, either), and so they have pulled the video of my exchange with Murray from circulation. When you’re an Asphalt Leaguer, many people from the overpriced private university world expect you to address them with slavish deference.

    https://vdare.com/articles/outer-boroughs-affect-why-snobs-like-charles-murray-won-t-vote-for-trump-despite-agreeing-with-him

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

  6. This story has a strong smell of comedy. Nobody will mistake a TS/SCI document as a souvenir. Now, if he has his father’s brain or mothers’ heart in formaldehyde in his office clutter …..

    • Replies: @Ray P
    @epebble

    Clarice: Most serial killers keep some sort of trophies from their victims
    Hannibal: I didn't
    Clarice: No, no, you ate yours

  7. Donald Trump’s Tour of His Manhattan Office

    Sep 14, 2015

    Donald Trump took WSJ’s Monica Langley on a tour of his office in the Trump Tower in Manhattan. Among his memorabilia: one of Shaquille O’Neal’s sneakers. Photo: Jarrard Cole/The Wall Street Journal

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @MEH 0910

    Not watching the video but his endless insecurity / need to brag (same thing, of course) is almost touching. Almost.


    [Haberman:] letters from the North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, which he routinely waved at visitors, alarming his advisers.
     
    Citation Needed

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @MEH 0910

    Trump (small) handing the woman a plaster mold casting of Shack's penis is the subtext.

  8. @Trinity
    I saw one of Shaw's shoes at Pete & Shorts in Clearwater. Thing was enormous with or without Trump's small hands. teehee.

    How does a 6' plus man have such small hands? Heredity or soft living?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Buzz Mohawk, @Harry Baldwin, @JR Ewing, @Jack D, @SunBakedSuburb

    Heredity. There is no way to “grow” your hands through manual labor.

    • Replies: @Trinity
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    You can't increase the length of your hands or fingers but you can definitely develop thicker and wider hands through manual labor, old school garage monkeys who turned wrenches all day, brick layers, roofers, etc. You would never see anyone in those occupations with hands like Trump. Even smaller guys develop, thick, muscled and veiny hands, not large hands but strong and capable hands.

    Exercise enthusiasts develop thick strong hands through rope climbing, pullups, monkey bars, weightlifting exercises like deadlifts, grippers, or just hanging from pull up bar. I imagine the mitts of mountain climbers are thick and muscled. Male gymnasts are generally small men who thickened and possibly made their hands wider through exercise.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  9. @Trinity
    I saw one of Shaw's shoes at Pete & Shorts in Clearwater. Thing was enormous with or without Trump's small hands. teehee.

    How does a 6' plus man have such small hands? Heredity or soft living?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Buzz Mohawk, @Harry Baldwin, @JR Ewing, @Jack D, @SunBakedSuburb

    How does a 6′ plus man have such small hands?

    That’s just how they are in public. They’re growers, not showers.

    • LOL: fish
  10. @Trinity
    I saw one of Shaw's shoes at Pete & Shorts in Clearwater. Thing was enormous with or without Trump's small hands. teehee.

    How does a 6' plus man have such small hands? Heredity or soft living?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Buzz Mohawk, @Harry Baldwin, @JR Ewing, @Jack D, @SunBakedSuburb

    Joe Rogan has shaken Trump’s hand. He says “Not small. Regular-sized hand.” Rogan doesn’t like Trump so I’ll take this as an admission against interest.

    • Replies: @Hannah Katz
    @Harry Baldwin

    Speaking of comparisons, you know how LeBron differs from Kyle Rittenhouse? Kyle hits his shots when under pressure.

    , @Trinity
    @Harry Baldwin

    Yeah, but Joe Rogan is like 5'7" in heels. Lolol.

  11. This is our world now. Used to be someone like Stephen Miller read Steve Sailer and applied his insights.

    Now the New York Times reads him and applies his obscurantism.

    Very well.

    • LOL: Paul Jolliffe, Russ
  12. @MEH 0910
    Donald Trump's Tour of His Manhattan Office
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAKYvvM6IpE
    Sep 14, 2015

    Donald Trump took WSJ's Monica Langley on a tour of his office in the Trump Tower in Manhattan. Among his memorabilia: one of Shaquille O'Neal's sneakers. Photo: Jarrard Cole/The Wall Street Journal
     

    Replies: @Polistra, @SunBakedSuburb

    Not watching the video but his endless insecurity / need to brag (same thing, of course) is almost touching. Almost.

    [Haberman:] letters from the North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, which he routinely waved at visitors, alarming his advisers.

    Citation Needed

    • Agree: Hangnail Hans
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Polistra


    Not watching the video but his endless insecurity / need to brag (same thing, of course) is almost touching. Almost.
     
    Trump is a hero for at least acting like the American people's interests should matter and bringing a hint of nationalism back to our politics.

    But Trump is a weird bird.

    For an alpha male--a guy who has been a huge success in business and popular culture--he is weirdly insecure. The guy gets in pissing matches with people who are wave-off material. He can give a speech and it will be mostly about Donald J. Trump--perhaps the defense of Donald J. Trump from some b.s. from some nobody--and five minutes on the American people. (And yeah, who needs all that junk from ... other people.)

    If he does come back, I sure hope he brings a whole lot more "whatever" to the personal attacks and a whole lot more "what's good for the American people".

    Replies: @Ralph L, @Luddite in Chief, @Bardon Kaldian, @Jack D, @SFG, @Anonymous

  13. I’ve got my letter from Kim Jong-un framed here on the wall.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @AnotherDad


    I’ve got my letter from Kim Jong-un framed here on the wall.
     
    I've got two - not one, but two - E-mails from Nigerian princes framed and hanging on my wall.
    , @TontoBubbaGoldstein
    @AnotherDad

    We always DM each other, but I screenshot them and save them on an SD card.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  14. @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!
     
    Yep, absolutely. This is THE reason people on the left and the deep state elite really really hate him. I move in some elite left wing circles, and when he announced his campaign, the horror over the "unseemliness" was constantly expressed.

    "This guy has gold faucets in his penthouse."
    "The hair! The worst combover ever."
    "My god, a bankrupt real estate guy with a stupid reality TV show"

    Of course the married White chicks in this circle took an instant loathing to him -- philanderer, dumping the old hit-the-wall wife for a shiny new model (with a hint of an escort about her).

    The visceral amygdala driven disgust of these women was beyond palpable--the rich Alpha male who always got the other cuter girl...but never ME! ME!!

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Hangnail Hans, @Thoughts, @Jack D, @Curle, @Currahee, @Muggles, @Ben tillman, @Nicholas Stix

    KPK. I think you and TAG nailed it.

    But what happens when someone who is not Trump, runs with Trump’s soft-nationalism–immigration restrictionism, building the wall, America first.

    They feel–know–that Trump’s opinions are so unseemly.

    We are simply separate peoples now. We have this post-sanity contingent of verbalist overclass parasites who simply do not believe in–find unseemly–the core requirements of maintaining civilization–keeping invaders out, eugenic fertility, the rule-of-law, marriage, producing what you consume, heck even that there are hard biological categories like “men” and “women”.

    I just do not even see the point. Let them have what they want…. just not with us.

    • Agree: Paul Jolliffe, mc23
    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @AnotherDad


    I just do not even see the point. Let them have what they want…. just not with us.
     
    If only they would let us.

    I think that most residents of the Trump supporting red states would be fine with being left alone and leaving the blue states alone except for the very few shared responsibilities outlined in the constitution: defense, currency, regulation of (actual) interstate commerce. This is the very essence of federalism.

    But the blue states wouldn't be satisfied with that because their mission is to save the less fortunate from themselves, and by virtue of not living in New York or California, the red state residents are "less fortunate" by definition.
    , @Prester John
    @AnotherDad

    Before 2016 Trump was friends with the Clintons (who epitomized the Ruling Class), with the Great Stainmaker himself even suggesting at one point that he make a run for the presidency. Trumpy took up his suggestion but when he unfolded his three-legged platform of draconian immigration restrictions, US overseas military cutbacks and domestic economic self-sufficiency that same Ruling Class turned against him with a vengeance which remains unabated to this day---because what he was suggesting was precisely what they did NOT want! Maybe they saw him as a traitor to his class, kind of a mirror image of FDR but without FDR's charm.

  15. What explains the FBI raid with weapons on a location the FBI had already examined and approved is documents incriminating (or creating problems for) criminal FBI scumbags.

    • Thanks: Russ
    • Replies: @Emblematic
    @J.Ross

    Exactly. It's the Russiagate stuff he wanted to declassify and release but couldn't because of the Durham 'ongoing investigation' scam. The fact some people don't seem to realize this is a bit odd.

    , @beavertales
    @J.Ross

    "What explains the FBI raid with weapons on a location the FBI had already examined (?)"

    A location already protected around the clock by Secret Service Agents armed with machine guns.

    To carry out the search of Mar-a-Lago, the FBI had to politely ask Trump's security to step aside. Does anyone believe the Secret Service was intimidated by the FBI menacingly brandishing their assault weapons? No - they continued guarding Mar-a-Lago as the bureau agents did their search.

    I think we've all had enough of FBI SWAT theatrics: fat-bellied goofs with M-4s practicing fake shock and awe. If their search was legitimate, there would be no reason to bring guns.

  16. We have a concrete example of an unqualified boorish climbing moron mishandling secrets: it’s Hillary, who got a diplomat killed. There’s also every congresscritter who depended on the Awans for IT services, plus Eric Swalwell. Not verifying but I’m going to guess that this Haberman person is cool with that.

    • Agree: fish
    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @J.Ross

    Maggie Haberman is the epitome of smug establishment journalism. There is always an undercurrent of snobbery in her writing and her online presence.

    "Trump is just so... gauche. How can you yokels support him?"

    "Oh, you're trying to argue online with me about Trump? Go away, peasant."

    "I work for the New York Times... you?"

    , @Alden
    @J.Ross

    Hillary got several non diplomat US State Department employees killed as well.

    Replies: @Che Blutarsky

    , @Curle
    @J.Ross

    Who by the way is pear shaped and looks like an penguin when she walks.

  17. @Polistra
    @MEH 0910

    Not watching the video but his endless insecurity / need to brag (same thing, of course) is almost touching. Almost.


    [Haberman:] letters from the North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, which he routinely waved at visitors, alarming his advisers.
     
    Citation Needed

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    Not watching the video but his endless insecurity / need to brag (same thing, of course) is almost touching. Almost.

    Trump is a hero for at least acting like the American people’s interests should matter and bringing a hint of nationalism back to our politics.

    But Trump is a weird bird.

    For an alpha male–a guy who has been a huge success in business and popular culture–he is weirdly insecure. The guy gets in pissing matches with people who are wave-off material. He can give a speech and it will be mostly about Donald J. Trump–perhaps the defense of Donald J. Trump from some b.s. from some nobody–and five minutes on the American people. (And yeah, who needs all that junk from … other people.)

    If he does come back, I sure hope he brings a whole lot more “whatever” to the personal attacks and a whole lot more “what’s good for the American people”.

    • Thanks: Paul Jolliffe, Russ
    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @AnotherDad

    HG Tudor explains the prime aims of narcissists and why they act so strangely, often against their own interest. The non-self-aware ones don't even realize they're lying. I've killed several hours at 1.25 speed in the last year listening to him rip Meghan Markle to shreds, sometimes quite humorously, because my father was married to one for 24 expensive and draining years. As my SIL said, she always gave us something to talk about when she wasn't around.
    HGTudorKnowingTheNarcissistUltra

    tl;dl, he isn't likely to change, unfortunately.

    , @Luddite in Chief
    @AnotherDad


    For an alpha male–a guy who has been a huge success in business and popular culture–he is weirdly insecure. The guy gets in pissing matches with people who are wave-off material. He can give a speech and it will be mostly about Donald J. Trump–perhaps the defense of Donald J. Trump from some b.s. from some nobody–and five minutes on the American people.
     
    That is because Donald J. Trump's favourite subject is...Donald J. Trump.

    (Not much indication this is likely to change, either.)

    As for his remarkable* self-absorption, perhaps his spending fifty-five minutes of a sixty-minute speech talking about himself and five minutes talking about The American People is simply his way of showing what he really thinks of them?





    *Notice how I resisted the temptation to use the word "unseemly"? It wasn't easy!
    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @AnotherDad

    The point is that the highest level politics is turned into celebrity culture second-ratedness.

    I think that in the US it began with the playboy JFK. Anyway, it all intensified in the last one or two decades.

    Second rate clowns (who may be good at manipulations, but, still ...).

    For instance, take Macron. What a piece of work. One should tell him: You are the President of France. You are de Gaulle. De Gaulle doesn't behave like idiotic clown.

    Or that embarrassment of Scholz, or, earlier, Schroeder. Schroeder worked, after he lost office, as the chairman of the board of Nord Stream AG and of Rosneft, after having been hired as a global manager by investment bank Rothschild, and also the chairman of the board of football club Hannover 96.

    You are the German Chancellor. You are Bismarck. Bismarck doesn't work as some kind of businessman-bureaucrat in a company.

    The last example is Finnish PM. Although the parallel is not technically exact (president & PM), she is the leader of Finland. And?

    https://edition.cnn.com/2022/08/18/europe/sanna-marin-finland-partying-video-intl/index.html

    Finnish PM says videos of her 'boisterous' partying shouldn't have been made public

    https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/sanna-marin-finland-pm-trendi-photoshoot-intl-scli/index.html

    https://dynaimage.cdn.cnn.com/cnn/q_auto,w_727,c_fit/http%3A%2F%2Fcdn.cnn.com%2Fcnnnext%2Fdam%2Fassets%2F201016151454-sanna-marin-trendimag.jpg

    You are the leader of Finland. You are Mannerheim. And Mannerheim doesn't go around partying & showing tits.

    Second & third rate people ....

    Replies: @Anonymous, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Yngvar, @Alden

    , @Jack D
    @AnotherDad


    guy who has been a huge success in business and popular culture–he is weirdly insecure.
     
    It's not weird at all. First of all, in NY society terms, he was never accepted - he was a bridge & tunnel dude from Queens. Trump Tower was for Eurotrash and Arabs and so on who could never get past a coop board on Park Avenue.

    2nd his huge success was always overplayed (by Trump) - mostly of what he did was in effect a bust out scheme. He would overborrow from banks and investors and pay himself lavishly and then after a few years the project would go bust and the banks and investors would take a bath. How many real billionaires want to go on reality TV? Trump needed the $. He in effect PLAYED a billionaire on TV.

    So it's completely unsurprising that he has a chip on his shoulder. The chip on his shoulder is also part of his shtick, which only makes him more endearing to his supporters.

    Look, the insecurity worked for him - it took him all the way to the White House. If he had been a more secure person he might have been content to drink himself to death with his father's money, the way that his brother did.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @AnotherDad, @David In TN

    , @SFG
    @AnotherDad

    Trump pissed off the left and energized them without doing much for the right. He annoyed feminists and got MeToo going, but he removed tax deductibility of alimony. He mobilized ethnic activists with jokes about taco bowls and bad hombres, but didn’t build the wall or repeal affirmative action. We got the worst of both worldS-the left energized, the right anesthetized (because we’re winning, man!).

    Replies: @jsm, @Bardon Kaldian

    , @Anonymous
    @AnotherDad

    Trump’s haggling/badgering insecurity style must be at least partly a stylistic choice based on psychologically profiling his attackers and/or marks. That’s a truism — no one hews to a strategy that doesn’t pay off — but as with the Meet The Press example of the Mussolini retweet in 2016, note that he doesn’t anxiously retreat into verbal dead ends like Martin Short’s “Nathan Sturm” SNL character. I think somehow he is more comfortable going straight to aggrieved hypersensitivity, to bag whatever he can from that approach first.

    With the countless petty stories, e.g. pretending to be on the phone with Bob Dole at the time of receiving a journalist visitor (Ron Rosenbaum—I think the Tim O’Brien quickie book was also a lazy collection of examples like this, that are probably 80-90% factual), I think this is pretty routine and an occupational hazard for non-sperg mega-rich guys actually. Trump is not that different from his cohort; no surprise he picks up the questionable habits and tics of big shots, he’s met many. Are there any Gary Cooper/Marlboro Man CEOs? I don’t believe our hysterical system selects for that

  18. Remember when you wouldn’t think twice about stopping to help someone whose car was disabled? Especially if it were a female? Those days are gone, gone to the land of “Why We Can’t Have Nice Things”


    People here say: “Get your guns and move to the hinterland! That’ll protect you from the wreckage which was once your society.” Note the names.

  19. @J.Ross
    What explains the FBI raid with weapons on a location the FBI had already examined and approved is documents incriminating (or creating problems for) criminal FBI scumbags.

    Replies: @Emblematic, @beavertales

    Exactly. It’s the Russiagate stuff he wanted to declassify and release but couldn’t because of the Durham ‘ongoing investigation’ scam. The fact some people don’t seem to realize this is a bit odd.

  20. @AnotherDad
    @Polistra


    Not watching the video but his endless insecurity / need to brag (same thing, of course) is almost touching. Almost.
     
    Trump is a hero for at least acting like the American people's interests should matter and bringing a hint of nationalism back to our politics.

    But Trump is a weird bird.

    For an alpha male--a guy who has been a huge success in business and popular culture--he is weirdly insecure. The guy gets in pissing matches with people who are wave-off material. He can give a speech and it will be mostly about Donald J. Trump--perhaps the defense of Donald J. Trump from some b.s. from some nobody--and five minutes on the American people. (And yeah, who needs all that junk from ... other people.)

    If he does come back, I sure hope he brings a whole lot more "whatever" to the personal attacks and a whole lot more "what's good for the American people".

    Replies: @Ralph L, @Luddite in Chief, @Bardon Kaldian, @Jack D, @SFG, @Anonymous

    HG Tudor explains the prime aims of narcissists and why they act so strangely, often against their own interest. The non-self-aware ones don’t even realize they’re lying. I’ve killed several hours at 1.25 speed in the last year listening to him rip Meghan Markle to shreds, sometimes quite humorously, because my father was married to one for 24 expensive and draining years. As my SIL said, she always gave us something to talk about when she wasn’t around.
    HGTudorKnowingTheNarcissistUltra

    tl;dl, he isn’t likely to change, unfortunately.

  21. @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!
     
    Yep, absolutely. This is THE reason people on the left and the deep state elite really really hate him. I move in some elite left wing circles, and when he announced his campaign, the horror over the "unseemliness" was constantly expressed.

    "This guy has gold faucets in his penthouse."
    "The hair! The worst combover ever."
    "My god, a bankrupt real estate guy with a stupid reality TV show"

    Of course the married White chicks in this circle took an instant loathing to him -- philanderer, dumping the old hit-the-wall wife for a shiny new model (with a hint of an escort about her).

    The visceral amygdala driven disgust of these women was beyond palpable--the rich Alpha male who always got the other cuter girl...but never ME! ME!!

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Hangnail Hans, @Thoughts, @Jack D, @Curle, @Currahee, @Muggles, @Ben tillman, @Nicholas Stix

    Yep, absolutely. This is THE reason people on the left and the deep state elite really really hate him.

    I think it’s an excuse to hate him; one of many. And he supplied many, and still does.

    But the real reason they “really really” hate him is that he represented a potential wrench in their works, and even worse he stood a chance of uniting a fair number of the remaining patriots in this country.

    Sadly, that chance was squandered. Partly by the “forces of reaction” but largely because of his own stupidity. Even sadder, I still don’t see anyone much better on the horizon.

    • Agree: Gordo, Polistra, AnotherDad
  22. @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!
     
    Yep, absolutely. This is THE reason people on the left and the deep state elite really really hate him. I move in some elite left wing circles, and when he announced his campaign, the horror over the "unseemliness" was constantly expressed.

    "This guy has gold faucets in his penthouse."
    "The hair! The worst combover ever."
    "My god, a bankrupt real estate guy with a stupid reality TV show"

    Of course the married White chicks in this circle took an instant loathing to him -- philanderer, dumping the old hit-the-wall wife for a shiny new model (with a hint of an escort about her).

    The visceral amygdala driven disgust of these women was beyond palpable--the rich Alpha male who always got the other cuter girl...but never ME! ME!!

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Hangnail Hans, @Thoughts, @Jack D, @Curle, @Currahee, @Muggles, @Ben tillman, @Nicholas Stix

    No it was the 1990s cheating [and not the pornstar 2000s cheating the media was going on about…that was hysterical b.s. that made Trump more likeable because it was such b.s.]

    I’m a Trump fan, a Trump voter

    But anyone who wasn’t worried about the Cheating is a fool. No one wants another Bill/Hillary Clinton.

    Marriage is a contract, and if you can’t honor the contract then how do you honor any other contract?

    But Trump won me over after my initial doubts

    That’s his job…to convince me that he’s semi-trustworthy…and he did so

  23. That’s Monica Langley of the WSJ in the top-of-column photo, then, is it?

    If so, Trump may want to re-think the idea of waving some athlete’s ghastly old shoe in the face of a member of the press.

    (Isn’t that the sort of thing Lucite cases are made for? Sealed Lucite cases?)

  24. Here is a critique of Ms Maggie Magaham .
    https://stormer-daily.rw/maggie-haberman-is-a-maggot/

  25. Here’s a headline the NYT will never run: Russia Major force for World Peace.

    https://sputniknews.com/20220814/pakistans-imran-khan-praises-india-for-continuing-russian-crude-purchases-despite-us-pressure-1099587813.html

    So Putin is Bringing India and Pakistan closer.

  26. @AnotherDad
    @Polistra


    Not watching the video but his endless insecurity / need to brag (same thing, of course) is almost touching. Almost.
     
    Trump is a hero for at least acting like the American people's interests should matter and bringing a hint of nationalism back to our politics.

    But Trump is a weird bird.

    For an alpha male--a guy who has been a huge success in business and popular culture--he is weirdly insecure. The guy gets in pissing matches with people who are wave-off material. He can give a speech and it will be mostly about Donald J. Trump--perhaps the defense of Donald J. Trump from some b.s. from some nobody--and five minutes on the American people. (And yeah, who needs all that junk from ... other people.)

    If he does come back, I sure hope he brings a whole lot more "whatever" to the personal attacks and a whole lot more "what's good for the American people".

    Replies: @Ralph L, @Luddite in Chief, @Bardon Kaldian, @Jack D, @SFG, @Anonymous

    For an alpha male–a guy who has been a huge success in business and popular culture–he is weirdly insecure. The guy gets in pissing matches with people who are wave-off material. He can give a speech and it will be mostly about Donald J. Trump–perhaps the defense of Donald J. Trump from some b.s. from some nobody–and five minutes on the American people.

    That is because Donald J. Trump’s favourite subject is…Donald J. Trump.

    (Not much indication this is likely to change, either.)

    As for his remarkable* self-absorption, perhaps his spending fifty-five minutes of a sixty-minute speech talking about himself and five minutes talking about The American People is simply his way of showing what he really thinks of them?

    *Notice how I resisted the temptation to use the word “unseemly”? It wasn’t easy!

  27. But Trump is a weird bird.

    What do you call a white guy who:
    1. fathered a family of respectable children (the apple does not fall far from the tree)
    2. published a best seller book
    3. had a hit TV show
    4. lead a multi-billion dollar business empire
    5. was President of the US for his first political job (in the face of overwhelming opposition to, and ridicule for, his running for that position)

    I’d call him sui generis but I do not apostheosize the NYT and CNN.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  28. OT — The Washington Post says that Volodymyr Zelensky deliberately avoided war preparations to make money.
    https://archive.ph/FH07a

    You can’t simply say to me, “Listen, you should start to prepare people now and tell them they need to put away money, they need to store up food.” If we had communicated that — and that is what some people wanted, who I will not name — then I would have been losing \$7 billion a month since last October, and at the moment when the Russians did attack, they would have taken us in three days. I’m not saying whose idea it was, but generally, our inner sense was right: If we sow chaos among people before the invasion, the Russians will devour us. Because during chaos, people flee the country.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @J.Ross

    https://twitter.com/washingtonpost/status/1560582394507313156
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2022/08/18/zelensky-ukraine-wapo-interview-warn-of-war/
    https://archive.ph/uHIkC

  29. @Harry Baldwin
    @Trinity

    Joe Rogan has shaken Trump's hand. He says "Not small. Regular-sized hand." Rogan doesn't like Trump so I'll take this as an admission against interest.

    Replies: @Hannah Katz, @Trinity

    Speaking of comparisons, you know how LeBron differs from Kyle Rittenhouse? Kyle hits his shots when under pressure.

  30. Anon[369] • Disclaimer says:

    Ron Unz’s article dealing with Sydney Schanberg sent me to his Wikipedia page were I found this hilarious bit:

    On September 14, 1987, Schanberg published a Newsday editorial entitled “Donald Trump-Public-Relations Master”… He called Trump a “public-relations virtuoso”, described an ongoing feud with then-New York City Mayor Ed Koch (who Trump called a “moron” and a “jerk”), provided numerous instances of Trump’s claims of superior intellect (“It would take an hour and a half to learn everything there is to learn about missiles. I think I know most of it anyway.”)

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sydney_Schanberg

    🤣🤣🤣

    If I had 1/1,000,000 of Trump’s confidence I’d feel like I had a superpower.

  31. @Trinity
    I saw one of Shaw's shoes at Pete & Shorts in Clearwater. Thing was enormous with or without Trump's small hands. teehee.

    How does a 6' plus man have such small hands? Heredity or soft living?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Buzz Mohawk, @Harry Baldwin, @JR Ewing, @Jack D, @SunBakedSuburb

    How does a 6′ plus man have such small hands? Heredity or soft living?

    It’s all heredity.

    I am about 6-3 and only wear size 12 shoes and have very stubby toes and fingers like Fred Flintsone.

    I wear XXL gloves but only because my hands are thick through the middle. There’s usually about 1/2″ of slack on the fingers. The girth comes from the weight room and manual outdoor labor over the years but the length of my fingers will never change.

    Luckily the men in my wife’s family have bigger hands and feet and that’s what my kids inherited. Both are teenagers and both have bigger hands and feet than me already and they tease me for it. The teasing would bother me if I weren’t so relieved for their sports careers.

  32. Now that everybody else has had their stupid take on Deshaun Watson I will give you my politically toxic stupid take.

    Nobody gives a flying f**k about the sex harassment of hot instagram massage therapists / whores. If you are a whore getting sex harassed is part of the point of it. If I was on the jury those bitches do not get a dollar. Not a dollar.

    Sheesh.

    If Deshaun Watson wasn’t trying to be a milquetoast nice guy when they show up at the front door he asks them how much for a blowjob before he lets them inside. This is exactly what you get for trying to be polite to a whore. The pretense ain’t just stupid it can cost you millions if you are Watson’s pay grade.

  33. @J.Ross
    We have a concrete example of an unqualified boorish climbing moron mishandling secrets: it's Hillary, who got a diplomat killed. There's also every congresscritter who depended on the Awans for IT services, plus Eric Swalwell. Not verifying but I'm going to guess that this Haberman person is cool with that.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Alden, @Curle

    Maggie Haberman is the epitome of smug establishment journalism. There is always an undercurrent of snobbery in her writing and her online presence.

    “Trump is just so… gauche. How can you yokels support him?”

    “Oh, you’re trying to argue online with me about Trump? Go away, peasant.”

    “I work for the New York Times… you?”

  34. @AnotherDad
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    KPK. I think you and TAG nailed it.

    But what happens when someone who is not Trump, runs with Trump's soft-nationalism--immigration restrictionism, building the wall, America first.

    They feel--know--that Trump's opinions are so unseemly.


    We are simply separate peoples now. We have this post-sanity contingent of verbalist overclass parasites who simply do not believe in--find unseemly--the core requirements of maintaining civilization--keeping invaders out, eugenic fertility, the rule-of-law, marriage, producing what you consume, heck even that there are hard biological categories like "men" and "women".

    I just do not even see the point. Let them have what they want.... just not with us.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Prester John

    I just do not even see the point. Let them have what they want…. just not with us.

    If only they would let us.

    I think that most residents of the Trump supporting red states would be fine with being left alone and leaving the blue states alone except for the very few shared responsibilities outlined in the constitution: defense, currency, regulation of (actual) interstate commerce. This is the very essence of federalism.

    But the blue states wouldn’t be satisfied with that because their mission is to save the less fortunate from themselves, and by virtue of not living in New York or California, the red state residents are “less fortunate” by definition.

    • Agree: J.Ross
  35. @Harry Baldwin
    @Trinity

    Joe Rogan has shaken Trump's hand. He says "Not small. Regular-sized hand." Rogan doesn't like Trump so I'll take this as an admission against interest.

    Replies: @Hannah Katz, @Trinity

    Yeah, but Joe Rogan is like 5’7″ in heels. Lolol.

  36. Mainstream Media sets the discourse. They throw up a few photos and title them out of context, simultaneously post some borderline defamatory articles setting out a polarised either or case, devoid of context, then throw their hands up in non-conclusion declaring that the public has decided, with a trailing online poll, parameters of which have already been narrowed to affirm only one dominant narrative: that of the mainstream media.

    Every day the same formula is followed and no matter how many times they’ve been found out the same public continues to follow them for information as a reliable and trusted source no matter how many times before they’ve been found to be unmitigated liars in the service of an evil cause.

    People say that mainstream media doesn’t exist, what with tik tok, youtube, instagram and facebook shorts. That porn is a choice and not a bludgeon of the innocent soul.

    It’s astounding to me that even the greatest minds of the internet pay no heed to the impression of electronic media on our people’s minds and so, their souls.

    What’s even more crazy is that we’re all gonna be obsessed with a fat tv reality star vs whatever lame brained deep state apparatchik they’ll have up next. It’s dopey to think that that the majority of us will get caught up with this, even Anglin is completely onboard the sideshow.

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    @Pat Hannagan

    That the public will follow mainstream media is like Sailer on an irrelevant factoid in search of an essay to value add a niche relevance profit stream.

    Levels upon levels of media all feeding off the one false source.

    All in service to a false discourse.

    We've got no other destiny than to be cursed to be born into this turmoil.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k5o1-HxaRFM

  37. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Trinity

    Heredity. There is no way to "grow" your hands through manual labor.

    Replies: @Trinity

    You can’t increase the length of your hands or fingers but you can definitely develop thicker and wider hands through manual labor, old school garage monkeys who turned wrenches all day, brick layers, roofers, etc. You would never see anyone in those occupations with hands like Trump. Even smaller guys develop, thick, muscled and veiny hands, not large hands but strong and capable hands.

    Exercise enthusiasts develop thick strong hands through rope climbing, pullups, monkey bars, weightlifting exercises like deadlifts, grippers, or just hanging from pull up bar. I imagine the mitts of mountain climbers are thick and muscled. Male gymnasts are generally small men who thickened and possibly made their hands wider through exercise.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Trinity

    I had the privilege of holding Abraham Lincoln's hands in my own, and they were impressive.

    Let me explain:

    I was a dinner guest at the home of a collector of art and interesting items. On a shelf in the living room, he kept a pair of rare bronze castings of Lincoln's hands. They were created from plaster life casts that were made by sculptor Leonard Volk in 1860 with Lincoln's cooperation.

    Augustus Saint-Gaudens oversaw the making of the bronzes in the 1880s. My host encouraged me to pick them up and examine them.

    The hands were a bit bigger than mine. The fingers were longer, thicker and stronger-looking, and I have done plenty of outdoor work. By holding copies-from-life of the Rail Splitter's hands and studying the details, I sensed a physically-impressive man. It was a meaningful experience, a kind of time travel.

    Here is a link to an interesting article I found about the works:

    https://www.artic.edu/articles/931/stilled-life-the-hands-and-face-of-abraham-lincoln-by-leonard-volk

    Replies: @rebel yell, @Ghost of Bull Moose

  38. @Pat Hannagan
    Mainstream Media sets the discourse. They throw up a few photos and title them out of context, simultaneously post some borderline defamatory articles setting out a polarised either or case, devoid of context, then throw their hands up in non-conclusion declaring that the public has decided, with a trailing online poll, parameters of which have already been narrowed to affirm only one dominant narrative: that of the mainstream media.

    Every day the same formula is followed and no matter how many times they've been found out the same public continues to follow them for information as a reliable and trusted source no matter how many times before they've been found to be unmitigated liars in the service of an evil cause.

    People say that mainstream media doesn't exist, what with tik tok, youtube, instagram and facebook shorts. That porn is a choice and not a bludgeon of the innocent soul.

    It's astounding to me that even the greatest minds of the internet pay no heed to the impression of electronic media on our people's minds and so, their souls.

    What's even more crazy is that we're all gonna be obsessed with a fat tv reality star vs whatever lame brained deep state apparatchik they'll have up next. It's dopey to think that that the majority of us will get caught up with this, even Anglin is completely onboard the sideshow.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3IDWmr4nLY

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

    That the public will follow mainstream media is like Sailer on an irrelevant factoid in search of an essay to value add a niche relevance profit stream.

    Levels upon levels of media all feeding off the one false source.

    All in service to a false discourse.

    We’ve got no other destiny than to be cursed to be born into this turmoil.

  39. Of course “both sides” are covering up for Israel and their agents in the US government.

    The original NYT “leak” said “US nuclear intelligence on IRAN … including signals intelligence.”

    https://bannedhipster.home.blog/2022/08/16/both-sides-on-script-re-fbi-trump-raid/

    In the same article they said such classified materials were routinely “mishandled” in the Trump administration and wound up in the hands of people without “authorization” or a “need to know.”

    Remember when there was a “controversy” over Jared Kushner getting security clearances? Kushner was “in charge of the Middle East.”

    This isn’t rocket science, it is just “our” media doesn’t want to say “Jewish Americans in the US government spying for Israel.”

    Certainly Merrick Garland and his placer, 9/11 Commissioner Jamie Gorelick, don’t want to say “Israel” either.

    So “both sides” are making up silly nonsense to avoid the issue of Jewish Americans in the US government spying for the Jewish state, Israel.

  40. @AnotherDad
    @Polistra


    Not watching the video but his endless insecurity / need to brag (same thing, of course) is almost touching. Almost.
     
    Trump is a hero for at least acting like the American people's interests should matter and bringing a hint of nationalism back to our politics.

    But Trump is a weird bird.

    For an alpha male--a guy who has been a huge success in business and popular culture--he is weirdly insecure. The guy gets in pissing matches with people who are wave-off material. He can give a speech and it will be mostly about Donald J. Trump--perhaps the defense of Donald J. Trump from some b.s. from some nobody--and five minutes on the American people. (And yeah, who needs all that junk from ... other people.)

    If he does come back, I sure hope he brings a whole lot more "whatever" to the personal attacks and a whole lot more "what's good for the American people".

    Replies: @Ralph L, @Luddite in Chief, @Bardon Kaldian, @Jack D, @SFG, @Anonymous

    The point is that the highest level politics is turned into celebrity culture second-ratedness.

    I think that in the US it began with the playboy JFK. Anyway, it all intensified in the last one or two decades.

    Second rate clowns (who may be good at manipulations, but, still …).

    For instance, take Macron. What a piece of work. One should tell him: You are the President of France. You are de Gaulle. De Gaulle doesn’t behave like idiotic clown.

    Or that embarrassment of Scholz, or, earlier, Schroeder. Schroeder worked, after he lost office, as the chairman of the board of Nord Stream AG and of Rosneft, after having been hired as a global manager by investment bank Rothschild, and also the chairman of the board of football club Hannover 96.

    You are the German Chancellor. You are Bismarck. Bismarck doesn’t work as some kind of businessman-bureaucrat in a company.

    The last example is Finnish PM. Although the parallel is not technically exact (president & PM), she is the leader of Finland. And?

    https://edition.cnn.com/2022/08/18/europe/sanna-marin-finland-partying-video-intl/index.html

    Finnish PM says videos of her ‘boisterous’ partying shouldn’t have been made public

    https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/sanna-marin-finland-pm-trendi-photoshoot-intl-scli/index.html

    You are the leader of Finland. You are Mannerheim. And Mannerheim doesn’t go around partying & showing tits.

    Second & third rate people ….

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Sanna was raised by a lesbian couple and believes that normal and a model of a loving family.

    , @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The Finnish prime minister is at heart just a boisterous sorority girl.

    But at least she isn’t fat.

    , @Yngvar
    @Bardon Kaldian

    It's just so unseemly!

    , @Alden
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Who knows what Mannerheim did in his private life? And with whom? Many of the late 19th century high commanders of the German army Bismarck promoted were gay and cross dressers.

    The Finnish PM filmed dancing while under the influence of something, with a man not her husband; gasp, clutch pearls, collapse on the fainting couch; has not damaged her country the way Frau straight and narrow Angela Merkel did to Germany. Or what prim and proper Dianne Feinstein and Nancy Pelosi and their husbands have done to the United States.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  41. @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!
     
    Yep, absolutely. This is THE reason people on the left and the deep state elite really really hate him. I move in some elite left wing circles, and when he announced his campaign, the horror over the "unseemliness" was constantly expressed.

    "This guy has gold faucets in his penthouse."
    "The hair! The worst combover ever."
    "My god, a bankrupt real estate guy with a stupid reality TV show"

    Of course the married White chicks in this circle took an instant loathing to him -- philanderer, dumping the old hit-the-wall wife for a shiny new model (with a hint of an escort about her).

    The visceral amygdala driven disgust of these women was beyond palpable--the rich Alpha male who always got the other cuter girl...but never ME! ME!!

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Hangnail Hans, @Thoughts, @Jack D, @Curle, @Currahee, @Muggles, @Ben tillman, @Nicholas Stix

    As opposed to Joe Biden, who was a really classy dude who did NOT have a comb over or a coke sniffing, hooker loving son.

