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Neil Young vs. Joe Rogan
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Elderly rock star Neil Young is back in the news for beefing with podcaster Joe Rogen over vaccines. (Young had polio as a child and is a big supporter of vaccines). That gives me a topical excuse to post a review I wrote for the first ever issue of The American Conservative:

Shakey: Neil Young’s Biography

Reviewed by Steve Sailer

The American Conservative, October 7, 2002

Shakey: Neil Young’s Biography by Jimmy McDonough, Random House, \$29.95

Of all the veteran rock stars featured at last September’s post-9/11 telethon “America: A Tribute to Heroes,” Neil Young earned the highest praise from critics by squeaking out John Lennon’s defeatist “Imagine” (“Imagine there’s no countries … Nothing to kill or die for”). In contrast, Tom Petty, with his long gray-blonde beard making him look like some crazed old Johnny Reb who had been holed up in the Blue Ridge Mountains surviving on raw squirrel meat ever since Appomattox, delivered a defiant version of his song “I Won’t Back Down” — and was roasted by the reviewers for his insensitive pro-Americanism.

Yet, Young (who is still a Canadian citizen but views himself as an American) seemed to grasp that Petty had been on the right track. Outside the entertainment establishment, few Americans were so out of touch with common sense and basic human emotions as to desire a return to old-fashioned anti-war songs of the tin-soldiers-and-Nixon-coming ilk that Young had performed with Crosby, Stills and Nash.

In December, Young quietly released “Let’s Roll,” the first patriotic ode to the businessmen-warriors of Flight 93. Unfortunately, it wasn’t a great piece of music, but it showed that the 57-year-old Young was more in touch with how Americans felt than almost anybody else in the music industry. For someone who had enjoyed his first hit, Buffalo Springfield’s insidious “Mr. Soul,” back in 1968, simply avoiding irrelevancy was no small accomplishment.

At 788 pages, Jimmy McDonough’s Shakey: Neil Young’s Biography may teach the non-fanatical reader more about Neil Young than he cares to know. Still, compared to other doorstop biographies, it’s a reasonably quick and interesting read. Despite Young’s ample abuse of cocaine, marijuana, and alcohol during the 1970’s, he’s still in full possession of a lively and cantankerous intelligence.

The book’s vast heapings of facts are especially necessary because the author never quite grasps who Young really is. After spending six years hanging around with his hero and four more writing it up, McDonough, a rock idealist, concludes perplexedly, “Young was an unsolved mystery, hermetically sealed.” Fortunately, the author accumulates enough data to allow his more worldly readers to put together a coherent portrait of Young and, perhaps, come to like him better as a man.



Young’s transformation from “Imagine” to “Let’s Roll” shocked many, but it’s never been hard for Young to change. He has run through as many personas as Madonna has: folkie (back before “folk” implied “lesbian”), granola head, drug-doomed decadent, new wave Devo-wannabe, country singer, Blues Brother clone, and grunge godfather. He’d showed his rebellious streak by publicly backing Ronald Reagan for a few years.

The first record I ever bought was Young’s 1969 “Cinnamon Girl,” a plodding but thunderous slab of lowbrow garage metal. I still turn it up whenever it comes on the radio.

The next year, though, Young released the song I most love to hate, the piano and French horn ballad “After the Goldrush,” a recording that the hippie era has yet to live down. Young’s ludicrous lyrics (“Flying Mother Nature’s silver seed to a new home in the sun”) and whiny vocal would have been easy to dismiss except for the catchy folk melody that twined like kudzu around my brain.

Unlike Madonna, though, Young seldom changes to stay current. In fact, he often seems gloriously oblivious to post-1960s music. In his most famous lyrics from 1979’s powerhouse “Rust Never Sleeps” album — “It’s better to burn out than to fade away … / The king is gone but he’s not forgotten / This is the story of a Johnny Rotten” — Young ignorantly confused the Sex Pistols’ recently dead bassist Sid Vicious with Johnny Rotten, their very much living (and highly annoyed) singer.

When he’s making an album, Young holes up on his three square mile ranch near Santa Cruz with various rock and roll fossils such Crazy Horse, the notoriously inept backup band that has been furnishing Young’s electric guitar records with thudding, funkless, undanceable rhythms for the last 30 years.

Young is a sort of passive-aggressive Little Napoleon who either dominates everyone around him, or leaves. Crosby, Stills and Nash were the most popular band in America before Young joined, but Young immediately called the tunes — even though he was manifestly putting most of his effort into his solo career. “As soon as they started to rehearse,” recounts Young’s business manager, “It was clear Neil was gonna be in charge. Everyone was afraid of Neil. Because Neil walked.”

Young prefers working with mediocre musicians like Crazy Horse who can’t afford to walk out on him. One of Young’s producers observed, “He doesn’t wanna play with really good musicians because they’ll bust him. Because he’s not an amazing musician — he’s just an amazing force. So, it’s always safe with guys that are less than you — you just tell ’em what to do and you know they’ll do it.”

During his Capitol Records apogee of 1953-1961, Frank Sinatra had naturally made use of the best sidemen, composers, lyricists, and arranger in the business. A few years later, though, Bob Dylan introduced the pop music version of the auteur theory, the assumption that the do-it-all singer-composer-lyricist-guitarist inevitably created more emotionally authentic music than specialists who each did one thing extremely well. Young’s broad but not infinitely deep set of talents was perfectly suited to make him Dylan’s most prominent disciple. Most importantly, since almost nobody is actually gifted enough to do all these jobs terribly well, Young had the requisite masculine self-assurance to ignore the skeptics who pointed out that the emperor had no voice. That Young had willed himself to become a famous singer despite his fingernails-on-a-blackboard pipes just showed his fans that he truly had concrete cojones. In the rock era, music became ever more of a “testostocracy” ruled not by the most talented, but by the most aggressive and self-convinced.

The secret to Young’s career longevity appears to be that his health has steadily improved with age. Today, the superior physical and mental constitution he inherited from his mother Rassy, a tomboy champion amateur golfer, and his sportswriter father Scott, hard-working author of 30 books, is no longer dragged down by the polio, epilepsy, and drug abuse of his younger years. He now lifts weights, works out aerobically, and plays a lot of golf. Of course, some might argue that after hoovering up all that cocaine before his second marriage in 1978, a naturally robust individual like Young sends the wrong message about the danger of drugs to the mediocre masses simply by not being dead by now.

Young became obsessed with model trains when he discovered they were one of the few toys that his quadriplegic son Ben could play by pushing a button with his forehead. Young soon became an important technological innovator in the model train industry, delivering breakthroughs in realistic locomotive sounds. He bought a stake in the venerable manufacturer Lionel. Unfortunately, the book ends before the sad day in 2001 when Lionel moved its factory to South Korea, laying off 325 unionized workers. Young’s most consistent political cause has been the protection of the jobs of Americans who work with their hands. So, it’s too bad we never learn the inside story of what must have been a wrenching time for Young in his dual roles as an owner and a union-supporter.

Shakey reveals that today Young lives a secret life of surprising normality, just like thousands of other successful ex-hippie entrepreneurs in Northern California. Young spends many of his days managing his Silicon Valley research and development lab; videoconferencing with his fellow Lionel executives; marketing his wares at toy industry conventions; playing golf; and coming home to his wife of 24 years. Young takes pride in his corporate skills. In the climactic chapter, Young taunts his baffled biographer, “Look around me — I’m a f—–‘ capitalist businessman! … I’m a good businessman, right?”

Young’s emerging bourgeois virtues seem to disillusion poor McDonough. He probably would have been happier writing about a true tormented genius, such as Kurt Cobain of Nirvana. Cobain, the last great rock star, was the grunge version of the 19th Century Romantic bohemian artist starving in a Parisian garret while swigging down absinthe to dull his tubercular pains. Similarly, just two weeks before the 1991 release of Nirvana’s landmark album “Nevermind,” the sickly, drug-ravaged, but inspired Cobain was sleeping in the backseat of his Plymouth Valiant.

In contrast, when the boys in Buffalo Springfield were negotiating their first record deal in 1966, the 21-year-old Young, newly arrived in L.A. from Canada, had one final request for famed music executive Ahmet Ertegun, “I’m a golfer. Can you get me in a country club out here?”

Just before blowing his brains out in 1994, the 27-year-old Cobain included Young’s line “It’s better to burn out than to fade away” in his suicide note. Young, of course, has neither burnt out nor faded away, making some of his best music around the time of Cobain’s death, when Young was nearly fifty. While Young’s 2002 album “Are You Passionate?” is nothing special, it’s better rock music than anybody back in 1966 imagined a 57-year-old could ever make.

The odds are that this time Young has finally entered the decline phase of his career. Then again, he’s surprised us many times before.

Compare Neil Young to another electric folkie of the same vintage, Donovan, who had a few years of big hits in the late Sixties but has been almost unseen for the half century since.

 
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  1. • Replies: @Ebony Obelisk
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I feel sorry for Sean Penn. He won an Oscar for playing one of the most iconic queer leaders in American history, and yet, even the preparation he did for that role failed to liberate him from the prison of his own gendered insecurity. Being Sean Penn is punishment in itself.

    , @Kronos
    @JohnnyWalker123

    How dare you insult the Scottish gene-stock as cowardly Sean Penn!

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/c3/f8/be/c3f8be5e6e76bbd159198704b39c2720.jpg

    Replies: @3g4me

  2. Great review. Cinnamon Girl and Old Man were very good the rest is forgettable to a novice like me. I remember as a kid in the 80’s being surprised he was a rock star. Just didn’t have the look.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Danindc


    Cinnamon Girl and Old Man were very good
     
    Derek's "Cinnamon", covered by Tommy Roe, was better. Roe is the rare individual who can say the Beatles opened for him.



    https://youtu.be/gepd8pdZeLI

    Replies: @Cato

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Danindc


    Cinnamon Girl and Old Man were very good the rest is forgettable to a novice like me.
     
    I'm not a big Neil Young fan either. But IMHO his best and most interesting is the 9+ minute trippy guitar jam, Down by the River. It's an ode to murdering your girlfriend. So maybe not as PC as Imagine.

    https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=KflCXmEX6BY&feature=share

    Replies: @Rouetheday, @TorontoTraveller

  3. Neil dumped his wife of close to 40 years for a movie star a few years back. Not long afterwards, his wife was diagnosed with cancer and died. He’s in no position to preach to any of us about about anything, yet people like him do exactly…that all the time. That fits into my theory about the current world: Passionate public posturing and social justice from the left is moral camouflage for their amorality.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    @J1234


    Neil dumped his wife of close to 40 years for a movie star a few years back. Not long afterwards, his wife was diagnosed with cancer and died. He’s in no position to preach to any of us about about anything, yet people like him do exactly…that all the time. That fits into my theory about the current world: Passionate public posturing and social justice from the left is moral camouflage for their amorality.
     
    People say you can be moral without being religious. That seems to be true until one's mortality can no longer be ignored, at which point amoral YOLOism seems to kick in with a vengeance.

    (And yes, I know NAAALT.)
    , @JimDandy
    @J1234

    I've been asking why all these washed-up old Jewish guys passionately want to commit genocide on the unvaxxed--Chomsky, Howard Stern, Gene Simmons, Fauci (that's a joke because some people here say he's a crypto-Jew) etc. But, in fairness, Neil Young makes the case that it's washed-up old guys in general who are totally losing their minds over the unvaxxed.

    Replies: @Ripple Earthdevil, @Carol, @3g4me

    , @Kronos
    @J1234

    What do they have to camouflage at this point? (You know, besides visiting a strange man on a strange island called Little St. James in the Caribbean.)

    , @Antiwar7
    @J1234

    Also, he kept having children, even when it was clear that every one of his children had serious disabilities. He sounds like a selfish person, who does not feel anyone's pain.

    , @Undisclosed
    @J1234

    what a stupid little theory

  4. Who’s “Joe Rogen?”

    Who’s Neil Young?

    • Agree: Verymuchalive, El Dato
    • Replies: @Anon
    @vinteuil

    Rogen's a commentator, basically a Leftist and a Bernie Sanders supporter, but who is too low-class for the modern Left. Some low-class "conservatives" like him for defending low-class causes like keeping trannies out of women's kickboxing* and making anti-vax statements he walks back a day later.

    *It's funny because women's kickboxing would have been seen as inherently "progressive" twenty years ago but has fallen out of favor for its low-class appeal and the women's lack of enthusiasm for fighting biological males. (I guess they weren't as strong as any man, oops.)

    Replies: @vinteuil, @El Dato

    , @tyrone
    @vinteuil

    You must live under a really splendid rock ......I'm so jealous.

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @vinteuil

    That's something I agree with.
    Reminds me of Dalrymple's confusion with Robert de Niro (he never heard of him).

    A characteristic of any civilization is - most people don't know whom they own the most, but are very informed about the trivia. For instance, hardly anyone has heard about John Bardeen (transistors, NMR). And...

    https://i.imgur.com/pXEqV6x.png

    But all people know of some ephemeral clowns from entertainment

  5. Could not care less what Neil Young thinks, but I’m a huge supporter of vaccines as well–one of the very best inventions of man. (Lots of people today have no idea how casually lethal the “before time” was.)

    But censoring debate is one of the worst inventions of man.

    • Agree: Rob, Thea
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @AnotherDad


    vaccines as well–one of the very best inventions of man.
    But censoring debate is one of the worst inventions of man.
     
    My, my hey hey: A vaccine against censors? - - Wouldn't that be what the Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers would come up with here right away? I mean: It will never get more clear // The solution is here!
    , @jsm
    @AnotherDad

    Some vaccines are truly miraculous. I would absolutely, in a heartbeat, say yes to a rabies vaccine -- if I got bit by a skunk that could not be caught and examined.

    Cuz rabies will kill you dead and the vax is Life-saving.

    But not ALL vaccines are so clearcut. As will all medical interventions, there are side effects for some people; some of which make the risk of the vax outweigh the benefit in certain individual cases. And then there are some vax makers that have ridden the coattails of the lifesaving vaccines' positive publicity to shyster the populace.

    For instance: Chicken Pox vax. CDC recommends and most pediatricians administer. But not because chicken pox is deadly -- or even particularly likely to result in serious comorbidities. (Reye's disease is rare.) The actual reason? Because chicken pox keeps kids out of school for a week and that is **inconvenient** for working parents. Meanwhile, it's becoming apparent that all these vaxed kids are causing an increase in shingles in their elders, since Grampa's no longer getting his natural immunity boost from being exposed to grandkid's chickenpox.

    Also, why is HepB given to infants who don't have foreseeable need for transfusion, born of healthy HepB negative mothers, at birth? Stated reason: Cuz it's convenient; the parents might not bring them back before they become potentially sexually-active adolescents. "Jab em while we got em."


    Truth is, the large majority of recently developed vax's are not about stopping deathly diseases. Yet, CDC never hesitates to add them to the schedule. Why? Because CDC has been regulatorily captured by Big Pharma, to whom more vax's means the more profit. And, to pro-vaxers, they're objects of religious devotion, never, at any time, their efficacy and necessity to be questioned, at all, ever, regardless of the state of health of the recipient. These people come unhinged at even the merest suggestion that maybe *this* particular injection in *that* particular person, might be unwise.

    Yep, objects of religious devotion, not a lot different from the Shroud of Turin.

    , @Kronos
    @AnotherDad

    Not to mention Orwellian word games. Of course the CDC changed the definition of vaccination during the pandemic. These mRNA “vaccines” are really gene therapeutics.

    https://www.citizensjournal.us/the-cdc-suddenly-changes-the-definition-of-vaccine-and-vaccination/

    https://www.citizensjournal.us/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/tweet.jpg

    , @Mr. Anon
    @AnotherDad


    Could not care less what Neil Young thinks, but I’m a huge supporter of vaccines as well–one of the very best inventions of man. (Lots of people today have no idea how casually lethal the “before time” was.)
     
    Most of that casual lethality was lifted by anti-biotics, personal hygiene, and the provision of clean drinking water and septic sewage systems.

    Vaccines are useful, but their reputation also benefits from a lot of carefully constructed PR. Lots of people today have no idea how vaccines are not necessarily the miracle cures they are made out to be.

    , @JR Ewing
    @AnotherDad

    Vaccines are modern technological miracles that have contributed more to the betterment of society than most people realize.

    But even though they are called by the same name, these covid injections are not real vaccines, which is why so many people are such useful idiots for the pharmo-tyranny complex, as your comment so aptly demonstrates.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @anonymous coward
    @AnotherDad

    There's no scientific evidence that vaccines provide any benefit at all.

    We vaccinate our kids against serious disease because why not?

    But it's purely an emotional decision, not grounded in science.

    Replies: @bike-anarkist

    , @Anon
    @AnotherDad

    I’m a huge fan of traditional vaccines too. I knew polio survivors growing up, not a pretty life.

    However vaccination policies must be revised as time goes on within a given population. Just like what happened with smallpox, some vaccines become obsolete. Others come along, like papilloma.

    Vaccinations are not innocuous medical acts, and should be free and informed. Regulators should do their job properly. Oh, and mRNA covid vaccines are not vaccines. Rather than prevent infection, they clearly work as a treatment-by-subscription, like Amazon’s “suscribe and save” drugs gambit. Oh, and with ómicron it is not clear that they prevent “serious covid” either, see Table 14 pf 44: https://www.publichealthscotland.scot/media/11318/22-01-26-covid19-winter_publication_report.pdf

  6. Anon[175] • Disclaimer says:

    I am not a particular fan of Tom Petty’s music, but I can at least listen to it without changing to another radio station. As a person, I have more respect for Tom Petty than Neil Young. Neil Young is 10 times as goofy as Petty, and has produced a career of almost complete and utter tunelessness. Yes, Cinnamon Girl isn’t bad, but it’s the only thing he ever created that wasn’t bad.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anon


    Yes, Cinnamon Girl isn’t bad, but it’s the only thing he ever created that wasn’t bad.
     
    As my President says, "C'mon, man!" Seriously, #175, give these 2 a chance. If you don't like the mellow ballad, check the 2nd one out for some serious distortion guitar. Note that Hey, Hey, My, My is not the same as My, My, Hey, Hey. (The tune is the same, but the first is the hard rocking version and the latter is the acoustic version - with different lyrics - from the 1st side of the album.)

    I could come up with 50 more great songs from this guy. I don't care if he's "as good" as some other musicians technically, he had a great sound, especially with the band Crazy Horse.

    You fans on here tell me if you've ever heard anything from the Hawks & Doves album. It's pretty obscure. How about you, Steve?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gc10vgmT_vk

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=331kyZ9OXMc

    Replies: @usNthem, @Steve Sailer

    , @Anon
    @Anon

    I’m not a fan of Neil Young, either, but one song he wrote, “Helpless”, I really like. He performed it for the “The Last Waltz” concert ( ca. 1978) which was also filmed. Great movie, lots of big names of the era, and snippets of young Martin Scorsese interviewing members of “The Band” from whom they related great tales of minor league rock ‘n’ roll band on the road, I.e. story of Ronnie Hawkins talking them into becoming his back-up band…”You’ll get more pussy than Frank Sinatra”.

    , @TorontoTraveller
    @Anon

    His late 80's / early 90's album "Freedom" is truly fantastic. "Harvest" is obviously great. I'm thinking that you may not know as much about music as you think you do.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    , @Stirge
    @Anon

    Harvest is an amazing album, and heart of gold was the best song he has ever written. Rust never sleeps is another great album. I saw him in 1986 when he did a concert for flood relief in Cheyenne WY. Amazing stage presence, he had that ineffable star quality that can't be faked. He's done some good things in his life but on a personal level he's an a-hole

    , @anon
    @Anon

    Heart of Gold and Old Man are classics

  7. Do you remember the lyrics of the verse about possessions when he sang “Imagine” after 9/11?
    It was a fleeting glimpse of honesty from Neil Young, one of my favorite singer/songwriters when I was young. “Imagine no possessions, I wonder if I can.”

    I have no time for Neil Young anymore. I read his autobiography. He is deranged, trying to hold on to his sinking wealth and finding surprise by the fact that he has to tone down his wildly expensive lifestyle and sell some “possessions” that he wonders if he can imagine living without. He carried on smoking weed for too many years and it seriously affected his brain. He was told by doctors to give it up and now is supremely proud that he was able to do so…at the age of 68 or something.

    This most recent kerfuffle that Steve so terribly misrepresents as being a beef between Neil Young and Joe Rogan is the last straw. Steve, this is a beef between Neil Young and Spotify. The fact that I cannot find the name Spotify anywhere in your article reflects badly on you as a writer and analyst. As to Neil, who the f*** does he think that he is? Has he ever watched Joe Rogan? Is he aware that Rogan has hosted doctors, scientists, researchers, etc. from both sides of the divide on the vaccines? Rogan is all about the right to free and open scientific discourse. Neil Young is all about woke fascism these days, and those views cancel him for me personally. You see, cancellation is okay when it is done by an individual. I can never condone people being cancelled broadly, by media, big tech, the establishment, etc. The only thing I can condone is your right to NEVER give people a cent of your money again. That is the way I feel about Neil Young. I admit that I probably learned more Neil Young songs than any other artist besides the Beatles. I still remember them all, though I can’t remember the songs I wrote a month or two ago, but that’s old age. If I want to hear Cinnamon Girl, a song I still love, I will listen to it for free. I would never see Neil Young live again, buy any of his music, or buy any of his books.

    Watch the Canadian Covid Care Alliance video for a logical analysis of this issue and the right to free and open scientific discourse.



    Video Link

    • Agree: lavoisier
    • Thanks: Mike Tre, 3g4me, Mark G.
    • Replies: @Longstreet
    @frankie p

    In Steve's defense, he wrote that article 20 years ago. I'm sure he regrets not predicting Spotify too

    Replies: @frankie p

    , @lavoisier
    @frankie p

    Lost respect for Mr. Young on this one.

    Never thought of him before as a book burner. But all leftists have that book burning gene it seems.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    , @Muggles
    @frankie p


    This most recent kerfuffle that Steve so terribly misrepresents as being a beef between Neil Young and Joe Rogan is the last straw. Steve, this is a beef between Neil Young and Spotify. The fact that I cannot find the name Spotify anywhere in your article reflects badly on you as a writer and analyst.
     
    Your comment here (above) reflects badly on you as a writer and analyst. Who didn't bother to read the line at the beginning of iSteve's article on Young's bio Shakey that first appeared in the American Conservative in 2002.

    Spotify didn't exist in 2002, just so you get my point.

    As to your other remark about "not being about Joe Rogan" that's misleading. It was Spotify's hosting of the Rogan podcast (paid for dearly by Spotify) that is the "beef." Young, the former "rebel hippie" is now just another dumb Woke COVID fear monger, bullying a vendor of music streams and podcasts.

    Young objects to having his precious music being sold along side of a streamed very popular podcaster who has a different opinion. So rather dim bulb Young is just another would be fascist style bully (or more contemporary, Red Guard style commie bully.)

    When you demand that others "shut up" and disappear, that is worse than simply being in disagreement. That is Woke fascism.

    Of course senile Young, the would be Canadian virtue signaler, is merely shooting himself in the foot. "Don't sell my product in the same online store as Joe Rogan!"

    Yes, Neil, why not spread your boycott around. So no one with WrongThink is tempted to buy your product. That will teach us!

    Replies: @frankie p

  8. Young bought that ranch around 1970 or so. He had had a few decent selling albums by that time, and decent airplay for a few songs but can such bring in THAT much money to afford a huge ranch just 40 miles from San Francisco, in the uplands of Silicon Valley, or was rural northern California land unusually cheap at that time?

    Artists notoriously get ripped off on their first record deal. If Young’s records sold, say, about 400K units by 1970 I can imagine him earning a few ten cents for each record sold. It’s not that much money. And touring could leave you broke. Jimmy Page broke up the Yardbirds in 1968 partly due to the fact that after a very successful American tour they all OWED money. In 1976 after touring for 18 months the Allman Brothers each took home a payday of 20K.

    Trying to wrap my head about how much a successful and well managed rock and roller could earn at that time. Grateful Dead out of necessity bunking together, living off 300/week, some performers driven to suicide by desperation despite selling millions of recofds (Badfinger). My guess is that Young took in about 50K per year 69-70. I base this on the fact that when Brian Jones parted with the Stones the previous year they offered him a settlement of 20K Sterling for the indefinite future, and the Stones had to be a much more lucrative outfit than Neil Young, so I imagine.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Daniel H

    Young was in a hugely popular band, CSN&Y, and had a very successful solo career simultaneously. He'd previously been in Buffalo Springfield, so CSN&Y was not his first rodeo. He was a smart guy and I think he tended to deal with the less larcenous music executives, such as Ahmet Ertegun. Plus, he's not the type of personality you could easily bully into bad deals. So, a larger than normal chunk of the huge revenue generated by Woodstock Era rock stars wound up in Young's pocket than was was common due to the rapaciousness of music industry suits.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldlan, @frankie p, @Rosie, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @PiltdownMan

    , @NorthOfTheOneOhOne
    @Daniel H


    My guess is that Young took in about 50K per year 69-70.
     
    US median income for 1970 was $9,870.00, up from $9,400.00 in 1969, I'd bet the only other people making $50K/year in 1970 were running corporations like Dow, DuPont, and GE.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    , @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Daniel H

    “Jimmy Page broke up the Yardbirds in 1968 partly due to the fact that after a very successful American tour they all OWED money.”

    And boy did he learn his lesson. After he formed Zeppelin he hired a heavy hitting gangster-like band manager who managed to negotiate something like a 90-10 split on gross revenue with the concert venues. As a result they were likely the richest band to that point in history.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Brutusale, @Joe S.Walker, @Seekers

    , @James J O'Meara
    @Daniel H

    Well, all that CIA funding helped.

    https://centerforaninformedamerica.com/laurelcanyon/

    http://www.conspirazzi.com/e-books/inside-the-lc.pdf

    Fun Fact: Danny Whitten, a guitarist/vocalist/songwriter with Crazy Horse, died of an overdose on November 18, 1972, after being fired by Young earlier that day during rehearsals in San Francisco. Young and Jack Nietzsche, Phil Spector’s former top assistant, had given Whitten $50 and a plane ticket to LA.

    , @Eric Novak
    @Daniel H

    What you haven’t taken into consideration is the explosion of the live music market in arenas, beginning in the 1980s. My ticket stubs from the beginning of the decade for popular live rock acts have prices of $10-$15. By the end of the decade, seats in the same sections are 4-5x the price. Ticket prices exploded even further in the 1990s and 2000s, thus making even touring legacy artists like Neil Young very rich.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

  9. Anon[567] • Disclaimer says:
    @vinteuil
    Who's "Joe Rogen?"

    Who's Neil Young?

    Replies: @Anon, @tyrone, @Bardon Kaldian

    Rogen’s a commentator, basically a Leftist and a Bernie Sanders supporter, but who is too low-class for the modern Left. Some low-class “conservatives” like him for defending low-class causes like keeping trannies out of women’s kickboxing* and making anti-vax statements he walks back a day later.

    *It’s funny because women’s kickboxing would have been seen as inherently “progressive” twenty years ago but has fallen out of favor for its low-class appeal and the women’s lack of enthusiasm for fighting biological males. (I guess they weren’t as strong as any man, oops.)

    • Replies: @vinteuil
    @Anon


    Rogen’s a commentator, basically a Leftist and a Bernie Sanders supporter, but who is too low-class for the modern Left.
     
    Yeah, I guess that's pretty much all you've got left to think.
    , @El Dato
    @Anon


    It’s funny because women’s kickboxing would have been seen as inherently “progressive” twenty years ago
     
    Well, I was mainly focused on the Bush/Blair shenanigans at that point in time but ... I can't believe that.

    Was there women's kickboxing outside of manga? Was it considered progressive?
  10. More seriously – Joe Rogan has shown himself, lately, to be every bit as good a noticer as Steve Sailer.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @vinteuil


    More seriously – Joe Rogan has shown himself, lately, to be every bit as good a noticer as Steve Sailer.
     
    I can't wholly agree. The one of the two is well read and knows how to use tools (mathematics, statistics). The other is more of an intuitive sport - whose senses are very intact though. I'm most impressed in the cases he follows his gut feeling and - Bingo! - He spoke with Jordan B. Peterson last week and the Peterson man said there'd be seven million kids dyin' because of air-pollution indoors per year. He said: Wh't, wh't wh't??? - Jamie (his asistant) - look that up for us, please. Turned out the ex-Professor had added one, if not two zeros to the actual number the report spoke of, that he claimed to have cited.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @Sick 'n Tired

    , @KevinB
    @vinteuil

    Not really. Rogan notices what he wants to notice and anything outside of that desire is ignored or rationalized away. I suspect he has a nose for ratings, and what may or may not be acceptable to his audience.

    Here's Joe with Eric Weinstein on IQ differences between racial groups. Note how Joe is visibly irritated by the notion that low average Black G has anything to do with world wide Black dysfunction. I suspect his displeasure is less virtue signaling and more an innate desire to protect the "little people," -- most likely because he has some inherent brutal instincts. But who knows:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcr5tkN02eg


    Joe with evolutionary scientist Bret Weinstein on the true reason why Blacks are impoverished.

    https://youtu.be/NR7gDJGFW5A?t=900

    The entire Bret Weinstein interview at the below link. It's interesting to watch all the way through as it displays how thoughtful "Progressives", like Joe and Brett, are unable to accommodate reality, all the while discussing why accommodating reality is an absolute necessity in contemporary discussions --- discussions that are increasingly bound by radical left wing proscription. Bret was apparently subjected to some good ole fashioned Maoist struggle, and that forced him to do a re-think on some of his positions:

    https://youtu.be/pRCzZp1J0v0

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Kronos, @Harry Baldwin

  11. You appear to have confused goy boy Joe Rogan with Jew boy Seth Rogen,

    • LOL: PaceLaw
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Ripple Earthdevil


    You appear to have confused goy boy Joe Rogan with Jew boy Seth Rogen,
     
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/rogan-rogen/

    Rogan/Rogen
    STEVE SAILER • NOVEMBER 25, 2021

    How many people think Joe Rogen is that funny movie star and how many people think Seth Rogan is that independent-thinking podcast host and UFC commentator?’

    I mean sure, one has a beard, glasses, and a cap and the other, at the moment, doesn’t, but they’re both high all the time.
     

  12. He famously married a woman who waited on him at a diner. Stayed married almost forever, then dumped her for Darryl Hanna. Hard to believe it’s the same guy who wrote Powderfinger.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @JMcG

    Neil Young (b. 1945)
    Daryl Hannah (b. 1960)

    BARN N&D Interview
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mUsV3fFlOiY
    Jan 18, 2022

    Neil Young /Crazy Horse - Barn (Official Film Trailer)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jgu2d-zEyQ
    Dec 1, 2021


    A documentary of the making of Neil Young and Crazy Horse recording BARN the album.
    BARN captures this legendary band in their element, in the wild, as they make music in a restored 19th century log barn under the full moon. Neil and the Horse are a 50 year old musical family and BARN catches a rare intimate glimpse of their easy humor, their brotherhood, and of course their music, created live, in their own unique spontaneous way.
     
    Neil Young & Crazy Horse - A Band A Brotherhood A Barn (Official Documentary)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbmkek5j6Vs
    Premiered Jan 20, 2022

    BARN the documentary film, directed by Daryl Hannah (dhlovelife), catches a rare intimate glimpse of this legendary band as they make music in a restored 19th-century log barn under the full moon. The film captures Neil and the Horse in an organic way, their easy irreverent humor, their brotherhood, and of course their music, as it was created. BARN intentionally lingers on single shots for entire songs, showing there are no tricks, revealing the raw, organic, and spontaneous process of the music bursting to life from unexpected moments. Exquisite changes of light and weather dance in the remote meadow where the barn sits, adding a sweet, mystical magic as the music thumps, reverberates, and echoes. The film is infused with the gratitude and joy that permeated the whole experience.
    [...]
    Band
    Neil Young
    Billy Talbot
    Ralph Molina
    Nils Lofgren
    [...]
    Music Produced By:
    The Volume Dealers - Neil Young and Niko Bolas
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barn_(album)
  13. Young’s most consistent political cause has been the protection of the jobs of Americans who work with their hands. So, it’s too bad we never learn the inside story of what must have been a wrenching time for Young in his dual roles as an owner and a union-supporter.

    It really would not have to be. Young might be one of the one in a million manager who knows that the division of labor among humans include how they protect their turf. Boilermakers form unions, liberal arts majors have professional organizations, and as a songwriter Young has ASCAP. All of them provide protection and networking.

    In the 1880s when corporations were given Human Rights and therefore Immortality by American courts, the workers lamely thought they could counter with European-type organization. They should have just formed a Labor Corporation and they could have been immortal too. Dummies.

    • Agree: Spect3r
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Franz


    Young might be one of the one in a million manager who knows that the division of labor among humans include how they protect their turf. Boilermakers form unions, liberal arts majors have professional organizations, and as a songwriter Young has ASCAP. All of them provide protection and networking.
     
    ASCAP's overprotection led to the creation of its rival, BMI, and thus to its members' royalties being cut in half:

    ASCAP’s economic and cultural heft overwhelmingly benefited older musicians, incumbent musical styles, and the music produced by its mainly white artists... Blacks were often discriminated against and as of 1939, only six of its one-hundred-seventy members were black. Jelly Roll Morton was denied membership for years. Duke Ellington gained admission only because his white manager Irving Mills took co-writer credits for much of his work... If it was possible, country artists were even less welcome:

    " I tried to get into ASCAP as far back as 1930, and I could not. Later I had many numbers, big hits, but I still never could get into ASCAP."
    Gene Autry

    Jimmie Rodgers got in two years after death. Bob Wills in 1957, twenty years after composing and writing hits. Important and influential songwriters like A.P. Carter, Ernest Tubb, and Roy Acuff never got in.




    https://www.history-of-rock.com/ascap-bmi-war.htm
     
    I'm surprised that Young was even in ASCAP. Canada has her own licensing agencies; perhaps that has something to do with it.

    The worst result of the ASCAP-BMI turf war was prohibiting Johnny Mercer from setting Antonio Carlos Jobim's music to English, which he had done with European tunes such as "Autumn Leaves" and "Summer Wind". Maybe someday drafts will be discovered in a lost Mercer suitcase.

    One way which ASCAP protects Young is seen here:


    https://www.abajournal.com/news/article/neil-young-sues-to-stop-trump-campaign-from-using-his-songs-will-consent-decrees-stand-in-the-way

    Replies: @Franz

  14. Joe Rogan does not interview anti-vaxxers. In fact, Robert Malone is a vaccinologist. But not all vaccines are created equal, not all are effective let alone safe, and some say that the Pfizer, Moderna and AstraZeneca products do not even qualify as vaccines. I say Dr. Robert Malone is more qualified to talk about vaccines that Neil Young, a washed-up old rocker.

  15. @Daniel H
    Young bought that ranch around 1970 or so. He had had a few decent selling albums by that time, and decent airplay for a few songs but can such bring in THAT much money to afford a huge ranch just 40 miles from San Francisco, in the uplands of Silicon Valley, or was rural northern California land unusually cheap at that time?

    Artists notoriously get ripped off on their first record deal. If Young's records sold, say, about 400K units by 1970 I can imagine him earning a few ten cents for each record sold. It's not that much money. And touring could leave you broke. Jimmy Page broke up the Yardbirds in 1968 partly due to the fact that after a very successful American tour they all OWED money. In 1976 after touring for 18 months the Allman Brothers each took home a payday of 20K.

    Trying to wrap my head about how much a successful and well managed rock and roller could earn at that time. Grateful Dead out of necessity bunking together, living off 300/week, some performers driven to suicide by desperation despite selling millions of recofds (Badfinger). My guess is that Young took in about 50K per year 69-70. I base this on the fact that when Brian Jones parted with the Stones the previous year they offered him a settlement of 20K Sterling for the indefinite future, and the Stones had to be a much more lucrative outfit than Neil Young, so I imagine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @Hapalong Cassidy, @James J O'Meara, @Eric Novak

    Young was in a hugely popular band, CSN&Y, and had a very successful solo career simultaneously. He’d previously been in Buffalo Springfield, so CSN&Y was not his first rodeo. He was a smart guy and I think he tended to deal with the less larcenous music executives, such as Ahmet Ertegun. Plus, he’s not the type of personality you could easily bully into bad deals. So, a larger than normal chunk of the huge revenue generated by Woodstock Era rock stars wound up in Young’s pocket than was was common due to the rapaciousness of music industry suits.

    • Agree: frankie p
    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldlan
    @Steve Sailer

    I heard once,about Tommy James and his parasitic manager,some Jewish* gangster. He really got ripped off,but its better than cement shoes.
    * Sorry, you know who,the shmuck from Philly.😉

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    , @frankie p
    @Steve Sailer

    Right on, Steve! I don't know where these guys come from, saying that Neil Young didn't make much money. Harvest was released in early 1972, and the original album sold 15,000,000 copies. To date, including compilations, singles, downloads, and streaming, the album is up to 23,000,000 in total sales. You mention Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young, and they were wildly successful in the very period that these guys say Neil didn't make any money; Deja Vu, released in March, 1970, sold nearly 15 million copies as an original album, and since then has broken sales of 24,000,000 copies. The money doesn't stop pouring in when the sales continue. Neil Young also toured prolifically through the years, and some of those tours were stadium tours. I remember Rust Never Sleeps in 1979 or 1980. This was a huge stadium tour, yielded a film and an album, and earned huge money. Neil Young accumulated a big pile of money over the years, but he also developed very expensive habits (the train collection, the land upkeep, not to mention the full-time staff taking care of his son, who has a severe disability).

    Neil Young released 43 studio albums, as well as contributing to multiple bands.

    , @Rosie
    @Steve Sailer

    I don't know how much involvement he had in the composition, but this is one of the greatest songs of that era IMO.

    https://youtu.be/Bw9gLjEGJrw

    Replies: @frankie p, @I, Libertine

    , @NorthOfTheOneOhOne
    @Steve Sailer

    Part of the reason CS&N's management pitched bringing Neil on board was because he would stand up to Stephen Stills, who was driving the band, management, the producer and the record company crazy at the time.

    I will challenge you on your assertion that Neil only worked with mediocrities. His backup band on the Harvest album, which produced his biggest hit Heart of Gold, the Stray Gators was actually very good. His use of Crazy Horse was more about his attempts at creating the most obnoxious rock music possible, something he excelled at.

    , @PiltdownMan
    @Steve Sailer

    I think it is worth remembering, too, that the big name rock starts of the second half of the 1960s and early 1970s were, in the popular imagination, something like the Silicon Valley instant whiz-kid millionaires of thirty years later. People marveled that talented young guys (mostly guys, back then) could become so rich, so quickly, off their talent. Singers of an earlier generation, through the fifties, didn't make that kind of money, because, for the most part, they didn't write their own songs. The big money was in being a successful singer-songwriter, and that started becoming the norm, around 1965.

    Worth remembering, too, how low asset prices were circa 1970, relative to today, for the kinds of luxury assets the rich have always chased. When I started thinking of applying to graduate business school in 1979, you could still buy a nice, new, high-rise two bedroom apartment in Manhattan's Upper East Side for about $80,000, no more than three or four years of a starting salary for an MBA fresh out of business school. The wealth creation in the Reagan era 1980s erased that window of affordability.

    I can forgive Neil Young a lot, who is of old North American Anglo-French settler stock (his mother was a member of Daughters of the American Revolution), and ornery and idiosyncratic, in his own way, just as Joe Rogen is.

    Here's Neil Young in 1971 talking about his newly acquired ranch, and singing a song.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=An2a1_Do_fc

  16. @vinteuil
    Who's "Joe Rogen?"

    Who's Neil Young?

    Replies: @Anon, @tyrone, @Bardon Kaldian

    You must live under a really splendid rock ……I’m so jealous.

    • Agree: Kronos
    • LOL: Dieter Kief
  17. Neil Young, who I’ve seen in concert at least 10 times, should have his music removed from Apple for his dangerous, pseudoscientific album about GMOs and Monsanto.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  18. Well, I like Old Neil’s music,( see what I did there). One song of his that I always liked was “Sugar Mountain.” Someone,like Joni Mitchell,I tink, razzed Neil as a guy who is overtaken with nostalgia at the age of 19!

    “Harvest Moon” was a very good later song.

    Didn’t he make fun of Whitney Houston in “Rockin’”? I don’t want a black woman on the Supe Court,btw.

    • Agree: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Bardon Kaldlan

    https://jonimitchell.com/news/newsitem.cfm?id=1592


    I Stand With Neil Young!
    Posted January 28, 2022

    I’ve decided to remove all my music from Spotify. Irresponsible people are spreading lies that are costing people their lives. I stand in solidarity with Neil Young and the global scientific and medical communities on this issue. —Joni Mitchell

    Read An Open Letter to Spotify: A call from the global scientific and medical communities to implement a misinformation policy.
     

    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1487369946086715399

    Replies: @Enemy of Earth, @TWS, @MEH 0910

  19. @AnotherDad
    Could not care less what Neil Young thinks, but I'm a huge supporter of vaccines as well--one of the very best inventions of man. (Lots of people today have no idea how casually lethal the "before time" was.)

    But censoring debate is one of the worst inventions of man.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @jsm, @Kronos, @Mr. Anon, @JR Ewing, @anonymous coward, @Anon

    vaccines as well–one of the very best inventions of man.
    But censoring debate is one of the worst inventions of man.

    My, my hey hey: A vaccine against censors? – – Wouldn’t that be what the Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers would come up with here right away? I mean: It will never get more clear // The solution is here!

  20. @Steve Sailer
    @Daniel H

    Young was in a hugely popular band, CSN&Y, and had a very successful solo career simultaneously. He'd previously been in Buffalo Springfield, so CSN&Y was not his first rodeo. He was a smart guy and I think he tended to deal with the less larcenous music executives, such as Ahmet Ertegun. Plus, he's not the type of personality you could easily bully into bad deals. So, a larger than normal chunk of the huge revenue generated by Woodstock Era rock stars wound up in Young's pocket than was was common due to the rapaciousness of music industry suits.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldlan, @frankie p, @Rosie, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @PiltdownMan

    I heard once,about Tommy James and his parasitic manager,some Jewish* gangster. He really got ripped off,but its better than cement shoes.
    * Sorry, you know who,the shmuck from Philly.😉

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Bardon Kaldlan


    I heard once about Tommy James
     
    This isn't breaking news, as Tommy James is probably the most famous example of the phenomena. Morris Levy and Roulette Records owed Tommy over $30 million at one point. The Sopranos had Jerry Adler play the Levy-inspired Hesh Rabkin.
  21. My two cents, if they’re worth even that much.

    Like most late 20th century music fans, I kinda liked Neil Young – until I sat through a couple of his concerts, dragged by a friend who worshipped him.

    Boring. Talk about “deep cuts”! I was familiar with his hits, but I didn’t recognize a single number he played until his encore. Even then, no Cinnamon Girl, no Heart of Gold, no Harvest Moon. People around me were asking each other – what’s this? What album was that from?

    I suppose true connoisseurs were happy, but there can’t that many connoisseurs in any one town. Most of us just sat respectfully, listening till it was over. The message was clear. I’m not going to play what you want to hear; you’re here to listen to what I want to play.

    While he was doing Imagine on that post 9/11 telethon, I found myself thinking: it’s being performed by someone even more self-absorbed than the songwriter.

  22. @frankie p
    Do you remember the lyrics of the verse about possessions when he sang "Imagine" after 9/11?
    It was a fleeting glimpse of honesty from Neil Young, one of my favorite singer/songwriters when I was young. "Imagine no possessions, I wonder if I can."

    I have no time for Neil Young anymore. I read his autobiography. He is deranged, trying to hold on to his sinking wealth and finding surprise by the fact that he has to tone down his wildly expensive lifestyle and sell some "possessions" that he wonders if he can imagine living without. He carried on smoking weed for too many years and it seriously affected his brain. He was told by doctors to give it up and now is supremely proud that he was able to do so...at the age of 68 or something.

    This most recent kerfuffle that Steve so terribly misrepresents as being a beef between Neil Young and Joe Rogan is the last straw. Steve, this is a beef between Neil Young and Spotify. The fact that I cannot find the name Spotify anywhere in your article reflects badly on you as a writer and analyst. As to Neil, who the f*** does he think that he is? Has he ever watched Joe Rogan? Is he aware that Rogan has hosted doctors, scientists, researchers, etc. from both sides of the divide on the vaccines? Rogan is all about the right to free and open scientific discourse. Neil Young is all about woke fascism these days, and those views cancel him for me personally. You see, cancellation is okay when it is done by an individual. I can never condone people being cancelled broadly, by media, big tech, the establishment, etc. The only thing I can condone is your right to NEVER give people a cent of your money again. That is the way I feel about Neil Young. I admit that I probably learned more Neil Young songs than any other artist besides the Beatles. I still remember them all, though I can't remember the songs I wrote a month or two ago, but that's old age. If I want to hear Cinnamon Girl, a song I still love, I will listen to it for free. I would never see Neil Young live again, buy any of his music, or buy any of his books.

    Watch the Canadian Covid Care Alliance video for a logical analysis of this issue and the right to free and open scientific discourse.

    https://rumble.com/embed/voaxg5/?pub=qdzr7

    Replies: @Longstreet, @lavoisier, @Muggles

    In Steve’s defense, he wrote that article 20 years ago. I’m sure he regrets not predicting Spotify too

    • Replies: @frankie p
    @Longstreet

    I'm not talking about the ancient American Conservative article. I'm talking about this blog post, framed as Neil Young vs. Joe Rogan when it is actually Neil Young vs. Spotify.

  23. He’s a good businessman, as he says. And as a recently minted U.S. citizen, wouldn’t want to get censored or land on the wrong side of the covid police state. Maybe he’s dumb enough to believe the lies and propaganda.

    I laughed when Young’s “Rockin’ in the Free World” was played at Trump rallies, since the song is critical of the U.S., the self-proclaimed great leader of the “Free World” (“people shufflin’ their feet, people sleepin’ in their shoes” go part of the lyrics).

    I’m thinkin’ that Gates, Fauci, and Soros paid Neil for the rights to (and jerk off to) the tune “We R in Control” (“we control the data banks, we control the think tanks, we control the flow of air…we control…we control…we’re controlling”).

    • Replies: @usNthem
    @roonaldo

    Kinda like Reagan playing Springsteen’s “born in the USA “, which was hardly a patriotic song, at some of his rallies. Of course old Brucey objected to it as well.

    Replies: @roonaldo

  24. @vinteuil
    More seriously - Joe Rogan has shown himself, lately, to be every bit as good a noticer as Steve Sailer.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @KevinB

    More seriously – Joe Rogan has shown himself, lately, to be every bit as good a noticer as Steve Sailer.

    I can’t wholly agree. The one of the two is well read and knows how to use tools (mathematics, statistics). The other is more of an intuitive sport – whose senses are very intact though. I’m most impressed in the cases he follows his gut feeling and – Bingo! – He spoke with Jordan B. Peterson last week and the Peterson man said there’d be seven million kids dyin’ because of air-pollution indoors per year. He said: Wh’t, wh’t wh’t??? – Jamie (his asistant) – look that up for us, please. Turned out the ex-Professor had added one, if not two zeros to the actual number the report spoke of, that he claimed to have cited.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @vinteuil
    @Dieter Kief


    I can’t wholly agree
     
    DK - in English, the best way to put that is "up to a point, Lord Copper."

    Not sure why you want to talk about Jordan Peterson.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @Dieter Kief

    , @Sick 'n Tired
    @Dieter Kief

    One of the better aspects of his podcast is that they do look up guest claims/stats and figure out whether it's fact, fiction, or exaggeration. Also it leads to him and the listeners sometimes learning things on the fly, and helps drive the conversation.

  25. Young was correct, and Petty wrong. The at-the-time resurgence of American Patriotism was a millstone around the neck of any artist who needed the support and prestige of the establishment. All Tom Petty did was write and perform songs that will be remembered for generations. Neil Young meanwhile though he will be forgotten ten minutes after he’s dead, received the patronage and support of the ruling class.

    As usual the people matter not at all — indeed no artist should aim for their support. Rather the elites. Thats why Young had all that money and Petty had to tour constantly.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Whiskey

    My guess is that Tom Petty wound up with plenty of money. His heirs took in $20 million more than expected in the three months after his death due to all the extra playing of his songs on the radio and the like.

    My general impression of Petty is that he liked show biz and was pretty good at the money side of it. He lived in the two most cliched places for stars to live: Mulholland Drive and Malibu beach. He was popular in L.A. for being the anti-Eagles: Like Don Henley, Petty was another redneck who made it big in the big city, but unlike Henley he didn't complain constantly about how soul-crushing Los Angeles was. Petty seemed to enjoy being a rich Hollywood rock star.

    Replies: @anon, @Mark G.

    , @Ben tillman
    @Whiskey

    Young wrote 30 songs better than Petty’s best.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @ArthurBiggs

    , @VivaLaMigra
    @Whiskey

    Well, I don't remember Petty "tour[ing] constantly" but perhaps that explains why his voice was totally SHOT by the time he did the Super Bowl halftime show at least a decade before his relatively early death. I bought his early albums which I'd dub "The Essential Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers" but by the time of his MTV video phase - Alice in Wonderland, anybody? - there wasn't enough solid material to make them worth buying - I'll stick to "Damn the Torpedoes!" Thank You Very Much.

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Whiskey

    "Young was correct, and Petty wrong. "

    I can't believe
    This killing wish:
    There's too many stars, and
    Not enough sky.
    Boys all think
    She's living kindness;
    Well ask a fellow waitress.
    Yeah ask a a fellow waitress.

    -- Tori Amos, "The Waitress"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UbeN7eRtdLU

  26. @Anon
    @vinteuil

    Rogen's a commentator, basically a Leftist and a Bernie Sanders supporter, but who is too low-class for the modern Left. Some low-class "conservatives" like him for defending low-class causes like keeping trannies out of women's kickboxing* and making anti-vax statements he walks back a day later.

    *It's funny because women's kickboxing would have been seen as inherently "progressive" twenty years ago but has fallen out of favor for its low-class appeal and the women's lack of enthusiasm for fighting biological males. (I guess they weren't as strong as any man, oops.)

    Replies: @vinteuil, @El Dato

    Rogen’s a commentator, basically a Leftist and a Bernie Sanders supporter, but who is too low-class for the modern Left.

    Yeah, I guess that’s pretty much all you’ve got left to think.

  27. Well I heard Mister Young sing about her
    Well I heard ol’ Neil put her down
    Well I hope Neil Young will remember
    A southern man don’t need him around anyhow

    • Agree: Enemy of Earth
    • Thanks: The Anti-Gnostic, TWS
    • Replies: @Rex Little
    @Chris Mallory


    Well I heard Mister Young sing about her
    Well I heard ol’ Neil put her down
    Well I hope Neil Young will remember
    A southern man don’t need him around anyhow
     
    Below a certain age (50, maybe?) people wouldn't have heard of Neil Young if not for those lyrics.

    Replies: @anon

  28. Neil ‘Karen’ Young did the same thing as an insecure 15-year-old who sees his girlfriend talking to a another guy: “It’s him or me“.

    Had about the same outcome: Spotify told him to pound sand, and he bitched out and backed down like a low-T NPC.

    Schwabian media doesn’t like it when some upstart has a larger audience than their favoured corporations.

    The WEF didn’t spend four decades grooming a clique of narcissistic sociopaths and infiltrating them into global power structures, to have a comedian turn it all to shit.

    OT: Guess what? “Major politicians are, by and large, put in place by a set of conspiracies that are global in scope” has to get moved out of the “conspiracy theory” bucket and into the “Known known” bucket.

    Schwab’s latest interview is another “open conspiracy” reveal: Ardern, Trudeau, and Macron join the list of ‘Young Global Leaders’ alumni along with Blair, Merkel, Sarkozy, Boris, Orban, Buttegeig, Sarkozy and BlackRock’s Fink.

    The thing that identifies all of these people, is that by and large they have unremarkable CVs prior to their elevation to power (of all of the abovenamed, only Boris was a reasonably exceptional student).

    Having been selected for WEF’s YGL program is the most relevant thing to their subsequent ascent (many of them were unremarkable as students, too – so they’re not being selected for cognitive ‘grunt’).

    It’s somewhat like the Rhodes Scholarship (which is unabashedly an Anglo-supremacist movement” read its charter) – with few exceptions, Rhodes Scholars were never actually top-flight students: there was an ideological filter that was performed well before the kiddie was ever put forward.

    The Rhodes has ‘pivoted’ in the last decade or so, and is in its death throes as a group of global influence – in the same way that Masonic and Jesuit/OpusDei preferment networks faded into irrelevance.

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
    @Kratoklastes

    "The thing that identifies all of these people, is that by and large they have unremarkable CVs prior to their elevation to power (of all of the abovenamed, only Boris was a reasonably exceptional student)."

    The same could be said of the "genius" musicians of Laurel Canyon, like Young and everyone else who just coincidentally moved to the same block in LA and all came from military intell. families.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @J.Ross

    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Kratoklastes

    "The WEF didn’t spend four decades grooming a clique of narcissistic sociopaths and infiltrating them into global power structures, to have a comedian turn it all to shit."

