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NYC Subway Ridership Still Down 70%
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Even in normal years, New York City tends to empty out over summer, especially in August. But everybody who is coming back should be back by mid-September. But this year … From the Metropolitan Transit Authority:

Subway

Date Total Estimated Ridership % Change From 2019 Weekday/Saturday/Sunday Average
Thursday, 9/17/20 1,679,085 -69.4%

Back in April, when New Yorkers were dying by the hundreds or even thousands each day, subway ridership was down over 90%. But it was back to down 75% in August, so September being down 69% isn’t much of an improvement over the summer.

Bus (Local, Limited, SBS and Express)

Date Total Estimated Ridership % Change From 2019 Weekday/Saturday/Sunday Average
Thursday, 9/17/20 1,052,000 -51%

Do people think buses are safer than subways? Why? Or do buses tend to serve service workers more than white collar workers who can work from home?

Long Island Rail Road

Date Total Estimated Ridership % Change From 2019 Monthly Weekday/Saturday/Sunday Average
Thursday, 9/17/20 86,800 -73%

I presume trains tend to normally carry white collar workers from the suburbs to city office jobs that can be done from home fairly well.

Metro-North Railroad

Date Total Estimated Ridership % Change From 2019 Monthly Weekday/Saturday/Sunday Average
Thursday, 9/17/20 61,500 -79%

Access-A-Ride

Date Total Scheduled Trips % Change From 2019 Weekday/Saturday/Sunday Average
Thursday, 9/17/20 21,005 -26.7%

I don’t know what this is.

Bridges and Tunnels

Date Total Traffic % Change From 2019 Weekday/Saturday/Sunday Average
Thursday, 9/17/20 848,024 -8.9%

A much larger fraction of commuters are driving into the city or within the city, but in absolute numbers even drivers are still down versus last year.

New York City has not had very many coronavirus cases since getting blasted in the spring. But commuters are not back yet. Will they come back after, say, a vaccine? Or has New York City suffered a permanent major fall in the number of daily workers it will see?

A lot of money will be made and lost by real estate speculators, especially with negligible interest rates.

 
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  1. Meanwhile, a budding crop of appalled folk singers are sharing new BLM protest songs!

    • Replies: @wren
    @Anonymous

    That's a lucky dad. Nice house, too. 12 views total when I watched. Your friends?

    Of course I'm sure the same folks they are singing in support of would love for that nice home to get lit, if given any opportunity...

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Courtesy Flush
    @Anonymous

    I like Americans but you are such a naive bunch.
    Too comfortable.

    , @SINCERITY.net
    @Anonymous

    These deluded idealist souls, singing girl and goodwhite father, have been systematically brainwashed with Leftist media lies.

    Father forgive them, they don't know the truth

    Sincerity dot net describes how such anti-racist lies are mandatory for media, police, teachers.

    School, media, everyone shamelessly lied to the poor soul of idealistic girl.

    We need a
    TruthRevolution.net

    Zero tolerance for lies by omission, outright lies, Leftist manipulation.
    It should be a crime to cause large scale riots by blatant misinformation, media lies, and school and college misinformation.
    Postmodernism is a scourge that should be considered a joke like homeopathy. Until we see a postmodernism airplane, it should not be accepted as a serious subject in colleges.

    It took me years of AMREN, VDARE, and academic texts by Rushton and other renegades to slowly deprogram myself from my own brainwashing

    , @Dumbo
    @Anonymous

    It's kind of sad that, if they lived in one of those "99 cities" instead of in the nice leafy suburb they seem to live, and if BLM blacks had their way, they would just shoot the father and rape the daughter, no time to listen to folk songs. Actually, is there a musical genre more White than folk? I doubt blacks and latinos like it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @tyrone
    @Anonymous

    The head tilt says it all.

    , @Whiskey
    @Anonymous

    Proof of any more needed White women are the permanent and natural enemy of White men. And that men with daughters are natural cucks. The cucks of the cucks

    We really need White sharia. Islam is right about women.

    Replies: @Alden, @JMcG

    , @Neoconned
    @Anonymous

    LOL

    F--kin white people....they so crazy....

    , @anon
    @Anonymous

    The father must be unfamiliar with the scene in "Clockwork Orange" where the nice liberal couple gets a beating and a raping from the hoodlums.
    Can these people really not recognize how inexcusably naïve they are?

    , @Kibernetika
    @Anonymous

    https://youtu.be/8V_hCqO6UQs

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Stewart M Schwartz
    @Anonymous

    https://www.kinderinstitute.com/george-kinder/ Kinder currently resides in Massachusetts and spends several months per year in London and Hana, Hawaii.

    , @Stewart M Schwartz
    @Anonymous

    heres george without his daughter

    , @Stewart M Schwartz
    @Anonymous

    heres george without his daughter,pretty sweet scam.

  2. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, a budding crop of appalled folk singers are sharing new BLM protest songs!

    https://youtu.be/LcPlk5xf3CI

    Replies: @wren, @Courtesy Flush, @SINCERITY.net, @Dumbo, @tyrone, @Whiskey, @Neoconned, @anon, @Kibernetika, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz

    That’s a lucky dad. Nice house, too. 12 views total when I watched. Your friends?

    Of course I’m sure the same folks they are singing in support of would love for that nice home to get lit, if given any opportunity…

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @wren


    That’s a lucky dad. Nice house, too. 12 views total when I watched. Your friends?
     
    Nooo. I just did a search on blm protests and that gem came up.

    Of course I’m sure the same folks they are singing in support of would love for that nice home to get lit, if given any opportunity…
     
    That is so cynical!

    Just for that, I’m going to write me a new folk song about it right now:

    Imagine there’s no stuff I don’t like.
    I wonder if you can.
    No stuff I don’t like below us.
    Above us only stuff I like.
    Imagine all the people
    Acting just like me hee hee.
  3. Will they come back after, say, a vaccine?

    Will they come back after, say, a new mayor?

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @wren

    Only after the current Mayor -- and his spendthrift wife -- are publicly guillotined under Sherman's statue, at 59th and 5th.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @slumber_j

    , @tyrone
    @wren

    The vaccine will become the new hydroxychloroquine …….THEY don't want a cure.

    , @anon
    @wren


    Will they come back after, say, a vaccine?

     

    People are getting the message that the vaccine talk is political theater to reassure people. None other than the CDC Director made it clear enough to a dumb doorknob.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/video/2020/sep/16/face-masks-coronavirus-cdc-robert-redfield

    There are no vaccines or antiviral drugs to prevent or treat human coronavirus infections.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coronavirus#Prevention_and_treatment

    Replies: @anon

  4. Back last spring, you identified the subway as a major vector of contagion. It appears that your message was taken to heart by New Yorkers.

    Flu season starts October 1.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Diversity Heretic


    Flu season starts October 1.
     
    Will they send a blood-red bat signal from the Empire State building?
    , @guest007
    @Diversity Heretic

    The same measures that prevent the spread of covid-19 (social distancing, masks, good hygiene) will prevent the spread of the flu. There is no way that the U.S. can have a bad flu season without a spike in Covid-19.

  5. AAR
    less than one blink of a gnat’s eye on duckduckgo
    it’s meeting people more than halfway because they’re disabled
    like the short SMART bus in Detroit

    1. How it Works
    Access-A-Ride (AAR) Paratransit Service provides public transportation for eligible customers with disabilities or health conditions that prevent them from using the public buses and subways for some or all of their trips. AAR operates 24/7/365.

    Services are available within NYC’s five boroughs (Brooklyn, the Bronx, Manhattan, Staten Island, and Queens) and within an area three quarters of a mile beyond fixed-route service across the NYC border to nearby parts of Nassau and Westchester counties
    Fares are the same as full fare on public transit.
    AAR operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.
    You may ride with other customers in a shared-ride program.
    Origin-to-destination service or feeder service is available for eligible customers.
    AAR offers non-priority trips with maximum ride times based on trip distance.
    AAR complies with federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) regulations.
    AAR provides interpretation and document translation services if your preferred language isn’t English. These free services are available during the application, eligibility, and scheduling processes.
    https://access.nyc.gov/programs/access-a-ride/

    • Replies: @jb
    @J.Ross

    tl;dr

    If you are disabled, they will come to your door with a van and take you direct to your destination. The van has a lift for wheelchairs, and possibly other accommodations as well, but the lift is the only one that's obvious. I have neighbors who use them regularly.

    , @Lot
    @J.Ross

    They are free taxis and shuttlebuses for wheelchair bound people run by the government. Every large and medium city has them.

    , @anon
    @J.Ross

    In the social media biz that's called pumping-up engagement. Intentionally leaving out some tidbit of information (and saying "I don't know") prompts helpful commenters like yourself to contribute (an end in itself) and also gives some readers a dopamine shot ("yay, I know more than the host").

    Replies: @J.Ross

  6. Anonymous[350] • Disclaimer says:

    Intellectual collapse in the party leadership leads straight to real economic collapse in the party controlled jurisdictions.

    As if we needed more… here is more evidence of Dem intellectual collapse:

    Jeffrey Toobin @JeffreyToobin Dems aren’t powerless. They can: 1. Abolish filibuster. 2. Statehood for DC, PR. 3. Increase # of federal judges. 4. Add 3 Justices to #SCOTUS. My @NewYorker column

    TOOBIN IS A TOP DEM LEGAL GUY AND HE IS GOING FULL HARRY REID.

    Read the Toobin twitter comments. Many dems recognize the folly here. They’re seeing the intellectual spiral. How can the Harry Reid Fan Club be gaining members at this late date?

    Unreal. It’s all a dream for Trump.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @Anonymous

    If the Democrats in the U.S. Senate eliminate the filibuster, it is because they believe that the Republicans will never be in the majority again.

    Replies: @MBlanc46

    , @Neoconned
    @Anonymous

    "Intellectual collapse in the party leadership leads straight to real economic collapse in the party controlled jurisdictions."

    Sounds almost like the rapid decline of the Ottomans in the 1700s to 1900s after the white slave trade they used to fill their functionary ranks, collapsed....


    "Toobin @JeffreyToobin Dems aren’t powerless. They can: 1. Abolish filibuster. 2. Statehood for DC, PR. 3. Increase # of federal judges. 4. Add 3 Justices to #SCOTUS. My @NewYorker column

    TOOBIN IS A TOP DEM LEGAL GUY AND HE IS GOING FULL HARRY REID.

    Read the Toobin twitter comments. Many dems recognize the folly here. They’re seeing the intellectual spiral. How can the Harry Reid Fan Club be gaining members at this late date?"

    He'd better be careful. American 2 party politics has always worked as a duopoly kept in line via a MAD like Cold War guarantee the whole system would collapse.

    Toobins nuts. This could go sideways. If the GOP sees the Dems doing procedural things like adding in states lile PR they will get equally desperate....and talk of military intervention will commence

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Anonymous

    The people who eventually decide elections, i.e.. swing voters, don't pay attention to people like Jeffrey Toobin, or what they tweet. They pay attention to TV.

    This election will be decided by suburban women who are freaked-the-f**k-out over COVID. Trump could have appealed to these people more if we weren't so..............Trumpy. He should have governed more, and tweeted less.

    Biden Harris by a clear majority is my prediction. I hope I'm wrong. But I don't think I will be.

  7. Real Estate speculators are mostly losing large sums. I know one family, Jewish of course, who have large real estate holdings, commercial property mostly, and they have had to take on emergency loans with high interest rates and to halve employees’ wages, a lot of people just aren’t paying rents.

    Watched Death Wish on TV the other night, viruses come and go but De Balsio could preside over a longer period of decline.

  8. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, a budding crop of appalled folk singers are sharing new BLM protest songs!

    https://youtu.be/LcPlk5xf3CI

    Replies: @wren, @Courtesy Flush, @SINCERITY.net, @Dumbo, @tyrone, @Whiskey, @Neoconned, @anon, @Kibernetika, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz

    I like Americans but you are such a naive bunch.
    Too comfortable.

    • Thanks: Buffalo Joe
  9. Anon[203] • Disclaimer says:

    You can open windows on buses, local and long-haul, at least here in Japan. Older subway and train cars also had openable windows. (There was quite an elaborate and now mostly forgotten system of etiquette involved in how, when, who, and how much train and subway windows were opened, but I imagine that a pandemic would overrule all that.) New train cars do not have windows that can be opened. The air conditioner is supposed to handle it. But nobody trusts that the air conditioner isn’t just recirculating virus. To make matters worse, there are special train cars with weak air conditioning, aimed at women, and in fact during rush hour there are women-only cars with weak air conditioning (but with more of an anti groping goal). These weak air conditioning cars might be death traps. Or maybe not. You’d think there would be more empirical research going on.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Anon

    The ridiculously uninformative COVID-19 Dashboard by the the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) says that there are 1507 death in Japan and the number of "daily cases" (however defined for Japan, if anyone even knows) is at 500/day.

    https://i.postimg.cc/xdVSYGpT/Cases-in-Nihon.png

    So those weak air conditioning cars are probably not death traps.

  10. It’s not just NY City. The number of people going through TSA checkpoints is a good measure of airline travel levels. One can see here that passenger counts are still 65 to 75% lower than year-ago numbers.

    One can chalk up some of this change to American’s changing of their ways of doing things, using Zoom, etc. That’s not the whole explanation though. We can wait until the US Gov’t GDP number come out, for what that’s good for, but we don’t really need that to know that the economy has not just sprung right back.

    It’s almost as if businesses can’t operate very well after having been forced to shut down on various whims by various government officials and not knowing if there may be further shutdowns at unpredictable times due to somebody somewhere not liking the new case counts.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Ach, the bookend states that are NY and California seem to operate on the governor's New Rule-a-Day for Covid. Businesses can open now, soon to open, maybe can open soon and then closed. Same with schools. Who is going to invest in starting up if you may be shut down in a heartbeat. Surprised there is not a bigger push back. Two local developers in my town both built or redeveloped buildings on our Main Street. One has not been occupied, the other has six store fronts vacant out of eight. Loans to be repaid and taxes due. You have to have deep pockets to do that.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    , @Anonymous
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Given that, in all likelihood, right now about 5% of Americans are infected and may be contagious, flying on commercial airlines sounds like an absolutely dumbest thing to do if one wants to avoid being infected.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @AnotherDad

    , @epebble
    @Achmed E. Newman

    https://www.calculatedriskblog.com/ gives High Frequency Indicators for the Economy every Monday morning. The data have been extremely stable since march drop-off showing only very gradual improvement (nationally).

    For example:

    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-KeCtxawIV0k/X19hrc6WBDI/AAAAAAAA2Lg/Xt8Ngc0Nh2oN21yXBJmqD__ULgdnnwFHgCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/TSASept142020.PNG

    https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-W1iSTRisdQ4/X146KX-rXOI/AAAAAAAA2LA/4oorbxx6EjY5tDN8ufZqW0mTyzJUlmk2ACLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/DinersSept122020.PNG

    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-QwvIYj29C_E/X110-4Nea4I/AAAAAAAA2Ko/-U6JW383EakEDjRHwJkICUvvwRep2CL2gCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/MovieSept122020.PNG

    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-EQQlWGgGzrc/X147_CV8hpI/AAAAAAAA2LI/PGebvPvYXu0q15zTus89aA48DmS6c1sygCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/TransitSept112020.PNG

    Replies: @anon

  11. Well, the Really Smart people who scored awfully high on SAT tests had a freak out and created $2 trillion boondoggle called the Covid Lockdown.

    As it turns out, a lot of them are neurotic head cases with no common sense.

    • Disagree: Pincher Martin
    • Thanks: TomSchmidt
    • LOL: Old and Grumpy
  12. Anonymous[285] • Disclaimer says:
    @wren
    @Anonymous

    That's a lucky dad. Nice house, too. 12 views total when I watched. Your friends?

    Of course I'm sure the same folks they are singing in support of would love for that nice home to get lit, if given any opportunity...

    Replies: @Anonymous

    That’s a lucky dad. Nice house, too. 12 views total when I watched. Your friends?

    Nooo. I just did a search on blm protests and that gem came up.

    Of course I’m sure the same folks they are singing in support of would love for that nice home to get lit, if given any opportunity…

    That is so cynical!

    Just for that, I’m going to write me a new folk song about it right now:

    Imagine there’s no stuff I don’t like.
    I wonder if you can.
    No stuff I don’t like below us.
    Above us only stuff I like.
    Imagine all the people
    Acting just like me hee hee.

  13. @wren
    Will they come back after, say, a vaccine?

    Will they come back after, say, a new mayor?

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @tyrone, @anon

    Only after the current Mayor — and his spendthrift wife — are publicly guillotined under Sherman’s statue, at 59th and 5th.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @Gary in Gramercy

    Not so many statues of Sherman down south. Wonder if that'll change now? Lincoln is on the verge of cancellation here and there, but I haven't heard much about the General.

    He did a lot to make America safe for Tariffs, Mercantilism, Manufacturing, and Commerce so it's natural that New York would appreciate him--NYC owes its primacy to him as much as to any other man.

    , @slumber_j
    @Gary in Gramercy


    Only after the current Mayor — and his spendthrift wife — are publicly guillotined under Sherman’s statue, at 59th and 5th.
     
    I'd pay good money to see that, and their heads on pikes at the sea lion tank in the Central Park Zoo.

    I went to a Rangers game with an old friend just after BDB was first elected. Conversation naturally turned to the new mayor, whom I didn't know that much about, and I asked my better-informed friend what he thought of him.

    "I can't stand him," he said. "I can't stand his whole family."

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

  14. As my pseudonym implies, this is a subject where my expertise can provide some insight. The subway and rail lines are primarily for commuters to get to and from jobs in Manhattan. So that implies a big reduction in middle class and upper middle class workers commuting to office jobs in Manhattan.

    Buses will be more for short distances and getting to working class jobs in the outer boroughs. Working class folks have less opportunity to work remotely.

    Tunnel and bridge traffic is very rare for commuters. Service jobs and truck transport mostly, I would guess.

    What all this implies is a big drop in white collar commuters working in Manhattan. This is a big loss in tax revenue for New York. New York doesn’t have tax treaties with NJ and CT specifically to take capture tax revenue from out of state commuters. There would also be a corresponding loss of revenue in the services provided to those white collar workers.

    • Agree: Bugg
    • Replies: @Charon
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Hence the trillion dollar slush fund for Pelosi and Schumer.

    They're still hanging tough and refusing to allow a vote on any covid package that doesn't include it.

    The media are blaming Trump and McConnell. Surprise surprise.

    , @Known Fact
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    NYC's elderly, to whatever extent they're going out these days, also prefer buses to subways -- less intimidating and no need for long steep stairs or elevators

    , @TomSchmidt
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    My wife's company gets a tax break for the number of workers employed in NYC, even if they are all working from home in the suburbs. So those workers continue to be taxed as if working in Manhattan: the company benefits by saving a few nickels at the expense of dollars in employee income taxes.

    , @Muggles
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    This is a big loss in tax revenue for New York. New York doesn’t have tax treaties with NJ and CT specifically to take capture tax revenue from out of state commuters.
     
    As a retired CPA with some experience with NYC/NY income taxes, I think you misunderstand how multistate tax compacts work (as in MD, DC, VA).

    Per a Google snippet: a reciprocal state agreement meaning that residents who live in one tax jurisdiction and work in the other only file and pay taxes in the jurisdiction they live.


    So your logic is incorrect. States with tax compacts let you file your state return only in the state in which you reside. You get to claim a full credit from your state (resident state) taxes with the taxes withheld in the state where you are employed. You don't have to file a state tax return in the state of employment to get your refund.

    NY/NYC collects income tax (based on a per day worked there rule) and you must apportion your taxable state income to each state. NY keeps it and it is somewhat complicated. You can claim a tax credit if you reside in a state with state income tax. Otherwise not. But now you are limited to how much state income tax you can deduct federally as an itemized deduction. Your local resident state tax may give you all or a partial credit for out of state income tax paid. NY/NYC keeps more taxes this way.

    NY/NYC method is very harsh. Even casual (one day or week) business trips to NY/NYC can trigger NY/NYC income taxes. You can't get it back easily or at all. Of course NJ just passed a special "millionaires" income tax as well. *sigh*

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @Anon

    , @Anon
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Live in a town with Midtown Direct Service to Penn Station in about half an hour. I first knew the day that Covid was being taken seriously when I drove past the station parking lot mid morning and it was almost empty.

    For a period in June/July I needed to be going into NY for work a bunch. Needed to bring stuff with me so probably would've have driven and not taken the train even if pre-covid. But I noticed a marked change in tunnel traffic from when I first started going in early June to late July, even as the parking lot is mostly empty. So of the (limited) people who are going in they are much more likely to be driving now than in the past.

  15. So a lot of NYC workers have pulled a Snake Plissken?

  16. @NJ Transit Commuter
    As my pseudonym implies, this is a subject where my expertise can provide some insight. The subway and rail lines are primarily for commuters to get to and from jobs in Manhattan. So that implies a big reduction in middle class and upper middle class workers commuting to office jobs in Manhattan.

    Buses will be more for short distances and getting to working class jobs in the outer boroughs. Working class folks have less opportunity to work remotely.

    Tunnel and bridge traffic is very rare for commuters. Service jobs and truck transport mostly, I would guess.

    What all this implies is a big drop in white collar commuters working in Manhattan. This is a big loss in tax revenue for New York. New York doesn’t have tax treaties with NJ and CT specifically to take capture tax revenue from out of state commuters. There would also be a corresponding loss of revenue in the services provided to those white collar workers.

    Replies: @Charon, @Known Fact, @TomSchmidt, @Muggles, @Anon

    Hence the trillion dollar slush fund for Pelosi and Schumer.

    They’re still hanging tough and refusing to allow a vote on any covid package that doesn’t include it.

    The media are blaming Trump and McConnell. Surprise surprise.

  17. Many mass transit authorities lose serious money to “fare jumpers”, the people that jump over turnstiles and avoid paying the fare. You can guess who is committing that crime and of course there are no repercussions. Also add in many more employees working from home, UBER and people not feeling safe on the buses and trains, therefore the future is not bright for public transit.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Wake up

    I doubt many of these fare jumpers are commuting to work, if they even are aware of the term...

    .

    ... not "commuting", I mean "work".

