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You can watch Ed Dutton interview me today on Bitchute here.

 
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  1. Anon[144] • Disclaimer says:

    So I guess you weren’t joking when you said your office is in your closet. How many hours a day are you holed up in there?

    Your closet is better than Dutton’s creepy basement dungeon that he films out of.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  2. Lot says:

    I got a Willy Wonka talking to Droopy Dog vibe. Ed needs to share his stash in advance with future guests

    The lighting was fine and you don’t look remotely like Sen. McConnell.

    I urge you to say “disproved” not “disproven” going forward.

    • Replies: @Charon
  3. Looking very LA in a good way.

    Ed Dutton seems like a true English eccentric.

    Matty “Big Boy” Yglesias was on the Joe Rogan podcast today shilling his ONE BILLION AMERICANS claptrap. Allegedly tripling the population will reduce political gridlock and the decline of social cohesion because reasons.

  4. Anon[169] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve, do you get a cut of the donations?

    There are a lot of websites that give advice on how to make five figures as a camgirl. You might have to pick and choose from the advice.

  5. For those of us who have been regular readers of iSteve for a few years, there is nothing new or deep in this interview, but it seems ideal for others who might not have had much or any exposure to Sailer, who, BTW, comes across much better and more coherent than the eccentric host with the colourful attire.

    (This is not a negative comment, BTW, not at all. Video is by nature shallow, but it is also entertaining.)

  6. Thanks for doing this, Steve. Very enjoyable.

    I’ve been looking for something to gently red pill a few people I know and this is perfect.

    I got a laugh out of seeing that you weren’t joking about working out of your closet. (predicting you’ll get a lot of comments to this effect)

  7. @Buzz Mohawk

    Sailer, who, BTW, comes across much better and more coherent than the eccentric host with the colourful attire.

    Nothing productive can come of turning this into a iSteve fans vs. Jolly Heretic Fans flamewar.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    , @Pop Warner
  8. I coulldn’t see a resemblance to Mich McConnel – maybe Roger Waters of Pink Floyd, or perhaps Erwin Rommel.

  9. @Buzz Mohawk

    The video is a pretty good summary of Steve’s various thoughts. Steve was articulate, and sounded reasonable and thoughtful.

    It’s hard to go very deep in a video. Writing is a more way to convey complex information. The videos are more for the mass market. Trump voters who want something a bit stronger than Tucker and Rush.

  10. anonymous[176] • Disclaimer says:

    For those who believe there is strong evidence showing large scale election fraud that robbed Trump of victory, why not call for large scale civil disobedience?

    • Replies: @Dr. DoomNGloom
    , @Dutch Boy
  11. BenKenobi says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve, my home office is a solarium with my 10 foot tall 15 year old money tree in the corner. I am often in my robe with my feet up on the desk and a coffee mug in hand while reading your writing.

    Why are you in a closet?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Pericles
  12. @JohnnyWalker123

    Somebody (in the Q&A session) asked Steve Sailer if Blacks represented the “Idiocracy” to which America was regressing into becoming. For a few moments, Steve seems taken aback, like he’s struggling to figure out a noncontroversial answer.

    Watch the video from 55:15-55:35. Steve looks away from the camera, like he’s averting his eyes. The body language is VERY interesting there. He can’t bear to look at the sheer brutality of the question. Almost like he’s wincing in pain.


    His interview answer is pretty diplomatic, but decent.

    His manner of writing is far more blunt. See below link.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/is-america-headed-toward-idiocracy/

    There’s sort of a disconnect between how Steve writes and how he talks. I suppose that reflects Sailers’s “Midwest nice” upbringing, which places a premium on keeping a polite face in public. If a NYC Italian or an Israeli Jew or a Chinese was asked the same question, the answer would’ve been uncomfortably blunt.

    Different ethnic groups have varying levels of comfort with causing psychological distress in other individuals. “Midwest Nice” is definitely towards the low end of the spectrum.

  13. Good stuff!

    Only listened to the 1st 10 minutes and will save the whole interview for bedtime or Monday’s drive. Personally, though I like to read, podcasts are great as I do a lot of long distance driving so I can learn as I go.

    Bitchute is better than Youtube as it does background playback so you can have your phone at home screen and not playing video, something the coppers can get you on – I’m actually not that interested in watching anyway as much as listening and thinking about what’s being discussed.

    Can’t believe you actually sit in clothes cupboard for 12 hours a day lol. Surely you can afford to commandeer a spare bedroom, assuming all your kids have left home? Do you listen to music with those earbuds? God I hope not!

    Seriously recommend you do a weekly one hour podcast, Steve. Same as Zedman’s weekly roundup.

    Btw, you look a hell of a lot like one of my uncles. Have the same passive exterior hiding a fierce intellect though I doubt you’re as much of a mercilessly scathing drunkard. You got a good thick Irish head of grey hair, good on ya.

    Re. the topic at hand, sports journos are the lowest of the low. They are paid *not* to notice. Probably why you got out.

  14. Charon says:
    @Steve Sailer

    That doesn’t sound particularly healthy, you know. And in L.A. yet, blessed with some of the world’s best weather. Why can’t you take your laptop [or tablet] outdoors now and then? Or–who knows–you could try your hand on the links.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    , @Anon
  15. @JohnnyWalker123

    There’s sort of a disconnect between how Steve writes and how he talks.

    That’s pretty much true for all of us. The internet has made it clear that people will be a lot meaner when they are at a distance and unseen.

    • Agree: Dissident
  16. Charon says:
    @Lot

    I urge you to say “disproved” not “disproven” going forward.

    Whatever you do, ignore this advice.

  17. Charon says:
    @Clifford Brown

    “Want to see me talk with @joerogan for over three hours?”

    Why no, Matt! Honestly, I’d rather be tortured to death.

    Presuming that’s any different, that is.

  18. Anonymous[122] • Disclaimer says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Steve has a California accent, which I think derives from the Midwest. It’s like the General American accent with a slower cadence and extended vowels. It’s slower than how people in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast speak.

    • Replies: @Dutch Boy
  19. vhrm says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Steve’s answer is the real answer and my impression at the time and also rewatching it is that his reaction is a genuine “well…. no”, as in “you [the asker of the question in the interview] don’t quite get it”.

    Using a normal distribution for IQ with mean 100 and a SD of 15 for whites and mean 85 and SD 15 for blacks, there will be almost twice as many whites under IQ 85 than blacks.

    Whites are 75% of population. — 0.75 * 0.16 (fraction of whites with IQ under 85)
    = 12% of us population is whites with IQ under 85.

    Blacks are 13% of population — 0.13 * 0.5 (fraction of blacks with IQ under 85)
    = 7% of US populaton is blacks with IQ under 85

    Based just on IQ ( and not looking at other possibly socially relevant differences between groups),
    “what do we do with lower IQ people?” is still more about dealing with white people than with black people.

    sources:
    – About normal curve cumulative distribution function https://www.inferentialthinking.com/chapters/14/3/SD_and_the_Normal_Curve.html

    – racial fractions in US from https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/US/PST045219
    “Population estimates, July 1, 2019, (V2019)”

  20. anonymous[751] • Disclaimer says:

    there’s an annoying, smarmy quality to your voice and diction which is not helped by your smirk.

    you take about 3x as long as necessary to say something like, “national football league”–which leaves plenty of time for your implied, “, you morons.”

    maybe don’t talk like this if you want people to listen to what you’re saying instead of just grokking that you despise them.

  21. Anonymous[139] • Disclaimer says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Somebody (in the Q&A session) asked Steve Sailer if Blacks represented the “Idiocracy” to which America was regressing into becoming.

    Actually the crowds and extras in Idiocracy seemed to be mostly Latino with some lower class white types, rather than black.

    UFC and the MMA scene today remind me of Idiocracy. UFC/MMA is very popular these days in general and with all major demographics, but its core fandom and the market it heavily targets seems to be very Latino and lower class white. Many of the fighters seem to be Latino as well. And the whole Ed Hardy-esque, Monster Energy Drink aesthetic of UFC/MMA reminds me of Idiocracy as well.

    • Replies: @Bostonvegas
    , @Anonymous
  22. Steve looks too young for his age.

  23. Steve was thoughtful and circumspect. Edward Dutton, a very entertaining and informative podcaster, has far more energy than Steve but I fear he may be sailing too close to the wind. Steve seems a bit more aware than Dutton about the strength and deviousness of our enemies.

  24. Off topic but apparently nobody watched the credible testimonies of Michigan poll workers and guiliani a couple days ago. Blatant anti-white racism and ballot fraud perpetrated by black Democrats. My viet wife is obsessed with it so I heard the whole thing.Two of the poll workers were immigrant women of color. One of them said “if you want to see real racism, come to India”. A black state rep bellowed that they were liars, but their testimony was very convincing. Would like to see a body language analysis of their testimony.

  25. YouTube is running away from allowing interesting talks like this. We’re lucky to have some alternative sites. Sometimes it’s good to talk somewhere away from the crowd.

    And at least there wasn’t an ad every 5 minutes.

  26. Anonymous[412] • Disclaimer says:

    Great so far… do more of these.

    When Dutton said “begs the question” Steve is mentally correcting the “beg” to “raises”, I just know it.

    • Replies: @Pericles
  27. Anonymous[265] • Disclaimer says:
    @vhrm

    LMAO! Woke math!

  28. Looking good Steve!

    Say can fellow iStevers help me out – looking for video of the wild “urban” fight with kids vs obese women vs other obese women vs a car. Thanks in advance.

  29. ISteve live is about how I imagined he would be. Although I appreciate the freedom of expression, I don’t agree with much of unz.com. I come for ISteve, who, despite notoriety, is more decent and charitable than most pundits, right or left. A civic nationalist, advocating public policy based on honest social science, and close to being a Rawlsian liberal.

  30. JackOH says:

    Good, mild-mannered (meaning “good” in this context) tour of the subject matter we go on about here.

    That high/low “coalition of the fringes” that informs the Democrats made me think immediately of another high/low “party”. Al-Qaeda. If my memory’s okay, and if the accounts I’ve read are reasonably factual, Al-Qaeda is bankrolled by Westernized and corrupt wealthy Muslims who’ve been guilted into getting right with Allah by a charismatic mullah du jour. So they fork over bucks to buy Hi-Luxes and AKs for angry, unemployed, and massively alienated young Islamists to get all wild ‘n’ crazy.

    As I said, gut reaction to Steve’s mention of the phrase. Somebody correct me if I’m mistaken about Al-Qaeda. Who could have guessed tech billionaires and BLM anarchists paired well, each for their own reasons?

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  31. Jack D says:
    @vhrm

    I haven’t tried to figure out what is wrong with your math (or whether it is wrong) but I had always heard that the # of blacks and whites below 85 was about equal as in this graph:

    This also matches with other measures of low IQ such as the number of people on welfare, in jail, etc. Of course since blacks are only 13% of the population, this means that they are 4x overrepresented on such measures on a per capita basis, but in terms of raw numbers they are 50/50.

    To me, the most notable thing about the graph is not the left half but the right half, especially out at the tails. You can see the vast gulf between blacks and whites at high IQ levels and understand why AA has to be a massive and never ending thumb on the scale.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @MSP
    , @TelfoedJohn
    , @utu
    , @Lurker
  32. Tom Verso says:

    It was interesting to see and hear someone whom you only know in print.

    But, wish he was being interview by someone who is more articulate. I could understand about half of what the interviewer was saying.

    Most interesting thing to me was the way the Election Fraud was dismissed as ‘the same o, some o’ thing that always goes on.

    I am old enough to remember when Eisenhower was elected the first time and have been a social science buff and formally educated in the field and I cannot remember anything like what has happened in PA, Georgia, Wisconsin.

    I am a-political haven’t voted in at least 50 years (voting is the opium of the people … makes one feel good about being ‘free’); but, clearly this is vote manipulation on a scale that is unprecedented. And, I can’t help but wonder way the is so little curiosity about it even if you are sanguine about the outcome.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    , @Graham
    , @Dube
  33. You look fine enough as a human specimen but too close to the camera — couldn’t you and Dutton pre-sync how close each of you were going to be, for consistency sake? You’ve got a bit of fisheye lens effect going on there while he could be a little closer and better lit. He looks like some sad northern shut-in while you are clearly the sunny Californian.

    Oh, and maybe lose those clothes hanging in the background — hang up a tarp or Minions blanket or Mercator projection map or something. I’d like a row of clocks labeled Washington, London, Moscow, Tokyo etc.

    I do look forward to actually listening to the discussion

  34. MSP says:
    @Jack D

    Looking at the graph, there are quite a lot more whites right at or slightly below 85; once you move lower the proportion shifts. So, there probably are more whites than blacks <85, but that’s probably not true for <80.

