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NBC News: Experts Got Monkeypox Wrong: It's Now a Gay Venereal Disease Spread Sexually
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From NBC News:

Sex between men, not skin contact, is fueling monkeypox, new research suggests

The claim that skin-to-skin contact during sex between men, not intercourse itself, drives most monkeypox transmission is likely backward, a growing group of experts say.

Aug. 17, 2022, 8:47 AM PDT
By Benjamin Ryan

Since the outset of the global monkeypox outbreak in May, public health and infectious disease experts have told the public that the virus is largely transmitting through skin-to-skin contact, in particular during sex between men.

Now, however, an expanding cadre of experts has come to believe that sex between men itself — both anal as well as oral intercourse — is likely the main driver of global monkeypox transmission. The skin contact that comes with sex, these experts say, is probably much less of a risk factor.

In recent weeks, a growing body of scientific evidence — including a trio of studies published in peer-reviewed journals, as well as reports from national, regional and global health authorities — has suggested that experts may have framed monkeypox’s typical transmission route precisely backward. …

“A growing body of evidence supports that sexual transmission, particularly through seminal fluids, is occurring with the current MPX outbreak,” said Dr. Aniruddha Hazra, medical director of the University of Chicago Sexual Wellness Clinic, referring to monkeypox and to recent studies that found the virus in semen.

Consequently, scientists told NBC News that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other public health authorities should update their monkeypox communication strategies to more strongly emphasize the centrality of intercourse among gay and bisexual men, who comprise nearly all U.S. cases, to the virus’ spread.

On Aug. 14, Dr. Jeffrey Klausner, an infectious disease physician at the University of Southern California, and Dr. Lao-Tzu Allan-Blitz, a resident physician in global health at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, published an essay on Medium in which they reviewed the science supporting the argument that during the current outbreak, monkeypox is largely transmitting through anal and oral intercourse between men.

“It looks very clear to us that this is an infection that is transmitting sexually the vast majority of the time,” Allan-Blitz said.

We were told, occasionally, by the more realistic advocates of the conventional wisdom, that, “Yeah, OK, blaming AIDS on Nancy Reagan or whatever was just cope. We admit, AIDS was due to Gay Liberation getting out of control in the 1970s. But now that’s over: gays learned their lessons. That’s why we have Gay Marriage now.”

But then along came PrEP medications for blocking infection by HIV, and now there’s AIDS 2: Monkeypox.

It’s also possible that monkeypox has mutated. The previous spread in the U.S. was completely different demographically, showing up in families that bought prairie dogs as pets for their children. From Slate:

What Happened the Last Time There Was a Monkeypox Outbreak in the U.S.

BY EMMA WALLENBROCK
MAY 25, 2022 2:51 PM

… And the U.S. has faced monkeypox before, most notably in July 2003, when 47 individuals from six Midwestern states—Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin—were confirmed to have or suspected of having the West African strain of the monkeypox virus (the same strain that has broken out in the U.S. and Europe this year). The outbreak began in Illinois, where an exotic animal vendor received a shipment of Gambian pouched rats and briefly housed them next to a prairie dog enclosure. The Gambian pouched rats were infected with monkeypox—which, despite its name, is more common in rodents than in monkeys—and passed it along to their neighbors.

Before the prairie dogs showed any signs of infection, they were sold as pets to both individuals and to pet shops, where their rapid and widespread distribution led to 71 total confirmed cases. (That’s human and animal infections.) One unfortunate family, the Kautzers, had bought two during a Mother’s Day event. After they got sick, they were told to quarantine “until the scabs fall off the sores,” and while one of their prairie dogs eventually succumbed to the illness, they were happy to keep the second (named Chuckles!) after he recovered.

… But during the 2003 outbreak, all 35 confirmed cases in humans were caused by direct contact with the infected prairie dogs. In fact, at the time, the CDC said that “no instances of monkeypox infection were attributed exclusively to person-to-person contact.”

 
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  1. At least my descendants a couple hundred years hence–though perhaps living in some Brazilified dump (if not genocided by some Chinese engineered bug)–will likely not have to hear about this garbage.

    Medical science will have figured this out this developmental failure and we’ll at last be free of the monkeypoxers.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @AnotherDad

    Unless being a bit gay is a help in figuring things out.

    Replies: @SFG, @anon, @Rich, @AnotherDad

  2. But let me guess, the rare monkeypox infections of children — and that dog recently in France— are the result of big warm hugs.

    • LOL: JR Ewing
    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @Anon

    That poor dog didn't even get a hit of meth, either.

    Replies: @Brutusale

  3. It’s a stirring testament to the effectiveness of the Legacy Media that most of the “regular” people that I’ve talked to — many in health care — do not connect monkeypox spread with promiscuous, anonymous, untraceable gay sex.

    A friend volunteers on the Board of a local Assisted Living nonprofit. She shared the email from the Medical Director, advising residents on how to avoid contracting monkeypox. It was basically worthless CDC-curated bullet points that could have been replaced by a single sentence, beginning, “There’s no reason to worry, since you didn’t spend Pride Month engaging in …”

    • Agree: Pixo
  4. 2 Parisian homosexuals had anal sex with their dog and gave him Monkeypox.

    Talk about screwing the pooch.

    • Thanks: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Daniel Dravot
    @JohnnyWalker123

    non-monodogamous gay couple in Paris

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @JohnnyWalker123

    They should be given the cat!


    (Seriously while I don't think men or women having receptive sex with a male dog is a great idea, at least the dog is doing it of his own free will. This on the other hand is pretty evil and makes you wonder about the monkeypox cases in adoptive children of homosexual couples)

    Replies: @TWS

    , @Prester John
    @JohnnyWalker123

    What some would call "an alternate lifestyle." Lol.

  5. I never knew that people keep prairie dogs as pets.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @prosa123

    Seems like they'd get away and burrow all over your neighborhood, much to your neighbors' annoyance.

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @prosa123

    I can see why people would keep prairie dogs as pets. They're cute little guys. I once lived next to a meadow that had a colony of them. When you walk by they all stand up and talk about you.


    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-mrs-a5Wmpv0/TZUPcBwjZkI/AAAAAAAAFY8/_E5RIQLjpWk/w1200-h630-p-k-no-nu/prairie-dogs.jpg

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @LP5, @Prester John

  6. The previous spread in the U.S. was completely different demographically, showing up in families that bought prairie dogs as pets for their children.

    Are we sure about that? Could’ve been gay men buying prairie dogs a la Richard Gere and gerbils.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    That's a story about the young Richard Gere made up by his rival Sylvester Stallone, who is a really good storyteller.

    Replies: @Random Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Jim Christian, @Old Prude, @Anon

    , @Mr Mox
    @Anonymous

    Are we sure about that? Could’ve been gay men buying prairie dogs a la Richard Gere and gerbils.

    Maybe it's the other way around. Be suspicious of prairie dogs owners buying gaffer tape.

  7. … And the U.S. has faced monkeypox before, most notably in July 2003, when 47 individuals from six Midwestern states—Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin—were confirmed to have or suspected of having the West African strain of the monkeypox virus (the same strain that has broken out in the U.S. and Europe this year). The outbreak began in Illinois, where an exotic animal vendor received a shipment of Gambian pouched rats and briefly housed them next to a prairie dog enclosure.

    “Gambian pouched rats”. Geez. There’s another one for your National Immigration Safety Review Board.

    Really, why do we tolerate this sort of stupid xenophilia. If you really want a “Gambian pouched rat”, then go to Gambia!

    ~~

    The 2nd thing to note: This outbreak–same strain–across the midwest went … nowhere.

    What’s the difference?

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @AnotherDad


    “Gambian pouched rats”. Geez. There’s another one for your National Immigration Safety Review Board.

    Really, why do we tolerate this sort of stupid xenophilia. If you really want a “Gambian pouched rat”, then go to Gambia!
     
    One good thing that came out of that outbreak was a complete ban on legally importing African rodents, "go to Gambia!" indeed.

    The 2nd thing to note: This outbreak–same strain–across the midwest went … nowhere.
     
    Indeed, prior to this gay sexual network outbreak with its ex-Nigeria index case, the Western African Clade had never been observed to transmit between humans. For now, I join many others in assuming all cases of children and dogs getting it were raped. But of course there's a big payoff for the virus getting better adapted to humans, as we've previously discussed with some reasonable hope that'll be hard for this virus.

    BTW, the significantly more lethal Congo Basin clade has been noted to transmit between humans, and I'm pretty sure for both reasons it's gotten much more study, plus is where the current preferred vaccine is being tested in an observational Phase III trial of a thousand healthcare workers. A study that's now a bit redundant seeing as we're using the vaccine in this pandemic, if we don't already have good data on its efficacy against monkeypox we will soon.
  8. Gay sex must have greater attractions than the heterosexual kind, if people are willing to take such risks for it. This is a German patient who got monkeypox and then discovered he also has HIV and syphilis.

    • Replies: @Thomas
    @Rob McX


    Gay sex must have greater attractions than the heterosexual kind, if people are willing to take such risks for it.
     
    It's the other way around: literal degenerates with nothing to live for but cheap and easy pleasure have no reason to be concerned about long-term consequences. It's an old maxim that a homosexual over 25 might as well be dead. It gets obscured by all the cultural handwringing of the time, but there's a reason that "the band played on" during the 1980s AIDS "epidemic." Homosexuals just didn't care enough to do otherwise.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    , @Random Anonymous
    @Rob McX

    That guy must be a real brown-noser.

    , @Pontius
    @Rob McX

    It's almost as if putting things up yer chuff is a bad idea or something.

    , @Anonymous
    @Rob McX

    W.T.F.?!?!?!?!

    Pat Buchanan's remark about gays and AIDS remains relevant. As it will in 50 years when some Lovecraftian looking intestinal parasites becomes a thing on account of the degenerate homosexual fetish du jour


    "The poor homosexuals. They have declared war on nature, and now nature is exacting an awful retribution."

    Replies: @Coemgen

    , @SFG
    @Rob McX

    Straight guys don’t often have sex in huge orgies or giant conga lines because you can’t find enough willing women. Even threesomes are kind of a fantasy for most people.

    You have two partners both with a male sex drive, anything goes.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Anon, @nebulafox

    , @Ed
    @Rob McX

    Omg that is hideous.

    , @Muggles
    @Rob McX

    They should use that photo for a "Scared Straight" educational poster.

    I guess that "German cleanliness" notion is just a myth...

    , @Indignant of Maidstone
    @Rob McX

    There are some men who got seriously unlucky

    You can see them at:-
    bmj-2022-072410.full.pdf

  9. … Precisely backwards

    • Replies: @Bluey Zahrsoff
    @michael droy

    Arse backwards?

  10. Is a shift in the official narrative afoot?

    Perhaps the ruling class realized it was worth their while really to try to contain it?

  11. @Anonymous

    The previous spread in the U.S. was completely different demographically, showing up in families that bought prairie dogs as pets for their children.
     
    Are we sure about that? Could've been gay men buying prairie dogs a la Richard Gere and gerbils.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mr Mox

    That’s a story about the young Richard Gere made up by his rival Sylvester Stallone, who is a really good storyteller.

    • Replies: @Random Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    They were competing for the same parts? That seems doubtful. For the same women?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Nachum

    , @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    "Story"? Mmm-hmmm.....

    , @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    It's amazing how that went viral and everybody in the country heard about it even before the internet. I was a kid in school in the 90s and somehow every kid knew about it.

    Sam Kinison had a hilariously raunchy set based on it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lr8Gha7Ps74

    Replies: @Nachum

    , @Jim Christian
    @Steve Sailer


    That’s a story about the young Richard Gere made up by his rival Sylvester Stallone, who is a really good storyteller.
     
    All right, Sailerman, now you've done it. Talked about gerbils. So, all the old heads around here know I was a phone guy in DC after my exploits in Naval Air for many years, the phone guy part in 1985-2010. I serviced and installed phone systems in all sorts of strange venues. While at Compu-Phone, we installed a 5 -phone system with the intercoms and 5 outside lines in a pet shop in the region on 16th Street NW between Kalorama and Dupont Circle. It sold dogs, fish, tarantulas, snakes, and various rodents, gerbils among them. Never paid any attention to that stuff, it was just another customer. Turned out, it was a strange venue. I go out there one day on a dead phone service call and there's a crowd of around a hundred folks at their front door. Weird. I park in the alley out back, go in through the back and ask what's up with all the people out front. PETA was there, protesting the "de-clawed" gerbil industry. Turns out, this pet store, owing to all the homos in the neighborhood sells de-clawed gerbils to the homos. By the hundreds, every week. Swear to God, that's what the guy said. These homos would feed these gerbils up each other's asses, so the guy says, the animal would, as you might guess, struggle, giving the homos a huge kick (in the ass, heh). Then, it was off to GW university's emergency room to pull the critter out. Swear to God, fellas. I'm surprised they didn't feed de-fanged snakes up each outhers' asses for crying out loud. And maybe they did.

    Homos are a sick, depraved, demented, perverted lot. I really don't have enough words for them. That incident sealed it for me. The entire enterprise is simply beyond any notion of normality and yet, they try to pretend it is. They are beyond redemption. And these days, I doubt PETA would challenge this bit of animal-abuse depravity. That would be homophobic.

    Replies: @Nachum, @Eustace Tilley (not), @Ron Mexico

    , @Old Prude
    @Steve Sailer

    Richard Gere moved to New England. He was interested in New Hampster.

    , @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    You are saying his not gay?

    Anyway, around 1991 my sister moved to Pasadena. She heard the same story albeit with a mouse instead of a Gerbil as the protagonist. She got it from her internist-to-the-stars who heard it on the medical grapevine. I remember because I couldn’t believe it and asked “how can he know?”. Those were innocent times.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  12. @Rob McX
    Gay sex must have greater attractions than the heterosexual kind, if people are willing to take such risks for it. This is a German patient who got monkeypox and then discovered he also has HIV and syphilis.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2022/08/17/11/61462813-11119463-image-a-19_1660731025695.jpg

    Replies: @Thomas, @Random Anonymous, @Pontius, @Anonymous, @SFG, @Ed, @Muggles, @Indignant of Maidstone

    Gay sex must have greater attractions than the heterosexual kind, if people are willing to take such risks for it.

    It’s the other way around: literal degenerates with nothing to live for but cheap and easy pleasure have no reason to be concerned about long-term consequences. It’s an old maxim that a homosexual over 25 might as well be dead. It gets obscured by all the cultural handwringing of the time, but there’s a reason that “the band played on” during the 1980s AIDS “epidemic.” Homosexuals just didn’t care enough to do otherwise.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @Thomas

    As they say "There's nothing sadder than an old queer"


    Hey, what did the brown gerbil say to the white gerbil?

    "You must be new around here."

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Prester John, @Haxo Angmark

  13. @Thomas
    @Rob McX


    Gay sex must have greater attractions than the heterosexual kind, if people are willing to take such risks for it.
     
    It's the other way around: literal degenerates with nothing to live for but cheap and easy pleasure have no reason to be concerned about long-term consequences. It's an old maxim that a homosexual over 25 might as well be dead. It gets obscured by all the cultural handwringing of the time, but there's a reason that "the band played on" during the 1980s AIDS "epidemic." Homosexuals just didn't care enough to do otherwise.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    As they say “There’s nothing sadder than an old queer”

    Hey, what did the brown gerbil say to the white gerbil?

    “You must be new around here.”

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @AceDeuce

    • Sick!: Achmed E. Newman

    but funny.

    , @Prester John
    @AceDeuce

    Or an old r&r performer.

    , @Haxo Angmark
    @AceDeuce

    what did the girl mushroom say to the boy musroom?

    ....you're a fun guy!

  14. @prosa123
    I never knew that people keep prairie dogs as pets.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Buzz Mohawk

    Seems like they’d get away and burrow all over your neighborhood, much to your neighbors’ annoyance.

  15. NBC News:

    After they got sick, they were told to quarantine “until the scabs fall off the sores,” and while one of their prairie dogs eventually succumbed to the illness, they were happy to keep the second (named Chuckles!) after he recovered.

    Scarred By Chuckles is opening for Gambian Rat Pouch at the Flea Market in Boca Raton this Thursday.

  16. Dr. Jeffrey Klausner, an infectious disease physician at the University of Southern California, and Dr. Lao-Tzu Allan-Blitz, a resident physician in global health at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, published an essay on Medium

    Reg, if that name doesn’t call for an anagram I don’t know what would.

    • Agree: Random Anonymous
    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @kaganovitch

    This is Lao-Tzu. I gotta say he looks a lot more like a Leo tzu und von than a Lao-Tzu, but that's where the 'flight from White' takes you i guess.

    tinyurl.com/msrrz5ut

    , @Joe S.Walker
    @kaganovitch

    Sounds like a character in some Kurt Vonnegut Jr-style satirical novel written c.1970.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    , @Muggles
    @kaganovitch


    Dr. Lao-Tzu Allan-Blitz,
     
    "Well doctor, I know I called in about some kind of pain, but in the meantime, it seems to have all gone away..."
    , @nightskyradio
    @kaganovitch

    "Dr. Lao-Tzu Allan-Blitz

    Reg, if that name doesn’t call for an anagram I don’t know what would."

    Total Anal Buzz Drill

  17. So, then, the canines who were owned by male homosexuals and contracted monkey pox were being raped, as many could have guessed.

    I wonder if this will turn some of my fellow ftm transgender individuals off from using Grindr. Hardly seems worth it.

    I saw a video of a crying homosexual with monkey pox on the news. He broadly addressed other homosexuals in his situation and said, “you’re not dirty.” I would strongly disagree with his sentiments.

  18. The Gambian pouched rats were infected with monkeypox—which, despite its name, is more common in rodents than in monkeys—and passed it along to their neighbors.

    Rodents? Don’t be giving the gays any ideas.

  19. ICYMI. The liver is the first line of defense against infection including virus. The anal cavity has three main veins
    into which blood drains. One of those three veins bypasses the liver and returns blood directly to the heart and on to the lungs to be oxygenated and circulated throughout the body unfiltered by the liver. This is not the case with the vaginal cavity. All returning vaginal blood is filtered by the liver before making its way to the heart and lungs. The societal prescriptions against sodomy are not just socially
    constructed. So there’s that….

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Chepe

    Well, no. The external pudendal veins drain to the great saphenous, which drains to the femoral veins which turn into the external iliacs; the internal pudendal veins drain to the internal iliacs. The external and internal iliacs then combine to form common iliac veins, which combine to form the inferior vena cava which dumps directly into the heart without entering the liver (though it does pass through the liver and receive the blood the liver cleaned from the hepatic veins).

    The liver’s there to detoxify the blood coming from the gut in case you ate something weird, though of course there are lots of white cells to fight infection too.

    The difference, from what I can gather, is the fragility of the rectal lining relative to the vaginal. The vagina is supposed to pass a complete human being out; the rectum is just supposed to pass poop. And nothing is supposed to come *in*.

    Replies: @Ben Kurtz, @Chepe

  20. @Anon
    But let me guess, the rare monkeypox infections of children — and that dog recently in France— are the result of big warm hugs.

    Replies: @JR Ewing

    That poor dog didn’t even get a hit of meth, either.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @JR Ewing

    Poppers. Amyl nitrate relaxes the muscles in the throat and sphincter.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poppers

  21. Woman at work asked our HR person if we were going to do anything about Monkeypox. I pointed out that “I don’t think anyone here attends gay orgies”.

    • Replies: @LP5
    @Redneck farmer

    Redneck Farmer writes:


    Woman at work asked our HR person if we were going to do anything about Monkeypox. I pointed out that “I don’t think anyone here attends gay orgies”.
     
    Work Rule #1000, never say anything controversial to or near anyone from HR. Somebody is notating your file, saving observations. And whatever you do, never put anything controversial in writing.

    Here is a quote from one of those Somebodies:
    "I save all the texts because they could be evidence."

    Btw, that same Somebody is not even an HR person, but acts like that outside work. Vigilance is the order of the day.
    , @Muggles
    @Redneck farmer


    Woman at work asked our HR person if we were going to do anything about Monkeypox. I pointed out that “I don’t think anyone here attends gay orgies”.
     
    Did they fire you "for cause" or can you still collect your unemployment benefits?
  22. @prosa123
    I never knew that people keep prairie dogs as pets.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Buzz Mohawk

    I can see why people would keep prairie dogs as pets. They’re cute little guys. I once lived next to a meadow that had a colony of them. When you walk by they all stand up and talk about you.

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    @Buzz Mohawk

    They dig holes in your prairie for your horses and cattle to drop a leg into, crippling the animal. Prairie dogs kill. There's quite a sport going on shooting these vermin in the head from 800 yards. Many of them are also rabid and are covered with Lyme ticks, they are nobody's friend. Vermin, like I said.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @Buzz Mohawk, @Rocko

    , @LP5
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Prairie dogs, long-term inhabitants of cube farms, too.

    , @Prester John
    @Buzz Mohawk

    My father had a friend who owned a ranch in western Colorado. He told my dad that ranchers, farmers uniformly despise them for all the damage they do to the landscape.

  23. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    That's a story about the young Richard Gere made up by his rival Sylvester Stallone, who is a really good storyteller.

    Replies: @Random Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Jim Christian, @Old Prude, @Anon

    They were competing for the same parts? That seems doubtful. For the same women?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Random Anonymous

    It goes back a long way. There is even a story about Stallone hating the attention Gere was getting from Princess Diana at a party, and a fight almost starting. Sly doesn't like to come off as less than the other guy. I knew a young man who had been hired to be Stallone's driver. Stallone fired him after one day, bluntly explaining, "You're too tall."

    , @Nachum
    @Random Anonymous

    As Stallone himself once put it (in reference to his audition, of rather non-audition, for the role of Han Solo), "Guys with faces like *this* don't get cast in roles like *that*. I get it."

  24. Dr Aniruddha Hazra

    Aniruddha Hazra = Hind hazard aura.

    Saliva killed HIV, so in that way 🐒pox is worse. “Don’t eat that. Y

    [MORE]
    ou don’t know where it’s been.”

    • Replies: @Daniel H
    @Reg Cæsar

    We've have already been warned about this stuff by our esteemed elders. Don't eat the poo poo.

    https://youtu.be/QUHkQ9vP_lA

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

  25. Not the greatest, but not bad, so what the heck.

  26. @Rob McX
    Gay sex must have greater attractions than the heterosexual kind, if people are willing to take such risks for it. This is a German patient who got monkeypox and then discovered he also has HIV and syphilis.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2022/08/17/11/61462813-11119463-image-a-19_1660731025695.jpg

    Replies: @Thomas, @Random Anonymous, @Pontius, @Anonymous, @SFG, @Ed, @Muggles, @Indignant of Maidstone

    That guy must be a real brown-noser.

    • LOL: Rich
  27. @Rob McX
    Gay sex must have greater attractions than the heterosexual kind, if people are willing to take such risks for it. This is a German patient who got monkeypox and then discovered he also has HIV and syphilis.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2022/08/17/11/61462813-11119463-image-a-19_1660731025695.jpg

    Replies: @Thomas, @Random Anonymous, @Pontius, @Anonymous, @SFG, @Ed, @Muggles, @Indignant of Maidstone

    It’s almost as if putting things up yer chuff is a bad idea or something.