  18. Rents are still probably too damn high but maybe a temporary receding of gentrification.

    On the topic a new film came out sympathetically chronically the loss of place and community from ethnic and sociological displacement among the black working and underclass who had little else but their communities and social capital. (Arguably more important than actual capital) Nobody seems to have actual seen it and everything I’ve seen from the trailers and NYT review makes it seem like it’s infested with film school cliches.

    But it once again brings to mind the lack of any regards for the same process happening to say working class English cockneys in London. The BBC tends to pretend the movement away is due to ‘upward mobility’ but the people moving tell a different story and the idea that ‘upward mobility’ involves leaving London is the most asinine thing I’ve ever heard. America’s opinion making class seem mostly to be people who moved away from their home, perhaps by vast distances and never returned. The tyranny of the ‘Anywheres’ against the ‘Somewheres’.

    I only noticed the review because the account that tracks edits to the NYTs had one where the name of the director was wrong and changed. Interesting it got a review despite literally nobody seeing the film and there being little buzz.

    Community displacement and losing your home community is bad and sad. But you’re only supposed to notice when whites are the ones doing the displacing. Other groups don’t displace, somehow.

    • Agree: bomag
    • Replies: @ia
    @Altai

    Blacks drove out the majority working class whites from Prince George's County which borders DC. Nobody knows and the blacks certainly don't care. So why are whites supposed to care about them? That's not a rhetorical question. Constantly playing virtue-signaling games and wringing one's hands over a group who means you harm is beyond stupid.

  19. I wonder if it’s more fear of the Covid Kung Flu, or fear of BLM riotin’ blacks.

    Wasn’t just recently that there was an attempt by a black dude to rape a woman (of indeterminate race) in a NY subway station in view of all?

    • Replies: @sayless
    @Dumbo

    That rape attempt was in the middle of the day, on the platform at Lexington Avenue and 59th or 66th Street, on the East Side. One of the safest stops in the city. What shocked me was that someone stood there filming it instead of going over to help.

    Fare beating is ignored now. Lots of homeless on the trains and some of the people are violent. When the doors close you're trapped because the doors between the cars are locked. Riding the subway is riskier than it was a year ago. The buses are safer.

    A couple of years ago an Access-A-Ride employee was fired for chronic tardiness, she worked at their call center. She was disabled, used Access-A-Ride to get to work, it kept making her late.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @West reanimator

    , @Buck Ransom
    @Dumbo

    Once the ongoing gentrification of everything above 96th Street is complete, Manhattan will be exclusively for Jews and Woke whites. It will then be protected like a fortress from all threats by the melanin-enriched. Will Corona-chan ultimately speed up this process or slow it down?

  20. @Diversity Heretic
    Back last spring, you identified the subway as a major vector of contagion. It appears that your message was taken to heart by New Yorkers.

    Flu season starts October 1.

    Replies: @El Dato, @guest007

    Flu season starts October 1.

    Will they send a blood-red bat signal from the Empire State building?

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  21. @Anon
    You can open windows on buses, local and long-haul, at least here in Japan. Older subway and train cars also had openable windows. (There was quite an elaborate and now mostly forgotten system of etiquette involved in how, when, who, and how much train and subway windows were opened, but I imagine that a pandemic would overrule all that.) New train cars do not have windows that can be opened. The air conditioner is supposed to handle it. But nobody trusts that the air conditioner isn't just recirculating virus. To make matters worse, there are special train cars with weak air conditioning, aimed at women, and in fact during rush hour there are women-only cars with weak air conditioning (but with more of an anti groping goal). These weak air conditioning cars might be death traps. Or maybe not. You'd think there would be more empirical research going on.

    Replies: @El Dato

    The ridiculously uninformative COVID-19 Dashboard by the the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) says that there are 1507 death in Japan and the number of “daily cases” (however defined for Japan, if anyone even knows) is at 500/day.

    So those weak air conditioning cars are probably not death traps.

  22. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, a budding crop of appalled folk singers are sharing new BLM protest songs!

    https://youtu.be/LcPlk5xf3CI

    Replies: @wren, @Courtesy Flush, @SINCERITY.net, @Dumbo, @tyrone, @Whiskey, @Neoconned, @anon, @Kibernetika, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz

    These deluded idealist souls, singing girl and goodwhite father, have been systematically brainwashed with Leftist media lies.

    Father forgive them, they don’t know the truth

    Sincerity dot net describes how such anti-racist lies are mandatory for media, police, teachers.

    School, media, everyone shamelessly lied to the poor soul of idealistic girl.

    We need a
    TruthRevolution.net

    Zero tolerance for lies by omission, outright lies, Leftist manipulation.
    It should be a crime to cause large scale riots by blatant misinformation, media lies, and school and college misinformation.
    Postmodernism is a scourge that should be considered a joke like homeopathy. Until we see a postmodernism airplane, it should not be accepted as a serious subject in colleges.

    It took me years of AMREN, VDARE, and academic texts by Rushton and other renegades to slowly deprogram myself from my own brainwashing

  23. Bridges and Tunnels

    The measure is probably vehicles not people. NYC has surprisingly poor logistics. There is little freight railroad left and the main port is Elizabeth NJ. So most everything is trucked into the core. I am guessing parking is easier and there is less traffic so there may be more use of personal cars.

    Also surprising is the lack of logistics into Long Island Nassau and Suffolk have about 3 million people but as far as I know mostly ships stuff in through NYC

    • Replies: @Bugg
    @George

    There is a train connection to the LIRR that starts right at water's edge in Brooklyn. The plan was for a cross harbor rail tunnel connecting Long Island and New Jersey. It goes back to the 1930s. Every few years, it gets proposed again but never happens. Would be a huge project, bigger than the tunnel upgrade and expansion of the 34th Street/New Jersey Hudson commuter rail tunnel. On the Brooklyn side it still is a barely active freight line that takes freight cars by barge from NJ and runs them to Long Island. But that's very limited and expensive. It was a commuter branch of the LIRR but that's long discontinued as unprofitable.

    So everything that comes into New York City and Long Island has to be trucked through the City. Or routed by train through Amtrak lines down from Albany; again, expensive and not very efficient.

    , @Redman
    @George

    Last weekend I drove into the City from Westchester for the first time since Covid. Couldn’t find a single spot on the UWS for the first time in my life. Had to put the car in a garage for a 2-hour excursion.

    Not exactly sure what the reason is for that. But I was expecting there to be more not less free parking.

    Replies: @hhsiii, @kaganovitch

    , @Anon
    @George


    Long Island Nassau and Suffolk have about 3 million people but as far as I know mostly ships stuff in through NYC
     
    Correct. All our ports are for fishermen or recreational boats, all our bridges are within NYC, and our 2 ferries (not counting those to even smaller islands) carry cars, pedestrians and motorcycles to Connecticut.

    We do have an airport! It's for people, though.

    If you're going to the city, it's by car or train. If you're leaving the area, it's by car or plane.

  24. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, a budding crop of appalled folk singers are sharing new BLM protest songs!

    https://youtu.be/LcPlk5xf3CI

    Replies: @wren, @Courtesy Flush, @SINCERITY.net, @Dumbo, @tyrone, @Whiskey, @Neoconned, @anon, @Kibernetika, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz

    It’s kind of sad that, if they lived in one of those “99 cities” instead of in the nice leafy suburb they seem to live, and if BLM blacks had their way, they would just shoot the father and rape the daughter, no time to listen to folk songs. Actually, is there a musical genre more White than folk? I doubt blacks and latinos like it.

    • Agree: Old Prude, bomag
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Dumbo


    Actually, is there a musical genre more White than folk?
     
    The Kingston Trio were Honolulu haoles named for the Jamaican capital.


    https://www.rollingstone.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/bob-shane-kingston-trio-death.jpg

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @I, Libertine, @mmack, @Bill Jones

  25. “New York City has not had very many coronavirus cases since getting blasted in the spring”

    Cuomo’s killed all those likely to die, De Blasio has driven out the rest.

    I think you’ve got to go back to Lincoln to find someone who’s killed more people in America than Andrew Cuomo.

    • Replies: @Neoconned
    @Bill Jones

    Mister Jones, sir:

    I agree w your sentiments regarding the Cuomo Homo clan and in particular that idiot governor but as a born & bred southerner i must differ with you regarding Lincoln.

    I just finished a few months ago Carl Sandbergs exhaustive biography of Lincoln and i found him a much more sympathetic figure & unifying figure than many of the vermin of his day and age like the insufferable radical Abolitionists....especially the New England elites....

    And then there were the psychotic Fireeater southern warmongers....who were some of the meanest mother f--kers this country has ever seen....

    Lincoln plodded that middle road....

    I'm sorry but as a off/on again NOLA denizen i have to correct this. Slavery as an economic system was on its way out anyway internationally....especially in the Americas....

    The stubborn, greedy Scots-Irish/English southern slaveowner aristocracy that was 40k-50k strong started the Civil War.

    Given the numerous compromises etc that were given to placate the Southern aristocracy during the 1820s to 1860 era its amazing the war was put off as long as it was.

    But the war wasn't so much about slavery as race baiting Abolitionists put it or as neo Confederate retards claim. It was about the ECONOMIC SYSTEM of slavery which controlled everything from land use to taxation to how land was chopped up & used. Most slaves were useless or semi useless. The slave-sellers were con men of the highest order....

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  26. Anyone have an on the ground report how the long enduring Chinatown in lower Manhattan is doing? The other Chinatowns in Brooklyn and Queens? My guess, they are ghost towns except for the state and federal Covid-19 dollars that various enterprises there thieved. Of course they lied on applications to thieve Government dollars, the Chinese network on this, trade ideas on how to finesse this, and have done so for decades.

    How ironic that an invasive China virus kills Chinese restaurants throughout America. The buffet model is out and I used to patronize local Chinese buffets. They Are Gone!

    NYC subways ridership decline shows the obvious. The more elite are telecommuting into their Manhattan jobs. The working class that has to physically show up, 50% or more of their jobs are wiped out in New York City. Blame riots, looting elite businesses, homeless on the streets and DeBlasio the pothead. He bungled the Covid response.

  27. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, a budding crop of appalled folk singers are sharing new BLM protest songs!

    https://youtu.be/LcPlk5xf3CI

    Replies: @wren, @Courtesy Flush, @SINCERITY.net, @Dumbo, @tyrone, @Whiskey, @Neoconned, @anon, @Kibernetika, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz

    The head tilt says it all.

  28. @wren
    Will they come back after, say, a vaccine?

    Will they come back after, say, a new mayor?

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @tyrone, @anon

    The vaccine will become the new hydroxychloroquine …….THEY don’t want a cure.

  29. A woman being knocked down and dry-humped on the subway platform doesn’t help ridership (captain obvious speaks).

    • Agree: wren
  30. @Gary in Gramercy
    @wren

    Only after the current Mayor -- and his spendthrift wife -- are publicly guillotined under Sherman's statue, at 59th and 5th.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @slumber_j

    Not so many statues of Sherman down south. Wonder if that’ll change now? Lincoln is on the verge of cancellation here and there, but I haven’t heard much about the General.

    He did a lot to make America safe for Tariffs, Mercantilism, Manufacturing, and Commerce so it’s natural that New York would appreciate him–NYC owes its primacy to him as much as to any other man.

  31. Steve,

    It’s not just NYC. Back on the train line I used to ride:

    https://chicago.cbslocal.com/2020/09/15/with-ridership-down-about-90-metra-looking-at-bleak-financial-forecast-for-2020-21/

    Metra Rail is facing a $682 million budget shortfall due to COVID-19 restrictions and two rounds of BLM rioting keeping people off trains and out of Da Loop.

    Anecdotally my wife talked to her aunt Friday. She passed on a conversation she had with the realtor that sold her house. The realtor is busy selling houses in towns like Elmhurst and the surrounding suburbs. The buyers? Rich Chicagoans from the North Side selling and moving out to the burbs.

    Good job Lori!

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    @mmack

    I’m in a less tony western suburb than Elmhurst. Houses are selling well here, even though the local public high school is Proviso West.

  32. “Access-a-Ride” is NYC’s special service for the disabled.

    They’re presumably more likely to be homebound even in good times, so it stands to reason that demand for this would drop less than for others.

  33. Anonymous[355] • Disclaimer says:

    In D.C.:

    Metro Warns of Service Cuts, Layoffs and More If Federal Funding Lapses

    Ridership and revenue have dropped as much as 90% on some lines, according to WMATA

    By Carissa DiMargo
    September 18, 2020

    Reduced hours, service cuts and layoffs could be on the table for Metro if federal funding runs out amid a huge drop in ridership due to the coronavirus pandemic.

    Ridership and revenue have dropped as much as 90% on some lines, according to WMATA. The transit agency says it has used funding from the CARES Act to maintain service, but that funding is expected to run out by the end of 2020…

    https://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local/transportation/metro-warns-of-service-cuts-layoffs-and-more-if-federal-funding-lapses/2422036/

    In Boston:

    MBTA joins other transit systems to seek more federal aid to replace lost fares

    By Adam Vaccaro Globe Staff
    September 15, 2020

    …The MBTA projects a budget shortfall of $300 million to $600 million next year, mainly due to dwindling fare collections as ridership remains far below pre-pandemic levels. Money authorized in the CARES Act, which Congress passed in the spring, has helped smooth over the budget issues during the ongoing fiscal year, but the T expects that funding to end by next summer…

    The T has begun exploring possible cuts to offset the losses, saying it will focus on preserving services and routes with high rates of use by low-income people, where ridership has been higher, while cutting service with fewer rides in communities that are less dependent on public transit.

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/2020/09/15/metro/mbta-presses-federal-funds-address-budget-shortfall/

    Fares account for 1/3 of the MBTA budget. But Massachusetts has its priorities right. Gear everything toward facilitating the low-income people. The Boston economy with its thousands of small businesses (restaurants, retail, etc.) will automatically take care of itself.

    Cities are done.

    • Agree: Muggles
  34. I’ve been taking the subway again, and bus. Not every day. The bus for when you have time. Older people like it. Or for going across town. Or say you are at 60th and 2nd and want to go to 75th and 3rd. Walk a block to a bus that takes you right there rather than 2 blocks to take a train that leaves you at 77th and Lexington, 3 blocks away.

    My wife is going into the office 2-3 days a week now. She had an empty car the other day. Spic and span. Me I take short hops just to load up at Fairway, a supermarket. Cars half full. With a guy scratching his bare feet, with a bloody ear humming Streets of Laredo.

    People will ride again when offices open back up. Which has to wait for full time school. My boys will be going 2-3 days a week, my daughter 1-2. But they keep pushing it back. I imagine cases may force reclosing. Already a slight uptick.

    I think I probably caught it on the subway in March. No big deal for me fortunately. This has gotten ridiculous. They wanted to flatten the curve to avoid overwhelming hospitals. Now they seem to want no cases at all.

    • Agree: Bugg
    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @hhsiii


    you are at 60th and 2nd and want to go to 75th and 3rd
     
    I'm surprised you can't walk this, as it's less than a mile. Going across town, I prefer to walk under a mile, like from Port Authority to Rockefeller Center.
  35. Do people think buses are safer than subways? Why? Or do buses tend to serve service workers more than white collar workers who can work from home?

    Or do buses tend to serve service workers more than white [ ] workers who can work from home?

    Fixed it. Paul Weyrich was a rightist transit fan (and investor) who would come right out and say that white commuters wanted trains, not buses.

    Another thing to consider: in some cities (like mine), bus drivers can converse with passengers, which can make a dull ride enjoyable. Does the MTA allow this? (We could also consume beverages onboard. Don’t try this in DC!)

    The presence of a driver, especially a burly one, gives a feeling of security. A train driver is in a cage, like a pilot. Conductors are a thing of the distant past, except on ticketed commuter rail.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Actually on the NYC subway, every train has both a driver and a conductor. They are both locked inside their little booths. The conductor is somewhere in the middle of the train. The job of the conductor is to operate the doors of the train. In most other places the driver does both but in NY the transit union won't let them get rid of the conductors.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  36. *People will ride again when offices open back up*

    People will ride again when Biden wins the election. Watch the numbers spike. Just watch.

  37. People need transportation to reach a destination and Cuomo and DeBlasio have shut down many of the destinations people might want to go to. Even where stores are open the shopping experience has suffered from hoodrat infestation, closed bars, restaurants and plywood facades.

    This is a problem all over the US but it is most intense in Democrat run jurisdictions.

  38. @Dumbo
    @Anonymous

    It's kind of sad that, if they lived in one of those "99 cities" instead of in the nice leafy suburb they seem to live, and if BLM blacks had their way, they would just shoot the father and rape the daughter, no time to listen to folk songs. Actually, is there a musical genre more White than folk? I doubt blacks and latinos like it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Actually, is there a musical genre more White than folk?

    The Kingston Trio were Honolulu haoles named for the Jamaican capital.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Reg Cæsar

    Reg, in my junior year in college we booked the KT to perform at Kleinhans Music hall in Buffalo, sold out performance. Last road show before they returned to SF and performed together one last time at the Hungry I. Never has a class had so much money to spend on senior week. And we spent it all. Good show.

    Replies: @MBlanc46

    , @I, Libertine
    @Reg Cæsar

    Although they sparked the folk music revival of the late 50s by playing music that actually sounded pleasant to the ear, they were despised by true folkies because they were, quite obviously , not communists.

    , @mmack
    @Reg Cæsar

    To tie your reply and Steve's post together, The Kingston Trio sang a song about the Boston (Sorry, Baaaah-ston) subway:

    https://youtu.be/MbtkL5_f6-4

    "Now, all night long Charlie rides through the stations
    Crying, "What will become of me?
    How can I afford to see my sister in Chelsea
    Or my cousin in Roxbury?"

    , @Bill Jones
    @Reg Cæsar

    Plainsong is fairly long honky.

    Chant like a Gregorian.

  39. Many service workers are still working but their hours have been cut. So with many working only 3 or 4 instead of 5 days, there’s fewer people on buses. Plus people are being more careful so they drive or bike instead of using a bus Non work bus travel is probably way down too. Movies restaurants bars closed and people are getting used to staying at home. No summer events, beaches closed, no need to leave home.

    Plus all the covid precaution signs are enough to scare anyone away from buses. One wonderful thing, with everyone staying home, street parking is always available. The parking ticket revenue must be way down.

  40. @Wake up
    Many mass transit authorities lose serious money to “fare jumpers”, the people that jump over turnstiles and avoid paying the fare. You can guess who is committing that crime and of course there are no repercussions. Also add in many more employees working from home, UBER and people not feeling safe on the buses and trains, therefore the future is not bright for public transit.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I doubt many of these fare jumpers are commuting to work, if they even are aware of the term…

    .

    … not “commuting”, I mean “work”.

  41. @Achmed E. Newman
    It's not just NY City. The number of people going through TSA checkpoints is a good measure of airline travel levels. One can see here that passenger counts are still 65 to 75% lower than year-ago numbers.

    One can chalk up some of this change to American's changing of their ways of doing things, using Zoom, etc. That's not the whole explanation though. We can wait until the US Gov't GDP number come out, for what that's good for, but we don't really need that to know that the economy has not just sprung right back.

    It's almost as if businesses can't operate very well after having been forced to shut down on various whims by various government officials and not knowing if there may be further shutdowns at unpredictable times due to somebody somewhere not liking the new case counts.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Anonymous, @epebble

    Ach, the bookend states that are NY and California seem to operate on the governor’s New Rule-a-Day for Covid. Businesses can open now, soon to open, maybe can open soon and then closed. Same with schools. Who is going to invest in starting up if you may be shut down in a heartbeat. Surprised there is not a bigger push back. Two local developers in my town both built or redeveloped buildings on our Main Street. One has not been occupied, the other has six store fronts vacant out of eight. Loans to be repaid and taxes due. You have to have deep pockets to do that.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Buffalo Joe

    The woman who is LA's health director said the schools will remain closed until after the election. Who knew the Kung Flu cared?

    She gets paid $500k a year and has a PhD in, wait for it ................ Sociology.

    https://www.dailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/LDN-L-VIRUS-LA-UPDATE-0509-05-3.jpg

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen

  42. @Gary in Gramercy
    @wren

    Only after the current Mayor -- and his spendthrift wife -- are publicly guillotined under Sherman's statue, at 59th and 5th.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @slumber_j

    Only after the current Mayor — and his spendthrift wife — are publicly guillotined under Sherman’s statue, at 59th and 5th.

    I’d pay good money to see that, and their heads on pikes at the sea lion tank in the Central Park Zoo.

    I went to a Rangers game with an old friend just after BDB was first elected. Conversation naturally turned to the new mayor, whom I didn’t know that much about, and I asked my better-informed friend what he thought of him.

    “I can’t stand him,” he said. “I can’t stand his whole family.”

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @slumber_j

    Your friend had good antennae. I lived through the Disaster Formerly Known as the David Dinkins Administration, and thought New Yorkers had learned their lesson after that. But two decades of adult supervision -- and the influx of both young people and immigrants, with no memory of how awful things used to be when incompetent minorities and their equally feckless apologists were in charge -- left too many of us soft and happy, thinking that the city could never go back to the way it was. It just couldn't...until it did.

    To paraphrase what Jack Kent Cooke said of Washington Redskins GM and coach George Allen, the current Mayor gave his wife an unlimited budget, and she stole it. Remember Rachel Noerdlinger, Chirlane McCray's first chief of staff, a position that had not previously existed, but which paid $170,000? After Noerdlinger's family issues -- both her live-in boyfriend and son had problems with the law -- and personal debt forced her resignation, New York City's First Lady simply hired a longtime friend as her replacement -- at a salary of $200,000.

    Go find every "mental health consultant" with a master's degree or better, and a sufficient quantum of melanin, who applied for program grants from the City of New York -- then check those consultants' driveways and garages. When you start seeing brand new Mercedes and BMW sedans, you'll have some idea where the "missing" $850 million went.

    Replies: @slumber_j

  43. @Reg Cæsar
    @Dumbo


    Actually, is there a musical genre more White than folk?
     
    The Kingston Trio were Honolulu haoles named for the Jamaican capital.


    https://www.rollingstone.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/bob-shane-kingston-trio-death.jpg

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @I, Libertine, @mmack, @Bill Jones

    Reg, in my junior year in college we booked the KT to perform at Kleinhans Music hall in Buffalo, sold out performance. Last road show before they returned to SF and performed together one last time at the Hungry I. Never has a class had so much money to spend on senior week. And we spent it all. Good show.

