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Nature: Coronavirus Crisis Will Cause Science to Concentrate on the Competent Rather Than the Diverse, and That's BAD.
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From Nature:

‘It’s like we’re going back 30 years’: how the coronavirus is gutting diversity in science

The pandemic is sabotaging the careers of researchers from under-represented groups, but institutions can help to staunch the outflow.
Chris Woolston

31 JULY 2020

Years of slow improvement in diversity and inclusion in science could come undone because of the COVID-19 crisis. In a June letter to Nature Ecology and Evolution, 19 researchers from around the world warned that job losses during the pandemic might pose “disproportionate existential threats” to researchers from under-represented groups, including women, people from minority ethnic backgrounds and those who are financially disadvantaged.

Co-author Raísa Vieira, an ecologist at the Federal University of Goiás in Goiânia, Brazil, says that the pandemic and related political upheavals are already eroding hard-won diversity gains in her home country. “It’s really sad to see what’s happening here,” she says. “It’s like we’re going back 30 years.” As the scientific director of Brazil’s National Association of Graduate Students, she is especially concerned about junior scientists at home and elsewhere. Although the pandemic affects everyone, she and others fear that the pain won’t be evenly distributed. She says it will take a concerted effort by institutions, funders and scientific journals to help ensure that people from under-represented groups can remain in science during the pandemic and beyond.

The pandemic threatens to make UK universities less diverse, says Christopher Jackson, a geologist at Imperial College London. As one of a very few Black Earth-science faculty members in the entire Northern Hemisphere, he’s familiar with the plight of under-represented researchers. He worries that as institutions try to cope with the virus and its consequences, diversity in hiring and promotion will become a low priority. “They’ll say this isn’t the time for progressive measures,” he predicts. “They won’t have the appetite for it. Certain racial and ethnic groups will be the hardest hit.” …

Minority-ethnic scientists in the United States are also having trouble hanging on, says Iris Wagstaff, a director-at-large of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers, based in Annapolis, Maryland. There are no firm statistics on the financial impacts for different communities, Wagstaff says, but she is very concerned about what she’s hearing from her organization’s members. “Across the board, our students, postdocs and early-career researchers of colour who study science, technology, engineering or maths (STEM) are losing funding, and their job searches are interrupted,” she says.

It’s almost as if during a crisis, people tend to direct money to scientists who can save millions of lives rather than to poseurs who can check privileged race boxes.

 
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  1. “Black Earth-science faculty member” sounds like some sort of specialist in studying dark soils.

    • Agree: Gordo, Ben tillman
    • Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers
    @David M

    Wish they'd leave well enough a-loam. };^D

    Here. take two ideology tablets and call me in the morning! Happy pills to compel compliance with corona-vagueness, by a “ethics” professor (whose name contains the word, “crutch” – straight outa central casting, eh?):
    https://www.lewrockwell.com/political-theatre/us-professor-psychoactive-pill-should-be-covertly-administered-to-ensure-lockdown-compliance/
    &
    https://tinyurl.com/y29nvqh4
    Dr. Vernon Coleman: How Many Billion Could the Covid-19 Vaccine Kill or Damage?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyE9cJ0w1hk
    These regressive "progressives" want a return to witchcraft from science.

    , @Escher
    @David M

    Or the dark arts.
    Is that another term headed for the chopping block, I wonder.

    , @nokangaroos
    @David M

    Black-Earth scientist n.:

    Scholar of
    1) Czernosem, the soil that develops on loess under continental clime
    2) Terra preta, artificial soil of the extinct raised-bed cultures in the Amazon

    But seriously ... the very hard sciences are notorious for being hideously un-black;
    see, the intersection between smart enough (no faking it, no feeling about it either) and willing to get dirty and wet (not what you think) is ... minuscule :P

  2. Meritocracy could be afforded to be pushed aside as long as the US was as dominant as it was. Any extra costs could easily be carried. But that is no longer true.

    America will continue to be an extremely powerful country but it won’t be a sole Superpower anymore. The longer-run trend will be for wokism to die out, simply by necessity. As genuine costs are rising with non-meritocratic choices, the pressure will build to undo the damage.

    • Agree: usNthem, ThreeCranes
    • Replies: @anon
    @Thulean Friend

    It would be sad if millions were to die due to covid.

    But the real tragedy.....

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Thulean Friend


    As genuine costs are rising with non-meritocratic choices, the pressure will build to undo the damage.
     
    The pressure will build to intensify the damage.

    It's already happening, all around us.
    , @Anonymous
    @Thulean Friend


    Meritocracy could be afforded to be pushed aside as long as the US was as dominant as it was. Any extra costs could easily be carried. But that is no longer true.
     
    Just one of the many diversions of capital from productive use. Empires are by their nature highly political -- income from political connections dwarfs any other income, and many successful rivals can be suppressed by intense lobbying. Eventually, business deteriorates to a lobbying scramble for favorable laws and a search for patronage jobs (e.g. Antifa, BLM).

    In England, the Imperial history seems to have established a dominant bureaucracy that was captured by lower class leftists. The government appears to be a strange mix of self hatred and stupidity. The rights of Englishmen were eliminated, and the English economy was, and has remained, closely controlled. The combination is deadly.

    Will the US end up the same way? Well, maybe not. The fascist totalitarian bureaucracy has been restricted to the cities, which are failing. It is just barely possible that the urban fascist totalitarian bureaucracy will lose its power as the cities lose their political power, and that a distributed economy will continue outside the cities.

    Note: some people may object to the description of urban government as "fascist totalitarian bureaucracy". I must apologize for using a euphemism, but I want to stay well within the Overton Window.
    , @Unladen Swallow
    @Thulean Friend

    I wish you were right, but if this summer is anything to go by, science is going to pushed harder in the DIE direction. No one it seems is willing to stand up to the PC brigades in academia.

    Replies: @Cato

    , @Ben tillman
    @Thulean Friend

    It’s called parasite load. And we are straining under it.

  3. Dr. Wang’s plight:

    University Of Pittsburgh Cardiologist Is Stripped From Fellowship Program After Criticizing Affirmative Action

    https://www.dailywire.com/news/university-of-pittsburgh-cardiologist-is-stripped-from-fellowship-program-after-criticizing-affirmative-action

    • Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @newrouter


    Dean of the School of Medicine Anantha Shekhar tweeted:

    As an institution and a community, we do not condone racism or discrimination of any kind
     

    Of any kind? Isn't that exactly what AA is doing?

    I notice that the good doctor lists the mantra in the iSteve "D.I.E." sequence. Could he be a reader?

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Moses

  4. The panic implied in the article is a beautiful thing to see. May it wash across the rest of our coddled society.

    • Replies: @Altai
    @Mike1

    I don't know you can't read much into it. Even if there was no impact at all, they'd be claiming there was and it's was urgent to get more money into DIE STEM.

    Replies: @Gabe Ruth

  5. It’s almost as if during a crisis, people tend to direct money to scientists who can save millions of lives rather than to poseurs who can check privileged race boxes.

    I love how the Clever People are eager to get set asides for themselves, without the slightest concern for their racial brothers and sisters. You know, the ones they call “proles”.

    There’s a special place in Hell in for them.

    These are the people who support desegregation for the masses, but assume they will always get a special deal. And really, they like hanging out with other Really Smart people from India, Nigeria, Asia, or wherever, much more than the “low brow” White crowd.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Disagree: Ben tillman
    • Replies: @Ian Smith
    @RichardTaylor

    I’d rather hang out with white proles than smart blacks. I’d take politely feigning an interest in NASCAR over listening to a lecture on white privilege or redlining any day of the week.

  6. @Thulean Friend
    Meritocracy could be afforded to be pushed aside as long as the US was as dominant as it was. Any extra costs could easily be carried. But that is no longer true.

    America will continue to be an extremely powerful country but it won't be a sole Superpower anymore. The longer-run trend will be for wokism to die out, simply by necessity. As genuine costs are rising with non-meritocratic choices, the pressure will build to undo the damage.

    Replies: @anon, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Anonymous, @Unladen Swallow, @Ben tillman

    It would be sad if millions were to die due to covid.

    But the real tragedy…..

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @anon


    It would be sad if millions were to die due to covid.
     
    I appreciate the Traitor General Casey reference, but no, we'll be fine. It's a great excuse though, to get rid of some of that dead wood... the ones that write those scientific papers about personnel and working conditions rather than about the science itself.
  7. ‘It’s like we’re going back 30 years’

    Who the fcuck talks Valley Girl in a header in Nature?

    “General Kala, Black Earth Scientist approaching.”
    “What do you mean Black Earth Scientist approaching? Open wallets! All donations!”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @El Dato

    “General Kala, Black Earth Scientist approaching.”
    “What do you mean Black Earth Scientist approaching? Open wallets! All donations!”
     

    If only Black Earth Scientist were as useful as Flash Gordon in a crisis, eh?

    Flash! A-ah!
    King of the impossible

    He's for every one of us
    Stand for every one of us
    He saves with a mighty hand
    Every man, every woman
    Every child, it's the mighty flash

     

    More like, "Close wallets! No donations!" I should think.
    , @J.Ross
    @El Dato

    No one, but no one comments on social media without the approval of the diversity officer.

  8. Interesting that research funding bodies and administrators don’t actually believe that ‘diversity’ improves scientific outcomes.

    • Agree: bomag
    • Replies: @Altai
    @Anonymous

    Which is a shame because some social scientists did autistic levels of statistical torture to some really poor datasets and found it does.

    https://www.pnas.org/content/117/17/9284


    By analyzing data from nearly all US PhD recipients and their dissertations across three decades, this paper finds demographically underrepresented students innovate at higher rates than majority students, but their novel contributions are discounted and less likely to earn them academic positions. The discounting of minorities’ innovations may partly explain their underrepresentation in influential positions of academia.

    ...

    The race categories are white, Asian, and underrepresented minorities. Underrepresented minorities combines Hispanics, African Americans, Native Americans, and any racial categories not captured by the first three
     
    Or maybe being poor groups who didn't demographically mature into stable middle and upper middle class backgrounds 2 or more generations previously like all the current field leaders explains it? American academics are so dumb. Everything is about race, nothing is ever about class.

    Replies: @bomag, @Fox

    , @Anonymous
    @Anonymous


    Interesting that research funding bodies and administrators don’t actually believe that ‘diversity’ improves scientific outcomes.
     
    In my experience as a faculty member, administrators, at least flatly don't believe in the enterprise of science. They believe in money. From that standpoint the faculty is simply a group of people who couldn't make it in real society (corporate management seems to think that way also). Dunning-Kruger effect on steroids, perhaps. Administrators in universities act a lot like thugs, apparently believing that the "unworldly" faculty will be stunned into acquiescence by sheer brutality.

    So, to administrators, faculty jobs are simply sinecures, and DIE is just a way to get more money by appointing yet more incompetents to fake working. The problem that administrators see is that the funding sources will describe their Departments as "too White" and reduce funding. In the same way, the funding sources see that funding "too White" institutions could reduce revenue to the funding sources.