    • Agree: Rich
  28. a shipment of Gambian pouched rats

    In what were these Gambian rats pouched? Oh, wait… we’d rather not know… At any rate, the Gambia itself resembles a pouch of sorts. Or a colon:

    • Replies: @George Kaplan
    @Reg Cæsar

    ...or a dick with monkeypox.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Bill Jones
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Gambia (And I've been there) is the best Examplar on the planet of Gunboat diplomacy.
    The degree to which it intrudes into France's Senegal is exactly the range of the Royal Navy's gunboats of the time. I was plaintively asked by one local "When are you British coming back?" The Cemetery in Banjul where the Colonial officers are buried is full of 20 odd year olds.

    , @LP5
    @Reg Cæsar

    Gambia, with capital city of East Bumfuck.

  29. Here the whole time, I’d thought the Monkeypox has been spread via a few superspreaders at big fat Greek weddings and ski lodges in the Italian alps…

    … well, yeah, the superspreaders might be gay, but I don’t know what that’d have to do with it …

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It was known briefly as Neil Patrick Harris disease until astute individuals noticed that outbreaks had occurred simultaneously in both China and Iran shortly after several hundred gay American troops participated in the Gay Military Pride Olympics in China.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  30. @AceDeuce
    @Thomas

    As they say "There's nothing sadder than an old queer"


    Hey, what did the brown gerbil say to the white gerbil?

    "You must be new around here."

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Prester John, @Haxo Angmark

    • Sick!: Achmed E. Newman

    but funny.

  31. @Reg Cæsar

    Dr Aniruddha Hazra
     
    Aniruddha Hazra = Hind hazard aura.


    Saliva killed HIV, so in that way 🐒pox is worse. "Don't eat that. You don't know where it's been."

    Replies: @Daniel H

    We’ve have already been warned about this stuff by our esteemed elders. Don’t eat the poo poo.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Daniel H

    https://youtu.be/TLIppgE45wM

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Daniel H

    This clip is the most convincing argument against white supremacism I've ever seen. Somebody call BM BLM.

    Replies: @BB753

  32. It is not being spread by homosexual sex because there is no such thing. It is being spread by homosexuals sodomizing each other. I’m normally against pedantry, but terminology does matter here.

    • Agree: Mike Tre
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Alan Mercer


    It is not being spread by homosexual sex because there is no such thing. It is being spread by homosexuals
     
    Homosexual is an oxymoron. It's also a Latin-Greek bastardization. (Which would make it an "acumoron". Or "oxystultus".)

    Heterosexual is redundant. But also heteroglot.
    , @Enemy of Earth
    @Alan Mercer

    I prefer the old, Biblical term sodomite. It's a shame a perfectly good word like gay has been co-opted to describe degeneracy.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  33. Yes the “propagandist” got it wrong, they thought they could foist this on the American people like they did Covid, but got much more blowback than they anticipated. Just like the polls get it wrong about candidates they don’t endorse; known to the rest of the world as LYING!

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @Rooster16


    ...they thought they could foist this on the American people like they did Covid, but got much more blowback than they anticipated
     
    Heh heh....you said "blow"....
  34. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    That's a story about the young Richard Gere made up by his rival Sylvester Stallone, who is a really good storyteller.

    Replies: @Random Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Jim Christian, @Old Prude, @Anon

    “Story”? Mmm-hmmm…..

  35. Anonymous[341] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rob McX
    Gay sex must have greater attractions than the heterosexual kind, if people are willing to take such risks for it. This is a German patient who got monkeypox and then discovered he also has HIV and syphilis.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2022/08/17/11/61462813-11119463-image-a-19_1660731025695.jpg

    Replies: @Thomas, @Random Anonymous, @Pontius, @Anonymous, @SFG, @Ed, @Muggles, @Indignant of Maidstone

    W.T.F.?!?!?!?!

    Pat Buchanan’s remark about gays and AIDS remains relevant. As it will in 50 years when some Lovecraftian looking intestinal parasites becomes a thing on account of the degenerate homosexual fetish du jour

    “The poor homosexuals. They have declared war on nature, and now nature is exacting an awful retribution.”

    • Agree: Enemy of Earth, Rich
    • Thanks: That Would Be Telling
    • Replies: @Coemgen
    @Anonymous

    https://youtu.be/ijVijP-CDVI?t=17

  36. @kaganovitch
    Dr. Jeffrey Klausner, an infectious disease physician at the University of Southern California, and Dr. Lao-Tzu Allan-Blitz, a resident physician in global health at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, published an essay on Medium

    Reg, if that name doesn't call for an anagram I don't know what would.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Joe S.Walker, @Muggles, @nightskyradio

    This is Lao-Tzu. I gotta say he looks a lot more like a Leo tzu und von than a Lao-Tzu, but that’s where the ‘flight from White’ takes you i guess.

    tinyurl.com/msrrz5ut

  37. Thanks for the good news Steve, sure makes me feel a lot better about my decision last month to limit my anonymous homosexual group hookup activities to chaste cuddles and Eskimo kisses.

    • LOL: Jim Christian
    • Replies: @Random Anonymous
    @Pixo

    You'll think twice about the Eskimo kisses if you look at the photo in comment #8!

  38. @Reg Cæsar

    a shipment of Gambian pouched rats
     
    In what were these Gambian rats pouched? Oh, wait... we'd rather not know... At any rate, the Gambia itself resembles a pouch of sorts. Or a colon:


    https://sovereignlimits.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/10/GMB_SEN_land_sketch_horiz_04-01.png

    Replies: @George Kaplan, @Bill Jones, @LP5

    …or a dick with monkeypox.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @George Kaplan

    Peyronie's disease.

  39. @Random Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    They were competing for the same parts? That seems doubtful. For the same women?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Nachum

    It goes back a long way. There is even a story about Stallone hating the attention Gere was getting from Princess Diana at a party, and a fight almost starting. Sly doesn’t like to come off as less than the other guy. I knew a young man who had been hired to be Stallone’s driver. Stallone fired him after one day, bluntly explaining, “You’re too tall.”

    • Thanks: Random Anonymous
  40. @Random Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    They were competing for the same parts? That seems doubtful. For the same women?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Nachum

    As Stallone himself once put it (in reference to his audition, of rather non-audition, for the role of Han Solo), “Guys with faces like *this* don’t get cast in roles like *that*. I get it.”

  41. Rob says:

    This is really good news. If it spread through casual contact, some women would have caught it by now, so std was the way to bet. Plus, anal, genital, and oral regions being the places men developed lesions first was a strong clue,

    A good (but only occasionally right) method to figure out what might be an std is to look at diseases that hit gay men younger and harder than straight men. An interesting thing would be to look at what diseases showed strong, sex-biased increased prevalence after gay liberation got going.

    STD is really a strategy, just like “respiratory infection” is a strategy. Getting to infectable cells is a problem every infection faces. Respiratory, GI, STD, eye infection and skin infection are the classical ways. In evolutionary terms, “gay std” may have become a winning strategy in the 1970s. A new niche opening up implies that a lot of species have yet to make the jump. If that’s true, gay men can expect lots of new diseases. Some will pass to the general population.

    Ever hear of pooled sample testing? If your test, for syphilis, let’s say, is really sensitive, meaning it can pick up syphilis at extremely low concentration, the infection is fairly rare, and testing is expensive, you can do pooled sample testing. Depending on what you think is the base rate of infection you mix urine/blood/saliva from a bunch of people, say 10, and use reagents for one test. If no one had syphilis, you just saved 9 tests. If someone(s) had syphilis, you do have to use ten more tests, so there’s an optimum pool size depending on the base rate. I don’t know the equation, but you are welcome to look it up.

    [MORE]

    So, let’s say you are having a sex cruise with 500 dudes. Everyone gives a non-anonymous “fluid” sample. What’s that, you can’t get the test results back before the orgies start? Not a problem! Start the tests, have the orgies. If no one tests positive, great! If someone does, surely contact tracing on a cruise should be easy? Maybe give everyone an unattractive contact-recording device, called an “ugly,” that will record who you had sex with, so before you “bump uglies,” you bump uglies. After the cruise, they can call people who got exposed to x.

    Prophylactic Pooled Sample Testing (PPST) is another possibility. Let’s say you are a HINK (High Income No Kida) fashionable, fairly promiscuous gay man. Why not have everyone in the Castro, or at least everyone who subscribes sends in blood, etc samples every week? The samples are pooled into groups of n and tested for everything they signed up for. When they test positive, send ‘em an email that they need to be tested for whatever it was.

    This might only work to surveil for new diseases, or at least diseases with low base rates in the gay community.

    At a minimum, gay clubs card, just like everywhere else, no? If your driver’s license says you live more than x miles away, you have to go into the pool. Traveling for sex is a big part of why new plagues hit gay men so fast,

    Changing gears, do you know why zoonotic jumps to people are rare for viruses? There are chains of sugar molecules called oligosaccharides that you attach to proteins. There’s a dipeptide at the end of some oligosaccharides that is two molecules of galactose attached each other in a particular way called galactose-α-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal) that most animals, Protozoa, and bacteria use, but the enzyme that synthesizes it was lost in the ancestors of people, Old World Monkeys, and apes.

    About 1% of the IgG antibody you produce is for alpha-gal. Meat and intestinal bacteria both have alpha-gal, so you are constantly being stimulated to produce anti-gal. It’s called natural antibody, and you’re evolved to produce it.

    Viruses glycosylate their proteins with whatever enzymes the host use, so viral particles from (non-ape/OW monkey) animals get into you, you already have antibodies to them! There’ve been proposals to grow attenuated SARS-CoV-2 in cells of new world monkeys to take advantage of anti-gal in vaccination.

    I wonder if other animals have lost sugars to thwart pathogens. Given that many species have multiple blood groups and the blood type antigens are oligosaccharides, I bet it’s really common.

    I’ve been thinking about the deranged response to COVID vaccination, and I think high school biology should be geared to a) understanding the universality of evolution by natural selections, and b) understanding that the production of T cells and especially antibodies in response to exposure is governed by the magic of evolution by natural selection.

    Seriously, understanding vaccines are important for any citizen of a republic. It’s a hugely divisive topic, not least because virtually every life scientist is moderate-prog and solidly ensconced in the College Grad culture.

    While vaccines are good overall, they could be better. Remember polio? It’s back in NYC! We use the inactivated polio vaccine. It’s a series of three shots. Both the live polio vaccine (given on a sugar cube) and the inactivated vaccine prevent severe disease, but the inactivated one does not cause sterilizing immunity. The live polio vaccine causes some permanent paralysis in, too lazy to look it up, maybe one in a million vaccinees.

    The live vaccine also has a problem in reversion to virulence. This usually does not harm the vaccinee, but they can produce live, virulent polio which can infect other people. In the third world, they try to vaccinate everyone in a village at the same time.

    There’s no reason the live vaccine should revert so frequently. Antibodies are protective (the dead vaccine works) so all that really matters is the production of antibodies to the 4 capsid proteins of each serotype. Preferably, vaccination would induce secretory (IgA) antibodies in the gut to induce sterilizing immunity. T cell responses to non-structural proteins might be nice, but you can do without them.

    So, there is no reason not to use the “guts” of the least reversion-prone serotype, which I believe is one, in all three (ok, now just 1) serotypes in the vaccine. There, just cut circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus production tenfold or more. Recode the guts, not nec. to attenuate, but to reduce recombination, which, frankly, matters a whole lot less.

    I’ve linked to studies of other ways to make polio vaccine less reversion-prone, which would probably, but not certainly, also reduce the number of people who get paralysis.

    Even if we didn’t do that, and set cvdpv aside, we could probably give genetic tests for common(ish) genetic defects that contraindicate vaccination. Honestly, if we just bit the bullet and had every baby sequenced (not SNPed) in utero we could probably exclude 99% of people who would have adverse reactions to each vaccine.

    On a cultural note, vaccinology has been a backwater of biology for a long time. It’s been the most useful field of biology, so it’s the lowest status academically. Lunatic criticism of vaccines has hardened everyone’s hearts to non-crazy criticisms. Things like, can we reduce the number of shots? Can we get more needle-free, as in oral, nasal, and cutaneous, vaccines? If vaccines made kids smile (the aforementioned sugar cube) instead of cry, there would be much wider acceptance of vaccination.

    A hit vaccine, something for relatively common illnesses would go a long way towards making common people like vaccines again like a vaccine for the common cold (even like 1/4 of them would make a real dent) or a universal flu vaccine (saw one in an old paper that induced heterologous immunity, but I didn’t look up if the flus it worked on are still considered very different)

    Therapeutic vaccines, the ones you can get after exposure to the pathogen are really interesting. Not sure if anyone tried the COVID vaccines this way, but they probably did.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Rob

    Did An Ancient Pathogen Reshape Our Cells?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KT44K_MRyQc
    Aug 11, 2022


    There is one - and only one - group of mammals that doesn’t have alpha-gal: the catarrhine primates, which are the monkeys of Africa and Asia, the apes, and us.
     
    , @That Would Be Telling
    @Rob

    Thanks for an as usual excellent posting!

    That reaction to alpha-gal can be taken too far through getting bitten by ticks, in the US the lone star tick and per that Wikipedia article in Australia the paralysis (!) tick. Can make you unable to eat "red meat", "food products containing beef, pork, lamb, venison, rabbit and offal" which for most of us would be ... bad. I would assume this also includes much more tasty elk and moose.


    I’ve been thinking about the deranged response to COVID vaccination, and I think high school biology....
     
    BZZT!

    I don't think your idea has a chance against America's long ingrained anti-intellectualism. Which is by no means all bad, to quote Neal Stephenson:

    But more importantly, it comes out of the fact that, during this century, intellectualism failed, and everyone knows it. In places like Russia and Germany, the common people agreed to loosen their grip on traditional folkways, mores, and religion, and let the intellectuals run with the ball, and they screwed everything up and turned the century into an abbatoir. Those wordy intellectuals used to be merely tedious; now they seem kind of dangerous as well.
     
    Mostly I think about the canard "mRNA vaccines are gene therapy," including from too many doctors who we should have assumed learned "DNA->mRNA->proteins" in high school, let alone college biology. They really, honestly, tell us to this day the vaccines work by permanently changing our genome vs. obviously changing our adaptive immune systems, hopefully permanently (so far so good, we can of course only learn this a day at a time).

    If they can't get the very most basic principle of molecular genetics right,

    a) understanding the universality of evolution by natural selections, and b) understanding that the production of T cells and especially antibodies in response to exposure is governed by the magic of evolution by natural selection.
     
    sounds like Mount Everest to me. No matter how intensely useful natural selection is as an organizing principle in learning and doing biology (for me, with E. Coli in the lab).
  42. Anonymous[146] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    That's a story about the young Richard Gere made up by his rival Sylvester Stallone, who is a really good storyteller.

    Replies: @Random Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Jim Christian, @Old Prude, @Anon

    It’s amazing how that went viral and everybody in the country heard about it even before the internet. I was a kid in school in the 90s and somehow every kid knew about it.

    Sam Kinison had a hilariously raunchy set based on it:

    • Replies: @Nachum
    @Anonymous

    Studies have been made about how things like Challenger jokes travelled the country so quickly. Early electronic communication did have something to do with it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JR Ewing

  43. @AnotherDad
    At least my descendants a couple hundred years hence--though perhaps living in some Brazilified dump (if not genocided by some Chinese engineered bug)--will likely not have to hear about this garbage.

    Medical science will have figured this out this developmental failure and we'll at last be free of the monkeypoxers.

    Replies: @Sean

    Unless being a bit gay is a help in figuring things out.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Sean

    And they wonder why I never experimented.

    Replies: @Sean

    , @anon
    @Sean

    No sarc: clever response. At first I thought, 'clever response, but there would still be lots of individuals around who weren't the least bit gay, but were good at figuring things out.' Like many pioneer inventors of even the very recent past.

    But my next thought was, 'increasingly though, scientific advances seem to rely on the brute force effort and IQ of whole slices of the STEM sector. And that could well be a bit gayer, on average, than the whole. Almost certainly is, if the 'gay varies in proportion to civilized' theory is true.

    We live in a society.

    , @Rich
    @Sean

    How could engaging in degenerate sex possibly help figure out anything? Men who engage in these perverted acts, in public rest rooms, parks, alleyways and other such clean areas, as well as participating in circuit parties and promiscuous sexual activity aren't the type of people who help society. They spread physical and mental disease. The only possible benefit is that they leave more women for the rest of us.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Sean


    Unless being a bit gay is a help in figuring things out.
     
    LOL.

    Producing and "figuring things out" are pretty much straight guys' wheelhouse. It's what we do.

    The "abnormal" personality that does help "figure things out" is the Aspie type--e.g. Isaac Newton. That's a hyper-male type, pretty much the opposite of the queers.

    ~~

    There ought to be a name--"homo-excuser"--for people who come up with all these ludicrously lame ideas to explain why homosexuals really aren't exactly what they are.

    They've given us the "gay uncle" trope--giving innumeracy a bad name. They've rolled out innumerable "he was gay", "he was gay" fantasies. They always trot out the "you don't like homos because ... you're secretly gay", which gives you an idea of homo-logic. (And proof they are not the "figure things out people".)

    No homosexuality is exactly what it is--just a sad, pathetic mental developmental dysfunction, like being congenitally blind or deaf or crippled. It's just that those with these other deformities are not socially destructive, aren't disease super-spreaders ... and don't continually stomp their feet and bitch and whine a bunch of lame bullshit about how their disorder is wonderful and we must appreciate it and worship it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Ray P, @nebulafox

  44. @Rooster16
    Yes the “propagandist” got it wrong, they thought they could foist this on the American people like they did Covid, but got much more blowback than they anticipated. Just like the polls get it wrong about candidates they don’t endorse; known to the rest of the world as LYING!

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    they thought they could foist this on the American people like they did Covid, but got much more blowback than they anticipated

    Heh heh….you said “blow”….

  45. @Achmed E. Newman
    Here the whole time, I'd thought the Monkeypox has been spread via a few superspreaders at big fat Greek weddings and ski lodges in the Italian alps...

    ... well, yeah, the superspreaders might be gay, but I don't know what that'd have to do with it ...

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    It was known briefly as Neil Patrick Harris disease until astute individuals noticed that outbreaks had occurred simultaneously in both China and Iran shortly after several hundred gay American troops participated in the Gay Military Pride Olympics in China.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Haha! I appreciate the riff on Ron Unz's big, big, theory, but I first had to look up Neil Patrick Harris. Never heard of the guy before.

  46. @Rob
    This is really good news. If it spread through casual contact, some women would have caught it by now, so std was the way to bet. Plus, anal, genital, and oral regions being the places men developed lesions first was a strong clue,

    A good (but only occasionally right) method to figure out what might be an std is to look at diseases that hit gay men younger and harder than straight men. An interesting thing would be to look at what diseases showed strong, sex-biased increased prevalence after gay liberation got going.

    STD is really a strategy, just like “respiratory infection” is a strategy. Getting to infectable cells is a problem every infection faces. Respiratory, GI, STD, eye infection and skin infection are the classical ways. In evolutionary terms, “gay std” may have become a winning strategy in the 1970s. A new niche opening up implies that a lot of species have yet to make the jump. If that’s true, gay men can expect lots of new diseases. Some will pass to the general population.

    Ever hear of pooled sample testing? If your test, for syphilis, let’s say, is really sensitive, meaning it can pick up syphilis at extremely low concentration, the infection is fairly rare, and testing is expensive, you can do pooled sample testing. Depending on what you think is the base rate of infection you mix urine/blood/saliva from a bunch of people, say 10, and use reagents for one test. If no one had syphilis, you just saved 9 tests. If someone(s) had syphilis, you do have to use ten more tests, so there’s an optimum pool size depending on the base rate. I don’t know the equation, but you are welcome to look it up.

    So, let’s say you are having a sex cruise with 500 dudes. Everyone gives a non-anonymous “fluid” sample. What’s that, you can’t get the test results back before the orgies start? Not a problem! Start the tests, have the orgies. If no one tests positive, great! If someone does, surely contact tracing on a cruise should be easy? Maybe give everyone an unattractive contact-recording device, called an “ugly,” that will record who you had sex with, so before you “bump uglies,” you bump uglies. After the cruise, they can call people who got exposed to x.

    Prophylactic Pooled Sample Testing (PPST) is another possibility. Let’s say you are a HINK (High Income No Kida) fashionable, fairly promiscuous gay man. Why not have everyone in the Castro, or at least everyone who subscribes sends in blood, etc samples every week? The samples are pooled into groups of n and tested for everything they signed up for. When they test positive, send ‘em an email that they need to be tested for whatever it was.

    This might only work to surveil for new diseases, or at least diseases with low base rates in the gay community.

    At a minimum, gay clubs card, just like everywhere else, no? If your driver’s license says you live more than x miles away, you have to go into the pool. Traveling for sex is a big part of why new plagues hit gay men so fast,

    Changing gears, do you know why zoonotic jumps to people are rare for viruses? There are chains of sugar molecules called oligosaccharides that you attach to proteins. There’s a dipeptide at the end of some oligosaccharides that is two molecules of galactose attached each other in a particular way called galactose-α-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal) that most animals, Protozoa, and bacteria use, but the enzyme that synthesizes it was lost in the ancestors of people, Old World Monkeys, and apes.

    About 1% of the IgG antibody you produce is for alpha-gal. Meat and intestinal bacteria both have alpha-gal, so you are constantly being stimulated to produce anti-gal. It’s called natural antibody, and you’re evolved to produce it.

    Viruses glycosylate their proteins with whatever enzymes the host use, so viral particles from (non-ape/OW monkey) animals get into you, you already have antibodies to them! There’ve been proposals to grow attenuated SARS-CoV-2 in cells of new world monkeys to take advantage of anti-gal in vaccination.

    I wonder if other animals have lost sugars to thwart pathogens. Given that many species have multiple blood groups and the blood type antigens are oligosaccharides, I bet it’s really common.

    I’ve been thinking about the deranged response to COVID vaccination, and I think high school biology should be geared to a) understanding the universality of evolution by natural selections, and b) understanding that the production of T cells and especially antibodies in response to exposure is governed by the magic of evolution by natural selection.

    Seriously, understanding vaccines are important for any citizen of a republic. It’s a hugely divisive topic, not least because virtually every life scientist is moderate-prog and solidly ensconced in the College Grad culture.

    While vaccines are good overall, they could be better. Remember polio? It’s back in NYC! We use the inactivated polio vaccine. It’s a series of three shots. Both the live polio vaccine (given on a sugar cube) and the inactivated vaccine prevent severe disease, but the inactivated one does not cause sterilizing immunity. The live polio vaccine causes some permanent paralysis in, too lazy to look it up, maybe one in a million vaccinees.

    The live vaccine also has a problem in reversion to virulence. This usually does not harm the vaccinee, but they can produce live, virulent polio which can infect other people. In the third world, they try to vaccinate everyone in a village at the same time.

    There’s no reason the live vaccine should revert so frequently. Antibodies are protective (the dead vaccine works) so all that really matters is the production of antibodies to the 4 capsid proteins of each serotype. Preferably, vaccination would induce secretory (IgA) antibodies in the gut to induce sterilizing immunity. T cell responses to non-structural proteins might be nice, but you can do without them.

    So, there is no reason not to use the “guts” of the least reversion-prone serotype, which I believe is one, in all three (ok, now just 1) serotypes in the vaccine. There, just cut circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus production tenfold or more. Recode the guts, not nec. to attenuate, but to reduce recombination, which, frankly, matters a whole lot less.

    I’ve linked to studies of other ways to make polio vaccine less reversion-prone, which would probably, but not certainly, also reduce the number of people who get paralysis.

    Even if we didn’t do that, and set cvdpv aside, we could probably give genetic tests for common(ish) genetic defects that contraindicate vaccination. Honestly, if we just bit the bullet and had every baby sequenced (not SNPed) in utero we could probably exclude 99% of people who would have adverse reactions to each vaccine.