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    @Buffalo Joe

    They were definitely a favorite of mine in my youth.

  44. Workers and businesses have discovered that in the age of the internet, actually going in to work is bullshit. The only people who need to actually, physically go into work are people in manufacturing – making things, building things – which is not what happens in the big city. The future is virtual and online. At last, the nice people have found a place to flee to.

    • Replies: @Peter Shaw
    @Dave from Oz

    Doubtful.

    Whilst it may be possible to keep the wheels turning with work from home, innovation and culture buidling are only really done in person.

    That and the fact that anyone who permanentky works from home might as well be in another country

    So whilst it will not go back to how it was, cities will still have their place

  45. By the way, the subway is perfectly fine these days–vastly preferable to the Before-Time version. I recommend it highly.

    • Agree: hhsiii
    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @slumber_j

    Are they still charging full fare?

    In Miami, all public transit has been free since March. This includes not only Metrorail and Metrobus in Dade County, but also Tri-Rail between Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach, and the Broward buses as well.

    The express buses use Greyhound-type vehicles and many of them are nearly empty. The other day I took a very nice ride from downtown Miami to the Sawgrass Mills area in Broward. There were four or five passengers on the bus, tops.

  46. @Reg Cæsar
    @Dumbo


    Actually, is there a musical genre more White than folk?
     
    The Kingston Trio were Honolulu haoles named for the Jamaican capital.


    https://www.rollingstone.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/bob-shane-kingston-trio-death.jpg

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @I, Libertine, @mmack, @Bill Jones

    Although they sparked the folk music revival of the late 50s by playing music that actually sounded pleasant to the ear, they were despised by true folkies because they were, quite obviously , not communists.

  47. @Reg Cæsar

    Do people think buses are safer than subways? Why? Or do buses tend to serve service workers more than white collar workers who can work from home?
     
    Or do buses tend to serve service workers more than white [ ] workers who can work from home?

    Fixed it. Paul Weyrich was a rightist transit fan (and investor) who would come right out and say that white commuters wanted trains, not buses.

    Another thing to consider: in some cities (like mine), bus drivers can converse with passengers, which can make a dull ride enjoyable. Does the MTA allow this? (We could also consume beverages onboard. Don't try this in DC!)

    The presence of a driver, especially a burly one, gives a feeling of security. A train driver is in a cage, like a pilot. Conductors are a thing of the distant past, except on ticketed commuter rail.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Actually on the NYC subway, every train has both a driver and a conductor. They are both locked inside their little booths. The conductor is somewhere in the middle of the train. The job of the conductor is to operate the doors of the train. In most other places the driver does both but in NY the transit union won’t let them get rid of the conductors.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Jack D


    In most other places the driver does both but in NY the transit union won’t let them get rid of the conductors.
     
    Theoretically, nyc subways really do need a conductor, for safety's sake. I’d typically ride in the conductors car for late night rides when I was alone. If attacked, I could pound on the conductors door, he could stop the train, thus trapping my assailants. Hoodrats knew that, and wouldn’t mess with me.

    Then there’s other reasons having a conductor is a good idea, but they aren’t always vigilant.

    https://youtu.be/Bh5j137Jybs

  48. @Diversity Heretic
    Back last spring, you identified the subway as a major vector of contagion. It appears that your message was taken to heart by New Yorkers.

    Flu season starts October 1.

    Replies: @El Dato, @guest007

    The same measures that prevent the spread of covid-19 (social distancing, masks, good hygiene) will prevent the spread of the flu. There is no way that the U.S. can have a bad flu season without a spike in Covid-19.

  49. @Anonymous
    Intellectual collapse in the party leadership leads straight to real economic collapse in the party controlled jurisdictions.

    As if we needed more... here is more evidence of Dem intellectual collapse:

    Jeffrey Toobin @JeffreyToobin Dems aren't powerless. They can: 1. Abolish filibuster. 2. Statehood for DC, PR. 3. Increase # of federal judges. 4. Add 3 Justices to #SCOTUS. My @NewYorker column

    TOOBIN IS A TOP DEM LEGAL GUY AND HE IS GOING FULL HARRY REID.

    Read the Toobin twitter comments. Many dems recognize the folly here. They're seeing the intellectual spiral. How can the Harry Reid Fan Club be gaining members at this late date?

    Unreal. It's all a dream for Trump.

    Replies: @guest007, @Neoconned, @Mr. Anon

    If the Democrats in the U.S. Senate eliminate the filibuster, it is because they believe that the Republicans will never be in the majority again.

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    @guest007

    And they will be correct. The end is near for the Repubs as a national party.

  50. @NJ Transit Commuter
    As my pseudonym implies, this is a subject where my expertise can provide some insight. The subway and rail lines are primarily for commuters to get to and from jobs in Manhattan. So that implies a big reduction in middle class and upper middle class workers commuting to office jobs in Manhattan.

    Buses will be more for short distances and getting to working class jobs in the outer boroughs. Working class folks have less opportunity to work remotely.

    Tunnel and bridge traffic is very rare for commuters. Service jobs and truck transport mostly, I would guess.

    What all this implies is a big drop in white collar commuters working in Manhattan. This is a big loss in tax revenue for New York. New York doesn’t have tax treaties with NJ and CT specifically to take capture tax revenue from out of state commuters. There would also be a corresponding loss of revenue in the services provided to those white collar workers.

    Replies: @Charon, @Known Fact, @TomSchmidt, @Muggles, @Anon

    NYC’s elderly, to whatever extent they’re going out these days, also prefer buses to subways — less intimidating and no need for long steep stairs or elevators

    • Agree: hhsiii
  51. @J.Ross
    AAR
    less than one blink of a gnat's eye on duckduckgo
    it's meeting people more than halfway because they're disabled
    like the short SMART bus in Detroit

    1. How it Works
    Access-A-Ride (AAR) Paratransit Service provides public transportation for eligible customers with disabilities or health conditions that prevent them from using the public buses and subways for some or all of their trips. AAR operates 24/7/365.

    Services are available within NYC’s five boroughs (Brooklyn, the Bronx, Manhattan, Staten Island, and Queens) and within an area three quarters of a mile beyond fixed-route service across the NYC border to nearby parts of Nassau and Westchester counties
    Fares are the same as full fare on public transit.
    AAR operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.
    You may ride with other customers in a shared-ride program.
    Origin-to-destination service or feeder service is available for eligible customers.
    AAR offers non-priority trips with maximum ride times based on trip distance.
    AAR complies with federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) regulations.
    AAR provides interpretation and document translation services if your preferred language isn’t English. These free services are available during the application, eligibility, and scheduling processes.
    https://access.nyc.gov/programs/access-a-ride/

    Replies: @jb, @Lot, @anon

    tl;dr

    If you are disabled, they will come to your door with a van and take you direct to your destination. The van has a lift for wheelchairs, and possibly other accommodations as well, but the lift is the only one that’s obvious. I have neighbors who use them regularly.

  52. @J.Ross
    AAR
    less than one blink of a gnat's eye on duckduckgo
    it's meeting people more than halfway because they're disabled
    like the short SMART bus in Detroit

    1. How it Works
    Access-A-Ride (AAR) Paratransit Service provides public transportation for eligible customers with disabilities or health conditions that prevent them from using the public buses and subways for some or all of their trips. AAR operates 24/7/365.

    Services are available within NYC’s five boroughs (Brooklyn, the Bronx, Manhattan, Staten Island, and Queens) and within an area three quarters of a mile beyond fixed-route service across the NYC border to nearby parts of Nassau and Westchester counties
    Fares are the same as full fare on public transit.
    AAR operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.
    You may ride with other customers in a shared-ride program.
    Origin-to-destination service or feeder service is available for eligible customers.
    AAR offers non-priority trips with maximum ride times based on trip distance.
    AAR complies with federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) regulations.
    AAR provides interpretation and document translation services if your preferred language isn’t English. These free services are available during the application, eligibility, and scheduling processes.
    https://access.nyc.gov/programs/access-a-ride/

    Replies: @jb, @Lot, @anon

    They are free taxis and shuttlebuses for wheelchair bound people run by the government. Every large and medium city has them.

  53. @Reg Cæsar
    @Dumbo


    Actually, is there a musical genre more White than folk?
     
    The Kingston Trio were Honolulu haoles named for the Jamaican capital.


    https://www.rollingstone.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/bob-shane-kingston-trio-death.jpg

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @I, Libertine, @mmack, @Bill Jones

    To tie your reply and Steve’s post together, The Kingston Trio sang a song about the Boston (Sorry, Baaaah-ston) subway:

    “Now, all night long Charlie rides through the stations
    Crying, “What will become of me?
    How can I afford to see my sister in Chelsea
    Or my cousin in Roxbury?”

  54. Buses are primarily used in the outer boroughs for shorter intraboro trips or in areas that are not near subways. Think old ladies shopping, or high school kids going to school. There are some crosstown routes in Manhattan, but they aren’t as used much. There are also express routes from the outer boroughs into Manhattan that are significantly more expensive than regular bus and subway fares, but they’re actually comfortable, clean and you can almost always get a seat. Personally on the occasions when business has made it necessary to go into Manhattan I find a parking lot on line near my destination and park and walk. It isn’t cheap, but you can find on line bookings that make it less expensive.

    What I hear for Wall Street and white shoe law firm people; they now now a lot of their office help was not very productive. Many of those jobs are not coming back. There have been and will be job cuts. Much of their work can be done over phones and bandwidth. Nobody wants to pay NYC rents nor taxes. And this is KILLING NY restaurants and bars. And the 2 idiots running this horror show have no clue about this economic disaster. If you cannot got an event at Madison Square Garden or Radio City (or Yankee or Shea Stadium), or take in a Broadway show, or go to a really good midtown restaurant, there isn’t much point to being in Manhattan.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Bugg


    they now now a lot of their office help was not very productive.
     
    Even outside Wall Street and law firms there are an enormous number of white and grey collar jobs that are nothing more than $100k/year paper pushing exercises.

    I'm surprised that there haven't been more layoffs among those workers.


    And the 2 idiots running this horror show have no clue about this economic disaster.
     
    They really seem to labor under the delusion economies can be turned on and off like a lamp.
    , @TomSchmidt
    @Bugg


    And the 2 idiots running this horror show have no clue about this economic disaster. If you cannot got an event at Madison Square Garden or Radio City (or Yankee or Shea Stadium), or take in a Broadway show, or go to a really good midtown restaurant, there isn’t much point to being in Manhattan.
     
    Yes! This seems obvious. Why do they insist on killing NYC?
  55. Anonymous[285] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Actually on the NYC subway, every train has both a driver and a conductor. They are both locked inside their little booths. The conductor is somewhere in the middle of the train. The job of the conductor is to operate the doors of the train. In most other places the driver does both but in NY the transit union won't let them get rid of the conductors.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    In most other places the driver does both but in NY the transit union won’t let them get rid of the conductors.

    Theoretically, nyc subways really do need a conductor, for safety’s sake. I’d typically ride in the conductors car for late night rides when I was alone. If attacked, I could pound on the conductors door, he could stop the train, thus trapping my assailants. Hoodrats knew that, and wouldn’t mess with me.

    Then there’s other reasons having a conductor is a good idea, but they aren’t always vigilant.

  56. @hhsiii
    I’ve been taking the subway again, and bus. Not every day. The bus for when you have time. Older people like it. Or for going across town. Or say you are at 60th and 2nd and want to go to 75th and 3rd. Walk a block to a bus that takes you right there rather than 2 blocks to take a train that leaves you at 77th and Lexington, 3 blocks away.

    My wife is going into the office 2-3 days a week now. She had an empty car the other day. Spic and span. Me I take short hops just to load up at Fairway, a supermarket. Cars half full. With a guy scratching his bare feet, with a bloody ear humming Streets of Laredo.

    People will ride again when offices open back up. Which has to wait for full time school. My boys will be going 2-3 days a week, my daughter 1-2. But they keep pushing it back. I imagine cases may force reclosing. Already a slight uptick.

    I think I probably caught it on the subway in March. No big deal for me fortunately. This has gotten ridiculous. They wanted to flatten the curve to avoid overwhelming hospitals. Now they seem to want no cases at all.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    you are at 60th and 2nd and want to go to 75th and 3rd

    I’m surprised you can’t walk this, as it’s less than a mile. Going across town, I prefer to walk under a mile, like from Port Authority to Rockefeller Center.

  57. Steve,

    Access-A-Ride is basically a scheduled pick-up service for old and/or disabled people so they can get to their doctor. It’s basically used for inelastic needs (i.e. medical care).

    -Doc in NYC

  58. @George
    Bridges and Tunnels

    The measure is probably vehicles not people. NYC has surprisingly poor logistics. There is little freight railroad left and the main port is Elizabeth NJ. So most everything is trucked into the core. I am guessing parking is easier and there is less traffic so there may be more use of personal cars.

    Also surprising is the lack of logistics into Long Island Nassau and Suffolk have about 3 million people but as far as I know mostly ships stuff in through NYC

    Replies: @Bugg, @Redman, @Anon

    There is a train connection to the LIRR that starts right at water’s edge in Brooklyn. The plan was for a cross harbor rail tunnel connecting Long Island and New Jersey. It goes back to the 1930s. Every few years, it gets proposed again but never happens. Would be a huge project, bigger than the tunnel upgrade and expansion of the 34th Street/New Jersey Hudson commuter rail tunnel. On the Brooklyn side it still is a barely active freight line that takes freight cars by barge from NJ and runs them to Long Island. But that’s very limited and expensive. It was a commuter branch of the LIRR but that’s long discontinued as unprofitable.

    So everything that comes into New York City and Long Island has to be trucked through the City. Or routed by train through Amtrak lines down from Albany; again, expensive and not very efficient.

  59. @NJ Transit Commuter
    As my pseudonym implies, this is a subject where my expertise can provide some insight. The subway and rail lines are primarily for commuters to get to and from jobs in Manhattan. So that implies a big reduction in middle class and upper middle class workers commuting to office jobs in Manhattan.

    Buses will be more for short distances and getting to working class jobs in the outer boroughs. Working class folks have less opportunity to work remotely.

    Tunnel and bridge traffic is very rare for commuters. Service jobs and truck transport mostly, I would guess.

    What all this implies is a big drop in white collar commuters working in Manhattan. This is a big loss in tax revenue for New York. New York doesn’t have tax treaties with NJ and CT specifically to take capture tax revenue from out of state commuters. There would also be a corresponding loss of revenue in the services provided to those white collar workers.

    Replies: @Charon, @Known Fact, @TomSchmidt, @Muggles, @Anon

    My wife’s company gets a tax break for the number of workers employed in NYC, even if they are all working from home in the suburbs. So those workers continue to be taxed as if working in Manhattan: the company benefits by saving a few nickels at the expense of dollars in employee income taxes.

  60. Ha, I can walk it and do. However, the wife often wants me home quickly after I have lingered over a pint too long, and I need to get dinner provisions and cook dinner. I do most of the dinner cooking.

    So I will walk over to 3rd. If a bus is in sight I take the bus if I’m running late. If not I walk. It only saves a couple of minutes probably.

    The City is good for walking. Last weekend we took the 3 kids and walked to the Conservatory Garden, along the Harlem Meer and back. Maybe 4-5 miles. My wife knows where a couple of quince bushes are and picked enough to make a compote.

  61. @Dumbo
    I wonder if it's more fear of the Covid Kung Flu, or fear of BLM riotin' blacks.

    Wasn't just recently that there was an attempt by a black dude to rape a woman (of indeterminate race) in a NY subway station in view of all?

    Replies: @sayless, @Buck Ransom

    That rape attempt was in the middle of the day, on the platform at Lexington Avenue and 59th or 66th Street, on the East Side. One of the safest stops in the city. What shocked me was that someone stood there filming it instead of going over to help.

    Fare beating is ignored now. Lots of homeless on the trains and some of the people are violent. When the doors close you’re trapped because the doors between the cars are locked. Riding the subway is riskier than it was a year ago. The buses are safer.

    A couple of years ago an Access-A-Ride employee was fired for chronic tardiness, she worked at their call center. She was disabled, used Access-A-Ride to get to work, it kept making her late.

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @sayless

    "Fired for chronic tardiness"? More like chronic tardiness is built into Access-a-Ride's very being.

    Amazingly, Access-a-Ride considers any pickup as long as 30 minutes after the scheduled pickup time to be "on time." (Thus a scheduled pickup for 9:30 isn't "late" if the van arrives right before 10:00.)

    So if you have a 10:00 a.m. doctor's appointment, and it's a 30-minute ride from your building to the M.D.'s office, you have to ask for a 9:00 pickup to have a decent chance of your ride arriving by 9:30. If you want to be safe, ask Access-a-Ride to show up at 8:45. (If you show up at a New York City doctor's office 30 minutes late without having called ahead to say you'll be delayed, your appointment will be cancelled and you'll be rescheduled for some other day. If you're lucky.)

    If you want to get to a doctor's appointment quickly and without hassle, take a city bus or, if you have the means, a cab. Don't take Access-a-Ride unless you want to add hypertension to your medical woes.

    , @West reanimator
    @sayless


    Fare beating is ignored now. Lots of homeless on the trains and some of the people are violent. When the doors close you’re trapped because the doors between the cars are locked. Riding the subway is riskier than it was a year ago. The buses are safer.
     
    Fare enforcement has been out since Deblasio took office, NYPD has been forbidden from arresting anyone for jumping the turnstile because of course the fare beaters were exactly who you'd expect they were, and therefore fare enforcement be raciss. There was an audit of NYCT two years ago that showed an estimated half million fares were lost on the subway every day. You might not have noticed them much when the trains were full of regular commuters, but this year, with all the office workers at home, the dirtbag naggers are frequently the majority of riders on the train.
  62. @Achmed E. Newman
    It's not just NY City. The number of people going through TSA checkpoints is a good measure of airline travel levels. One can see here that passenger counts are still 65 to 75% lower than year-ago numbers.

    One can chalk up some of this change to American's changing of their ways of doing things, using Zoom, etc. That's not the whole explanation though. We can wait until the US Gov't GDP number come out, for what that's good for, but we don't really need that to know that the economy has not just sprung right back.

    It's almost as if businesses can't operate very well after having been forced to shut down on various whims by various government officials and not knowing if there may be further shutdowns at unpredictable times due to somebody somewhere not liking the new case counts.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Anonymous, @epebble

    Given that, in all likelihood, right now about 5% of Americans are infected and may be contagious, flying on commercial airlines sounds like an absolutely dumbest thing to do if one wants to avoid being infected.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anonymous

    True, if you are 75 years old and/or have a major medical condition, yeah.. Otherwise, why are you worried about getting infected? There's a good chance you'll never even know you've been. Then again, during flu season at that age you may catch a strain of influenza that will kill you in the hospital bed later. That means every winter, some worse than others. So, don't go anywhere in the winter time.

    Then there's the TSA guy or girl who might give you come surface-born disease while feeling you up for what looks like a large Scripto marker on the scanner ...

    I guess you could live the rest of your life in quarantine. The chance of suicide goes up, and my wife is always talking about the people who live alone who may not be found till 3 days after they die. Personally, I don't see what the problem with that last thing is, unless you are worried about being posthumously arrested once Serve-Pro comes in and finds your stash...

    , @AnotherDad
    @Anonymous


    Given that, in all likelihood, right now about 5% of Americans are infected and may be contagious, flying on commercial airlines sounds like an absolutely dumbest thing to do if one wants to avoid being infected.
     
    Sure, there's some increased chance of infection.

    If you are elderly and/or have one of these comorbidities that seem to get folks whacked or if you're one of these folks who freaks over wearing a mask--excuse me "face diaper"--then skip it.

    But for normal folks ... it's great time to travel!

    -- Airports, TSA lines less congested, faster, more pleasant.
    -- Planes are way less crowded. Some major airlines are blocking out middle seats.
    -- Less congestion--almost all flights are on-time.
    -- Fares are lower. (In a couple weeks, AnotherMom and i'm flying across the country for $21.98 each. Ok, it's Frontier and everything else costs ... but 2500 miles for < a penny a mile?)
    -- Accomodations are available and somewhat cheaper. (Note: one negative is a lot of the "free breakfast" bars have closed up--which sucks.)

    I will note that a lot of people sick of the Democrats' lockdown b.s. have been out and about in the great outdoors. A close friend of mine hit the Utah red rock parks a couple weeks back, said everyplace was packed. But i'd guess that eases up with the end of summer and getting out there this fall will be nice if not uncrowded.

    I'll admit there's some increased risk to getting on the plane--but it's small for normal travelers. Probably is not the best time to try and chat up that cute stranger in your row and try join the mile high club. (At least don't do it face-to-face.)
  63. NYC buses cater to the working classes, often in outer borough areas away from the subway lines, and folks too feeble to climb up and down the subway stairs.

    Access-A-Ride is basically a publicly subsidized taxi service for the profoundly crippled.

    It makes sense in this day and age that there is more elasticity in ride demand among work-from-anywhere white collar professionals, and less among the work-in-person classes and the poor people who need private cars but can’t afford them.

    N.B. So glad I left NYC mere weeks after Mayor Idiot took office!

    • Replies: @Supply and Demand
    @Ben Kurtz

    ‘Mayor Idiot’ being Giuliani, right?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Ben Kurtz

  64. @George
    Bridges and Tunnels

    The measure is probably vehicles not people. NYC has surprisingly poor logistics. There is little freight railroad left and the main port is Elizabeth NJ. So most everything is trucked into the core. I am guessing parking is easier and there is less traffic so there may be more use of personal cars.

    Also surprising is the lack of logistics into Long Island Nassau and Suffolk have about 3 million people but as far as I know mostly ships stuff in through NYC

    Replies: @Bugg, @Redman, @Anon

    Last weekend I drove into the City from Westchester for the first time since Covid. Couldn’t find a single spot on the UWS for the first time in my life. Had to put the car in a garage for a 2-hour excursion.

    Not exactly sure what the reason is for that. But I was expecting there to be more not less free parking.

    • Replies: @hhsiii
    @Redman

    It’s harder to park during the day. Day trippers take up spots. Easier at night. They eliminated one street sweeping day a week and while it’s tougher now in September, way easier than pre Covid September-June usually.