    Damn, son! 😃

    Yo Sailer: 300K dead pre vax, 600K dead post vax. Wha happened?¡¿

    Replies: @Travis, @Kratoklastes

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Kratoklastes


    he bitched out and backed down like a low-T NPC
     
    What do you mean? It seems like Neil stuck to his guns and had his songs removed.
  29. I don’t get Neil Young’s greatness, so I thought it must be me, and I went to Ranker. Looked like a good list. (Google “Elton Kiki.”) Neil Sedaka is #40, Okay, I thought, now I’m getting to the Neils. Neil Diamond at #72, still no Neil Young. So I gave up. I think my problem is, I grew up on Long Island, in high school in the 60’s. We were loaded with amazing pop bands playing small clubs. Every band had a vocalist, usually Italian, who could sing better than Neil Young.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @SafeNow

    The hippie era put a dent in Sinatra era Italian-American coolness, but Italian-Americans came back with a bang in movies in the 1970s.

    , @VivaLaMigra
    @SafeNow

    Anyone can sing better than Neil Young. There are vocalists who don't have good voices, but adopt a style to which their voices are suited. Think of Rod Stewart, Tom Petty, and Bob Dylan. I can listen to their material. On the other hand, listening to "Sugar Mountain" is pretty painful, 'cuz what's the fuckin' point?

  30. I hope Neil Young will remember

    Nobody needs him around, anyhow

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @Hibernian

    People always talk about the Beach Boys palling around with Charlie Manson, but it's less well known how close Young was with Chuck and the "Family".

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

  31. @frankie p
    Do you remember the lyrics of the verse about possessions when he sang "Imagine" after 9/11?
    It was a fleeting glimpse of honesty from Neil Young, one of my favorite singer/songwriters when I was young. "Imagine no possessions, I wonder if I can."

    I have no time for Neil Young anymore. I read his autobiography. He is deranged, trying to hold on to his sinking wealth and finding surprise by the fact that he has to tone down his wildly expensive lifestyle and sell some "possessions" that he wonders if he can imagine living without. He carried on smoking weed for too many years and it seriously affected his brain. He was told by doctors to give it up and now is supremely proud that he was able to do so...at the age of 68 or something.

    This most recent kerfuffle that Steve so terribly misrepresents as being a beef between Neil Young and Joe Rogan is the last straw. Steve, this is a beef between Neil Young and Spotify. The fact that I cannot find the name Spotify anywhere in your article reflects badly on you as a writer and analyst. As to Neil, who the f*** does he think that he is? Has he ever watched Joe Rogan? Is he aware that Rogan has hosted doctors, scientists, researchers, etc. from both sides of the divide on the vaccines? Rogan is all about the right to free and open scientific discourse. Neil Young is all about woke fascism these days, and those views cancel him for me personally. You see, cancellation is okay when it is done by an individual. I can never condone people being cancelled broadly, by media, big tech, the establishment, etc. The only thing I can condone is your right to NEVER give people a cent of your money again. That is the way I feel about Neil Young. I admit that I probably learned more Neil Young songs than any other artist besides the Beatles. I still remember them all, though I can't remember the songs I wrote a month or two ago, but that's old age. If I want to hear Cinnamon Girl, a song I still love, I will listen to it for free. I would never see Neil Young live again, buy any of his music, or buy any of his books.

    Watch the Canadian Covid Care Alliance video for a logical analysis of this issue and the right to free and open scientific discourse.

    https://rumble.com/embed/voaxg5/?pub=qdzr7

    Replies: @Longstreet, @lavoisier, @Muggles

    Lost respect for Mr. Young on this one.

    Never thought of him before as a book burner. But all leftists have that book burning gene it seems.

    • Agree: Muggles
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @lavoisier


    Never thought of him before as a book burner. But all leftists have that book burning gene it seems.
     
    Neil Young is a right wing leftist - if not, you can look at him the other way round...
    His vaccine-radicalism is childhood stuff, Steve above is spot on.
  32. @J1234
    Neil dumped his wife of close to 40 years for a movie star a few years back. Not long afterwards, his wife was diagnosed with cancer and died. He's in no position to preach to any of us about about anything, yet people like him do exactly...that all the time. That fits into my theory about the current world: Passionate public posturing and social justice from the left is moral camouflage for their amorality.

    Replies: @Rosie, @JimDandy, @Kronos, @Antiwar7, @Undisclosed

    Neil dumped his wife of close to 40 years for a movie star a few years back. Not long afterwards, his wife was diagnosed with cancer and died. He’s in no position to preach to any of us about about anything, yet people like him do exactly…that all the time. That fits into my theory about the current world: Passionate public posturing and social justice from the left is moral camouflage for their amorality.

    People say you can be moral without being religious. That seems to be true until one’s mortality can no longer be ignored, at which point amoral YOLOism seems to kick in with a vengeance.

    (And yes, I know NAAALT.)

  33. @Danindc
    Great review. Cinnamon Girl and Old Man were very good the rest is forgettable to a novice like me. I remember as a kid in the 80’s being surprised he was a rock star. Just didn’t have the look.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Hypnotoad666

    Cinnamon Girl and Old Man were very good

    Derek’s “Cinnamon”, covered by Tommy Roe, was better. Roe is the rare individual who can say the Beatles opened for him.

    • Thanks: Danindc
    • Replies: @Cato
    @Reg Cæsar

    I'm a Boomer, but this kind of tune was detested by young people already well before 1970. In the city I grew up in, In-a-gadda-da-vida's appearance on AM radio seemed to mark the transition from bouncy, swinging, clean-cut music to a darker music that stirred the soul but didn't invite dancing.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  34. @Dieter Kief
    @vinteuil


    More seriously – Joe Rogan has shown himself, lately, to be every bit as good a noticer as Steve Sailer.
     
    I can't wholly agree. The one of the two is well read and knows how to use tools (mathematics, statistics). The other is more of an intuitive sport - whose senses are very intact though. I'm most impressed in the cases he follows his gut feeling and - Bingo! - He spoke with Jordan B. Peterson last week and the Peterson man said there'd be seven million kids dyin' because of air-pollution indoors per year. He said: Wh't, wh't wh't??? - Jamie (his asistant) - look that up for us, please. Turned out the ex-Professor had added one, if not two zeros to the actual number the report spoke of, that he claimed to have cited.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @Sick 'n Tired

    I can’t wholly agree

    DK – in English, the best way to put that is “up to a point, Lord Copper.”

    Not sure why you want to talk about Jordan Peterson.

    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @vinteuil

    DK – in English, the best way to put that is “up to a point, Lord Copper.”

    Nice reference. Kudos to you, sir.

    , @Dieter Kief
    @vinteuil

    vinteuil - tanks, your version of my thought is nice and all (that is a quote actually by somebody who's English is quite right , just in case, heheh), but, I wanted to go on, it (= your version) doesn't exactly eypress what's up in my version.
    Yours lacks the sigh, which goes along with mine quite nicely.

    The Jordan B. Peterson reference in my comment above might not be for your rather sensible ears, I can - quite easily - imagine that. Sorry. But things like that happen all the time, while we're Rockin' in the Free World.

  35. @Steve Sailer
    @Daniel H

    Young was in a hugely popular band, CSN&Y, and had a very successful solo career simultaneously. He'd previously been in Buffalo Springfield, so CSN&Y was not his first rodeo. He was a smart guy and I think he tended to deal with the less larcenous music executives, such as Ahmet Ertegun. Plus, he's not the type of personality you could easily bully into bad deals. So, a larger than normal chunk of the huge revenue generated by Woodstock Era rock stars wound up in Young's pocket than was was common due to the rapaciousness of music industry suits.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldlan, @frankie p, @Rosie, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @PiltdownMan

    Right on, Steve! I don’t know where these guys come from, saying that Neil Young didn’t make much money. Harvest was released in early 1972, and the original album sold 15,000,000 copies. To date, including compilations, singles, downloads, and streaming, the album is up to 23,000,000 in total sales. You mention Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young, and they were wildly successful in the very period that these guys say Neil didn’t make any money; Deja Vu, released in March, 1970, sold nearly 15 million copies as an original album, and since then has broken sales of 24,000,000 copies. The money doesn’t stop pouring in when the sales continue. Neil Young also toured prolifically through the years, and some of those tours were stadium tours. I remember Rust Never Sleeps in 1979 or 1980. This was a huge stadium tour, yielded a film and an album, and earned huge money. Neil Young accumulated a big pile of money over the years, but he also developed very expensive habits (the train collection, the land upkeep, not to mention the full-time staff taking care of his son, who has a severe disability).

    Neil Young released 43 studio albums, as well as contributing to multiple bands.

  36. @Steve Sailer
    @Daniel H

    Young was in a hugely popular band, CSN&Y, and had a very successful solo career simultaneously. He'd previously been in Buffalo Springfield, so CSN&Y was not his first rodeo. He was a smart guy and I think he tended to deal with the less larcenous music executives, such as Ahmet Ertegun. Plus, he's not the type of personality you could easily bully into bad deals. So, a larger than normal chunk of the huge revenue generated by Woodstock Era rock stars wound up in Young's pocket than was was common due to the rapaciousness of music industry suits.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldlan, @frankie p, @Rosie, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @PiltdownMan

    I don’t know how much involvement he had in the composition, but this is one of the greatest songs of that era IMO.

    • Replies: @frankie p
    @Rosie

    Neil Young has no input into the composition of that tune.

    , @I, Libertine
    @Rosie

    That was was Crosby Stills and Nash, not CSN &Y. Two different bands, actually. Neil would have had nothing to do with that song. But it is a great tune.

    Replies: @G. Poulin

  37. He’d showed his rebellious streak by publicly backing Ronald Reagan for a few years.

    Thank you, Steve!

    I had never read your review before, and I had this memory in my head of reading this about Neil Young in Cosmo magazine at the time it used to accidentally come to my and a roommate’s apartment. I have not trusted my memory completely on that, because I mostly read the magazine for the pictures (and scratch & sniff stuff).

  38. “The first record I ever bought was Young’s 1969 “Cinnamon Girl,” a plodding but thunderous slab of lowbrow garage metal. I still turn it up whenever it comes on the radio.”

    During your review of the Beatles’ Let it Be documentary, I believe you said that 1970’s Let it Be was the first album you ever bought, Steve. Or are you making a distinction between your first purchased LP and your first purchased 45 single? Oftentimes, the words “album” and “record” are used interchangeably, hence the confusion as to which one was your actual first
    purchase.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    "Or are you making a distinction between your first purchased LP and your first purchased 45 single?"

    Yes. I started buying singles first, then albums some months later.

    To be technical, "Cinnamon Girl" was the first single I bought new at a record store. I had previously bought a couple of singles used at a thrift shop: a Sly and the Family Stone single ("Everyday People"?) and "Hey Jude"/"Revolution."

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @TorontoTraveller

  39. @Daniel H
    Young bought that ranch around 1970 or so. He had had a few decent selling albums by that time, and decent airplay for a few songs but can such bring in THAT much money to afford a huge ranch just 40 miles from San Francisco, in the uplands of Silicon Valley, or was rural northern California land unusually cheap at that time?

    Artists notoriously get ripped off on their first record deal. If Young's records sold, say, about 400K units by 1970 I can imagine him earning a few ten cents for each record sold. It's not that much money. And touring could leave you broke. Jimmy Page broke up the Yardbirds in 1968 partly due to the fact that after a very successful American tour they all OWED money. In 1976 after touring for 18 months the Allman Brothers each took home a payday of 20K.

    Trying to wrap my head about how much a successful and well managed rock and roller could earn at that time. Grateful Dead out of necessity bunking together, living off 300/week, some performers driven to suicide by desperation despite selling millions of recofds (Badfinger). My guess is that Young took in about 50K per year 69-70. I base this on the fact that when Brian Jones parted with the Stones the previous year they offered him a settlement of 20K Sterling for the indefinite future, and the Stones had to be a much more lucrative outfit than Neil Young, so I imagine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @Hapalong Cassidy, @James J O'Meara, @Eric Novak

    My guess is that Young took in about 50K per year 69-70.

    US median income for 1970 was \$9,870.00, up from \$9,400.00 in 1969, I’d bet the only other people making \$50K/year in 1970 were running corporations like Dow, DuPont, and GE.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @NorthOfTheOneOhOne

    To give an idea of pop culture context, in 1970 singer Dean Martin signed or was in the midst of a multi year contract for his TV show, worth in 197o dollars (not adjusted for inflation, but real dollars) 35 million. In other words in 1970, Dean Martin earned about 11 million dollars per year for his highly popular TV show. Add to the fact that he was also a movie star, made albums (and singles), performed live in Vegas, as well as being one of the largest private owners of RCA Victor stock, and his income probably was closer to 12-13 million per yr in late '60's early 1970's. In the words of HOF NY M Casey Stengel, that's simply Amazin'.

    No one in the NFL, the NBA, or in MLB earned anywhere close to 1 million per yr in 1970, and Dean earned over 10 million dollars, which would be comparable to around 35 million per yr today. Muhammad Ali probably didn't earn 10 million dollars in 1970. The only other entertainer in front of the camera who would come close to Dean Martin's earning power was probably Bob Hope.

    Both Hope and Martin were excellent golfers, by the way.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  40. My sister used to play that damn harvest moon album constantly – I frikin hated it then and now. However, Like A Hurricane is one of the old sack’s songs I do happen to like. Who gives a crap what that Canadian dickhead thinks about anything?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @usNthem

    Well, that gets to the gist of it, UsNThem. There's no reason any musical artist, other artist, or actor or actress should have any particular wisdom or insight that would make it worth listening to him when he spouts out his political views. It's understandable if you've already paid good money for the show. That's when the whole "shut up and sing!" advice is warranted.

    As much as I liked that review, I really couldn't care less what any musician, artist, or actor/actress does in his personal life either. That is, not any more than any other random interesting character. This explains why I've never bought a People Magazine copy or written about these people on my blog.

    , @TorontoTraveller
    @usNthem

    He's an American dickhead now. I am ambivalent about his change in citizenship.

  41. @J1234
    Neil dumped his wife of close to 40 years for a movie star a few years back. Not long afterwards, his wife was diagnosed with cancer and died. He's in no position to preach to any of us about about anything, yet people like him do exactly...that all the time. That fits into my theory about the current world: Passionate public posturing and social justice from the left is moral camouflage for their amorality.

    Replies: @Rosie, @JimDandy, @Kronos, @Antiwar7, @Undisclosed

    I’ve been asking why all these washed-up old Jewish guys passionately want to commit genocide on the unvaxxed–Chomsky, Howard Stern, Gene Simmons, Fauci (that’s a joke because some people here say he’s a crypto-Jew) etc. But, in fairness, Neil Young makes the case that it’s washed-up old guys in general who are totally losing their minds over the unvaxxed.

    • Replies: @Ripple Earthdevil
    @JimDandy

    They're happy to commit genocide against their fellow tribesmen, as Israel has one of the highest vaccination rates on the planet and as such is also a leading indicator that the injections are a complete flop.

    , @Carol
    @JimDandy

    The unvaxxed are handling their own genocide just fine, per r/HermanCainAward.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    , @3g4me
    @JimDandy

    @42 Jim Dandy: "But, in fairness, Neil Young makes the case that it’s washed-up old guys in general who are totally losing their minds over the unvaxxed."

    Washed-up old guys and women, and soyboi men who might as well be women. And the Han, and the sub-continentals in the Anglosphere, and anyone else who is anti-White.

    Gee, what a surprising overlap between that group and Sailer's commentariat. So sorry, just noticing.

  42. @Anon
    I am not a particular fan of Tom Petty's music, but I can at least listen to it without changing to another radio station. As a person, I have more respect for Tom Petty than Neil Young. Neil Young is 10 times as goofy as Petty, and has produced a career of almost complete and utter tunelessness. Yes, Cinnamon Girl isn't bad, but it's the only thing he ever created that wasn't bad.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon, @TorontoTraveller, @Stirge, @anon

    Yes, Cinnamon Girl isn’t bad, but it’s the only thing he ever created that wasn’t bad.

    As my President says, “C’mon, man!” Seriously, #175, give these 2 a chance. If you don’t like the mellow ballad, check the 2nd one out for some serious distortion guitar. Note that Hey, Hey, My, My is not the same as My, My, Hey, Hey. (The tune is the same, but the first is the hard rocking version and the latter is the acoustic version – with different lyrics – from the 1st side of the album.)

    I could come up with 50 more great songs from this guy. I don’t care if he’s “as good” as some other musicians technically, he had a great sound, especially with the band Crazy Horse.

    You fans on here tell me if you’ve ever heard anything from the Hawks & Doves album. It’s pretty obscure. How about you, Steve?

    • Agree: Trelane
    • Replies: @usNthem
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I'm lodging a formal complaint about this video being posted and of course causing me to hit the play button. Now, this damn tune is embedded in my brain, which often happens with songs I don't particularly care for. Damnation!

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I like "Powderfinger" -- second best American civil war rock song by a Canadian.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdPs5YXQTSw

  43. Funny Donald Trump story on his ex-newfriend Neil Young…

    • LOL: Daniel H
    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Anonymous

    Whatever else you say about him, Trump is quite the raconteur. If he doesn't run in '24 he should tour as a stand up act. (Or maybe he'll do both).

  44. @Dieter Kief
    @vinteuil


    More seriously – Joe Rogan has shown himself, lately, to be every bit as good a noticer as Steve Sailer.
     
    I can't wholly agree. The one of the two is well read and knows how to use tools (mathematics, statistics). The other is more of an intuitive sport - whose senses are very intact though. I'm most impressed in the cases he follows his gut feeling and - Bingo! - He spoke with Jordan B. Peterson last week and the Peterson man said there'd be seven million kids dyin' because of air-pollution indoors per year. He said: Wh't, wh't wh't??? - Jamie (his asistant) - look that up for us, please. Turned out the ex-Professor had added one, if not two zeros to the actual number the report spoke of, that he claimed to have cited.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @Sick 'n Tired

    One of the better aspects of his podcast is that they do look up guest claims/stats and figure out whether it’s fact, fiction, or exaggeration. Also it leads to him and the listeners sometimes learning things on the fly, and helps drive the conversation.

    • Agree: JR Ewing, Dieter Kief
  45. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/nypost/status/1487130128010432518

    Replies: @Ebony Obelisk, @Kronos

    I feel sorry for Sean Penn. He won an Oscar for playing one of the most iconic queer leaders in American history, and yet, even the preparation he did for that role failed to liberate him from the prison of his own gendered insecurity. Being Sean Penn is punishment in itself.

    • Agree: Daniel H
  46. That is the ancient question. Is it better to do a few or a single thing well, even great, (e.g. Sinatra with his singing abilities), or catch a touch of the Jupiter Complex, and attempt to do every single thing of the creative process better than anyone else? (e.g. Dylan with songwriting, singing, producing, etc). The thing is, if one compares Sinatra vs Dylan side by side, Dylan’s singing ability doesn’t come anywhere near Sinatra’s. Just on pure vocal talent alone, it’s not even close, Sinatra wins hands down.

    And, for the most part, Sinatra evolved as a recording artist in the type of genre that he sung. He mainly sung about Love. Over the decades, he added nuances and depth to his repertoire. Dylan, however, wrote about many emotions, things, etc. But his vocal interpretations regarding Love would have to for the most part, take a back seat to Sinatra.

    Actually, from a purely vocal singing ability and being able to convey emotional authenticity through pure singing alone, regarding the theme of Love, pretty much every 20th Century singer in the English language would have to take a back seat to Sinatra. Or, Sinatra remains in the conversation with any would be contenders. Like it or not, Sinatra defined how one sang about Love, and the various nuances that it contains.

    • Replies: @Rex Little
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi


    Dylan’s singing ability doesn’t come anywhere near Sinatra’s. Just on pure vocal talent alone, it’s not even close
     
    It's not even that close. You want close to Dylan as a singer, try the average karaoke bar drunk.
  47. And another thing:

    If we’re going to discuss musical artists and their political views, we really need to talk about Eric Clapton. It’s possible Steve or the VDare guys have discussed his long-ago treatise (haha, “treatise” to put it mildly) about race during one of his shows as a young man, along with voicing his support for Enoch Powell specifically on immigration. This was in the mid-1970’s, mind you!

    Eric Clapton was way ahead on that issue of even Peter Brimelow (who I assume still lived in England then). Under pressure from the Commies, Eric Clapton folded to a great degree, while Peter Brimelow doesn’t. Of course, Peter Brimelow can’t play guitar as well as Eric Clapton, as far as I know, and make millions of dollars at it, so …

    Eric Clapton is in the news again with his anti-Totalitarian PanicFest stance. VDare writer Carl Horowitz has a good article about it, which will be discussed on Peak Stupidity soon – “Is This A Sovereign Nation / Or Just A Police State?” Eric Clapton, COVID, And Immigration.

    • Replies: @Escher
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I guess he didn’t include musical ability in his treatise, considering he started his career as (and still is to some extent) a blues man.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  48. @Steve Sailer
    @Daniel H

    Young was in a hugely popular band, CSN&Y, and had a very successful solo career simultaneously. He'd previously been in Buffalo Springfield, so CSN&Y was not his first rodeo. He was a smart guy and I think he tended to deal with the less larcenous music executives, such as Ahmet Ertegun. Plus, he's not the type of personality you could easily bully into bad deals. So, a larger than normal chunk of the huge revenue generated by Woodstock Era rock stars wound up in Young's pocket than was was common due to the rapaciousness of music industry suits.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldlan, @frankie p, @Rosie, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @PiltdownMan

    Part of the reason CS&N’s management pitched bringing Neil on board was because he would stand up to Stephen Stills, who was driving the band, management, the producer and the record company crazy at the time.

    I will challenge you on your assertion that Neil only worked with mediocrities. His backup band on the Harvest album, which produced his biggest hit Heart of Gold, the Stray Gators was actually very good. His use of Crazy Horse was more about his attempts at creating the most obnoxious rock music possible, something he excelled at.

  49. Anonymous[352] • Disclaimer says:

    I don’t agree with Neil, but c’mon! It’s Neil Young! He’s a fucking artist! It’s his JOB to blow people’s minds, not to think things through! He’s blown my mind enough through the years to go gentle on him while he acts like an ass.

    Jordan Peterson is an intellectual. He’s not an artist. You gonna cancel him because he can’t play a guitar or sing worth a shit?

    Neil even blew Paul McCartney’s mind not that long ago. Imagine being able to take McCartney out of his comfort zone? That ain’t so easy. Neil did it!

    Leave Neil alone, you assholes!

    In fact, I’m not asking you all, I’m TELLING you all to be nice to Neil!! 😠

    • Agree: Ben tillman
    • Replies: @tyrone
    @Anonymous


    Leave Neil alone, you assholes!
     
    ........and don't forget Brittany!
    , @loren
    @Anonymous

    he sounds good and looks almost dead.

  50. @frankie p
    Do you remember the lyrics of the verse about possessions when he sang "Imagine" after 9/11?
    It was a fleeting glimpse of honesty from Neil Young, one of my favorite singer/songwriters when I was young. "Imagine no possessions, I wonder if I can."

    I have no time for Neil Young anymore. I read his autobiography. He is deranged, trying to hold on to his sinking wealth and finding surprise by the fact that he has to tone down his wildly expensive lifestyle and sell some "possessions" that he wonders if he can imagine living without. He carried on smoking weed for too many years and it seriously affected his brain. He was told by doctors to give it up and now is supremely proud that he was able to do so...at the age of 68 or something.

    This most recent kerfuffle that Steve so terribly misrepresents as being a beef between Neil Young and Joe Rogan is the last straw. Steve, this is a beef between Neil Young and Spotify. The fact that I cannot find the name Spotify anywhere in your article reflects badly on you as a writer and analyst. As to Neil, who the f*** does he think that he is? Has he ever watched Joe Rogan? Is he aware that Rogan has hosted doctors, scientists, researchers, etc. from both sides of the divide on the vaccines? Rogan is all about the right to free and open scientific discourse. Neil Young is all about woke fascism these days, and those views cancel him for me personally. You see, cancellation is okay when it is done by an individual. I can never condone people being cancelled broadly, by media, big tech, the establishment, etc. The only thing I can condone is your right to NEVER give people a cent of your money again. That is the way I feel about Neil Young. I admit that I probably learned more Neil Young songs than any other artist besides the Beatles. I still remember them all, though I can't remember the songs I wrote a month or two ago, but that's old age. If I want to hear Cinnamon Girl, a song I still love, I will listen to it for free. I would never see Neil Young live again, buy any of his music, or buy any of his books.

    Watch the Canadian Covid Care Alliance video for a logical analysis of this issue and the right to free and open scientific discourse.

    https://rumble.com/embed/voaxg5/?pub=qdzr7

    Replies: @Longstreet, @lavoisier, @Muggles

    This most recent kerfuffle that Steve so terribly misrepresents as being a beef between Neil Young and Joe Rogan is the last straw. Steve, this is a beef between Neil Young and Spotify. The fact that I cannot find the name Spotify anywhere in your article reflects badly on you as a writer and analyst.

    Your comment here (above) reflects badly on you as a writer and analyst. Who didn’t bother to read the line at the beginning of iSteve’s article on Young’s bio Shakey that first appeared in the American Conservative in 2002.

    Spotify didn’t exist in 2002, just so you get my point.

    As to your other remark about “not being about Joe Rogan” that’s misleading. It was Spotify’s hosting of the Rogan podcast (paid for dearly by Spotify) that is the “beef.” Young, the former “rebel hippie” is now just another dumb Woke COVID fear monger, bullying a vendor of music streams and podcasts.

    Young objects to having his precious music being sold along side of a streamed very popular podcaster who has a different opinion. So rather dim bulb Young is just another would be fascist style bully (or more contemporary, Red Guard style commie bully.)

    When you demand that others “shut up” and disappear, that is worse than simply being in disagreement. That is Woke fascism.

    Of course senile Young, the would be Canadian virtue signaler, is merely shooting himself in the foot. “Don’t sell my product in the same online store as Joe Rogan!”

    Yes, Neil, why not spread your boycott around. So no one with WrongThink is tempted to buy your product. That will teach us!

    • Replies: @frankie p
    @Muggles

    I'm not talking about the ancient American Conservative article. I'm talking about this blog post, framed as Neil Young vs. Joe Rogan when it is actually Neil Young vs. Spotify.

    Replies: @Muggles

  51. Neil Young demanded that Spotify deplatform Joe Rogan because Joe questioned vaccine madness. Neil gave them an ultimatum “It’s me or Joe!” Neil found himself out on his ass. Then Neil declared victory. The whole thing was pretty hilarious in my opinion.

  52. @Franz

    Young’s most consistent political cause has been the protection of the jobs of Americans who work with their hands. So, it’s too bad we never learn the inside story of what must have been a wrenching time for Young in his dual roles as an owner and a union-supporter.
     
    It really would not have to be. Young might be one of the one in a million manager who knows that the division of labor among humans include how they protect their turf. Boilermakers form unions, liberal arts majors have professional organizations, and as a songwriter Young has ASCAP. All of them provide protection and networking.

    In the 1880s when corporations were given Human Rights and therefore Immortality by American courts, the workers lamely thought they could counter with European-type organization. They should have just formed a Labor Corporation and they could have been immortal too. Dummies.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Young might be one of the one in a million manager who knows that the division of labor among humans include how they protect their turf. Boilermakers form unions, liberal arts majors have professional organizations, and as a songwriter Young has ASCAP. All of them provide protection and networking.

    ASCAP’s overprotection led to the creation of its rival, BMI, and thus to its members’ royalties being cut in half:

    ASCAP’s economic and cultural heft overwhelmingly benefited older musicians, incumbent musical styles, and the music produced by its mainly white artists… Blacks were often discriminated against and as of 1939, only six of its one-hundred-seventy members were black. Jelly Roll Morton was denied membership for years. Duke Ellington gained admission only because his white manager Irving Mills took co-writer credits for much of his work… If it was possible, country artists were even less welcome:

    ” I tried to get into ASCAP as far back as 1930, and I could not. Later I had many numbers, big hits, but I still never could get into ASCAP.”
    Gene Autry

    Jimmie Rodgers got in two years after death. Bob Wills in 1957, twenty years after composing and writing hits. Important and influential songwriters like A.P. Carter, Ernest Tubb, and Roy Acuff never got in.

    https://www.history-of-rock.com/ascap-bmi-war.htm

    I’m surprised that Young was even in ASCAP. Canada has her own licensing agencies; perhaps that has something to do with it.

    The worst result of the ASCAP-BMI turf war was prohibiting Johnny Mercer from setting Antonio Carlos Jobim’s music to English, which he had done with European tunes such as “Autumn Leaves” and “Summer Wind”. Maybe someday drafts will be discovered in a lost Mercer suitcase.

    One way which ASCAP protects Young is seen here:

    https://www.abajournal.com/news/article/neil-young-sues-to-stop-trump-campaign-from-using-his-songs-will-consent-decrees-stand-in-the-way

    • Replies: @Franz
    @Reg Cæsar

    @ Reg Cæsar --

    Thanks for the links.

    It's just more evidence that the union model was a dead-end in America for anybody. A local steel plant took a strike vote in the 1990s and not one black steelworker showed up at the union hall.

    When a younger member asked why, he had to be told that when those workers were young, they couldn't even fill out an application for work. It was the unions that kept that kept things segregated in the north, not the government.

    Black workers were hired by the company. And that was who they were loyal to. It made the idea of union solidarity a joke.

  53. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "The first record I ever bought was Young’s 1969 “Cinnamon Girl,” a plodding but thunderous slab of lowbrow garage metal. I still turn it up whenever it comes on the radio."

    During your review of the Beatles' Let it Be documentary, I believe you said that 1970's Let it Be was the first album you ever bought, Steve. Or are you making a distinction between your first purchased LP and your first purchased 45 single? Oftentimes, the words "album" and "record" are used interchangeably, hence the confusion as to which one was your actual first
    purchase.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    “Or are you making a distinction between your first purchased LP and your first purchased 45 single?”

    Yes. I started buying singles first, then albums some months later.

    To be technical, “Cinnamon Girl” was the first single I bought new at a record store. I had previously bought a couple of singles used at a thrift shop: a Sly and the Family Stone single (“Everyday People”?) and “Hey Jude”/”Revolution.”

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    Mom had a copy of the Beatles' 1968 single "Hey Jude/Revolution" it was the first single released under their independent label Apple. It was a cool single, because the A side showed a Granny Smith Apple on the actual single where the writing appears, while the B side showed the apple cut in half.

    Pretty cool visual design on a 45 for 1968.

    , @TorontoTraveller
    @Steve Sailer

    Do you get the sense that Yojimbo has a bit too much time on his hands?

    Perhaps he is hard at work on his 700-page Steve Sailer biography.

  54. In 2020/21, youth crime declined significantly in England and Wales. See below.

    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1050107/Youth_Justice_Statistics_2020-21.pdf

    The number of children who received a caution or sentence has fallen
    by 17% in the last year with an 82% decrease over the last ten years.

    The number of first time entrants has fallen by 20% since the previous
    year, with an 81% fall from the year ending March 2011.

    The reoffending rate decreased by 3.6 percentage points in the last
    year and 4.1 percentage points from the year ending March 2010. This
    was the sixth consecutive year on year fall.

    Charts. As you can see below, an increasing proportion of youth arrests involve non-Whites (disproportionately Blacks).

    View post on imgur.com

    View post on imgur.com

    -Roughly 350,000 British youths were arrested in 2006/07. The number of arrests for 2020/21 was approximately 50,000. This implies a British youths were arrested ~7x more often 14 years ago (2006/07 vs 2020/21).
    -15,800 children were cautioned or sentenced in 2020/21. This compares to over 130,000 youth cautions & sentences in 2006/07.
    -There were 8,800 first-time entrants to the youth justice system. In 2006/07, the figure was over 110,000 first-time entrants.

    I was curious whether the above trends were a result of less youth misbehavior or a less punitive criminal justice system. Here’s an answer.

    View post on imgur.com

    As you can see in the above chart, the average custodial sentencing length has INCREASED over the last decade. So despite INCREASING harshness, fewer British youths are making their way into the system.

    The national incarceration rate (for all ages) was 138 (per 100,000 inhabitants) in 2020. In 2006, the rate was 145 per 100,000 inhabitants. So only a 5% decline. See below links.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/1022592/incarceration-rate-in-uk/

    https://www.prisonstudies.org/country/united-kingdom-england-wales

    Therefore, we can assume that the British criminal justice system hasn’t become significantly less punitive in recent years. The system has either remained the same (as indicated by national the incarceration rate remaining nearly constant since 2006) or become more punitive (as measured by the average custodial sentencing length increasing notably in the last decade).

    So we can conclude that British youths are now committing criminal offences at a drastically lower rate than they were back in 2006. Which is fascinating.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I've heard Brits wonder why kids these days aren't getting as drunk as they did in the 1990s.

    Replies: @Excal, @JohnnyWalker123, @Anonymous

    , @Mr. Peabody
    @JohnnyWalker123

    It ain't unnecessarily so.
    Maybe the Brits just decriminalized a bunch of bottom-tier stuff. Places like NYC and SF will be reporting steep drops in crime now that they have stopped arresting the guys who shoot up in the park, shoplift, or take a dump on your shoes. And, they tend to treat their new in town Mohammedens the way we we treat our Black criminal class (i.e. DIE).
    On the other end of the graph they do tend to hammer their Hanibal Lechter types with serious prison time, but only after they have let them skate a few time.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    , @3g4me
    @JohnnyWalker123

    @55 Johnny Walker 123: "So we can conclude that British youths are now committing criminal offences at a drastically lower rate than they were back in 2006. Which is fascinating."

    Which is also phenomenally misleading and shortsighted, and in keeping with those who always think they can quantify the qualitative. Since England has gone full woke, it's Whites who are so indiscreet as to voice their discomfort with becoming a hated minority in their own land who are jailed for 'hate crimes.' Meanwhile, Jamaicans and various other sub-Saharans go around knifing people, and the Pakis continue to rape White girls, but they don't get jailed because of raycissm. And half the cops are either utterly brainwashed White hall monitors, or non-Whites who really get off on hassling White Englishmen.

    But go on pretending it's just a numbers game - perhaps Steve will make you heir to his column.

    , @Bill Jones
    @JohnnyWalker123

    One thing I didn't see (or possibly just overlooked) in your piece was any mention of the actual crime rate in the UK.
    You focused entirely on the criminal justice system side of things.
    A few other factors might be
    A. Britain have have become accustomed to a level of crime where it's not seen as being worth reporting.
    B. The police may have ceased responding to and reporting on crimes committed against certain groups; such a few thousand white working class girls sexually abused, kidnapped, raped and beaten by Pakistanis. Straight into the Memory hole. Never happened.
    C. Police may have just refocused their attention on non-crimes like the plane that flew over a football match with a "White Lives Matter" banner, to such a degree that real crimes go un-resolved. Think of the squad of 12 FBI agents sent to investigate the non-crime of a none-noose hanging on the door of a garage allocated to a black-ish Nascar driver. Who knows how many exploding Mohammad's went undetected that week?

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  55. @Reg Cæsar
    @Danindc


    Cinnamon Girl and Old Man were very good
     
    Derek's "Cinnamon", covered by Tommy Roe, was better. Roe is the rare individual who can say the Beatles opened for him.



    https://youtu.be/gepd8pdZeLI

    Replies: @Cato

    I’m a Boomer, but this kind of tune was detested by young people already well before 1970. In the city I grew up in, In-a-gadda-da-vida‘s appearance on AM radio seemed to mark the transition from bouncy, swinging, clean-cut music to a darker music that stirred the soul but didn’t invite dancing.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Cato

    In the mostly Italian neighborhood in which we owned a house, I kidded my best friend (who loved the song) that it was about a teen on our block--"In the Garbage of Vito". Actually, the song's lyrics were In the Garden of Eden..., but the singer was recovering from the night before.

    Michael Medved once did a column on how 1969 was a lot squarer than people remember. Heck, Rowe's own "Dizzy" topped the charts for weeks that year.

    Replies: @Cato

  56. Young’s yella

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
  57. @Danindc
    Great review. Cinnamon Girl and Old Man were very good the rest is forgettable to a novice like me. I remember as a kid in the 80’s being surprised he was a rock star. Just didn’t have the look.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Hypnotoad666

    Cinnamon Girl and Old Man were very good the rest is forgettable to a novice like me.

    I’m not a big Neil Young fan either. But IMHO his best and most interesting is the 9+ minute trippy guitar jam, Down by the River. It’s an ode to murdering your girlfriend. So maybe not as PC as Imagine.

    https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=KflCXmEX6BY&feature=share

    • Thanks: Danindc
    • Replies: @Rouetheday
    @Hypnotoad666

    A couple of weeks back I was dividing my time between surfing the web on my computer and watching YouTube videos through my TV. I came across a music video of "Down By the River", a song I hadn't listened to in years. While listening to the song I discovered an article on one of my favorite "Black People Behaving Badly" web sites (as my disapproving sister likes to call them). It was about the Irish woman who had been killed by what was described at the time as a 'Romanian National' (is that a PC way of saying "Gypsy'?). She was killed while jogging along a canal towpath. As I'm reading this detail I can hear Neil start to sing the chorus- "Down by the river/ I shot my baby...".

    That was some spooky shit.

    Replies: @David Jones, @JMcG

    , @TorontoTraveller
    @Hypnotoad666

    "Down by the river
    I shot my baby"

    is not a lyric about committing homicide. It is a lyric about injecting heroin.

    I'm seeing a lot of commenters on this thread who seem way more out of touch than Neil Young seems to be.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan, @Hypnotoad666

  58. @SafeNow
    I don’t get Neil Young’s greatness, so I thought it must be me, and I went to Ranker. Looked like a good list. (Google “Elton Kiki.”) Neil Sedaka is #40, Okay, I thought, now I’m getting to the Neils. Neil Diamond at #72, still no Neil Young. So I gave up. I think my problem is, I grew up on Long Island, in high school in the 60’s. We were loaded with amazing pop bands playing small clubs. Every band had a vocalist, usually Italian, who could sing better than Neil Young.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @VivaLaMigra

    The hippie era put a dent in Sinatra era Italian-American coolness, but Italian-Americans came back with a bang in movies in the 1970s.

  59. @Steve Sailer
    @Daniel H

    Young was in a hugely popular band, CSN&Y, and had a very successful solo career simultaneously. He'd previously been in Buffalo Springfield, so CSN&Y was not his first rodeo. He was a smart guy and I think he tended to deal with the less larcenous music executives, such as Ahmet Ertegun. Plus, he's not the type of personality you could easily bully into bad deals. So, a larger than normal chunk of the huge revenue generated by Woodstock Era rock stars wound up in Young's pocket than was was common due to the rapaciousness of music industry suits.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldlan, @frankie p, @Rosie, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @PiltdownMan

    I think it is worth remembering, too, that the big name rock starts of the second half of the 1960s and early 1970s were, in the popular imagination, something like the Silicon Valley instant whiz-kid millionaires of thirty years later. People marveled that talented young guys (mostly guys, back then) could become so rich, so quickly, off their talent. Singers of an earlier generation, through the fifties, didn’t make that kind of money, because, for the most part, they didn’t write their own songs. The big money was in being a successful singer-songwriter, and that started becoming the norm, around 1965.

    Worth remembering, too, how low asset prices were circa 1970, relative to today, for the kinds of luxury assets the rich have always chased. When I started thinking of applying to graduate business school in 1979, you could still buy a nice, new, high-rise two bedroom apartment in Manhattan’s Upper East Side for about \$80,000, no more than three or four years of a starting salary for an MBA fresh out of business school. The wealth creation in the Reagan era 1980s erased that window of affordability.

    I can forgive Neil Young a lot, who is of old North American Anglo-French settler stock (his mother was a member of Daughters of the American Revolution), and ornery and idiosyncratic, in his own way, just as Joe Rogen is.

    Here’s Neil Young in 1971 talking about his newly acquired ranch, and singing a song.

  60. Well I heard Mister Young sing about us
    Well I heard ole Neil put us down
    Well, I hope Neil Young will remember
    Rogan fans don’t need him around anyhow

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman, Gordo
  61. @Whiskey
    Young was correct, and Petty wrong. The at-the-time resurgence of American Patriotism was a millstone around the neck of any artist who needed the support and prestige of the establishment. All Tom Petty did was write and perform songs that will be remembered for generations. Neil Young meanwhile though he will be forgotten ten minutes after he's dead, received the patronage and support of the ruling class.

    As usual the people matter not at all -- indeed no artist should aim for their support. Rather the elites. Thats why Young had all that money and Petty had to tour constantly.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ben tillman, @VivaLaMigra, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    My guess is that Tom Petty wound up with plenty of money. His heirs took in \$20 million more than expected in the three months after his death due to all the extra playing of his songs on the radio and the like.

    My general impression of Petty is that he liked show biz and was pretty good at the money side of it. He lived in the two most cliched places for stars to live: Mulholland Drive and Malibu beach. He was popular in L.A. for being the anti-Eagles: Like Don Henley, Petty was another redneck who made it big in the big city, but unlike Henley he didn’t complain constantly about how soul-crushing Los Angeles was. Petty seemed to enjoy being a rich Hollywood rock star.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Steve Sailer

    He also made it with Stevie Nicks I think.

    , @Mark G.
    @Steve Sailer


    My guess is that Tom Petty wound up with plenty of money. His heirs took in $20 million more than expected in the three months after his death due to all the extra playing of his songs on the radio and the like.

     

    I know someone who worked for Petty's ex-wife. She got a lot of his money as part of the divorce settlement but I'm sure he made plenty more money after that. I was told his ex-wife was crazy. She thought the U.S. government owned an earthquake machine it would use to start earthquakes. I was also told she was forgetful. She would set a pair of sunglasses down on a table, forget they were there, and then start yelling at her employees they stole them. I was also told in her younger days she was quite pretty but as she got older she started to look like Jabba the Hutt.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

  62. @JimDandy
    @J1234

    I've been asking why all these washed-up old Jewish guys passionately want to commit genocide on the unvaxxed--Chomsky, Howard Stern, Gene Simmons, Fauci (that's a joke because some people here say he's a crypto-Jew) etc. But, in fairness, Neil Young makes the case that it's washed-up old guys in general who are totally losing their minds over the unvaxxed.

    Replies: @Ripple Earthdevil, @Carol, @3g4me

    They’re happy to commit genocide against their fellow tribesmen, as Israel has one of the highest vaccination rates on the planet and as such is also a leading indicator that the injections are a complete flop.

  63. @JohnnyWalker123
    In 2020/21, youth crime declined significantly in England and Wales. See below.

    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1050107/Youth_Justice_Statistics_2020-21.pdf


    The number of children who received a caution or sentence has fallen
    by 17% in the last year with an 82% decrease over the last ten years.
     

    The number of first time entrants has fallen by 20% since the previous
    year, with an 81% fall from the year ending March 2011.

     


    The reoffending rate decreased by 3.6 percentage points in the last
    year and 4.1 percentage points from the year ending March 2010. This
    was the sixth consecutive year on year fall.

     

    Charts. As you can see below, an increasing proportion of youth arrests involve non-Whites (disproportionately Blacks).

    https://imgur.com/a/YUfjPe6

    https://imgur.com/a/ODpqdqY

    -Roughly 350,000 British youths were arrested in 2006/07. The number of arrests for 2020/21 was approximately 50,000. This implies a British youths were arrested ~7x more often 14 years ago (2006/07 vs 2020/21).
    -15,800 children were cautioned or sentenced in 2020/21. This compares to over 130,000 youth cautions & sentences in 2006/07.
    -There were 8,800 first-time entrants to the youth justice system. In 2006/07, the figure was over 110,000 first-time entrants.

    I was curious whether the above trends were a result of less youth misbehavior or a less punitive criminal justice system. Here's an answer.

    https://imgur.com/a/XUYfyV7

    As you can see in the above chart, the average custodial sentencing length has INCREASED over the last decade. So despite INCREASING harshness, fewer British youths are making their way into the system.

    The national incarceration rate (for all ages) was 138 (per 100,000 inhabitants) in 2020. In 2006, the rate was 145 per 100,000 inhabitants. So only a 5% decline. See below links.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/1022592/incarceration-rate-in-uk/

    https://www.prisonstudies.org/country/united-kingdom-england-wales

    Therefore, we can assume that the British criminal justice system hasn't become significantly less punitive in recent years. The system has either remained the same (as indicated by national the incarceration rate remaining nearly constant since 2006) or become more punitive (as measured by the average custodial sentencing length increasing notably in the last decade).

    So we can conclude that British youths are now committing criminal offences at a drastically lower rate than they were back in 2006. Which is fascinating.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mr. Peabody, @3g4me, @Bill Jones

    I’ve heard Brits wonder why kids these days aren’t getting as drunk as they did in the 1990s.

    • Replies: @Excal
    @Steve Sailer

    In the 90s, it felt like some grownups somewhere were ultimately in charge and taking care of things, even if some of the more public ones were doing it poorly (Major, Clinton). Today, it feels like whoever's in charge is in advanced mental decline, doing things which make no sense.

    Perhaps some of the yoof sense that they're essentially on their own now, or at least will be quite soon, and are staying away from the sauce a bit. It's amazing how quickly you can sober up when you really have to.

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Steve Sailer

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/09/world/europe/britain-youth-drinking-alcohol.html


    Britain’s ‘New Puritans’: Youth Drinking Falls Dramatically

     


    When Xenia Clegg Littler and her friends were underage, their idea of fun was shopping, walking in parks and eating ice cream, not doing shots or chugging beer. She never had a drink until she was 18, the legal age in Britain and now, at 19, she has as little interest in alcohol as ever.

    “I’d rather wake up in the morning and get on with my day and achieve what I want to achieve than wake up with a massive hangover,” said Ms. Clegg Littler, an actress from West London. “I need to have control over where I am, and what I do.”

    Teenage and young adult drinking has fallen drastically in recent years all across Europe, and nowhere as much as in Britain. In less than a generation, British teenagers have gone from being among the biggest underage imbibers anywhere in Europe to being about average.

    There are competing ideas about what is driving the trend, but it has been documented in multiple studies, including one released in late September, based on surveys conducted every four years for the World Health Organization in more than 30 countries.

    In 2002, according to the W.H.O. study, about 26 percent of European 15-year-olds drank alcohol at least once a week, but by 2014, that had dropped to 13 percent. The surveys measured England, Scotland and Wales separately, but their results were similar, and taken together, the share of 15-year-olds who were regular drinkers there fell from about 46 percent to about 10 percent.

    A report from the University of Sheffield, based on a different set of surveys and also released recently, found similarly striking results among minors and young adults in England. In 2002, 25 percent of people aged 8 to 12 said they had tried alcohol, but in 2016, just 4 percent had. In 2001, it found, only 12 percent of English 16- and 17-year-olds considered themselves non-drinkers; in 2016, that was up to 35 percent.

    Binge drinking and drunkenness by young people have also declined, in Britain and across Europe, but not as steeply as regular or occasional drinking. (Youth drinking has also declined significantly in the United States — where underage binge drinking has taken center stage in Supreme Court confirmation hearings — but it has long been less prevalent than in Europe, and has not dropped as sharply.)

    The theories about why young Britons drink less than their predecessors are intriguing but unproven, said James Nicholls, the director of research and policy development at Alcohol Research UK, a nonprofit group. But he suggested that the spread of social media is one factor.

    “Alcohol doesn’t play as important a role in socializing as it did in the past,” Mr. Nicholls said. “Young people can now have an active social life without leaving their house.”

    Social media has made users more image-conscious, he noted, while also providing lasting documentation, in text and images, of behavior people might prefer to forget.

    “There’s a trend of greater sense of health consciousness among young people,” Mr. Nicholls added. “There’s a move away from alcohol and drugs, there’s less of a culture of intoxication.”

    Under government pressure and the threat of losing their licenses, British pubs, once known for being lax about underage drinking, have grown much more vigilant over the last generation about demanding identification from young patrons. The Sheffield study looked at where underage drinkers were when they had tried to get alcohol, and the source that declined the most, by far, was pubs.

    Alex Boote, 19, a student at University College of London who grew up in Cornwall, said he drank primarily at parties before turning 18, but even then, he said, it was only an occasional thing.

    “I think that at that age the idea is that you drink to get drunk,” he said. “And I do think it’s still definitely considered cool when you’re young — smoking is what has become a lot less cool than it used to be.”

    But he supported the theory that social media has helped drive adolescent alcohol consumption downward, “because it gives people more ways to impress others than getting drunk at parties.”

    Alcohol has become more expensive in Britain over the last decade, driven in part by higher taxes, which may help dissuade young drinkers. Some young people guessed a reason for the decline is that their peers have become more likely to resort to drugs like marijuana and ecstasy, which are often more accessible to minors than alcohol.

    “I suppose it was a combination of it being more cool and more enjoyable,” said James Samouel, a 19-year-old history student who grew up in south London, referring to marijuana use by peers. “A health thing as well — alcohol is so much worse for you.”

    But in fact, surveys show that drug use, while still common, has also become less prevalent among young people.

    “It doesn’t seem that people are switching from drinking to drugs,” said Dr. Melissa Oldham, the lead author of the Sheffield University report. “It’s a move away from alcohol and drugs to other hobbies.”

    Mr. Nicholls pointed to another possible explanation for young people turning away from alcohol. Their parents grew up in an era when youth drinking was more common and may still be regular drinkers.

    “If it’s what your parents did,” he said, “it’s not cool.”
     

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    , @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer


    I’ve heard Brits wonder why kids these days aren’t getting as drunk as they did in the 1990s.
     
    Greater proportion of Muslims?
  64. @Longstreet
    @frankie p

    In Steve's defense, he wrote that article 20 years ago. I'm sure he regrets not predicting Spotify too

    Replies: @frankie p

    I’m not talking about the ancient American Conservative article. I’m talking about this blog post, framed as Neil Young vs. Joe Rogan when it is actually Neil Young vs. Spotify.

  65. @Muggles
    @frankie p


    This most recent kerfuffle that Steve so terribly misrepresents as being a beef between Neil Young and Joe Rogan is the last straw. Steve, this is a beef between Neil Young and Spotify. The fact that I cannot find the name Spotify anywhere in your article reflects badly on you as a writer and analyst.
     
    Your comment here (above) reflects badly on you as a writer and analyst. Who didn't bother to read the line at the beginning of iSteve's article on Young's bio Shakey that first appeared in the American Conservative in 2002.

    Spotify didn't exist in 2002, just so you get my point.

    As to your other remark about "not being about Joe Rogan" that's misleading. It was Spotify's hosting of the Rogan podcast (paid for dearly by Spotify) that is the "beef." Young, the former "rebel hippie" is now just another dumb Woke COVID fear monger, bullying a vendor of music streams and podcasts.

    Young objects to having his precious music being sold along side of a streamed very popular podcaster who has a different opinion. So rather dim bulb Young is just another would be fascist style bully (or more contemporary, Red Guard style commie bully.)

    When you demand that others "shut up" and disappear, that is worse than simply being in disagreement. That is Woke fascism.

    Of course senile Young, the would be Canadian virtue signaler, is merely shooting himself in the foot. "Don't sell my product in the same online store as Joe Rogan!"

    Yes, Neil, why not spread your boycott around. So no one with WrongThink is tempted to buy your product. That will teach us!

    Replies: @frankie p

    I’m not talking about the ancient American Conservative article. I’m talking about this blog post, framed as Neil Young vs. Joe Rogan when it is actually Neil Young vs. Spotify.

    • Disagree: bomag
    • Replies: @Muggles
    @frankie p

    Goodness knows we all should know "what you were talking about" since only the very first part of the blog post even mentioned Joe Rogan or Spotify.

    Since Young's beef is about Spotify hosting Joe Rogan, your response seems insincere. Prior to some recent Rogan show on Spotify, Young had no issue with Spotify at all selling his tunes.

    As to the stupidity of Young launching a consumer boycott of his own products, you remain silent.

  66. @Rosie
    @Steve Sailer

    I don't know how much involvement he had in the composition, but this is one of the greatest songs of that era IMO.

    https://youtu.be/Bw9gLjEGJrw

    Replies: @frankie p, @I, Libertine

    Neil Young has no input into the composition of that tune.

  67. @Anonymous
    Funny Donald Trump story on his ex-newfriend Neil Young…

    https://youtu.be/Wtbovof8FaI

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    Whatever else you say about him, Trump is quite the raconteur. If he doesn’t run in ’24 he should tour as a stand up act. (Or maybe he’ll do both).

  68. @usNthem
    My sister used to play that damn harvest moon album constantly - I frikin hated it then and now. However, Like A Hurricane is one of the old sack’s songs I do happen to like. Who gives a crap what that Canadian dickhead thinks about anything?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @TorontoTraveller

    Well, that gets to the gist of it, UsNThem. There’s no reason any musical artist, other artist, or actor or actress should have any particular wisdom or insight that would make it worth listening to him when he spouts out his political views. It’s understandable if you’ve already paid good money for the show. That’s when the whole “shut up and sing!” advice is warranted.