    No one really had a problem with Trump before he got into politics. Democrats practice the politics of personal destruction – if someone is “bad” politically then they are “bad” on a personal level. They practice Beria’s maxim – show me the man and I’ll show you the crime. Trump could have been a choir boy and once he embraced these political positions they would have found a way to hate him anyway.

    Dr. Oz was once upon a time a perfectly acceptable member of the Hollywood crowd, hanging around with Oprah, etc. But now that control of the Senate is in the balance, he is the most evil carpet bagger dude every, as if Democrats had anything against carpetbaggers (see Hillary).

    • Replies: @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @Jack D


    As opposed to Joe Biden, who was a really classy dude who did NOT have a comb over or a coke sniffing, hooker loving son.

    No one really had a problem with Trump before he got into politics. Democrats practice the politics of personal destruction – if someone is “bad” politically then they are “bad” on a personal level.
     

    True enough as far as it goes, and of course, Dems get a pass from the left BECAUSE they are Dems.

    Again, for the vast majority of elite Leftoids in business and academia, it wasn't that they didn't have a problem with Trump, it's that Trump wasn't even on their radar.

    He was from a different planet. But when he arrived on THEIR planet, the reaction wasn't "You know let's hear what the guy has to say and what he thinks about the country and where it should go."

    Nope, it was those darn gold faucets in Trump Tower, and it still continues to be. And remember, the elite media couldn't help themselves either.

    Their vision of what a President should be is smooth talking Obama, or some Hollywood version of a president, a Martin Sheen or a Michael Douglas. Polished. Empathetic.

    Biden is the exception, But remember Biden "won" because he was the alternative to the unseemly guy with the big red tie, the trophy wife, and the gold faucets.

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Jack D

    Both parties have a tendency to attack individual candidates and hominem rather than address their policy positions.

    What this shows is that swing voters in the United States are generally poorly informed.

    It would be nice if every candidate for federal office had to complete a handwritten questionnaire delineating their positions on the 20 most pressing issues of the day.

    This could then be used as the basis for discussions as whether voters want to elect them.

    An example of this was that recently I read an interview with some anti-abortion politician, I don't even remember who, who said that in all the years up to the reversal of Roe versus Wade, he had never considered what legislation should look like "at a granular level".

    And yet the issue of abortion has always been a nuanced granular one for anybody who takes public policy seriously.

    The reason we elect legislators is so that they can legislate sensible laws at a granular level. Isn't that part of the reason why we have so many attorneys in legislatures?

  42. Was it here?

    A plurality of Democrats believe our border is being invaded.

  43. @epebble
    This story has a strong smell of comedy. Nobody will mistake a TS/SCI document as a souvenir. Now, if he has his father's brain or mothers' heart in formaldehyde in his office clutter .....

    Replies: @Ray P

    Clarice: Most serial killers keep some sort of trophies from their victims
    Hannibal: I didn’t
    Clarice: No, no, you ate yours

  44. @Trinity
    I saw one of Shaw's shoes at Pete & Shorts in Clearwater. Thing was enormous with or without Trump's small hands. teehee.

    How does a 6' plus man have such small hands? Heredity or soft living?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Buzz Mohawk, @Harry Baldwin, @JR Ewing, @Jack D, @SunBakedSuburb

    It’s a stupid issue – who cares how big his hands are? It started it the ’80 when when Spy magazine (and future Vanity Fair editor ) Graydon Carter took to referring to him as a “short-fingered vulgarian.” His other choice of epithet was “Queens born casino operator” but “short fingered vulgarian” won out. The snobbishness just oozes from these titles. Trump contested it rather than ignoring it. The elites think that “aha, we got to him – we are so cool that we would never acknowledge an insult” but the fact that Trump fights back only endears him more to his base.

    But “short fingered” is a little different than small hands and actually has a element of truth. The truth is that Donald is a bit pudgy and this includes having pudgy, puffy hands. This makes his hands out of proportion and makes his digits appear shorter than they really are because they are partly buried in the fat of his hands.

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    @Jack D

    Right. We've got to get beyond personalities and into issues.

    https://youtu.be/I7f7gBv0TjE?t=525

    At some stage in the future people would begin to act rational.

    Until then, we're stuck with the present day.

    , @hhsiii
    @Jack D

    Yeah, I remember that. What ws their name for Henry Kravis? I used to think he was the short-fingered vulgarian; something about dwarfish buyout maven.

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    I thought it was a rumor started by Sylvester Stallone, who is a really good story teller.

  45. @AnotherDad
    @Polistra


    Not watching the video but his endless insecurity / need to brag (same thing, of course) is almost touching. Almost.
     
    Trump is a hero for at least acting like the American people's interests should matter and bringing a hint of nationalism back to our politics.

    But Trump is a weird bird.

    For an alpha male--a guy who has been a huge success in business and popular culture--he is weirdly insecure. The guy gets in pissing matches with people who are wave-off material. He can give a speech and it will be mostly about Donald J. Trump--perhaps the defense of Donald J. Trump from some b.s. from some nobody--and five minutes on the American people. (And yeah, who needs all that junk from ... other people.)

    If he does come back, I sure hope he brings a whole lot more "whatever" to the personal attacks and a whole lot more "what's good for the American people".

    Replies: @Ralph L, @Luddite in Chief, @Bardon Kaldian, @Jack D, @SFG, @Anonymous

    guy who has been a huge success in business and popular culture–he is weirdly insecure.

    It’s not weird at all. First of all, in NY society terms, he was never accepted – he was a bridge & tunnel dude from Queens. Trump Tower was for Eurotrash and Arabs and so on who could never get past a coop board on Park Avenue.

    2nd his huge success was always overplayed (by Trump) – mostly of what he did was in effect a bust out scheme. He would overborrow from banks and investors and pay himself lavishly and then after a few years the project would go bust and the banks and investors would take a bath. How many real billionaires want to go on reality TV? Trump needed the \$. He in effect PLAYED a billionaire on TV.

    So it’s completely unsurprising that he has a chip on his shoulder. The chip on his shoulder is also part of his shtick, which only makes him more endearing to his supporters.

    Look, the insecurity worked for him – it took him all the way to the White House. If he had been a more secure person he might have been content to drink himself to death with his father’s money, the way that his brother did.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Jack D

    He's the only guy in his class who wan't okay with normalizing rape and murder, on that alone I'll take him.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    2nd his huge success was always overplayed (by Trump) – mostly of what he did was in effect a bust out scheme
     
    My impression: I would not want to be in business with Trump. He doesn't radiate "solid midwestern farmer, man-of-his-word", he radiates "huckster".

    But if all he did was a sleazy "bust out" scheme, then the banks should have stopped loaning him money--a very long time ago.

    My impression is that Trump's big success was making the right call on the come back of NYC real estate in the 80s after the 70s doldrums. And after than he had the reputation to get loans ... but a couple of his grandiose casino/resort projects were dubious--or simply just the "wrong call"--and went tits up.

    ~~

    But what i'm talking about is not insecurity about origins or being accepted by polite society or any of that. It's Trump's habit of getting into these pissing matches with nobodies who take shots at him. To me, if you're alpha, you have self-confidence and the natterings of nobodies are nothing. They are not even pinpricks and you just roll on doing what you do.

    Replies: @Drive-by poster, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    , @David In TN
    @Jack D

    Trump talks too much, thinks out loud, says stupid things into an open microphone. For example, when Ghislaine Maxwell was arrested in 2020, Trump said, "I wish her well." Stupid.

    Re 2024, Trump is a political dead end, a 78 year old lame duck in the extremely unlikely event he won. Why, in heaven's name , do people think he will do things he never did when he was in the White house with the pen and phone?

    Trump's phenomenal energy for a man his age is going to run out. He may have a health issue. He's too old anyway.

    By the way, I voted for him twice.

  46. @Jack D
    @Trinity

    It's a stupid issue - who cares how big his hands are? It started it the '80 when when Spy magazine (and future Vanity Fair editor ) Graydon Carter took to referring to him as a “short-fingered vulgarian.” His other choice of epithet was "Queens born casino operator" but "short fingered vulgarian" won out. The snobbishness just oozes from these titles. Trump contested it rather than ignoring it. The elites think that "aha, we got to him - we are so cool that we would never acknowledge an insult" but the fact that Trump fights back only endears him more to his base.

    But "short fingered" is a little different than small hands and actually has a element of truth. The truth is that Donald is a bit pudgy and this includes having pudgy, puffy hands. This makes his hands out of proportion and makes his digits appear shorter than they really are because they are partly buried in the fat of his hands.

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan, @hhsiii, @Buzz Mohawk

    Right. We’ve got to get beyond personalities and into issues.

    At some stage in the future people would begin to act rational.

    Until then, we’re stuck with the present day.

  47. @J.Ross
    We have a concrete example of an unqualified boorish climbing moron mishandling secrets: it's Hillary, who got a diplomat killed. There's also every congresscritter who depended on the Awans for IT services, plus Eric Swalwell. Not verifying but I'm going to guess that this Haberman person is cool with that.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Alden, @Curle

    Hillary got several non diplomat US State Department employees killed as well.

    • Thanks: J.Ross
    • Replies: @Che Blutarsky
    @Alden

    Hillary got several non diplomat US State Department employees killed as well.

    So she's even responsible for a few deaths that she didn't directly order.

  48. @J.Ross
    We have a concrete example of an unqualified boorish climbing moron mishandling secrets: it's Hillary, who got a diplomat killed. There's also every congresscritter who depended on the Awans for IT services, plus Eric Swalwell. Not verifying but I'm going to guess that this Haberman person is cool with that.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Alden, @Curle

    Who by the way is pear shaped and looks like an penguin when she walks.

  49. @AnotherDad
    @Polistra


    Not watching the video but his endless insecurity / need to brag (same thing, of course) is almost touching. Almost.
     
    Trump is a hero for at least acting like the American people's interests should matter and bringing a hint of nationalism back to our politics.

    But Trump is a weird bird.

    For an alpha male--a guy who has been a huge success in business and popular culture--he is weirdly insecure. The guy gets in pissing matches with people who are wave-off material. He can give a speech and it will be mostly about Donald J. Trump--perhaps the defense of Donald J. Trump from some b.s. from some nobody--and five minutes on the American people. (And yeah, who needs all that junk from ... other people.)

    If he does come back, I sure hope he brings a whole lot more "whatever" to the personal attacks and a whole lot more "what's good for the American people".

    Replies: @Ralph L, @Luddite in Chief, @Bardon Kaldian, @Jack D, @SFG, @Anonymous

    Trump pissed off the left and energized them without doing much for the right. He annoyed feminists and got MeToo going, but he removed tax deductibility of alimony. He mobilized ethnic activists with jokes about taco bowls and bad hombres, but didn’t build the wall or repeal affirmative action. We got the worst of both worldS-the left energized, the right anesthetized (because we’re winning, man!).

    • Replies: @jsm
    @SFG

    Agreed about no wall, SFG.

    But I've said before. I'll say again: Trump did something amazing for us, something so valuable and enduring that a mere wall, a thing that could be torn down by the next admin, pales in comparison. He pants'd the entire mainstream media and establishment Republicans, revealed them to be the anti-white liars they are.

    And once you've seen it, you can't unsee it.

    That is a legacy that will last a very long time, indeed.

    In fact, as a direct result of what Trump showed us, us Wyoming voters tossed Lizard Cheney out on her ample tail, and by a margin so great it's breathtaking. (Hageman won by almost 38 percentage points.) Because of what Trump showed us, us Wyomingites gave a big fat raspberry to the entire bunch of warmongering Cheneys, taking away their ability to send White American boys to pointless meatgrinder wars to be maimed and brain-damaged.

    Sending the Cheneys packing is one in the win column. An unqualified, straight-up, no-arguments win, and I hope and believe it's only the beginning.

    Thank you, President Donald John Trump! You rock!

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @SFG

    Talked the talk, didn't walk the walk.

    Unlike, I hope, this guy .....

    https://edition.cnn.com/2022/08/17/uk/scotland-period-dignity-scli-intl-wellness-gbr/index.html

    Scottish local authorities come under fire for appointing man as 'period dignity officer'

    Local authorities in Scotland have come in for criticism after they appointed a man to the role of period dignity officer, responsible for coordinating the region's response to a new law that makes menstrual products free to access in the country.

    A group of colleges and local councils in Tay region in eastern Scotland announced the appointment of Jason Grant, who previously worked as a student wellbeing officer at a local college, to the role on Thursday.

    https://cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/220817094032-jason-grant-exlarge-169.jpeg

    However, critics argue that a woman would have been better suited to the job.
    .........................................
    Grant's role is the first of its kind in Scotland.

    "He will coordinate and streamline the approach to 'Period Dignity' across the area by working directly with the colleges and local authorities," Grainger PR said in a press release announcing the appointment, which was made by a working group of .

    "Jason will lead a regional campaign across schools, colleges and wider communities, raising awareness and understanding of the new Act and ensuring that the Scottish Government funding is allocated appropriately," it said.

    The Period Products Act came into force on Monday and means that menstrual products, including tampons and pads, will be made available free of charge in public facilities in Scotland.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

  50. Serious question – Who (individual or agency or administrative position, etc.) has greater authority to determine what documents are classified/non-classified/etc. than the POTUS?
    And what is the mechanism that they use to enforce their decisions?

  51. @AnotherDad
    I've got my letter from Kim Jong-un framed here on the wall.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @TontoBubbaGoldstein

    I’ve got my letter from Kim Jong-un framed here on the wall.

    I’ve got two – not one, but two – E-mails from Nigerian princes framed and hanging on my wall.

  52. @The Anti-Gnostic
    As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!

    I mean really. I never.

    Replies: @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Mr. Anon, @Ben tillman

    As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!

    I mean really. I never.

    That’s a lot of it, at least for the rank-and-file upwardly mobile Democratic voter. Their politics are largely a lifestyle choice. They wish not to be seen with the wrong kind of people or holding unfashionable views. They couldn’t possible vote for somebody so vulgar.

    For the moneyed interests that own the Democratic Party (and the Republican Party too, for that matter) – their objection to Trump was more than that. Trump’s election was a deviation from their plan – a hiccup in the uniparty con-job. The hoi-polloi are not supposed to get so far as to actually give voice to their actual concerns. They are trying to stamp Trump into the Earth only to stamp on those who support him – to make it plain to them that they don’t get what they want. Ever.

    A lot of people (Trump supporters) are taking the line: You’re not going to get away with it! He’s our guy!

    My line is: He’s not our guy anyway – not really. Stamp away! We’ll still be here.

    • Agree: rebel yell
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Mr. Anon

    Mr. Anon wrote:


    That’s a lot of it, at least for the rank-and-file upwardly mobile Democratic voter. Their politics are largely a lifestyle choice. They wish not to be seen with the wrong kind of people or holding unfashionable views. They couldn’t possible vote for somebody so vulgar.

    For the moneyed interests that own the Democratic Party (and the Republican Party too, for that matter) – their objection to Trump was more than that. Trump’s election was a deviation from their plan – a hiccup in the uniparty con-job.
     
    Yeah.

    We need to keep this clearly in mind.

    I've been puzzling for quite a while over the deep hatred directed towards Trump.

    Trump's actual policies, after all, are pretty mainstream: Bill Clinton could have signed on to many of Trump's policies back in the '90s.

    But Trump is not under the control of the Deep State. He said nasty things about the Deep State back in the 2016 campaign. And therefore -- as Chuck Schumer publicly warned Trump -- they are out to destroy him.

    The random suburban fluff-heads who despise Trump are of course just being manipulated by the Deep State. They lack the ability to choose their own clothes without deferring to what is "in fashion" for this year.

    Only marginally human.

    What is most interesting is the media's (and the fluffheads') beliefs as to why half the country supports Trump: it must be Trump voters' atavistic prejudice and insecurity, etc.

    I think the ruling class -- people like Corvinus, James Shearer, Jack D, etc. -- really do not grasp that Trump voters have a, quite justifiable, hatred, for the unproductive parasitic class that has been milking the ordinary workers in this country for so long.

    To understand the hatred that the victims have for the victimizers would require the victimizers to look in the mirror and actually see the face of evil staring back.

    And that they cannot do.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Mr. Anon

  53. @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!
     
    Yep, absolutely. This is THE reason people on the left and the deep state elite really really hate him. I move in some elite left wing circles, and when he announced his campaign, the horror over the "unseemliness" was constantly expressed.

    "This guy has gold faucets in his penthouse."
    "The hair! The worst combover ever."
    "My god, a bankrupt real estate guy with a stupid reality TV show"

    Of course the married White chicks in this circle took an instant loathing to him -- philanderer, dumping the old hit-the-wall wife for a shiny new model (with a hint of an escort about her).

    The visceral amygdala driven disgust of these women was beyond palpable--the rich Alpha male who always got the other cuter girl...but never ME! ME!!

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Hangnail Hans, @Thoughts, @Jack D, @Curle, @Currahee, @Muggles, @Ben tillman, @Nicholas Stix

    Yea. Same reaction to Andrew Jackson.

  54. He mobilized ethnic activists

    This is an absurd criticism of Trump. Any Republican candidate, even a milquetoast like Romney is going to energize the ethnic activists. They don’t need any evidence. Biden has said more “racist” things than any presidential candidate since Wallace and he gets a pass, because Democrat.

    but didn’t build the wall

    You blame Trump for that, and not Paul Ryan and other RINOs who refused to support it? What did you expect Trump to do?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Harry Baldwin

    Strong agree. I love these illiterate morons who take this tack and call for DeSantis as though DeSantis was not already being defamed as a Nazi.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Harry Baldwin


    but didn’t build the wall

    You blame Trump for that, and not Paul Ryan and other RINOs who refused to support it? What did you expect Trump to do?
     
    RINOs like Paul Ryan are complete garbage. Worthless sub-humans who should be paraded naked through the city, pelted with shit, then have their heads on pikes in the city square. But ... the Wall was not Paul Ryan's platform. Paul Ryan is known garage. That's the point.

    The Wall is the American People's platform--Trump's platform. It was Trump's job to insist on the Wall--everything, complete funding, approval, etc.--in any deal with the devil (a.k.a. Ryan). No Wall--no deal.

    There is zero reason why we do not have a complete wall--right now! The whole thing could easily have been built during Trump's presidency. And once built, it becomes much more politically difficult/embarrassing/outrageous for Biden to knock it down to allow the invasion he's waving in now.

    But we don't have it. We do not have it because Trump lacked the discipline and will to insist on it. People blab, blab, blab into Trump's ear and whisper sweet nothings and puff up his ego and ... the interests of the American people are out the window. Trump got "Art of the Deal"ed by Paul Ryan. Yeah, that is precisely Trump's fault.

    Replies: @Polistra

  55. @SFG
    @AnotherDad

    Trump pissed off the left and energized them without doing much for the right. He annoyed feminists and got MeToo going, but he removed tax deductibility of alimony. He mobilized ethnic activists with jokes about taco bowls and bad hombres, but didn’t build the wall or repeal affirmative action. We got the worst of both worldS-the left energized, the right anesthetized (because we’re winning, man!).

    Replies: @jsm, @Bardon Kaldian

    Agreed about no wall, SFG.

    But I’ve said before. I’ll say again: Trump did something amazing for us, something so valuable and enduring that a mere wall, a thing that could be torn down by the next admin, pales in comparison. He pants’d the entire mainstream media and establishment Republicans, revealed them to be the anti-white liars they are.

    And once you’ve seen it, you can’t unsee it.

    That is a legacy that will last a very long time, indeed.

    In fact, as a direct result of what Trump showed us, us Wyoming voters tossed Lizard Cheney out on her ample tail, and by a margin so great it’s breathtaking. (Hageman won by almost 38 percentage points.) Because of what Trump showed us, us Wyomingites gave a big fat raspberry to the entire bunch of warmongering Cheneys, taking away their ability to send White American boys to pointless meatgrinder wars to be maimed and brain-damaged.

    Sending the Cheneys packing is one in the win column. An unqualified, straight-up, no-arguments win, and I hope and believe it’s only the beginning.

    Thank you, President Donald John Trump! You rock!

  56. @SFG
    @AnotherDad

    Trump pissed off the left and energized them without doing much for the right. He annoyed feminists and got MeToo going, but he removed tax deductibility of alimony. He mobilized ethnic activists with jokes about taco bowls and bad hombres, but didn’t build the wall or repeal affirmative action. We got the worst of both worldS-the left energized, the right anesthetized (because we’re winning, man!).

    Replies: @jsm, @Bardon Kaldian

    Talked the talk, didn’t walk the walk.

    Unlike, I hope, this guy …..

    https://edition.cnn.com/2022/08/17/uk/scotland-period-dignity-scli-intl-wellness-gbr/index.html

    Scottish local authorities come under fire for appointing man as ‘period dignity officer’

    Local authorities in Scotland have come in for criticism after they appointed a man to the role of period dignity officer, responsible for coordinating the region’s response to a new law that makes menstrual products free to access in the country.

    A group of colleges and local councils in Tay region in eastern Scotland announced the appointment of Jason Grant, who previously worked as a student wellbeing officer at a local college, to the role on Thursday.

    However, critics argue that a woman would have been better suited to the job.
    …………………………………..
    Grant’s role is the first of its kind in Scotland.

    “He will coordinate and streamline the approach to ‘Period Dignity’ across the area by working directly with the colleges and local authorities,” Grainger PR said in a press release announcing the appointment, which was made by a working group of .

    “Jason will lead a regional campaign across schools, colleges and wider communities, raising awareness and understanding of the new Act and ensuring that the Scottish Government funding is allocated appropriately,” it said.

    The Period Products Act came into force on Monday and means that menstrual products, including tampons and pads, will be made available free of charge in public facilities in Scotland.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I like the fact that he's wearing a red shirt.

  57. @Jack D
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    As opposed to Joe Biden, who was a really classy dude who did NOT have a comb over or a coke sniffing, hooker loving son.

    No one really had a problem with Trump before he got into politics. Democrats practice the politics of personal destruction - if someone is "bad" politically then they are "bad" on a personal level. They practice Beria's maxim - show me the man and I'll show you the crime. Trump could have been a choir boy and once he embraced these political positions they would have found a way to hate him anyway.

    Dr. Oz was once upon a time a perfectly acceptable member of the Hollywood crowd, hanging around with Oprah, etc. But now that control of the Senate is in the balance, he is the most evil carpet bagger dude every, as if Democrats had anything against carpetbaggers (see Hillary).

    Replies: @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Jonathan Mason

    As opposed to Joe Biden, who was a really classy dude who did NOT have a comb over or a coke sniffing, hooker loving son.

    No one really had a problem with Trump before he got into politics. Democrats practice the politics of personal destruction – if someone is “bad” politically then they are “bad” on a personal level.

    True enough as far as it goes, and of course, Dems get a pass from the left BECAUSE they are Dems.

    Again, for the vast majority of elite Leftoids in business and academia, it wasn’t that they didn’t have a problem with Trump, it’s that Trump wasn’t even on their radar.

    He was from a different planet. But when he arrived on THEIR planet, the reaction wasn’t “You know let’s hear what the guy has to say and what he thinks about the country and where it should go.”

    Nope, it was those darn gold faucets in Trump Tower, and it still continues to be. And remember, the elite media couldn’t help themselves either.

    Their vision of what a President should be is smooth talking Obama, or some Hollywood version of a president, a Martin Sheen or a Michael Douglas. Polished. Empathetic.

    Biden is the exception, But remember Biden “won” because he was the alternative to the unseemly guy with the big red tie, the trophy wife, and the gold faucets.

  58. @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!
     
    Yep, absolutely. This is THE reason people on the left and the deep state elite really really hate him. I move in some elite left wing circles, and when he announced his campaign, the horror over the "unseemliness" was constantly expressed.

    "This guy has gold faucets in his penthouse."
    "The hair! The worst combover ever."
    "My god, a bankrupt real estate guy with a stupid reality TV show"

    Of course the married White chicks in this circle took an instant loathing to him -- philanderer, dumping the old hit-the-wall wife for a shiny new model (with a hint of an escort about her).

    The visceral amygdala driven disgust of these women was beyond palpable--the rich Alpha male who always got the other cuter girl...but never ME! ME!!

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Hangnail Hans, @Thoughts, @Jack D, @Curle, @Currahee, @Muggles, @Ben tillman, @Nicholas Stix

    Trump impressed me as a character left out of Bonfire of the Vanities.

  59. @Harry Baldwin
    He mobilized ethnic activists

    This is an absurd criticism of Trump. Any Republican candidate, even a milquetoast like Romney is going to energize the ethnic activists. They don't need any evidence. Biden has said more "racist" things than any presidential candidate since Wallace and he gets a pass, because Democrat.

    but didn’t build the wall

    You blame Trump for that, and not Paul Ryan and other RINOs who refused to support it? What did you expect Trump to do?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @AnotherDad

    Strong agree. I love these illiterate morons who take this tack and call for DeSantis as though DeSantis was not already being defamed as a Nazi.

  60. @Jack D
    @AnotherDad


    guy who has been a huge success in business and popular culture–he is weirdly insecure.
     
    It's not weird at all. First of all, in NY society terms, he was never accepted - he was a bridge & tunnel dude from Queens. Trump Tower was for Eurotrash and Arabs and so on who could never get past a coop board on Park Avenue.

    2nd his huge success was always overplayed (by Trump) - mostly of what he did was in effect a bust out scheme. He would overborrow from banks and investors and pay himself lavishly and then after a few years the project would go bust and the banks and investors would take a bath. How many real billionaires want to go on reality TV? Trump needed the $. He in effect PLAYED a billionaire on TV.

    So it's completely unsurprising that he has a chip on his shoulder. The chip on his shoulder is also part of his shtick, which only makes him more endearing to his supporters.

    Look, the insecurity worked for him - it took him all the way to the White House. If he had been a more secure person he might have been content to drink himself to death with his father's money, the way that his brother did.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @AnotherDad, @David In TN

    He’s the only guy in his class who wan’t okay with normalizing rape and murder, on that alone I’ll take him.

  61. @J.Ross
    What explains the FBI raid with weapons on a location the FBI had already examined and approved is documents incriminating (or creating problems for) criminal FBI scumbags.

    Replies: @Emblematic, @beavertales

    “What explains the FBI raid with weapons on a location the FBI had already examined (?)”

    A location already protected around the clock by Secret Service Agents armed with machine guns.

    To carry out the search of Mar-a-Lago, the FBI had to politely ask Trump’s security to step aside. Does anyone believe the Secret Service was intimidated by the FBI menacingly brandishing their assault weapons? No – they continued guarding Mar-a-Lago as the bureau agents did their search.

    I think we’ve all had enough of FBI SWAT theatrics: fat-bellied goofs with M-4s practicing fake shock and awe. If their search was legitimate, there would be no reason to bring guns.

    • Agree: J.Ross
  62. @AnotherDad
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    KPK. I think you and TAG nailed it.

    But what happens when someone who is not Trump, runs with Trump's soft-nationalism--immigration restrictionism, building the wall, America first.

    They feel--know--that Trump's opinions are so unseemly.


    We are simply separate peoples now. We have this post-sanity contingent of verbalist overclass parasites who simply do not believe in--find unseemly--the core requirements of maintaining civilization--keeping invaders out, eugenic fertility, the rule-of-law, marriage, producing what you consume, heck even that there are hard biological categories like "men" and "women".

    I just do not even see the point. Let them have what they want.... just not with us.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Prester John

    Before 2016 Trump was friends with the Clintons (who epitomized the Ruling Class), with the Great Stainmaker himself even suggesting at one point that he make a run for the presidency. Trumpy took up his suggestion but when he unfolded his three-legged platform of draconian immigration restrictions, US overseas military cutbacks and domestic economic self-sufficiency that same Ruling Class turned against him with a vengeance which remains unabated to this day—because what he was suggesting was precisely what they did NOT want! Maybe they saw him as a traitor to his class, kind of a mirror image of FDR but without FDR’s charm.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
  63. Meanwhile in America.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Dream

    One minute after the picture was taken, he slapped the blonde one hard upside her head. I couldn't decide which one should get my sympathy. Neither, maybe?

    Replies: @Dream

  64. @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!
     
    Yep, absolutely. This is THE reason people on the left and the deep state elite really really hate him. I move in some elite left wing circles, and when he announced his campaign, the horror over the "unseemliness" was constantly expressed.

    "This guy has gold faucets in his penthouse."
    "The hair! The worst combover ever."
    "My god, a bankrupt real estate guy with a stupid reality TV show"

    Of course the married White chicks in this circle took an instant loathing to him -- philanderer, dumping the old hit-the-wall wife for a shiny new model (with a hint of an escort about her).

    The visceral amygdala driven disgust of these women was beyond palpable--the rich Alpha male who always got the other cuter girl...but never ME! ME!!

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Hangnail Hans, @Thoughts, @Jack D, @Curle, @Currahee, @Muggles, @Ben tillman, @Nicholas Stix

    Great post.

    Somehow, though, the Dem sycophants never utter a word about obviously senile Joe, a known pervert (just read his daughter’s diary) and enabler of his son’s coke/hooker habit while strong arming dear defenseless Ukraine a few years back so sonny boy could get paid — mafia style – for doing zero work.

    And the Big Guy China slice. The FBI works at glacial speed on Hunter’s laptop and other corrupt indicators. Too busy fussing over souvenirs Trump might have kept.. The Dems love the Police State when they get to run it.

    Of course Biden was loathed by St. Obama and was long a corrupt Credit Card Industry stooge for decades.

    Now he can barely say a coherent sentence and we will eventually (not yet! Dems fear Kamala more!) learn just how complicit the MSM and DC Elites are in covering up for this creep.

    Trump Derangement Syndrome is still strong and St. Fauci has yet to unleash the CDC to cure it.

    “TrumpPox” is the thus far incurable disease of our Oligarchic elites.

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    @Muggles

    Not to mention that Joe is the son of a used-car salesman, which gives him a sleazier background than Trump’s.

  65. A personal letter from a head of state is the literal definition of “memorabilia.” It is very little else. The idea that some of the “nation’s secrets” might be contained in said letter is simply idiotic. But par for the course. Hey, remember when the NY Times was all about revealing the “nation’s secrets”? That’s a long time ago.

    But this is all just the same impulse that had the press constantly taking Trump’s obvious jokes as literal statements. It’s deliberate obtuseness (call it the Corvinus Syndrome). If Trump is doing it, it MUST be evil, so let us hold up everything in front of a fun-house mirror until we get the view of it that accords with our biases, and then insist that we’re only speaking the plain truth.

    I hope there is a special corner of hell reserved for members of the press.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @peterike

    The Trump Rally I attended in 2016 began with the Orange Man pointing at the Press gallery and saying "See those people back there? They are the worst kind of people! The worst!"

  66. @The Anti-Gnostic
    As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!

    I mean really. I never.

    Replies: @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Mr. Anon, @Ben tillman

    What could be more gauche than telling the emperor he wears no clothes?

  67. @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!
     
    Yep, absolutely. This is THE reason people on the left and the deep state elite really really hate him. I move in some elite left wing circles, and when he announced his campaign, the horror over the "unseemliness" was constantly expressed.

    "This guy has gold faucets in his penthouse."
    "The hair! The worst combover ever."
    "My god, a bankrupt real estate guy with a stupid reality TV show"

    Of course the married White chicks in this circle took an instant loathing to him -- philanderer, dumping the old hit-the-wall wife for a shiny new model (with a hint of an escort about her).

    The visceral amygdala driven disgust of these women was beyond palpable--the rich Alpha male who always got the other cuter girl...but never ME! ME!!

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Hangnail Hans, @Thoughts, @Jack D, @Curle, @Currahee, @Muggles, @Ben tillman, @Nicholas Stix

    I have to laugh at the part about the reality TV show. Can you really be a snob if you even know of the show’s existence?

    • Agree: Alden
  68. @Muggles
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    Great post.

    Somehow, though, the Dem sycophants never utter a word about obviously senile Joe, a known pervert (just read his daughter's diary) and enabler of his son's coke/hooker habit while strong arming dear defenseless Ukraine a few years back so sonny boy could get paid -- mafia style - for doing zero work.

    And the Big Guy China slice. The FBI works at glacial speed on Hunter's laptop and other corrupt indicators. Too busy fussing over souvenirs Trump might have kept.. The Dems love the Police State when they get to run it.

    Of course Biden was loathed by St. Obama and was long a corrupt Credit Card Industry stooge for decades.

    Now he can barely say a coherent sentence and we will eventually (not yet! Dems fear Kamala more!) learn just how complicit the MSM and DC Elites are in covering up for this creep.

    Trump Derangement Syndrome is still strong and St. Fauci has yet to unleash the CDC to cure it.

    "TrumpPox" is the thus far incurable disease of our Oligarchic elites.

    Replies: @Ben tillman

    Not to mention that Joe is the son of a used-car salesman, which gives him a sleazier background than Trump’s.

  69. The Fall-out from Pelosi’s Most Excellent Taiwan Adventure, may not be limited to WWIII.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/taiwanese-officials-trounce-pelosi-after-sons-huge-holdings-china-tech-exposed

    The Taiwanese are miffed,

    It’s interesting how in the English translations of all the Welcome to Taiwan Nancy Speeches- 3 or 4, the mention of her grifter son having bummed a ride was seamlessly erased.
    But to notice that would be a conspiracy theorist.

  70. @Jack D
    @Trinity

    It's a stupid issue - who cares how big his hands are? It started it the '80 when when Spy magazine (and future Vanity Fair editor ) Graydon Carter took to referring to him as a “short-fingered vulgarian.” His other choice of epithet was "Queens born casino operator" but "short fingered vulgarian" won out. The snobbishness just oozes from these titles. Trump contested it rather than ignoring it. The elites think that "aha, we got to him - we are so cool that we would never acknowledge an insult" but the fact that Trump fights back only endears him more to his base.

    But "short fingered" is a little different than small hands and actually has a element of truth. The truth is that Donald is a bit pudgy and this includes having pudgy, puffy hands. This makes his hands out of proportion and makes his digits appear shorter than they really are because they are partly buried in the fat of his hands.

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan, @hhsiii, @Buzz Mohawk

    Yeah, I remember that. What ws their name for Henry Kravis? I used to think he was the short-fingered vulgarian; something about dwarfish buyout maven.

  71. @AnotherDad
    I've got my letter from Kim Jong-un framed here on the wall.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @TontoBubbaGoldstein

    We always DM each other, but I screenshot them and save them on an SD card.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @TontoBubbaGoldstein

    We Skype. He likes to use those funny face apps. I keep screenshots.

    http://imgs.dab3games.com/kim-jong-un-funny-facetjy0.jpg

    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-m6ivyTIew9g/Unf3HD-z_mI/AAAAAAAAJO8/CuDJFML-UKg/s320/meh_ro11194.jpg

    http://ryan-apex-16.weebly.com/uploads/5/9/0/4/59042685/2889777_orig.jpg

    https://i.redd.it/zmrcha2gmtk31.png

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/12/24/2440977300000578-0-image-a-7_1419437998208.jpg

  72. @Harry Baldwin
    He mobilized ethnic activists

    This is an absurd criticism of Trump. Any Republican candidate, even a milquetoast like Romney is going to energize the ethnic activists. They don't need any evidence. Biden has said more "racist" things than any presidential candidate since Wallace and he gets a pass, because Democrat.

    but didn’t build the wall

    You blame Trump for that, and not Paul Ryan and other RINOs who refused to support it? What did you expect Trump to do?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @AnotherDad

    but didn’t build the wall

    You blame Trump for that, and not Paul Ryan and other RINOs who refused to support it? What did you expect Trump to do?

    RINOs like Paul Ryan are complete garbage. Worthless sub-humans who should be paraded naked through the city, pelted with shit, then have their heads on pikes in the city square. But … the Wall was not Paul Ryan’s platform. Paul Ryan is known garage. That’s the point.

    The Wall is the American People’s platform–Trump’s platform. It was Trump’s job to insist on the Wall–everything, complete funding, approval, etc.–in any deal with the devil (a.k.a. Ryan). No Wall–no deal.

    There is zero reason why we do not have a complete wall–right now! The whole thing could easily have been built during Trump’s presidency. And once built, it becomes much more politically difficult/embarrassing/outrageous for Biden to knock it down to allow the invasion he’s waving in now.

    But we don’t have it. We do not have it because Trump lacked the discipline and will to insist on it. People blab, blab, blab into Trump’s ear and whisper sweet nothings and puff up his ego and … the interests of the American people are out the window. Trump got “Art of the Deal”ed by Paul Ryan. Yeah, that is precisely Trump’s fault.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @AnotherDad


    There is zero reason why we do not have a complete wall–right now! The whole thing could easily have been built during Trump’s presidency. And once built, it becomes much more politically difficult/embarrassing/outrageous for Biden to knock it down to allow the invasion he’s waving in now.
     
    They'd tear sections of the wall down on their first day in office. To the cheering of multitudes, including the entire establishment. Billions more dollars wasted, along with an environmental disaster. A wall is pretty pointless without political and public will behind it. At Berlin they shot to kill.
  73. @Jack D
    @Trinity

    It's a stupid issue - who cares how big his hands are? It started it the '80 when when Spy magazine (and future Vanity Fair editor ) Graydon Carter took to referring to him as a “short-fingered vulgarian.” His other choice of epithet was "Queens born casino operator" but "short fingered vulgarian" won out. The snobbishness just oozes from these titles. Trump contested it rather than ignoring it. The elites think that "aha, we got to him - we are so cool that we would never acknowledge an insult" but the fact that Trump fights back only endears him more to his base.

    But "short fingered" is a little different than small hands and actually has a element of truth. The truth is that Donald is a bit pudgy and this includes having pudgy, puffy hands. This makes his hands out of proportion and makes his digits appear shorter than they really are because they are partly buried in the fat of his hands.

