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Nominative Determinism: Hunter S. Biden's "Fear and Loathing in Palm Springs"
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Howie Carr of the Boston Herald was perhaps the first to point out how much The New Yorker’s 2019 article on the misadventures of Hunter Biden, Esq. reads like an uninspired book report on Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. From The New Yorker:

More from The New Yorker:

Zachary Romfo, who worked at the Hertz office in Prescott, told me that he found a crack pipe in the car and, on one of the consoles, a line of white-powder residue. Beau Biden’s attorney-general badge was on the dashboard. Hertz called the Prescott police department, and officers there filed a “narcotics offense” report, listing the items seized from the car, including a plastic baggie containing a “white powdery substance,” a Secret Service business card, credit cards, and Hunter’s driver’s license. Later, according to a police report, Secret Service agents informed Prescott police that Hunter was “secure/well.” Subsequent test results indicated that the glass pipe contained cocaine residue, but investigators didn’t find any fingerprints on it. Public prosecutors in the county and the city declined to bring a case against Hunter, citing a lack of evidence that the pipe had been used by him. Jon Paladini, Prescott’s city attorney, told me that he was not aware of any requests by officials in Washington to drop the investigation into Hunter. “It’s a very Republican area,” he said. “I don’t think political favors, necessarily, would even work, had they been requested.” …

One night, outside a club on Hollywood Boulevard, Hunter and another man got into an argument, and a group of bouncers intervened. A friend of one of the bouncers, a Samoan man who went by the nickname Baby Down, felt sorry for Hunter and took him to Mel’s Drive-In to get some food, and to his hotel to pick up his belongings. Early on the morning of October 26th, Baby Down dropped Hunter off at the Hertz rental office at Los Angeles International Airport.

The secret of Fear and Loathing is that nothing ever happens in it. Hunter S. Thompson mostly just drops people off at the airport and deals with car rental agencies, while having hilarious thoughts about all the horrible things that might (but never do) happen. Hunter Biden’s life seems more action-packed.

In case you are wondering, Hunter Biden was born in 1970, the year before Hunter S. Thompson became famous for F&L. Anyway, I really doubt Joe was into HST ever. But maybe Hunter’s late mother?

 
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  1. So ,will the democrat murder hornets be coming for Joe now …..it’s all falling into place.

  2. He said that he has no idea whether the owl was real or a hallucination.

    Describes well Joe Biden’s mental state.

  3. lol.

    The owl is a very common “mask” for UFO alien sightings…..

    Maybe Hunter can produce his own Urantia Papers:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Urantia_Book

    • Replies: @tyrone
    @Justvisiting

    Oooooh, mothman!…….

  4. Now I understand what Steve was riffing on with his previous tweets. Driving while sleepy can be problematic, with or without chemical enhancements.

    • Replies: @donut
    @Hypnotoad666

    Agree and thanks .

    , @Paco Wové
    @Hypnotoad666

    Ha! Hadn't even realized until now that the background music is the Beatles' Golden Slumbers.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Hypnotoad666


    Driving while sleepy can be problematic, with or without chemical enhancements.
     
    Great advice.

    I've lived a pretty tame life--never sent to war, fights stopped a the fist level. Probably the closest i've come to being killed was being knocked off the road by a drunk, while driving to Thanksgiving at a cousin's in Houston ... but my car landed on its side in Stagner Lake outside Smithville. Popped out the shattered window, town doc got the glass out of my eye ... i was peachy.

    But the closest i've come to killing myself has almost certainly been driving sleepy.

    Don't do it! Definitely just pull over--in non-vibrant area--plop in the back and snooze.

    Sleep is good. Don't drive home without it.
  5. Did you catch the punch line (emphasis mine) of The New Yorker article about the rental car, because the Herald seems to have overlooked it?

    Zachary Romfo, who worked at the Hertz office in Prescott, told me that he found a crack pipe in the car and, on one of the consoles, a line of white-powder residue. Beau Biden’s attorney-general badge was on the dashboard. Hertz called the Prescott police department, and officers there filed a “narcotics offense” report, listing the items seized from the car, including a plastic baggie containing a “white powdery substance,” a Secret Service business card, credit cards, and Hunter’s driver’s license. Later, according to a police report, Secret Service agents informed Prescott police that Hunter was “secure/well.” Subsequent test results indicated that the glass pipe contained cocaine residue, but investigators didn’t find any fingerprints on it. Public prosecutors in the county and the city declined to bring a case against Hunter, citing a lack of evidence that the pipe had been used by him. Jon Paladini, Prescott’s city attorney, told me that he was not aware of any requests by officials in Washington to drop the investigation into Hunter. “It’s a very Republican area,” he said. “I don’t think political favors, necessarily, would even work, had they been requested.”

    The lack of evidence is strong with these guys.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @The Alarmist

    Thanks.

    , @James O'Meara
    @The Alarmist

    "The lack of evidence is strong with these guys."

    The only things most people seem to learn from encounters with logic in college are:

    1. One counterexample refutes a generalization: "Not all of them are like that."

    2. Unless there's a knockdown mathematical proof, you don't really know it. "Well, every vote COULD have been cast for Biden, it's not a self-contradiction, so it COULD happen."

    I choose to believe this shows most people shouldn't be exposed to logic, not that teaching logic is harmful in itself. It should be left to the Russells and Carnaps, it just poisons hoi polloi.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @obwandiyag

  6. So, he was two when his mom and sister were killed in a car accident, and he was “seriously injured.” Maybe he hit his head?

    • Replies: @Dago Shoes
    @JimDandy

    There was an article about just this possibility … not sure, however, if the author meant it to be taken seriously or not.

    But, yes, Hunter and his brother and father Joe were all injured -- Hunter supposedly knocked unconscious.

    https://vdare.com/articles/hunter-biden-probably-brain-damaged-spells-trouble-for-a-biden-white-house

    Replies: @JimDandy

  7. @The Alarmist
    Did you catch the punch line (emphasis mine) of The New Yorker article about the rental car, because the Herald seems to have overlooked it?

    Zachary Romfo, who worked at the Hertz office in Prescott, told me that he found a crack pipe in the car and, on one of the consoles, a line of white-powder residue. Beau Biden’s attorney-general badge was on the dashboard. Hertz called the Prescott police department, and officers there filed a “narcotics offense” report, listing the items seized from the car, including a plastic baggie containing a “white powdery substance,” a Secret Service business card, credit cards, and Hunter’s driver’s license. Later, according to a police report, Secret Service agents informed Prescott police that Hunter was “secure/well.” Subsequent test results indicated that the glass pipe contained cocaine residue, but investigators didn’t find any fingerprints on it. Public prosecutors in the county and the city declined to bring a case against Hunter, citing a lack of evidence that the pipe had been used by him. Jon Paladini, Prescott’s city attorney, told me that he was not aware of any requests by officials in Washington to drop the investigation into Hunter. “It’s a very Republican area,” he said. “I don’t think political favors, necessarily, would even work, had they been requested.”
     
    The lack of evidence is strong with these guys.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @James O'Meara

    Thanks.

  8. To be serious for a moment: I believe Joe’s first wife’s last name was Hunter. And Hunter Biden’s full name is Robert Hunter Biden.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    To be serious for a moment: I believe Joe’s first wife’s last name was Hunter. And Hunter Biden’s full name is Robert Hunter Biden.
     
    Goes well with Beau Gatherer Biden.
  9. Hunter said that, in his talks with his father, “I’m saying sorry to him, and he says, ‘I’m the one who’s sorry,’ and we have an ongoing debate about who should be more sorry. And we both realize that the only true antidote to any of this is winning. He says, ‘Look, it’s going to go away.’ There is truly a higher purpose here, and this will go away. So can you survive the assault?”

    I understand many parents are blind to the shortcomings of their children, but this is next level stuff. Other than as a conduit for collecting bribe money, what possible purpose could Hunter Biden have in helping Joe’s political career? No one is going to listen to or respect Joe’s junkie son even in the rare event he has a good idea.

    The whole article is interesting, I hadn’t read this before. Hunter got a liar loan for 110% of the value of a $1.6 million house in 2006. He and uncle Jimmy also got swindled trying to buy a hedge fund from a convicted felon. Hunter and John Heinz’s son start a consulting company that has no value other their own political connections. It is clear window into the ruling class, kind of a John McCain at the Naval Academy on steroids. There are never consequences for failure and infinite opportunities. This system has to collapse eventually.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Barnard

    'It is clear window into the ruling class, kind of a John McCain at the Naval Academy on steroids. There are never consequences for failure and infinite opportunities. This system has to collapse eventually."

    And this is the juice behind the idea that "diversity is our strength" and "enough with all these old White guys." From the other side: Trump's cabinet, all working against him but somehow he seems to think he can only appoint old, fat, White males.

    When the system favors White men ("infinite opportunities"), AND has no "consequences for failure," people will conclude it's the White guys fault.

    As Chris Rock said about OJ, I don't agree, but I understand..."