  35. @vhrm

    You can play with these IQ numbers if you have a scientific calculator with the function
    normalcdf(lo,hi,mean,stddev), which gives the proportion of a population that has an IQ (or any other trait) between lo and hi, given an average value mean and a standard deviation stddev. For whites, mean = 100, stddev=15. Note that the the curve of the normal distribution gets very small toward the low end and high end, but never zero. So we can ask, What proportion of the population has a negative IQ? We get normal(-9E99,0,100,15) = 13.15E-12 = 1/76E9 = one person in 76 billion.
    Also, what proportion of the population has an IQ > 1000? It is
    normalcdf(1000,9E99,100,15) = … Uh-oh, this proportion rounds off to zero. Let’s try
    normalcdf(500,9E99,100,15) = still zero
    normalcdf(300,9E99,100,15) = 77E-42 = 1/13E39 = one person in 13×10^39. You’d need a vast intergalactic empire to have a person with an IQ of 300+. A mere galactic empire would suffice to find a person of negative IQ.

    • Replies: @HA
  36. kihowi says:

    You look so human there, have you mellowed with age? I remember watching another interview with you a long time ago and you were so stiff and awkward it triggered an uncanny valley response in me and I had to shut it off. I thought “now I know why he’s a writer I guess”.

  37. J.Ross says:

    Star student athlete clobbers referee, escorted away by police, guess the — no, it’s not that one.
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9017211/Texas-prep-football-player-attacks-referee.html

  38. @Jack D

    This also matches with other measures of low IQ such as the number of people on welfare, in jail, etc.

    Yes, recidivist criminality is associated with 85 IQ and under. If both white and black have the same total population of people under 85 IQ, which the bell curve graph suggests, you would expect the prison populations to be about the same. And if fact they are – black and white are each 40% of the prison population:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incarceration_in_the_United_States#Race_and_ethnicity

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  39. Listening to you, I realize that there is a California accent. It is very subtle, and I can’t put my finger on what differentiates the accent, but on hearing your voice, you sound like my many cousins who live spread out from San Diego to Camarillo.

  40. Luke Lea says:

    I liked his answer, “We [meaning groups] are all inferior to others in some respects and superior in others.” or words to that effect.

  41. Pericles says:
    @Anonymous

    On the internet, we have free reign to beg the question.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @duncsbaby
  42. utu says:
    @Jack D

    Your curves are not consistent with two Gaussians B(85,15), W(100,15) and the ratio W/B=60.1%/13.4%. If it was the ratios would be as follows:

    W/B=1 at IQ=70
    W/B=1.8 IQ=80
    W/B=3.8 at IQ=90
    W/B=7.4 at IQ=100
    W/B= 14.4 at IQ=110
    W/B=28 at IQ=120

    • Thanks: vhrm
    • Replies: @Jack D
  43. @anonymous

    There should be wide scale civil disobedience. At a minimum we are owed transparency, and security. I’d gladly throw Trump under the bus to get those outcomes.

    I expressed skepticism about the Dominion voting machine narrative. Not that they are secure, but that they were the source of the issue. The sickening fact is that vote theft has been going on for years and the mail ins eviscerate any semblance of chain-of-custody or meaningful observation.
    Isolated issues of in person observation also occur in the highest density areas.

    One simple reform would be to go the route of Nebraska and Maine, electing electors by congressional district with two additional either state-wide or picked by the legislature. This reform would mitigate the effects of running up the score in isolated areas. Only widespread fraud could have a large impact.

    I also strongly oppose mail-in votes for multiple reasons.

    • Agree: Hibernian, RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @anonymous
    , @RadicalCenter
  44. @BenKenobi

    Steve, my home office is a solarium with my 10 foot tall 15 year old money tree in the corner. I am often in my robe with my feet up on the desk and a coffee mug in hand while reading your writing.

    Why are you in a closet?

    Because you haven’t donated?

    Closets are more expensive than flyover solaria in Zelda Gilroy’s district.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
  45. Lurker says:
    @Jack D

    I haven’t tried to figure out what is wrong with your math

    He slipped in the assumption that whites are 75% of the US population. This is false, last census had that figure at @63%. So it’s certainly lower now.

    • Replies: @BlackFlag
  46. Steve,
    I respectfully disagree that Trump probably “lost” narrowly. I’ve explained that I don’t buy into the Dominion narrative, but the oddities in the close states with mail in votes, lack of signature checks, lack of custody, harvesting, and so forth are more than enough to put the contest in doubt.

    The oddities of abnormally high Biden totals among urban blacks in selected areas and deviations between normal bellwethers are, to say the least, highly suspicious. There are a number of ways to cheat, and the states of PA, GA, AZ, and NV not only enabled these, but have dragged their feet on reasonable examination.

    We have yet to see a meaningful examination of the real issues. Instead we get diversions like recounts when we need recount, auditing, and re-canvasing. That these are not automatic is a first world disgrace. It would not be that hard to make election cheating much harder and the results hard to criticize.

    Am I to believe that PA had 10x more mail in votes but a 27 x lower rate in ballot rejections because of Democrat voter “education”. If they were *perfect*, it wouldn’t add up. If inner city ethnics were being adequately coached for that level of perfection, we can safely assume they had the kind of oversight not consistent with a secret and secure ballot.
    A PA court rules that the law governing observers is ambiguous and doesn’t assure them any right for meaningful observation? What could the legislative intent been, fung shui?
    We complained early and loudly about the governor and SOS re-writing legislation, but courts won’t enforce even the plainest laws in a meaningfully secure way.

    How about those late ballots in NY state that flipped a state senate seat. In what universe are late discovered balltos not prima facie evidence of a crime? At a minimum the chain of custody has been violated. If they were legit, it sucks, but misplacing ballots is inexcusable. I have a hard time believing they were ever misplaced. The burden of proof is completely backwards here.

    From where I stand, the results cannot be taken credulously. They need stronger transparency.

    And thanks for the callout to Carnegie Mellon

    • Agree: BB753
    • Thanks: Goatweed
    • Replies: @Dutch Boy
    , @Grumpy
  47. Steve, what is the point of doing such an interview?

  48. Dan Smith says:

    Good interview, Steve. On the topic of Morgan Freeman: his seminal role as a Magic Negro was in Driving Miss Daisy. Shawshank Redemption not far behind. Stephen King loves those characters. The Shining had Scatman Cruthers and The Green Mile Michael Clarke Duncan. Will Smith played Bagger Vance though Freeman could have easily handled it. My favorite not so Magic Negro is Samuel L. Jackson in Jackie Brown as Ordell Robey (I named one of my cats Ordell) and Jules Winnfield in Pulp Fiction. I bet you could do a great article in Taki’s Magazine about Magic Negroes. Perhaps you have already.

  49. Jack D says:
    @utu

    Should the data fit the curve or should the curve fit the data? IQ itself is ROUGHLY Gaussian, not strictly Gaussian and appears more Gaussian that it really is because of the norming of the tests and the raw score to IQ conversion forces it into a somewhat (but not perfectly) Gaussian distribution. And some tests are normed at SD15 (Wechsler) and others SD=16 (Stanford-Binet).

    • Replies: @vhrm
  50. It’s kind of weird hearing someone’s voice for the first time when you are very familiar with their writing. Steve’s is deeper than I expected.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
  51. HA says:
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    “normalcdf(lo,hi,mean,stddev)”

    As with most “single point” probability distributions, IQ is “fat-tailed” and doesn’t follow a normal/Gaussian distribution (though within a standard deviation or two, the discrepancies are often small in comparison with the inherent uncertainties in the mean and standard deviation, so it’s more than adequate). Population averages of IQ do of course follow a Gaussian distribution, depending on how big the sample size, but by virtue of the Central Limit Theorem, that can be said of most anything.

    (I haven’t read the linked paper — I just offer it for noting that the fat tails of IQ distributions is common knowledge among those who study such things.)

    • Replies: @Lot
  52. @JohnnyWalker123

    I saw Idiocracy when it came out back in 2006. It looks like the estimated 2505 arrival was off by, oh I’d say 486 years.

  53. @anononononon

    I suppose you’re right.

    I was not familiar with the Englishman. First impressions, you know.

    Anyone who will have Steve Sailer as a guest on his program is brilliant, as far as I’m concerned.

    Cheerio.

  54. Dutch Boy says:
    @Anonymous

    I grew up in the San Diego area (after my father’s army service) and I can attest that the area was heavily populated by ex-Midwesterners (as were my parents). Many of them ended up here after military service (esp. the navy). There is something about growing up in a land-locked icebox that makes sea service seem attractive (not to mention the warm weather).

  55. BenKenobi says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    flyover

    You wound me, dear Reg. I live in a gentrified downtown Vancouver neighborhood. I can see English Bay — technically the Pacific — from my desk.

    • Replies: @Muggles
  56. @jimmyriddle

    “Mich McConnel [sic]”

    Steve doesn’t look like the droopy senator from Kentucky. Nor does he resemble Sheila Kuehl who truly does have the wizened, grinning face of a turtle that pops out of its shell and thinks it’s better than me. Steve looks like my brother: a middle age commercial actor, intermittingly successful since the 1980s, and now, in the age of hysterical negrophilia, is the boyfriend to the octogenarian lady from Palm Springs who owns several apartment buildings in the Valley.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    , @James Speaks
  57. vhrm says:
    @Jack D

    For the purposes of my general argument 1:1 and 2:1 are equivalent so there’s no need to grind it out any finer than we have.

    I want to convey that there are plenty of non-blacks with low IQ and that Steve’s answer accurately captures the situation rather than being a polite dodge.

    See e.g. the anon above who thinks my post is “woke math”. That’s whose perspective I’m trying to adjust in terms of not overinterpreting what the 1sd difference means.

    And yes, of course, the much bigger issue is the apparent majority of people out there who don’t know anything about HBD and how much it explains about various hot button gaps, but those people weren’t watching or reading iSteve.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @HA
  58. Anon[240] • Disclaimer says:

    My best professors over the years had the same kind of measured, contemplative, calm delivery. Ted Cruz is perhaps the best political/cultural speaker in the country, and the same goes for him. You can go back to William Buckley on this style. At the other end of the spectrum one finds Rachel Maddow, Kamala, Spartacus, Dershowitz, and, alas, Rudy.

  59. Dennis Dale says: • Website

    Why Dutton? So affected.

    Eff that. Sailer needs to go on Joe Rogan. Rogan’s regular-guy credulity is ideal for the subject of HBD, and you could do hours on HGH in sports and acting alone.

    • Replies: @Danindc
  60. @JackOH

    “Who could have guessed tech billionaires and BLM anarchists [terrorists] paired well”

    Me. Since I retired from the lucrative ancient alien theorist trade I took up societal analysis. My newsletter reaches 1500 readers in the intermountain west. Send a SASE to Jerry Brown’s Joint in Colusa and I’ll send you a free copy. It’ll take six weeks to arrive because I’m busy trying to get Jerry to kick his porn habit and that creepy Jesuit cult the Gov. invited onto his ranch is up to no good in the back 40.

  61. Jack D says:
    @vhrm

    I understand what you are saying as far as the exact ratios not being crucial to your point but I think that if you say to the average person ” there are twice as many stupid white people as there are stupid black people in the US ” or “two thirds of really stupid people are white” that comes across differently than saying “there are as many stupid blacks as there are stupid whites, even though blacks are only 13% of the population”.

    Maybe if you had said it was 1:1 rather than 2:1 he would not have accused you of doing “woke math”.

  62. I wish he didn’t interrupt you so much.

  63. @Tom Verso

    “Election Fraud was dismissed as the ‘the same ”

    Election fraud is as American as Stephen King’s Magic Negros. Recent history shows the 2000 recount in Florida and the 2004 Diebold electronic voting machines in Ohio were fraudulent. Since Obama is a creature of the Babylonian shadow state, my bet is both of his elections were rigged in some way. Although warmongering troll McCain and empty-headed male model Romney were both repulsive. I find the House of Bush way more interesting than shallow Obama so I can’t be bothered. 2020 was fraud city; it’s time for Blumpft! to accept that his enemies stole it fair and square. Otherwise Brennan will unleash his Pakistani mercenaries to seed even more virus around the country.

    • Replies: @Tom Verso
  64. HA says:
    @vhrm

    “there are twice as many stupid white people as there are stupid black people in the US”

    Setting aside the loaded language (and disregarding however woke that makes me), under the 75%:13% population criteria you listed, the crossing IQ (assuming the means are 100:85 and the standard deviations are 15:15 respectively) is 73.4. In other words, the number of black folk and white folk with IQ at or below that level is the same. For a lower cutoff IQ, black folk predominate.

    For the population ratios utu gave (60.1:13.4), the crossing IQ is 78.1.

    So in either case, for a cutoff IQ of 85, the number of white folk at that IQ or lower is indeed well above the number of black folk. (Under your population criteria, there are almost twice as many white folk in the IQ<=85 group).

    That is all calculated under Gaussian assumptions, which isn't strictly correct, but for about a standard deviation or two away from the mean, it is probably pretty close.

    If someone wants to give me some Flynn reversal momentum assumptions, I can calculate how much time we have left till we reach peak Idiocracy — i.e., when everyone is just as stupid as everyone else — at which point none of this is going to matter in the least.