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan, @hhsiii, @Buzz Mohawk

    I thought it was a rumor started by Sylvester Stallone, who is a really good story teller.

    • LOL: Old Prude
  74. Anonymous[556] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad
    @Polistra


    Not watching the video but his endless insecurity / need to brag (same thing, of course) is almost touching. Almost.
     
    Trump is a hero for at least acting like the American people's interests should matter and bringing a hint of nationalism back to our politics.

    But Trump is a weird bird.

    For an alpha male--a guy who has been a huge success in business and popular culture--he is weirdly insecure. The guy gets in pissing matches with people who are wave-off material. He can give a speech and it will be mostly about Donald J. Trump--perhaps the defense of Donald J. Trump from some b.s. from some nobody--and five minutes on the American people. (And yeah, who needs all that junk from ... other people.)

    If he does come back, I sure hope he brings a whole lot more "whatever" to the personal attacks and a whole lot more "what's good for the American people".

    Replies: @Ralph L, @Luddite in Chief, @Bardon Kaldian, @Jack D, @SFG, @Anonymous

    Trump’s haggling/badgering insecurity style must be at least partly a stylistic choice based on psychologically profiling his attackers and/or marks. That’s a truism — no one hews to a strategy that doesn’t pay off — but as with the Meet The Press example of the Mussolini retweet in 2016, note that he doesn’t anxiously retreat into verbal dead ends like Martin Short’s “Nathan Sturm” SNL character. I think somehow he is more comfortable going straight to aggrieved hypersensitivity, to bag whatever he can from that approach first.

    With the countless petty stories, e.g. pretending to be on the phone with Bob Dole at the time of receiving a journalist visitor (Ron Rosenbaum—I think the Tim O’Brien quickie book was also a lazy collection of examples like this, that are probably 80-90% factual), I think this is pretty routine and an occupational hazard for non-sperg mega-rich guys actually. Trump is not that different from his cohort; no surprise he picks up the questionable habits and tics of big shots, he’s met many. Are there any Gary Cooper/Marlboro Man CEOs? I don’t believe our hysterical system selects for that

  75. @Jack D
    @AnotherDad


    guy who has been a huge success in business and popular culture–he is weirdly insecure.
     
    It's not weird at all. First of all, in NY society terms, he was never accepted - he was a bridge & tunnel dude from Queens. Trump Tower was for Eurotrash and Arabs and so on who could never get past a coop board on Park Avenue.

    2nd his huge success was always overplayed (by Trump) - mostly of what he did was in effect a bust out scheme. He would overborrow from banks and investors and pay himself lavishly and then after a few years the project would go bust and the banks and investors would take a bath. How many real billionaires want to go on reality TV? Trump needed the $. He in effect PLAYED a billionaire on TV.

    So it's completely unsurprising that he has a chip on his shoulder. The chip on his shoulder is also part of his shtick, which only makes him more endearing to his supporters.

    Look, the insecurity worked for him - it took him all the way to the White House. If he had been a more secure person he might have been content to drink himself to death with his father's money, the way that his brother did.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @AnotherDad, @David In TN

    2nd his huge success was always overplayed (by Trump) – mostly of what he did was in effect a bust out scheme

    My impression: I would not want to be in business with Trump. He doesn’t radiate “solid midwestern farmer, man-of-his-word”, he radiates “huckster”.

    But if all he did was a sleazy “bust out” scheme, then the banks should have stopped loaning him money–a very long time ago.

    My impression is that Trump’s big success was making the right call on the come back of NYC real estate in the 80s after the 70s doldrums. And after than he had the reputation to get loans … but a couple of his grandiose casino/resort projects were dubious–or simply just the “wrong call”–and went tits up.

    ~~

    But what i’m talking about is not insecurity about origins or being accepted by polite society or any of that. It’s Trump’s habit of getting into these pissing matches with nobodies who take shots at him. To me, if you’re alpha, you have self-confidence and the natterings of nobodies are nothing. They are not even pinpricks and you just roll on doing what you do.

    • Replies: @Drive-by poster
    @AnotherDad


    But what i’m talking about is not insecurity about origins or being accepted by polite society or any of that. It’s Trump’s habit of getting into these pissing matches with nobodies who take shots at him. To me, if you’re alpha, you have self-confidence and the natterings of nobodies are nothing.
     
    Self-awareness is an important quality, too, one that Trump (unfortunately) lacks.

    Trump does not have the introspection that would allow him to understand that, by seeking their approval, he allows himself to be controlled by the very people he dislikes. It's what makes him such an endearing figure among nobodies who also think that, once "important" people start taking them seriously, they will not be nobodies anymore.

    Orwell once observed, "The average millionaire is only the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit." Trump, alas, has lived his entire life proving that money does not change who you are.

    If Trump could somehow get past his inherent need to be the richest and smartest guy in the room, he could be a truly great leader. However, if four years in the White House did not cure him of this incessant need, I do not know what would.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @AnotherDad

    Some years ago, before he did the reality TV thing, Trump wanted to buy the Buffalo Bills. NFL owners — now there’s an clubby bunch.

    Trump’s personality, as well as his performance.as an XFL owner, ensured that buying the Bills was never gonna happen. If memory serves, it was Lamar Hunt, the very epitome of the you-can-trust soft spoken Midwestern tycoon, who stood up and told his pals that Trump was unacceptable.

    Fast forward to the Washington press club dinner, where the sharply creased pants Obama sneers at the possibility of Trump becoming president. All the “right” people laugh at the guy with the gold faucets and the trophy wife.

    Not a good move, Barack baby. Not a good move.

    After he won, Bill Burr was on Conan O’Brien, and he called Trump “the greatest shit talker of all time.”

    He was not wrong.

  76. @TontoBubbaGoldstein
    @AnotherDad

    We always DM each other, but I screenshot them and save them on an SD card.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    We Skype. He likes to use those funny face apps. I keep screenshots.

    [MORE]

  77. @Bardon Kaldian
    @AnotherDad

    The point is that the highest level politics is turned into celebrity culture second-ratedness.

    I think that in the US it began with the playboy JFK. Anyway, it all intensified in the last one or two decades.

    Second rate clowns (who may be good at manipulations, but, still ...).

    For instance, take Macron. What a piece of work. One should tell him: You are the President of France. You are de Gaulle. De Gaulle doesn't behave like idiotic clown.

    Or that embarrassment of Scholz, or, earlier, Schroeder. Schroeder worked, after he lost office, as the chairman of the board of Nord Stream AG and of Rosneft, after having been hired as a global manager by investment bank Rothschild, and also the chairman of the board of football club Hannover 96.

    You are the German Chancellor. You are Bismarck. Bismarck doesn't work as some kind of businessman-bureaucrat in a company.

    The last example is Finnish PM. Although the parallel is not technically exact (president & PM), she is the leader of Finland. And?

    https://edition.cnn.com/2022/08/18/europe/sanna-marin-finland-partying-video-intl/index.html

    Finnish PM says videos of her 'boisterous' partying shouldn't have been made public

    https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/sanna-marin-finland-pm-trendi-photoshoot-intl-scli/index.html

    https://dynaimage.cdn.cnn.com/cnn/q_auto,w_727,c_fit/http%3A%2F%2Fcdn.cnn.com%2Fcnnnext%2Fdam%2Fassets%2F201016151454-sanna-marin-trendimag.jpg

    You are the leader of Finland. You are Mannerheim. And Mannerheim doesn't go around partying & showing tits.

    Second & third rate people ....

    Replies: @Anonymous, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Yngvar, @Alden

    Sanna was raised by a lesbian couple and believes that normal and a model of a loving family.

  78. @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    2nd his huge success was always overplayed (by Trump) – mostly of what he did was in effect a bust out scheme
     
    My impression: I would not want to be in business with Trump. He doesn't radiate "solid midwestern farmer, man-of-his-word", he radiates "huckster".

    But if all he did was a sleazy "bust out" scheme, then the banks should have stopped loaning him money--a very long time ago.

    My impression is that Trump's big success was making the right call on the come back of NYC real estate in the 80s after the 70s doldrums. And after than he had the reputation to get loans ... but a couple of his grandiose casino/resort projects were dubious--or simply just the "wrong call"--and went tits up.

    ~~

    But what i'm talking about is not insecurity about origins or being accepted by polite society or any of that. It's Trump's habit of getting into these pissing matches with nobodies who take shots at him. To me, if you're alpha, you have self-confidence and the natterings of nobodies are nothing. They are not even pinpricks and you just roll on doing what you do.

    Replies: @Drive-by poster, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    But what i’m talking about is not insecurity about origins or being accepted by polite society or any of that. It’s Trump’s habit of getting into these pissing matches with nobodies who take shots at him. To me, if you’re alpha, you have self-confidence and the natterings of nobodies are nothing.

    Self-awareness is an important quality, too, one that Trump (unfortunately) lacks.

    Trump does not have the introspection that would allow him to understand that, by seeking their approval, he allows himself to be controlled by the very people he dislikes. It’s what makes him such an endearing figure among nobodies who also think that, once “important” people start taking them seriously, they will not be nobodies anymore.

    Orwell once observed, “The average millionaire is only the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit.” Trump, alas, has lived his entire life proving that money does not change who you are.

    If Trump could somehow get past his inherent need to be the richest and smartest guy in the room, he could be a truly great leader. However, if four years in the White House did not cure him of this incessant need, I do not know what would.

    • Agree: Polistra
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Drive-by poster


    Orwell once observed, “The average millionaire is only the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit.”
     
    Orwell was a socialist. I assure you that the average millionaire is NOT the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit. Have the millionaire and the dishwasher trade places and in 5 years time (maybe a lot less) the dishwasher will be back to washing dishes and the millionaire will be back to being a millionaire. There is a reason why the millionaire became a millionaire and the dishwasher became a dishwasher in the 1st place. Yes, luck and birth and so on play into it but the biggest factor is the man himself.

    This goes double in America where the millionaire and the dishwasher are probably not the same race.

    Do you really think that the only difference between Adrian Oswaldo Sura Reyes and the cops holding him is that they are wearing different uniforms?


    https://www.oxygen.com/sites/oxygen/files/styles/blog-post-embedded--tablet-1_5x/public/2022/08/adrian-oswaldo-sura-reyes.jpg?itok=yBwBI-g8

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Harry Baldwin, @Drive-by poster

  79. Off Steve Sailer

    Javed Ali….a Muslim….just declared a civil war against the Native Born White American Historic Majority on MSNBC….

    Steve….who is Javed Ali?…Perhaps you can make a post about this…

    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Javed Ali was appointed by Trump to the NSC…….for this alone, I hope Trump rots rots rots in jail….

    , @epebble
    @War for Blair Mountain

    "Ali called for political rhetoric to temper down"

    Joy Reid: "At this point, we need to have serious conversations around preparing for actual violence. People keep saying a Civil War is coming. I would say the Civil War is here. And I don’t mean to be hyperbolic"


    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/msnbc-host-after-threats-against-the-fbi-the-civil-war-is-here/ar-AA10OPaS

  80. @Bardon Kaldian
    @AnotherDad

    The point is that the highest level politics is turned into celebrity culture second-ratedness.

    I think that in the US it began with the playboy JFK. Anyway, it all intensified in the last one or two decades.

    Second rate clowns (who may be good at manipulations, but, still ...).

    For instance, take Macron. What a piece of work. One should tell him: You are the President of France. You are de Gaulle. De Gaulle doesn't behave like idiotic clown.

    Or that embarrassment of Scholz, or, earlier, Schroeder. Schroeder worked, after he lost office, as the chairman of the board of Nord Stream AG and of Rosneft, after having been hired as a global manager by investment bank Rothschild, and also the chairman of the board of football club Hannover 96.

    You are the German Chancellor. You are Bismarck. Bismarck doesn't work as some kind of businessman-bureaucrat in a company.

    The last example is Finnish PM. Although the parallel is not technically exact (president & PM), she is the leader of Finland. And?

    https://edition.cnn.com/2022/08/18/europe/sanna-marin-finland-partying-video-intl/index.html

    Finnish PM says videos of her 'boisterous' partying shouldn't have been made public

    https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/sanna-marin-finland-pm-trendi-photoshoot-intl-scli/index.html

    https://dynaimage.cdn.cnn.com/cnn/q_auto,w_727,c_fit/http%3A%2F%2Fcdn.cnn.com%2Fcnnnext%2Fdam%2Fassets%2F201016151454-sanna-marin-trendimag.jpg

    You are the leader of Finland. You are Mannerheim. And Mannerheim doesn't go around partying & showing tits.

    Second & third rate people ....

    Replies: @Anonymous, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Yngvar, @Alden

    The Finnish prime minister is at heart just a boisterous sorority girl.

    But at least she isn’t fat.

  81. @War for Blair Mountain
    Off Steve Sailer

    Javed Ali….a Muslim….just declared a civil war against the Native Born White American Historic Majority on MSNBC….

    Steve….who is Javed Ali?…Perhaps you can make a post about this…

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain, @epebble

    Javed Ali was appointed by Trump to the NSC…….for this alone, I hope Trump rots rots rots in jail….

  82. @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    2nd his huge success was always overplayed (by Trump) – mostly of what he did was in effect a bust out scheme
     
    My impression: I would not want to be in business with Trump. He doesn't radiate "solid midwestern farmer, man-of-his-word", he radiates "huckster".

    But if all he did was a sleazy "bust out" scheme, then the banks should have stopped loaning him money--a very long time ago.

    My impression is that Trump's big success was making the right call on the come back of NYC real estate in the 80s after the 70s doldrums. And after than he had the reputation to get loans ... but a couple of his grandiose casino/resort projects were dubious--or simply just the "wrong call"--and went tits up.

    ~~

    But what i'm talking about is not insecurity about origins or being accepted by polite society or any of that. It's Trump's habit of getting into these pissing matches with nobodies who take shots at him. To me, if you're alpha, you have self-confidence and the natterings of nobodies are nothing. They are not even pinpricks and you just roll on doing what you do.

    Replies: @Drive-by poster, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    Some years ago, before he did the reality TV thing, Trump wanted to buy the Buffalo Bills. NFL owners — now there’s an clubby bunch.

    Trump’s personality, as well as his performance.as an XFL owner, ensured that buying the Bills was never gonna happen. If memory serves, it was Lamar Hunt, the very epitome of the you-can-trust soft spoken Midwestern tycoon, who stood up and told his pals that Trump was unacceptable.

    Fast forward to the Washington press club dinner, where the sharply creased pants Obama sneers at the possibility of Trump becoming president. All the “right” people laugh at the guy with the gold faucets and the trophy wife.

    Not a good move, Barack baby. Not a good move.

    After he won, Bill Burr was on Conan O’Brien, and he called Trump “the greatest shit talker of all time.”

    He was not wrong.

  83. @Drive-by poster
    @AnotherDad


    But what i’m talking about is not insecurity about origins or being accepted by polite society or any of that. It’s Trump’s habit of getting into these pissing matches with nobodies who take shots at him. To me, if you’re alpha, you have self-confidence and the natterings of nobodies are nothing.
     
    Self-awareness is an important quality, too, one that Trump (unfortunately) lacks.

    Trump does not have the introspection that would allow him to understand that, by seeking their approval, he allows himself to be controlled by the very people he dislikes. It's what makes him such an endearing figure among nobodies who also think that, once "important" people start taking them seriously, they will not be nobodies anymore.

    Orwell once observed, "The average millionaire is only the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit." Trump, alas, has lived his entire life proving that money does not change who you are.

    If Trump could somehow get past his inherent need to be the richest and smartest guy in the room, he could be a truly great leader. However, if four years in the White House did not cure him of this incessant need, I do not know what would.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Orwell once observed, “The average millionaire is only the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit.”

    Orwell was a socialist. I assure you that the average millionaire is NOT the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit. Have the millionaire and the dishwasher trade places and in 5 years time (maybe a lot less) the dishwasher will be back to washing dishes and the millionaire will be back to being a millionaire. There is a reason why the millionaire became a millionaire and the dishwasher became a dishwasher in the 1st place. Yes, luck and birth and so on play into it but the biggest factor is the man himself.

    This goes double in America where the millionaire and the dishwasher are probably not the same race.

    Do you really think that the only difference between Adrian Oswaldo Sura Reyes and the cops holding him is that they are wearing different uniforms?

    https://www.oxygen.com/sites/oxygen/files/styles/blog-post-embedded--tablet-1_5x/public/2022/08/adrian-oswaldo-sura-reyes.jpg?itok=yBwBI-g8

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Jack D

    Orwell was right in a deeper sense that those people don't possess a broader vision of reality. A self-made b/millionaire may have that, but he's not a history-making politician, statesman, which is an altogether different animal.

    The problem with Trump is that, apart from his failings, he's adept only in manipulating the media (which he has a gift for), but has no knowledge of historical America and her destiny. He should possess an unshakable strategy & elastic tactics.

    Also, he lacks serious morality, which is best exemplified by his pardons (Assange etc.).

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Jack D

    Agree. In his early years, the still-committed socialist Orwell had some goofy and naive ideas. Down and Out in Paris and London has a number of them, such as that restaurants aren't necessary, you can prepare better food at home, but people like to dine out just to feel superior to the people serving them. Also, that Christian charities had no right to require the tramps to whom they were serving free meals to attend a religious service afterward.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @Drive-by poster
    @Jack D


    Orwell was a socialist.
     
    There was quite a bit more to Orwell than his socialist leanings.

    In any event, I hope you are not under the apprehension that Orwell's being a socialist precluded him from being an excellent observer of people (as indeed Orwell was).

    I assure you that the average millionaire is NOT the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit.
     
    Sadly, being a millionaire is not as impressive as it once was. There are parts of the world (and even some parts of the US) where the cost of living is so high that one must more or less be a millionaire in order to enjoy even a relatively modest standard of living.

    It has been my experience that millionaires (particularly newly-minted ones) have a strong interest in getting other people to believe there is something extraordinary about them compared to other people. Well, I have come across selfish millionaires, kindly millionaires, interesting millionaires, boorish millionaires, etc.

    In short, my experience with them off and on through the years has not given me reason to believe that being a millionaire necessarily makes one a smarter, more capable, or better person (or, for that matter, a worse one).

    The most noteworthy difference I have seen between the wealthy and the poor is not one of intelligence, ability, or kindliness, but rather, the ability of money to act as a cushion of sorts against the blows of life. This can, sometimes, result in wealthy people being able to behave foolishly for much longer than those of more modest means simply because their money allows them more leeway to continue their foolishness.

    (Alas, so-called public assistance [e.g. Universal Credit] has changed this in recent decades and allowed foolish people to have their foolishness subsidised by the taxpayers.)

    So while I may have started out believing millionaires are, somehow, extraordinary people, my experience with them over the years has caused me to modify that viewpoint.

    However, if this is a viewpoint you wish to maintain, far be it from me to try to talk you out of it. I am only trying to relate my own experiences and how they have served to change my own outlook as time went along.

    (Perhaps I have been hanging out with the wrong crowd?)

    Replies: @Jack D, @Buzz Mohawk

  84. @Trinity
    I saw one of Shaw's shoes at Pete & Shorts in Clearwater. Thing was enormous with or without Trump's small hands. teehee.

    How does a 6' plus man have such small hands? Heredity or soft living?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Buzz Mohawk, @Harry Baldwin, @JR Ewing, @Jack D, @SunBakedSuburb

    “Thing was enormous … small hands. teehee.”

    “… nobody, not even the rain, has such small hands.”

    • Replies: @D. K.
    @SunBakedSuburb

    ***

    The poem Elliot gives Lee, which contains the line "Nobody, not even the rain, has such small hands", is "Somewhere I Have Never Travelled, Gladly Beyond" by E.E. Cummings.

    ***

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0091167/trivia?ref_=ttqu_sa_1

    I saw "Hannah and Her Sisters" (1986) the same weekend that I saw "Brazil" (1985), with the same group of friends, in Seattle's University District, while the former film was still in limited release. That was in between Valentine's Day and Washington's Birthday (Observed), in mid-February of 1986. Oh, to be twenty-something....

    Replies: @duncsbaby

  85. @Jack D
    @Drive-by poster


    Orwell once observed, “The average millionaire is only the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit.”
     
    Orwell was a socialist. I assure you that the average millionaire is NOT the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit. Have the millionaire and the dishwasher trade places and in 5 years time (maybe a lot less) the dishwasher will be back to washing dishes and the millionaire will be back to being a millionaire. There is a reason why the millionaire became a millionaire and the dishwasher became a dishwasher in the 1st place. Yes, luck and birth and so on play into it but the biggest factor is the man himself.

    This goes double in America where the millionaire and the dishwasher are probably not the same race.

    Do you really think that the only difference between Adrian Oswaldo Sura Reyes and the cops holding him is that they are wearing different uniforms?


    https://www.oxygen.com/sites/oxygen/files/styles/blog-post-embedded--tablet-1_5x/public/2022/08/adrian-oswaldo-sura-reyes.jpg?itok=yBwBI-g8

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Harry Baldwin, @Drive-by poster

    Orwell was right in a deeper sense that those people don’t possess a broader vision of reality. A self-made b/millionaire may have that, but he’s not a history-making politician, statesman, which is an altogether different animal.

    The problem with Trump is that, apart from his failings, he’s adept only in manipulating the media (which he has a gift for), but has no knowledge of historical America and her destiny. He should possess an unshakable strategy & elastic tactics.

    Also, he lacks serious morality, which is best exemplified by his pardons (Assange etc.).

  86. @MEH 0910
    Donald Trump's Tour of His Manhattan Office
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAKYvvM6IpE
    Sep 14, 2015

    Donald Trump took WSJ's Monica Langley on a tour of his office in the Trump Tower in Manhattan. Among his memorabilia: one of Shaquille O'Neal's sneakers. Photo: Jarrard Cole/The Wall Street Journal
     

    Replies: @Polistra, @SunBakedSuburb

    Trump (small) handing the woman a plaster mold casting of Shack’s penis is the subtext.

  87. @Dream
    Meanwhile in America.

    https://twitter.com/JCAndersonNYC/status/1560455898404896768?t=cdIr2k0w_Ny88SMYJinXfA&s=19

    Replies: @Polistra

    One minute after the picture was taken, he slapped the blonde one hard upside her head. I couldn’t decide which one should get my sympathy. Neither, maybe?

    • Replies: @Dream
    @Polistra

    You are not a class revolutionary, are you?

    Replies: @Alden

  88. https://dossier.substack.com/p/biden-officials-scramble-to-escape

    Lawyers representing America’s service members are beginning to produce victories defending the U.S. Armed Forces against forced compliance with biomedical gene therapy experiments, and suddenly, nobody in the Pentagon wants to take accountability for their legally dubious mRNA injection order.

  89. Guys,Atlanta rapper Nappy Roots has been shot. Again,Nappy Roots has been shot,but it appears he will be ok.

    • LOL: William Badwhite
    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @Bardon Kaldlan

    That's a relief. They look horrible when dyed.

    , @Dennis Dale
    @Bardon Kaldlan

    Thank God. We can't lose Nappy Roots.

    Replies: @Dennis Dale

  90. @Bardon Kaldlan
    Guys,Atlanta rapper Nappy Roots has been shot. Again,Nappy Roots has been shot,but it appears he will be ok.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @Dennis Dale

    That’s a relief. They look horrible when dyed.

  91. @Alden
    @J.Ross

    Hillary got several non diplomat US State Department employees killed as well.

    Replies: @Che Blutarsky

    Hillary got several non diplomat US State Department employees killed as well.

    So she’s even responsible for a few deaths that she didn’t directly order.

  92. @Jack D
    @AnotherDad


    guy who has been a huge success in business and popular culture–he is weirdly insecure.
     
    It's not weird at all. First of all, in NY society terms, he was never accepted - he was a bridge & tunnel dude from Queens. Trump Tower was for Eurotrash and Arabs and so on who could never get past a coop board on Park Avenue.

    2nd his huge success was always overplayed (by Trump) - mostly of what he did was in effect a bust out scheme. He would overborrow from banks and investors and pay himself lavishly and then after a few years the project would go bust and the banks and investors would take a bath. How many real billionaires want to go on reality TV? Trump needed the $. He in effect PLAYED a billionaire on TV.

    So it's completely unsurprising that he has a chip on his shoulder. The chip on his shoulder is also part of his shtick, which only makes him more endearing to his supporters.

    Look, the insecurity worked for him - it took him all the way to the White House. If he had been a more secure person he might have been content to drink himself to death with his father's money, the way that his brother did.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @AnotherDad, @David In TN

    Trump talks too much, thinks out loud, says stupid things into an open microphone. For example, when Ghislaine Maxwell was arrested in 2020, Trump said, “I wish her well.” Stupid.

    Re 2024, Trump is a political dead end, a 78 year old lame duck in the extremely unlikely event he won. Why, in heaven’s name , do people think he will do things he never did when he was in the White house with the pen and phone?

    Trump’s phenomenal energy for a man his age is going to run out. He may have a health issue. He’s too old anyway.

    By the way, I voted for him twice.

    • Agree: duncsbaby
  93. @Bardon Kaldlan
    Guys,Atlanta rapper Nappy Roots has been shot. Again,Nappy Roots has been shot,but it appears he will be ok.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @Dennis Dale

    Thank God. We can’t lose Nappy Roots.

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
    @Dennis Dale

    Nappy Roots was just getting straightened out too.

  94. @AnotherDad
    @Harry Baldwin


    but didn’t build the wall

    You blame Trump for that, and not Paul Ryan and other RINOs who refused to support it? What did you expect Trump to do?
     
    RINOs like Paul Ryan are complete garbage. Worthless sub-humans who should be paraded naked through the city, pelted with shit, then have their heads on pikes in the city square. But ... the Wall was not Paul Ryan's platform. Paul Ryan is known garage. That's the point.

    The Wall is the American People's platform--Trump's platform. It was Trump's job to insist on the Wall--everything, complete funding, approval, etc.--in any deal with the devil (a.k.a. Ryan). No Wall--no deal.

    There is zero reason why we do not have a complete wall--right now! The whole thing could easily have been built during Trump's presidency. And once built, it becomes much more politically difficult/embarrassing/outrageous for Biden to knock it down to allow the invasion he's waving in now.

    But we don't have it. We do not have it because Trump lacked the discipline and will to insist on it. People blab, blab, blab into Trump's ear and whisper sweet nothings and puff up his ego and ... the interests of the American people are out the window. Trump got "Art of the Deal"ed by Paul Ryan. Yeah, that is precisely Trump's fault.

    Replies: @Polistra

    There is zero reason why we do not have a complete wall–right now! The whole thing could easily have been built during Trump’s presidency. And once built, it becomes much more politically difficult/embarrassing/outrageous for Biden to knock it down to allow the invasion he’s waving in now.

    They’d tear sections of the wall down on their first day in office. To the cheering of multitudes, including the entire establishment. Billions more dollars wasted, along with an environmental disaster. A wall is pretty pointless without political and public will behind it. At Berlin they shot to kill.

  95. @Dennis Dale
    @Bardon Kaldlan

    Thank God. We can't lose Nappy Roots.

    Replies: @Dennis Dale

    Nappy Roots was just getting straightened out too.

    • LOL: Harry Baldwin
  96. @Jack D
    @Drive-by poster


    Orwell once observed, “The average millionaire is only the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit.”
     
    Orwell was a socialist. I assure you that the average millionaire is NOT the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit. Have the millionaire and the dishwasher trade places and in 5 years time (maybe a lot less) the dishwasher will be back to washing dishes and the millionaire will be back to being a millionaire. There is a reason why the millionaire became a millionaire and the dishwasher became a dishwasher in the 1st place. Yes, luck and birth and so on play into it but the biggest factor is the man himself.

    This goes double in America where the millionaire and the dishwasher are probably not the same race.

    Do you really think that the only difference between Adrian Oswaldo Sura Reyes and the cops holding him is that they are wearing different uniforms?


    https://www.oxygen.com/sites/oxygen/files/styles/blog-post-embedded--tablet-1_5x/public/2022/08/adrian-oswaldo-sura-reyes.jpg?itok=yBwBI-g8

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Harry Baldwin, @Drive-by poster

    Agree. In his early years, the still-committed socialist Orwell had some goofy and naive ideas. Down and Out in Paris and London has a number of them, such as that restaurants aren’t necessary, you can prepare better food at home, but people like to dine out just to feel superior to the people serving them. Also, that Christian charities had no right to require the tramps to whom they were serving free meals to attend a religious service afterward.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Harry Baldwin

    Down and out in Paris and London is a great book. And 1930s high end Paris restaurants weren’t too different from American restaurants today. Most of the employees were illegal aliens working illegally. For very low wages and a mattress in the basement.

    Replies: @anon

  97. @Bardon Kaldian
    @SFG

    Talked the talk, didn't walk the walk.

    Unlike, I hope, this guy .....

    https://edition.cnn.com/2022/08/17/uk/scotland-period-dignity-scli-intl-wellness-gbr/index.html

    Scottish local authorities come under fire for appointing man as 'period dignity officer'

    Local authorities in Scotland have come in for criticism after they appointed a man to the role of period dignity officer, responsible for coordinating the region's response to a new law that makes menstrual products free to access in the country.

    A group of colleges and local councils in Tay region in eastern Scotland announced the appointment of Jason Grant, who previously worked as a student wellbeing officer at a local college, to the role on Thursday.

    https://cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/220817094032-jason-grant-exlarge-169.jpeg

    However, critics argue that a woman would have been better suited to the job.
    .........................................
    Grant's role is the first of its kind in Scotland.

    "He will coordinate and streamline the approach to 'Period Dignity' across the area by working directly with the colleges and local authorities," Grainger PR said in a press release announcing the appointment, which was made by a working group of .

    "Jason will lead a regional campaign across schools, colleges and wider communities, raising awareness and understanding of the new Act and ensuring that the Scottish Government funding is allocated appropriately," it said.

    The Period Products Act came into force on Monday and means that menstrual products, including tampons and pads, will be made available free of charge in public facilities in Scotland.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    I like the fact that he’s wearing a red shirt.

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
  98. @War for Blair Mountain
    Off Steve Sailer

    Javed Ali….a Muslim….just declared a civil war against the Native Born White American Historic Majority on MSNBC….

    Steve….who is Javed Ali?…Perhaps you can make a post about this…

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain, @epebble

    “Ali called for political rhetoric to temper down”

    Joy Reid: “At this point, we need to have serious conversations around preparing for actual violence. People keep saying a Civil War is coming. I would say the Civil War is here. And I don’t mean to be hyperbolic”

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/msnbc-host-after-threats-against-the-fbi-the-civil-war-is-here/ar-AA10OPaS

  99. LA Flash Mob loots a 7-11, great HD security cam.

  100. @Trinity
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    You can't increase the length of your hands or fingers but you can definitely develop thicker and wider hands through manual labor, old school garage monkeys who turned wrenches all day, brick layers, roofers, etc. You would never see anyone in those occupations with hands like Trump. Even smaller guys develop, thick, muscled and veiny hands, not large hands but strong and capable hands.

    Exercise enthusiasts develop thick strong hands through rope climbing, pullups, monkey bars, weightlifting exercises like deadlifts, grippers, or just hanging from pull up bar. I imagine the mitts of mountain climbers are thick and muscled. Male gymnasts are generally small men who thickened and possibly made their hands wider through exercise.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    I had the privilege of holding Abraham Lincoln’s hands in my own, and they were impressive.

    Let me explain:

    I was a dinner guest at the home of a collector of art and interesting items. On a shelf in the living room, he kept a pair of rare bronze castings of Lincoln’s hands. They were created from plaster life casts that were made by sculptor Leonard Volk in 1860 with Lincoln’s cooperation.

    Augustus Saint-Gaudens oversaw the making of the bronzes in the 1880s. My host encouraged me to pick them up and examine them.

    The hands were a bit bigger than mine. The fingers were longer, thicker and stronger-looking, and I have done plenty of outdoor work. By holding copies-from-life of the Rail Splitter’s hands and studying the details, I sensed a physically-impressive man. It was a meaningful experience, a kind of time travel.

    Here is a link to an interesting article I found about the works:

    https://www.artic.edu/articles/931/stilled-life-the-hands-and-face-of-abraham-lincoln-by-leonard-volk

    • Thanks: Trinity, Alden
    • Replies: @rebel yell
    @Buzz Mohawk


    I was a dinner guest at the home of a collector of art and interesting items. On a shelf in the living room, he kept a pair of rare bronze castings of Lincoln’s hands.
     
    Gee Buzz, you've been around. My humble travels pale by comparison. Though in the end it is the travels in the world of ideas that count, as you and all on ISteve know, and it's a pleasure to share the trail with you and others here. I'm just back from camping in the North Cascades high country, an excellent counterpoint to the day-to-day worries of life, important though those worries may be.

    Replies: @D. K., @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Didn’t Lincoln have Marfan syndrome or something?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  101. @J.Ross
    OT -- The Washington Post says that Volodymyr Zelensky deliberately avoided war preparations to make money.
    https://archive.ph/FH07a

    You can’t simply say to me, “Listen, you should start to prepare people now and tell them they need to put away money, they need to store up food.” If we had communicated that — and that is what some people wanted, who I will not name — then I would have been losing $7 billion a month since last October, and at the moment when the Russians did attack, they would have taken us in three days. I’m not saying whose idea it was, but generally, our inner sense was right: If we sow chaos among people before the invasion, the Russians will devour us. Because during chaos, people flee the country.
     

    Replies: @MEH 0910


    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2022/08/18/zelensky-ukraine-wapo-interview-warn-of-war/
    https://archive.ph/uHIkC

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
  102. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Trinity

    "Thing was enormous ... small hands. teehee."

    "... nobody, not even the rain, has such small hands."

    Replies: @D. K.

    ***

    The poem Elliot gives Lee, which contains the line “Nobody, not even the rain, has such small hands”, is “Somewhere I Have Never Travelled, Gladly Beyond” by E.E. Cummings.

    ***

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0091167/trivia?ref_=ttqu_sa_1

    I saw “Hannah and Her Sisters” (1986) the same weekend that I saw “Brazil” (1985), with the same group of friends, in Seattle’s University District, while the former film was still in limited release. That was in between Valentine’s Day and Washington’s Birthday (Observed), in mid-February of 1986. Oh, to be twenty-something….

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
    @D. K.

    The last stanza of that poem: "There is something about you that opens and closes, only something in me understands the voice of your eyes is deeper than all roses, nobody, not even the rain, has such small hands." I memorized that poem back around that time when I was very interested in poetry. I could be wrong on a couple of words.

  103. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Trinity

    I had the privilege of holding Abraham Lincoln's hands in my own, and they were impressive.

    Let me explain:

    I was a dinner guest at the home of a collector of art and interesting items. On a shelf in the living room, he kept a pair of rare bronze castings of Lincoln's hands. They were created from plaster life casts that were made by sculptor Leonard Volk in 1860 with Lincoln's cooperation.

    Augustus Saint-Gaudens oversaw the making of the bronzes in the 1880s. My host encouraged me to pick them up and examine them.

    The hands were a bit bigger than mine. The fingers were longer, thicker and stronger-looking, and I have done plenty of outdoor work. By holding copies-from-life of the Rail Splitter's hands and studying the details, I sensed a physically-impressive man. It was a meaningful experience, a kind of time travel.

    Here is a link to an interesting article I found about the works:

    https://www.artic.edu/articles/931/stilled-life-the-hands-and-face-of-abraham-lincoln-by-leonard-volk

    Replies: @rebel yell, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I was a dinner guest at the home of a collector of art and interesting items. On a shelf in the living room, he kept a pair of rare bronze castings of Lincoln’s hands.

    Gee Buzz, you’ve been around. My humble travels pale by comparison. Though in the end it is the travels in the world of ideas that count, as you and all on ISteve know, and it’s a pleasure to share the trail with you and others here. I’m just back from camping in the North Cascades high country, an excellent counterpoint to the day-to-day worries of life, important though those worries may be.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    @rebel yell

    ***

    Though my problems are meaningless, that don't make them go away
    I need a crowd of people, but I can't face them day to day

    ***

    Neil Young, "On the Beach" ["On the Beach" LP (1974)]

    https://www.songfacts.com/facts/neil-young/on-the-beach

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @rebel yell


    I’m just back from camping in the North Cascades high country...
     
    Beautiful! That's better than any dinner party. I loved it when I used to backpack for days in the Rockies sometimes without seeing another soul, and I remember a quote somewhere about how spending time in solitude is enjoyable but that it is essential to know that one can return to the company of friends afterward... something like that. Welcome home.
  104. @rebel yell
    @Buzz Mohawk


    I was a dinner guest at the home of a collector of art and interesting items. On a shelf in the living room, he kept a pair of rare bronze castings of Lincoln’s hands.
     
    Gee Buzz, you've been around. My humble travels pale by comparison. Though in the end it is the travels in the world of ideas that count, as you and all on ISteve know, and it's a pleasure to share the trail with you and others here. I'm just back from camping in the North Cascades high country, an excellent counterpoint to the day-to-day worries of life, important though those worries may be.

    Replies: @D. K., @Buzz Mohawk

    ***

    Though my problems are meaningless, that don’t make them go away
    I need a crowd of people, but I can’t face them day to day

    ***

    Neil Young, “On the Beach” [“On the Beach” LP (1974)]

    https://www.songfacts.com/facts/neil-young/on-the-beach

  105. @Bardon Kaldian
    @AnotherDad

    The point is that the highest level politics is turned into celebrity culture second-ratedness.

    I think that in the US it began with the playboy JFK. Anyway, it all intensified in the last one or two decades.

    Second rate clowns (who may be good at manipulations, but, still ...).