    On a cultural note, vaccinology has been a backwater of biology for a long time. It’s been the most useful field of biology, so it’s the lowest status academically. Lunatic criticism of vaccines has hardened everyone’s hearts to non-crazy criticisms. Things like, can we reduce the number of shots? Can we get more needle-free, as in oral, nasal, and cutaneous, vaccines? If vaccines made kids smile (the aforementioned sugar cube) instead of cry, there would be much wider acceptance of vaccination.

    A hit vaccine, something for relatively common illnesses would go a long way towards making common people like vaccines again like a vaccine for the common cold (even like 1/4 of them would make a real dent) or a universal flu vaccine (saw one in an old paper that induced heterologous immunity, but I didn’t look up if the flus it worked on are still considered very different)

    Therapeutic vaccines, the ones you can get after exposure to the pathogen are really interesting. Not sure if anyone tried the COVID vaccines this way, but they probably did.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @That Would Be Telling

    Did An Ancient Pathogen Reshape Our Cells?

    Aug 11, 2022

    There is one – and only one – group of mammals that doesn’t have alpha-gal: the catarrhine primates, which are the monkeys of Africa and Asia, the apes, and us.

  47. It’s also possible that monkeypox has mutated. The previous spread in the U.S. was completely different demographically, showing up in families that bought prairie dogs as pets for their children.

    But crucially the cases there behaved much like those in West and Central Africa, it didn’t lead to infections outside their households. Without the animal reservoirs the disease would burn out quickly with few if any human to human infections between strangers in public. There is no evidence the virus mutated, it’s just hard to find a big gay scene in rural Nigeria. What happened is an emigrant living in London went back to visit relatives, got infected in the typical way in their household and brought it back to the one group of people who could keep it going in person to person transmission, gay men in big Western cities.

    That this was purely from condomless anal sex and the classic household transmission was made clear from a total lack of significant transmission to people who don’t fit those profiles of being a gay sexual partner or member of a household.

    The political radicalisation of the professional classes types made the science denial of the dangerous new environment created by PrEP clear. There was so much written about how PrEP wouldn’t lead to risk compensation etc, so much written about how it would actually lead to a decline in overall STDs because the early programmes required users to come in and get a full STD panel check and treatment every month when they’d be given a new round of truvada or whatever drug was being used in their area. But obviously the pressure would be to make it as available as possible and thus those requirements would fall away.

    As PrEP usage climbed, the pressure would mount on less and less risk taking gay men to get with the new programme and not use condoms and get on PrEP too. If you’re not having condomless sex with strangers you shouldn’t be taking PrEP, that’s the whole point of PrEP, initially it was envisioned as a drug for HIV infected people to be able to have sex with their partners or spouses (Or for those people to be able to have added protection) or for prostitutes who were inclined to have condomless sex with strangers no matter what. What has happened is it’s been given to gay men who were otherwise inclined to use condoms to protect themselves from HIV and who now are inclined to not use them at all. It started with the most high risk individuals and then radiated out to even gay men who used to use condoms with strangers.

    Now you can make the case that this will end HIV transmission among gay men (Which will also reduce it among straight people since gay men are the main reservoir of the virus in the West) and if made cheap enough, among straight people in Sub-Saharan Africa. And that the increase in other STDs are a price worth paying. But what has made me so annoyed and why I’ve been writing for so long is they lied. They denied the reality that exactly this would happen and we’d be opening up an environment for new viruses to appear like HIV did. They still may not, monkeypox isn’t HIV but they openly lied, so many papers were published that were no different to Colin Powell with his vial of anthrax and it disappoints me greatly that epidemiology as a science was sullied like that.

    And for the record, here are a pair of a recent review articles on known viruses that shed in human seminal fluid. Monkeypox isn’t on either list, even among highly studied viruses it’s often not appreciated if sexual transmission isn’t obvious. Which one will be the next monkeypox?

    From Ancient To Emerging Infections: The Odyssey of Viruses In The Male Genital Tract
    https://journals.physiology.org/doi/epdf/10.1152/physrev.00021.2019

    The Breadth of Viruses in Human Semen

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5652425/

    Here is the case study of a cluster of Ebola cases that lead to the confirmation that Ebola could be sexually transmitted, even in completely asymptomatic individuals over a year after recovery. All viral hemorrhagic fevers are now either known or suspected to be shed in semen.

    Resurgence of Ebola Virus Disease in Guinea Linked to a Survivor With Virus Persistence in Seminal Fluid for More Than 500 Days
    We report on an Ebola virus disease (EVD) survivor who showed Ebola virus in seminal fluid 531 days after onset of disease. The persisting virus was sexually transmitted in February 2016, about 470 days after onset of symptoms, and caused a new cluster of EVD in Guinea and Liberia.

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27585800/

    https://sci-hub.hkvisa.net/10.1093/cid/ciw601

  48. • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Reg Cæsar


    Bugger all:

    Rise in popularity of anal sex has led to health problems for women
     
    Things didn't work out in the end.
  49. @Reg Cæsar

    Bugger all:

    Rise in popularity of anal sex has led to health problems for women

    Things didn’t work out in the end.

    • LOL: Cool Daddy Jimbo
  50. @Alan Mercer
    It is not being spread by homosexual sex because there is no such thing. It is being spread by homosexuals sodomizing each other. I'm normally against pedantry, but terminology does matter here.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Enemy of Earth

    It is not being spread by homosexual sex because there is no such thing. It is being spread by homosexuals

    Homosexual is an oxymoron. It’s also a Latin-Greek bastardization. (Which would make it an “acumoron”. Or “oxystultus”.)

    Heterosexual is redundant. But also heteroglot.

  51. @George Kaplan
    @Reg Cæsar

    ...or a dick with monkeypox.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Peyronie’s disease.

  52. @Pixo
    Thanks for the good news Steve, sure makes me feel a lot better about my decision last month to limit my anonymous homosexual group hookup activities to chaste cuddles and Eskimo kisses.

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/a1/89/56/a189564dd87d6519826e3a0dc14d6503.jpg

    Replies: @Random Anonymous

    You’ll think twice about the Eskimo kisses if you look at the photo in comment #8!

  53. Are those gay men who want to catch monkey pox to be referred to as “tree swingers”?

    • LOL: Jim Christian
  54. @Buzz Mohawk
    @prosa123

    I can see why people would keep prairie dogs as pets. They're cute little guys. I once lived next to a meadow that had a colony of them. When you walk by they all stand up and talk about you.


    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-mrs-a5Wmpv0/TZUPcBwjZkI/AAAAAAAAFY8/_E5RIQLjpWk/w1200-h630-p-k-no-nu/prairie-dogs.jpg

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @LP5, @Prester John

    They dig holes in your prairie for your horses and cattle to drop a leg into, crippling the animal. Prairie dogs kill. There’s quite a sport going on shooting these vermin in the head from 800 yards. Many of them are also rabid and are covered with Lyme ticks, they are nobody’s friend. Vermin, like I said.

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    @Jim Christian

    In the Denver area in the 1980s, the prairie dogs attracted rattlesnakes. People who thought prairie dogs were cute would walk out to see a 6 to 8 foot Western Diamondback Rattlesnake eying them coldly in the yard.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jim Christian

    I know you're right.

    Based on the facts you outline, I'm surprised our political leaders, our media, our academia, and our social media influencers aren't telling us to welcome more prairie dogs into our communities.

    Wait for it: Congress will pass the Affirmatively Furthering Prairie Dog Colonies Act, and the president will order the Department of Agriculture to implement it.

    And soon we will be hearing that another reason to take guns away from us is all the "gun violence" against prairie dogs.

    , @Rocko
    @Jim Christian

    Then again, that's what happens when you invade their habitat. As someone who probably complains of others invading your habitat, this should be familiar to you

    Replies: @Jim Christian

  55. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    That's a story about the young Richard Gere made up by his rival Sylvester Stallone, who is a really good storyteller.

    Replies: @Random Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Jim Christian, @Old Prude, @Anon

    That’s a story about the young Richard Gere made up by his rival Sylvester Stallone, who is a really good storyteller.

    All right, Sailerman, now you’ve done it. Talked about gerbils. So, all the old heads around here know I was a phone guy in DC after my exploits in Naval Air for many years, the phone guy part in 1985-2010. I serviced and installed phone systems in all sorts of strange venues. While at Compu-Phone, we installed a 5 -phone system with the intercoms and 5 outside lines in a pet shop in the region on 16th Street NW between Kalorama and Dupont Circle. It sold dogs, fish, tarantulas, snakes, and various rodents, gerbils among them. Never paid any attention to that stuff, it was just another customer. Turned out, it was a strange venue. I go out there one day on a dead phone service call and there’s a crowd of around a hundred folks at their front door. Weird. I park in the alley out back, go in through the back and ask what’s up with all the people out front. PETA was there, protesting the “de-clawed” gerbil industry. Turns out, this pet store, owing to all the homos in the neighborhood sells de-clawed gerbils to the homos. By the hundreds, every week. Swear to God, that’s what the guy said. These homos would feed these gerbils up each other’s asses, so the guy says, the animal would, as you might guess, struggle, giving the homos a huge kick (in the ass, heh). Then, it was off to GW university’s emergency room to pull the critter out. Swear to God, fellas. I’m surprised they didn’t feed de-fanged snakes up each outhers’ asses for crying out loud. And maybe they did.

    Homos are a sick, depraved, demented, perverted lot. I really don’t have enough words for them. That incident sealed it for me. The entire enterprise is simply beyond any notion of normality and yet, they try to pretend it is. They are beyond redemption. And these days, I doubt PETA would challenge this bit of animal-abuse depravity. That would be homophobic.

    • Replies: @Nachum
    @Jim Christian

    The rumor dates to 1984, so they may have picked up the practice from the rumor.

    Replies: @mc23

    , @Eustace Tilley (not)
    @Jim Christian

    Gerbils up recta? Oh, my!
    No end to what Calibans try.
    Though they talk about "pride"
    They've got plenty to hide.
    Pray the gods smell the stench from on high.

    , @Ron Mexico
    @Jim Christian

    Agreed. My mother worked medical records in 3 SoCal hospitals, I joined as a summer job. Regularly came across ER visits for what you described and dildos stuck up the ass. Not sure these dudes are even worthy of purgatory.

  56. @Anonymous

    The previous spread in the U.S. was completely different demographically, showing up in families that bought prairie dogs as pets for their children.
     
    Are we sure about that? Could've been gay men buying prairie dogs a la Richard Gere and gerbils.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mr Mox

    Are we sure about that? Could’ve been gay men buying prairie dogs a la Richard Gere and gerbils.

    Maybe it’s the other way around. Be suspicious of prairie dogs owners buying gaffer tape.

  57. @Alan Mercer
    It is not being spread by homosexual sex because there is no such thing. It is being spread by homosexuals sodomizing each other. I'm normally against pedantry, but terminology does matter here.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Enemy of Earth

    I prefer the old, Biblical term sodomite. It’s a shame a perfectly good word like gay has been co-opted to describe degeneracy.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Enemy of Earth


    I prefer the old, Biblical term sodomite
     
    As an epidemiologist one said, Sodom today, Gomorrah the world!
  58. @Jim Christian
    @Buzz Mohawk

    They dig holes in your prairie for your horses and cattle to drop a leg into, crippling the animal. Prairie dogs kill. There's quite a sport going on shooting these vermin in the head from 800 yards. Many of them are also rabid and are covered with Lyme ticks, they are nobody's friend. Vermin, like I said.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @Buzz Mohawk, @Rocko

    In the Denver area in the 1980s, the prairie dogs attracted rattlesnakes. People who thought prairie dogs were cute would walk out to see a 6 to 8 foot Western Diamondback Rattlesnake eying them coldly in the yard.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Diversity Heretic

    I must admit I ran into a rattlesnake in the foothills of Boulder not far from that prairie dog colony.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

  59. @JohnnyWalker123
    2 Parisian homosexuals had anal sex with their dog and gave him Monkeypox.

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1558938268246351873

    Talk about screwing the pooch.

    Replies: @Daniel Dravot, @YetAnotherAnon, @Prester John

    non-monodogamous gay couple in Paris

    • Agree: The Anti-Gnostic
  60. @JohnnyWalker123
    2 Parisian homosexuals had anal sex with their dog and gave him Monkeypox.

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1558938268246351873

    Talk about screwing the pooch.

    Replies: @Daniel Dravot, @YetAnotherAnon, @Prester John

    They should be given the cat!

    (Seriously while I don’t think men or women having receptive sex with a male dog is a great idea, at least the dog is doing it of his own free will. This on the other hand is pretty evil and makes you wonder about the monkeypox cases in adoptive children of homosexual couples)

    • Replies: @TWS
    @YetAnotherAnon

    I don't wonder at all.

  61. Is it too hasty to conclude nothing good comes out of Africa? ‘Gambian pouched rats’, Monkeypox included! And Gambian toy boys to take home..https://www.telegraph.co.uk/world-news/2022/08/17/gambia-tells-uk-grandmothers-seek-toy-boys-elsewhere/
    “The Gambia tells UK grandmothers to seek toy boys elsewhere..Young Gambian beach boys can be seen assisting older female tourists, some old enough to be their grandmothers, out of noisy clubs and off into the night. Most of the Gambian men who meet up with older women are motivated by the lack of jobs and low wages. By becoming a toy boy they can earn £200 in only a few days, which is equivalent to a monthly salary. They scour the stunning white sand beaches looking for older women, who also come from the Netherlands, Sweden and Germany. Some relationships are organised online beforehand, and the toy boys meet the women at the airport…Kausu Samateh, a tourist guide, said poverty was increasingly driving young men into prostitution. He said: “People are poor here, so they have no choice. They think it is better to go to Europe where they will have a better life. They hope that the old ladies will take them.”

    • Replies: @Nachum
    @TyRade

    Some black female American novelist past her prime went to Jamaica to find a stud. She found one and wrote a novel about how great it was, and they made a movie out of it. Then it turned out he was gay and after her for her money.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

  62. @Reg Cæsar

    a shipment of Gambian pouched rats
     
    In what were these Gambian rats pouched? Oh, wait... we'd rather not know... At any rate, the Gambia itself resembles a pouch of sorts. Or a colon:


    https://sovereignlimits.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/10/GMB_SEN_land_sketch_horiz_04-01.png

    Replies: @George Kaplan, @Bill Jones, @LP5

    The Gambia (And I’ve been there) is the best Examplar on the planet of Gunboat diplomacy.
    The degree to which it intrudes into France’s Senegal is exactly the range of the Royal Navy’s gunboats of the time. I was plaintively asked by one local “When are you British coming back?” The Cemetery in Banjul where the Colonial officers are buried is full of 20 odd year olds.

    • Thanks: AceDeuce
  63. Homosexuals are such a vile and depraved race.

  64. I saw a shocking photo at the Daily Mail earlier today. I looked earlier tonight and this medical story about a 40 year old white German with monkeypox hadn’t been picked up by any big US outlet. This guy tested as being immunocompromised and had undiagnosed HIV and syphilis. It is incredible, as is what happened to his nose. It started to “rot.” It got better but is not back to normal.

    For those interested I suggest you go read the article. The cases we have had so far are considered mild. What they think could happen to those who are immunocompromised and get severe cases is not good. In two Southern states about 70% of people with monkeypox are black. Due to various factors I am wondering how many gay blacks in those states are immunocompromised?

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-11119463/Pictured-Monkeypox-patient-nose-started-rot.html

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @notsaying


    It got better but is not back to normal.
     
    This seems like the workings of a witch.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZB5ig6vpQug

    Replies: @notsaying

    , @AceDeuce
    @notsaying


    In two Southern states about 70% of people with monkeypox are black. Due to various factors I am wondering how many gay blacks in those states are immunocompromised?

     

    It's hard to fathom the irresponsibility of "de bleck kom-mun-uh-tee" when it comes to any form of rational restraint, sexual or otherwise. The Tuskegee Study (It wasn't an "experiment") was in response to the astronomic rates of the disease among Southern negroes. Syphilis was, in the early 1930s, only beginning to be understood, and was still largely untreatable in any satisfactory way. In the early 1900s, an epidemic of syphilis swept through the black "community" killing many. Thankfully due to limited contact with negroes, it did not spread wholesale to Whites.

    Here's a tidbit regarding syphilis and negroes in the South, that serves to indicate the extent of the problem (whole article (linked below) is worth reading):


    In 1943, the Alabama legislature passed a unique law that mandated blood tests for syphilis for all its civilians between the ages of 14 and 50 years. Family members younger than 14 or older than 50 years underwent blood testing only if another family member in the same household tested positive. Early in the program treatment included 8-, 16-, or 30-week heavy-metal therapy for early syphilis and a 40-week alternating course of heavy-metal therapy for late-latent syphilis.34

    Two years later, in the Birmingham and Jefferson County arm of the program, 271,000 people were surveyed. Whites and blacks had participation in the survey (ie, 163,000 and 108,000, respectively) representing 89% of their respective populations. Three percent of whites and 30% of blacks had positive test results for syphilis. Ninety-three percent of those infected who received therapy for early syphilis at the USPHS-run rapid treatment center in Birmingham were African American35; a total of 3231 people with early syphilis were treated at the rapid treatment center.
     

    https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/224795

    Replies: @notsaying

  65. @Rob McX
    Gay sex must have greater attractions than the heterosexual kind, if people are willing to take such risks for it. This is a German patient who got monkeypox and then discovered he also has HIV and syphilis.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2022/08/17/11/61462813-11119463-image-a-19_1660731025695.jpg

    Replies: @Thomas, @Random Anonymous, @Pontius, @Anonymous, @SFG, @Ed, @Muggles, @Indignant of Maidstone

    Straight guys don’t often have sex in huge orgies or giant conga lines because you can’t find enough willing women. Even threesomes are kind of a fantasy for most people.

    You have two partners both with a male sex drive, anything goes.

    • Agree: nebulafox
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @SFG

    "Straight guys don’t often have sex in huge orgies or giant conga lines because you can’t find enough willing women. "

    Maybe in the distant past there were tribes where women had sex drives like men. But once sexually transmissible diseases arrived they'd all have died out.


    "Our Ford--or Our Freud, as, for some inscrutable reason, he chose to call himself whenever he spoke of psychological matters--Our Freud had been the first to reveal the appalling dangers of family life. The world was full of fathers--was therefore full of misery; full of mothers--therefore of every kind of perversion from sadism to chastity; full of brothers, sisters, uncles, aunts--full of madness and suicide.

    'And yet, among the savages of Samoa, in certain islands off the coast of New Guinea...'

    The tropical sunshine lay like warm honey on the naked bodies of children tumbling promiscuously among the hibiscus blossoms. Home was in any one of twenty palm-thatched houses. In the Trobriands conception was the work of ancestral ghosts; nobody had ever heard of a father.

    'Extremes,' said the Controller, 'meet. For the good reason that they were made to meet.'"
     
    Alas, Paradise (assuming Margaret Mead and Franz Boas were good faith reporters - a big ask) couldn't survive modernity.

    The report also noted that Hepatitis A has the next largest prevalence compared to gonorrhea and chlamydia. However, it was not possible to produce estimates of prevalence due to low testing numbers.

    “Syphilis, though lower in prevalence, has been steadily increasing. Hepatitis B has not changed significantly in the past three years. For most of the past seven years, chlamydia has persisted as a high prevalence S.T.I. from 31 per cent in 2010 to 22 per cent in 2017.

     

    https://www.samoaobserver.ws/category/samoa/27353
    , @Anon
    @SFG

    It’s not entirely an availability issue. Most straight men wouldn’t be eager to sleep with a dozen women in a weekend. The men that do would have underlying psychiatric issues — manic depression, sociopathy, etc.

    It’s fairly obvious most gay men are psychiatric head cases, who are made worse by modern gay culture. Most gay men would be better off leading closeted lives with wives, albeit open-minded ones.

    It’s also fairly obvious why so many STD’s come out of Africa, since African men will put their dick in anything that moves.

    , @nebulafox
    @SFG

    I think the prevailing attitude for men in much of human history, before homosexuality as an all-encompassing psycho-social construct or marriage primarily for the purpose of love was a thing, was "Of course I'm doing this sex act with another man/a prostitute/a slave! I'd never force my wife to do something she'd in all probability find disgusting and shameful. What kind of uncaring monster do you think I am?"

  66. @Sean
    @AnotherDad

    Unless being a bit gay is a help in figuring things out.

    Replies: @SFG, @anon, @Rich, @AnotherDad

    And they wonder why I never experimented.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @SFG


    http://evoandproud.blogspot.com/2022/05/a-virus-that-increases-intelligence-and.html

    An association between CMV and IQ has now been found in healthy individuals. A Czech study has shown that IQ, especially verbal IQ, is higher in people with antibodies to CMV. Moreover, the IQ advantage decreases with decreasing levels of CMV antibodies, i.e., with increasing time since the CMV infection (Chvatálova et al. 2022)


    If we look at the epidemiological data, we see that male homosexuals are especially susceptible. A study at a venereal disease clinic found that antibodies to CMV were present in 94% of the male homosexual patients and 54% of the male heterosexual patients. “The data suggest that sexual transmission is an important mode of spread of CMV among adults and that homosexual men are at greater risk for CMV infections than are heterosexual men” (Drew et al. 1981). Another study has identified passive anal sex as the most effective means of transmission: “Of seven sexual practices investigated, only passive anal-genital intercourse correlated with the acquisition of >cytomegalovirus infection (p =0.008)” (Mintz et al. 1983). [...] ? Does passive anal sex facilitate CMV infection? Or does CMV infection facilitate the desire for passive anal sex?
     
  67. @Chepe
    ICYMI. The liver is the first line of defense against infection including virus. The anal cavity has three main veins
    into which blood drains. One of those three veins bypasses the liver and returns blood directly to the heart and on to the lungs to be oxygenated and circulated throughout the body unfiltered by the liver. This is not the case with the vaginal cavity. All returning vaginal blood is filtered by the liver before making its way to the heart and lungs. The societal prescriptions against sodomy are not just socially
    constructed. So there's that....

    Replies: @SFG

    Well, no. The external pudendal veins drain to the great saphenous, which drains to the femoral veins which turn into the external iliacs; the internal pudendal veins drain to the internal iliacs. The external and internal iliacs then combine to form common iliac veins, which combine to form the inferior vena cava which dumps directly into the heart without entering the liver (though it does pass through the liver and receive the blood the liver cleaned from the hepatic veins).

    The liver’s there to detoxify the blood coming from the gut in case you ate something weird, though of course there are lots of white cells to fight infection too.

    The difference, from what I can gather, is the fragility of the rectal lining relative to the vaginal. The vagina is supposed to pass a complete human being out; the rectum is just supposed to pass poop. And nothing is supposed to come *in*.

    • Replies: @Ben Kurtz
    @SFG

    Also, have you compared the diameter of the average poop to the average newborn's head? The relative hardness of those two items?

    And have you compared the vagina's capacity for self-lubrication (in case of penetration) to that of the rectum? Unlubricated sex is generally considered more dangerous than lubricated no matter the orifice. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_sex

    , @Chepe
    @SFG

    I don't like to be argumentative but well yes. True I over simplified for easy intake. But looks like you got a little overzealous with the copy and paste in response.
    Here's a simple way to put it.: the rectal veins run lateralward on the pelvic surface of the levator to end in the internal iliac vein. Veins superior to the middle rectal vein in the colon and rectum drain via the portal system to the liver. Veins inferior, and including, the middle rectal vein drain into systemic circulation and are returned to the heart, bypassing the liver. This is not the case with the vagina.
    The liver is the first line of defense in the immune system It doesn't check on what you ate for lunch. Cheers.