    • Replies: @vhrm
  65. Dutch Boy says:
    @Dr. DoomNGloom

    These guys think that the machines were programmed to switch votes from Trump to Biden (in Michigan and presumptively elsewhere) and have created easy to understand graphs to make their point:

    • Replies: @Ian M.
  66. Grumpy says:
    @Dr. DoomNGloom

    This was an extremely odd election.

    Last summer, I drove 4,000 miles round-trip and did not see one Biden bumper sticker, flag, or sign anywhere. And I was keeping my eye out for them.

    Is it really conceivable that 25 million more people voted in 2020 than in 2016? An almost 20 percent increase? Has that happened before?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @JimmyGee
  67. BlackFlag says:
    @Lurker

    For births it’s something like:
    45% white
    25% latino
    15% black
    15% other

  68. @Charon

    LA’s mayor doesn’t even want people walking around outside right now — much healthier to just sit inside, right?

  69. George says:

    Did YouTube ban this video while you were streaming it?

  70. @SunBakedSuburb

    No resemblance to McConnell whatsoever, but it is starting to bug me that I can’t come up with a past or current actor who would play our host in the acclaimed Sailer biopic

    • Replies: @Danindc
  71. @Clifford Brown

    Rogan podcast today shilling his ONE BILLION AMERICANS claptrap. Allegedly tripling the population will reduce political gridlock and the decline of social cohesion because reasons.

    Does he actually say that? Maybe the most totally ass backwards sentiment I’ve ever heard, most progressives just avoid issues like social cohesion, it takes a real dummy to bring up something even a total layman can tell your position on is idiotic on its face. I assumed it was purely a “population is power” ak style argument outlining that superpowers basically always need a huge population (of course he ignores that human capital is just as big a factor).

    Anyone who thinks artificially tripling the population (rather than a gradual organic growthrate through procreation) through immigration would unleash anything less than total social, ecological, and economic devastation on the American middle class and below is seriously retarded. At best you could say it MIGHT increase their peak capability as far as leveraging industry and military against competitors, but it almost definitely wouldn’t imo. America would almost certainly be a stronger international hegemon without it’s black underclass and the domestic bugbears springing from said that the political class is obsessed with. That’s what mass 3rd world immigration is all about and all it’s really good for: stronger domestic domination of the political class over uppity citizens who expect competent governance.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    , @Charon
  72. @JohnnyWalker123

    “There’s sort of a disconnect between how Steve writes and how he talks. I suppose that reflects Sailers’s ‘Midwest nice’ upbringing, which places a premium on keeping a polite face in public.”

    No. It’s because Sailer’s adopted. Adoptees present a false agreeable front that conceals profound fear, anger, and resentment at being rejected by their bio parents. The strangulated voice is a symptom of this as well.

  73. Anon[146] • Disclaimer says:
    @Charon

    That doesn’t sound particularly healthy, you know. And in L.A. yet, blessed with some of the world’s best weather. Why can’t you take your laptop [or tablet] outdoors now and then? Or–who knows–you could try your hand on the links.

    Actually, the challenge in LA, where the sun is stronger than in most of the country and omnipresent virtually year around, is to avoid getting too much sun.

    Having a windowless closet for an office is not that bad in LA where you can always step outside to get some sunlight. Whereas it’s not so great in many parts of the country where it’s not unusual to go for long stretches of time, weeks even, with cloudiness and little sunlight, especially in the winter when the sun goes down early. In those places the challenge is to try to get as much sunlight as possible and take advantage of scarce sunny days.

  74. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:

    Is this a glimpse of the fabled closet ?

    Looking good, thin @Isteve

    • Replies: @Danindc
  75. Mike Tre says:

    Mr Dutton comes across like he just snorted an 8-ball from the top of a stripper’s silicone enhanced breast.

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
  76. @anononononon

    I am a fan of both and it was entertaining watching the difference in speaking pace between Edward and Steve. Edward’s videos are usually him rattling off a ton of information very fast, while Steve speaks much slower.

    And if you’re unfamiliar with Dutton you should get familiar, he’s a very good academic with years of research under his belt. It’s rare to have a fellow traveler still published and cited by academia

  77. @TelfoedJohn

    Yes, recidivist criminality is associated with 85 IQ and under.

    Until this election!

    OT, but the Cyrus family chimes in on the continuing saga of Harry Styles and “nappy[-]ass heaux” Candace Owens:

    Noah Cyrus Is ”Mortified” After Using Racially Insensitive Word While Defending Harry Styles

    Candace is clearly nappier, but who da ho’?

    [MORE]

    Noah could pass as half-Asian and make good money selling her hair:

    • Replies: @Jack D
  78. Anonymous[304] • Disclaimer says:
    @Clifford Brown

    One billion American Matt Yglesiai and there will be nothing left to eat. What a fat fool!

  79. @Reg Cæsar

    My three gripes about internet discourse.

    1. That begs the question of why someone would use “beg the question” to mean “raise the question,” when it fact it means the logical fallacy of assuming what you are trying to prove.

    2. Free reign. Free the rein of a horse so it makes its own way. Vs. the reign of Henry the VIIIth. Vs. the rain in Spain…

    3. Fascism is about rule by business corporations. No. Fascist corporatism comes directly from its anarchosyndicalist roots, and before that from Catholic social doctrine that recognized corporate bodies (a group of people together in a single body, corpos) such as church, town, university, guild.

    These are literally bees in my bonnet!

    • LOL: vhrm
  80. vhrm says:
    @HA

    “there are twice as many stupid white people as there are stupid black people in the US”

    Setting aside the loaded language…

    I’ll point out that that statement in quotes is from a post of Jack D’s that (accurately) paraphrases but considerably coarsens the equivalent from my post.

    I mention it because i expressly didn’t want to use loaded language since that gives people looking to be offended something to latch on to and also it doesn’t look good in confirmation hearings.

    Going on on this tangent: over the past year or so i’ve tried to not refer to posts or people as “stupid” or its synonyms. It leads to wordier and blander posts, but it’s also forced me sometimes to really think about how to make and/or attack an argument rather than dismissing it as “s”. It’s just as often made me not bother to respond to particularly faulty , apparent bad faith, etc. posts because the effort would be too high. Those instances of walking away have probably been almost equally as useful instead of

    [ETA nothing in this post is meant as snarky or back-handed against anyone. I’m commenting on it because it’s an example where the use of “s” vs not clearly was noticed ]

    • Agree: Mark G.
    • LOL: Muggles
  81. anon[178] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve has a massive forehead

  82. Jack D says:
    @Grumpy

    I don’t know where you drove but in my SWPL (but increasingly S and E. Asian and Middle Eastern – I have 4 new neighbors and they are all foreign doctors) Philadelphia suburb the Biden signs outnumbered the Trump signs at least 4:1 as did the vote totals. The upscale suburbs in the swing states are where Trump lost the election – that’s where there was a real swing against him.

    • Replies: @Grumpy
  83. Jack D says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    It’s all so confusing. The white girl looks Asian and the Mexican guy looks white.

    • Replies: @Muggles
  84. This all is about marginal issues. White race Americans are in existential danger, as are Europeans elsewhere- and all this about IQ, Trump, Biden, minoritarianism…is of secondary importance.

    A country cannot survive if it is all about money, success, limelight, hedonism, materially good life- and basically not more. A lonely crowd of aspiring billionaires cannot last.

    US was anti-communist until Communism collapsed; but, also, US was basically a nation-state of various anglo-americanized whites/Europeans, with a significant black minority & negligible others (except Indians in reservations & movies). The US had great destiny with Manifest Destiny & as mega- linguistically anglicized Western world ( man as measure, individualism, democracy, law & order, creative chaos- but contained, modernism, science combined with Christianity & ancient Greco-Roman world, all soaked in Enlightenment in uneasy coexistence with Romanticism). The archetypal West, or White Man as the desired pinnacle. It ceased to be so in self-perception, especially elites, somewhere after the 60’s, but actually after the 80/90’s. There are two groups in the US that are instinctively anti-Russian, paleo- anti-communists & ex-Soviet Jews. But they are, I’d say, not the principal enemy of the Holy Russia & the Eternal Han.

    Russia is the only world dominant white race country which expressly loathes & denies US/Western Europe new world-view: gays, sex minorities adoration, race mixing & Negrolatry, money oriented life-style, rootless cosmopolitanism as the ideal, world without borders, trans-national capitalism, zombie egoism falsely presented as individualism, loathing of nuclear family & nation as extended family, … Due to its weaknesses, Russia is still assailable on many fronts- but it is unconquerable.

    US elites have profited much from China, but in next 10-20 years they will hate China even more. China, although culturally & ethnically too different from Russia (Russia can be the white nationalist ultimate dream country in some future, while China, evidently- not) is the obvious candidate to replace US as the premier world power in most areas (except popular culture) while remaining a nation-state, hostile to cosmopolitan, Anglo-American dominated world elites with their post-cold war sacred cows, which are, at their core, the ideology of the 60’s New Left.

    A country cannot survive if it understands itself as a mega-corporation & a bunch of egotists (frequently grouped), toys with a moral code, pursue unnatural distractions as something crucially for its existence, a big chunk of its core population eating itself out in self-loathing & hatred & guilt; explicitly dumps blood, soil & a national destiny which is no goulash of competing groups & self-centered aliens.

    As for Steve- keep it up.

    Leonardo da Vinci in his early 60s or late 50s

    Walt Whitman in his 40s

  85. @Magic Dirt Resident

    You didn’t have to wait…

    Steve,

    You looked very healthy in your new interview. The shirt is a little too dark/high contrast for you, but the jacket was very nice.

    I’m looking forward to deepfake videos of you now that its quite effective. Do you worry about antifa types “finding” old video of you saying explicitly racist things in order to defame you?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  86. Lot says:
    @HA

    I don’t agree with calling IQ “fat tailed.” Intelligence itself, sure, maybe.

    But the point of the modern IQ scale is to express intelligence measures with scores fitted to a standard normal curve.

    If your IQ test has “fat tails” you didn’t norm the scores properly.

    • Replies: @HA
  87. @Athletic and Whitesplosive

    Social cohesion will increase with 1000000000 Americans. There will be so many people, everyone will be stuck together cheek to jowl.

  88. @Clifford Brown

    Between Matt “666666666 immigrants” Yglesias and Tristan “more social media control” Harris interviews, Rogan’s been doing a good job promoting the left agenda recently. I won’t pay Spotify to listen to him.

  89. Dutton: some say California’s a Third World state with immense disparities between rich and poor. Your view?

    Sailer: We have almost no mosquitoes.

  90. Muggles says:
    @BenKenobi

    I live in a gentrified downtown Vancouver neighborhood. I can see English Bay — technically the Pacific — from my desk.

    I am envious, though not in winter.

    Did they have the big fireworks display over English Bay this summer? Or was that COVID’ed away?

    We once stayed at a nearby B&B one evening where that occurred. We had no idea, but was told about it and walked down to see it. Good thing, as they close all of the streets anywhere near that beach and area. An annual international fireworks show, different nations each year.

    It was in the “gay district” area. I was moved by the sight of nearby young gay males singing O’Canada with considerable patriotic enthusiasm. Previously we had stayed at a B&B where the author of the lyrics (in a poem) supposedly wrote it.

    Americans tend to think we are the only demonstrative patriots on the planet. Not so.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
  91. Muggles says:
    @Jack D

    It’s all so confusing. The white girl looks Asian and the Mexican guy looks white.

    They both look horrifyingly stupid.

    Like people who can’t afford Motel 6.

    But I’m sure their kids, when and if, will torment them about that…

  92. Bill P says:

    Good interview, I watched the entire thing. Dutton was quite respectful and pleasant. Interestingly, I’d heard of “the Jolly Heretic,” but the name Edward Dutton was only vaguely familiar. Funny how that works in these days of twitter.

    BTW, you look fine, Steve. I don’t know where you got this idea that you look like Mitch McConnell. I don’t see it at all. McConnell doesn’t even look that bad anyway. He’s just a little peculiar-looking with his glasses and fleshy jowls and neck, but not all that out of the ordinary. He is a pretty extraordinary politician, however. Being senate majority leader in a nation of over 300 million is nothing to sneer at.

    I find the sacralization of blacks that the two of you briefly discussed the most interesting topic of the entire interview, and perhaps the most important concerning American culture and politics.

    This has long mystified me, since it doesn’t exist in the many other societies in which blacks have been enslaved. There is a magical negro in Chinese mythology (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kunlun_Nu), but he’s more of a Zwarte Piet (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zwarte_Piet) character. I’m sure there are similar Arab characters as well, but I’m not familiar with them. Whatever the case, despite these occasional magical negros, one does not find these societies ascribing holy characteristics to the entire race. So why do Americans do this?