    For instance, take Macron. What a piece of work. One should tell him: You are the President of France. You are de Gaulle. De Gaulle doesn't behave like idiotic clown.

    Or that embarrassment of Scholz, or, earlier, Schroeder. Schroeder worked, after he lost office, as the chairman of the board of Nord Stream AG and of Rosneft, after having been hired as a global manager by investment bank Rothschild, and also the chairman of the board of football club Hannover 96.

    You are the German Chancellor. You are Bismarck. Bismarck doesn't work as some kind of businessman-bureaucrat in a company.

    The last example is Finnish PM. Although the parallel is not technically exact (president & PM), she is the leader of Finland. And?

    https://edition.cnn.com/2022/08/18/europe/sanna-marin-finland-partying-video-intl/index.html

    Finnish PM says videos of her 'boisterous' partying shouldn't have been made public

    https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/sanna-marin-finland-pm-trendi-photoshoot-intl-scli/index.html

    https://dynaimage.cdn.cnn.com/cnn/q_auto,w_727,c_fit/http%3A%2F%2Fcdn.cnn.com%2Fcnnnext%2Fdam%2Fassets%2F201016151454-sanna-marin-trendimag.jpg

    You are the leader of Finland. You are Mannerheim. And Mannerheim doesn't go around partying & showing tits.

    Second & third rate people ....

    Replies: @Anonymous, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Yngvar, @Alden

    It’s just so unseemly!

  106. @Polistra
    @Dream

    One minute after the picture was taken, he slapped the blonde one hard upside her head. I couldn't decide which one should get my sympathy. Neither, maybe?

    Replies: @Dream

    You are not a class revolutionary, are you?

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Dream

    Polistra’s not a class warrior. He’s just a women hater who gets off at the thought of a black man hitting a White woman.

    Replies: @Dream

  107. DJT wasn’t insecure when he dismissed the pussy-grabbing tape as just “Locker room talk, locker room talk.” I was certain that he’d have to resign the candidacy – and so was the DNC, which surely had that tape ready from early on, as its nuclear option. Who else on earth would have survived, and what would he say, right off the top of his head? Granted, the flyover women came through in support, but that was an impressive gesture of assurance.

    • Agree: Nicholas Stix
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Dube


    DJT wasn’t insecure when he dismissed the pussy-grabbing tape as just “Locker room talk, locker room talk.” I was certain that he’d have to resign the candidacy – and so was the DNC, which surely had that tape ready from early on, as its nuclear option. Who else on earth would have survived, and what would he say, right off the top of his head?
     
    I remember, during the Clinton administration, reading an interview with Vernon Jordan, Washington Democratic Party fixer and Bill Clinton's golfing-buddy. This was probably in Time or Newsweek. The interviewer asked Jordan what he and Clinton talked about while they were golfing. Jordan replied "P**sy".

    In the eyes of anybody who wasn't a brain-washed Democrat, the Democratic Party forfeited any right it may have had to express outrage at Donald Trump's boorishness when they stood behind that vulgar lecher Bill Clinton, a long time p**sy-grabber (and, probably, rapist).

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix, @Curle

    , @Brutusale
    @Dube

    A lot of people looked at the source and saw it for what it was, an attack from the family group of morons who stupidly believed the delusion that they still ran the GOP.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Bush

  108. @Harry Baldwin
    @Jack D

    Agree. In his early years, the still-committed socialist Orwell had some goofy and naive ideas. Down and Out in Paris and London has a number of them, such as that restaurants aren't necessary, you can prepare better food at home, but people like to dine out just to feel superior to the people serving them. Also, that Christian charities had no right to require the tramps to whom they were serving free meals to attend a religious service afterward.

    Replies: @Alden

    Down and out in Paris and London is a great book. And 1930s high end Paris restaurants weren’t too different from American restaurants today. Most of the employees were illegal aliens working illegally. For very low wages and a mattress in the basement.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Alden


    And 1930s high end Paris restaurants weren’t too different from American restaurants today. Most of the employees were illegal aliens working illegally.
     
    What country were they from?

    Replies: @epebble

  109. @Dube
    DJT wasn't insecure when he dismissed the pussy-grabbing tape as just "Locker room talk, locker room talk." I was certain that he'd have to resign the candidacy - and so was the DNC, which surely had that tape ready from early on, as its nuclear option. Who else on earth would have survived, and what would he say, right off the top of his head? Granted, the flyover women came through in support, but that was an impressive gesture of assurance.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Brutusale

    DJT wasn’t insecure when he dismissed the pussy-grabbing tape as just “Locker room talk, locker room talk.” I was certain that he’d have to resign the candidacy – and so was the DNC, which surely had that tape ready from early on, as its nuclear option. Who else on earth would have survived, and what would he say, right off the top of his head?

    I remember, during the Clinton administration, reading an interview with Vernon Jordan, Washington Democratic Party fixer and Bill Clinton’s golfing-buddy. This was probably in Time or Newsweek. The interviewer asked Jordan what he and Clinton talked about while they were golfing. Jordan replied “P**sy”.

    In the eyes of anybody who wasn’t a brain-washed Democrat, the Democratic Party forfeited any right it may have had to express outrage at Donald Trump’s boorishness when they stood behind that vulgar lecher Bill Clinton, a long time p**sy-grabber (and, probably, rapist).

    • Agree: David In TN
    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    @Mr. Anon

    Thanks! Either I'd never known that, or I'd long ago forgotten it.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910, @David In TN

    , @Curle
    @Mr. Anon

    Double standards are the standard.

  110. @Bardon Kaldian
    @AnotherDad

    The point is that the highest level politics is turned into celebrity culture second-ratedness.

    I think that in the US it began with the playboy JFK. Anyway, it all intensified in the last one or two decades.

    Second rate clowns (who may be good at manipulations, but, still ...).

    For instance, take Macron. What a piece of work. One should tell him: You are the President of France. You are de Gaulle. De Gaulle doesn't behave like idiotic clown.

    Or that embarrassment of Scholz, or, earlier, Schroeder. Schroeder worked, after he lost office, as the chairman of the board of Nord Stream AG and of Rosneft, after having been hired as a global manager by investment bank Rothschild, and also the chairman of the board of football club Hannover 96.

    You are the German Chancellor. You are Bismarck. Bismarck doesn't work as some kind of businessman-bureaucrat in a company.

    The last example is Finnish PM. Although the parallel is not technically exact (president & PM), she is the leader of Finland. And?

    https://edition.cnn.com/2022/08/18/europe/sanna-marin-finland-partying-video-intl/index.html

    Finnish PM says videos of her 'boisterous' partying shouldn't have been made public

    https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/sanna-marin-finland-pm-trendi-photoshoot-intl-scli/index.html

    https://dynaimage.cdn.cnn.com/cnn/q_auto,w_727,c_fit/http%3A%2F%2Fcdn.cnn.com%2Fcnnnext%2Fdam%2Fassets%2F201016151454-sanna-marin-trendimag.jpg

    You are the leader of Finland. You are Mannerheim. And Mannerheim doesn't go around partying & showing tits.

    Second & third rate people ....

    Replies: @Anonymous, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Yngvar, @Alden

    Who knows what Mannerheim did in his private life? And with whom? Many of the late 19th century high commanders of the German army Bismarck promoted were gay and cross dressers.

    The Finnish PM filmed dancing while under the influence of something, with a man not her husband; gasp, clutch pearls, collapse on the fainting couch; has not damaged her country the way Frau straight and narrow Angela Merkel did to Germany. Or what prim and proper Dianne Feinstein and Nancy Pelosi and their husbands have done to the United States.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Alden

    No German commander in these times was gay; Mannerheim was an imposing figure who didn't have time for little games of inferior breeds..

    Mannerheim was sent to the Hamina Cadet School, a state school educating aristocrats for the Imperial Russian Army, in 1882. The handsome young Baron towered over his classmates, standing 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m). He was expelled in 1886 when he left without permission.
    .........................................................
    Mannerheim served in the Imperial Chevalier Guard until 1904. In 1896, he took part in the coronation of Emperor Nicholas II, standing for four hours in his full-dress Imperial Chevalier Guard uniform at bottom of the steps leading up to the imperial throne. Mannerheim always considered the coronation a high-point of his life, recalling with his pride his role in what he called an "indescribably magnificent" coronation.
    ......................................................................
    Mannerheim's mother tongue was Swedish. He spoke fluent German, French, and Russian, the latter of which he learned in the forces of the Russian Imperial Army. He also spoke some English, Polish, Portuguese, Latin, and Chinese. He didn't start learning Finnish properly until after Finland's independence.
    .....................................................................................
    Participants in a Finnish survey taken 53 years after his death voted Mannerheim the greatest Finn of all time. During his own lifetime he became, alongside Jean Sibelius, the best-known Finnish personage at home and abroad. Given the broad recognition in Finland and elsewhere of his unparalleled role in establishing and later preserving Finland's independence from the Soviet Union, Mannerheim has long been referred to as the father of modern Finland, and the New York Times has called the Finnish capital Helsinki's Mannerheim Museum memorializing the leader's life and times "the closest thing there is to a [Finnish] national shrine".

  111. @Dream
    @Polistra

    You are not a class revolutionary, are you?

    Replies: @Alden

    Polistra’s not a class warrior. He’s just a women hater who gets off at the thought of a black man hitting a White woman.

    • Replies: @Dream
    @Alden

    This form of cuckoldry seems to be not uncommon among many right wing white "men".

  112. @Mr. Anon
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!

    I mean really. I never.
     
    That's a lot of it, at least for the rank-and-file upwardly mobile Democratic voter. Their politics are largely a lifestyle choice. They wish not to be seen with the wrong kind of people or holding unfashionable views. They couldn't possible vote for somebody so vulgar.

    For the moneyed interests that own the Democratic Party (and the Republican Party too, for that matter) - their objection to Trump was more than that. Trump's election was a deviation from their plan - a hiccup in the uniparty con-job. The hoi-polloi are not supposed to get so far as to actually give voice to their actual concerns. They are trying to stamp Trump into the Earth only to stamp on those who support him - to make it plain to them that they don't get what they want. Ever.

    A lot of people (Trump supporters) are taking the line: You're not going to get away with it! He's our guy!

    My line is: He's not our guy anyway - not really. Stamp away! We'll still be here.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Mr. Anon wrote:

    That’s a lot of it, at least for the rank-and-file upwardly mobile Democratic voter. Their politics are largely a lifestyle choice. They wish not to be seen with the wrong kind of people or holding unfashionable views. They couldn’t possible vote for somebody so vulgar.

    For the moneyed interests that own the Democratic Party (and the Republican Party too, for that matter) – their objection to Trump was more than that. Trump’s election was a deviation from their plan – a hiccup in the uniparty con-job.

    Yeah.

    We need to keep this clearly in mind.

    I’ve been puzzling for quite a while over the deep hatred directed towards Trump.

    Trump’s actual policies, after all, are pretty mainstream: Bill Clinton could have signed on to many of Trump’s policies back in the ’90s.

    But Trump is not under the control of the Deep State. He said nasty things about the Deep State back in the 2016 campaign. And therefore — as Chuck Schumer publicly warned Trump — they are out to destroy him.

    The random suburban fluff-heads who despise Trump are of course just being manipulated by the Deep State. They lack the ability to choose their own clothes without deferring to what is “in fashion” for this year.

    Only marginally human.

    What is most interesting is the media’s (and the fluffheads’) beliefs as to why half the country supports Trump: it must be Trump voters’ atavistic prejudice and insecurity, etc.

    I think the ruling class — people like Corvinus, James Shearer, Jack D, etc. — really do not grasp that Trump voters have a, quite justifiable, hatred, for the unproductive parasitic class that has been milking the ordinary workers in this country for so long.

    To understand the hatred that the victims have for the victimizers would require the victimizers to look in the mirror and actually see the face of evil staring back.

    And that they cannot do.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @PhysicistDave

    Thank you for including me in the ruling class. I am honored.

    Class driven resentment doesn't really work in America because the classes are fluid. In this week's New Yorker there is a piece by someone who dug into the Biden family history (tl:dr - alcohol played a big part like in many Irish tragedies - Hunter was not the first) and the family flitted back and forth from the fringe of the upper class to the fringe of the working class - there are no bright lines.

    After a century of the total failure of Marxism and Fascism, it's sad/laughable that you are still talking about an "unproductive parasitic class (cough - Jews) that has been milking the ordinary workers ". The funny thing about the unproductive parasitic class is that if you get rid of them, ordinary workers don't become better off, they become even poorer. This has been proven in real world science experiments - you remove the unproductive parasitic class from Cuba and send them to Florida and instead of getting richer, the working class of Cuba gets even poorer (and meanwhile, magically, Florida grows richer as a result of the "unproductive parasitic class" moving there). Usually if you rid a creature of parasite, the creature grows stronger so these must be a strange sort of parasite. Or else maybe the cure is worse that the disease.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @anon

    , @Mr. Anon
    @PhysicistDave

    I mostly agree, as indeed I do with most of what you post. Just a couple observations:

    I would hardly call Jack D a member of the ruling class. And he seems to understand that gentile working and middle-class people have a right to be angry at the ruling elite. He just doesn't care, because they aren't his people. Corvinus - that insipid NPC - is certainly not a member of the ruling class.


    What is most interesting is the media’s (and the fluffheads’) beliefs as to why half the country supports Trump: it must be Trump voters’ atavistic prejudice and insecurity, etc.
     
    Perhaps some prejudices are justified. And as far as insecurity goes, I imagine many Whites do feel insecure in modern America. So? Why is this disqualifying? Why is acting on insecurity illegitimate, if one has genuine reason to feel insecure? Isn't recognizing one's insecurity the first step in making oneself more secure - not "feeling" more secure mind you, but actually "being" more secure. The wealthy go to great lengths to ensure their security (personal, financial, etc.).

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  113. @Alden
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Who knows what Mannerheim did in his private life? And with whom? Many of the late 19th century high commanders of the German army Bismarck promoted were gay and cross dressers.

    The Finnish PM filmed dancing while under the influence of something, with a man not her husband; gasp, clutch pearls, collapse on the fainting couch; has not damaged her country the way Frau straight and narrow Angela Merkel did to Germany. Or what prim and proper Dianne Feinstein and Nancy Pelosi and their husbands have done to the United States.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    No German commander in these times was gay; Mannerheim was an imposing figure who didn’t have time for little games of inferior breeds..

    Mannerheim was sent to the Hamina Cadet School, a state school educating aristocrats for the Imperial Russian Army, in 1882. The handsome young Baron towered over his classmates, standing 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m). He was expelled in 1886 when he left without permission.
    …………………………………………………
    Mannerheim served in the Imperial Chevalier Guard until 1904. In 1896, he took part in the coronation of Emperor Nicholas II, standing for four hours in his full-dress Imperial Chevalier Guard uniform at bottom of the steps leading up to the imperial throne. Mannerheim always considered the coronation a high-point of his life, recalling with his pride his role in what he called an “indescribably magnificent” coronation.
    …………………………………………………………….
    Mannerheim’s mother tongue was Swedish. He spoke fluent German, French, and Russian, the latter of which he learned in the forces of the Russian Imperial Army. He also spoke some English, Polish, Portuguese, Latin, and Chinese. He didn’t start learning Finnish properly until after Finland’s independence.
    ………………………………………………………………………….
    Participants in a Finnish survey taken 53 years after his death voted Mannerheim the greatest Finn of all time. During his own lifetime he became, alongside Jean Sibelius, the best-known Finnish personage at home and abroad. Given the broad recognition in Finland and elsewhere of his unparalleled role in establishing and later preserving Finland’s independence from the Soviet Union, Mannerheim has long been referred to as the father of modern Finland, and the New York Times has called the Finnish capital Helsinki’s Mannerheim Museum memorializing the leader’s life and times “the closest thing there is to a [Finnish] national shrine”.

  114. @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    As with all these bombshells the Left gets bug-eyed over, the inevitable fallback is that Trump is just so unseemly!
     
    Yep, absolutely. This is THE reason people on the left and the deep state elite really really hate him. I move in some elite left wing circles, and when he announced his campaign, the horror over the "unseemliness" was constantly expressed.

    "This guy has gold faucets in his penthouse."
    "The hair! The worst combover ever."
    "My god, a bankrupt real estate guy with a stupid reality TV show"

    Of course the married White chicks in this circle took an instant loathing to him -- philanderer, dumping the old hit-the-wall wife for a shiny new model (with a hint of an escort about her).

    The visceral amygdala driven disgust of these women was beyond palpable--the rich Alpha male who always got the other cuter girl...but never ME! ME!!

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Hangnail Hans, @Thoughts, @Jack D, @Curle, @Currahee, @Muggles, @Ben tillman, @Nicholas Stix

    Your observations are brilliant, but things are even worse than that, when you count people who claim to embrace Trump’s policy positions, but who still find him “unseemly,” and refused to vote for him.

    I showed up Charles Murray at a Center for Immigration Studies mini-conference, at which he, Jason Richwine, and Amy Wax spoke on unskilled immigration on the eve of the 2016 election. Murray said that he agreed with Trump’s policy positions, but hated his “temperament,” and thus refused to vote for him. I said, “There’s a law in ethics: If you desire the ends, you desire the means. Trump is the means” (that’s not a paraphrase).

    I wrote: The choice is between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, and the only chance of achieving the goal Murray seeks, is if Trump is elected president.

    Murray: “I’m not going to argue with you about whether I am right in thinking that, but that’s what I think.”

    I threw up my hands in despair.

    I wrote: Millions of citizens are willing to end the American experiment in self-government—merely because they don’t like the style (or “affect”) of the only man standing between us and oblivion.

    “Let’s hope that substance wins out.”

    The video of the exchange was up for years, but the guys that run CIS, Steve Camarota and Mark Krikorian, hate my guts (and Murray is hardly a fan, either), and so they have pulled the video of my exchange with Murray from circulation. When you’re an Asphalt Leaguer, many people from the overpriced private university world expect you to address them with slavish deference.

    https://vdare.com/articles/outer-boroughs-affect-why-snobs-like-charles-murray-won-t-vote-for-trump-despite-agreeing-with-him

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Nicholas Stix

    Conservatives like Murray have internalized a model of US politics from back when Eisenhower was debating Stevenson over how much of the welfare state we're going to have. That was a different country; gone, vanished. Politics are territorial, not ideological.

    The Democrats know exactly how it's done: you cram tax eaters into cities, lavish "infrastructure" spending on them, drawing ever more tax eaters, and bam!, a Red state like Georgia becomes Blue. These jurisdictions are enemy territory; no white conservative politician is ever going to get due process and a fair trial in the DC Circuit. Some Q'anisha Wompass DA in Fulton County is subpoenaing Senators.

    This is why we can't even be in the same country with these people. The January 6 protestors were gulaged--enemy territory. Charles Murray, a complete egghead who goes to campus riots expecting a debate to break out, is safe in Belmont with its $750,000 entrance fee. He can't figure out why Nicholas Stix--who doesn't even have a single peer-reviewed article to his credit--is saying such uncouth things.

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    , @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @Nicholas Stix

    Thanks for the compliment, and you're right about how even very smart people like Murray somehow can't see the benefit of the tradeoffs.

    I have very good friends who are eminently sensible politically, yet Trump somehow triggers them similarly.

    Their ostensible rationale is that Trump isn't the right vessel to deliver the goods.

    Well it's certainly possible he may be the only one who CAN deliver at least some of the goods, and maybe the last one standing who has a shot at doing it.

  115. @peterike
    A personal letter from a head of state is the literal definition of "memorabilia." It is very little else. The idea that some of the "nation's secrets" might be contained in said letter is simply idiotic. But par for the course. Hey, remember when the NY Times was all about revealing the "nation's secrets"? That's a long time ago.

    But this is all just the same impulse that had the press constantly taking Trump's obvious jokes as literal statements. It's deliberate obtuseness (call it the Corvinus Syndrome). If Trump is doing it, it MUST be evil, so let us hold up everything in front of a fun-house mirror until we get the view of it that accords with our biases, and then insist that we're only speaking the plain truth.

    I hope there is a special corner of hell reserved for members of the press.

    Replies: @Old Prude

    The Trump Rally I attended in 2016 began with the Orange Man pointing at the Press gallery and saying “See those people back there? They are the worst kind of people! The worst!”

  116. @Mr. Anon
    @Dube


    DJT wasn’t insecure when he dismissed the pussy-grabbing tape as just “Locker room talk, locker room talk.” I was certain that he’d have to resign the candidacy – and so was the DNC, which surely had that tape ready from early on, as its nuclear option. Who else on earth would have survived, and what would he say, right off the top of his head?
     
    I remember, during the Clinton administration, reading an interview with Vernon Jordan, Washington Democratic Party fixer and Bill Clinton's golfing-buddy. This was probably in Time or Newsweek. The interviewer asked Jordan what he and Clinton talked about while they were golfing. Jordan replied "P**sy".

    In the eyes of anybody who wasn't a brain-washed Democrat, the Democratic Party forfeited any right it may have had to express outrage at Donald Trump's boorishness when they stood behind that vulgar lecher Bill Clinton, a long time p**sy-grabber (and, probably, rapist).

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix, @Curle

    Thanks! Either I’d never known that, or I’d long ago forgotten it.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Nicholas Stix

    https://observer.com/1998/02/the-media-mudslideled-by-matt-drudgeinto-the-clinton-muck/

    , @MEH 0910
    @Nicholas Stix

    https://www.nearbycafe.com/loveandlust/steinberg/erotic/cn/cn68.html

    https://twitter.com/larryelder/status/1005743998869200896

    https://twitter.com/anncoulter/status/1412098623349927938

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2617258/

    , @David In TN
    @Nicholas Stix

    I remember Vernon Jordan's remark concerning his friendship with Bill Clinton and their favorite subject of conversation. It was one of those things that stuck in my memory bank. There was NO reaction to the interview from the MSM.

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

  117. @rebel yell
    @Buzz Mohawk


    I was a dinner guest at the home of a collector of art and interesting items. On a shelf in the living room, he kept a pair of rare bronze castings of Lincoln’s hands.
     
    Gee Buzz, you've been around. My humble travels pale by comparison. Though in the end it is the travels in the world of ideas that count, as you and all on ISteve know, and it's a pleasure to share the trail with you and others here. I'm just back from camping in the North Cascades high country, an excellent counterpoint to the day-to-day worries of life, important though those worries may be.

    Replies: @D. K., @Buzz Mohawk

    I’m just back from camping in the North Cascades high country…

    Beautiful! That’s better than any dinner party. I loved it when I used to backpack for days in the Rockies sometimes without seeing another soul, and I remember a quote somewhere about how spending time in solitude is enjoyable but that it is essential to know that one can return to the company of friends afterward… something like that. Welcome home.

  118. @Dube
    DJT wasn't insecure when he dismissed the pussy-grabbing tape as just "Locker room talk, locker room talk." I was certain that he'd have to resign the candidacy - and so was the DNC, which surely had that tape ready from early on, as its nuclear option. Who else on earth would have survived, and what would he say, right off the top of his head? Granted, the flyover women came through in support, but that was an impressive gesture of assurance.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Brutusale

    A lot of people looked at the source and saw it for what it was, an attack from the family group of morons who stupidly believed the delusion that they still ran the GOP.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Bush

  119. @Nicholas Stix
    @Mr. Anon

    Thanks! Either I'd never known that, or I'd long ago forgotten it.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910, @David In TN

    • Thanks: Nicholas Stix
  120. @Alden
    @Dream

    Polistra’s not a class warrior. He’s just a women hater who gets off at the thought of a black man hitting a White woman.

    Replies: @Dream

    This form of cuckoldry seems to be not uncommon among many right wing white “men”.

  121. @Jack D
    @Drive-by poster


    Orwell once observed, “The average millionaire is only the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit.”
     
    Orwell was a socialist. I assure you that the average millionaire is NOT the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit. Have the millionaire and the dishwasher trade places and in 5 years time (maybe a lot less) the dishwasher will be back to washing dishes and the millionaire will be back to being a millionaire. There is a reason why the millionaire became a millionaire and the dishwasher became a dishwasher in the 1st place. Yes, luck and birth and so on play into it but the biggest factor is the man himself.

    This goes double in America where the millionaire and the dishwasher are probably not the same race.

    Do you really think that the only difference between Adrian Oswaldo Sura Reyes and the cops holding him is that they are wearing different uniforms?


    https://www.oxygen.com/sites/oxygen/files/styles/blog-post-embedded--tablet-1_5x/public/2022/08/adrian-oswaldo-sura-reyes.jpg?itok=yBwBI-g8

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Harry Baldwin, @Drive-by poster

    Orwell was a socialist.

    There was quite a bit more to Orwell than his socialist leanings.

    In any event, I hope you are not under the apprehension that Orwell’s being a socialist precluded him from being an excellent observer of people (as indeed Orwell was).

    I assure you that the average millionaire is NOT the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit.

    Sadly, being a millionaire is not as impressive as it once was. There are parts of the world (and even some parts of the US) where the cost of living is so high that one must more or less be a millionaire in order to enjoy even a relatively modest standard of living.

    It has been my experience that millionaires (particularly newly-minted ones) have a strong interest in getting other people to believe there is something extraordinary about them compared to other people. Well, I have come across selfish millionaires, kindly millionaires, interesting millionaires, boorish millionaires, etc.

    In short, my experience with them off and on through the years has not given me reason to believe that being a millionaire necessarily makes one a smarter, more capable, or better person (or, for that matter, a worse one).

    The most noteworthy difference I have seen between the wealthy and the poor is not one of intelligence, ability, or kindliness, but rather, the ability of money to act as a cushion of sorts against the blows of life. This can, sometimes, result in wealthy people being able to behave foolishly for much longer than those of more modest means simply because their money allows them more leeway to continue their foolishness.

    (Alas, so-called public assistance [e.g. Universal Credit] has changed this in recent decades and allowed foolish people to have their foolishness subsidised by the taxpayers.)

    So while I may have started out believing millionaires are, somehow, extraordinary people, my experience with them over the years has caused me to modify that viewpoint.

    However, if this is a viewpoint you wish to maintain, far be it from me to try to talk you out of it. I am only trying to relate my own experiences and how they have served to change my own outlook as time went along.

    (Perhaps I have been hanging out with the wrong crowd?)

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Drive-by poster

    Being rich doesn't make you a better person. It doesn't make you superhuman. But most (self made) rich people have demonstrated a talent for getting rich, if nothing else. And most dishwashers have not.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Drive-by poster


    It has been my experience that millionaires (particularly newly-minted ones) have a strong interest in getting other people to believe there is something extraordinary about them compared to other people.
     
    What you have observed is the classic difference between new and old money. It's especially a thing here in lower New England where I live.

    Many old money people, that is those who inherited a fortune going back generations here in the Northeast, show no signs of being rich. There is an old stereotype, sometimes still true, of the very rich person who drives an ordinary car and lives an unostentatious life. I have known such people. You can't tell they're rich, but they have lived their entire lives never having to worry about getting a job or making any money. Some of them, I have known, do in fact go out and work anyway.

    Then there is the new money stereotype to which you refer. The nouveau riche enjoy all the stuff they can buy, and many of them enjoy showing it off. This is just a normal function of the human ego. We need to assure ourselves that we are safe and valued in our group and that we can win a sexy mate and reproduce. This is a basic as HBD gets.

    It's just that the old money farts feel no need to prove anything.

    I have old money friends. One is even an old, old money friend. We actually worked together forty years ago when we were young. Then her father died and she became a multimillionaire and married the son of multimillionaires. You've never heard of her, and you never would have known that she is richer than those flashy people you think are rich. She drives a Subaru.

    Just don't judge any American for what is in her trust fund. It's not her fault, and she may be completely normal.

  122. @Nicholas Stix
    @Mr. Anon

    Thanks! Either I'd never known that, or I'd long ago forgotten it.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910, @David In TN

    https://www.nearbycafe.com/loveandlust/steinberg/erotic/cn/cn68.html

    [MORE]

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2617258/

  123. @PhysicistDave
    @Mr. Anon

    Mr. Anon wrote:


    That’s a lot of it, at least for the rank-and-file upwardly mobile Democratic voter. Their politics are largely a lifestyle choice. They wish not to be seen with the wrong kind of people or holding unfashionable views. They couldn’t possible vote for somebody so vulgar.

    For the moneyed interests that own the Democratic Party (and the Republican Party too, for that matter) – their objection to Trump was more than that. Trump’s election was a deviation from their plan – a hiccup in the uniparty con-job.
     
    Yeah.

    We need to keep this clearly in mind.

    I've been puzzling for quite a while over the deep hatred directed towards Trump.

    Trump's actual policies, after all, are pretty mainstream: Bill Clinton could have signed on to many of Trump's policies back in the '90s.

    But Trump is not under the control of the Deep State. He said nasty things about the Deep State back in the 2016 campaign. And therefore -- as Chuck Schumer publicly warned Trump -- they are out to destroy him.

    The random suburban fluff-heads who despise Trump are of course just being manipulated by the Deep State. They lack the ability to choose their own clothes without deferring to what is "in fashion" for this year.

    Only marginally human.

    What is most interesting is the media's (and the fluffheads') beliefs as to why half the country supports Trump: it must be Trump voters' atavistic prejudice and insecurity, etc.

    I think the ruling class -- people like Corvinus, James Shearer, Jack D, etc. -- really do not grasp that Trump voters have a, quite justifiable, hatred, for the unproductive parasitic class that has been milking the ordinary workers in this country for so long.

    To understand the hatred that the victims have for the victimizers would require the victimizers to look in the mirror and actually see the face of evil staring back.

    And that they cannot do.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Mr. Anon

    Thank you for including me in the ruling class. I am honored.

    Class driven resentment doesn’t really work in America because the classes are fluid. In this week’s New Yorker there is a piece by someone who dug into the Biden family history (tl:dr – alcohol played a big part like in many Irish tragedies – Hunter was not the first) and the family flitted back and forth from the fringe of the upper class to the fringe of the working class – there are no bright lines.

    After a century of the total failure of Marxism and Fascism, it’s sad/laughable that you are still talking about an “unproductive parasitic class (cough – Jews) that has been milking the ordinary workers “. The funny thing about the unproductive parasitic class is that if you get rid of them, ordinary workers don’t become better off, they become even poorer. This has been proven in real world science experiments – you remove the unproductive parasitic class from Cuba and send them to Florida and instead of getting richer, the working class of Cuba gets even poorer (and meanwhile, magically, Florida grows richer as a result of the “unproductive parasitic class” moving there). Usually if you rid a creature of parasite, the creature grows stronger so these must be a strange sort of parasite. Or else maybe the cure is worse that the disease.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Jack D

    https://twitter.com/adamentous/status/1559128430779764736
    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2022/08/22/the-untold-history-of-the-biden-family
    https://archive.ph/zkGIy

    https://twitter.com/NewYorker/status/1560403871549296647
    https://www.newyorker.com/podcast/politics-and-more/uncovering-biden-family-secrets
    https://archive.ph/LIysB

    https://open.spotify.com/episode/4xl2g9ae7L5amUzcyWdRka

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    Here your comment touches upon a concept that has entered my mind from time-to-time: Things we might idealistically wish were not a part of life are actually necessary parts of the system. It's just that often we can't perceive what, exactly, it is that those things contribute.

    No matter. If a system can't work well without something that has no obvious purpose and even offends in some way, then that thing, whatever it is, must be essential.

    You know, we speculate a lot around here about why homosexuals exist, for example. Many of our HBD bent will offer up intelligent assumptions to the effect that non-reproducing members of the species don't need to exist and have no reason to. People like Steve wonder (I've seen it) why such people even exist -- given a simplistic-yet-logical view that evolution would not further the presence of individuals who ostensibly don't reproduce and therefore don't further themselves.

    Well, ya know, maybe there are more complicated reasons for the existence of some details of anything. Maybe, just maybe, real life systems are more complicated than we "smart" people think. Frankly, I think we would at least consider this possibility if we were really smart.

    But I still don't understand why there has to be a skunk in my woods at present. I was wondering this very thing last night, lying in bed with the window open...

    Replies: @Jack D, @PhysicistDave, @Patrick McNally, @Mr. Anon, @kaganovitch

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Jack D

    Jack D wrote to me:


    it’s sad/laughable that you are still talking about an “unproductive parasitic class (cough – Jews)
     
    You are psychotically paranoid, Jack!

    I said nothing about Jews, and if you look back through my comments, you will find me more than once attacking anti-Semites.

    Some Jews are crooks and parasites; many non-Jews are crooks and parasites.

    And I have said so again and again and again.

    Indeed, I have said again and again and again that anti-Semites distract from the real enemy, which is the entire ruling class, which happens to be largely White, male, cis-gender, and, yes, non-Jewish. And, yes, the ruling class does indeed include some Blacks, women, Jews, and trans-kooks, but they are minorities among the ruling class.

    Am I anti-Jewish because I think that some Jews are crooks and parasites?

    Then I must also be anti-Irish, anti-English, anti-German, etc., since I also maintain that some members of those ethnic groups are crooks and parasites.

    You are a psychotic paranoid, Jack.

    You need help.

    Really.
    , @PhysicistDave
    @Jack D

    Jack D wrote to me:


    After a century of the total failure of Marxism and Fascism, it’s sad/laughable that you are still talking about an “unproductive parasitic class (cough – Jews) that has been milking the ordinary workers
     
    You are really revealing your stunningly impressive ignorance of history!

    Marx did not invent the idea of class conflict: he stole it from the classical libertarians and turned it on its head. As Marx himself admitted, "[A]s far as I am concerned, the credit for having discovered the existence and the conflict of classes in modern society does not belong to me. Bourgeois historians presented the historical development of this class struggle, and the economists showed its economic anatomy long before I did."

    If you have the patience to actually reduce your ignorance, here is a scholarly paper on the pre-Marixist classical libertarian analysis of productive vs. predatory classes: I trust that you know that Jean-Baptiste Say was not a socialist!

    Or if you are simply too lazy to read an actual scholarly paper, here is a brief web post, "Class Struggle Rightly Conceived."

    Anyone who paid any attention to the world around him for thousands of years has known that there are productive classes who actually produce useful goods and services and parasitic classes that produce no useful goods or services but merely engages in predation on the producers.

    You know what ichneumonid wasps are? You and the other members of the parasitic class are ichneumonid wasps.

    Jack D also wrote:

    This has been proven in real world science experiments – you remove the unproductive parasitic class from Cuba and send them to Florida and instead of getting richer, the working class of Cuba gets even poorer
     
    But of course, the Communists, who are prime examples of the predatory class, chased out the producers from Cuba: Communists, like all leftists, are liars and con artists.

    As usual, you are repeating the Marxist lies that entrepreneurs and capitalists are parasites: they are not; they are producers. Not at all like you.

    The post to which I just linked quotes from the historian David Hart on precisely this point:

    "A consequence of Say’s view is that there were many productive contributors to the new industrialism, including factory owners, entrepreneurs, engineers and other technologists as well as those in the knowledge industry such as teachers, scientists and other 'savants' or intellectuals....

    "The theorists of industrialism concluded from their theory of production that it was the state and the privileged classes allied to or making up the state ... which were essentially nonproductive. They also believed that throughout history there had been conflict between these two antagonistic classes which could only be brought to end with the radical separation of peaceful and productive civil society from the inefficiencies and privileges of the state and its favourites"
     
    Or if you prefer a more famous author, try reading The Human Condition: An Ecological and Historical View by the dean of world historians, William Hardy McNeill.

    McNeill describes the activities of people like you as "macro-parasitism," as opposed to "micro-parasitism," infection by disease micro-organisms. So we can change the metaphor from saying that you are an ichneumonid wasp to saying that you are a macro version of an infectious bacillus.

    Jack D also wrote:

    Class driven resentment doesn’t really work in America because the classes are fluid.
     
    Most ruling classes have some degree of openness: that does not prevent those who are being parasitized by the ruling class from hating the ruling class.

    Maybe you have not been paying much attention to current affairs, but ordinary productive Americans really, really hate people like you!

    Jack D also wrote to me:

    Thank you for including me in the ruling class. I am honored.
     
    Don't let it go to your head. You are a very, very low level member of the ruling elite. You only count because, after all, you do live by parasitism.

    You're more like a bag man in the Mafia than one of the actual Mafia dons.

    Pathetic, but still evil.
    , @anon
    @Jack D


    This has been proven in real world science experiments – you remove the unproductive parasitic class from Cuba and send them to Florida and instead of getting richer, the working class of Cuba gets even poorer (and meanwhile, magically, Florida grows richer as a result of the “unproductive parasitic class” moving there)
     
    Uh, aren’t there some confounding variables in the mix? US-led sanctions, to begin with.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  124. @Jack D
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    As opposed to Joe Biden, who was a really classy dude who did NOT have a comb over or a coke sniffing, hooker loving son.

    No one really had a problem with Trump before he got into politics. Democrats practice the politics of personal destruction - if someone is "bad" politically then they are "bad" on a personal level. They practice Beria's maxim - show me the man and I'll show you the crime. Trump could have been a choir boy and once he embraced these political positions they would have found a way to hate him anyway.

    Dr. Oz was once upon a time a perfectly acceptable member of the Hollywood crowd, hanging around with Oprah, etc. But now that control of the Senate is in the balance, he is the most evil carpet bagger dude every, as if Democrats had anything against carpetbaggers (see Hillary).

    Replies: @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Jonathan Mason

    Both parties have a tendency to attack individual candidates and hominem rather than address their policy positions.

    What this shows is that swing voters in the United States are generally poorly informed.

    It would be nice if every candidate for federal office had to complete a handwritten questionnaire delineating their positions on the 20 most pressing issues of the day.

    This could then be used as the basis for discussions as whether voters want to elect them.