    Replies: @Father O'Hara

    , @Peter D. Bredon
    @Barnard

    Biden/Biden channeling Pres. Muffley and Premier Kissoff (go to 3:30 if you must).


    https://youtu.be/SFhyqGTgFH8

  10. Yeah but did Dr. Jill Biden get credit for life-long learning?

  11. Steve, thanks for the “Rango” clip. Adult animation too funny.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Buffalo Joe

    Here's my review of "Rango." They let the guy, Gore Verbinski, who made a fortune off "Pirates of the Caribbean" do whatever he wanted in "Rango" and it's pretty wild.

    https://www.takimag.com/article/rango_johnny_depps_peyote_western/

  12. The New Yorker article is a very well-crafted attempt to sanitize the unsanitizeable! 😎

    • Replies: @Prester John
    @Dan Hayes

    Well, considering that the NYer is part of the demokrat party apparatchiki, this would come as no surprise.

    I still give his old man one year max before he exits stage left (where else?) in favor of Womyn of Kullah Kamalalalalolala.

  13. Well, let’s hope he really runs wild ‘n free as the President’s son. We’re stuck with the next four years; we might as well enjoy them.

  14. Really, who can respect the Bidens after all the sleaze that came out? There is a reason Biden could never win a single primary until the Party stepped up and made it clear that he was Stop-Bernie.

    And I think Dr. Jill, is highly likely to call in the Chinese Military to help bail her out when things start going south:

    A. States just ignoring federal lockdown orders, gun grabs, outlawing Christianity / Christmas, banning consumption of certain foods like meat, eggs, poultry, milk etc (destined for China).
    B. States pushing back with force against say, Feds trying to seize said supplies of food (for China) or guns (so no hunting that’s reserved for Chinese only deplorable!)

    Dr. Phil has more legitimacy and gravitas than Dr. Jill. IF the Bidens just focus on looting the treasury like most Democrats things will be OK, but Dr. Jill is stupid and full of herself enough to do something more. And being China’s bought ho, her family will push out resources to China while Americans starve.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Whiskey


    And I think Dr. Jill, is highly likely to call in the Chinese Military to help bail her out when things start going south:
     
    https://twitter.com/CopingMAGA/status/1338623106395607041
  15. @Hypnotoad666
    Now I understand what Steve was riffing on with his previous tweets. Driving while sleepy can be problematic, with or without chemical enhancements.

    https://youtu.be/Jgw8MEwTVwM

    Replies: @donut, @Paco Wové, @AnotherDad

    Agree and thanks .

  16. @Hypnotoad666
    Now I understand what Steve was riffing on with his previous tweets. Driving while sleepy can be problematic, with or without chemical enhancements.

    https://youtu.be/Jgw8MEwTVwM

    Replies: @donut, @Paco Wové, @AnotherDad

    Ha! Hadn’t even realized until now that the background music is the Beatles’ Golden Slumbers.

  17. On a related note I decided to read the wikipedia page on Chelsea Clinton’s convicted-felon-father-in-law. His crime was serial fraud to the tune of 10 million in cahoots with west Africans. The way it’s worded it reads like he did one of those swindles where they e-mail people claiming to be Nigerian royalty who need help getting their millions dollars out of Lagos. Also he is supposed to pay them back and still owes 9.8 million.

    Does anybody else remember when Chelsea wanted to go to medical school and become a physician?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Morton's toes

    I think she was interested in a career in public health at one point and may have cadged an MPH.

  18. OT:

    Steve, you’re a baseball guy, what’s your take on the Cleveland Indians cucking to the woke?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/13/sports/baseball/cleveland-indians-baseball-name-change.html

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Dr. X

    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

    I wonder if the push to remove memories of America's rich Indian heritage is being done in part in deference to the rising and already vastly more influential New Indians?

    Replies: @HammerJack, @JohnnyWalker123, @B36, @anon, @Joe Stalin, @Mike Tre, @Dr. X, @Anon, @e.272, @JohnnyD

  19. Something tells me that if you were to ask Joe Biden about Hunter S. Thompson, Biden would start boasting about how he ran for President in 1972 and beat Richard Nixon, despite being a Black-transgender-Irish-Catholic coal miner from Scranton.

    • LOL: kaganovitch
  20. @Dr. X
    OT:

    Steve, you're a baseball guy, what's your take on the Cleveland Indians cucking to the woke?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/13/sports/baseball/cleveland-indians-baseball-name-change.html

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

    I wonder if the push to remove memories of America’s rich Indian heritage is being done in part in deference to the rising and already vastly more influential New Indians?

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Steve Sailer

    In the bad old days, we paid respect.

    https://i.ibb.co/ckbV9W9/US0005-Buffalo-Nickel-1920-D-MS67-2x3-56a178f35f9b58b7d0bfa2c5.jpg


    https://cdn.coinvalues.com/original/3d/ba/cd/1900-indian-head-penny-31-1423488022.jpg


    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/f1/ad/b9/f1adb905d294b8853198340439bd493d--silver-certificate-dollar-bills.jpg

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Stick

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Steve Sailer


    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

     

    Yes, I've noticed this too.

    Hardly anyone talks about Native Americans these days.

    In the past, Natives were glamorized by the popular culture, media, academia, etc. You always used to see people telling stories about them (often related to Lewis&Clark, Oregon Trail, pilgrims, Squanto, or pioneer days). They were valorized by tv and movies (Bonanza, Peter Pan, Dances with Wolves, Lone Ranger&Tonto, Pocahontas, etc).

    I'm old enough to remember when Natives were seen as noble warrior types. That's why they used a Native (or a guy who sorta looked Native) in that "Crying Indian" PSA.

    Sports teams were named after Natives as a form of respect, not mockery.

    Now the Natives are disappearing from public view. They're the one minority who (for whatever reason) don't get public exposure. The last time they were in public view a lot was maybe the 90s.

    The disappearance of the Natives is one of the more interesting phenomenons of the last two decades.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Bill in Glendale, @PiltdownMan, @anon, @prosa123, @gent

    , @B36
    @Steve Sailer

    Or, keeping Native Americans out of sight and out of mind so they can't horn in on the upcoming reparations scam.

    , @anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Speaking as a borderline millennial who grew up in the imperial capital, Indians definitely had lost their cachet in my demographic... no cowboys and Indians on the playground for us. I think their star had started falling before the rise of the Nu-Mericans (tm).

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Steve Sailer

    In Chicago, they got a whole OTA TV channel.


    Native American television channel makes debut in Chicago

    FNX is the first and only nationally distributed TV channel in the U.S. exclusively devoted to Native American and World Indigenous programming and is carried by 20 affiliate stations in 21 states from Alaska to New York, reaching more than 57 million households across the United States. This marks the first time the 5 Federally Recognized tribes, and the Tribal communities of North Dakota will have a television channel exclusively devoted to telling stories by and about American Indian communities. The channel currently features North Dakotan tribal members on various genres of programs as well as original series Wassaja, The AUX and Studio 49.

    "Launching FNX in Chicago is extremely exciting for all who work so hard to deliver First Nations Experience daily. This partnership with WRJK TV aligns with our mission to provide the global audience Native American and World Indigenous educational content that informs, inspires and entertains." said Interim Director of Operations Anthony Papa.

    https://fnx.org/press-release/native-american-television-channel-makes-debut-in-chicago/
     

    Replies: @John Up North, @Jim Don Bob, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Mike Tre
    @Steve Sailer

    What's an AmerIndian to do these days for a little attention? It's almost as if they need to beat a drum in some kid's face!

    , @Dr. X
    @Steve Sailer

    If you read the Bakke decision, in 1973 the UC Davis med school had an explicit admissions quota for blacks, "Chicanos," and American Indians.

    "Chicanos" have obviously become Latinx, but, with the exception of Elizabeth Warren, you don't hear much about the Indian cut of the affirmative action racket any more.

    Maybe the tax-free Indian casino industry that developed since the 1990s is seen as sufficient payoff...

    , @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDYoM1FGmLg

    Replies: @Steve from Detroit

    , @e.272
    @Steve Sailer

    There's an embarrassing problem that American Indians cause for blacks. Indians fought back relentlessly for 400 years against their European conquerors and were very difficult to keep as slaves. For that, they earned admiration and respect. Majestic rivers, hundreds of cities and towns, and entire states are named after Indian tribes and words. Blacks get ghetto roads and school buildings named after their heroes. This, I think, is the reason Indians are being marginalized.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @JohnnyD
    @Steve Sailer

    2020: The New Indians use the Old American Indians to bring in more New Indians to code.

  21. I assumed the first passage was the Hunter Thompson one, good work.

    Hertz was pretty understanding!

  22. @Justvisiting
    lol.

    The owl is a very common "mask" for UFO alien sightings.....

    Maybe Hunter can produce his own Urantia Papers:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Urantia_Book

    Replies: @tyrone

    Oooooh, mothman!…….

  23. @The Alarmist
    Did you catch the punch line (emphasis mine) of The New Yorker article about the rental car, because the Herald seems to have overlooked it?