    The best theory I have come up with so far (and I haven’t really fleshed it out) is that it has something to do with Anglo metaphysics. After reading Michael Hanby, who offers a critique of America’s founding philosophy (pretty compelling to me), I came up with this idea that blacks are “intersectional” to the two competing strains of American philosophy, one of which posits a sort of mechanistic, determinist, natural law based aristocracy (which would characterize the attitude of most isteve readers as well as the majority of the Founding Fathers) while the other embraces a strong voluntarist progressive ideal (the American “classical liberal” left). Hanby has nothing to say about American blacks or their sacralization, but it seems to me that blacks embody the argument of both sides: they are proof of either the divine order of things (natural law), or they are proof of the supremacy of the human will (social constructs, etc.).

    Because blacks serve as such an elegant proxy for this struggle of ideas in America, their importance has grown out of all proportion to their numbers, achievements, economic contributions, and even their costs in our society. They are the totem of totems, the taboo of taboos, and have thereby taken on a sacred status that to outsiders looks pretty crazy. It is, objectively speaking, pretty silly, but that isn’t the kind of thing you can say out loud.

    Those with a different metaphysical set of assumptions are likely immune to this. Devout Jews and Catholics, unassimilated Orientals, Latin Americans, Hindus, Muslims and Africans aren’t going to really “feel” it, although as we can see many may try to take advantage of it or just “go along to get along.”

    Anyway, it’s a theory, and it seems pretty plausible to me.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  93. @SunBakedSuburb

    Meme of theDay goes to

    the age of hysterical negrophilia.

  94. Grumpy says:
    @Jack D

    Most of the drive was on Interstate 80, which links New York and San Francisco. There were not nearly as many campaign signs or bumper stickers on the road compared to four years ago, but those that we saw were 100 percent Trump.

  95. HA says:
    @Lot

    “I don’t agree with calling IQ ‘fat tailed.’… the point of the modern IQ scale is to express intelligence measures with scores fitted to a standard normal curve.”

    That’s a valid point, but in reference to the comment I was replying to, it is still the case that “there are many more people with an IQ of 170 or more than would be predicted by the normal distribution, thus the IQ distribution appears to have fat tails.”

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Lot
  96. JimmyGee says:
    @Grumpy

    Regarding possible election day chicanery, does it really matter whether we have a Republican or Democrat neo-liberal administration in Washington?

    For all the expectations early on that Trump’s administration would be different, his was just a standard Republican administration. And that’s just what Biden’s will be…

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
  97. JimmyGee says:
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    “Adoptees present a false agreeable front that conceals profound fear, anger, and resentment at being rejected by their bio parents…”

    Very interesting. That might partly explain why my Ex behaved the way she did behind closed doors. I, like most Canadians, naturally assumed it was my fault…

  98. @JimmyGee

    I think a Biden administration creates a unique investment opportunity.

    I took a bath on my oil stocks and Bakken plays under the Trump years.

    I see a Biden Administration as making Energy Expensive Again. Oil companies are great investments when you choke off drilling and make the price of oil go up. Other companies, not so much.

  99. anon[146] • Disclaimer says:
    @HA

    That’s a valid point, but in reference to the comment I was replying to, it is still the case that “there are many more people with an IQ of 170 or more than would be predicted by the normal distribution, thus the IQ distribution appears to have fat tails.”

    The official IQ tests like the Stanford-Binet that psychologists use and for which there is a decent sample size of scores generally top out at 160.

    If you examine the claims of people who claim IQ scores higher than 160, often you’ll find that the tests they took are dubious.

    For example, Keith Raniere, the NXIUM cult conman, claimed to be one of the smartest men in the world based on some made up IQ test:

    “Raniere claim of super-intelligence based on little known and controversial ‘take-home’ IQ test”

    https://frankreport.com/2016/01/29/13919/

    “As I mentioned in my last post, one of the most basic claims of NXIVM is that its founder, Keith Raniere, is one of the smartest people in the world. This claim is based almost entirely on a single, unsupervised test he took in the 1980’s.

    This is an extremely important claim since NXIVM purports to teach people life skills and deep truths about humanity and philosophy and success. Consequently if it is true that the leader is smarter than almost everyone else, he may know something that a student doesn’t.

    If on the other hand, the claim is bogus, then the student could ask, what does he know that I don’t know that I should pay him?”

    The super- intelligence claim is a bedrock claim of NXIVM.

    The test that NXIVM uses to establish Raniere as one of the smartest men comes from the Mega Society, founded 1982. It is a so-called “High IQ society”
    Its website http://www.megasociety.org.

    The Mega society was founded by Ronald K. Hoeflin and it claims it is open to people who have scored at the one-in-a-million level of general intelligence on a test the society created.

    The Mega Society claims is is able to discriminate at that one in a million level.”

    • Replies: @Calvin Hobbes
  100. Lot says:
    @HA

    “there are many more people with an IQ of 170 or more than would be predicted by the normal distribution, thus the IQ distribution appears to have fat tails.”

    Under the normal meaning of IQ in scholarly research, this sentence in incoherent. The meaning of “IQ of 170 or more” is exactly the same as “intelligence test scores at or above the percentile represented by 70/15 (or 70/16) standard deviations above the mean”

    It is like saying “3% of the population has a top 1% score.”

    As to whether raw scores in intelligence tests have a fat upper tail, I have no opinion but am doubtful it’s especially fat within any Western homogeneous population and with well designed tests.

    There’s a related question, “Are IQ tests well normed past the 4 SD level” and the answer is not especially. So that’s why they report a lot of people with 170+ IQs. Those people have raw scores that should have been assigned lower IQ scores.

    • Replies: @HA
  101. @Anonymous

    Went to a ufc card couple years ago in vegas,the crowd was very polite despite a certain meathead element.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  102. @Bill P

    “The best theory I have come up with so far (and I haven’t really fleshed it out) is that it has something to do with Anglo metaphysics. After reading Michael Hanby, who offers a critique of America’s founding philosophy (pretty compelling to me), I came up with this idea that blacks are “intersectional” to the two competing strains of American philosophy, one of which posits a sort of mechanistic, determinist, natural law based aristocracy (which would characterize the attitude of most isteve readers as well as the majority of the Founding Fathers) while the other embraces a strong voluntarist progressive ideal (the American “classical liberal” left). Hanby has nothing to say about American blacks or their sacralization, but it seems to me that blacks embody the argument of both sides: they are proof of either the divine order of things (natural law), or they are proof of the supremacy of the human will (social constructs, etc.).”

    Can you flesh this out with an example of each side’s thinking re blacks?

    • Replies: @Bill P
  103. Bill P says:
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    Oh come on…

    How many of us don’t sometimes fantasize about how life might have been if we’d been adopted? I, for one, can imagine a much easier childhood as an adoptee.

    Nice, grateful parents, no psycho arguments involving bludgeoning weapons favored by certain “Celtic fringe” cultures, no afternoon pint of liquor on Easter, none of that “my life would’ve been easier if I’d aborted you kids” sort of stuff.

    But then again I would have missed all that. I guess it’s a toss-up.

    • Replies: @Charon
  104. @Bostonvegas

    The two pro wrestling shows I’ve been to had very nice crowds: e.g., they were super-patient for a semi-disabled fan who needed a long time to get out of the row after the show.

  105. BenKenobi says:
    @Muggles

    I am envious, though not in winter.

    I’m originally from Ontario, where it’s either too hot or too cold. Think plus 30C or minus 30C. Vancouver has the best weather in Canada. Pleasant summers and mild winters.

    We once stayed at a nearby B&B […] in the “gay district” area.

    Yeah that sounds like the area around Davie Street in the West End, the low-density residential area in the western half of the downtown core.

    The fireworks were indeed cancelled.

  106. Bill P says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Sure, I have some time lately, but I need to read more (and carefully) to make sure I don’t misrepresent Hanby’s arguments, so it will take me a little while.

  107. @anon

    The Mega society was founded by Ronald K. Hoeflin and it claims it is open to people who have scored at the one-in-a-million level of general intelligence on a test the society created.

    Even without checking it out, my guess is that this Mega society” stuff is baloney.

    But getting an IMO gold medal probably is legit evidence of one-in-a-million smarts.

  108. Anon[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    The strangulated voice is a symptom of this as well.

    I’m not sure what you’re talking about. His voice sounds fine. It’s pleasant sounding, and even a bit folksy.

    • Agree: MEH 0910
  109. HA says:
    @Lot

    “’Are IQ tests well normed past the 4 SD level’ and the answer is not especially. So that’s why they report a lot of people with 170+ IQs.”

    Now, we’re getting into tomato-tomahto territory. You noted that “the point of the modern IQ scale is to express intelligence measures with scores fitted to a standard normal curve”, and also admitted that this doesn’t happen beyond a certain number of standard deviations, and you also noted there are more people whose nominal score is 170 (pace anon-[146]’s clarifications) than there should be. “Fat tails”, however misleading or nonsensical, seems a pretty good way to encapsulate all that and get the meaning across, more so than trying to square the preceding jumble of contradictions. But that’s my take, and I would guess that of Tabarrok, and the researchers I originally linked to, though they’re more than qualified to speak for themselves.

  110. Anonymous[343] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve’s voice sounds positively stentorian compared to Matt Yglesias:

    • Replies: @Ian M.
    , @clyde
  111. anonymous[951] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dr. DoomNGloom

    What would civil disobedience look like? What would be concrete demands?

    • Replies: @Dr. DoomNGloom
  112. Pericles says:
    @BenKenobi

    It reminds me of the journalist who moved to a business position saying he got better paid reading the Economist than writing it.

  113. Charon says:
    @Athletic and Whitesplosive

    superpowers basically always need a huge population

    Of course he knows full well that there’s a tiny superpower at the eastern end of the Mediterranean which has a similarly tiny population. And the world’s fourth or fifth largest nuclear arsenal, depending on whom you want to believe.

    And not incidentally, as we note here from time to time, tightly controlled borders and no plans to admit a million migrants, much less a billion.

  114. Charon says:
    @Bill P

    This thread has really taken a dark turn. I’m outta here.

  115. Graham says:
    @Tom Verso

    Ed Dutton was speaking perfectly clearly; and so was Steve. I listened to the whole thing while driving and pretty much got every word. But Ed’s accent is indeed probably unfamiliar and a little hard to follow for some American readers and he speaks too fast.

  116. duncsbaby says:
    @Pericles

    You just got Caesared.

    • Replies: @Pericles
  117. @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    No. It’s because Sailer’s adopted. Adoptees present a false agreeable front that conceals profound fear, anger, and resentment at being rejected by their bio parents.

    Pop-psychology at its worst. This is better than crystal healing or Mormon archeology….

    • Replies: @HA
  118. It is surprising to notice that here at Unz only a few while at Bitchute about half commented on the vote fraud issue.

    In fact at Bitchute comments many were shocked to notice that both Dutton and Sailer are defeatists. They seem to believe in MSM and Big Tech ridiculous propaganda about the elections. However, all this naivety and defeatism might not be that surprising. Unlike Ron ”Honest” Unz both Dutton and Sailer seem to still buy into many official truths from the Magic bullet and collapsing towers all the way to the sanctity of Big Pharma.

    Sailer’s Unz blogger colleague Anatoly Karlin also shocked many by accepting the official narrative about the elections. Between the lines it is easy to read that one reason for Karlin’s defeatism seems to be that he is upset that Trump does not buy into COVID hysteria. Perhaps Sailer shares Karlin’s attitude? After all, Sailer is even a bigger true believer in Big Pharma.

    One explanation for defeatism might also be that Sailer does not believe in the Rockefeller-Rothschild U$Srael ruling elite that is trying to save their money machine (FED run fractional banking petrodollar system) by a scamdemic that not only gets rid of Trump by enabling massive vote fraud but also resets the world economy and creates a global police state. Therefore Sailer might find it difficult to believe in a massive well planned conspiracy to steal the election. After all, to steal the elections with massive coordinated vote fraud you need a ruling elite that really calls the shots. But there is no mathematical proof that a ruling elite exists!

    Therefore this might also be a methodological question that involves empiricism vs. rationalism.
    https://www.unz.com/jderbyshire/john-derbyshire-on-hans-herman-hoppe-the-last-paleolibertarian/

    Number guys are often empiricists who tend to be slightly autistic beta nerds. They have hard time reading people and thus tend to not believe in large conspiracies. Often they do not even believe in small conspiracies. Not even when they themselves are the target victims! For them individuals and societies are atomistic and things just happen more or less randomly. History just bumbles along.

    Empiricists do try to find some general mathematical patterns in history and sociology but easily get lost and often do not see the rationalist big picture, i.e. the forest for the trees. Human sciences are too categorically different from the natural sciences that number guys are so in love with. Statistics might be exciting but a terrible foundation for the study of history and sociology. Even if you love baseball.

