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Nobel Prize in Literature: Some French Chick

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From the Nobel organization:

Annie Ernaux

The Nobel Prize in Literature for 2022 is awarded to the French author Annie Ernaux,
“for the courage and clinical acuity with which she uncovers the roots, estrangements and
collective restraints of personal memory”.

I have zero opinion on this.

 
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  1. I have zero opinion on this.

    My opinion, based solely on the line drawing, is that no sane man should go near this woman.

    The artist is to be commended for depicting neuroses up the wazoo so succinctly.

    • LOL: Almost Missouri
  2. As far as I can tell her books are mostly autobiographical. She’s been writing for many years, and is now 82.

  3. 80 years old chick.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Bardon Kaldian

    80 years of brooding solipsism.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Gary in Gramercy

    , @Old Prude
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Let me do a favor for all you fellows, and especially you, Steve:

    When you are in the company of chicks, Do NOT refer to chicks as "chicks".

    Two data points: Years ago I had a wonderful chick friend: Athletic, artistic, intelligent, good-looking..
    When I used the word "chicks" she came near un-glued. It was the ONLY time she got angry at me.

    Last month I went to a garage band performance with Mrs. Prude. When I referred to the "chick singer" she and every other chick in ear-shot scowled at me. I did it again and she hissed "Women don't like that!" Who knew?

    P.S. I refer to Mrs. Prude as a "hippy chick", and she doesn't seem to mind. Who can understand these chicks?

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @stillCARealist

    , @Truth
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Right up there in sex appeal with Nancy Pelosi, HUBBA-HUBBA!

  4. This is hilarious. Apparently all she does is write My Big Book About Me:

    Annie Ernaux started her literary career in 1974 with Les Armoires vides (Cleaned Out), an autobiographical novel. In 1984, she won the Renaudot Prize for another of her autobiographical works La Place (A Man’s Place), an autobiographical narrative focusing on her relationship with her father and her experiences growing up in a small town in France, and her subsequent process of moving into adulthood and away from her parents’ place of origin.

    Very early in her career, she turned away from fiction to focus on autobiography. Her work combines historic and individual experiences. She charts her parents’ social progression (La place, La honte), her teenage years (Ce qu’ils disent ou rien), her marriage (La femme gelée), her passionate affair with an eastern European man (Passion simple), her abortion (L’événement), Alzheimer’s disease (Je ne suis pas sortie de ma nuit), the death of her mother (Une femme), and breast cancer (L’usage de la photo). Ernaux also wrote L’écriture comme un couteau (Writing as Sharp as a Knife) with Frédéric-Yves Jeannet.

    A Woman’s Story, A Man’s Place, and Simple Passion were recognized as The New York Times Notable Books, and A Woman’s Story was a Finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Shame was named a Publishers Weekly Best Book of 1998, I Remain in Darkness a Top Memoir of 1999 by The Washington Post, and The Possession was listed as a Top Ten Book of 2008 by More Magazine.

    Her 2008 historical memoir Les Années (The Years), very well received by French critics, is considered by many to be her magnum opus. In this book, Ernaux writes about herself in the third person (elle, or “she” in English) for the first time, providing a vivid look at French society just after the Second World War until the early 2000s. It is the moving social story of a woman and of the evolving society she lived in.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    for the first time, providing a vivid look at French society just after the Second World War until the early 2000s.
     
    Well thank goodness for that. No one had any idea what French society was like in that obscure time period.

    her relationship with her father and her experiences growing up in a small town in France ... moving into adulthood and away from her parents’ place of origin ... her parents’ social progression ... her teenage years ... her marriage, her passionate affair with an eastern European man
     
    Why no ¡B!lacks or Muslims? Racist!

    Replies: @Anon7, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Colin Wright

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    "her parents’ social progression (La place, La honte), her teenage years (Ce qu’ils disent ou rien), her marriage (La femme gelée), her passionate affair with an eastern European man (Passion simple), her abortion (L’événement), Alzheimer’s disease (Je ne suis pas sortie de ma nuit), the death of her mother (Une femme), and breast cancer (L’usage de la photo)"

    I see a big female life event is missing from that list.

    One of the pleasures of parenthood is making a mother into a grandmother. Let's hope she had siblings who stepped up to the plate.

    Replies: @Wilkey, @HFR

    , @Muggles
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    This is hilarious. Apparently all she does is write My Big Book About Me:
     
    Yes, excellent observation.

    From what I can tell this is the same genre as the thousands of female novelists (mostly but not exclusively Jewish) who crank out unread novels for other lonely cat ladies living off divorces. Quite popular with Manhattan publishers and the library ladies nationwide who order books.

    At least she's European and writes in a language many can read. The commentators here who have read her (such a literate bunch of Men of UNZ!) seem to think she's okay.

    If you like that sort of thing.

    The kind of brainy woman who at first encounter seems interesting but probably is at long last, best avoided. In her World of Me, you are just gist for her mill.

    But a biological female who is a decent writer, White (not that we're noticing) and is no worse than average in political views, for her kind.

    But how many Big Books of Me does mankind really need?

    Replies: @Dave from Oz, @Rob

    , @Wilkey
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    This is hilarious. Apparently all she does is write My Big Book About Me
     
    Perhaps they’re just trying to establish a precedent so they can award yet another well-deserved Nobel to His Holiness, the Lightbringer, the Won, Barack Hussein Obama, whose favorite and only subject is always himself.

    Replies: @Meretricious

    , @fish
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Apparently all she does is write My Big Book About Me:



    It’s the book that every woman yearns to write.

  5. A recent /pol/ humor thread was graced with samples of the comic Sundae Kids, which represented idealized relationships: the “punchline” in every strip is a hug. The reactions inevitably pointed out that relationships don’t work that way.

  6. @Bardon Kaldian
    80 years old chick.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Old Prude, @Truth

    80 years of brooding solipsism.

    • Thanks: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    80 years of brooding solipsism.
     
    And this differs from 2016's winner in that...

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    , @Gary in Gramercy
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Beats a hundred years of solitude.

  7. Why not Houellebecq? Why not?

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Anon

    Because.

  8. Well, in a fit of almost objectivity, the Swedes gave Nobel Prize to a person that is not a Swede (wow) and actually writes something (as oppozed to a few previous winners) and has not made her name on blatant russophobia (again as opposed to a few previous winners).

    In other word, many thanks it is the French hag rather than Zelenskys wife.

  9. And now Velma in Scooby Doo has been retconned as a lesbian.

    Velma Is Officially a Lesbian in New ‘Scooby-Doo’ Film

    Clips from the brand new movie “Trick or Treat Scooby-Doo!,” which show the Mystery Inc. member googly-eyed and speechless when encountering costume designer Coco Diablo, have gone viral on Twitter, confirming suspicions held by the “Scooby” fan base for decades.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Anon7

    There was always some subtext to it, kind of like Shaggy and marijuana (why did he always have the munchies? For dog treats?) and the actress who played the inspiration for Velma (Zelda Gilroy) in The Loves of Dobie Gillis, Sheila Kuehl, went on to be one of the first openly gay legislators in California. (Made quite a few anti-male laws over there, as I recall.) Even her Wikipedia pic looks vaguely Velma-ish.

    So it’s more of a joke back and forth across reality and fantasy than a real out-of-nowhere retcon like, say, making Iron Man a woman of color when the character was conceived as a conservative industrialist (Stan Lee wanted to see if he could make a hero out of a personality type the kids hated).

  10. I don’t know. I like writers to “write what they know.” And the only thing any of us truly know is ourselves, our milieu, etc. I especially hate when certain types of liberals try to express how blacks or Hispanics feel to us.

    • Agree: Carol
    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Happy Tapir

    'I don’t know. I like writers to “write what they know.” '

    Yes -- and when they don't, they often decline sharply. Conrad would be the perfect example.

  11. @The Anti-Gnostic
    This is hilarious. Apparently all she does is write My Big Book About Me:

    Annie Ernaux started her literary career in 1974 with Les Armoires vides (Cleaned Out), an autobiographical novel. In 1984, she won the Renaudot Prize for another of her autobiographical works La Place (A Man's Place), an autobiographical narrative focusing on her relationship with her father and her experiences growing up in a small town in France, and her subsequent process of moving into adulthood and away from her parents' place of origin.