  68. @kaganovitch
    Dr. Jeffrey Klausner, an infectious disease physician at the University of Southern California, and Dr. Lao-Tzu Allan-Blitz, a resident physician in global health at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, published an essay on Medium

    Reg, if that name doesn't call for an anagram I don't know what would.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Joe S.Walker, @Muggles, @nightskyradio

    Sounds like a character in some Kurt Vonnegut Jr-style satirical novel written c.1970.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Joe S.Walker

    Sounds like a character in some Kurt Vonnegut Jr-style satirical novel written c.1970.

    Indeed he does. What's even funnier , though I can't get his picture to post here , if you google his image he looks like a young Hermann Goering.
    It would appear that his parents were sharp enough to figure out how the 21st century was likely to go and they positioned him to reach the pinnacle of the medical field 30 years ago. Impressive!

  69. @SFG
    @Rob McX

    Straight guys don’t often have sex in huge orgies or giant conga lines because you can’t find enough willing women. Even threesomes are kind of a fantasy for most people.

    You have two partners both with a male sex drive, anything goes.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Anon, @nebulafox

    “Straight guys don’t often have sex in huge orgies or giant conga lines because you can’t find enough willing women. “

    Maybe in the distant past there were tribes where women had sex drives like men. But once sexually transmissible diseases arrived they’d all have died out.

    “Our Ford–or Our Freud, as, for some inscrutable reason, he chose to call himself whenever he spoke of psychological matters–Our Freud had been the first to reveal the appalling dangers of family life. The world was full of fathers–was therefore full of misery; full of mothers–therefore of every kind of perversion from sadism to chastity; full of brothers, sisters, uncles, aunts–full of madness and suicide.

    ‘And yet, among the savages of Samoa, in certain islands off the coast of New Guinea…’

    The tropical sunshine lay like warm honey on the naked bodies of children tumbling promiscuously among the hibiscus blossoms. Home was in any one of twenty palm-thatched houses. In the Trobriands conception was the work of ancestral ghosts; nobody had ever heard of a father.

    ‘Extremes,’ said the Controller, ‘meet. For the good reason that they were made to meet.’”

    Alas, Paradise (assuming Margaret Mead and Franz Boas were good faith reporters – a big ask) couldn’t survive modernity.

    The report also noted that Hepatitis A has the next largest prevalence compared to gonorrhea and chlamydia. However, it was not possible to produce estimates of prevalence due to low testing numbers.

    “Syphilis, though lower in prevalence, has been steadily increasing. Hepatitis B has not changed significantly in the past three years. For most of the past seven years, chlamydia has persisted as a high prevalence S.T.I. from 31 per cent in 2010 to 22 per cent in 2017.

    https://www.samoaobserver.ws/category/samoa/27353

  70. @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    It's amazing how that went viral and everybody in the country heard about it even before the internet. I was a kid in school in the 90s and somehow every kid knew about it.

    Sam Kinison had a hilariously raunchy set based on it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lr8Gha7Ps74

    Replies: @Nachum

    Studies have been made about how things like Challenger jokes travelled the country so quickly. Early electronic communication did have something to do with it.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Nachum

    I can remember hearing space shuttle jokes on January 28, 1986.

    It's presumed that Wall Street traders with Bloomberg terminals were responsible for their spread.

    Replies: @Nachum, @slumber_j, @Known Fact, @kimchilover

    , @JR Ewing
    @Nachum

    What were Christa McAuliffe's last words?

    "What does this button do?"

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  71. @Jim Christian
    @Steve Sailer


    That’s a story about the young Richard Gere made up by his rival Sylvester Stallone, who is a really good storyteller.
     
    All right, Sailerman, now you've done it. Talked about gerbils. So, all the old heads around here know I was a phone guy in DC after my exploits in Naval Air for many years, the phone guy part in 1985-2010. I serviced and installed phone systems in all sorts of strange venues. While at Compu-Phone, we installed a 5 -phone system with the intercoms and 5 outside lines in a pet shop in the region on 16th Street NW between Kalorama and Dupont Circle. It sold dogs, fish, tarantulas, snakes, and various rodents, gerbils among them. Never paid any attention to that stuff, it was just another customer. Turned out, it was a strange venue. I go out there one day on a dead phone service call and there's a crowd of around a hundred folks at their front door. Weird. I park in the alley out back, go in through the back and ask what's up with all the people out front. PETA was there, protesting the "de-clawed" gerbil industry. Turns out, this pet store, owing to all the homos in the neighborhood sells de-clawed gerbils to the homos. By the hundreds, every week. Swear to God, that's what the guy said. These homos would feed these gerbils up each other's asses, so the guy says, the animal would, as you might guess, struggle, giving the homos a huge kick (in the ass, heh). Then, it was off to GW university's emergency room to pull the critter out. Swear to God, fellas. I'm surprised they didn't feed de-fanged snakes up each outhers' asses for crying out loud. And maybe they did.

    Homos are a sick, depraved, demented, perverted lot. I really don't have enough words for them. That incident sealed it for me. The entire enterprise is simply beyond any notion of normality and yet, they try to pretend it is. They are beyond redemption. And these days, I doubt PETA would challenge this bit of animal-abuse depravity. That would be homophobic.

    Replies: @Nachum, @Eustace Tilley (not), @Ron Mexico

    The rumor dates to 1984, so they may have picked up the practice from the rumor.

    • Replies: @mc23
    @Nachum

    In 1985 Philadelphia Newscaster Jerry Penacoli was involved in a Gerbling scandal that resulted in running him out of town. He had been very popular.

    I worked at a hospital nearby the one Penacoli was taken to. On Monday morning a co-worker came in bursting with laughter. He knew people who worked in the emergency room at Lankenau Hospital and told me the story.

    Next I heard several people involved at Lankenau were fired. Four to six weeks later Penacoli was done in Philly. He went on to have quite a successful career anyway.

    Now it's rated as an urban myth. I rate it as true.

  72. @TyRade
    Is it too hasty to conclude nothing good comes out of Africa? 'Gambian pouched rats', Monkeypox included! And Gambian toy boys to take home..https://www.telegraph.co.uk/world-news/2022/08/17/gambia-tells-uk-grandmothers-seek-toy-boys-elsewhere/
    "The Gambia tells UK grandmothers to seek toy boys elsewhere..Young Gambian beach boys can be seen assisting older female tourists, some old enough to be their grandmothers, out of noisy clubs and off into the night. Most of the Gambian men who meet up with older women are motivated by the lack of jobs and low wages. By becoming a toy boy they can earn £200 in only a few days, which is equivalent to a monthly salary. They scour the stunning white sand beaches looking for older women, who also come from the Netherlands, Sweden and Germany. Some relationships are organised online beforehand, and the toy boys meet the women at the airport...Kausu Samateh, a tourist guide, said poverty was increasingly driving young men into prostitution. He said: "People are poor here, so they have no choice. They think it is better to go to Europe where they will have a better life. They hope that the old ladies will take them.”

    Replies: @Nachum

    Some black female American novelist past her prime went to Jamaica to find a stud. She found one and wrote a novel about how great it was, and they made a movie out of it. Then it turned out he was gay and after her for her money.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Nachum

    Terry McMillan?

    Replies: @Nachum

  73. @Nachum
    @Anonymous

    Studies have been made about how things like Challenger jokes travelled the country so quickly. Early electronic communication did have something to do with it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JR Ewing

    I can remember hearing space shuttle jokes on January 28, 1986.

    It’s presumed that Wall Street traders with Bloomberg terminals were responsible for their spread.

    • Replies: @Nachum
    @Steve Sailer

    Right, Bloomberg- you've reminded me.

    , @slumber_j
    @Steve Sailer


    It’s presumed that Wall Street traders with Bloomberg terminals were responsible for their spread.
     
    Yes, that was the explanation I heard at the time from contemporaries at college who had summer jobs at Wall Street firms.
    , @Known Fact
    @Steve Sailer

    Space Shuttle gallows humor actually predates the Challenger disaster. The flights began in 1981 but had become boringly routine by 1983 or 84 -- and yet our Florida paper sent a staffer to every single launch, for one reason and one reason alone, the tiny chance it might all go blooey. This CYA assignment never failed to generate darkly cynical mirth around the newsroom

    , @kimchilover
    @Steve Sailer

    Wow, I always wondered. The space shuttle blew-up on my birthday in 6th grade. The next morning I heard two jokes that have stuck with me my whole life (largely because they seemed so sophisticated for a 6th grader):

    1) What does NASA stand for? Need Another Seven Astronauts.

    2) How do you know Christa Mcauliffe had dandruff? They found her head and shoulders on the beach.

  74. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It was known briefly as Neil Patrick Harris disease until astute individuals noticed that outbreaks had occurred simultaneously in both China and Iran shortly after several hundred gay American troops participated in the Gay Military Pride Olympics in China.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Haha! I appreciate the riff on Ron Unz’s big, big, theory, but I first had to look up Neil Patrick Harris. Never heard of the guy before.

  75. @notsaying
    I saw a shocking photo at the Daily Mail earlier today. I looked earlier tonight and this medical story about a 40 year old white German with monkeypox hadn't been picked up by any big US outlet. This guy tested as being immunocompromised and had undiagnosed HIV and syphilis. It is incredible, as is what happened to his nose. It started to "rot." It got better but is not back to normal.

    For those interested I suggest you go read the article. The cases we have had so far are considered mild. What they think could happen to those who are immunocompromised and get severe cases is not good. In two Southern states about 70% of people with monkeypox are black. Due to various factors I am wondering how many gay blacks in those states are immunocompromised?


    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-11119463/Pictured-Monkeypox-patient-nose-started-rot.html

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @AceDeuce

    It got better but is not back to normal.

    This seems like the workings of a witch.

    • Replies: @notsaying
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It does, doesn't it? It took me hours to actually click article and read it after seeing that awful picture on the front page. I thought the nose was maybe connected to the syphilis or HIV but apparently not.

    This monkeypox can be worse than we thought. Also what we have here is based on the milder of the two kinds in Africa

    There is all this talk coming from gay guys and groups about stigma. I think the bigger worry should be about not getting the disease.

  76. @notsaying
    I saw a shocking photo at the Daily Mail earlier today. I looked earlier tonight and this medical story about a 40 year old white German with monkeypox hadn't been picked up by any big US outlet. This guy tested as being immunocompromised and had undiagnosed HIV and syphilis. It is incredible, as is what happened to his nose. It started to "rot." It got better but is not back to normal.

    For those interested I suggest you go read the article. The cases we have had so far are considered mild. What they think could happen to those who are immunocompromised and get severe cases is not good. In two Southern states about 70% of people with monkeypox are black. Due to various factors I am wondering how many gay blacks in those states are immunocompromised?


    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-11119463/Pictured-Monkeypox-patient-nose-started-rot.html

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @AceDeuce

    In two Southern states about 70% of people with monkeypox are black. Due to various factors I am wondering how many gay blacks in those states are immunocompromised?

    It’s hard to fathom the irresponsibility of “de bleck kom-mun-uh-tee” when it comes to any form of rational restraint, sexual or otherwise. The Tuskegee Study (It wasn’t an “experiment”) was in response to the astronomic rates of the disease among Southern negroes. Syphilis was, in the early 1930s, only beginning to be understood, and was still largely untreatable in any satisfactory way. In the early 1900s, an epidemic of syphilis swept through the black “community” killing many. Thankfully due to limited contact with negroes, it did not spread wholesale to Whites.

    Here’s a tidbit regarding syphilis and negroes in the South, that serves to indicate the extent of the problem (whole article (linked below) is worth reading):

    In 1943, the Alabama legislature passed a unique law that mandated blood tests for syphilis for all its civilians between the ages of 14 and 50 years. Family members younger than 14 or older than 50 years underwent blood testing only if another family member in the same household tested positive. Early in the program treatment included 8-, 16-, or 30-week heavy-metal therapy for early syphilis and a 40-week alternating course of heavy-metal therapy for late-latent syphilis.34

    Two years later, in the Birmingham and Jefferson County arm of the program, 271,000 people were surveyed. Whites and blacks had participation in the survey (ie, 163,000 and 108,000, respectively) representing 89% of their respective populations. Three percent of whites and 30% of blacks had positive test results for syphilis. Ninety-three percent of those infected who received therapy for early syphilis at the USPHS-run rapid treatment center in Birmingham were African American35; a total of 3231 people with early syphilis were treated at the rapid treatment center.

    https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/224795

    • Agree: Jim Christian
    • Replies: @notsaying
    @AceDeuce

    Wow, those numbers are bad! How could so many blacks have syphilis?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  77. @Redneck farmer
    Woman at work asked our HR person if we were going to do anything about Monkeypox. I pointed out that "I don't think anyone here attends gay orgies".

    Replies: @LP5, @Muggles

    Redneck Farmer writes:

    Woman at work asked our HR person if we were going to do anything about Monkeypox. I pointed out that “I don’t think anyone here attends gay orgies”.

    Work Rule #1000, never say anything controversial to or near anyone from HR. Somebody is notating your file, saving observations. And whatever you do, never put anything controversial in writing.

    Here is a quote from one of those Somebodies:
    “I save all the texts because they could be evidence.”

    Btw, that same Somebody is not even an HR person, but acts like that outside work. Vigilance is the order of the day.

  78. @Buzz Mohawk
    @prosa123

    I can see why people would keep prairie dogs as pets. They're cute little guys. I once lived next to a meadow that had a colony of them. When you walk by they all stand up and talk about you.


    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-mrs-a5Wmpv0/TZUPcBwjZkI/AAAAAAAAFY8/_E5RIQLjpWk/w1200-h630-p-k-no-nu/prairie-dogs.jpg

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @LP5, @Prester John

    Prairie dogs, long-term inhabitants of cube farms, too.

  79. @Reg Cæsar

    a shipment of Gambian pouched rats
     
    In what were these Gambian rats pouched? Oh, wait... we'd rather not know... At any rate, the Gambia itself resembles a pouch of sorts. Or a colon:


    https://sovereignlimits.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/10/GMB_SEN_land_sketch_horiz_04-01.png

    Replies: @George Kaplan, @Bill Jones, @LP5

    Gambia, with capital city of East Bumfuck.

  80. “no instances of monkeypox infection were attributed exclusively to person-to-person contact.”

    That was then. The human-to-human spread via anal sex between persons, many of whom are boosted with HIV-management cocktails, will likely produce a super strain of the disease that will find it far easier to jump to the rest of the population.

    The “authorities” could close churches and sporting events as possible super-spreader events for COVID, but they can’t find it in themselves to close down the gay festivals and parties that are proving to be actual super-spreader events for monkeypox, inter alia.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @The Alarmist


    The “authorities” could close churches and sporting events as possible super-spreader events for COVID, but they can’t find it in themselves to close down the gay festivals and parties that are proving to be actual super-spreader events for monkeypox, inter alia.
     
    Big difference between a not low case fatality rate (CFR) spread by respiration disease and monkeypox which outside of Africa has a CFR that's effectively nil; per Wikipedia right now 40,213 confirmed, 7,216 suspected cases, only six deaths, two in Spain, one each in Brazil (that guy had a lot of comorbidities I recall reading on Unz.com), Ecuador, India and Peru.

    Indeed, they absolutely should be shutting down these gay sexual networks if for no other reasons than the potential for mutations making monkeypox more adapted to humans, but we know that's not going to happen for the same reasons our ruling and publish health trash delighted in shutting down churches (but sporting events???). It's also in theory a lot easier for the vulnerable population to avoid getting it at all, which you can't say about a respiratory spread disease.
    , @That Would Be Telling
    @The Alarmist

    OT except for the weaponization of "Monkeypox is the Gorilla Glue of disease brand names."


    "Cheney’s Humiliating Defeat Is Another Sign That We Are Winning"

    Kurt Schlichter

    Here's a thought exercise – would Liz Cheney have gotten more or fewer votes than she did if she had announced, right before the election, "I have monkeypox?" Considering that the pus plague is polling better than she did in the Wyoming primary the other night, perhaps she should have just announced that "I am monkeypox."

    She is Republican monkeypox, you know. She is a walking, talking, warmongering, loathsome disease infecting the nether regions of the Republican Party, and her resounding rejection by the decent Americans of Wyoming demonstrates that we are curing the infection that is her kind....
     

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  81. Anon[311] • Disclaimer says:
    @SFG
    @Rob McX

    Straight guys don’t often have sex in huge orgies or giant conga lines because you can’t find enough willing women. Even threesomes are kind of a fantasy for most people.

    You have two partners both with a male sex drive, anything goes.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Anon, @nebulafox

    It’s not entirely an availability issue. Most straight men wouldn’t be eager to sleep with a dozen women in a weekend. The men that do would have underlying psychiatric issues — manic depression, sociopathy, etc.

    It’s fairly obvious most gay men are psychiatric head cases, who are made worse by modern gay culture. Most gay men would be better off leading closeted lives with wives, albeit open-minded ones.

    It’s also fairly obvious why so many STD’s come out of Africa, since African men will put their dick in anything that moves.

    • Agree: Rich, anonymouseperson
  82. @Nachum
    @Jim Christian

    The rumor dates to 1984, so they may have picked up the practice from the rumor.

    Replies: @mc23

    In 1985 Philadelphia Newscaster Jerry Penacoli was involved in a Gerbling scandal that resulted in running him out of town. He had been very popular.

    I worked at a hospital nearby the one Penacoli was taken to. On Monday morning a co-worker came in bursting with laughter. He knew people who worked in the emergency room at Lankenau Hospital and told me the story.

    Next I heard several people involved at Lankenau were fired. Four to six weeks later Penacoli was done in Philly. He went on to have quite a successful career anyway.

    Now it’s rated as an urban myth. I rate it as true.

    • Agree: Jim Christian
  83. @Enemy of Earth
    @Alan Mercer

    I prefer the old, Biblical term sodomite. It's a shame a perfectly good word like gay has been co-opted to describe degeneracy.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I prefer the old, Biblical term sodomite

    As an epidemiologist one said, Sodom today, Gomorrah the world!

  84. All judgements aside it should be added to Sex-Ed that having anal sex is just below getting a blood transfusion when it comes to spreading a disease. The walls of the Colon absorbs substances into the body very effectively.

    Gays refusing to wear condoms and insisting this is not an STD are deluding themselves to engage in risky self-serving behavior

    • Replies: @Gordo
    @mc23

    If LGBT sex education had any purpose other than grooming it would at least cover the high disease load in the male homosexual community, the high rate of domestic violence in the lesbian community and the high suicide rate in the transgender community.

    I could reasonably add a ‘very’ in front of each instance of ‘high’.

  85. @Jim Christian
    @Steve Sailer


    That’s a story about the young Richard Gere made up by his rival Sylvester Stallone, who is a really good storyteller.
     
    All right, Sailerman, now you've done it. Talked about gerbils. So, all the old heads around here know I was a phone guy in DC after my exploits in Naval Air for many years, the phone guy part in 1985-2010. I serviced and installed phone systems in all sorts of strange venues. While at Compu-Phone, we installed a 5 -phone system with the intercoms and 5 outside lines in a pet shop in the region on 16th Street NW between Kalorama and Dupont Circle. It sold dogs, fish, tarantulas, snakes, and various rodents, gerbils among them. Never paid any attention to that stuff, it was just another customer. Turned out, it was a strange venue. I go out there one day on a dead phone service call and there's a crowd of around a hundred folks at their front door. Weird. I park in the alley out back, go in through the back and ask what's up with all the people out front. PETA was there, protesting the "de-clawed" gerbil industry. Turns out, this pet store, owing to all the homos in the neighborhood sells de-clawed gerbils to the homos. By the hundreds, every week. Swear to God, that's what the guy said. These homos would feed these gerbils up each other's asses, so the guy says, the animal would, as you might guess, struggle, giving the homos a huge kick (in the ass, heh). Then, it was off to GW university's emergency room to pull the critter out. Swear to God, fellas. I'm surprised they didn't feed de-fanged snakes up each outhers' asses for crying out loud. And maybe they did.

    Homos are a sick, depraved, demented, perverted lot. I really don't have enough words for them. That incident sealed it for me. The entire enterprise is simply beyond any notion of normality and yet, they try to pretend it is. They are beyond redemption. And these days, I doubt PETA would challenge this bit of animal-abuse depravity. That would be homophobic.

    Replies: @Nachum, @Eustace Tilley (not), @Ron Mexico

    Gerbils up recta? Oh, my!
    No end to what Calibans try.
    Though they talk about “pride”
    They’ve got plenty to hide.
    Pray the gods smell the stench from on high.

    • LOL: Jim Christian
  86. @JR Ewing
    @Anon

    That poor dog didn't even get a hit of meth, either.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Poppers. Amyl nitrate relaxes the muscles in the throat and sphincter.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poppers

  87. @SFG
    @Chepe

    Well, no. The external pudendal veins drain to the great saphenous, which drains to the femoral veins which turn into the external iliacs; the internal pudendal veins drain to the internal iliacs. The external and internal iliacs then combine to form common iliac veins, which combine to form the inferior vena cava which dumps directly into the heart without entering the liver (though it does pass through the liver and receive the blood the liver cleaned from the hepatic veins).

    The liver’s there to detoxify the blood coming from the gut in case you ate something weird, though of course there are lots of white cells to fight infection too.

    The difference, from what I can gather, is the fragility of the rectal lining relative to the vaginal. The vagina is supposed to pass a complete human being out; the rectum is just supposed to pass poop. And nothing is supposed to come *in*.

    Replies: @Ben Kurtz, @Chepe

    Also, have you compared the diameter of the average poop to the average newborn’s head? The relative hardness of those two items?

    And have you compared the vagina’s capacity for self-lubrication (in case of penetration) to that of the rectum? Unlubricated sex is generally considered more dangerous than lubricated no matter the orifice. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_sex

  88. https://twitter.com/i/events/1559995973052645376


    https://fortune.com/2022/08/16/pets-monkeypox-isolated-cdc-human-to-dog-transmission/
    https://archive.ph/UsGKM

    Pets exposed to people with monkeypox should be isolated to ensure they don’t spread the virus to other people or animals, US health officials said after a dog was reported to be infected with the virus in Paris.

    Because monkeypox can spread through close contact with an infectious person, people who have tested positive should be careful when cuddling or petting animals, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance issued Friday. Pets may also pick up the virus through blankets or other household items used by patients, the CDC said, and if a pet appears to be sick, owners should contact a veterinarian.

    “Pets that had close contact with a symptomatic person with monkeypox should be kept at home and away from other animals and people for 21 days after the most recent contact,” the Atlanta-based CDC said in a statement on its website dated Aug. 12. “Infected people should not take care of exposed pets.”

    The CDC updated its guidance after a dog was reported to have contracted monkeypox from its owners in what is thought to be the first case of human-to-dog transmission. The four-year-old greyhound developed lesions almost two weeks after his owners, a non-monogamous gay couple, began showing symptoms of monkeypox, according to a report published Aug. 10 in The Lancet medical journal. The dog’s owners, who were both positive for monkeypox, reported allowing the dog to sleep in their bed.

    “Our findings should prompt debate on the need to isolate pets from monkeypox virus-positive individuals,” the authors of the Lancet study concluded. “We call for further investigation on secondary transmissions via pets.”

    https://www.cdc.gov/poxvirus/monkeypox/veterinarian/monkeypox-in-animals.html

    https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(22)01487-8/fulltext
    https://archive.ph/brE8m

    12 days after symptom onset, their male Italian greyhound, aged 4 years and with no previous medical disorders, presented with mucocutaneous lesions, including abdomen pustules and a thin anal ulceration

    Men who have sex with pets.

