The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Narrative Squared
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From the New York Times:

After 1963, a Silence Fell Upon Dallas. Not This Year.
By MANNY FERNANDEZ, RICHARD FAUSSET and ALAN BLINDER JULY 15, 2016

DALLAS — Two months after this city’s darkest day in November 1963, when President John F. Kennedy was killed by a sniper in Dealey Plaza, James F. Chambers, publisher of The Dallas Times Herald, was ordered out of a cab in the Detroit snow. He had made the mistake of telling the driver he was from Dallas.

For years after the assassination, Dallas was labeled the “city of hate” because it had been the focal point of a loose-knit anti-Kennedy movement led by right-wing extremists. The city’s response was, for the most part, silence. It stepped, for a time, into the shadows of the national stage because of its guilt, shame and anger, growing only more insular and misunderstood.

Fifty-two years later, the second-worst day in the city’s history has provided Dallas with a new and dramatic global moment. It has seized that moment far differently, presenting to the nation the face of a majority-minority city with diverse, grace-under-pressure leaders and a calm efficiency in the face of chaos.

 
Hide 123 CommentsLeave a Comment
123 Comments to "Narrative Squared"
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. “For years after the assassination, Dallas was labeled the “city of hate” because it had been the focal point of a loose-knit anti-Kennedy movement led by right-wing extremists. “

    So an American communist who’d actually been to Moscow shoots the President, and and it’s the right-wing extremists wot did it?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The three reporters are not saying "a loose-knit anti-Kennedy movement led by right-wing extremists" murdered JFK, but they're not not saying it either.
    , @Bill
    Yes. That's what happened. Does that surprise you?

    Right in front of our eyes, recently, the tale of black incompetence and incomprehensible black savagery that was the aftermath of Katrina was retconned into a tale of white supremacist evil. Was Michael King a good guy or a bad guy? *You* may remember that George Zimmerman was the good guy and St Trayvon Skittles was the bad guy, but nobody younger than 10 when the incident happened will. *You* may remember that Darren Wilson was the good guy and The Gentle Giant of Ferguson was the bad guy, but nobody younger than 10 when the incident happened will. Etc. The media's power to retcon is pretty awe-inspiring.

    The Hollywood trope of the bigoted dad and the goodthinking children takes on a whole different flavor when you've been paying attention to the news for a few decades.

    If you are a reflective type, it makes you wonder just how much of the crap you know isn't so. Like, for example, did medieval theologians really routinely argue about how many angels could dance on the head of a pin? Maybe not routinely. Did it even happen once?
    , @Neoconned
    The General consensus is a rogue group of right wing CIA guys uses their connections with the mob who they used to try to get rid of Castro to wack JFK.

    There were CIA ties to the Marcello mob in New Orleans and with "The Outfit" in Chicago and Dallas. They called in favors and found "lone wolf" to use Oswalds term "patsy."
  2. @Anonymous Nephew
    "For years after the assassination, Dallas was labeled the “city of hate” because it had been the focal point of a loose-knit anti-Kennedy movement led by right-wing extremists. "

    So an American communist who'd actually been to Moscow shoots the President, and and it's the right-wing extremists wot did it?

    The three reporters are not saying “a loose-knit anti-Kennedy movement led by right-wing extremists” murdered JFK, but they’re not not saying it either.

    • Replies: @guest
    What *are* they saying? Mostly nothing, except that they don't like Dallas circa 1963 (duh). Dallas now is better because Current Year.

    Maybe that gobbledygook makes sense to them. But to me, it sounds like they're saying the MSM of the day shamed Dallas into silence by calling it a "city of hate" because it had the misfortune to simultaneously have a pinko nut working there when the president stopped by and have a lot of anti-Kennedy people in residence. They deserve to be beat up on to this day because Kennedy died and it's a cardinal sin to have been anti-Kennedy to whatever degree at the time. For some unspecified reason. How compassionate and understanding of our enlightened liberal betters. They sure can hold a grudge.

    Do they know what fanatics they come off as? Do they care? I realize they don't write for people like me. What's the difference, to people who want to blame ante-civil rights Southerners for everything and those who don't know better?

    COnspiracy theories help. If everyone knew it was a pro-Castro loon they'd shut up with the "city of hate" crap. They wouldn't want Marxism associated with hate. They might not even teach about it in school, and kids would grow up ignorant of the name "Kennedy." Which actually doesn't sound that bad.

    , @guest
    I realize, of course, the "city of hate" argument is the same Climate of Hate argument they use to damn Trump for everything, including attacks on Trump itself. Or how they blamed the Gabby Giffords shooting on Sarah Palin, for some bizarre reason.

    It wouldn't work on Obama, even if he said "F the police" the night before a nationwide race war ignited.
    , @Olorin
    You forgot one point:

    Anything but far-left opinion = HATE. And HATE is an ontologically essential cosmic presence.

    Once HATE is purged, all will be utopia.

    HATE is the left's EVIL, oozing through the cosmos, animating trucks to lead innocent Muslims astray. (Though somehow punishing the deserving whites for existing. Which isn't HATE. Don't ask me, I never comprehended the Abrahamic religions.)

    On that note, don't miss M.G. Miles's latest essay on the religion of progressives and thinking about its genetic basis, over at Those Who Can See blog.

  3. “James F. Chambers, publisher of The Dallas Times Herald, was ordered out of a cab in the Detroit snow. He had made the mistake of telling the driver he was from Dallas.”
    Stuff that never happened.GIF.

  4. > Step 1: Communist murders JFK
    >Step 2: Lying press ignore aforementioned Communism, proceed to smear and blame those eeeeevil Birchers
    >Step 3: Repeat step 2 for a few decades
    >Step 4: In the current year, the NYT celebrates the “city’s white mayor, white county executive, black police chief, Latino city manager and Latina lesbian sheriff”, who have “projected a striking image of modern melting-pot Dallas…”

    • Replies: @Cryptogenic
    I think the most "striking image of melting-pot Dallas" is of a Black Lives Matter terrorist murdering five policemen. But let's talk about how awesome diverse bureaucrats are. You want calm? You want efficiency? I give you Baltimore, St. Louis, New Orleans, Monrovia...
    , @AndrewR
    The "Latino" city manager is as white as they come. But I guess having a Spanish surname transmogrifies the most Aryan of people into Persons of Color

    http://dallasmorningviewsblog.dallasnews.com/files/2014/01/a.c.-gonzalez.jpg

    Seriously though, why exactly is the NYT any more respected than the National Enquirer?

  5. Oswald was a CIA Agent who was set up to take the fall.

    Judge Garrison found evidence that businessman Clay Shaw and pilot David Ferrie were involved in the assassination. Before he could testify, Ferrie mysteriously died.

    Here’s a picture of David Ferrie with Oswald. Both were in the Civil Air Patrol together.

    https://twitter.com/TrumpLion1776/status/737856463234867200

    • Replies: @Flip
    https://www.amazon.com/JFK-Unspeakable-Why-Died-Matters/dp/1439193886C
    , @Paul Jolliffe
    JW123,

    It's more than just that. Ferrie and Shaw were probably only tangentially involved, but "Oswald" was up to his eyeballs in it, although I strongly doubt he knew exactly what was to happen at 12:30 on 11/22/63 in front of the TSBD.

    It seems likely that Ferrie's role was to be a back-up getaway pilot for some of the team due to arrive in Houston very early in the morning of the 23rd. His mad dash on the afternoon of the 22d from Carlos Marcello's courtroom in New Orleans to the pay phone outside the ice-skating rink in Houston 400 miles away early on the 23rd remains unexplained.

    The FBI didn't believe Ferrie's explanation then, no one believes it today, and no one can give a non-conspiratorial reason for that frantic trip. Ferrie was a bit player with a minor role to play, a role that turned out to be unnecessary.

    "Oswald" and his identity were being used by multiple persons for years before 1963. Of course he was connected to the CIA!

    Proof?

    The USMC, the Marines, have official and unimpeachable records that place him from mid-September to early October of 1958 in both the naval hospital in Atsugi, Japan and Ping Tung, Taiwan. When "Oswald" supposedly "defected" to the USSR in 1959, the Navy sent out a confidential message on November 4 to other US intelligence agencies that stated that "Oswald" had served with Marine Air Control Squadrons in Taiwan.

    Now I admit that "Oswald" was an unusual guy, but even he couldn't be in both Japan and Taiwan at once.

    Two men, one identity, two locations at the same time.

    And the Warren Commission knew it and classified it for as long as they could.
    , @guest
    There's proof: two guys were in the same thing together, one of whom shot the president. Therefore...um...
    , @syonredux
    Some simple advice: read this book

    Reclaiming History: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy
    by Vincent Bugliosi

    https://www.amazon.com/Reclaiming-History-Assassination-President-Kennedy/dp/0393045250
  6. The NYT used to bore me to tears; nowadays it just makes me boke.

    • Replies: @pink_point
    Are any of the other mainstream media different?

    The USA have become a particularly unsightly parody, I am afraid.

    (And by the way, if this is the media scene, you bet university environment is at least as bad.)
  7. Immediately after RFK was killed, a woman in a polka dot dress was spotted yelling “we shot him.”

    New analysis has revealed there were multiple gunmen involved with the RFK assassination.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "Immediately after RFK was killed, a woman in a polka dot dress was spotted yelling “we shot him.”"

    Well, that's certainly iron-clad evidence. It is surely completely impossible that the woman who was being interviewed misheard what a woman in a polka-dot dress might have said. Surely the polka-dot clad mind-control assassin must have actually said "we shot him", not "they shot him" or "...unintelligible...." or anything else. Nor is it possible that there was more than one woman wearing a polka-dot dress in public in 1968; with polka-dot dresses, as in Highlander, there can only be one. And, of course, it is well known that assassins leaving the scene of their murders always boast about the crime they've just committed.

  8. President Lyndon Johnson killed JFK.

    His attorney and mistress have confirmed this.

    • Replies: @Millennial
    So, who tried to shoot General Edwin Walker?
  9. It’s funny, as a kid, I just accepted that narrative, and took it for granted that Dallas was chock full of violent rednecks. When you think about Oswald, he’s just about everything a Texas redneck isn’t.

    It’s interesting to note that the Beatles concert in Dallas was a factor in their giving up on playing publicly. It was after Lennon had made his Jesus comment, the public had reacted, and he was terrified he would be shot down onstage in Dallas, home of the Kennedy assassination.

    During their performance a firecracker went off, and all the Beatles looked at Lennon, to see if he’d been shot. As the boys might have said, “who needs that shit?” Ironically, Oswald and his ilk would have agreed with Lennon’s Jesus comment.

    Here’s the boys at a Dallas press conference, prior to the concert, “joking” about being shot:

    • Replies: @guest
    They stopped touring because they couldn't hear themselves and they were lazy and not very competitive musicians. They could make plenty of money without bothering, anyway.
  10. Didn’t this article run a week ago in Politico and the Washington Post? (I could have sworn I read about it on this very site.)

    I guess that’s the meaning of Narrative Squared. (Or should it now be Cubed?) It also shows that the Narrative is the only point of reference today’s reporters–and especially editors–have. They simply can’t imagine any other way of telling a story, even when the result is telling the same story over and over again.

    • Agree: pink_point
    • Replies: @pink_point
    Aren't they all the same, one medium? :)
    , @Dr. X

    Didn’t this article run a week ago in Politico and the Washington Post? (I could have sworn I read about it on this very site.)

    I guess that’s the meaning of Narrative Squared. (Or should it now be Cubed?) It also shows that the Narrative is the only point of reference today’s reporters–and especially editors–have. They simply can’t imagine any other way of telling a story, even when the result is telling the same story over and over again.
     
    It's called "propaganda," kids. Lemme spell it for ya: "P-R-O-P-A-G-A-N-D-A."

    Just like in the Soviet Union, the Five Year Plan was always a success, and always produced another bountiful harvest for the Workers' Paradise -- meanwhile, the people in capitalist countries were starving to death in the streets.
  11. @JohnnyWalker123
    President Lyndon Johnson killed JFK.

    His attorney and mistress have confirmed this.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZKjm9ezTXQ

    So, who tried to shoot General Edwin Walker?

    • Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe

    So, who tried to shoot General Edwin Walker?
     
    Oswald did. That's one of the principal reasons he was such a great patsy ie., because he had a history of doing screwy things. I actually believe Oswald fired on JFK. But he missed. The trained sniper at the grassy knoll, on the other hand....
    , @Dirk Dagger
    False flag.
  12. “It has seized that moment far differently, presenting to the nation the face of a majority-minority city with diverse, grace-under-pressure leaders and a calm efficiency in the face of chaos.”