    Very early in her career, she turned away from fiction to focus on autobiography. Her work combines historic and individual experiences. She charts her parents' social progression (La place, La honte), her teenage years (Ce qu'ils disent ou rien), her marriage (La femme gelée), her passionate affair with an eastern European man (Passion simple), her abortion (L'événement), Alzheimer's disease (Je ne suis pas sortie de ma nuit), the death of her mother (Une femme), and breast cancer (L'usage de la photo). Ernaux also wrote L'écriture comme un couteau (Writing as Sharp as a Knife) with Frédéric-Yves Jeannet.

    A Woman's Story, A Man's Place, and Simple Passion were recognized as The New York Times Notable Books, and A Woman's Story was a Finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Shame was named a Publishers Weekly Best Book of 1998, I Remain in Darkness a Top Memoir of 1999 by The Washington Post, and The Possession was listed as a Top Ten Book of 2008 by More Magazine.

    Her 2008 historical memoir Les Années (The Years), very well received by French critics, is considered by many to be her magnum opus. In this book, Ernaux writes about herself in the third person (elle, or "she" in English) for the first time, providing a vivid look at French society just after the Second World War until the early 2000s. It is the moving social story of a woman and of the evolving society she lived in.
     

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @YetAnotherAnon, @Muggles, @Wilkey, @fish

    for the first time, providing a vivid look at French society just after the Second World War until the early 2000s.

    Well thank goodness for that. No one had any idea what French society was like in that obscure time period.

    her relationship with her father and her experiences growing up in a small town in France … moving into adulthood and away from her parents’ place of origin … her parents’ social progression … her teenage years … her marriage, her passionate affair with an eastern European man

    Why no ¡B!lacks or Muslims? Racist!

    • Replies: @Anon7
    @Almost Missouri

    "No one had any idea what French society was like in that obscure time period."

    As you point out, it's not like you could watch TV and find out, like the excellent French series Maigret, covering the exploits of the famous fictional detective, set just after WWII. Unlike modern French TV detective fiction, which offers gorgeous travelogue views in spectacular French locations, Maigret seems to deliberately seek out the smallest, most dilapidated French towns. Rather than speak with high officials and intellectuals and fashion models, Commissaire Jules Maigret of the Paris Brigade makes it a point to talk with everybody, including small boys and vagrants, in his search for the truth.

    , @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Almost Missouri

    Eastern European man is non-descript. He could have been the nominal prince of Latvia or he could have been a gypsy.

    (Gypsy is a slur that will get you a strike if you use it on twitter!)

    Replies: @fish

    , @Colin Wright
    @Almost Missouri

    '...Why no ¡B!lacks or Muslims? Racist!'

    Not to mention, man?

    She's white, racist, and hetero-normative. Not good enough, Nobel. Not good enough.

    ...my suspicion is this was the best they could do and still have a defensible winner, quality-wise.

  12. She definitely plagiarized Trump’s method of comb over:

    • LOL: SafeNow
  13. The Nobel as well as the Booker are extremely useful as negative signals. In fact, any book that wins any prize these days is probably woke, chick lit, BIPOC, or gender ideology crap, including science fiction prizes.

    • Agree: Bill Jones, fish
    • Replies: @tr
    @Anon

    All prizes devolve over time to booby prizes.
    It hasn't happened yet to the science Nobels, but the clock is ticking. . . .

    Replies: @Mike_from_SGV

  14. @Almost Missouri
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    for the first time, providing a vivid look at French society just after the Second World War until the early 2000s.
     
    Well thank goodness for that. No one had any idea what French society was like in that obscure time period.

    her relationship with her father and her experiences growing up in a small town in France ... moving into adulthood and away from her parents’ place of origin ... her parents’ social progression ... her teenage years ... her marriage, her passionate affair with an eastern European man
     
    Why no ¡B!lacks or Muslims? Racist!

    Replies: @Anon7, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Colin Wright

    “No one had any idea what French society was like in that obscure time period.”

    As you point out, it’s not like you could watch TV and find out, like the excellent French series Maigret, covering the exploits of the famous fictional detective, set just after WWII. Unlike modern French TV detective fiction, which offers gorgeous travelogue views in spectacular French locations, Maigret seems to deliberately seek out the smallest, most dilapidated French towns. Rather than speak with high officials and intellectuals and fashion models, Commissaire Jules Maigret of the Paris Brigade makes it a point to talk with everybody, including small boys and vagrants, in his search for the truth.

  15. @Almost Missouri
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    for the first time, providing a vivid look at French society just after the Second World War until the early 2000s.
     
    Well thank goodness for that. No one had any idea what French society was like in that obscure time period.

    her relationship with her father and her experiences growing up in a small town in France ... moving into adulthood and away from her parents’ place of origin ... her parents’ social progression ... her teenage years ... her marriage, her passionate affair with an eastern European man
     
    Why no ¡B!lacks or Muslims? Racist!

    Replies: @Anon7, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Colin Wright

    Eastern European man is non-descript. He could have been the nominal prince of Latvia or he could have been a gypsy.

    (Gypsy is a slur that will get you a strike if you use it on twitter!)

    • Replies: @fish
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    (Gypsy is a slur that will get you a strike if you use it on twitter!)



    Another good reason to stay off Twitter.

  16. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Bardon Kaldian

    80 years of brooding solipsism.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Gary in Gramercy

    80 years of brooding solipsism.

    And this differs from 2016’s winner in that…

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Reg Cæsar

    LOL. Good one.

    To be fair, Dylan has an enormous range outside his brooding solipsism. He even had a genuinely Christian conversion experience along the way and wrote the best gospel rock ever. He also managed to have the grounding life experiences of children.

  17. Although
    Annie Ernaux
    ‘sfamous for tales of woe,
    the Nobelist judges should know
    what is absent from her portfolio:
    She’s never been on a talk show,
    nor in
    Charlie Hebdo
    (or has she?), so…
    c’est faux.

    • LOL: Recently Based
    • Replies: @Dube
    @Reg Cæsar

    Workshop note. I like the curve of the right edge - seriously, a finishing touch. And I like Tilleynot's scallop, #17 just below here, violated as intended with the final line. The shape doesn't have to matter but it's nice. I'm missing tonight's open reading at the library so I appreciate the fellowship. Performance is a distinct rhetoric, but for me the proof is how it lies in silence on the page. The eye can fondle as the ear cannot.

  18. 15 minutes for Annie Ernaux
    Is as far as we Warhols will go.
    La France et la Guerre,
    Sa sordide affaire:
    We don’t care, and we don’t care to know.

    • LOL: kaganovitch
  19. @Reg Cæsar
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    80 years of brooding solipsism.
     
    And this differs from 2016's winner in that...

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    LOL. Good one.

    To be fair, Dylan has an enormous range outside his brooding solipsism. He even had a genuinely Christian conversion experience along the way and wrote the best gospel rock ever. He also managed to have the grounding life experiences of children.

  20. “…the roots, estrangements and collective restraints of personal memory” — Songs in the Key of Me. Oh well, would-be authors are always encouraged to write about what they know best.

  21. Pearl S. Buck, 1938.

    It was always thus.

  22. Nobel ain’t done well with this bit:
    The ig-Nobles for Peace and for Lit.
    “Well, untangle me photons!
    They be pygmies and morons
    Who with Herr Double Umlauts don’t fit!”

  23. …her experiences growing up in a small town in France … moving into adulthood … and then this happened, and then that happened …blah blah blah

    If she’s such a great writer she could have at least pulled a Time’s Arrow, starting with her burial and working backward from there. (Or Eastward Ho! for you William Tenn fans)

  24. Anon[400] • Disclaimer says:

    This may be the only time I’ve actually read a work by a Nobel Prize winning author before the award was given. I’ve read A Woman’s Story by Ernaux and liked it. Have yet to read to her other stuff, though. But she’s not a bad writer from what I’ve been able to tell.

    • Thanks: Occasional lurker
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anon

    Concur.
    A few decades back I read a book by her.
    As I recall, it was mostly observational snippets from riding one of the Paris commuter trains.
    She was pretty good at "noticing" stuff and articulating it.
    I suspect she's being given the prize for the wrong reasons, but I think she is not unskilled.
    Still, although Milan Kundera will never win that prize these days, he would be much more deserving.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  25. Any literary critic who uses “acuity” or “aplomb” is full of shit.

  26. @Bardon Kaldian
    80 years old chick.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Old Prude, @Truth

    Let me do a favor for all you fellows, and especially you, Steve:

    When you are in the company of chicks, Do NOT refer to chicks as “chicks”.

    Two data points: Years ago I had a wonderful chick friend: Athletic, artistic, intelligent, good-looking..
    When I used the word “chicks” she came near un-glued. It was the ONLY time she got angry at me.