    • Agree: TWS
    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @MEH 0910


    So how can you prevent this from happening to your pet?
     
    ------------

    Seriously CDC, is this a trick question? Because it seems pretty easy to prevent.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

  89. @Joe S.Walker
    @kaganovitch

    Sounds like a character in some Kurt Vonnegut Jr-style satirical novel written c.1970.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    Sounds like a character in some Kurt Vonnegut Jr-style satirical novel written c.1970.

    Indeed he does. What’s even funnier , though I can’t get his picture to post here , if you google his image he looks like a young Hermann Goering.
    It would appear that his parents were sharp enough to figure out how the 21st century was likely to go and they positioned him to reach the pinnacle of the medical field 30 years ago. Impressive!

  90. @Anonymous
    @Rob McX

    W.T.F.?!?!?!?!

    Pat Buchanan's remark about gays and AIDS remains relevant. As it will in 50 years when some Lovecraftian looking intestinal parasites becomes a thing on account of the degenerate homosexual fetish du jour


    "The poor homosexuals. They have declared war on nature, and now nature is exacting an awful retribution."

    Replies: @Coemgen

  91. @Nachum
    @TyRade

    Some black female American novelist past her prime went to Jamaica to find a stud. She found one and wrote a novel about how great it was, and they made a movie out of it. Then it turned out he was gay and after her for her money.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    Terry McMillan?

    • Replies: @Nachum
    @kaganovitch

    Yup, that's the one.

  92. @kaganovitch
    @Nachum

    Terry McMillan?

    Replies: @Nachum

    Yup, that’s the one.

  93. @Steve Sailer
    @Nachum

    I can remember hearing space shuttle jokes on January 28, 1986.

    It's presumed that Wall Street traders with Bloomberg terminals were responsible for their spread.

    Replies: @Nachum, @slumber_j, @Known Fact, @kimchilover

    Right, Bloomberg- you’ve reminded me.

  94. @JohnnyWalker123
    2 Parisian homosexuals had anal sex with their dog and gave him Monkeypox.

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1558938268246351873

    Talk about screwing the pooch.

    Replies: @Daniel Dravot, @YetAnotherAnon, @Prester John

    What some would call “an alternate lifestyle.” Lol.

  95. @Buzz Mohawk
    @prosa123

    I can see why people would keep prairie dogs as pets. They're cute little guys. I once lived next to a meadow that had a colony of them. When you walk by they all stand up and talk about you.


    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-mrs-a5Wmpv0/TZUPcBwjZkI/AAAAAAAAFY8/_E5RIQLjpWk/w1200-h630-p-k-no-nu/prairie-dogs.jpg

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @LP5, @Prester John

    My father had a friend who owned a ranch in western Colorado. He told my dad that ranchers, farmers uniformly despise them for all the damage they do to the landscape.

  96. @SFG
    @Sean

    And they wonder why I never experimented.

    Replies: @Sean

    http://evoandproud.blogspot.com/2022/05/a-virus-that-increases-intelligence-and.html

    An association between CMV and IQ has now been found in healthy individuals. A Czech study has shown that IQ, especially verbal IQ, is higher in people with antibodies to CMV. Moreover, the IQ advantage decreases with decreasing levels of CMV antibodies, i.e., with increasing time since the CMV infection (Chvatálova et al. 2022)

    If we look at the epidemiological data, we see that male homosexuals are especially susceptible. A study at a venereal disease clinic found that antibodies to CMV were present in 94% of the male homosexual patients and 54% of the male heterosexual patients. “The data suggest that sexual transmission is an important mode of spread of CMV among adults and that homosexual men are at greater risk for CMV infections than are heterosexual men” (Drew et al. 1981). Another study has identified passive anal sex as the most effective means of transmission: “Of seven sexual practices investigated, only passive anal-genital intercourse correlated with the acquisition of >cytomegalovirus infection (p =0.008)” (Mintz et al. 1983). […] ? Does passive anal sex facilitate CMV infection? Or does CMV infection facilitate the desire for passive anal sex?

    • Thanks: Gordo
  97. @AceDeuce
    @Thomas

    As they say "There's nothing sadder than an old queer"


    Hey, what did the brown gerbil say to the white gerbil?

    "You must be new around here."

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Prester John, @Haxo Angmark

    Or an old r&r performer.

  98. @YetAnotherAnon
    @JohnnyWalker123

    They should be given the cat!


    (Seriously while I don't think men or women having receptive sex with a male dog is a great idea, at least the dog is doing it of his own free will. This on the other hand is pretty evil and makes you wonder about the monkeypox cases in adoptive children of homosexual couples)

    Replies: @TWS

    I don’t wonder at all.

  99. @Steve Sailer
    @Nachum

    I can remember hearing space shuttle jokes on January 28, 1986.

    It's presumed that Wall Street traders with Bloomberg terminals were responsible for their spread.

    Replies: @Nachum, @slumber_j, @Known Fact, @kimchilover

    It’s presumed that Wall Street traders with Bloomberg terminals were responsible for their spread.

    Yes, that was the explanation I heard at the time from contemporaries at college who had summer jobs at Wall Street firms.

  100. Dr. Lao-Tzu Allan-Blitz

    That one is going in the Great Name Hall of Fame

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Known Fact

    https://doximity-res.cloudinary.com/image/upload/t_public_profile_photo_320x320/jowimfhei5asnhbwb7ff.jpg

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    , @kaganovitch
    @Known Fact

    Did you think he looks like this?

    https://dwtr67e3ikfml.cloudfront.net/avatars/446279b3laotzuallanblitz

    Replies: @Known Fact

  101. anon[216] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sean
    @AnotherDad

    Unless being a bit gay is a help in figuring things out.

    Replies: @SFG, @anon, @Rich, @AnotherDad

    No sarc: clever response. At first I thought, ‘clever response, but there would still be lots of individuals around who weren’t the least bit gay, but were good at figuring things out.’ Like many pioneer inventors of even the very recent past.

    But my next thought was, ‘increasingly though, scientific advances seem to rely on the brute force effort and IQ of whole slices of the STEM sector. And that could well be a bit gayer, on average, than the whole. Almost certainly is, if the ‘gay varies in proportion to civilized’ theory is true.

    We live in a society.

  102. @Steve Sailer
    @Nachum

    I can remember hearing space shuttle jokes on January 28, 1986.

    It's presumed that Wall Street traders with Bloomberg terminals were responsible for their spread.

    Replies: @Nachum, @slumber_j, @Known Fact, @kimchilover

    Space Shuttle gallows humor actually predates the Challenger disaster. The flights began in 1981 but had become boringly routine by 1983 or 84 — and yet our Florida paper sent a staffer to every single launch, for one reason and one reason alone, the tiny chance it might all go blooey. This CYA assignment never failed to generate darkly cynical mirth around the newsroom

  103. ” I see leper colonies on the horizon, as far as the eye can see.” – Lydia Lunch

  104. What a difference a comma makes.

    The RSS feed title for this reads
    “NBC News: Experts Got Monkeypox Wrong: It’s Now a Gay Venereal Disease Spread Sexually, by Steve Sailer”

  105. @AnotherDad

    … And the U.S. has faced monkeypox before, most notably in July 2003, when 47 individuals from six Midwestern states—Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin—were confirmed to have or suspected of having the West African strain of the monkeypox virus (the same strain that has broken out in the U.S. and Europe this year). The outbreak began in Illinois, where an exotic animal vendor received a shipment of Gambian pouched rats and briefly housed them next to a prairie dog enclosure.
     
    "Gambian pouched rats". Geez. There's another one for your National Immigration Safety Review Board.

    Really, why do we tolerate this sort of stupid xenophilia. If you really want a "Gambian pouched rat", then go to Gambia!

    ~~

    The 2nd thing to note: This outbreak--same strain--across the midwest went ... nowhere.

    What's the difference?

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    “Gambian pouched rats”. Geez. There’s another one for your National Immigration Safety Review Board.

    Really, why do we tolerate this sort of stupid xenophilia. If you really want a “Gambian pouched rat”, then go to Gambia!

    One good thing that came out of that outbreak was a complete ban on legally importing African rodents, “go to Gambia!” indeed.

    The 2nd thing to note: This outbreak–same strain–across the midwest went … nowhere.

    Indeed, prior to this gay sexual network outbreak with its ex-Nigeria index case, the Western African Clade had never been observed to transmit between humans. For now, I join many others in assuming all cases of children and dogs getting it were raped. But of course there’s a big payoff for the virus getting better adapted to humans, as we’ve previously discussed with some reasonable hope that’ll be hard for this virus.

    BTW, the significantly more lethal Congo Basin clade has been noted to transmit between humans, and I’m pretty sure for both reasons it’s gotten much more study, plus is where the current preferred vaccine is being tested in an observational Phase III trial of a thousand healthcare workers. A study that’s now a bit redundant seeing as we’re using the vaccine in this pandemic, if we don’t already have good data on its efficacy against monkeypox we will soon.

    • Thanks: ic1000
  106. @Rob
    This is really good news. If it spread through casual contact, some women would have caught it by now, so std was the way to bet. Plus, anal, genital, and oral regions being the places men developed lesions first was a strong clue,

    A good (but only occasionally right) method to figure out what might be an std is to look at diseases that hit gay men younger and harder than straight men. An interesting thing would be to look at what diseases showed strong, sex-biased increased prevalence after gay liberation got going.

    STD is really a strategy, just like “respiratory infection” is a strategy. Getting to infectable cells is a problem every infection faces. Respiratory, GI, STD, eye infection and skin infection are the classical ways. In evolutionary terms, “gay std” may have become a winning strategy in the 1970s. A new niche opening up implies that a lot of species have yet to make the jump. If that’s true, gay men can expect lots of new diseases. Some will pass to the general population.

    Ever hear of pooled sample testing? If your test, for syphilis, let’s say, is really sensitive, meaning it can pick up syphilis at extremely low concentration, the infection is fairly rare, and testing is expensive, you can do pooled sample testing. Depending on what you think is the base rate of infection you mix urine/blood/saliva from a bunch of people, say 10, and use reagents for one test. If no one had syphilis, you just saved 9 tests. If someone(s) had syphilis, you do have to use ten more tests, so there’s an optimum pool size depending on the base rate. I don’t know the equation, but you are welcome to look it up.

    So, let’s say you are having a sex cruise with 500 dudes. Everyone gives a non-anonymous “fluid” sample. What’s that, you can’t get the test results back before the orgies start? Not a problem! Start the tests, have the orgies. If no one tests positive, great! If someone does, surely contact tracing on a cruise should be easy? Maybe give everyone an unattractive contact-recording device, called an “ugly,” that will record who you had sex with, so before you “bump uglies,” you bump uglies. After the cruise, they can call people who got exposed to x.

    Prophylactic Pooled Sample Testing (PPST) is another possibility. Let’s say you are a HINK (High Income No Kida) fashionable, fairly promiscuous gay man. Why not have everyone in the Castro, or at least everyone who subscribes sends in blood, etc samples every week? The samples are pooled into groups of n and tested for everything they signed up for. When they test positive, send ‘em an email that they need to be tested for whatever it was.

    This might only work to surveil for new diseases, or at least diseases with low base rates in the gay community.

    At a minimum, gay clubs card, just like everywhere else, no? If your driver’s license says you live more than x miles away, you have to go into the pool. Traveling for sex is a big part of why new plagues hit gay men so fast,

    Changing gears, do you know why zoonotic jumps to people are rare for viruses? There are chains of sugar molecules called oligosaccharides that you attach to proteins. There’s a dipeptide at the end of some oligosaccharides that is two molecules of galactose attached each other in a particular way called galactose-α-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal) that most animals, Protozoa, and bacteria use, but the enzyme that synthesizes it was lost in the ancestors of people, Old World Monkeys, and apes.

    About 1% of the IgG antibody you produce is for alpha-gal. Meat and intestinal bacteria both have alpha-gal, so you are constantly being stimulated to produce anti-gal. It’s called natural antibody, and you’re evolved to produce it.

    Viruses glycosylate their proteins with whatever enzymes the host use, so viral particles from (non-ape/OW monkey) animals get into you, you already have antibodies to them! There’ve been proposals to grow attenuated SARS-CoV-2 in cells of new world monkeys to take advantage of anti-gal in vaccination.

    I wonder if other animals have lost sugars to thwart pathogens. Given that many species have multiple blood groups and the blood type antigens are oligosaccharides, I bet it’s really common.

    I’ve been thinking about the deranged response to COVID vaccination, and I think high school biology should be geared to a) understanding the universality of evolution by natural selections, and b) understanding that the production of T cells and especially antibodies in response to exposure is governed by the magic of evolution by natural selection.

    Seriously, understanding vaccines are important for any citizen of a republic. It’s a hugely divisive topic, not least because virtually every life scientist is moderate-prog and solidly ensconced in the College Grad culture.

    While vaccines are good overall, they could be better. Remember polio? It’s back in NYC! We use the inactivated polio vaccine. It’s a series of three shots. Both the live polio vaccine (given on a sugar cube) and the inactivated vaccine prevent severe disease, but the inactivated one does not cause sterilizing immunity. The live polio vaccine causes some permanent paralysis in, too lazy to look it up, maybe one in a million vaccinees.

    The live vaccine also has a problem in reversion to virulence. This usually does not harm the vaccinee, but they can produce live, virulent polio which can infect other people. In the third world, they try to vaccinate everyone in a village at the same time.

    There’s no reason the live vaccine should revert so frequently. Antibodies are protective (the dead vaccine works) so all that really matters is the production of antibodies to the 4 capsid proteins of each serotype. Preferably, vaccination would induce secretory (IgA) antibodies in the gut to induce sterilizing immunity. T cell responses to non-structural proteins might be nice, but you can do without them.

    So, there is no reason not to use the “guts” of the least reversion-prone serotype, which I believe is one, in all three (ok, now just 1) serotypes in the vaccine. There, just cut circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus production tenfold or more. Recode the guts, not nec. to attenuate, but to reduce recombination, which, frankly, matters a whole lot less.

    I’ve linked to studies of other ways to make polio vaccine less reversion-prone, which would probably, but not certainly, also reduce the number of people who get paralysis.

    Even if we didn’t do that, and set cvdpv aside, we could probably give genetic tests for common(ish) genetic defects that contraindicate vaccination. Honestly, if we just bit the bullet and had every baby sequenced (not SNPed) in utero we could probably exclude 99% of people who would have adverse reactions to each vaccine.

    On a cultural note, vaccinology has been a backwater of biology for a long time. It’s been the most useful field of biology, so it’s the lowest status academically. Lunatic criticism of vaccines has hardened everyone’s hearts to non-crazy criticisms. Things like, can we reduce the number of shots? Can we get more needle-free, as in oral, nasal, and cutaneous, vaccines? If vaccines made kids smile (the aforementioned sugar cube) instead of cry, there would be much wider acceptance of vaccination.

    A hit vaccine, something for relatively common illnesses would go a long way towards making common people like vaccines again like a vaccine for the common cold (even like 1/4 of them would make a real dent) or a universal flu vaccine (saw one in an old paper that induced heterologous immunity, but I didn’t look up if the flus it worked on are still considered very different)

    Therapeutic vaccines, the ones you can get after exposure to the pathogen are really interesting. Not sure if anyone tried the COVID vaccines this way, but they probably did.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @That Would Be Telling

    Thanks for an as usual excellent posting!

    That reaction to alpha-gal can be taken too far through getting bitten by ticks, in the US the lone star tick and per that Wikipedia article in Australia the paralysis (!) tick. Can make you unable to eat “red meat”, “food products containing beef, pork, lamb, venison, rabbit and offal” which for most of us would be … bad. I would assume this also includes much more tasty elk and moose.

    I’ve been thinking about the deranged response to COVID vaccination, and I think high school biology….

    BZZT!

    I don’t think your idea has a chance against America’s long ingrained anti-intellectualism. Which is by no means all bad, to quote Neal Stephenson:

    But more importantly, it comes out of the fact that, during this century, intellectualism failed, and everyone knows it. In places like Russia and Germany, the common people agreed to loosen their grip on traditional folkways, mores, and religion, and let the intellectuals run with the ball, and they screwed everything up and turned the century into an abbatoir. Those wordy intellectuals used to be merely tedious; now they seem kind of dangerous as well.

    Mostly I think about the canard “mRNA vaccines are gene therapy,” including from too many doctors who we should have assumed learned “DNA->mRNA->proteins” in high school, let alone college biology. They really, honestly, tell us to this day the vaccines work by permanently changing our genome vs. obviously changing our adaptive immune systems, hopefully permanently (so far so good, we can of course only learn this a day at a time).

    If they can’t get the very most basic principle of molecular genetics right,

    a) understanding the universality of evolution by natural selections, and b) understanding that the production of T cells and especially antibodies in response to exposure is governed by the magic of evolution by natural selection.

    sounds like Mount Everest to me. No matter how intensely useful natural selection is as an organizing principle in learning and doing biology (for me, with E. Coli in the lab).

  107. When Edward Jenner had developed his smallpox vaccination, he tested it by taking dried pus from pustules of people who had smallpox, and inoculated it into an 8-year-old boy multiple times (as one does).

    If you were exposed to pus from monkeypox lesions, it seems inherently more likely that the virus would be transmitted through mucous membranes than through intact skin which forms a waterproof barrier.

    The CDC really needs to get back to basics.

  108. @Steve Sailer
    @Nachum

    I can remember hearing space shuttle jokes on January 28, 1986.

    It's presumed that Wall Street traders with Bloomberg terminals were responsible for their spread.

    Replies: @Nachum, @slumber_j, @Known Fact, @kimchilover

    Wow, I always wondered. The space shuttle blew-up on my birthday in 6th grade. The next morning I heard two jokes that have stuck with me my whole life (largely because they seemed so sophisticated for a 6th grader):

    1) What does NASA stand for? Need Another Seven Astronauts.

    2) How do you know Christa Mcauliffe had dandruff? They found her head and shoulders on the beach.

    • LOL: Rich
  109. @Rob McX
    Gay sex must have greater attractions than the heterosexual kind, if people are willing to take such risks for it. This is a German patient who got monkeypox and then discovered he also has HIV and syphilis.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2022/08/17/11/61462813-11119463-image-a-19_1660731025695.jpg

    Replies: @Thomas, @Random Anonymous, @Pontius, @Anonymous, @SFG, @Ed, @Muggles, @Indignant of Maidstone

    Omg that is hideous.

  110. @Diversity Heretic
    @Jim Christian

    In the Denver area in the 1980s, the prairie dogs attracted rattlesnakes. People who thought prairie dogs were cute would walk out to see a 6 to 8 foot Western Diamondback Rattlesnake eying them coldly in the yard.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    I must admit I ran into a rattlesnake in the foothills of Boulder not far from that prairie dog colony.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Funny, I ran into a prairie dog not far from a faggot colony (Boulder).

  111. @Rob McX
    Gay sex must have greater attractions than the heterosexual kind, if people are willing to take such risks for it. This is a German patient who got monkeypox and then discovered he also has HIV and syphilis.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2022/08/17/11/61462813-11119463-image-a-19_1660731025695.jpg

    Replies: @Thomas, @Random Anonymous, @Pontius, @Anonymous, @SFG, @Ed, @Muggles, @Indignant of Maidstone

    They should use that photo for a “Scared Straight” educational poster.

    I guess that “German cleanliness” notion is just a myth…

  112. @kaganovitch
    Dr. Jeffrey Klausner, an infectious disease physician at the University of Southern California, and Dr. Lao-Tzu Allan-Blitz, a resident physician in global health at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, published an essay on Medium

    Reg, if that name doesn't call for an anagram I don't know what would.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Joe S.Walker, @Muggles, @nightskyradio

    Dr. Lao-Tzu Allan-Blitz,

    “Well doctor, I know I called in about some kind of pain, but in the meantime, it seems to have all gone away…”

  113. @Redneck farmer
    Woman at work asked our HR person if we were going to do anything about Monkeypox. I pointed out that "I don't think anyone here attends gay orgies".

    Replies: @LP5, @Muggles

    Woman at work asked our HR person if we were going to do anything about Monkeypox. I pointed out that “I don’t think anyone here attends gay orgies”.

    Did they fire you “for cause” or can you still collect your unemployment benefits?

    • LOL: Kratoklastes
  114. @Jim Christian
    @Buzz Mohawk

    They dig holes in your prairie for your horses and cattle to drop a leg into, crippling the animal. Prairie dogs kill. There's quite a sport going on shooting these vermin in the head from 800 yards. Many of them are also rabid and are covered with Lyme ticks, they are nobody's friend. Vermin, like I said.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @Buzz Mohawk, @Rocko

    I know you’re right.

    Based on the facts you outline, I’m surprised our political leaders, our media, our academia, and our social media influencers aren’t telling us to welcome more prairie dogs into our communities.

    Wait for it: Congress will pass the Affirmatively Furthering Prairie Dog Colonies Act, and the president will order the Department of Agriculture to implement it.

    And soon we will be hearing that another reason to take guns away from us is all the “gun violence” against prairie dogs.

    • Agree: Jim Christian
  115. @kaganovitch
    Dr. Jeffrey Klausner, an infectious disease physician at the University of Southern California, and Dr. Lao-Tzu Allan-Blitz, a resident physician in global health at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, published an essay on Medium

    Reg, if that name doesn't call for an anagram I don't know what would.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Joe S.Walker, @Muggles, @nightskyradio

    “Dr. Lao-Tzu Allan-Blitz

    Reg, if that name doesn’t call for an anagram I don’t know what would.”

    Total Anal Buzz Drill

    • LOL: Random Anonymous
  116. @Achmed E. Newman
    @notsaying


    It got better but is not back to normal.
     
    This seems like the workings of a witch.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZB5ig6vpQug

    Replies: @notsaying

    It does, doesn’t it? It took me hours to actually click article and read it after seeing that awful picture on the front page. I thought the nose was maybe connected to the syphilis or HIV but apparently not.

    This monkeypox can be worse than we thought. Also what we have here is based on the milder of the two kinds in Africa

    There is all this talk coming from gay guys and groups about stigma. I think the bigger worry should be about not getting the disease.

  117. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    That's a story about the young Richard Gere made up by his rival Sylvester Stallone, who is a really good storyteller.

    Replies: @Random Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Jim Christian, @Old Prude, @Anon

    Richard Gere moved to New England. He was interested in New Hampster.

  118. @The Alarmist

    “no instances of monkeypox infection were attributed exclusively to person-to-person contact.”
     
    That was then. The human-to-human spread via anal sex between persons, many of whom are boosted with HIV-management cocktails, will likely produce a super strain of the disease that will find it far easier to jump to the rest of the population.

    The “authorities” could close churches and sporting events as possible super-spreader events for COVID, but they can’t find it in themselves to close down the gay festivals and parties that are proving to be actual super-spreader events for monkeypox, inter alia.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @That Would Be Telling

    The “authorities” could close churches and sporting events as possible super-spreader events for COVID, but they can’t find it in themselves to close down the gay festivals and parties that are proving to be actual super-spreader events for monkeypox, inter alia.

    Big difference between a not low case fatality rate (CFR) spread by respiration disease and monkeypox which outside of Africa has a CFR that’s effectively nil; per Wikipedia right now 40,213 confirmed, 7,216 suspected cases, only six deaths, two in Spain, one each in Brazil (that guy had a lot of comorbidities I recall reading on Unz.com), Ecuador, India and Peru.