    , @kaganovitch
    @Redman

    Not exactly sure what the reason is for that. But I was expecting there to be more not less free parking.


    50-60% of spots have been taken by outdoor dining tables of restaurants that aren't allowed indoor dining. Where sidewalks don't allow for outdoor dining setup (too narrow), the city moves them into the parking lane.

  65. Anon[142] • Disclaimer says:
    @George
    Bridges and Tunnels

    The measure is probably vehicles not people. NYC has surprisingly poor logistics. There is little freight railroad left and the main port is Elizabeth NJ. So most everything is trucked into the core. I am guessing parking is easier and there is less traffic so there may be more use of personal cars.

    Also surprising is the lack of logistics into Long Island Nassau and Suffolk have about 3 million people but as far as I know mostly ships stuff in through NYC

    Replies: @Bugg, @Redman, @Anon

    Long Island Nassau and Suffolk have about 3 million people but as far as I know mostly ships stuff in through NYC

    Correct. All our ports are for fishermen or recreational boats, all our bridges are within NYC, and our 2 ferries (not counting those to even smaller islands) carry cars, pedestrians and motorcycles to Connecticut.

    We do have an airport! It’s for people, though.

    If you’re going to the city, it’s by car or train. If you’re leaving the area, it’s by car or plane.

  66. Do people think buses are safer than subways? Why?

    Maybe people are scared of being trapped belowground with enraged or feral blacks.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Daniel Williams

    Buses have drivers. Drivers are forbidden to get out of their seats to deal with unruly passengers. It’s a Wcom issue.

    Passengers can easily go to the driver and complain. Many drivers are big aggressive blacks who can and do control the thugs verbally. Drivers always can call the police or their dispatcher and the police will get there quickly. Many city buses have the bus number on the roof so the police helicopters can find and follow it.

    Easy and best tactic after police are called is the driver just parks in the next bus stop or even in the middle of the street and opens the doors He she orders the thug out and announces the police are on the way and if you have warrants best leave. Also can tell passengers to get off and the next bus will be along in 10 minutes.

    When the bus driver stops the other passengers who want to get to work or whatever can jump in and harass the thug.

    Drivers with radios to police and bus headquarters, that’s why buses are safer. Plus very very fast police response.

    Try being a restaurant or convenience store clerk manager or passerby trying to get the police to respond to a fight or aggressive thug harassing people.

  67. “has New York City suffered a permanent major fall in the number of daily workers it will see?”

    In a word, yes. Cuomo’s order telling “nonessential” workers to stay home will wind up killing more than his order to accept COVID patients into nursing homes: it will wind up as the key cause of the death of NYC (or at least THIS NYC. I don’t know what the next one can or will be). He liked the fear and the power it gave him, but now that fear keeps employees away from Manhattan. My wife’s company will not bring employees back to Manhattan before JULY.

    Repeated at company after company, that means most of the 3 million people who commute into the city won’t return. That kills the small businesses that sell lunches to these people and provide services. They cannot pay rent and income taxes drop, and eventually property values drop, driving down property taxes. Decreased property and commuter taxes undercut the MTA budget, which either has to raise fares to levels even whites blanch at, or cut services (but the latter winds up driving ridership decreases so severe that there is little effective savings from them), so that soon the city will be UNABLE to successfully move 3MM people into the core every day to work in offices, whether people want to return or not.

    And why return? Over 50% of restaurants are likely to close, including old favorites of mine like Gotham Bar and Grill. (One wag once commented that Manhattan was the ideal location for offices because it supplied that drug most essential to high business executives: lunch.) broadway is shut, and the complex, entangled arts infrastructure, of people struggling to make 40K in a city where that won’t pay for a studio just so they can train the next generation while trying for and waiting for their shot: that’s dying, too, due to Cuomo.

    The Metropolitan Opera is also desperate. This is important since it’s one of the last cultural organizations that is not under the paw of the Feds, Like the DC shows beloved of Scalia and Ginsburg (did she leave them anything? My guess is no), and It has an endowment of millions. If they cannot run operas, they lose half their annual income. I told them when asked: run the damn shows, and I’ll come and wear a mask, but save the city and its arts scene.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @TomSchmidt

    Gotham closed mostly for other reasons. It never recovered after Portale left. The new chef changed the menu enough to alienate the old guard (who were in process of retiring to Florida anyway) without changing it enough to bring in a new crowd.

    I can't imagine that Ginsburg had all that much to leave. She was always in government service and academia and never made any serious $. Marty was a very successful tax lawyer but he retired to academia early as well.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    , @usNthem
    @TomSchmidt

    The economy in general has been pretty much irretrievably wrecked in so many different ways. None and I mean none of these f-ing politicians and their GD sycophants or advisors gave any serious consideration to the long term ramifications of these insane policies/diktats. It’s obvious by now that this covitard virus is no where near the mega killer it was touted as being. However, the damage has been done to millions of livelihoods and the psyches of millions more. We’re never getting back to December 2019.

    Replies: @Alden, @TomSchmidt

    , @RadicalCenter
    @TomSchmidt

    We tell the LA and Pasadena Symphonies that we will not return until they offer normal in-person concerts without any absurd mask and distancing requirements. They are blindly submitting to these measures and intensifying the hysteria and fear with the fervor of a religion, so we have no sympathy when they say they are just complying with “the law.” If they were actively opposing the lockdown and the bizarre face-diapering and the rest, we would feel differently.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @Je Suis Omar Mateen

  68. I don’t have the numbers for Philly but as a data point, when I pass the parking lot at my local commuter rail station nowadays on weekdays, it is virtually empty. In the past the lot was full to capacity every morning.

    I think the ‘rona is a double edged sword for mass transit – not only are people afraid to go on the train (or are still working remotely so they don’t need to) but it has also reduced traffic so that driving is easier. Unlike NY where driving to work is virtually out of the question in most cases (or smaller cities where EVERYONE drives unless they are too poor to afford a car), in Philly driving vs taking the train was sort of a closely balanced proposition for commuters – depending on your personal preferences and location you might do one or the other. But the ‘rona has tipped the scales toward driving being more convenient/less risky.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    It’s not just the overhyped flu but also the realization since June that if you find yourself the victim of crime don’t expect the police to be much more than onlookers. And public transportation systems, particularly stations, are a favorite target-rich environment for feral yuts to find prey.

  69. @Altai
    Rents are still probably too damn high but maybe a temporary receding of gentrification.

    On the topic a new film came out sympathetically chronically the loss of place and community from ethnic and sociological displacement among the black working and underclass who had little else but their communities and social capital. (Arguably more important than actual capital) Nobody seems to have actual seen it and everything I've seen from the trailers and NYT review makes it seem like it's infested with film school cliches.

    But it once again brings to mind the lack of any regards for the same process happening to say working class English cockneys in London. The BBC tends to pretend the movement away is due to 'upward mobility' but the people moving tell a different story and the idea that 'upward mobility' involves leaving London is the most asinine thing I've ever heard. America's opinion making class seem mostly to be people who moved away from their home, perhaps by vast distances and never returned. The tyranny of the 'Anywheres' against the 'Somewheres'.

    I only noticed the review because the account that tracks edits to the NYTs had one where the name of the director was wrong and changed. Interesting it got a review despite literally nobody seeing the film and there being little buzz.

    https://twitter.com/nyt_diff/status/1307554740235112448

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMSP2UwCkYY

    Community displacement and losing your home community is bad and sad. But you're only supposed to notice when whites are the ones doing the displacing. Other groups don't displace, somehow.

    Replies: @ia

    Blacks drove out the majority working class whites from Prince George’s County which borders DC. Nobody knows and the blacks certainly don’t care. So why are whites supposed to care about them? That’s not a rhetorical question. Constantly playing virtue-signaling games and wringing one’s hands over a group who means you harm is beyond stupid.

    • Agree: Alden, RadicalCenter
  70. @Ben Kurtz
    NYC buses cater to the working classes, often in outer borough areas away from the subway lines, and folks too feeble to climb up and down the subway stairs.

    Access-A-Ride is basically a publicly subsidized taxi service for the profoundly crippled.

    It makes sense in this day and age that there is more elasticity in ride demand among work-from-anywhere white collar professionals, and less among the work-in-person classes and the poor people who need private cars but can't afford them.

    N.B. So glad I left NYC mere weeks after Mayor Idiot took office!

    Replies: @Supply and Demand

    ‘Mayor Idiot’ being Giuliani, right?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Supply and Demand


    Mayor Idiot’ being Giuliani, right?
     
    Only a major idiot would even joke about Mayor Giuliani's achievements after he was elected, all while psycho-rags like the Village Voice and the NYT harassed and harangued him every week, repeatedly referring to him as a nazi for moving to close down the porn theaters in Times Square, and a mob supporter gone rogue for getting the mob out of Jacob Javits Center. They kept trying to link his long deceased father to the mob. They never could get that narrative going.

    Before Giuliani, we had a new, state of the art Convention Center that had many dark (empty) days where it made no money, because exhibitors wouldn’t deal with the mob shakedowns. After Giuliani blew them out, the place was stuffed exhibitors every single day of the year. As it should have been.

    Giuliani was smart, had balls, was clean as a whistle, and changed the downward spiral of New York City until they voted in another Democrat. Bloomberg had enough brains to ride Giuliani's success wave, and bailed as it was petering.

    De Blasio and his cross-eyed retard wife have achieved what seemed impossible: They've made the quality of New York City worse than during the psycho Koch administration, and the current inhabitants don’t even possess the minimal moral rectitude, or even common sense to organize for his recall.

    Notice a pattern, old sport?

    Replies: @Supply and Demand

    , @Ben Kurtz
    @Supply and Demand

    Ha ha ha.

  71. @TomSchmidt
    "has New York City suffered a permanent major fall in the number of daily workers it will see?"

    In a word, yes. Cuomo's order telling "nonessential" workers to stay home will wind up killing more than his order to accept COVID patients into nursing homes: it will wind up as the key cause of the death of NYC (or at least THIS NYC. I don't know what the next one can or will be). He liked the fear and the power it gave him, but now that fear keeps employees away from Manhattan. My wife's company will not bring employees back to Manhattan before JULY.

    Repeated at company after company, that means most of the 3 million people who commute into the city won't return. That kills the small businesses that sell lunches to these people and provide services. They cannot pay rent and income taxes drop, and eventually property values drop, driving down property taxes. Decreased property and commuter taxes undercut the MTA budget, which either has to raise fares to levels even whites blanch at, or cut services (but the latter winds up driving ridership decreases so severe that there is little effective savings from them), so that soon the city will be UNABLE to successfully move 3MM people into the core every day to work in offices, whether people want to return or not.

    And why return? Over 50% of restaurants are likely to close, including old favorites of mine like Gotham Bar and Grill. (One wag once commented that Manhattan was the ideal location for offices because it supplied that drug most essential to high business executives: lunch.) broadway is shut, and the complex, entangled arts infrastructure, of people struggling to make 40K in a city where that won't pay for a studio just so they can train the next generation while trying for and waiting for their shot: that's dying, too, due to Cuomo.

    The Metropolitan Opera is also desperate. This is important since it's one of the last cultural organizations that is not under the paw of the Feds, Like the DC shows beloved of Scalia and Ginsburg (did she leave them anything? My guess is no), and It has an endowment of millions. If they cannot run operas, they lose half their annual income. I told them when asked: run the damn shows, and I'll come and wear a mask, but save the city and its arts scene.

    Replies: @Jack D, @usNthem, @RadicalCenter

    Gotham closed mostly for other reasons. It never recovered after Portale left. The new chef changed the menu enough to alienate the old guard (who were in process of retiring to Florida anyway) without changing it enough to bring in a new crowd.

    I can’t imagine that Ginsburg had all that much to leave. She was always in government service and academia and never made any serious $. Marty was a very successful tax lawyer but he retired to academia early as well.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Jack D

    Ah, I hadn't followed the actual reason for the closing. Just noted it as one small death in a maelstrom of dying. I can think of all the fine times I had there, now no more.

    You might not be familiar with the "Hetty Green" type of academic who saves 50% of income. I've known a few, including a woman In New Orleans who drove around her unairconditjoned obsolete car from her New England university, for years. They wind up miserly squirreling away small fortunes, and you'll see these stories from time to time of "Professor leaves millions to Podunk U."

    Ginsburg turned 21 in 1954, which is also the year that the Dow finally returned to the level it had first hit in 1929. (with reinvested dividends, you were whole sooner.) she was part of a generation that will wind up paying no net taxes to the Federal Government, because their SS payments were low when young, and Ginsburg never paid a dime in Medicare taxes before she was 32. Even 5% of income invested in stocks since 1954 would leave her loaded, even if she WERE paid only 75% of what a man got.

  72. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, a budding crop of appalled folk singers are sharing new BLM protest songs!

    https://youtu.be/LcPlk5xf3CI

    Replies: @wren, @Courtesy Flush, @SINCERITY.net, @Dumbo, @tyrone, @Whiskey, @Neoconned, @anon, @Kibernetika, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz

    Proof of any more needed White women are the permanent and natural enemy of White men. And that men with daughters are natural cucks. The cucks of the cucks

    We really need White sharia. Islam is right about women.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Whiskey

    The man wrote the song and is equally involved with the woman.

    Proof White men, like the White men Supreme Court justices who decided Brown vs Topeka and ordered us to spend billions on school bussing, destroyer our great cities and subjected tens of millions of White children to 13 years of abuse by the black savages. It was White men Supreme Court judges who imposed affirmative action with their anti White men rulings in Griggs and Kaiser.

    Eisenhower a White man sent the army to herd Whites into black schools with bayonets. Kennedy ordered affirmative action for federal jobs in March 1961.
    LBJ along with 435 90 percent White man congress critters and 10o White man senators passed the anti White 1964 civil rights act , 1965 immigration act and worst of all for Whites 1968 affirmative action act

    Nixon, a White man created the affirmative action beneficiary Hispanic race. Carter a White man gleefully continued the Johnson Nixon affirmative action crusade against Whites. Regean did nothing against affirmative action and ordered amnesty for illegal non Whites.

    It’s White men who passed every anti White law, issued every anti White court finding and ruling

    You know it I know it everyone knows it.

    , @JMcG
    @Whiskey

    I agree with you more often than many around here, but where do you get the idea that white men with daughters are cucks? In my experience, and I have a great deal, the opposite is true.

  73. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, a budding crop of appalled folk singers are sharing new BLM protest songs!

    https://youtu.be/LcPlk5xf3CI

    Replies: @wren, @Courtesy Flush, @SINCERITY.net, @Dumbo, @tyrone, @Whiskey, @Neoconned, @anon, @Kibernetika, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz

    LOL

    F–kin white people….they so crazy….

  74. @TomSchmidt
    "has New York City suffered a permanent major fall in the number of daily workers it will see?"

    In a word, yes. Cuomo's order telling "nonessential" workers to stay home will wind up killing more than his order to accept COVID patients into nursing homes: it will wind up as the key cause of the death of NYC (or at least THIS NYC. I don't know what the next one can or will be). He liked the fear and the power it gave him, but now that fear keeps employees away from Manhattan. My wife's company will not bring employees back to Manhattan before JULY.

    Repeated at company after company, that means most of the 3 million people who commute into the city won't return. That kills the small businesses that sell lunches to these people and provide services. They cannot pay rent and income taxes drop, and eventually property values drop, driving down property taxes. Decreased property and commuter taxes undercut the MTA budget, which either has to raise fares to levels even whites blanch at, or cut services (but the latter winds up driving ridership decreases so severe that there is little effective savings from them), so that soon the city will be UNABLE to successfully move 3MM people into the core every day to work in offices, whether people want to return or not.

    And why return? Over 50% of restaurants are likely to close, including old favorites of mine like Gotham Bar and Grill. (One wag once commented that Manhattan was the ideal location for offices because it supplied that drug most essential to high business executives: lunch.) broadway is shut, and the complex, entangled arts infrastructure, of people struggling to make 40K in a city where that won't pay for a studio just so they can train the next generation while trying for and waiting for their shot: that's dying, too, due to Cuomo.

    The Metropolitan Opera is also desperate. This is important since it's one of the last cultural organizations that is not under the paw of the Feds, Like the DC shows beloved of Scalia and Ginsburg (did she leave them anything? My guess is no), and It has an endowment of millions. If they cannot run operas, they lose half their annual income. I told them when asked: run the damn shows, and I'll come and wear a mask, but save the city and its arts scene.

    Replies: @Jack D, @usNthem, @RadicalCenter

    The economy in general has been pretty much irretrievably wrecked in so many different ways. None and I mean none of these f-ing politicians and their GD sycophants or advisors gave any serious consideration to the long term ramifications of these insane policies/diktats. It’s obvious by now that this covitard virus is no where near the mega killer it was touted as being. However, the damage has been done to millions of livelihoods and the psyches of millions more. We’re never getting back to December 2019.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @usNthem

    Last I looked only 9,500 died of covid alone, average age 78. The rest of the deaths were average age 78 with cancer COPD cardiovascular, and other deadly diseases.

    Every 2 years or so TPTB come up with a new hysterical panic. But people are becoming more and more cynical about these contrived panics.

    I can still remember The Coming Ice Age magazine covers 1978-1984, not so long ago. Then it changed to global warming. People 40 and older are bombarded with it from kindergarten on. But they can’t help but notice that the weather hasn’t changed in their lifetimes.

    Anorexia propaganda just when people were getting chubbier. Autism, suddenly every badly behaved kid has autism. It’s all lies, manufactured panic. Transgender children. When will it end? Never.

    , @TomSchmidt
    @usNthem

    Yes, in March I thought NYCwould take years to get back to January. Now i know that January will never return.

    I would like the chance to view Wagner at the Met again. I don't know when I will get it, since the schedule for three seasons now has had performances of his work exactly when I could not go, Covid the last two seasons.

    I'd love to see Cuomo DARE to run in 2022. He is getting support now because he can blame Trump. By 2022 the damage will be too obvious for anyone to ignore. He will be lucky to slink away and dump the mess in someone else's lap.

  75. @J.Ross
    AAR
    less than one blink of a gnat's eye on duckduckgo
    it's meeting people more than halfway because they're disabled
    like the short SMART bus in Detroit

    1. How it Works
    Access-A-Ride (AAR) Paratransit Service provides public transportation for eligible customers with disabilities or health conditions that prevent them from using the public buses and subways for some or all of their trips. AAR operates 24/7/365.

    Services are available within NYC’s five boroughs (Brooklyn, the Bronx, Manhattan, Staten Island, and Queens) and within an area three quarters of a mile beyond fixed-route service across the NYC border to nearby parts of Nassau and Westchester counties
    Fares are the same as full fare on public transit.
    AAR operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.
    You may ride with other customers in a shared-ride program.
    Origin-to-destination service or feeder service is available for eligible customers.
    AAR offers non-priority trips with maximum ride times based on trip distance.
    AAR complies with federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) regulations.
    AAR provides interpretation and document translation services if your preferred language isn’t English. These free services are available during the application, eligibility, and scheduling processes.
    https://access.nyc.gov/programs/access-a-ride/

    Replies: @jb, @Lot, @anon

    In the social media biz that’s called pumping-up engagement. Intentionally leaving out some tidbit of information (and saying “I don’t know”) prompts helpful commenters like yourself to contribute (an end in itself) and also gives some readers a dopamine shot (“yay, I know more than the host”).

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @anon

    What's the social media biz?

  76. @Anonymous
    Intellectual collapse in the party leadership leads straight to real economic collapse in the party controlled jurisdictions.

    As if we needed more... here is more evidence of Dem intellectual collapse:

    Jeffrey Toobin @JeffreyToobin Dems aren't powerless. They can: 1. Abolish filibuster. 2. Statehood for DC, PR. 3. Increase # of federal judges. 4. Add 3 Justices to #SCOTUS. My @NewYorker column

    TOOBIN IS A TOP DEM LEGAL GUY AND HE IS GOING FULL HARRY REID.

    Read the Toobin twitter comments. Many dems recognize the folly here. They're seeing the intellectual spiral. How can the Harry Reid Fan Club be gaining members at this late date?

    Unreal. It's all a dream for Trump.

    Replies: @guest007, @Neoconned, @Mr. Anon

    “Intellectual collapse in the party leadership leads straight to real economic collapse in the party controlled jurisdictions.”

    Sounds almost like the rapid decline of the Ottomans in the 1700s to 1900s after the white slave trade they used to fill their functionary ranks, collapsed….

    “Toobin @JeffreyToobin Dems aren’t powerless. They can: 1. Abolish filibuster. 2. Statehood for DC, PR. 3. Increase # of federal judges. 4. Add 3 Justices to #SCOTUS. My @NewYorker column

    TOOBIN IS A TOP DEM LEGAL GUY AND HE IS GOING FULL HARRY REID.

    Read the Toobin twitter comments. Many dems recognize the folly here. They’re seeing the intellectual spiral. How can the Harry Reid Fan Club be gaining members at this late date?”

    He’d better be careful. American 2 party politics has always worked as a duopoly kept in line via a MAD like Cold War guarantee the whole system would collapse.

    Toobins nuts. This could go sideways. If the GOP sees the Dems doing procedural things like adding in states lile PR they will get equally desperate….and talk of military intervention will commence

    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
    @Neoconned

    Or perhaps in answer to these little postage stamp new states some democrats are lusting after, they begin a fight back by carving new states out of democrat-dominated current states. Think eastern Washington or Oregon, northern California, western regions of Virginia chafing under the demographic domination of the fedgov drones and trough feeders on the fedgov in the eastern regions. They could get back to par with new senate seats from such seceding regions fairly quickly, and create momentum toward a usefully contiguous red zone. If a breakup were ultimately needed, that would be a real leg up.

  77. “New York City has not had very many coronavirus cases since getting blasted in the spring.”

    You mean when Cuomo ordered all the sick old people into the nursing homes, basically creating that massive death toll?

    I suppose I could have the fox bed down in the coop with the chickens and then wonder why all my hens are dead in the morning.

  78. @Achmed E. Newman
    It's not just NY City. The number of people going through TSA checkpoints is a good measure of airline travel levels. One can see here that passenger counts are still 65 to 75% lower than year-ago numbers.

    One can chalk up some of this change to American's changing of their ways of doing things, using Zoom, etc. That's not the whole explanation though. We can wait until the US Gov't GDP number come out, for what that's good for, but we don't really need that to know that the economy has not just sprung right back.