    Last month I went to a garage band performance with Mrs. Prude. When I referred to the “chick singer” she and every other chick in ear-shot scowled at me. I did it again and she hissed “Women don’t like that!” Who knew?

    P.S. I refer to Mrs. Prude as a “hippy chick”, and she doesn’t seem to mind. Who can understand these chicks?

    • LOL: fish
    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Old Prude

    Of course. Women don't like to be referred to as "chicks", except in special circumstances.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Old Prude

    I dunno bout that Willis. I've dated chicks who thought it was a compliment to be called a chick, it made them feel sexy. One chick liked to refer to herself as "an all-around chick". Courses for horses, I reckon. Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men?

    , @stillCARealist
    @Old Prude

    The problem is this is a Frenchie.

    Should be "chicque"

  27. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Bardon Kaldian

    80 years of brooding solipsism.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Gary in Gramercy

    Beats a hundred years of solitude.

    • LOL: The Anti-Gnostic
  28. So, it’s Official: Psycho Babble Conquers All.

  29. @Almost Missouri
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    for the first time, providing a vivid look at French society just after the Second World War until the early 2000s.
     
    Well thank goodness for that. No one had any idea what French society was like in that obscure time period.

    her relationship with her father and her experiences growing up in a small town in France ... moving into adulthood and away from her parents’ place of origin ... her parents’ social progression ... her teenage years ... her marriage, her passionate affair with an eastern European man
     
    Why no ¡B!lacks or Muslims? Racist!

    Replies: @Anon7, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Colin Wright

    ‘…Why no ¡B!lacks or Muslims? Racist!’

    Not to mention, man?

    She’s white, racist, and hetero-normative. Not good enough, Nobel. Not good enough.

    …my suspicion is this was the best they could do and still have a defensible winner, quality-wise.

  30. It’s sort of like Maya Angelou: You can look very long and still find nothing the woman actually *did* apart from writing about herself.

    What do they write *about*? It’s sort of the exact inverse of Franklin’s famous adage about being remembered.

    • Replies: @Dave from Oz
    @Nachum

    Maybe Ernaux and Angelou are so highly regarded because in writing exclisively about themselves, they write about all women. But the only way that could be true is if all women were basically identical.

    Replies: @Nachum

  31. The Nobel Prize has been in decadence for quite some time, and in particular the Literature one. For years they just refuse to give it to writers who are more well-known, then they give it to a… rock star. Ridiculous.

    It seems they have a grudge against certain authors – i.e. Borges, Murakami, even Roth.

    Now they give it again to this woman very few people know and who doesn’t seem so great, from the descriptions.

    But all Nobel prizes are a bit ridiculous, also Economy (Krugman??) and many of the Science ones (“let’s give an award to a lesbian Iranian girl, a gay man”, etc).

    I say, let’s do away with them. Nobel’s best invention was still dynamite.

  32. “I have zero opinion on this.”

    neither does anybody else. this award is as irrelevant today as horse racing, a thing from 100 years ago that people moved on from. it made sense in 1900. it doesn’t now. it’s a vestige from another era.

    time to retire the literature award. all writing talent moved on to other textual forms decades ago. especially as the committee deliberately excludes modern fiction writers, this award is worthless. only total nobodies wasting their time in long dead artforms are even eligible. anybody with any actual talent is writing other stuff.

    if the NFL can officially can the Pro Bowl for being irrelevant now, and it has, then the Nobel people can officially can this one. this award is much, much less relevant than the Academy or Grammy awards, which have declined in relevance themselves.

  33. She writes in a very cold and precise way, Her genre is autobiography, Her parents were factory workers in Nordmandy who were able to quit it and run a small grocer-cafe shop in a village. As she has a very high verbal IQ (>135), she became a tenured French littérature teacher for high school (professeur agrégé). But all her life vision has been inhabited by a profound hatred of well off people. She married a dumber husband from « bourgeoisie » who dumped her after 17 years when she started to have some success.

    Her abortion, her mother being threaten by her father in an isolated simulacre of violence, her relationship with a married man, her mother Alzheimer disease, etc are the stuff of wich her book are made.

    She is extremely sectarian and wanted another writer Millet – who wrote about Breivik – totally cancelled. She had more than 100 intellectuals sign a petition against the guy in our reference paper Le Monde.

    She is a friend to Palestinian, Woke, Gays, Antifa, and the coalition of the fringes ….Her gang is with Edouard Louis and Didier Eribon.

    I think she is with Houellebecq among my favorite author. But for HBD ideas, she is a revolting choice and Houellebecq would have been a delicacy .

    Race, Jews outside Israelies, Billionnaires, all that is too far from her worldview.

    • Replies: @Happy Tapir
    @Bruno

    Hi Bruno, what would you recommend as her best book?

    Replies: @Bruno

  34. Despite her leftist positions and success in university studies, many critics outside universities but belonging to reference papers or publishing book companies, and executive public servants in the cultural sector – our intellectual elite in France – don’t like her. That’s because her vocabulary and style is so dry. And to scratch beyond the surface, you need to be more of a gifted person than a well read person.

    When someone asked her what motivated her to succeed at school, she answered that she wanted to « avenger her race ».

    Sadly her race is a « social class construct ».

  35. OT: What happened to “WW II Leaders….”? The link goes to another post.

  36. @Bardon Kaldian
    80 years old chick.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Old Prude, @Truth

    Right up there in sex appeal with Nancy Pelosi, HUBBA-HUBBA!

  37. Is Ernaux’ literary style especially engaging? Seriously, I haven’t read her works, but are they perhaps wonderful to read even if they’re, erm, “self-regardent” like Seven Pillars of Wisdom?

    • Agree: Not Raul
  38. I’m tempted to crank call Jerry Jenkins next year.

  39. @The Anti-Gnostic
    This is hilarious. Apparently all she does is write My Big Book About Me:

    Annie Ernaux started her literary career in 1974 with Les Armoires vides (Cleaned Out), an autobiographical novel. In 1984, she won the Renaudot Prize for another of her autobiographical works La Place (A Man's Place), an autobiographical narrative focusing on her relationship with her father and her experiences growing up in a small town in France, and her subsequent process of moving into adulthood and away from her parents' place of origin.

    Very early in her career, she turned away from fiction to focus on autobiography. Her work combines historic and individual experiences. She charts her parents' social progression (La place, La honte), her teenage years (Ce qu'ils disent ou rien), her marriage (La femme gelée), her passionate affair with an eastern European man (Passion simple), her abortion (L'événement), Alzheimer's disease (Je ne suis pas sortie de ma nuit), the death of her mother (Une femme), and breast cancer (L'usage de la photo). Ernaux also wrote L'écriture comme un couteau (Writing as Sharp as a Knife) with Frédéric-Yves Jeannet.

    A Woman's Story, A Man's Place, and Simple Passion were recognized as The New York Times Notable Books, and A Woman's Story was a Finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Shame was named a Publishers Weekly Best Book of 1998, I Remain in Darkness a Top Memoir of 1999 by The Washington Post, and The Possession was listed as a Top Ten Book of 2008 by More Magazine.

    Her 2008 historical memoir Les Années (The Years), very well received by French critics, is considered by many to be her magnum opus. In this book, Ernaux writes about herself in the third person (elle, or "she" in English) for the first time, providing a vivid look at French society just after the Second World War until the early 2000s. It is the moving social story of a woman and of the evolving society she lived in.
     

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @YetAnotherAnon, @Muggles, @Wilkey, @fish

    “her parents’ social progression (La place, La honte), her teenage years (Ce qu’ils disent ou rien), her marriage (La femme gelée), her passionate affair with an eastern European man (Passion simple), her abortion (L’événement), Alzheimer’s disease (Je ne suis pas sortie de ma nuit), the death of her mother (Une femme), and breast cancer (L’usage de la photo)”

    I see a big female life event is missing from that list.

    One of the pleasures of parenthood is making a mother into a grandmother. Let’s hope she had siblings who stepped up to the plate.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @YetAnotherAnon


    I see a big female life event is missing from that list.

     

    No - her bio mentioned the abortion (/sarc).

    Replies: @HFR

    , @HFR
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Ernaux has 2 sons. She doesn't need siblings to step up to the plate. I don't know whether the sons have families.

    Replies: @CCG

  40. “for the courage and clinical acuity with which she uncovers the roots, estrangements and
    collective restraints of personal memory”.