    Indeed, they absolutely should be shutting down these gay sexual networks if for no other reasons than the potential for mutations making monkeypox more adapted to humans, but we know that’s not going to happen for the same reasons our ruling and publish health trash delighted in shutting down churches (but sporting events???). It’s also in theory a lot easier for the vulnerable population to avoid getting it at all, which you can’t say about a respiratory spread disease.

  119. @Jim Christian
    @Steve Sailer


    That’s a story about the young Richard Gere made up by his rival Sylvester Stallone, who is a really good storyteller.
     
    All right, Sailerman, now you've done it. Talked about gerbils. So, all the old heads around here know I was a phone guy in DC after my exploits in Naval Air for many years, the phone guy part in 1985-2010. I serviced and installed phone systems in all sorts of strange venues. While at Compu-Phone, we installed a 5 -phone system with the intercoms and 5 outside lines in a pet shop in the region on 16th Street NW between Kalorama and Dupont Circle. It sold dogs, fish, tarantulas, snakes, and various rodents, gerbils among them. Never paid any attention to that stuff, it was just another customer. Turned out, it was a strange venue. I go out there one day on a dead phone service call and there's a crowd of around a hundred folks at their front door. Weird. I park in the alley out back, go in through the back and ask what's up with all the people out front. PETA was there, protesting the "de-clawed" gerbil industry. Turns out, this pet store, owing to all the homos in the neighborhood sells de-clawed gerbils to the homos. By the hundreds, every week. Swear to God, that's what the guy said. These homos would feed these gerbils up each other's asses, so the guy says, the animal would, as you might guess, struggle, giving the homos a huge kick (in the ass, heh). Then, it was off to GW university's emergency room to pull the critter out. Swear to God, fellas. I'm surprised they didn't feed de-fanged snakes up each outhers' asses for crying out loud. And maybe they did.

    Homos are a sick, depraved, demented, perverted lot. I really don't have enough words for them. That incident sealed it for me. The entire enterprise is simply beyond any notion of normality and yet, they try to pretend it is. They are beyond redemption. And these days, I doubt PETA would challenge this bit of animal-abuse depravity. That would be homophobic.

    Replies: @Nachum, @Eustace Tilley (not), @Ron Mexico

    Agreed. My mother worked medical records in 3 SoCal hospitals, I joined as a summer job. Regularly came across ER visits for what you described and dildos stuck up the ass. Not sure these dudes are even worthy of purgatory.

  120. @Daniel H
    @Reg Cæsar

    We've have already been warned about this stuff by our esteemed elders. Don't eat the poo poo.

    https://youtu.be/QUHkQ9vP_lA

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

  121. @Daniel H
    @Reg Cæsar

    We've have already been warned about this stuff by our esteemed elders. Don't eat the poo poo.

    https://youtu.be/QUHkQ9vP_lA

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    This clip is the most convincing argument against white supremacism I’ve ever seen. Somebody call BM BLM.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Reg Cæsar

    Say what you want about Africans, but they've got their survival instincts intact.

  122. Animal to Human transmission of a virus? The only way to infect a human with a virus from
    an animal is direct injection. The Immune system would jump into action at first exposure
    and recognize the animal virus as foreign and destroy it. This of course requires a belief in
    virus theory. A virus is manufactured by a cell as the last line of defense against toxins. My viruses
    are not yours and my body knows it.

  123. @Nachum
    @Anonymous

    Studies have been made about how things like Challenger jokes travelled the country so quickly. Early electronic communication did have something to do with it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JR Ewing

    What were Christa McAuliffe’s last words?

    “What does this button do?”

    • LOL: Gordo
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @JR Ewing

    I thought the last words on the tape were "OK, OK, you can drive if you really want".

  124. @Sean
    @AnotherDad

    Unless being a bit gay is a help in figuring things out.

    Replies: @SFG, @anon, @Rich, @AnotherDad

    How could engaging in degenerate sex possibly help figure out anything? Men who engage in these perverted acts, in public rest rooms, parks, alleyways and other such clean areas, as well as participating in circuit parties and promiscuous sexual activity aren’t the type of people who help society. They spread physical and mental disease. The only possible benefit is that they leave more women for the rest of us.

  125. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/i/events/1559995973052645376

    https://twitter.com/FortuneMagazine/status/1559995578146328578
    https://fortune.com/2022/08/16/pets-monkeypox-isolated-cdc-human-to-dog-transmission/
    https://archive.ph/UsGKM

    Pets exposed to people with monkeypox should be isolated to ensure they don’t spread the virus to other people or animals, US health officials said after a dog was reported to be infected with the virus in Paris.

    Because monkeypox can spread through close contact with an infectious person, people who have tested positive should be careful when cuddling or petting animals, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance issued Friday. Pets may also pick up the virus through blankets or other household items used by patients, the CDC said, and if a pet appears to be sick, owners should contact a veterinarian.

    “Pets that had close contact with a symptomatic person with monkeypox should be kept at home and away from other animals and people for 21 days after the most recent contact,” the Atlanta-based CDC said in a statement on its website dated Aug. 12. “Infected people should not take care of exposed pets.”

    The CDC updated its guidance after a dog was reported to have contracted monkeypox from its owners in what is thought to be the first case of human-to-dog transmission. The four-year-old greyhound developed lesions almost two weeks after his owners, a non-monogamous gay couple, began showing symptoms of monkeypox, according to a report published Aug. 10 in The Lancet medical journal. The dog’s owners, who were both positive for monkeypox, reported allowing the dog to sleep in their bed.

    “Our findings should prompt debate on the need to isolate pets from monkeypox virus-positive individuals,” the authors of the Lancet study concluded. “We call for further investigation on secondary transmissions via pets.”
     
    https://www.cdc.gov/poxvirus/monkeypox/veterinarian/monkeypox-in-animals.html

    https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(22)01487-8/fulltext
    https://archive.ph/brE8m

    12 days after symptom onset, their male Italian greyhound, aged 4 years and with no previous medical disorders, presented with mucocutaneous lesions, including abdomen pustules and a thin anal ulceration
     
    Men who have sex with pets.

    Replies: @JR Ewing

    So how can you prevent this from happening to your pet?

    ————

    Seriously CDC, is this a trick question? Because it seems pretty easy to prevent.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @JR Ewing


    So how can you prevent this from happening to your pet?
     
    Seriously CDC, is this a trick question? Because it seems pretty easy to prevent.

    "Ohhhh, so you're telling me that I'm supposed to keep my schlong OUT of my dog's ass? Thanks, Doc! Appreciate the clarification."
  126. Doing what they do best.

  127. It appears from the stories I’ve seen on the internet that most sufferers have monkeypox on only some parts of their bodies (e.g., some have it around the mouth region only). Some have it on two or three regions, but this isn’t universal.

    This would seem seem to be strong evidence against the spreading by casual touch theory. Surely people would be much more likely to frequently touch other parts of their own bodies than to share casual touches with others, but they’re not spreading it to themselves.

  128. @AceDeuce
    @Thomas

    As they say "There's nothing sadder than an old queer"


    Hey, what did the brown gerbil say to the white gerbil?

    "You must be new around here."

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Prester John, @Haxo Angmark

    what did the girl mushroom say to the boy musroom?

    ….you’re a fun guy!

  129. @JR Ewing
    @Nachum

    What were Christa McAuliffe's last words?

    "What does this button do?"

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    I thought the last words on the tape were “OK, OK, you can drive if you really want“.

  130. @Known Fact
    Dr. Lao-Tzu Allan-Blitz

    That one is going in the Great Name Hall of Fame

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @kaganovitch

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @kaganovitch

    Forgot to label that. That's Lao-Tzu hisself.

  131. @Known Fact
    Dr. Lao-Tzu Allan-Blitz

    That one is going in the Great Name Hall of Fame

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @kaganovitch

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @kaganovitch

    I was expecting someone more like a Jewish-American Sun Tzu, who would advise me to sit quietly by the riverside and wait for a pastrami on rye to float on by

  132. @Sean
    @AnotherDad

    Unless being a bit gay is a help in figuring things out.

    Replies: @SFG, @anon, @Rich, @AnotherDad

    Unless being a bit gay is a help in figuring things out.

    LOL.

    Producing and “figuring things out” are pretty much straight guys’ wheelhouse. It’s what we do.

    The “abnormal” personality that does help “figure things out” is the Aspie type–e.g. Isaac Newton. That’s a hyper-male type, pretty much the opposite of the queers.

    ~~

    There ought to be a name–“homo-excuser”–for people who come up with all these ludicrously lame ideas to explain why homosexuals really aren’t exactly what they are.

    They’ve given us the “gay uncle” trope–giving innumeracy a bad name. They’ve rolled out innumerable “he was gay”, “he was gay” fantasies. They always trot out the “you don’t like homos because … you’re secretly gay”, which gives you an idea of homo-logic. (And proof they are not the “figure things out people”.)

    No homosexuality is exactly what it is–just a sad, pathetic mental developmental dysfunction, like being congenitally blind or deaf or crippled. It’s just that those with these other deformities are not socially destructive, aren’t disease super-spreaders … and don’t continually stomp their feet and bitch and whine a bunch of lame bullshit about how their disorder is wonderful and we must appreciate it and worship it.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad

    The most dangerous aspect of this demographic is their intense desire to be taken as normal. The ones who admit right up front they're perverted are closer to sanity.

    , @Ray P
    @AnotherDad


    There ought to be a name–“homo-excuser”–for people who come up with all these ludicrously lame ideas to explain why homosexuals really aren’t exactly what they are.
     
    A paedopologist?
    , @nebulafox
    @AnotherDad

    Isaac Newton was a bit of an odd duck. Near as we can tell, he wasn't interested in anybody sexually, male or female. He also happened to be a devout Christian heretic (Arian), who took his beliefs so seriously that it caused problems with his academic career in a time period when that sort of thing normally wasn't an issue anymore.

    To be honest, that was probably for the best: from everything we can tell about his personality from people who knew him, he would have been an awful husband and father. The only comparable left-brain intellect we've seen since is Einstein, and his personal life was a complete mess, despite being the more socially well-adjusted of the two by a wide margin.

    (I don't get the mildly autistic science geek == homosexuality stereotype: there's no bigger or lesser predisposition to it than in most other male demographics. Artists, literature, philosophy, that I can get.)

  133. It’s no secret that some gay men use gerbils as part of their way of “enhancing” the gay sex act so what’s to say that they haven’t been using Gambian Pouched Rats and Prairie Dogs as substitutes?

  134. @Reg Cæsar
    @Daniel H

    This clip is the most convincing argument against white supremacism I've ever seen. Somebody call BM BLM.

    Replies: @BB753

    Say what you want about Africans, but they’ve got their survival instincts intact.

  135. @kaganovitch
    @Known Fact

    Did you think he looks like this?

    https://dwtr67e3ikfml.cloudfront.net/avatars/446279b3laotzuallanblitz

    Replies: @Known Fact

    I was expecting someone more like a Jewish-American Sun Tzu, who would advise me to sit quietly by the riverside and wait for a pastrami on rye to float on by

  136. @The Alarmist

    “no instances of monkeypox infection were attributed exclusively to person-to-person contact.”
     
    That was then. The human-to-human spread via anal sex between persons, many of whom are boosted with HIV-management cocktails, will likely produce a super strain of the disease that will find it far easier to jump to the rest of the population.

    The “authorities” could close churches and sporting events as possible super-spreader events for COVID, but they can’t find it in themselves to close down the gay festivals and parties that are proving to be actual super-spreader events for monkeypox, inter alia.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @That Would Be Telling

    OT except for the weaponization of “Monkeypox is the Gorilla Glue of disease brand names.”

    Cheney’s Humiliating Defeat Is Another Sign That We Are Winning

    Kurt Schlichter

    Here’s a thought exercise – would Liz Cheney have gotten more or fewer votes than she did if she had announced, right before the election, “I have monkeypox?” Considering that the pus plague is polling better than she did in the Wyoming primary the other night, perhaps she should have just announced that “I am monkeypox.”

    She is Republican monkeypox, you know. She is a walking, talking, warmongering, loathsome disease infecting the nether regions of the Republican Party, and her resounding rejection by the decent Americans of Wyoming demonstrates that we are curing the infection that is her kind….

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @That Would Be Telling

    https://twitter.com/KurtSchlichter/status/1560116646085201920


    We see through her, and there's nothing there. No talent. No brains. No achievements. Courage? What courage does it take to do what everyone knows will get her a daily media tongue bath and a permanent seat on the panel of that unwatched CNN show with Brian Stelter, who is a potato?
     
    https://twitter.com/townhallcom/status/1560329433558433792
  137. @mc23
    All judgements aside it should be added to Sex-Ed that having anal sex is just below getting a blood transfusion when it comes to spreading a disease. The walls of the Colon absorbs substances into the body very effectively.

    Gays refusing to wear condoms and insisting this is not an STD are deluding themselves to engage in risky self-serving behavior

    Replies: @Gordo

    If LGBT sex education had any purpose other than grooming it would at least cover the high disease load in the male homosexual community, the high rate of domestic violence in the lesbian community and the high suicide rate in the transgender community.

    I could reasonably add a ‘very’ in front of each instance of ‘high’.

    • Agree: mc23, Jim Don Bob
  138. @kaganovitch
    @Known Fact

    https://doximity-res.cloudinary.com/image/upload/t_public_profile_photo_320x320/jowimfhei5asnhbwb7ff.jpg

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    Forgot to label that. That’s Lao-Tzu hisself.

  139. @michael droy
    ... Precisely backwards

    Replies: @Bluey Zahrsoff

    Arse backwards?

  140. @That Would Be Telling
    @The Alarmist

    OT except for the weaponization of "Monkeypox is the Gorilla Glue of disease brand names."


    "Cheney’s Humiliating Defeat Is Another Sign That We Are Winning"

    Kurt Schlichter

    Here's a thought exercise – would Liz Cheney have gotten more or fewer votes than she did if she had announced, right before the election, "I have monkeypox?" Considering that the pus plague is polling better than she did in the Wyoming primary the other night, perhaps she should have just announced that "I am monkeypox."

    She is Republican monkeypox, you know. She is a walking, talking, warmongering, loathsome disease infecting the nether regions of the Republican Party, and her resounding rejection by the decent Americans of Wyoming demonstrates that we are curing the infection that is her kind....
     

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    We see through her, and there’s nothing there. No talent. No brains. No achievements. Courage? What courage does it take to do what everyone knows will get her a daily media tongue bath and a permanent seat on the panel of that unwatched CNN show with Brian Stelter, who is a potato?

  141. @SFG
    @Chepe

    Well, no. The external pudendal veins drain to the great saphenous, which drains to the femoral veins which turn into the external iliacs; the internal pudendal veins drain to the internal iliacs. The external and internal iliacs then combine to form common iliac veins, which combine to form the inferior vena cava which dumps directly into the heart without entering the liver (though it does pass through the liver and receive the blood the liver cleaned from the hepatic veins).

    The liver’s there to detoxify the blood coming from the gut in case you ate something weird, though of course there are lots of white cells to fight infection too.

    The difference, from what I can gather, is the fragility of the rectal lining relative to the vaginal. The vagina is supposed to pass a complete human being out; the rectum is just supposed to pass poop. And nothing is supposed to come *in*.

    Replies: @Ben Kurtz, @Chepe

    I don’t like to be argumentative but well yes. True I over simplified for easy intake. But looks like you got a little overzealous with the copy and paste in response.
    Here’s a simple way to put it.: the rectal veins run lateralward on the pelvic surface of the levator to end in the internal iliac vein. Veins superior to the middle rectal vein in the colon and rectum drain via the portal system to the liver. Veins inferior, and including, the middle rectal vein drain into systemic circulation and are returned to the heart, bypassing the liver. This is not the case with the vagina.
    The liver is the first line of defense in the immune system It doesn’t check on what you ate for lunch. Cheers.

  142. @AceDeuce
    @notsaying


    In two Southern states about 70% of people with monkeypox are black. Due to various factors I am wondering how many gay blacks in those states are immunocompromised?

     

    It's hard to fathom the irresponsibility of "de bleck kom-mun-uh-tee" when it comes to any form of rational restraint, sexual or otherwise. The Tuskegee Study (It wasn't an "experiment") was in response to the astronomic rates of the disease among Southern negroes. Syphilis was, in the early 1930s, only beginning to be understood, and was still largely untreatable in any satisfactory way. In the early 1900s, an epidemic of syphilis swept through the black "community" killing many. Thankfully due to limited contact with negroes, it did not spread wholesale to Whites.

    Here's a tidbit regarding syphilis and negroes in the South, that serves to indicate the extent of the problem (whole article (linked below) is worth reading):


    In 1943, the Alabama legislature passed a unique law that mandated blood tests for syphilis for all its civilians between the ages of 14 and 50 years. Family members younger than 14 or older than 50 years underwent blood testing only if another family member in the same household tested positive. Early in the program treatment included 8-, 16-, or 30-week heavy-metal therapy for early syphilis and a 40-week alternating course of heavy-metal therapy for late-latent syphilis.34

    Two years later, in the Birmingham and Jefferson County arm of the program, 271,000 people were surveyed. Whites and blacks had participation in the survey (ie, 163,000 and 108,000, respectively) representing 89% of their respective populations. Three percent of whites and 30% of blacks had positive test results for syphilis. Ninety-three percent of those infected who received therapy for early syphilis at the USPHS-run rapid treatment center in Birmingham were African American35; a total of 3231 people with early syphilis were treated at the rapid treatment center.
     

    https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/224795

    Replies: @notsaying

    Wow, those numbers are bad! How could so many blacks have syphilis?

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @notsaying

    "those numbers are bad! How could so many blacks have syphilis?"

    Syphilis was pretty much untreatable before the 1940s, and when treatments became available WW2 troops got priority.

    IIRC black men are still at the top of the STI tables today.



    OT, but is this, as EVERY report on it suggests, an effect of lockdown, or an effect of the Covid jabs?

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2022/08/18/lockdown-effects-feared-killing-people-covid/


    The effects of lockdown may now be killing more people than are dying of Covid, official statistics suggest.

    Figures for excess deaths from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) show that around 1,000 more people than usual are currently dying each week from conditions other than the virus.

    The Telegraph understands that the Department of Health has ordered an investigation into the figures amid concern that the deaths are linked to delays to and deferment of treatment for conditions such as cancer, diabetes and heart disease.

    Over the past two months, the number of excess deaths not from Covid dwarfs the number linked to the virus. It comes amid renewed calls for Covid measures such as compulsory face masks in the winter.

    But the figures suggest the country is facing a new silent health crisis linked to the pandemic response rather than to the virus itself.

     

    My emboldening. The pandemic response included both jabs and lockdown.

    My experience is that lockdown wasn't a pain except that I couldn't visit elderly relatives, though it may have felt much worse in a city - I could go over the fields and woods any time I wished.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11125573/Effects-lockdown-causing-deaths-Covid.html

    The effects of lockdown could be causing more deaths than Covid as nearly 10,000 more deaths than the five-year average are recorded, ONS data has found.

    Released on Tuesday, the Office for National Statistics' figures for excess deaths in the UK has revealed that about 1,000 more people than usual are dying each week from illnesses and conditions other than Covid.

    This makes the rate for excess deaths 14.4 per cent higher than the five-year average, meaning 1,350 more people have died than usual in the week ending 5 August.

    Covid-related deaths made up for 469 of them, but the remaining 881 have 'not been explained'. Since the start of June, nearly 10,000 more deaths unrelated to Covid have been recorded than the five-year average, making up around 1,089 per week.

    This figure is over three times the number of people who died from Covid, 2,811, over the same period.

    ONS analysis takes into consideration the ageing population changes, yet still found a 'substantial ongoing excess'.
     
    Mind, believe it or not, in England where everywhere is open, some NHS doctors are still refusing to see patients face to face.

    The jab has to be in the suspect frame, but also the wholesale cancellation of doctors appointments during 2020/2021. I'm sure a lot of ailments just weren't picked up.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @notsaying

  143. @AnotherDad
    @Sean


    Unless being a bit gay is a help in figuring things out.
     
    LOL.

    Producing and "figuring things out" are pretty much straight guys' wheelhouse. It's what we do.

    The "abnormal" personality that does help "figure things out" is the Aspie type--e.g. Isaac Newton. That's a hyper-male type, pretty much the opposite of the queers.

    ~~

    There ought to be a name--"homo-excuser"--for people who come up with all these ludicrously lame ideas to explain why homosexuals really aren't exactly what they are.

    They've given us the "gay uncle" trope--giving innumeracy a bad name. They've rolled out innumerable "he was gay", "he was gay" fantasies. They always trot out the "you don't like homos because ... you're secretly gay", which gives you an idea of homo-logic. (And proof they are not the "figure things out people".)

    No homosexuality is exactly what it is--just a sad, pathetic mental developmental dysfunction, like being congenitally blind or deaf or crippled. It's just that those with these other deformities are not socially destructive, aren't disease super-spreaders ... and don't continually stomp their feet and bitch and whine a bunch of lame bullshit about how their disorder is wonderful and we must appreciate it and worship it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Ray P, @nebulafox

    The most dangerous aspect of this demographic is their intense desire to be taken as normal. The ones who admit right up front they’re perverted are closer to sanity.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  144. @notsaying
    @AceDeuce

    Wow, those numbers are bad! How could so many blacks have syphilis?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    “those numbers are bad! How could so many blacks have syphilis?”

    Syphilis was pretty much untreatable before the 1940s, and when treatments became available WW2 troops got priority.

    IIRC black men are still at the top of the STI tables today.

    OT, but is this, as EVERY report on it suggests, an effect of lockdown, or an effect of the Covid jabs?

    [MORE]

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2022/08/18/lockdown-effects-feared-killing-people-covid/

    The effects of lockdown may now be killing more people than are dying of Covid, official statistics suggest.

    Figures for excess deaths from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) show that around 1,000 more people than usual are currently dying each week from conditions other than the virus.

    The Telegraph understands that the Department of Health has ordered an investigation into the figures amid concern that the deaths are linked to delays to and deferment of treatment for conditions such as cancer, diabetes and heart disease.

    Over the past two months, the number of excess deaths not from Covid dwarfs the number linked to the virus. It comes amid renewed calls for Covid measures such as compulsory face masks in the winter.

    But the figures suggest the country is facing a new silent health crisis linked to the pandemic response rather than to the virus itself.

    My emboldening. The pandemic response included both jabs and lockdown.

    My experience is that lockdown wasn’t a pain except that I couldn’t visit elderly relatives, though it may have felt much worse in a city – I could go over the fields and woods any time I wished.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11125573/Effects-lockdown-causing-deaths-Covid.html

    The effects of lockdown could be causing more deaths than Covid as nearly 10,000 more deaths than the five-year average are recorded, ONS data has found.

    Released on Tuesday, the Office for National Statistics’ figures for excess deaths in the UK has revealed that about 1,000 more people than usual are dying each week from illnesses and conditions other than Covid.

    This makes the rate for excess deaths 14.4 per cent higher than the five-year average, meaning 1,350 more people have died than usual in the week ending 5 August.

    Covid-related deaths made up for 469 of them, but the remaining 881 have ‘not been explained’. Since the start of June, nearly 10,000 more deaths unrelated to Covid have been recorded than the five-year average, making up around 1,089 per week.

    This figure is over three times the number of people who died from Covid, 2,811, over the same period.

    ONS analysis takes into consideration the ageing population changes, yet still found a ‘substantial ongoing excess’.

    Mind, believe it or not, in England where everywhere is open, some NHS doctors are still refusing to see patients face to face.

    The jab has to be in the suspect frame, but also the wholesale cancellation of doctors appointments during 2020/2021. I’m sure a lot of ailments just weren’t picked up.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @YetAnotherAnon

    https://www.preprints.org/manuscript/202208.0151/v1


    This study focuses on cardiovascular effects, particularly myocarditis and pericarditis events, after BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccine injection in Thai adolescents. This prospective cohort study enrolled students from two schools aged 13–18 years who received the second dose of the BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccine. Data including demographics, symptoms, vital signs, ECG, echocardiography and cardiac enzymes were collected at baseline, Day 3, Day 7, and Day 14 (optional) using case record forms.We enrolled 314 participants; of these, 13 participants were lost to follow up, leaving 301 participants for analysis. The most common cardiovascular effects were tachycardia (7.64%), shortness of breath (6.64%), palpitation (4.32%), chest pain (4.32%), and hypertension (3.99%). Seven participants (2.33%) exhibited at least one elevated cardiac biomarker or positive lab assessments. Cardiovascular effects were found in 29.24% of patients, ranging from tachycardia, palpitation, and myopericarditis. Myopericarditis was confirmed in one patient after vaccination. Two patients had suspected pericarditis and four patients had suspected subclinical myocarditis. Conclusion: Cardiovascular effects in adolescents after BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccination included tachycardia, palpitation, and myocarditis. The clinical presentation of myopericarditis after vaccination was usually mild, with all cases fully recovering within 14 days. Hence, adolescents receiving mRNA vaccines should be monitored for side effects.
     
    Giving the vaccine to healthy children, who are not made seriously unwell by covid, is criminal.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    , @notsaying
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Very interesting. I wonder what the rest of the world is experiencing, particularly the US and other First World countries.

    I am one of those people who do not think the vaccines are having serious side effects for more than a tiny number of people. A lot of care was delayed or just never received and I have no idea what the consequences of that would be. That has to be a top possible explanation.

    I have to mention the fact that people were not just prevented from seeing doctors. They were stopped from getting admitted to hospitals as across the nation Covid patients were given #1 priority even after vaccines were available. People with other conditions did die over that decision and the longer that occurred after all adults could get vaccinated, the more upset I got about this. Why should someone who didn't get vaccinated get a bed instead of a heart or cancer patient?

    I never heard anybody in the government or in medicine explain that. I would like to know the reasoning, besides pacifying the anti-vaxxers who made their decisions but did not want to live with the consequences.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @James B. Shearer

  145. @YetAnotherAnon
    @notsaying

    "those numbers are bad! How could so many blacks have syphilis?"

    Syphilis was pretty much untreatable before the 1940s, and when treatments became available WW2 troops got priority.

    IIRC black men are still at the top of the STI tables today.



    OT, but is this, as EVERY report on it suggests, an effect of lockdown, or an effect of the Covid jabs?

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2022/08/18/lockdown-effects-feared-killing-people-covid/


    The effects of lockdown may now be killing more people than are dying of Covid, official statistics suggest.

    Figures for excess deaths from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) show that around 1,000 more people than usual are currently dying each week from conditions other than the virus.

    The Telegraph understands that the Department of Health has ordered an investigation into the figures amid concern that the deaths are linked to delays to and deferment of treatment for conditions such as cancer, diabetes and heart disease.

    Over the past two months, the number of excess deaths not from Covid dwarfs the number linked to the virus. It comes amid renewed calls for Covid measures such as compulsory face masks in the winter.

    But the figures suggest the country is facing a new silent health crisis linked to the pandemic response rather than to the virus itself.

     

    My emboldening. The pandemic response included both jabs and lockdown.

    My experience is that lockdown wasn't a pain except that I couldn't visit elderly relatives, though it may have felt much worse in a city - I could go over the fields and woods any time I wished.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11125573/Effects-lockdown-causing-deaths-Covid.html

    The effects of lockdown could be causing more deaths than Covid as nearly 10,000 more deaths than the five-year average are recorded, ONS data has found.

    Released on Tuesday, the Office for National Statistics' figures for excess deaths in the UK has revealed that about 1,000 more people than usual are dying each week from illnesses and conditions other than Covid.

    This makes the rate for excess deaths 14.4 per cent higher than the five-year average, meaning 1,350 more people have died than usual in the week ending 5 August.

    Covid-related deaths made up for 469 of them, but the remaining 881 have 'not been explained'. Since the start of June, nearly 10,000 more deaths unrelated to Covid have been recorded than the five-year average, making up around 1,089 per week.

    This figure is over three times the number of people who died from Covid, 2,811, over the same period.

    ONS analysis takes into consideration the ageing population changes, yet still found a 'substantial ongoing excess'.
     
    Mind, believe it or not, in England where everywhere is open, some NHS doctors are still refusing to see patients face to face.

    The jab has to be in the suspect frame, but also the wholesale cancellation of doctors appointments during 2020/2021. I'm sure a lot of ailments just weren't picked up.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @notsaying

    https://www.preprints.org/manuscript/202208.0151/v1

    This study focuses on cardiovascular effects, particularly myocarditis and pericarditis events, after BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccine injection in Thai adolescents. This prospective cohort study enrolled students from two schools aged 13–18 years who received the second dose of the BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccine. Data including demographics, symptoms, vital signs, ECG, echocardiography and cardiac enzymes were collected at baseline, Day 3, Day 7, and Day 14 (optional) using case record forms.We enrolled 314 participants; of these, 13 participants were lost to follow up, leaving 301 participants for analysis. The most common cardiovascular effects were tachycardia (7.64%), shortness of breath (6.64%), palpitation (4.32%), chest pain (4.32%), and hypertension (3.99%). Seven participants (2.33%) exhibited at least one elevated cardiac biomarker or positive lab assessments. Cardiovascular effects were found in 29.24% of patients, ranging from tachycardia, palpitation, and myopericarditis. Myopericarditis was confirmed in one patient after vaccination. Two patients had suspected pericarditis and four patients had suspected subclinical myocarditis. Conclusion: Cardiovascular effects in adolescents after BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccination included tachycardia, palpitation, and myocarditis. The clinical presentation of myopericarditis after vaccination was usually mild, with all cases fully recovering within 14 days. Hence, adolescents receiving mRNA vaccines should be monitored for side effects.

    Giving the vaccine to healthy children, who are not made seriously unwell by covid, is criminal.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @YetAnotherAnon

    From your source—

    Nothing like a small, uncontrolled, non-peer-reviewed study out of Thailand to make the anti-vaxx crowd sit up and take notice! I'm only commenting because the likes of Simone Gold (@drsimonegold) are posting stuff like "cardiovascular adverse effects in around a third of teens" based on this preprint.

    Here are some highlights from this "bombshell" report:
    - 301 participants evaluated

    - "None of the participants died, required mechanical ventilation, or required inotropic support."

    - "Three patients diagnosed with myopericarditis and pericarditis were treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for 2 weeks with no residual symptoms and complete follow-up."

    The study's introduction acknowledges the need for controlled studies in order to say anything conclusive about causality: "Although cardiovascular events have been reported with the COVID-19 vaccine, causality has yet to be established, because such cardiovascular adverse events are also common among the general public who do not receive the intervention [13]."

    And yet the authors made no attempt to conduct a controlled study here! They instead relied mainly on diary-based self-report of symptoms such as elevated heart rate, shortness of breath, and elevated blood pressure to produce their key finding that 29.24% of patients had "cardiovascular effects."

  146. @AnotherDad
    @Sean


    Unless being a bit gay is a help in figuring things out.
     
    LOL.

    Producing and "figuring things out" are pretty much straight guys' wheelhouse. It's what we do.

    The "abnormal" personality that does help "figure things out" is the Aspie type--e.g. Isaac Newton. That's a hyper-male type, pretty much the opposite of the queers.

    ~~

    There ought to be a name--"homo-excuser"--for people who come up with all these ludicrously lame ideas to explain why homosexuals really aren't exactly what they are.

    They've given us the "gay uncle" trope--giving innumeracy a bad name. They've rolled out innumerable "he was gay", "he was gay" fantasies. They always trot out the "you don't like homos because ... you're secretly gay", which gives you an idea of homo-logic. (And proof they are not the "figure things out people".)

    No homosexuality is exactly what it is--just a sad, pathetic mental developmental dysfunction, like being congenitally blind or deaf or crippled. It's just that those with these other deformities are not socially destructive, aren't disease super-spreaders ... and don't continually stomp their feet and bitch and whine a bunch of lame bullshit about how their disorder is wonderful and we must appreciate it and worship it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Ray P, @nebulafox

    There ought to be a name–“homo-excuser”–for people who come up with all these ludicrously lame ideas to explain why homosexuals really aren’t exactly what they are.

    A paedopologist?

  147. @Jim Christian
    @Buzz Mohawk

    They dig holes in your prairie for your horses and cattle to drop a leg into, crippling the animal. Prairie dogs kill. There's quite a sport going on shooting these vermin in the head from 800 yards. Many of them are also rabid and are covered with Lyme ticks, they are nobody's friend. Vermin, like I said.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @Buzz Mohawk, @Rocko

    Then again, that’s what happens when you invade their habitat. As someone who probably complains of others invading your habitat, this should be familiar to you

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    @Rocko

    Well, I swat house flies when they get in, but living in New England Whitemanland I don't sweat invaders, but thanks for your support.

  148. @AnotherDad
    @Sean


    Unless being a bit gay is a help in figuring things out.
     
    LOL.

    Producing and "figuring things out" are pretty much straight guys' wheelhouse. It's what we do.

    The "abnormal" personality that does help "figure things out" is the Aspie type--e.g. Isaac Newton. That's a hyper-male type, pretty much the opposite of the queers.

    ~~

    There ought to be a name--"homo-excuser"--for people who come up with all these ludicrously lame ideas to explain why homosexuals really aren't exactly what they are.

    They've given us the "gay uncle" trope--giving innumeracy a bad name. They've rolled out innumerable "he was gay", "he was gay" fantasies. They always trot out the "you don't like homos because ... you're secretly gay", which gives you an idea of homo-logic. (And proof they are not the "figure things out people".)

    No homosexuality is exactly what it is--just a sad, pathetic mental developmental dysfunction, like being congenitally blind or deaf or crippled. It's just that those with these other deformities are not socially destructive, aren't disease super-spreaders ... and don't continually stomp their feet and bitch and whine a bunch of lame bullshit about how their disorder is wonderful and we must appreciate it and worship it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Ray P, @nebulafox

    Isaac Newton was a bit of an odd duck. Near as we can tell, he wasn’t interested in anybody sexually, male or female. He also happened to be a devout Christian heretic (Arian), who took his beliefs so seriously that it caused problems with his academic career in a time period when that sort of thing normally wasn’t an issue anymore.

    To be honest, that was probably for the best: from everything we can tell about his personality from people who knew him, he would have been an awful husband and father. The only comparable left-brain intellect we’ve seen since is Einstein, and his personal life was a complete mess, despite being the more socially well-adjusted of the two by a wide margin.

    (I don’t get the mildly autistic science geek == homosexuality stereotype: there’s no bigger or lesser predisposition to it than in most other male demographics. Artists, literature, philosophy, that I can get.)

  149. @SFG
    @Rob McX

    Straight guys don’t often have sex in huge orgies or giant conga lines because you can’t find enough willing women. Even threesomes are kind of a fantasy for most people.

    You have two partners both with a male sex drive, anything goes.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Anon, @nebulafox

    I think the prevailing attitude for men in much of human history, before homosexuality as an all-encompassing psycho-social construct or marriage primarily for the purpose of love was a thing, was “Of course I’m doing this sex act with another man/a prostitute/a slave! I’d never force my wife to do something she’d in all probability find disgusting and shameful. What kind of uncaring monster do you think I am?”

  150. @YetAnotherAnon
    @notsaying

    "those numbers are bad! How could so many blacks have syphilis?"

    Syphilis was pretty much untreatable before the 1940s, and when treatments became available WW2 troops got priority.

    IIRC black men are still at the top of the STI tables today.



    OT, but is this, as EVERY report on it suggests, an effect of lockdown, or an effect of the Covid jabs?

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2022/08/18/lockdown-effects-feared-killing-people-covid/


    The effects of lockdown may now be killing more people than are dying of Covid, official statistics suggest.

    Figures for excess deaths from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) show that around 1,000 more people than usual are currently dying each week from conditions other than the virus.

    The Telegraph understands that the Department of Health has ordered an investigation into the figures amid concern that the deaths are linked to delays to and deferment of treatment for conditions such as cancer, diabetes and heart disease.

    Over the past two months, the number of excess deaths not from Covid dwarfs the number linked to the virus. It comes amid renewed calls for Covid measures such as compulsory face masks in the winter.

    But the figures suggest the country is facing a new silent health crisis linked to the pandemic response rather than to the virus itself.

     

    My emboldening. The pandemic response included both jabs and lockdown.

    My experience is that lockdown wasn't a pain except that I couldn't visit elderly relatives, though it may have felt much worse in a city - I could go over the fields and woods any time I wished.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11125573/Effects-lockdown-causing-deaths-Covid.html

    The effects of lockdown could be causing more deaths than Covid as nearly 10,000 more deaths than the five-year average are recorded, ONS data has found.

    Released on Tuesday, the Office for National Statistics' figures for excess deaths in the UK has revealed that about 1,000 more people than usual are dying each week from illnesses and conditions other than Covid.

    This makes the rate for excess deaths 14.4 per cent higher than the five-year average, meaning 1,350 more people have died than usual in the week ending 5 August.

    Covid-related deaths made up for 469 of them, but the remaining 881 have 'not been explained'. Since the start of June, nearly 10,000 more deaths unrelated to Covid have been recorded than the five-year average, making up around 1,089 per week.

    This figure is over three times the number of people who died from Covid, 2,811, over the same period.

    ONS analysis takes into consideration the ageing population changes, yet still found a 'substantial ongoing excess'.
     
    Mind, believe it or not, in England where everywhere is open, some NHS doctors are still refusing to see patients face to face.

    The jab has to be in the suspect frame, but also the wholesale cancellation of doctors appointments during 2020/2021. I'm sure a lot of ailments just weren't picked up.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @notsaying

    Very interesting. I wonder what the rest of the world is experiencing, particularly the US and other First World countries.

    I am one of those people who do not think the vaccines are having serious side effects for more than a tiny number of people. A lot of care was delayed or just never received and I have no idea what the consequences of that would be. That has to be a top possible explanation.

    I have to mention the fact that people were not just prevented from seeing doctors. They were stopped from getting admitted to hospitals as across the nation Covid patients were given #1 priority even after vaccines were available. People with other conditions did die over that decision and the longer that occurred after all adults could get vaccinated, the more upset I got about this. Why should someone who didn’t get vaccinated get a bed instead of a heart or cancer patient?

    I never heard anybody in the government or in medicine explain that. I would like to know the reasoning, besides pacifying the anti-vaxxers who made their decisions but did not want to live with the consequences.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @notsaying

    If you're not considering that COVID causes significant morbidity and delayed mortality you're not living in reality; if Unz.com is any guide anti-vaxxers are generally floomers when they don't just deny the pandemic altogether. We started seeing this before anyone outside a clinical trial got a vaccination, see for example this start of a discussion on a paper from VA data. In the large and not so old cohort of people who did not require hospitalization, thirty day survivors had an 8% greater mortality rate in the next six months compared to the control group. There's no reason to believe that stopped at six months.

    It was overall about three time worse than the seasonal flu for those who did require hospitalization, and all that classic Wuhan, which of course was followed by serially more transmissible and I think we still believe more lethal Alpha and Delta.


    I have to mention the fact that people were not just prevented from seeing doctors. They were stopped from getting admitted to hospitals as across the nation Covid patients were given #1 priority even after vaccines were available. People with other conditions did die over that decision and the longer that occurred after all adults could get vaccinated, the more upset I got about this. Why should someone who didn’t get vaccinated get a bed instead of a heart or cancer patient?
     
    I did not see that happening locally, and I wonder how much it was nationally, because COVID beds were limited to those that could be put in physical, air isolation. Otherwise for example healthcare workers had no safe places to put on or doff PPE. Everyone would have to at minimum wear an N95 mask for their whole shift, and it was a long time before those got back to sufficient supply. And it's considered to be poor form to wantonly give it to those in the hospital for other reasons.

    One way to get a handle on this is to see if we get to a point where all cause mortality was obviously pulled forward, if we get to a point where it drops below the expected baseline. It's still elevated, and note the figures the CDC collects and reports (the only sort of thing they can be trusted to do) have a delay that can be up to eight or more weeks as death certificates trickle in from the states.

    I don't like that it's still 100% three weeks ago, and it's been over 100%, often up to 110% ever since the Omicron wave peaked. Although with figures this low you have to properly adjust for the aging population, you need to check the CDC's work, also see how much the Officially scored as COVID deaths factor into that. Not large absolute numbers at 2,000 plus or minus a week, one tenth the Omicron peak. But we also suspect undercounting, which I think happened throughout the entire pandemic.

    And how many simply avoided going to the doctor or hospital out of concern over getting COVID? Concentrations of sick people are a general obvious risk that I think a lot of people didn't realize or remember before the pandemic. Plus plenty of scary stories like "this couple isolated successfully until they had someone come to their dwelling to cut their air, both died of COVID soon afterwards."

    A weird thing was also how the flu all but disappeared for the 2020-21 season. There was higher than normal uptake of vaccines for it, but that's not enough to account for that, I wonder what guesses or better the epidemiologists have today. It did come back 2021-22 and was almost entirely typed as the nastier A when checked.

    Replies: @notsaying

    , @James B. Shearer
    @notsaying

    "...Why should someone who didn’t get vaccinated get a bed instead of a heart or cancer patient?"

    Generally speaking there is a feeling doctors should not be deciding who deserves medical care and who doesn't but should treat everybody. And you can't assume the covid patients were all unvacinated.

    Replies: @notsaying

  151. @YetAnotherAnon
    @YetAnotherAnon

    https://www.preprints.org/manuscript/202208.0151/v1


    This study focuses on cardiovascular effects, particularly myocarditis and pericarditis events, after BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccine injection in Thai adolescents. This prospective cohort study enrolled students from two schools aged 13–18 years who received the second dose of the BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccine. Data including demographics, symptoms, vital signs, ECG, echocardiography and cardiac enzymes were collected at baseline, Day 3, Day 7, and Day 14 (optional) using case record forms.We enrolled 314 participants; of these, 13 participants were lost to follow up, leaving 301 participants for analysis. The most common cardiovascular effects were tachycardia (7.64%), shortness of breath (6.64%), palpitation (4.32%), chest pain (4.32%), and hypertension (3.99%). Seven participants (2.33%) exhibited at least one elevated cardiac biomarker or positive lab assessments. Cardiovascular effects were found in 29.24% of patients, ranging from tachycardia, palpitation, and myopericarditis. Myopericarditis was confirmed in one patient after vaccination. Two patients had suspected pericarditis and four patients had suspected subclinical myocarditis. Conclusion: Cardiovascular effects in adolescents after BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccination included tachycardia, palpitation, and myocarditis. The clinical presentation of myopericarditis after vaccination was usually mild, with all cases fully recovering within 14 days. Hence, adolescents receiving mRNA vaccines should be monitored for side effects.
     
    Giving the vaccine to healthy children, who are not made seriously unwell by covid, is criminal.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    From your source—

    Nothing like a small, uncontrolled, non-peer-reviewed study out of Thailand to make the anti-vaxx crowd sit up and take notice! I’m only commenting because the likes of Simone Gold (@drsimonegold) are posting stuff like “cardiovascular adverse effects in around a third of teens” based on this preprint.

    Here are some highlights from this “bombshell” report:
    – 301 participants evaluated

    – “None of the participants died, required mechanical ventilation, or required inotropic support.”

    – “Three patients diagnosed with myopericarditis and pericarditis were treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for 2 weeks with no residual symptoms and complete follow-up.”

    The study’s introduction acknowledges the need for controlled studies in order to say anything conclusive about causality: “Although cardiovascular events have been reported with the COVID-19 vaccine, causality has yet to be established, because such cardiovascular adverse events are also common among the general public who do not receive the intervention [13].”

    And yet the authors made no attempt to conduct a controlled study here! They instead relied mainly on diary-based self-report of symptoms such as elevated heart rate, shortness of breath, and elevated blood pressure to produce their key finding that 29.24% of patients had “cardiovascular effects.”

  152. @notsaying
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Very interesting. I wonder what the rest of the world is experiencing, particularly the US and other First World countries.

    I am one of those people who do not think the vaccines are having serious side effects for more than a tiny number of people. A lot of care was delayed or just never received and I have no idea what the consequences of that would be. That has to be a top possible explanation.

    I have to mention the fact that people were not just prevented from seeing doctors. They were stopped from getting admitted to hospitals as across the nation Covid patients were given #1 priority even after vaccines were available. People with other conditions did die over that decision and the longer that occurred after all adults could get vaccinated, the more upset I got about this. Why should someone who didn't get vaccinated get a bed instead of a heart or cancer patient?

    I never heard anybody in the government or in medicine explain that. I would like to know the reasoning, besides pacifying the anti-vaxxers who made their decisions but did not want to live with the consequences.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @James B. Shearer

    If you’re not considering that COVID causes significant morbidity and delayed mortality you’re not living in reality; if Unz.com is any guide anti-vaxxers are generally floomers when they don’t just deny the pandemic altogether. We started seeing this before anyone outside a clinical trial got a vaccination, see for example this start of a discussion on a paper from VA data. In the large and not so old cohort of people who did not require hospitalization, thirty day survivors had an 8% greater mortality rate in the next six months compared to the control group. There’s no reason to believe that stopped at six months.

    It was overall about three time worse than the seasonal flu for those who did require hospitalization, and all that classic Wuhan, which of course was followed by serially more transmissible and I think we still believe more lethal Alpha and Delta.

    I have to mention the fact that people were not just prevented from seeing doctors. They were stopped from getting admitted to hospitals as across the nation Covid patients were given #1 priority even after vaccines were available. People with other conditions did die over that decision and the longer that occurred after all adults could get vaccinated, the more upset I got about this. Why should someone who didn’t get vaccinated get a bed instead of a heart or cancer patient?

    I did not see that happening locally, and I wonder how much it was nationally, because COVID beds were limited to those that could be put in physical, air isolation. Otherwise for example healthcare workers had no safe places to put on or doff PPE. Everyone would have to at minimum wear an N95 mask for their whole shift, and it was a long time before those got back to sufficient supply. And it’s considered to be poor form to wantonly give it to those in the hospital for other reasons.

    One way to get a handle on this is to see if we get to a point where all cause mortality was obviously pulled forward, if we get to a point where it drops below the expected baseline. It’s still elevated, and note the figures the CDC collects and reports (the only sort of thing they can be trusted to do) have a delay that can be up to eight or more weeks as death certificates trickle in from the states.

    I don’t like that it’s still 100% three weeks ago, and it’s been over 100%, often up to 110% ever since the Omicron wave peaked. Although with figures this low you have to properly adjust for the aging population, you need to check the CDC’s work, also see how much the Officially scored as COVID deaths factor into that. Not large absolute numbers at 2,000 plus or minus a week, one tenth the Omicron peak. But we also suspect undercounting, which I think happened throughout the entire pandemic.

    And how many simply avoided going to the doctor or hospital out of concern over getting COVID? Concentrations of sick people are a general obvious risk that I think a lot of people didn’t realize or remember before the pandemic. Plus plenty of scary stories like “this couple isolated successfully until they had someone come to their dwelling to cut their air, both died of COVID soon afterwards.”