    Again, industrial civilization depends on Christian religious fanatics, and the aren't available nowadays. See: https://youtu.be/CpGupes7NvI

    Here's a video about when science was important because it affected Christianity:
    https://youtu.be/9t36Jkz6q6I?t=1236

    And here's one about today, in which science is something that interferes with politics and Christianity isn't important:
    https://youtu.be/7hSj01bAZAU

    Could be we're in serious trouble.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Mr. Anon

  9. @newrouter
    Dr. Wang's plight:

    University Of Pittsburgh Cardiologist Is Stripped From Fellowship Program After Criticizing Affirmative Action

    https://www.dailywire.com/news/university-of-pittsburgh-cardiologist-is-stripped-from-fellowship-program-after-criticizing-affirmative-action

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Dean of the School of Medicine Anantha Shekhar tweeted:

    As an institution and a community, we do not condone racism or discrimination of any kind

    Of any kind? Isn’t that exactly what AA is doing?

    I notice that the good doctor lists the mantra in the iSteve “D.I.E.” sequence. Could he be a reader?

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder



    As an institution and a community, we do not condone racism or discrimination of any kind
     
    Of any kind? Isn’t that exactly what AA is doing?
     
    Truth is the first casualty of culture war.
    , @Moses
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder


    Dean of the School of Medicine Anantha Shekhar tweeted:

    As an institution and a community, we do not condone racism or discrimination of any kind

     

    That’s rich coming from an Indian Brahmin.

    Oh my sides!
  10. @Thulean Friend
    Meritocracy could be afforded to be pushed aside as long as the US was as dominant as it was. Any extra costs could easily be carried. But that is no longer true.

    America will continue to be an extremely powerful country but it won't be a sole Superpower anymore. The longer-run trend will be for wokism to die out, simply by necessity. As genuine costs are rising with non-meritocratic choices, the pressure will build to undo the damage.

    Replies: @anon, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Anonymous, @Unladen Swallow, @Ben tillman

    As genuine costs are rising with non-meritocratic choices, the pressure will build to undo the damage.

    The pressure will build to intensify the damage.

    It’s already happening, all around us.

  11. What a desolate desert of stupidity.

    Universities scrub names of racist leaders — students say it’s a first step

    In February, University College London (UCL) committed to dropping the names of Francis Galton and Karl Pearson, celebrated statisticians who supported eugenics, from buildings and lecture halls on campus. “Then there was a long pause and nothing happened,” says Michael Sulu, a UCL biochemical engineer who campaigned for the removal of the names.

    According to a university spokesperson, the COVID-19 pandemic delayed action. After George Floyd died and worldwide protests erupted, UCL announced on 19 June that three spaces would have Galton’s and Pearson’s names removed immediately. They now bear generic names such as Lecture Theatre 115. Sulu credits student groups at the university with keeping up the pressure to ensure change.

    “Lecture Theatre 115”, comrade.

    Chris Jackson, a geoscientist at Imperial College London, agrees that faculty members should put their weight behind such efforts. “You have to kind of stand for something. For me, at least, as a professor at a fancy university, what are you going to use your platform for and your position for?”

    Do your fucking job maybe instead of howling with wolves? Like, you know, science and stuff??

    In the penultimate pragraph, the difficult topic of the gibs is broached:

    More transparency and accountability around how universities handle cases of racism would help to rebuild trust with Black academics, Jackson says. He also calls for universities to pay the students and faculty members who serve on diversity and equity committees. This sort of “invisible work” is important but isn’t often rewarded monetarily or factored into career-advancement decisions.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @El Dato

    “Lecture Theatre 115”, comrade.

    Room 101?

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @El Dato


    After George Floyd died and worldwide protests erupted . . .
     
    First Floyd was "murdered," then he was "killed," now he merely "died."

    Of course, it should read: "After George Floyd overdosed and worldwide protests erupted..."

    Replies: @Steve Richter, @HallParvey, @El Dato, @jsm

    , @Rob McX
    @El Dato

    Yeah, Michael Sulu, I did an image search on him.

    https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/sites/news/files/styles/large_image/public/me-_head.jpg?itok=h4ws4Xfm

    And on the Grenadier "Guardsmen" armed robbers mentioned by another commenter somewhere.

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/content/dam/news/2020/01/13/TELEMMGLPICT000221253323_trans_NvBQzQNjv4BqYO7_xiyF6r3HKBKXSTLIcVHco0voaiKN9Kyq5VeWOHI.jpeg?imwidth=1400

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/content/dam/news/2020/01/13/TELEMMGLPICT000221255852_trans_NvBQzQNjv4BqBqQpMmcJbyOsM10vwHMrJppnxqhrLTkqq8q44Gaa1R0.jpeg?imwidth=1240


    Remind me again why diversity is so wonderful.

    , @bomag
    @El Dato


    [the usual abject pandering] would help to rebuild trust with Black academics
     
    Good grief.

    Plenty of abject obeisance to the Other of Color in the Academy since about 1850.

    It has bought nothing.

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    , @Escher
    @El Dato

    The 5 families should learn a few things from these guys on effective shakedown tactics.

  12. @Mike1
    The panic implied in the article is a beautiful thing to see. May it wash across the rest of our coddled society.

    Replies: @Altai

    I don’t know you can’t read much into it. Even if there was no impact at all, they’d be claiming there was and it’s was urgent to get more money into DIE STEM.

    • Replies: @Gabe Ruth
    @Altai

    Agree, I think this is more a function of which groups are allowed to advocate for themselves as groups. I'm sure it's hard out there for all academics, and I'm sure you can find academics of all races complaining. But to the extent that it affects white academics there are plenty who would welcome it as long as it advanced DIE, the prime directive of our civilization.

  13. @El Dato
    What a desolate desert of stupidity.

    Universities scrub names of racist leaders — students say it’s a first step

    In February, University College London (UCL) committed to dropping the names of Francis Galton and Karl Pearson, celebrated statisticians who supported eugenics, from buildings and lecture halls on campus. “Then there was a long pause and nothing happened,” says Michael Sulu, a UCL biochemical engineer who campaigned for the removal of the names.

    According to a university spokesperson, the COVID-19 pandemic delayed action. After George Floyd died and worldwide protests erupted, UCL announced on 19 June that three spaces would have Galton’s and Pearson’s names removed immediately. They now bear generic names such as Lecture Theatre 115. Sulu credits student groups at the university with keeping up the pressure to ensure change.
     
    "Lecture Theatre 115", comrade.

    Chris Jackson, a geoscientist at Imperial College London, agrees that faculty members should put their weight behind such efforts. “You have to kind of stand for something. For me, at least, as a professor at a fancy university, what are you going to use your platform for and your position for?”

     

    Do your fucking job maybe instead of howling with wolves? Like, you know, science and stuff??

    In the penultimate pragraph, the difficult topic of the gibs is broached:

    More transparency and accountability around how universities handle cases of racism would help to rebuild trust with Black academics, Jackson says. He also calls for universities to pay the students and faculty members who serve on diversity and equity committees. This sort of “invisible work” is important but isn’t often rewarded monetarily or factored into career-advancement decisions.

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpmiZ7zsHXY

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hypnotoad666, @Rob McX, @bomag, @Escher

    “Lecture Theatre 115”, comrade.

    Room 101?

    • Agree: El Dato
  14. • Replies: @Giancarlo M. Kumquat
    @Anonymous

    What God forsaken pile of shit movie was SHE gonna be in??

    , @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Must be the model for the new Wonder Woman comic.

    https://boundingintocomics.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/2020.08.10-01.59-boundingintocomics-5f3152acacdf7-768x1181.jpeg

    , @njguy73
    @Anonymous

    The careers of represented people aren't exactly taking off, either.

    , @Nicholas Stix
    @Anonymous

    Another DNC talking point?

  15. • Replies: @Escher
    @Anonymous

    Maybe the virus itself is racist.
    Could someone kick start the cancellation process?

    , @Kyle
    @Anonymous

    https://atlantablackstar.com/2016/11/22/study-african-americans-have-stronger-immune-systems-whites/


    “The strength of the immune response was directly related to the percentage of genes derived from African ancestors,” Barriero said. “Basically, the more African you have in your genome, the stronger you’re going to respond to infection.”
    “While both studies concluded that African-American immune systems are more effective at fighting off bacteria and infections, Barriero made sure not to label the immune systems of African descendants as “better” than ones of European descent. The downside to having a strengthened immune system is that leaves African-Americans susceptible to developing inflammatory auto-immune diseases like Lupus and Crohn’s disease, he noted.”
     
    I read a different article about that study but I can’t find it now. The authors of the study said that the less robust immune response was probably selected for. Perhaps white counties have a lower threshold for herd immunity. Lower immune response could mean less people with severely damaged lungs, coughing up less viral load?
    , @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    My understanding is that warm weather reduces transmission by causing infected water droplets to evaporate before they can be inhaled. From this, you would expect respiratory diseases like this to be less prevalent in hot countries, however you would also expect people from such countries to react worse when they are infected.

    (Incidentally, this is why slavery never became established in the northern U.S. It wasn't so much due to Puritan moral objections as to the fact that in the premodern era, Africans in cold climates quickly died of respiratory illnesses.)

  16. @Anonymous
    Interesting that research funding bodies and administrators don't actually believe that 'diversity' improves scientific outcomes.

    Replies: @Altai, @Anonymous

    Which is a shame because some social scientists did autistic levels of statistical torture to some really poor datasets and found it does.

    https://www.pnas.org/content/117/17/9284

    By analyzing data from nearly all US PhD recipients and their dissertations across three decades, this paper finds demographically underrepresented students innovate at higher rates than majority students, but their novel contributions are discounted and less likely to earn them academic positions. The discounting of minorities’ innovations may partly explain their underrepresentation in influential positions of academia.

    The race categories are white, Asian, and underrepresented minorities. Underrepresented minorities combines Hispanics, African Americans, Native Americans, and any racial categories not captured by the first three

    Or maybe being poor groups who didn’t demographically mature into stable middle and upper middle class backgrounds 2 or more generations previously like all the current field leaders explains it? American academics are so dumb. Everything is about race, nothing is ever about class.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Altai


    underrepresented students innovate at higher rates
     
    Subtext: Money is being left on the table; gov't program needed to force employers to use these higher achievers.
    , @Fox
    @Altai

    I wonder how this "analysis" was conducted to assess "innovating" of underrepresented vs. majority students. What is innovating in this context? And who is doing the assessing? Is it necessary to have personal identifier of the students whose work is being assessed or is it anonymous? Just having a new idea is not the same thing as being creative or being an innovator. Maybe these "novel contributions" are discounted because they are, besides being novel, often not useful. If I posit that division by zero ought to be introduced as a legitimate operation in mathematics because I can produce all sorts of marvelous and novel results, then I produce a "novel contribution" but it is quite useless, false and destructive.