    Holy cow, I’ll bet that one’s a real page turner. “Couldn’t put it down!” Ya’ jus’ gotta find out what happens in the next chapter. Will it be collective restraints? Roots? or (take a deep breath, and plunge in) estrangements. Those estrangements!

    JWM

    • LOL: duncsbaby
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @jwm

    Yeah, just WTF does "for the courage and clinical acuity with which she uncovers the roots, estrangements and collective restraints of personal memory" mean?

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

  41. ‘I have zero opinion on this.”

    And yet you get paid.

    • Troll: duncsbaby
    • Replies: @Anon
    @obwandiyag

    Well, so do you.

    , @Muggles
    @obwandiyag


    I have zero opinion on this.”

    And yet you get paid.
     
    iSteve gets donations from readers.

    I'm sure yours is still in the mail...
  42. I have zero opinion on this.

    What is this supposed to mean?

    • Replies: @fish
    @Anonymous

    What is this supposed to mean?



    That the usual pithy analysis that draws you here day after day will not be forthcoming.

  43. This tells you how little a Nobel Prize is worth.

    Along with Pulitzer’s, Palme d’Or, Oscars, et al.

  44. By the way- Physics Nobel. It is not difficult to understand. Just watch, if you have spare time, these two videos & you’ll get the big picture.

  45. I’ve always found autobiographical fiction odd. It is one thing to use your personal experiences & traits to create a believable world- and something entirely different to go on & on about your personal life (which is your business no one of sane mind is interested in).

    Among greatest authors we can see this & it works: Tolstoy is both Pierre and Andrei; Proust is divided among Charlus, Swann and, of course, the Narrator; Joyce is partially Stephen, but his humane & “dirty” aspect is in Leopold Bloom.

    But most novelists- Dostoevsky, Conrad, Faulkner,..- don’t care about their lives as materia poetica for fiction.

    I find it hard to understand why anyone would bother with their life to write about it for decades. Personal life just isn’t so interesting. There is more to life than that.

    • Agree: Muggles
    • Thanks: Yahya
    • Replies: @Yngvar
    @Bardon Kaldian


    I find it hard to understand why anyone would bother with their life to write about it for decades. Personal life just isn’t so interesting. There is more to life than that.
     
    Norwegian author Karl Ove Knausgård wrote a six volume autobiographical work called My Struggle.
    The series was positively received in the English speaking world.

    Here is the Guardian:

    Karl Ove Knausgaard: the latest literary sensation
    Zadie Smith says she needs his books 'like crack'. The Norwegian writer's unflinching six-volume account of his day-to-day life has also provoked legal action and death threats. Is he brave or shameless, asks Hari Kunzru
     
    So then it's a market for it, but Annie Ernaux first book was about her first abortion and there is a French film coming out now based on that book, so this prize is very clearly a 'commentary' on the abortion rights debate going on in the US.

    They just can't help it; The United States of America towers over them and they have to roar.

    Replies: @Yngvar, @Bardon Kaldian

  46. I have zero opinion on this.

    And that’s how you do 1,000 posts a year.

    • Thanks: Rob
  47. A surprise to me. I figured they would finally award the Nobel to Tolstoy, to honor Russia.

    • Replies: @anon
    @SafeNow

    You have to not be dead. Unless you mean one of Tolstoy's many living descendants is a literary genius.

  48. anon[216] • Disclaimer says:

    I was intrigued by “She charts her parents’ social progression, her teenage years, . . . Alzheimer’s disease . . .” Turns out it was her mother that had it. I downloaded the English translation at Libgen. Terse, novella-length; one could read it completely in a very few hours. I would have to do that to really evaluate it, but the bits I read seemed well-chosen and an appropriate combination of modern micro-tragedy and small doses of humor.

    What was Proust but a marvellous curator of tidbits of ordinary life? Her work seems far more sparse than Proust at first glance, but to decide that, I’d have to read considerably more of her ouevre; overall, it’s probably longer than Proust’s by now. What if she really could say as much as he did, but in plainer language? I doubt it, but what if?

    Would she be worth a Nobel if masculine men (certainly not Proust, BTW) were still widely interested in reading and writing literature? Probably not, but that does not describe c2022. There’s little point in complaining about this kind of instance of affirmative action Nobel because, within our New Dark Age that currents like feminism both reflect and brought about, Ernaux’s prize fits.

  49. @SafeNow
    A surprise to me. I figured they would finally award the Nobel to Tolstoy, to honor Russia.

    Replies: @anon

    You have to not be dead. Unless you mean one of Tolstoy’s many living descendants is a literary genius.

  50. @obwandiyag
    'I have zero opinion on this."

    And yet you get paid.

    Replies: @Anon, @Muggles

    Well, so do you.

  51. I can just imagine the monologue in a certain mansion in Montecito.

    “Look, H, this French woman got a Nobel Prize in literature for writing about herself. She’s not even a woman of color or royalty like I am! I should write my autobiography. It’s time I told my truth to the world so South Africans can dance in the streets again. Actually everyone everywhere will be dancing in the streets when they realize I’ve devoted myself to a life of service, like Mother Theresa, except better dressed. I think I’ll start with my acceptance speech for my Nobel Prize.”

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Kylie

    Do you think Oprah sounds more profound in French?

    Replies: @Kylie

  52. @obwandiyag
    'I have zero opinion on this."

    And yet you get paid.

    Replies: @Anon, @Muggles

    I have zero opinion on this.”

    And yet you get paid.

    iSteve gets donations from readers.

    I’m sure yours is still in the mail…

  53. @The Anti-Gnostic
    This is hilarious. Apparently all she does is write My Big Book About Me:

    Annie Ernaux started her literary career in 1974 with Les Armoires vides (Cleaned Out), an autobiographical novel. In 1984, she won the Renaudot Prize for another of her autobiographical works La Place (A Man's Place), an autobiographical narrative focusing on her relationship with her father and her experiences growing up in a small town in France, and her subsequent process of moving into adulthood and away from her parents' place of origin.

    Very early in her career, she turned away from fiction to focus on autobiography. Her work combines historic and individual experiences. She charts her parents' social progression (La place, La honte), her teenage years (Ce qu'ils disent ou rien), her marriage (La femme gelée), her passionate affair with an eastern European man (Passion simple), her abortion (L'événement), Alzheimer's disease (Je ne suis pas sortie de ma nuit), the death of her mother (Une femme), and breast cancer (L'usage de la photo). Ernaux also wrote L'écriture comme un couteau (Writing as Sharp as a Knife) with Frédéric-Yves Jeannet.

    A Woman's Story, A Man's Place, and Simple Passion were recognized as The New York Times Notable Books, and A Woman's Story was a Finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Shame was named a Publishers Weekly Best Book of 1998, I Remain in Darkness a Top Memoir of 1999 by The Washington Post, and The Possession was listed as a Top Ten Book of 2008 by More Magazine.

    Her 2008 historical memoir Les Années (The Years), very well received by French critics, is considered by many to be her magnum opus. In this book, Ernaux writes about herself in the third person (elle, or "she" in English) for the first time, providing a vivid look at French society just after the Second World War until the early 2000s. It is the moving social story of a woman and of the evolving society she lived in.
     

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @YetAnotherAnon, @Muggles, @Wilkey, @fish

    This is hilarious. Apparently all she does is write My Big Book About Me:

    Yes, excellent observation.

    From what I can tell this is the same genre as the thousands of female novelists (mostly but not exclusively Jewish) who crank out unread novels for other lonely cat ladies living off divorces. Quite popular with Manhattan publishers and the library ladies nationwide who order books.

    At least she’s European and writes in a language many can read. The commentators here who have read her (such a literate bunch of Men of UNZ!) seem to think she’s okay.

    If you like that sort of thing.

    The kind of brainy woman who at first encounter seems interesting but probably is at long last, best avoided. In her World of Me, you are just gist for her mill.

    But a biological female who is a decent writer, White (not that we’re noticing) and is no worse than average in political views, for her kind.

    But how many Big Books of Me does mankind really need?

    • Replies: @Dave from Oz
    @Muggles


    In her World of Me, you are just gist for her mill.
     
    Another Taylor Swift hater, I bet.
    , @Rob
    @Muggles


    In her World of Me, you are just gist for her mill.
     
    Very well said. Except it grist for the mill.
  54. Even assuming the translation is poor, this is some pretty awful writing. Because the ideas are so stupid.

    We made love on a Sunday in October, I was lying on a piece of drawing paper spread out on the bed. He wanted to know what kind of picture the mixture of his sperm and my menstrual blood would make.