    It's almost as if businesses can't operate very well after having been forced to shut down on various whims by various government officials and not knowing if there may be further shutdowns at unpredictable times due to somebody somewhere not liking the new case counts.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Anonymous, @epebble

    https://www.calculatedriskblog.com/ gives High Frequency Indicators for the Economy every Monday morning. The data have been extremely stable since march drop-off showing only very gradual improvement (nationally).

    For example:

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @anon
    @epebble

    Another graph for the nerds:

    The fall surge is here

    https://ci3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/NcjycNd_VdBxTepPGHAamg4XRzv91W3F7DCCFRbsh30Tdym9nweDB4oF6r7gsqvcCoQWnbZOsf55xFFzEhMNLFN3Dm-_KX_m2dzS0qlrzzlf9NLc5I5Rt4wkVbHg4SSA1MaAxuc0aCDBV5eWtCpb4NhtH1aAtoqOTiiUeM0VQfF2a2s=s0-d-e1-ft#https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/09/22/multimedia/22-MORNING-FALLSURGE/22-MORNING-FALLSURGE-articleLarge.png

  79. anon[429] • Disclaimer says:
    @wren
    Will they come back after, say, a vaccine?

    Will they come back after, say, a new mayor?

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @tyrone, @anon

    Will they come back after, say, a vaccine?

    People are getting the message that the vaccine talk is political theater to reassure people. None other than the CDC Director made it clear enough to a dumb doorknob.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/video/2020/sep/16/face-masks-coronavirus-cdc-robert-redfield

    There are no vaccines or antiviral drugs to prevent or treat human coronavirus infections.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coronavirus#Prevention_and_treatment

    • Replies: @anon
    @anon

    Majority of Americans report no confidence in Trump to confirm vaccine safety, effectiveness: POLL

    https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/majority-americans-report-confidence-trump-confirm-vaccine-safety/story?id=73121980

  80. @NJ Transit Commuter
    As my pseudonym implies, this is a subject where my expertise can provide some insight. The subway and rail lines are primarily for commuters to get to and from jobs in Manhattan. So that implies a big reduction in middle class and upper middle class workers commuting to office jobs in Manhattan.

    Buses will be more for short distances and getting to working class jobs in the outer boroughs. Working class folks have less opportunity to work remotely.

    Tunnel and bridge traffic is very rare for commuters. Service jobs and truck transport mostly, I would guess.

    What all this implies is a big drop in white collar commuters working in Manhattan. This is a big loss in tax revenue for New York. New York doesn’t have tax treaties with NJ and CT specifically to take capture tax revenue from out of state commuters. There would also be a corresponding loss of revenue in the services provided to those white collar workers.

    Replies: @Charon, @Known Fact, @TomSchmidt, @Muggles, @Anon

    This is a big loss in tax revenue for New York. New York doesn’t have tax treaties with NJ and CT specifically to take capture tax revenue from out of state commuters.

    As a retired CPA with some experience with NYC/NY income taxes, I think you misunderstand how multistate tax compacts work (as in MD, DC, VA).

    Per a Google snippet: a reciprocal state agreement meaning that residents who live in one tax jurisdiction and work in the other only file and pay taxes in the jurisdiction they live.

    So your logic is incorrect. States with tax compacts let you file your state return only in the state in which you reside. You get to claim a full credit from your state (resident state) taxes with the taxes withheld in the state where you are employed. You don’t have to file a state tax return in the state of employment to get your refund.

    NY/NYC collects income tax (based on a per day worked there rule) and you must apportion your taxable state income to each state. NY keeps it and it is somewhat complicated. You can claim a tax credit if you reside in a state with state income tax. Otherwise not. But now you are limited to how much state income tax you can deduct federally as an itemized deduction. Your local resident state tax may give you all or a partial credit for out of state income tax paid. NY/NYC keeps more taxes this way.

    NY/NYC method is very harsh. Even casual (one day or week) business trips to NY/NYC can trigger NY/NYC income taxes. You can’t get it back easily or at all. Of course NJ just passed a special “millionaires” income tax as well. *sigh*

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Muggles

    I live in NY and work sometimes in MA. NY grants a dollar-for-dollar credit for income taxès paid to MA, since MA taxes rates are lower than NY.

    My city also has an income, like NYC. Unlike NYC, my city's tax is a surcharge on my total state taxes due. Several years back, after my wife's job moved to NJ because her building was hit by a 757 and collapsed while the Federal Government had its thumb up its ass, we were both working in NJ and living in NY. All our NJ taxes offset NY states taxes, so the net number of dollars owed to NY was small, say 9000 of the 10,000 we owed went to NJ instead of NY. We then would pay a 10% surtax on the 1000 actually paid to NY, instead of the 10,000 we would normally owe less the 9000 credit for taxes paid NJ.

    It almost made being in NJ worthwhile.

    , @Anon
    @Muggles

    I'm unfortunately not in a position to be impacted by the millionaires tax. But spoke to my brother in law who is, and he doesn't work in NY. His accountant told him to move to PA (lesser tax) or DE (no tax) if it really bothered him.

    OT but I have read about the lengths high tax states like NY, CT, etc go to in order to justify that you should still be paying their tax, even if you have established what you are calling your primary residence in someplace like FL. "You've moved to FL, ok, why is your cell phone still your old area code? Where do you go to the doctor? Where does your DOG go the vet?

    Was in someone's house years ago and he kept a log in his office with the number of days that year he was in NY, the number of days he was in FL, and the number of days he was elsewhere. Apparently that doesn't suffice anymore.

  81. @slumber_j
    By the way, the subway is perfectly fine these days--vastly preferable to the Before-Time version. I recommend it highly.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    Are they still charging full fare?

    In Miami, all public transit has been free since March. This includes not only Metrorail and Metrobus in Dade County, but also Tri-Rail between Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach, and the Broward buses as well.

    The express buses use Greyhound-type vehicles and many of them are nearly empty. The other day I took a very nice ride from downtown Miami to the Sawgrass Mills area in Broward. There were four or five passengers on the bus, tops.

  82. @usNthem
    @TomSchmidt

    The economy in general has been pretty much irretrievably wrecked in so many different ways. None and I mean none of these f-ing politicians and their GD sycophants or advisors gave any serious consideration to the long term ramifications of these insane policies/diktats. It’s obvious by now that this covitard virus is no where near the mega killer it was touted as being. However, the damage has been done to millions of livelihoods and the psyches of millions more. We’re never getting back to December 2019.

    Replies: @Alden, @TomSchmidt

    Last I looked only 9,500 died of covid alone, average age 78. The rest of the deaths were average age 78 with cancer COPD cardiovascular, and other deadly diseases.

    Every 2 years or so TPTB come up with a new hysterical panic. But people are becoming more and more cynical about these contrived panics.

    I can still remember The Coming Ice Age magazine covers 1978-1984, not so long ago. Then it changed to global warming. People 40 and older are bombarded with it from kindergarten on. But they can’t help but notice that the weather hasn’t changed in their lifetimes.

    Anorexia propaganda just when people were getting chubbier. Autism, suddenly every badly behaved kid has autism. It’s all lies, manufactured panic. Transgender children. When will it end? Never.

  83. @anon
    @wren


    Will they come back after, say, a vaccine?

     

    People are getting the message that the vaccine talk is political theater to reassure people. None other than the CDC Director made it clear enough to a dumb doorknob.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/video/2020/sep/16/face-masks-coronavirus-cdc-robert-redfield

    There are no vaccines or antiviral drugs to prevent or treat human coronavirus infections.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coronavirus#Prevention_and_treatment

    Replies: @anon

    Majority of Americans report no confidence in Trump to confirm vaccine safety, effectiveness: POLL

    https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/majority-americans-report-confidence-trump-confirm-vaccine-safety/story?id=73121980

  84. @Whiskey
    @Anonymous

    Proof of any more needed White women are the permanent and natural enemy of White men. And that men with daughters are natural cucks. The cucks of the cucks

    We really need White sharia. Islam is right about women.

    Replies: @Alden, @JMcG

    The man wrote the song and is equally involved with the woman.

    Proof White men, like the White men Supreme Court justices who decided Brown vs Topeka and ordered us to spend billions on school bussing, destroyer our great cities and subjected tens of millions of White children to 13 years of abuse by the black savages. It was White men Supreme Court judges who imposed affirmative action with their anti White men rulings in Griggs and Kaiser.

    Eisenhower a White man sent the army to herd Whites into black schools with bayonets. Kennedy ordered affirmative action for federal jobs in March 1961.
    LBJ along with 435 90 percent White man congress critters and 10o White man senators passed the anti White 1964 civil rights act , 1965 immigration act and worst of all for Whites 1968 affirmative action act

    Nixon, a White man created the affirmative action beneficiary Hispanic race. Carter a White man gleefully continued the Johnson Nixon affirmative action crusade against Whites. Regean did nothing against affirmative action and ordered amnesty for illegal non Whites.

    It’s White men who passed every anti White law, issued every anti White court finding and ruling

    You know it I know it everyone knows it.

  85. Bus riders are a poorer clientele that has less alternate travel options than subway riders do.

    It’s not that buses are perceived as safer than subways. It’s that bus riders, unlike subway riders, aren’t wealthy enough to have cars that they can use during the virus.

  86. Anonymous[145] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    I don't have the numbers for Philly but as a data point, when I pass the parking lot at my local commuter rail station nowadays on weekdays, it is virtually empty. In the past the lot was full to capacity every morning.

    I think the 'rona is a double edged sword for mass transit - not only are people afraid to go on the train (or are still working remotely so they don't need to) but it has also reduced traffic so that driving is easier. Unlike NY where driving to work is virtually out of the question in most cases (or smaller cities where EVERYONE drives unless they are too poor to afford a car), in Philly driving vs taking the train was sort of a closely balanced proposition for commuters - depending on your personal preferences and location you might do one or the other. But the 'rona has tipped the scales toward driving being more convenient/less risky.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    It’s not just the overhyped flu but also the realization since June that if you find yourself the victim of crime don’t expect the police to be much more than onlookers. And public transportation systems, particularly stations, are a favorite target-rich environment for feral yuts to find prey.

  87. @Anonymous
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Given that, in all likelihood, right now about 5% of Americans are infected and may be contagious, flying on commercial airlines sounds like an absolutely dumbest thing to do if one wants to avoid being infected.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @AnotherDad

    True, if you are 75 years old and/or have a major medical condition, yeah.. Otherwise, why are you worried about getting infected? There’s a good chance you’ll never even know you’ve been. Then again, during flu season at that age you may catch a strain of influenza that will kill you in the hospital bed later. That means every winter, some worse than others. So, don’t go anywhere in the winter time.

    Then there’s the TSA guy or girl who might give you come surface-born disease while feeling you up for what looks like a large Scripto marker on the scanner …

    I guess you could live the rest of your life in quarantine. The chance of suicide goes up, and my wife is always talking about the people who live alone who may not be found till 3 days after they die. Personally, I don’t see what the problem with that last thing is, unless you are worried about being posthumously arrested once Serve-Pro comes in and finds your stash…

  88. Meanwhile, above ground, Times Square was AWESOME today!

    And should you or the NYPD not agree, ya’ll can, of course, go fuck yourself:

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    @Anonymous

    Where you have Africans, you have Africa

  89. @Jack D
    @TomSchmidt

    Gotham closed mostly for other reasons. It never recovered after Portale left. The new chef changed the menu enough to alienate the old guard (who were in process of retiring to Florida anyway) without changing it enough to bring in a new crowd.

    I can't imagine that Ginsburg had all that much to leave. She was always in government service and academia and never made any serious $. Marty was a very successful tax lawyer but he retired to academia early as well.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    Ah, I hadn’t followed the actual reason for the closing. Just noted it as one small death in a maelstrom of dying. I can think of all the fine times I had there, now no more.

    You might not be familiar with the “Hetty Green” type of academic who saves 50% of income. I’ve known a few, including a woman In New Orleans who drove around her unairconditjoned obsolete car from her New England university, for years. They wind up miserly squirreling away small fortunes, and you’ll see these stories from time to time of “Professor leaves millions to Podunk U.”

    Ginsburg turned 21 in 1954, which is also the year that the Dow finally returned to the level it had first hit in 1929. (with reinvested dividends, you were whole sooner.) she was part of a generation that will wind up paying no net taxes to the Federal Government, because their SS payments were low when young, and Ginsburg never paid a dime in Medicare taxes before she was 32. Even 5% of income invested in stocks since 1954 would leave her loaded, even if she WERE paid only 75% of what a man got.

  90. @Anonymous
    Intellectual collapse in the party leadership leads straight to real economic collapse in the party controlled jurisdictions.

    As if we needed more... here is more evidence of Dem intellectual collapse:

    Jeffrey Toobin @JeffreyToobin Dems aren't powerless. They can: 1. Abolish filibuster. 2. Statehood for DC, PR. 3. Increase # of federal judges. 4. Add 3 Justices to #SCOTUS. My @NewYorker column

    TOOBIN IS A TOP DEM LEGAL GUY AND HE IS GOING FULL HARRY REID.

    Read the Toobin twitter comments. Many dems recognize the folly here. They're seeing the intellectual spiral. How can the Harry Reid Fan Club be gaining members at this late date?

    Unreal. It's all a dream for Trump.

    Replies: @guest007, @Neoconned, @Mr. Anon

    The people who eventually decide elections, i.e.. swing voters, don’t pay attention to people like Jeffrey Toobin, or what they tweet. They pay attention to TV.

    This election will be decided by suburban women who are freaked-the-f**k-out over COVID. Trump could have appealed to these people more if we weren’t so…………..Trumpy. He should have governed more, and tweeted less.

    Biden Harris by a clear majority is my prediction. I hope I’m wrong. But I don’t think I will be.

  91. @usNthem
    @TomSchmidt

    The economy in general has been pretty much irretrievably wrecked in so many different ways. None and I mean none of these f-ing politicians and their GD sycophants or advisors gave any serious consideration to the long term ramifications of these insane policies/diktats. It’s obvious by now that this covitard virus is no where near the mega killer it was touted as being. However, the damage has been done to millions of livelihoods and the psyches of millions more. We’re never getting back to December 2019.

    Replies: @Alden, @TomSchmidt

    Yes, in March I thought NYCwould take years to get back to January. Now i know that January will never return.

    I would like the chance to view Wagner at the Met again. I don’t know when I will get it, since the schedule for three seasons now has had performances of his work exactly when I could not go, Covid the last two seasons.

    I’d love to see Cuomo DARE to run in 2022. He is getting support now because he can blame Trump. By 2022 the damage will be too obvious for anyone to ignore. He will be lucky to slink away and dump the mess in someone else’s lap.

  92. @Muggles
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    This is a big loss in tax revenue for New York. New York doesn’t have tax treaties with NJ and CT specifically to take capture tax revenue from out of state commuters.
     
    As a retired CPA with some experience with NYC/NY income taxes, I think you misunderstand how multistate tax compacts work (as in MD, DC, VA).

    Per a Google snippet: a reciprocal state agreement meaning that residents who live in one tax jurisdiction and work in the other only file and pay taxes in the jurisdiction they live.


    So your logic is incorrect. States with tax compacts let you file your state return only in the state in which you reside. You get to claim a full credit from your state (resident state) taxes with the taxes withheld in the state where you are employed. You don't have to file a state tax return in the state of employment to get your refund.

    NY/NYC collects income tax (based on a per day worked there rule) and you must apportion your taxable state income to each state. NY keeps it and it is somewhat complicated. You can claim a tax credit if you reside in a state with state income tax. Otherwise not. But now you are limited to how much state income tax you can deduct federally as an itemized deduction. Your local resident state tax may give you all or a partial credit for out of state income tax paid. NY/NYC keeps more taxes this way.

    NY/NYC method is very harsh. Even casual (one day or week) business trips to NY/NYC can trigger NY/NYC income taxes. You can't get it back easily or at all. Of course NJ just passed a special "millionaires" income tax as well. *sigh*

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @Anon

    I live in NY and work sometimes in MA. NY grants a dollar-for-dollar credit for income taxès paid to MA, since MA taxes rates are lower than NY.

    My city also has an income, like NYC. Unlike NYC, my city’s tax is a surcharge on my total state taxes due. Several years back, after my wife’s job moved to NJ because her building was hit by a 757 and collapsed while the Federal Government had its thumb up its ass, we were both working in NJ and living in NY. All our NJ taxes offset NY states taxes, so the net number of dollars owed to NY was small, say 9000 of the 10,000 we owed went to NJ instead of NY. We then would pay a 10% surtax on the 1000 actually paid to NY, instead of the 10,000 we would normally owe less the 9000 credit for taxes paid NJ.

    It almost made being in NJ worthwhile.

  93. @Bugg
    Buses are primarily used in the outer boroughs for shorter intraboro trips or in areas that are not near subways. Think old ladies shopping, or high school kids going to school. There are some crosstown routes in Manhattan, but they aren't as used much. There are also express routes from the outer boroughs into Manhattan that are significantly more expensive than regular bus and subway fares, but they're actually comfortable, clean and you can almost always get a seat. Personally on the occasions when business has made it necessary to go into Manhattan I find a parking lot on line near my destination and park and walk. It isn't cheap, but you can find on line bookings that make it less expensive.

    What I hear for Wall Street and white shoe law firm people; they now now a lot of their office help was not very productive. Many of those jobs are not coming back. There have been and will be job cuts. Much of their work can be done over phones and bandwidth. Nobody wants to pay NYC rents nor taxes. And this is KILLING NY restaurants and bars. And the 2 idiots running this horror show have no clue about this economic disaster. If you cannot got an event at Madison Square Garden or Radio City (or Yankee or Shea Stadium), or take in a Broadway show, or go to a really good midtown restaurant, there isn't much point to being in Manhattan.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @TomSchmidt

    they now now a lot of their office help was not very productive.

    Even outside Wall Street and law firms there are an enormous number of white and grey collar jobs that are nothing more than $100k/year paper pushing exercises.

    I’m surprised that there haven’t been more layoffs among those workers.

    And the 2 idiots running this horror show have no clue about this economic disaster.

    They really seem to labor under the delusion economies can be turned on and off like a lamp.

    • Agree: Bugg
  94. News from Chicago, another mail carrier shot and critically injured 11/30 am yesterday. Mail carriers are threatening to stop deliveries to south and west side.

    Interfering with especially shooting mail carriers are federal crimes. Post office has its own police and inspectors. Stopping mail delivery not to just one building but whole neighborhoods demonstrates true anarchy has arrived. Plus, there’s the workmen’s compensation costs including project life long earnings is killed or unable to go back to work.

    A conspiracy theorist might think that some state governors and the mayors and city council and county supervisors are acting for a foreign power that wants to destroy America.

  95. Anonymous[285] • Disclaimer says:
    @Supply and Demand
    @Ben Kurtz

    ‘Mayor Idiot’ being Giuliani, right?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Ben Kurtz

    Mayor Idiot’ being Giuliani, right?

    Only a major idiot would even joke about Mayor Giuliani’s achievements after he was elected, all while psycho-rags like the Village Voice and the NYT harassed and harangued him every week, repeatedly referring to him as a nazi for moving to close down the porn theaters in Times Square, and a mob supporter gone rogue for getting the mob out of Jacob Javits Center. They kept trying to link his long deceased father to the mob. They never could get that narrative going.

    Before Giuliani, we had a new, state of the art Convention Center that had many dark (empty) days where it made no money, because exhibitors wouldn’t deal with the mob shakedowns. After Giuliani blew them out, the place was stuffed exhibitors every single day of the year. As it should have been.

    Giuliani was smart, had balls, was clean as a whistle, and changed the downward spiral of New York City until they voted in another Democrat. Bloomberg had enough brains to ride Giuliani’s success wave, and bailed as it was petering.

    De Blasio and his cross-eyed retard wife have achieved what seemed impossible: They’ve made the quality of New York City worse than during the psycho Koch administration, and the current inhabitants don’t even possess the minimal moral rectitude, or even common sense to organize for his recall.

    Notice a pattern, old sport?

    • Replies: @Supply and Demand
    @Anonymous

    My father-in-law has used the recent chaos to snap up 2 wonderful properties in Queens. I’m sending the half-Chinese daughter to university there with one of the properties so she can establish residency, and giving explicit orders to organize for deBlasio’s picked successor. Giuliani was good for the boomers and the protection of their wealth. DB is good for everyone else who wants to be enterprising.

    Replies: @Alden

  96. Anon[402] • Disclaimer says:
    @NJ Transit Commuter
    As my pseudonym implies, this is a subject where my expertise can provide some insight. The subway and rail lines are primarily for commuters to get to and from jobs in Manhattan. So that implies a big reduction in middle class and upper middle class workers commuting to office jobs in Manhattan.

    Buses will be more for short distances and getting to working class jobs in the outer boroughs. Working class folks have less opportunity to work remotely.

    Tunnel and bridge traffic is very rare for commuters. Service jobs and truck transport mostly, I would guess.

    What all this implies is a big drop in white collar commuters working in Manhattan. This is a big loss in tax revenue for New York. New York doesn’t have tax treaties with NJ and CT specifically to take capture tax revenue from out of state commuters. There would also be a corresponding loss of revenue in the services provided to those white collar workers.

    Replies: @Charon, @Known Fact, @TomSchmidt, @Muggles, @Anon

    Live in a town with Midtown Direct Service to Penn Station in about half an hour. I first knew the day that Covid was being taken seriously when I drove past the station parking lot mid morning and it was almost empty.

    For a period in June/July I needed to be going into NY for work a bunch. Needed to bring stuff with me so probably would’ve have driven and not taken the train even if pre-covid. But I noticed a marked change in tunnel traffic from when I first started going in early June to late July, even as the parking lot is mostly empty. So of the (limited) people who are going in they are much more likely to be driving now than in the past.

  97. @Reg Cæsar
    @Dumbo


    Actually, is there a musical genre more White than folk?
     
    The Kingston Trio were Honolulu haoles named for the Jamaican capital.


    https://www.rollingstone.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/bob-shane-kingston-trio-death.jpg

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @I, Libertine, @mmack, @Bill Jones

    Plainsong is fairly long honky.

    Chant like a Gregorian.