    Interestingly, for a long time Sailer even tried to find excuses for Jeffrey Epstein and still does not seem to believe that he was a small part of a huge Zionist-pedo conspiracy to blackmail elite scientists, politicians and businessmen. That is a too far-out conspiracy. After all, do satanist pedophiles even exist? Surely Israel would not create a network of them and help them take leading positions in western countries. Unthinkable. Pure QAnon nonsense. Nothing to see here. Or notice.
    https://laitonlehti.net/2019/09/19/censored-video-now-on-bitchute-steve-sailer-on-pedophile-jeffrey-epstein/

    Anyone who looks at the facts must realize that the elections were stolen by the ruling elite. First, the polls were purposefully way off. Ridiculously so. One would think that alone would have given Dutton and Sailer a rude awakening. Instead they still sound like Nate Silver.

    Second, mail-in voting was a total joke and made fraud much easier. The lack of ID and signature verification is absurd at least for Europeans. It really opened the floodgates for massive vote fraud. Why is this not obvious to Dutton and Sailer?

    Third, nobody denies that many Republican poll watchers were not allowed meaningful access and many were even thrown out. Is this not a huge red flag? Why does this not seem to concern Dutton and Sailer? They sound like Bill Barr. Btw, he just also happened to cover up Iran-Contra for the ruling elite.

    Fourth, the many huge statistical anomalies are also a red flag. Both Dutton and Sailer are number guys. Have they really not read the Basham article?? Is Spectator also a too far-out publication?

    https://spectator.us/reasons-why-the-2020-presidential-election-is-deeply-puzzling/

    Steve Cortes also gives a short summary of these anomalies:

    It is also surprising that Dutton and Sailer seem to not have heard of the ultimate (election) number guy, Matt Braynard who has unearthed very important *undeniable and verified* facts which alone prove that Trump won enough swing states:

    Perhaps Dutton could make a program about the elections and explain us why he believes they were not stolen? Afterall, it is a very important topic and his audience is clearly very interested.

    Also Steve Sailer could also try to touch the subject in his popular Unz blog. It is difficult to imagine anything more important to notice.

    • Replies: @Dutch Boy
    , @vhrm
    , @Luke Ford
  119. Pericles says:
    @duncsbaby

    ITYM ‘Ceasared’ (wink).

  120. Danindc says:
    @Dennis Dale

    Make it happen Dennis. Wish really hard!

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
  121. Danindc says:
    @Anonymous

    Steve’s healthy countenance screams paleo diet.

  122. @anonymous

    What would civil disobedience look like? What would be concrete demands?

    I’m open to suggestions on the form it should take, but very noisy demonstrations at state capitals would be a good start. Secondarily would be actions that really scare the politicians into believing that they will lose control because they activated the core group that keeps government functional. For example, rather than boycott elections, boycott other state and county registrations, hunting, fishing, auto registration, and parking regulations. If one gets creative, there are probably a huge number of ways that state, city, and county governments can be disrupted. An alternative would be “slow down” tactics that hold government to “letter of the law”. For example, floods of building permits.

    I’m spit balling, but election lawyers probably have a pretty good list of what should be sufficient,
    The overarching Demand is the goal is visible election security. Steps that enhance security would include
    1) all ballots start with paper, that are serialized and audited
    2) scans of all ballots online
    3) all ballots and mail in cover sheets scanned and posted online
    4) strong voter authentication with data cross checks and routine audits of voter roles
    5) automatic auditing of the vote, at a minimum statistical sampling with results triggering broader audits
    6) simultaneous presentation of results
    7) strong chain of custody requirements
    8) treat late ballot (discoveries) as prima facie evidence of a crime
    9) strict limits on mail-in voting to traditional absentee
    10) 2 factor voter ID at the polls
    11) even stronger ID required for any mail in
    12) consistent rules within states
    13) requirement for 3rd party observation of voting and counting

    • Replies: @anonymous
  123. Gordo says:

    Nice interview, and now I know what Steve sounds like, Ed I had heard before.

  124. Sean says:

    You looked younger and sounded a little older than I expected. Very calm and self assured anyway.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  125. Dube says:
    @Tom Verso

    Most interesting thing to me was the way the Election Fraud was dismissed as ‘the same o, some o’ thing that always goes on….but, clearly this is vote manipulation on a scale that is unprecedented. And, I can’t help but wonder way the is so little curiosity about it even if you are sanguine about the outcome.

    And that’s why I left near the start.

    Just my own exit poll.

  126. Dutch Boy says:
    @Marco de Wit

    Sailer is a science guy and the Big Pharma answer to all criticism is “you’re wrong because science.” Scientific claims by financially interested parties ought to be treated with deep skepticism rather than credulity. This goes triple for Big Pharma, with their documented history of mass murder (just ask Ron Unz).

    • Replies: @Marco de Wit
  127. Dennis Dale says: • Website
    @Danindc

    Okay boomer. I know it ain’t gonna happen. Who even wants to see Steve try to walk a stoned Joe Rogan through the basics of HBD? But it should happen nonetheless.

    Sailer should watch Rogan interviewing Mel Gibson on all this HGH shit older wealthy guys are doing now, though.

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
  128. MEH 0910 says:

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  129. Dennis Dale says: • Website
    @Dennis Dale

    addendum:
    Come to think of it, Steve walking a stoned Rogan through the basics of HBD might be a rich mine of comic potential.

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @Danindc
  130. Anon[354] • Disclaimer says:

    I enjoy Dutton’s work, and he’s generally a good popularizer of HBD and related topics.

    Although Dutton doesn’t really get into his personal work in this interview, he fancies himself a serious researcher. However, he’s very much in the lazy, casual pop evo psych theorizing mode. You know the type – the kind that takes baldness, for example, and explains it with some plausible sounding evo psych explanation e.g. “Baldness evolved because it signaled you were a good dad/provider” or “Baldness evolved because it signaled how tough you are – look how scary bald criminals look!” etc.

  131. @vhrm

    NonHispanic whites absolutely are NOT 75% of the US population.

  132. Anonymous[390] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    I am an MMA and UFC fan. I must confess as I have gotten older and mellowed (testosterone gradually reduces over time), I really do not enjoy seeing CTE happening before my eyes. I am very much of the school of thought that says that everyone involved (referee, commission, corner and fighter) should do everything they can to avoid it once it is obvious the fighter is going to lose, i.e. by stopping the fight. I think our contingent has gained more sway than the “Just Bleed” contingent. Now UFC is a big business, they have an incentive to not be banned anywhere. This policy also helps maintain good fighters as good for longer.

    The reason why I like UFC is that it is the best answer to the question of who wins a real fight, and how they should go about it. Having been bullied in school, this has been a long time research topic of interest to me. It’s why I have taken classes/gone to gyms/dojos in, in order, Karate, Judo, BJJ, and MMA gyms including wrestling, boxing, Muay Thai, and MMA. It’s a cool sport because each of the component arts is basically a refined art form in itself, if you think of each they necessarily have PhD level exponentry in academic terms. But to do MMA, you basically have to have at least undergraduate level understanding of most components and certainly striking, groundwork, and the art of taking an opponent to the ground or defending that (wrestling, judo).

    There are definitely thugs who do MMA and enjoy MMA but there are also a lot of folks like myself out there. I think it’s a general truism that around early blue belt level BJJ is sufficient for real life fighting because fight-starting douchebags are practically non-existent at the blue belt level let alone purple and above, so your chances of meeting one on the street are pretty minimal.

    But yes, definitely there is a “fall of Rome” vibe in Western civilization, on steroids basically. In this clown world, being proficient at unarmed combat (and avoiding it) is a must.

  133. @Dr. DoomNGloom

    Outstanding reasoning. You are the first person I’ve heard to point out that if a State allocates EVs by congressional district, fraud in one district will win the fraudsters at most that district. They wouldn’t steal the whole State’s big treasure trove of EVs (e.g. the swing States that Harris/Biden are trying to steal right now — Pennsylvania, Michigan, Georgia, Wisconsin, Arizona).

    Let’s think about the electorally massive States where unrelenting immivasion will probably render Republicans unable to consistently win statewide elections — including presidential elections. The Republicans will have a very hard time winning the presidency without Florida, and it will be impossible if they lose both Florida and Texas.

    While the Republicans still control the governorships and legislatures of Texas and Florida, one of their top priorities should be to enact statutes allocating one electoral vote to the winner of each congressional district, as Nebraska and Maine do. Set the statute to take effect before the presidential election where you’d guess both States will be tipping Dem statewide. For example, enact the statute in 2022 to take effect with the 2032 presidential election.

    That way, the Republicans still can win all the EVs of Texas and hopefully Florida in 2024 and maybe 2028.

    By 2032, when the Dem presidential ticket could squeak out a majority of the popular vote in Texas (for the first time in more than half a century), the new system would kick in. The 2032 Republican ticket could win half or just slightly more than half of Texas’s EVs, instead of NONE. Same with Florida.

    California Republicans should have adopted the congressional district method of allocating EVs back when there was a Republican legislative majority at times and a Republican Governor to sign it. Imagine Cali’s EVs splitting 40-15 instead of 55-to-zero. Nice swing for the republicans.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  134. HA says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    “Pop-psychology at its worst.”

    No, I think this time he’s on to something. It’s kind of like how everyone knows that all left-handed people are psychopaths who should be shot on sight– they’re perpetually enraged by a world oriented against them and it’s only a matter of time before they explode under the strain.

    It’s also kind of similar to how every child with a physical deformity eventually grows up to be the arch-villain in a James Bond film. And why women with a third nipple are all witches.

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian
  135. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sean

    Do the CSPAN work before censorship in the United States.

    This is the godfather of the alt right were talkin about not some goon you talk to on the phone at work.

  136. vhrm says:
    @Marco de Wit

    Thanks for sharing those two videos. They’re not conclusive about who won the election, but they are the first i’ve seen that have at least some credible sounding information and analysis pointing to SOME possible fraud.

    That Braynard Voter Integrity Project one is exactly the kind of analysis that any Secretary of State and the Republican (and TBH the Democrats) should be doing as a matter of course. While it doesn’t necessarily show there’s enough fraud to have moved the election it certainly is strong evidence against the prestige media assertion that fraud is vanishingly small.

    The Steve Cortes one is also interesting. I’ve been wondering why we aren’t hearing more about mail-in ballot rejection rates.

    There was some triumphant pre-election coverage about how low they are… and some suppositions as to why that might be:
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/02/us/election-ballots-rejections.html
    But not much since then.

    Anyway… those are excellent videos and that’s the level of analysis and discourse that should have been happening all along instead of the totally unverifiable assertions or easily falsified claims that have generally been raised in he month since the election.

    Unfortunately i think it’s probably too late now to do anything about it now. Maybe Republicans or others will push for actual electoral reforms and have this kind of auditing be done in future elections as a matter of course.

    (as to your other claims, it’s not something i’m knowledgeable about, but I highly doubt the “easy money” pro-Fed globalists really care very much about Trump vs Biden. Trump’s been printing money and inflating asset prices like nobody’s business anyway)

    • Replies: @Marco de Wit
  137. Ian M. says:
    @Anonymous

    I didn’t know Yglesias was gay.

  138. Ian M. says:
    @Dutch Boy

    Shiva’s analysis is bogus.

    We should expect a negatively sloped line.

    Look at the limit cases:

    If 100% of straight-ticket voters in a precinct voted Republican, then the delta percentage support that Trump got among individual-ballot voters over and above the straight-ticket vote would be a maximum of 0%, i.e., it would be something negative.

    On the other hand, if 0% of straight-ticket voters in a precinct voted Republican, then the delta percentage support that Trump got among individual-ballot voters over and above the straight-ticket vote would be a minimum of 0%, i.e., it would be something positive.

    So we should expect the trend line to go from something positive to something negative.

  139. Is there an MP3 of the interview?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  140. Barnes_Law (@Robert Barnes) Tweeted: A court ordered statistically significant sample of Arizona’s mail in ballots found 11% of the accepted ballots did NOT match according to the Democrats’ own expert. That is thirty times more illegal ballots than the margin of victory. Georgia, Pennsylvania & Nevada likely worse. https://twitter.com/barnes_law/status/1335331233706856448?s=27

  141. Anonymous[390] • Disclaimer says:

    Damn, I was editing and missed the 5min deadline.

    I made the point that MMA is more demanding skill-wise than individual component sports. At least masters or PhD level in something is very useful in order to be a world champion. There are UFC champions who have been world champion or at least Oly medalist in something else. Wrestling, kick boxing, judo I think, Sambo and BJJ for sure. But they have to have the undergrad level in the other arts. And their other championship, to a man, occurred before their MMA world championship (which was usually in their early twenties). There are some greats who do not have a championship in anything, and are great all-rounders, GSP comes to mind although his wrestling was stand-out (that being said, it was MMA wrestling).

    It’s like being multi-class in D&D – it just takes longer to be equally competent in more than one area, so you can respect the journey the athlete has taken to get there.

    What’s also interesting on a cerebral level is the evolution the sport has made, where BJJ dominated, then Ground and Pound (i.e. wrestling with ground-based striking), then more modern fusion type of athletes who are not one dimensional. There is a rock paper scissors aspect where styles make fights.