    Afterwards we looked at the paper, the damp picture. We saw a woman whose face was being devoured by her thick mouth, whose body seemed to fade and flow, formless. Or perhaps it was the northern lights, or a sunset.

    We were amazed not to have had this idea before. We wondered if other people had had the same idea. The next day he framed the picture and hung it on the wall of his room.

    There’s more, or perhaps less, of this tripe here:

    https://www.annie-ernaux.org/fragments-around-philippe-v/

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    @Peterike


    We made love on a Sunday in October, I was lying on a piece of drawing paper spread out on the bed. He wanted to know what kind of picture the mixture of his sperm and my menstrual blood would make.
     
    I don't mind autobiographical literature as long as it's interesting and well written. This is just stupid and disgusting and doesn't make me want to know more about this woman's life -- I feel I know too much already...
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Peterike

    I know someone who had a post-divorce fling with an artist who smeared her with paint and banged her in various attitudes against a white painted wall .

    (Guys only relate this kind of tale to each other when they're 20-odd, but a grown woman will tell her three best female friends)

  55. @YetAnotherAnon
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    "her parents’ social progression (La place, La honte), her teenage years (Ce qu’ils disent ou rien), her marriage (La femme gelée), her passionate affair with an eastern European man (Passion simple), her abortion (L’événement), Alzheimer’s disease (Je ne suis pas sortie de ma nuit), the death of her mother (Une femme), and breast cancer (L’usage de la photo)"

    I see a big female life event is missing from that list.

    One of the pleasures of parenthood is making a mother into a grandmother. Let's hope she had siblings who stepped up to the plate.

    Replies: @Wilkey, @HFR

    I see a big female life event is missing from that list.

    No – her bio mentioned the abortion (/sarc).

    • Replies: @HFR
    @Wilkey

    Ernaux had an abortion when she was young and then had 2 sons when she was married. These events can be combined in one's life.

  56. @The Anti-Gnostic
    This is hilarious. Apparently all she does is write My Big Book About Me:

    Annie Ernaux started her literary career in 1974 with Les Armoires vides (Cleaned Out), an autobiographical novel. In 1984, she won the Renaudot Prize for another of her autobiographical works La Place (A Man's Place), an autobiographical narrative focusing on her relationship with her father and her experiences growing up in a small town in France, and her subsequent process of moving into adulthood and away from her parents' place of origin.

    Very early in her career, she turned away from fiction to focus on autobiography. Her work combines historic and individual experiences. She charts her parents' social progression (La place, La honte), her teenage years (Ce qu'ils disent ou rien), her marriage (La femme gelée), her passionate affair with an eastern European man (Passion simple), her abortion (L'événement), Alzheimer's disease (Je ne suis pas sortie de ma nuit), the death of her mother (Une femme), and breast cancer (L'usage de la photo). Ernaux also wrote L'écriture comme un couteau (Writing as Sharp as a Knife) with Frédéric-Yves Jeannet.

    A Woman's Story, A Man's Place, and Simple Passion were recognized as The New York Times Notable Books, and A Woman's Story was a Finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Shame was named a Publishers Weekly Best Book of 1998, I Remain in Darkness a Top Memoir of 1999 by The Washington Post, and The Possession was listed as a Top Ten Book of 2008 by More Magazine.

    Her 2008 historical memoir Les Années (The Years), very well received by French critics, is considered by many to be her magnum opus. In this book, Ernaux writes about herself in the third person (elle, or "she" in English) for the first time, providing a vivid look at French society just after the Second World War until the early 2000s. It is the moving social story of a woman and of the evolving society she lived in.
     

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @YetAnotherAnon, @Muggles, @Wilkey, @fish

    This is hilarious. Apparently all she does is write My Big Book About Me

    Perhaps they’re just trying to establish a precedent so they can award yet another well-deserved Nobel to His Holiness, the Lightbringer, the Won, Barack Hussein Obama, whose favorite and only subject is always himself.

    • Replies: @Meretricious
    @Wilkey

    If Obama were ever awarded a Nobel in Literature it would be all over for the literature prize. Giving one to Toni Morrison was bad enough but Obama's would be met with international laughter.

  57. @The Anti-Gnostic
    This is hilarious. Apparently all she does is write My Big Book About Me:

    Annie Ernaux started her literary career in 1974 with Les Armoires vides (Cleaned Out), an autobiographical novel. In 1984, she won the Renaudot Prize for another of her autobiographical works La Place (A Man's Place), an autobiographical narrative focusing on her relationship with her father and her experiences growing up in a small town in France, and her subsequent process of moving into adulthood and away from her parents' place of origin.

    Very early in her career, she turned away from fiction to focus on autobiography. Her work combines historic and individual experiences. She charts her parents' social progression (La place, La honte), her teenage years (Ce qu'ils disent ou rien), her marriage (La femme gelée), her passionate affair with an eastern European man (Passion simple), her abortion (L'événement), Alzheimer's disease (Je ne suis pas sortie de ma nuit), the death of her mother (Une femme), and breast cancer (L'usage de la photo). Ernaux also wrote L'écriture comme un couteau (Writing as Sharp as a Knife) with Frédéric-Yves Jeannet.

    A Woman's Story, A Man's Place, and Simple Passion were recognized as The New York Times Notable Books, and A Woman's Story was a Finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Shame was named a Publishers Weekly Best Book of 1998, I Remain in Darkness a Top Memoir of 1999 by The Washington Post, and The Possession was listed as a Top Ten Book of 2008 by More Magazine.

    Her 2008 historical memoir Les Années (The Years), very well received by French critics, is considered by many to be her magnum opus. In this book, Ernaux writes about herself in the third person (elle, or "she" in English) for the first time, providing a vivid look at French society just after the Second World War until the early 2000s. It is the moving social story of a woman and of the evolving society she lived in.
     

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @YetAnotherAnon, @Muggles, @Wilkey, @fish

    Apparently all she does is write My Big Book About Me:

    It’s the book that every woman yearns to write.

  58. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Almost Missouri

    Eastern European man is non-descript. He could have been the nominal prince of Latvia or he could have been a gypsy.

    (Gypsy is a slur that will get you a strike if you use it on twitter!)

    Replies: @fish

    (Gypsy is a slur that will get you a strike if you use it on twitter!)

    Another good reason to stay off Twitter.

  59. @jwm
    “for the courage and clinical acuity with which she uncovers the roots, estrangements and
    collective restraints of personal memory”.

    Holy cow, I'll bet that one's a real page turner. "Couldn't put it down!" Ya' jus' gotta find out what happens in the next chapter. Will it be collective restraints? Roots? or (take a deep breath, and plunge in) estrangements. Those estrangements!

    JWM

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Yeah, just WTF does “for the courage and clinical acuity with which she uncovers the roots, estrangements and collective restraints of personal memory” mean?

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Jim Don Bob

    It means, "Daddy used to touch me down there, but I waited until long after he and Mommy were in the ground to mention it to anyone. 'Believe all women,' n'est-ce pas?"

  60. @Old Prude
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Let me do a favor for all you fellows, and especially you, Steve:

    When you are in the company of chicks, Do NOT refer to chicks as "chicks".

    Two data points: Years ago I had a wonderful chick friend: Athletic, artistic, intelligent, good-looking..
    When I used the word "chicks" she came near un-glued. It was the ONLY time she got angry at me.

    Last month I went to a garage band performance with Mrs. Prude. When I referred to the "chick singer" she and every other chick in ear-shot scowled at me. I did it again and she hissed "Women don't like that!" Who knew?

    P.S. I refer to Mrs. Prude as a "hippy chick", and she doesn't seem to mind. Who can understand these chicks?

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @stillCARealist

    Of course. Women don’t like to be referred to as “chicks”, except in special circumstances.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Women don’t like to be referred to as “chicks”, except in special circumstances.
     

    https://arc-anglerfish-washpost-prod-washpost.s3.amazonaws.com/public/NHINH5BGQBEAJDVETKRSC4C7D4.jpg

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  61. Steve’s Twitter reply to Jim Passon led me to the latter’s retweet of this. Sarah Langs has shown an inordinate amount of interest in baseball’s consecutive-game streaks.

    Now we know why– she has Lou Gehrig’s disease:

  62. @Anonymous

    I have zero opinion on this.
     
    What is this supposed to mean?

    Replies: @fish

    What is this supposed to mean?

    That the usual pithy analysis that draws you here day after day will not be forthcoming.