    Zachary Romfo, who worked at the Hertz office in Prescott, told me that he found a crack pipe in the car and, on one of the consoles, a line of white-powder residue. Beau Biden’s attorney-general badge was on the dashboard. Hertz called the Prescott police department, and officers there filed a “narcotics offense” report, listing the items seized from the car, including a plastic baggie containing a “white powdery substance,” a Secret Service business card, credit cards, and Hunter’s driver’s license. Later, according to a police report, Secret Service agents informed Prescott police that Hunter was “secure/well.” Subsequent test results indicated that the glass pipe contained cocaine residue, but investigators didn’t find any fingerprints on it. Public prosecutors in the county and the city declined to bring a case against Hunter, citing a lack of evidence that the pipe had been used by him. Jon Paladini, Prescott’s city attorney, told me that he was not aware of any requests by officials in Washington to drop the investigation into Hunter. “It’s a very Republican area,” he said. “I don’t think political favors, necessarily, would even work, had they been requested.”
     
    The lack of evidence is strong with these guys.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @James O'Meara

    “The lack of evidence is strong with these guys.”

    The only things most people seem to learn from encounters with logic in college are:

    1. One counterexample refutes a generalization: “Not all of them are like that.”

    2. Unless there’s a knockdown mathematical proof, you don’t really know it. “Well, every vote COULD have been cast for Biden, it’s not a self-contradiction, so it COULD happen.”

    I choose to believe this shows most people shouldn’t be exposed to logic, not that teaching logic is harmful in itself. It should be left to the Russells and Carnaps, it just poisons hoi polloi.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @James O'Meara

    My undergrad degree was Aerospace Engineering, so I dealt a lot in fuzzy logic.

    , @obwandiyag
    @James O'Meara

    THE hoi polloi don't have a clue what logic is. Other than something Spock says all the time. If you think college-educated people constitute THE hoi polloi, you're sadly mistaken. And yes, I did say "THE" hoi polloi, because that is how you say it (because English is not Greek) if you are a grown-up and not a childish pedant.

  24. @Barnard

    Hunter said that, in his talks with his father, “I’m saying sorry to him, and he says, ‘I’m the one who’s sorry,’ and we have an ongoing debate about who should be more sorry. And we both realize that the only true antidote to any of this is winning. He says, ‘Look, it’s going to go away.’ There is truly a higher purpose here, and this will go away. So can you survive the assault?”
     
    I understand many parents are blind to the shortcomings of their children, but this is next level stuff. Other than as a conduit for collecting bribe money, what possible purpose could Hunter Biden have in helping Joe's political career? No one is going to listen to or respect Joe's junkie son even in the rare event he has a good idea.

    The whole article is interesting, I hadn't read this before. Hunter got a liar loan for 110% of the value of a $1.6 million house in 2006. He and uncle Jimmy also got swindled trying to buy a hedge fund from a convicted felon. Hunter and John Heinz's son start a consulting company that has no value other their own political connections. It is clear window into the ruling class, kind of a John McCain at the Naval Academy on steroids. There are never consequences for failure and infinite opportunities. This system has to collapse eventually.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Peter D. Bredon

    ‘It is clear window into the ruling class, kind of a John McCain at the Naval Academy on steroids. There are never consequences for failure and infinite opportunities. This system has to collapse eventually.”

    And this is the juice behind the idea that “diversity is our strength” and “enough with all these old White guys.” From the other side: Trump’s cabinet, all working against him but somehow he seems to think he can only appoint old, fat, White males.

    When the system favors White men (“infinite opportunities”), AND has no “consequences for failure,” people will conclude it’s the White guys fault.

    As Chris Rock said about OJ, I don’t agree, but I understand…”

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    @James O'Meara

    He took that from Sam Kinison,who was discussing wife beating.

  25. @Barnard

    Hunter said that, in his talks with his father, “I’m saying sorry to him, and he says, ‘I’m the one who’s sorry,’ and we have an ongoing debate about who should be more sorry. And we both realize that the only true antidote to any of this is winning. He says, ‘Look, it’s going to go away.’ There is truly a higher purpose here, and this will go away. So can you survive the assault?”
     
    I understand many parents are blind to the shortcomings of their children, but this is next level stuff. Other than as a conduit for collecting bribe money, what possible purpose could Hunter Biden have in helping Joe's political career? No one is going to listen to or respect Joe's junkie son even in the rare event he has a good idea.

    The whole article is interesting, I hadn't read this before. Hunter got a liar loan for 110% of the value of a $1.6 million house in 2006. He and uncle Jimmy also got swindled trying to buy a hedge fund from a convicted felon. Hunter and John Heinz's son start a consulting company that has no value other their own political connections. It is clear window into the ruling class, kind of a John McCain at the Naval Academy on steroids. There are never consequences for failure and infinite opportunities. This system has to collapse eventually.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Peter D. Bredon

    Biden/Biden channeling Pres. Muffley and Premier Kissoff (go to 3:30 if you must).

  26. @Steve Sailer
    @Dr. X

    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

    I wonder if the push to remove memories of America's rich Indian heritage is being done in part in deference to the rising and already vastly more influential New Indians?

    Replies: @HammerJack, @JohnnyWalker123, @B36, @anon, @Joe Stalin, @Mike Tre, @Dr. X, @Anon, @e.272, @JohnnyD

    In the bad old days, we paid respect.


    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @HammerJack

    Thanks for the reminders, HJ. The last time they put an Indian on the currency/coinage was with those Sacajawea dollar coins. I made fun of them same as with the Susan Anthony ones, because, unfortunately, this was just another dig at the White Man and Lewis & Clark and their Corps of Discovery expedition, as if this one Indian was more important than them.

    That one was just more prodding, as the Harriet Tubman-on-the-$20 may yet still be. If Crazy Horse or, better yet, Quanah Parker, last chief of the Comanches, were put on a coin or bill, I'd have no problem with it.

    Replies: @Adam Smith, @Old Prude

    , @Stick
    @HammerJack

    What's odd is that the Redskin logo comes from the US Nickel which depicts a prarie Sioux chief. The Redskins were actually the Pennepe Indians that lived along the Pennepe River now known as the Deleware River and Indians. They were called Redskins because they painted themselves red. Go figure. Remember, if someone paints themselves a color do not refer to them as that color. That be racist.

  27. @Steve Sailer
    @Dr. X

    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

    I wonder if the push to remove memories of America's rich Indian heritage is being done in part in deference to the rising and already vastly more influential New Indians?

    Replies: @HammerJack, @JohnnyWalker123, @B36, @anon, @Joe Stalin, @Mike Tre, @Dr. X, @Anon, @e.272, @JohnnyD

    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

    Yes, I’ve noticed this too.

    Hardly anyone talks about Native Americans these days.

    In the past, Natives were glamorized by the popular culture, media, academia, etc. You always used to see people telling stories about them (often related to Lewis&Clark, Oregon Trail, pilgrims, Squanto, or pioneer days). They were valorized by tv and movies (Bonanza, Peter Pan, Dances with Wolves, Lone Ranger&Tonto, Pocahontas, etc).

    I’m old enough to remember when Natives were seen as noble warrior types. That’s why they used a Native (or a guy who sorta looked Native) in that “Crying Indian” PSA.

    Sports teams were named after Natives as a form of respect, not mockery.

    Now the Natives are disappearing from public view. They’re the one minority who (for whatever reason) don’t get public exposure. The last time they were in public view a lot was maybe the 90s.

    The disappearance of the Natives is one of the more interesting phenomenons of the last two decades.

    • Replies: @Jimbo
    @JohnnyWalker123

    That's what I keep pointing out to people: Indians these days are looked upon as pathetic eternal.victims, useful only as proof of the evils of the white man. So anything like a team name has to be mockery, since calling attention to them in any way only shows their pathetic nature. So most people literally can't comprehend that these team names were adopted out of respect. Just doesn't compute.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Bill in Glendale
    @JohnnyWalker123

    But look how sacred they are in Canada. And there's some trend at universities to frequently "acknowledge" that the campus land belonged to (was taken from) indigenous peoples.

    , @PiltdownMan
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Now the Natives are disappearing from public view. They’re the one minority who (for whatever reason) don’t get public exposure. The last time they were in public view a lot was maybe the 90s.
     
    Or perhaps the 70s.

    https://youtu.be/21ixwIaN7qw

    https://i.imgur.com/UGfYaG4.jpg
    , @anon
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Now the Natives are disappearing from public view. They’re the one minority who (for whatever reason) don’t get public exposure.

    The Navaho out in Arizona and New Mexico got exposure this year as victims of the Coof.
    Probably about 15 minutes worth. Not necessarily fame, though.

    , @prosa123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Now the Natives are disappearing from public view. They’re the one minority who (for whatever reason) don’t get public exposure.

    What about the gambling casinos?

    , @gent
    @JohnnyWalker123

    They're more politically useful if they're dead and silent.

  28. @Steve Sailer
    @Dr. X

    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

    I wonder if the push to remove memories of America's rich Indian heritage is being done in part in deference to the rising and already vastly more influential New Indians?