    Yeah, I get it that’s it’s very “fall of Rome” civilizational decline, and in this modern clown world unfortunately we need to know self defence skills as gentlemen. And it’s very unfortunate that you have to risk brain damage to compete. That’s why I never competed in striking. And even if you are good, depending on your style you may be causing someone else permanent life-altering damage.

  142. anonymous[176] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dr. DoomNGloom

    For example, rather than boycott elections, boycott other state and county registrations, hunting, fishing, auto registration, and parking regulations.

    That just doesn’t sound strong enough to do anything.

  143. @vhrm

    Thanks for an excellent comment vhrm. However, what do you mean: “Thanks for sharing those two videos. They’re not conclusive about who won the election,”

    What is wrong with Braynard’s analysis? Why do you think he has not enough proof that many swing states were stolen?

    • Replies: @vhrm
  144. I listened to the whole interview while mowing the lawn yesterday instead of waiting for Monday. Gotta admit I also preemptively had checked out this Dutton bloke by listening to his bigoted rant on the Irish which I saw down below.

    Though I was thinking evil thoughts, at first at his high pitched nonsensical stuttering, I gave way to old age and just listened no matter how often he interrupted with his gibber every time you brought up some reflective insight.

    Though Dutton was a large deficit to overcome, and no matter how often I thought how HBD sounds like a cultish phase locked circle jerk, ultimately I found the experience rewarding, entirely due to a few snippets from you.

    You said something about where you live at 15 being what people will always consider hometown. Along with your thoughts on music as insight into personality like movies, made me think of how grounding in senses music is, that songs will always remind me of a certain time and place with the vistas I saw, the emotions I felt, and who I shared it with.

    For instance my wife and I always have a songlist we love that reminds us of house hunting before she gave birth. Or songs a close mate of mine shares with me that take me back to year 11.

    There’s songs my kids share like Wildcats of Kilkenny by the Pogues which I’d play them as kids with the made up story of mine that went along with it, them roll playing birds and the then the cats hunting them.

    I’d like to think these things are far more profound and metaphysically meaningful than mere metrics to be mendaciously gathered and then manipulated by some globo-homo big tech psyche unit.

    More of that please, Steve. Less HBD.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  145. @Dutch Boy

    You are exactly right, Dutch Boy! I find it puzzling that Sailer totally accepts all Big Pharma figures about COVID and vaccine research like economists used to believe all numbers coming from the Soviet Union. I guess his personal experience with cancer made him a true believer in Big Pharma.

    This despite the fact that by far the best example of regulatory capture is Big Pharma. In practice the pharma cartel works like the Politburo.

    The situation is made even worse by IP laws that allow patents and thus create a double incentive to poison the people. The regulatory agencies (i.e. Big Pharma) have an incentive to lower RDAs (recommended daily allowances of vitamins, etc that build up immunity) and raise poison levels so they can push toxic drugs and products. (Btw, has Sailer ever mentioned RDAs or even how much vitamin D does he take? Unfortunately Dutton did not ask him that.)

    This all is made even worse by the modern cancer paradigm that downplays aneuploidy theory of cancer. If Duesberg is right then Big Pharma (i.e. regulatory agencies) are not only making us sick but killing us by the millions. (Btw, I do not remember Sailer ever mentioning aneuploidy theory. Has he? Google does not find anything.)

    Even worse is the modern virus theory pushed by Big Pharma that does not even try to isolate pathological viruses. It is simply absurd. Why is Steve Sailer not worried about that??

    How can you test with PCR and antibody tests if you don’t first properly isolate the virus in the first place?? Kary Mullis was very worried about the misuse of PCR-tests. How convenient that the Covid pandemic appeared immediately after he died.

    All this creates the possibility that this mess is by design. What if there is no Covid pandemic at all? After all, there is no excess mortality!! Why are these number guys like Sailer not interested in that obvious fact? One would think they would be feverishly studying mortality numbers.

    Furthermore, it might well be that there never was any AIDS epidemic either as Duesberg has theorized! The homos did it to themselves with their mad popper orgies though nowadays that is a hate fact.

    Were AIDS and several other fake virus epidemics only rehearsals for Covid? (Btw, has Sailer ever mentioned Duesberg’s AIDS theory?)

    After all, the ruling elite/U$Srael knows that fractional reserve banking is inherently unstable. They knew that a bank panic and a great depression were coming anyway. They feared that could have caused a bank reform (demanded by the reform movement led by the Swiss) and take the money machine (FED run fractional reserve banking backed by petrodollar system) away from them.

    How very convenient that now they can pin the depression on Covid and at the same time get rid of Trump AND build a global police state.

    Why is Steve Sailer and so many other prominent nationalists not worried about this strange coincidence?? The only site that is worried is LewRockwell.com

    Nobody denies that the COVID theory can easily be used to destroy our civil rights and create a police state. So is not the first order of business to properly isolate and analyse the virus and then conduct proper tests?

    Or if that is too much to ask why not take one community of 10 000 people who live a healthy life, take 100 mcg D-vitamin every day, avoid industrial pollution, wear no masks and take no vaccinations. (Like the Amish though perhaps they should increase their D-vitamin doses) Then compare that village to another village were everybody is totally vaccinated, follows official RDAs, wear masks, keep social distance even in Christmas and live in their closet and are as hysterical about viruses as Steve Sailer. Then see who gets sick.

    Unfortunately according to Big Pharma (i.e. regulatory agencies) it would be illegal to conduct such an experiment. Why? Because if would be “unethical”!

    Talk about a “scientific” attitude!

    Why does this not ring any bells?

    Btw, why does it seem that in American nationalist circles people are much more into Big Pharma worship? In Europe and especially in Germany people are much more skeptical.

    Many people like Sailer think that it would be very difficult to create a fake pandemic because that would involve a conspiracy. But so what? Conspiracies happen all the time. It would not even require a bigger conspiracy than 9/11. You only need a regulatory capture (including WHO) and media capture. Rest would follow almost automatically. (But Sailer does not seem to believe in 9/11 conspiracy or does he?)

    This conspiracy would be easy for U$Srael especially since it would be in the interest of Israel to keep the money machine going and build a global police state. Sionists would not only take care of the media but also AMA (American medical association which is dominated by Jews).

    In fact, creating a Covid pandemic is absolutely vital for the national security of Israel, since it is totally dependent on the FED money machine that finances not only the U$Srael war machine but in practice also Israeli economy and the many Ponzi and other over leveraged schemes run by Jewish bankers and hedge funds.)

    Of course, if you do not believe in the ruling elite and the existence of U$Srael then it is much more easier to believe in the official narrative.

    Perhaps it would be useful to write a kind of timeline article about suspicious virus pandemics where I could list the biggest names and give an overview of their work (Duesberg, Mullis, Lanka, Rappaport, etc.) in chronological order. The coincidences are so striking. Does anyone want to cooperate? I can write a draft in a few days but my english skills are so poor that finalizing and grammatically correcting it would take forever.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @vhrm
  146. @Marco de Wit

    I’ve seen Duesberg do his spiel on how AIDS isn’t caused by HIV. It’s pretty persuasive while you are hearing him give it, until you have time to stop and think.

    • Replies: @Marco de Wit
  147. vhrm says:
    @Marco de Wit

    Even worse is the modern virus theory pushed by Big Pharma that does not even try to isolate pathological viruses. It is simply absurd. Why is Steve Sailer not worried about that??

    How can you test with PCR and antibody tests if you don’t first properly isolate the virus in the first place?? Kary Mullis was very worried about the misuse of PCR-tests. How convenient that the Covid pandemic appeared immediately after he died.

    All this creates the possibility that this mess is by design. What if there is no Covid pandemic at all? After all, there is no excess mortality!! Why are these number guys like Sailer not interested in that obvious fact? One would think they would be feverishly studying mortality numbers.

    Sars-Cov-2 has been identified (and photographed and also genetically sequenced thousands of times). And there are excess deaths that roughly correspond to deaths attributed to Covid-19.

    While there’s a lot about the Covid-19 response that’s been overblown, one of the things that’s worked relatively well is that the virus later named Sars-Cov-2 was identified very quickly. This has allowed development of the tests and vaccines. The virus was sequenced early and then found around the world with credible mutations corresponding to its spread
    https://nextstrain.org/ncov/global

    and yes, there’s excess mortality.
    Here it is for some European countries https://ourworldindata.org/excess-mortality-covid

    here it is for the US (graph at the bottom) https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/covid19/excess_deaths.htm

  148. clyde says:
    @Anonymous

    What a blob. I mean go for walk, hit the gym. This guy is young but a blob, there is no excuse. Fat head makes for fat stupid liberal fantasizing ideas and theorizing. Which Matty is brimming over with.

    This dude needs a few more Washington DC muggings to sort himself out. He’s only got mugged once that we know of.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  149. clyde says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    That looks like Steve’s debut on blogging heads.

  150. @vhrm

    Thanks very much for those sources. My education background is in history so I claim no expertise in virology. All I can do is to apply common sense and compare sources.

    1. Has the virus really been isolated in a proper manner?

    It seems isolation has not been done properly. Here is one source that quotes CDC:

    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2020/12/no_author/does-the-covid-19-coronavirus-really-exist/

    Note also that a photo does not mean much if there is no proper isolation and analysis. We do also have photos of unicorns. In Europe there is a movement led by Stefan Lanka that for years has demanded proper proof from authorities that certain pathogenic viruses exist at all. Without taking any position on the issue it is surprising how difficult it is to find proper proof.

    Note also that all this does not mean that the virus does not exist. (Though it might.) It could be that there is some other reason. For example, the isolation procedure might be flawed or not executed properly or frequently enough. Maybe this could even be by design so that it would be easier to declare epidemics and pandemics.

    The common sense point is that should we not demand first things first? If you are going to destroy civil rights and destroy the economy by declaring a pandemic would you not first be really really sure and start from the beginning by properly isolating and analyzing the purported virus?

    Can we agree at least that it is surprising that the isolation has not been done in a clear cut way frequently enough so doubt would be put to rest?

    Can we also agree that we should always be skeptical of Big Pharma and the research the have financed and influenced?

    2. Excess mortality.

    Here again we have to start from the beginning. WHO defines pandemic:
    “A pandemic is the worldwide spread of a new disease.” Furthermore it is claimed that Covid pandemic is really serious and has relatively high mortality.

    So from this it should follow that there is excess YEARLY mortality in many countries. Your source does not prove that at all. Of course the purported pandemic has lasted less than a year. During the first wave mortality rose markedly only in a few locations and even then only among the very old and quickly dropped to normal levels. That is not proof of a Covid pandemic.

    Btw, Steve Sailer seemed to realise this but explained something to the effect that “we have to take care of our elderly”. Well, if 60-100 year old people are dying that is life even if Sailer himself is in his sixties. Before declaring a pandemic as the cause would it not be more reasonable to first check other causes like air pollution and vitamin D deficiencies especially since the first wave was in the spring when especially the elderly have huge vitamin D deficiencies?

    (Btw, is not a little suspicious that the excess local mortality seemed to take place where the air pollution is relatively high AND people traditionally have relatively low vitamin D levels? For example, Wuhan and North Italy have terrible air pollution.)

    Furthermore, during the second wave there is even less proof which is consistent with the hypothesis that there has been no pandemic. It is also consistent with the Vitamin D hypothesis. I bet that in a few months we will have absolute proof that there was no excess mortality except in few isolated cases (local areas) which can be explained by other causes.

    Can we at least agree that the mortality has been way way lower than authorities and Steve Sailer, Ron Unz and others expected. Why is this not a big red flag? Should not empiricist scientists be really concern if their predictions fail again and again?

    • Replies: @vhrm
  151. Tom Verso says:
    @SunBakedSuburb

    You write:

    “Election fraud is as American as Stephen King’s Magic Negros.

    Yes I agree.
    But, surely the magnitude and blatant audacious manipulation is unprecedented across multiple states.
    How about the alleged “water main break” in the Georgia vote counting building, or the late ballets in Penn. etc.

    Best

  152. I just replied to vhrm about the purported pandemic and received this notification:

    Viesti osoitteesta [message from address] https://www.unz.com:

    This comment was marked as spam.

    I hope I have not upset Sailer or Unz with my comments. I am used to very negative reactions when I bring up Duesberg, Lanka, Rappaport, etc. However, let’s hope we are now dealing only with a bug.

  153. @vhrm

    Hmmm. I replied in great length but my reply was marked as spam (I have screen capture) and seems to have vanished. Perhaps only a bug so I will now try another time. Unfortunately I copied my reply only partly but I will post it here and see if it will be also marked as spam.

    —–

    Thanks very much for those sources. My education background is in history so I claim no expertise in virology. All I can do is to apply common sense and compare theories by being aware that paradigmatic mistakes happen and that Big Pharma is utterly corrupt.