  63. @Anon7
    And now Velma in Scooby Doo has been retconned as a lesbian.

    Velma Is Officially a Lesbian in New ‘Scooby-Doo’ Film

    Clips from the brand new movie “Trick or Treat Scooby-Doo!,” which show the Mystery Inc. member googly-eyed and speechless when encountering costume designer Coco Diablo, have gone viral on Twitter, confirming suspicions held by the “Scooby” fan base for decades.

     

    Replies: @SFG

    There was always some subtext to it, kind of like Shaggy and marijuana (why did he always have the munchies? For dog treats?) and the actress who played the inspiration for Velma (Zelda Gilroy) in The Loves of Dobie Gillis, Sheila Kuehl, went on to be one of the first openly gay legislators in California. (Made quite a few anti-male laws over there, as I recall.) Even her Wikipedia pic looks vaguely Velma-ish.

    So it’s more of a joke back and forth across reality and fantasy than a real out-of-nowhere retcon like, say, making Iron Man a woman of color when the character was conceived as a conservative industrialist (Stan Lee wanted to see if he could make a hero out of a personality type the kids hated).

  64. @Nachum
    It's sort of like Maya Angelou: You can look very long and still find nothing the woman actually *did* apart from writing about herself.

    What do they write *about*? It's sort of the exact inverse of Franklin's famous adage about being remembered.

    Replies: @Dave from Oz

    Maybe Ernaux and Angelou are so highly regarded because in writing exclisively about themselves, they write about all women. But the only way that could be true is if all women were basically identical.

    • Replies: @Nachum
    @Dave from Oz

    And some lives, like Angelou's, are weird enough they can't be.

    Ah, there's something.

  65. @Muggles
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    This is hilarious. Apparently all she does is write My Big Book About Me:
     
    Yes, excellent observation.

    From what I can tell this is the same genre as the thousands of female novelists (mostly but not exclusively Jewish) who crank out unread novels for other lonely cat ladies living off divorces. Quite popular with Manhattan publishers and the library ladies nationwide who order books.

    At least she's European and writes in a language many can read. The commentators here who have read her (such a literate bunch of Men of UNZ!) seem to think she's okay.

    If you like that sort of thing.

    The kind of brainy woman who at first encounter seems interesting but probably is at long last, best avoided. In her World of Me, you are just gist for her mill.

    But a biological female who is a decent writer, White (not that we're noticing) and is no worse than average in political views, for her kind.

    But how many Big Books of Me does mankind really need?

    Replies: @Dave from Oz, @Rob

    In her World of Me, you are just gist for her mill.

    Another Taylor Swift hater, I bet.

  66. The mere fact you posted this news, Mr. Sailer, shows you DO have an opinion on it. It’a classic caginess on your part.

  67. @Wilkey
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    This is hilarious. Apparently all she does is write My Big Book About Me
     
    Perhaps they’re just trying to establish a precedent so they can award yet another well-deserved Nobel to His Holiness, the Lightbringer, the Won, Barack Hussein Obama, whose favorite and only subject is always himself.

    Replies: @Meretricious

    If Obama were ever awarded a Nobel in Literature it would be all over for the literature prize. Giving one to Toni Morrison was bad enough but Obama’s would be met with international laughter.

  68. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Old Prude

    Of course. Women don't like to be referred to as "chicks", except in special circumstances.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Women don’t like to be referred to as “chicks”, except in special circumstances.

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Reg Cæsar

    I said women, not entertainers.

  69. @Kylie
    I can just imagine the monologue in a certain mansion in Montecito.

    "Look, H, this French woman got a Nobel Prize in literature for writing about herself. She's not even a woman of color or royalty like I am! I should write my autobiography. It's time I told my truth to the world so South Africans can dance in the streets again. Actually everyone everywhere will be dancing in the streets when they realize I've devoted myself to a life of service, like Mother Theresa, except better dressed. I think I'll start with my acceptance speech for my Nobel Prize."

    Replies: @Anon

    Do you think Oprah sounds more profound in French?

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Anon

    "Do you think Oprah sounds more profound in French?"

    I've never heard her in French. But I'm probably not the best person to ask. Unlike so many white women, I am immune to the appeal of the magisterial Negress and her pronouncements, both the individual and the type.

  70. @YetAnotherAnon
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    "her parents’ social progression (La place, La honte), her teenage years (Ce qu’ils disent ou rien), her marriage (La femme gelée), her passionate affair with an eastern European man (Passion simple), her abortion (L’événement), Alzheimer’s disease (Je ne suis pas sortie de ma nuit), the death of her mother (Une femme), and breast cancer (L’usage de la photo)"

    I see a big female life event is missing from that list.

    One of the pleasures of parenthood is making a mother into a grandmother. Let's hope she had siblings who stepped up to the plate.

    Replies: @Wilkey, @HFR

    Ernaux has 2 sons. She doesn’t need siblings to step up to the plate. I don’t know whether the sons have families.

    • Thanks: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @CCG
    @HFR

    At least one of her sons (David) has children:
    https://cineuropa.org/en/interview/425941/

  71. @Bruno
    She writes in a very cold and precise way, Her genre is autobiography, Her parents were factory workers in Nordmandy who were able to quit it and run a small grocer-cafe shop in a village. As she has a very high verbal IQ (>135), she became a tenured French littérature teacher for high school (professeur agrégé). But all her life vision has been inhabited by a profound hatred of well off people. She married a dumber husband from « bourgeoisie » who dumped her after 17 years when she started to have some success.

    Her abortion, her mother being threaten by her father in an isolated simulacre of violence, her relationship with a married man, her mother Alzheimer disease, etc are the stuff of wich her book are made.

    She is extremely sectarian and wanted another writer Millet - who wrote about Breivik - totally cancelled. She had more than 100 intellectuals sign a petition against the guy in our reference paper Le Monde.

    She is a friend to Palestinian, Woke, Gays, Antifa, and the coalition of the fringes ….Her gang is with Edouard Louis and Didier Eribon.

    I think she is with Houellebecq among my favorite author. But for HBD ideas, she is a revolting choice and Houellebecq would have been a delicacy .

    Race, Jews outside Israelies, Billionnaires, all that is too far from her worldview.

    Replies: @Happy Tapir

    Hi Bruno, what would you recommend as her best book?

    • Replies: @Bruno
    @Happy Tapir

    A short one first : La place. I don’t know the name in English translation. Meaning is « The square » and « status : a person’s position in society hierarchy ».

    I also like Les années. Or Passion simple. Je ne suis pas sorti de ma nuit.

  72. @Wilkey
    @YetAnotherAnon


    I see a big female life event is missing from that list.

     

    No - her bio mentioned the abortion (/sarc).

    Replies: @HFR

    Ernaux had an abortion when she was young and then had 2 sons when she was married. These events can be combined in one’s life.

  73. it used to be that adult males read books…no more…fiction is a primarily female pursuit, which led to novels focusing on female matters and perspectives…men play video games, listen to music and watch sports…

    same sort of thing led to the transformation of movies–adults used to go see movies for entertainment…no longer…now movies are made for children and young couples on a date…

    • Replies: @Irish Anti-Puritan
    @Propagandist Hacker

    You're not wrong but many male litterateurs of the past did write love stories or about the relationships between men and women and had a lot of female readers.

    Balzac's La Comedie Humaine has a lot about who will marry who. The ballroom scenes in War and Peace. Great Expectations by Dickens. Dr Zhivago is a love story etc.

    Women made up a majority of theatre-goers in the 19th century, according to George Bernard Shaw.

  74. Where does she fall in Hot-Crazy matrix?

  75. @Reg Cæsar
    Although
    Annie Ernaux
    'sfamous for tales of woe,
    the Nobelist judges should know
    what is absent from her portfolio:
    She's never been on a talk show,
    nor in
    Charlie Hebdo
    (or has she?), so...
    c'est faux.

    Replies: @Dube

    Workshop note. I like the curve of the right edge – seriously, a finishing touch. And I like Tilleynot’s scallop, #17 just below here, violated as intended with the final line. The shape doesn’t have to matter but it’s nice. I’m missing tonight’s open reading at the library so I appreciate the fellowship. Performance is a distinct rhetoric, but for me the proof is how it lies in silence on the page. The eye can fondle as the ear cannot.

  76. @Old Prude
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Let me do a favor for all you fellows, and especially you, Steve:

    When you are in the company of chicks, Do NOT refer to chicks as "chicks".