  98. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, a budding crop of appalled folk singers are sharing new BLM protest songs!

    https://youtu.be/LcPlk5xf3CI

    Replies: @wren, @Courtesy Flush, @SINCERITY.net, @Dumbo, @tyrone, @Whiskey, @Neoconned, @anon, @Kibernetika, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz

    The father must be unfamiliar with the scene in “Clockwork Orange” where the nice liberal couple gets a beating and a raping from the hoodlums.
    Can these people really not recognize how inexcusably naïve they are?

  99. Let a (mostly) lifelong Noo Yawkuh throw his two cents in.

    They’re NEVER coming back. Not if they can possibly avoid it.

    For months I’ve been puzzled by other people’s puzzlement at the calamitous drop in ridership. For at least two generations and likely more, the subways have only been useful to people with Manhattan addresses already, who could hop on and off for a few stops to go to work or shopping or doctors’ offices or what have you, and save the cost and aggravation of a cab. To the rest of us…? – they were a filthy, ugly, profoundly-depressing daily nightmare to be endured…..hopefully with an end-point not coinciding with your own retirement, illness or death. If you could mass-probe the minds of a packed rush-hour car bound for the outer boroughs (not yet possible, but give China time) you’d doubtless discover hundreds of people all woolgathering from the exact same daydream: the glorious day when, via change of fortune, address, or both, they need never ever again set foot in a NYC subway car.

    The pandemic is almost certainly prompting good men to diminish their state-enforced misery by gulping opioids and adding their names to the White Death tally – but of all the reasons why 2020 has been the worst five years in most people’s lives, Zoom and Skype rendering the hated MetroCard obsolete and diminishing down to a dot in the rear-view mirror of their life ain’t one of them. If anything, it’s the poor bastards still chained to mass transit who require 500 cc’s – stat! – of shitlib society’s most concerned hand-wringing; everybody else just got a brand-new lease on life arriving special-delivery from way out in left field – I dunno, the return address is all Chinese characters and Mao’s face is on all the stamps. And so what if it is? Freeing a million lost souls from the NYC subway system is a helluva lot more Nobel Prizeworthy than letting your son-in-law arrange for Netanyahu to shake hands with the two stooges more afraid of Hamas than he is.

    • LOL: TomSchmidt
    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Ragno

    Great comment. My wife grew up in Manhattan. She went to one of the magnet schools often discussed here. I used to wonder if she wouldn’t be bored out here in the sticks of Pennsylvania. She spent her childhood dreaming of getting out of that hellhole. All she wanted was a white picket fence and a garden of her own. So, I might not have freed as many as Covid, but I helped at least one little girl escape.

  100. @Redman
    @George

    Last weekend I drove into the City from Westchester for the first time since Covid. Couldn’t find a single spot on the UWS for the first time in my life. Had to put the car in a garage for a 2-hour excursion.

    Not exactly sure what the reason is for that. But I was expecting there to be more not less free parking.

    Replies: @hhsiii, @kaganovitch

    It’s harder to park during the day. Day trippers take up spots. Easier at night. They eliminated one street sweeping day a week and while it’s tougher now in September, way easier than pre Covid September-June usually.

  101. Anon[402] • Disclaimer says:
    @Muggles
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    This is a big loss in tax revenue for New York. New York doesn’t have tax treaties with NJ and CT specifically to take capture tax revenue from out of state commuters.
     
    As a retired CPA with some experience with NYC/NY income taxes, I think you misunderstand how multistate tax compacts work (as in MD, DC, VA).

    Per a Google snippet: a reciprocal state agreement meaning that residents who live in one tax jurisdiction and work in the other only file and pay taxes in the jurisdiction they live.


    So your logic is incorrect. States with tax compacts let you file your state return only in the state in which you reside. You get to claim a full credit from your state (resident state) taxes with the taxes withheld in the state where you are employed. You don't have to file a state tax return in the state of employment to get your refund.

    NY/NYC collects income tax (based on a per day worked there rule) and you must apportion your taxable state income to each state. NY keeps it and it is somewhat complicated. You can claim a tax credit if you reside in a state with state income tax. Otherwise not. But now you are limited to how much state income tax you can deduct federally as an itemized deduction. Your local resident state tax may give you all or a partial credit for out of state income tax paid. NY/NYC keeps more taxes this way.

    NY/NYC method is very harsh. Even casual (one day or week) business trips to NY/NYC can trigger NY/NYC income taxes. You can't get it back easily or at all. Of course NJ just passed a special "millionaires" income tax as well. *sigh*

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @Anon

    I’m unfortunately not in a position to be impacted by the millionaires tax. But spoke to my brother in law who is, and he doesn’t work in NY. His accountant told him to move to PA (lesser tax) or DE (no tax) if it really bothered him.

    OT but I have read about the lengths high tax states like NY, CT, etc go to in order to justify that you should still be paying their tax, even if you have established what you are calling your primary residence in someplace like FL. “You’ve moved to FL, ok, why is your cell phone still your old area code? Where do you go to the doctor? Where does your DOG go the vet?

    Was in someone’s house years ago and he kept a log in his office with the number of days that year he was in NY, the number of days he was in FL, and the number of days he was elsewhere. Apparently that doesn’t suffice anymore.

  102. @anon
    @J.Ross

    In the social media biz that's called pumping-up engagement. Intentionally leaving out some tidbit of information (and saying "I don't know") prompts helpful commenters like yourself to contribute (an end in itself) and also gives some readers a dopamine shot ("yay, I know more than the host").

    Replies: @J.Ross

    What’s the social media biz?

  103. OT: The white bar owner who shot a mulatto kid who jumped on him, killing him, just killed himself after receiving notice that a warrant was issued for his arrest, including a manslaughter charge, among others. Incredibly sad.

    Vid of the shooting below…

  104. @Buffalo Joe
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Ach, the bookend states that are NY and California seem to operate on the governor's New Rule-a-Day for Covid. Businesses can open now, soon to open, maybe can open soon and then closed. Same with schools. Who is going to invest in starting up if you may be shut down in a heartbeat. Surprised there is not a bigger push back. Two local developers in my town both built or redeveloped buildings on our Main Street. One has not been occupied, the other has six store fronts vacant out of eight. Loans to be repaid and taxes due. You have to have deep pockets to do that.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    The woman who is LA’s health director said the schools will remain closed until after the election. Who knew the Kung Flu cared?

    She gets paid $500k a year and has a PhD in, wait for it ……………. Sociology.

    • Thanks: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Jim Don Bob

    "The [ghoul] who is LA’s health director said the schools will remain closed until after the election. Who knew the Kung Flu cared?"

    Thereby confirming my statement in early March that BULL$$$HIT-2020 is Joe Diaper's and the Democratic Party's 2020 election strategy. A hoax, a medical billing fraud, and a psychological terror attack.

    So take off that filthy skid-marked face diaper and burn it. And, as always:

    Get Out Live Life!

  105. @sayless
    @Dumbo

    That rape attempt was in the middle of the day, on the platform at Lexington Avenue and 59th or 66th Street, on the East Side. One of the safest stops in the city. What shocked me was that someone stood there filming it instead of going over to help.

    Fare beating is ignored now. Lots of homeless on the trains and some of the people are violent. When the doors close you're trapped because the doors between the cars are locked. Riding the subway is riskier than it was a year ago. The buses are safer.

    A couple of years ago an Access-A-Ride employee was fired for chronic tardiness, she worked at their call center. She was disabled, used Access-A-Ride to get to work, it kept making her late.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @West reanimator

    “Fired for chronic tardiness”? More like chronic tardiness is built into Access-a-Ride’s very being.

    Amazingly, Access-a-Ride considers any pickup as long as 30 minutes after the scheduled pickup time to be “on time.” (Thus a scheduled pickup for 9:30 isn’t “late” if the van arrives right before 10:00.)

    So if you have a 10:00 a.m. doctor’s appointment, and it’s a 30-minute ride from your building to the M.D.’s office, you have to ask for a 9:00 pickup to have a decent chance of your ride arriving by 9:30. If you want to be safe, ask Access-a-Ride to show up at 8:45. (If you show up at a New York City doctor’s office 30 minutes late without having called ahead to say you’ll be delayed, your appointment will be cancelled and you’ll be rescheduled for some other day. If you’re lucky.)

    If you want to get to a doctor’s appointment quickly and without hassle, take a city bus or, if you have the means, a cab. Don’t take Access-a-Ride unless you want to add hypertension to your medical woes.

  106. Don’t take the A Train:

    Manhattan subway train derails after laughing saboteur throws metal clamps on tracks: police sources

    I always get ricin mixed up with sarin:

    Woman arrested for allegedly sending Trump poisoned letter

    Trump’s only hope is to have a federal judge in Honolulu overrule the federal judge in San Francisco. But then the Democrats could counter with a federal judge in Guam (under the Constitution’s little-known The Judge Furthest Out in the Pacific Wins clause).
    –iStwitter

    Guam may be the farthest out, but for furthest out, it’s a competition between Portland and Seattle, which have left San Francisco, Madison, and Greenwich Village in the dust.

    People use both further and farther to mean “more distant.” However, American English speakers favor farther for physical distances and further for figurative distances.

    Farther vs. Further

  107. @Neoconned
    @Anonymous

    "Intellectual collapse in the party leadership leads straight to real economic collapse in the party controlled jurisdictions."

    Sounds almost like the rapid decline of the Ottomans in the 1700s to 1900s after the white slave trade they used to fill their functionary ranks, collapsed....


    "Toobin @JeffreyToobin Dems aren’t powerless. They can: 1. Abolish filibuster. 2. Statehood for DC, PR. 3. Increase # of federal judges. 4. Add 3 Justices to #SCOTUS. My @NewYorker column

    TOOBIN IS A TOP DEM LEGAL GUY AND HE IS GOING FULL HARRY REID.

    Read the Toobin twitter comments. Many dems recognize the folly here. They’re seeing the intellectual spiral. How can the Harry Reid Fan Club be gaining members at this late date?"

    He'd better be careful. American 2 party politics has always worked as a duopoly kept in line via a MAD like Cold War guarantee the whole system would collapse.

    Toobins nuts. This could go sideways. If the GOP sees the Dems doing procedural things like adding in states lile PR they will get equally desperate....and talk of military intervention will commence

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian

    Or perhaps in answer to these little postage stamp new states some democrats are lusting after, they begin a fight back by carving new states out of democrat-dominated current states. Think eastern Washington or Oregon, northern California, western regions of Virginia chafing under the demographic domination of the fedgov drones and trough feeders on the fedgov in the eastern regions. They could get back to par with new senate seats from such seceding regions fairly quickly, and create momentum toward a usefully contiguous red zone. If a breakup were ultimately needed, that would be a real leg up.

  108. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, a budding crop of appalled folk singers are sharing new BLM protest songs!

    https://youtu.be/LcPlk5xf3CI

    Replies: @wren, @Courtesy Flush, @SINCERITY.net, @Dumbo, @tyrone, @Whiskey, @Neoconned, @anon, @Kibernetika, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Kibernetika

    I got 2 LOLs out of that one! First I went to see what comment your were responding to. I finally got to playing that video, something I knew I'd regret. I skipped the talking after 5 seconds and got right to a place when they were singing "... imagine if there were healthcare..." something, and just laughed out loud. Then, John Belushi smashing that guitar... LOL again.

    Thank you, Kibernetika.

  109. Fewer people riding the subway. The Horror, The Horror….

  110. Same faggots as you, Sailer. Terrified of the sniffles.

  111. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, a budding crop of appalled folk singers are sharing new BLM protest songs!

    https://youtu.be/LcPlk5xf3CI

    Replies: @wren, @Courtesy Flush, @SINCERITY.net, @Dumbo, @tyrone, @Whiskey, @Neoconned, @anon, @Kibernetika, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz

    https://www.kinderinstitute.com/george-kinder/ Kinder currently resides in Massachusetts and spends several months per year in London and Hana, Hawaii.

  112. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, a budding crop of appalled folk singers are sharing new BLM protest songs!

    https://youtu.be/LcPlk5xf3CI

    Replies: @wren, @Courtesy Flush, @SINCERITY.net, @Dumbo, @tyrone, @Whiskey, @Neoconned, @anon, @Kibernetika, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz

    heres george without his daughter

  113. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, a budding crop of appalled folk singers are sharing new BLM protest songs!

    https://youtu.be/LcPlk5xf3CI

    Replies: @wren, @Courtesy Flush, @SINCERITY.net, @Dumbo, @tyrone, @Whiskey, @Neoconned, @anon, @Kibernetika, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz, @Stewart M Schwartz

    heres george without his daughter,pretty sweet scam.

  114. @mmack
    Steve,

    It’s not just NYC. Back on the train line I used to ride:

    https://chicago.cbslocal.com/2020/09/15/with-ridership-down-about-90-metra-looking-at-bleak-financial-forecast-for-2020-21/

    Metra Rail is facing a $682 million budget shortfall due to COVID-19 restrictions and two rounds of BLM rioting keeping people off trains and out of Da Loop.

    Anecdotally my wife talked to her aunt Friday. She passed on a conversation she had with the realtor that sold her house. The realtor is busy selling houses in towns like Elmhurst and the surrounding suburbs. The buyers? Rich Chicagoans from the North Side selling and moving out to the burbs.

    Good job Lori!

    Replies: @MBlanc46

    I’m in a less tony western suburb than Elmhurst. Houses are selling well here, even though the local public high school is Proviso West.

  115. @Buffalo Joe
    @Reg Cæsar

    Reg, in my junior year in college we booked the KT to perform at Kleinhans Music hall in Buffalo, sold out performance. Last road show before they returned to SF and performed together one last time at the Hungry I. Never has a class had so much money to spend on senior week. And we spent it all. Good show.

    Replies: @MBlanc46

    They were definitely a favorite of mine in my youth.

  116. @guest007
    @Anonymous

    If the Democrats in the U.S. Senate eliminate the filibuster, it is because they believe that the Republicans will never be in the majority again.

    Replies: @MBlanc46

    And they will be correct. The end is near for the Repubs as a national party.

  117. @Kibernetika
    @Anonymous

    https://youtu.be/8V_hCqO6UQs

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I got 2 LOLs out of that one! First I went to see what comment your were responding to. I finally got to playing that video, something I knew I’d regret. I skipped the talking after 5 seconds and got right to a place when they were singing “… imagine if there were healthcare…” something, and just laughed out loud. Then, John Belushi smashing that guitar… LOL again.

    Thank you, Kibernetika.

  118. BART – Bay Area Rapid Transit ridership total monthy trips:

    10,329,856 – August 2019

    1,169,259 – August 2020

    BART, and for that matter, California 1973

    bart_vintage_postcard

    President Richard M. Nixon and his wife, Pat, take a BART ride.

    nixonontrain380

    Map of BART’s service/lines, San Francisco Bay Area.

    Bart

    BART as is:

    Barts

    BART was already in severe finance trouble pre SARS-Cov-2; in no large part due to its significant turnstile/fair jumping reparations deserving ridership.

  119. @Redman
    @George

    Last weekend I drove into the City from Westchester for the first time since Covid. Couldn’t find a single spot on the UWS for the first time in my life. Had to put the car in a garage for a 2-hour excursion.

    Not exactly sure what the reason is for that. But I was expecting there to be more not less free parking.

    Replies: @hhsiii, @kaganovitch

    Not exactly sure what the reason is for that. But I was expecting there to be more not less free parking.

    50-60% of spots have been taken by outdoor dining tables of restaurants that aren’t allowed indoor dining. Where sidewalks don’t allow for outdoor dining setup (too narrow), the city moves them into the parking lane.

  120. @slumber_j
    @Gary in Gramercy


    Only after the current Mayor — and his spendthrift wife — are publicly guillotined under Sherman’s statue, at 59th and 5th.
     
    I'd pay good money to see that, and their heads on pikes at the sea lion tank in the Central Park Zoo.

    I went to a Rangers game with an old friend just after BDB was first elected. Conversation naturally turned to the new mayor, whom I didn't know that much about, and I asked my better-informed friend what he thought of him.

    "I can't stand him," he said. "I can't stand his whole family."

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    Your friend had good antennae. I lived through the Disaster Formerly Known as the David Dinkins Administration, and thought New Yorkers had learned their lesson after that. But two decades of adult supervision — and the influx of both young people and immigrants, with no memory of how awful things used to be when incompetent minorities and their equally feckless apologists were in charge — left too many of us soft and happy, thinking that the city could never go back to the way it was. It just couldn’t…until it did.

    To paraphrase what Jack Kent Cooke said of Washington Redskins GM and coach George Allen, the current Mayor gave his wife an unlimited budget, and she stole it. Remember Rachel Noerdlinger, Chirlane McCray’s first chief of staff, a position that had not previously existed, but which paid $170,000? After Noerdlinger’s family issues — both her live-in boyfriend and son had problems with the law — and personal debt forced her resignation, New York City’s First Lady simply hired a longtime friend as her replacement — at a salary of $200,000.

    Go find every “mental health consultant” with a master’s degree or better, and a sufficient quantum of melanin, who applied for program grants from the City of New York — then check those consultants’ driveways and garages. When you start seeing brand new Mercedes and BMW sedans, you’ll have some idea where the “missing” $850 million went.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Gary in Gramercy


    But two decades of adult supervision — and the influx of both young people and immigrants, with no memory of how awful things used to be when incompetent minorities and their equally feckless apologists were in charge — left too many of us soft and happy, thinking that the city could never go back to the way it was.
     
    I'll admit to having been one of those people, despite having experienced the old, weird New York in the 1980s and early 90s. I remember the horror starting to dawn on me in--bizarrely--the first month of this mayor's first term: suddenly the Upper East Side was very notably bummier. I don't even believe this is possible, this effect, I thought to myself--but it was.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

  121. @Supply and Demand
    @Ben Kurtz

    ‘Mayor Idiot’ being Giuliani, right?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Ben Kurtz

    Ha ha ha.

  122. @TomSchmidt
    "has New York City suffered a permanent major fall in the number of daily workers it will see?"

    In a word, yes. Cuomo's order telling "nonessential" workers to stay home will wind up killing more than his order to accept COVID patients into nursing homes: it will wind up as the key cause of the death of NYC (or at least THIS NYC. I don't know what the next one can or will be). He liked the fear and the power it gave him, but now that fear keeps employees away from Manhattan. My wife's company will not bring employees back to Manhattan before JULY.

    Repeated at company after company, that means most of the 3 million people who commute into the city won't return. That kills the small businesses that sell lunches to these people and provide services. They cannot pay rent and income taxes drop, and eventually property values drop, driving down property taxes. Decreased property and commuter taxes undercut the MTA budget, which either has to raise fares to levels even whites blanch at, or cut services (but the latter winds up driving ridership decreases so severe that there is little effective savings from them), so that soon the city will be UNABLE to successfully move 3MM people into the core every day to work in offices, whether people want to return or not.

    And why return? Over 50% of restaurants are likely to close, including old favorites of mine like Gotham Bar and Grill. (One wag once commented that Manhattan was the ideal location for offices because it supplied that drug most essential to high business executives: lunch.) broadway is shut, and the complex, entangled arts infrastructure, of people struggling to make 40K in a city where that won't pay for a studio just so they can train the next generation while trying for and waiting for their shot: that's dying, too, due to Cuomo.

    The Metropolitan Opera is also desperate. This is important since it's one of the last cultural organizations that is not under the paw of the Feds, Like the DC shows beloved of Scalia and Ginsburg (did she leave them anything? My guess is no), and It has an endowment of millions. If they cannot run operas, they lose half their annual income. I told them when asked: run the damn shows, and I'll come and wear a mask, but save the city and its arts scene.

    Replies: @Jack D, @usNthem, @RadicalCenter

    We tell the LA and Pasadena Symphonies that we will not return until they offer normal in-person concerts without any absurd mask and distancing requirements. They are blindly submitting to these measures and intensifying the hysteria and fear with the fervor of a religion, so we have no sympathy when they say they are just complying with “the law.” If they were actively opposing the lockdown and the bizarre face-diapering and the rest, we would feel differently.

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @RadicalCenter

    Excellent to read. Walt Disney concert hall should have pretty good ventilation with all that titanium directing the natural winds into it... or maybe that was just for show.

    Run the damn shows and let people who want to come decide if they want to go with the existing setup. The audience is part of the show, especially at the opera. This isn't hard.

    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @RadicalCenter

    "We tell the LA and Pasadena Symphonies that we will not return until they offer normal in-person concerts without any absurd mask and distancing requirements."

    I told the Oregon Symphony the same thing via online questionnaire: No face diapers, no DSM distancing, no scolding by staff, no stupid signs plastered everywhere. Everything 100% back to normal or I won't attend a single concert. And livestreams are utterly pointless: I have not and will not watch any of them. The CDC admitted covid is 94% medical coding fraud and it's time we acknowledge that en masse and behave accordingly, including physician licensure revocation and prison time for the most flagrant and prolific fraudists. And of course refunding every $8000 coronabonus, with 9% penalty interest.

  123. @sayless
    @Dumbo

    That rape attempt was in the middle of the day, on the platform at Lexington Avenue and 59th or 66th Street, on the East Side. One of the safest stops in the city. What shocked me was that someone stood there filming it instead of going over to help.

    Fare beating is ignored now. Lots of homeless on the trains and some of the people are violent. When the doors close you're trapped because the doors between the cars are locked. Riding the subway is riskier than it was a year ago. The buses are safer.

    A couple of years ago an Access-A-Ride employee was fired for chronic tardiness, she worked at their call center. She was disabled, used Access-A-Ride to get to work, it kept making her late.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @West reanimator

    Fare beating is ignored now. Lots of homeless on the trains and some of the people are violent. When the doors close you’re trapped because the doors between the cars are locked. Riding the subway is riskier than it was a year ago. The buses are safer.

    Fare enforcement has been out since Deblasio took office, NYPD has been forbidden from arresting anyone for jumping the turnstile because of course the fare beaters were exactly who you’d expect they were, and therefore fare enforcement be raciss. There was an audit of NYCT two years ago that showed an estimated half million fares were lost on the subway every day. You might not have noticed them much when the trains were full of regular commuters, but this year, with all the office workers at home, the dirtbag naggers are frequently the majority of riders on the train.

  124. Will they come back after, say, a vaccine?

    No. And not just NYC–although it’s situation will be amongst the worse.