    1. Has the virus really been isolated in a proper manner? It seems isolation has not been done properly. Here is one source that quotes CDC:
    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2020/12/no_author/does-the-covid-19-coronavirus-really-exist/

    Note also that a photo does not mean much if there is no proper isolation and analysis. We do also have photos of unicorns. In Europe there is a movement led by Stefan Lanka that for years has demanded proper proof from authorities that certain pathogenic viruses exist at all. Without taking any position on the issue it is surprising how difficult it is to find proper proof.

    Note also that all this does not mean that the virus does not exist. (Though it might.) It could be that there is some other reason. For example, the isolation procedure might be flawed or not executed properly or frequently enough. Maybe this could even be by design so that it would be easier to declare epidemics and pandemics.

    The common sense point is that should we not demand first things first? If you are going to destroy civil rights and destroy the economy by declaring a pandemic would you not first be really really sure and start from the beginning by properly isolating and analyzing the purported virus?Can we agree at least that it is surprising that the isolation has not been done in a clear cut way frequently enough so doubt would be put to rest?

    Can we also agree that we should always be skeptical of Big Pharma and the research the have financed and influenced?

    2. Excess mortality.

    Here again we have to start from the beginning. WHO defines pandemic:
    “A pandemic is the worldwide spread of a new disease.” Furthermore it is claimed that Covid pandemic is really serious and has relatively high mortality.

    So from this it should follow that there is excess YEARLY mortality in many countries. Your source does not prove that at all. Of course the purported pandemic has lasted less than a year but long enough so that pandemic should be easy to prove. (Note who has the burden of proof.) During the first wave mortality rose markedly only in a few locations and even then only among the very old and quickly dropped to normal levels. That is not proof of a Covid pandemic.

    Btw, Steve Sailer seemed to realise this but explained something to the effect that “we have to take care of our elderly”. Well, if 60-100 year old people are dying that is life even if Sailer himself is in his sixties. Before declaring a pandemic as the cause would it not be more reasonable to first check other causes like air pollution and vitamin D deficiencies especially since the first wave was in the spring when especially the elderly have huge vitamin D deficiencies?

    (Btw, is not a little suspicious that the excess local mortality seemed to take place where the air pollution is relatively high AND people traditionally have relatively low vitamin D levels? For example, Wuhan and North Italy have terrible air pollution.)

    Furthermore, during the second wave there is even less proof which is consistent with the hypothesis that there has been no pandemic. It is also consistent with the Vitamin D hypothesis. I bet that in a few months we will have absolute proof that there was no excess mortality except in few isolated cases (local areas) which can be explained by other causes.

    Can we at least agree that the mortality has been way way lower than authorities and Steve Sailer, Ron Unz and others expected. Why is this not a big red flag? Should not empiricist scientists be really concerned if their predictions fail again and again?

  154. @jimmyriddle

    From certain angles, iSteve resembles Fred MacMurray. But that vibe doesn’t wholly translate to webcam.

    I imagine with a spray tan and a $1,000 suit, iSteve would easily have more on-screen charisma than 95 percent of the degenerate hacks that feature on television.

  155. @Steve Sailer

    Well, would it be too much to ask why?

    I think we can agree that Peter Duesberg and Kary Mullis are very respected scientists so I guess we can also agree that the burden of proof is on those who claim that there is a dangerous virus killing many people.

    Especially since by declaring an epidemic and especially a pandemic you destroy civil rights, destroy the economy and help create a police state. These not only kill many people directly and indirectly but also our freedom.

    So is it too much to ask proof?

    And even if you just “want to play it safe” (and destroy the economy and create a police state to “save” very old people) then at least can we agree that it is important to be very skeptical with the official theories and encourage critical thinking?

  156. Luke Ford says: • Website
    @Marco de Wit

    You are wrong about everything, including the “magic” bullet which was not at all magical. Delusional conspiracy thinking appeals primarily to losers.

    https://www.outsidethebeltway.com/more-nonsense-about-the-election/

    • Replies: @Marco de Wit
  157. Anonymous[367] • Disclaimer says:
    @Pat Hannagan

    Ahh, the Pogues. I only know them through Ian Stuart of Skrewdriver:

    ‘Now we’ve got the fucking police outside telling us the gigs off, who’s orders are them bastards taking? You know what I mean? We’re British people and we’re European people here to listen to a fucking concert, whilst them wankers outside telling us we can’t have one. When down the road Public Enemy are playing going “kill whitey”, their allowed to play! You’ve got the fucking Pogues down the other side of the road, singing bomb the British people up the IRA, their allowed to fucking play! So why the fucking pigs telling us we can’t have a fucking gig in our own country? Fuck them!’
    IAN STUART DONALDSON

    In any case, I listened to almost all of the interview and found it a good introduction. I thought Dutton was good, and his voice appropriate for Parliament to be honest.

  158. Anon[149] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve is looking much more presentable these days. He needs an ascot to complete the look tho.

  159. vhrm says:
    @Marco de Wit

    What is wrong with Braynard’s analysis? Why do you think he has not enough proof that many swing states were stolen?

    There’s nothing wrong Braynard’s analysis (that I can immediately identify).

    Showing that hundreds of people voted in two states is very interesting, but not enough to say the presidential election was stolen. Similarly to say that 0.5% -2% (or whatever the range was) of people he reached said they hadn’t requested an absentee ballot.

    To my mind (and to his of you watch his conclusion) this is the level of evidence that says “this should be investigated more”. i.e. state and local law enforcement and the political parties and interested civil liberties groups should look into his claims by interviewing some of the people involved and try to identify possible bad actors and see if there was large enough scale fraud to change the election, etc. And we don’t even know it’s all on the Dem side (I think; haven’t researched the vid).

    E.g. if he’d found 50k dead people voting in Detroit, that would be one thing, but he definitively DIDN’T find that out anything near it.

    So I think it’s absolutely interesting findings but no smoking gun.

    • Disagree: Marco de Wit
    • Replies: @Marco de Wit
  160. Anonymous[215] • Disclaimer says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I voted for Biden and am a huge Steve fan; he’s definitely not only for Trump voters.

    • Agree: Marco de Wit
    • Replies: @Anon
  161. vhrm says:
    @Marco de Wit

    1. Has the virus really been isolated in a proper manner?

    It seems isolation has not been done properly. Here is one source that quotes CDC:

    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2020/12/no_author/does-the-covid-19-coronavirus-really-exist/

    That article totally misinterprets what the CDC is saying in the document when they say:

    Positive results are indicative of active infection with SARS-CoV-2 but do not rule out bacterial infection or co-infection with other viruses. The agent detected may not be the definite cause of disease. Detection of viral RNA may not indicate the presence of infectious virus or that 2019-nCoV is the causative agent for clinical symptoms.

    This is talking about how to interpret a positive test in a given patient. It is basically a technical disclaimer about the capabilities of the test. It reiterate what the test proves and doesn’t prove about why this person is sick. It’s saying:
    1) a positive test means this person has SARS-CoV-2 virus in him, but that doesn’t mean that that’s the main problem with this particular person. He may also have OTHER things that might be causing his respiratory symptoms. i.e. he may also have bacterial pneumonia or the common cold or a flu or lung cancer or who knows what and this test doesn’t know anything about that.

    2) “Detection of viral RNA may not indicate the presence of infectious virus” : this part is saying that the test can’t tell the difference between an active virus particle that may spread and old remnants of chopped up virus.

    As to virus isolation, i’m not a biologist either, but there’s just plenty of evidence that that some virus that didn’t exist or was very uncommon before late 2019 then spread around the world primarily through the air when people are close to each other. And it has disproportionately been found in people who have the COVID-19 disease. i.e. there IS a virus and it CAUSES COVID-19 in some people.
    The CDC isolated it in Jan 2020, replicated it and made it available. (see the bottom of https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/lab/grows-virus-cell-culture.html which includes a link to their procedure) Also many many other people have independently isolated and sequenced the virus in other places see links in (https://fullfact.org/health/Covid-isolated-virus/ )

    By this point it it looks like a duck, swims like a duck, quacks like a duck, waddles like a duck, smells like a duck, tastes like a duck, and has not done anything un-ducklike.

    RE mortality:

    Here again we have to start from the beginning. WHO defines pandemic:
    “A pandemic is the worldwide spread of a new disease.” Furthermore it is claimed that Covid pandemic is really serious and has relatively high mortality.

    Whether there IS a pandemic and how serious it is are two different issues and here we may find some common ground.

    As i mentioned above i think there’s very very little room to doubt that there’s a pandemic of the Sars-Cov-2 virus that started in 2019 and causes “flu-like” symptoms in humans and is especially dangerous to the elderly.

    I think the deaths are much more likely to be caused by that than by Vitamin D deficiency or humidity which presumably cycles about the same every year. (though both Vitamin D and humidity were discussed at some length in iSteve comments as being contributing factors to the spread)

    Now what people and governments should do about it and what government interventions are worth it etc. THAT’s been discussed here at length. Steve leans more toward the “it’s serious” side, but there has been vigorous back and forth in the comments among his readers all along.

    Yes the original projections back in March were very high and the epidemiologists’ models turned out to be simplistic and not up to the task most of the time. Personally i think the lockdowns are economically ill-advised, a near Soviet curtailment of civil rights, and definitely “not worth it”. I would have liked a Sweden model.

    But that doesn’t mean there’s no pandemic of a virus out here killing people.

    • Thanks: Marco de Wit
    • Replies: @Marco de Wit
  162. @vhrm

    Thank you for a reasonable reply. Steve Sailer and some others seemed to have gotten upset but you have discussed this contentious topic in a reasonable and gentleman like manner.

    Obviously, we have different sources. You trust the official sources and I do not. Instead I trust more “dissident” scientists and virologists such as Peter Duesberg, Kary Mullis and Stefan Lanka.

    Neither of us is an expert in virology so I guess we just have to agree to disagree.

    However, can we agree on that:

    1. The burden of proof is on those who demand lockdowns.

    2. Big Pharma has achieved regulatory capture.

    3. Big Pharma/regulators are killing people with too low RDAs

    4. Big Pharma/regulators are killing people by allowing too high pollution and toxicity levels.
    (Could we even call it ADAs, “allowed daily allowances”. Please help with terminology. 🙂

    5. IP laws give Big Pharma a further incentive to kill people with low RDAs and high ADAs.

    6. IP laws give Big Pharma a further incentive to blame viruses for the consequent health problems and deaths.

    7. Virus isolation attempts must be done more transparently and more frequently preferably by independent groups in an open source manner by taking videos of each step.

    8. Prove in an open source manner that people have died from the virus and not just with the purported virus (like with AIDS patients according to Duesberg) with the following steps:
    It is isolated.
    It is contagious.
    It is pathogenic.
    It exists in large amounts (copies) in one person
    It causes deaths and serious illnesses in people with good immune systems (people who do not have serious nutritional deficiencies and are not poisoned by serious pollution and toxicities)
    It causes deaths in control groups (preferably big villages) with healthy lifestyles that are nutritionally supplemented and do not use masks and do not practice social distancing, etc.

    9. There is not enough proof for general lockdowns that destroy both our civil rights and the economy while at the same time serving the interests of the cultural Marxist globalists and the U$Srael/ruling elite that has achieved state capture with FED controlled fractional reserve petrodollar money machine that finances the destruction of our rights with censoring and warmongering police state.

    10. We must discuss all these questions in a calm and reasonable manner since our freedom and civilisation itself hangs in the balance.

  163. @vhrm

    Braynard himself stated that he has found and proven enough vote fraud to turn enough swing states. You disagree but do not explain why even if Braynard has presented the evidence in an open source manner.

    I am surprised by your and Sailer’s defeatist attitude.

    • Replies: @vhrm
  164. @Luke Ford

    Please explain why you think I am “wrong about everything”.

    You did not even explain why you ignore Braynard’s analysis. He has hard evidence of extensive voter fraud.

    Furthermore, please explain why you think conspiracies do not exist. Do you deny Maine, Lusitania, Pearl Harbour, Holohoax, Tonkin, Kuwaiti Incubator Baby, Iraqi WMD, Epstein pedoring, etc. conspiracies? Furthermore, Ron Unz has presented pretty conclusive evidence of such large Israel orchestrated conspiracies as JFK assassination and 9/11, for example.

    The fact that many of these conspiracies were orchestrated by Jews and Israel does not mean that all Jews are evil. Instead it only shows that some Jews and especially Israel play hardball and benefit from these hoaxes and conspiracies.

  165. It does strike me how Steve remains calm and low-key even while discussing these culturally crucial and emotionally volatile issues. He’s like an ancient Pompeiian researcher who would politely like to call attention to some troubling trends he’s noticed in the latest report from the Roman Bureau of Volcano Management.

  166. Still wondering who could play Steve. Too bad Steve Ihnat died young — blue eyes but overall not a bad match.

  167. @clyde

    What a blob. I mean go for walk…

    He did. And got mugged.

  168. @RadicalCenter

    One simple reform would be to go the route of Nebraska and Maine, electing electors by congressional district with two additional either state-wide or picked by the legislature.