    Two data points: Years ago I had a wonderful chick friend: Athletic, artistic, intelligent, good-looking..
    When I used the word "chicks" she came near un-glued. It was the ONLY time she got angry at me.

    Last month I went to a garage band performance with Mrs. Prude. When I referred to the "chick singer" she and every other chick in ear-shot scowled at me. I did it again and she hissed "Women don't like that!" Who knew?

    P.S. I refer to Mrs. Prude as a "hippy chick", and she doesn't seem to mind. Who can understand these chicks?

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @stillCARealist

    I dunno bout that Willis. I’ve dated chicks who thought it was a compliment to be called a chick, it made them feel sexy. One chick liked to refer to herself as “an all-around chick”. Courses for horses, I reckon. Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men?

  77. What? A white woman? I’d expect a POC writing about her hair.

  78. @Anon
    Why not Houellebecq? Why not?

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Because.

  79. I just completed Blood Meridian and found that it lived up to the hype. I’ve also read The Road and No Country For Old Men. Is it possible this chick could be more deserving than McCarthy? I bet they’d love to give it to the undeserving Alice Walker, whose Color Purple I’ve read twice and enjoyed, but they can’t get passed the Jewish thing with her, even more than the Lizard People thing.

  80. @HFR
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Ernaux has 2 sons. She doesn't need siblings to step up to the plate. I don't know whether the sons have families.

    Replies: @CCG

    At least one of her sons (David) has children:
    https://cineuropa.org/en/interview/425941/

  81. @Peterike
    Even assuming the translation is poor, this is some pretty awful writing. Because the ideas are so stupid.

    We made love on a Sunday in October, I was lying on a piece of drawing paper spread out on the bed. He wanted to know what kind of picture the mixture of his sperm and my menstrual blood would make.

    Afterwards we looked at the paper, the damp picture. We saw a woman whose face was being devoured by her thick mouth, whose body seemed to fade and flow, formless. Or perhaps it was the northern lights, or a sunset.

    We were amazed not to have had this idea before. We wondered if other people had had the same idea. The next day he framed the picture and hung it on the wall of his room.

    There’s more, or perhaps less, of this tripe here:

    https://www.annie-ernaux.org/fragments-around-philippe-v/

    Replies: @Dumbo, @YetAnotherAnon

    We made love on a Sunday in October, I was lying on a piece of drawing paper spread out on the bed. He wanted to know what kind of picture the mixture of his sperm and my menstrual blood would make.

    I don’t mind autobiographical literature as long as it’s interesting and well written. This is just stupid and disgusting and doesn’t make me want to know more about this woman’s life — I feel I know too much already…

    • Agree: Colin Wright, Kylie
  82. @Anon
    @Kylie

    Do you think Oprah sounds more profound in French?

    Replies: @Kylie

    “Do you think Oprah sounds more profound in French?”

    I’ve never heard her in French. But I’m probably not the best person to ask. Unlike so many white women, I am immune to the appeal of the magisterial Negress and her pronouncements, both the individual and the type.

  83. @Reg Cæsar
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Women don’t like to be referred to as “chicks”, except in special circumstances.
     

    https://arc-anglerfish-washpost-prod-washpost.s3.amazonaws.com/public/NHINH5BGQBEAJDVETKRSC4C7D4.jpg

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    I said women, not entertainers.

  84. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    This may be the only time I've actually read a work by a Nobel Prize winning author before the award was given. I've read A Woman's Story by Ernaux and liked it. Have yet to read to her other stuff, though. But she's not a bad writer from what I've been able to tell.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Concur.
    A few decades back I read a book by her.
    As I recall, it was mostly observational snippets from riding one of the Paris commuter trains.
    She was pretty good at “noticing” stuff and articulating it.
    I suspect she’s being given the prize for the wrong reasons, but I think she is not unskilled.
    Still, although Milan Kundera will never win that prize these days, he would be much more deserving.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    I met Milan Kundera's English language translator, Michael Henry Heim, about 40 years ago. He was the head of the West L.A. Amnesty International branch. I didn't stick with AI, but Heim was hugely impressive.

  85. I like Houellebecq but I can’t picture him as a Nobel laureate. He writes short comic novels full of spiteful humour. Its not intended to be Great Literature in the first place.

    Roth did not deserve a Nobel, though The Human Stain was a great book. I don’t know how many are aware of it but Roth draws heavily on Balzac and Céline for influence, essentially producing inferior pastiches of their work imo.

    These Tragedy of the American Dream novels that Roth and Updike write do not strike me as all that poignant. If you find that materialism doesn’t fill the void in your soul the remedy is to put shiny cars and new kitchens aside and become a Christian. Since a Jewish/atheist author will not come to that conclusion they just spin in you in circles instead.

    Then you have authors like Beckett/Pinter/Stoppard/Wittgenstein (yes a philosopher, but look at his underpinning assumptions) who paint life as an abyss, so that serious literature and thought become synonymous with demoralisation.

  86. @Jim Don Bob
    @jwm

    Yeah, just WTF does "for the courage and clinical acuity with which she uncovers the roots, estrangements and collective restraints of personal memory" mean?

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    It means, “Daddy used to touch me down there, but I waited until long after he and Mommy were in the ground to mention it to anyone. ‘Believe all women,’ n’est-ce pas?”

  87. @Propagandist Hacker
    it used to be that adult males read books...no more...fiction is a primarily female pursuit, which led to novels focusing on female matters and perspectives...men play video games, listen to music and watch sports...

    same sort of thing led to the transformation of movies--adults used to go see movies for entertainment...no longer...now movies are made for children and young couples on a date...

    Replies: @Irish Anti-Puritan

    You’re not wrong but many male litterateurs of the past did write love stories or about the relationships between men and women and had a lot of female readers.

    Balzac’s La Comedie Humaine has a lot about who will marry who. The ballroom scenes in War and Peace. Great Expectations by Dickens. Dr Zhivago is a love story etc.

    Women made up a majority of theatre-goers in the 19th century, according to George Bernard Shaw.

    • Agree: Occasional lurker
  88. Know nothing of this woman but bet she is anti-Catholic.

  89. @Anonymous
    @Anon

    Concur.
    A few decades back I read a book by her.
    As I recall, it was mostly observational snippets from riding one of the Paris commuter trains.
    She was pretty good at "noticing" stuff and articulating it.
    I suspect she's being given the prize for the wrong reasons, but I think she is not unskilled.
    Still, although Milan Kundera will never win that prize these days, he would be much more deserving.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I met Milan Kundera’s English language translator, Michael Henry Heim, about 40 years ago. He was the head of the West L.A. Amnesty International branch. I didn’t stick with AI, but Heim was hugely impressive.

  90. @Peterike
    Even assuming the translation is poor, this is some pretty awful writing. Because the ideas are so stupid.

    We made love on a Sunday in October, I was lying on a piece of drawing paper spread out on the bed. He wanted to know what kind of picture the mixture of his sperm and my menstrual blood would make.

    Afterwards we looked at the paper, the damp picture. We saw a woman whose face was being devoured by her thick mouth, whose body seemed to fade and flow, formless. Or perhaps it was the northern lights, or a sunset.

    We were amazed not to have had this idea before. We wondered if other people had had the same idea. The next day he framed the picture and hung it on the wall of his room.

    There’s more, or perhaps less, of this tripe here:

    https://www.annie-ernaux.org/fragments-around-philippe-v/

    Replies: @Dumbo, @YetAnotherAnon

    I know someone who had a post-divorce fling with an artist who smeared her with paint and banged her in various attitudes against a white painted wall .

    (Guys only relate this kind of tale to each other when they’re 20-odd, but a grown woman will tell her three best female friends)

  91. @Dave from Oz
    @Nachum

    Maybe Ernaux and Angelou are so highly regarded because in writing exclisively about themselves, they write about all women. But the only way that could be true is if all women were basically identical.

    Replies: @Nachum

    And some lives, like Angelou’s, are weird enough they can’t be.

    Ah, there’s something.

  92. Everything you need to know about the Literature Prize:

    Robert Frost was nominated 31 times and never won.

    The glaringly obvious fact about the Lit Prize is the incredible snobbery of the committee. Was C. S. Forester ever nominated? Pop quiz : name anything by Luigi Pirandello and compare it to the Hornblower epics. Will Stephen King ever get a nomination? Because Dolores Claiborne is better than anything the last 20 or so winners have written.
    The Literature Prize: only weepy Angsty BS nobody ever read need apply.