    An example of this was that recently I read an interview with some anti-abortion politician, I don’t even remember who, who said that in all the years up to the reversal of Roe versus Wade, he had never considered what legislation should look like “at a granular level”.

    And yet the issue of abortion has always been a nuanced granular one for anybody who takes public policy seriously.

    The reason we elect legislators is so that they can legislate sensible laws at a granular level. Isn’t that part of the reason why we have so many attorneys in legislatures?

  125. @Jack D
    @PhysicistDave

    Thank you for including me in the ruling class. I am honored.

    Class driven resentment doesn't really work in America because the classes are fluid. In this week's New Yorker there is a piece by someone who dug into the Biden family history (tl:dr - alcohol played a big part like in many Irish tragedies - Hunter was not the first) and the family flitted back and forth from the fringe of the upper class to the fringe of the working class - there are no bright lines.

    After a century of the total failure of Marxism and Fascism, it's sad/laughable that you are still talking about an "unproductive parasitic class (cough - Jews) that has been milking the ordinary workers ". The funny thing about the unproductive parasitic class is that if you get rid of them, ordinary workers don't become better off, they become even poorer. This has been proven in real world science experiments - you remove the unproductive parasitic class from Cuba and send them to Florida and instead of getting richer, the working class of Cuba gets even poorer (and meanwhile, magically, Florida grows richer as a result of the "unproductive parasitic class" moving there). Usually if you rid a creature of parasite, the creature grows stronger so these must be a strange sort of parasite. Or else maybe the cure is worse that the disease.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @anon


    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2022/08/22/the-untold-history-of-the-biden-family
    https://archive.ph/zkGIy

    [MORE]


    https://www.newyorker.com/podcast/politics-and-more/uncovering-biden-family-secrets
    https://archive.ph/LIysB

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @MEH 0910

    Yes, that's the article. Well worth reading not just for its insight into Joe Biden but also as a piece of social history of the last century.

    Joe's grandpa Joe was one of the 1st 3 employees of what later became Amoco, back when Amoco consisted of immigrant peddler (and future billionaire) Louis Blaustein and a horse drawn wagon with a kerosene tank on the back. Joseph rose in the growing company but the bottle held him back. Eventually they shipped him off to Scranton to get rid of him. Joseph is said to bear an uncanny resemblance to Hunter (especially off the wagon Hunter).

    An Irishman once told me a bitter joke - "Why did God create alcohol? So that the Irish would not take over the world."

  126. @MEH 0910
    @Jack D

    https://twitter.com/adamentous/status/1559128430779764736
    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2022/08/22/the-untold-history-of-the-biden-family
    https://archive.ph/zkGIy

    https://twitter.com/NewYorker/status/1560403871549296647
    https://www.newyorker.com/podcast/politics-and-more/uncovering-biden-family-secrets
    https://archive.ph/LIysB

    https://open.spotify.com/episode/4xl2g9ae7L5amUzcyWdRka

    Replies: @Jack D

    Yes, that’s the article. Well worth reading not just for its insight into Joe Biden but also as a piece of social history of the last century.

    Joe’s grandpa Joe was one of the 1st 3 employees of what later became Amoco, back when Amoco consisted of immigrant peddler (and future billionaire) Louis Blaustein and a horse drawn wagon with a kerosene tank on the back. Joseph rose in the growing company but the bottle held him back. Eventually they shipped him off to Scranton to get rid of him. Joseph is said to bear an uncanny resemblance to Hunter (especially off the wagon Hunter).

    An Irishman once told me a bitter joke – “Why did God create alcohol? So that the Irish would not take over the world.”

    • Thanks: MEH 0910
  127. @Nicholas Stix
    @Mr. Anon

    Thanks! Either I'd never known that, or I'd long ago forgotten it.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910, @David In TN

    I remember Vernon Jordan’s remark concerning his friendship with Bill Clinton and their favorite subject of conversation. It was one of those things that stuck in my memory bank. There was NO reaction to the interview from the MSM.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    @David In TN

    I vaguely recall the msm years later, raging that racist rightwingers had been calling Vernon Jordan a womanizer.

  128. @Nicholas Stix
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    Your observations are brilliant, but things are even worse than that, when you count people who claim to embrace Trump’s policy positions, but who still find him “unseemly,” and refused to vote for him.

    I showed up Charles Murray at a Center for Immigration Studies mini-conference, at which he, Jason Richwine, and Amy Wax spoke on unskilled immigration on the eve of the 2016 election. Murray said that he agreed with Trump’s policy positions, but hated his “temperament,” and thus refused to vote for him. I said, “There’s a law in ethics: If you desire the ends, you desire the means. Trump is the means” (that’s not a paraphrase).

    I wrote: The choice is between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, and the only chance of achieving the goal Murray seeks, is if Trump is elected president.

    Murray: “I’m not going to argue with you about whether I am right in thinking that, but that’s what I think.”

    I threw up my hands in despair.

    I wrote: Millions of citizens are willing to end the American experiment in self-government—merely because they don’t like the style (or “affect”) of the only man standing between us and oblivion.

    “Let’s hope that substance wins out.”

    The video of the exchange was up for years, but the guys that run CIS, Steve Camarota and Mark Krikorian, hate my guts (and Murray is hardly a fan, either), and so they have pulled the video of my exchange with Murray from circulation. When you’re an Asphalt Leaguer, many people from the overpriced private university world expect you to address them with slavish deference.

    https://vdare.com/articles/outer-boroughs-affect-why-snobs-like-charles-murray-won-t-vote-for-trump-despite-agreeing-with-him

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    Conservatives like Murray have internalized a model of US politics from back when Eisenhower was debating Stevenson over how much of the welfare state we’re going to have. That was a different country; gone, vanished. Politics are territorial, not ideological.

    The Democrats know exactly how it’s done: you cram tax eaters into cities, lavish “infrastructure” spending on them, drawing ever more tax eaters, and bam!, a Red state like Georgia becomes Blue. These jurisdictions are enemy territory; no white conservative politician is ever going to get due process and a fair trial in the DC Circuit. Some Q’anisha Wompass DA in Fulton County is subpoenaing Senators.

    This is why we can’t even be in the same country with these people. The January 6 protestors were gulaged–enemy territory. Charles Murray, a complete egghead who goes to campus riots expecting a debate to break out, is safe in Belmont with its \$750,000 entrance fee. He can’t figure out why Nicholas Stix–who doesn’t even have a single peer-reviewed article to his credit–is saying such uncouth things.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Thank you. I'm with you all the way, except for one matter. I actually do have one peer-reviewed article to my credit, albeit under a pseudonym: "Making Up the Grade: Notes from the Antiversity," Academic Questions, Spring, 1998. It was for years the state-of-the-art report on politicized grading in higher ed.

    I wrote it under the pseudonym, Robert Berman, which was the luckiest of many I used.

    As you're probably aware, AQ is the journal of the conservative National Association of Scholars. I thought of the group as neocons, which some certainly were, but a highly placed CI insisted at the time that some of the bosses were paleocons.

    When I submitted my ms. in spring, 1997, the editor, a liberal prof named Sandy Pinsker, put me under tremendous pressure to publish it under my own name. He very well knew that doing so would have been career suicide. I refused. He made me prove that I'd published (non-academic) articles pseudonymously, and I sent him a list of around 36 credits. When I saw him at the NAS table at the national conference in Chicago in April, 1999, and he saw my nameplate (no pseudonym), he stared daggers at me.

    These people do not want to reform academia. As you implied, they believe in caste. If you're not from their caste, you may not say or do anything.

  129. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Trinity

    I had the privilege of holding Abraham Lincoln's hands in my own, and they were impressive.

    Let me explain:

    I was a dinner guest at the home of a collector of art and interesting items. On a shelf in the living room, he kept a pair of rare bronze castings of Lincoln's hands. They were created from plaster life casts that were made by sculptor Leonard Volk in 1860 with Lincoln's cooperation.

    Augustus Saint-Gaudens oversaw the making of the bronzes in the 1880s. My host encouraged me to pick them up and examine them.

    The hands were a bit bigger than mine. The fingers were longer, thicker and stronger-looking, and I have done plenty of outdoor work. By holding copies-from-life of the Rail Splitter's hands and studying the details, I sensed a physically-impressive man. It was a meaningful experience, a kind of time travel.

    Here is a link to an interesting article I found about the works:

    https://www.artic.edu/articles/931/stilled-life-the-hands-and-face-of-abraham-lincoln-by-leonard-volk

    Replies: @rebel yell, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Didn’t Lincoln have Marfan syndrome or something?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Some people think he did, but it has not been proven. His hands were long, but strong, I can tell you. For the castings, he had them clenched, so I didn't get to see them opened full-length, but I compared my finger segments to his, and his were longer and somewhat thicker. I am 6'2" with proportional hands. His seemed nicely formed to me, actually.

    His narrow upper body is most noticeable in some photographs, and he was 6'4" in the 19th century, so Marfan's is a possibility.

  130. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Didn’t Lincoln have Marfan syndrome or something?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Some people think he did, but it has not been proven. His hands were long, but strong, I can tell you. For the castings, he had them clenched, so I didn’t get to see them opened full-length, but I compared my finger segments to his, and his were longer and somewhat thicker. I am 6’2″ with proportional hands. His seemed nicely formed to me, actually.

    His narrow upper body is most noticeable in some photographs, and he was 6’4″ in the 19th century, so Marfan’s is a possibility.

  131. @PhysicistDave
    @Mr. Anon

    Mr. Anon wrote:


    That’s a lot of it, at least for the rank-and-file upwardly mobile Democratic voter. Their politics are largely a lifestyle choice. They wish not to be seen with the wrong kind of people or holding unfashionable views. They couldn’t possible vote for somebody so vulgar.

    For the moneyed interests that own the Democratic Party (and the Republican Party too, for that matter) – their objection to Trump was more than that. Trump’s election was a deviation from their plan – a hiccup in the uniparty con-job.
     
    Yeah.

    We need to keep this clearly in mind.

    I've been puzzling for quite a while over the deep hatred directed towards Trump.

    Trump's actual policies, after all, are pretty mainstream: Bill Clinton could have signed on to many of Trump's policies back in the '90s.

    But Trump is not under the control of the Deep State. He said nasty things about the Deep State back in the 2016 campaign. And therefore -- as Chuck Schumer publicly warned Trump -- they are out to destroy him.

    The random suburban fluff-heads who despise Trump are of course just being manipulated by the Deep State. They lack the ability to choose their own clothes without deferring to what is "in fashion" for this year.

    Only marginally human.

    What is most interesting is the media's (and the fluffheads') beliefs as to why half the country supports Trump: it must be Trump voters' atavistic prejudice and insecurity, etc.

    I think the ruling class -- people like Corvinus, James Shearer, Jack D, etc. -- really do not grasp that Trump voters have a, quite justifiable, hatred, for the unproductive parasitic class that has been milking the ordinary workers in this country for so long.

    To understand the hatred that the victims have for the victimizers would require the victimizers to look in the mirror and actually see the face of evil staring back.

    And that they cannot do.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Mr. Anon

    I mostly agree, as indeed I do with most of what you post. Just a couple observations:

    I would hardly call Jack D a member of the ruling class. And he seems to understand that gentile working and middle-class people have a right to be angry at the ruling elite. He just doesn’t care, because they aren’t his people. Corvinus – that insipid NPC – is certainly not a member of the ruling class.

    What is most interesting is the media’s (and the fluffheads’) beliefs as to why half the country supports Trump: it must be Trump voters’ atavistic prejudice and insecurity, etc.

    Perhaps some prejudices are justified. And as far as insecurity goes, I imagine many Whites do feel insecure in modern America. So? Why is this disqualifying? Why is acting on insecurity illegitimate, if one has genuine reason to feel insecure? Isn’t recognizing one’s insecurity the first step in making oneself more secure – not “feeling” more secure mind you, but actually “being” more secure. The wealthy go to great lengths to ensure their security (personal, financial, etc.).

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Mr. Anon

    Mr. Anon wrote to me:


    I would hardly call Jack D a member of the ruling class.
     
    I am defining "ruling class" in simple political-economic terms: they are the people who live by parasitizing the productive members of society.

    Jack has told us enough about himself so that we know he is one of them.

    To be sure, he does not seem to be a terribly powerful or important member of the ruling class.

    But he is still one of them.

    Sorts like a bag man in the Mafia: not one of the big dons, but still a member of the family.

    Mr. Anon also wrote:

    Perhaps some prejudices are justified. And as far as insecurity goes, I imagine many Whites do feel insecure in modern America.
     
    Not just Whites. Lots of Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians also have good reason to feel insecure.

    Mr. Anon also wrote:

    So? Why is this disqualifying? Why is acting on insecurity illegitimate, if one has genuine reason to feel insecure? Isn’t recognizing one’s insecurity the first step in making oneself more secure – not “feeling” more secure mind you, but actually “being” more secure.
     
    Well, sure, that's the point: the ruling elite sneers at the insecurities of the productive members of society and implies that these insecurities are either irrational or, in some sense, the fault of the productive people.

    The truth is that most members of the ruling class are pretty insecure themselves: that, after all, is the reason for Trump Derangement Syndrome.

    And they have good reason to feel insecure: They are incapable of engaging in any sort of productive activity, and they rightly fear that if the masses become fully aware of this then the masses will do some very nasty things to the ruling elite.

    That has, after all, happened again and again throughout history: lampposts, Madame La Guillotine, etc.

    My read on history is that most ruling classes have had a great deal of insecurity for just this reason: they always face the danger that peasants with pitchforks will do what they ought to do.

    Hence our pal Jack's psychotic suggestion that in attacking the ruling class I am attacking the "Jews," even though he knows as well as I that I said nothing about the "Jews" and that most members of the ruling class are not Jewish.

    Jack is afraid.

    And he should be.

    Justice cannot sleep forever.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  132. @Mr. Anon
    @Dube


    DJT wasn’t insecure when he dismissed the pussy-grabbing tape as just “Locker room talk, locker room talk.” I was certain that he’d have to resign the candidacy – and so was the DNC, which surely had that tape ready from early on, as its nuclear option. Who else on earth would have survived, and what would he say, right off the top of his head?
     
    I remember, during the Clinton administration, reading an interview with Vernon Jordan, Washington Democratic Party fixer and Bill Clinton's golfing-buddy. This was probably in Time or Newsweek. The interviewer asked Jordan what he and Clinton talked about while they were golfing. Jordan replied "P**sy".

    In the eyes of anybody who wasn't a brain-washed Democrat, the Democratic Party forfeited any right it may have had to express outrage at Donald Trump's boorishness when they stood behind that vulgar lecher Bill Clinton, a long time p**sy-grabber (and, probably, rapist).

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix, @Curle

    Double standards are the standard.

  133. @Drive-by poster
    @Jack D


    Orwell was a socialist.
     
    There was quite a bit more to Orwell than his socialist leanings.

    In any event, I hope you are not under the apprehension that Orwell's being a socialist precluded him from being an excellent observer of people (as indeed Orwell was).

    I assure you that the average millionaire is NOT the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit.
     
    Sadly, being a millionaire is not as impressive as it once was. There are parts of the world (and even some parts of the US) where the cost of living is so high that one must more or less be a millionaire in order to enjoy even a relatively modest standard of living.

    It has been my experience that millionaires (particularly newly-minted ones) have a strong interest in getting other people to believe there is something extraordinary about them compared to other people. Well, I have come across selfish millionaires, kindly millionaires, interesting millionaires, boorish millionaires, etc.

    In short, my experience with them off and on through the years has not given me reason to believe that being a millionaire necessarily makes one a smarter, more capable, or better person (or, for that matter, a worse one).

    The most noteworthy difference I have seen between the wealthy and the poor is not one of intelligence, ability, or kindliness, but rather, the ability of money to act as a cushion of sorts against the blows of life. This can, sometimes, result in wealthy people being able to behave foolishly for much longer than those of more modest means simply because their money allows them more leeway to continue their foolishness.

    (Alas, so-called public assistance [e.g. Universal Credit] has changed this in recent decades and allowed foolish people to have their foolishness subsidised by the taxpayers.)

    So while I may have started out believing millionaires are, somehow, extraordinary people, my experience with them over the years has caused me to modify that viewpoint.

    However, if this is a viewpoint you wish to maintain, far be it from me to try to talk you out of it. I am only trying to relate my own experiences and how they have served to change my own outlook as time went along.

    (Perhaps I have been hanging out with the wrong crowd?)

    Replies: @Jack D, @Buzz Mohawk

    Being rich doesn’t make you a better person. It doesn’t make you superhuman. But most (self made) rich people have demonstrated a talent for getting rich, if nothing else. And most dishwashers have not.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    Dishwasher is an interesting example. It used to depend on when in life that person was a dishwasher: One of my best hometown friends worked as a dishwasher when we were in high school (and when I was dropping out.) I worked there with him a little, so I knew what he did. He washed dishes and taught me how to.

    He is the dean of the business school at a certain state's flagship university. Has been for years now. He heads their MBA program, and he is of course published. His specialty is energy economics, and he has worked as a consultant to governments around the world. BTW energy is one of the very biggest issues in his particular state, so his interests do matter. (He was even interested in this stuff when we were growing up during the 70s energy crisis. That was the seed for him.)

    (Not that I agree with him on everything, mind you. He was an early proponent of "Peak Oil," and he wrote a lot about it. I remember when he was predicting $200 per barrel crude -- back far enough now for inflation to make that probably closer to $300.)

    Myself, I worked as a cafeteria runner and then cook for a year during college. Now I are a sucksess! :)

    Of course, we all here know that these things are impossible now. Only immigrants can do these jobs -- and they must make careers out of them and support famblees with five children -- five future Democrat voters...

  134. @Jack D
    @PhysicistDave

    Thank you for including me in the ruling class. I am honored.

    Class driven resentment doesn't really work in America because the classes are fluid. In this week's New Yorker there is a piece by someone who dug into the Biden family history (tl:dr - alcohol played a big part like in many Irish tragedies - Hunter was not the first) and the family flitted back and forth from the fringe of the upper class to the fringe of the working class - there are no bright lines.

    After a century of the total failure of Marxism and Fascism, it's sad/laughable that you are still talking about an "unproductive parasitic class (cough - Jews) that has been milking the ordinary workers ". The funny thing about the unproductive parasitic class is that if you get rid of them, ordinary workers don't become better off, they become even poorer. This has been proven in real world science experiments - you remove the unproductive parasitic class from Cuba and send them to Florida and instead of getting richer, the working class of Cuba gets even poorer (and meanwhile, magically, Florida grows richer as a result of the "unproductive parasitic class" moving there). Usually if you rid a creature of parasite, the creature grows stronger so these must be a strange sort of parasite. Or else maybe the cure is worse that the disease.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @anon

    Here your comment touches upon a concept that has entered my mind from time-to-time: Things we might idealistically wish were not a part of life are actually necessary parts of the system. It’s just that often we can’t perceive what, exactly, it is that those things contribute.

    No matter. If a system can’t work well without something that has no obvious purpose and even offends in some way, then that thing, whatever it is, must be essential.

    You know, we speculate a lot around here about why homosexuals exist, for example. Many of our HBD bent will offer up intelligent assumptions to the effect that non-reproducing members of the species don’t need to exist and have no reason to. People like Steve wonder (I’ve seen it) why such people even exist — given a simplistic-yet-logical view that evolution would not further the presence of individuals who ostensibly don’t reproduce and therefore don’t further themselves.

    Well, ya know, maybe there are more complicated reasons for the existence of some details of anything. Maybe, just maybe, real life systems are more complicated than we “smart” people think. Frankly, I think we would at least consider this possibility if we were really smart.

    But I still don’t understand why there has to be a skunk in my woods at present. I was wondering this very thing last night, lying in bed with the window open…

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk

    There are some theories that male homosexuals exist because they somehow aid in making their sister offspring more fertile. I have no idea whether that's correct.

    It should be noted that in many species (and historically over a large time scale in humans) most males do not reproduce - a handful of alpha males father all the offspring. You only need 1 bull for 20 or 30 cows. So why does nature produce males and females 50/50? I dunno.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote to Jack D:


    You know, we speculate a lot around here about why homosexuals exist, for example. Many of our HBD bent will offer up intelligent assumptions to the effect that non-reproducing members of the species don’t need to exist and have no reason to.
     
    The answer is probably pretty simple.

    Genes code for proteins.

    That is all they do.

    Their effect depends on how those proteins behave in terms of the general environment: other genes and proteins for that individual, developmental processes, the social environment, etc.

    The genes that slightly increases the odds that someone is gay are most probably "pleiotropic": i.e., they produce more than one effect, a bit like the sickle-cell gene. That is, after all, what you'd expect: if there were a gay gene whose only function were to say "Yes, you are gay!", that gene would be rapidly weeded out of the gene pool. And if there were such a surefire gay gene, then if one identical twin were gay, the other would be also, for certain, which is not what we see.

    What is the other effect of the "gay genes" that enables them to survive in the gene pool? Who knows -- could be anything. Maybe they cause the bearer to be more nurturing, and so he puts more resources into helping his kids survive. Maybe it makes the bearer slightly less likely to show lemming-like behavior and blindly follow others into disaster. Or maybe it is something not behavioral at all: maybe some of the "gay genes" give the bearer slightly better hearing or vision or resistance to osteoporosis, or whatever.

    A lot of the HBD speculation you see online comes from people who have never bothered to actually study genetics.

    Real genetics is complicated, and funny things are expected to happen, including the survival of some genes that, in certain situations, can have some negative effects.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    , @Patrick McNally
    @Buzz Mohawk

    It's not unusual to see a male dog humping another male. No one bothers to classify this as "homosexuality" among dogs because it is assumed that the male dog would still reproduce with a female if given the chance. Among humans, the capacity for memory changes things. If a man walked up to you and tried humping the way that I've seen some male dogs do with each other, then you would have to remember this. Even if male-female relations, the types of approaches which a male cat might make to a female can be frowned upon in human relations. Everything is more regulated because of human memory.

    "Homosexuality" may just be a derivative offshoot of this way that we remember things. Instead of having a scattered layer of male-on-male games the way that dogs do, only a select portion of humans does the analogous behavior. But then once one starts doing such one is in a sense committed to a certain lifestyle. The dog who engages in behavior which appears to be homosexual has not committed themselves to such a lifestyle, and therefore can revert back to normal reproductive behavior at any time.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Well, ya know, maybe there are more complicated reasons for the existence of some details of anything. Maybe, just maybe, real life systems are more complicated than we “smart” people think. Frankly, I think we would at least consider this possibility if we were really smart.
     
    I've often thought this about corruption. I suspect that some level of corruption (bribery, etc.) is necessary for the proper functioning of a society. It offends my sense of civics, but there it is. The real problem is when corruption becomes completely untethered from any real useful function. Crooked road contractors and builders who bribe politicans to get contracts at least do build roads and buildings. I'm sure there was rampant corruption in America between the 1930s and the 1970s, but at least stuff got built: dams, freeways, airports, harbors, etc.

    What we have now are armies of crooked diversity consultants, LGBT-activists and the like who simply squander public resources on useless and harmful bulls**t. The real damage they do is not the spending of the money itself but the things they do with it. It would be better to just set the money on fire. The money would still be wasted, but at least we wouldn't get the awful things on which the money is spent.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @kaganovitch

    , @kaganovitch
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Well, ya know, maybe there are more complicated reasons for the existence of some details of anything. Maybe, just maybe, real life systems are more complicated than we “smart” people think. Frankly, I think we would at least consider this possibility if we were really smart.

    This is basically Hayek's central insight.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  135. @Drive-by poster
    @Jack D


    Orwell was a socialist.
     
    There was quite a bit more to Orwell than his socialist leanings.

    In any event, I hope you are not under the apprehension that Orwell's being a socialist precluded him from being an excellent observer of people (as indeed Orwell was).

    I assure you that the average millionaire is NOT the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit.
     
    Sadly, being a millionaire is not as impressive as it once was. There are parts of the world (and even some parts of the US) where the cost of living is so high that one must more or less be a millionaire in order to enjoy even a relatively modest standard of living.

    It has been my experience that millionaires (particularly newly-minted ones) have a strong interest in getting other people to believe there is something extraordinary about them compared to other people. Well, I have come across selfish millionaires, kindly millionaires, interesting millionaires, boorish millionaires, etc.

    In short, my experience with them off and on through the years has not given me reason to believe that being a millionaire necessarily makes one a smarter, more capable, or better person (or, for that matter, a worse one).

    The most noteworthy difference I have seen between the wealthy and the poor is not one of intelligence, ability, or kindliness, but rather, the ability of money to act as a cushion of sorts against the blows of life. This can, sometimes, result in wealthy people being able to behave foolishly for much longer than those of more modest means simply because their money allows them more leeway to continue their foolishness.

    (Alas, so-called public assistance [e.g. Universal Credit] has changed this in recent decades and allowed foolish people to have their foolishness subsidised by the taxpayers.)

    So while I may have started out believing millionaires are, somehow, extraordinary people, my experience with them over the years has caused me to modify that viewpoint.

    However, if this is a viewpoint you wish to maintain, far be it from me to try to talk you out of it. I am only trying to relate my own experiences and how they have served to change my own outlook as time went along.

    (Perhaps I have been hanging out with the wrong crowd?)

    Replies: @Jack D, @Buzz Mohawk

    It has been my experience that millionaires (particularly newly-minted ones) have a strong interest in getting other people to believe there is something extraordinary about them compared to other people.

    What you have observed is the classic difference between new and old money. It’s especially a thing here in lower New England where I live.

    Many old money people, that is those who inherited a fortune going back generations here in the Northeast, show no signs of being rich. There is an old stereotype, sometimes still true, of the very rich person who drives an ordinary car and lives an unostentatious life. I have known such people. You can’t tell they’re rich, but they have lived their entire lives never having to worry about getting a job or making any money. Some of them, I have known, do in fact go out and work anyway.

    Then there is the new money stereotype to which you refer. The nouveau riche enjoy all the stuff they can buy, and many of them enjoy showing it off. This is just a normal function of the human ego. We need to assure ourselves that we are safe and valued in our group and that we can win a sexy mate and reproduce. This is a basic as HBD gets.

    It’s just that the old money farts feel no need to prove anything.

    I have old money friends. One is even an old, old money friend. We actually worked together forty years ago when we were young. Then her father died and she became a multimillionaire and married the son of multimillionaires. You’ve never heard of her, and you never would have known that she is richer than those flashy people you think are rich. She drives a Subaru.

    Just don’t judge any American for what is in her trust fund. It’s not her fault, and she may be completely normal.

  136. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    Here your comment touches upon a concept that has entered my mind from time-to-time: Things we might idealistically wish were not a part of life are actually necessary parts of the system. It's just that often we can't perceive what, exactly, it is that those things contribute.

    No matter. If a system can't work well without something that has no obvious purpose and even offends in some way, then that thing, whatever it is, must be essential.

    You know, we speculate a lot around here about why homosexuals exist, for example. Many of our HBD bent will offer up intelligent assumptions to the effect that non-reproducing members of the species don't need to exist and have no reason to. People like Steve wonder (I've seen it) why such people even exist -- given a simplistic-yet-logical view that evolution would not further the presence of individuals who ostensibly don't reproduce and therefore don't further themselves.

    Well, ya know, maybe there are more complicated reasons for the existence of some details of anything. Maybe, just maybe, real life systems are more complicated than we "smart" people think. Frankly, I think we would at least consider this possibility if we were really smart.

    But I still don't understand why there has to be a skunk in my woods at present. I was wondering this very thing last night, lying in bed with the window open...

    Replies: @Jack D, @PhysicistDave, @Patrick McNally, @Mr. Anon, @kaganovitch

    There are some theories that male homosexuals exist because they somehow aid in making their sister offspring more fertile. I have no idea whether that’s correct.

    It should be noted that in many species (and historically over a large time scale in humans) most males do not reproduce – a handful of alpha males father all the offspring. You only need 1 bull for 20 or 30 cows. So why does nature produce males and females 50/50? I dunno.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Jack D


    There are some theories that male homosexuals exist because they somehow aid in making their sister offspring more fertile. I have no idea whether that’s correct.
     
    https://twitter.com/JayMan471/status/725365852409892865
    https://www.unz.com/jman/greg-cochrans-gay-germ-hypothesis-an-exercise-in-the-power-of-germs/

    In this post, I will review Gregory Cochran’s “gay germ” hypothesis. I wanted to make an index of Cochran’s posts from his and Henry Harpending’s blog West Hunter that discuss it. These posts don’t seem to all show up under the “Homosexuality” category there, and I wanted links to them to be all in one place. So here are the key posts, with a brief synopsis of each post’s major points.

    [...]
    Not Final! – Key post where Cochran reviews the case for the gay germ, demonstrating the unworkability of all the alternatives. Shows how processes of elimination (essentially, the reductio ad absurdum) can sometime be a useful method of getting at the truth. Excludes ideas such heterozygote advantage (requires very strong selective pressure for advantage – but nonetheless ruled out by GWAS), sexual antagonistic selection (i.e., benefit to females but costly to males – also ruled out by GWAS), group selection (impossible, and no evidence anyway). Explains the how immune complexes generated by molecular mimicry can cause damage to specific tissues not infected by the pathogen. Notes the ubiquitous impact of genes, but the often highly indirect nature of this impact, which may explain the low but non-zero heritability of homosexuality. And notes that pathogens are often responsible for common fitness-reducing syndromes.
     
  137. @Nicholas Stix
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    Your observations are brilliant, but things are even worse than that, when you count people who claim to embrace Trump’s policy positions, but who still find him “unseemly,” and refused to vote for him.

    I showed up Charles Murray at a Center for Immigration Studies mini-conference, at which he, Jason Richwine, and Amy Wax spoke on unskilled immigration on the eve of the 2016 election. Murray said that he agreed with Trump’s policy positions, but hated his “temperament,” and thus refused to vote for him. I said, “There’s a law in ethics: If you desire the ends, you desire the means. Trump is the means” (that’s not a paraphrase).

    I wrote: The choice is between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, and the only chance of achieving the goal Murray seeks, is if Trump is elected president.

    Murray: “I’m not going to argue with you about whether I am right in thinking that, but that’s what I think.”

    I threw up my hands in despair.

    I wrote: Millions of citizens are willing to end the American experiment in self-government—merely because they don’t like the style (or “affect”) of the only man standing between us and oblivion.

    “Let’s hope that substance wins out.”

    The video of the exchange was up for years, but the guys that run CIS, Steve Camarota and Mark Krikorian, hate my guts (and Murray is hardly a fan, either), and so they have pulled the video of my exchange with Murray from circulation. When you’re an Asphalt Leaguer, many people from the overpriced private university world expect you to address them with slavish deference.

    https://vdare.com/articles/outer-boroughs-affect-why-snobs-like-charles-murray-won-t-vote-for-trump-despite-agreeing-with-him

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    Thanks for the compliment, and you’re right about how even very smart people like Murray somehow can’t see the benefit of the tradeoffs.

    I have very good friends who are eminently sensible politically, yet Trump somehow triggers them similarly.

    Their ostensible rationale is that Trump isn’t the right vessel to deliver the goods.

    Well it’s certainly possible he may be the only one who CAN deliver at least some of the goods, and maybe the last one standing who has a shot at doing it.

  138. I’m sure that until very recently most homosexuals had children. Getting married and having children was like paying taxes or going to war: something you did whether you wanted to or not. Personal fulfilment didn’t come into it.

  139. @Jack D
    @Drive-by poster

    Being rich doesn't make you a better person. It doesn't make you superhuman. But most (self made) rich people have demonstrated a talent for getting rich, if nothing else. And most dishwashers have not.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Dishwasher is an interesting example. It used to depend on when in life that person was a dishwasher: One of my best hometown friends worked as a dishwasher when we were in high school (and when I was dropping out.) I worked there with him a little, so I knew what he did. He washed dishes and taught me how to.

    He is the dean of the business school at a certain state’s flagship university. Has been for years now. He heads their MBA program, and he is of course published. His specialty is energy economics, and he has worked as a consultant to governments around the world. BTW energy is one of the very biggest issues in his particular state, so his interests do matter. (He was even interested in this stuff when we were growing up during the 70s energy crisis. That was the seed for him.)

    (Not that I agree with him on everything, mind you. He was an early proponent of “Peak Oil,” and he wrote a lot about it. I remember when he was predicting \$200 per barrel crude — back far enough now for inflation to make that probably closer to \$300.)

    Myself, I worked as a cafeteria runner and then cook for a year during college. Now I are a sucksess! 🙂

    Of course, we all here know that these things are impossible now. Only immigrants can do these jobs — and they must make careers out of them and support famblees with five children — five future Democrat voters…

  140. @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk

    There are some theories that male homosexuals exist because they somehow aid in making their sister offspring more fertile. I have no idea whether that's correct.

    It should be noted that in many species (and historically over a large time scale in humans) most males do not reproduce - a handful of alpha males father all the offspring. You only need 1 bull for 20 or 30 cows. So why does nature produce males and females 50/50? I dunno.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    There are some theories that male homosexuals exist because they somehow aid in making their sister offspring more fertile. I have no idea whether that’s correct.


    https://www.unz.com/jman/greg-cochrans-gay-germ-hypothesis-an-exercise-in-the-power-of-germs/

    In this post, I will review Gregory Cochran’s “gay germ” hypothesis. I wanted to make an index of Cochran’s posts from his and Henry Harpending’s blog West Hunter that discuss it. These posts don’t seem to all show up under the “Homosexuality” category there, and I wanted links to them to be all in one place. So here are the key posts, with a brief synopsis of each post’s major points.

    […]
    Not Final! – Key post where Cochran reviews the case for the gay germ, demonstrating the unworkability of all the alternatives. Shows how processes of elimination (essentially, the reductio ad absurdum) can sometime be a useful method of getting at the truth. Excludes ideas such heterozygote advantage (requires very strong selective pressure for advantage – but nonetheless ruled out by GWAS), sexual antagonistic selection (i.e., benefit to females but costly to males – also ruled out by GWAS), group selection (impossible, and no evidence anyway). Explains the how immune complexes generated by molecular mimicry can cause damage to specific tissues not infected by the pathogen. Notes the ubiquitous impact of genes, but the often highly indirect nature of this impact, which may explain the low but non-zero heritability of homosexuality. And notes that pathogens are often responsible for common fitness-reducing syndromes.

  141. https://jonathanturley.org/2022/08/12/twitter-permanently-bans-paul-sperry-after-posting-on-the-mar-a-lago-raid/

    Investigative journalist Paul Sperry is still reporting:

    https://www.realclearinvestigations.com/articles/2022/08/18/fbi_unit_leading_mar-a-lago_probe_previously_led_russiagate_hoax_848582.html


    [MORE]

  142. @Jack D
    @PhysicistDave

    Thank you for including me in the ruling class. I am honored.

    Class driven resentment doesn't really work in America because the classes are fluid. In this week's New Yorker there is a piece by someone who dug into the Biden family history (tl:dr - alcohol played a big part like in many Irish tragedies - Hunter was not the first) and the family flitted back and forth from the fringe of the upper class to the fringe of the working class - there are no bright lines.

    After a century of the total failure of Marxism and Fascism, it's sad/laughable that you are still talking about an "unproductive parasitic class (cough - Jews) that has been milking the ordinary workers ". The funny thing about the unproductive parasitic class is that if you get rid of them, ordinary workers don't become better off, they become even poorer. This has been proven in real world science experiments - you remove the unproductive parasitic class from Cuba and send them to Florida and instead of getting richer, the working class of Cuba gets even poorer (and meanwhile, magically, Florida grows richer as a result of the "unproductive parasitic class" moving there). Usually if you rid a creature of parasite, the creature grows stronger so these must be a strange sort of parasite. Or else maybe the cure is worse that the disease.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @anon

    Jack D wrote to me:

    it’s sad/laughable that you are still talking about an “unproductive parasitic class (cough – Jews)

    You are psychotically paranoid, Jack!

    I said nothing about Jews, and if you look back through my comments, you will find me more than once attacking anti-Semites.

    Some Jews are crooks and parasites; many non-Jews are crooks and parasites.

    And I have said so again and again and again.

    Indeed, I have said again and again and again that anti-Semites distract from the real enemy, which is the entire ruling class, which happens to be largely White, male, cis-gender, and, yes, non-Jewish. And, yes, the ruling class does indeed include some Blacks, women, Jews, and trans-kooks, but they are minorities among the ruling class.

    Am I anti-Jewish because I think that some Jews are crooks and parasites?

    Then I must also be anti-Irish, anti-English, anti-German, etc., since I also maintain that some members of those ethnic groups are crooks and parasites.

    You are a psychotic paranoid, Jack.

    You need help.

    Really.

  143. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    Here your comment touches upon a concept that has entered my mind from time-to-time: Things we might idealistically wish were not a part of life are actually necessary parts of the system. It's just that often we can't perceive what, exactly, it is that those things contribute.

    No matter. If a system can't work well without something that has no obvious purpose and even offends in some way, then that thing, whatever it is, must be essential.

    You know, we speculate a lot around here about why homosexuals exist, for example. Many of our HBD bent will offer up intelligent assumptions to the effect that non-reproducing members of the species don't need to exist and have no reason to. People like Steve wonder (I've seen it) why such people even exist -- given a simplistic-yet-logical view that evolution would not further the presence of individuals who ostensibly don't reproduce and therefore don't further themselves.

    Well, ya know, maybe there are more complicated reasons for the existence of some details of anything. Maybe, just maybe, real life systems are more complicated than we "smart" people think. Frankly, I think we would at least consider this possibility if we were really smart.

    But I still don't understand why there has to be a skunk in my woods at present. I was wondering this very thing last night, lying in bed with the window open...