    Replies: @HammerJack, @JohnnyWalker123, @B36, @anon, @Joe Stalin, @Mike Tre, @Dr. X, @Anon, @e.272, @JohnnyD

    Or, keeping Native Americans out of sight and out of mind so they can’t horn in on the upcoming reparations scam.

    • Thanks: Stan d Mute
  29. @Steve Sailer
    @Dr. X

    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

    I wonder if the push to remove memories of America's rich Indian heritage is being done in part in deference to the rising and already vastly more influential New Indians?

    Replies: @HammerJack, @JohnnyWalker123, @B36, @anon, @Joe Stalin, @Mike Tre, @Dr. X, @Anon, @e.272, @JohnnyD

    Speaking as a borderline millennial who grew up in the imperial capital, Indians definitely had lost their cachet in my demographic… no cowboys and Indians on the playground for us. I think their star had started falling before the rise of the Nu-Mericans ™.

  30. OK, I now like Hunter Biden.

  31. @Steve Sailer
    @Dr. X

    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

    I wonder if the push to remove memories of America's rich Indian heritage is being done in part in deference to the rising and already vastly more influential New Indians?

    Replies: @HammerJack, @JohnnyWalker123, @B36, @anon, @Joe Stalin, @Mike Tre, @Dr. X, @Anon, @e.272, @JohnnyD

    In Chicago, they got a whole OTA TV channel.

    Native American television channel makes debut in Chicago

    FNX is the first and only nationally distributed TV channel in the U.S. exclusively devoted to Native American and World Indigenous programming and is carried by 20 affiliate stations in 21 states from Alaska to New York, reaching more than 57 million households across the United States. This marks the first time the 5 Federally Recognized tribes, and the Tribal communities of North Dakota will have a television channel exclusively devoted to telling stories by and about American Indian communities. The channel currently features North Dakotan tribal members on various genres of programs as well as original series Wassaja, The AUX and Studio 49.

    “Launching FNX in Chicago is extremely exciting for all who work so hard to deliver First Nations Experience daily. This partnership with WRJK TV aligns with our mission to provide the global audience Native American and World Indigenous educational content that informs, inspires and entertains.” said Interim Director of Operations Anthony Papa.

    https://fnx.org/press-release/native-american-television-channel-makes-debut-in-chicago/

    • Replies: @John Up North
    @Joe Stalin

    On Chicago's Northside there was for many years an American Indian Center located on West Wilson Avenue. I think the building had at one time been a Masonic Lodge. I stopped in a few times. They had a Native American museum and some classrooms. There was also a large gym where the people would perform weekly colorful native dances with drums and singing. Now that was some positive diversity.

    The neighborhood gentrified to the point where just a few years ago the AIC closed and their building was sold and turned into luxury condos. I don't know if the AIC ever reopened at another location.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Cortes

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Joe Stalin


    FNX is the first and only nationally distributed TV channel in the U.S. exclusively devoted to Native American and World Indigenous programming...
     
    The highest rated program is probably Day Drinking with Tonto.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Joe Stalin

    Ribs baron "Famous" Dave Anderson is from Chicago. Half-Chippewa, half-Choctaw.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_W._Anderson

    Replies: @ganderson

  32. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Steve Sailer


    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

     

    Yes, I've noticed this too.

    Hardly anyone talks about Native Americans these days.

    In the past, Natives were glamorized by the popular culture, media, academia, etc. You always used to see people telling stories about them (often related to Lewis&Clark, Oregon Trail, pilgrims, Squanto, or pioneer days). They were valorized by tv and movies (Bonanza, Peter Pan, Dances with Wolves, Lone Ranger&Tonto, Pocahontas, etc).

    I'm old enough to remember when Natives were seen as noble warrior types. That's why they used a Native (or a guy who sorta looked Native) in that "Crying Indian" PSA.

    Sports teams were named after Natives as a form of respect, not mockery.

    Now the Natives are disappearing from public view. They're the one minority who (for whatever reason) don't get public exposure. The last time they were in public view a lot was maybe the 90s.

    The disappearance of the Natives is one of the more interesting phenomenons of the last two decades.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Bill in Glendale, @PiltdownMan, @anon, @prosa123, @gent

    That’s what I keep pointing out to people: Indians these days are looked upon as pathetic eternal.victims, useful only as proof of the evils of the white man. So anything like a team name has to be mockery, since calling attention to them in any way only shows their pathetic nature. So most people literally can’t comprehend that these team names were adopted out of respect. Just doesn’t compute.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jimbo


    So most people literally can’t comprehend that these team names were adopted out of respect.
     
    Beyond that, the PC crowd pushing these renamings does so even over the objections of Indians themselves. It's not about the Indians - it's about the "evil White Man", as you say.

    Steve is speculating here, but I do think that the •Indians would be down with this relegation of the American Indians to the dustbin of history for their own "good name".

    Replies: @RSDB

  33. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Steve Sailer


    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

     

    Yes, I've noticed this too.

    Hardly anyone talks about Native Americans these days.

    In the past, Natives were glamorized by the popular culture, media, academia, etc. You always used to see people telling stories about them (often related to Lewis&Clark, Oregon Trail, pilgrims, Squanto, or pioneer days). They were valorized by tv and movies (Bonanza, Peter Pan, Dances with Wolves, Lone Ranger&Tonto, Pocahontas, etc).

    I'm old enough to remember when Natives were seen as noble warrior types. That's why they used a Native (or a guy who sorta looked Native) in that "Crying Indian" PSA.

    Sports teams were named after Natives as a form of respect, not mockery.

    Now the Natives are disappearing from public view. They're the one minority who (for whatever reason) don't get public exposure. The last time they were in public view a lot was maybe the 90s.

    The disappearance of the Natives is one of the more interesting phenomenons of the last two decades.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Bill in Glendale, @PiltdownMan, @anon, @prosa123, @gent

    But look how sacred they are in Canada. And there’s some trend at universities to frequently “acknowledge” that the campus land belonged to (was taken from) indigenous peoples.

  34. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Steve Sailer


    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

     

    Yes, I've noticed this too.

    Hardly anyone talks about Native Americans these days.

    In the past, Natives were glamorized by the popular culture, media, academia, etc. You always used to see people telling stories about them (often related to Lewis&Clark, Oregon Trail, pilgrims, Squanto, or pioneer days). They were valorized by tv and movies (Bonanza, Peter Pan, Dances with Wolves, Lone Ranger&Tonto, Pocahontas, etc).

    I'm old enough to remember when Natives were seen as noble warrior types. That's why they used a Native (or a guy who sorta looked Native) in that "Crying Indian" PSA.

    Sports teams were named after Natives as a form of respect, not mockery.

    Now the Natives are disappearing from public view. They're the one minority who (for whatever reason) don't get public exposure. The last time they were in public view a lot was maybe the 90s.

    The disappearance of the Natives is one of the more interesting phenomenons of the last two decades.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Bill in Glendale, @PiltdownMan, @anon, @prosa123, @gent

    Now the Natives are disappearing from public view. They’re the one minority who (for whatever reason) don’t get public exposure. The last time they were in public view a lot was maybe the 90s.

    Or perhaps the 70s.

  35. @Joe Stalin
    @Steve Sailer

    In Chicago, they got a whole OTA TV channel.


    Native American television channel makes debut in Chicago

    FNX is the first and only nationally distributed TV channel in the U.S. exclusively devoted to Native American and World Indigenous programming and is carried by 20 affiliate stations in 21 states from Alaska to New York, reaching more than 57 million households across the United States. This marks the first time the 5 Federally Recognized tribes, and the Tribal communities of North Dakota will have a television channel exclusively devoted to telling stories by and about American Indian communities. The channel currently features North Dakotan tribal members on various genres of programs as well as original series Wassaja, The AUX and Studio 49.

    "Launching FNX in Chicago is extremely exciting for all who work so hard to deliver First Nations Experience daily. This partnership with WRJK TV aligns with our mission to provide the global audience Native American and World Indigenous educational content that informs, inspires and entertains." said Interim Director of Operations Anthony Papa.

    https://fnx.org/press-release/native-american-television-channel-makes-debut-in-chicago/
     

    Replies: @John Up North, @Jim Don Bob, @Reg Cæsar

    On Chicago’s Northside there was for many years an American Indian Center located on West Wilson Avenue. I think the building had at one time been a Masonic Lodge. I stopped in a few times. They had a Native American museum and some classrooms. There was also a large gym where the people would perform weekly colorful native dances with drums and singing. Now that was some positive diversity.

    The neighborhood gentrified to the point where just a few years ago the AIC closed and their building was sold and turned into luxury condos. I don’t know if the AIC ever reopened at another location.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @John Up North

    When I first moved to Uptown in 1988, there was an American Indian rock band playing at the bar down the street on Lawrence, a quarter of a mile north of Wilson.

    Replies: @John Up North, @Bu'bha al-Teksani

    , @Cortes
    @John Up North

    “There was also a large gym where the people would perform weekly colorful native dances with drums and singing. Now that was some positive diversity.”

    A friend in Michigan got a very poor reaction from the answer to the popular Scottish pub joke question

    “Which song is sung in 72% of John Wayne films?”