    A weird thing was also how the flu all but disappeared for the 2020-21 season. There was higher than normal uptake of vaccines for it, but that’s not enough to account for that, I wonder what guesses or better the epidemiologists have today. It did come back 2021-22 and was almost entirely typed as the nastier A when checked.

    • Replies: @notsaying
    @That Would Be Telling

    Thank you for your excellent response but I do not know why you think I discount the negative effects of Covid. I do not.

    In fact, I would say there are more than we know or can prove with multiple, completed studies right now. I am more than willing to get future boosters and shots. I haven't had Covid yet as far as I know and I do not want to get a serious or deadly case of it.

    I have seen it said that there was so little flu due to distancing and masking. We will see what happens this year.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  153. Anon[812] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    That's a story about the young Richard Gere made up by his rival Sylvester Stallone, who is a really good storyteller.

    Replies: @Random Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Jim Christian, @Old Prude, @Anon

    You are saying his not gay?

    Anyway, around 1991 my sister moved to Pasadena. She heard the same story albeit with a mouse instead of a Gerbil as the protagonist. She got it from her internist-to-the-stars who heard it on the medical grapevine. I remember because I couldn’t believe it and asked “how can he know?”. Those were innocent times.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    Richard Gere is on his third wife and has two kids.

    Replies: @Rob McX

  154. @That Would Be Telling
    @notsaying

    If you're not considering that COVID causes significant morbidity and delayed mortality you're not living in reality; if Unz.com is any guide anti-vaxxers are generally floomers when they don't just deny the pandemic altogether. We started seeing this before anyone outside a clinical trial got a vaccination, see for example this start of a discussion on a paper from VA data. In the large and not so old cohort of people who did not require hospitalization, thirty day survivors had an 8% greater mortality rate in the next six months compared to the control group. There's no reason to believe that stopped at six months.

    It was overall about three time worse than the seasonal flu for those who did require hospitalization, and all that classic Wuhan, which of course was followed by serially more transmissible and I think we still believe more lethal Alpha and Delta.


    I have to mention the fact that people were not just prevented from seeing doctors. They were stopped from getting admitted to hospitals as across the nation Covid patients were given #1 priority even after vaccines were available. People with other conditions did die over that decision and the longer that occurred after all adults could get vaccinated, the more upset I got about this. Why should someone who didn’t get vaccinated get a bed instead of a heart or cancer patient?
     
    I did not see that happening locally, and I wonder how much it was nationally, because COVID beds were limited to those that could be put in physical, air isolation. Otherwise for example healthcare workers had no safe places to put on or doff PPE. Everyone would have to at minimum wear an N95 mask for their whole shift, and it was a long time before those got back to sufficient supply. And it's considered to be poor form to wantonly give it to those in the hospital for other reasons.

    One way to get a handle on this is to see if we get to a point where all cause mortality was obviously pulled forward, if we get to a point where it drops below the expected baseline. It's still elevated, and note the figures the CDC collects and reports (the only sort of thing they can be trusted to do) have a delay that can be up to eight or more weeks as death certificates trickle in from the states.

    I don't like that it's still 100% three weeks ago, and it's been over 100%, often up to 110% ever since the Omicron wave peaked. Although with figures this low you have to properly adjust for the aging population, you need to check the CDC's work, also see how much the Officially scored as COVID deaths factor into that. Not large absolute numbers at 2,000 plus or minus a week, one tenth the Omicron peak. But we also suspect undercounting, which I think happened throughout the entire pandemic.

    And how many simply avoided going to the doctor or hospital out of concern over getting COVID? Concentrations of sick people are a general obvious risk that I think a lot of people didn't realize or remember before the pandemic. Plus plenty of scary stories like "this couple isolated successfully until they had someone come to their dwelling to cut their air, both died of COVID soon afterwards."

    A weird thing was also how the flu all but disappeared for the 2020-21 season. There was higher than normal uptake of vaccines for it, but that's not enough to account for that, I wonder what guesses or better the epidemiologists have today. It did come back 2021-22 and was almost entirely typed as the nastier A when checked.

    Replies: @notsaying

    Thank you for your excellent response but I do not know why you think I discount the negative effects of Covid. I do not.

    In fact, I would say there are more than we know or can prove with multiple, completed studies right now. I am more than willing to get future boosters and shots. I haven’t had Covid yet as far as I know and I do not want to get a serious or deadly case of it.

    I have seen it said that there was so little flu due to distancing and masking. We will see what happens this year.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @notsaying


    Thank you for your excellent response but I do not know why you think I discount the negative effects of Covid. I do not.
     
    You're welcome, and I'm sorry my prose wasn't clear. I was referring to your early sentence:

    I am one of those people who do not think the vaccines are having serious side effects for more than a tiny number of people.
     
    Specifically the people who are unable to weigh the adverse side effect risks of the vaccines, in the US all presenting the body with stabilized copies of the spike protein, with the very real as you then acknowledge risks of getting an infection that includes zillions more unstabilized spike proteins. That's the theory, we now have a lot of data to also compare vaccinated vs. not, the difference was stark in my local region.

    For example with enough as in millions of doses of Phase IV "post-marketing" data resulting in our ending recommending the Janssen adenovirus vector vaccines due to its blood clotting problems. Those are are even worse with the Oxford one; that whole direction has proven to be a terrible disappointment, including being much less easily manufactured than mRNA vaccines, with the Sputnik V second dose being extremely hard such that that vaccine never got anywhere.

    Boosters, we'll only learn a day at a time. The current sequence of prime then a pandemic context quick first boost (look at childhood schedules and you'd expect perhaps a two month interval), followed by a second boost dose in a more normal six months is doing the job, with special populations with weaker immune systems having a recommended third, fourth total dose.

    Going back to theory, as we'd expect there's parts of the spike protein that are sufficiently conserved that the immune system response to either a vaccine or a natural infection by this unnatural virus results in a significant degree of protection. That natural infection with its many more targets like the N for nucleocapsid protein does not confer sterilizing immunity is sobering. Some of this can be blamed on COVID being a moving target (classic Wuhan -> Alpha -> Delta -> Omicron first subvariant -> more subvariants) but I gather not all.

    Again, by definition stuff you only learn a day at a time, and the people who play the "gotcha" game with over-enthusiastic pro-vaxxers are arguably worse than them, those pro-vaxxers at least had many "eternal" vaccines to point at, while of course the glaring exceptions of smallpox, flu and TDaP and a not well understood family of coronaviruses should have prompted more caution. (The biggest problem with the anti-vaxxers is of course their inability to tell the truth, by my observation since at least November 2020.)

    Indeed, the 2020-21 not a flu season as such was suspected to be caused in part by the non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) which for COVID weren't enough except to most of the time in most places keep the curve bent enough to avoid losing people due to hospital capacity limitations. But it could be more, for example Aesop of Raconteur Report is an ER nurse in the LA area, saw a lot of Hispanics get COVID while point of contact testing showed almost no flu. We've never gotten the impression that population was good at observing NPIs, but maybe overt lockdowns helped those flu results???

    This year I assume we expect another fairly normal flu season like 2021-22, as you say we'll see. But yikes, look here, the anti-vaxx hysterics have a lot to answer for. For 64+ 2019-20 to 2021-22 as far as they have data, 53.5%, 56.5%, 50.5%, for 18+ total doses 72.2, 80.5, 71.5 million. That is, before they started really screaming bloody murder, flu vaccine uptake had a real boost shall I say in the 2020-21 season, then dropped below 2019-20 which we can take as a baseline. If the guys who guess which flu stains will be prevalent did equally good job for the two latter seasons the hysterics have a lot of blood on their hands.

    Which they will always blame on the COVID vaccines, and now the most extreme are advocating literally burying their mistakes by genociding "filthbloods" who got COVID vaccines (here's just one example). I wonder if our stubborn refusal to die as they've confidently predicted since 2020 is causing too much cognitive dissonance for those extremists to bear.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  155. @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    You are saying his not gay?

    Anyway, around 1991 my sister moved to Pasadena. She heard the same story albeit with a mouse instead of a Gerbil as the protagonist. She got it from her internist-to-the-stars who heard it on the medical grapevine. I remember because I couldn’t believe it and asked “how can he know?”. Those were innocent times.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Richard Gere is on his third wife and has two kids.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Steve Sailer

    If people think he's gay, nothing will change their minds - "Wives and kids? False flag!"

    Replies: @Zero Philosopher

  156. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    Richard Gere is on his third wife and has two kids.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    If people think he’s gay, nothing will change their minds – “Wives and kids? False flag!”

    • Replies: @Zero Philosopher
    @Rob McX

    Plenty of gay men have come out of the closet in their forties and fifties after having sired kids. Here is a fact that might shock you: many gay men have sex with women. And enjoy it. You could say that these men are bisexual, but since a lot of people refuse to acknowledge that bisexuality in men is a thing except as a sexual perversion, let's just call these men gay men that like having sex with women.

  157. @JR Ewing
    @MEH 0910


    So how can you prevent this from happening to your pet?
     
    ------------

    Seriously CDC, is this a trick question? Because it seems pretty easy to prevent.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    So how can you prevent this from happening to your pet?

    Seriously CDC, is this a trick question? Because it seems pretty easy to prevent.

    “Ohhhh, so you’re telling me that I’m supposed to keep my schlong OUT of my dog’s ass? Thanks, Doc! Appreciate the clarification.”

  158. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Diversity Heretic

    I must admit I ran into a rattlesnake in the foothills of Boulder not far from that prairie dog colony.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

    Funny, I ran into a prairie dog not far from a faggot colony (Boulder).

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
  159. @notsaying
    @That Would Be Telling

    Thank you for your excellent response but I do not know why you think I discount the negative effects of Covid. I do not.

    In fact, I would say there are more than we know or can prove with multiple, completed studies right now. I am more than willing to get future boosters and shots. I haven't had Covid yet as far as I know and I do not want to get a serious or deadly case of it.

    I have seen it said that there was so little flu due to distancing and masking. We will see what happens this year.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    Thank you for your excellent response but I do not know why you think I discount the negative effects of Covid. I do not.

    You’re welcome, and I’m sorry my prose wasn’t clear. I was referring to your early sentence:

    I am one of those people who do not think the vaccines are having serious side effects for more than a tiny number of people.

    Specifically the people who are unable to weigh the adverse side effect risks of the vaccines, in the US all presenting the body with stabilized copies of the spike protein, with the very real as you then acknowledge risks of getting an infection that includes zillions more unstabilized spike proteins. That’s the theory, we now have a lot of data to also compare vaccinated vs. not, the difference was stark in my local region.

    For example with enough as in millions of doses of Phase IV “post-marketing” data resulting in our ending recommending the Janssen adenovirus vector vaccines due to its blood clotting problems. Those are are even worse with the Oxford one; that whole direction has proven to be a terrible disappointment, including being much less easily manufactured than mRNA vaccines, with the Sputnik V second dose being extremely hard such that that vaccine never got anywhere.

    Boosters, we’ll only learn a day at a time. The current sequence of prime then a pandemic context quick first boost (look at childhood schedules and you’d expect perhaps a two month interval), followed by a second boost dose in a more normal six months is doing the job, with special populations with weaker immune systems having a recommended third, fourth total dose.

    Going back to theory, as we’d expect there’s parts of the spike protein that are sufficiently conserved that the immune system response to either a vaccine or a natural infection by this unnatural virus results in a significant degree of protection. That natural infection with its many more targets like the N for nucleocapsid protein does not confer sterilizing immunity is sobering. Some of this can be blamed on COVID being a moving target (classic Wuhan -> Alpha -> Delta -> Omicron first subvariant -> more subvariants) but I gather not all.

    Again, by definition stuff you only learn a day at a time, and the people who play the “gotcha” game with over-enthusiastic pro-vaxxers are arguably worse than them, those pro-vaxxers at least had many “eternal” vaccines to point at, while of course the glaring exceptions of smallpox, flu and TDaP and a not well understood family of coronaviruses should have prompted more caution. (The biggest problem with the anti-vaxxers is of course their inability to tell the truth, by my observation since at least November 2020.)

    Indeed, the 2020-21 not a flu season as such was suspected to be caused in part by the non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) which for COVID weren’t enough except to most of the time in most places keep the curve bent enough to avoid losing people due to hospital capacity limitations. But it could be more, for example Aesop of Raconteur Report is an ER nurse in the LA area, saw a lot of Hispanics get COVID while point of contact testing showed almost no flu. We’ve never gotten the impression that population was good at observing NPIs, but maybe overt lockdowns helped those flu results???

    This year I assume we expect another fairly normal flu season like 2021-22, as you say we’ll see. But yikes, look here, the anti-vaxx hysterics have a lot to answer for. For 64+ 2019-20 to 2021-22 as far as they have data, 53.5%, 56.5%, 50.5%, for 18+ total doses 72.2, 80.5, 71.5 million. That is, before they started really screaming bloody murder, flu vaccine uptake had a real boost shall I say in the 2020-21 season, then dropped below 2019-20 which we can take as a baseline. If the guys who guess which flu stains will be prevalent did equally good job for the two latter seasons the hysterics have a lot of blood on their hands.

    Which they will always blame on the COVID vaccines, and now the most extreme are advocating literally burying their mistakes by genociding “filthbloods” who got COVID vaccines (here’s just one example). I wonder if our stubborn refusal to die as they’ve confidently predicted since 2020 is causing too much cognitive dissonance for those extremists to bear.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @That Would Be Telling

    I don't see why people who might be at risk for blood clots should not have coagulation blood work done before receiving vaccinations and start on a prophylactic course of anticoagulation therapy if they are perceived to be at risk.

  160. @That Would Be Telling
    @notsaying


    Thank you for your excellent response but I do not know why you think I discount the negative effects of Covid. I do not.
     
    You're welcome, and I'm sorry my prose wasn't clear. I was referring to your early sentence:

    I am one of those people who do not think the vaccines are having serious side effects for more than a tiny number of people.
     
    Specifically the people who are unable to weigh the adverse side effect risks of the vaccines, in the US all presenting the body with stabilized copies of the spike protein, with the very real as you then acknowledge risks of getting an infection that includes zillions more unstabilized spike proteins. That's the theory, we now have a lot of data to also compare vaccinated vs. not, the difference was stark in my local region.

    For example with enough as in millions of doses of Phase IV "post-marketing" data resulting in our ending recommending the Janssen adenovirus vector vaccines due to its blood clotting problems. Those are are even worse with the Oxford one; that whole direction has proven to be a terrible disappointment, including being much less easily manufactured than mRNA vaccines, with the Sputnik V second dose being extremely hard such that that vaccine never got anywhere.

    Boosters, we'll only learn a day at a time. The current sequence of prime then a pandemic context quick first boost (look at childhood schedules and you'd expect perhaps a two month interval), followed by a second boost dose in a more normal six months is doing the job, with special populations with weaker immune systems having a recommended third, fourth total dose.

    Going back to theory, as we'd expect there's parts of the spike protein that are sufficiently conserved that the immune system response to either a vaccine or a natural infection by this unnatural virus results in a significant degree of protection. That natural infection with its many more targets like the N for nucleocapsid protein does not confer sterilizing immunity is sobering. Some of this can be blamed on COVID being a moving target (classic Wuhan -> Alpha -> Delta -> Omicron first subvariant -> more subvariants) but I gather not all.

    Again, by definition stuff you only learn a day at a time, and the people who play the "gotcha" game with over-enthusiastic pro-vaxxers are arguably worse than them, those pro-vaxxers at least had many "eternal" vaccines to point at, while of course the glaring exceptions of smallpox, flu and TDaP and a not well understood family of coronaviruses should have prompted more caution. (The biggest problem with the anti-vaxxers is of course their inability to tell the truth, by my observation since at least November 2020.)

    Indeed, the 2020-21 not a flu season as such was suspected to be caused in part by the non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) which for COVID weren't enough except to most of the time in most places keep the curve bent enough to avoid losing people due to hospital capacity limitations. But it could be more, for example Aesop of Raconteur Report is an ER nurse in the LA area, saw a lot of Hispanics get COVID while point of contact testing showed almost no flu. We've never gotten the impression that population was good at observing NPIs, but maybe overt lockdowns helped those flu results???

    This year I assume we expect another fairly normal flu season like 2021-22, as you say we'll see. But yikes, look here, the anti-vaxx hysterics have a lot to answer for. For 64+ 2019-20 to 2021-22 as far as they have data, 53.5%, 56.5%, 50.5%, for 18+ total doses 72.2, 80.5, 71.5 million. That is, before they started really screaming bloody murder, flu vaccine uptake had a real boost shall I say in the 2020-21 season, then dropped below 2019-20 which we can take as a baseline. If the guys who guess which flu stains will be prevalent did equally good job for the two latter seasons the hysterics have a lot of blood on their hands.

    Which they will always blame on the COVID vaccines, and now the most extreme are advocating literally burying their mistakes by genociding "filthbloods" who got COVID vaccines (here's just one example). I wonder if our stubborn refusal to die as they've confidently predicted since 2020 is causing too much cognitive dissonance for those extremists to bear.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I don’t see why people who might be at risk for blood clots should not have coagulation blood work done before receiving vaccinations and start on a prophylactic course of anticoagulation therapy if they are perceived to be at risk.

  161. @notsaying
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Very interesting. I wonder what the rest of the world is experiencing, particularly the US and other First World countries.

    I am one of those people who do not think the vaccines are having serious side effects for more than a tiny number of people. A lot of care was delayed or just never received and I have no idea what the consequences of that would be. That has to be a top possible explanation.

    I have to mention the fact that people were not just prevented from seeing doctors. They were stopped from getting admitted to hospitals as across the nation Covid patients were given #1 priority even after vaccines were available. People with other conditions did die over that decision and the longer that occurred after all adults could get vaccinated, the more upset I got about this. Why should someone who didn't get vaccinated get a bed instead of a heart or cancer patient?

    I never heard anybody in the government or in medicine explain that. I would like to know the reasoning, besides pacifying the anti-vaxxers who made their decisions but did not want to live with the consequences.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @James B. Shearer

    “…Why should someone who didn’t get vaccinated get a bed instead of a heart or cancer patient?”

    Generally speaking there is a feeling doctors should not be deciding who deserves medical care and who doesn’t but should treat everybody. And you can’t assume the covid patients were all unvacinated.

    • Replies: @notsaying
    @James B. Shearer

    I am agree with that principle.

    But from the beginning all the hospitals put the Covid patients first. They continued to do so and if there was another big surge in the future, as far as I know they would continue to put them first.

    Why? Nobody ever said. Certainly as vaccines were available for all that did work well to reduce the chance of getting Covid so bad that you had to be admitted, I do not see why we continued to deny bed to others so Covid patients could have them.

    I am not assuming all hospitalized Covid patients were unvaccinated. I do think that cancer and heart patients and others with very serious conditions should have been prioritized over the unvaccinated. Why should innocent people suffer because people didn't get vaccinated?

  162. Thank you, monkeypox.

    I supported the right conspiracy theory this time, and on social media too! Now and then you feel like detective Poirot if you can figure out which journalist knows how the story will end. And you see the media snared in their own ideology. They couldn’t say anything about monkeypox other than random anyone-can-get-it fear porn or they would be guilty of hatethought. I bet they had access to the same information but in their infinite wisdom they unlearned it to save transbabies from climate change and rightwing extremism.

  163. @Rocko
    @Jim Christian

    Then again, that's what happens when you invade their habitat. As someone who probably complains of others invading your habitat, this should be familiar to you

    Replies: @Jim Christian

    Well, I swat house flies when they get in, but living in New England Whitemanland I don’t sweat invaders, but thanks for your support.

  164. Have you noticed the MSM has instituted its own “Don’t say gay” law? Now it’s “men who have sex with men.” Wtf?

  165. @Rob McX
    Gay sex must have greater attractions than the heterosexual kind, if people are willing to take such risks for it. This is a German patient who got monkeypox and then discovered he also has HIV and syphilis.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2022/08/17/11/61462813-11119463-image-a-19_1660731025695.jpg

    Replies: @Thomas, @Random Anonymous, @Pontius, @Anonymous, @SFG, @Ed, @Muggles, @Indignant of Maidstone

    There are some men who got seriously unlucky

    You can see them at:-
    bmj-2022-072410.full.pdf

  166. @James B. Shearer
    @notsaying

    "...Why should someone who didn’t get vaccinated get a bed instead of a heart or cancer patient?"

    Generally speaking there is a feeling doctors should not be deciding who deserves medical care and who doesn't but should treat everybody. And you can't assume the covid patients were all unvacinated.

    Replies: @notsaying

    I am agree with that principle.

    But from the beginning all the hospitals put the Covid patients first. They continued to do so and if there was another big surge in the future, as far as I know they would continue to put them first.

    Why? Nobody ever said. Certainly as vaccines were available for all that did work well to reduce the chance of getting Covid so bad that you had to be admitted, I do not see why we continued to deny bed to others so Covid patients could have them.

    I am not assuming all hospitalized Covid patients were unvaccinated. I do think that cancer and heart patients and others with very serious conditions should have been prioritized over the unvaccinated. Why should innocent people suffer because people didn’t get vaccinated?

  167. I am not assuming all hospitalized Covid patients were unvaccinated. I do think that cancer and heart patients and others with very serious conditions should have been prioritized over the unvaccinated. Why should innocent people suffer because people didn’t get vaccinated?”

    How are you going to determine which covid patients were unvaccinated? If you ask them (assuming they are capable of answering) they will just lie if they know you aren’t treating the unvaccinated. And as for innocent people likely some of the cancer and heart patients smoked. Are you going to try to deny smokers treatment as well? How about heavy drinkers? It’s just an endless can of worms.

  168. @Rob McX
    @Steve Sailer

    If people think he's gay, nothing will change their minds - "Wives and kids? False flag!"

    Replies: @Zero Philosopher

    Plenty of gay men have come out of the closet in their forties and fifties after having sired kids. Here is a fact that might shock you: many gay men have sex with women. And enjoy it. You could say that these men are bisexual, but since a lot of people refuse to acknowledge that bisexuality in men is a thing except as a sexual perversion, let’s just call these men gay men that like having sex with women.

  169. You read things like this and it’s almost enough to make you think that butt-fucking is somehow ‘bad’


  170. https://www.nytimes.com/2022/08/22/us/michigan-dog-illness-parvovirus.html
    https://archive.ph/JbqKP

    An unidentified illness has been sickening and killing dozens of dogs in Michigan in recent weeks, puzzling veterinarians who are racing to determine whether it’s contagious and if there are treatments, local officials said.

    Most of the affected dogs have been under the age of two. The Otsego County Animal Shelter in Gaylord, Mich., reported that the illness had killed more than 20 dogs in the county, some within a few days of showing symptoms. Those symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea and bloody stools, according to a statement from Melissa FitzGerald, the director of the shelter.

    [MORE]

    Ms. FitzGerald said that while veterinarians were still not sure what the cause of the illness is, “the best guess” is that it is a new strain of parvovirus, a disease that particularly affects puppies and causes bouts of bloody diarrhea and vomiting.

    The state has found some evidence of parvovirus — which spreads from dog to dog, strikes in their gastrointestinal tracts and can be lethal. But when the dogs have been tested for that virus at the clinic, the tests have come back negative, Ms. FitzGerald said.

    “We have not spoken to this until now because we really don’t know anything,” she said. “The only thing is to make sure your pets are vaccinated and, at the first sign of illness, get to the veterinarian.”

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