    Replies: @Jack D, @PhysicistDave, @Patrick McNally, @Mr. Anon, @kaganovitch

    Buzz Mohawk wrote to Jack D:

    You know, we speculate a lot around here about why homosexuals exist, for example. Many of our HBD bent will offer up intelligent assumptions to the effect that non-reproducing members of the species don’t need to exist and have no reason to.

    The answer is probably pretty simple.

    Genes code for proteins.

    That is all they do.

    Their effect depends on how those proteins behave in terms of the general environment: other genes and proteins for that individual, developmental processes, the social environment, etc.

    The genes that slightly increases the odds that someone is gay are most probably “pleiotropic”: i.e., they produce more than one effect, a bit like the sickle-cell gene. That is, after all, what you’d expect: if there were a gay gene whose only function were to say “Yes, you are gay!”, that gene would be rapidly weeded out of the gene pool. And if there were such a surefire gay gene, then if one identical twin were gay, the other would be also, for certain, which is not what we see.

    What is the other effect of the “gay genes” that enables them to survive in the gene pool? Who knows — could be anything. Maybe they cause the bearer to be more nurturing, and so he puts more resources into helping his kids survive. Maybe it makes the bearer slightly less likely to show lemming-like behavior and blindly follow others into disaster. Or maybe it is something not behavioral at all: maybe some of the “gay genes” give the bearer slightly better hearing or vision or resistance to osteoporosis, or whatever.

    A lot of the HBD speculation you see online comes from people who have never bothered to actually study genetics.

    Real genetics is complicated, and funny things are expected to happen, including the survival of some genes that, in certain situations, can have some negative effects.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @PhysicistDave

    https://www.unz.com/jman/greg-cochrans-gay-germ-hypothesis-an-exercise-in-the-power-of-germs/


    Depths of Madness – The first post in the series. Here Cochran lays out the basic case, and notes key facts that point to the pathogen (e.g., high rate of discordance between identical twins, the evolutionary maladaptiveness of obligate male homosexuality and the paradox of how it could have become so common, how pathogens can affect brain function)
     
    Gregory Cochran:
    https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2012/02/16/depths-of-madness/

    My model – not the only possible model based on a pathogen, but reasonable – leans on a couple of natural examples. One is narcolepsy. We now know that narcolepsy happens when a particular kind of neuron, concentrated in a little region in the hypothalamus, somehow gets zapped. 99% of narcolepsy cases happen in the 25% of the population that has a particular HLA type – which suggests that something, probably a virus, triggers an overenthusiastic immune response that zaps a neuron subpopulation that produce a particular neurotransmitter (called hypocretin or orexin) that regulates appetite and sleep patterns. And it doesn’t do anything else: narcoleptics aren’t stupid. You can compare narcolepsy to type I diabetes or Parkinson’s disease. Suppose there’s a neuron subpopulation that performs a key function in male sexual desire: wipe out that subpopulation, and Bob’s your uncle.

    Another is toxoplasma, which we now know changes mouse behavior in ways that increase a mouse’s chance of being devoured by a cat, the definitive host for toxo. Infected mice are attracted to cat urine, while uninfected mice avoid it. In fact, in infected mice, cat urine apparently triggers activity in neural pathways involved in sexual arousal. Microorganisms can reprogram sexual attraction in mammals.
     

    Replies: @Jack D

  144. @Alden
    @Harry Baldwin

    Down and out in Paris and London is a great book. And 1930s high end Paris restaurants weren’t too different from American restaurants today. Most of the employees were illegal aliens working illegally. For very low wages and a mattress in the basement.

    Replies: @anon

    And 1930s high end Paris restaurants weren’t too different from American restaurants today. Most of the employees were illegal aliens working illegally.

    What country were they from?

    • Replies: @epebble
    @anon

    France had immigration from Vietnam in the Between Wars (WW1 - WW2) period. They also had a lot of immigration from Southern and Eastern Europe due to political instability and poverty in those countries.

    https://missionsetrangeres.com/eglises-asie/1995-10-16-la-diaspora-vietnamienne-en-france-un-cas/

    https://www.histoire-immigration.fr/histoire-de-l-immigration/le-film-deux-siecles-d-histoire-de-l-immigration-en-france/le-film

    https://www.histoire-immigration.fr/sites/default/files/musee/atoms/video/03_chap3_750_0.mp4

  145. @anon
    @Alden


    And 1930s high end Paris restaurants weren’t too different from American restaurants today. Most of the employees were illegal aliens working illegally.
     
    What country were they from?

    Replies: @epebble

  146. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    Here your comment touches upon a concept that has entered my mind from time-to-time: Things we might idealistically wish were not a part of life are actually necessary parts of the system. It's just that often we can't perceive what, exactly, it is that those things contribute.

    No matter. If a system can't work well without something that has no obvious purpose and even offends in some way, then that thing, whatever it is, must be essential.

    You know, we speculate a lot around here about why homosexuals exist, for example. Many of our HBD bent will offer up intelligent assumptions to the effect that non-reproducing members of the species don't need to exist and have no reason to. People like Steve wonder (I've seen it) why such people even exist -- given a simplistic-yet-logical view that evolution would not further the presence of individuals who ostensibly don't reproduce and therefore don't further themselves.

    Well, ya know, maybe there are more complicated reasons for the existence of some details of anything. Maybe, just maybe, real life systems are more complicated than we "smart" people think. Frankly, I think we would at least consider this possibility if we were really smart.

    But I still don't understand why there has to be a skunk in my woods at present. I was wondering this very thing last night, lying in bed with the window open...

    Replies: @Jack D, @PhysicistDave, @Patrick McNally, @Mr. Anon, @kaganovitch

    It’s not unusual to see a male dog humping another male. No one bothers to classify this as “homosexuality” among dogs because it is assumed that the male dog would still reproduce with a female if given the chance. Among humans, the capacity for memory changes things. If a man walked up to you and tried humping the way that I’ve seen some male dogs do with each other, then you would have to remember this. Even if male-female relations, the types of approaches which a male cat might make to a female can be frowned upon in human relations. Everything is more regulated because of human memory.

    “Homosexuality” may just be a derivative offshoot of this way that we remember things. Instead of having a scattered layer of male-on-male games the way that dogs do, only a select portion of humans does the analogous behavior. But then once one starts doing such one is in a sense committed to a certain lifestyle. The dog who engages in behavior which appears to be homosexual has not committed themselves to such a lifestyle, and therefore can revert back to normal reproductive behavior at any time.

  147. @Mr. Anon
    @PhysicistDave

    I mostly agree, as indeed I do with most of what you post. Just a couple observations:

    I would hardly call Jack D a member of the ruling class. And he seems to understand that gentile working and middle-class people have a right to be angry at the ruling elite. He just doesn't care, because they aren't his people. Corvinus - that insipid NPC - is certainly not a member of the ruling class.


    What is most interesting is the media’s (and the fluffheads’) beliefs as to why half the country supports Trump: it must be Trump voters’ atavistic prejudice and insecurity, etc.
     
    Perhaps some prejudices are justified. And as far as insecurity goes, I imagine many Whites do feel insecure in modern America. So? Why is this disqualifying? Why is acting on insecurity illegitimate, if one has genuine reason to feel insecure? Isn't recognizing one's insecurity the first step in making oneself more secure - not "feeling" more secure mind you, but actually "being" more secure. The wealthy go to great lengths to ensure their security (personal, financial, etc.).

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Mr. Anon wrote to me:

    I would hardly call Jack D a member of the ruling class.

    I am defining “ruling class” in simple political-economic terms: they are the people who live by parasitizing the productive members of society.

    Jack has told us enough about himself so that we know he is one of them.

    To be sure, he does not seem to be a terribly powerful or important member of the ruling class.

    But he is still one of them.

    Sorts like a bag man in the Mafia: not one of the big dons, but still a member of the family.

    Mr. Anon also wrote:

    Perhaps some prejudices are justified. And as far as insecurity goes, I imagine many Whites do feel insecure in modern America.

    Not just Whites. Lots of Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians also have good reason to feel insecure.

    Mr. Anon also wrote:

    So? Why is this disqualifying? Why is acting on insecurity illegitimate, if one has genuine reason to feel insecure? Isn’t recognizing one’s insecurity the first step in making oneself more secure – not “feeling” more secure mind you, but actually “being” more secure.

    Well, sure, that’s the point: the ruling elite sneers at the insecurities of the productive members of society and implies that these insecurities are either irrational or, in some sense, the fault of the productive people.

    The truth is that most members of the ruling class are pretty insecure themselves: that, after all, is the reason for Trump Derangement Syndrome.

    And they have good reason to feel insecure: They are incapable of engaging in any sort of productive activity, and they rightly fear that if the masses become fully aware of this then the masses will do some very nasty things to the ruling elite.

    That has, after all, happened again and again throughout history: lampposts, Madame La Guillotine, etc.

    My read on history is that most ruling classes have had a great deal of insecurity for just this reason: they always face the danger that peasants with pitchforks will do what they ought to do.

    Hence our pal Jack’s psychotic suggestion that in attacking the ruling class I am attacking the “Jews,” even though he knows as well as I that I said nothing about the “Jews” and that most members of the ruling class are not Jewish.

    Jack is afraid.

    And he should be.

    Justice cannot sleep forever.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @PhysicistDave

    I guess you define "Ruling Class" a lot more broadly than I would.

    Based on his posts, Jack D is some kind of lawyer. Lawyering is a necessary profession. They aren't all parasites. I have no idea what kind of law he practices. In any event, he is a man of relatively modest means, based on what he has said here. I don't imagine that any real member of the ruling class frequents this website.

    And Corvinus comes across like a public school teacher who hangs on every word he hears on NPR. Also not ruling class - just a pathetic lickspittle.

    The Ruling Class (RC) consist of billionaire entrepreneurs and financiers and centi-millionaire corporate executives and perhaps the upper echelon of their political and policy "thought-leaders" (Henry Kissinger or Klaus Schwab being good examples of the latter). Then there is the broad upper-middle class of technocrat servitors who administer their system. This includes government officials, academics, middle-management, etc. They aren't RC, just the hired help.

    Think of it as being akin to a feudal system, as in the Middle Ages, because that is exactly what they intend for it to become.


    That has, after all, happened again and again throughout history: lampposts, Madame La Guillotine, etc.
     
    How many French aristocrats actually perished by the guillotine? The King and Queen, certainly. But my read of history is that most members of the Ancien Regime managed to high-tail it out of France with their heads still attached. Pretty much the same in Russia. I don't think the Bolsheviks killed that many members of the pre-revolution ruling class.

    The fact is, those unproductive elites you mention usually make out just fine. Oh, they may on occasion lose their positions in society (though, often, they don't even do that) but they seldom seem to lose their lives. They mostly seem to skate.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Anonymous

  148. @Jack D
    @PhysicistDave

    Thank you for including me in the ruling class. I am honored.

    Class driven resentment doesn't really work in America because the classes are fluid. In this week's New Yorker there is a piece by someone who dug into the Biden family history (tl:dr - alcohol played a big part like in many Irish tragedies - Hunter was not the first) and the family flitted back and forth from the fringe of the upper class to the fringe of the working class - there are no bright lines.

    After a century of the total failure of Marxism and Fascism, it's sad/laughable that you are still talking about an "unproductive parasitic class (cough - Jews) that has been milking the ordinary workers ". The funny thing about the unproductive parasitic class is that if you get rid of them, ordinary workers don't become better off, they become even poorer. This has been proven in real world science experiments - you remove the unproductive parasitic class from Cuba and send them to Florida and instead of getting richer, the working class of Cuba gets even poorer (and meanwhile, magically, Florida grows richer as a result of the "unproductive parasitic class" moving there). Usually if you rid a creature of parasite, the creature grows stronger so these must be a strange sort of parasite. Or else maybe the cure is worse that the disease.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @anon

    Jack D wrote to me:

    After a century of the total failure of Marxism and Fascism, it’s sad/laughable that you are still talking about an “unproductive parasitic class (cough – Jews) that has been milking the ordinary workers

    You are really revealing your stunningly impressive ignorance of history!

    Marx did not invent the idea of class conflict: he stole it from the classical libertarians and turned it on its head. As Marx himself admitted, “[A]s far as I am concerned, the credit for having discovered the existence and the conflict of classes in modern society does not belong to me. Bourgeois historians presented the historical development of this class struggle, and the economists showed its economic anatomy long before I did.”

    If you have the patience to actually reduce your ignorance, here is a scholarly paper on the pre-Marixist classical libertarian analysis of productive vs. predatory classes: I trust that you know that Jean-Baptiste Say was not a socialist!

    Or if you are simply too lazy to read an actual scholarly paper, here is a brief web post, “Class Struggle Rightly Conceived.”

    Anyone who paid any attention to the world around him for thousands of years has known that there are productive classes who actually produce useful goods and services and parasitic classes that produce no useful goods or services but merely engages in predation on the producers.

    You know what ichneumonid wasps are? You and the other members of the parasitic class are ichneumonid wasps.

    Jack D also wrote:

    This has been proven in real world science experiments – you remove the unproductive parasitic class from Cuba and send them to Florida and instead of getting richer, the working class of Cuba gets even poorer

    But of course, the Communists, who are prime examples of the predatory class, chased out the producers from Cuba: Communists, like all leftists, are liars and con artists.

    As usual, you are repeating the Marxist lies that entrepreneurs and capitalists are parasites: they are not; they are producers. Not at all like you.

    The post to which I just linked quotes from the historian David Hart on precisely this point:

    “A consequence of Say’s view is that there were many productive contributors to the new industrialism, including factory owners, entrepreneurs, engineers and other technologists as well as those in the knowledge industry such as teachers, scientists and other ‘savants’ or intellectuals….

    “The theorists of industrialism concluded from their theory of production that it was the state and the privileged classes allied to or making up the state … which were essentially nonproductive. They also believed that throughout history there had been conflict between these two antagonistic classes which could only be brought to end with the radical separation of peaceful and productive civil society from the inefficiencies and privileges of the state and its favourites”

    Or if you prefer a more famous author, try reading The Human Condition: An Ecological and Historical View by the dean of world historians, William Hardy McNeill.

    McNeill describes the activities of people like you as “macro-parasitism,” as opposed to “micro-parasitism,” infection by disease micro-organisms. So we can change the metaphor from saying that you are an ichneumonid wasp to saying that you are a macro version of an infectious bacillus.

    Jack D also wrote:

    Class driven resentment doesn’t really work in America because the classes are fluid.

    Most ruling classes have some degree of openness: that does not prevent those who are being parasitized by the ruling class from hating the ruling class.

    Maybe you have not been paying much attention to current affairs, but ordinary productive Americans really, really hate people like you!

    Jack D also wrote to me:

    Thank you for including me in the ruling class. I am honored.

    Don’t let it go to your head. You are a very, very low level member of the ruling elite. You only count because, after all, you do live by parasitism.

    You’re more like a bag man in the Mafia than one of the actual Mafia dons.

    Pathetic, but still evil.

  149. @PhysicistDave
    @Mr. Anon

    Mr. Anon wrote to me:


    I would hardly call Jack D a member of the ruling class.
     
    I am defining "ruling class" in simple political-economic terms: they are the people who live by parasitizing the productive members of society.

    Jack has told us enough about himself so that we know he is one of them.

    To be sure, he does not seem to be a terribly powerful or important member of the ruling class.

    But he is still one of them.

    Sorts like a bag man in the Mafia: not one of the big dons, but still a member of the family.

    Mr. Anon also wrote:

    Perhaps some prejudices are justified. And as far as insecurity goes, I imagine many Whites do feel insecure in modern America.
     
    Not just Whites. Lots of Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians also have good reason to feel insecure.

    Mr. Anon also wrote:

    So? Why is this disqualifying? Why is acting on insecurity illegitimate, if one has genuine reason to feel insecure? Isn’t recognizing one’s insecurity the first step in making oneself more secure – not “feeling” more secure mind you, but actually “being” more secure.
     
    Well, sure, that's the point: the ruling elite sneers at the insecurities of the productive members of society and implies that these insecurities are either irrational or, in some sense, the fault of the productive people.

    The truth is that most members of the ruling class are pretty insecure themselves: that, after all, is the reason for Trump Derangement Syndrome.

    And they have good reason to feel insecure: They are incapable of engaging in any sort of productive activity, and they rightly fear that if the masses become fully aware of this then the masses will do some very nasty things to the ruling elite.

    That has, after all, happened again and again throughout history: lampposts, Madame La Guillotine, etc.

    My read on history is that most ruling classes have had a great deal of insecurity for just this reason: they always face the danger that peasants with pitchforks will do what they ought to do.

    Hence our pal Jack's psychotic suggestion that in attacking the ruling class I am attacking the "Jews," even though he knows as well as I that I said nothing about the "Jews" and that most members of the ruling class are not Jewish.

    Jack is afraid.

    And he should be.

    Justice cannot sleep forever.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I guess you define “Ruling Class” a lot more broadly than I would.

    Based on his posts, Jack D is some kind of lawyer. Lawyering is a necessary profession. They aren’t all parasites. I have no idea what kind of law he practices. In any event, he is a man of relatively modest means, based on what he has said here. I don’t imagine that any real member of the ruling class frequents this website.

    And Corvinus comes across like a public school teacher who hangs on every word he hears on NPR. Also not ruling class – just a pathetic lickspittle.

    The Ruling Class (RC) consist of billionaire entrepreneurs and financiers and centi-millionaire corporate executives and perhaps the upper echelon of their political and policy “thought-leaders” (Henry Kissinger or Klaus Schwab being good examples of the latter). Then there is the broad upper-middle class of technocrat servitors who administer their system. This includes government officials, academics, middle-management, etc. They aren’t RC, just the hired help.

    Think of it as being akin to a feudal system, as in the Middle Ages, because that is exactly what they intend for it to become.

    That has, after all, happened again and again throughout history: lampposts, Madame La Guillotine, etc.

    How many French aristocrats actually perished by the guillotine? The King and Queen, certainly. But my read of history is that most members of the Ancien Regime managed to high-tail it out of France with their heads still attached. Pretty much the same in Russia. I don’t think the Bolsheviks killed that many members of the pre-revolution ruling class.

    The fact is, those unproductive elites you mention usually make out just fine. Oh, they may on occasion lose their positions in society (though, often, they don’t even do that) but they seldom seem to lose their lives. They mostly seem to skate.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Mr. Anon

    Mr. Anon wrote to me:


    I guess you define “Ruling Class” a lot more broadly than I would.

    Based on his posts, Jack D is some kind of lawyer. Lawyering is a necessary profession. They aren’t all parasites.
     
    I have had the misfortune to know quite a few lawyers.

    The vast majority are parasites.

    Extraordinarily unscrupulous, dishonest, pathologically lying parasites.

    Mr, Anon also wrote:

    The Ruling Class (RC) consist of billionaire entrepreneurs and financiers and centi-millionaire corporate executives and perhaps the upper echelon of their political and policy “thought-leaders” (Henry Kissinger or Klaus Schwab being good examples of the latter).
     
    There just are not enough of those people to control the populace, not nearly enough.

    They would be nothing, completely powerless, if not for underlings like Corvinus, Jack D, etc.

    It's always that way in dictatorships, you know. Hitler, Himmler, et al. would simply have been absurd clowns if not for the mass of henchmen in the Gestapo, the SS, etc. Similarly, Stalin would have been just a guy with a silly-looking mustache if not for the apparatchiks in the KGB, the Party, etc.

    The ruling class is always much larger than the top echelons: it has to be, for simple numerical reasons.

    You're using the phrase "ruling class" just to refer to the top echelons of the ruling class. But they just could not rule without the lower echelons of the ruling class.

    Mr. Anon also wrote:

    Then there is the broad upper-middle class of technocrat servitors who administer their system. This includes government officials, academics, middle-management, etc. They aren’t RC, just the hired help.
     
    Well, considering that the "hired help" are an essential, integral, and committed part of the apparatus, I think it is reasoanble to label them part of the "ruling class."

    In any case, we seem to agree on the actual reality, even though you want to limit the term "ruling class" more than I do.

    I will point out that the links that I provided shows that my usage has a historical background.

    Mr. Anon also wrote:

    How many French aristocrats actually perished by the guillotine? The King and Queen, certainly. But my read of history is that most members of the Ancien Regime managed to high-tail it out of France with their heads still attached. Pretty much the same in Russia. I don’t think the Bolsheviks killed that many members of the pre-revolution ruling class.
     
    Yes, I think that is probably accurate.

    Which is fine by me.

    I just want Jack D and Corvinus and everyone like them to end up as impoverished émigrés begging for food in some slum in Southeast Asia or South America, deprived of any influence in American society.

    I'd rather the revolution be no more bloody than necessary.

    But usually the ruling class does not give up without violence, and so some bloodshed does tend to occur.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Curle, @Corvinus

    , @Anonymous
    @Mr. Anon


    Based on his posts, Jack D is some kind of lawyer. Lawyering is a necessary profession. They aren’t all parasites. I have no idea what kind of law he practices. In any event, he is a man of relatively modest means, based on what he has said here. I don’t imagine that any real member of the ruling class frequents this website.
     
    JackD may be of modest means, but he is one of the smartest guys around. He has to be one of the most intelligent people in the country. Cognitive ability is the coin of the realm. Therefore, he is ruling class.
  150. anon[254] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    @PhysicistDave

    Thank you for including me in the ruling class. I am honored.

    Class driven resentment doesn't really work in America because the classes are fluid. In this week's New Yorker there is a piece by someone who dug into the Biden family history (tl:dr - alcohol played a big part like in many Irish tragedies - Hunter was not the first) and the family flitted back and forth from the fringe of the upper class to the fringe of the working class - there are no bright lines.

    After a century of the total failure of Marxism and Fascism, it's sad/laughable that you are still talking about an "unproductive parasitic class (cough - Jews) that has been milking the ordinary workers ". The funny thing about the unproductive parasitic class is that if you get rid of them, ordinary workers don't become better off, they become even poorer. This has been proven in real world science experiments - you remove the unproductive parasitic class from Cuba and send them to Florida and instead of getting richer, the working class of Cuba gets even poorer (and meanwhile, magically, Florida grows richer as a result of the "unproductive parasitic class" moving there). Usually if you rid a creature of parasite, the creature grows stronger so these must be a strange sort of parasite. Or else maybe the cure is worse that the disease.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @anon

    This has been proven in real world science experiments – you remove the unproductive parasitic class from Cuba and send them to Florida and instead of getting richer, the working class of Cuba gets even poorer (and meanwhile, magically, Florida grows richer as a result of the “unproductive parasitic class” moving there)

    Uh, aren’t there some confounding variables in the mix? US-led sanctions, to begin with.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @anon

    I think Florida grows richer because it has a growing population of people who moved to Florida, mainly as retirees who move from expensive States like New York to Florida where homes are much cheaper and there is no state income tax.

    As the population grows more people make money out of building homes, selling washing machines and carpets, fast food and groceries, and mowing lawns.

    None of this is an indication that Florida is building fine new cities. There is just more and more suburbans spread and shopping centers anchored by Walmart selling stuff from China, or Publix selling produce grown in Mexico.

    Does a hotel worker or agricultural worker in Florida actually have a better quality of life than a hotel worker or agricultural worker in Cuba? I don't really know the answer to this question, but I do know that approximately 20% of the homes in Florida are in trailer parks.

    And I do know that Cuba has produced its own Covid-19 vaccine and vaccinated its whole population, but that Florida has not.

    If the US is not scared of competition with Cuba, why does it not allow its citizens to go on vacation there and see what life is really like in Cuba?

    Replies: @Jack D, @kaganovitch

  151. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    Here your comment touches upon a concept that has entered my mind from time-to-time: Things we might idealistically wish were not a part of life are actually necessary parts of the system. It's just that often we can't perceive what, exactly, it is that those things contribute.

    No matter. If a system can't work well without something that has no obvious purpose and even offends in some way, then that thing, whatever it is, must be essential.

    You know, we speculate a lot around here about why homosexuals exist, for example. Many of our HBD bent will offer up intelligent assumptions to the effect that non-reproducing members of the species don't need to exist and have no reason to. People like Steve wonder (I've seen it) why such people even exist -- given a simplistic-yet-logical view that evolution would not further the presence of individuals who ostensibly don't reproduce and therefore don't further themselves.

    Well, ya know, maybe there are more complicated reasons for the existence of some details of anything. Maybe, just maybe, real life systems are more complicated than we "smart" people think. Frankly, I think we would at least consider this possibility if we were really smart.

    But I still don't understand why there has to be a skunk in my woods at present. I was wondering this very thing last night, lying in bed with the window open...

    Replies: @Jack D, @PhysicistDave, @Patrick McNally, @Mr. Anon, @kaganovitch

    Well, ya know, maybe there are more complicated reasons for the existence of some details of anything. Maybe, just maybe, real life systems are more complicated than we “smart” people think. Frankly, I think we would at least consider this possibility if we were really smart.

    I’ve often thought this about corruption. I suspect that some level of corruption (bribery, etc.) is necessary for the proper functioning of a society. It offends my sense of civics, but there it is. The real problem is when corruption becomes completely untethered from any real useful function. Crooked road contractors and builders who bribe politicans to get contracts at least do build roads and buildings. I’m sure there was rampant corruption in America between the 1930s and the 1970s, but at least stuff got built: dams, freeways, airports, harbors, etc.

    What we have now are armies of crooked diversity consultants, LGBT-activists and the like who simply squander public resources on useless and harmful bulls**t. The real damage they do is not the spending of the money itself but the things they do with it. It would be better to just set the money on fire. The money would still be wasted, but at least we wouldn’t get the awful things on which the money is spent.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Mr. Anon

    Mr. Anon wrote to Buzz Mohawk:


    I’ve often thought this about corruption. I suspect that some level of corruption (bribery, etc.) is necessary for the proper functioning of a society.
     
    Government exists to seize wealth from the productive members of society and hand it over to members of the government apparatus and its hangers on.

    If you think about it, if you were an anthropologist from Mars describing governments on earth throughout the last five millennia of recorded history, that would be a good summary description.

    All other attempts to define "government" (the means to satisfy collective goals or fill collective needs, etc.) really ignore what has been going on in fact for five thousand years on this planet.

    Keep that in mind, and the fact that governments always involve corruption becomes kinda obvious, indeed self-evident.

    As you expand government, you will therefore expand corruption.

    As Orwell said, "To see what is in front of one's nose needs a constant struggle," but only because there are people (people in the ruling class, I would say!) who are paid very well to obfuscate what is plainly in front of our noses.

    And has been throughout human history.
    , @kaganovitch
    @Mr. Anon

    I’ve often thought this about corruption. I suspect that some level of corruption (bribery, etc.) is necessary for the proper functioning of a society. It offends my sense of civics, but there it is.

    I think there is much truth to what you say. It will often be the case that the safeguards against corruption may be worse than the corruption itself. The political spoils system of civil service may have been bad but the accumulation of administrative power in the hands of the permanent civil service may well be worse.

    A much more 'retail' example; Back in the day , 20 or so years ago the company I was working for had the food service contract for a major NY Metro hospital. At the time food service management's year end bonus was tied to our performance on several surveys of patient satisfaction. It is, for various reasons, difficult to score over 80-85 percent on these surveys even if you do everything right so my director was convinced he could move the needle by getting the food upstairs much hotter. The thing is our temperatures were compliant with standards so he knew he couldn't get the hospital to make large capital investment (around 3 million) in new system. So he pretended to be outraged at getting dinged on dietary compliance by last inspection and established a 'zero tolerance' doorway supervisory inspection for dietary compliance that delayed the carts sufficiently that they were often out of temperature compliance. He then used that to snooker the hospital into replacing entire system with heated/refrigerated carts which required great outlay for electrical work , new AC ducting, the hi tech carts etc. total over 3 million just to move the needle on a survey so he could get a bigger bonus.

    When he announced the year end bonuses with great satisfaction I, idiot that I am, told him "Mike, if you gave me a 10k stack of hundreds, I could have gotten even higher scores by remunerating the patients and we could have saved the hospital 3 million." He didn't take comment well but fortunately I was able to jump ship a few weeks later so no real repercussions. Everything he did was technically defensible but created much more 'friction' / inefficiency than good, old fashioned corruption.

  152. @Mr. Anon
    @PhysicistDave

    I guess you define "Ruling Class" a lot more broadly than I would.

    Based on his posts, Jack D is some kind of lawyer. Lawyering is a necessary profession. They aren't all parasites. I have no idea what kind of law he practices. In any event, he is a man of relatively modest means, based on what he has said here. I don't imagine that any real member of the ruling class frequents this website.

    And Corvinus comes across like a public school teacher who hangs on every word he hears on NPR. Also not ruling class - just a pathetic lickspittle.

    The Ruling Class (RC) consist of billionaire entrepreneurs and financiers and centi-millionaire corporate executives and perhaps the upper echelon of their political and policy "thought-leaders" (Henry Kissinger or Klaus Schwab being good examples of the latter). Then there is the broad upper-middle class of technocrat servitors who administer their system. This includes government officials, academics, middle-management, etc. They aren't RC, just the hired help.

    Think of it as being akin to a feudal system, as in the Middle Ages, because that is exactly what they intend for it to become.


    That has, after all, happened again and again throughout history: lampposts, Madame La Guillotine, etc.
     
    How many French aristocrats actually perished by the guillotine? The King and Queen, certainly. But my read of history is that most members of the Ancien Regime managed to high-tail it out of France with their heads still attached. Pretty much the same in Russia. I don't think the Bolsheviks killed that many members of the pre-revolution ruling class.

    The fact is, those unproductive elites you mention usually make out just fine. Oh, they may on occasion lose their positions in society (though, often, they don't even do that) but they seldom seem to lose their lives. They mostly seem to skate.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Anonymous

    Mr. Anon wrote to me:

    I guess you define “Ruling Class” a lot more broadly than I would.

    Based on his posts, Jack D is some kind of lawyer. Lawyering is a necessary profession. They aren’t all parasites.

    I have had the misfortune to know quite a few lawyers.

    The vast majority are parasites.

    Extraordinarily unscrupulous, dishonest, pathologically lying parasites.

    Mr, Anon also wrote:

    The Ruling Class (RC) consist of billionaire entrepreneurs and financiers and centi-millionaire corporate executives and perhaps the upper echelon of their political and policy “thought-leaders” (Henry Kissinger or Klaus Schwab being good examples of the latter).

    There just are not enough of those people to control the populace, not nearly enough.

    They would be nothing, completely powerless, if not for underlings like Corvinus, Jack D, etc.

    It’s always that way in dictatorships, you know. Hitler, Himmler, et al. would simply have been absurd clowns if not for the mass of henchmen in the Gestapo, the SS, etc. Similarly, Stalin would have been just a guy with a silly-looking mustache if not for the apparatchiks in the KGB, the Party, etc.

    The ruling class is always much larger than the top echelons: it has to be, for simple numerical reasons.

    You’re using the phrase “ruling class” just to refer to the top echelons of the ruling class. But they just could not rule without the lower echelons of the ruling class.

    Mr. Anon also wrote:

    Then there is the broad upper-middle class of technocrat servitors who administer their system. This includes government officials, academics, middle-management, etc. They aren’t RC, just the hired help.

    Well, considering that the “hired help” are an essential, integral, and committed part of the apparatus, I think it is reasoanble to label them part of the “ruling class.”

    In any case, we seem to agree on the actual reality, even though you want to limit the term “ruling class” more than I do.

    I will point out that the links that I provided shows that my usage has a historical background.

    Mr. Anon also wrote:

    How many French aristocrats actually perished by the guillotine? The King and Queen, certainly. But my read of history is that most members of the Ancien Regime managed to high-tail it out of France with their heads still attached. Pretty much the same in Russia. I don’t think the Bolsheviks killed that many members of the pre-revolution ruling class.

    Yes, I think that is probably accurate.

    Which is fine by me.

    I just want Jack D and Corvinus and everyone like them to end up as impoverished émigrés begging for food in some slum in Southeast Asia or South America, deprived of any influence in American society.

    I’d rather the revolution be no more bloody than necessary.

    But usually the ruling class does not give up without violence, and so some bloodshed does tend to occur.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @PhysicistDave


    I just want Jack D and Corvinus and everyone like them to end up as impoverished émigrés begging for food
     
    This is really sick. As much as I think you are misguided, I only wish you and your family well.

    And whatever happens I don't think I am going to be on the street begging, regardless of whatever sick fantasy you may have.

    Bitter sickos like you think that come the revolution they will be on top but it doesn't usually turn out that way. Whatever ill you wish for me will come back to you, doubled for good measure.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @Curle
    @PhysicistDave

    Corvinus’ trick is pretty crude/basic. He invents some claim that would advance an position he favors, asserts it as an fact or tries to put the claim in the mouth of someone with authority, then he demands it be given authority as an null hypothesis and harangues skeptics to prove him wrong as the only alternative to declaring him the victor. It is pretty stupid and tiresome but educational as an example of an erroneous form of arguing that some use. I tend to think it helps illustrate some of the practices of Talmudism.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @Corvinus
    @PhysicistDave

    “I just want Jack D and Corvinus and everyone like them to end up as impoverished émigrés begging for food in some slum in Southeast Asia or South America, deprived of any influence in American society.“

    Right, wishing someone anonymous who makes comments your personally disagree with to essentially suffer when civil war comes that you have is normal behavior.

    Indeed, you have unwittingly told us a lot about yourself.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  153. @Mr. Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Well, ya know, maybe there are more complicated reasons for the existence of some details of anything. Maybe, just maybe, real life systems are more complicated than we “smart” people think. Frankly, I think we would at least consider this possibility if we were really smart.
     
    I've often thought this about corruption. I suspect that some level of corruption (bribery, etc.) is necessary for the proper functioning of a society. It offends my sense of civics, but there it is. The real problem is when corruption becomes completely untethered from any real useful function. Crooked road contractors and builders who bribe politicans to get contracts at least do build roads and buildings. I'm sure there was rampant corruption in America between the 1930s and the 1970s, but at least stuff got built: dams, freeways, airports, harbors, etc.

    What we have now are armies of crooked diversity consultants, LGBT-activists and the like who simply squander public resources on useless and harmful bulls**t. The real damage they do is not the spending of the money itself but the things they do with it. It would be better to just set the money on fire. The money would still be wasted, but at least we wouldn't get the awful things on which the money is spent.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @kaganovitch

    Mr. Anon wrote to Buzz Mohawk:

    I’ve often thought this about corruption. I suspect that some level of corruption (bribery, etc.) is necessary for the proper functioning of a society.

    Government exists to seize wealth from the productive members of society and hand it over to members of the government apparatus and its hangers on.

    If you think about it, if you were an anthropologist from Mars describing governments on earth throughout the last five millennia of recorded history, that would be a good summary description.

    All other attempts to define “government” (the means to satisfy collective goals or fill collective needs, etc.) really ignore what has been going on in fact for five thousand years on this planet.

    Keep that in mind, and the fact that governments always involve corruption becomes kinda obvious, indeed self-evident.

    As you expand government, you will therefore expand corruption.

    As Orwell said, “To see what is in front of one’s nose needs a constant struggle,” but only because there are people (people in the ruling class, I would say!) who are paid very well to obfuscate what is plainly in front of our noses.

    And has been throughout human history.

  154. @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote to Jack D:


    You know, we speculate a lot around here about why homosexuals exist, for example. Many of our HBD bent will offer up intelligent assumptions to the effect that non-reproducing members of the species don’t need to exist and have no reason to.
     
    The answer is probably pretty simple.

    Genes code for proteins.

    That is all they do.

    Their effect depends on how those proteins behave in terms of the general environment: other genes and proteins for that individual, developmental processes, the social environment, etc.

    The genes that slightly increases the odds that someone is gay are most probably "pleiotropic": i.e., they produce more than one effect, a bit like the sickle-cell gene. That is, after all, what you'd expect: if there were a gay gene whose only function were to say "Yes, you are gay!", that gene would be rapidly weeded out of the gene pool. And if there were such a surefire gay gene, then if one identical twin were gay, the other would be also, for certain, which is not what we see.

    What is the other effect of the "gay genes" that enables them to survive in the gene pool? Who knows -- could be anything. Maybe they cause the bearer to be more nurturing, and so he puts more resources into helping his kids survive. Maybe it makes the bearer slightly less likely to show lemming-like behavior and blindly follow others into disaster. Or maybe it is something not behavioral at all: maybe some of the "gay genes" give the bearer slightly better hearing or vision or resistance to osteoporosis, or whatever.

    A lot of the HBD speculation you see online comes from people who have never bothered to actually study genetics.

    Real genetics is complicated, and funny things are expected to happen, including the survival of some genes that, in certain situations, can have some negative effects.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    https://www.unz.com/jman/greg-cochrans-gay-germ-hypothesis-an-exercise-in-the-power-of-germs/

    Depths of Madness – The first post in the series. Here Cochran lays out the basic case, and notes key facts that point to the pathogen (e.g., high rate of discordance between identical twins, the evolutionary maladaptiveness of obligate male homosexuality and the paradox of how it could have become so common, how pathogens can affect brain function)

    Gregory Cochran:
    https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2012/02/16/depths-of-madness/

    My model – not the only possible model based on a pathogen, but reasonable – leans on a couple of natural examples. One is narcolepsy. We now know that narcolepsy happens when a particular kind of neuron, concentrated in a little region in the hypothalamus, somehow gets zapped. 99% of narcolepsy cases happen in the 25% of the population that has a particular HLA type – which suggests that something, probably a virus, triggers an overenthusiastic immune response that zaps a neuron subpopulation that produce a particular neurotransmitter (called hypocretin or orexin) that regulates appetite and sleep patterns. And it doesn’t do anything else: narcoleptics aren’t stupid. You can compare narcolepsy to type I diabetes or Parkinson’s disease. Suppose there’s a neuron subpopulation that performs a key function in male sexual desire: wipe out that subpopulation, and Bob’s your uncle.