    (For best effect, humour the contestants who answer “The Yellow Rose of Texas” and the like and you can string them along for a good while. “Oh, you’re definitely familiar with the lyrics...”)

  36. @Joe Stalin
    @Steve Sailer

    In Chicago, they got a whole OTA TV channel.


    Native American television channel makes debut in Chicago

    FNX is the first and only nationally distributed TV channel in the U.S. exclusively devoted to Native American and World Indigenous programming and is carried by 20 affiliate stations in 21 states from Alaska to New York, reaching more than 57 million households across the United States. This marks the first time the 5 Federally Recognized tribes, and the Tribal communities of North Dakota will have a television channel exclusively devoted to telling stories by and about American Indian communities. The channel currently features North Dakotan tribal members on various genres of programs as well as original series Wassaja, The AUX and Studio 49.

    "Launching FNX in Chicago is extremely exciting for all who work so hard to deliver First Nations Experience daily. This partnership with WRJK TV aligns with our mission to provide the global audience Native American and World Indigenous educational content that informs, inspires and entertains." said Interim Director of Operations Anthony Papa.

    https://fnx.org/press-release/native-american-television-channel-makes-debut-in-chicago/
     

    Replies: @John Up North, @Jim Don Bob, @Reg Cæsar

    FNX is the first and only nationally distributed TV channel in the U.S. exclusively devoted to Native American and World Indigenous programming…

    The highest rated program is probably Day Drinking with Tonto.

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Jim Don Bob

    "Day Drinking With Tonto"


    Wow: poking fun at a new cultural endeavor, based on outdated, unflattering ethnic stereotypes of the worst kind.

    I like it.

  37. Howie Carr of the Boston Herald was perhaps the first to point out how much The New Yorker’s 2019 article on the misadventures of Hunter Biden, Esq. reads like an uninspired book report on Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.

    A point of correspondence that Howie Carr doesn’t mention is the presence of large Samoans. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas , of course, had Dr. Gonzo, the “half-crazed 300 lb Samoan.”

    From the New Yorker article.


    One night, outside a club on Hollywood Boulevard, Hunter and another man got into an argument, and a group of bouncers intervened. A friend of one of the bouncers, a Samoan man who went by the nickname Baby Down, felt sorry for Hunter and took him to Mel’s Drive-In to get some food, and to his hotel to pick up his belongings. Early on the morning of October 26th, Baby Down dropped Hunter off at the Hertz rental office at Los Angeles International Airport.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @PiltdownMan

    Thanks.

  38. @Steve Sailer
    @Dr. X

    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

    I wonder if the push to remove memories of America's rich Indian heritage is being done in part in deference to the rising and already vastly more influential New Indians?

    Replies: @HammerJack, @JohnnyWalker123, @B36, @anon, @Joe Stalin, @Mike Tre, @Dr. X, @Anon, @e.272, @JohnnyD

    What’s an AmerIndian to do these days for a little attention? It’s almost as if they need to beat a drum in some kid’s face!

  39. @John Up North
    @Joe Stalin

    On Chicago's Northside there was for many years an American Indian Center located on West Wilson Avenue. I think the building had at one time been a Masonic Lodge. I stopped in a few times. They had a Native American museum and some classrooms. There was also a large gym where the people would perform weekly colorful native dances with drums and singing. Now that was some positive diversity.

    The neighborhood gentrified to the point where just a few years ago the AIC closed and their building was sold and turned into luxury condos. I don't know if the AIC ever reopened at another location.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Cortes

    When I first moved to Uptown in 1988, there was an American Indian rock band playing at the bar down the street on Lawrence, a quarter of a mile north of Wilson.

    • Replies: @John Up North
    @Steve Sailer

    Carol's bar is still there on Clark and Leland, although under new owners. The new owners gave the bar a much needed rehab. Up until the lockdowns Carol's would still feature live country music every Friday and Saturday night. The long time house band, Diamond Back, would play until 5 in the morning. Chicago really sucks now.

    , @Bu'bha al-Teksani
    @Steve Sailer

    Uptown had quite a population of Indians 1969-72 when I lived three years in Chicago. Remembered bar names seen from a #49 bus are Tommy's Teepee and Sammy's Reservation. You wouldn't want to drink there. Worked with an Indian in the Sun-Times composing room. There were some around, come to the city for the same reason everybody else did – good wages for working guys.

    Replies: @Stick

  40. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Steve Sailer


    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

     

    Yes, I've noticed this too.

    Hardly anyone talks about Native Americans these days.

    In the past, Natives were glamorized by the popular culture, media, academia, etc. You always used to see people telling stories about them (often related to Lewis&Clark, Oregon Trail, pilgrims, Squanto, or pioneer days). They were valorized by tv and movies (Bonanza, Peter Pan, Dances with Wolves, Lone Ranger&Tonto, Pocahontas, etc).

    I'm old enough to remember when Natives were seen as noble warrior types. That's why they used a Native (or a guy who sorta looked Native) in that "Crying Indian" PSA.

    Sports teams were named after Natives as a form of respect, not mockery.

    Now the Natives are disappearing from public view. They're the one minority who (for whatever reason) don't get public exposure. The last time they were in public view a lot was maybe the 90s.

    The disappearance of the Natives is one of the more interesting phenomenons of the last two decades.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Bill in Glendale, @PiltdownMan, @anon, @prosa123, @gent

    Now the Natives are disappearing from public view. They’re the one minority who (for whatever reason) don’t get public exposure.

    The Navaho out in Arizona and New Mexico got exposure this year as victims of the Coof.
    Probably about 15 minutes worth. Not necessarily fame, though.

  41. There’s a lot of privilege involved with how white professionals can rebound from drug problems and pick up their careers where they left off.

  42. The New Yorker’s 2019 article on the misadventures of Hunter Biden, Esq. reads like an uninspired book report… including…

    Including an amateur capitilization error:

    a plastic baggie

    Eustace, where are your proofreaders? I’m sure the lawyers at Pactiv had something to say concerning their registered trademark.

    Their Golden Valley branch building looks just like Dilbert’s:

    containing a “white powdery substance…”

    …and is a stone’s throw from Cheerios’ World HQ. “Contents may settle during shipment!”

  43. @HammerJack
    @Steve Sailer

    In the bad old days, we paid respect.

    https://i.ibb.co/ckbV9W9/US0005-Buffalo-Nickel-1920-D-MS67-2x3-56a178f35f9b58b7d0bfa2c5.jpg


    https://cdn.coinvalues.com/original/3d/ba/cd/1900-indian-head-penny-31-1423488022.jpg


    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/f1/ad/b9/f1adb905d294b8853198340439bd493d--silver-certificate-dollar-bills.jpg

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Stick

    Thanks for the reminders, HJ. The last time they put an Indian on the currency/coinage was with those Sacajawea dollar coins. I made fun of them same as with the Susan Anthony ones, because, unfortunately, this was just another dig at the White Man and Lewis & Clark and their Corps of Discovery expedition, as if this one Indian was more important than them.

    That one was just more prodding, as the Harriet Tubman-on-the-$20 may yet still be. If Crazy Horse or, better yet, Quanah Parker, last chief of the Comanches, were put on a coin or bill, I’d have no problem with it.

    • Agree: Mr McKenna
    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @Achmed E. Newman

    https://images.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/inline-images/Stamped-bills-blog_1.jpg

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Old Prude
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The Sacajawea dollar is the best looking American coin for the last 100 years

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  44. @Joe Stalin
    @Steve Sailer

    In Chicago, they got a whole OTA TV channel.


    Native American television channel makes debut in Chicago

    FNX is the first and only nationally distributed TV channel in the U.S. exclusively devoted to Native American and World Indigenous programming and is carried by 20 affiliate stations in 21 states from Alaska to New York, reaching more than 57 million households across the United States. This marks the first time the 5 Federally Recognized tribes, and the Tribal communities of North Dakota will have a television channel exclusively devoted to telling stories by and about American Indian communities. The channel currently features North Dakotan tribal members on various genres of programs as well as original series Wassaja, The AUX and Studio 49.

    "Launching FNX in Chicago is extremely exciting for all who work so hard to deliver First Nations Experience daily. This partnership with WRJK TV aligns with our mission to provide the global audience Native American and World Indigenous educational content that informs, inspires and entertains." said Interim Director of Operations Anthony Papa.

    https://fnx.org/press-release/native-american-television-channel-makes-debut-in-chicago/
     

    Replies: @John Up North, @Jim Don Bob, @Reg Cæsar

    Ribs baron “Famous” Dave Anderson is from Chicago. Half-Chippewa, half-Choctaw.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_W._Anderson

    • Replies: @ganderson
    @Reg Cæsar

    Wrestler Wahoo McDaniel was always identified at "an authentic Choctaw-Chickasaw Indian"

    When I ran for U of Minn student body president back in the ’70s I finished dead last in the primary, right behind Harold Iron Shield. Great Name!

    Come to think of it, I did about as well as Senator Harris!