    As much as I liked that review, I really couldn’t care less what any musician, artist, or actor/actress does in his personal life either. That is, not any more than any other random interesting character. This explains why I’ve never bought a People Magazine copy or written about these people on my blog.

    • Agree: usNthem
  69. “Yet, Young (who is still a Canadian citizen but views himself as an American) ”

    Is that like Rachel Dolezal? What are his preferred pronouns?

  70. @Daniel H
    Young bought that ranch around 1970 or so. He had had a few decent selling albums by that time, and decent airplay for a few songs but can such bring in THAT much money to afford a huge ranch just 40 miles from San Francisco, in the uplands of Silicon Valley, or was rural northern California land unusually cheap at that time?

    Artists notoriously get ripped off on their first record deal. If Young's records sold, say, about 400K units by 1970 I can imagine him earning a few ten cents for each record sold. It's not that much money. And touring could leave you broke. Jimmy Page broke up the Yardbirds in 1968 partly due to the fact that after a very successful American tour they all OWED money. In 1976 after touring for 18 months the Allman Brothers each took home a payday of 20K.

    Trying to wrap my head about how much a successful and well managed rock and roller could earn at that time. Grateful Dead out of necessity bunking together, living off 300/week, some performers driven to suicide by desperation despite selling millions of recofds (Badfinger). My guess is that Young took in about 50K per year 69-70. I base this on the fact that when Brian Jones parted with the Stones the previous year they offered him a settlement of 20K Sterling for the indefinite future, and the Stones had to be a much more lucrative outfit than Neil Young, so I imagine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @Hapalong Cassidy, @James J O'Meara, @Eric Novak

    “Jimmy Page broke up the Yardbirds in 1968 partly due to the fact that after a very successful American tour they all OWED money.”

    And boy did he learn his lesson. After he formed Zeppelin he hired a heavy hitting gangster-like band manager who managed to negotiate something like a 90-10 split on gross revenue with the concert venues. As a result they were likely the richest band to that point in history.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    I'm guessing that rockers tended to get richer off their second band than their first one. Everybody in CSN&Y had been in a band with at least one hit record before, so they probably did well for themselves.

    , @Brutusale
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    If you're going to deal with a Bill Graham, you'd better have a Peter Grant.

    , @Joe S.Walker
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    The Yardbirds were managed by Mickie Most, an old-school rip-off artist who had the additional disadvantage of thinking there was no point whatever in spending time or money on the recording of albums. They might have done better in America if their last couple of albums hadn't been, respectively, a rag-bag of demos and first takes and an incompetently-recorded live album. I'm surprised Page didn't place an Aleister Crowley-inspired curse on him.

    , @Seekers
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    Yes, Peter Grant was a heavy in both senses of the word.

  71. Steve, I really did like this review. That description of Tom Petty at the beginning was great! Regarding After the Goldrush, I never can connect that title with the song. You are right that with a good tune, it doesn’t matter what the lyrics are. It doesn’t work the other way.

    As for Neil’s voice, well, I just get used to stuff. There are probably many would-be Rush fans that turned the band’s music off due to Geddy Lee’s vocals, but after a while it’s all fine. I’m not up for hearing a crooner all the time. If I want a great male voice in a song, my go-to guy is the late Gerry Rafferty. He overlaid lots of vocals on top of one another, but he had the smoothest, best voice in pop music, IMO.

    Try this one:

    As usual, the album artwork was by Gerry’s friend Patrick Byrne.

  72. Ronnie Van Zant, Lynyrd Skynyrd’s front man channeled the working man in flyover country far ahead of trumpism. He responded to Neil Young’s “Southern Man” with “Sweet Home Alabama”

    Well I heard Mister Young sing about her
    Well I heard ol’ Neil put her down
    Well I hope Neil Young will remember
    A southern man don’t need him around anyhow

    However Van Zant frequently wore a Neil Young t-shirt when performing.

    In the current environment, this concert would be cancelled for the obvious reasons. But what a joy it was to folks lucky enough to have gone

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @George Taylor

    I loved hearing that one back in the day, George. Southern Man indeed has just plain ignorant lyrics, just as bad as Cortez the Killer* did, but they hit closer to home in time and place. Both songs have long great guitar solos, so I just ignore the lyrics. What the heck did a young Neil Young know really know about the antebellum South or the time of the Conquistadors?

    However, I think Skynyrd forgave him and vice versa. I do wonder whether the line "and my name is on the line. How could people get so unkind?" from the song Human Highway off of Comes a Time is about this little feud.

    BTW, Neil's song Alabama Song would have pissed off many Southerners too, had they heard it. Again, the lyrics were stupid.


    .


    * See "A Visual Fisking of Cortez the Killer".

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @YetAnotherAnon

  73. A few years later, though, Bob Dylan introduced the pop music version of the auteur theory, the assumption that the do-it-all singer-composer-lyricist-guitarist inevitably created more emotionally authentic music than specialists who each did one thing extremely well. Young’s broad but not infinitely deep set of talents was perfectly suited to make him Dylan’s most prominent disciple.

    The funny thing is Dylan seems to be the opposite of Young in a lot of ways: an introvert rather than an extrovert, someone who’s ok with not being the dominant personality in a room, who tends to enjoy working with musicians more technically gifted than himself, not a hardball negotiator. Dylan’s earliest memories of having bands in Minnesota were of perpetually losing them to more forceful personalities, leading him to launch himself as a solo star instead. And a list of guitarists he’s worked with on some of his best projects would look like this: Mike Bloomfield, Robbie Robertson, Eric Clapton (on “Desire”), Mark Knopfler, Daniel Lanois (also as producer), G.E. Smith, Charlie Sexton. He writes in his autobiography about wishing he’d invited Mick Jones of the Clash to record with him while he was in his heyday as an experimental guitarist and producer.

    My impression is that Dylan’s best 60s and 70s records just sort of came together spontaneously but that he lost interest in the recording process in the 80s and 90s, tending to defer to his producers like the Was brothers (e.g. the overproduced “Under the Red Sky” in 1990 contains cameos by the likes of Slash and Elton John). Similarly the way he tells it he ended up in the Traveling Wilburys out of a surfeit of politeness towards George Harrison.

    Eventually after a heart scare in 1997 he decided to get serious about making records again, brought back Lanois whom he’d clashed with making a decent record in 1989, and taught himself to produce them himself, while aging into the role of the live bandleader who knows what he wants too.

    [MORE]

    Seinfeld writer Larry Charles tells a good story about Dylan’s lack of appetite for confrontation: going into a TV studio meeting in the late 90s Dylan takes offence at a studio exec’s comment about Woodstock and turns his chair away from the table to face out the window, not participating any more until the meeting ends. A female executive mouths to Charles “he’s like a retarded child!”. Pretty different from the 21-year-old Young’s assertiveness.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @S Johnson

    Sounds like Dylan prefers to mostly live inside his own head, which, in his case, is pretty reasonable since he's got an impressively original and interesting brain.

    Replies: @S Johnson

  74. @Daniel H
    Young bought that ranch around 1970 or so. He had had a few decent selling albums by that time, and decent airplay for a few songs but can such bring in THAT much money to afford a huge ranch just 40 miles from San Francisco, in the uplands of Silicon Valley, or was rural northern California land unusually cheap at that time?

    Artists notoriously get ripped off on their first record deal. If Young's records sold, say, about 400K units by 1970 I can imagine him earning a few ten cents for each record sold. It's not that much money. And touring could leave you broke. Jimmy Page broke up the Yardbirds in 1968 partly due to the fact that after a very successful American tour they all OWED money. In 1976 after touring for 18 months the Allman Brothers each took home a payday of 20K.

    Trying to wrap my head about how much a successful and well managed rock and roller could earn at that time. Grateful Dead out of necessity bunking together, living off 300/week, some performers driven to suicide by desperation despite selling millions of recofds (Badfinger). My guess is that Young took in about 50K per year 69-70. I base this on the fact that when Brian Jones parted with the Stones the previous year they offered him a settlement of 20K Sterling for the indefinite future, and the Stones had to be a much more lucrative outfit than Neil Young, so I imagine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @Hapalong Cassidy, @James J O'Meara, @Eric Novak

    Well, all that CIA funding helped.

    https://centerforaninformedamerica.com/laurelcanyon/

    http://www.conspirazzi.com/e-books/inside-the-lc.pdf

    Fun Fact: Danny Whitten, a guitarist/vocalist/songwriter with Crazy Horse, died of an overdose on November 18, 1972, after being fired by Young earlier that day during rehearsals in San Francisco. Young and Jack Nietzsche, Phil Spector’s former top assistant, had given Whitten \$50 and a plane ticket to LA.

  75. @vinteuil
    More seriously - Joe Rogan has shown himself, lately, to be every bit as good a noticer as Steve Sailer.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @KevinB

    Not really. Rogan notices what he wants to notice and anything outside of that desire is ignored or rationalized away. I suspect he has a nose for ratings, and what may or may not be acceptable to his audience.

    Here’s Joe with Eric Weinstein on IQ differences between racial groups. Note how Joe is visibly irritated by the notion that low average Black G has anything to do with world wide Black dysfunction. I suspect his displeasure is less virtue signaling and more an innate desire to protect the “little people,” — most likely because he has some inherent brutal instincts. But who knows:

    Joe with evolutionary scientist Bret Weinstein on the true reason why Blacks are impoverished.

    The entire Bret Weinstein interview at the below link. It’s interesting to watch all the way through as it displays how thoughtful “Progressives”, like Joe and Brett, are unable to accommodate reality, all the while discussing why accommodating reality is an absolute necessity in contemporary discussions — discussions that are increasingly bound by radical left wing proscription. Bret was apparently subjected to some good ole fashioned Maoist struggle, and that forced him to do a re-think on some of his positions:

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @KevinB


    low average Black G
     
    Capitalizing black is bad enough. Let's not capitalize g.

    Well, okay, in titles, and at the beginning of a sentence:

    What Is General Intelligence (G Factor)?
    , @Kronos
    @KevinB

    I love how the first video still has Bret crossed-eyed.

    But to be fair, there was once a time when the white-black crime rate was much closer to par. But as chronicled in these two superb books things really started to go to shit for the black community in the 1950s.

    https://www.basicbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/9780465065882.jpg?fit=1724%2C2600

    https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1392432154l/20811537.jpg

    That the typical low IQ of blacks combined with the glamorization of mafia life/WASP decadent sexual norms really was a culturally lethal combo. So much so that it’s a very popular meme topic.

    https://i.redd.it/d4juyycc1l941.jpg

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @KevinB

    Acknowledging racial differences in average intelligence is something no one with any kind of public platform is willing to do. Joe Rogan, Scott Adams, Ann Coulter, Tucker Carlson--none of them will do it. Even the late, great radio host Bob Grant, who would go where most men fear to tread, would never go quite that far. I don't know about Rogan, but I'm pretty sure the others understand the issue but know better than to talk about it. Look what happens to anyone who does.

    Adams once discussed an idea that I found revealing of his perspective--that there's knowledge that is not useful knowledge, in that there's nothing useful you can do with it. I think he feels that if we were to accept the reality of lower average black intelligence, then what? So instead he blames blacks' poor academic performance on the teachers' unions for denying school choice. That's bullshit and Adams must know that, but it's useful. Teachers' unions, being such a powerful element of the progressive coalition, are worth attacking for that reason alone.

    How we can survive continuing to deny the obvious truth of group differences? I don't know. It seems it will be the death of us. At the same time, I can't condemn public figures for not wanting to be banished from the public arena. We all remember Stefan Molyneux.

  76. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    "Or are you making a distinction between your first purchased LP and your first purchased 45 single?"

    Yes. I started buying singles first, then albums some months later.

    To be technical, "Cinnamon Girl" was the first single I bought new at a record store. I had previously bought a couple of singles used at a thrift shop: a Sly and the Family Stone single ("Everyday People"?) and "Hey Jude"/"Revolution."

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @TorontoTraveller

    Mom had a copy of the Beatles’ 1968 single “Hey Jude/Revolution” it was the first single released under their independent label Apple. It was a cool single, because the A side showed a Granny Smith Apple on the actual single where the writing appears, while the B side showed the apple cut in half.

    Pretty cool visual design on a 45 for 1968.

  77. @Rosie
    @Steve Sailer

    I don't know how much involvement he had in the composition, but this is one of the greatest songs of that era IMO.

    https://youtu.be/Bw9gLjEGJrw

    Replies: @frankie p, @I, Libertine

    That was was Crosby Stills and Nash, not CSN &Y. Two different bands, actually. Neil would have had nothing to do with that song. But it is a great tune.

    • Replies: @G. Poulin
    @I, Libertine

    Two different bands is right. Was never a big fan of either band, but always thought that the boys made better music without Neil Young's whiny ass dragging everything down.

  78. @Kratoklastes
    Neil 'Karen' Young did the same thing as an insecure 15-year-old who sees his girlfriend talking to a another guy: "It's him or me".

    Had about the same outcome: Spotify told him to pound sand, and he bitched out and backed down like a low-T NPC.

    Schwabian media doesn't like it when some upstart has a larger audience than their favoured corporations.

    The WEF didn't spend four decades grooming a clique of narcissistic sociopaths and infiltrating them into global power structures, to have a comedian turn it all to shit.

    OT: Guess what? "Major politicians are, by and large, put in place by a set of conspiracies that are global in scope" has to get moved out of the "conspiracy theory" bucket and into the "Known known" bucket.

    Schwab's latest interview is another "open conspiracy" reveal: Ardern, Trudeau, and Macron join the list of 'Young Global Leaders' alumni along with Blair, Merkel, Sarkozy, Boris, Orban, Buttegeig, Sarkozy and BlackRock's Fink.

    The thing that identifies all of these people, is that by and large they have unremarkable CVs prior to their elevation to power (of all of the abovenamed, only Boris was a reasonably exceptional student).

    Having been selected for WEF's YGL program is the most relevant thing to their subsequent ascent (many of them were unremarkable as students, too - so they're not being selected for cognitive 'grunt').

    It's somewhat like the Rhodes Scholarship (which is unabashedly an Anglo-supremacist movement" read its charter) - with few exceptions, Rhodes Scholars were never actually top-flight students: there was an ideological filter that was performed well before the kiddie was ever put forward.

    The Rhodes has 'pivoted' in the last decade or so, and is in its death throes as a group of global influence - in the same way that Masonic and Jesuit/OpusDei preferment networks faded into irrelevance.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @ScarletNumber

    “The thing that identifies all of these people, is that by and large they have unremarkable CVs prior to their elevation to power (of all of the abovenamed, only Boris was a reasonably exceptional student).”

    The same could be said of the “genius” musicians of Laurel Canyon, like Young and everyone else who just coincidentally moved to the same block in LA and all came from military intell. families.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @James J O'Meara

    Neil Young's father was in military intelligence while writing dozens of books about hockey in Canada? What a man!

    And like I say, the Cold War was very well-funded so lots of people have family connections. E.g., my mother's best friend's husband was the chief designer of the SR-71 for the CIA. But for some reason, the CIA never gave me my official CIA electric guitar.

    Also, Laurel Canyon isn't a block, it's a few square miles of the Hollywood Hills above the music clubs on the Sunset Strip.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @profnasty, @Mike Tre

    , @J.Ross
    @James J O'Meara

    Zappa's dad wasn't intel, he was chemwar. He tried in his spare time but never completed a history of Sicily (which isn't too bad of a failure as Sicily has an extremely long and complex history).

  79. @AnotherDad
    Could not care less what Neil Young thinks, but I'm a huge supporter of vaccines as well--one of the very best inventions of man. (Lots of people today have no idea how casually lethal the "before time" was.)

    But censoring debate is one of the worst inventions of man.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @jsm, @Kronos, @Mr. Anon, @JR Ewing, @anonymous coward, @Anon

    Some vaccines are truly miraculous. I would absolutely, in a heartbeat, say yes to a rabies vaccine — if I got bit by a skunk that could not be caught and examined.

    Cuz rabies will kill you dead and the vax is Life-saving.

    But not ALL vaccines are so clearcut. As will all medical interventions, there are side effects for some people; some of which make the risk of the vax outweigh the benefit in certain individual cases. And then there are some vax makers that have ridden the coattails of the lifesaving vaccines’ positive publicity to shyster the populace.

    For instance: Chicken Pox vax. CDC recommends and most pediatricians administer. But not because chicken pox is deadly — or even particularly likely to result in serious comorbidities. (Reye’s disease is rare.) The actual reason? Because chicken pox keeps kids out of school for a week and that is **inconvenient** for working parents. Meanwhile, it’s becoming apparent that all these vaxed kids are causing an increase in shingles in their elders, since Grampa’s no longer getting his natural immunity boost from being exposed to grandkid’s chickenpox.

    Also, why is HepB given to infants who don’t have foreseeable need for transfusion, born of healthy HepB negative mothers, at birth? Stated reason: Cuz it’s convenient; the parents might not bring them back before they become potentially sexually-active adolescents. “Jab em while we got em.”

    Truth is, the large majority of recently developed vax’s are not about stopping deathly diseases. Yet, CDC never hesitates to add them to the schedule. Why? Because CDC has been regulatorily captured by Big Pharma, to whom more vax’s means the more profit. And, to pro-vaxers, they’re objects of religious devotion, never, at any time, their efficacy and necessity to be questioned, at all, ever, regardless of the state of health of the recipient. These people come unhinged at even the merest suggestion that maybe *this* particular injection in *that* particular person, might be unwise.

    Yep, objects of religious devotion, not a lot different from the Shroud of Turin.

  80. Anon[893] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    I am not a particular fan of Tom Petty's music, but I can at least listen to it without changing to another radio station. As a person, I have more respect for Tom Petty than Neil Young. Neil Young is 10 times as goofy as Petty, and has produced a career of almost complete and utter tunelessness. Yes, Cinnamon Girl isn't bad, but it's the only thing he ever created that wasn't bad.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon, @TorontoTraveller, @Stirge, @anon

    I’m not a fan of Neil Young, either, but one song he wrote, “Helpless”, I really like. He performed it for the “The Last Waltz” concert ( ca. 1978) which was also filmed. Great movie, lots of big names of the era, and snippets of young Martin Scorsese interviewing members of “The Band” from whom they related great tales of minor league rock ‘n’ roll band on the road, I.e. story of Ronnie Hawkins talking them into becoming his back-up band…”You’ll get more pussy than Frank Sinatra”.

  81. @Cato
    @Reg Cæsar

    I'm a Boomer, but this kind of tune was detested by young people already well before 1970. In the city I grew up in, In-a-gadda-da-vida's appearance on AM radio seemed to mark the transition from bouncy, swinging, clean-cut music to a darker music that stirred the soul but didn't invite dancing.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    In the mostly Italian neighborhood in which we owned a house, I kidded my best friend (who loved the song) that it was about a teen on our block–“In the Garbage of Vito”. Actually, the song’s lyrics were In the Garden of Eden…, but the singer was recovering from the night before.

    Michael Medved once did a column on how 1969 was a lot squarer than people remember. Heck, Rowe’s own “Dizzy” topped the charts for weeks that year.

    • Replies: @Cato
    @Reg Cæsar

    Yeah, the song fell out of fashion very quickly -- probably because it was on AM radio (FM was new and cool then, AM was fading). Nevertheless, among my friends, it seemed that taste in music shifted at that time, and it shifted in the direction that Iron Butterfly pointed. But we were high school students, getting high every day, and might not have been typical.

  82. @NorthOfTheOneOhOne
    @Daniel H


    My guess is that Young took in about 50K per year 69-70.
     
    US median income for 1970 was $9,870.00, up from $9,400.00 in 1969, I'd bet the only other people making $50K/year in 1970 were running corporations like Dow, DuPont, and GE.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    To give an idea of pop culture context, in 1970 singer Dean Martin signed or was in the midst of a multi year contract for his TV show, worth in 197o dollars (not adjusted for inflation, but real dollars) 35 million. In other words in 1970, Dean Martin earned about 11 million dollars per year for his highly popular TV show. Add to the fact that he was also a movie star, made albums (and singles), performed live in Vegas, as well as being one of the largest private owners of RCA Victor stock, and his income probably was closer to 12-13 million per yr in late ’60’s early 1970’s. In the words of HOF NY M Casey Stengel, that’s simply Amazin’.

    No one in the NFL, the NBA, or in MLB earned anywhere close to 1 million per yr in 1970, and Dean earned over 10 million dollars, which would be comparable to around 35 million per yr today. Muhammad Ali probably didn’t earn 10 million dollars in 1970. The only other entertainer in front of the camera who would come close to Dean Martin’s earning power was probably Bob Hope.

    Both Hope and Martin were excellent golfers, by the way.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    I read that Dean Martin earned $15 million in 1968.

    Replies: @William Badwhite

  83. @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Daniel H

    “Jimmy Page broke up the Yardbirds in 1968 partly due to the fact that after a very successful American tour they all OWED money.”

    And boy did he learn his lesson. After he formed Zeppelin he hired a heavy hitting gangster-like band manager who managed to negotiate something like a 90-10 split on gross revenue with the concert venues. As a result they were likely the richest band to that point in history.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Brutusale, @Joe S.Walker, @Seekers

    I’m guessing that rockers tended to get richer off their second band than their first one. Everybody in CSN&Y had been in a band with at least one hit record before, so they probably did well for themselves.

  84. @AnotherDad
    Could not care less what Neil Young thinks, but I'm a huge supporter of vaccines as well--one of the very best inventions of man. (Lots of people today have no idea how casually lethal the "before time" was.)

    But censoring debate is one of the worst inventions of man.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @jsm, @Kronos, @Mr. Anon, @JR Ewing, @anonymous coward, @Anon

    Not to mention Orwellian word games. Of course the CDC changed the definition of vaccination during the pandemic. These mRNA “vaccines” are really gene therapeutics.

    https://www.citizensjournal.us/the-cdc-suddenly-changes-the-definition-of-vaccine-and-vaccination/

  85. Some say that Neil’s problem is that he’s a “boomer.”

    That’s not it.

    The problem is that he’s a canadian.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  86. @vinteuil
    @Dieter Kief


    I can’t wholly agree
     
    DK - in English, the best way to put that is "up to a point, Lord Copper."

    Not sure why you want to talk about Jordan Peterson.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @Dieter Kief

    DK – in English, the best way to put that is “up to a point, Lord Copper.”

    Nice reference. Kudos to you, sir.

  87. Neil Young’s success can be tied to one specific guitar: “Old Black,” a 1953 Gold Top Les Paul he’s been playing since 1969.

    https://www.guitarlobby.com/neil-young-guitars-and-gear/

    That guitar has made him a lot of money.

  88. @KevinB
    @vinteuil

    Not really. Rogan notices what he wants to notice and anything outside of that desire is ignored or rationalized away. I suspect he has a nose for ratings, and what may or may not be acceptable to his audience.

    Here's Joe with Eric Weinstein on IQ differences between racial groups. Note how Joe is visibly irritated by the notion that low average Black G has anything to do with world wide Black dysfunction. I suspect his displeasure is less virtue signaling and more an innate desire to protect the "little people," -- most likely because he has some inherent brutal instincts. But who knows:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcr5tkN02eg


    Joe with evolutionary scientist Bret Weinstein on the true reason why Blacks are impoverished.

    https://youtu.be/NR7gDJGFW5A?t=900

    The entire Bret Weinstein interview at the below link. It's interesting to watch all the way through as it displays how thoughtful "Progressives", like Joe and Brett, are unable to accommodate reality, all the while discussing why accommodating reality is an absolute necessity in contemporary discussions --- discussions that are increasingly bound by radical left wing proscription. Bret was apparently subjected to some good ole fashioned Maoist struggle, and that forced him to do a re-think on some of his positions:

    https://youtu.be/pRCzZp1J0v0

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Kronos, @Harry Baldwin

    low average Black G

    Capitalizing black is bad enough. Let’s not capitalize g.

    Well, okay, in titles, and at the beginning of a sentence:

    What Is General Intelligence (G Factor)?

  89. @Anonymous
    I don’t agree with Neil, but c'mon! It’s Neil Young! He’s a fucking artist! It’s his JOB to blow people's minds, not to think things through! He’s blown my mind enough through the years to go gentle on him while he acts like an ass.

    Jordan Peterson is an intellectual. He’s not an artist. You gonna cancel him because he can’t play a guitar or sing worth a shit?

    Neil even blew Paul McCartney's mind not that long ago. Imagine being able to take McCartney out of his comfort zone? That ain’t so easy. Neil did it!

    Leave Neil alone, you assholes!

    In fact, I’m not asking you all, I’m TELLING you all to be nice to Neil!! 😠

    https://youtu.be/ZCjWa7ypZMc

    Replies: @tyrone, @loren

    Leave Neil alone, you assholes!

    ……..and don’t forget Brittany!

    • LOL: Spect3r
  90. @James J O'Meara
    @Kratoklastes

    "The thing that identifies all of these people, is that by and large they have unremarkable CVs prior to their elevation to power (of all of the abovenamed, only Boris was a reasonably exceptional student)."

    The same could be said of the "genius" musicians of Laurel Canyon, like Young and everyone else who just coincidentally moved to the same block in LA and all came from military intell. families.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @J.Ross

    Neil Young’s father was in military intelligence while writing dozens of books about hockey in Canada? What a man!

    And like I say, the Cold War was very well-funded so lots of people have family connections. E.g., my mother’s best friend’s husband was the chief designer of the SR-71 for the CIA. But for some reason, the CIA never gave me my official CIA electric guitar.

    Also, Laurel Canyon isn’t a block, it’s a few square miles of the Hollywood Hills above the music clubs on the Sunset Strip.

    • LOL: JMcG
    • Troll: Spect3r
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Steve Sailer

    Laurel Canyon is bigger sure but at one point a wierdly large number of people who would go on to become influential were sharing the same block, and one address in particular. It was like a steroids-enhanced version of when Anthony Burgess and Gore Vidal lived next door and alternated documentary narration jobs, or when Arthur Koestler and several other major authors shared an apartment building floor, or Heinlein and Hubbard renting from Parsons.
    --intel scum can't write books in their spare hours or later career
    Now that's what I call contumely.
    https://postimg.cc/SJxqh5dw
    In fact, are there any intelligence officers who do not go on to become authors?

    , @profnasty
    @Steve Sailer

    Sorry not sorry.
    Military Intel to Sodomy(think D.Geffen); Rock stardom is fraud.
    George Martin's buddies wrote and performed the Beatles songs. Barry McGuire did NOT write Eve of Destruction.
    Recording sessions were often interminable. Zappa's dad made chemical weapons. Zappa was a quirky guitar player who drove his band with a bull whip. And, like MLK, a sex pervert.
    Disclaimer:
    I am a pop music fanatic. Only difference, I know how it's made. Goood sausage!

    , @Mike Tre
    @Steve Sailer

    https://centerforaninformedamerica.com/inside-the-lc-the-strange-but-mostly-true-story-of-laurel-canyon-and-the-birth-of-the-hippie-generation-part-i/

  91. @frankie p
    @Muggles

    I'm not talking about the ancient American Conservative article. I'm talking about this blog post, framed as Neil Young vs. Joe Rogan when it is actually Neil Young vs. Spotify.

    Replies: @Muggles

    Goodness knows we all should know “what you were talking about” since only the very first part of the blog post even mentioned Joe Rogan or Spotify.

    Since Young’s beef is about Spotify hosting Joe Rogan, your response seems insincere. Prior to some recent Rogan show on Spotify, Young had no issue with Spotify at all selling his tunes.

    As to the stupidity of Young launching a consumer boycott of his own products, you remain silent.

  92. @George Taylor
    Ronnie Van Zant, Lynyrd Skynyrd's front man channeled the working man in flyover country far ahead of trumpism. He responded to Neil Young's "Southern Man" with "Sweet Home Alabama"

    Well I heard Mister Young sing about her
    Well I heard ol' Neil put her down
    Well I hope Neil Young will remember
    A southern man don't need him around anyhow
     
    However Van Zant frequently wore a Neil Young t-shirt when performing. https://youtu.be/6GxWmSVv-cY
    In the current environment, this concert would be cancelled for the obvious reasons. But what a joy it was to folks lucky enough to have gone

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I loved hearing that one back in the day, George. Southern Man indeed has just plain ignorant lyrics, just as bad as Cortez the Killer* did, but they hit closer to home in time and place. Both songs have long great guitar solos, so I just ignore the lyrics. What the heck did a young Neil Young know really know about the antebellum South or the time of the Conquistadors?

    However, I think Skynyrd forgave him and vice versa. I do wonder whether the line “and my name is on the line. How could people get so unkind?” from the song Human Highway off of Comes a Time is about this little feud.

    BTW, Neil’s song Alabama Song would have pissed off many Southerners too, had they heard it. Again, the lyrics were stupid.

    .

    * See “A Visual Fisking of Cortez the Killer”.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I think Skynyrd forgave him and vice versa.

    BTW, Neil’s song Alabama Song would have pissed off many Southerners too, had they heard it. Again, the lyrics were stupid.

     

    Mod. these two quotes answer the questions you rise:


    Ronnie Van Zant: “We wrote ‘Alabama’ as a joke. We didn’t even think about it – the words just came out that way. We just laughed like hell, and said ‘Ain’t that funny’. We love Neil Young, we love his music.”

    Ronnie Van Zant sporting a Neil Young shirt. | photo credit: pinterest.com

    Neil Young: “I think “Sweet Home Alabama” is a great song. I’ve actually performed it live a couple of times myself. My own song “Alabama” richly deserved the shot Lynyrd Skynyrd gave me with their great record. I don’t like my words when I listen to it today.”

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    " Southern Man... plain ignorant lyrics... long great guitar solos"

    "In countries where there is only one race," said Churchill, "broad and lofty views are taken of the colour problem."

    The Canada that Neil Young grew up in was pretty white - only ethnic tension to speak of was with the French!

    But it is a great guitar solo. I really like his manic guitar.

    (The first I heard of NY was someone at school putting on "Cinnamon Girl" at lunchtime.)

    PS - Joni Mitchell, another who had polio as a child, has also dropped Spotify.

  93. @KevinB
    @vinteuil

    Not really. Rogan notices what he wants to notice and anything outside of that desire is ignored or rationalized away. I suspect he has a nose for ratings, and what may or may not be acceptable to his audience.

    Here's Joe with Eric Weinstein on IQ differences between racial groups. Note how Joe is visibly irritated by the notion that low average Black G has anything to do with world wide Black dysfunction. I suspect his displeasure is less virtue signaling and more an innate desire to protect the "little people," -- most likely because he has some inherent brutal instincts. But who knows:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcr5tkN02eg


    Joe with evolutionary scientist Bret Weinstein on the true reason why Blacks are impoverished.

    https://youtu.be/NR7gDJGFW5A?t=900

    The entire Bret Weinstein interview at the below link. It's interesting to watch all the way through as it displays how thoughtful "Progressives", like Joe and Brett, are unable to accommodate reality, all the while discussing why accommodating reality is an absolute necessity in contemporary discussions --- discussions that are increasingly bound by radical left wing proscription. Bret was apparently subjected to some good ole fashioned Maoist struggle, and that forced him to do a re-think on some of his positions:

    https://youtu.be/pRCzZp1J0v0

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Kronos, @Harry Baldwin

    I love how the first video still has Bret crossed-eyed.

    But to be fair, there was once a time when the white-black crime rate was much closer to par. But as chronicled in these two superb books things really started to go to shit for the black community in the 1950s.

    https://www.basicbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/9780465065882.jpg?fit=1724%2C2600

    That the typical low IQ of blacks combined with the glamorization of mafia life/WASP decadent sexual norms really was a culturally lethal combo. So much so that it’s a very popular meme topic.

  94. @AnotherDad
    Could not care less what Neil Young thinks, but I'm a huge supporter of vaccines as well--one of the very best inventions of man. (Lots of people today have no idea how casually lethal the "before time" was.)

    But censoring debate is one of the worst inventions of man.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @jsm, @Kronos, @Mr. Anon, @JR Ewing, @anonymous coward, @Anon

    Could not care less what Neil Young thinks, but I’m a huge supporter of vaccines as well–one of the very best inventions of man. (Lots of people today have no idea how casually lethal the “before time” was.)

    Most of that casual lethality was lifted by anti-biotics, personal hygiene, and the provision of clean drinking water and septic sewage systems.

    Vaccines are useful, but their reputation also benefits from a lot of carefully constructed PR. Lots of people today have no idea how vaccines are not necessarily the miracle cures they are made out to be.

  95. So aging hippy rocker is now just shilling for The Man. Maybe he has a lot of Pfeizer stock.

    I’m not a Neil Young fan at all. The only song of his I really like is Harvest Moon, a nostalgic ballad, but I like that one quite a bit.

    As for John Lennon’s idiot song Imagine, the best version for my money is the one by A Perfect Circle:

    The tone of it captures what the lyrics really imply, if you think about them from a conservative (and therefore pessimistic) point of view. It would serve well as the anthem of the World Economic Forum.

    • Agree: Kylie, sayless
    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Mr. Anon

    Sweet! I haven’t heard this album in forever.

    , @Mike Tre
    @Mr. Anon

    Is MJK a conservative? He gives a lot of credence to metaphysics. I certainly don't think he's a glib utopianist like Lennon claimed to be, but as with Jimmy it's not always easy to know exactly where he's coming from with anything.

    (I'm fairly certain the Tool song Vicarious is an anti war song aimed at George W Bush, and the song Tempest is aimed at Trump, but maybe I'm overthinking things.)

  96. Does Young still own his music?

    If he doesn’t, do the owners has cause against him?

    • Agree: VivaLaMigra
    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Goatweed


    Does Young still own his music?

    If he doesn’t, do the owners has cause against him?
     
    The owners of his music have strong ties to Pfizer.

    Ol Neil maybe has a cause against them.
  97. @Reg Cæsar
    @Cato

    In the mostly Italian neighborhood in which we owned a house, I kidded my best friend (who loved the song) that it was about a teen on our block--"In the Garbage of Vito". Actually, the song's lyrics were In the Garden of Eden..., but the singer was recovering from the night before.

    Michael Medved once did a column on how 1969 was a lot squarer than people remember. Heck, Rowe's own "Dizzy" topped the charts for weeks that year.

    Replies: @Cato

    Yeah, the song fell out of fashion very quickly — probably because it was on AM radio (FM was new and cool then, AM was fading). Nevertheless, among my friends, it seemed that taste in music shifted at that time, and it shifted in the direction that Iron Butterfly pointed. But we were high school students, getting high every day, and might not have been typical.

  98. I don’t know who Neil Young or Tom Petty are. I’m happy having it that way.

  99. anon[320] • Disclaimer says:

    First, I can’t really get my head around anyone actually listening to Neil Young on Spotify. And in any discussion of a subject the includes money, it’s always money. Specifically, the money angle must get resolved first. So first, was Young making anything on Spotify?

    He just sold 1/2 of his catalogue for \$150 million. https://www.bbc.com/news/business-55557633

    So it won’t impoverish the guy. As far as “about the money”, It doesn’t much matter.

    I think the US political narrative of the vaccine is idiotic, but it has enormous traction. So if Young buys into it, then why not act out? Seriously, does anyone care?

    As far as Young/Rogan, I think Rogan ‘won’. He showed he has more power, and Young looks weak if that is his best tactic.

  100. Paul Joseph Watson has pointed out the “feud” may be deeper and more sinister than you think.

    50% of Neil’s song catalog is owned by Hipgnosis Songs Fund, which in turn is owned by The Blackstone Group. The Blackstone Group’s CEO is Stephen Schwartzman, a World Economic Forum (WEF) member—and the WEF has called for censorship of “misinformation” against the vaccines. And The Blackstone Group’s senior adviser is Jeffrey Kindler, former Pfizer CEO.

    In other words, a globalist group making bank off vaccines and trying to stop people from questioning the vaccines trotted Neil Young out there to parrot their globalist talking points and then financially punish Spotify by spiting their face.

    It’s not Neil Young v. Joe Rogan, its the World Deep State v. Joe Rogan.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon
    • Thanks: 3g4me
    • Replies: @anon
    @R.G. Camara

    Fine but was Young has already gotten his money. Is he being bribed or threatened?

    As far as drugs/money and corruption, a drug like Humera is bank:


    AbbVie's Humira has increased its revenue from 2011 to 2018, generating 7.9 billion U.S. dollars in 2011, a record high of 19.9 billion U.S. dollars in 2018, and 19.8 billion in 2020. Humira is expected to continue its success in the near future. It is projected to maintain similar high revenues.
     
    I'd believe AbbVie would do virtually anything for Humera.

    Firms like Blackstone aren't betting on outcomes. They own the casino.
  101. @Hypnotoad666
    @Danindc


    Cinnamon Girl and Old Man were very good the rest is forgettable to a novice like me.
     
    I'm not a big Neil Young fan either. But IMHO his best and most interesting is the 9+ minute trippy guitar jam, Down by the River. It's an ode to murdering your girlfriend. So maybe not as PC as Imagine.

    https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=KflCXmEX6BY&feature=share

    Replies: @Rouetheday, @TorontoTraveller

    A couple of weeks back I was dividing my time between surfing the web on my computer and watching YouTube videos through my TV. I came across a music video of “Down By the River”, a song I hadn’t listened to in years. While listening to the song I discovered an article on one of my favorite “Black People Behaving Badly” web sites (as my disapproving sister likes to call them). It was about the Irish woman who had been killed by what was described at the time as a ‘Romanian National’ (is that a PC way of saying “Gypsy’?). She was killed while jogging along a canal towpath. As I’m reading this detail I can hear Neil start to sing the chorus- “Down by the river/ I shot my baby…”.

    That was some spooky shit.

    • Replies: @David Jones
    @Rouetheday

    Ya, except she was beaten to death and they released the Romanian and arrested a Slovak instead.

    , @JMcG
    @Rouetheday

    Aisling Murphy was a beautiful 23 year old Irish teacher, murdered on January 12 by a filthy gypsy. Her murder was all over the papers, vigils were held, Irish parents were admonished about the awful job they’ve done raising their sons, new laws addressing domestic violence were discussed. Then, the Gardaí arrested the filthy gypsy that murdered her. The piece of garbage had gone to the hospital to have the wounds treated that had been inflicted by young Miss Murphy as he murdered her.
    Since then? Crickets.
    His name is Josef Puska. He, his wife and children have been living on the idiotic Irish taxpayers for years.

  102. @Kratoklastes
    Neil 'Karen' Young did the same thing as an insecure 15-year-old who sees his girlfriend talking to a another guy: "It's him or me".

    Had about the same outcome: Spotify told him to pound sand, and he bitched out and backed down like a low-T NPC.

    Schwabian media doesn't like it when some upstart has a larger audience than their favoured corporations.

    The WEF didn't spend four decades grooming a clique of narcissistic sociopaths and infiltrating them into global power structures, to have a comedian turn it all to shit.

    OT: Guess what? "Major politicians are, by and large, put in place by a set of conspiracies that are global in scope" has to get moved out of the "conspiracy theory" bucket and into the "Known known" bucket.

    Schwab's latest interview is another "open conspiracy" reveal: Ardern, Trudeau, and Macron join the list of 'Young Global Leaders' alumni along with Blair, Merkel, Sarkozy, Boris, Orban, Buttegeig, Sarkozy and BlackRock's Fink.

    The thing that identifies all of these people, is that by and large they have unremarkable CVs prior to their elevation to power (of all of the abovenamed, only Boris was a reasonably exceptional student).

    Having been selected for WEF's YGL program is the most relevant thing to their subsequent ascent (many of them were unremarkable as students, too - so they're not being selected for cognitive 'grunt').

    It's somewhat like the Rhodes Scholarship (which is unabashedly an Anglo-supremacist movement" read its charter) - with few exceptions, Rhodes Scholars were never actually top-flight students: there was an ideological filter that was performed well before the kiddie was ever put forward.

    The Rhodes has 'pivoted' in the last decade or so, and is in its death throes as a group of global influence - in the same way that Masonic and Jesuit/OpusDei preferment networks faded into irrelevance.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @ScarletNumber

    “The WEF didn’t spend four decades grooming a clique of narcissistic sociopaths and infiltrating them into global power structures, to have a comedian turn it all to shit.”

    Damn, son! 😃

    Yo Sailer: 300K dead pre vax, 600K dead post vax. Wha happened?¡¿

    • Agree: VivaLaMigra, Old Prude
    • LOL: Kratoklastes
    • Replies: @Travis
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    It is now obvious that the vaccines failed, just as masks failed to stop the spread.
    Israel is currently overrun with cases, ICU admission hit record levels despite 90% fully vaccinated and 80% boosted. Cases in Israel are up 24,725% since they mandated the boosters.

    Vax all you want, but it won’t stop Omicron. Even Pfizer admits the vaccines offer little to no protection against the new variants which is the reason they will have a new vaccine available in March. The FDA recently banned Monoclonal antibodies because they were 'doing nothing' against omicron'. That's why FDA pulled its authorization. In 6 weeks these mandated vaccines will be banned by the FDA because they are not effective against the new variants.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @Old Prude, @Rob

    , @Kratoklastes
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    I haven't heard Rogan say "Damn, son!" for quite a while.

    I've never been able to get away with referring to something as "the shit" in a positive context.

    Whenever I try to use that - e.g., "Eugyppius' substack is the shit" - it gets wildly misinterpreted.

    Pull that shit up, Jamie remains au courant.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  103. I hope Neil Young will remember a southern man don’t need him around anyhow.

  104. Neil really jumped the shark with this. There is no possible way that he could have watched the Rogan-Malone podcast and then claimed that it was misinformation. There is some speculation that the letter and statement were written by wife Hannah (or at very least she pushed hm to do it), but it really isn’t important. Even if he thought the podcast was (imaginary) misinformation, he would still have no call to attempt to censor and ban it. Censorship is un-American, Neil, and you should know that.

    From about 1995 – 1999, I had the good fortune to have a friend who got tickets for Neil’s Annual Bridge School Benefit Concert held at Mountain View’s Shoreline Amphitheater, a hop and skip over from Neil’s ranch just West in the Coastal Mountains. It was held to support the special needs school his son attended, and the background of the stage was always filled by 3 rows of special needs kids on display to us the audience and with a great rear stage view of the performances.

    The only rule was that all performances were acoustic (I believe they allowed the bass guitar to be amplified). And artists volunteered for the cause. Over those 5 years I saw great bands and great performances from the likes of : Lou Reed , Metallica, Blues Traveler, Alanis Morissette, Green Day, Cheryl Crow, REM, Smashing Pumpkins, and several others I can’t remember right now.

    Neil would always MC winding himself into the concert, introducing his wife, Peggy, and sometimes even playing guitar solos with one of the groups. And every year, there was a middle section of just Neil and a piano and a guitar singing his original work

    Which was terrible. Slow, turgid, boring, incoherent. With the exception of one year of those 5 performances where he played a large chunk of a Buffalo Springfield song.

    I have followed Young from Buffalo Springfield days through his solo work, but he stopped making interesting, vital, relevant music decades ago. But he did have that friend-of-the-band thing going for him–embracing Devo and Sonic Youth and others during their time

    In the mid-1990s, friends and I were walking in Golden Gate Park trying to get to the free Pearl Jam concert. We never made it, couldn’t get in, but we found out later that Eddie Vedder had taken sick just before the performance—only to have Neil Young take his place in the band doing all the vocals.

    There’s no positive-type explanation for Young’s actions this week. None. Moreover, it’s completely uncalled for–he doesn’t own the rights to much of his music anyway, he’s wealthy, enjoys prestige among musicians and fans, Furthermore, Rogan is more popular at this point and for good reason. It just makes Neil Young look deluded and small. And goes a long way to destroying his musical legacy.

    Having fuck you money is supposed to give you the freedom to take a principled stand in the name of open dialog,, free speech and free thought. These wealthy, influential artists are instead doing the opposite.

    There is a pox infecting the land.

    • Agree: usNthem
    • Thanks: El Dato, bomag
  105. @Achmed E. Newman
    And another thing:

    If we're going to discuss musical artists and their political views, we really need to talk about Eric Clapton. It's possible Steve or the VDare guys have discussed his long-ago treatise (haha, "treatise" to put it mildly) about race during one of his shows as a young man, along with voicing his support for Enoch Powell specifically on immigration. This was in the mid-1970's, mind you!

    Eric Clapton was way ahead on that issue of even Peter Brimelow (who I assume still lived in England then). Under pressure from the Commies, Eric Clapton folded to a great degree, while Peter Brimelow doesn't. Of course, Peter Brimelow can't play guitar as well as Eric Clapton, as far as I know, and make millions of dollars at it, so ...

    Eric Clapton is in the news again with his anti-Totalitarian PanicFest stance. VDare writer Carl Horowitz has a good article about it, which will be discussed on Peak Stupidity soon - "Is This A Sovereign Nation / Or Just A Police State?" Eric Clapton, COVID, And Immigration.

    Replies: @Escher

    I guess he didn’t include musical ability in his treatise, considering he started his career as (and still is to some extent) a blues man.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Escher

    That's discussed in Mr. Horowitz's article too, Escher.

  106. @Whiskey
    Young was correct, and Petty wrong. The at-the-time resurgence of American Patriotism was a millstone around the neck of any artist who needed the support and prestige of the establishment. All Tom Petty did was write and perform songs that will be remembered for generations. Neil Young meanwhile though he will be forgotten ten minutes after he's dead, received the patronage and support of the ruling class.

    As usual the people matter not at all -- indeed no artist should aim for their support. Rather the elites. Thats why Young had all that money and Petty had to tour constantly.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ben tillman, @VivaLaMigra, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Young wrote 30 songs better than Petty’s best.

    • Disagree: Old Prude
    • LOL: JMcG
    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @Ben tillman

    Nothing in the universe is better than Wild One Forever.

    But I will grant everything Petty sang after Even the Losers pretty much sucks.

    , @ArthurBiggs
    @Ben tillman

    I saw Neil Young do an acoustic (mostly) set back in about 1983 and it was one of the best concerts I've ever been to. I became a huge fan. But lets be honest, Tom Petty was massively more successful with basically the same fan base. It's not even close.

  107. “Neil Young vs. Joe Rogen” is inaccurate. No evidence Joe Rogen knows who Neil Young is—rather Neil Young vs. Spotify. Young demanded Spotify remove Rogen’s show over alleged medical “misinformation”—or else threatened to try to pull his songs. Faced with “him or me” ultimatum, Spotify called Young’s bluff, preemptively obliged Neil’s threats/demands, put to rest quickly removing all of Young’s music—thereby warding off any protracted public feud, minimizing publicity Young was hoping to draw.

    Spotify sent a clear message to Neil how much of a fight they’d put up to keep his content on their platform—lest other activist celebs get ideas of threatening to hold song catalogs hostage to force Spotify to bend to ransom demands. No negotiations with terrorists.

    Humiliating own-goal on a personal level for Neil—but problems compounded by the fact that Neil doesn’t actually fully own his songs. Just last year, on a day that will live in infamy, Neil Young sold 50% of the rights to his music catalog to investors at U.K.-based Hipgnosis Songs Fund (founded by veteran music industry exec CEO Merck Mercuriadis) for \$150 million.

    Investors can’t be happy that revenue from royalties on the catalog of 1,180 Neil Young songs they acquired will fall below expectations since his entire catalog was suddenly removed from the world’s most popular music streaming service—all because ol’ Neil had to run his big mouth desperately trying to virtue signal and appear relevant to younger generations.

    With more than 162.4 million subscribers in 2021, Spotify held 31% of global market share, more than double that of top competitors Apple Music (15%) and Amazon Music (13%). Despite Neil Young’s protestations to the contrary, this was an enormously embarrassing episode—epic self-own.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/business-55557633

    Neil Young sells song rights in ‘\$150m’ deal
    6 January 2021

    An investment firm has bought 50% of the rights to all Neil Young’s songs.

    Hipgnosis Songs Fund spent an estimated \$150m (£110m) on 1,180 songs written by the Canadian folk rocker.

    The fund, which lets people invest in hit songs, has previously splashed out about £1bn snapping up rights to songs from the likes of Mark Ronson, Chic, Barry Manilow and Blondie.

    Founded by music industry veteran Merck Mercuriadis, Hipgnosis turns music royalties into an income stream.

    “This is a deal that changes Hipgnosis forever,” said Mr Mercuriadis.

    “I bought my first Neil Young album aged seven. Harvest was my companion and I know every note, every word, every pause and silence intimately.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Juvenalis

    Joe Rogan is 54. Of course he knows who Neil Young is.

    , @VivaLaMigra
    @Juvenalis

    I'm sure it took Spotify exec's all of five seconds to decide between Option A: Pull JR, to whom we contractually owe $100 million in the Here and Now vs. Option B: Pull Young's catalog which will generate FUTURE, but uncertain, revenues. All the while knowing that the organization which owns a 50% stake in said catalog will SUE Ol' Neil's sagging hippie ass for Tortious Interference, win, and put his financial balls through the wringer, at which point Loser Neil will be BEGGING us to make his mostly-crap material available to anyone who will click on it at a 40% discount.

    , @MEH 0910
    @Juvenalis


    No evidence Joe Rogen knows who Neil Young is
     
    Joe Rogan addresses Neil Young Spotify controversy & Misinformation
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dSqLWrSVWaY

    Joe Rogan has issued a statement about Spotify and Neil Young removing his music off the platform due to claims of misinformation.
    Here’s Joe’s side of the story.
    This is not my video
     
    https://www.instagram.com/tv/CZYQ_nDJi6G/

    joerogan My thoughts on the latest controversy with @spotify

    Edit: I just realized “chuckie’s in love” is Ricky Lee Jones not Joni Mitchell. Doh!
     

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  108. @Anonymous
    I don’t agree with Neil, but c'mon! It’s Neil Young! He’s a fucking artist! It’s his JOB to blow people's minds, not to think things through! He’s blown my mind enough through the years to go gentle on him while he acts like an ass.

    Jordan Peterson is an intellectual. He’s not an artist. You gonna cancel him because he can’t play a guitar or sing worth a shit?

    Neil even blew Paul McCartney's mind not that long ago. Imagine being able to take McCartney out of his comfort zone? That ain’t so easy. Neil did it!

    Leave Neil alone, you assholes!

    In fact, I’m not asking you all, I’m TELLING you all to be nice to Neil!! 😠

    https://youtu.be/ZCjWa7ypZMc

    Replies: @tyrone, @loren

    he sounds good and looks almost dead.

  109. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/nypost/status/1487130128010432518

    Replies: @Ebony Obelisk, @Kronos

    How dare you insult the Scottish gene-stock as cowardly Sean Penn!

    • LOL: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @3g4me
    @Kronos

    @110 Kronos: What would a subcon (JohnnyWalker123) know about manliness?

  110. @J1234
    Neil dumped his wife of close to 40 years for a movie star a few years back. Not long afterwards, his wife was diagnosed with cancer and died. He's in no position to preach to any of us about about anything, yet people like him do exactly...that all the time. That fits into my theory about the current world: Passionate public posturing and social justice from the left is moral camouflage for their amorality.

    Replies: @Rosie, @JimDandy, @Kronos, @Antiwar7, @Undisclosed

    What do they have to camouflage at this point? (You know, besides visiting a strange man on a strange island called Little St. James in the Caribbean.)

  111. @Juvenalis
    “Neil Young vs. Joe Rogen” is inaccurate. No evidence Joe Rogen knows who Neil Young is—rather Neil Young vs. Spotify. Young demanded Spotify remove Rogen's show over alleged medical "misinformation"—or else threatened to try to pull his songs. Faced with "him or me" ultimatum, Spotify called Young's bluff, preemptively obliged Neil's threats/demands, put to rest quickly removing all of Young's music—thereby warding off any protracted public feud, minimizing publicity Young was hoping to draw.

    Spotify sent a clear message to Neil how much of a fight they'd put up to keep his content on their platform—lest other activist celebs get ideas of threatening to hold song catalogs hostage to force Spotify to bend to ransom demands. No negotiations with terrorists.

    Humiliating own-goal on a personal level for Neil—but problems compounded by the fact that Neil doesn't actually fully own his songs. Just last year, on a day that will live in infamy, Neil Young sold 50% of the rights to his music catalog to investors at U.K.-based Hipgnosis Songs Fund (founded by veteran music industry exec CEO Merck Mercuriadis) for $150 million.

    Investors can't be happy that revenue from royalties on the catalog of 1,180 Neil Young songs they acquired will fall below expectations since his entire catalog was suddenly removed from the world's most popular music streaming service—all because ol' Neil had to run his big mouth desperately trying to virtue signal and appear relevant to younger generations.

    With more than 162.4 million subscribers in 2021, Spotify held 31% of global market share, more than double that of top competitors Apple Music (15%) and Amazon Music (13%). Despite Neil Young's protestations to the contrary, this was an enormously embarrassing episode—epic self-own.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/business-55557633

    Neil Young sells song rights in '$150m' deal
    6 January 2021


    An investment firm has bought 50% of the rights to all Neil Young's songs.

    Hipgnosis Songs Fund spent an estimated $150m (£110m) on 1,180 songs written by the Canadian folk rocker.

    The fund, which lets people invest in hit songs, has previously splashed out about £1bn snapping up rights to songs from the likes of Mark Ronson, Chic, Barry Manilow and Blondie.

    Founded by music industry veteran Merck Mercuriadis, Hipgnosis turns music royalties into an income stream.

    "This is a deal that changes Hipgnosis forever," said Mr Mercuriadis.

    "I bought my first Neil Young album aged seven. Harvest was my companion and I know every note, every word, every pause and silence intimately.
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @VivaLaMigra, @MEH 0910

    Joe Rogan is 54. Of course he knows who Neil Young is.

  112. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @NorthOfTheOneOhOne

    To give an idea of pop culture context, in 1970 singer Dean Martin signed or was in the midst of a multi year contract for his TV show, worth in 197o dollars (not adjusted for inflation, but real dollars) 35 million. In other words in 1970, Dean Martin earned about 11 million dollars per year for his highly popular TV show. Add to the fact that he was also a movie star, made albums (and singles), performed live in Vegas, as well as being one of the largest private owners of RCA Victor stock, and his income probably was closer to 12-13 million per yr in late '60's early 1970's. In the words of HOF NY M Casey Stengel, that's simply Amazin'.

    No one in the NFL, the NBA, or in MLB earned anywhere close to 1 million per yr in 1970, and Dean earned over 10 million dollars, which would be comparable to around 35 million per yr today. Muhammad Ali probably didn't earn 10 million dollars in 1970. The only other entertainer in front of the camera who would come close to Dean Martin's earning power was probably Bob Hope.

    Both Hope and Martin were excellent golfers, by the way.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I read that Dean Martin earned \$15 million in 1968.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    @Steve Sailer


    I read that Dean Martin earned \$15 million in 1968.
     
    Not totally on topic, but Dean Martin's son flew F-4's for the CA Air National Guard - call sign was a not too original "Deano" - and he was killed flying a radar departure out of March AFB.

    I read that Dean Sr. never got over it.

    Guys that were in the F-4 community at the time say he was a stand-up guy and a solid (not great - he screwed up the departure that led to his and his WSO's death) pilot. If F-4 guys were in the LA area they'd call Deano who would get them invites to the Playboy Mansion.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dean_Paul_Martin
  113. @Mr. Anon
    So aging hippy rocker is now just shilling for The Man. Maybe he has a lot of Pfeizer stock.

    I'm not a Neil Young fan at all. The only song of his I really like is Harvest Moon, a nostalgic ballad, but I like that one quite a bit.

    As for John Lennon's idiot song Imagine, the best version for my money is the one by A Perfect Circle:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rakape74oNY

    The tone of it captures what the lyrics really imply, if you think about them from a conservative (and therefore pessimistic) point of view. It would serve well as the anthem of the World Economic Forum.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Mike Tre

    Sweet! I haven’t heard this album in forever.

  114. Paul Joseph Watson on Neil Young:

    Rage on Behalf of the Machine

    Shilling in the name

    https://summit.news/2022/01/28/rage-on-behalf-of-the-machine/

  115. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Kratoklastes

    "The WEF didn’t spend four decades grooming a clique of narcissistic sociopaths and infiltrating them into global power structures, to have a comedian turn it all to shit."

    Damn, son! 😃

    Yo Sailer: 300K dead pre vax, 600K dead post vax. Wha happened?¡¿

    Replies: @Travis, @Kratoklastes

    It is now obvious that the vaccines failed, just as masks failed to stop the spread.
    Israel is currently overrun with cases, ICU admission hit record levels despite 90% fully vaccinated and 80% boosted. Cases in Israel are up 24,725% since they mandated the boosters.

    Vax all you want, but it won’t stop Omicron. Even Pfizer admits the vaccines offer little to no protection against the new variants which is the reason they will have a new vaccine available in March. The FDA recently banned Monoclonal antibodies because they were ‘doing nothing’ against omicron’. That’s why FDA pulled its authorization. In 6 weeks these mandated vaccines will be banned by the FDA because they are not effective against the new variants.

    • Agree: VivaLaMigra
    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Travis

    My entire family received two doses of the Pfizer vaccine when they became available. My wife had the booster before Christmas.
    All of us have just had Covid, with the exception of one teenage child. I spent a day in bed with a headache, backache and very mild congestion. Other than a very little residual fatigue for a further three days, that was it. No fever, no shortness of breath, no reduced 02 saturation.
    All of us had pretty much identical symptoms. One child has been entirely symptom free despite living in the same house.
    Just describing my experience.

    , @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Travis

    Good point...since the FDA banned the monoclonal antibodies they should soon outlaw the mRNA vaccines which are already outdated and are now obsolete , worthless and potentially harmful with little to no benefit against the new variants. (According to Pfizer)

    Even against the Alpha, beta, Delta variants these vaccines never approached 90% efficacy , as demonstrated with the data, the efficacy fell rapidly after 5 months. Pfizer realized the boosters would be required and began pushing the boosters last summer, begging the FDA to approve boosters when they realized the vaccines were failing after just 5 months as they admitted in their FDA application for booster authorization....These vaccines never would have been approved if they went thru the normal 2 year trials , since the efficacy rapidly fell below 50%....

    , @Old Prude
    @Travis

    As a person having been triple pricked, I say the vaccines worked at getting us to a point where face diapers weren't mandatory, so yay vaccines for that!

    In the factory, everyone has diapered up again. It hasn't done squat to stop the spread of the cooties in the work force. FWIW, the arrogant pricks who work for me in the machine shop refuse to diaper up. My team of undiapered contrarians (more including some anti-vaxxers) hasn't had one case of Cooties.

    Face Diapers don't do squat except dehumanize. Vaccines don't do squat except allow you to shed the diaper.

    , @Rob
    @Travis

    Any idiot knows that they should do poly- or at least oligoclonal antibodies against a new disease without a stable serotype. The monoclonal antibody is one molecule. It binds a protein, yes. But it binds a small portion of a protein. I want to say averages seven good contacts, but could be wrong. I’ll google. Could not find it quickly. So, let’s just go with seven. If one mutates, that can be it (though usually not when tested) for binding. When tested, they almost always mutate to alanine, the smallest amino acid with a beta carbon in the side chain, but mutating to a larger one can completely abrogate the interaction by steric interference.

    A monoclonal antibody has the advantage that it is known to be neutralizing. And maybe they pick one with lots of strong interactions, or one that at least has a large and negative ΔG of binding. But finding the interactions requires alanine scanning. That can be done in parallel, but it’s a lot of resources if testing a lot of antibodies. I’m guessing but do not know that they didn’t do that for Remdesivir. Determining that a single monoclonal antibody is neutralizing is fairly easy. Could be done in parallel for a lot of monoclonal antibodies.

    Then take the ten best! Take 15! They probably do not all bind the same epitope. Do some competition assays to see! If nothing else, this gives you a competitive advantage against some asshole’s monoclonal antibody, especially when variants start showing up. And they will. This more closely imitates what an animal does. The antibody response to an infection can be thousands of clones. Though many will bind the same epitope, many will not be neutralizing.

    The FDA might’ve been a problem here. They make getting approval for a drug into a headache. I could not find an approved polyclonal antibody therapy, though, in fairness, hyperimmune serum is polyclonal. The more active ingredients your product has, the more likely the FDA is to nix it. Pretty sure they won’t let you continue with the application, crossing off that nixed antibody. “You see,” the FDA public servant says, “all your efficacy data was based on those 10 antibodies. Is nine the same as ten? Huh, is it? No, it is not. Collect more efficacy data with the nine antibody therapy, please. What’s that, the FDA should take into account the fact that there is no approved antibody therapy, so people are dying for no good reason? Mr. Pharma-man, I am getting awfully tired of these questions. The FDA mandate is to make sure drugs are safe. Not to make sure people don’t die. New efficacy data, please.”

    Especially when the FDA has never approved a combination antibody therapy. Will google. Looks like no. Granted, there’s nothing stopping a doctor for precribing two monoclonals together.

    Replies: @Rob

  116. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I've heard Brits wonder why kids these days aren't getting as drunk as they did in the 1990s.

    Replies: @Excal, @JohnnyWalker123, @Anonymous

    In the 90s, it felt like some grownups somewhere were ultimately in charge and taking care of things, even if some of the more public ones were doing it poorly (Major, Clinton). Today, it feels like whoever’s in charge is in advanced mental decline, doing things which make no sense.

    Perhaps some of the yoof sense that they’re essentially on their own now, or at least will be quite soon, and are staying away from the sauce a bit. It’s amazing how quickly you can sober up when you really have to.

    • Agree: El Dato
  117. I was always amused at kids I knew taking “My My Hey Hey” seriously – not realizing it is a conscious ode to absurdity. Either that or the Artist was so coked out he thought the lyrics had Deep Meaning

    “This is the story of Johnny Rotten”

    No, it’s not! There’s nothing in the song about Johnny Rotten-

    Better to burn out than fade away-

    But that’s Sid Vicious, not Johnny Rotten. Oh, wait! He just used the name “Johnny Rotten” to get the cheap rhyme!

    Out of the Blue and Into the Black

    Omigod! WHAT DOES THAT MEAN!?!

    Writing about this reminded me how awful pop music became in the late sixties and beyond.

    I Joyed in Rock while it was Still Fun-

    But how could all these fans of Neil Young and his absurdity not even mention the song:

    “Last Trip to Tulsa” ?

    • Replies: @anon
    @Jim Given


    Better to burn out than fade away-
     
    neil yes please just shut up
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jim Given

    It doesn't matter, Jim. It's the melody and sound, not the lyrics.

    I've never heard or heard of Last Trip to Tulsa. I can't vouch for his songs after Hawks & Doves and Comes a Time. (2 albums) Steve says he got better after his heyday. I don't believe it. NONE of them do.

    Hawks & Doves title song:

    "Ain't getting old, ain't getting younger though,
    just getting used to the lay of the land.
    Ain't tongue-tied, just ain't got nothin' to say.
    I'm proud to be livin' in the USA."


    "Ready to go, willing to stay and pay (USA, USA)
    so my sweet love can dance another free day."


    ....

    "The big wind blows. So the tall grass bends,
    but for you, don't push too hard my friend."


    ...

    "Got rock & roll, got country music playin'.
    If you hate us, you just don't know what you're sayin'"


    This was from somewhere in '74 to '77. I first heard the album in '87. Speaking OF the lyrics on this one, what were Neil's political lyrics about here, just anti-Communist?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTvwhE140Wk

    , @VivaLaMigra
    @Jim Given

    Neil Young also "wrote" the atrocious "Lotta Love" for the no-talent Nicollete Larson. Yeah, that PoS must have taken him all of ten minutes to knock out. Or, I could have it all wrong; perhaps "serious artiste" Mr. Young anguished over this pop masterpiece for days? At any rate it sold a lot of vinyl and made Neil a "lotta dough" in royalties which no doubt disappeared up Neil's nose about as quickly as Ms. Larson's "career" evaporated. I was actually surprised to learn in recent years that Young had written it and figured he'd penned it as a favor to a struggling fellow performer and nothing more, but then I discovered that he'd actually taken enough personal pride in it to have recorded it himself. Well, it does have that super rebellious line "...lotta love...to change the way things are..."..!

    Replies: @frankie p

    , @Old Prude
    @Jim Given

    Yeah, sure the song doesn't contain tight logic but all it needs to make it work is "Hey hey my my. Rock and Roll will never die." and "Its better to burn out than to fade away". All the rest is just frosting.

  118. @lavoisier
    @frankie p

    Lost respect for Mr. Young on this one.

    Never thought of him before as a book burner. But all leftists have that book burning gene it seems.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Never thought of him before as a book burner. But all leftists have that book burning gene it seems.

    Neil Young is a right wing leftist – if not, you can look at him the other way round…
    His vaccine-radicalism is childhood stuff, Steve above is spot on.

  119. @Achmed E. Newman
    @George Taylor

    I loved hearing that one back in the day, George. Southern Man indeed has just plain ignorant lyrics, just as bad as Cortez the Killer* did, but they hit closer to home in time and place. Both songs have long great guitar solos, so I just ignore the lyrics. What the heck did a young Neil Young know really know about the antebellum South or the time of the Conquistadors?

    However, I think Skynyrd forgave him and vice versa. I do wonder whether the line "and my name is on the line. How could people get so unkind?" from the song Human Highway off of Comes a Time is about this little feud.

    BTW, Neil's song Alabama Song would have pissed off many Southerners too, had they heard it. Again, the lyrics were stupid.


    .


    * See "A Visual Fisking of Cortez the Killer".

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @YetAnotherAnon

    I think Skynyrd forgave him and vice versa.

    BTW, Neil’s song Alabama Song would have pissed off many Southerners too, had they heard it. Again, the lyrics were stupid.

    Mod. these two quotes answer the questions you rise:

    Ronnie Van Zant: “We wrote ‘Alabama’ as a joke. We didn’t even think about it – the words just came out that way. We just laughed like hell, and said ‘Ain’t that funny’. We love Neil Young, we love his music.”

    Ronnie Van Zant sporting a Neil Young shirt. | photo credit: pinterest.com

    Neil Young: “I think “Sweet Home Alabama” is a great song. I’ve actually performed it live a couple of times myself. My own song “Alabama” richly deserved the shot Lynyrd Skynyrd gave me with their great record. I don’t like my words when I listen to it today.”

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Dieter Kief

    He who writes the best guitar riff wins. Decision: "Sweet Home Alabama" over "Southern Man."

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @The Germ Theory of Disease

  120. @vinteuil
    @Dieter Kief


    I can’t wholly agree
     
    DK - in English, the best way to put that is "up to a point, Lord Copper."

    Not sure why you want to talk about Jordan Peterson.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @Dieter Kief

    vinteuil – tanks, your version of my thought is nice and all (that is a quote actually by somebody who’s English is quite right , just in case, heheh), but, I wanted to go on, it (= your version) doesn’t exactly eypress what’s up in my version.
    Yours lacks the sigh, which goes along with mine quite nicely.

    The Jordan B. Peterson reference in my comment above might not be for your rather sensible ears, I can – quite easily – imagine that. Sorry. But things like that happen all the time, while we’re Rockin’ in the Free World.

  121. It must have been back in the late seventies. My friends an I was chatting about everything and nothing, when somebody mentioned Neil Young – to which another replied:

    “Neil Young? Isn’t he the guy who cries snot in rods?”

    Whenever I hear a Neil Young song, that sentence still pops up in my head.

  122. @vinteuil
    Who's "Joe Rogen?"

    Who's Neil Young?

    Replies: @Anon, @tyrone, @Bardon Kaldian

    That’s something I agree with.
    Reminds me of Dalrymple’s confusion with Robert de Niro (he never heard of him).

    A characteristic of any civilization is – most people don’t know whom they own the most, but are very informed about the trivia. For instance, hardly anyone has heard about John Bardeen (transistors, NMR). And…

    But all people know of some ephemeral clowns from entertainment

  123. @Jim Given
    I was always amused at kids I knew taking "My My Hey Hey" seriously - not realizing it is a conscious ode to absurdity. Either that or the Artist was so coked out he thought the lyrics had Deep Meaning

    "This is the story of Johnny Rotten"

    No, it's not! There's nothing in the song about Johnny Rotten-

    Better to burn out than fade away-

    But that's Sid Vicious, not Johnny Rotten. Oh, wait! He just used the name "Johnny Rotten" to get the cheap rhyme!

    Out of the Blue and Into the Black

    Omigod! WHAT DOES THAT MEAN!?!

    Writing about this reminded me how awful pop music became in the late sixties and beyond.

    I Joyed in Rock while it was Still Fun-

    But how could all these fans of Neil Young and his absurdity not even mention the song:

    "Last Trip to Tulsa" ?

    Replies: @anon, @Achmed E. Newman, @VivaLaMigra, @Old Prude

    Better to burn out than fade away-

    neil yes please just shut up

  124. @Anon
    @vinteuil

    Rogen's a commentator, basically a Leftist and a Bernie Sanders supporter, but who is too low-class for the modern Left. Some low-class "conservatives" like him for defending low-class causes like keeping trannies out of women's kickboxing* and making anti-vax statements he walks back a day later.

    *It's funny because women's kickboxing would have been seen as inherently "progressive" twenty years ago but has fallen out of favor for its low-class appeal and the women's lack of enthusiasm for fighting biological males. (I guess they weren't as strong as any man, oops.)

    Replies: @vinteuil, @El Dato

    It’s funny because women’s kickboxing would have been seen as inherently “progressive” twenty years ago

    Well, I was mainly focused on the Bush/Blair shenanigans at that point in time but … I can’t believe that.

    Was there women’s kickboxing outside of manga? Was it considered progressive?

  125. @Anon
    I am not a particular fan of Tom Petty's music, but I can at least listen to it without changing to another radio station. As a person, I have more respect for Tom Petty than Neil Young. Neil Young is 10 times as goofy as Petty, and has produced a career of almost complete and utter tunelessness. Yes, Cinnamon Girl isn't bad, but it's the only thing he ever created that wasn't bad.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon, @TorontoTraveller, @Stirge, @anon

    His late 80’s / early 90’s album “Freedom” is truly fantastic. “Harvest” is obviously great. I’m thinking that you may not know as much about music as you think you do.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @TorontoTraveller

    Neil Young • Freedom playlist:
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_mK22DuiRqvi4EcouP6xaKtiEXydmoVEp8

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_(Neil_Young_album)
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9c/Neil_Young_Freedom.jpg

  126. @usNthem
    My sister used to play that damn harvest moon album constantly - I frikin hated it then and now. However, Like A Hurricane is one of the old sack’s songs I do happen to like. Who gives a crap what that Canadian dickhead thinks about anything?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @TorontoTraveller

    He’s an American dickhead now. I am ambivalent about his change in citizenship.

  127. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    "Or are you making a distinction between your first purchased LP and your first purchased 45 single?"

    Yes. I started buying singles first, then albums some months later.

    To be technical, "Cinnamon Girl" was the first single I bought new at a record store. I had previously bought a couple of singles used at a thrift shop: a Sly and the Family Stone single ("Everyday People"?) and "Hey Jude"/"Revolution."

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @TorontoTraveller

    Do you get the sense that Yojimbo has a bit too much time on his hands?

    Perhaps he is hard at work on his 700-page Steve Sailer biography.

  128. @Achmed E. Newman
    @George Taylor

    I loved hearing that one back in the day, George. Southern Man indeed has just plain ignorant lyrics, just as bad as Cortez the Killer* did, but they hit closer to home in time and place. Both songs have long great guitar solos, so I just ignore the lyrics. What the heck did a young Neil Young know really know about the antebellum South or the time of the Conquistadors?

    However, I think Skynyrd forgave him and vice versa. I do wonder whether the line "and my name is on the line. How could people get so unkind?" from the song Human Highway off of Comes a Time is about this little feud.

    BTW, Neil's song Alabama Song would have pissed off many Southerners too, had they heard it. Again, the lyrics were stupid.


    .


    * See "A Visual Fisking of Cortez the Killer".

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @YetAnotherAnon

    ” Southern Man… plain ignorant lyrics… long great guitar solos”

    “In countries where there is only one race,” said Churchill, “broad and lofty views are taken of the colour problem.”

    The Canada that Neil Young grew up in was pretty white – only ethnic tension to speak of was with the French!

    But it is a great guitar solo. I really like his manic guitar.

    (The first I heard of NY was someone at school putting on “Cinnamon Girl” at lunchtime.)

    PS – Joni Mitchell, another who had polio as a child, has also dropped Spotify.

    • Agree: Dieter Kief
  129. @I, Libertine
    @Rosie

    That was was Crosby Stills and Nash, not CSN &Y. Two different bands, actually. Neil would have had nothing to do with that song. But it is a great tune.

    Replies: @G. Poulin

    Two different bands is right. Was never a big fan of either band, but always thought that the boys made better music without Neil Young’s whiny ass dragging everything down.

  130. Old Neil barely knows who Joe Rogan is. Neil figured Spotify needed him more than Rogan. The whole incident is kinda humorous. Adele cancelling in Las Vegas. She was very strident about how only vaxxxxed and boostered would be allowed into her shows. That diva imploded with lots of financial fallout

  131. Neil Young has been southparkishly followed by Joni Mitchell and most recently Bryan Adams in demanding that streaming service Spotify no longer recognize the huge burning solar popularity of Joe Rogan. Spotify’s customers don’t know who these 60s rockers are. It’s like when globohomo tried to attack Trump by having “leader of the conservatives” (their words) George Walker Bush come out against him, and after “owing” silence to the bringer of cop-killing. I was less shocked by the picture of Joni Mitchell in blackface costumed as a pimp than by the news that she is apparently still alive.

  132. The Daily Show might have said it best …

    Though there is always this …

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @The Alarmist

    "So Neil Young pulled his letter to Spotify because it seems he doesn’t even own his music portfolio anymore & therefore has no control. That checks out because he was in our offices a decade ago trying to sell it. We passed!"

    As of now, in the UK, Neil Young is definitely on Spotify.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

  133. @James J O'Meara
    @Kratoklastes

    "The thing that identifies all of these people, is that by and large they have unremarkable CVs prior to their elevation to power (of all of the abovenamed, only Boris was a reasonably exceptional student)."

    The same could be said of the "genius" musicians of Laurel Canyon, like Young and everyone else who just coincidentally moved to the same block in LA and all came from military intell. families.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @J.Ross

    Zappa’s dad wasn’t intel, he was chemwar. He tried in his spare time but never completed a history of Sicily (which isn’t too bad of a failure as Sicily has an extremely long and complex history).

  134. @Steve Sailer
    @James J O'Meara

    Neil Young's father was in military intelligence while writing dozens of books about hockey in Canada? What a man!

    And like I say, the Cold War was very well-funded so lots of people have family connections. E.g., my mother's best friend's husband was the chief designer of the SR-71 for the CIA. But for some reason, the CIA never gave me my official CIA electric guitar.

    Also, Laurel Canyon isn't a block, it's a few square miles of the Hollywood Hills above the music clubs on the Sunset Strip.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @profnasty, @Mike Tre

    Laurel Canyon is bigger sure but at one point a wierdly large number of people who would go on to become influential were sharing the same block, and one address in particular. It was like a steroids-enhanced version of when Anthony Burgess and Gore Vidal lived next door and alternated documentary narration jobs, or when Arthur Koestler and several other major authors shared an apartment building floor, or Heinlein and Hubbard renting from Parsons.
    –intel scum can’t write books in their spare hours or later career
    Now that’s what I call contumely.
    https://postimg.cc/SJxqh5dw
    In fact, are there any intelligence officers who do not go on to become authors?

  135. @Hypnotoad666
    @Danindc


    Cinnamon Girl and Old Man were very good the rest is forgettable to a novice like me.
     
    I'm not a big Neil Young fan either. But IMHO his best and most interesting is the 9+ minute trippy guitar jam, Down by the River. It's an ode to murdering your girlfriend. So maybe not as PC as Imagine.

    https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=KflCXmEX6BY&feature=share

    Replies: @Rouetheday, @TorontoTraveller

    “Down by the river
    I shot my baby”

    is not a lyric about committing homicide. It is a lyric about injecting heroin.

    I’m seeing a lot of commenters on this thread who seem way more out of touch than Neil Young seems to be.

    • Replies: @Veteran Aryan
    @TorontoTraveller


    ...not a lyric about committing homicide. It is a lyric about injecting heroin.

    I’m seeing a lot of commenters on this thread who seem way more out of touch than Neil Young seems to be.
     
    Perhaps you can recommend a good heroin injection primer to remedy their ignorance?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @TorontoTraveller


    “Down by the river
    I shot my baby”

    is not a lyric about committing homicide. It is a lyric about injecting heroin.
     
    " . . . shot her dead."

    Alright. That interpretation makes sense. And given Young's history, it seems most likely now that you mention it. NY does seem more like a negligent overdose guy than a Jimmy Hendrix, caught my baby messin' round, kinda guy.


    Hey Joe, where you goin' with that gun of your hand?
    Hey Joe, I said, where you goin' with that gun in your hand? Oh
    I'm goin' down to shoot my old lady
    You know I caught her messin' 'round with another man, yeah
    I'm goin' down to shoot my old lady
    You know I caught her messin' 'round with another man
    Huh, and that ain't too cool

    Replies: @Dnought

  136. @Rouetheday
    @Hypnotoad666

    A couple of weeks back I was dividing my time between surfing the web on my computer and watching YouTube videos through my TV. I came across a music video of "Down By the River", a song I hadn't listened to in years. While listening to the song I discovered an article on one of my favorite "Black People Behaving Badly" web sites (as my disapproving sister likes to call them). It was about the Irish woman who had been killed by what was described at the time as a 'Romanian National' (is that a PC way of saying "Gypsy'?). She was killed while jogging along a canal towpath. As I'm reading this detail I can hear Neil start to sing the chorus- "Down by the river/ I shot my baby...".

    That was some spooky shit.

    Replies: @David Jones, @JMcG

    Ya, except she was beaten to death and they released the Romanian and arrested a Slovak instead.

  137. @Escher
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I guess he didn’t include musical ability in his treatise, considering he started his career as (and still is to some extent) a blues man.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    That’s discussed in Mr. Horowitz’s article too, Escher.

  138. If you think hippies aren’t nazis, you’ve got another think coming. (Not to disparage real National Socialists. Boy do we need them now.)
    On the other hand, Donovan Leach gave us the hurdy gurdy. He is the real deal.
    Sunshine superman.

  139. @Jim Given
    I was always amused at kids I knew taking "My My Hey Hey" seriously - not realizing it is a conscious ode to absurdity. Either that or the Artist was so coked out he thought the lyrics had Deep Meaning

    "This is the story of Johnny Rotten"

    No, it's not! There's nothing in the song about Johnny Rotten-

    Better to burn out than fade away-

    But that's Sid Vicious, not Johnny Rotten. Oh, wait! He just used the name "Johnny Rotten" to get the cheap rhyme!

    Out of the Blue and Into the Black

    Omigod! WHAT DOES THAT MEAN!?!

    Writing about this reminded me how awful pop music became in the late sixties and beyond.

    I Joyed in Rock while it was Still Fun-

    But how could all these fans of Neil Young and his absurdity not even mention the song:

    "Last Trip to Tulsa" ?

    Replies: @anon, @Achmed E. Newman, @VivaLaMigra, @Old Prude

    It doesn’t matter, Jim. It’s the melody and sound, not the lyrics.

    I’ve never heard or heard of Last Trip to Tulsa. I can’t vouch for his songs after Hawks & Doves and Comes a Time. (2 albums) Steve says he got better after his heyday. I don’t believe it. NONE of them do.

    Hawks & Doves title song:

    “Ain’t getting old, ain’t getting younger though,
    just getting used to the lay of the land.
    Ain’t tongue-tied, just ain’t got nothin’ to say.
    I’m proud to be livin’ in the USA.”

    “Ready to go, willing to stay and pay (USA, USA)
    so my sweet love can dance another free day.”

    ….

    “The big wind blows. So the tall grass bends,
    but for you, don’t push too hard my friend.”

    “Got rock & roll, got country music playin’.
    If you hate us, you just don’t know what you’re sayin’”

    This was from somewhere in ’74 to ’77. I first heard the album in ’87. Speaking OF the lyrics on this one, what were Neil’s political lyrics about here, just anti-Communist?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTvwhE140Wk

  140. @Ripple Earthdevil
    You appear to have confused goy boy Joe Rogan with Jew boy Seth Rogen,

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    You appear to have confused goy boy Joe Rogan with Jew boy Seth Rogen,

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/rogan-rogen/

    Rogan/Rogen
    STEVE SAILER • NOVEMBER 25, 2021

    How many people think Joe Rogen is that funny movie star and how many people think Seth Rogan is that independent-thinking podcast host and UFC commentator?’

    I mean sure, one has a beard, glasses, and a cap and the other, at the moment, doesn’t, but they’re both high all the time.

  141. @Steve Sailer
    @James J O'Meara

    Neil Young's father was in military intelligence while writing dozens of books about hockey in Canada? What a man!

    And like I say, the Cold War was very well-funded so lots of people have family connections. E.g., my mother's best friend's husband was the chief designer of the SR-71 for the CIA. But for some reason, the CIA never gave me my official CIA electric guitar.

    Also, Laurel Canyon isn't a block, it's a few square miles of the Hollywood Hills above the music clubs on the Sunset Strip.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @profnasty, @Mike Tre

    Sorry not sorry.
    Military Intel to Sodomy(think D.Geffen); Rock stardom is fraud.
    George Martin’s buddies wrote and performed the Beatles songs. Barry McGuire did NOT write Eve of Destruction.
    Recording sessions were often interminable. Zappa’s dad made chemical weapons. Zappa was a quirky guitar player who drove his band with a bull whip. And, like MLK, a sex pervert.
    Disclaimer:
    I am a pop music fanatic. Only difference, I know how it’s made. Goood sausage!

  142. @AnotherDad
    Could not care less what Neil Young thinks, but I'm a huge supporter of vaccines as well--one of the very best inventions of man. (Lots of people today have no idea how casually lethal the "before time" was.)

    But censoring debate is one of the worst inventions of man.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @jsm, @Kronos, @Mr. Anon, @JR Ewing, @anonymous coward, @Anon

    Vaccines are modern technological miracles that have contributed more to the betterment of society than most people realize.

    But even though they are called by the same name, these covid injections are not real vaccines, which is why so many people are such useful idiots for the pharmo-tyranny complex, as your comment so aptly demonstrates.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @JR Ewing

    @ Vaccines are modern technological miracles..

    Indeed. In order of importance: clean drinking water, antibiotics, vaccines.

    For quite a long time, medical congresses tackled the question of how to enlarge the captive vaccine market. One possible solution was to homologate rules between Japan, Europe & USA, to lower costs and time to market. Another was to extend patent duration. Yet another was to negotiate adverse events funds with the national governments. Adverse events was the Achilles’ heel of the industry, because vaccinations reach huge numbers of healthy people, and that considerable increases the chances of people noticing adverse effects and blaming them on vaccines (sometimes wrongly).

    Anyway, it seems that lately, someone decided to cross the line between contemplation and action, and has hugely increased the vaccine market (conflating vaccines with genetic therapeutics) while lowering financial risk.

  143. @roonaldo
    He's a good businessman, as he says. And as a recently minted U.S. citizen, wouldn't want to get censored or land on the wrong side of the covid police state. Maybe he's dumb enough to believe the lies and propaganda.

    I laughed when Young's "Rockin' in the Free World" was played at Trump rallies, since the song is critical of the U.S., the self-proclaimed great leader of the "Free World" ("people shufflin' their feet, people sleepin' in their shoes" go part of the lyrics).

    I'm thinkin' that Gates, Fauci, and Soros paid Neil for the rights to (and jerk off to) the tune "We R in Control" ("we control the data banks, we control the think tanks, we control the flow of air...we control...we control...we're controlling").

    Replies: @usNthem

    Kinda like Reagan playing Springsteen’s “born in the USA “, which was hardly a patriotic song, at some of his rallies. Of course old Brucey objected to it as well.

    • Thanks: roonaldo
    • Replies: @roonaldo
    @usNthem

    I remember how odd it was for the Reagan camp to adopt that song, but I suppose it is still being misconstrued. I wouldn't put it past them to use The Guess Who's "American Woman" if they put a female on the ballot.

    For cringeworthiness, nothing tops Al Gore and the Dem's "La Macarena" craze. If they adopted Jimi Hendrix's "Star Spangled Banner" to open their gatherings, that'd be progress.

    I gotta cut Neil some slack, though. His open air concert awhile back in Boise was a great time--I'd never seen him live. Nils Lofgren is playing with him again, too.

  144. I love Live Rust. Put on headphones, turn up to 11, and just dig the screaming electric guitars. Neils weird high voice just makes the dish better. For all the other odd stuff, hippy-dippy stuff, he can be forgiven. Powder Finger on Live Rust redeems all.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Old Prude

    Damn right, Old Prude! Powderfinger is one of my favorites. I've got Hey, Hey, My, My playing right now out of this lame-assed tablet's speaker, so that's nothing like hearing this at V=11. Even so, it's so good that I can't post this till the song's over.

    That distortion makes it sound like he's strumming on the lid of aa trash dumpster, but still!!

    BTW, Steve Sailer, Neil here is not completely sure it WAS Johnny Rotten. He goes "Is this the story of Johnny Rotten?" I'm like "hey, I don't know man - you wrote the song."

  145. @SafeNow
    I don’t get Neil Young’s greatness, so I thought it must be me, and I went to Ranker. Looked like a good list. (Google “Elton Kiki.”) Neil Sedaka is #40, Okay, I thought, now I’m getting to the Neils. Neil Diamond at #72, still no Neil Young. So I gave up. I think my problem is, I grew up on Long Island, in high school in the 60’s. We were loaded with amazing pop bands playing small clubs. Every band had a vocalist, usually Italian, who could sing better than Neil Young.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @VivaLaMigra

    Anyone can sing better than Neil Young. There are vocalists who don’t have good voices, but adopt a style to which their voices are suited. Think of Rod Stewart, Tom Petty, and Bob Dylan. I can listen to their material. On the other hand, listening to “Sugar Mountain” is pretty painful, ‘cuz what’s the fuckin’ point?

  146. @Ben tillman
    @Whiskey

    Young wrote 30 songs better than Petty’s best.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @ArthurBiggs

    Nothing in the universe is better than Wild One Forever.

    But I will grant everything Petty sang after Even the Losers pretty much sucks.

  147. @JMcG
    He famously married a woman who waited on him at a diner. Stayed married almost forever, then dumped her for Darryl Hanna. Hard to believe it’s the same guy who wrote Powderfinger.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    Neil Young (b. 1945)
    Daryl Hannah (b. 1960)

    BARN N&D Interview

    Jan 18, 2022

    [MORE]

    Neil Young /Crazy Horse – Barn (Official Film Trailer)

    Dec 1, 2021

    A documentary of the making of Neil Young and Crazy Horse recording BARN the album.
    BARN captures this legendary band in their element, in the wild, as they make music in a restored 19th century log barn under the full moon. Neil and the Horse are a 50 year old musical family and BARN catches a rare intimate glimpse of their easy humor, their brotherhood, and of course their music, created live, in their own unique spontaneous way.

    Neil Young & Crazy Horse – A Band A Brotherhood A Barn (Official Documentary)

    Premiered Jan 20, 2022

    BARN the documentary film, directed by Daryl Hannah (dhlovelife), catches a rare intimate glimpse of this legendary band as they make music in a restored 19th-century log barn under the full moon. The film captures Neil and the Horse in an organic way, their easy irreverent humor, their brotherhood, and of course their music, as it was created. BARN intentionally lingers on single shots for entire songs, showing there are no tricks, revealing the raw, organic, and spontaneous process of the music bursting to life from unexpected moments. Exquisite changes of light and weather dance in the remote meadow where the barn sits, adding a sweet, mystical magic as the music thumps, reverberates, and echoes. The film is infused with the gratitude and joy that permeated the whole experience.
    […]
    Band
    Neil Young
    Billy Talbot
    Ralph Molina
    Nils Lofgren
    […]
    Music Produced By:
    The Volume Dealers – Neil Young and Niko Bolas

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barn_(album)

  148. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    That is the ancient question. Is it better to do a few or a single thing well, even great, (e.g. Sinatra with his singing abilities), or catch a touch of the Jupiter Complex, and attempt to do every single thing of the creative process better than anyone else? (e.g. Dylan with songwriting, singing, producing, etc). The thing is, if one compares Sinatra vs Dylan side by side, Dylan's singing ability doesn't come anywhere near Sinatra's. Just on pure vocal talent alone, it's not even close, Sinatra wins hands down.

    And, for the most part, Sinatra evolved as a recording artist in the type of genre that he sung. He mainly sung about Love. Over the decades, he added nuances and depth to his repertoire. Dylan, however, wrote about many emotions, things, etc. But his vocal interpretations regarding Love would have to for the most part, take a back seat to Sinatra.

    Actually, from a purely vocal singing ability and being able to convey emotional authenticity through pure singing alone, regarding the theme of Love, pretty much every 20th Century singer in the English language would have to take a back seat to Sinatra. Or, Sinatra remains in the conversation with any would be contenders. Like it or not, Sinatra defined how one sang about Love, and the various nuances that it contains.

    Replies: @Rex Little

    Dylan’s singing ability doesn’t come anywhere near Sinatra’s. Just on pure vocal talent alone, it’s not even close

    It’s not even that close. You want close to Dylan as a singer, try the average karaoke bar drunk.

  149. @Ben tillman
    @Whiskey

    Young wrote 30 songs better than Petty’s best.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @ArthurBiggs

    I saw Neil Young do an acoustic (mostly) set back in about 1983 and it was one of the best concerts I’ve ever been to. I became a huge fan. But lets be honest, Tom Petty was massively more successful with basically the same fan base. It’s not even close.

  150. @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Daniel H

    “Jimmy Page broke up the Yardbirds in 1968 partly due to the fact that after a very successful American tour they all OWED money.”

    And boy did he learn his lesson. After he formed Zeppelin he hired a heavy hitting gangster-like band manager who managed to negotiate something like a 90-10 split on gross revenue with the concert venues. As a result they were likely the richest band to that point in history.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Brutusale, @Joe S.Walker, @Seekers

    If you’re going to deal with a Bill Graham, you’d better have a Peter Grant.

  151. @Chris Mallory
    Well I heard Mister Young sing about her
    Well I heard ol' Neil put her down
    Well I hope Neil Young will remember
    A southern man don't need him around anyhow

    Replies: @Rex Little

    Well I heard Mister Young sing about her
    Well I heard ol’ Neil put her down
    Well I hope Neil Young will remember
    A southern man don’t need him around anyhow

    Below a certain age (50, maybe?) people wouldn’t have heard of Neil Young if not for those lyrics.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Rex Little

    The grunge guys hyped him all the time (he even made a record with Pearl Jam). So 15 year olds in 19995 would be around 40 today, and they'd know him if they were paying the least bit attention.

  152. @Rouetheday
    @Hypnotoad666

    A couple of weeks back I was dividing my time between surfing the web on my computer and watching YouTube videos through my TV. I came across a music video of "Down By the River", a song I hadn't listened to in years. While listening to the song I discovered an article on one of my favorite "Black People Behaving Badly" web sites (as my disapproving sister likes to call them). It was about the Irish woman who had been killed by what was described at the time as a 'Romanian National' (is that a PC way of saying "Gypsy'?). She was killed while jogging along a canal towpath. As I'm reading this detail I can hear Neil start to sing the chorus- "Down by the river/ I shot my baby...".

    That was some spooky shit.

    Replies: @David Jones, @JMcG

    Aisling Murphy was a beautiful 23 year old Irish teacher, murdered on January 12 by a filthy gypsy. Her murder was all over the papers, vigils were held, Irish parents were admonished about the awful job they’ve done raising their sons, new laws addressing domestic violence were discussed. Then, the Gardaí arrested the filthy gypsy that murdered her. The piece of garbage had gone to the hospital to have the wounds treated that had been inflicted by young Miss Murphy as he murdered her.
    Since then? Crickets.
    His name is Josef Puska. He, his wife and children have been living on the idiotic Irish taxpayers for years.

  153. @Jim Given
    I was always amused at kids I knew taking "My My Hey Hey" seriously - not realizing it is a conscious ode to absurdity. Either that or the Artist was so coked out he thought the lyrics had Deep Meaning

    "This is the story of Johnny Rotten"

    No, it's not! There's nothing in the song about Johnny Rotten-

    Better to burn out than fade away-

    But that's Sid Vicious, not Johnny Rotten. Oh, wait! He just used the name "Johnny Rotten" to get the cheap rhyme!

    Out of the Blue and Into the Black

    Omigod! WHAT DOES THAT MEAN!?!

    Writing about this reminded me how awful pop music became in the late sixties and beyond.

    I Joyed in Rock while it was Still Fun-

    But how could all these fans of Neil Young and his absurdity not even mention the song:

    "Last Trip to Tulsa" ?

    Replies: @anon, @Achmed E. Newman, @VivaLaMigra, @Old Prude

    Neil Young also “wrote” the atrocious “Lotta Love” for the no-talent Nicollete Larson. Yeah, that PoS must have taken him all of ten minutes to knock out. Or, I could have it all wrong; perhaps “serious artiste” Mr. Young anguished over this pop masterpiece for days? At any rate it sold a lot of vinyl and made Neil a “lotta dough” in royalties which no doubt disappeared up Neil’s nose about as quickly as Ms. Larson’s “career” evaporated. I was actually surprised to learn in recent years that Young had written it and figured he’d penned it as a favor to a struggling fellow performer and nothing more, but then I discovered that he’d actually taken enough personal pride in it to have recorded it himself. Well, it does have that super rebellious line “…lotta love…to change the way things are…”..!

    • Replies: @frankie p
    @VivaLaMigra

    Neil Young wrote and recorded "Lotta Love" for the Comes a Time album. Nicolette Larson sang backing vocals on Comes a Time, but not on the "Lotta Love" track. The story goes that while they were recording American Stars and Bars, she found a tape on the floor of his car and popped it in. She hears "Lotta Love" and said that it was a great song. Neil said, "You want it. It's yours." He certainly didn't write it for Nicolette Larson.

  154. @Travis
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    It is now obvious that the vaccines failed, just as masks failed to stop the spread.
    Israel is currently overrun with cases, ICU admission hit record levels despite 90% fully vaccinated and 80% boosted. Cases in Israel are up 24,725% since they mandated the boosters.

    Vax all you want, but it won’t stop Omicron. Even Pfizer admits the vaccines offer little to no protection against the new variants which is the reason they will have a new vaccine available in March. The FDA recently banned Monoclonal antibodies because they were 'doing nothing' against omicron'. That's why FDA pulled its authorization. In 6 weeks these mandated vaccines will be banned by the FDA because they are not effective against the new variants.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @Old Prude, @Rob

    My entire family received two doses of the Pfizer vaccine when they became available. My wife had the booster before Christmas.
    All of us have just had Covid, with the exception of one teenage child. I spent a day in bed with a headache, backache and very mild congestion. Other than a very little residual fatigue for a further three days, that was it. No fever, no shortness of breath, no reduced 02 saturation.
    All of us had pretty much identical symptoms. One child has been entirely symptom free despite living in the same house.
    Just describing my experience.

  155. Neil Young fans seem enamored of the backing band “Crazy Horse” but can anyone name a single member? I don’t know about their individual or collective musical talent, but since I basically ignored anything Neil Young did after CSN&Y it wasn’t a concern. It would seem that Neil’s attitude toward the band was about the same as another egomaniacal artist, Frank Zappa, had toward any musicians he worked with; he paid the “Mothers of Invention” union scale while he kept all the profits. I heard an interview where he basically said that anyone in HIS band who didn’t like it was free to leave; there were half a dozen others who would take the gig. I’d have to presume that the members of Crazy Horse were OK with picking up a few crumbs from the album and concert ticket cash flow generated by a “name” performer and I can’t fault them for that; everybody’s gotta eat.

  156. Neil Young is a ridiculously overrated and under talented wretch. Hideous to look at and to listen to. His success supports the theory that 60’s counter culture was a deep state plot to diminish and vulgarize the value and substance of American culture.

    He is just pure garbage.

  157. Neil Young … and I thought I was fixated on the past.

    Imagine it’s 1970 and some crooner or ragtime artist who was mildly popular around 1920 demands that a talk show host stop spreading “misinformation.” Or else!

    • Agree: Kylie
  158. @AnotherDad
    Could not care less what Neil Young thinks, but I'm a huge supporter of vaccines as well--one of the very best inventions of man. (Lots of people today have no idea how casually lethal the "before time" was.)

    But censoring debate is one of the worst inventions of man.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @jsm, @Kronos, @Mr. Anon, @JR Ewing, @anonymous coward, @Anon

    There’s no scientific evidence that vaccines provide any benefit at all.

    We vaccinate our kids against serious disease because why not?

    But it’s purely an emotional decision, not grounded in science.

    • Replies: @bike-anarkist
    @anonymous coward

    It is just, "Give me convenience or give me death".

    Then these asshloles abuse their children with face diapers and force the vexxes upon them.
    It's a steal: both, the children's health and their future.

  159. @Bardon Kaldlan
    Well, I like Old Neil's music,( see what I did there). One song of his that I always liked was "Sugar Mountain." Someone,like Joni Mitchell,I tink, razzed Neil as a guy who is overtaken with nostalgia at the age of 19!

    "Harvest Moon" was a very good later song.

    Didn't he make fun of Whitney Houston in "Rockin'"? I don't want a black woman on the Supe Court,btw.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    https://jonimitchell.com/news/newsitem.cfm?id=1592

    I Stand With Neil Young!
    Posted January 28, 2022

    I’ve decided to remove all my music from Spotify. Irresponsible people are spreading lies that are costing people their lives. I stand in solidarity with Neil Young and the global scientific and medical communities on this issue. —Joni Mitchell

    Read An Open Letter to Spotify: A call from the global scientific and medical communities to implement a misinformation policy.

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Enemy of Earth
    @MEH 0910

    Methinks Joni's cognitive function has been affected by her bout with Morgellons. Or maybe it's creeping senility.

    P.S. I've always detested that phrase, "stand in solidarity with." It's such a retarded affectation. Can't they just say, "I agree with?"

    , @TWS
    @MEH 0910

    What in the world? Do both Mitchell and Young use the crypt keeper's plastic surgeon?

    , @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/RollingStone/status/1487583884132945924

    Replies: @The Alarmist

  160. @Mr. Anon
    So aging hippy rocker is now just shilling for The Man. Maybe he has a lot of Pfeizer stock.

    I'm not a Neil Young fan at all. The only song of his I really like is Harvest Moon, a nostalgic ballad, but I like that one quite a bit.

    As for John Lennon's idiot song Imagine, the best version for my money is the one by A Perfect Circle:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rakape74oNY

    The tone of it captures what the lyrics really imply, if you think about them from a conservative (and therefore pessimistic) point of view. It would serve well as the anthem of the World Economic Forum.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Mike Tre

    Is MJK a conservative? He gives a lot of credence to metaphysics. I certainly don’t think he’s a glib utopianist like Lennon claimed to be, but as with Jimmy it’s not always easy to know exactly where he’s coming from with anything.

    (I’m fairly certain the Tool song Vicarious is an anti war song aimed at George W Bush, and the song Tempest is aimed at Trump, but maybe I’m overthinking things.)

  161. @JimDandy
    @J1234

    I've been asking why all these washed-up old Jewish guys passionately want to commit genocide on the unvaxxed--Chomsky, Howard Stern, Gene Simmons, Fauci (that's a joke because some people here say he's a crypto-Jew) etc. But, in fairness, Neil Young makes the case that it's washed-up old guys in general who are totally losing their minds over the unvaxxed.

    Replies: @Ripple Earthdevil, @Carol, @3g4me

    The unvaxxed are handling their own genocide just fine, per r/HermanCainAward.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Carol

    Very true, the robust beast--brimming with good health and youthful vitality--Herman Cain, sadly cut down BY/WITH/WHATEVS Covid in his prime.

  162. @Steve Sailer
    @James J O'Meara

    Neil Young's father was in military intelligence while writing dozens of books about hockey in Canada? What a man!

    And like I say, the Cold War was very well-funded so lots of people have family connections. E.g., my mother's best friend's husband was the chief designer of the SR-71 for the CIA. But for some reason, the CIA never gave me my official CIA electric guitar.

    Also, Laurel Canyon isn't a block, it's a few square miles of the Hollywood Hills above the music clubs on the Sunset Strip.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @profnasty, @Mike Tre

  163. @Bardon Kaldlan
    @Steve Sailer

    I heard once,about Tommy James and his parasitic manager,some Jewish* gangster. He really got ripped off,but its better than cement shoes.
    * Sorry, you know who,the shmuck from Philly.😉

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    I heard once about Tommy James

    This isn’t breaking news, as Tommy James is probably the most famous example of the phenomena. Morris Levy and Roulette Records owed Tommy over \$30 million at one point. The Sopranos had Jerry Adler play the Levy-inspired Hesh Rabkin.

  164. @Kratoklastes
    Neil 'Karen' Young did the same thing as an insecure 15-year-old who sees his girlfriend talking to a another guy: "It's him or me".

    Had about the same outcome: Spotify told him to pound sand, and he bitched out and backed down like a low-T NPC.

    Schwabian media doesn't like it when some upstart has a larger audience than their favoured corporations.

    The WEF didn't spend four decades grooming a clique of narcissistic sociopaths and infiltrating them into global power structures, to have a comedian turn it all to shit.

    OT: Guess what? "Major politicians are, by and large, put in place by a set of conspiracies that are global in scope" has to get moved out of the "conspiracy theory" bucket and into the "Known known" bucket.

    Schwab's latest interview is another "open conspiracy" reveal: Ardern, Trudeau, and Macron join the list of 'Young Global Leaders' alumni along with Blair, Merkel, Sarkozy, Boris, Orban, Buttegeig, Sarkozy and BlackRock's Fink.

    The thing that identifies all of these people, is that by and large they have unremarkable CVs prior to their elevation to power (of all of the abovenamed, only Boris was a reasonably exceptional student).

    Having been selected for WEF's YGL program is the most relevant thing to their subsequent ascent (many of them were unremarkable as students, too - so they're not being selected for cognitive 'grunt').

    It's somewhat like the Rhodes Scholarship (which is unabashedly an Anglo-supremacist movement" read its charter) - with few exceptions, Rhodes Scholars were never actually top-flight students: there was an ideological filter that was performed well before the kiddie was ever put forward.

    The Rhodes has 'pivoted' in the last decade or so, and is in its death throes as a group of global influence - in the same way that Masonic and Jesuit/OpusDei preferment networks faded into irrelevance.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @ScarletNumber

    he bitched out and backed down like a low-T NPC

    What do you mean? It seems like Neil stuck to his guns and had his songs removed.

  165. Sung to the tune of “The Loner” (Neil Young):

    Is it a code of honor
    That he just can’t un-codify?
    Is he a prima donna
    With opinions he won’t modify?
    Is he afraid of Corona?
    Is that why he’s off Spotify?

    No more Spotify content
    He took his songs and home he went
    Rogan lied
    Neil Young cried
    He’s the loser

    [MORE]

    • Thanks: frankie p
    • Replies: @frankie p
    @the one they call Desanex

    Great song, The Loner

    , @frankie p
    @the one they call Desanex

    We had our own alternative chorus back in the day, when we took these things for granted, waking up with them every morning, experiencing them at inconvenient times, etc.:

    Know when you feel it
    You've got to free it
    Unzip your fly
    Heave a sigh
    It's a boner

  166. Curious that among all these comments, no one commented on how this also sends an even stronger signal that Spotify is moving away from a music based business to a podcast/”talk radio” business model.

  167. @Whiskey
    Young was correct, and Petty wrong. The at-the-time resurgence of American Patriotism was a millstone around the neck of any artist who needed the support and prestige of the establishment. All Tom Petty did was write and perform songs that will be remembered for generations. Neil Young meanwhile though he will be forgotten ten minutes after he's dead, received the patronage and support of the ruling class.

    As usual the people matter not at all -- indeed no artist should aim for their support. Rather the elites. Thats why Young had all that money and Petty had to tour constantly.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ben tillman, @VivaLaMigra, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Well, I don’t remember Petty “tour[ing] constantly” but perhaps that explains why his voice was totally SHOT by the time he did the Super Bowl halftime show at least a decade before his relatively early death. I bought his early albums which I’d dub “The Essential Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers” but by the time of his MTV video phase – Alice in Wonderland, anybody? – there wasn’t enough solid material to make them worth buying – I’ll stick to “Damn the Torpedoes!” Thank You Very Much.

  168. @Juvenalis
    “Neil Young vs. Joe Rogen” is inaccurate. No evidence Joe Rogen knows who Neil Young is—rather Neil Young vs. Spotify. Young demanded Spotify remove Rogen's show over alleged medical "misinformation"—or else threatened to try to pull his songs. Faced with "him or me" ultimatum, Spotify called Young's bluff, preemptively obliged Neil's threats/demands, put to rest quickly removing all of Young's music—thereby warding off any protracted public feud, minimizing publicity Young was hoping to draw.

    Spotify sent a clear message to Neil how much of a fight they'd put up to keep his content on their platform—lest other activist celebs get ideas of threatening to hold song catalogs hostage to force Spotify to bend to ransom demands. No negotiations with terrorists.

    Humiliating own-goal on a personal level for Neil—but problems compounded by the fact that Neil doesn't actually fully own his songs. Just last year, on a day that will live in infamy, Neil Young sold 50% of the rights to his music catalog to investors at U.K.-based Hipgnosis Songs Fund (founded by veteran music industry exec CEO Merck Mercuriadis) for $150 million.

    Investors can't be happy that revenue from royalties on the catalog of 1,180 Neil Young songs they acquired will fall below expectations since his entire catalog was suddenly removed from the world's most popular music streaming service—all because ol' Neil had to run his big mouth desperately trying to virtue signal and appear relevant to younger generations.

    With more than 162.4 million subscribers in 2021, Spotify held 31% of global market share, more than double that of top competitors Apple Music (15%) and Amazon Music (13%). Despite Neil Young's protestations to the contrary, this was an enormously embarrassing episode—epic self-own.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/business-55557633

    Neil Young sells song rights in '$150m' deal
    6 January 2021


    An investment firm has bought 50% of the rights to all Neil Young's songs.

    Hipgnosis Songs Fund spent an estimated $150m (£110m) on 1,180 songs written by the Canadian folk rocker.

    The fund, which lets people invest in hit songs, has previously splashed out about £1bn snapping up rights to songs from the likes of Mark Ronson, Chic, Barry Manilow and Blondie.

    Founded by music industry veteran Merck Mercuriadis, Hipgnosis turns music royalties into an income stream.

    "This is a deal that changes Hipgnosis forever," said Mr Mercuriadis.

    "I bought my first Neil Young album aged seven. Harvest was my companion and I know every note, every word, every pause and silence intimately.
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @VivaLaMigra, @MEH 0910

    I’m sure it took Spotify exec’s all of five seconds to decide between Option A: Pull JR, to whom we contractually owe \$100 million in the Here and Now vs. Option B: Pull Young’s catalog which will generate FUTURE, but uncertain, revenues. All the while knowing that the organization which owns a 50% stake in said catalog will SUE Ol’ Neil’s sagging hippie ass for Tortious Interference, win, and put his financial balls through the wringer, at which point Loser Neil will be BEGGING us to make his mostly-crap material available to anyone who will click on it at a 40% discount.

  169. @Travis
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    It is now obvious that the vaccines failed, just as masks failed to stop the spread.
    Israel is currently overrun with cases, ICU admission hit record levels despite 90% fully vaccinated and 80% boosted. Cases in Israel are up 24,725% since they mandated the boosters.

    Vax all you want, but it won’t stop Omicron. Even Pfizer admits the vaccines offer little to no protection against the new variants which is the reason they will have a new vaccine available in March. The FDA recently banned Monoclonal antibodies because they were 'doing nothing' against omicron'. That's why FDA pulled its authorization. In 6 weeks these mandated vaccines will be banned by the FDA because they are not effective against the new variants.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @Old Prude, @Rob

    Good point…since the FDA banned the monoclonal antibodies they should soon outlaw the mRNA vaccines which are already outdated and are now obsolete , worthless and potentially harmful with little to no benefit against the new variants. (According to Pfizer)

    Even against the Alpha, beta, Delta variants these vaccines never approached 90% efficacy , as demonstrated with the data, the efficacy fell rapidly after 5 months. Pfizer realized the boosters would be required and began pushing the boosters last summer, begging the FDA to approve boosters when they realized the vaccines were failing after just 5 months as they admitted in their FDA application for booster authorization….These vaccines never would have been approved if they went thru the normal 2 year trials , since the efficacy rapidly fell below 50%….

  170. Oh no, now Joni Mitchell leaves Spotify in solidarity with Young! One more and it’s a trend. Who will be next?

  171. @JohnnyWalker123
    In 2020/21, youth crime declined significantly in England and Wales. See below.

    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1050107/Youth_Justice_Statistics_2020-21.pdf


    The number of children who received a caution or sentence has fallen
    by 17% in the last year with an 82% decrease over the last ten years.
     

    The number of first time entrants has fallen by 20% since the previous
    year, with an 81% fall from the year ending March 2011.

     


    The reoffending rate decreased by 3.6 percentage points in the last
    year and 4.1 percentage points from the year ending March 2010. This
    was the sixth consecutive year on year fall.

     

    Charts. As you can see below, an increasing proportion of youth arrests involve non-Whites (disproportionately Blacks).

    https://imgur.com/a/YUfjPe6

    https://imgur.com/a/ODpqdqY

    -Roughly 350,000 British youths were arrested in 2006/07. The number of arrests for 2020/21 was approximately 50,000. This implies a British youths were arrested ~7x more often 14 years ago (2006/07 vs 2020/21).
    -15,800 children were cautioned or sentenced in 2020/21. This compares to over 130,000 youth cautions & sentences in 2006/07.
    -There were 8,800 first-time entrants to the youth justice system. In 2006/07, the figure was over 110,000 first-time entrants.

    I was curious whether the above trends were a result of less youth misbehavior or a less punitive criminal justice system. Here's an answer.

    https://imgur.com/a/XUYfyV7

    As you can see in the above chart, the average custodial sentencing length has INCREASED over the last decade. So despite INCREASING harshness, fewer British youths are making their way into the system.

    The national incarceration rate (for all ages) was 138 (per 100,000 inhabitants) in 2020. In 2006, the rate was 145 per 100,000 inhabitants. So only a 5% decline. See below links.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/1022592/incarceration-rate-in-uk/

    https://www.prisonstudies.org/country/united-kingdom-england-wales

    Therefore, we can assume that the British criminal justice system hasn't become significantly less punitive in recent years. The system has either remained the same (as indicated by national the incarceration rate remaining nearly constant since 2006) or become more punitive (as measured by the average custodial sentencing length increasing notably in the last decade).

    So we can conclude that British youths are now committing criminal offences at a drastically lower rate than they were back in 2006. Which is fascinating.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mr. Peabody, @3g4me, @Bill Jones

    It ain’t unnecessarily so.
    Maybe the Brits just decriminalized a bunch of bottom-tier stuff. Places like NYC and SF will be reporting steep drops in crime now that they have stopped arresting the guys who shoot up in the park, shoplift, or take a dump on your shoes. And, they tend to treat their new in town Mohammedens the way we we treat our Black criminal class (i.e. DIE).
    On the other end of the graph they do tend to hammer their Hanibal Lechter types with serious prison time, but only after they have let them skate a few time.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Mr. Peabody

    If you look at my above data, you'll see the non-White proportion of youth arrests has INCREASED in recent years. So it doesn't appear that there's any attempt to racially bias arrests in favor of non-Whites.

    Here's a chart of the UK homicide rate over time.

    https://imgur.com/a/NZxyEx4

    If the British criminal justice system had become less punitive with time, we'd expect a major increase in the homicide rate. When petty criminals get away with low-level crimes, they often take that as a green light to escalate more serious stuff (like murder).

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

  172. @J1234
    Neil dumped his wife of close to 40 years for a movie star a few years back. Not long afterwards, his wife was diagnosed with cancer and died. He's in no position to preach to any of us about about anything, yet people like him do exactly...that all the time. That fits into my theory about the current world: Passionate public posturing and social justice from the left is moral camouflage for their amorality.

    Replies: @Rosie, @JimDandy, @Kronos, @Antiwar7, @Undisclosed

    Also, he kept having children, even when it was clear that every one of his children had serious disabilities. He sounds like a selfish person, who does not feel anyone’s pain.

  173. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    I read that Dean Martin earned $15 million in 1968.

    Replies: @William Badwhite

    I read that Dean Martin earned \$15 million in 1968.

    Not totally on topic, but Dean Martin’s son flew F-4’s for the CA Air National Guard – call sign was a not too original “Deano” – and he was killed flying a radar departure out of March AFB.

    I read that Dean Sr. never got over it.

    Guys that were in the F-4 community at the time say he was a stand-up guy and a solid (not great – he screwed up the departure that led to his and his WSO’s death) pilot. If F-4 guys were in the LA area they’d call Deano who would get them invites to the Playboy Mansion.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dean_Paul_Martin

  174. “…since almost nobody is gifted enough to do all these jobs terribly well…”

    Steve Winwood can do it all: produce, play any instrument needed, and he has astoundingly good pipes.

    • Replies: @Jimbo in OPKS
    @F. Galton

    Truth. Saw Winwood open for Michael McDonald once and Steely Dan once in past 5 yrs. He hasn’t lost a thing.

  175. Joni Mitchell has joined Team Young. These Boomer sex drugs and r&r types were into personal freedom, in the sense that they, personally, wanted to do whatever they felt like doing. Whatever. The old dead heads who host the Sirius channels are covid scolds, too. They’re old and scared, what are you gonna do?

    One thing about this thread: I’m not a ‘Neil Young fan’ either, but I like a few of his songs. I might even turn them up if they come in the radio, too.

    A lot of ‘not fans’ on here who cop to liking this or that song. Guy writes pop music, and he’s good at it . Who cares about the lyrics? Most pop lyrics are retarded. The good thing is a lot of them are incomprehensible. I know I’m not the only one who’s found out they were singing a line to a pop song that was actually something completely different.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Ghost of Bull Moose


    The old dead heads who host the Sirius channels are covid scolds, too. They’re old and scared, what are you gonna do?
     
    I noticed that too. The DJ's must have gotten a memo from corporate. Or, as you point out, they're all aging Boomers, so maybe it just comes naturally to them.

    What I want to know is - if I'm paying $170 a year for satellite radio, why the Hell do I still have to listen to DJ's yakking over the song intros? It really pisses me off.
    , @J.Ross
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Young did this really crummy legislation-through-music flop seeking to nudge the creation of electric cars. It is musically competant if sadly lacking in innovation. He tries to invoke American imagery of a character so inoffensively common and vague as to be meaningless, but it turned out Johnny Magic was a Saffa.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2qUn0yRSxw

  176. Another 70s hippy singer joins Neil Young and asks for her songs to be removed from Spotify:

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/irresponsible-people-are-spreading-lies-joni-mitchell-removes-music-spotify-solidarity

    Neil Young AND Joni Mitchell? Joe Rogan must surely now be regretting his scandalous dalliance with the free exchange of information.

  177. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Joni Mitchell has joined Team Young. These Boomer sex drugs and r&r types were into personal freedom, in the sense that they, personally, wanted to do whatever they felt like doing. Whatever. The old dead heads who host the Sirius channels are covid scolds, too. They’re old and scared, what are you gonna do?

    One thing about this thread: I’m not a ‘Neil Young fan’ either, but I like a few of his songs. I might even turn them up if they come in the radio, too.

    A lot of ‘not fans’ on here who cop to liking this or that song. Guy writes pop music, and he’s good at it . Who cares about the lyrics? Most pop lyrics are retarded. The good thing is a lot of them are incomprehensible. I know I’m not the only one who’s found out they were singing a line to a pop song that was actually something completely different.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @J.Ross

    The old dead heads who host the Sirius channels are covid scolds, too. They’re old and scared, what are you gonna do?

    I noticed that too. The DJ’s must have gotten a memo from corporate. Or, as you point out, they’re all aging Boomers, so maybe it just comes naturally to them.

    What I want to know is – if I’m paying \$170 a year for satellite radio, why the Hell do I still have to listen to DJ’s yakking over the song intros? It really pisses me off.

  178. It’s over: Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Bryan Adams, REO Speedwagon, Grace Slick, Barry Manilow, Dan Hill, Ray Stevens, Leonard Warren, Allan Eddy, Colin Wilkie, Louie “The Charmer” Walcott, and now Ethel Merman have demanded their catalogs be removed from Spotify in protest of Joe Rogan’s openness to ideas.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @J.Ross

    REO Speedwagon?! Man, those guys need to learn to roll with the changes.

    You know, you know, you know you got to... keep on rollin', keep on rollin' ...

    Also, remember, you can tune a piano, but you can't tuna fish.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEidbkibsiE

    , @Dieter Kief
    @J.Ross

    Thanks!

    , @The Alarmist
    @J.Ross

    I can hear that boardroom discussion: We hate to lose 37 listeners, but that Rogan guy is gold.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  179. @Travis
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    It is now obvious that the vaccines failed, just as masks failed to stop the spread.
    Israel is currently overrun with cases, ICU admission hit record levels despite 90% fully vaccinated and 80% boosted. Cases in Israel are up 24,725% since they mandated the boosters.

    Vax all you want, but it won’t stop Omicron. Even Pfizer admits the vaccines offer little to no protection against the new variants which is the reason they will have a new vaccine available in March. The FDA recently banned Monoclonal antibodies because they were 'doing nothing' against omicron'. That's why FDA pulled its authorization. In 6 weeks these mandated vaccines will be banned by the FDA because they are not effective against the new variants.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @Old Prude, @Rob

    As a person having been triple pricked, I say the vaccines worked at getting us to a point where face diapers weren’t mandatory, so yay vaccines for that!

    In the factory, everyone has diapered up again. It hasn’t done squat to stop the spread of the cooties in the work force. FWIW, the arrogant pricks who work for me in the machine shop refuse to diaper up. My team of undiapered contrarians (more including some anti-vaxxers) hasn’t had one case of Cooties.

    Face Diapers don’t do squat except dehumanize. Vaccines don’t do squat except allow you to shed the diaper.

  180. @MEH 0910
    @Bardon Kaldlan

    https://jonimitchell.com/news/newsitem.cfm?id=1592


    I Stand With Neil Young!
    Posted January 28, 2022

    I’ve decided to remove all my music from Spotify. Irresponsible people are spreading lies that are costing people their lives. I stand in solidarity with Neil Young and the global scientific and medical communities on this issue. —Joni Mitchell

    Read An Open Letter to Spotify: A call from the global scientific and medical communities to implement a misinformation policy.
     

    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1487369946086715399

    Replies: @Enemy of Earth, @TWS, @MEH 0910

    Methinks Joni’s cognitive function has been affected by her bout with Morgellons. Or maybe it’s creeping senility.

    P.S. I’ve always detested that phrase, “stand in solidarity with.” It’s such a retarded affectation. Can’t they just say, “I agree with?”

  181. BREAKING NEWS — it’s over for Rogan — Team Neil has been joined by another decisively great artist!

    [MORE]

  182. @Jim Given
    I was always amused at kids I knew taking "My My Hey Hey" seriously - not realizing it is a conscious ode to absurdity. Either that or the Artist was so coked out he thought the lyrics had Deep Meaning

    "This is the story of Johnny Rotten"

    No, it's not! There's nothing in the song about Johnny Rotten-

    Better to burn out than fade away-

    But that's Sid Vicious, not Johnny Rotten. Oh, wait! He just used the name "Johnny Rotten" to get the cheap rhyme!

    Out of the Blue and Into the Black

    Omigod! WHAT DOES THAT MEAN!?!

    Writing about this reminded me how awful pop music became in the late sixties and beyond.

    I Joyed in Rock while it was Still Fun-

    But how could all these fans of Neil Young and his absurdity not even mention the song:

    "Last Trip to Tulsa" ?

    Replies: @anon, @Achmed E. Newman, @VivaLaMigra, @Old Prude

    Yeah, sure the song doesn’t contain tight logic but all it needs to make it work is “Hey hey my my. Rock and Roll will never die.” and “Its better to burn out than to fade away”. All the rest is just frosting.

  183. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Joni Mitchell has joined Team Young. These Boomer sex drugs and r&r types were into personal freedom, in the sense that they, personally, wanted to do whatever they felt like doing. Whatever. The old dead heads who host the Sirius channels are covid scolds, too. They’re old and scared, what are you gonna do?

    One thing about this thread: I’m not a ‘Neil Young fan’ either, but I like a few of his songs. I might even turn them up if they come in the radio, too.

    A lot of ‘not fans’ on here who cop to liking this or that song. Guy writes pop music, and he’s good at it . Who cares about the lyrics? Most pop lyrics are retarded. The good thing is a lot of them are incomprehensible. I know I’m not the only one who’s found out they were singing a line to a pop song that was actually something completely different.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @J.Ross

    Young did this really crummy legislation-through-music flop seeking to nudge the creation of electric cars. It is musically competant if sadly lacking in innovation. He tries to invoke American imagery of a character so inoffensively common and vague as to be meaningless, but it turned out Johnny Magic was a Saffa.

  184. For someone who had enjoyed his first hit, Buffalo Springfield’s insidious “Mr. Soul,”

    Insidious? Okaaaay. Which came second, “Mr. Soul” or “Jumpin’ Jack Flash”? Either Neil Young or Keith Richards should sue.

  185. (back before “folk” implied “lesbian”),

    Sort of OT but folk started out in the late 40s/early 50s with a heavy lesbian (and Stalinist) tinge. It was only with the early 60s advents of beauties like Mary Travers, Joan Baez, Michelle Phillips, and others that it lost the dyke aura.

    But it returned to form.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Paperback Writer

    Don't forget Joni. Here in this 1966 Canadian TV hootenanny special, they open with a standard bit of Kingston-Trio-Nancy-Whiskeyish stuff, then she does a solo - and the rest of the players just stare at her as if a musical goddess dropped in from a nearby galaxy.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLu2-gG68S0

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

  186. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anon


    Yes, Cinnamon Girl isn’t bad, but it’s the only thing he ever created that wasn’t bad.
     
    As my President says, "C'mon, man!" Seriously, #175, give these 2 a chance. If you don't like the mellow ballad, check the 2nd one out for some serious distortion guitar. Note that Hey, Hey, My, My is not the same as My, My, Hey, Hey. (The tune is the same, but the first is the hard rocking version and the latter is the acoustic version - with different lyrics - from the 1st side of the album.)

    I could come up with 50 more great songs from this guy. I don't care if he's "as good" as some other musicians technically, he had a great sound, especially with the band Crazy Horse.

    You fans on here tell me if you've ever heard anything from the Hawks & Doves album. It's pretty obscure. How about you, Steve?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gc10vgmT_vk

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=331kyZ9OXMc

    Replies: @usNthem, @Steve Sailer

    I’m lodging a formal complaint about this video being posted and of course causing me to hit the play button. Now, this damn tune is embedded in my brain, which often happens with songs I don’t particularly care for. Damnation!

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @usNthem

    Take it up with Master Ron. I'm already on his shit-list. (That's a table in the database.) ;-}

    First, tell me which one. I cannot see how ANYONE could not like Comes a Time (the song).

    The lyrics really hit home for me way back, in the early 1990s when I first heard this album. BTW, how many of the erudite (I don't write that sarcastically) commenters here could explain to Neil Young, why it's not "a wonder tall trees ain't layin' down" due to "this old world keeps spinning round"? Anyone? Anyone? Isaac something ... Isaac? Anyone?

    Replies: @usNthem

  187. @JimDandy
    @J1234

    I've been asking why all these washed-up old Jewish guys passionately want to commit genocide on the unvaxxed--Chomsky, Howard Stern, Gene Simmons, Fauci (that's a joke because some people here say he's a crypto-Jew) etc. But, in fairness, Neil Young makes the case that it's washed-up old guys in general who are totally losing their minds over the unvaxxed.

    Replies: @Ripple Earthdevil, @Carol, @3g4me

    @42 Jim Dandy: “But, in fairness, Neil Young makes the case that it’s washed-up old guys in general who are totally losing their minds over the unvaxxed.”

    Washed-up old guys and women, and soyboi men who might as well be women. And the Han, and the sub-continentals in the Anglosphere, and anyone else who is anti-White.

    Gee, what a surprising overlap between that group and Sailer’s commentariat. So sorry, just noticing.

  188. @JohnnyWalker123
    In 2020/21, youth crime declined significantly in England and Wales. See below.

    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1050107/Youth_Justice_Statistics_2020-21.pdf


    The number of children who received a caution or sentence has fallen
    by 17% in the last year with an 82% decrease over the last ten years.
     

    The number of first time entrants has fallen by 20% since the previous
    year, with an 81% fall from the year ending March 2011.

     


    The reoffending rate decreased by 3.6 percentage points in the last
    year and 4.1 percentage points from the year ending March 2010. This
    was the sixth consecutive year on year fall.

     

    Charts. As you can see below, an increasing proportion of youth arrests involve non-Whites (disproportionately Blacks).

    https://imgur.com/a/YUfjPe6

    https://imgur.com/a/ODpqdqY

    -Roughly 350,000 British youths were arrested in 2006/07. The number of arrests for 2020/21 was approximately 50,000. This implies a British youths were arrested ~7x more often 14 years ago (2006/07 vs 2020/21).
    -15,800 children were cautioned or sentenced in 2020/21. This compares to over 130,000 youth cautions & sentences in 2006/07.
    -There were 8,800 first-time entrants to the youth justice system. In 2006/07, the figure was over 110,000 first-time entrants.

    I was curious whether the above trends were a result of less youth misbehavior or a less punitive criminal justice system. Here's an answer.

    https://imgur.com/a/XUYfyV7

    As you can see in the above chart, the average custodial sentencing length has INCREASED over the last decade. So despite INCREASING harshness, fewer British youths are making their way into the system.

    The national incarceration rate (for all ages) was 138 (per 100,000 inhabitants) in 2020. In 2006, the rate was 145 per 100,000 inhabitants. So only a 5% decline. See below links.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/1022592/incarceration-rate-in-uk/

    https://www.prisonstudies.org/country/united-kingdom-england-wales

    Therefore, we can assume that the British criminal justice system hasn't become significantly less punitive in recent years. The system has either remained the same (as indicated by national the incarceration rate remaining nearly constant since 2006) or become more punitive (as measured by the average custodial sentencing length increasing notably in the last decade).

    So we can conclude that British youths are now committing criminal offences at a drastically lower rate than they were back in 2006. Which is fascinating.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mr. Peabody, @3g4me, @Bill Jones

    @55 Johnny Walker 123: “So we can conclude that British youths are now committing criminal offences at a drastically lower rate than they were back in 2006. Which is fascinating.”

    Which is also phenomenally misleading and shortsighted, and in keeping with those who always think they can quantify the qualitative. Since England has gone full woke, it’s Whites who are so indiscreet as to voice their discomfort with becoming a hated minority in their own land who are jailed for ‘hate crimes.’ Meanwhile, Jamaicans and various other sub-Saharans go around knifing people, and the Pakis continue to rape White girls, but they don’t get jailed because of raycissm. And half the cops are either utterly brainwashed White hall monitors, or non-Whites who really get off on hassling White Englishmen.

    But go on pretending it’s just a numbers game – perhaps Steve will make you heir to his column.

  189. @Kronos
    @JohnnyWalker123

    How dare you insult the Scottish gene-stock as cowardly Sean Penn!

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/c3/f8/be/c3f8be5e6e76bbd159198704b39c2720.jpg

    Replies: @3g4me

    @110 Kronos: What would a subcon (JohnnyWalker123) know about manliness?

  190. @Anon
    I am not a particular fan of Tom Petty's music, but I can at least listen to it without changing to another radio station. As a person, I have more respect for Tom Petty than Neil Young. Neil Young is 10 times as goofy as Petty, and has produced a career of almost complete and utter tunelessness. Yes, Cinnamon Girl isn't bad, but it's the only thing he ever created that wasn't bad.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon, @TorontoTraveller, @Stirge, @anon

    Harvest is an amazing album, and heart of gold was the best song he has ever written. Rust never sleeps is another great album. I saw him in 1986 when he did a concert for flood relief in Cheyenne WY. Amazing stage presence, he had that ineffable star quality that can’t be faked. He’s done some good things in his life but on a personal level he’s an a-hole

  191. @Anon
    I am not a particular fan of Tom Petty's music, but I can at least listen to it without changing to another radio station. As a person, I have more respect for Tom Petty than Neil Young. Neil Young is 10 times as goofy as Petty, and has produced a career of almost complete and utter tunelessness. Yes, Cinnamon Girl isn't bad, but it's the only thing he ever created that wasn't bad.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon, @TorontoTraveller, @Stirge, @anon

    Heart of Gold and Old Man are classics

  192. @MEH 0910
    @Bardon Kaldlan

    https://jonimitchell.com/news/newsitem.cfm?id=1592


    I Stand With Neil Young!
    Posted January 28, 2022

    I’ve decided to remove all my music from Spotify. Irresponsible people are spreading lies that are costing people their lives. I stand in solidarity with Neil Young and the global scientific and medical communities on this issue. —Joni Mitchell

    Read An Open Letter to Spotify: A call from the global scientific and medical communities to implement a misinformation policy.
     

    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1487369946086715399

    Replies: @Enemy of Earth, @TWS, @MEH 0910

    What in the world? Do both Mitchell and Young use the crypt keeper’s plastic surgeon?

  193. On the topic of the Hauxxinations, I saw a meme that one of the Men of Unz should have coined:

    Truck Fudeau

    How did we miss that?

    https://off-guardian.org/2022/01/28/discuss-the-canadian-trucker-convoy/

  194. @J1234
    Neil dumped his wife of close to 40 years for a movie star a few years back. Not long afterwards, his wife was diagnosed with cancer and died. He's in no position to preach to any of us about about anything, yet people like him do exactly...that all the time. That fits into my theory about the current world: Passionate public posturing and social justice from the left is moral camouflage for their amorality.

    Replies: @Rosie, @JimDandy, @Kronos, @Antiwar7, @Undisclosed

    what a stupid little theory

  195. “…Crosby, Stills and Nash were the most popular band in America before Young joined, but Young immediately called the tunes…Young prefers working with mediocre musicians like Crazy Horse who can’t afford to walk out on him…”

    Further evidence that music critics have absolutely nothing to contribute to understanding music. As Frank said, “writing about music is like dancing about architecture”.

    Crosby, Stills and Nash were tiresome and trite before Young joined them and remained tiresome and trite after he left. Young’s music with Crazy Horse is still compelling and listenable even 40 years on.

    That said, anybody who takes medical or political advice from a musician or actor is too stupid to be allowed out unsupervised.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Wade Hampton


    Crosby, Stills and Nash were tiresome and trite before Young joined them and remained tiresome and trite after he left.
     
    Whiny chick music at best. I was on a road trip to the Grand Canyon in the summer of 1968 and they played Marakesh over and over and over again until I wanted to rip the radio out of the car. Problem was that it wasn't my car.
  196. @Carol
    @JimDandy

    The unvaxxed are handling their own genocide just fine, per r/HermanCainAward.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Very true, the robust beast–brimming with good health and youthful vitality–Herman Cain, sadly cut down BY/WITH/WHATEVS Covid in his prime.

    • Agree: Old Prude
  197. @The Alarmist
    The Daily Show might have said it best ...


    https://twitter.com/TheDailyShow/status/1485995182000689156?s=20&t=1lcPf3zxeC2Xky27aRuU6Q


    Though there is always this ...

    https://twitter.com/DonaldJTrumpJr/status/1486388986973200393?s=20&t=au827MgbOIEarc8Ao3HgCQ

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    “So Neil Young pulled his letter to Spotify because it seems he doesn’t even own his music portfolio anymore & therefore has no control. That checks out because he was in our offices a decade ago trying to sell it. We passed!”

    As of now, in the UK, Neil Young is definitely on Spotify.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @YetAnotherAnon

    I never got Neil Young. I found even The Psychadelic Furs a far more enjoyable listen.

  198. @Paperback Writer

    (back before “folk” implied “lesbian”),
     
    Sort of OT but folk started out in the late 40s/early 50s with a heavy lesbian (and Stalinist) tinge. It was only with the early 60s advents of beauties like Mary Travers, Joan Baez, Michelle Phillips, and others that it lost the dyke aura.

    But it returned to form.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    Don’t forget Joni. Here in this 1966 Canadian TV hootenanny special, they open with a standard bit of Kingston-Trio-Nancy-Whiskeyish stuff, then she does a solo – and the rest of the players just stare at her as if a musical goddess dropped in from a nearby galaxy.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Yes, I did forget her and thanks for this clip - her voice is unusually strong here albeit a bit too juvenile for my taste.

    Too bad she ruined it with all that smoking. If she hadn't smoked so much her voice would have matured beautifully.

    I forget their names but there were a whole bunch of other lesser folk starlets who got one album and then vanished. All very pretty.

  199. @Hibernian
    I hope Neil Young will remember

    Nobody needs him around, anyhow

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    People always talk about the Beach Boys palling around with Charlie Manson, but it’s less well known how close Young was with Chuck and the “Family”.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @AceDeuce

    We'll never know the full truth of that sordid story. I bet it's a doozy.

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @Brutusale

  200. @Whiskey
    Young was correct, and Petty wrong. The at-the-time resurgence of American Patriotism was a millstone around the neck of any artist who needed the support and prestige of the establishment. All Tom Petty did was write and perform songs that will be remembered for generations. Neil Young meanwhile though he will be forgotten ten minutes after he's dead, received the patronage and support of the ruling class.

    As usual the people matter not at all -- indeed no artist should aim for their support. Rather the elites. Thats why Young had all that money and Petty had to tour constantly.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ben tillman, @VivaLaMigra, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “Young was correct, and Petty wrong. ”

    I can’t believe
    This killing wish:
    There’s too many stars, and
    Not enough sky.
    Boys all think
    She’s living kindness;
    Well ask a fellow waitress.
    Yeah ask a a fellow waitress.

    — Tori Amos, “The Waitress”

  201. @Wade Hampton
    "...Crosby, Stills and Nash were the most popular band in America before Young joined, but Young immediately called the tunes...Young prefers working with mediocre musicians like Crazy Horse who can’t afford to walk out on him..."

    Further evidence that music critics have absolutely nothing to contribute to understanding music. As Frank said, "writing about music is like dancing about architecture".

    Crosby, Stills and Nash were tiresome and trite before Young joined them and remained tiresome and trite after he left. Young's music with Crazy Horse is still compelling and listenable even 40 years on.

    That said, anybody who takes medical or political advice from a musician or actor is too stupid to be allowed out unsupervised.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Crosby, Stills and Nash were tiresome and trite before Young joined them and remained tiresome and trite after he left.

    Whiny chick music at best. I was on a road trip to the Grand Canyon in the summer of 1968 and they played Marakesh over and over and over again until I wanted to rip the radio out of the car. Problem was that it wasn’t my car.

  202. @Travis
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    It is now obvious that the vaccines failed, just as masks failed to stop the spread.
    Israel is currently overrun with cases, ICU admission hit record levels despite 90% fully vaccinated and 80% boosted. Cases in Israel are up 24,725% since they mandated the boosters.

    Vax all you want, but it won’t stop Omicron. Even Pfizer admits the vaccines offer little to no protection against the new variants which is the reason they will have a new vaccine available in March. The FDA recently banned Monoclonal antibodies because they were 'doing nothing' against omicron'. That's why FDA pulled its authorization. In 6 weeks these mandated vaccines will be banned by the FDA because they are not effective against the new variants.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @Old Prude, @Rob

    Any idiot knows that they should do poly- or at least oligoclonal antibodies against a new disease without a stable serotype. The monoclonal antibody is one molecule. It binds a protein, yes. But it binds a small portion of a protein. I want to say averages seven good contacts, but could be wrong. I’ll google. Could not find it quickly. So, let’s just go with seven. If one mutates, that can be it (though usually not when tested) for binding. When tested, they almost always mutate to alanine, the smallest amino acid with a beta carbon in the side chain, but mutating to a larger one can completely abrogate the interaction by steric interference.

    A monoclonal antibody has the advantage that it is known to be neutralizing. And maybe they pick one with lots of strong interactions, or one that at least has a large and negative ΔG of binding. But finding the interactions requires alanine scanning. That can be done in parallel, but it’s a lot of resources if testing a lot of antibodies. I’m guessing but do not know that they didn’t do that for Remdesivir. Determining that a single monoclonal antibody is neutralizing is fairly easy. Could be done in parallel for a lot of monoclonal antibodies.

    Then take the ten best! Take 15! They probably do not all bind the same epitope. Do some competition assays to see! If nothing else, this gives you a competitive advantage against some asshole’s monoclonal antibody, especially when variants start showing up. And they will. This more closely imitates what an animal does. The antibody response to an infection can be thousands of clones. Though many will bind the same epitope, many will not be neutralizing.

    The FDA might’ve been a problem here. They make getting approval for a drug into a headache. I could not find an approved polyclonal antibody therapy, though, in fairness, hyperimmune serum is polyclonal. The more active ingredients your product has, the more likely the FDA is to nix it. Pretty sure they won’t let you continue with the application, crossing off that nixed antibody. “You see,” the FDA public servant says, “all your efficacy data was based on those 10 antibodies. Is nine the same as ten? Huh, is it? No, it is not. Collect more efficacy data with the nine antibody therapy, please. What’s that, the FDA should take into account the fact that there is no approved antibody therapy, so people are dying for no good reason? Mr. Pharma-man, I am getting awfully tired of these questions. The FDA mandate is to make sure drugs are safe. Not to make sure people don’t die. New efficacy data, please.”

    Especially when the FDA has never approved a combination antibody therapy. Will google. Looks like no. Granted, there’s nothing stopping a doctor for precribing two monoclonals together.

    • Thanks: Inquiring Mind
    • Replies: @Rob
    @Rob

    I was wrong on the combo monoclonal antibody thing. There’s an approved Ebola treatment, inmazeb, that is three monoclonals.

    Have to wonder why that’s not the best practice for antibody treatments of diseases with (possibly) evolving serotypes. Inmazeb is Regeneron, so one would think they’d have been willing to do an oligoclonal covid treatment. Probably easier approval with just one. Not to mention new products to deal with escape variants. Maybe not enough people get monoclonal antibodies to matter? But give the virus one antibody at a time, and maybe it can evolve around each in series. Give them three at a time, then escape is less likely, though not impossible.

    Replies: @bike-anarkist

  203. Well I hope Neil Young will remember, Spotify dont need him around any how.

  204. @Old Prude
    I love Live Rust. Put on headphones, turn up to 11, and just dig the screaming electric guitars. Neils weird high voice just makes the dish better. For all the other odd stuff, hippy-dippy stuff, he can be forgiven. Powder Finger on Live Rust redeems all.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Damn right, Old Prude! Powderfinger is one of my favorites. I’ve got Hey, Hey, My, My playing right now out of this lame-assed tablet’s speaker, so that’s nothing like hearing this at V=11. Even so, it’s so good that I can’t post this till the song’s over.

    That distortion makes it sound like he’s strumming on the lid of aa trash dumpster, but still!!

    BTW, Steve Sailer, Neil here is not completely sure it WAS Johnny Rotten. He goes “Is this the story of Johnny Rotten?” I’m like “hey, I don’t know man – you wrote the song.”

  205. @Dieter Kief
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I think Skynyrd forgave him and vice versa.

    BTW, Neil’s song Alabama Song would have pissed off many Southerners too, had they heard it. Again, the lyrics were stupid.

     

    Mod. these two quotes answer the questions you rise:


    Ronnie Van Zant: “We wrote ‘Alabama’ as a joke. We didn’t even think about it – the words just came out that way. We just laughed like hell, and said ‘Ain’t that funny’. We love Neil Young, we love his music.”

    Ronnie Van Zant sporting a Neil Young shirt. | photo credit: pinterest.com

    Neil Young: “I think “Sweet Home Alabama” is a great song. I’ve actually performed it live a couple of times myself. My own song “Alabama” richly deserved the shot Lynyrd Skynyrd gave me with their great record. I don’t like my words when I listen to it today.”

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    He who writes the best guitar riff wins. Decision: “Sweet Home Alabama” over “Southern Man.”

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer

    Hmmm, best guitar riff, yeah, I guess so. Best guitar solo - I like Free Bird, like any red-blooded American, but I'd say Neil's solo on Southern Man beats Skynyrd's on Free Bird. I know, blasphemer! Skynyrd had an advantage too, with like 3 guitars playing.

    If you want to beat them all, you need to push play on Blue Sky from the Allman Brother's Eat a Peach. Can't be beat (maybe Mark Knofler on Telegraph Road.

    First Duane Allman and Dicky Betts:

    (Best part is at 3:45.)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JSMubgZoL58

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Steve Sailer

    "Southern Man" is about the piano bump, not the guitar.

    btw, I sort of can't believe the Unzitariat has such incredibly crappy taste in music.

  206. @usNthem
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I'm lodging a formal complaint about this video being posted and of course causing me to hit the play button. Now, this damn tune is embedded in my brain, which often happens with songs I don't particularly care for. Damnation!

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Take it up with Master Ron. I’m already on his shit-list. (That’s a table in the database.) ;-}

    First, tell me which one. I cannot see how ANYONE could not like Comes a Time (the song).

    The lyrics really hit home for me way back, in the early 1990s when I first heard this album. BTW, how many of the erudite (I don’t write that sarcastically) commenters here could explain to Neil Young, why it’s not “a wonder tall trees ain’t layin’ down” due to “this old world keeps spinning round”? Anyone? Anyone? Isaac something … Isaac? Anyone?

    • Replies: @usNthem
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Hey hey, my my - I’m telling you, give Like A Hurricane a whirl - great song. Just don’t watch the video. Young is a freaking maniac on stage...

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Achmed E. Newman

  207. @S Johnson

    A few years later, though, Bob Dylan introduced the pop music version of the auteur theory, the assumption that the do-it-all singer-composer-lyricist-guitarist inevitably created more emotionally authentic music than specialists who each did one thing extremely well. Young’s broad but not infinitely deep set of talents was perfectly suited to make him Dylan’s most prominent disciple.
     
    The funny thing is Dylan seems to be the opposite of Young in a lot of ways: an introvert rather than an extrovert, someone who's ok with not being the dominant personality in a room, who tends to enjoy working with musicians more technically gifted than himself, not a hardball negotiator. Dylan's earliest memories of having bands in Minnesota were of perpetually losing them to more forceful personalities, leading him to launch himself as a solo star instead. And a list of guitarists he's worked with on some of his best projects would look like this: Mike Bloomfield, Robbie Robertson, Eric Clapton (on "Desire"), Mark Knopfler, Daniel Lanois (also as producer), G.E. Smith, Charlie Sexton. He writes in his autobiography about wishing he'd invited Mick Jones of the Clash to record with him while he was in his heyday as an experimental guitarist and producer.

    My impression is that Dylan's best 60s and 70s records just sort of came together spontaneously but that he lost interest in the recording process in the 80s and 90s, tending to defer to his producers like the Was brothers (e.g. the overproduced "Under the Red Sky" in 1990 contains cameos by the likes of Slash and Elton John). Similarly the way he tells it he ended up in the Traveling Wilburys out of a surfeit of politeness towards George Harrison.

    Eventually after a heart scare in 1997 he decided to get serious about making records again, brought back Lanois whom he'd clashed with making a decent record in 1989, and taught himself to produce them himself, while aging into the role of the live bandleader who knows what he wants too.

    Seinfeld writer Larry Charles tells a good story about Dylan's lack of appetite for confrontation: going into a TV studio meeting in the late 90s Dylan takes offence at a studio exec's comment about Woodstock and turns his chair away from the table to face out the window, not participating any more until the meeting ends. A female executive mouths to Charles "he's like a retarded child!". Pretty different from the 21-year-old Young's assertiveness.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Sounds like Dylan prefers to mostly live inside his own head, which, in his case, is pretty reasonable since he’s got an impressively original and interesting brain.

    • Replies: @S Johnson
    @Steve Sailer

    Funny anecdote:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gzR4Jf7G0Cw

    “Far out… he likes caviar.”

    Replies: @Anonymous

  208. @Steve Sailer
    @Dieter Kief

    He who writes the best guitar riff wins. Decision: "Sweet Home Alabama" over "Southern Man."

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Hmmm, best guitar riff, yeah, I guess so. Best guitar solo – I like Free Bird, like any red-blooded American, but I’d say Neil’s solo on Southern Man beats Skynyrd’s on Free Bird. I know, blasphemer! Skynyrd had an advantage too, with like 3 guitars playing.

    If you want to beat them all, you need to push play on Blue Sky from the Allman Brother’s Eat a Peach. Can’t be beat (maybe Mark Knofler on Telegraph Road.

    First Duane Allman and Dicky Betts:

    (Best part is at 3:45.)

  209. @JohnnyWalker123
    In 2020/21, youth crime declined significantly in England and Wales. See below.

    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1050107/Youth_Justice_Statistics_2020-21.pdf


    The number of children who received a caution or sentence has fallen
    by 17% in the last year with an 82% decrease over the last ten years.
     

    The number of first time entrants has fallen by 20% since the previous
    year, with an 81% fall from the year ending March 2011.

     


    The reoffending rate decreased by 3.6 percentage points in the last
    year and 4.1 percentage points from the year ending March 2010. This
    was the sixth consecutive year on year fall.

     

    Charts. As you can see below, an increasing proportion of youth arrests involve non-Whites (disproportionately Blacks).

    https://imgur.com/a/YUfjPe6

    https://imgur.com/a/ODpqdqY

    -Roughly 350,000 British youths were arrested in 2006/07. The number of arrests for 2020/21 was approximately 50,000. This implies a British youths were arrested ~7x more often 14 years ago (2006/07 vs 2020/21).
    -15,800 children were cautioned or sentenced in 2020/21. This compares to over 130,000 youth cautions & sentences in 2006/07.
    -There were 8,800 first-time entrants to the youth justice system. In 2006/07, the figure was over 110,000 first-time entrants.

    I was curious whether the above trends were a result of less youth misbehavior or a less punitive criminal justice system. Here's an answer.

    https://imgur.com/a/XUYfyV7

    As you can see in the above chart, the average custodial sentencing length has INCREASED over the last decade. So despite INCREASING harshness, fewer British youths are making their way into the system.

    The national incarceration rate (for all ages) was 138 (per 100,000 inhabitants) in 2020. In 2006, the rate was 145 per 100,000 inhabitants. So only a 5% decline. See below links.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/1022592/incarceration-rate-in-uk/

    https://www.prisonstudies.org/country/united-kingdom-england-wales

    Therefore, we can assume that the British criminal justice system hasn't become significantly less punitive in recent years. The system has either remained the same (as indicated by national the incarceration rate remaining nearly constant since 2006) or become more punitive (as measured by the average custodial sentencing length increasing notably in the last decade).

    So we can conclude that British youths are now committing criminal offences at a drastically lower rate than they were back in 2006. Which is fascinating.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mr. Peabody, @3g4me, @Bill Jones

    One thing I didn’t see (or possibly just overlooked) in your piece was any mention of the actual crime rate in the UK.
    You focused entirely on the criminal justice system side of things.
    A few other factors might be
    A. Britain have have become accustomed to a level of crime where it’s not seen as being worth reporting.
    B. The police may have ceased responding to and reporting on crimes committed against certain groups; such a few thousand white working class girls sexually abused, kidnapped, raped and beaten by Pakistanis. Straight into the Memory hole. Never happened.
    C. Police may have just refocused their attention on non-crimes like the plane that flew over a football match with a “White Lives Matter” banner, to such a degree that real crimes go un-resolved. Think of the squad of 12 FBI agents sent to investigate the non-crime of a none-noose hanging on the door of a garage allocated to a black-ish Nascar driver. Who knows how many exploding Mohammad’s went undetected that week?

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Bill Jones

    A national crime survey called "The Crime Survey for England and Wales" is conducted annually.
    The survey, which began in 1981, is conducted on behalf of the Office for National Statistics
    The survey asks members of the public about their experiences with criminal victimization over the last year. The benefit of this survey is that it includes unreported crime.

    The survey was previously conducted face-to-face, but it shifted to phone-based interviews during the Covid era.

    See the chart below to see the long-term trend in the number of experienced criminal incidents. As you can see, the crime rate seems to have fallen substantially in recent years. This suggests that there hasn't been a decline in policing or sentencing severity - otherwise we'd expect the opposite trend.

    A benefit of this data is that it can't be affected by misreporting by the police or courts. This data also doesn't rely on members of the public making formal complaints. This data is a measure of what the public reports having experienced. It's relatively fair and non-biased.

    https://imgur.com/a/7xV0Na7

    See more below.

    https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/bulletins/crimeinenglandandwales/yearendingmarch2021


    Since the mid-1990s, there have been long-term falls seen in overall CSEW crime estimates

     


    Telephone-operated Crime Survey for England and Wales (TCSEW)
    Estimates from the TCSEW are derived from a total of 36,801 telephone interviews conducted with household residents in England and Wales aged 18 years and over between 20 May 2020 and 31 March 2021.
     

    The Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) estimates continue to provide important information in relation to longer-term trends in crime from year ending December 1981 to year ending March 2020. TCSEW provides estimates of crime for the year ending March 2021 only.
     
    Here's a graph of police-reported homicides. Unlike other crimes, homicide is reported with nearly 100% consistency and precision. You can't really fudge the homicide rate (as you can do for other crimes).

    https://imgur.com/a/NZxyEx4

    While the rate has fluctuated with time, the general long-term trend is downward. If policing or sentencing severity had significantly weakened, we'd expect more homicides over time.

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Sam Malone

  210. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anon


    Yes, Cinnamon Girl isn’t bad, but it’s the only thing he ever created that wasn’t bad.
     
    As my President says, "C'mon, man!" Seriously, #175, give these 2 a chance. If you don't like the mellow ballad, check the 2nd one out for some serious distortion guitar. Note that Hey, Hey, My, My is not the same as My, My, Hey, Hey. (The tune is the same, but the first is the hard rocking version and the latter is the acoustic version - with different lyrics - from the 1st side of the album.)

    I could come up with 50 more great songs from this guy. I don't care if he's "as good" as some other musicians technically, he had a great sound, especially with the band Crazy Horse.

    You fans on here tell me if you've ever heard anything from the Hawks & Doves album. It's pretty obscure. How about you, Steve?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gc10vgmT_vk

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=331kyZ9OXMc

    Replies: @usNthem, @Steve Sailer

    I like “Powderfinger” — second best American civil war rock song by a Canadian.

  211. @Steve Sailer
    @S Johnson

    Sounds like Dylan prefers to mostly live inside his own head, which, in his case, is pretty reasonable since he's got an impressively original and interesting brain.

    Replies: @S Johnson

    Funny anecdote:

    “Far out… he likes caviar.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @S Johnson

    Here’s another good Dylan story. What a great time to be alive. Life was awesome:

    https://youtu.be/EOAowiF3y_8

    Replies: @S Johnson

  212. @Achmed E. Newman
    @usNthem

    Take it up with Master Ron. I'm already on his shit-list. (That's a table in the database.) ;-}

    First, tell me which one. I cannot see how ANYONE could not like Comes a Time (the song).

    The lyrics really hit home for me way back, in the early 1990s when I first heard this album. BTW, how many of the erudite (I don't write that sarcastically) commenters here could explain to Neil Young, why it's not "a wonder tall trees ain't layin' down" due to "this old world keeps spinning round"? Anyone? Anyone? Isaac something ... Isaac? Anyone?

    Replies: @usNthem

    Hey hey, my my – I’m telling you, give Like A Hurricane a whirl – great song. Just don’t watch the video. Young is a freaking maniac on stage…

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @usNthem

    Like a Hurricane is terrific.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @usNthem

    Give it a whirl? I've given it more than a few whirls. Yes, indeed. I did know a girl who shared this Neil Young album with me - she worked once at a place called The Hurricane. Yeah... I know ...

    Then you've got "Welfare mothers, make better lovers, dee-vorce-eeeee." "You'll see 'em in every laundromat in town, yeah ... (welfare mothers, make better lovers)". That one doesn't have any great melody to it, so, nah.

  213. @usNthem
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Hey hey, my my - I’m telling you, give Like A Hurricane a whirl - great song. Just don’t watch the video. Young is a freaking maniac on stage...

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Achmed E. Newman

    Like a Hurricane is terrific.

    • Agree: usNthem
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Steve Sailer

    Because of Neil Young's voice, a lot of his best stuff is better as a cover.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXoSiL8eiIQ

  214. @usNthem
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Hey hey, my my - I’m telling you, give Like A Hurricane a whirl - great song. Just don’t watch the video. Young is a freaking maniac on stage...

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Achmed E. Newman

    Give it a whirl? I’ve given it more than a few whirls. Yes, indeed. I did know a girl who shared this Neil Young album with me – she worked once at a place called The Hurricane. Yeah… I know …

    Then you’ve got “Welfare mothers, make better lovers, dee-vorce-eeeee.” “You’ll see ’em in every laundromat in town, yeah … (welfare mothers, make better lovers)”. That one doesn’t have any great melody to it, so, nah.

  215. @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Daniel H

    “Jimmy Page broke up the Yardbirds in 1968 partly due to the fact that after a very successful American tour they all OWED money.”

    And boy did he learn his lesson. After he formed Zeppelin he hired a heavy hitting gangster-like band manager who managed to negotiate something like a 90-10 split on gross revenue with the concert venues. As a result they were likely the richest band to that point in history.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Brutusale, @Joe S.Walker, @Seekers

    The Yardbirds were managed by Mickie Most, an old-school rip-off artist who had the additional disadvantage of thinking there was no point whatever in spending time or money on the recording of albums. They might have done better in America if their last couple of albums hadn’t been, respectively, a rag-bag of demos and first takes and an incompetently-recorded live album. I’m surprised Page didn’t place an Aleister Crowley-inspired curse on him.

  216. @F. Galton
    "...since almost nobody is gifted enough to do all these jobs terribly well..."

    Steve Winwood can do it all: produce, play any instrument needed, and he has astoundingly good pipes.

    Replies: @Jimbo in OPKS

    Truth. Saw Winwood open for Michael McDonald once and Steely Dan once in past 5 yrs. He hasn’t lost a thing.

  217. Anon[270] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad
    Could not care less what Neil Young thinks, but I'm a huge supporter of vaccines as well--one of the very best inventions of man. (Lots of people today have no idea how casually lethal the "before time" was.)

    But censoring debate is one of the worst inventions of man.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @jsm, @Kronos, @Mr. Anon, @JR Ewing, @anonymous coward, @Anon

    I’m a huge fan of traditional vaccines too. I knew polio survivors growing up, not a pretty life.

    However vaccination policies must be revised as time goes on within a given population. Just like what happened with smallpox, some vaccines become obsolete. Others come along, like papilloma.

    Vaccinations are not innocuous medical acts, and should be free and informed. Regulators should do their job properly. Oh, and mRNA covid vaccines are not vaccines. Rather than prevent infection, they clearly work as a treatment-by-subscription, like Amazon’s “suscribe and save” drugs gambit. Oh, and with ómicron it is not clear that they prevent “serious covid” either, see Table 14 pf 44: https://www.publichealthscotland.scot/media/11318/22-01-26-covid19-winter_publication_report.pdf

  218. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Paperback Writer

    Don't forget Joni. Here in this 1966 Canadian TV hootenanny special, they open with a standard bit of Kingston-Trio-Nancy-Whiskeyish stuff, then she does a solo - and the rest of the players just stare at her as if a musical goddess dropped in from a nearby galaxy.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLu2-gG68S0

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    Yes, I did forget her and thanks for this clip – her voice is unusually strong here albeit a bit too juvenile for my taste.

    Too bad she ruined it with all that smoking. If she hadn’t smoked so much her voice would have matured beautifully.

    I forget their names but there were a whole bunch of other lesser folk starlets who got one album and then vanished. All very pretty.

  219. @AceDeuce
    @Hibernian

    People always talk about the Beach Boys palling around with Charlie Manson, but it's less well known how close Young was with Chuck and the "Family".

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    We’ll never know the full truth of that sordid story. I bet it’s a doozy.

    • Agree: AceDeuce
    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @Paperback Writer

    Today--the day after my original post, Takimag's The Week that Perished article for today mentions Young in the context of his little tantrum over Joe Rogan, and lo and behold it mentions Young's Manson connection--says NY bought Charlie a motorcycle. I hadn't heard/don't remember that.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    , @Brutusale
    @Paperback Writer

    This guy had a lot to do with Manson's introduction to the LA rock scene.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terry_Melcher

  220. Anon[270] • Disclaimer says:
    @JR Ewing
    @AnotherDad

    Vaccines are modern technological miracles that have contributed more to the betterment of society than most people realize.

    But even though they are called by the same name, these covid injections are not real vaccines, which is why so many people are such useful idiots for the pharmo-tyranny complex, as your comment so aptly demonstrates.

    Replies: @Anon

    @ Vaccines are modern technological miracles..

    Indeed. In order of importance: clean drinking water, antibiotics, vaccines.

    For quite a long time, medical congresses tackled the question of how to enlarge the captive vaccine market. One possible solution was to homologate rules between Japan, Europe & USA, to lower costs and time to market. Another was to extend patent duration. Yet another was to negotiate adverse events funds with the national governments. Adverse events was the Achilles’ heel of the industry, because vaccinations reach huge numbers of healthy people, and that considerable increases the chances of people noticing adverse effects and blaming them on vaccines (sometimes wrongly).

    Anyway, it seems that lately, someone decided to cross the line between contemplation and action, and has hugely increased the vaccine market (conflating vaccines with genetic therapeutics) while lowering financial risk.

  221. anon[650] • Disclaimer says:
    @R.G. Camara
    Paul Joseph Watson has pointed out the "feud" may be deeper and more sinister than you think.

    50% of Neil's song catalog is owned by Hipgnosis Songs Fund, which in turn is owned by The Blackstone Group. The Blackstone Group's CEO is Stephen Schwartzman, a World Economic Forum (WEF) member---and the WEF has called for censorship of "misinformation" against the vaccines. And The Blackstone Group's senior adviser is Jeffrey Kindler, former Pfizer CEO.

    In other words, a globalist group making bank off vaccines and trying to stop people from questioning the vaccines trotted Neil Young out there to parrot their globalist talking points and then financially punish Spotify by spiting their face.

    It's not Neil Young v. Joe Rogan, its the World Deep State v. Joe Rogan.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbq1VqjlM10

    Replies: @anon

    Fine but was Young has already gotten his money. Is he being bribed or threatened?

    As far as drugs/money and corruption, a drug like Humera is bank:

    AbbVie’s Humira has increased its revenue from 2011 to 2018, generating 7.9 billion U.S. dollars in 2011, a record high of 19.9 billion U.S. dollars in 2018, and 19.8 billion in 2020. Humira is expected to continue its success in the near future. It is projected to maintain similar high revenues.

    I’d believe AbbVie would do virtually anything for Humera.

    Firms like Blackstone aren’t betting on outcomes. They own the casino.

  222. @TorontoTraveller
    @Anon

    His late 80's / early 90's album "Freedom" is truly fantastic. "Harvest" is obviously great. I'm thinking that you may not know as much about music as you think you do.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  223. @TorontoTraveller
    @Hypnotoad666

    "Down by the river
    I shot my baby"

    is not a lyric about committing homicide. It is a lyric about injecting heroin.

    I'm seeing a lot of commenters on this thread who seem way more out of touch than Neil Young seems to be.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan, @Hypnotoad666

    …not a lyric about committing homicide. It is a lyric about injecting heroin.

    I’m seeing a lot of commenters on this thread who seem way more out of touch than Neil Young seems to be.

    Perhaps you can recommend a good heroin injection primer to remedy their ignorance?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Veteran Aryan

    You don't need a primer, just one push... the needle and the spoon, and a trip to the moon...

    (More Skynyrd there, but no, I am ignorant, as I've never seen this done or known anyone who's taken it.)

  224. Young just gotta have his shots.

  225. @Veteran Aryan
    @TorontoTraveller


    ...not a lyric about committing homicide. It is a lyric about injecting heroin.

    I’m seeing a lot of commenters on this thread who seem way more out of touch than Neil Young seems to be.
     
    Perhaps you can recommend a good heroin injection primer to remedy their ignorance?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    You don’t need a primer, just one push… the needle and the spoon, and a trip to the moon…

    (More Skynyrd there, but no, I am ignorant, as I’ve never seen this done or known anyone who’s taken it.)

  226. @J.Ross
    It's over: Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Bryan Adams, REO Speedwagon, Grace Slick, Barry Manilow, Dan Hill, Ray Stevens, Leonard Warren, Allan Eddy, Colin Wilkie, Louie "The Charmer" Walcott, and now Ethel Merman have demanded their catalogs be removed from Spotify in protest of Joe Rogan's openness to ideas.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Dieter Kief, @The Alarmist

    REO Speedwagon?! Man, those guys need to learn to roll with the changes.

    You know, you know, you know you got to… keep on rollin’, keep on rollin’ …

    Also, remember, you can tune a piano, but you can’t tuna fish.

  227. @usNthem
    @roonaldo

    Kinda like Reagan playing Springsteen’s “born in the USA “, which was hardly a patriotic song, at some of his rallies. Of course old Brucey objected to it as well.

    Replies: @roonaldo

    I remember how odd it was for the Reagan camp to adopt that song, but I suppose it is still being misconstrued. I wouldn’t put it past them to use The Guess Who’s “American Woman” if they put a female on the ballot.

    For cringeworthiness, nothing tops Al Gore and the Dem’s “La Macarena” craze. If they adopted Jimi Hendrix’s “Star Spangled Banner” to open their gatherings, that’d be progress.

    I gotta cut Neil some slack, though. His open air concert awhile back in Boise was a great time–I’d never seen him live. Nils Lofgren is playing with him again, too.

  228. @Steve Sailer
    @usNthem

    Like a Hurricane is terrific.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Because of Neil Young’s voice, a lot of his best stuff is better as a cover.

  229. @S Johnson
    @Steve Sailer

    Funny anecdote:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gzR4Jf7G0Cw

    “Far out… he likes caviar.”

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Here’s another good Dylan story. What a great time to be alive. Life was awesome:

    • Agree: S Johnson
    • Replies: @S Johnson
    @Anonymous

    Al Kooper’s naive organ-playing on “Like a Rolling Stone” is a good example of a great sound that wouldn’t have happened under a more controlling, type-A bandleader.

  230. Have the powers that be nudged Barbara Streisand to withdraw her catalog yet?
    An Australian anon explains how things work:

    My dad who’s never heard (fell on deaf ears) of Joe Rogan before
    –sees the news this week trash talking Joe Rogan.
    –wonders to himself who is this evil man, maybe I’ll see for myself.
    –switches on a Joe Rogan podcast
    –three hours later he tells me that Joe is mostly objective and unjudging, just asks questions that people genuinely want to ask
    –says he will definitely be listening to Joe’s podcasts in the future
    –[too] many to interviews to chose from
    –tells me he’s gotta go and finish off another JRE

    If a book gets banned you know there is something in there they don’t want you to know.

  231. @Reg Cæsar
    @Franz


    Young might be one of the one in a million manager who knows that the division of labor among humans include how they protect their turf. Boilermakers form unions, liberal arts majors have professional organizations, and as a songwriter Young has ASCAP. All of them provide protection and networking.
     
    ASCAP's overprotection led to the creation of its rival, BMI, and thus to its members' royalties being cut in half:

    ASCAP’s economic and cultural heft overwhelmingly benefited older musicians, incumbent musical styles, and the music produced by its mainly white artists... Blacks were often discriminated against and as of 1939, only six of its one-hundred-seventy members were black. Jelly Roll Morton was denied membership for years. Duke Ellington gained admission only because his white manager Irving Mills took co-writer credits for much of his work... If it was possible, country artists were even less welcome:

    " I tried to get into ASCAP as far back as 1930, and I could not. Later I had many numbers, big hits, but I still never could get into ASCAP."
    Gene Autry

    Jimmie Rodgers got in two years after death. Bob Wills in 1957, twenty years after composing and writing hits. Important and influential songwriters like A.P. Carter, Ernest Tubb, and Roy Acuff never got in.




    https://www.history-of-rock.com/ascap-bmi-war.htm
     
    I'm surprised that Young was even in ASCAP. Canada has her own licensing agencies; perhaps that has something to do with it.

    The worst result of the ASCAP-BMI turf war was prohibiting Johnny Mercer from setting Antonio Carlos Jobim's music to English, which he had done with European tunes such as "Autumn Leaves" and "Summer Wind". Maybe someday drafts will be discovered in a lost Mercer suitcase.

    One way which ASCAP protects Young is seen here:


    https://www.abajournal.com/news/article/neil-young-sues-to-stop-trump-campaign-from-using-his-songs-will-consent-decrees-stand-in-the-way

    Replies: @Franz

    @ Reg Cæsar —

    Thanks for the links.

    It’s just more evidence that the union model was a dead-end in America for anybody. A local steel plant took a strike vote in the 1990s and not one black steelworker showed up at the union hall.

    When a younger member asked why, he had to be told that when those workers were young, they couldn’t even fill out an application for work. It was the unions that kept that kept things segregated in the north, not the government.

    Black workers were hired by the company. And that was who they were loyal to. It made the idea of union solidarity a joke.

  232. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I've heard Brits wonder why kids these days aren't getting as drunk as they did in the 1990s.

    Replies: @Excal, @JohnnyWalker123, @Anonymous

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/09/world/europe/britain-youth-drinking-alcohol.html

    Britain’s ‘New Puritans’: Youth Drinking Falls Dramatically

    When Xenia Clegg Littler and her friends were underage, their idea of fun was shopping, walking in parks and eating ice cream, not doing shots or chugging beer. She never had a drink until she was 18, the legal age in Britain and now, at 19, she has as little interest in alcohol as ever.

    “I’d rather wake up in the morning and get on with my day and achieve what I want to achieve than wake up with a massive hangover,” said Ms. Clegg Littler, an actress from West London. “I need to have control over where I am, and what I do.”

    Teenage and young adult drinking has fallen drastically in recent years all across Europe, and nowhere as much as in Britain. In less than a generation, British teenagers have gone from being among the biggest underage imbibers anywhere in Europe to being about average.

    There are competing ideas about what is driving the trend, but it has been documented in multiple studies, including one released in late September, based on surveys conducted every four years for the World Health Organization in more than 30 countries.

    In 2002, according to the W.H.O. study, about 26 percent of European 15-year-olds drank alcohol at least once a week, but by 2014, that had dropped to 13 percent. The surveys measured England, Scotland and Wales separately, but their results were similar, and taken together, the share of 15-year-olds who were regular drinkers there fell from about 46 percent to about 10 percent.

    A report from the University of Sheffield, based on a different set of surveys and also released recently, found similarly striking results among minors and young adults in England. In 2002, 25 percent of people aged 8 to 12 said they had tried alcohol, but in 2016, just 4 percent had. In 2001, it found, only 12 percent of English 16- and 17-year-olds considered themselves non-drinkers; in 2016, that was up to 35 percent.

    Binge drinking and drunkenness by young people have also declined, in Britain and across Europe, but not as steeply as regular or occasional drinking. (Youth drinking has also declined significantly in the United States — where underage binge drinking has taken center stage in Supreme Court confirmation hearings — but it has long been less prevalent than in Europe, and has not dropped as sharply.)

    The theories about why young Britons drink less than their predecessors are intriguing but unproven, said James Nicholls, the director of research and policy development at Alcohol Research UK, a nonprofit group. But he suggested that the spread of social media is one factor.

    “Alcohol doesn’t play as important a role in socializing as it did in the past,” Mr. Nicholls said. “Young people can now have an active social life without leaving their house.”

    Social media has made users more image-conscious, he noted, while also providing lasting documentation, in text and images, of behavior people might prefer to forget.

    “There’s a trend of greater sense of health consciousness among young people,” Mr. Nicholls added. “There’s a move away from alcohol and drugs, there’s less of a culture of intoxication.”

    Under government pressure and the threat of losing their licenses, British pubs, once known for being lax about underage drinking, have grown much more vigilant over the last generation about demanding identification from young patrons. The Sheffield study looked at where underage drinkers were when they had tried to get alcohol, and the source that declined the most, by far, was pubs.

    Alex Boote, 19, a student at University College of London who grew up in Cornwall, said he drank primarily at parties before turning 18, but even then, he said, it was only an occasional thing.

    “I think that at that age the idea is that you drink to get drunk,” he said. “And I do think it’s still definitely considered cool when you’re young — smoking is what has become a lot less cool than it used to be.”

    But he supported the theory that social media has helped drive adolescent alcohol consumption downward, “because it gives people more ways to impress others than getting drunk at parties.”

    Alcohol has become more expensive in Britain over the last decade, driven in part by higher taxes, which may help dissuade young drinkers. Some young people guessed a reason for the decline is that their peers have become more likely to resort to drugs like marijuana and ecstasy, which are often more accessible to minors than alcohol.

    “I suppose it was a combination of it being more cool and more enjoyable,” said James Samouel, a 19-year-old history student who grew up in south London, referring to marijuana use by peers. “A health thing as well — alcohol is so much worse for you.”

    But in fact, surveys show that drug use, while still common, has also become less prevalent among young people.

    “It doesn’t seem that people are switching from drinking to drugs,” said Dr. Melissa Oldham, the lead author of the Sheffield University report. “It’s a move away from alcohol and drugs to other hobbies.”

    Mr. Nicholls pointed to another possible explanation for young people turning away from alcohol. Their parents grew up in an era when youth drinking was more common and may still be regular drinkers.

    “If it’s what your parents did,” he said, “it’s not cool.”

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @JohnnyWalker123

    My son's alcohol consumption is as close to zero as makes no difference. Black v White compared to mine at his age.
    My free time hobbies were things like rebuilding car engines (The unsung beauty of the original Mini was that with two mates you could tip it on its side onto an old mattress and take the subframe with engine and transmission out in half an hour) His are things like fishing and hiking.
    We had a spare TV set but he reckoned he didn't have space for it in his room. He gets his mind-numbing via the web.
    Comparing pictures of him and me at his age there is no doubt as to paternity but one does wonder.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  233. The Needle and the Damage Done indeed

  234. @Bill Jones
    @JohnnyWalker123

    One thing I didn't see (or possibly just overlooked) in your piece was any mention of the actual crime rate in the UK.
    You focused entirely on the criminal justice system side of things.
    A few other factors might be
    A. Britain have have become accustomed to a level of crime where it's not seen as being worth reporting.
    B. The police may have ceased responding to and reporting on crimes committed against certain groups; such a few thousand white working class girls sexually abused, kidnapped, raped and beaten by Pakistanis. Straight into the Memory hole. Never happened.
    C. Police may have just refocused their attention on non-crimes like the plane that flew over a football match with a "White Lives Matter" banner, to such a degree that real crimes go un-resolved. Think of the squad of 12 FBI agents sent to investigate the non-crime of a none-noose hanging on the door of a garage allocated to a black-ish Nascar driver. Who knows how many exploding Mohammad's went undetected that week?

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    A national crime survey called “The Crime Survey for England and Wales” is conducted annually.
    The survey, which began in 1981, is conducted on behalf of the Office for National Statistics
    The survey asks members of the public about their experiences with criminal victimization over the last year. The benefit of this survey is that it includes unreported crime.

    The survey was previously conducted face-to-face, but it shifted to phone-based interviews during the Covid era.

    See the chart below to see the long-term trend in the number of experienced criminal incidents. As you can see, the crime rate seems to have fallen substantially in recent years. This suggests that there hasn’t been a decline in policing or sentencing severity – otherwise we’d expect the opposite trend.

    A benefit of this data is that it can’t be affected by misreporting by the police or courts. This data also doesn’t rely on members of the public making formal complaints. This data is a measure of what the public reports having experienced. It’s relatively fair and non-biased.

    View post on imgur.com

    See more below.

    https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/bulletins/crimeinenglandandwales/yearendingmarch2021

    Since the mid-1990s, there have been long-term falls seen in overall CSEW crime estimates

    Telephone-operated Crime Survey for England and Wales (TCSEW)
    Estimates from the TCSEW are derived from a total of 36,801 telephone interviews conducted with household residents in England and Wales aged 18 years and over between 20 May 2020 and 31 March 2021.

    The Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) estimates continue to provide important information in relation to longer-term trends in crime from year ending December 1981 to year ending March 2020. TCSEW provides estimates of crime for the year ending March 2021 only.

    Here’s a graph of police-reported homicides. Unlike other crimes, homicide is reported with nearly 100% consistency and precision. You can’t really fudge the homicide rate (as you can do for other crimes).

    View post on imgur.com

    While the rate has fluctuated with time, the general long-term trend is downward. If policing or sentencing severity had significantly weakened, we’d expect more homicides over time.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Thanks, that's the missing piece,

    I've noticed that English Football hooligans can't even terrorize the continent anymore.
    The place has gone to the dogs.

    , @Sam Malone
    @JohnnyWalker123

    This data indicating a longterm decline in crime committed by British youth is interesting and pretty surprising. I wonder if the answer could be something as simple as the new tech being more likely to keep crime-prone youth glued to their screens?

    Maybe the kids increasingly are just zoned out at home looking at their snapchat updates on their smart phones and killing people with baseball bats in GTA V on their gaming console while streaming Squid Game on their HD flat screen, such that they can no longer be arsed to actually get out and about in the fresh air and attack innocent bystanders for no reason with the same vigor and consistency seen in prior decades.

    Very powerful gaming systems coupled with high-quality, immersive games that can be played in real-time against or with peers have exploded in popularity over the last 20 years, with continual improvements making them ever more appealing and addictive. The rise of smart phones has also occurred in the last decade and a half, along with the advent of social media. The highly addictive (and sedentary) nature of both have been very noticeable, particularly among the young. High-quality flat screen TVs are also a development of the last 15-20 years, and the streaming services delivering all the sports and entertainment you could want are even more recent. All together, they make staying inside alone and not moving a hell of a lot more engrossing than it used to be.

    Then to top it all off, there would be the added inclination to passivity which is induced by use of the heavy 'skunk' weed which has been pervasive among underclass British youth since at least the 1990s.

  235. @Mr. Peabody
    @JohnnyWalker123

    It ain't unnecessarily so.
    Maybe the Brits just decriminalized a bunch of bottom-tier stuff. Places like NYC and SF will be reporting steep drops in crime now that they have stopped arresting the guys who shoot up in the park, shoplift, or take a dump on your shoes. And, they tend to treat their new in town Mohammedens the way we we treat our Black criminal class (i.e. DIE).
    On the other end of the graph they do tend to hammer their Hanibal Lechter types with serious prison time, but only after they have let them skate a few time.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    If you look at my above data, you’ll see the non-White proportion of youth arrests has INCREASED in recent years. So it doesn’t appear that there’s any attempt to racially bias arrests in favor of non-Whites.

    Here’s a chart of the UK homicide rate over time.

    View post on imgur.com

    If the British criminal justice system had become less punitive with time, we’d expect a major increase in the homicide rate. When petty criminals get away with low-level crimes, they often take that as a green light to escalate more serious stuff (like murder).

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The Tories have more or less been in office for a long time in Britain and they don't like crime.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @JohnnyWalker123, @JMcG

    , @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Hasn't the prime minister been a Tory for the last dozen years?

  236. @Steve Sailer
    @Whiskey

    My guess is that Tom Petty wound up with plenty of money. His heirs took in $20 million more than expected in the three months after his death due to all the extra playing of his songs on the radio and the like.

    My general impression of Petty is that he liked show biz and was pretty good at the money side of it. He lived in the two most cliched places for stars to live: Mulholland Drive and Malibu beach. He was popular in L.A. for being the anti-Eagles: Like Don Henley, Petty was another redneck who made it big in the big city, but unlike Henley he didn't complain constantly about how soul-crushing Los Angeles was. Petty seemed to enjoy being a rich Hollywood rock star.

    Replies: @anon, @Mark G.

    He also made it with Stevie Nicks I think.

  237. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Mr. Peabody

    If you look at my above data, you'll see the non-White proportion of youth arrests has INCREASED in recent years. So it doesn't appear that there's any attempt to racially bias arrests in favor of non-Whites.

    Here's a chart of the UK homicide rate over time.

    https://imgur.com/a/NZxyEx4

    If the British criminal justice system had become less punitive with time, we'd expect a major increase in the homicide rate. When petty criminals get away with low-level crimes, they often take that as a green light to escalate more serious stuff (like murder).

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    The Tories have more or less been in office for a long time in Britain and they don’t like crime.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Steve Sailer


    The Tories have more or less been in office for a long time in Britain and they don’t like crime.
     
    You haven’t been paying attention: This stretch of Tory rule has been nothing but a crime and graft fest that makes Tony Blair blush with admiration.
    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Steve Sailer


    The Tories have more or less been in office for a long time in Britain and they don’t like crime.

     


    Hasn’t the prime minister been a Tory for the last dozen years?

     

    The Tories were in power from 1979 through 1997 (Thatcher and Major).
    Labor was in power from 1997 through 2010 (Blair and Brown).
    Tories have been in power from 2010 onward (Cameron, May, Johnson).

    So the fall in the rates of crime & homicide preceded Tory rule.

    By the way, why was there so much crime in the UK in the late 1990s? Any explanation?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @S Johnson

    , @JMcG
    @Steve Sailer

    Rotherham?

  238. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Mr. Peabody

    If you look at my above data, you'll see the non-White proportion of youth arrests has INCREASED in recent years. So it doesn't appear that there's any attempt to racially bias arrests in favor of non-Whites.

    Here's a chart of the UK homicide rate over time.

    https://imgur.com/a/NZxyEx4

    If the British criminal justice system had become less punitive with time, we'd expect a major increase in the homicide rate. When petty criminals get away with low-level crimes, they often take that as a green light to escalate more serious stuff (like murder).

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    Hasn’t the prime minister been a Tory for the last dozen years?

  239. @Rex Little
    @Chris Mallory


    Well I heard Mister Young sing about her
    Well I heard ol’ Neil put her down
    Well I hope Neil Young will remember
    A southern man don’t need him around anyhow
     
    Below a certain age (50, maybe?) people wouldn't have heard of Neil Young if not for those lyrics.

    Replies: @anon

    The grunge guys hyped him all the time (he even made a record with Pearl Jam). So 15 year olds in 19995 would be around 40 today, and they’d know him if they were paying the least bit attention.

  240. @J.Ross
    It's over: Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Bryan Adams, REO Speedwagon, Grace Slick, Barry Manilow, Dan Hill, Ray Stevens, Leonard Warren, Allan Eddy, Colin Wilkie, Louie "The Charmer" Walcott, and now Ethel Merman have demanded their catalogs be removed from Spotify in protest of Joe Rogan's openness to ideas.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Dieter Kief, @The Alarmist

    Thanks!

  241. @YetAnotherAnon
    @The Alarmist

    "So Neil Young pulled his letter to Spotify because it seems he doesn’t even own his music portfolio anymore & therefore has no control. That checks out because he was in our offices a decade ago trying to sell it. We passed!"

    As of now, in the UK, Neil Young is definitely on Spotify.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    I never got Neil Young. I found even The Psychadelic Furs a far more enjoyable listen.

  242. @J.Ross
    It's over: Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Bryan Adams, REO Speedwagon, Grace Slick, Barry Manilow, Dan Hill, Ray Stevens, Leonard Warren, Allan Eddy, Colin Wilkie, Louie "The Charmer" Walcott, and now Ethel Merman have demanded their catalogs be removed from Spotify in protest of Joe Rogan's openness to ideas.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Dieter Kief, @The Alarmist

    I can hear that boardroom discussion: We hate to lose 37 listeners, but that Rogan guy is gold.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @The Alarmist

    I have seen a claim from a supposed Spotify executive that the only musicians they care about are current ones, but even then Rogan is bigger and his fans don't overlap. The right (and the right-by-Overton) owns long format interview. The closest the left has is NPR, which never sits down with anyone and lets them talk. Everything on NPR is edited to hell and the newer stuff like RadioLab is irritatingly short attention span (the style on RadioLab is to constantly interrupt themselves).

  243. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Bill Jones

    A national crime survey called "The Crime Survey for England and Wales" is conducted annually.
    The survey, which began in 1981, is conducted on behalf of the Office for National Statistics
    The survey asks members of the public about their experiences with criminal victimization over the last year. The benefit of this survey is that it includes unreported crime.

    The survey was previously conducted face-to-face, but it shifted to phone-based interviews during the Covid era.

    See the chart below to see the long-term trend in the number of experienced criminal incidents. As you can see, the crime rate seems to have fallen substantially in recent years. This suggests that there hasn't been a decline in policing or sentencing severity - otherwise we'd expect the opposite trend.

    A benefit of this data is that it can't be affected by misreporting by the police or courts. This data also doesn't rely on members of the public making formal complaints. This data is a measure of what the public reports having experienced. It's relatively fair and non-biased.

    https://imgur.com/a/7xV0Na7

    See more below.

    https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/bulletins/crimeinenglandandwales/yearendingmarch2021


    Since the mid-1990s, there have been long-term falls seen in overall CSEW crime estimates

     


    Telephone-operated Crime Survey for England and Wales (TCSEW)
    Estimates from the TCSEW are derived from a total of 36,801 telephone interviews conducted with household residents in England and Wales aged 18 years and over between 20 May 2020 and 31 March 2021.
     

    The Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) estimates continue to provide important information in relation to longer-term trends in crime from year ending December 1981 to year ending March 2020. TCSEW provides estimates of crime for the year ending March 2021 only.
     
    Here's a graph of police-reported homicides. Unlike other crimes, homicide is reported with nearly 100% consistency and precision. You can't really fudge the homicide rate (as you can do for other crimes).

    https://imgur.com/a/NZxyEx4

    While the rate has fluctuated with time, the general long-term trend is downward. If policing or sentencing severity had significantly weakened, we'd expect more homicides over time.

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Sam Malone

    Thanks, that’s the missing piece,

    I’ve noticed that English Football hooligans can’t even terrorize the continent anymore.
    The place has gone to the dogs.

  244. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Steve Sailer

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/09/world/europe/britain-youth-drinking-alcohol.html


    Britain’s ‘New Puritans’: Youth Drinking Falls Dramatically

     


    When Xenia Clegg Littler and her friends were underage, their idea of fun was shopping, walking in parks and eating ice cream, not doing shots or chugging beer. She never had a drink until she was 18, the legal age in Britain and now, at 19, she has as little interest in alcohol as ever.

    “I’d rather wake up in the morning and get on with my day and achieve what I want to achieve than wake up with a massive hangover,” said Ms. Clegg Littler, an actress from West London. “I need to have control over where I am, and what I do.”

    Teenage and young adult drinking has fallen drastically in recent years all across Europe, and nowhere as much as in Britain. In less than a generation, British teenagers have gone from being among the biggest underage imbibers anywhere in Europe to being about average.

    There are competing ideas about what is driving the trend, but it has been documented in multiple studies, including one released in late September, based on surveys conducted every four years for the World Health Organization in more than 30 countries.

    In 2002, according to the W.H.O. study, about 26 percent of European 15-year-olds drank alcohol at least once a week, but by 2014, that had dropped to 13 percent. The surveys measured England, Scotland and Wales separately, but their results were similar, and taken together, the share of 15-year-olds who were regular drinkers there fell from about 46 percent to about 10 percent.

    A report from the University of Sheffield, based on a different set of surveys and also released recently, found similarly striking results among minors and young adults in England. In 2002, 25 percent of people aged 8 to 12 said they had tried alcohol, but in 2016, just 4 percent had. In 2001, it found, only 12 percent of English 16- and 17-year-olds considered themselves non-drinkers; in 2016, that was up to 35 percent.

    Binge drinking and drunkenness by young people have also declined, in Britain and across Europe, but not as steeply as regular or occasional drinking. (Youth drinking has also declined significantly in the United States — where underage binge drinking has taken center stage in Supreme Court confirmation hearings — but it has long been less prevalent than in Europe, and has not dropped as sharply.)

    The theories about why young Britons drink less than their predecessors are intriguing but unproven, said James Nicholls, the director of research and policy development at Alcohol Research UK, a nonprofit group. But he suggested that the spread of social media is one factor.

    “Alcohol doesn’t play as important a role in socializing as it did in the past,” Mr. Nicholls said. “Young people can now have an active social life without leaving their house.”

    Social media has made users more image-conscious, he noted, while also providing lasting documentation, in text and images, of behavior people might prefer to forget.

    “There’s a trend of greater sense of health consciousness among young people,” Mr. Nicholls added. “There’s a move away from alcohol and drugs, there’s less of a culture of intoxication.”

    Under government pressure and the threat of losing their licenses, British pubs, once known for being lax about underage drinking, have grown much more vigilant over the last generation about demanding identification from young patrons. The Sheffield study looked at where underage drinkers were when they had tried to get alcohol, and the source that declined the most, by far, was pubs.

    Alex Boote, 19, a student at University College of London who grew up in Cornwall, said he drank primarily at parties before turning 18, but even then, he said, it was only an occasional thing.

    “I think that at that age the idea is that you drink to get drunk,” he said. “And I do think it’s still definitely considered cool when you’re young — smoking is what has become a lot less cool than it used to be.”

    But he supported the theory that social media has helped drive adolescent alcohol consumption downward, “because it gives people more ways to impress others than getting drunk at parties.”

    Alcohol has become more expensive in Britain over the last decade, driven in part by higher taxes, which may help dissuade young drinkers. Some young people guessed a reason for the decline is that their peers have become more likely to resort to drugs like marijuana and ecstasy, which are often more accessible to minors than alcohol.

    “I suppose it was a combination of it being more cool and more enjoyable,” said James Samouel, a 19-year-old history student who grew up in south London, referring to marijuana use by peers. “A health thing as well — alcohol is so much worse for you.”

    But in fact, surveys show that drug use, while still common, has also become less prevalent among young people.

    “It doesn’t seem that people are switching from drinking to drugs,” said Dr. Melissa Oldham, the lead author of the Sheffield University report. “It’s a move away from alcohol and drugs to other hobbies.”

    Mr. Nicholls pointed to another possible explanation for young people turning away from alcohol. Their parents grew up in an era when youth drinking was more common and may still be regular drinkers.

    “If it’s what your parents did,” he said, “it’s not cool.”
     

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    My son’s alcohol consumption is as close to zero as makes no difference. Black v White compared to mine at his age.
    My free time hobbies were things like rebuilding car engines (The unsung beauty of the original Mini was that with two mates you could tip it on its side onto an old mattress and take the subframe with engine and transmission out in half an hour) His are things like fishing and hiking.
    We had a spare TV set but he reckoned he didn’t have space for it in his room. He gets his mind-numbing via the web.
    Comparing pictures of him and me at his age there is no doubt as to paternity but one does wonder.

    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Bill Jones

    Have you ever seen the show UK Skins?

    It was claimed that this show was based on the lives of the youths of Bristol , England. I recall this show was popular back in 2007. That was right before the fall in teen pregnancy, crime, and alcohol consumption began in the UK.

    Here's a trailer for the show.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lyq-EvsIC7o

    Is there any realism to the show? Was British youth culture like that 15 years ago (before British youths sobered up and straightened themselves out)?

  245. This just in …

  246. A democracy of today’s liberals = Rule of the Stupid People

    “American liberals are obsessed with finding ways to silence and censor their adversaries. Every week, if not every day, they have new targets they want de-platformed, banned, silenced, and otherwise prevented from speaking or being heard (by “liberals,” I mean the term of self-description used by the dominant wing of the Democratic Party)….

    “It is not possible to disagree with liberals or see the world differently than they see it. The only two choices are unthinking submission to their dogma or acting as an agent of “disinformation.” Dissent does not exist to them; any deviation from their worldview is inherently dangerous — to the point that it cannot be heard.”

    https://greenwald.substack.com/p/the-pressure-campaign-on-spotify

  247. Crime, Covid and Classic Rock: Welcome to the Boomer Old Folks Home Thread.

    • LOL: Kylie
  248. Here’s a great piece from Greenwald about the “Liberal” need to censor.

    It’s worth the read if only for the quote from the Clinton bint about grifting.

    The lack of self-awareness of these things is astonishing.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/greenwald-pressure-campaign-remove-joe-rogan-spotify-reveals-liberal-religion-censorship

  249. And here’s a nice piece about Neil Young’s links to Pfizer,

    https://tessa.substack.com/p/neil-young-pfizer

  250. @MEH 0910
    @Bardon Kaldlan

    https://jonimitchell.com/news/newsitem.cfm?id=1592


    I Stand With Neil Young!
    Posted January 28, 2022

    I’ve decided to remove all my music from Spotify. Irresponsible people are spreading lies that are costing people their lives. I stand in solidarity with Neil Young and the global scientific and medical communities on this issue. —Joni Mitchell

    Read An Open Letter to Spotify: A call from the global scientific and medical communities to implement a misinformation policy.
     

    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1487369946086715399

    Replies: @Enemy of Earth, @TWS, @MEH 0910

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @MEH 0910

    Did someone create a Boomer version of Spotify???

  251. @KevinB
    @vinteuil

    Not really. Rogan notices what he wants to notice and anything outside of that desire is ignored or rationalized away. I suspect he has a nose for ratings, and what may or may not be acceptable to his audience.

    Here's Joe with Eric Weinstein on IQ differences between racial groups. Note how Joe is visibly irritated by the notion that low average Black G has anything to do with world wide Black dysfunction. I suspect his displeasure is less virtue signaling and more an innate desire to protect the "little people," -- most likely because he has some inherent brutal instincts. But who knows:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcr5tkN02eg


    Joe with evolutionary scientist Bret Weinstein on the true reason why Blacks are impoverished.

    https://youtu.be/NR7gDJGFW5A?t=900

    The entire Bret Weinstein interview at the below link. It's interesting to watch all the way through as it displays how thoughtful "Progressives", like Joe and Brett, are unable to accommodate reality, all the while discussing why accommodating reality is an absolute necessity in contemporary discussions --- discussions that are increasingly bound by radical left wing proscription. Bret was apparently subjected to some good ole fashioned Maoist struggle, and that forced him to do a re-think on some of his positions:

    https://youtu.be/pRCzZp1J0v0

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Kronos, @Harry Baldwin

    Acknowledging racial differences in average intelligence is something no one with any kind of public platform is willing to do. Joe Rogan, Scott Adams, Ann Coulter, Tucker Carlson–none of them will do it. Even the late, great radio host Bob Grant, who would go where most men fear to tread, would never go quite that far. I don’t know about Rogan, but I’m pretty sure the others understand the issue but know better than to talk about it. Look what happens to anyone who does.

    Adams once discussed an idea that I found revealing of his perspective–that there’s knowledge that is not useful knowledge, in that there’s nothing useful you can do with it. I think he feels that if we were to accept the reality of lower average black intelligence, then what? So instead he blames blacks’ poor academic performance on the teachers’ unions for denying school choice. That’s bullshit and Adams must know that, but it’s useful. Teachers’ unions, being such a powerful element of the progressive coalition, are worth attacking for that reason alone.

    How we can survive continuing to deny the obvious truth of group differences? I don’t know. It seems it will be the death of us. At the same time, I can’t condemn public figures for not wanting to be banished from the public arena. We all remember Stefan Molyneux.

  252. @Paperback Writer
    @AceDeuce

    We'll never know the full truth of that sordid story. I bet it's a doozy.

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @Brutusale

    Today–the day after my original post, Takimag’s The Week that Perished article for today mentions Young in the context of his little tantrum over Joe Rogan, and lo and behold it mentions Young’s Manson connection–says NY bought Charlie a motorcycle. I hadn’t heard/don’t remember that.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @AceDeuce

    If you're interested in the subject, an unstable gay journo named Tom O'Neill wrote a book called Chaos, about the Manson gang. I've referred to it a couple of times. The book itself is a total data dump, very poorly written, and repetitive BUT full of fantastic basic research.

    It's worth a read - but be prepared to dig.

    Replies: @Sick 'n Tired

  253. @Goatweed
    Does Young still own his music?

    If he doesn’t, do the owners has cause against him?

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    Does Young still own his music?

    If he doesn’t, do the owners has cause against him?

    The owners of his music have strong ties to Pfizer.

    Ol Neil maybe has a cause against them.

  254. @AceDeuce
    @Paperback Writer

    Today--the day after my original post, Takimag's The Week that Perished article for today mentions Young in the context of his little tantrum over Joe Rogan, and lo and behold it mentions Young's Manson connection--says NY bought Charlie a motorcycle. I hadn't heard/don't remember that.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    If you’re interested in the subject, an unstable gay journo named Tom O’Neill wrote a book called Chaos, about the Manson gang. I’ve referred to it a couple of times. The book itself is a total data dump, very poorly written, and repetitive BUT full of fantastic basic research.

    It’s worth a read – but be prepared to dig.

    • Thanks: AceDeuce
    • Replies: @Sick 'n Tired
    @Paperback Writer

    Tom O'Neill was a guest on Joe Rogan's podcast and explained the book and a lot of the information in it as well. I read it afterwards and found his interview helped understand the book better.

    https://open.spotify.com/episode/4OXGSwuHYf0gHtJxGWIbLL?si=qvghF5O4TJOwVvmn_174gA&utm_source=copy-link

  255. Who’s a worse singer:

    Neil Yong or Bob Dylan

    IMO neither can carry a tune.

    I prefer 70s Black and KC and the Sunshine Band Disco.

    I like to partner dance.

    To all these preachy folk and rock “singers” that can’t carry a tune I say:

    “Shut up and dance”.

    • Replies: @S Johnson
    @annonymous

    Dylan’s voice was very strong during the 1970s, although it’s pretty beat-up now (although still capable of achieving some great effects, check out “Shake Shake Mama” from 2009):

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=smb86Il2sgA

    Replies: @usNthem

  256. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The Tories have more or less been in office for a long time in Britain and they don't like crime.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @JohnnyWalker123, @JMcG

    The Tories have more or less been in office for a long time in Britain and they don’t like crime.

    You haven’t been paying attention: This stretch of Tory rule has been nothing but a crime and graft fest that makes Tony Blair blush with admiration.

  257. @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/RollingStone/status/1487583884132945924

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    Did someone create a Boomer version of Spotify???

  258. Quite apart from the rights and the wrongs of this, I’m struck by how damn old Young and Mitchell are. They’ve been friends for 60 years.

    This is the “we are stardust” “never trust anyone over 30” generation!

    Jim Morrison had he lived would be 78!

    Robby Krieger is a wizened old man!!

  259. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Kratoklastes

    "The WEF didn’t spend four decades grooming a clique of narcissistic sociopaths and infiltrating them into global power structures, to have a comedian turn it all to shit."

    Damn, son! 😃

    Yo Sailer: 300K dead pre vax, 600K dead post vax. Wha happened?¡¿

    Replies: @Travis, @Kratoklastes

    I haven’t heard Rogan say “Damn, son!” for quite a while.

    I’ve never been able to get away with referring to something as “the shit” in a positive context.

    Whenever I try to use that – e.g., “Eugyppius’ substack is the shit” – it gets wildly misinterpreted.

    Pull that shit up, Jamie remains au courant.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Kratoklastes

    Joe was sure saying "fuck" a lot when he had Tulsi Gabbard on. Perhaps it's what's on his mind when she's sitting across the table from him.

  260. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The Tories have more or less been in office for a long time in Britain and they don't like crime.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @JohnnyWalker123, @JMcG

    The Tories have more or less been in office for a long time in Britain and they don’t like crime.

    Hasn’t the prime minister been a Tory for the last dozen years?

    The Tories were in power from 1979 through 1997 (Thatcher and Major).
    Labor was in power from 1997 through 2010 (Blair and Brown).
    Tories have been in power from 2010 onward (Cameron, May, Johnson).

    So the fall in the rates of crime & homicide preceded Tory rule.

    By the way, why was there so much crime in the UK in the late 1990s? Any explanation?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Pretty much "Clockwork Orange" came true in England in the 1990s, especially urban yobs driving out to the countryside to commit home invasions and steal cars. I went to a business lunch in a nice suburb of Oxford in 1994 and the only thing the locals talked about for an hour was getting their cars stolen.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Harry Baldwin

    , @S Johnson
    @JohnnyWalker123

    New Labour reformed the police root-and-branch to make them much more of a crime-recording agency than crime-fighting force (a change already underway since the gradual move away from foot patrol introduced by the previous Labour government). And in 2004 the statistics method was changed to allow police services themselves to define whether and what crime reported by a victim had been committed. So it’s doubtful crime has objectively fallen since the late 1990s, much more likely that the figures are just massaged politically.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  261. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I've heard Brits wonder why kids these days aren't getting as drunk as they did in the 1990s.

    Replies: @Excal, @JohnnyWalker123, @Anonymous

    I’ve heard Brits wonder why kids these days aren’t getting as drunk as they did in the 1990s.

    Greater proportion of Muslims?

  262. @Rob
    @Travis

    Any idiot knows that they should do poly- or at least oligoclonal antibodies against a new disease without a stable serotype. The monoclonal antibody is one molecule. It binds a protein, yes. But it binds a small portion of a protein. I want to say averages seven good contacts, but could be wrong. I’ll google. Could not find it quickly. So, let’s just go with seven. If one mutates, that can be it (though usually not when tested) for binding. When tested, they almost always mutate to alanine, the smallest amino acid with a beta carbon in the side chain, but mutating to a larger one can completely abrogate the interaction by steric interference.

    A monoclonal antibody has the advantage that it is known to be neutralizing. And maybe they pick one with lots of strong interactions, or one that at least has a large and negative ΔG of binding. But finding the interactions requires alanine scanning. That can be done in parallel, but it’s a lot of resources if testing a lot of antibodies. I’m guessing but do not know that they didn’t do that for Remdesivir. Determining that a single monoclonal antibody is neutralizing is fairly easy. Could be done in parallel for a lot of monoclonal antibodies.

    Then take the ten best! Take 15! They probably do not all bind the same epitope. Do some competition assays to see! If nothing else, this gives you a competitive advantage against some asshole’s monoclonal antibody, especially when variants start showing up. And they will. This more closely imitates what an animal does. The antibody response to an infection can be thousands of clones. Though many will bind the same epitope, many will not be neutralizing.

    The FDA might’ve been a problem here. They make getting approval for a drug into a headache. I could not find an approved polyclonal antibody therapy, though, in fairness, hyperimmune serum is polyclonal. The more active ingredients your product has, the more likely the FDA is to nix it. Pretty sure they won’t let you continue with the application, crossing off that nixed antibody. “You see,” the FDA public servant says, “all your efficacy data was based on those 10 antibodies. Is nine the same as ten? Huh, is it? No, it is not. Collect more efficacy data with the nine antibody therapy, please. What’s that, the FDA should take into account the fact that there is no approved antibody therapy, so people are dying for no good reason? Mr. Pharma-man, I am getting awfully tired of these questions. The FDA mandate is to make sure drugs are safe. Not to make sure people don’t die. New efficacy data, please.”

    Especially when the FDA has never approved a combination antibody therapy. Will google. Looks like no. Granted, there’s nothing stopping a doctor for precribing two monoclonals together.

    Replies: @Rob

    I was wrong on the combo monoclonal antibody thing. There’s an approved Ebola treatment, inmazeb, that is three monoclonals.

    Have to wonder why that’s not the best practice for antibody treatments of diseases with (possibly) evolving serotypes. Inmazeb is Regeneron, so one would think they’d have been willing to do an oligoclonal covid treatment. Probably easier approval with just one. Not to mention new products to deal with escape variants. Maybe not enough people get monoclonal antibodies to matter? But give the virus one antibody at a time, and maybe it can evolve around each in series. Give them three at a time, then escape is less likely, though not impossible.

    • Replies: @bike-anarkist
    @Rob

    You are still wrong to assume that the Medical Industry can do better than nature, which includes one's natural immunity.
    The only reason for pharmacological interventions is promoting "convenience".
    Convenience = $$$, and muh vacation, muh kidz hockey, muh trivial pursuit.

    In sum: the worship of Mammon! It doesn't matter that the "thing" one paid so much for is meaningless, it only matters that one spent so much for it. Nothing to do with"free markets".

    The Coronaprank has illuminated society's inherent destructive narcissism. That narcisism has created Commodified Human beings, now treated no better than domestic livestock (QR codes) and are GMO to boot!

    Replies: @Rob

  263. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Steve Sailer


    The Tories have more or less been in office for a long time in Britain and they don’t like crime.

     


    Hasn’t the prime minister been a Tory for the last dozen years?

     

    The Tories were in power from 1979 through 1997 (Thatcher and Major).
    Labor was in power from 1997 through 2010 (Blair and Brown).
    Tories have been in power from 2010 onward (Cameron, May, Johnson).

    So the fall in the rates of crime & homicide preceded Tory rule.

    By the way, why was there so much crime in the UK in the late 1990s? Any explanation?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @S Johnson

    Pretty much “Clockwork Orange” came true in England in the 1990s, especially urban yobs driving out to the countryside to commit home invasions and steal cars. I went to a business lunch in a nice suburb of Oxford in 1994 and the only thing the locals talked about for an hour was getting their cars stolen.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Steve Sailer

    I believe you once speculated that the deindustrialization of the 80s&90s created a socially & economically marginalized White underclass in the UK. The forerunners of the "Chavs."

    Here's one article that I found that might be relevant.

    https://vdare.com/articles/charles-murray-gets-readmitted-to-polite-society-at-a-price-ignoring-immigration


    Blue-collar whites are doing reasonably well in Germany, but they seem to be falling apart even faster in Britain than in America.

    Neither Coming Apart nor its critics explore this phenomenon.

    Back in 2005, I offered half-dozen reasons for why British “youfs” were turning into Ali Gs more rapidly than their distant cousins in America.

    One key reason: the chief divide in England is class, while in America it’s race. White working class Americans have retained one subliminal, unspoken bit of racial pride: they believe street crime is a black thing, not a white thing.

    In confirmation, last August in England, blacks started looting and white yobs followed them into the streets. It’s hard to imagine that happening on a large scale in America. Historian David Starkey caused a huge uproar by saying on the BBC what everybody was sensing:

    "What has happened is that a substantial section of the chavs … have become black. … The whites have become black. A particular sort of violent destructive, nihilistic gangster culture has become the fashion and black and white boys and girls operate in this language together.”
     
    You wrote another good article here.

    https://vdare.com/articles/how-much-ruin-in-a-nation-uk-vs-us-white-working-class

    Why have the morals of the white working class in the U.S. proven more resilient than those of their white counterparts in Great Britain?

     


    So, despite obvious problems, such as the crystal methamphetamine epidemic, the American white working class has shown more impressive moral hardiness than the English.

     


    Religion. Perhaps the most striking and important difference: the strength of Christianity here—whereas the main religious emotion in Britain is apathy.
     

    Culture
     

    widespread filtering of yobbo norms up the social scale in Britain–soccer replacing cricket and rugby or the spread of the downscale Estuary English accent into the upper middle classes—merely reflects how the educated classes in Britain have lost control of the culture. Similarly, middle-class African-Americans have lost control to the gangsta rappers.

     


    Guns (not what you think). While the rate of assault has been higher in England than America, angry Americans are more lethal because of our hundreds of millions of guns.

    But, on the other hand, burglary is a far safer career choice in Britain because the chance of being blown away by a homeowner is low
     

    Lack of federalism. Parliament reigns supreme, so localities don't compete to see who has the most hard-nosed police departments like they do in America.

     


    Speed. Remember the tale of how to boil a frog? Just keep raising the temperature imperceptibly so the frog never notices it's being boiled alive. (Don't try this at home, kids.) Something similar happened in England, where society fell apart so slowly that elite opinion had time to get used to each new outrage.

     


    Class vs. Race. The central divide in Britain is class—in America, it's race. And that has had a little understood salutary effect on white working class Americans.

    In England, the sons of maharajas were often more welcome at Eton and Oxford than the sons of fishmongers. Similarly, in the last couple of decades, blacks have been more welcomed into the working class in Britain than in America—because British working class identity centers on not acting like a toff. The entrance requirements to the working class are amiably relaxed—no need for "the rain in Spain falls mainly on the plain" elocution lessons. If you like 'aving a pint with your mates at the pub while watching Arsenal on the telly,' well, you're halfway home.

    Likewise, English youth see the gangsta rap lifestyle as a bit of a lark (as brilliantly parodied by Sacha Baron Cohen's brainless wigger Ali G). In contrast, white working class Americans view it, based on the abundant evidence provided by American blacks, as a one-way ticket to prison and the grave.
     
    It's interesting to think back on that time, when things were so different.

    It appears that the UK seems to have gotten control over issues like crime, youth misbehavior, and teen drinking.

    Teen pregnancy too.

    https://imgur.com/a/SQ88UbZ
    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Steve Sailer

    The England that Anthony Burgess imagined was still a white England, though. Alex and his droogs would be Pakistanis or Jamaicans now.

  264. @Daniel H
    Young bought that ranch around 1970 or so. He had had a few decent selling albums by that time, and decent airplay for a few songs but can such bring in THAT much money to afford a huge ranch just 40 miles from San Francisco, in the uplands of Silicon Valley, or was rural northern California land unusually cheap at that time?

    Artists notoriously get ripped off on their first record deal. If Young's records sold, say, about 400K units by 1970 I can imagine him earning a few ten cents for each record sold. It's not that much money. And touring could leave you broke. Jimmy Page broke up the Yardbirds in 1968 partly due to the fact that after a very successful American tour they all OWED money. In 1976 after touring for 18 months the Allman Brothers each took home a payday of 20K.

    Trying to wrap my head about how much a successful and well managed rock and roller could earn at that time. Grateful Dead out of necessity bunking together, living off 300/week, some performers driven to suicide by desperation despite selling millions of recofds (Badfinger). My guess is that Young took in about 50K per year 69-70. I base this on the fact that when Brian Jones parted with the Stones the previous year they offered him a settlement of 20K Sterling for the indefinite future, and the Stones had to be a much more lucrative outfit than Neil Young, so I imagine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @NorthOfTheOneOhOne, @Hapalong Cassidy, @James J O'Meara, @Eric Novak

    What you haven’t taken into consideration is the explosion of the live music market in arenas, beginning in the 1980s. My ticket stubs from the beginning of the decade for popular live rock acts have prices of \$10-\$15. By the end of the decade, seats in the same sections are 4-5x the price. Ticket prices exploded even further in the 1990s and 2000s, thus making even touring legacy artists like Neil Young very rich.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Eric Novak

    It's possible that the majority of concerts I saw from say 1977-1988 cost no more than $10. I think the Rolling Stones in 1978 might have been in the $15 or $20 range, although it's all very hazy in my memories. I can recall paying ridiculously cheap cover charges for high potential bands that record companies were subsidizing to play in Houston: $2 for Talking Heads, $3 for Elvis Costello, $3 for the Police.

    Concert-going was not a particularly expensive hobby. I can recall passing on a chance to see Frank Sinatra around 1979 because he was very expensive because old people had lots of money, but I don't recall having to skip too many rock concerts because they were too expensive for me. In contrast, albums seemed expensive and I couldn't afford to buy more than one per week or one per ten days or so. I think albums tended to cost about $7 in 1978 although inflation was steady in that era.

    My recollection is that the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics introduced a whole new level of expensiveness for tickets. For example, seeing the US basketball team with Michael Jordan play Germany in a first round game cost $60, which seemed like an awful lot at the time. After 1984, tickets for sports and concerts cost a lot more. I think Peter Ueberoth single-handedly broke through the expensive ticket ceiling.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910, @Brutusale

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Eric Novak

    Here's a 1969 Rolling Stone magazine article:

    The Rolling Stones Impose High Ticket Prices for US Tour https://www.rollingstone.com › music › music-news › t...
    It begins with two evening shows at the Forum in Los Angeles November 8th, with tickets priced from $5.50 to $8.50.

    It would be interesting to see a graph of Rolling Stones ticket prices over the decades. The Stones are kind of like how economic historians use carpenters' wages as a measuring stick since ancient times.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Eric Novak

    Here's a blog from 2006 that says that the big upturn in revenue for classic rock stars came around 1997, and much of it came from much greater price discriminations: e.g., if you want to sit close to the stage, you'll pay a huge amount. In the good old days, there wasn't a lot price discrimination. Everybody paid the same amount and the people who got in line earliest got the best seats. After awhile, the bands started charging much higher prices for the good seats.

    http://ec970socialecon.blogspot.com/2006/06/ticket-prices-part-2.html

    My recollection is that scalpers got a lot of the premium for big bands around 1980. E.g., a friend slept on the sidewalk in front of the ticket office for Bruce Springsteen or somebody of the same drawing power. He was first in line when tickets went on sale, but the first 20 rows were already gone. He figured that ticket agency employees had bought them all up before opening the box office window after prearranging with scalpers to resell the hundreds of tickets they bought.

    I can recall having an email discussion about rock concert ticket prices around the turn of the century with a Very Famous Economist. He was offended by my theory that back when we were young, bands were missing out on much of the value they created due to these type of shenanigans. I don't recall what his theory was, but he was peeved that I had a different one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  265. @anonymous coward
    @AnotherDad

    There's no scientific evidence that vaccines provide any benefit at all.

    We vaccinate our kids against serious disease because why not?

    But it's purely an emotional decision, not grounded in science.

    Replies: @bike-anarkist

    It is just, “Give me convenience or give me death”.

    Then these asshloles abuse their children with face diapers and force the vexxes upon them.
    It’s a steal: both, the children’s health and their future.

  266. @Rob
    @Rob

    I was wrong on the combo monoclonal antibody thing. There’s an approved Ebola treatment, inmazeb, that is three monoclonals.

    Have to wonder why that’s not the best practice for antibody treatments of diseases with (possibly) evolving serotypes. Inmazeb is Regeneron, so one would think they’d have been willing to do an oligoclonal covid treatment. Probably easier approval with just one. Not to mention new products to deal with escape variants. Maybe not enough people get monoclonal antibodies to matter? But give the virus one antibody at a time, and maybe it can evolve around each in series. Give them three at a time, then escape is less likely, though not impossible.

    Replies: @bike-anarkist

    You are still wrong to assume that the Medical Industry can do better than nature, which includes one’s natural immunity.
    The only reason for pharmacological interventions is promoting “convenience”.
    Convenience = \$\$\$, and muh vacation, muh kidz hockey, muh trivial pursuit.

    In sum: the worship of Mammon! It doesn’t matter that the “thing” one paid so much for is meaningless, it only matters that one spent so much for it. Nothing to do with”free markets”.

    The Coronaprank has illuminated society’s inherent destructive narcissism. That narcisism has created Commodified Human beings, now treated no better than domestic livestock (QR codes) and are GMO to boot!

    • Replies: @Rob
    @bike-anarkist

    Well, if you are getting a covid monoclonal antibody, that is a solid sign that your natural immunity is not doing such a great job. As to medicine doing better than nature, I was discussing making the medical treatment more like nature’s antibody response and how that would be better.

  267. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Steve Sailer


    The Tories have more or less been in office for a long time in Britain and they don’t like crime.

     


    Hasn’t the prime minister been a Tory for the last dozen years?

     

    The Tories were in power from 1979 through 1997 (Thatcher and Major).
    Labor was in power from 1997 through 2010 (Blair and Brown).
    Tories have been in power from 2010 onward (Cameron, May, Johnson).

    So the fall in the rates of crime & homicide preceded Tory rule.

    By the way, why was there so much crime in the UK in the late 1990s? Any explanation?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @S Johnson

    New Labour reformed the police root-and-branch to make them much more of a crime-recording agency than crime-fighting force (a change already underway since the gradual move away from foot patrol introduced by the previous Labour government). And in 2004 the statistics method was changed to allow police services themselves to define whether and what crime reported by a victim had been committed. So it’s doubtful crime has objectively fallen since the late 1990s, much more likely that the figures are just massaged politically.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @S Johnson

    Those figures were based NOT on police reports.

    Those figures were based on a survey of the general public.

    https://imgur.com/a/7xV0Na7#eGsuZcD

    See more here.

    https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/bulletins/crimeinenglandandwales/yearendingmarch2021

    Telephone-operated Crime Survey for England and Wales (TCSEW)
    Estimates from the TCSEW are derived from a total of 36,801 telephone interviews conducted with household residents in England and Wales aged 18 years and over between 20 May 2020 and 31 March 2021.
     


    The Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) estimates continue to provide important information in relation to longer-term trends in crime from year ending December 1981 to year ending March 2020. TCSEW provides estimates of crime for the year ending March 2021 only.

     

    The benefit of a survey is that you're asking members of the general public to tell you whether they've been criminally victimized. That's much different than relying on police-provided statistics.

    It is possible for the government to misreport statistics, but the general public has no incentive. Especially in a country like the UK, the people are fairly honest and straightforward.

    There's no ethnicity-related questions. So PC wouldn't affect the responses.

    The majority of the UK's crime is perpetrated by Whites. In the UK, the crime issue isn't necessarily as intertwined with racial issues as we see in the U.S. So crime can be discussed more easily.

    In conclusion, the official crime statistics might be misreported by British officials. However, crime survey data is reliable, as it relies on responses from the British general public (who are truthful). This data shows a strong general downward trend in crime over the last quarter century.

    If the British criminal justice system were becoming increasingly lenient, we'd expect the opposite trend. We'd also expect the homicide rate (which is reported with near 100% accuracy and can't be significantly misreported) to increase, not fall significantly. When criminals feel the system is lenient, they have more of a tendency to engage in highly egregious crimes (like killing other people).

    Given this data and the increase in the increase in the average custodial sentencing length, we can conclude that the British criminal justice system hasn't become less punitive in recent years. Rather, the fall in British youth crime (as well as teen pregnancy and alcohol consumption) is a function of British youths misbehaving less.

    Replies: @S Johnson

  268. @VivaLaMigra
    @Jim Given

    Neil Young also "wrote" the atrocious "Lotta Love" for the no-talent Nicollete Larson. Yeah, that PoS must have taken him all of ten minutes to knock out. Or, I could have it all wrong; perhaps "serious artiste" Mr. Young anguished over this pop masterpiece for days? At any rate it sold a lot of vinyl and made Neil a "lotta dough" in royalties which no doubt disappeared up Neil's nose about as quickly as Ms. Larson's "career" evaporated. I was actually surprised to learn in recent years that Young had written it and figured he'd penned it as a favor to a struggling fellow performer and nothing more, but then I discovered that he'd actually taken enough personal pride in it to have recorded it himself. Well, it does have that super rebellious line "...lotta love...to change the way things are..."..!

    Replies: @frankie p

    Neil Young wrote and recorded “Lotta Love” for the Comes a Time album. Nicolette Larson sang backing vocals on Comes a Time, but not on the “Lotta Love” track. The story goes that while they were recording American Stars and Bars, she found a tape on the floor of his car and popped it in. She hears “Lotta Love” and said that it was a great song. Neil said, “You want it. It’s yours.” He certainly didn’t write it for Nicolette Larson.

  269. @the one they call Desanex
    Sung to the tune of “The Loner” (Neil Young):

    Is it a code of honor
    That he just can’t un-codify?
    Is he a prima donna
    With opinions he won’t modify?
    Is he afraid of Corona?
    Is that why he’s off Spotify?

    No more Spotify content
    He took his songs and home he went
    Rogan lied
    Neil Young cried
    He’s the loser
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKXhsdm4SOY

    Replies: @frankie p, @frankie p

    Great song, The Loner

  270. @Anonymous
    @S Johnson

    Here’s another good Dylan story. What a great time to be alive. Life was awesome:

    https://youtu.be/EOAowiF3y_8

    Replies: @S Johnson

    Al Kooper’s naive organ-playing on “Like a Rolling Stone” is a good example of a great sound that wouldn’t have happened under a more controlling, type-A bandleader.

  271. @the one they call Desanex
    Sung to the tune of “The Loner” (Neil Young):

    Is it a code of honor
    That he just can’t un-codify?
    Is he a prima donna
    With opinions he won’t modify?
    Is he afraid of Corona?
    Is that why he’s off Spotify?

    No more Spotify content
    He took his songs and home he went
    Rogan lied
    Neil Young cried
    He’s the loser
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKXhsdm4SOY

    Replies: @frankie p, @frankie p

    We had our own alternative chorus back in the day, when we took these things for granted, waking up with them every morning, experiencing them at inconvenient times, etc.:

    Know when you feel it
    You’ve got to free it
    Unzip your fly
    Heave a sigh
    It’s a boner

  272. @annonymous
    Who's a worse singer:

    Neil Yong or Bob Dylan

    IMO neither can carry a tune.

    I prefer 70s Black and KC and the Sunshine Band Disco.

    I like to partner dance.

    To all these preachy folk and rock "singers" that can't carry a tune I say:

    "Shut up and dance".

    Replies: @S Johnson

    Dylan’s voice was very strong during the 1970s, although it’s pretty beat-up now (although still capable of achieving some great effects, check out “Shake Shake Mama” from 2009):

    • Replies: @usNthem
    @S Johnson

    Blood on the Tracks is my go to Dylan album.

  273. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Pretty much "Clockwork Orange" came true in England in the 1990s, especially urban yobs driving out to the countryside to commit home invasions and steal cars. I went to a business lunch in a nice suburb of Oxford in 1994 and the only thing the locals talked about for an hour was getting their cars stolen.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Harry Baldwin

    I believe you once speculated that the deindustrialization of the 80s&90s created a socially & economically marginalized White underclass in the UK. The forerunners of the “Chavs.”

    Here’s one article that I found that might be relevant.

    https://vdare.com/articles/charles-murray-gets-readmitted-to-polite-society-at-a-price-ignoring-immigration

    Blue-collar whites are doing reasonably well in Germany, but they seem to be falling apart even faster in Britain than in America.

    Neither Coming Apart nor its critics explore this phenomenon.

    Back in 2005, I offered half-dozen reasons for why British “youfs” were turning into Ali Gs more rapidly than their distant cousins in America.

    One key reason: the chief divide in England is class, while in America it’s race. White working class Americans have retained one subliminal, unspoken bit of racial pride: they believe street crime is a black thing, not a white thing.

    In confirmation, last August in England, blacks started looting and white yobs followed them into the streets. It’s hard to imagine that happening on a large scale in America. Historian David Starkey caused a huge uproar by saying on the BBC what everybody was sensing:

    “What has happened is that a substantial section of the chavs … have become black. … The whites have become black. A particular sort of violent destructive, nihilistic gangster culture has become the fashion and black and white boys and girls operate in this language together.”

    You wrote another good article here.

    https://vdare.com/articles/how-much-ruin-in-a-nation-uk-vs-us-white-working-class

    Why have the morals of the white working class in the U.S. proven more resilient than those of their white counterparts in Great Britain?

    So, despite obvious problems, such as the crystal methamphetamine epidemic, the American white working class has shown more impressive moral hardiness than the English.

    Religion. Perhaps the most striking and important difference: the strength of Christianity here—whereas the main religious emotion in Britain is apathy.

    Culture

    widespread filtering of yobbo norms up the social scale in Britain–soccer replacing cricket and rugby or the spread of the downscale Estuary English accent into the upper middle classes—merely reflects how the educated classes in Britain have lost control of the culture. Similarly, middle-class African-Americans have lost control to the gangsta rappers.

    Guns (not what you think). While the rate of assault has been higher in England than America, angry Americans are more lethal because of our hundreds of millions of guns.

    But, on the other hand, burglary is a far safer career choice in Britain because the chance of being blown away by a homeowner is low

    Lack of federalism. Parliament reigns supreme, so localities don’t compete to see who has the most hard-nosed police departments like they do in America.

    Speed. Remember the tale of how to boil a frog? Just keep raising the temperature imperceptibly so the frog never notices it’s being boiled alive. (Don’t try this at home, kids.) Something similar happened in England, where society fell apart so slowly that elite opinion had time to get used to each new outrage.

    Class vs. Race. The central divide in Britain is class—in America, it’s race. And that has had a little understood salutary effect on white working class Americans.

    In England, the sons of maharajas were often more welcome at Eton and Oxford than the sons of fishmongers. Similarly, in the last couple of decades, blacks have been more welcomed into the working class in Britain than in America—because British working class identity centers on not acting like a toff. The entrance requirements to the working class are amiably relaxed—no need for “the rain in Spain falls mainly on the plain” elocution lessons. If you like ‘aving a pint with your mates at the pub while watching Arsenal on the telly,’ well, you’re halfway home.

    Likewise, English youth see the gangsta rap lifestyle as a bit of a lark (as brilliantly parodied by Sacha Baron Cohen’s brainless wigger Ali G). In contrast, white working class Americans view it, based on the abundant evidence provided by American blacks, as a one-way ticket to prison and the grave.

    It’s interesting to think back on that time, when things were so different.

    It appears that the UK seems to have gotten control over issues like crime, youth misbehavior, and teen drinking.

    Teen pregnancy too.

    View post on imgur.com

  274. @Kratoklastes
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    I haven't heard Rogan say "Damn, son!" for quite a while.

    I've never been able to get away with referring to something as "the shit" in a positive context.

    Whenever I try to use that - e.g., "Eugyppius' substack is the shit" - it gets wildly misinterpreted.

    Pull that shit up, Jamie remains au courant.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Joe was sure saying “fuck” a lot when he had Tulsi Gabbard on. Perhaps it’s what’s on his mind when she’s sitting across the table from him.

  275. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Pretty much "Clockwork Orange" came true in England in the 1990s, especially urban yobs driving out to the countryside to commit home invasions and steal cars. I went to a business lunch in a nice suburb of Oxford in 1994 and the only thing the locals talked about for an hour was getting their cars stolen.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Harry Baldwin

    The England that Anthony Burgess imagined was still a white England, though. Alex and his droogs would be Pakistanis or Jamaicans now.

  276. @S Johnson
    @JohnnyWalker123

    New Labour reformed the police root-and-branch to make them much more of a crime-recording agency than crime-fighting force (a change already underway since the gradual move away from foot patrol introduced by the previous Labour government). And in 2004 the statistics method was changed to allow police services themselves to define whether and what crime reported by a victim had been committed. So it’s doubtful crime has objectively fallen since the late 1990s, much more likely that the figures are just massaged politically.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Those figures were based NOT on police reports.

    Those figures were based on a survey of the general public.

    View post on imgur.com

    See more here.

    https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/bulletins/crimeinenglandandwales/yearendingmarch2021

    Telephone-operated Crime Survey for England and Wales (TCSEW)
    Estimates from the TCSEW are derived from a total of 36,801 telephone interviews conducted with household residents in England and Wales aged 18 years and over between 20 May 2020 and 31 March 2021.

    The Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) estimates continue to provide important information in relation to longer-term trends in crime from year ending December 1981 to year ending March 2020. TCSEW provides estimates of crime for the year ending March 2021 only.

    The benefit of a survey is that you’re asking members of the general public to tell you whether they’ve been criminally victimized. That’s much different than relying on police-provided statistics.

    It is possible for the government to misreport statistics, but the general public has no incentive. Especially in a country like the UK, the people are fairly honest and straightforward.

    There’s no ethnicity-related questions. So PC wouldn’t affect the responses.

    The majority of the UK’s crime is perpetrated by Whites. In the UK, the crime issue isn’t necessarily as intertwined with racial issues as we see in the U.S. So crime can be discussed more easily.

    In conclusion, the official crime statistics might be misreported by British officials. However, crime survey data is reliable, as it relies on responses from the British general public (who are truthful). This data shows a strong general downward trend in crime over the last quarter century.

    If the British criminal justice system were becoming increasingly lenient, we’d expect the opposite trend. We’d also expect the homicide rate (which is reported with near 100% accuracy and can’t be significantly misreported) to increase, not fall significantly. When criminals feel the system is lenient, they have more of a tendency to engage in highly egregious crimes (like killing other people).

    Given this data and the increase in the increase in the average custodial sentencing length, we can conclude that the British criminal justice system hasn’t become less punitive in recent years. Rather, the fall in British youth crime (as well as teen pregnancy and alcohol consumption) is a function of British youths misbehaving less.

    • Replies: @S Johnson
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Thanks. It's probably true that the average British youth has got less aggressive, more likely to be passive, overweight or medicated. On the other hand murders in the UK mostly mean stabbings, and emergency services have got a lot better even in the last ten years at saving lives from stabbings. Then there are other features of life, like drugs and vandalism, which would once have been considered crime but now might not even be reported by the public as crime due to police passivity.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  277. @Bill Jones
    @JohnnyWalker123

    My son's alcohol consumption is as close to zero as makes no difference. Black v White compared to mine at his age.
    My free time hobbies were things like rebuilding car engines (The unsung beauty of the original Mini was that with two mates you could tip it on its side onto an old mattress and take the subframe with engine and transmission out in half an hour) His are things like fishing and hiking.
    We had a spare TV set but he reckoned he didn't have space for it in his room. He gets his mind-numbing via the web.
    Comparing pictures of him and me at his age there is no doubt as to paternity but one does wonder.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Have you ever seen the show UK Skins?

    It was claimed that this show was based on the lives of the youths of Bristol , England. I recall this show was popular back in 2007. That was right before the fall in teen pregnancy, crime, and alcohol consumption began in the UK.

    Here’s a trailer for the show.

    Is there any realism to the show? Was British youth culture like that 15 years ago (before British youths sobered up and straightened themselves out)?

  278. @S Johnson
    @annonymous

    Dylan’s voice was very strong during the 1970s, although it’s pretty beat-up now (although still capable of achieving some great effects, check out “Shake Shake Mama” from 2009):

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=smb86Il2sgA

    Replies: @usNthem

    Blood on the Tracks is my go to Dylan album.

  279. @The Alarmist
    @J.Ross

    I can hear that boardroom discussion: We hate to lose 37 listeners, but that Rogan guy is gold.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    I have seen a claim from a supposed Spotify executive that the only musicians they care about are current ones, but even then Rogan is bigger and his fans don’t overlap. The right (and the right-by-Overton) owns long format interview. The closest the left has is NPR, which never sits down with anyone and lets them talk. Everything on NPR is edited to hell and the newer stuff like RadioLab is irritatingly short attention span (the style on RadioLab is to constantly interrupt themselves).

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  280. @Eric Novak
    @Daniel H

    What you haven’t taken into consideration is the explosion of the live music market in arenas, beginning in the 1980s. My ticket stubs from the beginning of the decade for popular live rock acts have prices of $10-$15. By the end of the decade, seats in the same sections are 4-5x the price. Ticket prices exploded even further in the 1990s and 2000s, thus making even touring legacy artists like Neil Young very rich.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    It’s possible that the majority of concerts I saw from say 1977-1988 cost no more than \$10. I think the Rolling Stones in 1978 might have been in the \$15 or \$20 range, although it’s all very hazy in my memories. I can recall paying ridiculously cheap cover charges for high potential bands that record companies were subsidizing to play in Houston: \$2 for Talking Heads, \$3 for Elvis Costello, \$3 for the Police.

    Concert-going was not a particularly expensive hobby. I can recall passing on a chance to see Frank Sinatra around 1979 because he was very expensive because old people had lots of money, but I don’t recall having to skip too many rock concerts because they were too expensive for me. In contrast, albums seemed expensive and I couldn’t afford to buy more than one per week or one per ten days or so. I think albums tended to cost about \$7 in 1978 although inflation was steady in that era.

    My recollection is that the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics introduced a whole new level of expensiveness for tickets. For example, seeing the US basketball team with Michael Jordan play Germany in a first round game cost \$60, which seemed like an awful lot at the time. After 1984, tickets for sports and concerts cost a lot more. I think Peter Ueberoth single-handedly broke through the expensive ticket ceiling.

    • Thanks: Eric Novak
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer

    The Rolling Stones - Live in Houston 1978/07/19 - Audio - 21st show of the tour
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MAUFG73NFXg


    Complete show for the first time! Extracted from CD "Live at The Pavilion 78" (no label) good audience/excellent soundboard. Audio references are below.

    The Stones were on the final course of tour 78, with an exclusive US tour only, they didn't even go through Canada that year. On the track list, he was going to dedicate himself to playing many songs from the album they were presenting, Some Girls, and even playing songs from more contemporary albums, from Sticky Fingers onwards, playing only two classics from the 60s, Honky tonk women and Jumping. Jack flash.
    There was no paraphernalia or theatricality in the shows, only in the open stadiums they put their "tongue" as stage decoration and threw balloons at the beginning of each show, but nothing else, not even fireworks at the end of the concerts.
    Even the shows were short in duration, compared to the 1975 and 1976 tours, only 1 hour and a half long.

    Sound references:
    # good audience tape
    @ exc. stereo soundboard from Handsome Girls (TSP-CD-200-4)
    *** exc. stereo soundboard from 2LP "Live From England 1974"

    Live at Sam Houston Coliseum, Houston, USA, July 19th, 1978.
    00:00:00 Intro by The Glimmer Stone
    00:01:07 Let It Rock # (Chuck Berry cover)
    00:03:56 All Down The Line @
    00:08:09 Honky Tonk Women @
    00:12:11 Star Star @
    00:16:59 When The Whip Comes Down #
    00:23:11 Beast Of Burden @
    00:30:09 Lies @
    00:34:29 Miss You #
    00:43:05 Just My Imagination # (The Temptations cover)
    00:51:03 Shattered #
    00:55:58 Respectable @
    01:00:13 Far Away Eyes #
    01:06:10 Love In Vain # (Robert Johnson cover)
    01:12:08 Tumbling Dice ***
    01:17:36 Happy *** (Keith Richards on vocals)
    01:20:57 Sweet Little Sixteen @ (Chuck Berry cover)
    01:24:52 Brown Sugar @
    01:28:57 Jumping Jack Flash @

    The Band:
    Mick Jagger: vocals, guitar, piano
    Keith Richards: guitar, vocals
    Ron Wood: guitar, pedal steel
    Bill Wyman: bass
    Charlie Watts: drums
    Ian Stuart: piano

    Aditional musician:
    Ian McLagan: piano, organ, backing vocals

    1978 playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4QlJsrbWw4Xc3RbU1t7KunWKmh1Sc2IM

    1978 US Tour:
    The US Tour 1978 was the tour in The United States to promote Some Girls album. Like the 1972 and 1975 U.S. tours, Bill Graham was the tour promoter. 24 cities and 25 shows was the lenght. The Stones used a stripped back, minimal stage show compared to the previous Tour of the Americas '75 and Tour of Europe '76, possibly due to the emergence of the punk rock scene and its emphasis solely on music and attitude rather than presenting a grandiose stage extravaganza. Continuing a schedule started in 1966 of touring the United States exactly every three years, the Stones played in a mixture of theatres, sometimes under a pseudonym (i.e., at the start of the 1978 US Tour in Lakeland, Florida, The Stones were billed on the ticket as "The Great Southeast Stoned Out Wrestling Champions"), arenas, and stadiums, a practice that they would follow for many of their future tours as well. The tour was the first in which Charlie Watts used the famous Gretsch drum set that he continues to play with the Stones to this day, as well as his first employment of a china cymbal as a crash.

    10 June Lakeland
    12 June Atlanta
    14 June Passaic
    15 June Washington
    17 June Philadelphia
    19 June New York City
    21 June Hampton
    22 June Myrtle Beach
    26 June Greensboro
    28 June Memphis
    29 June Lexington
    1 July Cleveland
    4 July Orchard Park
    6 July Detroit
    8 July Chicago
    10 July Saint Paul
    11 July St. Louis
    13 July New Orleans
    16 July Boulder
    18 July Fort Worth
    19 July Houston
    21 July Tucson
    23 July Anaheim
    24 July Anaheim
    26 July Oakland
     
    The Rolling Stones - The 1978 tour rehearsals - Audio
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7a2Ix3Xo4uc

    This is the most complete version of the rehearsals for the upcoming tour 1978. Very good soundboard recording extracted from CD "The complete Woodstock tapes" (VGP-130)
    Missing only "Gimme shelter" deleted due copyright.

    Recorded at Bearsville Studios, between May 27th and June 8th, Woodstock, USA.

    00:00:00 Intro by The Glimmer Stone
    00:01:07 Miss you I
    00:18:51 Respectable I
    00:22:30 Love in vain
    00:28:24 Play with fire
    00:32:01 No expectations
    00:34:24 Instrumental jam #1
    00:40:09 Blues jam #1
    00:46:09 Blues jam #2
    00:47:20 Blues jam #3
    00:49:49 Blues jam #4
    00:50:32 Blues jam #5
    00:56:18 Gimme shelter I
    00:57:56 When the whip comes down
    01:03:09 Miss you II
    01:10:16 Don't look back I
    01:21:16 Instrumental jam #2
    01:23:34 Beast of burden I
    01:33:14 C'mon everybody/Summertime blues
    01:47:58 Rocket 88
    01:57:19 Drum solo
    01:58:54 Crazy mama
    02:09:38 Star star
    Gimme shelter II (deleted)
    02:13:21 Don't look back II
    02:14:05 Beautiful Delilah
    02:20:00 Cocksucker blues
    02:26:57 It's only rock and roll
    02:34:37 All down the line
    02:38:49 Honky tonk women
    02:41:26 Brown sugar I
    02:50:00 Tumbling dice I
    02:57:17 Jumping Jack flash
    03:03:41 Memory motel I
    03:07:07 The fat man
    03:09:19 Beast of burden II
    03:17:02 Hot stuff
    03:19:50 Something else
    03:20:49 Sweet little sixteen I
    03:23:40 High-heel sneakers
    03:26:28 Play with fire
    03:27:05 Crackin' up
    03:31:06 Tell me (you're coming back)
    03:36:38 Shake your hips
    03:39:41 Respectable II
    03:42:43 Don't look back III
    03:45:47 Instrumental jam III
    03:50:49 Sweet little sixteen II
    03:54:40 Let it rock
    03:55:35 Shattered
    03:59:54 Memory motel II
    04:12:37 Faraway eyes
    04:19:40 Let's spend the night together
    04:28:10 Tumbling dice II
    04:31:09 Happy
    04:34:39 Prodigal son
    04:41:19 Brown sugar II
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer

    http://www.thepolicewiki.org/Police_wiki/index.php?title=1978-1979_Outlandos_d%27Amour_Tour

    THE POLICE - Houston, TX 08-03-1979 Opry House USA (full show)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ezlh5rU8oL0


    THE POLICE - Houston, TX 08-03-1979 Opry House USA (full show)

    Can't Stand Losing You
    Truth Hits Everybody
    So Lonely
    Fall Out
    Born In The 50's
    Hole In My Life
    Be My Girl, Sally
    Peanuts
    Roxanne
    Landlord
    Next To You

    Outlandos D'amour USA Tour 1979
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Brutusale
    @Steve Sailer

    My ticket for the 1975 Led Zeppelin tour stop at the Boston Garden that was cancelled by Boston mayor Kevin White was $7.50.

    The Cars at the Rat, 1977 was $1.00.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  281. @Eric Novak
    @Daniel H

    What you haven’t taken into consideration is the explosion of the live music market in arenas, beginning in the 1980s. My ticket stubs from the beginning of the decade for popular live rock acts have prices of $10-$15. By the end of the decade, seats in the same sections are 4-5x the price. Ticket prices exploded even further in the 1990s and 2000s, thus making even touring legacy artists like Neil Young very rich.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    Here’s a 1969 Rolling Stone magazine article:

    The Rolling Stones Impose High Ticket Prices for US Tour https://www.rollingstone.com › music › music-news › t…
    It begins with two evening shows at the Forum in Los Angeles November 8th, with tickets priced from \$5.50 to \$8.50.

    It would be interesting to see a graph of Rolling Stones ticket prices over the decades. The Stones are kind of like how economic historians use carpenters’ wages as a measuring stick since ancient times.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Steve Sailer


    It would be interesting to see a graph of Rolling Stones ticket prices over the decades. The Stones are kind of like how economic historians use carpenters’ wages as a measuring stick since ancient times.
     
    How about a graph that compares RS ticket prices with the median income of their fan base. I have a feeling those might be closely correlated.

    In a way, each band is a sort of monopoly because each (really good) band is unique, and it is the only supplier of its own concerts. For example, if you are a big Rolling Stone fan, it's not really a competitive substitute to go see some cheaper new band that the kids are listening to. So the Stones will charge whatever their fans will pay. And the older and wealthier the fans get, the more they will pay.
  282. @Eric Novak
    @Daniel H

    What you haven’t taken into consideration is the explosion of the live music market in arenas, beginning in the 1980s. My ticket stubs from the beginning of the decade for popular live rock acts have prices of $10-$15. By the end of the decade, seats in the same sections are 4-5x the price. Ticket prices exploded even further in the 1990s and 2000s, thus making even touring legacy artists like Neil Young very rich.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    Here’s a blog from 2006 that says that the big upturn in revenue for classic rock stars came around 1997, and much of it came from much greater price discriminations: e.g., if you want to sit close to the stage, you’ll pay a huge amount. In the good old days, there wasn’t a lot price discrimination. Everybody paid the same amount and the people who got in line earliest got the best seats. After awhile, the bands started charging much higher prices for the good seats.

    http://ec970socialecon.blogspot.com/2006/06/ticket-prices-part-2.html

    My recollection is that scalpers got a lot of the premium for big bands around 1980. E.g., a friend slept on the sidewalk in front of the ticket office for Bruce Springsteen or somebody of the same drawing power. He was first in line when tickets went on sale, but the first 20 rows were already gone. He figured that ticket agency employees had bought them all up before opening the box office window after prearranging with scalpers to resell the hundreds of tickets they bought.

    I can recall having an email discussion about rock concert ticket prices around the turn of the century with a Very Famous Economist. He was offended by my theory that back when we were young, bands were missing out on much of the value they created due to these type of shenanigans. I don’t recall what his theory was, but he was peeved that I had a different one.

    • Thanks: Eric Novak
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    ...if you want to sit close to the stage, you’ll pay a huge amount.
     
    When I saw 1964: The Tribute at Orchestra Hall in Minneapolis, the ticket prices probably reflected this logic.

    But it was backward. The band got every detail right, but they could only disguise themselves so well. Thus, it was a better experience to sit way in the back. Otherwise, you're in the "uncanny valley".
  283. If a song is any good, it’s good on a uke. This [ahem] young lady sounds better in her humble bedroom than Neil does in the most expensive studio:

    She’s even better on “Don’t You Forget About Me, “Eye of the Tiger“, and especially “White Wedding“.

    Was she even born when these were hits?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Reg Cæsar

    Oops, sorry. That was from another comment. Here she is, doing Neil:


    https://youtu.be/mVXO4BJGydY

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    , @Ralph L
    @Reg Cæsar

    My sister has a English-Polish friend who apparently made (pre-covid) a decent living playing the ukulele internationally. And she's middle-aged.

  284. @Steve Sailer
    @Eric Novak

    Here's a blog from 2006 that says that the big upturn in revenue for classic rock stars came around 1997, and much of it came from much greater price discriminations: e.g., if you want to sit close to the stage, you'll pay a huge amount. In the good old days, there wasn't a lot price discrimination. Everybody paid the same amount and the people who got in line earliest got the best seats. After awhile, the bands started charging much higher prices for the good seats.

    http://ec970socialecon.blogspot.com/2006/06/ticket-prices-part-2.html

    My recollection is that scalpers got a lot of the premium for big bands around 1980. E.g., a friend slept on the sidewalk in front of the ticket office for Bruce Springsteen or somebody of the same drawing power. He was first in line when tickets went on sale, but the first 20 rows were already gone. He figured that ticket agency employees had bought them all up before opening the box office window after prearranging with scalpers to resell the hundreds of tickets they bought.

    I can recall having an email discussion about rock concert ticket prices around the turn of the century with a Very Famous Economist. He was offended by my theory that back when we were young, bands were missing out on much of the value they created due to these type of shenanigans. I don't recall what his theory was, but he was peeved that I had a different one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    …if you want to sit close to the stage, you’ll pay a huge amount.

    When I saw 1964: The Tribute at Orchestra Hall in Minneapolis, the ticket prices probably reflected this logic.

    But it was backward. The band got every detail right, but they could only disguise themselves so well. Thus, it was a better experience to sit way in the back. Otherwise, you’re in the “uncanny valley”.

  285. @JohnnyWalker123
    @S Johnson

    Those figures were based NOT on police reports.

    Those figures were based on a survey of the general public.

    https://imgur.com/a/7xV0Na7#eGsuZcD

    See more here.

    https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/bulletins/crimeinenglandandwales/yearendingmarch2021

    Telephone-operated Crime Survey for England and Wales (TCSEW)
    Estimates from the TCSEW are derived from a total of 36,801 telephone interviews conducted with household residents in England and Wales aged 18 years and over between 20 May 2020 and 31 March 2021.
     


    The Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) estimates continue to provide important information in relation to longer-term trends in crime from year ending December 1981 to year ending March 2020. TCSEW provides estimates of crime for the year ending March 2021 only.

     

    The benefit of a survey is that you're asking members of the general public to tell you whether they've been criminally victimized. That's much different than relying on police-provided statistics.

    It is possible for the government to misreport statistics, but the general public has no incentive. Especially in a country like the UK, the people are fairly honest and straightforward.

    There's no ethnicity-related questions. So PC wouldn't affect the responses.

    The majority of the UK's crime is perpetrated by Whites. In the UK, the crime issue isn't necessarily as intertwined with racial issues as we see in the U.S. So crime can be discussed more easily.

    In conclusion, the official crime statistics might be misreported by British officials. However, crime survey data is reliable, as it relies on responses from the British general public (who are truthful). This data shows a strong general downward trend in crime over the last quarter century.

    If the British criminal justice system were becoming increasingly lenient, we'd expect the opposite trend. We'd also expect the homicide rate (which is reported with near 100% accuracy and can't be significantly misreported) to increase, not fall significantly. When criminals feel the system is lenient, they have more of a tendency to engage in highly egregious crimes (like killing other people).

    Given this data and the increase in the increase in the average custodial sentencing length, we can conclude that the British criminal justice system hasn't become less punitive in recent years. Rather, the fall in British youth crime (as well as teen pregnancy and alcohol consumption) is a function of British youths misbehaving less.

    Replies: @S Johnson

    Thanks. It’s probably true that the average British youth has got less aggressive, more likely to be passive, overweight or medicated. On the other hand murders in the UK mostly mean stabbings, and emergency services have got a lot better even in the last ten years at saving lives from stabbings. Then there are other features of life, like drugs and vandalism, which would once have been considered crime but now might not even be reported by the public as crime due to police passivity.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @S Johnson


    On the other hand murders in the UK mostly mean stabbings, and emergency services have got a lot better even in the last ten years at saving lives from stabbings.
     
    That's a good point. Life-saving medical procedures have improved, so we'd expect the homicide rate to decline. I wonder if there's a way to quantify this. A way to control (for the reduced mortality effects of new medical procedures) when analyzing homicide rates over time.

    Then there are other features of life, like drugs and vandalism, which would once have been considered crime but now might not even be reported by the public as crime due to police passivity.
     
    The public may have changed its perception of minor crimes (like drug dealing and vandalism), but violent crime is different. Being subject to violent attack is a memorable experience that you don't soon forget. Being violently victimized feels like an actual crime, very unlike seeing vandalism or drug deal incidents. You might be passive when you see vandalized property, but you feel viscerally affected by a violent attack.

    So refer to the chart below, which shows how many violent incidents were reported by the general public in the UK.

    https://imgur.com/a/9QML9WH

    Over the time, the definition of violence probably has become broader. Something like shoving a person, which would've been dismissed as "nothing" back a few decades ago, is more likely to be viewed as a "micro aggression" now. People are more sensitive. Therefore, I don't think the public would've become less likely to identify incidents of violent personal victimization.

    So I do think the decline in violence is real.

    Here is another chart that shows the decline in theft. Having something stolen from you is fairly memorable too. When you experience theft, that feels like you're being victimized.

    https://imgur.com/a/9nPU0Kl

    While one can argue whether vandalism or drug dealing incidents constitute true crimes, there's no question that theft and violence fit under that term. Even when people don't report those incidents, they do feel genuinely victimized when someone steals from them and, more especially, physically harms them. So there's likely not underreporting by the general public.

    Here's another relevant chart that shows police-recorded criminal incidents and survey-reported incidents. As you can see in the chart below, the police recorded fewer crimes than the public reported. This gap (public reported incidents - police recorded incidents) represents unreported crime. You may have to click on the chart below to see it.

    https://knoema.com/infographics/jmnedjb/uk-crime-trends-not-so-clear-cut

    https://imgur.com/a/2YUPiPM

    While there is a substantial amount of unreported crime in the UK, it has been falling in recent years. Therefore, while laxity may be significantly distorting the true crime rate in the UK, the distortion has diminished in recent years.

    So if you want to say the British police are too lax in reporting crime and making arrests, you may very well be correct. However, it seems that the issue was more severe in past years.

    To conclude, there likely has been a very substantial drop in the crime rate in the UK. Especially youth crime.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  286. @Reg Cæsar
    If a song is any good, it's good on a uke. This [ahem] young lady sounds better in her humble bedroom than Neil does in the most expensive studio:


    https://youtu.be/l_cR5S9GRUk


    She's even better on "Don't You Forget About Me, "Eye of the Tiger", and especially "White Wedding".

    Was she even born when these were hits?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Ralph L

    Oops, sorry. That was from another comment. Here she is, doing Neil:

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Reg Cæsar

    Neil Young - Harvest Moon [Official Music Video]
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2MtEsrcTTs

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harvest_Moon_(Neil_Young_song)


    The song uses a moon motif, which Young has mentioned as being very important to him and having quasi-religious undertones.[1] It is a tribute to his wife Pegi Young, and the two are dancing in a bar in the music video.[2] Linda Ronstadt provides the backing vocals.[3]
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pegi_Young

    Young was born Margaret Mary Morton[20] in San Mateo, California, on December 1, 1952 to Thomas and Margaret Jean (Foley) Morton.[21][22]

    Young met future husband Neil Young in 1974 when she was working as a waitress at a diner near his ranch, a story he tells in the 1992 song "Unknown Legend". They married in August 1978[23] and had two children, Ben and Amber, in addition to her becoming stepmother to his first child, Zeke.[7] Both Ben and Zeke are diagnosed with cerebral palsy,[24] and Amber with epilepsy.[24] In July 2014, Neil filed for divorce in California.[25]

    Young died of cancer on January 1, 2019, aged 66, in Mountain View, California—just a few miles south of her birthplace in San Mateo.[21][26]
     
    Harvest Moon (Live)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPRHW_mScP0
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreamin%27_Man_Live_%2792

    Dreamin' Man Live '92 is a live album by the Canadian / American musician Neil Young, released on December 8, 2009. It features live, solo acoustic performances of all ten songs from Harvest Moon, recorded on tour in 1992.[4] The album is volume twelve in Young's Archives Performance Series and the fifth to be released.[5]
     
  287. @Steve Sailer
    @Eric Novak

    It's possible that the majority of concerts I saw from say 1977-1988 cost no more than $10. I think the Rolling Stones in 1978 might have been in the $15 or $20 range, although it's all very hazy in my memories. I can recall paying ridiculously cheap cover charges for high potential bands that record companies were subsidizing to play in Houston: $2 for Talking Heads, $3 for Elvis Costello, $3 for the Police.

    Concert-going was not a particularly expensive hobby. I can recall passing on a chance to see Frank Sinatra around 1979 because he was very expensive because old people had lots of money, but I don't recall having to skip too many rock concerts because they were too expensive for me. In contrast, albums seemed expensive and I couldn't afford to buy more than one per week or one per ten days or so. I think albums tended to cost about $7 in 1978 although inflation was steady in that era.

    My recollection is that the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics introduced a whole new level of expensiveness for tickets. For example, seeing the US basketball team with Michael Jordan play Germany in a first round game cost $60, which seemed like an awful lot at the time. After 1984, tickets for sports and concerts cost a lot more. I think Peter Ueberoth single-handedly broke through the expensive ticket ceiling.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910, @Brutusale

    The Rolling Stones – Live in Houston 1978/07/19 – Audio – 21st show of the tour

    [MORE]

    Complete show for the first time! Extracted from CD “Live at The Pavilion 78” (no label) good audience/excellent soundboard. Audio references are below.

    The Stones were on the final course of tour 78, with an exclusive US tour only, they didn’t even go through Canada that year. On the track list, he was going to dedicate himself to playing many songs from the album they were presenting, Some Girls, and even playing songs from more contemporary albums, from Sticky Fingers onwards, playing only two classics from the 60s, Honky tonk women and Jumping. Jack flash.
    There was no paraphernalia or theatricality in the shows, only in the open stadiums they put their “tongue” as stage decoration and threw balloons at the beginning of each show, but nothing else, not even fireworks at the end of the concerts.
    Even the shows were short in duration, compared to the 1975 and 1976 tours, only 1 hour and a half long.

    Sound references:
    # good audience tape
    @ exc. stereo soundboard from Handsome Girls (TSP-CD-200-4)
    *** exc. stereo soundboard from 2LP “Live From England 1974”

    Live at Sam Houston Coliseum, Houston, USA, July 19th, 1978.
    00:00:00 Intro by The Glimmer Stone
    00:01:07 Let It Rock # (Chuck Berry cover)
    00:03:56 All Down The Line @
    00:08:09 Honky Tonk Women @
    00:12:11 Star Star @
    00:16:59 When The Whip Comes Down #
    00:23:11 Beast Of Burden @
    00:30:09 Lies @
    00:34:29 Miss You #
    00:43:05 Just My Imagination # (The Temptations cover)
    00:51:03 Shattered #
    00:55:58 Respectable @
    01:00:13 Far Away Eyes #
    01:06:10 Love In Vain # (Robert Johnson cover)
    01:12:08 Tumbling Dice ***
    01:17:36 Happy *** (Keith Richards on vocals)
    01:20:57 Sweet Little Sixteen @ (Chuck Berry cover)
    01:24:52 Brown Sugar @
    01:28:57 Jumping Jack Flash @

    The Band:
    Mick Jagger: vocals, guitar, piano
    Keith Richards: guitar, vocals
    Ron Wood: guitar, pedal steel
    Bill Wyman: bass
    Charlie Watts: drums
    Ian Stuart: piano

    Aditional musician:
    Ian McLagan: piano, organ, backing vocals

    1978 playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4QlJsrbWw4Xc3RbU1t7KunWKmh1Sc2IM

    1978 US Tour:
    The US Tour 1978 was the tour in The United States to promote Some Girls album. Like the 1972 and 1975 U.S. tours, Bill Graham was the tour promoter. 24 cities and 25 shows was the lenght. The Stones used a stripped back, minimal stage show compared to the previous Tour of the Americas ’75 and Tour of Europe ’76, possibly due to the emergence of the punk rock scene and its emphasis solely on music and attitude rather than presenting a grandiose stage extravaganza. Continuing a schedule started in 1966 of touring the United States exactly every three years, the Stones played in a mixture of theatres, sometimes under a pseudonym (i.e., at the start of the 1978 US Tour in Lakeland, Florida, The Stones were billed on the ticket as “The Great Southeast Stoned Out Wrestling Champions”), arenas, and stadiums, a practice that they would follow for many of their future tours as well. The tour was the first in which Charlie Watts used the famous Gretsch drum set that he continues to play with the Stones to this day, as well as his first employment of a china cymbal as a crash.

    10 June Lakeland
    12 June Atlanta
    14 June Passaic
    15 June Washington
    17 June Philadelphia
    19 June New York City
    21 June Hampton
    22 June Myrtle Beach
    26 June Greensboro
    28 June Memphis
    29 June Lexington
    1 July Cleveland
    4 July Orchard Park
    6 July Detroit
    8 July Chicago
    10 July Saint Paul
    11 July St. Louis
    13 July New Orleans
    16 July Boulder
    18 July Fort Worth
    19 July Houston
    21 July Tucson
    23 July Anaheim
    24 July Anaheim
    26 July Oakland

    The Rolling Stones – The 1978 tour rehearsals – Audio

    This is the most complete version of the rehearsals for the upcoming tour 1978. Very good soundboard recording extracted from CD “The complete Woodstock tapes” (VGP-130)
    Missing only “Gimme shelter” deleted due copyright.

    Recorded at Bearsville Studios, between May 27th and June 8th, Woodstock, USA.

    00:00:00 Intro by The Glimmer Stone
    00:01:07 Miss you I
    00:18:51 Respectable I
    00:22:30 Love in vain
    00:28:24 Play with fire
    00:32:01 No expectations
    00:34:24 Instrumental jam #1
    00:40:09 Blues jam #1
    00:46:09 Blues jam #2
    00:47:20 Blues jam #3
    00:49:49 Blues jam #4
    00:50:32 Blues jam #5
    00:56:18 Gimme shelter I
    00:57:56 When the whip comes down
    01:03:09 Miss you II
    01:10:16 Don’t look back I
    01:21:16 Instrumental jam #2
    01:23:34 Beast of burden I
    01:33:14 C’mon everybody/Summertime blues
    01:47:58 Rocket 88
    01:57:19 Drum solo
    01:58:54 Crazy mama
    02:09:38 Star star
    Gimme shelter II (deleted)
    02:13:21 Don’t look back II
    02:14:05 Beautiful Delilah
    02:20:00 Cocksucker blues
    02:26:57 It’s only rock and roll
    02:34:37 All down the line
    02:38:49 Honky tonk women
    02:41:26 Brown sugar I
    02:50:00 Tumbling dice I
    02:57:17 Jumping Jack flash
    03:03:41 Memory motel I
    03:07:07 The fat man
    03:09:19 Beast of burden II
    03:17:02 Hot stuff
    03:19:50 Something else
    03:20:49 Sweet little sixteen I
    03:23:40 High-heel sneakers
    03:26:28 Play with fire
    03:27:05 Crackin’ up
    03:31:06 Tell me (you’re coming back)
    03:36:38 Shake your hips
    03:39:41 Respectable II
    03:42:43 Don’t look back III
    03:45:47 Instrumental jam III
    03:50:49 Sweet little sixteen II
    03:54:40 Let it rock
    03:55:35 Shattered
    03:59:54 Memory motel II
    04:12:37 Faraway eyes
    04:19:40 Let’s spend the night together
    04:28:10 Tumbling dice II
    04:31:09 Happy
    04:34:39 Prodigal son
    04:41:19 Brown sugar II

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @MEH 0910

    The 1978 "Some Girls" album isn't considered peak Rolling Stones, but it had a lot of solid hard rockers for a stadium tour.

    Unfortunately, the show I saw at Angel Stadium was plagued by a bad echo. The stage was in centerfield and the sound bounced back off the grandstand behind home plate.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

  288. @Steve Sailer
    @Eric Novak

    It's possible that the majority of concerts I saw from say 1977-1988 cost no more than $10. I think the Rolling Stones in 1978 might have been in the $15 or $20 range, although it's all very hazy in my memories. I can recall paying ridiculously cheap cover charges for high potential bands that record companies were subsidizing to play in Houston: $2 for Talking Heads, $3 for Elvis Costello, $3 for the Police.

    Concert-going was not a particularly expensive hobby. I can recall passing on a chance to see Frank Sinatra around 1979 because he was very expensive because old people had lots of money, but I don't recall having to skip too many rock concerts because they were too expensive for me. In contrast, albums seemed expensive and I couldn't afford to buy more than one per week or one per ten days or so. I think albums tended to cost about $7 in 1978 although inflation was steady in that era.

    My recollection is that the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics introduced a whole new level of expensiveness for tickets. For example, seeing the US basketball team with Michael Jordan play Germany in a first round game cost $60, which seemed like an awful lot at the time. After 1984, tickets for sports and concerts cost a lot more. I think Peter Ueberoth single-handedly broke through the expensive ticket ceiling.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910, @Brutusale

    http://www.thepolicewiki.org/Police_wiki/index.php?title=1978-1979_Outlandos_d%27Amour_Tour

    THE POLICE – Houston, TX 08-03-1979 Opry House USA (full show)

    [MORE]

    THE POLICE – Houston, TX 08-03-1979 Opry House USA (full show)

    Can’t Stand Losing You
    Truth Hits Everybody
    So Lonely
    Fall Out
    Born In The 50’s
    Hole In My Life
    Be My Girl, Sally
    Peanuts
    Roxanne
    Landlord
    Next To You

    Outlandos D’amour USA Tour 1979

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @MEH 0910

    Thanks. Here's my review of the concert on p. 13 of the Rice "Thresher:"

    https://scholarship.rice.edu/bitstream/handle/1911/67288/thr19790315.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

  289. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The Tories have more or less been in office for a long time in Britain and they don't like crime.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @JohnnyWalker123, @JMcG

    Rotherham?

  290. @TorontoTraveller
    @Hypnotoad666

    "Down by the river
    I shot my baby"

    is not a lyric about committing homicide. It is a lyric about injecting heroin.

    I'm seeing a lot of commenters on this thread who seem way more out of touch than Neil Young seems to be.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan, @Hypnotoad666

    “Down by the river
    I shot my baby”

    is not a lyric about committing homicide. It is a lyric about injecting heroin.

    ” . . . shot her dead.”

    Alright. That interpretation makes sense. And given Young’s history, it seems most likely now that you mention it. NY does seem more like a negligent overdose guy than a Jimmy Hendrix, caught my baby messin’ round, kinda guy.

    Hey Joe, where you goin’ with that gun of your hand?
    Hey Joe, I said, where you goin’ with that gun in your hand? Oh
    I’m goin’ down to shoot my old lady
    You know I caught her messin’ ’round with another man, yeah
    I’m goin’ down to shoot my old lady
    You know I caught her messin’ ’round with another man
    Huh, and that ain’t too cool

    • Replies: @Dnought
    @Hypnotoad666

    Not to be pedantic, but Hendrix didn't write Hey Joe. Supposedly it was written by a folkie named Billy Roberts. There were several recordings before Hendrix (including the Byrds).

    The version that always seemed to me the most affecting (but not as good as Hendrix's) is the one by the band Love, whose singer Arthur Lee, always struck me as the type of guy for whom it could have been autobiographical.

  291. Yoko Ono Vows To Put MORE Music On Spotify Unless They Remove Joe Rogan.

    • LOL: Mark G.
  292. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Bill Jones

    A national crime survey called "The Crime Survey for England and Wales" is conducted annually.
    The survey, which began in 1981, is conducted on behalf of the Office for National Statistics
    The survey asks members of the public about their experiences with criminal victimization over the last year. The benefit of this survey is that it includes unreported crime.

    The survey was previously conducted face-to-face, but it shifted to phone-based interviews during the Covid era.

    See the chart below to see the long-term trend in the number of experienced criminal incidents. As you can see, the crime rate seems to have fallen substantially in recent years. This suggests that there hasn't been a decline in policing or sentencing severity - otherwise we'd expect the opposite trend.

    A benefit of this data is that it can't be affected by misreporting by the police or courts. This data also doesn't rely on members of the public making formal complaints. This data is a measure of what the public reports having experienced. It's relatively fair and non-biased.

    https://imgur.com/a/7xV0Na7

    See more below.

    https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/bulletins/crimeinenglandandwales/yearendingmarch2021


    Since the mid-1990s, there have been long-term falls seen in overall CSEW crime estimates

     


    Telephone-operated Crime Survey for England and Wales (TCSEW)
    Estimates from the TCSEW are derived from a total of 36,801 telephone interviews conducted with household residents in England and Wales aged 18 years and over between 20 May 2020 and 31 March 2021.
     

    The Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) estimates continue to provide important information in relation to longer-term trends in crime from year ending December 1981 to year ending March 2020. TCSEW provides estimates of crime for the year ending March 2021 only.
     
    Here's a graph of police-reported homicides. Unlike other crimes, homicide is reported with nearly 100% consistency and precision. You can't really fudge the homicide rate (as you can do for other crimes).

    https://imgur.com/a/NZxyEx4

    While the rate has fluctuated with time, the general long-term trend is downward. If policing or sentencing severity had significantly weakened, we'd expect more homicides over time.

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Sam Malone

    This data indicating a longterm decline in crime committed by British youth is interesting and pretty surprising. I wonder if the answer could be something as simple as the new tech being more likely to keep crime-prone youth glued to their screens?

    Maybe the kids increasingly are just zoned out at home looking at their snapchat updates on their smart phones and killing people with baseball bats in GTA V on their gaming console while streaming Squid Game on their HD flat screen, such that they can no longer be arsed to actually get out and about in the fresh air and attack innocent bystanders for no reason with the same vigor and consistency seen in prior decades.

    Very powerful gaming systems coupled with high-quality, immersive games that can be played in real-time against or with peers have exploded in popularity over the last 20 years, with continual improvements making them ever more appealing and addictive. The rise of smart phones has also occurred in the last decade and a half, along with the advent of social media. The highly addictive (and sedentary) nature of both have been very noticeable, particularly among the young. High-quality flat screen TVs are also a development of the last 15-20 years, and the streaming services delivering all the sports and entertainment you could want are even more recent. All together, they make staying inside alone and not moving a hell of a lot more engrossing than it used to be.

    Then to top it all off, there would be the added inclination to passivity which is induced by use of the heavy ‘skunk’ weed which has been pervasive among underclass British youth since at least the 1990s.

  293. @Paperback Writer
    @AceDeuce

    We'll never know the full truth of that sordid story. I bet it's a doozy.

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @Brutusale

    This guy had a lot to do with Manson’s introduction to the LA rock scene.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terry_Melcher

  294. And Blackstone owns Young and Pfizer
    https://markcrispinmiller.com/2022/01/blackstone-owns-half-of-neil-youngs-song-catalog/

    Neil Young is just one more Capitalist Tool.

    And to tie it into Steve’s Underpants Gnome question.
    Blackstone has been a big actor in Steps 2 and 3.

  295. @Steve Sailer
    @Eric Novak

    It's possible that the majority of concerts I saw from say 1977-1988 cost no more than $10. I think the Rolling Stones in 1978 might have been in the $15 or $20 range, although it's all very hazy in my memories. I can recall paying ridiculously cheap cover charges for high potential bands that record companies were subsidizing to play in Houston: $2 for Talking Heads, $3 for Elvis Costello, $3 for the Police.

    Concert-going was not a particularly expensive hobby. I can recall passing on a chance to see Frank Sinatra around 1979 because he was very expensive because old people had lots of money, but I don't recall having to skip too many rock concerts because they were too expensive for me. In contrast, albums seemed expensive and I couldn't afford to buy more than one per week or one per ten days or so. I think albums tended to cost about $7 in 1978 although inflation was steady in that era.

    My recollection is that the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics introduced a whole new level of expensiveness for tickets. For example, seeing the US basketball team with Michael Jordan play Germany in a first round game cost $60, which seemed like an awful lot at the time. After 1984, tickets for sports and concerts cost a lot more. I think Peter Ueberoth single-handedly broke through the expensive ticket ceiling.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910, @Brutusale

    My ticket for the 1975 Led Zeppelin tour stop at the Boston Garden that was cancelled by Boston mayor Kevin White was \$7.50.

    The Cars at the Rat, 1977 was \$1.00.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Brutusale

    Tickets at the Fillmore East in 1969 were $3, $4, and $5. Of course $5 was the cost of an LP on sale, so it wasn't nothing.

  296. @bike-anarkist
    @Rob

    You are still wrong to assume that the Medical Industry can do better than nature, which includes one's natural immunity.
    The only reason for pharmacological interventions is promoting "convenience".
    Convenience = $$$, and muh vacation, muh kidz hockey, muh trivial pursuit.

    In sum: the worship of Mammon! It doesn't matter that the "thing" one paid so much for is meaningless, it only matters that one spent so much for it. Nothing to do with"free markets".

    The Coronaprank has illuminated society's inherent destructive narcissism. That narcisism has created Commodified Human beings, now treated no better than domestic livestock (QR codes) and are GMO to boot!

    Replies: @Rob

    Well, if you are getting a covid monoclonal antibody, that is a solid sign that your natural immunity is not doing such a great job. As to medicine doing better than nature, I was discussing making the medical treatment more like nature’s antibody response and how that would be better.

  297. @S Johnson
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Thanks. It's probably true that the average British youth has got less aggressive, more likely to be passive, overweight or medicated. On the other hand murders in the UK mostly mean stabbings, and emergency services have got a lot better even in the last ten years at saving lives from stabbings. Then there are other features of life, like drugs and vandalism, which would once have been considered crime but now might not even be reported by the public as crime due to police passivity.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    On the other hand murders in the UK mostly mean stabbings, and emergency services have got a lot better even in the last ten years at saving lives from stabbings.

    That’s a good point. Life-saving medical procedures have improved, so we’d expect the homicide rate to decline. I wonder if there’s a way to quantify this. A way to control (for the reduced mortality effects of new medical procedures) when analyzing homicide rates over time.

    Then there are other features of life, like drugs and vandalism, which would once have been considered crime but now might not even be reported by the public as crime due to police passivity.

    The public may have changed its perception of minor crimes (like drug dealing and vandalism), but violent crime is different. Being subject to violent attack is a memorable experience that you don’t soon forget. Being violently victimized feels like an actual crime, very unlike seeing vandalism or drug deal incidents. You might be passive when you see vandalized property, but you feel viscerally affected by a violent attack.

    So refer to the chart below, which shows how many violent incidents were reported by the general public in the UK.

    View post on imgur.com

    Over the time, the definition of violence probably has become broader. Something like shoving a person, which would’ve been dismissed as “nothing” back a few decades ago, is more likely to be viewed as a “micro aggression” now. People are more sensitive. Therefore, I don’t think the public would’ve become less likely to identify incidents of violent personal victimization.

    So I do think the decline in violence is real.

    Here is another chart that shows the decline in theft. Having something stolen from you is fairly memorable too. When you experience theft, that feels like you’re being victimized.

    View post on imgur.com

    While one can argue whether vandalism or drug dealing incidents constitute true crimes, there’s no question that theft and violence fit under that term. Even when people don’t report those incidents, they do feel genuinely victimized when someone steals from them and, more especially, physically harms them. So there’s likely not underreporting by the general public.

    Here’s another relevant chart that shows police-recorded criminal incidents and survey-reported incidents. As you can see in the chart below, the police recorded fewer crimes than the public reported. This gap (public reported incidents – police recorded incidents) represents unreported crime. You may have to click on the chart below to see it.

    https://knoema.com/infographics/jmnedjb/uk-crime-trends-not-so-clear-cut

    View post on imgur.com

    While there is a substantial amount of unreported crime in the UK, it has been falling in recent years. Therefore, while laxity may be significantly distorting the true crime rate in the UK, the distortion has diminished in recent years.

    So if you want to say the British police are too lax in reporting crime and making arrests, you may very well be correct. However, it seems that the issue was more severe in past years.

    To conclude, there likely has been a very substantial drop in the crime rate in the UK. Especially youth crime.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Property crime was common in Britain in the 1990s. But you can fight burglary via target-hardening so that it becomes harder to steal stuff.

    Replies: @S Johnson, @JohnnyWalker123

  298. @JohnnyWalker123
    @S Johnson


    On the other hand murders in the UK mostly mean stabbings, and emergency services have got a lot better even in the last ten years at saving lives from stabbings.
     
    That's a good point. Life-saving medical procedures have improved, so we'd expect the homicide rate to decline. I wonder if there's a way to quantify this. A way to control (for the reduced mortality effects of new medical procedures) when analyzing homicide rates over time.

    Then there are other features of life, like drugs and vandalism, which would once have been considered crime but now might not even be reported by the public as crime due to police passivity.
     
    The public may have changed its perception of minor crimes (like drug dealing and vandalism), but violent crime is different. Being subject to violent attack is a memorable experience that you don't soon forget. Being violently victimized feels like an actual crime, very unlike seeing vandalism or drug deal incidents. You might be passive when you see vandalized property, but you feel viscerally affected by a violent attack.

    So refer to the chart below, which shows how many violent incidents were reported by the general public in the UK.

    https://imgur.com/a/9QML9WH

    Over the time, the definition of violence probably has become broader. Something like shoving a person, which would've been dismissed as "nothing" back a few decades ago, is more likely to be viewed as a "micro aggression" now. People are more sensitive. Therefore, I don't think the public would've become less likely to identify incidents of violent personal victimization.

    So I do think the decline in violence is real.

    Here is another chart that shows the decline in theft. Having something stolen from you is fairly memorable too. When you experience theft, that feels like you're being victimized.

    https://imgur.com/a/9nPU0Kl

    While one can argue whether vandalism or drug dealing incidents constitute true crimes, there's no question that theft and violence fit under that term. Even when people don't report those incidents, they do feel genuinely victimized when someone steals from them and, more especially, physically harms them. So there's likely not underreporting by the general public.

    Here's another relevant chart that shows police-recorded criminal incidents and survey-reported incidents. As you can see in the chart below, the police recorded fewer crimes than the public reported. This gap (public reported incidents - police recorded incidents) represents unreported crime. You may have to click on the chart below to see it.

    https://knoema.com/infographics/jmnedjb/uk-crime-trends-not-so-clear-cut

    https://imgur.com/a/2YUPiPM

    While there is a substantial amount of unreported crime in the UK, it has been falling in recent years. Therefore, while laxity may be significantly distorting the true crime rate in the UK, the distortion has diminished in recent years.

    So if you want to say the British police are too lax in reporting crime and making arrests, you may very well be correct. However, it seems that the issue was more severe in past years.

    To conclude, there likely has been a very substantial drop in the crime rate in the UK. Especially youth crime.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Property crime was common in Britain in the 1990s. But you can fight burglary via target-hardening so that it becomes harder to steal stuff.

    • Replies: @S Johnson
    @Steve Sailer

    London Times report, January 30 2022:


    The percentage of solved burglaries has nearly halved in seven years across England and Wales, and in some areas fewer than one in 30 crimes are reaching court, The Times has learnt.

    Police solved just over 5 per cent of burglaries last year compared with nearly 9.4 per cent in 2015, analysis of official statistics reveals.

    In total there were 268,000 burglaries between April 2020 and April last year, of which only 14,000 were solved while 243,000 cases were abandoned, largely because of evidential difficulties such as problems securing CCTV recordings or a failure to find a suspect. By comparison police solved close to 32,000 of 342,043 burglaries seven years earlier in 2014-15. That year more than 301,000 were not solved and more than 8,000 have not been assigned an outcome in government statistics. The statistics comprise residential and commercial burglaries.

    The Metropolitan Police, the biggest force in Britain, had what is termed a sanction detection rate of 3.8 per cent between January and December last year for residential burglaries. That means a formal resolution such as a charge, summons or community penalty was applied to just over 1,500 of the city’s 40,000 burglaries.
     
    I’m a bit doubtful that the public crime survey reflects an objective fall in crimes committed as much as apathy or sneaky recording methods. It’s effectively an opinion poll, which we all know can be manipulated, but I’m willing to hear otherwise.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Steve Sailer

    That's true. Home security systems are pretty common in much of the UK these days. I'm sure that deters many potential burglars.

    However, if you look at the violent crime, there's the same drastic fall.

    What's the best way to target-harden yourself against violent crime? Carry a gun.

    Yet handguns have been banned in the UK since 1997. This has "target-softened" British civilians.

    Therefore, we would assume that since UK targets have become "softer" from 1997 onward, there should be MORE violent crime. We would not assume that violent crime would DECLINE.

    One takeaway from all this is that the British public has become substantially LESS PRONE TO VIOLENCE over the last quarter century. In other ways, they (most especially the youths) are behaving much better. Which is interesting.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  299. @Steve Sailer
    @Dieter Kief

    He who writes the best guitar riff wins. Decision: "Sweet Home Alabama" over "Southern Man."

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “Southern Man” is about the piano bump, not the guitar.

    btw, I sort of can’t believe the Unzitariat has such incredibly crappy taste in music.

  300. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Property crime was common in Britain in the 1990s. But you can fight burglary via target-hardening so that it becomes harder to steal stuff.

    Replies: @S Johnson, @JohnnyWalker123

    London Times report, January 30 2022:

    The percentage of solved burglaries has nearly halved in seven years across England and Wales, and in some areas fewer than one in 30 crimes are reaching court, The Times has learnt.

    Police solved just over 5 per cent of burglaries last year compared with nearly 9.4 per cent in 2015, analysis of official statistics reveals.

    In total there were 268,000 burglaries between April 2020 and April last year, of which only 14,000 were solved while 243,000 cases were abandoned, largely because of evidential difficulties such as problems securing CCTV recordings or a failure to find a suspect. By comparison police solved close to 32,000 of 342,043 burglaries seven years earlier in 2014-15. That year more than 301,000 were not solved and more than 8,000 have not been assigned an outcome in government statistics. The statistics comprise residential and commercial burglaries.

    The Metropolitan Police, the biggest force in Britain, had what is termed a sanction detection rate of 3.8 per cent between January and December last year for residential burglaries. That means a formal resolution such as a charge, summons or community penalty was applied to just over 1,500 of the city’s 40,000 burglaries.

    I’m a bit doubtful that the public crime survey reflects an objective fall in crimes committed as much as apathy or sneaky recording methods. It’s effectively an opinion poll, which we all know can be manipulated, but I’m willing to hear otherwise.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @S Johnson

    You make a good point there. Fewer cases are being solved and fewer arrests are being made, even when you control for the falling crime victimization rate. This could reflect poorer quality policing.

    Though I think self-reported survey data is more reliable.

    The only 100% objective measure is the homicide rate. However, as you pointed out, advances in medical treatment may have reduced that to some (unknown) extent.

    The homicide rate fell in the last year.

    https://imgur.com/a/zOVmIQt

    However, in recent years, there has been a surge in the number of police-recorded sexual offences and rapes.

    https://imgur.com/a/Wg0qQid

    One final point I'll make is this.

    The proportion of incarcerated individuals who are young (under the age of 21) has fallen.

    https://researchbriefings.files.parliament.uk/documents/SN04334/SN04334.pdf


    The current data series on prisoner
    age goes back to 2002. The
    proportion of offenders under the age
    of 21 has decreased since 2002 when
    they represented around 16% of the
    prison population. At the end of June
    2021, under 21s accounted for 5%
    of
    the prison population
     
    https://imgur.com/a/KmcTucK

    We see the same trend in Scotland.

    https://imgur.com/a/aqMp7zF

    Interestingly, an increasing number & proportion of older individuals are being incarcerated.

    So the data aren't consistent.

    -Sexual offences & rapes are being recorded at an increasingly higher rate.
    -Overall, the self-reported rate of crime victimization (including violence) has fallen.
    -The homicide rate has fluctuated recently, but has generally decreased over time.
    -Younger people are being incarcerated less often, both in absolute and relative numbers.
    -Older people are being incarcerated more often.
    -The arrest rate (and rate of crimes being solved) is falling, even after controlling for the crime rate.
  301. @Brutusale
    @Steve Sailer

    My ticket for the 1975 Led Zeppelin tour stop at the Boston Garden that was cancelled by Boston mayor Kevin White was $7.50.

    The Cars at the Rat, 1977 was $1.00.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Tickets at the Fillmore East in 1969 were \$3, \$4, and \$5. Of course \$5 was the cost of an LP on sale, so it wasn’t nothing.

  302. @Reg Cæsar
    If a song is any good, it's good on a uke. This [ahem] young lady sounds better in her humble bedroom than Neil does in the most expensive studio:


    https://youtu.be/l_cR5S9GRUk


    She's even better on "Don't You Forget About Me, "Eye of the Tiger", and especially "White Wedding".

    Was she even born when these were hits?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Ralph L

    My sister has a English-Polish friend who apparently made (pre-covid) a decent living playing the ukulele internationally. And she’s middle-aged.

  303. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Property crime was common in Britain in the 1990s. But you can fight burglary via target-hardening so that it becomes harder to steal stuff.

    Replies: @S Johnson, @JohnnyWalker123

    That’s true. Home security systems are pretty common in much of the UK these days. I’m sure that deters many potential burglars.

    However, if you look at the violent crime, there’s the same drastic fall.

    What’s the best way to target-harden yourself against violent crime? Carry a gun.

    Yet handguns have been banned in the UK since 1997. This has “target-softened” British civilians.

    Therefore, we would assume that since UK targets have become “softer” from 1997 onward, there should be MORE violent crime. We would not assume that violent crime would DECLINE.

    One takeaway from all this is that the British public has become substantially LESS PRONE TO VIOLENCE over the last quarter century. In other ways, they (most especially the youths) are behaving much better. Which is interesting.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Yet handguns have been banned in the UK since 1997. This has “target-softened” British civilians.
     
    Uh, one reason it was so easy to ban them is that only one Briton in a thousand owned any to begin with. The law hardly made any difference. In the US, Prohibition was very different-- a large portion of the adult population drank, and continued to do so.

    Note that the law has loopholes for Northern Ireland, and doesn't apply to the Isle of Man, Guernsey, nor Jersey. The last has an active pistol shooters' group.

    If crime has gone down in the UK, it's likely that it's from the same causes as in the US and elsewhere-- the aging of demographic bulges quickly replaced by demographic bottlenecks, more time wasted indoors on social media, etc.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  304. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Steve Sailer

    That's true. Home security systems are pretty common in much of the UK these days. I'm sure that deters many potential burglars.

    However, if you look at the violent crime, there's the same drastic fall.

    What's the best way to target-harden yourself against violent crime? Carry a gun.

    Yet handguns have been banned in the UK since 1997. This has "target-softened" British civilians.

    Therefore, we would assume that since UK targets have become "softer" from 1997 onward, there should be MORE violent crime. We would not assume that violent crime would DECLINE.

    One takeaway from all this is that the British public has become substantially LESS PRONE TO VIOLENCE over the last quarter century. In other ways, they (most especially the youths) are behaving much better. Which is interesting.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Yet handguns have been banned in the UK since 1997. This has “target-softened” British civilians.

    Uh, one reason it was so easy to ban them is that only one Briton in a thousand owned any to begin with. The law hardly made any difference. In the US, Prohibition was very different– a large portion of the adult population drank, and continued to do so.

    Note that the law has loopholes for Northern Ireland, and doesn’t apply to the Isle of Man, Guernsey, nor Jersey. The last has an active pistol shooters’ group.

    If crime has gone down in the UK, it’s likely that it’s from the same causes as in the US and elsewhere– the aging of demographic bulges quickly replaced by demographic bottlenecks, more time wasted indoors on social media, etc.

    • Agree: S Johnson
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar


    If crime has gone down in the UK, it’s likely that it’s from the same causes as in the US and elsewhere– the aging of demographic bulges quickly replaced by demographic bottlenecks, more time wasted indoors on social media, etc.

     

    Probably.
  305. @Paperback Writer
    @AceDeuce

    If you're interested in the subject, an unstable gay journo named Tom O'Neill wrote a book called Chaos, about the Manson gang. I've referred to it a couple of times. The book itself is a total data dump, very poorly written, and repetitive BUT full of fantastic basic research.

    It's worth a read - but be prepared to dig.

    Replies: @Sick 'n Tired

    Tom O’Neill was a guest on Joe Rogan’s podcast and explained the book and a lot of the information in it as well. I read it afterwards and found his interview helped understand the book better.

    • Thanks: AceDeuce
  306. Handguns were banned in 1997 by a three-party consensus after a school shooting in Dunblane, Scotland (future tennis star Andy Murray was one of the young pupils who survived). It was a pretty cosmetic response to something obviously carried out by a disturbed individual, who would probably have found any other way to kill. Other than in Sherlock Holmes stories, where Holmes often packs his pistol before heading out to the climax of the plot, I’ve never heard of handguns being carried for protection in Britain before or since.

  307. @Hypnotoad666
    @TorontoTraveller


    “Down by the river
    I shot my baby”

    is not a lyric about committing homicide. It is a lyric about injecting heroin.
     
    " . . . shot her dead."

    Alright. That interpretation makes sense. And given Young's history, it seems most likely now that you mention it. NY does seem more like a negligent overdose guy than a Jimmy Hendrix, caught my baby messin' round, kinda guy.


    Hey Joe, where you goin' with that gun of your hand?
    Hey Joe, I said, where you goin' with that gun in your hand? Oh
    I'm goin' down to shoot my old lady
    You know I caught her messin' 'round with another man, yeah
    I'm goin' down to shoot my old lady
    You know I caught her messin' 'round with another man
    Huh, and that ain't too cool

    Replies: @Dnought

    Not to be pedantic, but Hendrix didn’t write Hey Joe. Supposedly it was written by a folkie named Billy Roberts. There were several recordings before Hendrix (including the Byrds).

    The version that always seemed to me the most affecting (but not as good as Hendrix’s) is the one by the band Love, whose singer Arthur Lee, always struck me as the type of guy for whom it could have been autobiographical.

  308. @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer

    http://www.thepolicewiki.org/Police_wiki/index.php?title=1978-1979_Outlandos_d%27Amour_Tour

    THE POLICE - Houston, TX 08-03-1979 Opry House USA (full show)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ezlh5rU8oL0


    THE POLICE - Houston, TX 08-03-1979 Opry House USA (full show)

    Can't Stand Losing You
    Truth Hits Everybody
    So Lonely
    Fall Out
    Born In The 50's
    Hole In My Life
    Be My Girl, Sally
    Peanuts
    Roxanne
    Landlord
    Next To You

    Outlandos D'amour USA Tour 1979
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Thanks. Here’s my review of the concert on p. 13 of the Rice “Thresher:”

    https://scholarship.rice.edu/bitstream/handle/1911/67288/thr19790315.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

    • Thanks: MEH 0910
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer

    Outlandos D'Amour (Remastered 2003) playlist:
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_lC4vwAZM8FzHZ4rTxdaVnryJtOMAv-xY4

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outlandos_d%27Amour
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/f3/Police-album-outlandosdamour.jpg

    , @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/1979-steve-sailer-makes-the-case-for-the-ramones/


    My last couple of years at Rice U., I was the rock critic for the college newspaper. This was an easy job for me because Houston was about a year behind my hometown of Los Angeles in music trends. The record companies would subsidize the up and coming bands to swing through Houston, a potentially huge market for them, but they couldn’t yet charge high ticket prices because few Houstonians had heard of them. So, I’d go see, say, The Police for $3 in a beer hall and report back to my Rice readers, “The Police are going to be big. You’re going to hear so much about this guy Sting that you’ll get totally sick of him.” (Well, actually, the last part is an exaggeration.)
     

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  309. @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer

    The Rolling Stones - Live in Houston 1978/07/19 - Audio - 21st show of the tour
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MAUFG73NFXg


    Complete show for the first time! Extracted from CD "Live at The Pavilion 78" (no label) good audience/excellent soundboard. Audio references are below.

    The Stones were on the final course of tour 78, with an exclusive US tour only, they didn't even go through Canada that year. On the track list, he was going to dedicate himself to playing many songs from the album they were presenting, Some Girls, and even playing songs from more contemporary albums, from Sticky Fingers onwards, playing only two classics from the 60s, Honky tonk women and Jumping. Jack flash.
    There was no paraphernalia or theatricality in the shows, only in the open stadiums they put their "tongue" as stage decoration and threw balloons at the beginning of each show, but nothing else, not even fireworks at the end of the concerts.
    Even the shows were short in duration, compared to the 1975 and 1976 tours, only 1 hour and a half long.

    Sound references:
    # good audience tape
    @ exc. stereo soundboard from Handsome Girls (TSP-CD-200-4)
    *** exc. stereo soundboard from 2LP "Live From England 1974"

    Live at Sam Houston Coliseum, Houston, USA, July 19th, 1978.
    00:00:00 Intro by The Glimmer Stone
    00:01:07 Let It Rock # (Chuck Berry cover)
    00:03:56 All Down The Line @
    00:08:09 Honky Tonk Women @
    00:12:11 Star Star @
    00:16:59 When The Whip Comes Down #
    00:23:11 Beast Of Burden @
    00:30:09 Lies @
    00:34:29 Miss You #
    00:43:05 Just My Imagination # (The Temptations cover)
    00:51:03 Shattered #
    00:55:58 Respectable @
    01:00:13 Far Away Eyes #
    01:06:10 Love In Vain # (Robert Johnson cover)
    01:12:08 Tumbling Dice ***
    01:17:36 Happy *** (Keith Richards on vocals)
    01:20:57 Sweet Little Sixteen @ (Chuck Berry cover)
    01:24:52 Brown Sugar @
    01:28:57 Jumping Jack Flash @

    The Band:
    Mick Jagger: vocals, guitar, piano
    Keith Richards: guitar, vocals
    Ron Wood: guitar, pedal steel
    Bill Wyman: bass
    Charlie Watts: drums
    Ian Stuart: piano

    Aditional musician:
    Ian McLagan: piano, organ, backing vocals

    1978 playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4QlJsrbWw4Xc3RbU1t7KunWKmh1Sc2IM

    1978 US Tour:
    The US Tour 1978 was the tour in The United States to promote Some Girls album. Like the 1972 and 1975 U.S. tours, Bill Graham was the tour promoter. 24 cities and 25 shows was the lenght. The Stones used a stripped back, minimal stage show compared to the previous Tour of the Americas '75 and Tour of Europe '76, possibly due to the emergence of the punk rock scene and its emphasis solely on music and attitude rather than presenting a grandiose stage extravaganza. Continuing a schedule started in 1966 of touring the United States exactly every three years, the Stones played in a mixture of theatres, sometimes under a pseudonym (i.e., at the start of the 1978 US Tour in Lakeland, Florida, The Stones were billed on the ticket as "The Great Southeast Stoned Out Wrestling Champions"), arenas, and stadiums, a practice that they would follow for many of their future tours as well. The tour was the first in which Charlie Watts used the famous Gretsch drum set that he continues to play with the Stones to this day, as well as his first employment of a china cymbal as a crash.

    10 June Lakeland
    12 June Atlanta
    14 June Passaic
    15 June Washington
    17 June Philadelphia
    19 June New York City
    21 June Hampton
    22 June Myrtle Beach
    26 June Greensboro
    28 June Memphis
    29 June Lexington
    1 July Cleveland
    4 July Orchard Park
    6 July Detroit
    8 July Chicago
    10 July Saint Paul
    11 July St. Louis
    13 July New Orleans
    16 July Boulder
    18 July Fort Worth
    19 July Houston
    21 July Tucson
    23 July Anaheim
    24 July Anaheim
    26 July Oakland
     
    The Rolling Stones - The 1978 tour rehearsals - Audio
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7a2Ix3Xo4uc

    This is the most complete version of the rehearsals for the upcoming tour 1978. Very good soundboard recording extracted from CD "The complete Woodstock tapes" (VGP-130)
    Missing only "Gimme shelter" deleted due copyright.

    Recorded at Bearsville Studios, between May 27th and June 8th, Woodstock, USA.

    00:00:00 Intro by The Glimmer Stone
    00:01:07 Miss you I
    00:18:51 Respectable I
    00:22:30 Love in vain
    00:28:24 Play with fire
    00:32:01 No expectations
    00:34:24 Instrumental jam #1
    00:40:09 Blues jam #1
    00:46:09 Blues jam #2
    00:47:20 Blues jam #3
    00:49:49 Blues jam #4
    00:50:32 Blues jam #5
    00:56:18 Gimme shelter I
    00:57:56 When the whip comes down
    01:03:09 Miss you II
    01:10:16 Don't look back I
    01:21:16 Instrumental jam #2
    01:23:34 Beast of burden I
    01:33:14 C'mon everybody/Summertime blues
    01:47:58 Rocket 88
    01:57:19 Drum solo
    01:58:54 Crazy mama
    02:09:38 Star star
    Gimme shelter II (deleted)
    02:13:21 Don't look back II
    02:14:05 Beautiful Delilah
    02:20:00 Cocksucker blues
    02:26:57 It's only rock and roll
    02:34:37 All down the line
    02:38:49 Honky tonk women
    02:41:26 Brown sugar I
    02:50:00 Tumbling dice I
    02:57:17 Jumping Jack flash
    03:03:41 Memory motel I
    03:07:07 The fat man
    03:09:19 Beast of burden II
    03:17:02 Hot stuff
    03:19:50 Something else
    03:20:49 Sweet little sixteen I
    03:23:40 High-heel sneakers
    03:26:28 Play with fire
    03:27:05 Crackin' up
    03:31:06 Tell me (you're coming back)
    03:36:38 Shake your hips
    03:39:41 Respectable II
    03:42:43 Don't look back III
    03:45:47 Instrumental jam III
    03:50:49 Sweet little sixteen II
    03:54:40 Let it rock
    03:55:35 Shattered
    03:59:54 Memory motel II
    04:12:37 Faraway eyes
    04:19:40 Let's spend the night together
    04:28:10 Tumbling dice II
    04:31:09 Happy
    04:34:39 Prodigal son
    04:41:19 Brown sugar II
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The 1978 “Some Girls” album isn’t considered peak Rolling Stones, but it had a lot of solid hard rockers for a stadium tour.

    Unfortunately, the show I saw at Angel Stadium was plagued by a bad echo. The stage was in centerfield and the sound bounced back off the grandstand behind home plate.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer

    I had occurred to me that July 1978 might have been too early a date for you to have been seeing concerts from college.


    23 July Anaheim
    24 July Anaheim
     
    The Rolling Stones - Live in Anaheim 1978/07/23 - Audio new source - 23rd show of the tour
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23fL82y1HG8

    Thanks to Matthew Rosney who alllow me to share his recording from this wonderful show, a real upgrade of previous recordings. All thanks to him!

    Words from Matthew:
    "Here's my recording offered for the anniversary of the legendary "shoes" concert. The mix is pretty Keith-y due to my field location. Not to be overlooked is the onstage wonder of Nicky Hopkins and Bobby Keys, guests for the afternoon.
    Years ago in a radio interview, Keith Richard was asked which moment of which concert had stuck most in his memory through the decades, and he answered immediately: “It was those shoes, man, those shoes,” and he dissolved in laughter."

    Complete show extracted from the "Matthew Rosney" tapes. Very good audience recording.

    Live at Anaheim Stadium, Anaheim, USA, July 23rd, 1978.

    00:00:00 Intro by The Glimmer Stone
    00:00:36 Intro/Let it rock
    00:03:24 All down the line
    00:07:50 Honky tonk women
    00:11:59 Star star
    00:15:59 When the whip comes down
    00:22:22 Beast of burden
    00:29:32 Lies
    00:34:19 Miss you
    00:44:13 Just my imagination
    00:52:30 Shattered
    00:57:42 Respectable
    01:01:08 Far away eyes
    01:06:53 Love in vain
    01:13:01 Tumbling dice
    01:18:16 Happy
    01:22:00 Sweet little sixteen
    01:25:45 Brown sugar
    01:30:18 Jumping Jack flash

    The Band:
    Mick Jagger: vocals, guitar, piano
    Keith Richards: guitar, vocals
    Ron Wood: guitar, pedal steel
    Bill Wyman: bass
    Charlie Watts: drums
    Ian Stuart: piano

    Aditional musician:
    Ian McLagan: piano, organ, backing vocals

    1978 playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4QlJsrbWw4Xc3RbU1t7KunWKmh1Sc2IM
     

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    , @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer

    Some Girls (2009 Re-Mastered) playlist:
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_kZG4HndlKobhYuQ3C2eaEdSG9MhhU5Frs

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Some_Girls
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/6c/Some_Girls.png


    Despite controversy surrounding its cover artwork and lyrical content, Some Girls was a commercial success, peaking at No. 2 on the UK Albums Chart and No. 1 on the US Billboard Top LPs & Tape chart. It became the band's top-selling album in the US, having been certified by the RIAA for selling six million copies sold by 2000. Several hit singles emerged from the album which would become rock radio staples for decades, including "Beast of Burden" (US No. 8), "Shattered" (US No. 31), "Respectable" (UK No. 23), highlighted by "Miss You", which reached No. 1 in the US and No. 3 in the UK.

    Rebounding from the relative critical disappointment of Black and Blue, Some Girls was a major critical success, with many reviewers calling it a classic return to form for the band and their best album since Exile on Main St. (1972). It became the only Rolling Stones album to be nominated for a Grammy Award in the Album of the Year category.[2] Retrospectively, it has continued to receive acclaim, with many commending the band's ability to blend contemporary music trends with their older signature style. Considered one of the band's finest records, Rolling Stone has included Some Girls in their lists of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

    [...]
    Background
    By 1976, the Rolling Stones' popularity was in decline as the charts were dominated by disco and newer bands such as Aerosmith and Kiss. In the UK, the punk rock movement was a rising force and made most artists connected with the 1960s era seem obsolete. The group had also failed to produce a critically acclaimed album since 1972's Exile on Main St.[3]

    Writing and recording
    Mick Jagger is generally regarded as the principal creative force behind Some Girls. Keith Richards was in legal trouble for much of 1977, which resulted in the band being inactive on the touring circuit during that year, except for two shows in Canada during the spring for the live album Love You Live.[3] Jagger solely wrote "Miss You", as well as "Lies" and "When the Whip Comes Down".[5] In addition to punk, Jagger claims to have been influenced by dance music, most notably disco, during the recording of Some Girls, and cites New York City as a major inspiration for the album, an explanation for his lyrical preoccupation with the city throughout.[3]
     

  310. @Steve Sailer
    @MEH 0910

    The 1978 "Some Girls" album isn't considered peak Rolling Stones, but it had a lot of solid hard rockers for a stadium tour.

    Unfortunately, the show I saw at Angel Stadium was plagued by a bad echo. The stage was in centerfield and the sound bounced back off the grandstand behind home plate.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    I had occurred to me that July 1978 might have been too early a date for you to have been seeing concerts from college.

    23 July Anaheim
    24 July Anaheim

    The Rolling Stones – Live in Anaheim 1978/07/23 – Audio new source – 23rd show of the tour

    [MORE]

    Thanks to Matthew Rosney who alllow me to share his recording from this wonderful show, a real upgrade of previous recordings. All thanks to him!

    Words from Matthew:
    “Here’s my recording offered for the anniversary of the legendary “shoes” concert. The mix is pretty Keith-y due to my field location. Not to be overlooked is the onstage wonder of Nicky Hopkins and Bobby Keys, guests for the afternoon.
    Years ago in a radio interview, Keith Richard was asked which moment of which concert had stuck most in his memory through the decades, and he answered immediately: “It was those shoes, man, those shoes,” and he dissolved in laughter.”

    Complete show extracted from the “Matthew Rosney” tapes. Very good audience recording.

    Live at Anaheim Stadium, Anaheim, USA, July 23rd, 1978.

    00:00:00 Intro by The Glimmer Stone
    00:00:36 Intro/Let it rock
    00:03:24 All down the line
    00:07:50 Honky tonk women
    00:11:59 Star star
    00:15:59 When the whip comes down
    00:22:22 Beast of burden
    00:29:32 Lies
    00:34:19 Miss you
    00:44:13 Just my imagination
    00:52:30 Shattered
    00:57:42 Respectable
    01:01:08 Far away eyes
    01:06:53 Love in vain
    01:13:01 Tumbling dice
    01:18:16 Happy
    01:22:00 Sweet little sixteen
    01:25:45 Brown sugar
    01:30:18 Jumping Jack flash

    The Band:
    Mick Jagger: vocals, guitar, piano
    Keith Richards: guitar, vocals
    Ron Wood: guitar, pedal steel
    Bill Wyman: bass
    Charlie Watts: drums
    Ian Stuart: piano

    Aditional musician:
    Ian McLagan: piano, organ, backing vocals

    1978 playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4QlJsrbWw4Xc3RbU1t7KunWKmh1Sc2IM

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    Okay, you were in college, but back in California for the summer of '78 when you caught the Stones concert.

    https://twitter.com/Steve_Sailer/status/1488833719129411585

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  311. @Steve Sailer
    @MEH 0910

    The 1978 "Some Girls" album isn't considered peak Rolling Stones, but it had a lot of solid hard rockers for a stadium tour.

    Unfortunately, the show I saw at Angel Stadium was plagued by a bad echo. The stage was in centerfield and the sound bounced back off the grandstand behind home plate.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    Some Girls (2009 Re-Mastered) playlist:
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_kZG4HndlKobhYuQ3C2eaEdSG9MhhU5Frs

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Some_Girls

    [MORE]

    Despite controversy surrounding its cover artwork and lyrical content, Some Girls was a commercial success, peaking at No. 2 on the UK Albums Chart and No. 1 on the US Billboard Top LPs & Tape chart. It became the band’s top-selling album in the US, having been certified by the RIAA for selling six million copies sold by 2000. Several hit singles emerged from the album which would become rock radio staples for decades, including “Beast of Burden” (US No. 8), “Shattered” (US No. 31), “Respectable” (UK No. 23), highlighted by “Miss You”, which reached No. 1 in the US and No. 3 in the UK.

    Rebounding from the relative critical disappointment of Black and Blue, Some Girls was a major critical success, with many reviewers calling it a classic return to form for the band and their best album since Exile on Main St. (1972). It became the only Rolling Stones album to be nominated for a Grammy Award in the Album of the Year category.[2] Retrospectively, it has continued to receive acclaim, with many commending the band’s ability to blend contemporary music trends with their older signature style. Considered one of the band’s finest records, Rolling Stone has included Some Girls in their lists of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

    […]
    Background
    By 1976, the Rolling Stones’ popularity was in decline as the charts were dominated by disco and newer bands such as Aerosmith and Kiss. In the UK, the punk rock movement was a rising force and made most artists connected with the 1960s era seem obsolete. The group had also failed to produce a critically acclaimed album since 1972’s Exile on Main St.[3]

    Writing and recording
    Mick Jagger is generally regarded as the principal creative force behind Some Girls. Keith Richards was in legal trouble for much of 1977, which resulted in the band being inactive on the touring circuit during that year, except for two shows in Canada during the spring for the live album Love You Live.[3] Jagger solely wrote “Miss You”, as well as “Lies” and “When the Whip Comes Down”.[5] In addition to punk, Jagger claims to have been influenced by dance music, most notably disco, during the recording of Some Girls, and cites New York City as a major inspiration for the album, an explanation for his lyrical preoccupation with the city throughout.[3]

  312. @Steve Sailer
    @MEH 0910

    Thanks. Here's my review of the concert on p. 13 of the Rice "Thresher:"

    https://scholarship.rice.edu/bitstream/handle/1911/67288/thr19790315.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

  313. @Juvenalis
    “Neil Young vs. Joe Rogen” is inaccurate. No evidence Joe Rogen knows who Neil Young is—rather Neil Young vs. Spotify. Young demanded Spotify remove Rogen's show over alleged medical "misinformation"—or else threatened to try to pull his songs. Faced with "him or me" ultimatum, Spotify called Young's bluff, preemptively obliged Neil's threats/demands, put to rest quickly removing all of Young's music—thereby warding off any protracted public feud, minimizing publicity Young was hoping to draw.

    Spotify sent a clear message to Neil how much of a fight they'd put up to keep his content on their platform—lest other activist celebs get ideas of threatening to hold song catalogs hostage to force Spotify to bend to ransom demands. No negotiations with terrorists.

    Humiliating own-goal on a personal level for Neil—but problems compounded by the fact that Neil doesn't actually fully own his songs. Just last year, on a day that will live in infamy, Neil Young sold 50% of the rights to his music catalog to investors at U.K.-based Hipgnosis Songs Fund (founded by veteran music industry exec CEO Merck Mercuriadis) for $150 million.

    Investors can't be happy that revenue from royalties on the catalog of 1,180 Neil Young songs they acquired will fall below expectations since his entire catalog was suddenly removed from the world's most popular music streaming service—all because ol' Neil had to run his big mouth desperately trying to virtue signal and appear relevant to younger generations.

    With more than 162.4 million subscribers in 2021, Spotify held 31% of global market share, more than double that of top competitors Apple Music (15%) and Amazon Music (13%). Despite Neil Young's protestations to the contrary, this was an enormously embarrassing episode—epic self-own.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/business-55557633

    Neil Young sells song rights in '$150m' deal
    6 January 2021


    An investment firm has bought 50% of the rights to all Neil Young's songs.

    Hipgnosis Songs Fund spent an estimated $150m (£110m) on 1,180 songs written by the Canadian folk rocker.

    The fund, which lets people invest in hit songs, has previously splashed out about £1bn snapping up rights to songs from the likes of Mark Ronson, Chic, Barry Manilow and Blondie.

    Founded by music industry veteran Merck Mercuriadis, Hipgnosis turns music royalties into an income stream.

    "This is a deal that changes Hipgnosis forever," said Mr Mercuriadis.

    "I bought my first Neil Young album aged seven. Harvest was my companion and I know every note, every word, every pause and silence intimately.
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @VivaLaMigra, @MEH 0910

    No evidence Joe Rogen knows who Neil Young is

    Joe Rogan addresses Neil Young Spotify controversy & Misinformation

    Joe Rogan has issued a statement about Spotify and Neil Young removing his music off the platform due to claims of misinformation.
    Here’s Joe’s side of the story.
    This is not my video

    https://www.instagram.com/tv/CZYQ_nDJi6G/

    joerogan My thoughts on the latest controversy with @spotify

    Edit: I just realized “chuckie’s in love” is Ricky Lee Jones not Joni Mitchell. Doh!

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    One little part of Joe Rogan's story doesn't add up. Joe Rogan was born in 1967, he said when he was 19 he was working security at Great Woods for a Neil Young concert, which would have been 1986, so he couldn't have heard Neil perform "Rockin' in the Free World" because that song didn't come out until 1989.

    https://www.setlist.fm/setlist/neil-young-and-crazy-horse/1986/great-woods-center-for-the-performing-arts-mansfield-ma-1bd199ec.html

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockin%27_in_the_Free_World


    Young wrote the song while on tour with his band The Restless in February 1989.
     
  314. @MEH 0910
    @Juvenalis


    No evidence Joe Rogen knows who Neil Young is
     
    Joe Rogan addresses Neil Young Spotify controversy & Misinformation
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dSqLWrSVWaY

    Joe Rogan has issued a statement about Spotify and Neil Young removing his music off the platform due to claims of misinformation.
    Here’s Joe’s side of the story.
    This is not my video
     
    https://www.instagram.com/tv/CZYQ_nDJi6G/

    joerogan My thoughts on the latest controversy with @spotify

    Edit: I just realized “chuckie’s in love” is Ricky Lee Jones not Joni Mitchell. Doh!
     

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    One little part of Joe Rogan’s story doesn’t add up. Joe Rogan was born in 1967, he said when he was 19 he was working security at Great Woods for a Neil Young concert, which would have been 1986, so he couldn’t have heard Neil perform “Rockin’ in the Free World” because that song didn’t come out until 1989.

    https://www.setlist.fm/setlist/neil-young-and-crazy-horse/1986/great-woods-center-for-the-performing-arts-mansfield-ma-1bd199ec.html

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockin%27_in_the_Free_World

    Young wrote the song while on tour with his band The Restless in February 1989.

  315. @Steve Sailer
    @Eric Novak

    Here's a 1969 Rolling Stone magazine article:

    The Rolling Stones Impose High Ticket Prices for US Tour https://www.rollingstone.com › music › music-news › t...
    It begins with two evening shows at the Forum in Los Angeles November 8th, with tickets priced from $5.50 to $8.50.

    It would be interesting to see a graph of Rolling Stones ticket prices over the decades. The Stones are kind of like how economic historians use carpenters' wages as a measuring stick since ancient times.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    It would be interesting to see a graph of Rolling Stones ticket prices over the decades. The Stones are kind of like how economic historians use carpenters’ wages as a measuring stick since ancient times.

    How about a graph that compares RS ticket prices with the median income of their fan base. I have a feeling those might be closely correlated.

    In a way, each band is a sort of monopoly because each (really good) band is unique, and it is the only supplier of its own concerts. For example, if you are a big Rolling Stone fan, it’s not really a competitive substitute to go see some cheaper new band that the kids are listening to. So the Stones will charge whatever their fans will pay. And the older and wealthier the fans get, the more they will pay.

  316. @Reg Cæsar
    @Reg Cæsar

    Oops, sorry. That was from another comment. Here she is, doing Neil:


    https://youtu.be/mVXO4BJGydY

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    Neil Young – Harvest Moon [Official Music Video]

    [MORE]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harvest_Moon_(Neil_Young_song)

    The song uses a moon motif, which Young has mentioned as being very important to him and having quasi-religious undertones.[1] It is a tribute to his wife Pegi Young, and the two are dancing in a bar in the music video.[2] Linda Ronstadt provides the backing vocals.[3]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pegi_Young

    Young was born Margaret Mary Morton[20] in San Mateo, California, on December 1, 1952 to Thomas and Margaret Jean (Foley) Morton.[21][22]

    Young met future husband Neil Young in 1974 when she was working as a waitress at a diner near his ranch, a story he tells in the 1992 song “Unknown Legend”. They married in August 1978[23] and had two children, Ben and Amber, in addition to her becoming stepmother to his first child, Zeke.[7] Both Ben and Zeke are diagnosed with cerebral palsy,[24] and Amber with epilepsy.[24] In July 2014, Neil filed for divorce in California.[25]

    Young died of cancer on January 1, 2019, aged 66, in Mountain View, California—just a few miles south of her birthplace in San Mateo.[21][26]

    Harvest Moon (Live)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreamin%27_Man_Live_%2792

    Dreamin’ Man Live ’92 is a live album by the Canadian / American musician Neil Young, released on December 8, 2009. It features live, solo acoustic performances of all ten songs from Harvest Moon, recorded on tour in 1992.[4] The album is volume twelve in Young’s Archives Performance Series and the fifth to be released.[5]

  317. Neil Young is another musical artist who had album cover art by the great Rick Griffin— the lettering on the On the Beach album. Three ns in it, each different from the other two (try making a font out of that), yet it makes a coherent whole.

  318. @Steve Sailer
    @Whiskey

    My guess is that Tom Petty wound up with plenty of money. His heirs took in $20 million more than expected in the three months after his death due to all the extra playing of his songs on the radio and the like.

    My general impression of Petty is that he liked show biz and was pretty good at the money side of it. He lived in the two most cliched places for stars to live: Mulholland Drive and Malibu beach. He was popular in L.A. for being the anti-Eagles: Like Don Henley, Petty was another redneck who made it big in the big city, but unlike Henley he didn't complain constantly about how soul-crushing Los Angeles was. Petty seemed to enjoy being a rich Hollywood rock star.

    Replies: @anon, @Mark G.

    My guess is that Tom Petty wound up with plenty of money. His heirs took in \$20 million more than expected in the three months after his death due to all the extra playing of his songs on the radio and the like.

    I know someone who worked for Petty’s ex-wife. She got a lot of his money as part of the divorce settlement but I’m sure he made plenty more money after that. I was told his ex-wife was crazy. She thought the U.S. government owned an earthquake machine it would use to start earthquakes. I was also told she was forgetful. She would set a pair of sunglasses down on a table, forget they were there, and then start yelling at her employees they stole them. I was also told in her younger days she was quite pretty but as she got older she started to look like Jabba the Hutt.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Mark G.


    I know someone who worked for Petty’s ex-wife. She got a lot of his money as part of the divorce settlement but I’m sure he made plenty more money after that. I was told his ex-wife was crazy. She thought the U.S. government owned an earthquake machine it would use to start earthquakes. I was also told she was forgetful. She would set a pair of sunglasses down on a table, forget they were there, and then start yelling at her employees they stole them.
     
    Recently watched the 1940 UK movie Gaslight and that's pretty much the plot.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYmtzaHwCKo

    which led me to the 1944 Ingrid Bergman version.

    https://therokuchannel.roku.com/details/fb5783ef2487547b8b84052a344ac014/gaslight
  319. @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer

    I had occurred to me that July 1978 might have been too early a date for you to have been seeing concerts from college.


    23 July Anaheim
    24 July Anaheim
     
    The Rolling Stones - Live in Anaheim 1978/07/23 - Audio new source - 23rd show of the tour
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23fL82y1HG8

    Thanks to Matthew Rosney who alllow me to share his recording from this wonderful show, a real upgrade of previous recordings. All thanks to him!

    Words from Matthew:
    "Here's my recording offered for the anniversary of the legendary "shoes" concert. The mix is pretty Keith-y due to my field location. Not to be overlooked is the onstage wonder of Nicky Hopkins and Bobby Keys, guests for the afternoon.
    Years ago in a radio interview, Keith Richard was asked which moment of which concert had stuck most in his memory through the decades, and he answered immediately: “It was those shoes, man, those shoes,” and he dissolved in laughter."

    Complete show extracted from the "Matthew Rosney" tapes. Very good audience recording.

    Live at Anaheim Stadium, Anaheim, USA, July 23rd, 1978.

    00:00:00 Intro by The Glimmer Stone
    00:00:36 Intro/Let it rock
    00:03:24 All down the line
    00:07:50 Honky tonk women
    00:11:59 Star star
    00:15:59 When the whip comes down
    00:22:22 Beast of burden
    00:29:32 Lies
    00:34:19 Miss you
    00:44:13 Just my imagination
    00:52:30 Shattered
    00:57:42 Respectable
    01:01:08 Far away eyes
    01:06:53 Love in vain
    01:13:01 Tumbling dice
    01:18:16 Happy
    01:22:00 Sweet little sixteen
    01:25:45 Brown sugar
    01:30:18 Jumping Jack flash

    The Band:
    Mick Jagger: vocals, guitar, piano
    Keith Richards: guitar, vocals
    Ron Wood: guitar, pedal steel
    Bill Wyman: bass
    Charlie Watts: drums
    Ian Stuart: piano

    Aditional musician:
    Ian McLagan: piano, organ, backing vocals

    1978 playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4QlJsrbWw4Xc3RbU1t7KunWKmh1Sc2IM
     

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    Okay, you were in college, but back in California for the summer of ’78 when you caught the Stones concert.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/Steve_Sailer/status/1489217911440904192
    [...]
    https://twitter.com/Steve_Sailer/status/1489237138956685320

  320. @Steve Sailer
    @MEH 0910

    Thanks. Here's my review of the concert on p. 13 of the Rice "Thresher:"

    https://scholarship.rice.edu/bitstream/handle/1911/67288/thr19790315.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/1979-steve-sailer-makes-the-case-for-the-ramones/

    My last couple of years at Rice U., I was the rock critic for the college newspaper. This was an easy job for me because Houston was about a year behind my hometown of Los Angeles in music trends. The record companies would subsidize the up and coming bands to swing through Houston, a potentially huge market for them, but they couldn’t yet charge high ticket prices because few Houstonians had heard of them. So, I’d go see, say, The Police for \$3 in a beer hall and report back to my Rice readers, “The Police are going to be big. You’re going to hear so much about this guy Sting that you’ll get totally sick of him.” (Well, actually, the last part is an exaggeration.)

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://news.rice.edu/news/2020/campanile-collection-goes-online


    The Campanile collection goes online

    Woodson Research Center digitizes every volume of Rice’s yearbook for maximum accessibility

    Every single edition of the Campanile, Rice’s yearbook, is now digitized and available online.

    That includes the special two-volume year in 1944 during World War II and the 1970 yearbook that was not a bound volume at all — just a cardboard box filled with assorted materials including Monty Python-inspired illustrations, atmospheric photos of student protests inside Allen Center and a 45 rpm record.
     

    https://news.rice.edu/sites/g/files/bxs2656/files/2021-09/campanile1.jpg

    "1970 Campaniles on display during Homecoming, Rice University." (1970) Rice University: https://hdl.handle.net/1911/79011.
     
    The Campanile, 1979
    The Campanile, 1980
  321. @Mark G.
    @Steve Sailer


    My guess is that Tom Petty wound up with plenty of money. His heirs took in $20 million more than expected in the three months after his death due to all the extra playing of his songs on the radio and the like.

     

    I know someone who worked for Petty's ex-wife. She got a lot of his money as part of the divorce settlement but I'm sure he made plenty more money after that. I was told his ex-wife was crazy. She thought the U.S. government owned an earthquake machine it would use to start earthquakes. I was also told she was forgetful. She would set a pair of sunglasses down on a table, forget they were there, and then start yelling at her employees they stole them. I was also told in her younger days she was quite pretty but as she got older she started to look like Jabba the Hutt.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    I know someone who worked for Petty’s ex-wife. She got a lot of his money as part of the divorce settlement but I’m sure he made plenty more money after that. I was told his ex-wife was crazy. She thought the U.S. government owned an earthquake machine it would use to start earthquakes. I was also told she was forgetful. She would set a pair of sunglasses down on a table, forget they were there, and then start yelling at her employees they stole them.

    Recently watched the 1940 UK movie Gaslight and that’s pretty much the plot.

    which led me to the 1944 Ingrid Bergman version.

    https://therokuchannel.roku.com/details/fb5783ef2487547b8b84052a344ac014/gaslight

  322. @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    Okay, you were in college, but back in California for the summer of '78 when you caught the Stones concert.

    https://twitter.com/Steve_Sailer/status/1488833719129411585

    Replies: @MEH 0910


    […]

  323. @Reg Cæsar
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Yet handguns have been banned in the UK since 1997. This has “target-softened” British civilians.
     
    Uh, one reason it was so easy to ban them is that only one Briton in a thousand owned any to begin with. The law hardly made any difference. In the US, Prohibition was very different-- a large portion of the adult population drank, and continued to do so.

    Note that the law has loopholes for Northern Ireland, and doesn't apply to the Isle of Man, Guernsey, nor Jersey. The last has an active pistol shooters' group.

    If crime has gone down in the UK, it's likely that it's from the same causes as in the US and elsewhere-- the aging of demographic bulges quickly replaced by demographic bottlenecks, more time wasted indoors on social media, etc.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    If crime has gone down in the UK, it’s likely that it’s from the same causes as in the US and elsewhere– the aging of demographic bulges quickly replaced by demographic bottlenecks, more time wasted indoors on social media, etc.

    Probably.

  324. @S Johnson
    @Steve Sailer

    London Times report, January 30 2022:


    The percentage of solved burglaries has nearly halved in seven years across England and Wales, and in some areas fewer than one in 30 crimes are reaching court, The Times has learnt.

    Police solved just over 5 per cent of burglaries last year compared with nearly 9.4 per cent in 2015, analysis of official statistics reveals.

    In total there were 268,000 burglaries between April 2020 and April last year, of which only 14,000 were solved while 243,000 cases were abandoned, largely because of evidential difficulties such as problems securing CCTV recordings or a failure to find a suspect. By comparison police solved close to 32,000 of 342,043 burglaries seven years earlier in 2014-15. That year more than 301,000 were not solved and more than 8,000 have not been assigned an outcome in government statistics. The statistics comprise residential and commercial burglaries.

    The Metropolitan Police, the biggest force in Britain, had what is termed a sanction detection rate of 3.8 per cent between January and December last year for residential burglaries. That means a formal resolution such as a charge, summons or community penalty was applied to just over 1,500 of the city’s 40,000 burglaries.
     
    I’m a bit doubtful that the public crime survey reflects an objective fall in crimes committed as much as apathy or sneaky recording methods. It’s effectively an opinion poll, which we all know can be manipulated, but I’m willing to hear otherwise.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    You make a good point there. Fewer cases are being solved and fewer arrests are being made, even when you control for the falling crime victimization rate. This could reflect poorer quality policing.

    Though I think self-reported survey data is more reliable.

    The only 100% objective measure is the homicide rate. However, as you pointed out, advances in medical treatment may have reduced that to some (unknown) extent.

    The homicide rate fell in the last year.

    View post on imgur.com

    However, in recent years, there has been a surge in the number of police-recorded sexual offences and rapes.

    View post on imgur.com

    One final point I’ll make is this.

    The proportion of incarcerated individuals who are young (under the age of 21) has fallen.

    https://researchbriefings.files.parliament.uk/documents/SN04334/SN04334.pdf

    The current data series on prisoner
    age goes back to 2002. The
    proportion of offenders under the age
    of 21 has decreased since 2002 when
    they represented around 16% of the
    prison population. At the end of June
    2021, under 21s accounted for 5%
    of
    the prison population

    View post on imgur.com

    We see the same trend in Scotland.

    View post on imgur.com

    Interestingly, an increasing number & proportion of older individuals are being incarcerated.

    So the data aren’t consistent.

    -Sexual offences & rapes are being recorded at an increasingly higher rate.
    -Overall, the self-reported rate of crime victimization (including violence) has fallen.
    -The homicide rate has fluctuated recently, but has generally decreased over time.
    -Younger people are being incarcerated less often, both in absolute and relative numbers.
    -Older people are being incarcerated more often.
    -The arrest rate (and rate of crimes being solved) is falling, even after controlling for the crime rate.

  325. @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Daniel H

    “Jimmy Page broke up the Yardbirds in 1968 partly due to the fact that after a very successful American tour they all OWED money.”

    And boy did he learn his lesson. After he formed Zeppelin he hired a heavy hitting gangster-like band manager who managed to negotiate something like a 90-10 split on gross revenue with the concert venues. As a result they were likely the richest band to that point in history.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Brutusale, @Joe S.Walker, @Seekers

    Yes, Peter Grant was a heavy in both senses of the word.

  326. @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/1979-steve-sailer-makes-the-case-for-the-ramones/


    My last couple of years at Rice U., I was the rock critic for the college newspaper. This was an easy job for me because Houston was about a year behind my hometown of Los Angeles in music trends. The record companies would subsidize the up and coming bands to swing through Houston, a potentially huge market for them, but they couldn’t yet charge high ticket prices because few Houstonians had heard of them. So, I’d go see, say, The Police for $3 in a beer hall and report back to my Rice readers, “The Police are going to be big. You’re going to hear so much about this guy Sting that you’ll get totally sick of him.” (Well, actually, the last part is an exaggeration.)
     

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    https://news.rice.edu/news/2020/campanile-collection-goes-online

    The Campanile collection goes online

    Woodson Research Center digitizes every volume of Rice’s yearbook for maximum accessibility

    Every single edition of the Campanile, Rice’s yearbook, is now digitized and available online.

    That includes the special two-volume year in 1944 during World War II and the 1970 yearbook that was not a bound volume at all — just a cardboard box filled with assorted materials including Monty Python-inspired illustrations, atmospheric photos of student protests inside Allen Center and a 45 rpm record.

    “1970 Campaniles on display during Homecoming, Rice University.” (1970) Rice University: https://hdl.handle.net/1911/79011.

    The Campanile, 1979
    The Campanile, 1980

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