    Outstanding reasoning. You are the first person I’ve heard to point out that if a State allocates EVs by congressional district, fraud in one district will win the fraudsters at most that district.

    Terrible reasoning. No state has an incentive to do this. Only two have, and one has regretted it. Nebraska hoped to attract more attention but, as one official there complained, “All we got was the Vice President’s wife!”

    California Republicans should have adopted the congressional district method of allocating EVs back when there was a Republican legislative majority at times and a Republican Governor to sign it.

    Wouldn’t it require an amendment to the state constitution? Not that that’s any great hurdle– with the exception of Alabama’s, California’s is the most bloated in the land.

    Your strategy has been used only, once by Michigan Democrats in 1892. The state returned to normal for 1896. As would California in time. Indeed, California was splitting her EV at the same time, 1892 and 1896, for a different reason. They wised up.

    Better and more achievable strategies would be to stop using aliens (illegal or legal) in apportionment, and splitting all the states more populous than Pennsylvania. California has nine or ten times the population of the entire United States at the first census.

    Those 15 GOP electors would be 19 or 21 under this plan, with four or six new senators to boot.

  169. @Reg Cæsar

    “A State” has no incentive to do that in the abstract sense that a State has more clout as a political-cultural entity when it can offer its whole big thumping trove of electoral votes to one side. Fair enough, Reg.

    But surely the (dwindling) Republican majority in the electorate and the Republican legislature of Texas have a strong incentive to enact district allocation of EVs.

    Practically speaking, we should be on the same page here. Do you expect Dems to be realistically capable of winning the popular vote for President in Texas statewide by 2032/2036 without massive fraud this time)? I do and I am sure you are paying attention to ongoing demographic changes down there too.

    Do you want the Dems to always win all of Texas’s EVs, every time, like California, such that Republicans or their successor can never win and we become a one-party country (well, more officially then 😉 ? I don’t and it doesn’t sound like you do either.

    You are entirely right, of course, that we need smaller States. States the size of California — and even Texas, Florida, and New York — are dangerous. They necessarily become less responsive to the will of the people, more administratively unwieldy and inefficient. Worst, the populous States become more authoritarian trying to impose a common set of laws and policies on an excessively large, unwisely diverse populace that does not sufficiently share a common language, values, way of life, and expectations about what society is.

    As a practical matter, people living in physically large States and not near the border of another State, are less able to legally avoid high sales tax or high excise taxes if his State levies them. This is the situation for the great majority of us in California. They are also unable to work in one State and live in another nearby State to take advantage of liberties and policies they favor in the other State, whether that’s self-defense and gun laws, protections for homeschooling, tolerance of adult marijuana possession, availability of homosexual “marriage”, etc.

    With more numerous, physically smaller, less populous States, we can more effectively force the governments to engage in tax competition, and policy competition, to get and keep good peaceful stable residents or to get revenue.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  170. @Reg Cæsar

    PS It is plausible that Republican-majority legislatures in Texas and Florida are smart enough to see the handwriting on the wall and enact district allocation of EV votes before they lose that majority. That will give the Republicans many more EVs than the zero they are going to get when Dems start routinely winning the statewide popular vote in Texas and Florida.

    It is NOT plausible that Dems in Congress will agree to create new States in a way that results in a sustained net gain of US Senate seats for Republicans.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  171. Anon[351] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Of course. Leftists love to subvert and destroy anything that is good. You act like we don’t already know that. Look at all the Californians moving to other states to ruin them after ruining California.

    If you voted for Democrats, you learned nothing from this blog and understand nothing. Doesn’t matter how big of a ‘fan’ you are. Besides, leftists lie constantly so why should anyone believe someone who admits to being a communist sympathizer?

  172. @RadicalCenter

    It is NOT plausible that Dems in Congress will agree to create new States in a way that results in a sustained net gain of US Senate seats for Republicans.

    They have to in Texas. Thanks to a Democratic Congress and a Whig President.

  173. @RadicalCenter

    But surely the (dwindling) Republican majority in the electorate and the Republican legislature of Texas have a strong incentive to enact district allocation of EVs.

    They have a stronger incentive to split the state in five.

    By the way, the districts don’t have to be congressional districts. They can be separate electoral districts, and even more gerrymandered. Michigan was split into two “senatorial” districts in 1892 for the extra electors. I’m sure the Democrats drew that line.

    Practically speaking, we should be on the same page here. Do you expect Dems to be realistically capable of winning the popular vote for President in Texas statewide by 2032/2036 without massive fraud this time)? I do and I am sure you are paying attention to ongoing demographic changes down there too.

    The electors are a statewide office, like the senators and the governor and others. So if they can take one, they can take any or all of the others. Once that happens, the district system is gone. (Unless the constitution covers it, in which the voters would have a direct say in a referendum.) It wouldn’t last any more than it did in Michigan after 1892.

    Do you want the Dems to always win all of Texas’s EVs, every time, like California, such that Republicans or their successor can never win and we become a one-party country (well, more officially then 😉 ? I don’t and it doesn’t sound like you do either.

    Ideally, the President should have so little power that the distribution of electoral votes shouldn’t matter. The Senators of the small states should be working on that goal; the EC is a mixed bag for them.

    The most effective treatment for California would be to expel the state from the Union. Trump’s victory would have been unquestionable both times. Perhaps there is some clause in our takeover treaty that can be used to negate it. We can always buy back the few remaining GOP counties.

  174. vhrm says:
    @Marco de Wit

    Barnyard says something somewhat different: he says he’s found enough slop in the system that it’s unknowable at this point who won. In the video that you posted, around 34:00 he says:

    …I have no confidence that Joe Biden is the deserved winner of this election based on our findings and the current results of the election in the states of Wisconsin, Georgia and Arizona and potentially other states.

    He may have won, he may not have won. Trump may have lost. Trump may have been reelected. We just can’t know because of how bad this election system has operated, because of all the problems it has allowed that I have brought to your attention.

    You know, when we were talking about this project with my team, someone said, “Well, what if you had like a million dollars and a bunch of FBI agents would you be able to find out the answer conclusively, ‘Who won this election’?”. And the answer is no i couldn’t even with all those resources with all the resources in the world i could not determine who had actually won this election given the problems that i’ve seen, and the problems that i’ve seen solely through the data that i’ve discovered through this project. …

    transcribed from:

    And i tend to agree with that. Our election system as it stands now (and as he demonstrated) is more of a yardstick rather than a micrometer. It just doesn’t have the precision to determine who won if two candidates are really close.

    Anything that gets probably within half a percent is really too close to call. With the level of precision that we actually have it would probably be more correct to replace all our mandatory recount rules with a coinflip rule:
    If the election count comes to within 0.5% (or some similar threshold) then it gets called a tie and is decided by a coinflip. That would be more strictly fair than the current stuff we have.

    This isn’t entirely fanciful. Racing sports deal with things like this already. It’s why you have ties in running and swimming. It’s not that people touched at “exactly” the same time, it’s just that the system just can’t tell you who won. (or, by rules times are only compared to some precision. like 1/100th of a second. https://www.pri.org/stories/2014-02-13/two-downhill-skiers-tie-olympic-gold-medal-did-one-actually-win)

    But any change like that would be for future elections, not for this one. Anyway considering that this is the level of precision that elections have been running all along, I think the chances of convincing courts in these states to re-run them are very low.

    • Replies: @Marco de Wit
  175. MEH 0910 says:
    @MEH 0910

    THE LANDLORD OF THE JOLLY HERETIC IS CELEBRATING THE LAUNCH OF HIS NEW BOOK, CASKETEERS!


    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  176. @vhrm

    If I understood correctly Braynard has proven that illegally submitted ballots clearly surpass the number of votes in the margin of victory in many swing states.

    So it seems to me – and you seem to agree – that it cannot be said that Joe Biden has won.

    If we couple this with the fact that poll watchers were not allowed meaningful access, i.e. there was no transparency in vote counting (plus many many other rules violations) does it then not follow that Trump won?

    So the state legislatures have the right and the duty to send in Trump supporting electors.

    Suppose you have a football game where the other side breaks the rules by first clearing out the stadium of all spectators, destroys the TV cameras and bribes the referees (who in fact belong to their team) and then declares victory.

    Would you then explain: Yes, there might have been some irregularities but there is just no way to know who won. Let’s just flip a coin.

    • Replies: @vhrm
  177. vhrm says:
    @Marco de Wit

    So it seems to me – and you seem to agree – that it cannot be said that Joe Biden has won.

    If we couple this with the fact that poll watchers were not allowed meaningful access, i.e. there was no transparency in vote counting (plus many many other rules violations) does it then not follow that Trump won?

    No, it does not follow.
    it cannot be said that Joe Biden has won.
    it cannot be said that Donald Trump has won.

    Braynard hasn’t proved (and hasn’t claimed to have) if any of this fraud was organized and if so by whom, nor do we know who these invalid votes were cast for, and there’s no way to ever know for sure (since ballots are anonymous after being taken out of their envelopes).

    If courts or legislatures engage with Braynard’s analysis seriously they can come to the conclusion that the election in some or all of this states is invalid. Then the States would have to follow their own laws (and i don’t know what they are) in dealing with that. Some sort of redo, perhaps…

    Check this out from Georgia in just 2019:

    A judge wrote in an order Friday that state Rep. Chris Erwin is no longer a member of the Georgia House because his election must be redone a third time.

    Erwin, a Republican from Homer, loses his northeast Georgia House seat while the election is in doubt, according to state law. He took office Jan. 14.

    Senior Superior Court Judge David Sweat threw out December’s election between Erwin and former state Rep. Dan Gasaway because three voters lived outside House District 28 and one person voted twice.

    Those four voters could have been enough to change the outcome of the election.

    https://www.ajc.com/news/state–regional-govt–politics/judge-removes-georgia-representative-from-office-over-disputed-election/9POc7IWE8kpJVTVHN1SlVN/

    These is about equivalent to the kinds of problems that Braynards analysis suggests.

    Your football analogy i think overstates the case because there’s no _proof_ (yet?), let alone definitive proof, that one side or the other did anything. This is more akin to a football game being played and then after it’s over someone measuring the field and pointing out: “Hey, this field is only 80 yards long, the crossbars on the posts are 5 feet too high and the clock runs 20% slow.”

    What do you do with that? Can you tell who SHOULD have won? You can’t.
    You can accept the game, and, optionally, fix the field before the next one, strike the game from the record, or replay it.

  178. @vhrm

    How likely is Trump to win a do-over?

    • Replies: @vhrm
  179. vhrm says:
    @Steve Sailer

    More likely to win with do-over than without one, but probably not good.

    First, if less than the three states agree to a redo it can be only a moral victory.
    If all three states (Arizona, Wisconsin, Georgia) agree he’d have to sweep them in order to win (tie) the election.

    And the new elections would be run by the same people and under similar rules as the last ones. There’s no reason to believe that the new elections would be any more precise or fraud resistant than the last ones.

    Beyond that, who knows.
    Covid vaccines are now announced.
    But we’re in flu-season and Arizona and Georgia COVID cases are growing.
    It’ll be the depth of winter in Wisconsin.
    It’ll be a political circus and some people might vote Biden because they feel that the 2nd vote is inappropriate. (e.g. in CA in 2003 i voted against the recall of Gray Davis (and for Schwarzenegger) because i while no fan of Davis he hadn’t done anything particularly impeachable (imo))

    But if Biden DID lose imagine the level of vibrant undocumented storefront remodeling and shopping and the MSM’s lack of noticing any difference compared to Trump’s loss in November.

  180. @vhrm

    Thanks for reply. However, at this point you sound like a troll. Or maybe you just hate Trump and therefore have succumbed to defeatism. Or perhaps you are an anonymous democrat having fun.

    But no matter. Unless, of course, Steve Sailer shares you attitude. That question started this discussion. The massive vote fraud seems not to interest him at all. Nothing to see. Or notice.

    Luckily Ron Unz has published some articles about vote fraud that do notice things.

    • Replies: @vhrm
  181. vhrm says:
    @Marco de Wit

    “Noticing” something is just the first part. Then one has to analyze it.

    Read what Braynard has said that i transcribed. He’s not winking and being coy and implying “i know it was stolen but i’m just not saying that because i want this video to appeal to normies”. What he says is what he actually found.

    Just like in our criminal legal system “X is found not guilty” doesn’t mean that X is necessarily innocent, just that it was not established beyond reasonable doubt that he is guilty.

    Though we don’t use these terms, an election is supposed to establish beyond reasonable doubt that enough legitimate voters voted for the winner. Braynard’s analysis suggests that this election has not established that, because there appear to be enough voters who voted who should not have voted that it’s _possible_ the eligible voters actually voted for Trump. But that’s all we know.

    He only did the boring “Actual science montage” version of this, not the sexy “Movie Science” version:

    (https://xkcd.com/683/ )

  182. MEH 0910 says:

    Real Home Realizations: Closet – realtor.com

    Now that you’ve spent so much time at home, maybe it’s time to find a new one with a home office. Find it with the realtor.com home office filter.

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