  45. @Steve Sailer
    @John Up North

    When I first moved to Uptown in 1988, there was an American Indian rock band playing at the bar down the street on Lawrence, a quarter of a mile north of Wilson.

    Replies: @John Up North, @Bu'bha al-Teksani

    Carol’s bar is still there on Clark and Leland, although under new owners. The new owners gave the bar a much needed rehab. Up until the lockdowns Carol’s would still feature live country music every Friday and Saturday night. The long time house band, Diamond Back, would play until 5 in the morning. Chicago really sucks now.

  46. @Morton's toes
    On a related note I decided to read the wikipedia page on Chelsea Clinton's convicted-felon-father-in-law. His crime was serial fraud to the tune of 10 million in cahoots with west Africans. The way it's worded it reads like he did one of those swindles where they e-mail people claiming to be Nigerian royalty who need help getting their millions dollars out of Lagos. Also he is supposed to pay them back and still owes 9.8 million.

    Does anybody else remember when Chelsea wanted to go to medical school and become a physician?

    Replies: @Art Deco

    I think she was interested in a career in public health at one point and may have cadged an MPH.

  47. @Jimbo
    @JohnnyWalker123

    That's what I keep pointing out to people: Indians these days are looked upon as pathetic eternal.victims, useful only as proof of the evils of the white man. So anything like a team name has to be mockery, since calling attention to them in any way only shows their pathetic nature. So most people literally can't comprehend that these team names were adopted out of respect. Just doesn't compute.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    So most people literally can’t comprehend that these team names were adopted out of respect.

    Beyond that, the PC crowd pushing these renamings does so even over the objections of Indians themselves. It’s not about the Indians – it’s about the “evil White Man”, as you say.

    Steve is speculating here, but I do think that the •Indians would be down with this relegation of the American Indians to the dustbin of history for their own “good name”.

    • Replies: @RSDB
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Steve is speculating here, but I do think that the •Indians would be down with this relegation of the American Indians to the dustbin of history for their own “good name”.

     

    Hardly, it would deprive them of that one stupid pun that every single Indian in America makes as often as possible: "I'm Indian-American, but not American Indian!"

    Plus, there's this guy: https://www.mcn-nsn.gov/chaudhuri-named-muscogee-creek-nation-ambassador/
  48. @Steve Sailer
    @Dr. X

    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

    I wonder if the push to remove memories of America's rich Indian heritage is being done in part in deference to the rising and already vastly more influential New Indians?

    Replies: @HammerJack, @JohnnyWalker123, @B36, @anon, @Joe Stalin, @Mike Tre, @Dr. X, @Anon, @e.272, @JohnnyD

    If you read the Bakke decision, in 1973 the UC Davis med school had an explicit admissions quota for blacks, “Chicanos,” and American Indians.

    “Chicanos” have obviously become Latinx, but, with the exception of Elizabeth Warren, you don’t hear much about the Indian cut of the affirmative action racket any more.

    Maybe the tax-free Indian casino industry that developed since the 1990s is seen as sufficient payoff…

  49. I think the “Native Americans” don’t want the limelight any more, because then attention will be drawn to their casino cash flow . . .

  50. @Steve Sailer
    @Dr. X

    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

    I wonder if the push to remove memories of America's rich Indian heritage is being done in part in deference to the rising and already vastly more influential New Indians?

    Replies: @HammerJack, @JohnnyWalker123, @B36, @anon, @Joe Stalin, @Mike Tre, @Dr. X, @Anon, @e.272, @JohnnyD

    • Replies: @Steve from Detroit
    @Anon

    One of the best hours of comedy you will ever see.

  51. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Steve Sailer


    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

     

    Yes, I've noticed this too.

    Hardly anyone talks about Native Americans these days.

    In the past, Natives were glamorized by the popular culture, media, academia, etc. You always used to see people telling stories about them (often related to Lewis&Clark, Oregon Trail, pilgrims, Squanto, or pioneer days). They were valorized by tv and movies (Bonanza, Peter Pan, Dances with Wolves, Lone Ranger&Tonto, Pocahontas, etc).

    I'm old enough to remember when Natives were seen as noble warrior types. That's why they used a Native (or a guy who sorta looked Native) in that "Crying Indian" PSA.

    Sports teams were named after Natives as a form of respect, not mockery.

    Now the Natives are disappearing from public view. They're the one minority who (for whatever reason) don't get public exposure. The last time they were in public view a lot was maybe the 90s.

    The disappearance of the Natives is one of the more interesting phenomenons of the last two decades.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Bill in Glendale, @PiltdownMan, @anon, @prosa123, @gent

    Now the Natives are disappearing from public view. They’re the one minority who (for whatever reason) don’t get public exposure.

    What about the gambling casinos?

  52. @Steve Sailer
    @Dr. X

    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

    I wonder if the push to remove memories of America's rich Indian heritage is being done in part in deference to the rising and already vastly more influential New Indians?

    Replies: @HammerJack, @JohnnyWalker123, @B36, @anon, @Joe Stalin, @Mike Tre, @Dr. X, @Anon, @e.272, @JohnnyD

    There’s an embarrassing problem that American Indians cause for blacks. Indians fought back relentlessly for 400 years against their European conquerors and were very difficult to keep as slaves. For that, they earned admiration and respect. Majestic rivers, hundreds of cities and towns, and entire states are named after Indian tribes and words. Blacks get ghetto roads and school buildings named after their heroes. This, I think, is the reason Indians are being marginalized.

    • Agree: Stick
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @e.272

    This is a repeat of a comment I made about this same thing a couple of years ago. It's not that these rivers, cities, and States were "named' after the corresponding Indians, though. Before the White Man, the rivers were already named, as they went with the tribes that lived around each. That's what they called themselves: The Huron were a tribe living along the Huron River, the Apalachicola along the Apalachicola, the Wateree along the Wateree, the Snoqualmie along the Snoqualmie, the Mohawk along the Mohawk, and thousands of other rivers are so named. It's the odd river (the ubiquitous Green Rivers or Broad River, or French Broad River (named after Bridget Bardot actually) that is not named this was in the eastern US.

    Those States with Indian names are named after the biggest of rivers that were taken from the names of the tribes living on them: Ohio, Tennessee, Mississippi, Missouri, etc...

    Then the towns are named after the rivers or spots on the rivers: Sioux City, Sioux Falls, Menominee Falls, Gila Bend, and so on. Some are Indian names for places to begin with that were never changed to English names like Tallahassee.

  53. @Jim Don Bob
    @Joe Stalin


    FNX is the first and only nationally distributed TV channel in the U.S. exclusively devoted to Native American and World Indigenous programming...
     
    The highest rated program is probably Day Drinking with Tonto.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    “Day Drinking With Tonto”

    Wow: poking fun at a new cultural endeavor, based on outdated, unflattering ethnic stereotypes of the worst kind.

    I like it.

  54. @Whiskey
    Really, who can respect the Bidens after all the sleaze that came out? There is a reason Biden could never win a single primary until the Party stepped up and made it clear that he was Stop-Bernie.

    And I think Dr. Jill, is highly likely to call in the Chinese Military to help bail her out when things start going south:

    A. States just ignoring federal lockdown orders, gun grabs, outlawing Christianity / Christmas, banning consumption of certain foods like meat, eggs, poultry, milk etc (destined for China).
    B. States pushing back with force against say, Feds trying to seize said supplies of food (for China) or guns (so no hunting that's reserved for Chinese only deplorable!)

    Dr. Phil has more legitimacy and gravitas than Dr. Jill. IF the Bidens just focus on looting the treasury like most Democrats things will be OK, but Dr. Jill is stupid and full of herself enough to do something more. And being China's bought ho, her family will push out resources to China while Americans starve.

    Replies: @anon

    And I think Dr. Jill, is highly likely to call in the Chinese Military to help bail her out when things start going south:

  55. @Steve Sailer
    @Dr. X

    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

    I wonder if the push to remove memories of America's rich Indian heritage is being done in part in deference to the rising and already vastly more influential New Indians?

    Replies: @HammerJack, @JohnnyWalker123, @B36, @anon, @Joe Stalin, @Mike Tre, @Dr. X, @Anon, @e.272, @JohnnyD

    2020: The New Indians use the Old American Indians to bring in more New Indians to code.

  56. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jimbo


    So most people literally can’t comprehend that these team names were adopted out of respect.
     
    Beyond that, the PC crowd pushing these renamings does so even over the objections of Indians themselves. It's not about the Indians - it's about the "evil White Man", as you say.

    Steve is speculating here, but I do think that the •Indians would be down with this relegation of the American Indians to the dustbin of history for their own "good name".

    Replies: @RSDB

    Steve is speculating here, but I do think that the •Indians would be down with this relegation of the American Indians to the dustbin of history for their own “good name”.

    Hardly, it would deprive them of that one stupid pun that every single Indian in America makes as often as possible: “I’m Indian-American, but not American Indian!”

    Plus, there’s this guy: https://www.mcn-nsn.gov/chaudhuri-named-muscogee-creek-nation-ambassador/

  57. @James O'Meara
    @Barnard

    'It is clear window into the ruling class, kind of a John McCain at the Naval Academy on steroids. There are never consequences for failure and infinite opportunities. This system has to collapse eventually."