    The Xi virus has simply pushed forward a transition that was in the making. Computer networking is starting to deliver on its promise of destroying the demand for proximity. Much–not all!–can be down remotely including a great deal of white collar work. Absent that need, people will live differently. Live in ways and in places that are cheaper or easier or more pleasant.

    Business travel will never recover as well. With increased prosperity millions and millions of people will travel more for pleasure. Count on anywhere nice/interesting being crowded. But the biz travel that props up major, full service airlines, will never be what it was.

    And this is just one prong. In the decades to come, the robotic and AI revolution will destroy hundreds of millions of jobs across the world–eventually billions. Self-driving cars and trucks alone will destroy millions of jobs just in the US. And in cutting out the labor component they’ll make taxi services much cheap and eliminate the desire for car ownership for millions of urbanites and young people … eroding the demand for cars. But this isn’t limited to low-skill: take a snap with your phone and answer some questions and the expert system will tell you what’s wrong, and give you a prescription, which can be drone delivered. The expert system has the gelled knowledge of tens of thousands of docs. Why settle for one?

    Then there’s biotech … my speculations there would be almost pointless.

    We are in the midst of shifts that will be even more profound than industrialization. As profound as anything since the neolithic settlement and agricultural revolution. Potentially more profound.

    Nothing is ever going to be the same.

    • Replies: @Bugg
    @AnotherDad

    My son is in a college finance program that's very competitive. We moved him into his off campus apartment, and while we were doing so he remotely was in class. A featured guest speaker with significant Wall Street cred explained that going forward business travel will finally be seen as pointless and wasteful. There's no need to send people across the country, burning otherwise productive hours wasted in crappy airports, car rental places, cookie cutter hotels and middling chain restaurants. You can do almost anything over the internet. COVID is going to accelerate these trends. Always be a place for going to some fun place to get together and build your team a bit, but it's getting scaled back.

  125. @Anonymous
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Given that, in all likelihood, right now about 5% of Americans are infected and may be contagious, flying on commercial airlines sounds like an absolutely dumbest thing to do if one wants to avoid being infected.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @AnotherDad

    Given that, in all likelihood, right now about 5% of Americans are infected and may be contagious, flying on commercial airlines sounds like an absolutely dumbest thing to do if one wants to avoid being infected.

    Sure, there’s some increased chance of infection.

    If you are elderly and/or have one of these comorbidities that seem to get folks whacked or if you’re one of these folks who freaks over wearing a mask–excuse me “face diaper”–then skip it.

    But for normal folks … it’s great time to travel!

    — Airports, TSA lines less congested, faster, more pleasant.
    — Planes are way less crowded. Some major airlines are blocking out middle seats.
    — Less congestion–almost all flights are on-time.
    — Fares are lower. (In a couple weeks, AnotherMom and i’m flying across the country for $21.98 each. Ok, it’s Frontier and everything else costs … but 2500 miles for < a penny a mile?)
    — Accomodations are available and somewhat cheaper. (Note: one negative is a lot of the "free breakfast" bars have closed up–which sucks.)

    I will note that a lot of people sick of the Democrats' lockdown b.s. have been out and about in the great outdoors. A close friend of mine hit the Utah red rock parks a couple weeks back, said everyplace was packed. But i'd guess that eases up with the end of summer and getting out there this fall will be nice if not uncrowded.

    I'll admit there's some increased risk to getting on the plane–but it's small for normal travelers. Probably is not the best time to try and chat up that cute stranger in your row and try join the mile high club. (At least don't do it face-to-face.)

  126. @Whiskey
    @Anonymous

    Proof of any more needed White women are the permanent and natural enemy of White men. And that men with daughters are natural cucks. The cucks of the cucks

    We really need White sharia. Islam is right about women.

    Replies: @Alden, @JMcG

    I agree with you more often than many around here, but where do you get the idea that white men with daughters are cucks? In my experience, and I have a great deal, the opposite is true.

  127. @Dumbo
    I wonder if it's more fear of the Covid Kung Flu, or fear of BLM riotin' blacks.

    Wasn't just recently that there was an attempt by a black dude to rape a woman (of indeterminate race) in a NY subway station in view of all?

    Replies: @sayless, @Buck Ransom

    Once the ongoing gentrification of everything above 96th Street is complete, Manhattan will be exclusively for Jews and Woke whites. It will then be protected like a fortress from all threats by the melanin-enriched. Will Corona-chan ultimately speed up this process or slow it down?

  128. @Ragno
    Let a (mostly) lifelong Noo Yawkuh throw his two cents in.

    They're NEVER coming back. Not if they can possibly avoid it.

    For months I've been puzzled by other people's puzzlement at the calamitous drop in ridership. For at least two generations and likely more, the subways have only been useful to people with Manhattan addresses already, who could hop on and off for a few stops to go to work or shopping or doctors' offices or what have you, and save the cost and aggravation of a cab. To the rest of us...? - they were a filthy, ugly, profoundly-depressing daily nightmare to be endured.....hopefully with an end-point not coinciding with your own retirement, illness or death. If you could mass-probe the minds of a packed rush-hour car bound for the outer boroughs (not yet possible, but give China time) you'd doubtless discover hundreds of people all woolgathering from the exact same daydream: the glorious day when, via change of fortune, address, or both, they need never ever again set foot in a NYC subway car.

    The pandemic is almost certainly prompting good men to diminish their state-enforced misery by gulping opioids and adding their names to the White Death tally - but of all the reasons why 2020 has been the worst five years in most people's lives, Zoom and Skype rendering the hated MetroCard obsolete and diminishing down to a dot in the rear-view mirror of their life ain't one of them. If anything, it's the poor bastards still chained to mass transit who require 500 cc's - stat! - of shitlib society's most concerned hand-wringing; everybody else just got a brand-new lease on life arriving special-delivery from way out in left field - I dunno, the return address is all Chinese characters and Mao's face is on all the stamps. And so what if it is? Freeing a million lost souls from the NYC subway system is a helluva lot more Nobel Prizeworthy than letting your son-in-law arrange for Netanyahu to shake hands with the two stooges more afraid of Hamas than he is.

    Replies: @JMcG

    Great comment. My wife grew up in Manhattan. She went to one of the magnet schools often discussed here. I used to wonder if she wouldn’t be bored out here in the sticks of Pennsylvania. She spent her childhood dreaming of getting out of that hellhole. All she wanted was a white picket fence and a garden of her own. So, I might not have freed as many as Covid, but I helped at least one little girl escape.

  129. @AnotherDad

    Will they come back after, say, a vaccine?
     
    No. And not just NYC--although it's situation will be amongst the worse.

    The Xi virus has simply pushed forward a transition that was in the making. Computer networking is starting to deliver on its promise of destroying the demand for proximity. Much--not all!--can be down remotely including a great deal of white collar work. Absent that need, people will live differently. Live in ways and in places that are cheaper or easier or more pleasant.

    Business travel will never recover as well. With increased prosperity millions and millions of people will travel more for pleasure. Count on anywhere nice/interesting being crowded. But the biz travel that props up major, full service airlines, will never be what it was.

    And this is just one prong. In the decades to come, the robotic and AI revolution will destroy hundreds of millions of jobs across the world--eventually billions. Self-driving cars and trucks alone will destroy millions of jobs just in the US. And in cutting out the labor component they'll make taxi services much cheap and eliminate the desire for car ownership for millions of urbanites and young people ... eroding the demand for cars. But this isn't limited to low-skill: take a snap with your phone and answer some questions and the expert system will tell you what's wrong, and give you a prescription, which can be drone delivered. The expert system has the gelled knowledge of tens of thousands of docs. Why settle for one?

    Then there's biotech ... my speculations there would be almost pointless.

    We are in the midst of shifts that will be even more profound than industrialization. As profound as anything since the neolithic settlement and agricultural revolution. Potentially more profound.

    Nothing is ever going to be the same.

    Replies: @Bugg

    My son is in a college finance program that’s very competitive. We moved him into his off campus apartment, and while we were doing so he remotely was in class. A featured guest speaker with significant Wall Street cred explained that going forward business travel will finally be seen as pointless and wasteful. There’s no need to send people across the country, burning otherwise productive hours wasted in crappy airports, car rental places, cookie cutter hotels and middling chain restaurants. You can do almost anything over the internet. COVID is going to accelerate these trends. Always be a place for going to some fun place to get together and build your team a bit, but it’s getting scaled back.

  130. @Gary in Gramercy
    @slumber_j

    Your friend had good antennae. I lived through the Disaster Formerly Known as the David Dinkins Administration, and thought New Yorkers had learned their lesson after that. But two decades of adult supervision -- and the influx of both young people and immigrants, with no memory of how awful things used to be when incompetent minorities and their equally feckless apologists were in charge -- left too many of us soft and happy, thinking that the city could never go back to the way it was. It just couldn't...until it did.

    To paraphrase what Jack Kent Cooke said of Washington Redskins GM and coach George Allen, the current Mayor gave his wife an unlimited budget, and she stole it. Remember Rachel Noerdlinger, Chirlane McCray's first chief of staff, a position that had not previously existed, but which paid $170,000? After Noerdlinger's family issues -- both her live-in boyfriend and son had problems with the law -- and personal debt forced her resignation, New York City's First Lady simply hired a longtime friend as her replacement -- at a salary of $200,000.

    Go find every "mental health consultant" with a master's degree or better, and a sufficient quantum of melanin, who applied for program grants from the City of New York -- then check those consultants' driveways and garages. When you start seeing brand new Mercedes and BMW sedans, you'll have some idea where the "missing" $850 million went.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    But two decades of adult supervision — and the influx of both young people and immigrants, with no memory of how awful things used to be when incompetent minorities and their equally feckless apologists were in charge — left too many of us soft and happy, thinking that the city could never go back to the way it was.

    I’ll admit to having been one of those people, despite having experienced the old, weird New York in the 1980s and early 90s. I remember the horror starting to dawn on me in–bizarrely–the first month of this mayor’s first term: suddenly the Upper East Side was very notably bummier. I don’t even believe this is possible, this effect, I thought to myself–but it was.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @slumber_j

    It got worse into December 2014, then got better. The real downturn began after Trump and the effort by the Mayor and state to be the UN-Trump.

    Warren Buffett once said that he wanted to buy the stock of a company designed by geniuses so I could be run by idiots... because eventually every company would be. Bloomberg might be a gun controlling nanny state nag, but he improved the running of the city so well that it could tolerate a buffoon like DeBlasio, unless an extreme crisis hit. Oops.

    We will see if enough outer borough whites remain to put a moderate Republican in power, or a reasonable Democrat like Koch. Indulging in Radical Chic just got immensely costly.

    Replies: @ATBOTL

  131. @RadicalCenter
    @TomSchmidt

    We tell the LA and Pasadena Symphonies that we will not return until they offer normal in-person concerts without any absurd mask and distancing requirements. They are blindly submitting to these measures and intensifying the hysteria and fear with the fervor of a religion, so we have no sympathy when they say they are just complying with “the law.” If they were actively opposing the lockdown and the bizarre face-diapering and the rest, we would feel differently.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    Excellent to read. Walt Disney concert hall should have pretty good ventilation with all that titanium directing the natural winds into it… or maybe that was just for show.

    Run the damn shows and let people who want to come decide if they want to go with the existing setup. The audience is part of the show, especially at the opera. This isn’t hard.

  132. @slumber_j
    @Gary in Gramercy


    But two decades of adult supervision — and the influx of both young people and immigrants, with no memory of how awful things used to be when incompetent minorities and their equally feckless apologists were in charge — left too many of us soft and happy, thinking that the city could never go back to the way it was.
     
    I'll admit to having been one of those people, despite having experienced the old, weird New York in the 1980s and early 90s. I remember the horror starting to dawn on me in--bizarrely--the first month of this mayor's first term: suddenly the Upper East Side was very notably bummier. I don't even believe this is possible, this effect, I thought to myself--but it was.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    It got worse into December 2014, then got better. The real downturn began after Trump and the effort by the Mayor and state to be the UN-Trump.

    Warren Buffett once said that he wanted to buy the stock of a company designed by geniuses so I could be run by idiots… because eventually every company would be. Bloomberg might be a gun controlling nanny state nag, but he improved the running of the city so well that it could tolerate a buffoon like DeBlasio, unless an extreme crisis hit. Oops.

    We will see if enough outer borough whites remain to put a moderate Republican in power, or a reasonable Democrat like Koch. Indulging in Radical Chic just got immensely costly.

    • Agree: slumber_j, Mark G.
    • Replies: @ATBOTL
    @TomSchmidt


    We will see if enough outer borough whites remain to put a moderate Republican in power, or a reasonable Democrat like Koch.
     
    No. Outer areas of NYC have been almost entirely purged of white Americans. Go to Ozone Park and look around. Go to Bensonhurst today. Population replacement of the white middle class and working class outer borough population is complete. That's the cause of DiBlasio being mayor and that's why there will no new Giuliani.
  133. @Jim Don Bob
    @Buffalo Joe

    The woman who is LA's health director said the schools will remain closed until after the election. Who knew the Kung Flu cared?

    She gets paid $500k a year and has a PhD in, wait for it ................ Sociology.

    https://www.dailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/LDN-L-VIRUS-LA-UPDATE-0509-05-3.jpg

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    “The [ghoul] who is LA’s health director said the schools will remain closed until after the election. Who knew the Kung Flu cared?”

    Thereby confirming my statement in early March that BULL$$$HIT-2020 is Joe Diaper’s and the Democratic Party’s 2020 election strategy. A hoax, a medical billing fraud, and a psychological terror attack.

    So take off that filthy skid-marked face diaper and burn it. And, as always:

    Get Out Live Life!

  134. @RadicalCenter
    @TomSchmidt

    We tell the LA and Pasadena Symphonies that we will not return until they offer normal in-person concerts without any absurd mask and distancing requirements. They are blindly submitting to these measures and intensifying the hysteria and fear with the fervor of a religion, so we have no sympathy when they say they are just complying with “the law.” If they were actively opposing the lockdown and the bizarre face-diapering and the rest, we would feel differently.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    “We tell the LA and Pasadena Symphonies that we will not return until they offer normal in-person concerts without any absurd mask and distancing requirements.”

    I told the Oregon Symphony the same thing via online questionnaire: No face diapers, no DSM distancing, no scolding by staff, no stupid signs plastered everywhere. Everything 100% back to normal or I won’t attend a single concert. And livestreams are utterly pointless: I have not and will not watch any of them. The CDC admitted covid is 94% medical coding fraud and it’s time we acknowledge that en masse and behave accordingly, including physician licensure revocation and prison time for the most flagrant and prolific fraudists. And of course refunding every $8000 coronabonus, with 9% penalty interest.

  135. New York isn’t the city it once was. It’s not a town of tough scrappy people anymore. It’s a town where the middle and upper classes are Kens and Karens of every color: think of the Central Park bird guy and the dog lady. The rest is people of every conceivable race and creed on earth, a babble of riff-raff.

    9/11 was almost 20 years ago. Since that time, the town has been flooded with soyboy Kens and busybody Karens who came because there was so much to do and very little crime. If 9/11 happened today the response of the populace would be vastly different. As it is, NYC is filled with Covid cowards. Nearly every 20-something walking down the street has a mask on. Even riding bikes! It’s absurd.

    On top of that you have a delinquent Mayor — the worst that city has ever had — and a power-mad Governor who rules by diktat and whim.

    When Covid hit, the wealthier people — nearly all Kens and Karens, especially the Karens — hightailed it out of town as fast as they could, believing every bit of propaganda. Many are never coming back — they are THAT afraid. Even though Covid has been effectively over in NYC since MAY, the drumbeat of fear porn continues unabated, and the screws are kept on tight. People aren’t returning to their offices because they’re afraid to. And the companies are afraid to insist on it.

    Crime has spiked entirely due to cataclysmically terrible, uber-Woke changes in policy and policing. There isn’t the least talk of pulling back some of the stupid changes around bail and so on. The wokesters love it. And so far, the shootings are mostly black-on-black, so nobody really cares.

    They are FINALLY opening up indoor dining on Sept. 30 (assuming it’s not another Cuomo head-fake like the last time), at 25% of capacity. Of course if there’s the tiniest uptick in meaningless Covid “cases” they will reverse course.

    If you look at any Cuomo tweet about Covid, the comments are full of people profusely thanking him for “saving us” and how all would be well were it not for the terrible Trump and racism and stuff. There may never have been a greater concentration of abject morons in one place in the history of civilization.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Thanks: Buck Ransom, Clyde
    • LOL: hhsiii
    • Replies: @Supply and Demand
    @peterike

    Where one group exits, another enters — as the white upper class departs, the Chinese upper class is happy to arrive, often at a steep discount. Qin & Qiong are higher IQ than Ken & Karen, and much more scrappy. NYC will continue.

    Replies: @hhsiii, @Peterike

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @peterike


    The rest is people of every conceivable race and creed on earth, a babble of riff-raff.
     
    So, it's literally the progtard ideal for America - an amalgamation of Third World slums because, "muh ethnic cuisine," and, "muh authenticity."

    the town has been flooded with soyboy Kens and busybody Karens who came because there was so much to do and very little crime.
     
    I blame Sex and the City.

    If you look at any Cuomo tweet about Covid, the comments are full of people profusely thanking him for “saving us”
     
    Sad isn't it? It's nauseating to watch the sheeple gobble up whatever retarded pronouncement Governor Nipz makes that day.

    Replies: @Peterike

    , @TomSchmidt
    @peterike

    Some people genuinely loved Stalin. Others knew enough not to show that they didn't love him.

  136. @Anonymous
    @Supply and Demand


    Mayor Idiot’ being Giuliani, right?
     
    Only a major idiot would even joke about Mayor Giuliani's achievements after he was elected, all while psycho-rags like the Village Voice and the NYT harassed and harangued him every week, repeatedly referring to him as a nazi for moving to close down the porn theaters in Times Square, and a mob supporter gone rogue for getting the mob out of Jacob Javits Center. They kept trying to link his long deceased father to the mob. They never could get that narrative going.

    Before Giuliani, we had a new, state of the art Convention Center that had many dark (empty) days where it made no money, because exhibitors wouldn’t deal with the mob shakedowns. After Giuliani blew them out, the place was stuffed exhibitors every single day of the year. As it should have been.

    Giuliani was smart, had balls, was clean as a whistle, and changed the downward spiral of New York City until they voted in another Democrat. Bloomberg had enough brains to ride Giuliani's success wave, and bailed as it was petering.

    De Blasio and his cross-eyed retard wife have achieved what seemed impossible: They've made the quality of New York City worse than during the psycho Koch administration, and the current inhabitants don’t even possess the minimal moral rectitude, or even common sense to organize for his recall.

    Notice a pattern, old sport?

    Replies: @Supply and Demand

    My father-in-law has used the recent chaos to snap up 2 wonderful properties in Queens. I’m sending the half-Chinese daughter to university there with one of the properties so she can establish residency, and giving explicit orders to organize for deBlasio’s picked successor. Giuliani was good for the boomers and the protection of their wealth. DB is good for everyone else who wants to be enterprising.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Supply and Demand

    I think Queens is heavily Asian now so she should be safe.

  137. @peterike
    New York isn't the city it once was. It's not a town of tough scrappy people anymore. It's a town where the middle and upper classes are Kens and Karens of every color: think of the Central Park bird guy and the dog lady. The rest is people of every conceivable race and creed on earth, a babble of riff-raff.

    9/11 was almost 20 years ago. Since that time, the town has been flooded with soyboy Kens and busybody Karens who came because there was so much to do and very little crime. If 9/11 happened today the response of the populace would be vastly different. As it is, NYC is filled with Covid cowards. Nearly every 20-something walking down the street has a mask on. Even riding bikes! It's absurd.

    On top of that you have a delinquent Mayor -- the worst that city has ever had -- and a power-mad Governor who rules by diktat and whim.

    When Covid hit, the wealthier people -- nearly all Kens and Karens, especially the Karens -- hightailed it out of town as fast as they could, believing every bit of propaganda. Many are never coming back -- they are THAT afraid. Even though Covid has been effectively over in NYC since MAY, the drumbeat of fear porn continues unabated, and the screws are kept on tight. People aren't returning to their offices because they're afraid to. And the companies are afraid to insist on it.

    Crime has spiked entirely due to cataclysmically terrible, uber-Woke changes in policy and policing. There isn't the least talk of pulling back some of the stupid changes around bail and so on. The wokesters love it. And so far, the shootings are mostly black-on-black, so nobody really cares.

    They are FINALLY opening up indoor dining on Sept. 30 (assuming it's not another Cuomo head-fake like the last time), at 25% of capacity. Of course if there's the tiniest uptick in meaningless Covid "cases" they will reverse course.

    If you look at any Cuomo tweet about Covid, the comments are full of people profusely thanking him for "saving us" and how all would be well were it not for the terrible Trump and racism and stuff. There may never have been a greater concentration of abject morons in one place in the history of civilization.

    Replies: @Supply and Demand, @The Wild Geese Howard, @TomSchmidt

    Where one group exits, another enters — as the white upper class departs, the Chinese upper class is happy to arrive, often at a steep discount. Qin & Qiong are higher IQ than Ken & Karen, and much more scrappy. NYC will continue.

    • Replies: @hhsiii
    @Supply and Demand

    Ok, Mayor Lindsay.

    , @Peterike
    @Supply and Demand

    “ Qin & Qiong are higher IQ than Ken & Karen, and much more scrappy. NYC will continue.”

    No kidding. Only thing is, I don’t want to live in a Chinese city. The corruption and filth are bad enough as it is. Why would I want them increasing by a factor of ten or so?

  138. @TomSchmidt
    @slumber_j

    It got worse into December 2014, then got better. The real downturn began after Trump and the effort by the Mayor and state to be the UN-Trump.

    Warren Buffett once said that he wanted to buy the stock of a company designed by geniuses so I could be run by idiots... because eventually every company would be. Bloomberg might be a gun controlling nanny state nag, but he improved the running of the city so well that it could tolerate a buffoon like DeBlasio, unless an extreme crisis hit. Oops.

    We will see if enough outer borough whites remain to put a moderate Republican in power, or a reasonable Democrat like Koch. Indulging in Radical Chic just got immensely costly.

    Replies: @ATBOTL

    We will see if enough outer borough whites remain to put a moderate Republican in power, or a reasonable Democrat like Koch.