  17. Putting the Death in DIE.

  18. Dr. Kizzmekia Shanta Corbett hardest hit.

  19. I don’t like math, and I lack both the education, discipline, and attention span required for a career in any hard science.

    But goddamn, I am really good at quickly scanning my eyes over each paragraph of diversity-ilicious essays written in a prestige-journal whose sole purpose of existence has been reduced to being being a great way for people like me to telegraph to people like you that you are nothing more than a mindless, social-media consuming lowbrow Deplorable in the presence of an extremely serious thinker.

  20. ALL HAIL CORONA-CHAN, GREATEST DAUGHTER OF FATHER NURGLE!

    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    @Redneck farmer

    Yes.

  21. @El Dato
    What a desolate desert of stupidity.

    Universities scrub names of racist leaders — students say it’s a first step

    In February, University College London (UCL) committed to dropping the names of Francis Galton and Karl Pearson, celebrated statisticians who supported eugenics, from buildings and lecture halls on campus. “Then there was a long pause and nothing happened,” says Michael Sulu, a UCL biochemical engineer who campaigned for the removal of the names.

    According to a university spokesperson, the COVID-19 pandemic delayed action. After George Floyd died and worldwide protests erupted, UCL announced on 19 June that three spaces would have Galton’s and Pearson’s names removed immediately. They now bear generic names such as Lecture Theatre 115. Sulu credits student groups at the university with keeping up the pressure to ensure change.
     
    "Lecture Theatre 115", comrade.

    Chris Jackson, a geoscientist at Imperial College London, agrees that faculty members should put their weight behind such efforts. “You have to kind of stand for something. For me, at least, as a professor at a fancy university, what are you going to use your platform for and your position for?”

     

    Do your fucking job maybe instead of howling with wolves? Like, you know, science and stuff??

    In the penultimate pragraph, the difficult topic of the gibs is broached:

    More transparency and accountability around how universities handle cases of racism would help to rebuild trust with Black academics, Jackson says. He also calls for universities to pay the students and faculty members who serve on diversity and equity committees. This sort of “invisible work” is important but isn’t often rewarded monetarily or factored into career-advancement decisions.

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpmiZ7zsHXY

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hypnotoad666, @Rob McX, @bomag, @Escher

    After George Floyd died and worldwide protests erupted . . .

    First Floyd was “murdered,” then he was “killed,” now he merely “died.”

    Of course, it should read: “After George Floyd overdosed and worldwide protests erupted…”

    • Replies: @Steve Richter
    @Hypnotoad666


    First Floyd was “murdered,” then he was “killed,” now he merely “died.”
     
    yeah, but the restraining office is still in prison. So upsetting that there is no coverage of the injustice being inflicted on those police officers. I guess risky for an individual to gather info on their case and report it. Would likely be banned by Twitter and YT.
    , @HallParvey
    @Hypnotoad666


    Of course, it should read: “After George Floyd overdosed and worldwide protests erupted…”
     
    It should have read, "After an unknown criminal living in a city somewhere in Minnesota tried to pass a countereit bill, he was arrested and in the process died." That should have been the end of it. (Note: Passing counterfeit money is a right restricted to the Federal Government and violation of that law is punished severly.)

    But, "They", you know, "Them", decided that it would be advantageous to stir the pot. So the world has been treated to never ending "reportage" by their tribal spokespouts about the slaughter of certain ethnics in the United States of America. And the gullible sat, night after night, swallowing the latest story out of Rampageland and quaking in fear. It was Policeland live. Real T.V. Not virtual. Real.

    Some hoped it would come to their area. After all, a new pair of Nikes is always welcome. Never mind that it was all being protected by the purveyers of law enforcement. After all, arrest, release, arrest, release, and each time generate reams of paperwork, justifies payment of lucrative salaries for all involved. Except the victim. The victim gets "justice", whatever that is. (Clintonian definition used here.)

    If it weren't phony, all insurance companies would revoke all insurance policies covering real estate anywhere within 100 miles of the Canadian border, and within 50 miles of the California coast. But it is just a show. And the show must go on.
    , @El Dato
    @Hypnotoad666

    Actually, a bit earlier in the same article, he got "killed".


    The protests, sparked when George Floyd was killed by police in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in May, are part of the Black Lives Matter movement ...
     

    According to a university spokesperson, the COVID-19 pandemic delayed action. After George Floyd died and worldwide protests erupted ...
     
    Worldwide, you hear!

    "He's pining for the fjords..."
    , @jsm
    @Hypnotoad666

    Of course, it should read: “After George Floyd overdosed and worldwide protests erupted…”


    Or.. "After George Floyd overdosed and the lying press said the cop killed him to gin up worldwide rioting and mayhem..."

  22. Coronavirus and competency in the same sentence? That is a joke, right?

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
  23. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @newrouter


    Dean of the School of Medicine Anantha Shekhar tweeted:

    As an institution and a community, we do not condone racism or discrimination of any kind
     

    Of any kind? Isn't that exactly what AA is doing?

    I notice that the good doctor lists the mantra in the iSteve "D.I.E." sequence. Could he be a reader?

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Moses

    As an institution and a community, we do not condone racism or discrimination of any kind

    Of any kind? Isn’t that exactly what AA is doing?

    Truth is the first casualty of culture war.

  24. Could it be? Could the pandemic undo the panderdemic?

    • Replies: @Goddard
    @Harry Baldwin


    Could the pandemic undo the panderdemic?
     
    Good one!
    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Harry Baldwin

    Harry, Trademark that tee shirt and bumper sticker gem. Too late, I'm on the phone with my attorney and my knee breaker, in case you protest.

    , @International Jew
    @Harry Baldwin

    As long as Kizzmekia Corbett has her high-profile job, my answer remains "nah".

  25. this week in virology shows the virus study academic world as 90% white and 10% asian.
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyFgCoP4ovsHbt92vM4zN2A

  26. @Anonymous
    https://twitter.com/latimes/status/1293932776018702337

    Replies: @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @Anonymous, @njguy73, @Nicholas Stix

    What God forsaken pile of shit movie was SHE gonna be in??

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  27. @Hypnotoad666
    @El Dato


    After George Floyd died and worldwide protests erupted . . .
     
    First Floyd was "murdered," then he was "killed," now he merely "died."

    Of course, it should read: "After George Floyd overdosed and worldwide protests erupted..."

    Replies: @Steve Richter, @HallParvey, @El Dato, @jsm

    First Floyd was “murdered,” then he was “killed,” now he merely “died.”

    yeah, but the restraining office is still in prison. So upsetting that there is no coverage of the injustice being inflicted on those police officers. I guess risky for an individual to gather info on their case and report it. Would likely be banned by Twitter and YT.

  28. “…researchers of colour”

    I was amazed to discover that ROCs really do exist. What’s more, there are UROCs! At Berkeley, natch.

    UROC at Berkeley

    Welcome to our student-led organization, Underrepresented Researchers of Color (UROC)! We serve as a pipeline to increase representation of marginalized students in research programs and grad schools, and seek to build a community of researchers of color. As research is an extremely isolating and exclusive process at this institution, we seek to dismantle this. Furthermore, students of color perform low rates of research at this research institution, alongside research programs on campus having low representation and acceptance rates of students of color. In other words, marginalized students receive little to no mentorship and access to resources to conduct their research/projects. We exist to bridge this gap.

    They even offer decolonizing research workshops to help UROCs. After a bit of research, I found that this group of undergrads just copied and pasted their manifesto from Ethnic Studies 198: Demystifying the Research Process: Decolonizing Methods in Academic Research.

    The description of this course contains this gem:

    Triggering Course Material
    Much of the course, particularly the Decolonizing Methods workshop series, will situate research historically as a site of violence and trauma against marginalized communities – much of which will include racial and sexual violence. In order to prevent additional trauma, you are excused from this class or section of this class.

    I’ve been trying to figure out how research historically is a site of violence and trauma – I’m sure atoms felt violated in Ernest Rutherford’s laboratory at the University of Manchester, but trauma?

  29. Anonymous[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thulean Friend
    Meritocracy could be afforded to be pushed aside as long as the US was as dominant as it was. Any extra costs could easily be carried. But that is no longer true.

    America will continue to be an extremely powerful country but it won't be a sole Superpower anymore. The longer-run trend will be for wokism to die out, simply by necessity. As genuine costs are rising with non-meritocratic choices, the pressure will build to undo the damage.

    Replies: @anon, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Anonymous, @Unladen Swallow, @Ben tillman

    Meritocracy could be afforded to be pushed aside as long as the US was as dominant as it was. Any extra costs could easily be carried. But that is no longer true.

    Just one of the many diversions of capital from productive use. Empires are by their nature highly political — income from political connections dwarfs any other income, and many successful rivals can be suppressed by intense lobbying. Eventually, business deteriorates to a lobbying scramble for favorable laws and a search for patronage jobs (e.g. Antifa, BLM).

    In England, the Imperial history seems to have established a dominant bureaucracy that was captured by lower class leftists. The government appears to be a strange mix of self hatred and stupidity. The rights of Englishmen were eliminated, and the English economy was, and has remained, closely controlled. The combination is deadly.

    Will the US end up the same way? Well, maybe not. The fascist totalitarian bureaucracy has been restricted to the cities, which are failing. It is just barely possible that the urban fascist totalitarian bureaucracy will lose its power as the cities lose their political power, and that a distributed economy will continue outside the cities.

    Note: some people may object to the description of urban government as “fascist totalitarian bureaucracy”. I must apologize for using a euphemism, but I want to stay well within the Overton Window.

  30. @Harry Baldwin
    Could it be? Could the pandemic undo the panderdemic?

    Replies: @Goddard, @Buffalo Joe, @International Jew

    Could the pandemic undo the panderdemic?

    Good one!

  31. @Anonymous
    https://twitter.com/latimes/status/1293932776018702337

    Replies: @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @Anonymous, @njguy73, @Nicholas Stix

    Must be the model for the new Wonder Woman comic.

  32. “Minority-ethnic scientists in the United States are also having trouble hanging on, says Iris Wagstaff, a director-at-large of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers, based in Annapolis, Maryland.”

    Iris Wagstaff huh?

    Wonder if she’s related to Professor Wagstaff of Huxley University?

  33. @Hypnotoad666
    @El Dato


    After George Floyd died and worldwide protests erupted . . .
     
    First Floyd was "murdered," then he was "killed," now he merely "died."

    Of course, it should read: "After George Floyd overdosed and worldwide protests erupted..."

    Replies: @Steve Richter, @HallParvey, @El Dato, @jsm

    Of course, it should read: “After George Floyd overdosed and worldwide protests erupted…”

    It should have read, “After an unknown criminal living in a city somewhere in Minnesota tried to pass a countereit bill, he was arrested and in the process died.” That should have been the end of it. (Note: Passing counterfeit money is a right restricted to the Federal Government and violation of that law is punished severly.)

    But, “They”, you know, “Them”, decided that it would be advantageous to stir the pot. So the world has been treated to never ending “reportage” by their tribal spokespouts about the slaughter of certain ethnics in the United States of America. And the gullible sat, night after night, swallowing the latest story out of Rampageland and quaking in fear. It was Policeland live. Real T.V. Not virtual. Real.

    Some hoped it would come to their area. After all, a new pair of Nikes is always welcome. Never mind that it was all being protected by the purveyers of law enforcement. After all, arrest, release, arrest, release, and each time generate reams of paperwork, justifies payment of lucrative salaries for all involved. Except the victim. The victim gets “justice”, whatever that is. (Clintonian definition used here.)

    If it weren’t phony, all insurance companies would revoke all insurance policies covering real estate anywhere within 100 miles of the Canadian border, and within 50 miles of the California coast. But it is just a show. And the show must go on.

  34. @Hypnotoad666
    @El Dato


    After George Floyd died and worldwide protests erupted . . .
     
    First Floyd was "murdered," then he was "killed," now he merely "died."

    Of course, it should read: "After George Floyd overdosed and worldwide protests erupted..."

    Replies: @Steve Richter, @HallParvey, @El Dato, @jsm

    Actually, a bit earlier in the same article, he got “killed”.

    The protests, sparked when George Floyd was killed by police in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in May, are part of the Black Lives Matter movement …

    According to a university spokesperson, the COVID-19 pandemic delayed action. After George Floyd died and worldwide protests erupted …

    Worldwide, you hear!

    “He’s pining for the fjords…”

  35. @Thulean Friend
    Meritocracy could be afforded to be pushed aside as long as the US was as dominant as it was. Any extra costs could easily be carried. But that is no longer true.

    America will continue to be an extremely powerful country but it won't be a sole Superpower anymore. The longer-run trend will be for wokism to die out, simply by necessity. As genuine costs are rising with non-meritocratic choices, the pressure will build to undo the damage.

    Replies: @anon, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Anonymous, @Unladen Swallow, @Ben tillman

    I wish you were right, but if this summer is anything to go by, science is going to pushed harder in the DIE direction. No one it seems is willing to stand up to the PC brigades in academia.

    • Replies: @Cato
    @Unladen Swallow


    I wish you were right, but if this summer is anything to go by, science is going to pushed harder in the DIE direction. No one it seems is willing to stand up to the PC brigades in academia.
     
    So it looks. But, historically, ideas evolve in such a way as to enhance the viability of the society in which the ideas emerge. Once the international competition dimension becomes obvious, this trashing of what is good should fade.
  36. Anonymous[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Interesting that research funding bodies and administrators don't actually believe that 'diversity' improves scientific outcomes.

    Replies: @Altai, @Anonymous

    Interesting that research funding bodies and administrators don’t actually believe that ‘diversity’ improves scientific outcomes.

    In my experience as a faculty member, administrators, at least flatly don’t believe in the enterprise of science. They believe in money. From that standpoint the faculty is simply a group of people who couldn’t make it in real society (corporate management seems to think that way also). Dunning-Kruger effect on steroids, perhaps. Administrators in universities act a lot like thugs, apparently believing that the “unworldly” faculty will be stunned into acquiescence by sheer brutality.

    So, to administrators, faculty jobs are simply sinecures, and DIE is just a way to get more money by appointing yet more incompetents to fake working. The problem that administrators see is that the funding sources will describe their Departments as “too White” and reduce funding. In the same way, the funding sources see that funding “too White” institutions could reduce revenue to the funding sources.

    Again, industrial civilization depends on Christian religious fanatics, and the aren’t available nowadays. See:

    Here’s a video about when science was important because it affected Christianity:

    And here’s one about today, in which science is something that interferes with politics and Christianity isn’t important:

    Could be we’re in serious trouble.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Anonymous

    As Lovecraft wrote:


    I retired early, being very sleepy, but was harassed by dreams of the most horrible sort. I seemed to be looking down from an immense height upon a twilit grotto, knee-deep with filth, where a white-bearded daemon swineherd drove about with his staff a flock of fungous, flabby beasts whose appearance filled me with unutterable loathing. Then, as the swineherd paused and nodded over his task, a mighty swarm of rats rained down on the stinking abyss and fell to devouring beasts and man alike.

    From this terrific vision I was abruptly awakened by the motions of N-Word-Man, who had been sleeping as usual across my feet. This time I did not have to question the source of his snarls and hisses, and of the fear which made him sink his claws into my ankle, unconscious of their effect; for on every side of the chamber the walls were alive with nauseous sound -- the veminous slithering of ravenous, gigantic rats. There was now no aurora to show the state of the arras -- the fallen section of which had been replaced - but I was not too frightened to switch on the light.
     
    , @Mr. Anon
    @Anonymous

    Universities largely seem to be rackets nowadays. Administrators run them as fiefdoms, creating ever more meaningless jobs for their cronies. It is well known among those who apply for faculty positions in the technical fields (what is now called STEM) that the chief metric by which tenure-track professors are judged is how much grant money they can bring in; not scholarship, not accomplishment. They are expected to be profit centers for the university.

    Of course, the university's job has always been to shape the young into being useful tools of the society, and nothing has changed in that regard. In some ways, they have always been a racket.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  37. In this house we believe that Science is real. Except when it interferes with Diversity. Then it’s not real.

  38. @Hypnotoad666
    @El Dato


    After George Floyd died and worldwide protests erupted . . .
     
    First Floyd was "murdered," then he was "killed," now he merely "died."

    Of course, it should read: "After George Floyd overdosed and worldwide protests erupted..."

    Replies: @Steve Richter, @HallParvey, @El Dato, @jsm

    Of course, it should read: “After George Floyd overdosed and worldwide protests erupted…”

    Or.. “After George Floyd overdosed and the lying press said the cop killed him to gin up worldwide rioting and mayhem…”

    • Agree: Ben tillman
  39. @David M
    “Black Earth-science faculty member” sounds like some sort of specialist in studying dark soils.

    Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Escher, @nokangaroos

    Wish they’d leave well enough a-loam. };^D

    Here. take two ideology tablets and call me in the morning! Happy pills to compel compliance with corona-vagueness, by a “ethics” professor (whose name contains the word, “crutch” – straight outa central casting, eh?):
    https://www.lewrockwell.com/political-theatre/us-professor-psychoactive-pill-should-be-covertly-administered-to-ensure-lockdown-compliance/
    &
    https://tinyurl.com/y29nvqh4
    Dr. Vernon Coleman: How Many Billion Could the Covid-19 Vaccine Kill or Damage?

    These regressive “progressives” want a return to witchcraft from science.

  40. China must be laughing. As soon as President Harris takes office, they’ll invade Taiwan and Japan and possibly Hawaii. There was some war-game simulation, and supposedly the Chinese could take the islands with paratroopers alone though they would have the kind of casualties the Germans did taking Crete.

    I don’t see this ever stopping, indeed if you take this society to its logical conclusion it would consist of every high IQ White man in a labor camp and various blacks and empowered womenz larping around as scientists and such while the real work is done by the men in the camps. The Soviet Union had something similar, Korolev spent years in a Siberian prison camp which is why the US got to the Moon first.

    Its not just that we got better Nazi rocket scientists, its that the guys below, our guys, were mostly smart ambitious young White men from places like Iowa and Illinois and working to make their mark, and not having to worry about being purged, while the best and the brightest in the USSR were shot or sent to prison so mediocre people could take their place.

    This mean that despite the huge advantage of mobilization in a command economy, the USSR was never really competitive as most of their top people ended up dead or the best years of their working careers in prison.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Whiskey


    our guys, were mostly smart ambitious young White men from places like Iowa and Illinois and working to make their mark
     
    Many of those same guys were highly intelligent Germanic stock, not wholly unlike von Braun and his team.
    , @Joe Stalin
    @Whiskey

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5sXsoRId2s

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mhPy5pP6pz4

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z67BZ1T0ehU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kr0s2t9uG5A

  41. Woke scientist: “A massive comet is on a collision course with earth, wiping out all life. Women and minorities are expected to suffer most.”

  42. Speaking of the Coof: bandanas and neck-gaiters appear to be worse than any mask at keeping droplets out of the air. They don’t do much that is useful.

    https://www.studyfinds.org/worst-face-masks-bandanas-neck-gaiters-more-harmful-not-wearing-mask-covid-19/

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @anon


    Speaking of the Coof: bandanas and neck-gaiters appear to be worse than any mask at keeping droplets out of the air. They don’t do much that is useful.
     
    And doesn't that strike you as exceedingly strange? Why would a cloth mask perform better than a cloth bandanna or cloth neck-gaiter? Why should cloth magically acquire droplet stopping powers by virtue of it being secured by your ears, rather than it being secured behind your head or pulled up over your face like the collar of a sweater? Does that make any sense?

    Or perhaps all of these studies purporting to show this, that, or the other about face coverings are just bulls**t.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @anon

    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @anon

    "Speaking of the Coof: bandanas and neck-gaiters appear to be worse than any mask at keeping droplets out of the air. They don’t do much that is useful."

    Feature not bug. They are VERY useful.... at dehumanizing and humiliating you.

    They function perfectly.

    , @HA
    @anon

    "There's different studies that show different things. The one you linked to used a laser and a phone camera to measure fluid droplets."

    A more extensive study showed somewhat different results because it had a different focus and used different criteria.

    In each case, the results depend on what specific weaves and materials are chosen (and also what clickbait types of "conclusions" may be drawn from the study by the article editors).

    Sure, you could get conspiratorial about that. In fact, you could get just as conspiratorial about hand-washing, given that the specific rubbing techniques, the temperature of the water, the type of detergent used, and the pathogen or toxin that one is trying to wash away, will produce a variety of results. Nowadays, there is a wide body of pseudo-scientific so-called best practices out there that have been adopted by OSHA and other such agencies: wash for 20 seconds or hum a round of Happy Birthday, etc. -- which kind of get the job done in the case of the most common pathogens we're currently dealing with. Or so we hope. But it's easy to tear down or poke holes in all that given all the inconsistencies and vagueness.

    And no doubt there were (and probably still are) a bunch of tantrum-throwers out there eager to resist the oppressive fascist nanny state that dares to write up so-called "health codes" and insist -- on the basis of such inconsistently designed and therefore vague "scientific" studies -- that we wash our hands every time we use the bathroom, and they issue dire threats about how subservient we're becoming, and they point out how this kind of thing makes us collectively less resistant to diseases and threatens to destroy us as a species, etc., etc., you probably know how the rest of the rant goes.

    While there's some truth to all that, most of the rest of us who have better things to do have learned to just roll our eyes and wash up, and cast shade and stink-eye on any self-styled rebels who think they're too cool for that sort of thing, and it hasn't destroyed us as a species just yet.

    Because in the end, if getting tied up in knots over being told to wash hands, strap on a seat belt, or wear a mask during a pandemic even makes it into the top 10 things in your life you're outraged over right now, then you, little Lord Fauntleroy, win the "first-world problems" prize. Would that we could all be so blessed.

  43. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @El Dato

    ‘It’s like we’re going back 30 years’
     
    Who the fcuck talks Valley Girl in a header in Nature?

    "General Kala, Black Earth Scientist approaching."
    "What do you mean Black Earth Scientist approaching? Open wallets! All donations!"

    Replies: @Anonymous, @J.Ross

    “General Kala, Black Earth Scientist approaching.”
    “What do you mean Black Earth Scientist approaching? Open wallets! All donations!”

    If only Black Earth Scientist were as useful as Flash Gordon in a crisis, eh?

    Flash! A-ah!
    King of the impossible

    He’s for every one of us
    Stand for every one of us
    He saves with a mighty hand
    Every man, every woman
    Every child, it’s the mighty flash

    More like, “Close wallets! No donations!” I should think.

    • LOL: El Dato
  44. BGR, which I’ve never heard of but is linked to by Google News, says that lump sum checks for up to $60,000 per family are on the way, so long as everyone votes for Harris/Biden. Yes, 60K, plus monthly stipends thereafter.

    https://bgr.com/2020/08/12/new-stimulus-check-for-coronavirus-relief-retroactive-payments/#

    • Replies: @notsaying
    @HammerJack

    I can only say I hope not. The Senate would have to go Democratic and enough people in both houses would have to vote for this madness. $2,000 per person a month including kids for the entire Covid-19 emergency -- plus as I recall 3 months after it -- would be God knows how many trillions of new deficit spending. I would love the money, don't get me wrong, but we just can't afford this. It's a fantasy.

    It doesn't speak well of the Democrats who sponsored and supported this bill. One of them was Kamala Harris.

    Replies: @Alfa158

  45. many so-called woke businesses like white shoe law firms are using CV to “furlough” their incompetent black employees–LOL. Black lives matter?

  46. As one of a very few Black Earth-science faculty members in the entire Northern Hemisphere

    The capitalization of black confused me for a second- I was thinking “what the hell is black earth science?”

  47. I know that Nature is an international publication but still, it seems very strange that nothing is mentioned about immigration in the quotes from the article.

    Isn’t that kind of ignoring the elephant in the room? If people can’t be here to study or aren’t able to get their temporary work visas or have lost their visas, obviously they can’t pursue a career in the US. I would assume that foreign students and foreign workers are being adversely affected by immigration changes on who can come into the country in other First World nations as well.

    I would like to know how COVID-19 is affecting American STEM students and employees, if at all. I could understand if government and private research funding ends up getting cut back because money is tight but I would not think that has happened yet.

    On a related topic: All those foreign worker bans that Trump instituted are going to be thwarted due to the State Department, according to the Center for Immigration Studies.

    “The State Department’s August 12 ruling regarding exceptions to the recently announced ban on foreign worker admissions will exempt almost everyone — another indication that the Trump administration seems not to want to inconvenience the private sector by seriously reducing the foreign worker population.”

    Once again when we think that finally something big and effective’s going to be done about immigration, it turns it’s not. So perhaps many of the foreign scientists that Nature’s worried about will end up right back here before we know or or never leave.

    https://cis.org/North/State-Department-Rule-All-Kills-Ban-ForeignWorker-Admissions

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @notsaying


    I would like to know how COVID-19 is affecting American STEM students and employees, if at all.
     
    Other than the stupid daily screening app, mask mandate, temperature check at the entrance, and worthless managers working from home it hasn't affected my workplace much.
  48. @Anonymous
    https://twitter.com/latimes/status/1293932776018702337

    Replies: @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @Anonymous, @njguy73, @Nicholas Stix

    The careers of represented people aren’t exactly taking off, either.

  49. @Whiskey
    China must be laughing. As soon as President Harris takes office, they'll invade Taiwan and Japan and possibly Hawaii. There was some war-game simulation, and supposedly the Chinese could take the islands with paratroopers alone though they would have the kind of casualties the Germans did taking Crete.

    I don't see this ever stopping, indeed if you take this society to its logical conclusion it would consist of every high IQ White man in a labor camp and various blacks and empowered womenz larping around as scientists and such while the real work is done by the men in the camps. The Soviet Union had something similar, Korolev spent years in a Siberian prison camp which is why the US got to the Moon first.

    Its not just that we got better Nazi rocket scientists, its that the guys below, our guys, were mostly smart ambitious young White men from places like Iowa and Illinois and working to make their mark, and not having to worry about being purged, while the best and the brightest in the USSR were shot or sent to prison so mediocre people could take their place.

    This mean that despite the huge advantage of mobilization in a command economy, the USSR was never really competitive as most of their top people ended up dead or the best years of their working careers in prison.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Joe Stalin

    our guys, were mostly smart ambitious young White men from places like Iowa and Illinois and working to make their mark

    Many of those same guys were highly intelligent Germanic stock, not wholly unlike von Braun and his team.

  50. @notsaying
    I know that Nature is an international publication but still, it seems very strange that nothing is mentioned about immigration in the quotes from the article.

    Isn't that kind of ignoring the elephant in the room? If people can't be here to study or aren't able to get their temporary work visas or have lost their visas, obviously they can't pursue a career in the US. I would assume that foreign students and foreign workers are being adversely affected by immigration changes on who can come into the country in other First World nations as well.

    I would like to know how COVID-19 is affecting American STEM students and employees, if at all. I could understand if government and private research funding ends up getting cut back because money is tight but I would not think that has happened yet.

    On a related topic: All those foreign worker bans that Trump instituted are going to be thwarted due to the State Department, according to the Center for Immigration Studies.

    "The State Department's August 12 ruling regarding exceptions to the recently announced ban on foreign worker admissions will exempt almost everyone — another indication that the Trump administration seems not to want to inconvenience the private sector by seriously reducing the foreign worker population."

    Once again when we think that finally something big and effective's going to be done about immigration, it turns it's not. So perhaps many of the foreign scientists that Nature's worried about will end up right back here before we know or or never leave.

    https://cis.org/North/State-Department-Rule-All-Kills-Ban-ForeignWorker-Admissions

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    I would like to know how COVID-19 is affecting American STEM students and employees, if at all.

    Other than the stupid daily screening app, mask mandate, temperature check at the entrance, and worthless managers working from home it hasn’t affected my workplace much.

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Thanks: notsaying
  51. The most interesting thing about this article is that it doesn’t have any evidence, and in fact, states that there IS no evidence supporting this point of view. It’s just a bunch of pull-quotes from activists stating that they “sense” or “have heard conversations.”

    This is an article about nothing, meant only to fill up the empty spaces with the words people expect to hear.

  52. You know the world is doomed when Nature starts to read like The Onion.

    • Agree: Rob McX
  53. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous


    Interesting that research funding bodies and administrators don’t actually believe that ‘diversity’ improves scientific outcomes.
     
    In my experience as a faculty member, administrators, at least flatly don't believe in the enterprise of science. They believe in money. From that standpoint the faculty is simply a group of people who couldn't make it in real society (corporate management seems to think that way also). Dunning-Kruger effect on steroids, perhaps. Administrators in universities act a lot like thugs, apparently believing that the "unworldly" faculty will be stunned into acquiescence by sheer brutality.

    So, to administrators, faculty jobs are simply sinecures, and DIE is just a way to get more money by appointing yet more incompetents to fake working. The problem that administrators see is that the funding sources will describe their Departments as "too White" and reduce funding. In the same way, the funding sources see that funding "too White" institutions could reduce revenue to the funding sources.

    Again, industrial civilization depends on Christian religious fanatics, and the aren't available nowadays. See: https://youtu.be/CpGupes7NvI

    Here's a video about when science was important because it affected Christianity:
    https://youtu.be/9t36Jkz6q6I?t=1236

    And here's one about today, in which science is something that interferes with politics and Christianity isn't important:
    https://youtu.be/7hSj01bAZAU

    Could be we're in serious trouble.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Mr. Anon

    As Lovecraft wrote:

    I retired early, being very sleepy, but was harassed by dreams of the most horrible sort. I seemed to be looking down from an immense height upon a twilit grotto, knee-deep with filth, where a white-bearded daemon swineherd drove about with his staff a flock of fungous, flabby beasts whose appearance filled me with unutterable loathing. Then, as the swineherd paused and nodded over his task, a mighty swarm of rats rained down on the stinking abyss and fell to devouring beasts and man alike.

    From this terrific vision I was abruptly awakened by the motions of N-Word-Man, who had been sleeping as usual across my feet. This time I did not have to question the source of his snarls and hisses, and of the fear which made him sink his claws into my ankle, unconscious of their effect; for on every side of the chamber the walls were alive with nauseous sound — the veminous slithering of ravenous, gigantic rats. There was now no aurora to show the state of the arras — the fallen section of which had been replaced – but I was not too frightened to switch on the light.

  54. @El Dato
    What a desolate desert of stupidity.

    Universities scrub names of racist leaders — students say it’s a first step

    In February, University College London (UCL) committed to dropping the names of Francis Galton and Karl Pearson, celebrated statisticians who supported eugenics, from buildings and lecture halls on campus. “Then there was a long pause and nothing happened,” says Michael Sulu, a UCL biochemical engineer who campaigned for the removal of the names.

    According to a university spokesperson, the COVID-19 pandemic delayed action. After George Floyd died and worldwide protests erupted, UCL announced on 19 June that three spaces would have Galton’s and Pearson’s names removed immediately. They now bear generic names such as Lecture Theatre 115. Sulu credits student groups at the university with keeping up the pressure to ensure change.
     
    "Lecture Theatre 115", comrade.

    Chris Jackson, a geoscientist at Imperial College London, agrees that faculty members should put their weight behind such efforts. “You have to kind of stand for something. For me, at least, as a professor at a fancy university, what are you going to use your platform for and your position for?”

     

    Do your fucking job maybe instead of howling with wolves? Like, you know, science and stuff??

    In the penultimate pragraph, the difficult topic of the gibs is broached:

    More transparency and accountability around how universities handle cases of racism would help to rebuild trust with Black academics, Jackson says. He also calls for universities to pay the students and faculty members who serve on diversity and equity committees. This sort of “invisible work” is important but isn’t often rewarded monetarily or factored into career-advancement decisions.

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpmiZ7zsHXY

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hypnotoad666, @Rob McX, @bomag, @Escher

    Yeah, Michael Sulu, I did an image search on him.

    And on the Grenadier “Guardsmen” armed robbers mentioned by another commenter somewhere.

    Remind me again why diversity is so wonderful.

  55. @anon
    Speaking of the Coof: bandanas and neck-gaiters appear to be worse than any mask at keeping droplets out of the air. They don't do much that is useful.

    https://www.studyfinds.org/worst-face-masks-bandanas-neck-gaiters-more-harmful-not-wearing-mask-covid-19/

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @HA

    Speaking of the Coof: bandanas and neck-gaiters appear to be worse than any mask at keeping droplets out of the air. They don’t do much that is useful.

    And doesn’t that strike you as exceedingly strange? Why would a cloth mask perform better than a cloth bandanna or cloth neck-gaiter? Why should cloth magically acquire droplet stopping powers by virtue of it being secured by your ears, rather than it being secured behind your head or pulled up over your face like the collar of a sweater? Does that make any sense?

    Or perhaps all of these studies purporting to show this, that, or the other about face coverings are just bulls**t.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Mr. Anon

    Yeah, they're lying again. They just don't want people wearing 'scary' face kerchiefs looking like bandits of old.

    , @anon
    @Mr. Anon

    And doesn’t that strike you as exceedingly strange? Why would a cloth mask perform better than a cloth bandanna or cloth neck-gaiter?

    Might just depend on the fabric and possibly the weave. Cotton and cotton / polyester have different properties vs. pure polyester or maybe spandex. This isn't difficult science, doesn't require a supercomputer running fluid flow equations.

    Or perhaps all of these studies purporting to show this, that, or the other about face coverings are just bulls**t.

    Possible, or maybe you're just displacing anger .

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  56. @Redneck farmer
    ALL HAIL CORONA-CHAN, GREATEST DAUGHTER OF FATHER NURGLE!

    Replies: @Hunsdon

    Yes.

  57. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous


    Interesting that research funding bodies and administrators don’t actually believe that ‘diversity’ improves scientific outcomes.
     
    In my experience as a faculty member, administrators, at least flatly don't believe in the enterprise of science. They believe in money. From that standpoint the faculty is simply a group of people who couldn't make it in real society (corporate management seems to think that way also). Dunning-Kruger effect on steroids, perhaps. Administrators in universities act a lot like thugs, apparently believing that the "unworldly" faculty will be stunned into acquiescence by sheer brutality.

    So, to administrators, faculty jobs are simply sinecures, and DIE is just a way to get more money by appointing yet more incompetents to fake working. The problem that administrators see is that the funding sources will describe their Departments as "too White" and reduce funding. In the same way, the funding sources see that funding "too White" institutions could reduce revenue to the funding sources.

    Again, industrial civilization depends on Christian religious fanatics, and the aren't available nowadays. See: https://youtu.be/CpGupes7NvI

    Here's a video about when science was important because it affected Christianity:
    https://youtu.be/9t36Jkz6q6I?t=1236

    And here's one about today, in which science is something that interferes with politics and Christianity isn't important:
    https://youtu.be/7hSj01bAZAU

    Could be we're in serious trouble.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Mr. Anon

    Universities largely seem to be rackets nowadays. Administrators run them as fiefdoms, creating ever more meaningless jobs for their cronies. It is well known among those who apply for faculty positions in the technical fields (what is now called STEM) that the chief metric by which tenure-track professors are judged is how much grant money they can bring in; not scholarship, not accomplishment. They are expected to be profit centers for the university.

    Of course, the university’s job has always been to shape the young into being useful tools of the society, and nothing has changed in that regard. In some ways, they have always been a racket.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Mr. Anon


    tenure-track professors are judged is how much grant money they can bring in; not scholarship, not accomplishment.
     
    That's the myth, but it's not true. Real income is from students and payroll funding. Since the 1960s riots, administrators have had as their top goal not having more riots. This, in practice, means nothing new. An innovative and successful researcher is apt to cause trouble -- and the work is stopped, whether funded or not. What's wanted it "research" that retraces old ground and cannot be questioned.

    If you want an example, look at early COVID-19 research and the present prohibition of hydroxychloroquine use in the US. Early COVID-19 research, routine disassembly of the virus, showed that commercial gene splicing had been used. The researchers were third world people who didn't know how the system worked. Their paper was withdrawn by administrators within 24 hours and has apparently vanished. Hydroxychloroquine use has been banned in the US, and patients are told to wait until they have pneumonia, then report to hospital the emergency room. That's murder, plain and simple, but it does keep research money flowing to politically important organizations.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  58. @Whiskey
    China must be laughing. As soon as President Harris takes office, they'll invade Taiwan and Japan and possibly Hawaii. There was some war-game simulation, and supposedly the Chinese could take the islands with paratroopers alone though they would have the kind of casualties the Germans did taking Crete.

    I don't see this ever stopping, indeed if you take this society to its logical conclusion it would consist of every high IQ White man in a labor camp and various blacks and empowered womenz larping around as scientists and such while the real work is done by the men in the camps. The Soviet Union had something similar, Korolev spent years in a Siberian prison camp which is why the US got to the Moon first.

    Its not just that we got better Nazi rocket scientists, its that the guys below, our guys, were mostly smart ambitious young White men from places like Iowa and Illinois and working to make their mark, and not having to worry about being purged, while the best and the brightest in the USSR were shot or sent to prison so mediocre people could take their place.

    This mean that despite the huge advantage of mobilization in a command economy, the USSR was never really competitive as most of their top people ended up dead or the best years of their working careers in prison.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Joe Stalin

  59. @anon
    @Thulean Friend

    It would be sad if millions were to die due to covid.

    But the real tragedy.....

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    It would be sad if millions were to die due to covid.

    I appreciate the Traitor General Casey reference, but no, we’ll be fine. It’s a great excuse though, to get rid of some of that dead wood… the ones that write those scientific papers about personnel and working conditions rather than about the science itself.

  60. From the article “….she and others fear the pain won’t be equally distributed.” So, coming soon to your neighborhood a Pain Clinic where pain will be administered to non minorities until equilibrium is established. I hope it’s just a pain shot and not a hammer blow or ball squeezing.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Buffalo Joe

    It's the retarded version of Fail Safe, which was itself idiotic yet pseudo-intelligent.

  61. @Harry Baldwin
    Could it be? Could the pandemic undo the panderdemic?

    Replies: @Goddard, @Buffalo Joe, @International Jew

    Harry, Trademark that tee shirt and bumper sticker gem. Too late, I’m on the phone with my attorney and my knee breaker, in case you protest.

  62. Anonymous[504] • Disclaimer says:

    As one of a very few Black Earth-science faculty members in the entire Northern Hemisphere

    In other words: whichever Blacks hold a geology/enviro degree don’t take their talents to Academia, to be hired to a job-for-life on sight; but seem to prefer some other field of varying reality which at least pays better, and carries the bonus of not having to deal with the weak-ass beta society of academe.

    Furthermore this apocalyptic periodic wave of people making this same predictable choice, every 5-6 years (or however long geo/enviro master’s takes), totals in maybe the low 3 figures per cycle?

    And they wonder why we’ve tuned out climate-change breast-beating?

  63. @HammerJack
    BGR, which I've never heard of but is linked to by Google News, says that lump sum checks for up to $60,000 per family are on the way, so long as everyone votes for Harris/Biden. Yes, 60K, plus monthly stipends thereafter.

    https://bgr.com/2020/08/12/new-stimulus-check-for-coronavirus-relief-retroactive-payments/#

    Replies: @notsaying

    I can only say I hope not. The Senate would have to go Democratic and enough people in both houses would have to vote for this madness. $2,000 per person a month including kids for the entire Covid-19 emergency — plus as I recall 3 months after it — would be God knows how many trillions of new deficit spending. I would love the money, don’t get me wrong, but we just can’t afford this. It’s a fantasy.

    It doesn’t speak well of the Democrats who sponsored and supported this bill. One of them was Kamala Harris.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @notsaying

    There are 61 million couples in the US and 74 million children. If we presume 10% percent are not eligible either because the household income is too high, or because they are a 3rd+ child, that comes to 480 billion dollars a month, and 5.76 trillion dollars a year.
    Well, the government can just print Monopoly money like they did with the bank and stock bailout, but how long before the world monetary system says, “OK, that’s Monopoly money”, blows the whistle and hollers, “Everybody out of the pool!”.

  64. @El Dato
    What a desolate desert of stupidity.

    Universities scrub names of racist leaders — students say it’s a first step

    In February, University College London (UCL) committed to dropping the names of Francis Galton and Karl Pearson, celebrated statisticians who supported eugenics, from buildings and lecture halls on campus. “Then there was a long pause and nothing happened,” says Michael Sulu, a UCL biochemical engineer who campaigned for the removal of the names.

    According to a university spokesperson, the COVID-19 pandemic delayed action. After George Floyd died and worldwide protests erupted, UCL announced on 19 June that three spaces would have Galton’s and Pearson’s names removed immediately. They now bear generic names such as Lecture Theatre 115. Sulu credits student groups at the university with keeping up the pressure to ensure change.
     
    "Lecture Theatre 115", comrade.

    Chris Jackson, a geoscientist at Imperial College London, agrees that faculty members should put their weight behind such efforts. “You have to kind of stand for something. For me, at least, as a professor at a fancy university, what are you going to use your platform for and your position for?”

     

    Do your fucking job maybe instead of howling with wolves? Like, you know, science and stuff??

    In the penultimate pragraph, the difficult topic of the gibs is broached:

    More transparency and accountability around how universities handle cases of racism would help to rebuild trust with Black academics, Jackson says. He also calls for universities to pay the students and faculty members who serve on diversity and equity committees. This sort of “invisible work” is important but isn’t often rewarded monetarily or factored into career-advancement decisions.

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpmiZ7zsHXY

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hypnotoad666, @Rob McX, @bomag, @Escher

    [the usual abject pandering] would help to rebuild trust with Black academics

    Good grief.

    Plenty of abject obeisance to the Other of Color in the Academy since about 1850.

    It has bought nothing.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    @bomag

    "More transparency and accountability around how universities handle cases of racism would help to rebuild trust with Black academics, Jackson says."

    The race hustlers use almost identical phrases for different institutions. The police also must "rebuild trust with black communities." Except that there never was any "trust" to "rebuild," because the problem was and remains black unfitness and black racism.

    And "more transparency and accountability around how universities handle cases of racism" is the last thing blacks want, because it would constantly expose their criminal race hoaxes.

  65. @Altai
    @Anonymous

    Which is a shame because some social scientists did autistic levels of statistical torture to some really poor datasets and found it does.

    https://www.pnas.org/content/117/17/9284


    By analyzing data from nearly all US PhD recipients and their dissertations across three decades, this paper finds demographically underrepresented students innovate at higher rates than majority students, but their novel contributions are discounted and less likely to earn them academic positions. The discounting of minorities’ innovations may partly explain their underrepresentation in influential positions of academia.

    ...

    The race categories are white, Asian, and underrepresented minorities. Underrepresented minorities combines Hispanics, African Americans, Native Americans, and any racial categories not captured by the first three
     
    Or maybe being poor groups who didn't demographically mature into stable middle and upper middle class backgrounds 2 or more generations previously like all the current field leaders explains it? American academics are so dumb. Everything is about race, nothing is ever about class.

    Replies: @bomag, @Fox

    underrepresented students innovate at higher rates

    Subtext: Money is being left on the table; gov’t program needed to force employers to use these higher achievers.

  66. @El Dato

    ‘It’s like we’re going back 30 years’
     
    Who the fcuck talks Valley Girl in a header in Nature?

    "General Kala, Black Earth Scientist approaching."
    "What do you mean Black Earth Scientist approaching? Open wallets! All donations!"

    Replies: @Anonymous, @J.Ross

    No one, but no one comments on social media without the approval of the diversity officer.

  67. @Buffalo Joe
    From the article "....she and others fear the pain won't be equally distributed." So, coming soon to your neighborhood a Pain Clinic where pain will be administered to non minorities until equilibrium is established. I hope it's just a pain shot and not a hammer blow or ball squeezing.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    It’s the retarded version of Fail Safe, which was itself idiotic yet pseudo-intelligent.

  68. @Harry Baldwin
    Could it be? Could the pandemic undo the panderdemic?

    Replies: @Goddard, @Buffalo Joe, @International Jew

    As long as Kizzmekia Corbett has her high-profile job, my answer remains “nah”.

  69. A decades long industrial war with China would burn all this away. We’ve had peace far too long. It has not been good for us.

    Pray for War.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @Whiskey

    Whiskey, I think you're fun, and I don't care what everyone else says.

  70. @Unladen Swallow
    @Thulean Friend

    I wish you were right, but if this summer is anything to go by, science is going to pushed harder in the DIE direction. No one it seems is willing to stand up to the PC brigades in academia.

    Replies: @Cato

    I wish you were right, but if this summer is anything to go by, science is going to pushed harder in the DIE direction. No one it seems is willing to stand up to the PC brigades in academia.

    So it looks. But, historically, ideas evolve in such a way as to enhance the viability of the society in which the ideas emerge. Once the international competition dimension becomes obvious, this trashing of what is good should fade.

    • LOL: Mr McKenna
  71. White scientists saving millions of lives? Irrelevant: Democratic governors will more than offset those millions with crippling economic shutdowns and disease-harboring facediaper mandates.

    Forever.

  72. @anon
    Speaking of the Coof: bandanas and neck-gaiters appear to be worse than any mask at keeping droplets out of the air. They don't do much that is useful.

    https://www.studyfinds.org/worst-face-masks-bandanas-neck-gaiters-more-harmful-not-wearing-mask-covid-19/

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @HA

    “Speaking of the Coof: bandanas and neck-gaiters appear to be worse than any mask at keeping droplets out of the air. They don’t do much that is useful.”

    Feature not bug. They are VERY useful…. at dehumanizing and humiliating you.

    They function perfectly.

  73. @David M
    “Black Earth-science faculty member” sounds like some sort of specialist in studying dark soils.

    Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Escher, @nokangaroos

    Or the dark arts.
    Is that another term headed for the chopping block, I wonder.

  74. @Anonymous
    https://twitter.com/ABC/status/1294453780218613760

    Replies: @Escher, @Kyle, @Anonymous

    Maybe the virus itself is racist.
    Could someone kick start the cancellation process?

  75. @El Dato
    What a desolate desert of stupidity.

    Universities scrub names of racist leaders — students say it’s a first step

    In February, University College London (UCL) committed to dropping the names of Francis Galton and Karl Pearson, celebrated statisticians who supported eugenics, from buildings and lecture halls on campus. “Then there was a long pause and nothing happened,” says Michael Sulu, a UCL biochemical engineer who campaigned for the removal of the names.

    According to a university spokesperson, the COVID-19 pandemic delayed action. After George Floyd died and worldwide protests erupted, UCL announced on 19 June that three spaces would have Galton’s and Pearson’s names removed immediately. They now bear generic names such as Lecture Theatre 115. Sulu credits student groups at the university with keeping up the pressure to ensure change.
     
    "Lecture Theatre 115", comrade.

    Chris Jackson, a geoscientist at Imperial College London, agrees that faculty members should put their weight behind such efforts. “You have to kind of stand for something. For me, at least, as a professor at a fancy university, what are you going to use your platform for and your position for?”

     

    Do your fucking job maybe instead of howling with wolves? Like, you know, science and stuff??

    In the penultimate pragraph, the difficult topic of the gibs is broached:

    More transparency and accountability around how universities handle cases of racism would help to rebuild trust with Black academics, Jackson says. He also calls for universities to pay the students and faculty members who serve on diversity and equity committees. This sort of “invisible work” is important but isn’t often rewarded monetarily or factored into career-advancement decisions.

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpmiZ7zsHXY

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hypnotoad666, @Rob McX, @bomag, @Escher

    The 5 families should learn a few things from these guys on effective shakedown tactics.

  76. @Altai
    @Anonymous

    Which is a shame because some social scientists did autistic levels of statistical torture to some really poor datasets and found it does.

    https://www.pnas.org/content/117/17/9284


    By analyzing data from nearly all US PhD recipients and their dissertations across three decades, this paper finds demographically underrepresented students innovate at higher rates than majority students, but their novel contributions are discounted and less likely to earn them academic positions. The discounting of minorities’ innovations may partly explain their underrepresentation in influential positions of academia.

    ...

    The race categories are white, Asian, and underrepresented minorities. Underrepresented minorities combines Hispanics, African Americans, Native Americans, and any racial categories not captured by the first three
     
    Or maybe being poor groups who didn't demographically mature into stable middle and upper middle class backgrounds 2 or more generations previously like all the current field leaders explains it? American academics are so dumb. Everything is about race, nothing is ever about class.

    Replies: @bomag, @Fox

    I wonder how this “analysis” was conducted to assess “innovating” of underrepresented vs. majority students. What is innovating in this context? And who is doing the assessing? Is it necessary to have personal identifier of the students whose work is being assessed or is it anonymous? Just having a new idea is not the same thing as being creative or being an innovator. Maybe these “novel contributions” are discounted because they are, besides being novel, often not useful. If I posit that division by zero ought to be introduced as a legitimate operation in mathematics because I can produce all sorts of marvelous and novel results, then I produce a “novel contribution” but it is quite useless, false and destructive.

  77. @notsaying
    @HammerJack

    I can only say I hope not. The Senate would have to go Democratic and enough people in both houses would have to vote for this madness. $2,000 per person a month including kids for the entire Covid-19 emergency -- plus as I recall 3 months after it -- would be God knows how many trillions of new deficit spending. I would love the money, don't get me wrong, but we just can't afford this. It's a fantasy.

    It doesn't speak well of the Democrats who sponsored and supported this bill. One of them was Kamala Harris.

    Replies: @Alfa158

    There are 61 million couples in the US and 74 million children. If we presume 10% percent are not eligible either because the household income is too high, or because they are a 3rd+ child, that comes to 480 billion dollars a month, and 5.76 trillion dollars a year.
    Well, the government can just print Monopoly money like they did with the bank and stock bailout, but how long before the world monetary system says, “OK, that’s Monopoly money”, blows the whistle and hollers, “Everybody out of the pool!”.

    • Agree: notsaying
  78. @Whiskey
    A decades long industrial war with China would burn all this away. We've had peace far too long. It has not been good for us.

    Pray for War.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna

    Whiskey, I think you’re fun, and I don’t care what everyone else says.

  79. @Mr. Anon
    @anon


    Speaking of the Coof: bandanas and neck-gaiters appear to be worse than any mask at keeping droplets out of the air. They don’t do much that is useful.
     
    And doesn't that strike you as exceedingly strange? Why would a cloth mask perform better than a cloth bandanna or cloth neck-gaiter? Why should cloth magically acquire droplet stopping powers by virtue of it being secured by your ears, rather than it being secured behind your head or pulled up over your face like the collar of a sweater? Does that make any sense?

    Or perhaps all of these studies purporting to show this, that, or the other about face coverings are just bulls**t.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @anon

    Yeah, they’re lying again. They just don’t want people wearing ‘scary’ face kerchiefs looking like bandits of old.

    • Agree: JMcG
  80. Anonymous[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Anon
    @Anonymous

    Universities largely seem to be rackets nowadays. Administrators run them as fiefdoms, creating ever more meaningless jobs for their cronies. It is well known among those who apply for faculty positions in the technical fields (what is now called STEM) that the chief metric by which tenure-track professors are judged is how much grant money they can bring in; not scholarship, not accomplishment. They are expected to be profit centers for the university.

    Of course, the university's job has always been to shape the young into being useful tools of the society, and nothing has changed in that regard. In some ways, they have always been a racket.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    tenure-track professors are judged is how much grant money they can bring in; not scholarship, not accomplishment.

    That’s the myth, but it’s not true. Real income is from students and payroll funding. Since the 1960s riots, administrators have had as their top goal not having more riots. This, in practice, means nothing new. An innovative and successful researcher is apt to cause trouble — and the work is stopped, whether funded or not. What’s wanted it “research” that retraces old ground and cannot be questioned.

    If you want an example, look at early COVID-19 research and the present prohibition of hydroxychloroquine use in the US. Early COVID-19 research, routine disassembly of the virus, showed that commercial gene splicing had been used. The researchers were third world people who didn’t know how the system worked. Their paper was withdrawn by administrators within 24 hours and has apparently vanished. Hydroxychloroquine use has been banned in the US, and patients are told to wait until they have pneumonia, then report to hospital the emergency room. That’s murder, plain and simple, but it does keep research money flowing to politically important organizations.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Anonymous


    That’s the myth, but it’s not true.
     
    No, it very much is true. I've known several people who interviewed for tenure-track positions in engineering and they were told flat out: bringing in money is the primary metric upon which you will be judged; publication is secondary, teaching is tertiay.
  81. Somewhat related:
    https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-england-birmingham-53741421/the-black-women-in-tech-coding-the-future

    One could be forgiven for thinking that the article was about black women actually doing cutting edge programming.

  82. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @newrouter


    Dean of the School of Medicine Anantha Shekhar tweeted:

    As an institution and a community, we do not condone racism or discrimination of any kind
     

    Of any kind? Isn't that exactly what AA is doing?

    I notice that the good doctor lists the mantra in the iSteve "D.I.E." sequence. Could he be a reader?

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Moses

    Dean of the School of Medicine Anantha Shekhar tweeted:

    As an institution and a community, we do not condone racism or discrimination of any kind

    That’s rich coming from an Indian Brahmin.

    Oh my sides!

    • Agree: HammerJack
  83. @RichardTaylor

    It’s almost as if during a crisis, people tend to direct money to scientists who can save millions of lives rather than to poseurs who can check privileged race boxes.
     
    I love how the Clever People are eager to get set asides for themselves, without the slightest concern for their racial brothers and sisters. You know, the ones they call "proles".

    There's a special place in Hell in for them.

    These are the people who support desegregation for the masses, but assume they will always get a special deal. And really, they like hanging out with other Really Smart people from India, Nigeria, Asia, or wherever, much more than the "low brow" White crowd.

    Replies: @Ian Smith

    I’d rather hang out with white proles than smart blacks. I’d take politely feigning an interest in NASCAR over listening to a lecture on white privilege or redlining any day of the week.