  93. stillCARealist [AKA "ForeverCARealist"] says:
    @Old Prude
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Let me do a favor for all you fellows, and especially you, Steve:

    When you are in the company of chicks, Do NOT refer to chicks as "chicks".

    Two data points: Years ago I had a wonderful chick friend: Athletic, artistic, intelligent, good-looking..
    When I used the word "chicks" she came near un-glued. It was the ONLY time she got angry at me.

    Last month I went to a garage band performance with Mrs. Prude. When I referred to the "chick singer" she and every other chick in ear-shot scowled at me. I did it again and she hissed "Women don't like that!" Who knew?

    P.S. I refer to Mrs. Prude as a "hippy chick", and she doesn't seem to mind. Who can understand these chicks?

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @stillCARealist

    The problem is this is a Frenchie.

    Should be “chicque”

  94. @Muggles
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    This is hilarious. Apparently all she does is write My Big Book About Me:
     
    Yes, excellent observation.

    From what I can tell this is the same genre as the thousands of female novelists (mostly but not exclusively Jewish) who crank out unread novels for other lonely cat ladies living off divorces. Quite popular with Manhattan publishers and the library ladies nationwide who order books.

    At least she's European and writes in a language many can read. The commentators here who have read her (such a literate bunch of Men of UNZ!) seem to think she's okay.

    If you like that sort of thing.

    The kind of brainy woman who at first encounter seems interesting but probably is at long last, best avoided. In her World of Me, you are just gist for her mill.

    But a biological female who is a decent writer, White (not that we're noticing) and is no worse than average in political views, for her kind.

    But how many Big Books of Me does mankind really need?

    Replies: @Dave from Oz, @Rob

    In her World of Me, you are just gist for her mill.

    Very well said. Except it grist for the mill.

  95. @Happy Tapir
    @Bruno

    Hi Bruno, what would you recommend as her best book?

    Replies: @Bruno

    A short one first : La place. I don’t know the name in English translation. Meaning is « The square » and « status : a person’s position in society hierarchy ».

    I also like Les années. Or Passion simple. Je ne suis pas sorti de ma nuit.

  96. @Happy Tapir
    I don’t know. I like writers to “write what they know.” And the only thing any of us truly know is ourselves, our milieu, etc. I especially hate when certain types of liberals try to express how blacks or Hispanics feel to us.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘I don’t know. I like writers to “write what they know.” ‘

    Yes — and when they don’t, they often decline sharply. Conrad would be the perfect example.

  97. @Anon
    The Nobel as well as the Booker are extremely useful as negative signals. In fact, any book that wins any prize these days is probably woke, chick lit, BIPOC, or gender ideology crap, including science fiction prizes.

    Replies: @tr

    All prizes devolve over time to booby prizes.
    It hasn’t happened yet to the science Nobels, but the clock is ticking. . . .

    • Replies: @Mike_from_SGV
    @tr

    At some point, DIE rules will be imposed on the science awards, rendering them garbage.

  98. Good call. There is no reason to have an opinion on this. Just completely ignoring all the obvious crap of Literature, Economy and Peace Nobel prizes is the way to go.

  99. @tr
    @Anon

    All prizes devolve over time to booby prizes.
    It hasn't happened yet to the science Nobels, but the clock is ticking. . . .

    Replies: @Mike_from_SGV

    At some point, DIE rules will be imposed on the science awards, rendering them garbage.

  100. @Bardon Kaldian
    I've always found autobiographical fiction odd. It is one thing to use your personal experiences & traits to create a believable world- and something entirely different to go on & on about your personal life (which is your business no one of sane mind is interested in).

    Among greatest authors we can see this & it works: Tolstoy is both Pierre and Andrei; Proust is divided among Charlus, Swann and, of course, the Narrator; Joyce is partially Stephen, but his humane & "dirty" aspect is in Leopold Bloom.

    But most novelists- Dostoevsky, Conrad, Faulkner,..- don't care about their lives as materia poetica for fiction.

    I find it hard to understand why anyone would bother with their life to write about it for decades. Personal life just isn't so interesting. There is more to life than that.

    Replies: @Yngvar

    I find it hard to understand why anyone would bother with their life to write about it for decades. Personal life just isn’t so interesting. There is more to life than that.

    Norwegian author Karl Ove Knausgård wrote a six volume autobiographical work called My Struggle.
    The series was positively received in the English speaking world.

    Here is the Guardian:

    Karl Ove Knausgaard: the latest literary sensation
    Zadie Smith says she needs his books ‘like crack’. The Norwegian writer’s unflinching six-volume account of his day-to-day life has also provoked legal action and death threats. Is he brave or shameless, asks Hari Kunzru

    So then it’s a market for it, but Annie Ernaux first book was about her first abortion and there is a French film coming out now based on that book, so this prize is very clearly a ‘commentary’ on the abortion rights debate going on in the US.

    They just can’t help it; The United States of America towers over them and they have to roar.

    • Replies: @Yngvar
    @Yngvar

    Just something extraneous follow up;
    Knausgaard wanted to write 10 volumes but the publisher said no.

    It's a bane of American authors to be so -- unwillingly, it looks -- tied to US Government foreign policy.

    Under President W. Bush there was a 'foreign outreach' program that for unknown reasons paid for some cardboard shelves and some American books in every public library in Norway.
    "The American Corner" it was called, and duly protested by the forces of good.

    During this same time, John Ashcroft came flying in here to Norway with his entourage, on governmental jets and with security. Said Hello! to our Justice Minister Friday afternoon, then headed off to a wild viking (ancient) family reunion on the west coast, then flew back to Oslo Sunday evening. A short hand-shake session with our Foreign Minister, and away he went!

    We're not cynical, I promise.

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @Yngvar

    Yes, I know about Knausgaard & find this all puzzling.

    Other than voyeurism, I can't find explanation for this phenomenon.

  101. @Yngvar
    @Bardon Kaldian


    I find it hard to understand why anyone would bother with their life to write about it for decades. Personal life just isn’t so interesting. There is more to life than that.
     
    Norwegian author Karl Ove Knausgård wrote a six volume autobiographical work called My Struggle.
    The series was positively received in the English speaking world.

    Here is the Guardian:

    Karl Ove Knausgaard: the latest literary sensation
    Zadie Smith says she needs his books 'like crack'. The Norwegian writer's unflinching six-volume account of his day-to-day life has also provoked legal action and death threats. Is he brave or shameless, asks Hari Kunzru
     
    So then it's a market for it, but Annie Ernaux first book was about her first abortion and there is a French film coming out now based on that book, so this prize is very clearly a 'commentary' on the abortion rights debate going on in the US.

    They just can't help it; The United States of America towers over them and they have to roar.

    Replies: @Yngvar, @Bardon Kaldian

    Just something extraneous follow up;
    Knausgaard wanted to write 10 volumes but the publisher said no.

    It’s a bane of American authors to be so — unwillingly, it looks — tied to US Government foreign policy.

    Under President W. Bush there was a ‘foreign outreach’ program that for unknown reasons paid for some cardboard shelves and some American books in every public library in Norway.
    “The American Corner” it was called, and duly protested by the forces of good.

    During this same time, John Ashcroft came flying in here to Norway with his entourage, on governmental jets and with security. Said Hello! to our Justice Minister Friday afternoon, then headed off to a wild viking (ancient) family reunion on the west coast, then flew back to Oslo Sunday evening. A short hand-shake session with our Foreign Minister, and away he went!

    We’re not cynical, I promise.

  102. @Yngvar
    @Bardon Kaldian


    I find it hard to understand why anyone would bother with their life to write about it for decades. Personal life just isn’t so interesting. There is more to life than that.
     
    Norwegian author Karl Ove Knausgård wrote a six volume autobiographical work called My Struggle.
    The series was positively received in the English speaking world.

    Here is the Guardian:

    Karl Ove Knausgaard: the latest literary sensation
    Zadie Smith says she needs his books 'like crack'. The Norwegian writer's unflinching six-volume account of his day-to-day life has also provoked legal action and death threats. Is he brave or shameless, asks Hari Kunzru
     
    So then it's a market for it, but Annie Ernaux first book was about her first abortion and there is a French film coming out now based on that book, so this prize is very clearly a 'commentary' on the abortion rights debate going on in the US.

    They just can't help it; The United States of America towers over them and they have to roar.

    Replies: @Yngvar, @Bardon Kaldian

    Yes, I know about Knausgaard & find this all puzzling.

    Other than voyeurism, I can’t find explanation for this phenomenon.

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