    And this is the juice behind the idea that "diversity is our strength" and "enough with all these old White guys." From the other side: Trump's cabinet, all working against him but somehow he seems to think he can only appoint old, fat, White males.

    When the system favors White men ("infinite opportunities"), AND has no "consequences for failure," people will conclude it's the White guys fault.

    As Chris Rock said about OJ, I don't agree, but I understand..."

    Replies: @Father O'Hara

    He took that from Sam Kinison,who was discussing wife beating.

  58. @Steve Sailer
    @John Up North

    When I first moved to Uptown in 1988, there was an American Indian rock band playing at the bar down the street on Lawrence, a quarter of a mile north of Wilson.

    Replies: @John Up North, @Bu'bha al-Teksani

    Uptown had quite a population of Indians 1969-72 when I lived three years in Chicago. Remembered bar names seen from a #49 bus are Tommy’s Teepee and Sammy’s Reservation. You wouldn’t want to drink there. Worked with an Indian in the Sun-Times composing room. There were some around, come to the city for the same reason everybody else did – good wages for working guys.

    • Replies: @Stick
    @Bu'bha al-Teksani

    My Indian work experience was with the Lumbi Indians. Nice guys to work with. Their idea of a good night out was to go to Fayetteville, NC, and roll some soldiers. Stuff you learn.

  59. @John Up North
    @Joe Stalin

    On Chicago's Northside there was for many years an American Indian Center located on West Wilson Avenue. I think the building had at one time been a Masonic Lodge. I stopped in a few times. They had a Native American museum and some classrooms. There was also a large gym where the people would perform weekly colorful native dances with drums and singing. Now that was some positive diversity.

    The neighborhood gentrified to the point where just a few years ago the AIC closed and their building was sold and turned into luxury condos. I don't know if the AIC ever reopened at another location.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Cortes

    “There was also a large gym where the people would perform weekly colorful native dances with drums and singing. Now that was some positive diversity.”

    A friend in Michigan got a very poor reaction from the answer to the popular Scottish pub joke question

    “Which song is sung in 72% of John Wayne films?”

    (For best effect, humour the contestants who answer “The Yellow Rose of Texas” and the like and you can string them along for a good while. “Oh, you’re definitely familiar with the lyrics…”)

  60. @PiltdownMan

    Howie Carr of the Boston Herald was perhaps the first to point out how much The New Yorker’s 2019 article on the misadventures of Hunter Biden, Esq. reads like an uninspired book report on Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.

     

    A point of correspondence that Howie Carr doesn't mention is the presence of large Samoans. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas , of course, had Dr. Gonzo, the "half-crazed 300 lb Samoan."

    From the New Yorker article.


    One night, outside a club on Hollywood Boulevard, Hunter and another man got into an argument, and a group of bouncers intervened. A friend of one of the bouncers, a Samoan man who went by the nickname Baby Down, felt sorry for Hunter and took him to Mel’s Drive-In to get some food, and to his hotel to pick up his belongings. Early on the morning of October 26th, Baby Down dropped Hunter off at the Hertz rental office at Los Angeles International Airport.

     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Thanks.

  61. This is not almost another Hunter. This is pure Castaneda.

    • LOL: Stick
  62. @Buffalo Joe
    Steve, thanks for the "Rango" clip. Adult animation too funny.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Here’s my review of “Rango.” They let the guy, Gore Verbinski, who made a fortune off “Pirates of the Caribbean” do whatever he wanted in “Rango” and it’s pretty wild.

    https://www.takimag.com/article/rango_johnny_depps_peyote_western/

    • Thanks: Buffalo Joe
  63. @James O'Meara
    @The Alarmist

    "The lack of evidence is strong with these guys."

    The only things most people seem to learn from encounters with logic in college are:

    1. One counterexample refutes a generalization: "Not all of them are like that."

    2. Unless there's a knockdown mathematical proof, you don't really know it. "Well, every vote COULD have been cast for Biden, it's not a self-contradiction, so it COULD happen."

    I choose to believe this shows most people shouldn't be exposed to logic, not that teaching logic is harmful in itself. It should be left to the Russells and Carnaps, it just poisons hoi polloi.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @obwandiyag

    My undergrad degree was Aerospace Engineering, so I dealt a lot in fuzzy logic.

  64. @e.272
    @Steve Sailer

    There's an embarrassing problem that American Indians cause for blacks. Indians fought back relentlessly for 400 years against their European conquerors and were very difficult to keep as slaves. For that, they earned admiration and respect. Majestic rivers, hundreds of cities and towns, and entire states are named after Indian tribes and words. Blacks get ghetto roads and school buildings named after their heroes. This, I think, is the reason Indians are being marginalized.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    This is a repeat of a comment I made about this same thing a couple of years ago. It’s not that these rivers, cities, and States were “named’ after the corresponding Indians, though. Before the White Man, the rivers were already named, as they went with the tribes that lived around each. That’s what they called themselves: The Huron were a tribe living along the Huron River, the Apalachicola along the Apalachicola, the Wateree along the Wateree, the Snoqualmie along the Snoqualmie, the Mohawk along the Mohawk, and thousands of other rivers are so named. It’s the odd river (the ubiquitous Green Rivers or Broad River, or French Broad River (named after Bridget Bardot actually) that is not named this was in the eastern US.

    Those States with Indian names are named after the biggest of rivers that were taken from the names of the tribes living on them: Ohio, Tennessee, Mississippi, Missouri, etc…

    Then the towns are named after the rivers or spots on the rivers: Sioux City, Sioux Falls, Menominee Falls, Gila Bend, and so on. Some are Indian names for places to begin with that were never changed to English names like Tallahassee.

  65. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Steve Sailer


    American Indians are being marginalized to the point of erasure.

     

    Yes, I've noticed this too.

    Hardly anyone talks about Native Americans these days.

    In the past, Natives were glamorized by the popular culture, media, academia, etc. You always used to see people telling stories about them (often related to Lewis&Clark, Oregon Trail, pilgrims, Squanto, or pioneer days). They were valorized by tv and movies (Bonanza, Peter Pan, Dances with Wolves, Lone Ranger&Tonto, Pocahontas, etc).

    I'm old enough to remember when Natives were seen as noble warrior types. That's why they used a Native (or a guy who sorta looked Native) in that "Crying Indian" PSA.

    Sports teams were named after Natives as a form of respect, not mockery.

    Now the Natives are disappearing from public view. They're the one minority who (for whatever reason) don't get public exposure. The last time they were in public view a lot was maybe the 90s.

    The disappearance of the Natives is one of the more interesting phenomenons of the last two decades.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Bill in Glendale, @PiltdownMan, @anon, @prosa123, @gent

    They’re more politically useful if they’re dead and silent.

  66. @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDYoM1FGmLg

    Replies: @Steve from Detroit

    One of the best hours of comedy you will ever see.

  67. @Reg Cæsar
    @Joe Stalin

    Ribs baron "Famous" Dave Anderson is from Chicago. Half-Chippewa, half-Choctaw.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_W._Anderson

    Replies: @ganderson

    Wrestler Wahoo McDaniel was always identified at “an authentic Choctaw-Chickasaw Indian”

    When I ran for U of Minn student body president back in the ’70s I finished dead last in the primary, right behind Harold Iron Shield. Great Name!

    Come to think of it, I did about as well as Senator Harris!

  68. We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold. I remember saying something like “I feel a bit lightheaded; maybe you should drive….” And suddenly there was a terrible roar all around us and the sky was full of what looked like huge owls, all swooping and screeching and diving around the car, which was going about a hundred miles an hour with the top down to Las Vegas.

  69. Hunter S. Thompson’s Hell’s Angels was likely his best work. The Fear and Loathing shit is Hunter making an assclown of himself to please his employer Rolling Stone. I’ve read F&L in Las Vegas and Hell’s Angels. The later is solid reading and worth a reader’s time.

    • Agree: black sea
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Stick

    Agree completely that Hunter S. Thompson’s Hell’s Angels was his best work. I read it as a yute and it is still memorable. HST got stomped for his trouble.

  70. @Bu'bha al-Teksani
    @Steve Sailer

    Uptown had quite a population of Indians 1969-72 when I lived three years in Chicago. Remembered bar names seen from a #49 bus are Tommy's Teepee and Sammy's Reservation. You wouldn't want to drink there. Worked with an Indian in the Sun-Times composing room. There were some around, come to the city for the same reason everybody else did – good wages for working guys.

    Replies: @Stick

    My Indian work experience was with the Lumbi Indians. Nice guys to work with. Their idea of a good night out was to go to Fayetteville, NC, and roll some soldiers. Stuff you learn.