  84. @Anonymous
    https://twitter.com/ABC/status/1294453780218613760

    Replies: @Escher, @Kyle, @Anonymous

    https://atlantablackstar.com/2016/11/22/study-african-americans-have-stronger-immune-systems-whites/

    “The strength of the immune response was directly related to the percentage of genes derived from African ancestors,” Barriero said. “Basically, the more African you have in your genome, the stronger you’re going to respond to infection.”
    “While both studies concluded that African-American immune systems are more effective at fighting off bacteria and infections, Barriero made sure not to label the immune systems of African descendants as “better” than ones of European descent. The downside to having a strengthened immune system is that leaves African-Americans susceptible to developing inflammatory auto-immune diseases like Lupus and Crohn’s disease, he noted.”

    I read a different article about that study but I can’t find it now. The authors of the study said that the less robust immune response was probably selected for. Perhaps white counties have a lower threshold for herd immunity. Lower immune response could mean less people with severely damaged lungs, coughing up less viral load?

  85. Another interpretation is that those who are marginal are often discarded in a crisis. Now the question is why are they marginal in the first place? It’s because of race, class and gender and little to do with actual merit or productivity.

    That’s another interpretation.

    It’s more right than you think.

  86. Anonymous[960] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    https://twitter.com/ABC/status/1294453780218613760

    Replies: @Escher, @Kyle, @Anonymous

    My understanding is that warm weather reduces transmission by causing infected water droplets to evaporate before they can be inhaled. From this, you would expect respiratory diseases like this to be less prevalent in hot countries, however you would also expect people from such countries to react worse when they are infected.

    (Incidentally, this is why slavery never became established in the northern U.S. It wasn’t so much due to Puritan moral objections as to the fact that in the premodern era, Africans in cold climates quickly died of respiratory illnesses.)

  87. @Anonymous
    @Mr. Anon


    tenure-track professors are judged is how much grant money they can bring in; not scholarship, not accomplishment.
     
    That's the myth, but it's not true. Real income is from students and payroll funding. Since the 1960s riots, administrators have had as their top goal not having more riots. This, in practice, means nothing new. An innovative and successful researcher is apt to cause trouble -- and the work is stopped, whether funded or not. What's wanted it "research" that retraces old ground and cannot be questioned.

    If you want an example, look at early COVID-19 research and the present prohibition of hydroxychloroquine use in the US. Early COVID-19 research, routine disassembly of the virus, showed that commercial gene splicing had been used. The researchers were third world people who didn't know how the system worked. Their paper was withdrawn by administrators within 24 hours and has apparently vanished. Hydroxychloroquine use has been banned in the US, and patients are told to wait until they have pneumonia, then report to hospital the emergency room. That's murder, plain and simple, but it does keep research money flowing to politically important organizations.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    That’s the myth, but it’s not true.

    No, it very much is true. I’ve known several people who interviewed for tenure-track positions in engineering and they were told flat out: bringing in money is the primary metric upon which you will be judged; publication is secondary, teaching is tertiay.

  88. @anon
    Speaking of the Coof: bandanas and neck-gaiters appear to be worse than any mask at keeping droplets out of the air. They don't do much that is useful.

    https://www.studyfinds.org/worst-face-masks-bandanas-neck-gaiters-more-harmful-not-wearing-mask-covid-19/

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @HA

    “There’s different studies that show different things. The one you linked to used a laser and a phone camera to measure fluid droplets.”

    A more extensive study showed somewhat different results because it had a different focus and used different criteria.

    In each case, the results depend on what specific weaves and materials are chosen (and also what clickbait types of “conclusions” may be drawn from the study by the article editors).

    Sure, you could get conspiratorial about that. In fact, you could get just as conspiratorial about hand-washing, given that the specific rubbing techniques, the temperature of the water, the type of detergent used, and the pathogen or toxin that one is trying to wash away, will produce a variety of results. Nowadays, there is a wide body of pseudo-scientific so-called best practices out there that have been adopted by OSHA and other such agencies: wash for 20 seconds or hum a round of Happy Birthday, etc. — which kind of get the job done in the case of the most common pathogens we’re currently dealing with. Or so we hope. But it’s easy to tear down or poke holes in all that given all the inconsistencies and vagueness.

    And no doubt there were (and probably still are) a bunch of tantrum-throwers out there eager to resist the oppressive fascist nanny state that dares to write up so-called “health codes” and insist — on the basis of such inconsistently designed and therefore vague “scientific” studies — that we wash our hands every time we use the bathroom, and they issue dire threats about how subservient we’re becoming, and they point out how this kind of thing makes us collectively less resistant to diseases and threatens to destroy us as a species, etc., etc., you probably know how the rest of the rant goes.

    While there’s some truth to all that, most of the rest of us who have better things to do have learned to just roll our eyes and wash up, and cast shade and stink-eye on any self-styled rebels who think they’re too cool for that sort of thing, and it hasn’t destroyed us as a species just yet.

    Because in the end, if getting tied up in knots over being told to wash hands, strap on a seat belt, or wear a mask during a pandemic even makes it into the top 10 things in your life you’re outraged over right now, then you, little Lord Fauntleroy, win the “first-world problems” prize. Would that we could all be so blessed.

  89. Trump should not put so much effort into banning or cutting off PRC tech giants like Huawei. Instead he should they level the playing field by hiring an army diversity officers. This was way USA and PRC tech companies can compete on the same footing.

  90. anon[287] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Anon
    @anon


    Speaking of the Coof: bandanas and neck-gaiters appear to be worse than any mask at keeping droplets out of the air. They don’t do much that is useful.
     
    And doesn't that strike you as exceedingly strange? Why would a cloth mask perform better than a cloth bandanna or cloth neck-gaiter? Why should cloth magically acquire droplet stopping powers by virtue of it being secured by your ears, rather than it being secured behind your head or pulled up over your face like the collar of a sweater? Does that make any sense?

    Or perhaps all of these studies purporting to show this, that, or the other about face coverings are just bulls**t.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @anon

    And doesn’t that strike you as exceedingly strange? Why would a cloth mask perform better than a cloth bandanna or cloth neck-gaiter?

    Might just depend on the fabric and possibly the weave. Cotton and cotton / polyester have different properties vs. pure polyester or maybe spandex. This isn’t difficult science, doesn’t require a supercomputer running fluid flow equations.

    Or perhaps all of these studies purporting to show this, that, or the other about face coverings are just bulls**t.

    Possible, or maybe you’re just displacing anger .

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @anon


    Might just depend on the fabric and possibly the weave.
     
    Well then it does not depend on it being a mask or a gaiter, does it? I guess that's a nuance that's too subtle for the average medical researcher (or you) to comprehend.

    Possible, or maybe you’re just displacing anger .
     
    Or perhaps you are just a credulous moron.
  91. @David M
    “Black Earth-science faculty member” sounds like some sort of specialist in studying dark soils.

    Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Escher, @nokangaroos

    Black-Earth scientist n.:

    Scholar of
    1) Czernosem, the soil that develops on loess under continental clime
    2) Terra preta, artificial soil of the extinct raised-bed cultures in the Amazon

    But seriously … the very hard sciences are notorious for being hideously un-black;
    see, the intersection between smart enough (no faking it, no feeling about it either) and willing to get dirty and wet (not what you think) is … minuscule 😛

  92. @Altai
    @Mike1

    I don't know you can't read much into it. Even if there was no impact at all, they'd be claiming there was and it's was urgent to get more money into DIE STEM.

    Replies: @Gabe Ruth

    Agree, I think this is more a function of which groups are allowed to advocate for themselves as groups. I’m sure it’s hard out there for all academics, and I’m sure you can find academics of all races complaining. But to the extent that it affects white academics there are plenty who would welcome it as long as it advanced DIE, the prime directive of our civilization.

  93. @Thulean Friend
    Meritocracy could be afforded to be pushed aside as long as the US was as dominant as it was. Any extra costs could easily be carried. But that is no longer true.

    America will continue to be an extremely powerful country but it won't be a sole Superpower anymore. The longer-run trend will be for wokism to die out, simply by necessity. As genuine costs are rising with non-meritocratic choices, the pressure will build to undo the damage.

    Replies: @anon, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Anonymous, @Unladen Swallow, @Ben tillman

    It’s called parasite load. And we are straining under it.

    • Agree: Mr McKenna
  94. Bloomberg via Tyler Cowen:

    Malaysia has detected a strain of the new coronavirus that’s been found to be 10 times more infectious.

    The mutation called D614G was found in at least three of the 45 cases in a cluster that started from a restaurant owner returning from India and breaching his 14-day home quarantine. The man has since been sentenced to five months in prison and fined. The strain was also found in another cluster involving people returning from the Philippines…

    The mutation has become the predominant variant in Europe and the U.S., with the World Health Organization saying there’s no evidence the strain leads to a more severe disease.

    https://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2020/08/heterogeneities-is-the-more-infectious-strain-of-covid-19-spreading-to-asia.html

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-08-17/malaysia-detects-virus-strain-that-s-10-times-more-infectious

    Ten times more infectious sounds like a lot. But is the article stating that this is the variant we’re already dealing with in the West? If so, why the headlines?

  95. @anon
    @Mr. Anon

    And doesn’t that strike you as exceedingly strange? Why would a cloth mask perform better than a cloth bandanna or cloth neck-gaiter?

    Might just depend on the fabric and possibly the weave. Cotton and cotton / polyester have different properties vs. pure polyester or maybe spandex. This isn't difficult science, doesn't require a supercomputer running fluid flow equations.

    Or perhaps all of these studies purporting to show this, that, or the other about face coverings are just bulls**t.

    Possible, or maybe you're just displacing anger .

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Might just depend on the fabric and possibly the weave.

    Well then it does not depend on it being a mask or a gaiter, does it? I guess that’s a nuance that’s too subtle for the average medical researcher (or you) to comprehend.

    Possible, or maybe you’re just displacing anger .

    Or perhaps you are just a credulous moron.

  96. #Diversity is “Anti-White”, it is reverse discrimination.

    There is nothing wrong with reversing allotments, carve outs or quotas from #Science.

    Science is and should be staffed with the BEST and Brightest.

  97. @bomag
    @El Dato


    [the usual abject pandering] would help to rebuild trust with Black academics
     
    Good grief.

    Plenty of abject obeisance to the Other of Color in the Academy since about 1850.

    It has bought nothing.

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    “More transparency and accountability around how universities handle cases of racism would help to rebuild trust with Black academics, Jackson says.”

    The race hustlers use almost identical phrases for different institutions. The police also must “rebuild trust with black communities.” Except that there never was any “trust” to “rebuild,” because the problem was and remains black unfitness and black racism.

    And “more transparency and accountability around how universities handle cases of racism” is the last thing blacks want, because it would constantly expose their criminal race hoaxes.

  98. @Anonymous
    https://twitter.com/latimes/status/1293932776018702337

    Replies: @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @Anonymous, @njguy73, @Nicholas Stix

    Another DNC talking point?

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The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
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