    No. Outer areas of NYC have been almost entirely purged of white Americans. Go to Ozone Park and look around. Go to Bensonhurst today. Population replacement of the white middle class and working class outer borough population is complete. That’s the cause of DiBlasio being mayor and that’s why there will no new Giuliani.

    • Agree: Bugg
  139. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, above ground, Times Square was AWESOME today!

    And should you or the NYPD not agree, ya'll can, of course, go fuck yourself:

    https://twitter.com/ScooterCasterNY/status/1307759784196747265?s=20

    Replies: @William Badwhite

    Where you have Africans, you have Africa

  140. @Daniel Williams

    Do people think buses are safer than subways? Why?
     
    Maybe people are scared of being trapped belowground with enraged or feral blacks.

    Replies: @Alden

    Buses have drivers. Drivers are forbidden to get out of their seats to deal with unruly passengers. It’s a Wcom issue.

    Passengers can easily go to the driver and complain. Many drivers are big aggressive blacks who can and do control the thugs verbally. Drivers always can call the police or their dispatcher and the police will get there quickly. Many city buses have the bus number on the roof so the police helicopters can find and follow it.

    Easy and best tactic after police are called is the driver just parks in the next bus stop or even in the middle of the street and opens the doors He she orders the thug out and announces the police are on the way and if you have warrants best leave. Also can tell passengers to get off and the next bus will be along in 10 minutes.

    When the bus driver stops the other passengers who want to get to work or whatever can jump in and harass the thug.

    Drivers with radios to police and bus headquarters, that’s why buses are safer. Plus very very fast police response.

    Try being a restaurant or convenience store clerk manager or passerby trying to get the police to respond to a fight or aggressive thug harassing people.

  141. I’m from Brooklyn and I have a specific reason why, since February, I won’t take the subway unless I absolutely have to but will occasionally take the bus. There are just a lot more homeless and/or mentally unbalanced people on the subways. If I’m on the bus, it’s easy to get off if someone unpleasant gets on. Might be a drag to wait for the next bus, but at least I am outdoors. And, generally, the bus rides are more pleasant since I can see where I am and where I am going. Being stuck underground on the train or platform with some of the worst people in NYC is a lot more uncomfortable.

    My husband used to take the bus/subway to work but his company asked him to drive in to minimize risk of Covid. They pay his tolls/mileage – pretty sweet!

    My Dad uses Access-a-ride (door to door service for the disabled) a lot less than he used to since he just stays home more than he used to.

  142. @peterike
    New York isn't the city it once was. It's not a town of tough scrappy people anymore. It's a town where the middle and upper classes are Kens and Karens of every color: think of the Central Park bird guy and the dog lady. The rest is people of every conceivable race and creed on earth, a babble of riff-raff.

    9/11 was almost 20 years ago. Since that time, the town has been flooded with soyboy Kens and busybody Karens who came because there was so much to do and very little crime. If 9/11 happened today the response of the populace would be vastly different. As it is, NYC is filled with Covid cowards. Nearly every 20-something walking down the street has a mask on. Even riding bikes! It's absurd.

    On top of that you have a delinquent Mayor -- the worst that city has ever had -- and a power-mad Governor who rules by diktat and whim.

    When Covid hit, the wealthier people -- nearly all Kens and Karens, especially the Karens -- hightailed it out of town as fast as they could, believing every bit of propaganda. Many are never coming back -- they are THAT afraid. Even though Covid has been effectively over in NYC since MAY, the drumbeat of fear porn continues unabated, and the screws are kept on tight. People aren't returning to their offices because they're afraid to. And the companies are afraid to insist on it.

    Crime has spiked entirely due to cataclysmically terrible, uber-Woke changes in policy and policing. There isn't the least talk of pulling back some of the stupid changes around bail and so on. The wokesters love it. And so far, the shootings are mostly black-on-black, so nobody really cares.

    They are FINALLY opening up indoor dining on Sept. 30 (assuming it's not another Cuomo head-fake like the last time), at 25% of capacity. Of course if there's the tiniest uptick in meaningless Covid "cases" they will reverse course.

    If you look at any Cuomo tweet about Covid, the comments are full of people profusely thanking him for "saving us" and how all would be well were it not for the terrible Trump and racism and stuff. There may never have been a greater concentration of abject morons in one place in the history of civilization.

    Replies: @Supply and Demand, @The Wild Geese Howard, @TomSchmidt

    The rest is people of every conceivable race and creed on earth, a babble of riff-raff.

    So, it’s literally the progtard ideal for America – an amalgamation of Third World slums because, “muh ethnic cuisine,” and, “muh authenticity.”

    the town has been flooded with soyboy Kens and busybody Karens who came because there was so much to do and very little crime.

    I blame Sex and the City.

    If you look at any Cuomo tweet about Covid, the comments are full of people profusely thanking him for “saving us”

    Sad isn’t it? It’s nauseating to watch the sheeple gobble up whatever retarded pronouncement Governor Nipz makes that day.

    • Replies: @Peterike
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    an amalgamation of Third World slums because, “muh ethnic cuisine,”

    I can take a 15 min subway ride and eat at a Himalayan restaurant. Himalayan! How many people can say THAT?

    PS - I did eat there. Just more mediocre Asian slops.

    Replies: @Clyde

  143. @Supply and Demand
    @Anonymous

    My father-in-law has used the recent chaos to snap up 2 wonderful properties in Queens. I’m sending the half-Chinese daughter to university there with one of the properties so she can establish residency, and giving explicit orders to organize for deBlasio’s picked successor. Giuliani was good for the boomers and the protection of their wealth. DB is good for everyone else who wants to be enterprising.

    Replies: @Alden

    I think Queens is heavily Asian now so she should be safe.

  144. @Supply and Demand
    @peterike

    Where one group exits, another enters — as the white upper class departs, the Chinese upper class is happy to arrive, often at a steep discount. Qin & Qiong are higher IQ than Ken & Karen, and much more scrappy. NYC will continue.

    Replies: @hhsiii, @Peterike

    Ok, Mayor Lindsay.

  145. @Supply and Demand
    @peterike

    Where one group exits, another enters — as the white upper class departs, the Chinese upper class is happy to arrive, often at a steep discount. Qin & Qiong are higher IQ than Ken & Karen, and much more scrappy. NYC will continue.

    Replies: @hhsiii, @Peterike

    “ Qin & Qiong are higher IQ than Ken & Karen, and much more scrappy. NYC will continue.”

    No kidding. Only thing is, I don’t want to live in a Chinese city. The corruption and filth are bad enough as it is. Why would I want them increasing by a factor of ten or so?

  146. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @peterike


    The rest is people of every conceivable race and creed on earth, a babble of riff-raff.
     
    So, it's literally the progtard ideal for America - an amalgamation of Third World slums because, "muh ethnic cuisine," and, "muh authenticity."

    the town has been flooded with soyboy Kens and busybody Karens who came because there was so much to do and very little crime.
     
    I blame Sex and the City.

    If you look at any Cuomo tweet about Covid, the comments are full of people profusely thanking him for “saving us”
     
    Sad isn't it? It's nauseating to watch the sheeple gobble up whatever retarded pronouncement Governor Nipz makes that day.

    Replies: @Peterike

    an amalgamation of Third World slums because, “muh ethnic cuisine,”

    I can take a 15 min subway ride and eat at a Himalayan restaurant. Himalayan! How many people can say THAT?

    PS – I did eat there. Just more mediocre Asian slops.

    • Thanks: The Wild Geese Howard
    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Peterike


    I can take a 15 min subway ride and eat at a Himalayan restaurant. Himalayan! How many people can say THAT?
    PS – I did eat there. Just more mediocre Asian slops.
     
    This is why they were called gooks during the Vietnam war. Even my liberal mom used this word. White people had vastly more respect for themselves and the white race. Notice how legitimate meals get reduced down to an Orwellian 1984 "bowl" at Chipotle and others.
    Life eating out of a bowl like a rickshaw driver.
  147. @Bill Jones
    "New York City has not had very many coronavirus cases since getting blasted in the spring"

    Cuomo's killed all those likely to die, De Blasio has driven out the rest.

    I think you've got to go back to Lincoln to find someone who's killed more people in America than Andrew Cuomo.

    Replies: @Neoconned

    Mister Jones, sir:

    I agree w your sentiments regarding the Cuomo Homo clan and in particular that idiot governor but as a born & bred southerner i must differ with you regarding Lincoln.

    I just finished a few months ago Carl Sandbergs exhaustive biography of Lincoln and i found him a much more sympathetic figure & unifying figure than many of the vermin of his day and age like the insufferable radical Abolitionists….especially the New England elites….

    And then there were the psychotic Fireeater southern warmongers….who were some of the meanest mother f–kers this country has ever seen….

    Lincoln plodded that middle road….

    I’m sorry but as a off/on again NOLA denizen i have to correct this. Slavery as an economic system was on its way out anyway internationally….especially in the Americas….

    The stubborn, greedy Scots-Irish/English southern slaveowner aristocracy that was 40k-50k strong started the Civil War.

    Given the numerous compromises etc that were given to placate the Southern aristocracy during the 1820s to 1860 era its amazing the war was put off as long as it was.

    But the war wasn’t so much about slavery as race baiting Abolitionists put it or as neo Confederate retards claim. It was about the ECONOMIC SYSTEM of slavery which controlled everything from land use to taxation to how land was chopped up & used. Most slaves were useless or semi useless. The slave-sellers were con men of the highest order….

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Neoconned

    I suggest you read Lincolns first inaugaral address- the one they don't teach you in school.

    https://avalon.law.yale.edu/19th_century/lincoln1.asp

    He plainly states he has no problem with slavery and that he is not empowered to do anything about it if he did.


    "I do but quote from one of those speeches when I declare that--

    I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so.

    Those who nominated and elected me did so with full knowledge that I had made this and many similar declarations and had never recanted them; and more than this, they placed in the platform for my acceptance, and as a law to themselves and to me, the clear and emphatic resolution which I now read:

    Resolved, That the maintenance inviolate of the rights of the States, and especially the right of each State to order and control its own domestic institutions according to its own judgment exclusively, is essential to that balance of power on which the perfection and endurance of our political fabric depend; and we denounce the lawless invasion by armed force of the soil of any State or Territory, no matter what pretext, as among the gravest of crimes.
     

    "
    He threatens violence only if The Federal Govt doesn't get its money- remember import taxes had been tripled/quadrupled.

    In doing this there needs to be no bloodshed or violence, and there shall be none unless it be forced upon the national authority. The power confided to me will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places belonging to the Government and to collect the duties and imposts; but beyond what may be necessary for these objects, there will be no invasion
     
    It was greed of Lincoln and his paymasters, the Railroads which caused the war,
  148. anon[429] • Disclaimer says:
    @epebble
    @Achmed E. Newman

    https://www.calculatedriskblog.com/ gives High Frequency Indicators for the Economy every Monday morning. The data have been extremely stable since march drop-off showing only very gradual improvement (nationally).

    For example:

    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-KeCtxawIV0k/X19hrc6WBDI/AAAAAAAA2Lg/Xt8Ngc0Nh2oN21yXBJmqD__ULgdnnwFHgCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/TSASept142020.PNG

    https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-W1iSTRisdQ4/X146KX-rXOI/AAAAAAAA2LA/4oorbxx6EjY5tDN8ufZqW0mTyzJUlmk2ACLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/DinersSept122020.PNG

    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-QwvIYj29C_E/X110-4Nea4I/AAAAAAAA2Ko/-U6JW383EakEDjRHwJkICUvvwRep2CL2gCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/MovieSept122020.PNG

    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-EQQlWGgGzrc/X147_CV8hpI/AAAAAAAA2LI/PGebvPvYXu0q15zTus89aA48DmS6c1sygCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/TransitSept112020.PNG

    Replies: @anon

    Another graph for the nerds:

    The fall surge is here

  149. @Bugg
    Buses are primarily used in the outer boroughs for shorter intraboro trips or in areas that are not near subways. Think old ladies shopping, or high school kids going to school. There are some crosstown routes in Manhattan, but they aren't as used much. There are also express routes from the outer boroughs into Manhattan that are significantly more expensive than regular bus and subway fares, but they're actually comfortable, clean and you can almost always get a seat. Personally on the occasions when business has made it necessary to go into Manhattan I find a parking lot on line near my destination and park and walk. It isn't cheap, but you can find on line bookings that make it less expensive.

    What I hear for Wall Street and white shoe law firm people; they now now a lot of their office help was not very productive. Many of those jobs are not coming back. There have been and will be job cuts. Much of their work can be done over phones and bandwidth. Nobody wants to pay NYC rents nor taxes. And this is KILLING NY restaurants and bars. And the 2 idiots running this horror show have no clue about this economic disaster. If you cannot got an event at Madison Square Garden or Radio City (or Yankee or Shea Stadium), or take in a Broadway show, or go to a really good midtown restaurant, there isn't much point to being in Manhattan.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @TomSchmidt

    And the 2 idiots running this horror show have no clue about this economic disaster. If you cannot got an event at Madison Square Garden or Radio City (or Yankee or Shea Stadium), or take in a Broadway show, or go to a really good midtown restaurant, there isn’t much point to being in Manhattan.

    Yes! This seems obvious. Why do they insist on killing NYC?

  150. @peterike
    New York isn't the city it once was. It's not a town of tough scrappy people anymore. It's a town where the middle and upper classes are Kens and Karens of every color: think of the Central Park bird guy and the dog lady. The rest is people of every conceivable race and creed on earth, a babble of riff-raff.

    9/11 was almost 20 years ago. Since that time, the town has been flooded with soyboy Kens and busybody Karens who came because there was so much to do and very little crime. If 9/11 happened today the response of the populace would be vastly different. As it is, NYC is filled with Covid cowards. Nearly every 20-something walking down the street has a mask on. Even riding bikes! It's absurd.

    On top of that you have a delinquent Mayor -- the worst that city has ever had -- and a power-mad Governor who rules by diktat and whim.

    When Covid hit, the wealthier people -- nearly all Kens and Karens, especially the Karens -- hightailed it out of town as fast as they could, believing every bit of propaganda. Many are never coming back -- they are THAT afraid. Even though Covid has been effectively over in NYC since MAY, the drumbeat of fear porn continues unabated, and the screws are kept on tight. People aren't returning to their offices because they're afraid to. And the companies are afraid to insist on it.

    Crime has spiked entirely due to cataclysmically terrible, uber-Woke changes in policy and policing. There isn't the least talk of pulling back some of the stupid changes around bail and so on. The wokesters love it. And so far, the shootings are mostly black-on-black, so nobody really cares.

    They are FINALLY opening up indoor dining on Sept. 30 (assuming it's not another Cuomo head-fake like the last time), at 25% of capacity. Of course if there's the tiniest uptick in meaningless Covid "cases" they will reverse course.

    If you look at any Cuomo tweet about Covid, the comments are full of people profusely thanking him for "saving us" and how all would be well were it not for the terrible Trump and racism and stuff. There may never have been a greater concentration of abject morons in one place in the history of civilization.

    Replies: @Supply and Demand, @The Wild Geese Howard, @TomSchmidt

    Some people genuinely loved Stalin. Others knew enough not to show that they didn’t love him.

  151. @Dave from Oz
    Workers and businesses have discovered that in the age of the internet, actually going in to work is bullshit. The only people who need to actually, physically go into work are people in manufacturing - making things, building things - which is not what happens in the big city. The future is virtual and online. At last, the nice people have found a place to flee to.

    Replies: @Peter Shaw

    Doubtful.

    Whilst it may be possible to keep the wheels turning with work from home, innovation and culture buidling are only really done in person.

    That and the fact that anyone who permanentky works from home might as well be in another country

    So whilst it will not go back to how it was, cities will still have their place

  152. So data point of one.

    I caught a train in Australia from from Melbourne (Australia’s second largest city, currently under stage 4 lockdown) to my home in the country. Approximately 200kms in the early evening

    The train would have seated 300 plus passengers. There was no conductor, no guards at the station, 6 passengers for tbe first 100kms od the journey and 1 passemger (me) for the second 100 kms.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Peter Shaw

    Living in a ghost town was the Rolling Stones recent single. you were riding on a Covid ghost train.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=14&v=8GWY0ahBM8c&feature=emb_logo

  153. @Peterike
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    an amalgamation of Third World slums because, “muh ethnic cuisine,”

    I can take a 15 min subway ride and eat at a Himalayan restaurant. Himalayan! How many people can say THAT?

    PS - I did eat there. Just more mediocre Asian slops.

    Replies: @Clyde

    I can take a 15 min subway ride and eat at a Himalayan restaurant. Himalayan! How many people can say THAT?
    PS – I did eat there. Just more mediocre Asian slops.

    This is why they were called gooks during the Vietnam war. Even my liberal mom used this word. White people had vastly more respect for themselves and the white race. Notice how legitimate meals get reduced down to an Orwellian 1984 “bowl” at Chipotle and others.
    Life eating out of a bowl like a rickshaw driver.

  154. @Peter Shaw
    So data point of one.

    I caught a train in Australia from from Melbourne (Australia's second largest city, currently under stage 4 lockdown) to my home in the country. Approximately 200kms in the early evening

    The train would have seated 300 plus passengers. There was no conductor, no guards at the station, 6 passengers for tbe first 100kms od the journey and 1 passemger (me) for the second 100 kms.

    Replies: @Clyde

    Living in a ghost town was the Rolling Stones recent single. you were riding on a Covid ghost train.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=14&v=8GWY0ahBM8c&feature=emb_logo

  155. Until recently the subway was, indeed, almost empty, long after restaurants and parks were attracting crowds.

    On Saturday, however, the subway was almost crowded, for the first time in my experience. I wondered what had changed. Then a woman near me said to her companion that this was the first time she was riding the subway since the pandemic began.

    Somehow all at once a great many people decided they were no longer afraid?

    Access-a-ride is a bus for the disabled.

    Meanwhile Metro North had double the usual number of passengers yesterday, and the Trailways bus from upstate was crowded–every seat taken–for the first time in memory.

  156. Anonymous[285] • Disclaimer says:

    On Saturday, however, the subway was almost crowded, for the first time in my experience. I wondered what had changed. Then a woman near me said to her companion that this was the first time she was riding the subway since the pandemic began.

    I believe it’s highly likely President Trump’s rapid fire campaign appearances across America, each one dwarfing Biden’s appearances in fan attendance, is having a decided subliminal effect for onlookers from both sides of the political aisle.

    Trump conveys a casual power that Biden can never generate. Biden, lacking self-possession, can only reflect his constituency, so at best, he exhibits the personal power of an old, shrill, angry soy boy. Not an engaging persona, to be sure, but certainly a somewhat repulsive, and definitely tragic one.

    The completely congruous sound and images of trump on the collective television screens of the teeming masses, casually improvising before enthusiastic crowds, while maskless, and loving it, is bound to influence people despite their initial misgivings.

    It’s how true leaders work.

    I don’t think it’s a far stretch to align Trump’s leadership style with George Patton’s. Patton was direct, transparent in spite of himself, not politically inclined even though he was operating in a primarily political arena, and many people considered him “a piece of work.” Some people hated his guts. I recall an historic instance of him driving into Mexico with troops to kill Pancho Villa. Although he fell short of his goal, he did come back with the dead carcass of Villa’s right-hand man strapped to the hood of his Packard.

    That’s not a politician. That’s not a spin doctor. That’s a leader. A leader completes tasks, or finds the next best option while out in the field. They make shit happen.

    That’s Trump, and that’s why so many don’t “get” him. They’ve never worked under a leader in their lives. Of course Trump seems bizarre to them. They’ve normalized being “losers.” Leaders dismiss committed losers before doing anything else. Neither understands the other.

    But again, his authentic behavior must have a subliminal effect.

    So New Yorkers are getting back on the subway.

  157. @Neoconned
    @Bill Jones

    Mister Jones, sir:

    I agree w your sentiments regarding the Cuomo Homo clan and in particular that idiot governor but as a born & bred southerner i must differ with you regarding Lincoln.

    I just finished a few months ago Carl Sandbergs exhaustive biography of Lincoln and i found him a much more sympathetic figure & unifying figure than many of the vermin of his day and age like the insufferable radical Abolitionists....especially the New England elites....

    And then there were the psychotic Fireeater southern warmongers....who were some of the meanest mother f--kers this country has ever seen....

    Lincoln plodded that middle road....

    I'm sorry but as a off/on again NOLA denizen i have to correct this. Slavery as an economic system was on its way out anyway internationally....especially in the Americas....

    The stubborn, greedy Scots-Irish/English southern slaveowner aristocracy that was 40k-50k strong started the Civil War.

    Given the numerous compromises etc that were given to placate the Southern aristocracy during the 1820s to 1860 era its amazing the war was put off as long as it was.

    But the war wasn't so much about slavery as race baiting Abolitionists put it or as neo Confederate retards claim. It was about the ECONOMIC SYSTEM of slavery which controlled everything from land use to taxation to how land was chopped up & used. Most slaves were useless or semi useless. The slave-sellers were con men of the highest order....

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    I suggest you read Lincolns first inaugaral address- the one they don’t teach you in school.

    https://avalon.law.yale.edu/19th_century/lincoln1.asp

    He plainly states he has no problem with slavery and that he is not empowered to do anything about it if he did.

    “I do but quote from one of those speeches when I declare that–

    I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so.

    Those who nominated and elected me did so with full knowledge that I had made this and many similar declarations and had never recanted them; and more than this, they placed in the platform for my acceptance, and as a law to themselves and to me, the clear and emphatic resolution which I now read:

    Resolved, That the maintenance inviolate of the rights of the States, and especially the right of each State to order and control its own domestic institutions according to its own judgment exclusively, is essential to that balance of power on which the perfection and endurance of our political fabric depend; and we denounce the lawless invasion by armed force of the soil of any State or Territory, no matter what pretext, as among the gravest of crimes.


    He threatens violence only if The Federal Govt doesn’t get its money- remember import taxes had been tripled/quadrupled.

    In doing this there needs to be no bloodshed or violence, and there shall be none unless it be forced upon the national authority. The power confided to me will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places belonging to the Government and to collect the duties and imposts; but beyond what may be necessary for these objects, there will be no invasion

    It was greed of Lincoln and his paymasters, the Railroads which caused the war,

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