  71. @HammerJack
    @Steve Sailer

    In the bad old days, we paid respect.

    https://i.ibb.co/ckbV9W9/US0005-Buffalo-Nickel-1920-D-MS67-2x3-56a178f35f9b58b7d0bfa2c5.jpg


    https://cdn.coinvalues.com/original/3d/ba/cd/1900-indian-head-penny-31-1423488022.jpg


    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/f1/ad/b9/f1adb905d294b8853198340439bd493d--silver-certificate-dollar-bills.jpg

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Stick

    What’s odd is that the Redskin logo comes from the US Nickel which depicts a prarie Sioux chief. The Redskins were actually the Pennepe Indians that lived along the Pennepe River now known as the Deleware River and Indians. They were called Redskins because they painted themselves red. Go figure. Remember, if someone paints themselves a color do not refer to them as that color. That be racist.

  72. Steve,

    I found a clip where Rango meets the notorious Raoul Duke:

  73. @Achmed E. Newman
    @HammerJack

    Thanks for the reminders, HJ. The last time they put an Indian on the currency/coinage was with those Sacajawea dollar coins. I made fun of them same as with the Susan Anthony ones, because, unfortunately, this was just another dig at the White Man and Lewis & Clark and their Corps of Discovery expedition, as if this one Indian was more important than them.

    That one was just more prodding, as the Harriet Tubman-on-the-$20 may yet still be. If Crazy Horse or, better yet, Quanah Parker, last chief of the Comanches, were put on a coin or bill, I'd have no problem with it.

    Replies: @Adam Smith, @Old Prude

    • LOL: Polemos
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Adam Smith

    See?? They're trying to make us WANT to go Mark-o-the-Beast cashless, Adam. Speaking of Mark 'o the Beast, look at that mug. I'm sure she was a good person, but give me Andy Jackson or give me change!

    Replies: @Adam Smith

  74. @Hypnotoad666
    Now I understand what Steve was riffing on with his previous tweets. Driving while sleepy can be problematic, with or without chemical enhancements.

    https://youtu.be/Jgw8MEwTVwM

    Replies: @donut, @Paco Wové, @AnotherDad

    Driving while sleepy can be problematic, with or without chemical enhancements.

    Great advice.

    I’ve lived a pretty tame life–never sent to war, fights stopped a the fist level. Probably the closest i’ve come to being killed was being knocked off the road by a drunk, while driving to Thanksgiving at a cousin’s in Houston … but my car landed on its side in Stagner Lake outside Smithville. Popped out the shattered window, town doc got the glass out of my eye … i was peachy.

    But the closest i’ve come to killing myself has almost certainly been driving sleepy.

    Don’t do it! Definitely just pull over–in non-vibrant area–plop in the back and snooze.

    Sleep is good. Don’t drive home without it.

    • Agree: Cortes
  75. @Anonymous
    To be serious for a moment: I believe Joe’s first wife’s last name was Hunter. And Hunter Biden’s full name is Robert Hunter Biden.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    To be serious for a moment: I believe Joe’s first wife’s last name was Hunter. And Hunter Biden’s full name is Robert Hunter Biden.

    Goes well with Beau Gatherer Biden.

  76. What’s odd is that the Redskin logo comes from the US Nickel which depicts a prarie Sioux chief.

    It was painted by an Indian and depicts another Indian nicknamed “Two Guns”. That would be a fine replacement for “Redskins”. Especially if they revive the Bullets!


    Family of Walter Wetzel, Native American who created Redskins logo, mixed on its retirement

    Two Guns’ surname was White Calf. Now that DC is gentrifying to a white bureaucrat/lawyer/hipster/gay majority, “White Calves” would be appropriate, too.

    Certainly more so than the Twenty-Third Amendment!

  77. @Dan Hayes
    The New Yorker article is a very well-crafted attempt to sanitize the unsanitizeable! 😎

    Replies: @Prester John

    Well, considering that the NYer is part of the demokrat party apparatchiki, this would come as no surprise.

    I still give his old man one year max before he exits stage left (where else?) in favor of Womyn of Kullah Kamalalalalolala.

  78. Washington Fakawi might be apt.

  79. @Stick
    Hunter S. Thompson's Hell's Angels was likely his best work. The Fear and Loathing shit is Hunter making an assclown of himself to please his employer Rolling Stone. I've read F&L in Las Vegas and Hell's Angels. The later is solid reading and worth a reader's time.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Agree completely that Hunter S. Thompson’s Hell’s Angels was his best work. I read it as a yute and it is still memorable. HST got stomped for his trouble.

  80. @JimDandy
    So, he was two when his mom and sister were killed in a car accident, and he was "seriously injured." Maybe he hit his head?

    Replies: @Dago Shoes

    There was an article about just this possibility … not sure, however, if the author meant it to be taken seriously or not.

    But, yes, Hunter and his brother and father Joe were all injured — Hunter supposedly knocked unconscious.

    https://vdare.com/articles/hunter-biden-probably-brain-damaged-spells-trouble-for-a-biden-white-house

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Dago Shoes

    Wow. Thanks.

  81. Hunter was the maiden name of Biden’s first wife.

  82. @Achmed E. Newman
    @HammerJack

    Thanks for the reminders, HJ. The last time they put an Indian on the currency/coinage was with those Sacajawea dollar coins. I made fun of them same as with the Susan Anthony ones, because, unfortunately, this was just another dig at the White Man and Lewis & Clark and their Corps of Discovery expedition, as if this one Indian was more important than them.

    That one was just more prodding, as the Harriet Tubman-on-the-$20 may yet still be. If Crazy Horse or, better yet, Quanah Parker, last chief of the Comanches, were put on a coin or bill, I'd have no problem with it.

    Replies: @Adam Smith, @Old Prude

    The Sacajawea dollar is the best looking American coin for the last 100 years

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Old Prude

    Sorry, OP, but I just saw it as another feminist/PC thing, and I don't keep 'em long*. If you're a collector, good on you. I don't know if you mean that it's made out of good material. Anything beats these modern pennies and dimes - they feel like they are coated plastic.

    .

    * when they occasionally come out of a vending machine.

  83. @Adam Smith
    @Achmed E. Newman

    https://images.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/inline-images/Stamped-bills-blog_1.jpg

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    See?? They’re trying to make us WANT to go Mark-o-the-Beast cashless, Adam. Speaking of Mark ‘o the Beast, look at that mug. I’m sure she was a good person, but give me Andy Jackson or give me change!

    • Agree: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @Achmed E. Newman

    https://thefederalistpapers.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Harriet-Tubman-with-gun-large.jpg

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  84. @Dago Shoes
    @JimDandy

    There was an article about just this possibility … not sure, however, if the author meant it to be taken seriously or not.

    But, yes, Hunter and his brother and father Joe were all injured -- Hunter supposedly knocked unconscious.

    https://vdare.com/articles/hunter-biden-probably-brain-damaged-spells-trouble-for-a-biden-white-house

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Wow. Thanks.

  85. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Adam Smith

    See?? They're trying to make us WANT to go Mark-o-the-Beast cashless, Adam. Speaking of Mark 'o the Beast, look at that mug. I'm sure she was a good person, but give me Andy Jackson or give me change!

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Adam Smith

    I like it Adam, but with that gun it won't fly through approval at the US mint. What if your kid takes a 20 to school? He could get arrested.

    Replies: @Adam Smith

  86. @Old Prude
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The Sacajawea dollar is the best looking American coin for the last 100 years

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Sorry, OP, but I just saw it as another feminist/PC thing, and I don’t keep ’em long*. If you’re a collector, good on you. I don’t know if you mean that it’s made out of good material. Anything beats these modern pennies and dimes – they feel like they are coated plastic.

    .

    * when they occasionally come out of a vending machine.

  87. @Adam Smith
    @Achmed E. Newman

    https://thefederalistpapers.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Harriet-Tubman-with-gun-large.jpg

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I like it Adam, but with that gun it won’t fly through approval at the US mint. What if your kid takes a 20 to school? He could get arrested.

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I like it too, but I forgot about the stupidity in the skools...

    13-Year-Old Suspended For Doodling Gun

    Kansas Student Charged With Felony After Making Gun Shape With Fingers

    https://care-manager.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/BenFranklinMask_AdobeStock_336536852-700x400-1.jpg

  88. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Adam Smith

    I like it Adam, but with that gun it won't fly through approval at the US mint. What if your kid takes a 20 to school? He could get arrested.

    Replies: @Adam Smith

  89. @James O'Meara
    @The Alarmist

    "The lack of evidence is strong with these guys."

    The only things most people seem to learn from encounters with logic in college are:

    1. One counterexample refutes a generalization: "Not all of them are like that."

    2. Unless there's a knockdown mathematical proof, you don't really know it. "Well, every vote COULD have been cast for Biden, it's not a self-contradiction, so it COULD happen."

    I choose to believe this shows most people shouldn't be exposed to logic, not that teaching logic is harmful in itself. It should be left to the Russells and Carnaps, it just poisons hoi polloi.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @obwandiyag

    THE hoi polloi don’t have a clue what logic is. Other than something Spock says all the time. If you think college-educated people constitute THE hoi polloi, you’re sadly mistaken. And yes, I did say “THE” hoi polloi, because that is how you say it (because English is not Greek) if you are a grown-up and not a childish pedant.

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