    Another is toxoplasma, which we now know changes mouse behavior in ways that increase a mouse’s chance of being devoured by a cat, the definitive host for toxo. Infected mice are attracted to cat urine, while uninfected mice avoid it. In fact, in infected mice, cat urine apparently triggers activity in neural pathways involved in sexual arousal. Microorganisms can reprogram sexual attraction in mammals.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @MEH 0910

    With all due respect, Cochran is not a virologist or any sort of biologist. This is like Linus Pauling speculating about Vitamin C - this is just too far outside of his wheelhouse to have any wort of credibility.

    Replies: @Curle, @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

  155. The dislike of lawyers goes back a long way. The ability to argue both sides of a question with equal effectiveness makes you a good lawyer, but it offends the sense of decency of many people. It implies there’s no such thing as objective truth, which is very disturbing.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Anonymous


    The ability to argue both sides of a question with equal effectiveness makes you a good lawyer
     
    Do you think good lawyers are born that way, or are they made?
    , @Curle
    @Anonymous

    There is such a thing as objective truth. It just can’t be reproduced in an courtroom nor is it amenable to the social laws of equality.

  156. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Nicholas Stix

    Conservatives like Murray have internalized a model of US politics from back when Eisenhower was debating Stevenson over how much of the welfare state we're going to have. That was a different country; gone, vanished. Politics are territorial, not ideological.

    The Democrats know exactly how it's done: you cram tax eaters into cities, lavish "infrastructure" spending on them, drawing ever more tax eaters, and bam!, a Red state like Georgia becomes Blue. These jurisdictions are enemy territory; no white conservative politician is ever going to get due process and a fair trial in the DC Circuit. Some Q'anisha Wompass DA in Fulton County is subpoenaing Senators.

    This is why we can't even be in the same country with these people. The January 6 protestors were gulaged--enemy territory. Charles Murray, a complete egghead who goes to campus riots expecting a debate to break out, is safe in Belmont with its $750,000 entrance fee. He can't figure out why Nicholas Stix--who doesn't even have a single peer-reviewed article to his credit--is saying such uncouth things.

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    Thank you. I’m with you all the way, except for one matter. I actually do have one peer-reviewed article to my credit, albeit under a pseudonym: “Making Up the Grade: Notes from the Antiversity,” Academic Questions, Spring, 1998. It was for years the state-of-the-art report on politicized grading in higher ed.

    I wrote it under the pseudonym, Robert Berman, which was the luckiest of many I used.

    As you’re probably aware, AQ is the journal of the conservative National Association of Scholars. I thought of the group as neocons, which some certainly were, but a highly placed CI insisted at the time that some of the bosses were paleocons.

    When I submitted my ms. in spring, 1997, the editor, a liberal prof named Sandy Pinsker, put me under tremendous pressure to publish it under my own name. He very well knew that doing so would have been career suicide. I refused. He made me prove that I’d published (non-academic) articles pseudonymously, and I sent him a list of around 36 credits. When I saw him at the NAS table at the national conference in Chicago in April, 1999, and he saw my nameplate (no pseudonym), he stared daggers at me.

    These people do not want to reform academia. As you implied, they believe in caste. If you’re not from their caste, you may not say or do anything.

  157. @David In TN
    @Nicholas Stix

    I remember Vernon Jordan's remark concerning his friendship with Bill Clinton and their favorite subject of conversation. It was one of those things that stuck in my memory bank. There was NO reaction to the interview from the MSM.

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    I vaguely recall the msm years later, raging that racist rightwingers had been calling Vernon Jordan a womanizer.

  158. @anon
    @Jack D


    This has been proven in real world science experiments – you remove the unproductive parasitic class from Cuba and send them to Florida and instead of getting richer, the working class of Cuba gets even poorer (and meanwhile, magically, Florida grows richer as a result of the “unproductive parasitic class” moving there)
     
    Uh, aren’t there some confounding variables in the mix? US-led sanctions, to begin with.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I think Florida grows richer because it has a growing population of people who moved to Florida, mainly as retirees who move from expensive States like New York to Florida where homes are much cheaper and there is no state income tax.

    As the population grows more people make money out of building homes, selling washing machines and carpets, fast food and groceries, and mowing lawns.

    None of this is an indication that Florida is building fine new cities. There is just more and more suburbans spread and shopping centers anchored by Walmart selling stuff from China, or Publix selling produce grown in Mexico.

    Does a hotel worker or agricultural worker in Florida actually have a better quality of life than a hotel worker or agricultural worker in Cuba? I don’t really know the answer to this question, but I do know that approximately 20% of the homes in Florida are in trailer parks.

    And I do know that Cuba has produced its own Covid-19 vaccine and vaccinated its whole population, but that Florida has not.

    If the US is not scared of competition with Cuba, why does it not allow its citizens to go on vacation there and see what life is really like in Cuba?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Jonathan Mason


    Why does it not allow its citizens to go on vacation there and see what life is really like in Cuba?
     
    Why? Because their dollars would support the repressive dictatorial regime and in particular the Cuban military that owns many of the resorts and hotels.
    , @kaganovitch
    @Jonathan Mason

    Does a hotel worker or agricultural worker in Florida actually have a better quality of life than a hotel worker or agricultural worker in Cuba? I don’t really know the answer to this question, but I do know that approximately 20% of the homes in Florida are in trailer parks.

    Indeed, the only reason you don't see these very same agricultural workers in Florida making home made rafts and risking their lives on the ocean to escape to Cuba is because they are too destitute and weak to afford even home made rafts. The Cubans, on the other hand, who had the advantage of the World's finest medical care, and with higher levels of general prosperity can afford the raft and the effort. It's insights like this that make you such a valuable commenter.

    Fwiw, your stats are decades out of date and even allowing for that they are B.S. In 1985 when Florida had 500,000 trailer homes they comprised %10 of housing units. Today with 10,000,000 housing units there are 50,000 manufactured housing units so around 1/2 of one percent, so off by orders of magnitude. Do you imagine that the average Cuban wouldn't weep with joy if he could get a manufactured home rather than a tumbledown driftwood shack held together with chicken wire? You just assume that the third world underclass shares your contempt for deplorables who are so declasse that they live in trailer parks. It's not so. First they have to come here and attend university before they learn the proper attitude to the deplorables who live in trailer parks and vote for Trump.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  159. @PhysicistDave
    @Mr. Anon

    Mr. Anon wrote to me:


    I guess you define “Ruling Class” a lot more broadly than I would.

    Based on his posts, Jack D is some kind of lawyer. Lawyering is a necessary profession. They aren’t all parasites.
     
    I have had the misfortune to know quite a few lawyers.

    The vast majority are parasites.

    Extraordinarily unscrupulous, dishonest, pathologically lying parasites.

    Mr, Anon also wrote:

    The Ruling Class (RC) consist of billionaire entrepreneurs and financiers and centi-millionaire corporate executives and perhaps the upper echelon of their political and policy “thought-leaders” (Henry Kissinger or Klaus Schwab being good examples of the latter).
     
    There just are not enough of those people to control the populace, not nearly enough.

    They would be nothing, completely powerless, if not for underlings like Corvinus, Jack D, etc.

    It's always that way in dictatorships, you know. Hitler, Himmler, et al. would simply have been absurd clowns if not for the mass of henchmen in the Gestapo, the SS, etc. Similarly, Stalin would have been just a guy with a silly-looking mustache if not for the apparatchiks in the KGB, the Party, etc.

    The ruling class is always much larger than the top echelons: it has to be, for simple numerical reasons.

    You're using the phrase "ruling class" just to refer to the top echelons of the ruling class. But they just could not rule without the lower echelons of the ruling class.

    Mr. Anon also wrote:

    Then there is the broad upper-middle class of technocrat servitors who administer their system. This includes government officials, academics, middle-management, etc. They aren’t RC, just the hired help.
     
    Well, considering that the "hired help" are an essential, integral, and committed part of the apparatus, I think it is reasoanble to label them part of the "ruling class."

    In any case, we seem to agree on the actual reality, even though you want to limit the term "ruling class" more than I do.

    I will point out that the links that I provided shows that my usage has a historical background.

    Mr. Anon also wrote:

    How many French aristocrats actually perished by the guillotine? The King and Queen, certainly. But my read of history is that most members of the Ancien Regime managed to high-tail it out of France with their heads still attached. Pretty much the same in Russia. I don’t think the Bolsheviks killed that many members of the pre-revolution ruling class.
     
    Yes, I think that is probably accurate.

    Which is fine by me.

    I just want Jack D and Corvinus and everyone like them to end up as impoverished émigrés begging for food in some slum in Southeast Asia or South America, deprived of any influence in American society.

    I'd rather the revolution be no more bloody than necessary.

    But usually the ruling class does not give up without violence, and so some bloodshed does tend to occur.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Curle, @Corvinus

    I just want Jack D and Corvinus and everyone like them to end up as impoverished émigrés begging for food

    This is really sick. As much as I think you are misguided, I only wish you and your family well.

    And whatever happens I don’t think I am going to be on the street begging, regardless of whatever sick fantasy you may have.

    Bitter sickos like you think that come the revolution they will be on top but it doesn’t usually turn out that way. Whatever ill you wish for me will come back to you, doubled for good measure.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Jack D

    Jack D wrote to me:


    And whatever happens I don’t think I am going to be on the street begging, regardless of whatever sick fantasy you may have.
     
    Oh, I suspect that you are indeed the kind of con artist who always lands on his feet.

    But you are indeed a parasite who lives off the labor of the productive members of our society: I note that you are not even trying to claim otherwise.

    And we can hope that you get what you deserve.

    Jack D also wrote to me:

    Bitter sickos like you think that come the revolution they will be on top but it doesn’t usually turn out that way. Whatever ill you wish for me will come back to you, doubled for good measure.
     
    One thing that parasites like you can never grasp is that decent, productive people like me do not want to end up "on top."

    I lack the desire to lord it over my fellow citizens; I find the idea of controlling others more than repulsive -- I simply find it boring.

    No, after the revolution I will not end up "on top," because the whole purpose of any just revolution is to end this nonsense of who is "on top."

    You have unwittingly told us a lot about yourself, Jack.

    And it's not pretty.

    And, yes, it would be a very good thing indeed if you and Corvinus were reduced to begging for food. You are both parasites on the productive members of society -- the manual laborers, the engineers, the entrepreneurs: in short, everyone who produces useful goods and services.

    You deserve to get what you produce.

    Which is nothing.

    Nothing at all.
  160. @Jonathan Mason
    @anon

    I think Florida grows richer because it has a growing population of people who moved to Florida, mainly as retirees who move from expensive States like New York to Florida where homes are much cheaper and there is no state income tax.

    As the population grows more people make money out of building homes, selling washing machines and carpets, fast food and groceries, and mowing lawns.

    None of this is an indication that Florida is building fine new cities. There is just more and more suburbans spread and shopping centers anchored by Walmart selling stuff from China, or Publix selling produce grown in Mexico.

    Does a hotel worker or agricultural worker in Florida actually have a better quality of life than a hotel worker or agricultural worker in Cuba? I don't really know the answer to this question, but I do know that approximately 20% of the homes in Florida are in trailer parks.

    And I do know that Cuba has produced its own Covid-19 vaccine and vaccinated its whole population, but that Florida has not.

    If the US is not scared of competition with Cuba, why does it not allow its citizens to go on vacation there and see what life is really like in Cuba?

    Replies: @Jack D, @kaganovitch

    Why does it not allow its citizens to go on vacation there and see what life is really like in Cuba?

    Why? Because their dollars would support the repressive dictatorial regime and in particular the Cuban military that owns many of the resorts and hotels.

  161. @MEH 0910
    @PhysicistDave

    https://www.unz.com/jman/greg-cochrans-gay-germ-hypothesis-an-exercise-in-the-power-of-germs/


    Depths of Madness – The first post in the series. Here Cochran lays out the basic case, and notes key facts that point to the pathogen (e.g., high rate of discordance between identical twins, the evolutionary maladaptiveness of obligate male homosexuality and the paradox of how it could have become so common, how pathogens can affect brain function)
     
    Gregory Cochran:
    https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2012/02/16/depths-of-madness/

    My model – not the only possible model based on a pathogen, but reasonable – leans on a couple of natural examples. One is narcolepsy. We now know that narcolepsy happens when a particular kind of neuron, concentrated in a little region in the hypothalamus, somehow gets zapped. 99% of narcolepsy cases happen in the 25% of the population that has a particular HLA type – which suggests that something, probably a virus, triggers an overenthusiastic immune response that zaps a neuron subpopulation that produce a particular neurotransmitter (called hypocretin or orexin) that regulates appetite and sleep patterns. And it doesn’t do anything else: narcoleptics aren’t stupid. You can compare narcolepsy to type I diabetes or Parkinson’s disease. Suppose there’s a neuron subpopulation that performs a key function in male sexual desire: wipe out that subpopulation, and Bob’s your uncle.

    Another is toxoplasma, which we now know changes mouse behavior in ways that increase a mouse’s chance of being devoured by a cat, the definitive host for toxo. Infected mice are attracted to cat urine, while uninfected mice avoid it. In fact, in infected mice, cat urine apparently triggers activity in neural pathways involved in sexual arousal. Microorganisms can reprogram sexual attraction in mammals.
     

    Replies: @Jack D

    With all due respect, Cochran is not a virologist or any sort of biologist. This is like Linus Pauling speculating about Vitamin C – this is just too far outside of his wheelhouse to have any wort of credibility.

    • Replies: @Curle
    @Jack D

    “Cochran is not a virologist or any sort of biologist.”

    Do you dispute his role in identifying and/or conceiving the virus theory of cancer? If not, what is the outer limit of the term virologist if it doesn’t include major discoveries regarding the effect of viruses on health?

    , @MEH 0910
    @Jack D

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_10,000_Year_Explosion

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/cochran-harpending-theory-of-recent-selective-pressure-supported/


    Cochran-Harpending Theory of Recent Selective Pressure Supported
    STEVE SAILER • NOVEMBER 15, 2021

    A widespread view is that, yeah, sure, human genetic evolution used to be important, but then we invented culture maybe 10,000 years ago when we invented agriculture, and since then it’s been all cultural evolution. C0chran and Harpending argued instead in the Ten Thousand Year Explosion that recent rapid cultural evolution brought about more selection pressure for genetic evolution. Today’s new paper is in line with their view.

    From Nature: Human Behavior:

    A selection pressure landscape for 870 human polygenic traits
     
    [...]
     
    https://twitter.com/gregoryconnor11/status/1460333645290524672
    , @MEH 0910
    @Jack D

    Steve Sailer in 2004:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/no-wmds-who-could-have-thunk-it/


    No WMDs? Who could have thunk it? — Well, weapons scientists, if the Administration had bothered to ask them. On Jerry Pournelle’s website, the sci-fi novelist (among other things) posts a message from Greg Cochran on how he knew before the war that Saddam wasn’t getting anywhere with nukes or delivery systems. (Indeed, Greg told me that over the phone several times over twelve months ago.)

    Cochran has a physics Ph.D., and worked on the highly successful, strategically crucial Trident Missile guidance system (which turned our submarine deterrent from merely a city-busting last resort into a more militarily useful silo-busting response) and also on the more publicized if still pending Star Wars system. He is in touch with former colleagues now at America’s weapons labs. (Since the end of the Cold War, he has remade himself into perhaps the most creative of evolutionary theorist since Bill Hamilton and Richard Trivers, as this Atlantic Monthly cover story about Greg and his research partner Paul Ewald indicates.)
     
    https://www.theatlantic.com/issues/99feb/germ2.htm
    https://archive.ph/R92C

    Replies: @Jack D, @MEH 0910

  162. Anonymous[535] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Anon
    @PhysicistDave

    I guess you define "Ruling Class" a lot more broadly than I would.

    Based on his posts, Jack D is some kind of lawyer. Lawyering is a necessary profession. They aren't all parasites. I have no idea what kind of law he practices. In any event, he is a man of relatively modest means, based on what he has said here. I don't imagine that any real member of the ruling class frequents this website.

    And Corvinus comes across like a public school teacher who hangs on every word he hears on NPR. Also not ruling class - just a pathetic lickspittle.

    The Ruling Class (RC) consist of billionaire entrepreneurs and financiers and centi-millionaire corporate executives and perhaps the upper echelon of their political and policy "thought-leaders" (Henry Kissinger or Klaus Schwab being good examples of the latter). Then there is the broad upper-middle class of technocrat servitors who administer their system. This includes government officials, academics, middle-management, etc. They aren't RC, just the hired help.

    Think of it as being akin to a feudal system, as in the Middle Ages, because that is exactly what they intend for it to become.


    That has, after all, happened again and again throughout history: lampposts, Madame La Guillotine, etc.
     
    How many French aristocrats actually perished by the guillotine? The King and Queen, certainly. But my read of history is that most members of the Ancien Regime managed to high-tail it out of France with their heads still attached. Pretty much the same in Russia. I don't think the Bolsheviks killed that many members of the pre-revolution ruling class.

    The fact is, those unproductive elites you mention usually make out just fine. Oh, they may on occasion lose their positions in society (though, often, they don't even do that) but they seldom seem to lose their lives. They mostly seem to skate.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Anonymous

    Based on his posts, Jack D is some kind of lawyer. Lawyering is a necessary profession. They aren’t all parasites. I have no idea what kind of law he practices. In any event, he is a man of relatively modest means, based on what he has said here. I don’t imagine that any real member of the ruling class frequents this website.

    JackD may be of modest means, but he is one of the smartest guys around. He has to be one of the most intelligent people in the country. Cognitive ability is the coin of the realm. Therefore, he is ruling class.

    • LOL: PhysicistDave
  163. @Anonymous
    The dislike of lawyers goes back a long way. The ability to argue both sides of a question with equal effectiveness makes you a good lawyer, but it offends the sense of decency of many people. It implies there's no such thing as objective truth, which is very disturbing.

    Replies: @Anon, @Curle

    The ability to argue both sides of a question with equal effectiveness makes you a good lawyer

    Do you think good lawyers are born that way, or are they made?

  164. @PhysicistDave
    @Mr. Anon

    Mr. Anon wrote to me:


    I guess you define “Ruling Class” a lot more broadly than I would.

    Based on his posts, Jack D is some kind of lawyer. Lawyering is a necessary profession. They aren’t all parasites.
     
    I have had the misfortune to know quite a few lawyers.

    The vast majority are parasites.

    Extraordinarily unscrupulous, dishonest, pathologically lying parasites.

    Mr, Anon also wrote:

    The Ruling Class (RC) consist of billionaire entrepreneurs and financiers and centi-millionaire corporate executives and perhaps the upper echelon of their political and policy “thought-leaders” (Henry Kissinger or Klaus Schwab being good examples of the latter).
     
    There just are not enough of those people to control the populace, not nearly enough.

    They would be nothing, completely powerless, if not for underlings like Corvinus, Jack D, etc.

    It's always that way in dictatorships, you know. Hitler, Himmler, et al. would simply have been absurd clowns if not for the mass of henchmen in the Gestapo, the SS, etc. Similarly, Stalin would have been just a guy with a silly-looking mustache if not for the apparatchiks in the KGB, the Party, etc.

    The ruling class is always much larger than the top echelons: it has to be, for simple numerical reasons.

    You're using the phrase "ruling class" just to refer to the top echelons of the ruling class. But they just could not rule without the lower echelons of the ruling class.

    Mr. Anon also wrote:

    Then there is the broad upper-middle class of technocrat servitors who administer their system. This includes government officials, academics, middle-management, etc. They aren’t RC, just the hired help.
     
    Well, considering that the "hired help" are an essential, integral, and committed part of the apparatus, I think it is reasoanble to label them part of the "ruling class."

    In any case, we seem to agree on the actual reality, even though you want to limit the term "ruling class" more than I do.

    I will point out that the links that I provided shows that my usage has a historical background.

    Mr. Anon also wrote:

    How many French aristocrats actually perished by the guillotine? The King and Queen, certainly. But my read of history is that most members of the Ancien Regime managed to high-tail it out of France with their heads still attached. Pretty much the same in Russia. I don’t think the Bolsheviks killed that many members of the pre-revolution ruling class.
     
    Yes, I think that is probably accurate.

    Which is fine by me.

    I just want Jack D and Corvinus and everyone like them to end up as impoverished émigrés begging for food in some slum in Southeast Asia or South America, deprived of any influence in American society.

    I'd rather the revolution be no more bloody than necessary.

    But usually the ruling class does not give up without violence, and so some bloodshed does tend to occur.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Curle, @Corvinus

    Corvinus’ trick is pretty crude/basic. He invents some claim that would advance an position he favors, asserts it as an fact or tries to put the claim in the mouth of someone with authority, then he demands it be given authority as an null hypothesis and harangues skeptics to prove him wrong as the only alternative to declaring him the victor. It is pretty stupid and tiresome but educational as an example of an erroneous form of arguing that some use. I tend to think it helps illustrate some of the practices of Talmudism.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Curle

    Curle wrote to me:


    Corvinus’ trick is pretty crude/basic. He invents some claim that would advance an position he favors, asserts it as an fact or tries to put the claim in the mouth of someone with authority, then he demands it be given authority as an null hypothesis and harangues skeptics to prove him wrong as the only alternative to declaring him the victor.
     
    What you are describing is that Corvinus tries to dishonestly manipulate the "burden of proof," which is certainly part of what he does. It is a standard (dishonest) trick by people who are not very bright but have picked up some (not very bright) debating tricks.

    I've seen it deployed by both religious believers and dogmatic atheists going at it with each other. Actually pretty funny when both sides do it!

    But Corvinus is a lot worse than that.

    I have a friend out here in central California who teaches AP English Comp: she is quite successful -- her students score very well on the AP tests; she has contributed a chapter to a book on the topic; etc.

    My friend says quite openly that her biggest problem is convincing her bright, hard-working students that their goal must be to focus on learning how to "bullshit" -- her specific choice of word.

    That is what our current educational system is focused on -- teaching kids to bullshit.

    And Corvinus is a successful product of that system.

    If you have followed Corvinus over the years, he loves accusing people who make generalizations of committing the "No True Scotsman fallacy."

    I have patiently explained to Corvinus that this is not in fact a fallacy: consider the sentence "No true Scotsman is named Sean Muramatsu."

    Now that sentence may be true or false, but it is not a logical fallacy. Indeed, it would seem likely that no one who could reasonably be called a Scotsman actually does have the name Sean Muramatsu. On the other hand, I chose the name because I actually do know of an American with that name (son of an old friend of mine -- I'm not sure if he is the same guy as the movie actor), and, strangely enough,, a bit of googling turns up the fact that there is a person with the surname Muramatsu who lives in Scotland. So perhaps there is a Sean Muramatsu in Scotland, or perhaps someday there will be.

    But it is not an issue to be decided by logic. It is a matter of empirical fact.

    The sentence "No true Scotsman is named Sean Muramatsu" may be true or it may be false; it is not a logical fallacy.

    I've patiently explained this to Corvinus, but it does not get through.

    All that he can do is repeat the phrase "No True Scotsman fallacy" that he has been taught. He actually thinks that is "critical thinking."

    Because he actually cannot think. Corvinus has been taught only to bullshit.

    The average plumber or farmer or airplane mechanic could understand the point, but Corvinus really cannot.

    And, most importantly, Corvinus' inability to grasp this point enables him to earn a living:

    As Upton Sinclair supposedly put it:

    “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.”
     
    Of course, since Corvinus produces nothing of value but does indeed earn a salary, one way or another Corvinus is living at the expense of the actual productive members of our society -- the truck drivers, the engineers, the entrepreneurs, etc.

    And there are an awful lot of economic parasites like Corvinus in our society today (take Jack D -- please!).

    This is the main reason for the economic malaise in the US today, and the main reason for despair among the working class.

    But almost everyone is afraid to say so publicly. Because while Corvinus (or Jack D) by himself is a nobody, the horde of people like Corvinus -- the educrats, the lawyers, the journalists, etc. -- collectively have a great deal of power indeed. One army ant is a nuisance, but a horde of army ants is dangerous.

    And so, I think, America will not survive.

    And, frankly, does not deserve to.
  165. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    Here your comment touches upon a concept that has entered my mind from time-to-time: Things we might idealistically wish were not a part of life are actually necessary parts of the system. It's just that often we can't perceive what, exactly, it is that those things contribute.

    No matter. If a system can't work well without something that has no obvious purpose and even offends in some way, then that thing, whatever it is, must be essential.

    You know, we speculate a lot around here about why homosexuals exist, for example. Many of our HBD bent will offer up intelligent assumptions to the effect that non-reproducing members of the species don't need to exist and have no reason to. People like Steve wonder (I've seen it) why such people even exist -- given a simplistic-yet-logical view that evolution would not further the presence of individuals who ostensibly don't reproduce and therefore don't further themselves.

    Well, ya know, maybe there are more complicated reasons for the existence of some details of anything. Maybe, just maybe, real life systems are more complicated than we "smart" people think. Frankly, I think we would at least consider this possibility if we were really smart.

    But I still don't understand why there has to be a skunk in my woods at present. I was wondering this very thing last night, lying in bed with the window open...

    Replies: @Jack D, @PhysicistDave, @Patrick McNally, @Mr. Anon, @kaganovitch

    Well, ya know, maybe there are more complicated reasons for the existence of some details of anything. Maybe, just maybe, real life systems are more complicated than we “smart” people think. Frankly, I think we would at least consider this possibility if we were really smart.

    This is basically Hayek’s central insight.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @kaganovitch

    Very interesting. Thank you.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

  166. @Jack D
    @MEH 0910

    With all due respect, Cochran is not a virologist or any sort of biologist. This is like Linus Pauling speculating about Vitamin C - this is just too far outside of his wheelhouse to have any wort of credibility.

    Replies: @Curle, @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    “Cochran is not a virologist or any sort of biologist.”

    Do you dispute his role in identifying and/or conceiving the virus theory of cancer? If not, what is the outer limit of the term virologist if it doesn’t include major discoveries regarding the effect of viruses on health?

  167. @Anonymous
    The dislike of lawyers goes back a long way. The ability to argue both sides of a question with equal effectiveness makes you a good lawyer, but it offends the sense of decency of many people. It implies there's no such thing as objective truth, which is very disturbing.

    Replies: @Anon, @Curle

    There is such a thing as objective truth. It just can’t be reproduced in an courtroom nor is it amenable to the social laws of equality.

  168. @Mr. Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Well, ya know, maybe there are more complicated reasons for the existence of some details of anything. Maybe, just maybe, real life systems are more complicated than we “smart” people think. Frankly, I think we would at least consider this possibility if we were really smart.
     
    I've often thought this about corruption. I suspect that some level of corruption (bribery, etc.) is necessary for the proper functioning of a society. It offends my sense of civics, but there it is. The real problem is when corruption becomes completely untethered from any real useful function. Crooked road contractors and builders who bribe politicans to get contracts at least do build roads and buildings. I'm sure there was rampant corruption in America between the 1930s and the 1970s, but at least stuff got built: dams, freeways, airports, harbors, etc.

    What we have now are armies of crooked diversity consultants, LGBT-activists and the like who simply squander public resources on useless and harmful bulls**t. The real damage they do is not the spending of the money itself but the things they do with it. It would be better to just set the money on fire. The money would still be wasted, but at least we wouldn't get the awful things on which the money is spent.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @kaganovitch

    I’ve often thought this about corruption. I suspect that some level of corruption (bribery, etc.) is necessary for the proper functioning of a society. It offends my sense of civics, but there it is.

    I think there is much truth to what you say. It will often be the case that the safeguards against corruption may be worse than the corruption itself. The political spoils system of civil service may have been bad but the accumulation of administrative power in the hands of the permanent civil service may well be worse.

    A much more ‘retail’ example; Back in the day , 20 or so years ago the company I was working for had the food service contract for a major NY Metro hospital. At the time food service management’s year end bonus was tied to our performance on several surveys of patient satisfaction. It is, for various reasons, difficult to score over 80-85 percent on these surveys even if you do everything right so my director was convinced he could move the needle by getting the food upstairs much hotter. The thing is our temperatures were compliant with standards so he knew he couldn’t get the hospital to make large capital investment (around 3 million) in new system. So he pretended to be outraged at getting dinged on dietary compliance by last inspection and established a ‘zero tolerance’ doorway supervisory inspection for dietary compliance that delayed the carts sufficiently that they were often out of temperature compliance. He then used that to snooker the hospital into replacing entire system with heated/refrigerated carts which required great outlay for electrical work , new AC ducting, the hi tech carts etc. total over 3 million just to move the needle on a survey so he could get a bigger bonus.

    When he announced the year end bonuses with great satisfaction I, idiot that I am, told him “Mike, if you gave me a 10k stack of hundreds, I could have gotten even higher scores by remunerating the patients and we could have saved the hospital 3 million.” He didn’t take comment well but fortunately I was able to jump ship a few weeks later so no real repercussions. Everything he did was technically defensible but created much more ‘friction’ / inefficiency than good, old fashioned corruption.

  169. @Jonathan Mason
    @anon

    I think Florida grows richer because it has a growing population of people who moved to Florida, mainly as retirees who move from expensive States like New York to Florida where homes are much cheaper and there is no state income tax.

    As the population grows more people make money out of building homes, selling washing machines and carpets, fast food and groceries, and mowing lawns.

    None of this is an indication that Florida is building fine new cities. There is just more and more suburbans spread and shopping centers anchored by Walmart selling stuff from China, or Publix selling produce grown in Mexico.

    Does a hotel worker or agricultural worker in Florida actually have a better quality of life than a hotel worker or agricultural worker in Cuba? I don't really know the answer to this question, but I do know that approximately 20% of the homes in Florida are in trailer parks.

    And I do know that Cuba has produced its own Covid-19 vaccine and vaccinated its whole population, but that Florida has not.

    If the US is not scared of competition with Cuba, why does it not allow its citizens to go on vacation there and see what life is really like in Cuba?

    Replies: @Jack D, @kaganovitch

    Does a hotel worker or agricultural worker in Florida actually have a better quality of life than a hotel worker or agricultural worker in Cuba? I don’t really know the answer to this question, but I do know that approximately 20% of the homes in Florida are in trailer parks.

    Indeed, the only reason you don’t see these very same agricultural workers in Florida making home made rafts and risking their lives on the ocean to escape to Cuba is because they are too destitute and weak to afford even home made rafts. The Cubans, on the other hand, who had the advantage of the World’s finest medical care, and with higher levels of general prosperity can afford the raft and the effort. It’s insights like this that make you such a valuable commenter.

    Fwiw, your stats are decades out of date and even allowing for that they are B.S. In 1985 when Florida had 500,000 trailer homes they comprised %10 of housing units. Today with 10,000,000 housing units there are 50,000 manufactured housing units so around 1/2 of one percent, so off by orders of magnitude. Do you imagine that the average Cuban wouldn’t weep with joy if he could get a manufactured home rather than a tumbledown driftwood shack held together with chicken wire? You just assume that the third world underclass shares your contempt for deplorables who are so declasse that they live in trailer parks. It’s not so. First they have to come here and attend university before they learn the proper attitude to the deplorables who live in trailer parks and vote for Trump.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @kaganovitch


    Do you imagine that the average Cuban wouldn’t weep with joy if he could get a manufactured home rather than a tumbledown driftwood shack held together with chicken wire?
     
    And when was the last time you went to Cuba to evaluate the state of the average family home.

    I must admit that I have not been to Cuba, but I have been to various places in Haiti, and even the average home in Haiti all the Dominican Republic would be would be well above your description.

    From what I have seen in photos of homes in Cuba the general domestic architectural style is similar to what you'll find elsewhere in the Hispanic Caribbean or Central and South America.

    I have seen ugly structures made of driftwood and old wooden boxes and pallets and corrugated iron and chicken wire in the Caribbean, but these are in fact chicken houses where people keep domestic fowl. Maybe that is what you saw from your cruise ship.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @kaganovitch, @Jack D

  170. @kaganovitch
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Well, ya know, maybe there are more complicated reasons for the existence of some details of anything. Maybe, just maybe, real life systems are more complicated than we “smart” people think. Frankly, I think we would at least consider this possibility if we were really smart.

    This is basically Hayek's central insight.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Very interesting. Thank you.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Buzz Mohawk

    There is a kinda similar quote from Chesterton

    " In the matter of reforming things, as distinct from deforming them, there is one plain and simple principle; a principle which will probably be called a paradox. There exists in such a case a certain institution or law; let us say, for the sake of simplicity, a fence or gate erected across a road. The more modern type of reformer goes gaily up to it and says, “I don’t see the use of this; let us clear it away.” To which the more intelligent type of reformer will do well to answer: “If you don’t see the use of it, I certainly won’t let you clear it away. Go away and think. Then, when you can come back and tell me that you do see the use of it, I may allow you to destroy it."

  171. @Jack D
    @PhysicistDave


    I just want Jack D and Corvinus and everyone like them to end up as impoverished émigrés begging for food
     
    This is really sick. As much as I think you are misguided, I only wish you and your family well.

    And whatever happens I don't think I am going to be on the street begging, regardless of whatever sick fantasy you may have.

    Bitter sickos like you think that come the revolution they will be on top but it doesn't usually turn out that way. Whatever ill you wish for me will come back to you, doubled for good measure.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Jack D wrote to me:

    And whatever happens I don’t think I am going to be on the street begging, regardless of whatever sick fantasy you may have.

    Oh, I suspect that you are indeed the kind of con artist who always lands on his feet.

    But you are indeed a parasite who lives off the labor of the productive members of our society: I note that you are not even trying to claim otherwise.

    And we can hope that you get what you deserve.

    Jack D also wrote to me:

    Bitter sickos like you think that come the revolution they will be on top but it doesn’t usually turn out that way. Whatever ill you wish for me will come back to you, doubled for good measure.

    One thing that parasites like you can never grasp is that decent, productive people like me do not want to end up “on top.”

    I lack the desire to lord it over my fellow citizens; I find the idea of controlling others more than repulsive — I simply find it boring.

    No, after the revolution I will not end up “on top,” because the whole purpose of any just revolution is to end this nonsense of who is “on top.”

    You have unwittingly told us a lot about yourself, Jack.

    And it’s not pretty.

    And, yes, it would be a very good thing indeed if you and Corvinus were reduced to begging for food. You are both parasites on the productive members of society — the manual laborers, the engineers, the entrepreneurs: in short, everyone who produces useful goods and services.

    You deserve to get what you produce.

    Which is nothing.

    Nothing at all.

  172. @Buzz Mohawk
    @kaganovitch

    Very interesting. Thank you.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    There is a kinda similar quote from Chesterton

    ” In the matter of reforming things, as distinct from deforming them, there is one plain and simple principle; a principle which will probably be called a paradox. There exists in such a case a certain institution or law; let us say, for the sake of simplicity, a fence or gate erected across a road. The more modern type of reformer goes gaily up to it and says, “I don’t see the use of this; let us clear it away.” To which the more intelligent type of reformer will do well to answer: “If you don’t see the use of it, I certainly won’t let you clear it away. Go away and think. Then, when you can come back and tell me that you do see the use of it, I may allow you to destroy it.”

  173. @kaganovitch
    @Jonathan Mason

    Does a hotel worker or agricultural worker in Florida actually have a better quality of life than a hotel worker or agricultural worker in Cuba? I don’t really know the answer to this question, but I do know that approximately 20% of the homes in Florida are in trailer parks.

    Indeed, the only reason you don't see these very same agricultural workers in Florida making home made rafts and risking their lives on the ocean to escape to Cuba is because they are too destitute and weak to afford even home made rafts. The Cubans, on the other hand, who had the advantage of the World's finest medical care, and with higher levels of general prosperity can afford the raft and the effort. It's insights like this that make you such a valuable commenter.

    Fwiw, your stats are decades out of date and even allowing for that they are B.S. In 1985 when Florida had 500,000 trailer homes they comprised %10 of housing units. Today with 10,000,000 housing units there are 50,000 manufactured housing units so around 1/2 of one percent, so off by orders of magnitude. Do you imagine that the average Cuban wouldn't weep with joy if he could get a manufactured home rather than a tumbledown driftwood shack held together with chicken wire? You just assume that the third world underclass shares your contempt for deplorables who are so declasse that they live in trailer parks. It's not so. First they have to come here and attend university before they learn the proper attitude to the deplorables who live in trailer parks and vote for Trump.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Do you imagine that the average Cuban wouldn’t weep with joy if he could get a manufactured home rather than a tumbledown driftwood shack held together with chicken wire?

    And when was the last time you went to Cuba to evaluate the state of the average family home.

    I must admit that I have not been to Cuba, but I have been to various places in Haiti, and even the average home in Haiti all the Dominican Republic would be would be well above your description.

    From what I have seen in photos of homes in Cuba the general domestic architectural style is similar to what you’ll find elsewhere in the Hispanic Caribbean or Central and South America.

    I have seen ugly structures made of driftwood and old wooden boxes and pallets and corrugated iron and chicken wire in the Caribbean, but these are in fact chicken houses where people keep domestic fowl. Maybe that is what you saw from your cruise ship.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Jonathan Mason

    Well, here you go

    https://havanatimes.org/uncategorized/traditional-farm-homes/

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-cuba-housing/cubans-risk-collapsing-homes-as-state-struggles-to-tackle-housing-woes

    https://havanatimes.org/opinion/the-state-of-housing-in-cuba/


    Doubtless all anti regime propaganda by anti vaxxers, capitalist running dogs and political pickpockets.