    Wow! What a contrast with 1963, when Dallas’ right-wing extremist establishment clutched that communist right-wing extremist assassin to its bosom!

    Or something.

    And while I’m feeling so upbeat, I’ll bet a Google search of “Dallas” and “Ferguson effect” will come up empty.

    Well… mostly. Except for this, but who’s gonna bother to click on some Old Grey Lady link? Anyway, it doesn’t count, because no statistics are offered.

    And from Dallas’ own paper, Dallas murder rate still high but shows signs of slowing, with the lede

    Murders are up nearly 40 percent over last year in Dallas, but the rate has slowed since an alarming spike in March.

    Violent Crimes Through May:
    67 murders, up 40% from 2015
    312 sexual assaults, down 7%
    1,805 robberies, up 15%
    1,747 aggravated assaults, up 16%

    I credit the sober, chaste leadership of Black Lives Matter for Dallas’ plunging rape rate in the current year.

    The face of a majority-minority city with diverse, grace-under-pressure leaders and a calm efficiency in the face of chaos.

    • Replies: @Cryptogenic
    I don't even bother citing data anymore. Black crime is now a "myth."

    Data have no effect on progressives. The correct way to frame any confrontation with them is by assuming what Chateau Heartiste calls "amused mastery." Let them feel your contempt and unwillingness to take them and their stupid shit seriously and they will lose their minds every time.

    Trump is of course really good at this sort of framing.
  13. @dearieme
    The NYT used to bore me to tears; nowadays it just makes me boke.

    Are any of the other mainstream media different?

    The USA have become a particularly unsightly parody, I am afraid.

    (And by the way, if this is the media scene, you bet university environment is at least as bad.)

    • Replies: @Gutenberg
    The University seems to be a couple years ahead of the media, since it's where the future elite is being trained. Cthulhu always swims left, and such.
  14. @ChrisZ
    Didn't this article run a week ago in Politico and the Washington Post? (I could have sworn I read about it on this very site.)

    I guess that's the meaning of Narrative Squared. (Or should it now be Cubed?) It also shows that the Narrative is the only point of reference today's reporters--and especially editors--have. They simply can't imagine any other way of telling a story, even when the result is telling the same story over and over again.

    Aren’t they all the same, one medium? :)

  15. @JohnnyWalker123
    Oswald was a CIA Agent who was set up to take the fall.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hpyMuduBmtQ

    Judge Garrison found evidence that businessman Clay Shaw and pilot David Ferrie were involved in the assassination. Before he could testify, Ferrie mysteriously died.

    Here's a picture of David Ferrie with Oswald. Both were in the Civil Air Patrol together.

    https://twitter.com/TrumpLion1776/status/737856463234867200
    • Replies: @Flip
    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2013/07/jacob-hornberger/no-military-coups-for-america/
  16. Well, Carlos Marcello ordered the hit, but I don’t see New Orleans being called the City of Ordering Hate.

  17. “For years after the assassination, Dallas was labeled the ‘city of hate’ “

    Like chicanerous supreme court judges citing their own footnotes in old dissents as if they were real law, the NYT tries to build backstory for its recent lies.

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/washington-post-dallas-had-finally-shaken-the-nickname-city-of-hate/#comment-1485618

  18. Growing up in the 70s in Philadelphia I despised the Dallas Cowboys, as did everyone I knew. Yet I never recall anyone referring to Dallas as the city of Hate. They had “America’s Team” and then the most popular Television show.

    My parents and most of my relatives were Liberals who supported Jimmy Carter, yet none of them ever referred to Dallas as the City of Hate, although many did believe there was a conspiracy to kill Kennedy.

    • Replies: @guest
    That "city of hate" stuff is for New York Times people. Which doesn't mean people who read the New York Times. The New York Times doesn't write for readers of the New York Times. It writes for its own crowd, and to make everyone else think the delusions of its crowd are the Actual Truth.
  19. Anybody here who is old enough to remember 1963 ever heard Walter Cronkite, Martin Luther King Jr., Bobby Kennedy, Jackie O, or Lyndon B. Johnson refer to Dallas as the city of hate on television?

    • Replies: @David In TN
    I'm old enough to remember 1963 and never heard it said by a public figure.
  20. View post on imgur.com

    From this NY Times treatment: “Just because the John Birch Society is no longer hanging out their shingles…..”

    The JBS was ahead of its time. They were famous for putting up billboards, “Get the US out of the UN and the UN out of the US”. Superior to this one from the lazy NYTimes crew.

  21. According to Donald Trump, Ted Cruz’s father is the reason Dallas became the city of hate.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    On the plus side Trump clearly looks like he would be inclined to release the still classified files on JFK, I believe a huge batch come up for publication, or further sealing, in 2017.
  22. @ChrisZ
    Didn't this article run a week ago in Politico and the Washington Post? (I could have sworn I read about it on this very site.)

    I guess that's the meaning of Narrative Squared. (Or should it now be Cubed?) It also shows that the Narrative is the only point of reference today's reporters--and especially editors--have. They simply can't imagine any other way of telling a story, even when the result is telling the same story over and over again.

    Didn’t this article run a week ago in Politico and the Washington Post? (I could have sworn I read about it on this very site.)

    I guess that’s the meaning of Narrative Squared. (Or should it now be Cubed?) It also shows that the Narrative is the only point of reference today’s reporters–and especially editors–have. They simply can’t imagine any other way of telling a story, even when the result is telling the same story over and over again.

    It’s called “propaganda,” kids. Lemme spell it for ya: “P-R-O-P-A-G-A-N-D-A.”

    Just like in the Soviet Union, the Five Year Plan was always a success, and always produced another bountiful harvest for the Workers’ Paradise — meanwhile, the people in capitalist countries were starving to death in the streets.

  23. The official JFK assassination story doesn’t add up at all and the Warren commission tried to keep it quiet.

  24. Pretty sure I don’t care who killed JFK.

  25. @Millennial
    So, who tried to shoot General Edwin Walker?

    So, who tried to shoot General Edwin Walker?

    Oswald did. That’s one of the principal reasons he was such a great patsy ie., because he had a history of doing screwy things. I actually believe Oswald fired on JFK. But he missed. The trained sniper at the grassy knoll, on the other hand….

    • Replies: @Neoconned
    His handlers probably had him shoot the general to establish a history of assassination attempts.

    It helps make him look loopy if he got caught and Ruby failed his janitorial job. That is - if Oswald started naming names.
  26. @Millennial
    So, who tried to shoot General Edwin Walker?

    False flag.

  27. Was that Detroit cabbie Irish, by any chance?

  28. The story I’d always heard was that Oswald allegedly killed Kennedy BUT there’s a lot of speculation that he was a patsy and any number of people from the mafia to the KKK were actually the ones who killed him.

    It wasn’t until I read more about it that I learned that Oswald was a communist who actually defected to the Soviet Union. That was when all the conspiracy theories started to make sense. Of course the left can’t admit that one of their own was the one that killed Kennedy, just like they can’t admit that practitioners of their pet religion commit acts of terrorism and mass rape.

    Just as with conspiracy theories surrounding 911 we can argue till the sun goes down about minutiae of details but it’s not hard for me to believe at all that the media would obfuscate, if not outright lie, to cover for members of one of their favoured classes.

    • Replies: @Travis
    Oswald was a a confirmed Marxist, thus the left invent a vast right wing conspiracy to cover it up....Just as they try and label Omar Mateen a homophobic homosexual, to hide his true motivations for killing 49 in Orlando.
  29. Two months after this city’s darkest day in November 1963, when President John F. Kennedy was killed by a sniper

    What a shame it is that now, over a half century later, we still have no idea who this sniper was. If we only knew his name and background we could make a fair assessment of his connections to the other right wing extremists in Dallas and to young Donald Trump. If we knew the identity of the assassin, it might even be possible to completely exonerate these others from any connection to this notorious crime. It might even be possible to connect the assassin to left wing causes instead. But since no arrest or investigation was ever made (that we can recall), this leaves us completely free to make these speculative connections in our leading national newspaper using smoke, mirrors and vague hand gestures.

    BTW, has anyone noticed that (in this age of newspaper cutbacks) that at the NYT it usually takes not one, not two but at least THREE crack reporters to pen these missives?

    In the past, one of the features of leftist totalitarian systems was something called “self-criticism”. Now this was mostly a form of torture inflicted on your enemies in which they were supposed to abase themselves by confessing their insufficient zeal for the Revolution and the Dear Leader. However, Maoism did involve a certain element of introspection – a revolutionary was supposed to examine his own character for flaws, for hints of bourgeois mentality, for lack of rigorous thinking based upon scientific principles of socialism. Modern leftism is completely lacking in ANY element of introspection. These people are so smug and confident in their armchair socialism that they are insufferable.

    • Agree: AndrewR, reiner Tor
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "BTW, has anyone noticed that (in this age of newspaper cutbacks) that at the NYT it usually takes not one, not two but at least THREE crack reporters to pen these missives?"

    Yes, three reporters is a lot of people to write an essentially fact-free non-news story. They could probably get software to auto-generate such pap.
    , @guest
    I figured they didn't bother to name Oswald because it hurts the Narrative, him not being a "right wing extremist." But it could be they don't want to rile up conspiracy theorists, because that, too, would distract from the Narrative.
    , @Muse
    I believe the addtional staff are minders there insure the questions asked, the facts collected and the subsequent "journalism" produced do not contradict the narrative. It is sort of like your personal political escort providing when touring communist countries.
    , @Clyde

    However, Maoism did involve a certain element of introspection – a revolutionary was supposed to examine his own character for flaws, for hints of bourgeois mentality, for lack of rigorous thinking based upon scientific principles of socialism.
     
    Like the inner Jihad the Muslims insist is the real meaning of Jihad. A few years back a Muslim commencement speaker at Harvard went on about this and boy did the numbnutz liberals there find this soooooo reassuring.

    2002 -But Zayed Yasin feels "jihad" is a misunderstood term. It is, he says, being misrepresented by his critics. "Jihad," he told The Crimson, "is not something that should make someone feel uncomfortable. It's a matter of other people deciding what they think jihad is and attributing to the word the product of their imagination. http://goo.gl/mfRtkv
     
    , @CJ
    Yes, three bylines -- on a piece of boilerplate that an experienced Comintern/Homintern operative ought to be able to cut-and-paste and trim to fit in half an hour. It likely has something to do with travel and expense accounts. If I were an NYT wordsmith I'd be trying to get every dollar I could out of the Old Grey Lady before she goes TU.
  30. “From the New York Times:

    For years after the assassination, Dallas was labeled the “city of hate” because……”

    ……..because the New York Times always reported that it was labeled the “city of hate”.

  31. @Marie
    > Step 1: Communist murders JFK
    >Step 2: Lying press ignore aforementioned Communism, proceed to smear and blame those eeeeevil Birchers
    >Step 3: Repeat step 2 for a few decades
    >Step 4: In the current year, the NYT celebrates the "city’s white mayor, white county executive, black police chief, Latino city manager and Latina lesbian sheriff", who have "projected a striking image of modern melting-pot Dallas..."

    I think the most “striking image of melting-pot Dallas” is of a Black Lives Matter terrorist murdering five policemen. But let’s talk about how awesome diverse bureaucrats are. You want calm? You want efficiency? I give you Baltimore, St. Louis, New Orleans, Monrovia…

  32. “Fifty-two years later, the second-worst day in the city’s history has provided Dallas with a new and dramatic global moment. It has seized that moment far differently, presenting to the nation the face of a majority-minority city with diverse, grace-under-pressure leaders and a calm efficiency in the face of chaos.”

    Gee, ya think there’s some kind of subliminal message there? The NYT strikes again, and as always with the subtlety of a blacksmith.

  33. @JohnnyWalker123
    Immediately after RFK was killed, a woman in a polka dot dress was spotted yelling "we shot him."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blP_ojEbR5o

    New analysis has revealed there were multiple gunmen involved with the RFK assassination.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URYZjbaeQo8

    “Immediately after RFK was killed, a woman in a polka dot dress was spotted yelling “we shot him.””

    Well, that’s certainly iron-clad evidence. It is surely completely impossible that the woman who was being interviewed misheard what a woman in a polka-dot dress might have said. Surely the polka-dot clad mind-control assassin must have actually said “we shot him”, not “they shot him” or “…unintelligible….” or anything else. Nor is it possible that there was more than one woman wearing a polka-dot dress in public in 1968; with polka-dot dresses, as in Highlander, there can only be one. And, of course, it is well known that assassins leaving the scene of their murders always boast about the crime they’ve just committed.

    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
    A woman-in-the-polka-dot-dress-yelling-"we shot him" anecdote BY ITSELF is terrible evidence for a conspiracy to kill RFK

    However, what's mighty interesting is what happened afterward: the LAPD had one of its most spooky interrogators, Hank Hernandez - seemingly a former covert ops guy in Latin America - go after the witness, Sandy Serrano, in a way that is anything but innocent.

    Listen to the interrogation. It's on tape.

    Hank Hernandez used every psychological ploy, every hint at legal charges, every attempt possible to intimidate, threaten, browbeat and finally wear down Serrano to get her to change her official statement that polka-dot dress woman was real and shouted "we".

    If what you wrote were the truth, then the LAPD could just have downplayed Serrano's statement, or ignored her. Instead, they went all-out to discredit her in a way that is highly suspicious.



    The real evidence of conspiracy in the RFK case is the ballistics evidence.
    But that's another story.
  34. @Jack D

    Two months after this city’s darkest day in November 1963, when President John F. Kennedy was killed by a sniper
     
    What a shame it is that now, over a half century later, we still have no idea who this sniper was. If we only knew his name and background we could make a fair assessment of his connections to the other right wing extremists in Dallas and to young Donald Trump. If we knew the identity of the assassin, it might even be possible to completely exonerate these others from any connection to this notorious crime. It might even be possible to connect the assassin to left wing causes instead. But since no arrest or investigation was ever made (that we can recall), this leaves us completely free to make these speculative connections in our leading national newspaper using smoke, mirrors and vague hand gestures.

    BTW, has anyone noticed that (in this age of newspaper cutbacks) that at the NYT it usually takes not one, not two but at least THREE crack reporters to pen these missives?

    In the past, one of the features of leftist totalitarian systems was something called "self-criticism". Now this was mostly a form of torture inflicted on your enemies in which they were supposed to abase themselves by confessing their insufficient zeal for the Revolution and the Dear Leader. However, Maoism did involve a certain element of introspection - a revolutionary was supposed to examine his own character for flaws, for hints of bourgeois mentality, for lack of rigorous thinking based upon scientific principles of socialism. Modern leftism is completely lacking in ANY element of introspection. These people are so smug and confident in their armchair socialism that they are insufferable.

    “BTW, has anyone noticed that (in this age of newspaper cutbacks) that at the NYT it usually takes not one, not two but at least THREE crack reporters to pen these missives?”

    Yes, three reporters is a lot of people to write an essentially fact-free non-news story. They could probably get software to auto-generate such pap.

    • Replies: @Daniel Williams

    Yes, three reporters is a lot of people to write an essentially fact-free non-news story. They could probably get software to auto-generate such pap.
     
    Maybe they are, and MANNY FERNANDEZ, RICHARD FAUSSET and ALAN BLINDER are the auto-generated names the machine kicked out. "Manny Fernandez" is particularly suspect.
  35. It’s amazing how much trouble communist loner veterans in Dealey Plaza can cause.

    The latest theory on the Kennedy assassination is that it was ordered by Yuri Andropov while he was a KGB higher up in Mexico, but that he didn’t have authorization from the Kremlin. The Warren commission had to make it look like Oswald was acting alone, because if it became general knowledge that the Soviets had done it, world war 3 would be the result.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Kind of like how in the fine movie "Carlos the Jackal," Yuri Andropov orders the assassination of Anwar Sadat. It's a convincing scene, but I couldn't find any evidence it really happened.
  36. I’m looking forward to the day when outlets like the New York Times stop writing about the Kennedys. The amount of reporters who secretly wish we were a monarchy and who yearn to be the chief eunuch at the God-Emperor’s court is simply amazing.

  37. @ic1000
    "It has seized that moment far differently, presenting to the nation the face of a majority-minority city with diverse, grace-under-pressure leaders and a calm efficiency in the face of chaos."

    Wow! What a contrast with 1963, when Dallas' right-wing extremist establishment clutched that communist right-wing extremist assassin to its bosom!

    Or something.

    And while I'm feeling so upbeat, I'll bet a Google search of "Dallas" and "Ferguson effect" will come up empty.

    Well... mostly. Except for this, but who's gonna bother to click on some Old Grey Lady link? Anyway, it doesn't count, because no statistics are offered.

    And from Dallas' own paper, Dallas murder rate still high but shows signs of slowing, with the lede

    Murders are up nearly 40 percent over last year in Dallas, but the rate has slowed since an alarming spike in March.
     
    Violent Crimes Through May:
    67 murders, up 40% from 2015
    312 sexual assaults, down 7%
    1,805 robberies, up 15%
    1,747 aggravated assaults, up 16%

    I credit the sober, chaste leadership of Black Lives Matter for Dallas' plunging rape rate in the current year.

    The face of a majority-minority city with diverse, grace-under-pressure leaders and a calm efficiency in the face of chaos.

    I don’t even bother citing data anymore. Black crime is now a “myth.”

    Data have no effect on progressives. The correct way to frame any confrontation with them is by assuming what Chateau Heartiste calls “amused mastery.” Let them feel your contempt and unwillingness to take them and their stupid shit seriously and they will lose their minds every time.

    Trump is of course really good at this sort of framing.

  38. @Marie
    > Step 1: Communist murders JFK
    >Step 2: Lying press ignore aforementioned Communism, proceed to smear and blame those eeeeevil Birchers
    >Step 3: Repeat step 2 for a few decades
    >Step 4: In the current year, the NYT celebrates the "city’s white mayor, white county executive, black police chief, Latino city manager and Latina lesbian sheriff", who have "projected a striking image of modern melting-pot Dallas..."

    The “Latino” city manager is as white as they come. But I guess having a Spanish surname transmogrifies the most Aryan of people into Persons of Color

    Seriously though, why exactly is the NYT any more respected than the National Enquirer?

  39. So MOG is the answer to all our problems … maybe we should try it at the national level. Wait!

  40. @Steve Sailer
    The three reporters are not saying "a loose-knit anti-Kennedy movement led by right-wing extremists" murdered JFK, but they're not not saying it either.

    What *are* they saying? Mostly nothing, except that they don’t like Dallas circa 1963 (duh). Dallas now is better because Current Year.

    Maybe that gobbledygook makes sense to them. But to me, it sounds like they’re saying the MSM of the day shamed Dallas into silence by calling it a “city of hate” because it had the misfortune to simultaneously have a pinko nut working there when the president stopped by and have a lot of anti-Kennedy people in residence. They deserve to be beat up on to this day because Kennedy died and it’s a cardinal sin to have been anti-Kennedy to whatever degree at the time. For some unspecified reason. How compassionate and understanding of our enlightened liberal betters. They sure can hold a grudge.

    Do they know what fanatics they come off as? Do they care? I realize they don’t write for people like me. What’s the difference, to people who want to blame ante-civil rights Southerners for everything and those who don’t know better?

    COnspiracy theories help. If everyone knew it was a pro-Castro loon they’d shut up with the “city of hate” crap. They wouldn’t want Marxism associated with hate. They might not even teach about it in school, and kids would grow up ignorant of the name “Kennedy.” Which actually doesn’t sound that bad.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Over the decades, I've never, EVER heard Dallas, TX specifically referred to as "the city of hate" per se. That sounds if not entirely made up, it certainly is leftist virtue signaling to others in the know, to serve as shorthand for the larger and ongoing generation war between the New Left and the Silent Majority.

    Just as the NYT carefully avoided the race of the perp in the Kitty Genovese case in '64 for several decades, so too they usually will brand/stereotype all those west of the Hudson (making key exceptions of course for such superzips as DC; Boston; Chi; SF; LA) as bumpkinland; extremist fringe; angry white males; etc.

    In other words, "city of hate" could just as easily apply to other cities in Red Stateland that are known to be majority white with little diversity and even less explicit endorsement of leftist politics.

    I've never heard that term referred to Dallas until this event. If it was a term it was so underground and not constantly and consistently applied to the city over the decades. Like, turn on Tom Brokaw circa 1988 Nightly News for an indepth story about the GOP convention held in Dallas (or was it in 1984?) and there were constant referrals to Dallas as "the city of hate". Seriously? Totally bogus. Or in 1993, during David Koresh's standoff in Waco, CNN would make occasional asides along the likes of "And you know, we shouldn't be surprised about the happenings in Waco, after all, its in the same state as Dallas, the city of hate." Come on.

    Think the NYT is doing a wee bit of projection. If any media outlet outlet or ideology tends to harbor hatred toward a city for its traditional makeup (e.g. majority white or WASP in particular) its the NYT.
  41. @JohnnyWalker123
    Oswald was a CIA Agent who was set up to take the fall.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hpyMuduBmtQ

    Judge Garrison found evidence that businessman Clay Shaw and pilot David Ferrie were involved in the assassination. Before he could testify, Ferrie mysteriously died.

    Here's a picture of David Ferrie with Oswald. Both were in the Civil Air Patrol together.

    https://twitter.com/TrumpLion1776/status/737856463234867200

    JW123,

    It’s more than just that. Ferrie and Shaw were probably only tangentially involved, but “Oswald” was up to his eyeballs in it, although I strongly doubt he knew exactly what was to happen at 12:30 on 11/22/63 in front of the TSBD.

    It seems likely that Ferrie’s role was to be a back-up getaway pilot for some of the team due to arrive in Houston very early in the morning of the 23rd. His mad dash on the afternoon of the 22d from Carlos Marcello’s courtroom in New Orleans to the pay phone outside the ice-skating rink in Houston 400 miles away early on the 23rd remains unexplained.

    The FBI didn’t believe Ferrie’s explanation then, no one believes it today, and no one can give a non-conspiratorial reason for that frantic trip. Ferrie was a bit player with a minor role to play, a role that turned out to be unnecessary.

    “Oswald” and his identity were being used by multiple persons for years before 1963. Of course he was connected to the CIA!

    Proof?

    The USMC, the Marines, have official and unimpeachable records that place him from mid-September to early October of 1958 in both the naval hospital in Atsugi, Japan and Ping Tung, Taiwan. When “Oswald” supposedly “defected” to the USSR in 1959, the Navy sent out a confidential message on November 4 to other US intelligence agencies that stated that “Oswald” had served with Marine Air Control Squadrons in Taiwan.

    Now I admit that “Oswald” was an unusual guy, but even he couldn’t be in both Japan and Taiwan at once.

    Two men, one identity, two locations at the same time.

    And the Warren Commission knew it and classified it for as long as they could.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    Some simple advice: read this book


    Reclaiming History: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy
    by Vincent Bugliosi





    https://www.amazon.com/Reclaiming-History-Assassination-President-Kennedy/dp/0393045250
  42. @Steve Sailer
    The three reporters are not saying "a loose-knit anti-Kennedy movement led by right-wing extremists" murdered JFK, but they're not not saying it either.

    I realize, of course, the “city of hate” argument is the same Climate of Hate argument they use to damn Trump for everything, including attacks on Trump itself. Or how they blamed the Gabby Giffords shooting on Sarah Palin, for some bizarre reason.

    It wouldn’t work on Obama, even if he said “F the police” the night before a nationwide race war ignited.

  43. @JohnnyWalker123
    Oswald was a CIA Agent who was set up to take the fall.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hpyMuduBmtQ

    Judge Garrison found evidence that businessman Clay Shaw and pilot David Ferrie were involved in the assassination. Before he could testify, Ferrie mysteriously died.

    Here's a picture of David Ferrie with Oswald. Both were in the Civil Air Patrol together.

    https://twitter.com/TrumpLion1776/status/737856463234867200

    There’s proof: two guys were in the same thing together, one of whom shot the president. Therefore…um…

  44. @yowza
    It's funny, as a kid, I just accepted that narrative, and took it for granted that Dallas was chock full of violent rednecks. When you think about Oswald, he's just about everything a Texas redneck isn't.

    It's interesting to note that the Beatles concert in Dallas was a factor in their giving up on playing publicly. It was after Lennon had made his Jesus comment, the public had reacted, and he was terrified he would be shot down onstage in Dallas, home of the Kennedy assassination.

    During their performance a firecracker went off, and all the Beatles looked at Lennon, to see if he'd been shot. As the boys might have said, "who needs that shit?" Ironically, Oswald and his ilk would have agreed with Lennon's Jesus comment.

    Here's the boys at a Dallas press conference, prior to the concert, "joking" about being shot:

    https://youtu.be/l7oxB4cx2n4

    They stopped touring because they couldn’t hear themselves and they were lazy and not very competitive musicians. They could make plenty of money without bothering, anyway.

  45. @Jack D

    Two months after this city’s darkest day in November 1963, when President John F. Kennedy was killed by a sniper
     
    What a shame it is that now, over a half century later, we still have no idea who this sniper was. If we only knew his name and background we could make a fair assessment of his connections to the other right wing extremists in Dallas and to young Donald Trump. If we knew the identity of the assassin, it might even be possible to completely exonerate these others from any connection to this notorious crime. It might even be possible to connect the assassin to left wing causes instead. But since no arrest or investigation was ever made (that we can recall), this leaves us completely free to make these speculative connections in our leading national newspaper using smoke, mirrors and vague hand gestures.

    BTW, has anyone noticed that (in this age of newspaper cutbacks) that at the NYT it usually takes not one, not two but at least THREE crack reporters to pen these missives?

    In the past, one of the features of leftist totalitarian systems was something called "self-criticism". Now this was mostly a form of torture inflicted on your enemies in which they were supposed to abase themselves by confessing their insufficient zeal for the Revolution and the Dear Leader. However, Maoism did involve a certain element of introspection - a revolutionary was supposed to examine his own character for flaws, for hints of bourgeois mentality, for lack of rigorous thinking based upon scientific principles of socialism. Modern leftism is completely lacking in ANY element of introspection. These people are so smug and confident in their armchair socialism that they are insufferable.

    I figured they didn’t bother to name Oswald because it hurts the Narrative, him not being a “right wing extremist.” But it could be they don’t want to rile up conspiracy theorists, because that, too, would distract from the Narrative.

  46. @Jack D

    Two months after this city’s darkest day in November 1963, when President John F. Kennedy was killed by a sniper
     
    What a shame it is that now, over a half century later, we still have no idea who this sniper was. If we only knew his name and background we could make a fair assessment of his connections to the other right wing extremists in Dallas and to young Donald Trump. If we knew the identity of the assassin, it might even be possible to completely exonerate these others from any connection to this notorious crime. It might even be possible to connect the assassin to left wing causes instead. But since no arrest or investigation was ever made (that we can recall), this leaves us completely free to make these speculative connections in our leading national newspaper using smoke, mirrors and vague hand gestures.

    BTW, has anyone noticed that (in this age of newspaper cutbacks) that at the NYT it usually takes not one, not two but at least THREE crack reporters to pen these missives?

    In the past, one of the features of leftist totalitarian systems was something called "self-criticism". Now this was mostly a form of torture inflicted on your enemies in which they were supposed to abase themselves by confessing their insufficient zeal for the Revolution and the Dear Leader. However, Maoism did involve a certain element of introspection - a revolutionary was supposed to examine his own character for flaws, for hints of bourgeois mentality, for lack of rigorous thinking based upon scientific principles of socialism. Modern leftism is completely lacking in ANY element of introspection. These people are so smug and confident in their armchair socialism that they are insufferable.

    I believe the addtional staff are minders there insure the questions asked, the facts collected and the subsequent “journalism” produced do not contradict the narrative. It is sort of like your personal political escort providing when touring communist countries.

  47. @Anonymous Nephew
    "For years after the assassination, Dallas was labeled the “city of hate” because it had been the focal point of a loose-knit anti-Kennedy movement led by right-wing extremists. "

    So an American communist who'd actually been to Moscow shoots the President, and and it's the right-wing extremists wot did it?

    Yes. That’s what happened. Does that surprise you?

    Right in front of our eyes, recently, the tale of black incompetence and incomprehensible black savagery that was the aftermath of Katrina was retconned into a tale of white supremacist evil. Was Michael King a good guy or a bad guy? *You* may remember that George Zimmerman was the good guy and St Trayvon Skittles was the bad guy, but nobody younger than 10 when the incident happened will. *You* may remember that Darren Wilson was the good guy and The Gentle Giant of Ferguson was the bad guy, but nobody younger than 10 when the incident happened will. Etc. The media’s power to retcon is pretty awe-inspiring.

    The Hollywood trope of the bigoted dad and the goodthinking children takes on a whole different flavor when you’ve been paying attention to the news for a few decades.

    If you are a reflective type, it makes you wonder just how much of the crap you know isn’t so. Like, for example, did medieval theologians really routinely argue about how many angels could dance on the head of a pin? Maybe not routinely. Did it even happen once?

    • Replies: @reiner Tor

    If you are a reflective type, it makes you wonder just how much of the crap you know isn’t so. Like, for example, did medieval theologians really routinely argue about how many angels could dance on the head of a pin? Maybe not routinely. Did it even happen once?
     
    Oh yeah, such thoughts have occurred to me, too.
    , @guest
    When you start to rethink medieval times you get into Dark Enlightenment territory, and it's difficult to come back. (Of course, you can rethink and reinterpret them entirely within the Elightened mindset, like wondering whether peasant revolts could've led to communist utopia had not nascent capitalism strangled them in the crib, or somesuch. But you're probably not thinking in such terms.)
  48. It’s funny that New York Times writers are so provincial that they don’t realize that there’s an entire country out there that can’t help but think “HULK SMASH!” when they read this kind of garbage.

  49. @pink_point
    Are any of the other mainstream media different?

    The USA have become a particularly unsightly parody, I am afraid.

    (And by the way, if this is the media scene, you bet university environment is at least as bad.)

    The University seems to be a couple years ahead of the media, since it’s where the future elite is being trained. Cthulhu always swims left, and such.

  50. @Steve Sailer
    The three reporters are not saying "a loose-knit anti-Kennedy movement led by right-wing extremists" murdered JFK, but they're not not saying it either.

    You forgot one point:

    Anything but far-left opinion = HATE. And HATE is an ontologically essential cosmic presence.

    Once HATE is purged, all will be utopia.

    HATE is the left’s EVIL, oozing through the cosmos, animating trucks to lead innocent Muslims astray. (Though somehow punishing the deserving whites for existing. Which isn’t HATE. Don’t ask me, I never comprehended the Abrahamic religions.)

    On that note, don’t miss M.G. Miles’s latest essay on the religion of progressives and thinking about its genetic basis, over at Those Who Can See blog.

  51. The stupidity of all JFK conspiracy theories manifests itself in several of the comments above. No need to comment to such drivel. What should be recognized is the one conspiracy that was effective took place AFTER the death of JFK, and that was the brilliant way the left replaced the true narrative–screwball Marxo-Com degenerate murders JFK out of his infantile understanding of actual Marxism and narcicisstic personality disorder–with the one widely accepted today, for which there is not a shred of evidence: right wing extremists, weewee-ed up on Dallas’s “climate of hate,” manipulated idiot Oswald into the shooting. Most young people today, including ALL 27-year-old know nothing reporters, believe it without questioning. If KGB helped the left on this issue, it was the most successful espionage campaign in history.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    I've already used up my agree button, but I do agree.
  52. @Jack D

    Two months after this city’s darkest day in November 1963, when President John F. Kennedy was killed by a sniper
     
    What a shame it is that now, over a half century later, we still have no idea who this sniper was. If we only knew his name and background we could make a fair assessment of his connections to the other right wing extremists in Dallas and to young Donald Trump. If we knew the identity of the assassin, it might even be possible to completely exonerate these others from any connection to this notorious crime. It might even be possible to connect the assassin to left wing causes instead. But since no arrest or investigation was ever made (that we can recall), this leaves us completely free to make these speculative connections in our leading national newspaper using smoke, mirrors and vague hand gestures.

    BTW, has anyone noticed that (in this age of newspaper cutbacks) that at the NYT it usually takes not one, not two but at least THREE crack reporters to pen these missives?

    In the past, one of the features of leftist totalitarian systems was something called "self-criticism". Now this was mostly a form of torture inflicted on your enemies in which they were supposed to abase themselves by confessing their insufficient zeal for the Revolution and the Dear Leader. However, Maoism did involve a certain element of introspection - a revolutionary was supposed to examine his own character for flaws, for hints of bourgeois mentality, for lack of rigorous thinking based upon scientific principles of socialism. Modern leftism is completely lacking in ANY element of introspection. These people are so smug and confident in their armchair socialism that they are insufferable.

    However, Maoism did involve a certain element of introspection – a revolutionary was supposed to examine his own character for flaws, for hints of bourgeois mentality, for lack of rigorous thinking based upon scientific principles of socialism.

    Like the inner Jihad the Muslims insist is the real meaning of Jihad. A few years back a Muslim commencement speaker at Harvard went on about this and boy did the numbnutz liberals there find this soooooo reassuring.

    2002 -But Zayed Yasin feels “jihad” is a misunderstood term. It is, he says, being misrepresented by his critics. “Jihad,” he told The Crimson, “is not something that should make someone feel uncomfortable. It’s a matter of other people deciding what they think jihad is and attributing to the word the product of their imagination. http://goo.gl/mfRtkv

  53. Lately I get the sense that reality is finally catching up with Steve, leaving him scrambling like Charlie Chaplin caught in a giant hampster wheel as his blog is overwhelmed with a tidal wave of long-predicted events.

  54. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    1493292

    [I wanted to edit my previous comment, but for some reason wasn't able to, so here is an edited version.]

    “By MANNY FERNANDEZ, RICHARD FAUSSET and ALAN BLINDER”

    I really feel that, on a regular basis, my perspective and interests are not represented in the NYT. Not that the backgrounds of the authors have to matter, but somehow they seem to.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    Surely that's not Alan Blinder, the Princeton economist...
  55. I’m not grasping thier math on the darkest day calculation. 2 dead is less than 5.

  56. @otto the P
    The stupidity of all JFK conspiracy theories manifests itself in several of the comments above. No need to comment to such drivel. What should be recognized is the one conspiracy that was effective took place AFTER the death of JFK, and that was the brilliant way the left replaced the true narrative--screwball Marxo-Com degenerate murders JFK out of his infantile understanding of actual Marxism and narcicisstic personality disorder--with the one widely accepted today, for which there is not a shred of evidence: right wing extremists, weewee-ed up on Dallas's "climate of hate," manipulated idiot Oswald into the shooting. Most young people today, including ALL 27-year-old know nothing reporters, believe it without questioning. If KGB helped the left on this issue, it was the most successful espionage campaign in history.

    I’ve already used up my agree button, but I do agree.

  57. Fifty-two years later, the second-worst day in the city’s history has provided Dallas with a new and dramatic global moment. It has seized that moment far differently, presenting to the nation the face of a majority-minority city

    To be fair, this part is actually true, isn’t it?

    • Replies: @guest
    Aside from the fact that I have no idea what the hell a "global moment" is, yes, I suppose. Dallas couldn't very have presented the face of a majority-minority city back in 1963, even if it wanted to. I don't know why you'd want to.
    , @syonredux

    Fifty-two years later, the second-worst day in the city’s history has provided Dallas with a new and dramatic global moment. It has seized that moment far differently, presenting to the nation the face of a majority-minority city

    To be fair, this part is actually true, isn’t it?
     
    But phrased in an overly PC fashion.It would be more honest to state it thusly:

    Fifty-two years later, the second-worst day in the city’s history has provided Dallas with a new and dramatic global moment. It has seized that moment far differently, presenting to the nation the face of a city with a non-Anglo White majority
     
  58. OT: Does anyone else find it creepy the way Trump involves his children. Rather reminds me of Gaddafi.

    [If you opt for a clannish ideology, you'll get clannish conduct.]

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Definitely not creepier than the Kennedy and Bush and Clinton dynasties. But yeah, that's not the ideal state of things.
    , @guest
    I don know about Gaddafi. It is a little creepy, if only for the fact that his sons copy his atrocious hairdo. At least they appear to have actual jobs, as opposed to made-up media jobs or political hack jobs. Even if their position is to sit there while other people do the work, occasionally saying yes, no, or ask daddy.
    , @Anon
    Trump involves his children probably because he feels that they're competent people.
  59. @Bill
    Yes. That's what happened. Does that surprise you?

    Right in front of our eyes, recently, the tale of black incompetence and incomprehensible black savagery that was the aftermath of Katrina was retconned into a tale of white supremacist evil. Was Michael King a good guy or a bad guy? *You* may remember that George Zimmerman was the good guy and St Trayvon Skittles was the bad guy, but nobody younger than 10 when the incident happened will. *You* may remember that Darren Wilson was the good guy and The Gentle Giant of Ferguson was the bad guy, but nobody younger than 10 when the incident happened will. Etc. The media's power to retcon is pretty awe-inspiring.

    The Hollywood trope of the bigoted dad and the goodthinking children takes on a whole different flavor when you've been paying attention to the news for a few decades.

    If you are a reflective type, it makes you wonder just how much of the crap you know isn't so. Like, for example, did medieval theologians really routinely argue about how many angels could dance on the head of a pin? Maybe not routinely. Did it even happen once?

    If you are a reflective type, it makes you wonder just how much of the crap you know isn’t so. Like, for example, did medieval theologians really routinely argue about how many angels could dance on the head of a pin? Maybe not routinely. Did it even happen once?

    Oh yeah, such thoughts have occurred to me, too.

  60. @Anonymous
    [I wanted to edit my previous comment, but for some reason wasn't able to, so here is an edited version.]

    “By MANNY FERNANDEZ, RICHARD FAUSSET and ALAN BLINDER”

    I really feel that, on a regular basis, my perspective and interests are not represented in the NYT. Not that the backgrounds of the authors have to matter, but somehow they seem to.

    Surely that’s not Alan Blinder, the Princeton economist…

  61. @Stephen R. Diamond
    OT: Does anyone else find it creepy the way Trump involves his children. Rather reminds me of Gaddafi.

    [If you opt for a clannish ideology, you'll get clannish conduct.]

    Definitely not creepier than the Kennedy and Bush and Clinton dynasties. But yeah, that’s not the ideal state of things.

  62. @Anthony
    It's amazing how much trouble communist loner veterans in Dealey Plaza can cause.

    The latest theory on the Kennedy assassination is that it was ordered by Yuri Andropov while he was a KGB higher up in Mexico, but that he didn't have authorization from the Kremlin. The Warren commission had to make it look like Oswald was acting alone, because if it became general knowledge that the Soviets had done it, world war 3 would be the result.

    Kind of like how in the fine movie “Carlos the Jackal,” Yuri Andropov orders the assassination of Anwar Sadat. It’s a convincing scene, but I couldn’t find any evidence it really happened.

  63. @Bill
    Yes. That's what happened. Does that surprise you?

    Right in front of our eyes, recently, the tale of black incompetence and incomprehensible black savagery that was the aftermath of Katrina was retconned into a tale of white supremacist evil. Was Michael King a good guy or a bad guy? *You* may remember that George Zimmerman was the good guy and St Trayvon Skittles was the bad guy, but nobody younger than 10 when the incident happened will. *You* may remember that Darren Wilson was the good guy and The Gentle Giant of Ferguson was the bad guy, but nobody younger than 10 when the incident happened will. Etc. The media's power to retcon is pretty awe-inspiring.

    The Hollywood trope of the bigoted dad and the goodthinking children takes on a whole different flavor when you've been paying attention to the news for a few decades.

    If you are a reflective type, it makes you wonder just how much of the crap you know isn't so. Like, for example, did medieval theologians really routinely argue about how many angels could dance on the head of a pin? Maybe not routinely. Did it even happen once?

    When you start to rethink medieval times you get into Dark Enlightenment territory, and it’s difficult to come back. (Of course, you can rethink and reinterpret them entirely within the Elightened mindset, like wondering whether peasant revolts could’ve led to communist utopia had not nascent capitalism strangled them in the crib, or somesuch. But you’re probably not thinking in such terms.)

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    I dunno. I've read a lot of Marxist history for children and teenagers (because that's what my parents bought me in the late 1980s in the communist country I grew up in), but the party line (which I did find sensible already at the age of ten or eleven) was that peasant and slave revolts and similar things had zero chance of creating something better, because the objective material conditions of a communist or even liberal capitalist society did not exist at the time, so the best thing a Spartacus or a Wat Tyler could've done would be to kill or enslave the slaveholders and kill or make serfs of the nobles and make slaveholders or noblemen of themselves (at least of the leaders). Even when I was a liberal I hated the vulgarian ideas that Afghanistan or Iraq could be turned into functioning democracies.
    , @Bill
    I like to think about reactionaries according to their "index date," the date on which they think society was set up more or less right. Somebody like, say, Newt Gingrich or Steve Sailer has an index date of 1950. People like Dennis Mangan or the Society of St Pius X (with reference to how the Church was set up rather than society) have an index date of around 1850. People like Dark Enlightenment types or French Integralists have index dates around 1750. I flatter myself that my index date is around 1350. I guess some of the more intense white nationalists have index dates going back to Ancient Rome or maybe the Aryan Expansion.
  64. @anon

    Fifty-two years later, the second-worst day in the city’s history has provided Dallas with a new and dramatic global moment. It has seized that moment far differently, presenting to the nation the face of a majority-minority city
     
    To be fair, this part is actually true, isn't it?

    Aside from the fact that I have no idea what the hell a “global moment” is, yes, I suppose. Dallas couldn’t very have presented the face of a majority-minority city back in 1963, even if it wanted to. I don’t know why you’d want to.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    But the BLM terrorist clearly showed the world the face of a true minority-majority city. Minorities murdering whites is the face of such a diverse city.
  65. @Stephen R. Diamond
    OT: Does anyone else find it creepy the way Trump involves his children. Rather reminds me of Gaddafi.

    [If you opt for a clannish ideology, you'll get clannish conduct.]

    I don know about Gaddafi. It is a little creepy, if only for the fact that his sons copy his atrocious hairdo. At least they appear to have actual jobs, as opposed to made-up media jobs or political hack jobs. Even if their position is to sit there while other people do the work, occasionally saying yes, no, or ask daddy.

  66. @Stephen R. Diamond
    OT: Does anyone else find it creepy the way Trump involves his children. Rather reminds me of Gaddafi.

    [If you opt for a clannish ideology, you'll get clannish conduct.]

    Trump involves his children probably because he feels that they’re competent people.

    • Replies: @David
    I think it's like the depiction of the Imperial household on the Ara Pacis. It implies dynastic stability, a beautiful and prosperous future, a shared civic religion. To Americans worried about the dissolution of their society, Trump's flaunting his united family is exactly what's wanted.

    This is yet another area where Hillary can't compete.
  67. @guest
    What *are* they saying? Mostly nothing, except that they don't like Dallas circa 1963 (duh). Dallas now is better because Current Year.

    Maybe that gobbledygook makes sense to them. But to me, it sounds like they're saying the MSM of the day shamed Dallas into silence by calling it a "city of hate" because it had the misfortune to simultaneously have a pinko nut working there when the president stopped by and have a lot of anti-Kennedy people in residence. They deserve to be beat up on to this day because Kennedy died and it's a cardinal sin to have been anti-Kennedy to whatever degree at the time. For some unspecified reason. How compassionate and understanding of our enlightened liberal betters. They sure can hold a grudge.

    Do they know what fanatics they come off as? Do they care? I realize they don't write for people like me. What's the difference, to people who want to blame ante-civil rights Southerners for everything and those who don't know better?

    COnspiracy theories help. If everyone knew it was a pro-Castro loon they'd shut up with the "city of hate" crap. They wouldn't want Marxism associated with hate. They might not even teach about it in school, and kids would grow up ignorant of the name "Kennedy." Which actually doesn't sound that bad.

    Over the decades, I’ve never, EVER heard Dallas, TX specifically referred to as “the city of hate” per se. That sounds if not entirely made up, it certainly is leftist virtue signaling to others in the know, to serve as shorthand for the larger and ongoing generation war between the New Left and the Silent Majority.

    Just as the NYT carefully avoided the race of the perp in the Kitty Genovese case in ’64 for several decades, so too they usually will brand/stereotype all those west of the Hudson (making key exceptions of course for such superzips as DC; Boston; Chi; SF; LA) as bumpkinland; extremist fringe; angry white males; etc.

    In other words, “city of hate” could just as easily apply to other cities in Red Stateland that are known to be majority white with little diversity and even less explicit endorsement of leftist politics.

    I’ve never heard that term referred to Dallas until this event. If it was a term it was so underground and not constantly and consistently applied to the city over the decades. Like, turn on Tom Brokaw circa 1988 Nightly News for an indepth story about the GOP convention held in Dallas (or was it in 1984?) and there were constant referrals to Dallas as “the city of hate”. Seriously? Totally bogus. Or in 1993, during David Koresh’s standoff in Waco, CNN would make occasional asides along the likes of “And you know, we shouldn’t be surprised about the happenings in Waco, after all, its in the same state as Dallas, the city of hate.” Come on.

    Think the NYT is doing a wee bit of projection. If any media outlet outlet or ideology tends to harbor hatred toward a city for its traditional makeup (e.g. majority white or WASP in particular) its the NYT.

    • Replies: @guest
    I think "city of hate" is an inside-NYT thing. Their crowd knows about it, and they just assume everybody else does, or should. It's one of their best tricks: pretending their oddball interests are perfectly mainstream, and in fact THE mainstream.

    I was trying to think of conservative or alt-right versions, but any example will do. Difference is, we don't run "the paper of record," and can't convince anyone that everyone who's anyone uses our little nicknames.
  68. , presenting to the nation the face of a majority-minority city

    Rhyme has its appeal, of course, but sometimes we need to face the unadorned truth. Dallas is a city where White Anglos are a minority.

    For years after the assassination, Dallas was labeled the “city of hate” because it had been the focal point of a loose-knit anti-Kennedy movement led by right-wing extremists.

    On the other hand, those “right-wing extremists” had nothing to do with Kennedy’s assassination. Lee Harvey Oswald was a Marxist.

  69. @Jefferson
    Anybody here who is old enough to remember 1963 ever heard Walter Cronkite, Martin Luther King Jr., Bobby Kennedy, Jackie O, or Lyndon B. Johnson refer to Dallas as the city of hate on television?

    I’m old enough to remember 1963 and never heard it said by a public figure.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  70. @anon

    Fifty-two years later, the second-worst day in the city’s history has provided Dallas with a new and dramatic global moment. It has seized that moment far differently, presenting to the nation the face of a majority-minority city
     
    To be fair, this part is actually true, isn't it?

    Fifty-two years later, the second-worst day in the city’s history has provided Dallas with a new and dramatic global moment. It has seized that moment far differently, presenting to the nation the face of a majority-minority city

    To be fair, this part is actually true, isn’t it?

    But phrased in an overly PC fashion.It would be more honest to state it thusly:

    Fifty-two years later, the second-worst day in the city’s history has provided Dallas with a new and dramatic global moment. It has seized that moment far differently, presenting to the nation the face of a city with a non-Anglo White majority

  71. @guest
    Aside from the fact that I have no idea what the hell a "global moment" is, yes, I suppose. Dallas couldn't very have presented the face of a majority-minority city back in 1963, even if it wanted to. I don't know why you'd want to.

    But the BLM terrorist clearly showed the world the face of a true minority-majority city. Minorities murdering whites is the face of such a diverse city.

    • Replies: @guest
    Diversity+Proximity=War.

    I wonder if we'll ever read that in the NYT, even just to damn "right wing extremists" with?
  72. @Paul Jolliffe
    JW123,

    It's more than just that. Ferrie and Shaw were probably only tangentially involved, but "Oswald" was up to his eyeballs in it, although I strongly doubt he knew exactly what was to happen at 12:30 on 11/22/63 in front of the TSBD.

    It seems likely that Ferrie's role was to be a back-up getaway pilot for some of the team due to arrive in Houston very early in the morning of the 23rd. His mad dash on the afternoon of the 22d from Carlos Marcello's courtroom in New Orleans to the pay phone outside the ice-skating rink in Houston 400 miles away early on the 23rd remains unexplained.

    The FBI didn't believe Ferrie's explanation then, no one believes it today, and no one can give a non-conspiratorial reason for that frantic trip. Ferrie was a bit player with a minor role to play, a role that turned out to be unnecessary.

    "Oswald" and his identity were being used by multiple persons for years before 1963. Of course he was connected to the CIA!

    Proof?

    The USMC, the Marines, have official and unimpeachable records that place him from mid-September to early October of 1958 in both the naval hospital in Atsugi, Japan and Ping Tung, Taiwan. When "Oswald" supposedly "defected" to the USSR in 1959, the Navy sent out a confidential message on November 4 to other US intelligence agencies that stated that "Oswald" had served with Marine Air Control Squadrons in Taiwan.

    Now I admit that "Oswald" was an unusual guy, but even he couldn't be in both Japan and Taiwan at once.

    Two men, one identity, two locations at the same time.

    And the Warren Commission knew it and classified it for as long as they could.

    Some simple advice: read this book

    Reclaiming History: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy
    by Vincent Bugliosi

    https://www.amazon.com/Reclaiming-History-Assassination-President-Kennedy/dp/0393045250

    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
    Did you actually read it - all 1,632 pages of it? Did anyone, anywhere, ever actually read it?

    It took Bugliosi 1.632 pages to say that "Oswald" did it all by himself, and Ruby did it all by himself.

    The original "double lone-nut" theory.
    , @The most deplorable one
    Then read this one for light relief:

    https://www.amazon.com/Reclaiming-Parkland-Vincent-Bugliosi-Assassina/dp/1626365334?ie=UTF8&SubscriptionId=AKIAILSHYYTFIVPWUY6Q&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=1626365334&linkCode=xm2&tag=duckduckgo-d-20
  73. @JohnnyWalker123
    Oswald was a CIA Agent who was set up to take the fall.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hpyMuduBmtQ

    Judge Garrison found evidence that businessman Clay Shaw and pilot David Ferrie were involved in the assassination. Before he could testify, Ferrie mysteriously died.

    Here's a picture of David Ferrie with Oswald. Both were in the Civil Air Patrol together.

    https://twitter.com/TrumpLion1776/status/737856463234867200

    Some simple advice: read this book

    Reclaiming History: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy
    by Vincent Bugliosi

    https://www.amazon.com/Reclaiming-History-Assassination-President-Kennedy/dp/0393045250

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    And also read that book

    Case Closed: Lee Harvey Oswald and the Assassination of JFK
    by Gerald Posner

    https://www.amazon.com/Case-Closed-Gerald-Posner/dp/1400034620/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1468704351&sr=1-1&keywords=case+closed
  74. Such complete and utter bullshit. Maybe Dallas-ites cared about their “role” in the Kennedy assassination back in the 60s. By the 80s, Dallas was synonymous with one of the country’s most popular TV shows; certainly no one there felt any responsibility for what some random guy had done decades before. Did this reporter even bother to talk to anyone from Dallas, ever in their life, or just drive through the city? Honestly, this is an astonishing level of ignorance.

    ETA: In with everyone else who has never, ever heard Dallas referred to as the “City of Hate.”

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Did this reporter even bother to talk to anyone from Dallas, ever in their life, or just drive through the city? Honestly, this is an astonishing level of ignorance."

    Most Liberals who work for The New York Times would rather get food poisoning than step foot in Texas or any other flyover country red state.
  75. @guest
    When you start to rethink medieval times you get into Dark Enlightenment territory, and it's difficult to come back. (Of course, you can rethink and reinterpret them entirely within the Elightened mindset, like wondering whether peasant revolts could've led to communist utopia had not nascent capitalism strangled them in the crib, or somesuch. But you're probably not thinking in such terms.)

    I dunno. I’ve read a lot of Marxist history for children and teenagers (because that’s what my parents bought me in the late 1980s in the communist country I grew up in), but the party line (which I did find sensible already at the age of ten or eleven) was that peasant and slave revolts and similar things had zero chance of creating something better, because the objective material conditions of a communist or even liberal capitalist society did not exist at the time, so the best thing a Spartacus or a Wat Tyler could’ve done would be to kill or enslave the slaveholders and kill or make serfs of the nobles and make slaveholders or noblemen of themselves (at least of the leaders). Even when I was a liberal I hated the vulgarian ideas that Afghanistan or Iraq could be turned into functioning democracies.

    • Replies: @guest
    That example came to mind because I am interested in the subject, and when I scratch beneath pop-history books I keep butting my head against Marxist claptrap. Possibly it's unorthodox Marxist claptrap. This is so, presumably, because most of them are from university presses and universities are full of Marxists, half-Marxists, pseudo-Marxists, or whatever it is I'm coming across.

    You're probably right about the mainstream Marxist interpretation of peasant revolts. And let's just forget about Maoists, liberation theologians and suchlike. One thing I've noticed is the pushing back further and further the origin of the capitalist class, and the finer and finer distinction between classes. Until you get to the point where a guy owning one more pig than his neighbor in AD 930 inexorably leads to John D. Rockefeller down the road. At least that's a tendency I've noticed.

    So if you just redefine nobles as capitalists and serfs as the proletariat, poof! But I admit it's a screwy example. I wanted to pick an obviously incorrect interpretation for absurdity's sake.

  76. @Travis
    Growing up in the 70s in Philadelphia I despised the Dallas Cowboys, as did everyone I knew. Yet I never recall anyone referring to Dallas as the city of Hate. They had "America's Team" and then the most popular Television show.

    My parents and most of my relatives were Liberals who supported Jimmy Carter, yet none of them ever referred to Dallas as the City of Hate, although many did believe there was a conspiracy to kill Kennedy.

    That “city of hate” stuff is for New York Times people. Which doesn’t mean people who read the New York Times. The New York Times doesn’t write for readers of the New York Times. It writes for its own crowd, and to make everyone else think the delusions of its crowd are the Actual Truth.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @Pericles
    New York, the actual City of Hate.
  77. @Anonymous Nephew
    "For years after the assassination, Dallas was labeled the “city of hate” because it had been the focal point of a loose-knit anti-Kennedy movement led by right-wing extremists. "

    So an American communist who'd actually been to Moscow shoots the President, and and it's the right-wing extremists wot did it?

    The General consensus is a rogue group of right wing CIA guys uses their connections with the mob who they used to try to get rid of Castro to wack JFK.

    There were CIA ties to the Marcello mob in New Orleans and with “The Outfit” in Chicago and Dallas. They called in favors and found “lone wolf” to use Oswalds term “patsy.”

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Smoking the (K2) Spice?
  78. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Over the decades, I've never, EVER heard Dallas, TX specifically referred to as "the city of hate" per se. That sounds if not entirely made up, it certainly is leftist virtue signaling to others in the know, to serve as shorthand for the larger and ongoing generation war between the New Left and the Silent Majority.

    Just as the NYT carefully avoided the race of the perp in the Kitty Genovese case in '64 for several decades, so too they usually will brand/stereotype all those west of the Hudson (making key exceptions of course for such superzips as DC; Boston; Chi; SF; LA) as bumpkinland; extremist fringe; angry white males; etc.

    In other words, "city of hate" could just as easily apply to other cities in Red Stateland that are known to be majority white with little diversity and even less explicit endorsement of leftist politics.

    I've never heard that term referred to Dallas until this event. If it was a term it was so underground and not constantly and consistently applied to the city over the decades. Like, turn on Tom Brokaw circa 1988 Nightly News for an indepth story about the GOP convention held in Dallas (or was it in 1984?) and there were constant referrals to Dallas as "the city of hate". Seriously? Totally bogus. Or in 1993, during David Koresh's standoff in Waco, CNN would make occasional asides along the likes of "And you know, we shouldn't be surprised about the happenings in Waco, after all, its in the same state as Dallas, the city of hate." Come on.

    Think the NYT is doing a wee bit of projection. If any media outlet outlet or ideology tends to harbor hatred toward a city for its traditional makeup (e.g. majority white or WASP in particular) its the NYT.

    I think “city of hate” is an inside-NYT thing. Their crowd knows about it, and they just assume everybody else does, or should. It’s one of their best tricks: pretending their oddball interests are perfectly mainstream, and in fact THE mainstream.

    I was trying to think of conservative or alt-right versions, but any example will do. Difference is, we don’t run “the paper of record,” and can’t convince anyone that everyone who’s anyone uses our little nicknames.

  79. @reiner Tor
    But the BLM terrorist clearly showed the world the face of a true minority-majority city. Minorities murdering whites is the face of such a diverse city.

    Diversity+Proximity=War.

    I wonder if we’ll ever read that in the NYT, even just to damn “right wing extremists” with?

  80. @syonredux
    Some simple advice: read this book

    Reclaiming History: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy
    by Vincent Bugliosi

    https://www.amazon.com/Reclaiming-History-Assassination-President-Kennedy/dp/0393045250

    And also read that book

    Case Closed: Lee Harvey Oswald and the Assassination of JFK
    by Gerald Posner

    https://www.amazon.com/Case-Closed-Gerald-Posner/dp/1400034620/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1468704351&sr=1-1&keywords=case+closed

  81. @Kevin O'Keeffe

    So, who tried to shoot General Edwin Walker?
     
    Oswald did. That's one of the principal reasons he was such a great patsy ie., because he had a history of doing screwy things. I actually believe Oswald fired on JFK. But he missed. The trained sniper at the grassy knoll, on the other hand....

    His handlers probably had him shoot the general to establish a history of assassination attempts.

    It helps make him look loopy if he got caught and Ruby failed his janitorial job. That is – if Oswald started naming names.

    • Replies: @guest
    About Oswald naming names, why did they let him sit in police custody for so long? He could have named names between the time he was caught and when Ruby shot him. Why didn't Ruby shoot Oswald earlier, at the photo-op? He was there, and it was a better opportunity than the one he got at the transfer.

    Also, why didn't anyone shoot Ruby to shut him up? He lived for years afterwards. The conspirators must have been on tenterhooks. But then I guess you'd need someone to shoot the guy who shot Ruby, and someone to shoot the guy who shot the guy, and so on.

  82. @reiner Tor
    I dunno. I've read a lot of Marxist history for children and teenagers (because that's what my parents bought me in the late 1980s in the communist country I grew up in), but the party line (which I did find sensible already at the age of ten or eleven) was that peasant and slave revolts and similar things had zero chance of creating something better, because the objective material conditions of a communist or even liberal capitalist society did not exist at the time, so the best thing a Spartacus or a Wat Tyler could've done would be to kill or enslave the slaveholders and kill or make serfs of the nobles and make slaveholders or noblemen of themselves (at least of the leaders). Even when I was a liberal I hated the vulgarian ideas that Afghanistan or Iraq could be turned into functioning democracies.

    That example came to mind because I am interested in the subject, and when I scratch beneath pop-history books I keep butting my head against Marxist claptrap. Possibly it’s unorthodox Marxist claptrap. This is so, presumably, because most of them are from university presses and universities are full of Marxists, half-Marxists, pseudo-Marxists, or whatever it is I’m coming across.

    You’re probably right about the mainstream Marxist interpretation of peasant revolts. And let’s just forget about Maoists, liberation theologians and suchlike. One thing I’ve noticed is the pushing back further and further the origin of the capitalist class, and the finer and finer distinction between classes. Until you get to the point where a guy owning one more pig than his neighbor in AD 930 inexorably leads to John D. Rockefeller down the road. At least that’s a tendency I’ve noticed.

    So if you just redefine nobles as capitalists and serfs as the proletariat, poof! But I admit it’s a screwy example. I wanted to pick an obviously incorrect interpretation for absurdity’s sake.

  83. @Neoconned
    His handlers probably had him shoot the general to establish a history of assassination attempts.

    It helps make him look loopy if he got caught and Ruby failed his janitorial job. That is - if Oswald started naming names.

    About Oswald naming names, why did they let him sit in police custody for so long? He could have named names between the time he was caught and when Ruby shot him. Why didn’t Ruby shoot Oswald earlier, at the photo-op? He was there, and it was a better opportunity than the one he got at the transfer.

    Also, why didn’t anyone shoot Ruby to shut him up? He lived for years afterwards. The conspirators must have been on tenterhooks. But then I guess you’d need someone to shoot the guy who shot Ruby, and someone to shoot the guy who shot the guy, and so on.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    Jack Ruby's pal Officer JD Tippit was supposed to shoot Oswald, he apparently got cold feet and ended up being shot himself. Ruby shooting Oswald was the not ideal fallback option.
  84. @guest
    When you start to rethink medieval times you get into Dark Enlightenment territory, and it's difficult to come back. (Of course, you can rethink and reinterpret them entirely within the Elightened mindset, like wondering whether peasant revolts could've led to communist utopia had not nascent capitalism strangled them in the crib, or somesuch. But you're probably not thinking in such terms.)

    I like to think about reactionaries according to their “index date,” the date on which they think society was set up more or less right. Somebody like, say, Newt Gingrich or Steve Sailer has an index date of 1950. People like Dennis Mangan or the Society of St Pius X (with reference to how the Church was set up rather than society) have an index date of around 1850. People like Dark Enlightenment types or French Integralists have index dates around 1750. I flatter myself that my index date is around 1350. I guess some of the more intense white nationalists have index dates going back to Ancient Rome or maybe the Aryan Expansion.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Interesting idea. Other index dates include 1860 and 1913 (beginning of graduated income tax), Woodrow Wilson assumes presidency.
    , @FX Enderby
    Speaking of SSPX, Bishop Williamson has some great videos on YouTube where he explains the history of liberalism, etc. Williamson's "index date" would seem to be some time before Henry VIII wrecked England (and by extension the future USA) because of his split with the Roman Catholic Church.

    I'm not a churchgoer but I think Williamson is excellent. Check out his lecture on the 7 ages of the Church for example.

    From what I gather, Williamson was kicked out of the SSPX for his supposed "anti-Semitism" so make of that what you will.
    , @guest
    "my index date is around 1350"

    Say, did you ever read Richard Weaver's "Ideas Have Consequences?" He traced the corruption of the Western Mind to William of Ockham's wrong turn in the great realism vs. nominalism battle. I think Ockham died around 1350. Maybe a coincidence, but look into it.
    , @syonredux
    Certain Save the Earth types say that it's been all downhill since the Neolithic Revolution....
  85. Can’t recall anyone calling Dallas c.o.h. IRL. I know “Virginia Is For Lovers” and Atlanta is “The City Too Busy To Hate”–the latter of which I always found a poor motto; in the intransitive-verb sense William Hartsfield said it, it makes sense as a statement about the people of the city. But then when you start plastering it on coffee mugs, it comes across as a bragging hype-slogan, something like Atlanta itself is too industrious for anyone to legitimately hate it. Conversely, it carries the nonsensical meaning of Atlanta, if it slowed down and took things easy, having more time to hate.

    Generally it shows that the best and brightest of New York (“City So Nice They Named It Twice”, etc.) are brighter than elsewhere. Who has ever unironically uttered “The Big Guava” in reference to Tampa?

  86. @EvolutionistX
    Such complete and utter bullshit. Maybe Dallas-ites cared about their "role" in the Kennedy assassination back in the 60s. By the 80s, Dallas was synonymous with one of the country's most popular TV shows; certainly no one there felt any responsibility for what some random guy had done decades before. Did this reporter even bother to talk to anyone from Dallas, ever in their life, or just drive through the city? Honestly, this is an astonishing level of ignorance.

    ETA: In with everyone else who has never, ever heard Dallas referred to as the "City of Hate."

    “Did this reporter even bother to talk to anyone from Dallas, ever in their life, or just drive through the city? Honestly, this is an astonishing level of ignorance.”

    Most Liberals who work for The New York Times would rather get food poisoning than step foot in Texas or any other flyover country red state.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Did this reporter even bother to talk to anyone from Dallas, ever in their life, or just drive through the city? Honestly, this is an astonishing level of ignorance.”

    Most Liberals who work for The New York Times would rather get food poisoning than step foot in Texas or any other flyover country red state.
     
    A lot of them will make an exception for Austin
  87. @Bill
    I like to think about reactionaries according to their "index date," the date on which they think society was set up more or less right. Somebody like, say, Newt Gingrich or Steve Sailer has an index date of 1950. People like Dennis Mangan or the Society of St Pius X (with reference to how the Church was set up rather than society) have an index date of around 1850. People like Dark Enlightenment types or French Integralists have index dates around 1750. I flatter myself that my index date is around 1350. I guess some of the more intense white nationalists have index dates going back to Ancient Rome or maybe the Aryan Expansion.

    Interesting idea. Other index dates include 1860 and 1913 (beginning of graduated income tax), Woodrow Wilson assumes presidency.

  88. OK Guys….

    When everyone agrees something is bullshit, then of course, it is BS. But it isn’t without its own rationale.

    Just WTF is “City of Hate”?

    However, there was and is this widely believed idea that everyone knew Dallas was a bad idea. Like everyone. For example:

    “Former Illinois Governor and two time Democratic nominee Adlai Stevenson warned JFK in advance. Stevenson had been in Dallas one month earlier and the scene was so hostile, he was assaulted.

    Chief Justice Earl Warren was at the WH for the annual Justice Dept. dinner held near Thanksgiving. JFK was to leave shortly after for Dallas. Warren, a JFK friend who eulogized him later at the National Cathederal, was in the family quarters that were crowded. He told JFK directly it was ill advised to go.”

    So …. It was widely assumed that Dallas was some fucked up place. And, lets face it. We did get to watch Oswald get gunned down on live television. And. The most popular television shows were shit like ‘Gunsmoke’ which was pro gun control. Miss Kitty required that guns be checked at the door of the Long Branch Saloon/Whorehouse.

    The point being that a lot of people thought it was sort of cool to perform a summary execution the same weekend. I would say 1/2 the country, anyway.

    Dallas was next to Ft Worth which was a cow town, not that dissimilar to Dodge City.

    As far as the fact that ‘everyone knew’ …. just the typical cognitive bias.

    Everyone thought Stevenson was a pussy and not a Texas alpha type. Just saying.

  89. @Bill
    I like to think about reactionaries according to their "index date," the date on which they think society was set up more or less right. Somebody like, say, Newt Gingrich or Steve Sailer has an index date of 1950. People like Dennis Mangan or the Society of St Pius X (with reference to how the Church was set up rather than society) have an index date of around 1850. People like Dark Enlightenment types or French Integralists have index dates around 1750. I flatter myself that my index date is around 1350. I guess some of the more intense white nationalists have index dates going back to Ancient Rome or maybe the Aryan Expansion.

    Speaking of SSPX, Bishop Williamson has some great videos on YouTube where he explains the history of liberalism, etc. Williamson’s “index date” would seem to be some time before Henry VIII wrecked England (and by extension the future USA) because of his split with the Roman Catholic Church.

    I’m not a churchgoer but I think Williamson is excellent. Check out his lecture on the 7 ages of the Church for example.

    From what I gather, Williamson was kicked out of the SSPX for his supposed “anti-Semitism” so make of that what you will.

  90. @Neoconned
    The General consensus is a rogue group of right wing CIA guys uses their connections with the mob who they used to try to get rid of Castro to wack JFK.

    There were CIA ties to the Marcello mob in New Orleans and with "The Outfit" in Chicago and Dallas. They called in favors and found "lone wolf" to use Oswalds term "patsy."

    Smoking the (K2) Spice?

  91. @Bill
    I like to think about reactionaries according to their "index date," the date on which they think society was set up more or less right. Somebody like, say, Newt Gingrich or Steve Sailer has an index date of 1950. People like Dennis Mangan or the Society of St Pius X (with reference to how the Church was set up rather than society) have an index date of around 1850. People like Dark Enlightenment types or French Integralists have index dates around 1750. I flatter myself that my index date is around 1350. I guess some of the more intense white nationalists have index dates going back to Ancient Rome or maybe the Aryan Expansion.

    “my index date is around 1350″

    Say, did you ever read Richard Weaver’s “Ideas Have Consequences?” He traced the corruption of the Western Mind to William of Ockham’s wrong turn in the great realism vs. nominalism battle. I think Ockham died around 1350. Maybe a coincidence, but look into it.

    • Replies: @Bill
    I'm an anti-fan of William. I haven't read that book, but I've encountered those ideas elsewhere. Nominalism is bad stuff.
  92. Marion Maréchal-Le Pen’s reaction:

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Can a French-speaker give us sn executive summary of what she did?
  93. @Mr. Anon
    "BTW, has anyone noticed that (in this age of newspaper cutbacks) that at the NYT it usually takes not one, not two but at least THREE crack reporters to pen these missives?"

    Yes, three reporters is a lot of people to write an essentially fact-free non-news story. They could probably get software to auto-generate such pap.

    Yes, three reporters is a lot of people to write an essentially fact-free non-news story. They could probably get software to auto-generate such pap.

    Maybe they are, and MANNY FERNANDEZ, RICHARD FAUSSET and ALAN BLINDER are the auto-generated names the machine kicked out. “Manny Fernandez” is particularly suspect.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    Good point.
  94. @Bill
    I like to think about reactionaries according to their "index date," the date on which they think society was set up more or less right. Somebody like, say, Newt Gingrich or Steve Sailer has an index date of 1950. People like Dennis Mangan or the Society of St Pius X (with reference to how the Church was set up rather than society) have an index date of around 1850. People like Dark Enlightenment types or French Integralists have index dates around 1750. I flatter myself that my index date is around 1350. I guess some of the more intense white nationalists have index dates going back to Ancient Rome or maybe the Aryan Expansion.

    Certain Save the Earth types say that it’s been all downhill since the Neolithic Revolution….

  95. @Jefferson
    "Did this reporter even bother to talk to anyone from Dallas, ever in their life, or just drive through the city? Honestly, this is an astonishing level of ignorance."

    Most Liberals who work for The New York Times would rather get food poisoning than step foot in Texas or any other flyover country red state.

    Did this reporter even bother to talk to anyone from Dallas, ever in their life, or just drive through the city? Honestly, this is an astonishing level of ignorance.”

    Most Liberals who work for The New York Times would rather get food poisoning than step foot in Texas or any other flyover country red state.

    A lot of them will make an exception for Austin

    • Replies: @The most deplorable one

    A lot of them will make an exception for Austin
     
    Wait until they find out that Cody Wilson and Defense Distributed are in Austin.
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Na-no, the so called enlightened types from Austin generally move to NY and are then grafted into the fold of the literati, cosmopolitan, Algonquin Round Table, etc. The Manhattan elites don't actually move to Austin, much less make a habit of venturing down to visit the city for extended periods of time.
  96. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @syonredux

    Did this reporter even bother to talk to anyone from Dallas, ever in their life, or just drive through the city? Honestly, this is an astonishing level of ignorance.”

    Most Liberals who work for The New York Times would rather get food poisoning than step foot in Texas or any other flyover country red state.
     
    A lot of them will make an exception for Austin

    A lot of them will make an exception for Austin

    Wait until they find out that Cody Wilson and Defense Distributed are in Austin.

  97. @syonredux

    Did this reporter even bother to talk to anyone from Dallas, ever in their life, or just drive through the city? Honestly, this is an astonishing level of ignorance.”

    Most Liberals who work for The New York Times would rather get food poisoning than step foot in Texas or any other flyover country red state.
     
    A lot of them will make an exception for Austin

    Na-no, the so called enlightened types from Austin generally move to NY and are then grafted into the fold of the literati, cosmopolitan, Algonquin Round Table, etc. The Manhattan elites don’t actually move to Austin, much less make a habit of venturing down to visit the city for extended periods of time.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Na-no, the so called enlightened types from Austin generally move to NY and are then grafted into the fold of the literati, cosmopolitan, Algonquin Round Table, etc. The Manhattan elites don’t actually move to Austin, much less make a habit of venturing down to visit the city for extended periods of time.
     
    It's certainly not a place where they would prefer to live, but sometimes it's a case of needs must when the devil drives.For example, I've known several Leftist academics from the Northeast who live in Austin. They complain about being in Texas, but they always note that at least they are living in Austin, and not in vile places like Dallas or Houston.

    Needless to say, they don't mention the fact that Austin is substantially Whiter than either Dallas or Houston.....








    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austin,_Texas#Demographics
  98. @Daniel Williams

    Yes, three reporters is a lot of people to write an essentially fact-free non-news story. They could probably get software to auto-generate such pap.
     
    Maybe they are, and MANNY FERNANDEZ, RICHARD FAUSSET and ALAN BLINDER are the auto-generated names the machine kicked out. "Manny Fernandez" is particularly suspect.

    Good point.

  99. Dallas was an urban GOP stronghold surrounded by Democratic White rural Texas in 1960. Today, minority-majority Dallas is an urban Democratic stronghold while White rural Texas is solidly Republican.

    Southern cities have rapidly moved away from the GOP in recent years. They moved rapidly toward it in the 1920s-1950s. Thus, Sixth Party System GOP stronghold Virginia voted for Obama both times.

    The trend for the GOP since 1994 has been for it to become more of a rural Jeffersonian/Jacksonian party.

    What’s happening to southern cities?

  100. CJ says:
    @Jack D

    Two months after this city’s darkest day in November 1963, when President John F. Kennedy was killed by a sniper
     
    What a shame it is that now, over a half century later, we still have no idea who this sniper was. If we only knew his name and background we could make a fair assessment of his connections to the other right wing extremists in Dallas and to young Donald Trump. If we knew the identity of the assassin, it might even be possible to completely exonerate these others from any connection to this notorious crime. It might even be possible to connect the assassin to left wing causes instead. But since no arrest or investigation was ever made (that we can recall), this leaves us completely free to make these speculative connections in our leading national newspaper using smoke, mirrors and vague hand gestures.

    BTW, has anyone noticed that (in this age of newspaper cutbacks) that at the NYT it usually takes not one, not two but at least THREE crack reporters to pen these missives?

    In the past, one of the features of leftist totalitarian systems was something called "self-criticism". Now this was mostly a form of torture inflicted on your enemies in which they were supposed to abase themselves by confessing their insufficient zeal for the Revolution and the Dear Leader. However, Maoism did involve a certain element of introspection - a revolutionary was supposed to examine his own character for flaws, for hints of bourgeois mentality, for lack of rigorous thinking based upon scientific principles of socialism. Modern leftism is completely lacking in ANY element of introspection. These people are so smug and confident in their armchair socialism that they are insufferable.

    Yes, three bylines — on a piece of boilerplate that an experienced Comintern/Homintern operative ought to be able to cut-and-paste and trim to fit in half an hour. It likely has something to do with travel and expense accounts. If I were an NYT wordsmith I’d be trying to get every dollar I could out of the Old Grey Lady before she goes TU.

  101. @syonredux
    Marion Maréchal-Le Pen's reaction:


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3_Gxp6Q-J-M

    Can a French-speaker give us sn executive summary of what she did?

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    I mean, what she said? (Edit function not working.)
  102. @reiner Tor
    Can a French-speaker give us sn executive summary of what she did?

    I mean, what she said? (Edit function not working.)

  103. @guest
    That "city of hate" stuff is for New York Times people. Which doesn't mean people who read the New York Times. The New York Times doesn't write for readers of the New York Times. It writes for its own crowd, and to make everyone else think the delusions of its crowd are the Actual Truth.

    New York, the actual City of Hate.

  104. @Mr. Anon
    "Immediately after RFK was killed, a woman in a polka dot dress was spotted yelling “we shot him.”"

    Well, that's certainly iron-clad evidence. It is surely completely impossible that the woman who was being interviewed misheard what a woman in a polka-dot dress might have said. Surely the polka-dot clad mind-control assassin must have actually said "we shot him", not "they shot him" or "...unintelligible...." or anything else. Nor is it possible that there was more than one woman wearing a polka-dot dress in public in 1968; with polka-dot dresses, as in Highlander, there can only be one. And, of course, it is well known that assassins leaving the scene of their murders always boast about the crime they've just committed.

    A woman-in-the-polka-dot-dress-yelling-”we shot him” anecdote BY ITSELF is terrible evidence for a conspiracy to kill RFK

    However, what’s mighty interesting is what happened afterward: the LAPD had one of its most spooky interrogators, Hank Hernandez – seemingly a former covert ops guy in Latin America – go after the witness, Sandy Serrano, in a way that is anything but innocent.

    Listen to the interrogation. It’s on tape.

    Hank Hernandez used every psychological ploy, every hint at legal charges, every attempt possible to intimidate, threaten, browbeat and finally wear down Serrano to get her to change her official statement that polka-dot dress woman was real and shouted “we”.

    If what you wrote were the truth, then the LAPD could just have downplayed Serrano’s statement, or ignored her. Instead, they went all-out to discredit her in a way that is highly suspicious.

    The real evidence of conspiracy in the RFK case is the ballistics evidence.
    But that’s another story.

  105. @syonredux
    Some simple advice: read this book


    Reclaiming History: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy
    by Vincent Bugliosi





    https://www.amazon.com/Reclaiming-History-Assassination-President-Kennedy/dp/0393045250

    Did you actually read it – all 1,632 pages of it? Did anyone, anywhere, ever actually read it?

    It took Bugliosi 1.632 pages to say that “Oswald” did it all by himself, and Ruby did it all by himself.

    The original “double lone-nut” theory.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Did you actually read it – all 1,632 pages of it? Did anyone, anywhere, ever actually read it?
     
    I read all of it, and was deeply impressed by Bugliosi's rigor. It's the definitive book on the Kennedy assassination. That's why I recommend it to the poor, misguided souls out there who think that Oswald didn't kill Kennedy.
  106. I actually believe Oswald fired on JFK. But he missed. The trained sniper at the grassy knoll, on the other hand….

    On its face, this is a pretty hilarious application of Occam’s Butterknife.

  107. @Anon
    Trump involves his children probably because he feels that they're competent people.

    I think it’s like the depiction of the Imperial household on the Ara Pacis. It implies dynastic stability, a beautiful and prosperous future, a shared civic religion. To Americans worried about the dissolution of their society, Trump’s flaunting his united family is exactly what’s wanted.

    This is yet another area where Hillary can’t compete.

  108. @Johnny Smoggins
    The story I'd always heard was that Oswald allegedly killed Kennedy BUT there's a lot of speculation that he was a patsy and any number of people from the mafia to the KKK were actually the ones who killed him.

    It wasn't until I read more about it that I learned that Oswald was a communist who actually defected to the Soviet Union. That was when all the conspiracy theories started to make sense. Of course the left can't admit that one of their own was the one that killed Kennedy, just like they can't admit that practitioners of their pet religion commit acts of terrorism and mass rape.

    Just as with conspiracy theories surrounding 911 we can argue till the sun goes down about minutiae of details but it's not hard for me to believe at all that the media would obfuscate, if not outright lie, to cover for members of one of their favoured classes.

    Oswald was a a confirmed Marxist, thus the left invent a vast right wing conspiracy to cover it up….Just as they try and label Omar Mateen a homophobic homosexual, to hide his true motivations for killing 49 in Orlando.

  109. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Na-no, the so called enlightened types from Austin generally move to NY and are then grafted into the fold of the literati, cosmopolitan, Algonquin Round Table, etc. The Manhattan elites don't actually move to Austin, much less make a habit of venturing down to visit the city for extended periods of time.

    Na-no, the so called enlightened types from Austin generally move to NY and are then grafted into the fold of the literati, cosmopolitan, Algonquin Round Table, etc. The Manhattan elites don’t actually move to Austin, much less make a habit of venturing down to visit the city for extended periods of time.

    It’s certainly not a place where they would prefer to live, but sometimes it’s a case of needs must when the devil drives.For example, I’ve known several Leftist academics from the Northeast who live in Austin. They complain about being in Texas, but they always note that at least they are living in Austin, and not in vile places like Dallas or Houston.

    Needless to say, they don’t mention the fact that Austin is substantially Whiter than either Dallas or Houston…..

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austin,_Texas#Demographics

  110. @Paul Jolliffe
    Did you actually read it - all 1,632 pages of it? Did anyone, anywhere, ever actually read it?

    It took Bugliosi 1.632 pages to say that "Oswald" did it all by himself, and Ruby did it all by himself.

    The original "double lone-nut" theory.

    Did you actually read it – all 1,632 pages of it? Did anyone, anywhere, ever actually read it?

    I read all of it, and was deeply impressed by Bugliosi’s rigor. It’s the definitive book on the Kennedy assassination. That’s why I recommend it to the poor, misguided souls out there who think that Oswald didn’t kill Kennedy.

  111. The General consensus is a rogue group of right wing CIA guys uses their connections with the mob who they used to try to get rid of Castro to wack JFK.

    There were CIA ties to the Marcello mob in New Orleans and with “The Outfit” in Chicago and Dallas. They called in favors and found “lone wolf” to use Oswalds term “patsy.”

    Mob’s always been known for their skill at range with rifles. /sarc

  112. “We shot him” could also just be shocked-speak for “OMG the president just got shot in my city.” But when you’re a Konspiracy Kook, EVERYTHING “proves” your theory.

  113. @guest
    "my index date is around 1350"

    Say, did you ever read Richard Weaver's "Ideas Have Consequences?" He traced the corruption of the Western Mind to William of Ockham's wrong turn in the great realism vs. nominalism battle. I think Ockham died around 1350. Maybe a coincidence, but look into it.

    I’m an anti-fan of William. I haven’t read that book, but I’ve encountered those ideas elsewhere. Nominalism is bad stuff.

  114. @guest
    About Oswald naming names, why did they let him sit in police custody for so long? He could have named names between the time he was caught and when Ruby shot him. Why didn't Ruby shoot Oswald earlier, at the photo-op? He was there, and it was a better opportunity than the one he got at the transfer.

    Also, why didn't anyone shoot Ruby to shut him up? He lived for years afterwards. The conspirators must have been on tenterhooks. But then I guess you'd need someone to shoot the guy who shot Ruby, and someone to shoot the guy who shot the guy, and so on.

    Jack Ruby’s pal Officer JD Tippit was supposed to shoot Oswald, he apparently got cold feet and ended up being shot himself. Ruby shooting Oswald was the not ideal fallback option.

    • Replies: @guest
    Still I wonder why Ruby waited so long. Did he get cold feet, too? The mob/CIA/space aliens sure can pick 'm.
  115. @Jefferson
    According to Donald Trump, Ted Cruz's father is the reason Dallas became the city of hate.

    On the plus side Trump clearly looks like he would be inclined to release the still classified files on JFK, I believe a huge batch come up for publication, or further sealing, in 2017.

  116. IBC says:

    When I think of Dallas, I think of oil tycoons, glass skyscrapers, and football. When I think of the Kennedy Assassination, I think of old warehouses and those labels school textbooks used to have with “county or parish” printed on them.

    For years after the assassination, Dallas was labeled the “city of hate” because it had been the focal point of a loose-knit anti-Kennedy movement led by right-wing extremists.

    Sounds like the NYT is supporting conspiracy theories, no?

    If there really was a high-level conspiracy to assassinate Kennedy, aren’t the odds pretty good that it somehow involved Fidel Castro? How many assassination attempts did the CIA make on him and who authorized them? It’s a fact that Oswald was a passionate supporter of Cuban communism and that he met with Cuban diplomats in Mexico just weeks prior to Kennedy’s assassination. After the assassination, he also became the prime suspect in an earlier attempt on the life of the fervently pro-segregation and anti-communist politician: Gen. Edwin Walker, a well-known Texas Democrat who had publicly called for the “liquidation” of Castro’s regime.

    While there’s no credible evidence that LBJ had anything to do with JFK’s killing, how politically useful was it for him to promote the idea that Kennedy died as a liberal martyr and that his death gave Johnson a special mandate to carry out the unfinished business of civil rights and social entitlement legislation that Kennedy was supposedly fighting for? Would it have hurt that mandate (and have made Kennedy to have seemed like a hypocrite and a bungler) if it became known that Kennedy himself had ordered Castro’s own assassination, not once, but multiple times? Would the public have started to hear some echoes of Edwin Walker?

    In the aftermath of the assassination, Johnson had a strong motive to lead an official narrative to avoid further escalation with Cuba and the USSR and also to consolidate any inadvertent political gains liberal Democrats could make from it. If Oswald had been able to make statements that he had shot Kennedy because Kennedy had tried to kill Castro, the liberal martyr narrative could have been killed right there and/or, the American public may have demanded revenge from Cuba, which could have triggered another world war. Since only death itself could have guaranteed Oswald’s silence, both Castro and Johnson had an incentive to kill him, or at least in the case of Johnson, potentially turn a blind eye to unsavory but politically serendipitous underworld forces already at work against Oswald in Dallas. If Johnson was involved in Kennedy’s assassination, I’m guessing that that was most likely the extent of it.

    I have no personal investment in this idea, but of all the Kennedy Assassination conspiracy theories out there, this sounds the most plausible to me.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2006/aug/03/cuba.duncancampbell2

    http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2015/03/jfk-assassination-lee-harvey-oswald-mexico-116195

  117. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @syonredux
    Some simple advice: read this book


    Reclaiming History: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy
    by Vincent Bugliosi





    https://www.amazon.com/Reclaiming-History-Assassination-President-Kennedy/dp/0393045250
    • Replies: @syonredux

    Then read this one for light relief:

    https://www.amazon.com/Reclaiming-Parkland-Vincent-Bugliosi-Assassina/dp/1626365334?ie=UTF8&SubscriptionId=AKIAILSHYYTFIVPWUY6Q&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=1626365334&linkCode=xm2&tag=duckduckgo-d-20
     
    A nutcase relative gave me a copy a while back. It's a very unconvincing book.
  118. @LondonBob
    Jack Ruby's pal Officer JD Tippit was supposed to shoot Oswald, he apparently got cold feet and ended up being shot himself. Ruby shooting Oswald was the not ideal fallback option.

    Still I wonder why Ruby waited so long. Did he get cold feet, too? The mob/CIA/space aliens sure can pick ‘m.

  119. @The most deplorable one
    Then read this one for light relief:

    https://www.amazon.com/Reclaiming-Parkland-Vincent-Bugliosi-Assassina/dp/1626365334?ie=UTF8&SubscriptionId=AKIAILSHYYTFIVPWUY6Q&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=1626365334&linkCode=xm2&tag=duckduckgo-d-20
  120. Jack Ruby’s pal Officer JD Tippit was supposed to shoot Oswald, he apparently got cold feet and ended up being shot himself. Ruby shooting Oswald was the not ideal fallback option.

    So, a conspiracy of dunces, then; hiring pros was out of the question.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    If you are going to be shot resisting arrest then you have to have a policeman do it. No BLM movement then.
  121. @Svigor

    Jack Ruby’s pal Officer JD Tippit was supposed to shoot Oswald, he apparently got cold feet and ended up being shot himself. Ruby shooting Oswald was the not ideal fallback option.
     
    So, a conspiracy of dunces, then; hiring pros was out of the question.

    If you are going to be shot resisting arrest then you have to have a policeman do it. No BLM movement then.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
The sources of America’s immigration problems—and a possible solution
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
Hundreds of POWs may have been left to die in Vietnam, abandoned by their government—and our media.