    , @kaganovitch
    @Jonathan Mason

    I must admit that I have not been to Cuba, but I have been to various places in Haiti, and even the average home in Haiti all the Dominican Republic would be would be well above your description.

    I don't know if this is better or worse than my description but it's clearly an order of magnitude worse than manufactured housing.

    From Britannica article on housing in Haiti
    " The majority of all rural housing consists of two-room dwellings that have mud walls and floors and roofs that are thatched with local grasses or palm leaves; they may also be constructed with plastic and other materials and roofed with corrugated metal. The windows are paneless and covered with wooden shutters. There is little furniture. In most such dwellings the kitchen is located outside the living quarters, and there is no electricity or piped water; sanitation facilities often consist of a simple latrine dug at a distance from the house.....In the cities, housing for the majority of people has been similar to that found in the rural areas. Densely populated slums generally consist of ramshackle houses, and the structural integrity of even professionally constructed buildings has suffered from generally lax enforcement of zoning and safety rules. Such endemic infrastructure problems contributed to the devastating effects of the January 2010 earthquake on Port-au-Prince, Léogâne, and neighbouring cities."

    , @Jack D
    @Jonathan Mason


    From what I have seen in photos of homes in Cuba the general domestic architectural style is similar to what you’ll find elsewhere in the Hispanic Caribbean or Central and South America.
     
    Prior to the revolution, Cuba was one of the richest countries in the Caribbean due to its sugar industry and tourism/gambling sector. As such, it had a large housing stock ranging from Spanish colonial mansions to mid-century modern suburban style housing not that different from what was being built not far away in Miami or in the better neighborhoods of the DR. The rural poor, of which there were many, lived in thatch roofed shacks which could be rebuilt after every hurricane. When the Communists came in, very little was built aside from some Soviet style apartment blocks (no doubt also paid for by the Russian sugar daddy - the Soviets spent countless billions on Cuba because it suited them to have it as a thorn in America's side) but whatever already existed did not disappear. However, since no one owned anything, a lot of the existing housing stock deteriorated. To this day, it's quite common for buildings in Havana to simply collapse from neglect.

    37 percent of 3.9 million residential buildings in the country were considered to be in an undesirable state by the end of 2020.

    This year, the first rains of June caused 146 buildings in the capital to partially crumble and two to come down completely, resulting in the death of a 69-year-old man, according to official media.

    https://www.ndtv.com/world-news/fearing-building-collapse-many-in-cuba-sleep-fully-clothed-some-stay-up-3124729

  174. @Jonathan Mason
    @kaganovitch


    Do you imagine that the average Cuban wouldn’t weep with joy if he could get a manufactured home rather than a tumbledown driftwood shack held together with chicken wire?
     
    And when was the last time you went to Cuba to evaluate the state of the average family home.

    I must admit that I have not been to Cuba, but I have been to various places in Haiti, and even the average home in Haiti all the Dominican Republic would be would be well above your description.

    From what I have seen in photos of homes in Cuba the general domestic architectural style is similar to what you'll find elsewhere in the Hispanic Caribbean or Central and South America.

    I have seen ugly structures made of driftwood and old wooden boxes and pallets and corrugated iron and chicken wire in the Caribbean, but these are in fact chicken houses where people keep domestic fowl. Maybe that is what you saw from your cruise ship.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @kaganovitch, @Jack D

  175. @Jonathan Mason
    @kaganovitch


    Do you imagine that the average Cuban wouldn’t weep with joy if he could get a manufactured home rather than a tumbledown driftwood shack held together with chicken wire?
     
    And when was the last time you went to Cuba to evaluate the state of the average family home.

    I must admit that I have not been to Cuba, but I have been to various places in Haiti, and even the average home in Haiti all the Dominican Republic would be would be well above your description.

    From what I have seen in photos of homes in Cuba the general domestic architectural style is similar to what you'll find elsewhere in the Hispanic Caribbean or Central and South America.

    I have seen ugly structures made of driftwood and old wooden boxes and pallets and corrugated iron and chicken wire in the Caribbean, but these are in fact chicken houses where people keep domestic fowl. Maybe that is what you saw from your cruise ship.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @kaganovitch, @Jack D

    I must admit that I have not been to Cuba, but I have been to various places in Haiti, and even the average home in Haiti all the Dominican Republic would be would be well above your description.

    I don’t know if this is better or worse than my description but it’s clearly an order of magnitude worse than manufactured housing.

    From Britannica article on housing in Haiti
    ” The majority of all rural housing consists of two-room dwellings that have mud walls and floors and roofs that are thatched with local grasses or palm leaves; they may also be constructed with plastic and other materials and roofed with corrugated metal. The windows are paneless and covered with wooden shutters. There is little furniture. In most such dwellings the kitchen is located outside the living quarters, and there is no electricity or piped water; sanitation facilities often consist of a simple latrine dug at a distance from the house…..In the cities, housing for the majority of people has been similar to that found in the rural areas. Densely populated slums generally consist of ramshackle houses, and the structural integrity of even professionally constructed buildings has suffered from generally lax enforcement of zoning and safety rules. Such endemic infrastructure problems contributed to the devastating effects of the January 2010 earthquake on Port-au-Prince, Léogâne, and neighbouring cities.”

  176. @D. K.
    @SunBakedSuburb

    ***

    The poem Elliot gives Lee, which contains the line "Nobody, not even the rain, has such small hands", is "Somewhere I Have Never Travelled, Gladly Beyond" by E.E. Cummings.

    ***

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0091167/trivia?ref_=ttqu_sa_1

    I saw "Hannah and Her Sisters" (1986) the same weekend that I saw "Brazil" (1985), with the same group of friends, in Seattle's University District, while the former film was still in limited release. That was in between Valentine's Day and Washington's Birthday (Observed), in mid-February of 1986. Oh, to be twenty-something....

    Replies: @duncsbaby

    The last stanza of that poem: “There is something about you that opens and closes, only something in me understands the voice of your eyes is deeper than all roses, nobody, not even the rain, has such small hands.” I memorized that poem back around that time when I was very interested in poetry. I could be wrong on a couple of words.

  177. @Curle
    @PhysicistDave

    Corvinus’ trick is pretty crude/basic. He invents some claim that would advance an position he favors, asserts it as an fact or tries to put the claim in the mouth of someone with authority, then he demands it be given authority as an null hypothesis and harangues skeptics to prove him wrong as the only alternative to declaring him the victor. It is pretty stupid and tiresome but educational as an example of an erroneous form of arguing that some use. I tend to think it helps illustrate some of the practices of Talmudism.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Curle wrote to me:

    Corvinus’ trick is pretty crude/basic. He invents some claim that would advance an position he favors, asserts it as an fact or tries to put the claim in the mouth of someone with authority, then he demands it be given authority as an null hypothesis and harangues skeptics to prove him wrong as the only alternative to declaring him the victor.

    What you are describing is that Corvinus tries to dishonestly manipulate the “burden of proof,” which is certainly part of what he does. It is a standard (dishonest) trick by people who are not very bright but have picked up some (not very bright) debating tricks.

    I’ve seen it deployed by both religious believers and dogmatic atheists going at it with each other. Actually pretty funny when both sides do it!

    But Corvinus is a lot worse than that.

    I have a friend out here in central California who teaches AP English Comp: she is quite successful — her students score very well on the AP tests; she has contributed a chapter to a book on the topic; etc.

    My friend says quite openly that her biggest problem is convincing her bright, hard-working students that their goal must be to focus on learning how to “bullshit” — her specific choice of word.

    That is what our current educational system is focused on — teaching kids to bullshit.

    And Corvinus is a successful product of that system.

    If you have followed Corvinus over the years, he loves accusing people who make generalizations of committing the “No True Scotsman fallacy.”

    I have patiently explained to Corvinus that this is not in fact a fallacy: consider the sentence “No true Scotsman is named Sean Muramatsu.”

    Now that sentence may be true or false, but it is not a logical fallacy. Indeed, it would seem likely that no one who could reasonably be called a Scotsman actually does have the name Sean Muramatsu. On the other hand, I chose the name because I actually do know of an American with that name (son of an old friend of mine — I’m not sure if he is the same guy as the movie actor), and, strangely enough,, a bit of googling turns up the fact that there is a person with the surname Muramatsu who lives in Scotland. So perhaps there is a Sean Muramatsu in Scotland, or perhaps someday there will be.

    But it is not an issue to be decided by logic. It is a matter of empirical fact.

    The sentence “No true Scotsman is named Sean Muramatsu” may be true or it may be false; it is not a logical fallacy.

    I’ve patiently explained this to Corvinus, but it does not get through.

    All that he can do is repeat the phrase “No True Scotsman fallacy” that he has been taught. He actually thinks that is “critical thinking.”

    Because he actually cannot think. Corvinus has been taught only to bullshit.

    The average plumber or farmer or airplane mechanic could understand the point, but Corvinus really cannot.

    And, most importantly, Corvinus’ inability to grasp this point enables him to earn a living:

    As Upton Sinclair supposedly put it:

    “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.”

    Of course, since Corvinus produces nothing of value but does indeed earn a salary, one way or another Corvinus is living at the expense of the actual productive members of our society — the truck drivers, the engineers, the entrepreneurs, etc.

    And there are an awful lot of economic parasites like Corvinus in our society today (take Jack D — please!).

    This is the main reason for the economic malaise in the US today, and the main reason for despair among the working class.

    But almost everyone is afraid to say so publicly. Because while Corvinus (or Jack D) by himself is a nobody, the horde of people like Corvinus — the educrats, the lawyers, the journalists, etc. — collectively have a great deal of power indeed. One army ant is a nuisance, but a horde of army ants is dangerous.

    And so, I think, America will not survive.

    And, frankly, does not deserve to.

    • LOL: Corvinus
  178. @Jack D
    @MEH 0910

    With all due respect, Cochran is not a virologist or any sort of biologist. This is like Linus Pauling speculating about Vitamin C - this is just too far outside of his wheelhouse to have any wort of credibility.

    Replies: @Curle, @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_10,000_Year_Explosion

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/cochran-harpending-theory-of-recent-selective-pressure-supported/

    Cochran-Harpending Theory of Recent Selective Pressure Supported
    STEVE SAILER • NOVEMBER 15, 2021

    A widespread view is that, yeah, sure, human genetic evolution used to be important, but then we invented culture maybe 10,000 years ago when we invented agriculture, and since then it’s been all cultural evolution. C0chran and Harpending argued instead in the Ten Thousand Year Explosion that recent rapid cultural evolution brought about more selection pressure for genetic evolution. Today’s new paper is in line with their view.

    From Nature: Human Behavior:

    A selection pressure landscape for 870 human polygenic traits

    […]

  179. @Jack D
    @MEH 0910

    With all due respect, Cochran is not a virologist or any sort of biologist. This is like Linus Pauling speculating about Vitamin C - this is just too far outside of his wheelhouse to have any wort of credibility.

    Replies: @Curle, @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    Steve Sailer in 2004:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/no-wmds-who-could-have-thunk-it/

    No WMDs? Who could have thunk it? — Well, weapons scientists, if the Administration had bothered to ask them. On Jerry Pournelle’s website, the sci-fi novelist (among other things) posts a message from Greg Cochran on how he knew before the war that Saddam wasn’t getting anywhere with nukes or delivery systems. (Indeed, Greg told me that over the phone several times over twelve months ago.)

    Cochran has a physics Ph.D., and worked on the highly successful, strategically crucial Trident Missile guidance system (which turned our submarine deterrent from merely a city-busting last resort into a more militarily useful silo-busting response) and also on the more publicized if still pending Star Wars system. He is in touch with former colleagues now at America’s weapons labs. (Since the end of the Cold War, he has remade himself into perhaps the most creative of evolutionary theorist since Bill Hamilton and Richard Trivers, as this Atlantic Monthly cover story about Greg and his research partner Paul Ewald indicates.)

    https://www.theatlantic.com/issues/99feb/germ2.htm
    https://archive.ph/R92C

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @MEH 0910

    WMD is much more in his wheelhouse than gay germs.

    Pauling well deserved his solo Nobel in Chemistry for his work on chemical bonds but his work on Vitamin C as a treatment for cancer is considered to be worthless. The converse of the maxim falsus in uno, falsus in omnibus (false in one thing, false in everything) is not , right in one thing, right in everything.

    , @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://slatestarcodex.com/2020/04/14/a-failure-but-not-of-prediction/


    First, a bunch of generic smart people on Twitter who got things exactly right – there are too many of these people to name, but Scott Aaronson highlights “Bill Gates, Balaji Srinivasan, Paul Graham, Greg Cochran, Robin Hanson, Sarah Constantin, Eliezer Yudkowsky, and Nicholas Christakis.” None of these people (except Greg Cochran) are domain experts, and none of them (except Greg Cochran) have creepy oracular powers. So how could they have beaten the experts? Haven’t we been told a million times that generic intelligence is no match for deep domain knowledge?
     

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  180. @MEH 0910
    @Jack D

    Steve Sailer in 2004:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/no-wmds-who-could-have-thunk-it/


    No WMDs? Who could have thunk it? — Well, weapons scientists, if the Administration had bothered to ask them. On Jerry Pournelle’s website, the sci-fi novelist (among other things) posts a message from Greg Cochran on how he knew before the war that Saddam wasn’t getting anywhere with nukes or delivery systems. (Indeed, Greg told me that over the phone several times over twelve months ago.)

    Cochran has a physics Ph.D., and worked on the highly successful, strategically crucial Trident Missile guidance system (which turned our submarine deterrent from merely a city-busting last resort into a more militarily useful silo-busting response) and also on the more publicized if still pending Star Wars system. He is in touch with former colleagues now at America’s weapons labs. (Since the end of the Cold War, he has remade himself into perhaps the most creative of evolutionary theorist since Bill Hamilton and Richard Trivers, as this Atlantic Monthly cover story about Greg and his research partner Paul Ewald indicates.)
     
    https://www.theatlantic.com/issues/99feb/germ2.htm
    https://archive.ph/R92C

    Replies: @Jack D, @MEH 0910

    WMD is much more in his wheelhouse than gay germs.

    Pauling well deserved his solo Nobel in Chemistry for his work on chemical bonds but his work on Vitamin C as a treatment for cancer is considered to be worthless. The converse of the maxim falsus in uno, falsus in omnibus (false in one thing, false in everything) is not , right in one thing, right in everything.

  181. @Jonathan Mason
    @kaganovitch


    Do you imagine that the average Cuban wouldn’t weep with joy if he could get a manufactured home rather than a tumbledown driftwood shack held together with chicken wire?
     
    And when was the last time you went to Cuba to evaluate the state of the average family home.

    I must admit that I have not been to Cuba, but I have been to various places in Haiti, and even the average home in Haiti all the Dominican Republic would be would be well above your description.

    From what I have seen in photos of homes in Cuba the general domestic architectural style is similar to what you'll find elsewhere in the Hispanic Caribbean or Central and South America.

    I have seen ugly structures made of driftwood and old wooden boxes and pallets and corrugated iron and chicken wire in the Caribbean, but these are in fact chicken houses where people keep domestic fowl. Maybe that is what you saw from your cruise ship.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @kaganovitch, @Jack D

    From what I have seen in photos of homes in Cuba the general domestic architectural style is similar to what you’ll find elsewhere in the Hispanic Caribbean or Central and South America.

    Prior to the revolution, Cuba was one of the richest countries in the Caribbean due to its sugar industry and tourism/gambling sector. As such, it had a large housing stock ranging from Spanish colonial mansions to mid-century modern suburban style housing not that different from what was being built not far away in Miami or in the better neighborhoods of the DR. The rural poor, of which there were many, lived in thatch roofed shacks which could be rebuilt after every hurricane. When the Communists came in, very little was built aside from some Soviet style apartment blocks (no doubt also paid for by the Russian sugar daddy – the Soviets spent countless billions on Cuba because it suited them to have it as a thorn in America’s side) but whatever already existed did not disappear. However, since no one owned anything, a lot of the existing housing stock deteriorated. To this day, it’s quite common for buildings in Havana to simply collapse from neglect.

    37 percent of 3.9 million residential buildings in the country were considered to be in an undesirable state by the end of 2020.

    This year, the first rains of June caused 146 buildings in the capital to partially crumble and two to come down completely, resulting in the death of a 69-year-old man, according to official media.

    https://www.ndtv.com/world-news/fearing-building-collapse-many-in-cuba-sleep-fully-clothed-some-stay-up-3124729

  182. Full text of National Archives letter to Trump on classified documents

    May 10, 2022
    Evan Corcoran Silverman Thompson 400 East Pratt Street Suite 900
    Baltimore, MD 21202 By Email
    Dear Mr. Corcoran:
    I write in response to your letters of April 29, 2022, and May 1, 2022, requesting that the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) further delay the disclosure to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) of the records that were the subject of our April 12, 2022 notification to an authorized representative of former President Trump.

    As you are no doubt aware, NARA had ongoing communications with the former President’s representatives throughout 2021 about what appeared to be missing Presidential records, which resulted in the transfer of 15 boxes of records to NARA in January 2022. In its initial review of materials within those boxes, NARA identified items marked as classified national security information, up to the level of Top Secret and including Sensitive Compartmented Information and Special Access Program materials. NARA informed the Department of Justice about that discovery, which prompted the Department to ask the President to request that NARA provide the FBI with access to the boxes at issue so that the FBI and others in the Intelligence Community could examine them. On April 11, 2022, the White House Counsel’s Office—affirming a request from the Department of Justice supported by an FBI letterhead memorandum—formally transmitted a request that NARA provide the FBI access to the 15 boxes for its review within seven days, with the possibility that the FBI might request copies of specific documents following its review of the boxes.

    Although the Presidential Records Act (PRA) generally restricts access to Presidential records in NARA’s custody for several years after the conclusion of a President’s tenure in office, the statute further provides that, “subject to any rights, defenses, or privileges which the United States or any agency or person may invoke,” such records “shall be made available . . . to an incumbent President if such records contain information that is needed for the conduct of current business of the incumbent President’s office and that is not otherwise available.” 44 U.S.C. §
    .
    .
    .

    https://justthenews.com/government/courts-law/full-text-national-archives-letter-trump-classified-documents

  183. @PhysicistDave
    @Mr. Anon

    Mr. Anon wrote to me:


    I guess you define “Ruling Class” a lot more broadly than I would.

    Based on his posts, Jack D is some kind of lawyer. Lawyering is a necessary profession. They aren’t all parasites.
     
    I have had the misfortune to know quite a few lawyers.

    The vast majority are parasites.

    Extraordinarily unscrupulous, dishonest, pathologically lying parasites.

    Mr, Anon also wrote:

    The Ruling Class (RC) consist of billionaire entrepreneurs and financiers and centi-millionaire corporate executives and perhaps the upper echelon of their political and policy “thought-leaders” (Henry Kissinger or Klaus Schwab being good examples of the latter).
     
    There just are not enough of those people to control the populace, not nearly enough.

    They would be nothing, completely powerless, if not for underlings like Corvinus, Jack D, etc.

    It's always that way in dictatorships, you know. Hitler, Himmler, et al. would simply have been absurd clowns if not for the mass of henchmen in the Gestapo, the SS, etc. Similarly, Stalin would have been just a guy with a silly-looking mustache if not for the apparatchiks in the KGB, the Party, etc.

    The ruling class is always much larger than the top echelons: it has to be, for simple numerical reasons.

    You're using the phrase "ruling class" just to refer to the top echelons of the ruling class. But they just could not rule without the lower echelons of the ruling class.

    Mr. Anon also wrote:

    Then there is the broad upper-middle class of technocrat servitors who administer their system. This includes government officials, academics, middle-management, etc. They aren’t RC, just the hired help.
     
    Well, considering that the "hired help" are an essential, integral, and committed part of the apparatus, I think it is reasoanble to label them part of the "ruling class."

    In any case, we seem to agree on the actual reality, even though you want to limit the term "ruling class" more than I do.

    I will point out that the links that I provided shows that my usage has a historical background.

    Mr. Anon also wrote:

    How many French aristocrats actually perished by the guillotine? The King and Queen, certainly. But my read of history is that most members of the Ancien Regime managed to high-tail it out of France with their heads still attached. Pretty much the same in Russia. I don’t think the Bolsheviks killed that many members of the pre-revolution ruling class.
     
    Yes, I think that is probably accurate.

    Which is fine by me.

    I just want Jack D and Corvinus and everyone like them to end up as impoverished émigrés begging for food in some slum in Southeast Asia or South America, deprived of any influence in American society.

    I'd rather the revolution be no more bloody than necessary.

    But usually the ruling class does not give up without violence, and so some bloodshed does tend to occur.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Curle, @Corvinus

    “I just want Jack D and Corvinus and everyone like them to end up as impoverished émigrés begging for food in some slum in Southeast Asia or South America, deprived of any influence in American society.“

    Right, wishing someone anonymous who makes comments your personally disagree with to essentially suffer when civil war comes that you have is normal behavior.

    Indeed, you have unwittingly told us a lot about yourself.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Corvinus

    My little buddy Corvinus wrote to me:


    Right, wishing someone anonymous who makes comments your personally disagree with to essentially suffer when civil war comes that you have is normal behavior.

    Indeed, you have unwittingly told us a lot about yourself.
     

    Oh, not "unwittingly" at all, Corvy!

    I mean what I say. And I, quite wittingly, intended you and people like you to find it disturbing.

    But you do misunderstand me on a key point: yea, I certainly do want you to suffer, but, no, it is not because you disagree with me.

    I do not think R.G. Camara and I have failed to disagree in any exchange we have had, but I do not want R. G. or his family to suffer, at least not in this life (he does seem to want me to go to Hell, so we can leave the next life, if there be one, for future discussion!).

    No, while I certainly do think you must, in all justice, suffer, it is not because you disagree with me.

    It is because you and Jack D and people like you are parasitizing the productive people in this society.

    You have no useful skills that would enable you to earn a living in a free society: what money you do manage to get in the current corrupt society is therefore necessarily at the expense of the productive people in this society.

    And that must, in any realistic meaning of justice, end.

    You must be deprived of your sinecure.

    And then you will be hungry.

    Hopefully, very, very hungry.

    A simple matter of social justice, little buddy.

    Parasites like you and Jack must be prevented from further bloodsucking on the productive members of society.

    Not because you disagree with me, not because of any opinions you have expressed, but simply because of your own despicable parasitic actions against the human race.

    Hostes humani generis.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  184. @Corvinus
    @PhysicistDave

    “I just want Jack D and Corvinus and everyone like them to end up as impoverished émigrés begging for food in some slum in Southeast Asia or South America, deprived of any influence in American society.“

    Right, wishing someone anonymous who makes comments your personally disagree with to essentially suffer when civil war comes that you have is normal behavior.

    Indeed, you have unwittingly told us a lot about yourself.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    My little buddy Corvinus wrote to me:

    Right, wishing someone anonymous who makes comments your personally disagree with to essentially suffer when civil war comes that you have is normal behavior.

    Indeed, you have unwittingly told us a lot about yourself.

    Oh, not “unwittingly” at all, Corvy!

    I mean what I say. And I, quite wittingly, intended you and people like you to find it disturbing.

    But you do misunderstand me on a key point: yea, I certainly do want you to suffer, but, no, it is not because you disagree with me.

    I do not think R.G. Camara and I have failed to disagree in any exchange we have had, but I do not want R. G. or his family to suffer, at least not in this life (he does seem to want me to go to Hell, so we can leave the next life, if there be one, for future discussion!).

    No, while I certainly do think you must, in all justice, suffer, it is not because you disagree with me.

    It is because you and Jack D and people like you are parasitizing the productive people in this society.

    You have no useful skills that would enable you to earn a living in a free society: what money you do manage to get in the current corrupt society is therefore necessarily at the expense of the productive people in this society.

    And that must, in any realistic meaning of justice, end.

    You must be deprived of your sinecure.

    And then you will be hungry.

    Hopefully, very, very hungry.

    A simple matter of social justice, little buddy.

    Parasites like you and Jack must be prevented from further bloodsucking on the productive members of society.

    Not because you disagree with me, not because of any opinions you have expressed, but simply because of your own despicable parasitic actions against the human race.

    Hostes humani generis.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @PhysicistDave

    “It is because you and Jack D and people like you are parasitizing the productive people in this society“

    Which is a patently false generalization. It’s literally insane to make that leap based on my comments.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  185. @PhysicistDave
    @Corvinus

    My little buddy Corvinus wrote to me:


    Right, wishing someone anonymous who makes comments your personally disagree with to essentially suffer when civil war comes that you have is normal behavior.

    Indeed, you have unwittingly told us a lot about yourself.
     

    Oh, not "unwittingly" at all, Corvy!

    I mean what I say. And I, quite wittingly, intended you and people like you to find it disturbing.

    But you do misunderstand me on a key point: yea, I certainly do want you to suffer, but, no, it is not because you disagree with me.

    I do not think R.G. Camara and I have failed to disagree in any exchange we have had, but I do not want R. G. or his family to suffer, at least not in this life (he does seem to want me to go to Hell, so we can leave the next life, if there be one, for future discussion!).

    No, while I certainly do think you must, in all justice, suffer, it is not because you disagree with me.

    It is because you and Jack D and people like you are parasitizing the productive people in this society.

    You have no useful skills that would enable you to earn a living in a free society: what money you do manage to get in the current corrupt society is therefore necessarily at the expense of the productive people in this society.

    And that must, in any realistic meaning of justice, end.

    You must be deprived of your sinecure.

    And then you will be hungry.

    Hopefully, very, very hungry.

    A simple matter of social justice, little buddy.

    Parasites like you and Jack must be prevented from further bloodsucking on the productive members of society.

    Not because you disagree with me, not because of any opinions you have expressed, but simply because of your own despicable parasitic actions against the human race.

    Hostes humani generis.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “It is because you and Jack D and people like you are parasitizing the productive people in this society“

    Which is a patently false generalization. It’s literally insane to make that leap based on my comments.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Corvinus

    My little buddy Corvinus wrote to me:


    [Dave] “It is because you and Jack D and people like you are parasitizing the productive people in this society“

    [Corvinus] Which is a patently false generalization. It’s literally insane to make that leap based on my comments.
     
    You seem not to know what the word "generalization" means!

    I referred specifically to two people -- you and Jack D. Not exactly a broad generalization.

    And you have dropped enough hints to make clear that you are an educrat of some kind.

    I note that you are not actually denying what I said: you are not, for example, claiming that you are an airplane mechanic who actually has skills that are useful to society.

    No: you are just continuing your usual silly game of accusing someone of over-generalizing... without actually trying to show that what they claim is false.

    Typical of worthless little social parasites like you. Play games with words at the expense of the real world and actual productive people.

    Hostis humani generis.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  186. @MEH 0910
    @Jack D

    Steve Sailer in 2004:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/no-wmds-who-could-have-thunk-it/


    No WMDs? Who could have thunk it? — Well, weapons scientists, if the Administration had bothered to ask them. On Jerry Pournelle’s website, the sci-fi novelist (among other things) posts a message from Greg Cochran on how he knew before the war that Saddam wasn’t getting anywhere with nukes or delivery systems. (Indeed, Greg told me that over the phone several times over twelve months ago.)

    Cochran has a physics Ph.D., and worked on the highly successful, strategically crucial Trident Missile guidance system (which turned our submarine deterrent from merely a city-busting last resort into a more militarily useful silo-busting response) and also on the more publicized if still pending Star Wars system. He is in touch with former colleagues now at America’s weapons labs. (Since the end of the Cold War, he has remade himself into perhaps the most creative of evolutionary theorist since Bill Hamilton and Richard Trivers, as this Atlantic Monthly cover story about Greg and his research partner Paul Ewald indicates.)
     
    https://www.theatlantic.com/issues/99feb/germ2.htm
    https://archive.ph/R92C

    Replies: @Jack D, @MEH 0910

    https://slatestarcodex.com/2020/04/14/a-failure-but-not-of-prediction/

    First, a bunch of generic smart people on Twitter who got things exactly right – there are too many of these people to name, but Scott Aaronson highlights “Bill Gates, Balaji Srinivasan, Paul Graham, Greg Cochran, Robin Hanson, Sarah Constantin, Eliezer Yudkowsky, and Nicholas Christakis.” None of these people (except Greg Cochran) are domain experts, and none of them (except Greg Cochran) have creepy oracular powers. So how could they have beaten the experts? Haven’t we been told a million times that generic intelligence is no match for deep domain knowledge?

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @MEH 0910

    From the link MEH 0910 gave:


    WHO THEN SHOULD YOU LISTEN TO? CONTRARIAN, RATIONALIST NERDS AND TECH TYCOONS ON SOCIAL MEDIA. BILL GATES,.. [et al.]
     
    Well... no.

    You really should not listen to anyone unless:

    A) They can give coherent reasons and evidence (which may require some follow-up on your part) backing up their views.

    OR

    B) They have proven expertise in that very specific domain as shown by their ability to deal with external physical reality (build bridges that do not fall down; design integrated circuits that work; etc.); being credentialed by other "experts" does not count. At all.

    It is important to keep in mind that, throughout human history, the vast majority of experts , in fields ranging from theology to medicine to philosophy, were proven frauds.

    Again, the only exception is people whose alleged expertise can be checked by actual physical results: e.g., a blacksmith is an expert if the stuff he makes stands up under use.

    But we do not usually bother to refer to a blacksmith as an "expert" -- it suffices to say that he is a competent blacksmith.

    We generally use the word "expert" to refer to people who aren't.

    Take Corvinus -- please!
  187. @Corvinus
    @PhysicistDave

    “It is because you and Jack D and people like you are parasitizing the productive people in this society“

    Which is a patently false generalization. It’s literally insane to make that leap based on my comments.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    My little buddy Corvinus wrote to me:

    [Dave] “It is because you and Jack D and people like you are parasitizing the productive people in this society“

    [Corvinus] Which is a patently false generalization. It’s literally insane to make that leap based on my comments.

    You seem not to know what the word “generalization” means!

    I referred specifically to two people — you and Jack D. Not exactly a broad generalization.

    And you have dropped enough hints to make clear that you are an educrat of some kind.

    I note that you are not actually denying what I said: you are not, for example, claiming that you are an airplane mechanic who actually has skills that are useful to society.

    No: you are just continuing your usual silly game of accusing someone of over-generalizing… without actually trying to show that what they claim is false.

    Typical of worthless little social parasites like you. Play games with words at the expense of the real world and actual productive people.

    Hostis humani generis.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @PhysicistDave

    Big trouble for Trump. Own it.

    https://www.politico.com/news/2022/08/27/intel-officials-national-security-fallout-trumps-mar-a-lago-documents-00054006

  188. @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://slatestarcodex.com/2020/04/14/a-failure-but-not-of-prediction/


    First, a bunch of generic smart people on Twitter who got things exactly right – there are too many of these people to name, but Scott Aaronson highlights “Bill Gates, Balaji Srinivasan, Paul Graham, Greg Cochran, Robin Hanson, Sarah Constantin, Eliezer Yudkowsky, and Nicholas Christakis.” None of these people (except Greg Cochran) are domain experts, and none of them (except Greg Cochran) have creepy oracular powers. So how could they have beaten the experts? Haven’t we been told a million times that generic intelligence is no match for deep domain knowledge?
     

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    From the link MEH 0910 gave:

    WHO THEN SHOULD YOU LISTEN TO? CONTRARIAN, RATIONALIST NERDS AND TECH TYCOONS ON SOCIAL MEDIA. BILL GATES,.. [et al.]

    Well… no.

    You really should not listen to anyone unless:

    A) They can give coherent reasons and evidence (which may require some follow-up on your part) backing up their views.

    OR

    B) They have proven expertise in that very specific domain as shown by their ability to deal with external physical reality (build bridges that do not fall down; design integrated circuits that work; etc.); being credentialed by other “experts” does not count. At all.

    It is important to keep in mind that, throughout human history, the vast majority of experts , in fields ranging from theology to medicine to philosophy, were proven frauds.

    Again, the only exception is people whose alleged expertise can be checked by actual physical results: e.g., a blacksmith is an expert if the stuff he makes stands up under use.

    But we do not usually bother to refer to a blacksmith as an “expert” — it suffices to say that he is a competent blacksmith.

    We generally use the word “expert” to refer to people who aren’t.

    Take Corvinus — please!

  189. PhysicistDave is just sore that he wasn’t smart enough to land a real job with Goldman or Mckinsey.

  190. @PhysicistDave
    @Corvinus

    My little buddy Corvinus wrote to me:


    [Dave] “It is because you and Jack D and people like you are parasitizing the productive people in this society“

    [Corvinus] Which is a patently false generalization. It’s literally insane to make that leap based on my comments.
     
    You seem not to know what the word "generalization" means!

    I referred specifically to two people -- you and Jack D. Not exactly a broad generalization.

    And you have dropped enough hints to make clear that you are an educrat of some kind.

    I note that you are not actually denying what I said: you are not, for example, claiming that you are an airplane mechanic who actually has skills that are useful to society.

    No: you are just continuing your usual silly game of accusing someone of over-generalizing... without actually trying to show that what they claim is false.

    Typical of worthless little social parasites like you. Play games with words at the expense of the real world and actual productive people.

    Hostis humani generis.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  191. My little buddy Corvinus wrote to me:

    Big trouble for Trump. Own it.

    Corvy, how to get this across?

    I voted against Trump in the 2016 primary.

    In 2020, in the primary, I voted for Xena the Warrior Princess (AKA Tulsi).

    Yes, in the general election in 2016, I voted for Trump over Hillary because Hillary was an evil, pathologically lying harpy. And similarly in 2020 because Biden was quite obviously senile.

    I am not particularly pro-Trump.

    I am pro-Bill of Rights.

    And, unlike you, I actually did work for a number of years for the US Intelligence Community.

    I know about this stuff.

    You don’t.

    I’ve had to deal with a serious breach of very high-level classified information (no, I cannot go into the details). You never have.

    You couldn’t even keep straight the difference between a subpoena and a search warrant!

    I know how the classification system works.

    You don’t.

    Almost certainly, what Trump had in his possession were highly abstract summaries, probably the daily intelligence briefings given to the President. That is very sensitive stuff at the time.

    But it gets stale rapidly.

    The stuff that is really critical long-term, that our enemies would really like to get their hands on, are the nitty-gritty details that never get up to the President: the names of our spies abroad, the technical details of how our weapons systems work, etc.

    If anyone had chosen to give that level of detail to Trump, they would have been violating the basic “need to know” rule. And they just would have bored Trump.

    Trump would have just been confused and bored by the DoE “How to Build A Thermonuclear Weapon” manual. (I, on the other hand, being a physicist, would find it fascinating. But, alas, I had no need to know.)

    Furthermore, the “processes” for declassification were established via Executive Orders by former Presidents: Obama and the Shrub.

    An EO from a former President cannot and does not bind a future President. Trump had the right to simply ignore them.

    Avril Haines is a political hack who is just doing her masters’ bidding. (Bizarrely, she started out studying physics: somehow, it does not surprise me that she did not stick with it!)

    I have given a lot of details here that should convince any sane person that I know an awful lot about this subject.

    You have posted comments indicating that, as usual, this is a topic on which you are stunningly ignorant.

    Does that ever embarrass you?

    Just a teeny bit, little buddy?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @PhysicistDave


    Trump would have just been confused and bored by the DoE “How to Build A Thermonuclear Weapon” manual.
     
    Just to clarify (as it's an easy mistake to make) this refers to the Department of Energy, not the Department of Education.
  192. @PhysicistDave
    My little buddy Corvinus wrote to me:

    Big trouble for Trump. Own it.
     
    Corvy, how to get this across?

    I voted against Trump in the 2016 primary.

    In 2020, in the primary, I voted for Xena the Warrior Princess (AKA Tulsi).

    Yes, in the general election in 2016, I voted for Trump over Hillary because Hillary was an evil, pathologically lying harpy. And similarly in 2020 because Biden was quite obviously senile.

    I am not particularly pro-Trump.

    I am pro-Bill of Rights.

    And, unlike you, I actually did work for a number of years for the US Intelligence Community.

    I know about this stuff.

    You don't.

    I've had to deal with a serious breach of very high-level classified information (no, I cannot go into the details). You never have.

    You couldn't even keep straight the difference between a subpoena and a search warrant!

    I know how the classification system works.

    You don't.

    Almost certainly, what Trump had in his possession were highly abstract summaries, probably the daily intelligence briefings given to the President. That is very sensitive stuff at the time.

    But it gets stale rapidly.

    The stuff that is really critical long-term, that our enemies would really like to get their hands on, are the nitty-gritty details that never get up to the President: the names of our spies abroad, the technical details of how our weapons systems work, etc.

    If anyone had chosen to give that level of detail to Trump, they would have been violating the basic "need to know" rule. And they just would have bored Trump.

    Trump would have just been confused and bored by the DoE "How to Build A Thermonuclear Weapon" manual. (I, on the other hand, being a physicist, would find it fascinating. But, alas, I had no need to know.)

    Furthermore, the "processes" for declassification were established via Executive Orders by former Presidents: Obama and the Shrub.

    An EO from a former President cannot and does not bind a future President. Trump had the right to simply ignore them.

    Avril Haines is a political hack who is just doing her masters' bidding. (Bizarrely, she started out studying physics: somehow, it does not surprise me that she did not stick with it!)

    I have given a lot of details here that should convince any sane person that I know an awful lot about this subject.

    You have posted comments indicating that, as usual, this is a topic on which you are stunningly ignorant.

    Does that ever embarrass you?

    Just a teeny bit, little buddy?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Trump would have just been confused and bored by the DoE “How to Build A Thermonuclear Weapon” manual.

    Just to clarify (as it’s an easy mistake to make) this refers to the Department of Energy, not the Department of Education.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS