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Is that a wire running to an electrode attached to his scalp? Is he prepped for an electroencephalogram? Or did he just slap a Band-Aid on top of one strand of his combover?

This 1976 picture looks like a still from a 1970s paranoid thriller film like The Conversation, Three Days of the Condor, or All the President’s Men. Joe would be well-cast as the sleazy lawyer sent by the covert government agency or giant multinational corporation to warn the hero to back off. He looks like a cross between Peter Boyle, John Cazale, and Harry Dean Stanton.

But I can also tell that Joe always sees himself as the hero of his movie, the Jack Nicholson/Dustin Hoffman/Robert Redford character. Heck, in Joe’s eyes, Joe is Jefferson Smith in Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.

In general, the long-haired era introduced by The Beatles in 1964 when Joe was already 21 and probably losing interest in pop music was not a good one for Catholic-Americans, at least not compared to the Crosby-Sinatra Era that preceded the Sixties-Seventies.

In Biden’s defense, he was a widower with small children at the time. I presume that when he married Dr. Jill in 1977 she started to exercise a salutary influence over his grooming.

Now, with the help of a lot of plastic surgery, Joe’s aesthetic is back to that of the cocky high school football star (skinny split end subtype) he was in c. 1960.

 
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  1. Biden as a young man was extraordinarily good looking, and no doubt that was a factor that steered him towards a career in politics, because he seems never to have been a policy heavyweight.

    But yeah, he did look like a sleaze bag in the ’70s. So the true character of Biden-Kinnock was revealed.

    • Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin
    @Jonathan Mason

    There's a good chance that with the suit Biden has on in that picture he's wearing a pair of patent leather shoes with matching belt. Though the change wasn't immediate, one of the best effects of the Reagan era was society jettisoning the hideous fashions that had haunted the 70's.

    , @Anon
    @Jonathan Mason

    Hair transplants are much better now, and Finasteride/Propecia which came out in the late 90s basically stops male pattern baldness. If he were younger he would've kept a full head of hair during his political career and not looked so sleazy. The sleazy look stems from him looking quite youthful while having significant hair loss, coupled with the 70s fashion for longer unkempt hair.

  2. In the main photo his eyes are open. Modern photos seem to show two just-open slits.

  3. Actually, men’s 1970s fashions and hairstyles tend to make guys look sleazy in retrospect.

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Rob McX

    Much of the fun in watching 1970ish TV shows is seeing the sideburns sprout, the hair become longer and fluffier, and men's ties, lapels and shirt collars widen to absurd lengths. I think the Rubicon was crossed the day Robert (Brady Bunch) Reed showed up with a perm

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8c/The_Brady_Bunch_Robert_Reed_Florence_Henderson_1973_%28cropped%29.jpg

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    , @Abe
    @Rob McX


    Actually, men’s 1970s fashions and hairstyles tend to make guys look sleazy in retrospect.
     
    1976 may as well have been 476 in terms of hair technology. AMERICAN HUSTLE very knowingly goofed on men’s grooming and fashion from this era by making its two male A-list stars look as distasteful as possible, cramming Bradley Cooper into a ridiculous Jewfro in addition to a pair of ridiculously high-waisted, ridiculously-tight polyester disco pants. However I rest my case for why Christian Bale is the best actor of our era (yes, even better than Daniel Day-Lewis) by how in that flick he totally melts into the role of the sleezeball con artist with a comb-over (who else can do that AND own Batman?)

    The thing is- the large majority of people do not have the beautifully-symmetrical facial features necessary to pull off the simple hairstyles of that decade (basically long hair with a part right down the middle). Even the return of “Tin-Tin”/boy-band male hairstyles in the early Aughts, where product is used to sculpt hair into a semi-chaotic series of spiky ridges and wavy swoops, is a marked improvement as it distracts from the facial irregularities most people are burdened with.

    Probably the least heralded area of technological advancement of the last 30 or so years is all the gradual, incremental improvements in grooming, skincare, dentistry and minor corrective surgeries that have become common. Example- watched SCROOGED with my family right before Christmas. In HD. 2nd worst upgrade-to-HD viewing mistake I’ve ever made (worst being rewatching SONG REMAINS THE SAME and realizing Robert Plant definitely did not wear underwear in 1973). The craters on Murray’s face on a 70” TV in HD are so ginormous I was afraid I was going to lose my car keys in one of them. I am pretty sure I saw ST. VINCENT in HD and the pockmarks on his face are MUCH LESS pronounced, maybe even effectively gone, so clearly he had some sensible, corrective “work” done in that area over the last 10-15 years and like all the other advancements I’m thinking of was sensible, did its job fairly well, and did not draw undue attention to itself.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Reg Cæsar, @Londoner, @Rob McX, @the one they call Desanex, @ScarletNumber

  4. He looks like a cross between Peter Boyle, John Cazale, and Harry Dean Stanton.

    He looks like Norman Gunston, a character from 1970s Australian television, best known for his celebrity interviews. Garry McDonald went on to star in another famous Oz comedy, ‘Mother and Son’.

  5. Comb-overs were as much a part of 70’s aesthetics as mustaches and sideburns. Remember, in those days only skin-heads shaved their heads. And successful hair implants were 20 years ahead in the future. Those were still dark days for balding men.

  6. Trying (unsuccessfully) for the mean n moody Clu Gulager look in “The Last Picture Show.”

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Cortes

    His acting career as the sleazy lawyer had a brief revival

    https://youtu.be/VMzfrod7hcE

  7. My Favorite Joe Biden Photo

    May we please make this a contest for everyone?

  8. On second thought, it’s way too easy, and the contest would never end.

    Wow, look how old he looked before his latest round of surgeries. Whatever else you say about the man, he does have a good surgeon.

    • LOL: Kolya Krassotkin
    • Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin
    @Polistra

    Okay, Bobby. Show me on the doll where the President touched you.

  9. @Cortes
    Trying (unsuccessfully) for the mean n moody Clu Gulager look in “The Last Picture Show.”

    Replies: @Cortes

    His acting career as the sleazy lawyer had a brief revival

  10. That mess was probably him trying to look young in that era. Work some ladies. I hate when old men have that thick hair in back, gruesome.

  11. I have a younger colleague who had that kind of hair going on. He finally decided to shave it all, and he’s loved the new look ever since.

  12. Now, with the help of a lot of plastic surgery, Joe’s aesthetic is back to that of the cocky high school football star (skinny split end subtype) he was in c. 1960.

    The 1976 pic shows a man with long back hair and a receding front hairline – looking like a younger version of Pierre Trudeau, but without the latter’s intelligence or smoothness. I don’t think hair transplants were too advanced at that time, so I take it that he has a toupee.
    Maestro Steve, do you have any links for the plastic surgery claims ?

  13. Right about the 70’s. I’ve seen Three Days of the Condor a few weeks ago. Unbelievable how the movie has aged. Conversations (especially Dunaway-Redford), pauses, fashion, music, … atrocious.

    All the President’s Men is even worse (pompous Jason Robards).

    Very, very few movies from that era have survived.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The 70s sucked. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise. That picture of Joe pretty much sums up the whole decade.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfwyVQxaB1o&list=PLLYDomDEwt5j4AQI2YMzx14sd488p683k

    , @Known Fact
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Very, very few movies from that era have survived.
     
    I don't know -- 1974 for example is pretty stacked

    https://www.imdb.com/list/ls062523318/

    , @gepay
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Bardon Kaldian
    Isn't it amazing how Chinatown has more than survived. Polanksk is one sleazy male who you wouldn't want your daughter to marry but at least he directed some really good movies.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Right about the 70’s. I’ve seen Three Days of the Condor a few weeks ago. Unbelievable how the movie has aged. Conversations (especially Dunaway-Redford), pauses, fashion, music, … atrocious.
     
    Yeah, what it really needs are are some fireballs, wokeness, and lines like "We have a situation here" and "Let's do this!".

    I find 70s movies to be, often, far and away better than the trite crap that gets made today.

    I might add, you clearly have no taste.

    , @Ganderson
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Respectfully disagree. Fashion in the 70s, at least for men, WAS awful, but a lot of good movies were made between 1967and 1978- my favorite might be “The Last Detail”. Chinatown’s pretty damn good as well. That posted list from ‘74 has some quality.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Bardon Kaldian

    , @Hiop
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The average 70s flick is superior to almost everything that contemporary Hollywood produces. 70s fashions and aesthics are heavenly compared to the present. I'll take comb overs, sideburns, and leisure suits any day over: obesity, tattoos, rainbow hair, and droopy drawers. I don't even want to think about the music industry. Every aspect of society has been ruined.

    , @Alden
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I tried to watch Day of the Condor on TV several times. I just couldn’t last more than the first half hour.

  14. • Agree: ScarletNumber
    • Thanks: Gordo
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @MEH 0910

    In England, that particular tonsorial variant is popularly known as 'the Max Wall hair cut'.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Peter D. Bredon
    @MEH 0910

    Joe would never rob a bank. He's on the payroll.

    "You can steal more money with a Del. Senator than with a shotgun" -- Al Capone

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @MEH 0910

    "Sal, Wyoming's not a country."

  15. We’re not gonna make it… are we.

    • Replies: @Rob (London)
    @Anonymous

    I re-watched T2 for the first time in several years last night. I still love it, but for the first time its weaknesses felt glaring. Namely, Linda Hamilton's limited acting ability (she's not terrible, but...), nearly every scene with Robert Furlong in it, and the voice-overs. Any movie that relies on narrative voice-overs has failed to some extent, and this isn't an exception.

    Arnold, Robert and every action scene, though - still amazing.

    Replies: @Hiop

  16. The contemporary Biden – despite the plastic surgery – reminds me of something hanging off the wall of a charnel house in Palermo, Sicily.

  17. @MEH 0910
    https://filmschoolrejects.com/john-cazales-unparalleled-cinematic-legacy/

    https://filmschoolrejects.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/john-cazale-dog-day-afternoon.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Peter D. Bredon, @Achmed E. Newman

    In England, that particular tonsorial variant is popularly known as ‘the Max Wall hair cut’.

    • LOL: Cortes
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    In popular British culture, the couplet of a Max Wall haircut is a 'Blackadder' haircut, named after the topiary atrocity sported by the actor Rowan Atkinson in the first BBC TV series of that name.

  18. Denis Leary once opined (which means that Bill Hicks probably said it first) that guys in the 70s were in the middle of the Sexual Revolution and wore clothes that guaranteed they wouldn’t get laid.

    Not true, BTW, there was lots of getting laid….; )–although I thought then as well as now that the styles were rather cringeworthy.

    Although, I just saw some wedding pictures of a family member from the mid 70s, and while clothes and hair were in the 70s styles, they weren’t terrible, and the people sure looked a lot better and more capable than the downtrodden mopish muppetlike schmoos wandering around nowadays. Happy, together White people who weren’t about to take much schitt off of anyone–that’s what you had then. (Off topic–my beloved grandmother looked so young in the pictures that I just saw–I did the math and realized that she was only a couple of years older than I am now, Sigh).

    Happy White folks are Public Enemy # 1 now, and it looks like the plots against them worked.

    BTW–one thing about Pedo Joezheimer’s Biden. When I lived in DC in the 80s, insiders tabbed the Sniffer as one of the dumbest members of Congress, which is like calling someone the tallest guy in the NBA, and they also said that he was one of the meanest, with a foul temper and high-handed attitude to his staff and others “below” him.

    And you mention his athletic exploits without talking about his Vietnam draft-induced “asthma”, which arrived out of the blue, got him ( I think) five medical deferments, and then miraculously “healed” after the war.

    • Replies: @Rob (London)
    @AceDeuce

    Sounds like Biden has quite a few key (negative) attributes in common with the guy he's replacing, then.

  19. Objectively, the best photo of Joe Biden is that photo of him campaigning at a pool in a black area of Delaware and he’s climbed up on the lifeguard stand like a tribal god surrounded by a huge mass of adoring Afro-Americans.

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Hockamaw

    Apocalypse Now -- The Comedy

    , @James O'Meara
    @Hockamaw

    "Now he's crossed to Cambodia with his Montagnard army, who worship the man, like a god, and follow every order however ridiculous."

    , @Rob (London)
    @Hockamaw

    It's C-3PO pretending to be an Ewok god in "Return of the Jedi". Uncannily so.

  20. When did he begin his hair implant therapy?

  21. Hi Steve,

    By sheer coincidence, I’m just going through my photo album at this precise moment!

    (Ah! Memories…)

    Steve, this here is my favorite photo, but when or where was it was taken?

    China? Ukraine? One of the Credit Card companies headquarters? The 2020 South Carolina primary?

    Nope. For the life of me, I just can’t remember. It could be anywhere I went, and at anytime in my political career.

    Yours,

    President Elect Ten Percent

    https://media.istockphoto.com/photos/business-man-giving-something-in-a-briefcase-while-give-success-the-picture-id1130869226?k=6&m=1130869226&s=170667a&w=0&h=Uqr1_EPmSysm2b3KqDkcVPZyp6m0StJsDxN1FxZrqE0=

  22. So now it’s time to make fun of a new president and move on as if nothing happened. Ha ha ha. We get it.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Are you Trusting the Plan?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @James O'Meara
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Riffing on Joe is all we have left. Enjoy it while we can. Soon enough we'll move into the "don't be the first to stop clapping for Stalin" stage.

    , @Stan Adams
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Der Bidenator offers plenty of (tragi)comedic material. The road ahead will be awfully bumpy, but it will be one hell of a ride.

    Say what you will about Joltin' Joe, but he's surprisingly photogenic:

    https://www.scriberrnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/feat.jpg

    (Wrong organ, Joe. It's your heart that's supposed to bleed.)

    https://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/b1a0707fa083879dc67c4841440e3015b4123a03/c=0-374-3745-2490/local/-/media/2017/06/26/Wilmington/Wilmington/636340820833333076-062617-BidenPool-SP729.JPG

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/11/20/14/35913026-8970247-image-m-4_1605882769599.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @Adam Smith, @Hippopotamusdrome

  23. That band aide… evidence of an early attempt at brain surgery from Dr. Jill?

  24. @Rob McX
    Actually, men's 1970s fashions and hairstyles tend to make guys look sleazy in retrospect.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Abe

    Much of the fun in watching 1970ish TV shows is seeing the sideburns sprout, the hair become longer and fluffier, and men’s ties, lapels and shirt collars widen to absurd lengths. I think the Rubicon was crossed the day Robert (Brady Bunch) Reed showed up with a perm

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Known Fact

    What they did to the Mad Men cast was downright cruel.

    https://www.out.com/sites/out.com/files/2015/02/20/mad-men.jpeg

    Even sophisticated Roger was affected, though they did give him a slutty French wife for his retirement.

    https://media1.popsugar-assets.com/files/thumbor/qYKcDt9ROsYtJs7EyE0Z0pWXm1g/fit-in/1024x1024/filters:format_auto-!!-:strip_icc-!!-/2015/05/19/041/n/1922283/b0c26291_01a3b4fe-8add-56d1-c21c-594920a77b82_MM_714_MY_0627_0184/i/Roger-Sterling-Now.jpg

    But worst of all, Pete Campbell turned into Joe Biden

    https://imgix.bustle.com/rehost/2016/9/13/15d89322-ada3-4a26-8105-349bf7bc4ba9.jpg?w=970&h=546&fit=crop&crop=faces&auto=format&q=70

  25. It looks like a Band-Aid with a strand of hair stuck under it. Joe got drunk the night before and bashed his head. When he got home he put on a bandage but he was still a little drunk and didn’t notice the strand of hair.

    It wouldn’t be surprising if Joe took to drink after the loss of his wife and child but we never hear about this. Where are the “Joe drowned his sorrow in the bottle” stories? There are lots of Presidents who had alcoholics in their families or maybe drank a bit too much themselves. Northern Europeans have a tendency toward alcoholism, perhaps because, like Indians, alcohol was introduced to them relatively recently vs. the wine drinking peoples of the Mediterranean who have consumed wine (in moderation) since antiquity. Often (as in the case of Trump) they react by staying completely away from alcohol. What is the relationship between Joe and alcohol?

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Jack D

    What is the relationship between Joe and alcohol?

    It's simple, they love each other.

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Jack D

    Like Trump, he will be drunk on power.

    , @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Jack D


    It wouldn’t be surprising if Joe took to drink after the loss of his wife and child but we never hear about this. Where are the “Joe drowned his sorrow in the bottle” stories? There are lots of Presidents who had alcoholics in their families or maybe drank a bit too much themselves.
     
    IIRC, Biden is teetotal and drank a Non-Alcoholic Beer at the "Beer Summit" with that Cambridge Police Officer who responded to the Home of Henry Louis Gates. I don't know when or why, but it's been that way for quite a while. He would have been a natural fit with the Kennedy-Dodd Democratic Senate Party Caucus, but apparently didn't indulge.

    Northern Europeans have a tendency toward alcoholism, perhaps because, like Indians, alcohol was introduced to them relatively recently vs. the wine drinking peoples of the Mediterranean who have consumed wine (in moderation) since antiquity. Often (as in the case of Trump) they react by staying completely away from alcohol. What is the relationship between Joe and alcohol?
     
    This is incorrect. American Indians utterly lacked the enzymes to process alcohol, which Northern Europeans certainly do not lack. Northern Europeans have been making alcohol in various forms for as long as the Meds, but the theory goes that parts of Europe which were effectively colonized by the Romans introduced a moderate, wine drinking culture, while those parts which remained free of Roman rule or which were far away enough from Rome and later to Roman rule retained their extant binge drinking cultures where alcohol was produced from grains or fruits (beer, whiskey, schnaps, cider etc). There is, of course, overlap between these cultures in various parts of Europe.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Bardon Kaldian, @Observator

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Jack D

    Jack, I worked with lots of guys who liked to drink. Worked with only a few guys that could handle their drinks. Sad when mom comes to get dad at the local gin mill where he has been since work ended at 4:30 and the kids are in the station wagon hoping their drunken Irish Catholic ironworker dad doesn't puke on the seats.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

    , @Expletive Deleted
    @Jack D

    Brits and Irish, and by extension their near-Continental forebears have been boozing heroically since at least the late neolithic. It's an almost inevitable concomitant of grain agriculture, spoiled granaries/pit silos, mouldy porridge and so on.
    I wouldn't like to be in a hut-full of them after they'd been caning it on the strong ale they doped with fly agaric, henbane, and other mind-melters. Can't really blame them, Orkney or the Hebrides in winter isn't much fun.

    Thank goodness the undocumented dreamers arriving from the east in the mid-3rd millennium BC seem to have brought some sort of linden/meadowsweet(clue's in the name)-flavoured strong mead/bragget with them, along with metallurgy, wheels and possibly horses. And a tiny bit of genocide. It was traditional back then.

  26. The best Biden photo will always be that wonderful Heart of Darkness shot, up in the lifeguard’s chair surrounded by adoring locals.

    By the way, while much is made of Trump’s military deferments (e.g. Captain Bonespurs), relatively little ever gets said about young Biden’s draft avoidance — the mysterious case of chronic asthma that oddly did not seem to hamper him during all those years of gridiron heroics

  27. @Jack D
    It looks like a Band-Aid with a strand of hair stuck under it. Joe got drunk the night before and bashed his head. When he got home he put on a bandage but he was still a little drunk and didn't notice the strand of hair.

    It wouldn't be surprising if Joe took to drink after the loss of his wife and child but we never hear about this. Where are the "Joe drowned his sorrow in the bottle" stories? There are lots of Presidents who had alcoholics in their families or maybe drank a bit too much themselves. Northern Europeans have a tendency toward alcoholism, perhaps because, like Indians, alcohol was introduced to them relatively recently vs. the wine drinking peoples of the Mediterranean who have consumed wine (in moderation) since antiquity. Often (as in the case of Trump) they react by staying completely away from alcohol. What is the relationship between Joe and alcohol?

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Jonathan Mason, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Buffalo Joe, @Expletive Deleted

    What is the relationship between Joe and alcohol?

    It’s simple, they love each other.

    • LOL: Jack D, Johann Ricke
  28. @Buzz Mohawk
    So now it's time to make fun of a new president and move on as if nothing happened. Ha ha ha. We get it.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @James O'Meara, @Stan Adams

    Are you Trusting the Plan?

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @AndrewR


    Are you Trusting the Plan?
     
    Where we go one, we go all.

    https://hdclump.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/gulag-800x450.jpg
  29. @Jack D
    It looks like a Band-Aid with a strand of hair stuck under it. Joe got drunk the night before and bashed his head. When he got home he put on a bandage but he was still a little drunk and didn't notice the strand of hair.

    It wouldn't be surprising if Joe took to drink after the loss of his wife and child but we never hear about this. Where are the "Joe drowned his sorrow in the bottle" stories? There are lots of Presidents who had alcoholics in their families or maybe drank a bit too much themselves. Northern Europeans have a tendency toward alcoholism, perhaps because, like Indians, alcohol was introduced to them relatively recently vs. the wine drinking peoples of the Mediterranean who have consumed wine (in moderation) since antiquity. Often (as in the case of Trump) they react by staying completely away from alcohol. What is the relationship between Joe and alcohol?

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Jonathan Mason, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Buffalo Joe, @Expletive Deleted

    Like Trump, he will be drunk on power.

  30. Early concerns about aneurysms?

    Anyway…the 70’s were a bad time for balding guys. They compensated with massive sideburns and proto-mullets, combined with the paleo combover. But I don’t know if that was any worse than today’s Scrubbing Bubble look, with the bushy beard and shiny, shaven dome.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Thirdtwin


    But I don’t know if that was any worse than today’s Scrubbing Bubble look, with the bushy beard and shiny, shaven dome.
     
    Don't forget the Man Buns, Mohawks, etc.

    Who knew Mad Max was the cinematic predictor of 21st century men's fashion?
  31. As the cliche goes, apples never fall far from the tree. JoeDepend’s father was a car salesman, surprise surprise. DiaperDon’s father, Fred, was a slumlord owning NY tenements. Woody Guthrie lived in one for awhile and even wrote a song entitled Old Man Trump. DiaperDon’s grandfather, Friedrich, owned a whorehouse in a mining boomtown, Monte Cristo, located above Darrington in the Cascades. When the ore ran out, Friedrich relocated his whorehouse to the mining boom in Alaska. Monte Cristo is now a ghost town. You can still hike up to the remains along the former railroad right of way. It had an interesting lodge reclaimed by the vegetation, but some vandals burned it down 30 years ago.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @nsa

    DiaperDon’s grandfather, Friedrich, owned a whorehouse in a mining boomtown, Monte Cristo, located above Darrington in the Cascades. When the ore ran out, Friedrich relocated his whorehouse to the mining boom in Alaska. Monte Cristo is now a ghost town. You can still hike up to the remains along the former railroad right of way. It had an interesting lodge reclaimed by the vegetation, but some vandals burned it down 30 years ago.


    I'm fascinated. Which local historian in Snohomish County, Washington maintains that Friedrich Trump's business was a whorehouse? And who has demonstrated he ever lived in Alaska?



    Fred, was a slumlord owning NY tenements. Woody Guthrie

    Why would you take Woody Guthrie seriously? You mean slums like this?

    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2015/08/17/nyregion/18APPRAISAL1/18APPRAISAL1-master1050.jpg

    Replies: @Jack D, @nsa

  32. Up until just a few years ago Biden looked great for a man his age. Now he has that hoary, wasted, vacant look that anyone with a fading elderly relative has seen before. The White House will be receiving deliveries of Depends by the pallet.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    @Johnny Smoggins

    Whory and wasted? Sounds like some of my best weekends as a single guy.

  33. That one band-aid holds the entire facade!

  34. @Jack D
    It looks like a Band-Aid with a strand of hair stuck under it. Joe got drunk the night before and bashed his head. When he got home he put on a bandage but he was still a little drunk and didn't notice the strand of hair.

    It wouldn't be surprising if Joe took to drink after the loss of his wife and child but we never hear about this. Where are the "Joe drowned his sorrow in the bottle" stories? There are lots of Presidents who had alcoholics in their families or maybe drank a bit too much themselves. Northern Europeans have a tendency toward alcoholism, perhaps because, like Indians, alcohol was introduced to them relatively recently vs. the wine drinking peoples of the Mediterranean who have consumed wine (in moderation) since antiquity. Often (as in the case of Trump) they react by staying completely away from alcohol. What is the relationship between Joe and alcohol?

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Jonathan Mason, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Buffalo Joe, @Expletive Deleted

    It wouldn’t be surprising if Joe took to drink after the loss of his wife and child but we never hear about this. Where are the “Joe drowned his sorrow in the bottle” stories? There are lots of Presidents who had alcoholics in their families or maybe drank a bit too much themselves.

    IIRC, Biden is teetotal and drank a Non-Alcoholic Beer at the “Beer Summit” with that Cambridge Police Officer who responded to the Home of Henry Louis Gates. I don’t know when or why, but it’s been that way for quite a while. He would have been a natural fit with the Kennedy-Dodd Democratic Senate Party Caucus, but apparently didn’t indulge.

    Northern Europeans have a tendency toward alcoholism, perhaps because, like Indians, alcohol was introduced to them relatively recently vs. the wine drinking peoples of the Mediterranean who have consumed wine (in moderation) since antiquity. Often (as in the case of Trump) they react by staying completely away from alcohol. What is the relationship between Joe and alcohol?

    This is incorrect. American Indians utterly lacked the enzymes to process alcohol, which Northern Europeans certainly do not lack. Northern Europeans have been making alcohol in various forms for as long as the Meds, but the theory goes that parts of Europe which were effectively colonized by the Romans introduced a moderate, wine drinking culture, while those parts which remained free of Roman rule or which were far away enough from Rome and later to Roman rule retained their extant binge drinking cultures where alcohol was produced from grains or fruits (beer, whiskey, schnaps, cider etc). There is, of course, overlap between these cultures in various parts of Europe.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)


    beer, whiskey, schnaps, cider
     
    Of these, only beer and cider would have predated relatively modern times (12th to 15th century) when the still was introduced to Europe from the Arabs (the word alcohol itself is Arabic). Freeze distillation (true applejack) may have been done earlier in the cold northern lands but the concentration of alcohol is not as high as for true distillation, nor is it possible to remove impurities using freeze distillation, with the result that the stuff gives you a nasty hangover. While it is certainly possible to get drunk on cider and unhopped beer (hops are first mentioned in connection with brewing in the 9th century), distilled beverages get the job done a lot faster and lead to more alcoholism. The N. European working classes always drank but only after the introduction of distilled beverages such as gin, abisinthe, whiskey, rum, etc. did alcohol create a true "drug problem" in Europe.

    Beer was seen as almost a health beverage compared to gin which lead to debauchery:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1e/Beer-street-and-Gin-lane.jpg

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Buzz Mohawk, @Alden

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    This is more a culture thing ...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcohol_preferences_in_Europe

    https://i.redd.it/gh0jl51b28k11.png

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Observator
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    We once had an alcoholic president, the tragic Frank Pierce, who was killed by cirrhosis less than a dozen years after he left office. Worse, his successor James Buchanan is so much like Biden, a third-rate hack who ended up in the presidency after decades in politics, just because he was a wily nonentity with great endurance, and had made himself into a useful tool for special interests.

    Into the leadership vacuum of the 1850s stepped the most determined enemies of the American people, moving unopposed into positions of power everywhere in the national government, packing the Supreme Court, silencing voices of reason in the south, diverting weapons from US arsenals in the north to the south, for the war they long plotted to dismember the world’s only experiment in self-government, once they lost control of it.

    Those who yammer on today about a new civil war may unfortunately be right after all.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

  35. @Rob McX
    Actually, men's 1970s fashions and hairstyles tend to make guys look sleazy in retrospect.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Abe

    Actually, men’s 1970s fashions and hairstyles tend to make guys look sleazy in retrospect.

    1976 may as well have been 476 in terms of hair technology. AMERICAN HUSTLE very knowingly goofed on men’s grooming and fashion from this era by making its two male A-list stars look as distasteful as possible, cramming Bradley Cooper into a ridiculous Jewfro in addition to a pair of ridiculously high-waisted, ridiculously-tight polyester disco pants. However I rest my case for why Christian Bale is the best actor of our era (yes, even better than Daniel Day-Lewis) by how in that flick he totally melts into the role of the sleezeball con artist with a comb-over (who else can do that AND own Batman?)

    The thing is- the large majority of people do not have the beautifully-symmetrical facial features necessary to pull off the simple hairstyles of that decade (basically long hair with a part right down the middle). Even the return of “Tin-Tin”/boy-band male hairstyles in the early Aughts, where product is used to sculpt hair into a semi-chaotic series of spiky ridges and wavy swoops, is a marked improvement as it distracts from the facial irregularities most people are burdened with.

    Probably the least heralded area of technological advancement of the last 30 or so years is all the gradual, incremental improvements in grooming, skincare, dentistry and minor corrective surgeries that have become common. Example- watched SCROOGED with my family right before Christmas. In HD. 2nd worst upgrade-to-HD viewing mistake I’ve ever made (worst being rewatching SONG REMAINS THE SAME and realizing Robert Plant definitely did not wear underwear in 1973). The craters on Murray’s face on a 70” TV in HD are so ginormous I was afraid I was going to lose my car keys in one of them. I am pretty sure I saw ST. VINCENT in HD and the pockmarks on his face are MUCH LESS pronounced, maybe even effectively gone, so clearly he had some sensible, corrective “work” done in that area over the last 10-15 years and like all the other advancements I’m thinking of was sensible, did its job fairly well, and did not draw undue attention to itself.

    • Agree: AceDeuce
    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Abe

    "The thing is- the large majority of people do not have the beautifully-symmetrical facial features necessary to pull off the simple hairstyles of that decade (basically long hair with a part right down the middle). "

    True that. There's a book called I think "Shag" that deals with the 70s and they made the illuminating point that everything was about "natural" which was interpreted to mean shaggy, from carpet (even in the bathroom; I've been in condos in NYC that survive from that era) to hair (face, head, and, um, elsewhere). Also avocado, banana and burnt sienna colors for furniture and appliances.

    I'm less outraged by 70s hairstyles, but improved dentistry is a no-brainer, a real deal-breaker for "let's go back to the good old days" of the 60s or 1800s. I like to say that "Everyone is a Traditionalist until they need dental work."

    I love Bill Murray but he's just a mess. Maybe he didn't have any work done and the makeup and camera work are what improved?

    Replies: @Abe, @Ozymandias

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Abe


    The thing is- the large majority of people do not have the beautifully-symmetrical facial features necessary to pull off the simple hairstyles of that decade (basically long hair with a part right down the middle).
     
    It is the Cadillac of men's hairstyles. Literally:


    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/VAkEhmZFXGA/hqdefault.jpg

    http://historydetroit.com/pics/cadillac_etching.jpg

    https://www.wikitree.com/photo.php/1/11/Laumet-1.png

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/5d/e6/3a/5de63a5ca8d6387fb1c4c271ea0cefdb.jpg

    , @Londoner
    @Abe

    How would you rate Gary Oldman versus Christian Bale?

    Replies: @Abe, @Jim Don Bob

    , @Rob McX
    @Abe


    ...(worst being rewatching SONG REMAINS THE SAME and realizing Robert Plant definitely did not wear underwear in 1973).
     
    Thanks for the warning, that's definitely a film for me to avoid, especially if it's remastered in HD. It reminds me of a line by some comedian, "His trousers were so tight, you could tell what religion he was".

    Replies: @Abe

    , @the one they call Desanex
    @Abe


    Probably the least heralded area of technological advancement of the last 30 or so years is all the gradual, incremental improvements in grooming, skincare, dentistry and minor corrective surgeries that have become common.
     
    I’ve been enjoying reruns of The Waltons on MeTV lately. I find the lank natural hair, pimples, and crooked teeth quite heartwarming. None of the Walton kids were prize-winners for beauty, but natural imperfection has a charm that fake beauty can’t match.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Known Fact

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Abe

    Does anybody remember laughter?

  36. @Jonathan Mason
    Biden as a young man was extraordinarily good looking, and no doubt that was a factor that steered him towards a career in politics, because he seems never to have been a policy heavyweight.

    But yeah, he did look like a sleaze bag in the '70s. So the true character of Biden-Kinnock was revealed.

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin, @Anon

    There’s a good chance that with the suit Biden has on in that picture he’s wearing a pair of patent leather shoes with matching belt. Though the change wasn’t immediate, one of the best effects of the Reagan era was society jettisoning the hideous fashions that had haunted the 70’s.

  37. @MEH 0910
    https://filmschoolrejects.com/john-cazales-unparalleled-cinematic-legacy/

    https://filmschoolrejects.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/john-cazale-dog-day-afternoon.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Peter D. Bredon, @Achmed E. Newman

    Joe would never rob a bank. He’s on the payroll.

    “You can steal more money with a Del. Senator than with a shotgun” — Al Capone

  38. @Abe
    @Rob McX


    Actually, men’s 1970s fashions and hairstyles tend to make guys look sleazy in retrospect.
     
    1976 may as well have been 476 in terms of hair technology. AMERICAN HUSTLE very knowingly goofed on men’s grooming and fashion from this era by making its two male A-list stars look as distasteful as possible, cramming Bradley Cooper into a ridiculous Jewfro in addition to a pair of ridiculously high-waisted, ridiculously-tight polyester disco pants. However I rest my case for why Christian Bale is the best actor of our era (yes, even better than Daniel Day-Lewis) by how in that flick he totally melts into the role of the sleezeball con artist with a comb-over (who else can do that AND own Batman?)

    The thing is- the large majority of people do not have the beautifully-symmetrical facial features necessary to pull off the simple hairstyles of that decade (basically long hair with a part right down the middle). Even the return of “Tin-Tin”/boy-band male hairstyles in the early Aughts, where product is used to sculpt hair into a semi-chaotic series of spiky ridges and wavy swoops, is a marked improvement as it distracts from the facial irregularities most people are burdened with.

    Probably the least heralded area of technological advancement of the last 30 or so years is all the gradual, incremental improvements in grooming, skincare, dentistry and minor corrective surgeries that have become common. Example- watched SCROOGED with my family right before Christmas. In HD. 2nd worst upgrade-to-HD viewing mistake I’ve ever made (worst being rewatching SONG REMAINS THE SAME and realizing Robert Plant definitely did not wear underwear in 1973). The craters on Murray’s face on a 70” TV in HD are so ginormous I was afraid I was going to lose my car keys in one of them. I am pretty sure I saw ST. VINCENT in HD and the pockmarks on his face are MUCH LESS pronounced, maybe even effectively gone, so clearly he had some sensible, corrective “work” done in that area over the last 10-15 years and like all the other advancements I’m thinking of was sensible, did its job fairly well, and did not draw undue attention to itself.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Reg Cæsar, @Londoner, @Rob McX, @the one they call Desanex, @ScarletNumber

    “The thing is- the large majority of people do not have the beautifully-symmetrical facial features necessary to pull off the simple hairstyles of that decade (basically long hair with a part right down the middle). ”

    True that. There’s a book called I think “Shag” that deals with the 70s and they made the illuminating point that everything was about “natural” which was interpreted to mean shaggy, from carpet (even in the bathroom; I’ve been in condos in NYC that survive from that era) to hair (face, head, and, um, elsewhere). Also avocado, banana and burnt sienna colors for furniture and appliances.

    I’m less outraged by 70s hairstyles, but improved dentistry is a no-brainer, a real deal-breaker for “let’s go back to the good old days” of the 60s or 1800s. I like to say that “Everyone is a Traditionalist until they need dental work.”

    I love Bill Murray but he’s just a mess. Maybe he didn’t have any work done and the makeup and camera work are what improved?

    • Replies: @Abe
    @James O'Meara


    I love Bill Murray but he’s just a mess. Maybe he didn’t have any work done and the makeup and camera work are what improved?
     
    Possibly. But cheap YUGE-screen TVs and HD/UHD resolution playback don’t leave much to the imagination. I already mentioned previously watching CASINO in UHD/4K (otherwise a gorgeous gorgeous transfer- cannot say enough of how wonderful the cinematography looks) and nearly barfing every time De Niro’s puckered, inflamed-looking cheek mole reared its ugly head in closeup.

    Recently we watched SPIDER-MAN FAR FROM HOME in mere HD and on the plane trip to Europe you can clearly see (despite DISNEY best-in-world production values) Tom Holland’s face (neck?) zit.
    , @Ozymandias
    @James O'Meara


    Also avocado, banana and burnt sienna colors for furniture and appliances.
     
    Avocado Green, Harvest Gold, Cerulean Blue. Dig it, man.
  39. Harry Dean Stanton as Joe today: “I feel like boiled crap.”

  40. @Buzz Mohawk
    So now it's time to make fun of a new president and move on as if nothing happened. Ha ha ha. We get it.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @James O'Meara, @Stan Adams

    Riffing on Joe is all we have left. Enjoy it while we can. Soon enough we’ll move into the “don’t be the first to stop clapping for Stalin” stage.

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk
  41. yeah, he looks like a lot of the characters in 70s, early 80s horror movies.

    Joe Biden is a fake tough guy, and somebody should have punched him in the mouth decades ago. would have saved us all so trouble.

    now he’s an old, pushy crook who will finishing destroying America for the left. a lifetime of getting away with running his mouth. at least it’s funny now when this stupid asshole starts blathering since he can barely get a sentence out.

  42. If the elderly Joe passes, will Kamala and the rest embark on a necrophilic cult, with Joe in a glass coffin displayed in a massive monument, like Lenin? To help smooth over the transition to the unwanted Kamala: “He never died. He guides us still.”

  43. I cant figure out how to add a picture to this blog for the life of me

  44. (One of more wholesome-looking shots of Diamond.)

    [MORE]
    (William Adolphe Bouguereau) (Past long hair era.)
    (Random unknown photo, saved from web at least a decade ago. Subject believed to be male.)

    • Thanks: kaganovitch
  45. Anon[389] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jonathan Mason
    Biden as a young man was extraordinarily good looking, and no doubt that was a factor that steered him towards a career in politics, because he seems never to have been a policy heavyweight.

    But yeah, he did look like a sleaze bag in the '70s. So the true character of Biden-Kinnock was revealed.

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin, @Anon

    Hair transplants are much better now, and Finasteride/Propecia which came out in the late 90s basically stops male pattern baldness. If he were younger he would’ve kept a full head of hair during his political career and not looked so sleazy. The sleazy look stems from him looking quite youthful while having significant hair loss, coupled with the 70s fashion for longer unkempt hair.

  46. @Abe
    @Rob McX


    Actually, men’s 1970s fashions and hairstyles tend to make guys look sleazy in retrospect.
     
    1976 may as well have been 476 in terms of hair technology. AMERICAN HUSTLE very knowingly goofed on men’s grooming and fashion from this era by making its two male A-list stars look as distasteful as possible, cramming Bradley Cooper into a ridiculous Jewfro in addition to a pair of ridiculously high-waisted, ridiculously-tight polyester disco pants. However I rest my case for why Christian Bale is the best actor of our era (yes, even better than Daniel Day-Lewis) by how in that flick he totally melts into the role of the sleezeball con artist with a comb-over (who else can do that AND own Batman?)

    The thing is- the large majority of people do not have the beautifully-symmetrical facial features necessary to pull off the simple hairstyles of that decade (basically long hair with a part right down the middle). Even the return of “Tin-Tin”/boy-band male hairstyles in the early Aughts, where product is used to sculpt hair into a semi-chaotic series of spiky ridges and wavy swoops, is a marked improvement as it distracts from the facial irregularities most people are burdened with.

    Probably the least heralded area of technological advancement of the last 30 or so years is all the gradual, incremental improvements in grooming, skincare, dentistry and minor corrective surgeries that have become common. Example- watched SCROOGED with my family right before Christmas. In HD. 2nd worst upgrade-to-HD viewing mistake I’ve ever made (worst being rewatching SONG REMAINS THE SAME and realizing Robert Plant definitely did not wear underwear in 1973). The craters on Murray’s face on a 70” TV in HD are so ginormous I was afraid I was going to lose my car keys in one of them. I am pretty sure I saw ST. VINCENT in HD and the pockmarks on his face are MUCH LESS pronounced, maybe even effectively gone, so clearly he had some sensible, corrective “work” done in that area over the last 10-15 years and like all the other advancements I’m thinking of was sensible, did its job fairly well, and did not draw undue attention to itself.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Reg Cæsar, @Londoner, @Rob McX, @the one they call Desanex, @ScarletNumber

    The thing is- the large majority of people do not have the beautifully-symmetrical facial features necessary to pull off the simple hairstyles of that decade (basically long hair with a part right down the middle).

    It is the Cadillac of men’s hairstyles. Literally:

  47. You forgot Brent Spiner in Night Court…

  48. Bandaid on top of the head is an underrated look.

  49. Here’s Trump in the same era and at about the same age. Therein explains a lot of the animosity.

  50. He doesn’t look too bad, he was good looking as a young man. The problem was the 70s.
    He should just have cut his hair short.
    If Joe Biden’s looks were our major problem…

  51. @Buzz Mohawk
    So now it's time to make fun of a new president and move on as if nothing happened. Ha ha ha. We get it.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @James O'Meara, @Stan Adams

    Der Bidenator offers plenty of (tragi)comedic material. The road ahead will be awfully bumpy, but it will be one hell of a ride.

    Say what you will about Joltin’ Joe, but he’s surprisingly photogenic:

    (Wrong organ, Joe. It’s your heart that’s supposed to bleed.)

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @Stan Adams

    Remember the mini series “V”? That first picture reminds me of one of the space lizards when they had part of their fake face ripped off.

    https://media.agonybooth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/21171127/v-the-original-miniseries-1983-splash.jpg

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    , @Adam Smith
    @Stan Adams

    https://i.postimg.cc/gkRWK1XK/joe.jpg

    https://i.postimg.cc/dVYKNnGc/kamala.jpg

    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    @Stan Adams

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-sFlsdoAgWu0/T6IcQK4x64I/AAAAAAAAA2E/_Y-CvKSrvYE/s1600/eye.jpg

  52. Creepy Joe today:

    • Replies: @Buck Ransom
    @turtle

    Saint Joe

  53. Bandaid on the head…maybe it was a result of Joe’s first attempt at hair plugs.

  54. @Abe
    @Rob McX


    Actually, men’s 1970s fashions and hairstyles tend to make guys look sleazy in retrospect.
     
    1976 may as well have been 476 in terms of hair technology. AMERICAN HUSTLE very knowingly goofed on men’s grooming and fashion from this era by making its two male A-list stars look as distasteful as possible, cramming Bradley Cooper into a ridiculous Jewfro in addition to a pair of ridiculously high-waisted, ridiculously-tight polyester disco pants. However I rest my case for why Christian Bale is the best actor of our era (yes, even better than Daniel Day-Lewis) by how in that flick he totally melts into the role of the sleezeball con artist with a comb-over (who else can do that AND own Batman?)

    The thing is- the large majority of people do not have the beautifully-symmetrical facial features necessary to pull off the simple hairstyles of that decade (basically long hair with a part right down the middle). Even the return of “Tin-Tin”/boy-band male hairstyles in the early Aughts, where product is used to sculpt hair into a semi-chaotic series of spiky ridges and wavy swoops, is a marked improvement as it distracts from the facial irregularities most people are burdened with.

    Probably the least heralded area of technological advancement of the last 30 or so years is all the gradual, incremental improvements in grooming, skincare, dentistry and minor corrective surgeries that have become common. Example- watched SCROOGED with my family right before Christmas. In HD. 2nd worst upgrade-to-HD viewing mistake I’ve ever made (worst being rewatching SONG REMAINS THE SAME and realizing Robert Plant definitely did not wear underwear in 1973). The craters on Murray’s face on a 70” TV in HD are so ginormous I was afraid I was going to lose my car keys in one of them. I am pretty sure I saw ST. VINCENT in HD and the pockmarks on his face are MUCH LESS pronounced, maybe even effectively gone, so clearly he had some sensible, corrective “work” done in that area over the last 10-15 years and like all the other advancements I’m thinking of was sensible, did its job fairly well, and did not draw undue attention to itself.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Reg Cæsar, @Londoner, @Rob McX, @the one they call Desanex, @ScarletNumber

    How would you rate Gary Oldman versus Christian Bale?

    • Replies: @Abe
    @Londoner


    How would you rate Gary Oldman versus Christian Bale?
     
    I love Gary Oldman! He also has an amazing ability to blend into a role (cf. his blackish pimp character in TRUE ROMANCE, or his equally wonderful- and wonderfully unrecognizable- performance in Coppola’s DRACULA). With that said he’s never been able to truly pull of the movie star bit and in recent years his performances have all had a sort of scene-chewy bluster to them, so despite his overall greatness (and in spite of his being ideologically one of us) I still have to give the edge to Bale.

    Replies: @Sick 'n Tired

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Londoner

    Both excellent actors, but Bale has played more diverse roles, in the old better sense of the word. Batman, Ford versus Ferrari, American Psycho, American Hustle, etc.

  55. So, when did Joe begin his hair implant therapy?

  56. @Abe
    @Rob McX


    Actually, men’s 1970s fashions and hairstyles tend to make guys look sleazy in retrospect.
     
    1976 may as well have been 476 in terms of hair technology. AMERICAN HUSTLE very knowingly goofed on men’s grooming and fashion from this era by making its two male A-list stars look as distasteful as possible, cramming Bradley Cooper into a ridiculous Jewfro in addition to a pair of ridiculously high-waisted, ridiculously-tight polyester disco pants. However I rest my case for why Christian Bale is the best actor of our era (yes, even better than Daniel Day-Lewis) by how in that flick he totally melts into the role of the sleezeball con artist with a comb-over (who else can do that AND own Batman?)

    The thing is- the large majority of people do not have the beautifully-symmetrical facial features necessary to pull off the simple hairstyles of that decade (basically long hair with a part right down the middle). Even the return of “Tin-Tin”/boy-band male hairstyles in the early Aughts, where product is used to sculpt hair into a semi-chaotic series of spiky ridges and wavy swoops, is a marked improvement as it distracts from the facial irregularities most people are burdened with.

    Probably the least heralded area of technological advancement of the last 30 or so years is all the gradual, incremental improvements in grooming, skincare, dentistry and minor corrective surgeries that have become common. Example- watched SCROOGED with my family right before Christmas. In HD. 2nd worst upgrade-to-HD viewing mistake I’ve ever made (worst being rewatching SONG REMAINS THE SAME and realizing Robert Plant definitely did not wear underwear in 1973). The craters on Murray’s face on a 70” TV in HD are so ginormous I was afraid I was going to lose my car keys in one of them. I am pretty sure I saw ST. VINCENT in HD and the pockmarks on his face are MUCH LESS pronounced, maybe even effectively gone, so clearly he had some sensible, corrective “work” done in that area over the last 10-15 years and like all the other advancements I’m thinking of was sensible, did its job fairly well, and did not draw undue attention to itself.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Reg Cæsar, @Londoner, @Rob McX, @the one they call Desanex, @ScarletNumber

    …(worst being rewatching SONG REMAINS THE SAME and realizing Robert Plant definitely did not wear underwear in 1973).

    Thanks for the warning, that’s definitely a film for me to avoid, especially if it’s remastered in HD. It reminds me of a line by some comedian, “His trousers were so tight, you could tell what religion he was”.

    • Replies: @Abe
    @Rob McX

    This is what I was referring to and you were imaging and the last thing you said you wanted to see, but... I can’t help myself.



    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=mqgyD_yTWCU

  57. @Abe
    @Rob McX


    Actually, men’s 1970s fashions and hairstyles tend to make guys look sleazy in retrospect.
     
    1976 may as well have been 476 in terms of hair technology. AMERICAN HUSTLE very knowingly goofed on men’s grooming and fashion from this era by making its two male A-list stars look as distasteful as possible, cramming Bradley Cooper into a ridiculous Jewfro in addition to a pair of ridiculously high-waisted, ridiculously-tight polyester disco pants. However I rest my case for why Christian Bale is the best actor of our era (yes, even better than Daniel Day-Lewis) by how in that flick he totally melts into the role of the sleezeball con artist with a comb-over (who else can do that AND own Batman?)

    The thing is- the large majority of people do not have the beautifully-symmetrical facial features necessary to pull off the simple hairstyles of that decade (basically long hair with a part right down the middle). Even the return of “Tin-Tin”/boy-band male hairstyles in the early Aughts, where product is used to sculpt hair into a semi-chaotic series of spiky ridges and wavy swoops, is a marked improvement as it distracts from the facial irregularities most people are burdened with.

    Probably the least heralded area of technological advancement of the last 30 or so years is all the gradual, incremental improvements in grooming, skincare, dentistry and minor corrective surgeries that have become common. Example- watched SCROOGED with my family right before Christmas. In HD. 2nd worst upgrade-to-HD viewing mistake I’ve ever made (worst being rewatching SONG REMAINS THE SAME and realizing Robert Plant definitely did not wear underwear in 1973). The craters on Murray’s face on a 70” TV in HD are so ginormous I was afraid I was going to lose my car keys in one of them. I am pretty sure I saw ST. VINCENT in HD and the pockmarks on his face are MUCH LESS pronounced, maybe even effectively gone, so clearly he had some sensible, corrective “work” done in that area over the last 10-15 years and like all the other advancements I’m thinking of was sensible, did its job fairly well, and did not draw undue attention to itself.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Reg Cæsar, @Londoner, @Rob McX, @the one they call Desanex, @ScarletNumber

    Probably the least heralded area of technological advancement of the last 30 or so years is all the gradual, incremental improvements in grooming, skincare, dentistry and minor corrective surgeries that have become common.

    I’ve been enjoying reruns of The Waltons on MeTV lately. I find the lank natural hair, pimples, and crooked teeth quite heartwarming. None of the Walton kids were prize-winners for beauty, but natural imperfection has a charm that fake beauty can’t match.

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @the one they call Desanex

    "None of the Walton kids were prize-winners for beauty, but natural imperfection has a charm that fake beauty can’t match." Didn't one of the daughters pose for Playboy?

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    , @Known Fact
    @the one they call Desanex


    I’ve been enjoying reruns of The Waltons on MeTV lately. I find the lank natural hair, pimples, and crooked teeth quite heartwarming.
     
    I think many older sports fans have a similar feeling -- ballplayers used to look more like common everyday schlubs, just really good at whatever sport they were playing. Now they're all so built, jacked and ripped.

    Also regarding the cosmetic improvements Abe mentions -- people back in the 70s (women especially) may have looked fine when young but usually did not age so well. Today you can age much more gracefully and attractively if you just take a little care of yourself.

  58. Joined the Army in 1976. The old black barber shaving our heads lamented the pitiful receding hairlines in young men caused by their long bouncy curls.

    You guys might enjoy the Grindhouse Movie trailer compilations on youtube.

  59. Joe rehearses his Inaugural Address. This is his “Ask not..” moment.

  60. As we move into the Biden era, I like to think of how Hillary must feel about all this. Joe Biden, a dummy, and Kamala Harris, a whore, will get to be President instead of her. It is salt in the wounds Trump inflicted on her.
    She will spend the remaining years of her life with bitter recriminations, popping pills to get through the day.
    This thought will be my consolation on Joe Biden’s inauguration day.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob, fish
    • Replies: @dearieme
    @rebel yell

    Careful! She still has two days to pull off a coup.

    , @Stan Adams
    @rebel yell

    Let's toast what might have been:



    Eat, drink, and be merry!

    https://i.ibb.co/0DLyRH7/hillary-wine-57a31dfbdb5ce963008b4a56.png

    "Mr. President, that's not lemonade. It's your urine sample."

    https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/joebiden-174447475-1588858911.jpg

  61. @Jack D
    It looks like a Band-Aid with a strand of hair stuck under it. Joe got drunk the night before and bashed his head. When he got home he put on a bandage but he was still a little drunk and didn't notice the strand of hair.

    It wouldn't be surprising if Joe took to drink after the loss of his wife and child but we never hear about this. Where are the "Joe drowned his sorrow in the bottle" stories? There are lots of Presidents who had alcoholics in their families or maybe drank a bit too much themselves. Northern Europeans have a tendency toward alcoholism, perhaps because, like Indians, alcohol was introduced to them relatively recently vs. the wine drinking peoples of the Mediterranean who have consumed wine (in moderation) since antiquity. Often (as in the case of Trump) they react by staying completely away from alcohol. What is the relationship between Joe and alcohol?

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Jonathan Mason, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Buffalo Joe, @Expletive Deleted

    Jack, I worked with lots of guys who liked to drink. Worked with only a few guys that could handle their drinks. Sad when mom comes to get dad at the local gin mill where he has been since work ended at 4:30 and the kids are in the station wagon hoping their drunken Irish Catholic ironworker dad doesn’t puke on the seats.

    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @Buffalo Joe

    "Mom called it 'the gene'"

    https://youtu.be/0-zFoQ2uJSc

    Suicide Kings is under-rated by the way.

  62. The Z-Man remarked last year that Joe Biden seems a guy perfectly suited to selling Cadillacs in Florida. That’s about the best summation I’ve heard.

    • Replies: @Curle
    @Darwin's Sh-tlist

    Weird he says that because when I think of a young Joe Biden I think of Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom the car salesman protagonist of John Updike’s 1960 novel Rabbit Run. Joe just seems to have that ‘what’s going on?’ look that I associate with Rabbit Angstrom.

  63. Haven’t been to my barber’s shop since March, but my Braun hair/beard trimmer works just fine and saves me $20 per visit. I do notice fewer comb-overs among today’s younger men. Now balding guys shave their heads, never saw that in my late twenties, early thirties.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Buffalo Joe

    George Clooney, who could certainly afford a haircut, revealed this year that he has been cutting his hair since forever with a Flowbee, a 1980s late night infomercial device which is a sort of a cross between a vacuum cleaner and a hair clipper. And his hair looks pretty good according to most ladies. Although I think that how well the device works might depend somewhat on the texture of your hair - just because it works for George doesn't mean it would work for you.

    https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/dec/04/go-with-the-flowbee-george-clooney-reveals-how-he-cuts-his-hair

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Buffalo Joe

    As I've mentioned here, I've been using a ManGroomer to maintain my "Buzz" since Corona-chan arrived. Saving the same $ as you. Very happy with it. Won't go back. My wife really likes it. No joke. That's what really matters.
    .

    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/S/aplus-media/vc/109af062-d058-4d2f-87e1-0c885c9cb1ab._SR970,300_.png

    , @Hockamaw
    @Buffalo Joe


    Haven’t been to my barber’s shop since March, but my Braun hair/beard trimmer works just fine and saves me $20 per visit.
     
    Same here, and we aren’t the only ones. Lot of guys never going back into a barber shop after COVID. Feel bad for the people who that’s their living, though. They’ve gotta be dying.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  64. @MEH 0910
    https://filmschoolrejects.com/john-cazales-unparalleled-cinematic-legacy/

    https://filmschoolrejects.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/john-cazale-dog-day-afternoon.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Peter D. Bredon, @Achmed E. Newman

    “Sal, Wyoming’s not a country.”

  65. @Bardon Kaldian
    Right about the 70's. I've seen Three Days of the Condor a few weeks ago. Unbelievable how the movie has aged. Conversations (especially Dunaway-Redford), pauses, fashion, music, ... atrocious.

    All the President’s Men is even worse (pompous Jason Robards).

    Very, very few movies from that era have survived.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Known Fact, @gepay, @Mr. Anon, @Ganderson, @Hiop, @Alden

    The 70s sucked. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise. That picture of Joe pretty much sums up the whole decade.

  66. anonymous[400] • Disclaimer says:

    He appears to have had a facelift fairly recently according to various interviewed cosmetic surgeons as one cruises the internet. Some feel it’s not a good one. To this viewer his eyes look beady and strange. This means he probably was planning to make a bid for the presidency and it was not the result of a spontaneous decision as this pathological liar has claimed. He’s just a cleaned up garbage can, a shined up exterior with garbage inside. Besides this he’s probably been getting some drugs to enhance his mental acuity for his public appearances such as in the debates. His mental decline will probably result in increasingly out of character behavior such as incoherent outbursts. He’s a real package.

    • Agree: Kolya Krassotkin
  67. Trump really ought to change his mind now and go to the inauguration. If the Secret Service declines to “let” him do it that would be even funnier. There needs to be more hysteria, not less. It hasn’t yet reached the truly useful level of hysteria out there.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  68. @nsa
    As the cliche goes, apples never fall far from the tree. JoeDepend's father was a car salesman, surprise surprise. DiaperDon's father, Fred, was a slumlord owning NY tenements. Woody Guthrie lived in one for awhile and even wrote a song entitled Old Man Trump. DiaperDon's grandfather, Friedrich, owned a whorehouse in a mining boomtown, Monte Cristo, located above Darrington in the Cascades. When the ore ran out, Friedrich relocated his whorehouse to the mining boom in Alaska. Monte Cristo is now a ghost town. You can still hike up to the remains along the former railroad right of way. It had an interesting lodge reclaimed by the vegetation, but some vandals burned it down 30 years ago.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    DiaperDon’s grandfather, Friedrich, owned a whorehouse in a mining boomtown, Monte Cristo, located above Darrington in the Cascades. When the ore ran out, Friedrich relocated his whorehouse to the mining boom in Alaska. Monte Cristo is now a ghost town. You can still hike up to the remains along the former railroad right of way. It had an interesting lodge reclaimed by the vegetation, but some vandals burned it down 30 years ago.

    I’m fascinated. Which local historian in Snohomish County, Washington maintains that Friedrich Trump’s business was a whorehouse? And who has demonstrated he ever lived in Alaska?

    Fred, was a slumlord owning NY tenements. Woody Guthrie

    Why would you take Woody Guthrie seriously? You mean slums like this?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Art Deco

    No one seriously disputes that Friedrich Trump was an innkeeper in the Klondike Gold Rush:

    https://www.bloomberg.com/features/2016-trump-family-fortune/

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/trump-canada-yukon-1.3235254

    https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2015/08/the-man-who-made-trump-who-he-is-121647

    Trump used to lie about being Swedish but AFAIK he's never denied Friedrich's well documented biography. (BTW, Friedrich tried to go back to Germany but they threw him out as a draft evader - history might have been different). BTW, Friedrich's partner in the hotel business was one Ernest Levin so the Trumps have rubbed shoulders with Jews in N. America right from the beginning. As was standard for frontier hotels, the Arctic would have also served as a restaurant, saloon and a whorehouse. The rooms (or cubicles - the Arctic was not very big) also featured scales so that the miners could pay for the lady's services in gold dust.


    I assume that Trump is proud of his enterprising grandfather who came to America a penniless immigrant and was able, using only his wits, to amass a sizable stake. Trump himself was in the hotel business and I'm sure that they weren't checking IDs to make sure that only married white Christian couples stayed at a Trump Hotel. There was a brief interlude perhaps from the 1st World War until the 1960s where hoteliers were concerned with respectability and making sure that no ladies of the evening or Jews or other undesirables stayed at their hotels, but in fact that was not the norm in American history and Trump has nothing to be ashamed of, not that the man has any sense of shame anyway.

    Replies: @Alden, @Buzz Mohawk

    , @nsa
    @Art Deco

    Hi, Art Deco. You can wiki Friedrich Trump and obtain a brief outline of the family history.......pimping and other sordid activities. Assume you are a local located in Snoho County...so greetings. Humble nsa is agnostic re politics, as voted Green Party. Reseeded clear cuts planting trees above Darrington many years ago, and hiked Monte Cristo several times. The best trek in the state is the Elwha River across the Olympic Range to the Hoh River. Have done it many times, with horses, on foot, once with Alpacas. Crowded now though. Takes at least three days but a last remaining wilderness trek.

  69. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Jack D


    It wouldn’t be surprising if Joe took to drink after the loss of his wife and child but we never hear about this. Where are the “Joe drowned his sorrow in the bottle” stories? There are lots of Presidents who had alcoholics in their families or maybe drank a bit too much themselves.
     
    IIRC, Biden is teetotal and drank a Non-Alcoholic Beer at the "Beer Summit" with that Cambridge Police Officer who responded to the Home of Henry Louis Gates. I don't know when or why, but it's been that way for quite a while. He would have been a natural fit with the Kennedy-Dodd Democratic Senate Party Caucus, but apparently didn't indulge.

    Northern Europeans have a tendency toward alcoholism, perhaps because, like Indians, alcohol was introduced to them relatively recently vs. the wine drinking peoples of the Mediterranean who have consumed wine (in moderation) since antiquity. Often (as in the case of Trump) they react by staying completely away from alcohol. What is the relationship between Joe and alcohol?
     
    This is incorrect. American Indians utterly lacked the enzymes to process alcohol, which Northern Europeans certainly do not lack. Northern Europeans have been making alcohol in various forms for as long as the Meds, but the theory goes that parts of Europe which were effectively colonized by the Romans introduced a moderate, wine drinking culture, while those parts which remained free of Roman rule or which were far away enough from Rome and later to Roman rule retained their extant binge drinking cultures where alcohol was produced from grains or fruits (beer, whiskey, schnaps, cider etc). There is, of course, overlap between these cultures in various parts of Europe.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Bardon Kaldian, @Observator

    beer, whiskey, schnaps, cider

    Of these, only beer and cider would have predated relatively modern times (12th to 15th century) when the still was introduced to Europe from the Arabs (the word alcohol itself is Arabic). Freeze distillation (true applejack) may have been done earlier in the cold northern lands but the concentration of alcohol is not as high as for true distillation, nor is it possible to remove impurities using freeze distillation, with the result that the stuff gives you a nasty hangover. While it is certainly possible to get drunk on cider and unhopped beer (hops are first mentioned in connection with brewing in the 9th century), distilled beverages get the job done a lot faster and lead to more alcoholism. The N. European working classes always drank but only after the introduction of distilled beverages such as gin, abisinthe, whiskey, rum, etc. did alcohol create a true “drug problem” in Europe.

    Beer was seen as almost a health beverage compared to gin which lead to debauchery:

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Jack D

    So, it's not true to say that alcohol was introduced to Northern Euros "relatively recently," even if you claim that 1,000 years ago was "recently" for the introduction of distilled spirits - because they of course had beers and the like much before that time. Hops is merely a flavoring, and does not contribute to alcohol content.

    Additionally, just because we use the Arabic loan word "alcohol" does not mean that the Arabs invented alcohol, much as the use of Arabic numerals doesn't mean that Arabs invented numbers. Meds tended to drink wine both before and after the widespread use of distillation for making spirits.

    And lastly, Gin isn't considered a health issue merely because it is distilled alcohol - rather, because Gin is heavy on added botanical flavors and additives unlike Whiskey, Gins sold on London streets likely were adulterated with harmful additives like turpentine.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    Didn't the Pilgrims carry beer on the Mayflower? Wasn't this customary on long sailing voyages at the time? I understand it was a way of maintaining a sanitary supply of water during ocean crossings, never mind the alcohol. If true, it's an interesting thought...

    Replies: @Cortes, @Jack D, @Expletive Deleted

    , @Alden
    @Jack D

    I dunno, there’s some evidence that the Irish Scots and Scandinavians were making some form of whiskey 2,000 years ago. Certainly the notorious Celt German drinking recorded by Greeks 2,500 years ago couldn’t have been beer and ale.

    being a historian I am very very very cynical about the Muslim Arabs invented everything lies. They blasted into the Mediterranean after the Justinian Plague and took over the legacy of Egypt Greece Carthage Rome etc. the Arabs were no more responsible for the prior achievements of civilizations they conquered than Raleigh and Rolfe were responsible for tobacco. Or the Spanish created potatoes tomatoes corn chili peppers etc.

    The Arabs invented everything is lies by the anti medieval catholic enlightenment Protestants with apologies to you anti White Jews and marxists. Even earlier the Greeks and Romans considered them barbarians

    The pre Roman conquest Celts of Austria had the exact same reaper McCormack re invented in the 1830s 40s.

    Replies: @Jack D

  70. My favorite Biden photo is the the lifeguard chair shot, where it looks like he’s declared himself King of Wakanda.

  71. @Polistra
    On second thought, it's way too easy, and the contest would never end.

    https://cloverchronicle.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Joe-Biden-Inappropriate-Behaviour.png

    Wow, look how old he looked before his latest round of surgeries. Whatever else you say about the man, he does have a good surgeon.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EPdtCLVWAAAffK7.jpg

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin

    Okay, Bobby. Show me on the doll where the President touched you.

  72. @Rob McX
    @Abe


    ...(worst being rewatching SONG REMAINS THE SAME and realizing Robert Plant definitely did not wear underwear in 1973).
     
    Thanks for the warning, that's definitely a film for me to avoid, especially if it's remastered in HD. It reminds me of a line by some comedian, "His trousers were so tight, you could tell what religion he was".

    Replies: @Abe

    This is what I was referring to and you were imaging and the last thing you said you wanted to see, but… I can’t help myself.

    [MORE]

    • LOL: Rob McX
  73. @Jack D
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)


    beer, whiskey, schnaps, cider
     
    Of these, only beer and cider would have predated relatively modern times (12th to 15th century) when the still was introduced to Europe from the Arabs (the word alcohol itself is Arabic). Freeze distillation (true applejack) may have been done earlier in the cold northern lands but the concentration of alcohol is not as high as for true distillation, nor is it possible to remove impurities using freeze distillation, with the result that the stuff gives you a nasty hangover. While it is certainly possible to get drunk on cider and unhopped beer (hops are first mentioned in connection with brewing in the 9th century), distilled beverages get the job done a lot faster and lead to more alcoholism. The N. European working classes always drank but only after the introduction of distilled beverages such as gin, abisinthe, whiskey, rum, etc. did alcohol create a true "drug problem" in Europe.

    Beer was seen as almost a health beverage compared to gin which lead to debauchery:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1e/Beer-street-and-Gin-lane.jpg

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Buzz Mohawk, @Alden

    So, it’s not true to say that alcohol was introduced to Northern Euros “relatively recently,” even if you claim that 1,000 years ago was “recently” for the introduction of distilled spirits – because they of course had beers and the like much before that time. Hops is merely a flavoring, and does not contribute to alcohol content.

    Additionally, just because we use the Arabic loan word “alcohol” does not mean that the Arabs invented alcohol, much as the use of Arabic numerals doesn’t mean that Arabs invented numbers. Meds tended to drink wine both before and after the widespread use of distillation for making spirits.

    And lastly, Gin isn’t considered a health issue merely because it is distilled alcohol – rather, because Gin is heavy on added botanical flavors and additives unlike Whiskey, Gins sold on London streets likely were adulterated with harmful additives like turpentine.

    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Right, the Arabs invented distillation, which I believe is what they called "al- cohol" (just winging it here). They were looking for ways to make perfumes and essential oils. It's sort of like the Chinese inventing gunpowder and using it for fireworks. It took the White man, like the ape in 2001, to figure out how to use them to make gin and guns so as to conquer the planet. Jury's still out on who was the wiser.

  74. @Art Deco
    @nsa

    DiaperDon’s grandfather, Friedrich, owned a whorehouse in a mining boomtown, Monte Cristo, located above Darrington in the Cascades. When the ore ran out, Friedrich relocated his whorehouse to the mining boom in Alaska. Monte Cristo is now a ghost town. You can still hike up to the remains along the former railroad right of way. It had an interesting lodge reclaimed by the vegetation, but some vandals burned it down 30 years ago.


    I'm fascinated. Which local historian in Snohomish County, Washington maintains that Friedrich Trump's business was a whorehouse? And who has demonstrated he ever lived in Alaska?



    Fred, was a slumlord owning NY tenements. Woody Guthrie

    Why would you take Woody Guthrie seriously? You mean slums like this?

    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2015/08/17/nyregion/18APPRAISAL1/18APPRAISAL1-master1050.jpg

    Replies: @Jack D, @nsa

    No one seriously disputes that Friedrich Trump was an innkeeper in the Klondike Gold Rush:

    https://www.bloomberg.com/features/2016-trump-family-fortune/

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/trump-canada-yukon-1.3235254

    https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2015/08/the-man-who-made-trump-who-he-is-121647

    Trump used to lie about being Swedish but AFAIK he’s never denied Friedrich’s well documented biography. (BTW, Friedrich tried to go back to Germany but they threw him out as a draft evader – history might have been different). BTW, Friedrich’s partner in the hotel business was one Ernest Levin so the Trumps have rubbed shoulders with Jews in N. America right from the beginning. As was standard for frontier hotels, the Arctic would have also served as a restaurant, saloon and a whorehouse. The rooms (or cubicles – the Arctic was not very big) also featured scales so that the miners could pay for the lady’s services in gold dust.

    I assume that Trump is proud of his enterprising grandfather who came to America a penniless immigrant and was able, using only his wits, to amass a sizable stake. Trump himself was in the hotel business and I’m sure that they weren’t checking IDs to make sure that only married white Christian couples stayed at a Trump Hotel. There was a brief interlude perhaps from the 1st World War until the 1960s where hoteliers were concerned with respectability and making sure that no ladies of the evening or Jews or other undesirables stayed at their hotels, but in fact that was not the norm in American history and Trump has nothing to be ashamed of, not that the man has any sense of shame anyway.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Jack D

    My grandfather went to the Alaska Gold rush and stayed in Alaska till about 1908. His name was mentioned in some newspaper articles as living in Dawson. I wonder if they ever met or my grandfather stayed in a Trump tavern or hotel. Or if my grandfather built any Trump hotels Then he went to San Francisco and caught the building boom after the fire. He was Canadian from Quebec. Decades later in the 1950s, he informed grandma that his Canadien wife had died. They were legally married but he was a bigamist all those years. Which explained why grandma never met any Canadian relatives. Quite a shock for a respectable lady. They snuck off to Tahoe for a quickie Nevada wedding big big secret.

    Most interesting ancestors are husband’s ancestor who came to San Francisco a little before the Gold Rush. He and his sister were very young teen orphans, like 14 and 15 in Boston. They had no money or relatives. Only future was her being a maid and him unskilled labor competing with the Irish. No money to buy an apprenticeship.

    They really wanted to go to Oregon. But had no money to join a wagon train or even get to St Louis. So the converted to Mormonism and joined a Mormon wagon train. The Mormons knew many of the converts only converted to get on a wagon train going west. So the real sincere Mormons kept guard at night to keep the false Mormons from deserting.

    They waited till the opportunity rose. They stole a string of horses and lit out for California with Mormons in pursuit. They ended up near San Jose and sold the horses. Then “ Gold!!! there’s gold st Sutter’s Mill!!!!” He went up to the mountains and mined gold.

    Then the most ballsy, macho job ever. He went to the Carson City silver strike and became a blaster. A blaster uses a hand drill to make a hole, puts a stick of dynamite in the hole and runs like hell before the dynamite goes off. He came back to San Francisco and somewhat settled down.

    They’re Scotch but obviously Viking descendants. Traced them back to the 1200s in Scotland. They were border bandit cattle rustlers extortionists kidnappers of heiresses and despised by both English and Scots governments. King James deported them to N Ireland 1610? to genocide the Catholic Irish. That was part of the deal for James to become king of England. Do something about the border bandits. N. Ireland must have been too civilized for them so they came to Massachusetts.

    Europeans never drank water. It caused at best diarrhea vomiting and stomach flu. At worst death from dysentery. So watered wine and weak beer was what they drank right up to 1900. There’s enough alcohol in like a 1 alcohol to 3 or 4 parts water to kill most of the germs. Imagine serving your 3 year olds weak beer and ale.

    Major reason the early American settlers thrived and had those big families was clean water and lots of almost free protein for the hunting.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D


    Trump has nothing to be ashamed of, not that the man has any sense of shame anyway.
     
    You know, Jack, that could be the man's epitaph -- deeply engraved and heavily layered with gold leaf, of course.

    Let's put that alongside another favorite, just for you, one mythically belonging to W.C. Fields but not actually appearing on his grave: "All in all, I'd rather be in Philadelphia."

  75. @Jack D
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)


    beer, whiskey, schnaps, cider
     
    Of these, only beer and cider would have predated relatively modern times (12th to 15th century) when the still was introduced to Europe from the Arabs (the word alcohol itself is Arabic). Freeze distillation (true applejack) may have been done earlier in the cold northern lands but the concentration of alcohol is not as high as for true distillation, nor is it possible to remove impurities using freeze distillation, with the result that the stuff gives you a nasty hangover. While it is certainly possible to get drunk on cider and unhopped beer (hops are first mentioned in connection with brewing in the 9th century), distilled beverages get the job done a lot faster and lead to more alcoholism. The N. European working classes always drank but only after the introduction of distilled beverages such as gin, abisinthe, whiskey, rum, etc. did alcohol create a true "drug problem" in Europe.

    Beer was seen as almost a health beverage compared to gin which lead to debauchery:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1e/Beer-street-and-Gin-lane.jpg

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Buzz Mohawk, @Alden

    Didn’t the Pilgrims carry beer on the Mayflower? Wasn’t this customary on long sailing voyages at the time? I understand it was a way of maintaining a sanitary supply of water during ocean crossings, never mind the alcohol. If true, it’s an interesting thought…

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Perhaps it was really small beer?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_beer

    Drinking untreated water would be a likely shortcut to severe health problems even for the hardy people who had reached the relatively safe age of 5 in the days of primitive sanitation. Hence the use of infusions and beer.

    The Armada survivor whose account of time in Ireland is preserved in “God’s Obvious Design” * remarked that nobody drank water despite it seeming to him to be the best he’d ever tasted - buttermilk was what everyone drank.

    * A collection of papers from a symposium in 1988, editor Patrick Gallagher.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @ScarletNumber

    , @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The beer ration on the Mayflower was a gallon per day per person. And not "small beer" which would not have withstood the voyage but full strength beer. Some believe that the Mayflower landed at Plymouth Rock because they were running out of beer. The captain needed enough beer to make it back home and was anxious to offload his passengers so he could begin the return voyage with enough beer in the hold to make it back. In the end, he ended up staying the winter because his crew (as well as the passengers) were devastated by disease. Only half the passengers were alive a year after they sailed.

    By the way, last November marked 400 years since the Pilgrims landed. There must have been massive celebrations of this momentous event in American history but I missed them because I was mourning a fentanyl addicted career criminal who ODed.

    Replies: @Alden, @Buzz Mohawk, @Johann Ricke, @danand

    , @Expletive Deleted
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The hipsters' favourite gargle, IPA, started off as India Pale Ale, or Export. Brewed as "dry" and low-sugar as they could to stop the constant agitation reinitiating fermentation onboard (with spectacular consequences), fined to try and get as much trub and yeast out and relatively heavily doped with expensive but mildly antibacteriological hops.

    It was supposed to withstand pitching about in one of His Majesty's foul "floating prisons" all the way round the Cape and across the ocean. In a fairly successful bid to keep the troops free of dysentery, which always incapacitated and even killed far more redcoats everywhere than any war.

    The sailors sanitised their frequently disgusting water ration with (compulsory) equal parts of (very strong) dark rum, which kept indefinitely, and of course the infamous limes, if available.

  76. @James O'Meara
    @Abe

    "The thing is- the large majority of people do not have the beautifully-symmetrical facial features necessary to pull off the simple hairstyles of that decade (basically long hair with a part right down the middle). "

    True that. There's a book called I think "Shag" that deals with the 70s and they made the illuminating point that everything was about "natural" which was interpreted to mean shaggy, from carpet (even in the bathroom; I've been in condos in NYC that survive from that era) to hair (face, head, and, um, elsewhere). Also avocado, banana and burnt sienna colors for furniture and appliances.

    I'm less outraged by 70s hairstyles, but improved dentistry is a no-brainer, a real deal-breaker for "let's go back to the good old days" of the 60s or 1800s. I like to say that "Everyone is a Traditionalist until they need dental work."

    I love Bill Murray but he's just a mess. Maybe he didn't have any work done and the makeup and camera work are what improved?

    Replies: @Abe, @Ozymandias

    I love Bill Murray but he’s just a mess. Maybe he didn’t have any work done and the makeup and camera work are what improved?

    Possibly. But cheap YUGE-screen TVs and HD/UHD resolution playback don’t leave much to the imagination. I already mentioned previously watching CASINO in UHD/4K (otherwise a gorgeous gorgeous transfer- cannot say enough of how wonderful the cinematography looks) and nearly barfing every time De Niro’s puckered, inflamed-looking cheek mole reared its ugly head in closeup.

    Recently we watched SPIDER-MAN FAR FROM HOME in mere HD and on the plane trip to Europe you can clearly see (despite DISNEY best-in-world production values) Tom Holland’s face (neck?) zit.

  77. Has anyone watched the new Night Stalker doc on Netflix? I found it funny that the two main detectives look better today (older, heavier, grayer or bald) than their vintage 70s looks. The famous Frank Salerno might as well be a different person. Amazing what a haircut and a decent suit can do for you.

  78. @Londoner
    @Abe

    How would you rate Gary Oldman versus Christian Bale?

    Replies: @Abe, @Jim Don Bob

    How would you rate Gary Oldman versus Christian Bale?

    I love Gary Oldman! He also has an amazing ability to blend into a role (cf. his blackish pimp character in TRUE ROMANCE, or his equally wonderful- and wonderfully unrecognizable- performance in Coppola’s DRACULA). With that said he’s never been able to truly pull of the movie star bit and in recent years his performances have all had a sort of scene-chewy bluster to them, so despite his overall greatness (and in spite of his being ideologically one of us) I still have to give the edge to Bale.

    • Replies: @Sick 'n Tired
    @Abe

    Gary Oldman is a great actor who seems to be able to morph into almost any role, Bale as a method actor changes his entire physical form for his roles, to the point he is almost unrecognizable. From becoming almost a human skeleton in the Machinist, a skinny crackhead in The Fighter, being in peak physical shape for 3 Batman films, to gaining 70lbs to play Dick Cheney, he takes the cake.

  79. @Buffalo Joe
    Haven't been to my barber's shop since March, but my Braun hair/beard trimmer works just fine and saves me $20 per visit. I do notice fewer comb-overs among today's younger men. Now balding guys shave their heads, never saw that in my late twenties, early thirties.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Buzz Mohawk, @Hockamaw

    George Clooney, who could certainly afford a haircut, revealed this year that he has been cutting his hair since forever with a Flowbee, a 1980s late night infomercial device which is a sort of a cross between a vacuum cleaner and a hair clipper. And his hair looks pretty good according to most ladies. Although I think that how well the device works might depend somewhat on the texture of your hair – just because it works for George doesn’t mean it would work for you.

    https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/dec/04/go-with-the-flowbee-george-clooney-reveals-how-he-cuts-his-hair

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Jack D

    I have been using a Flowbee for years. It's hard to get the back right because it's hard to see the back of your head, but it does an ok job.

    Clooney has such great hair he could use dull garden shears and he'd look fine.

  80. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Jack D


    It wouldn’t be surprising if Joe took to drink after the loss of his wife and child but we never hear about this. Where are the “Joe drowned his sorrow in the bottle” stories? There are lots of Presidents who had alcoholics in their families or maybe drank a bit too much themselves.
     
    IIRC, Biden is teetotal and drank a Non-Alcoholic Beer at the "Beer Summit" with that Cambridge Police Officer who responded to the Home of Henry Louis Gates. I don't know when or why, but it's been that way for quite a while. He would have been a natural fit with the Kennedy-Dodd Democratic Senate Party Caucus, but apparently didn't indulge.

    Northern Europeans have a tendency toward alcoholism, perhaps because, like Indians, alcohol was introduced to them relatively recently vs. the wine drinking peoples of the Mediterranean who have consumed wine (in moderation) since antiquity. Often (as in the case of Trump) they react by staying completely away from alcohol. What is the relationship between Joe and alcohol?
     
    This is incorrect. American Indians utterly lacked the enzymes to process alcohol, which Northern Europeans certainly do not lack. Northern Europeans have been making alcohol in various forms for as long as the Meds, but the theory goes that parts of Europe which were effectively colonized by the Romans introduced a moderate, wine drinking culture, while those parts which remained free of Roman rule or which were far away enough from Rome and later to Roman rule retained their extant binge drinking cultures where alcohol was produced from grains or fruits (beer, whiskey, schnaps, cider etc). There is, of course, overlap between these cultures in various parts of Europe.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Bardon Kaldian, @Observator

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Bardon Kaldian

    This is probably also a sex thing. (BTW I don't like to use the word "gender," which concerns grammar and, increasingly, ridiculous political and academic ideas, when I mean male and female.)

    So, to reiterate, this is probably also a male/female thing. It would be interesting to see a breakdown of the two.

    Women tend to prefer things like wine when men drink spirits. My wife will enjoy a chardonnay while I sip bourbon. That is typical.

    It's like cigars: you can imagine a man relaxing with one, as I used to do quite a bit, but not a woman, even though there is nothing preventing a woman from smoking a cigar except cultural norms. The same is true for spirits, though perhaps not as much. (In fact, I know that Hungarian women enjoy their palinka, which is basically a fruit spirit equivalent in strength to vodka.)

    Today in the US, though, you can bet money that women are very big on white wine. That is a big trend now. We men, on the other hand, are still enjoying our beers whiskeys.

    Tucker Carlson, to his credit, recently mentioned "angry wine ladies in yoga pants." My wife and I laughed together at that, because those women live here, and because even my wife sometimes, she admits, matches that description. Personally, I like the yoga pants part.

  81. @Bardon Kaldian
    Right about the 70's. I've seen Three Days of the Condor a few weeks ago. Unbelievable how the movie has aged. Conversations (especially Dunaway-Redford), pauses, fashion, music, ... atrocious.

    All the President’s Men is even worse (pompous Jason Robards).

    Very, very few movies from that era have survived.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Known Fact, @gepay, @Mr. Anon, @Ganderson, @Hiop, @Alden

    Very, very few movies from that era have survived.

    I don’t know — 1974 for example is pretty stacked

    https://www.imdb.com/list/ls062523318/

  82. @Buffalo Joe
    Haven't been to my barber's shop since March, but my Braun hair/beard trimmer works just fine and saves me $20 per visit. I do notice fewer comb-overs among today's younger men. Now balding guys shave their heads, never saw that in my late twenties, early thirties.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Buzz Mohawk, @Hockamaw

    As I’ve mentioned here, I’ve been using a ManGroomer to maintain my “Buzz” since Corona-chan arrived. Saving the same $ as you. Very happy with it. Won’t go back. My wife really likes it. No joke. That’s what really matters.
    .

  83. @Londoner
    @Abe

    How would you rate Gary Oldman versus Christian Bale?

    Replies: @Abe, @Jim Don Bob

    Both excellent actors, but Bale has played more diverse roles, in the old better sense of the word. Batman, Ford versus Ferrari, American Psycho, American Hustle, etc.

  84. @Buffalo Joe
    Haven't been to my barber's shop since March, but my Braun hair/beard trimmer works just fine and saves me $20 per visit. I do notice fewer comb-overs among today's younger men. Now balding guys shave their heads, never saw that in my late twenties, early thirties.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Buzz Mohawk, @Hockamaw

    Haven’t been to my barber’s shop since March, but my Braun hair/beard trimmer works just fine and saves me $20 per visit.

    Same here, and we aren’t the only ones. Lot of guys never going back into a barber shop after COVID. Feel bad for the people who that’s their living, though. They’ve gotta be dying.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Hockamaw

    My barber was trying to retire anyway. A guy in his seventies who restores Corvette cars, he was having trouble finding a young man to take on loyal customers like me. He just couldn't quit on us. This has given him the opportunity.

    God bless him, and Bye Bye to another piece of American Pie.
    .
    https://s1.cdn.autoevolution.com/images/news/gallery/tuxedo-black-1967-chevrolet-corvette-l88-convertible-is-the-only-one-of-its-kind_18.jpg
    Yes, I know Joe Biden has one, but so does my barber, and it looks just like this, side pipes and all.

    Replies: @danand

  85. @Jack D
    @Buffalo Joe

    George Clooney, who could certainly afford a haircut, revealed this year that he has been cutting his hair since forever with a Flowbee, a 1980s late night infomercial device which is a sort of a cross between a vacuum cleaner and a hair clipper. And his hair looks pretty good according to most ladies. Although I think that how well the device works might depend somewhat on the texture of your hair - just because it works for George doesn't mean it would work for you.

    https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/dec/04/go-with-the-flowbee-george-clooney-reveals-how-he-cuts-his-hair

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    I have been using a Flowbee for years. It’s hard to get the back right because it’s hard to see the back of your head, but it does an ok job.

    Clooney has such great hair he could use dull garden shears and he’d look fine.

  86. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    Didn't the Pilgrims carry beer on the Mayflower? Wasn't this customary on long sailing voyages at the time? I understand it was a way of maintaining a sanitary supply of water during ocean crossings, never mind the alcohol. If true, it's an interesting thought...

    Replies: @Cortes, @Jack D, @Expletive Deleted

    Perhaps it was really small beer?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_beer

    Drinking untreated water would be a likely shortcut to severe health problems even for the hardy people who had reached the relatively safe age of 5 in the days of primitive sanitation. Hence the use of infusions and beer.

    The Armada survivor whose account of time in Ireland is preserved in “God’s Obvious Design” * remarked that nobody drank water despite it seeming to him to be the best he’d ever tasted – buttermilk was what everyone drank.

    * A collection of papers from a symposium in 1988, editor Patrick Gallagher.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Cortes

    Interesting. Thanks!

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Cortes

    I don't drink water; fish fuck in it.

  87. @Hockamaw
    @Buffalo Joe


    Haven’t been to my barber’s shop since March, but my Braun hair/beard trimmer works just fine and saves me $20 per visit.
     
    Same here, and we aren’t the only ones. Lot of guys never going back into a barber shop after COVID. Feel bad for the people who that’s their living, though. They’ve gotta be dying.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    My barber was trying to retire anyway. A guy in his seventies who restores Corvette cars, he was having trouble finding a young man to take on loyal customers like me. He just couldn’t quit on us. This has given him the opportunity.

    God bless him, and Bye Bye to another piece of American Pie.
    .

    Yes, I know Joe Biden has one, but so does my barber, and it looks just like this, side pipes and all.

    • Replies: @danand
    @Buzz Mohawk

    “...I know Joe Biden has one...”

    Fortunately Joe can no longer recall where he left the keys.

    https://flic.kr/p/2ktCJma

  88. @Cortes
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Perhaps it was really small beer?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_beer

    Drinking untreated water would be a likely shortcut to severe health problems even for the hardy people who had reached the relatively safe age of 5 in the days of primitive sanitation. Hence the use of infusions and beer.

    The Armada survivor whose account of time in Ireland is preserved in “God’s Obvious Design” * remarked that nobody drank water despite it seeming to him to be the best he’d ever tasted - buttermilk was what everyone drank.

    * A collection of papers from a symposium in 1988, editor Patrick Gallagher.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @ScarletNumber

    Interesting. Thanks!

  89. @Stan Adams
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Der Bidenator offers plenty of (tragi)comedic material. The road ahead will be awfully bumpy, but it will be one hell of a ride.

    Say what you will about Joltin' Joe, but he's surprisingly photogenic:

    https://www.scriberrnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/feat.jpg

    (Wrong organ, Joe. It's your heart that's supposed to bleed.)

    https://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/b1a0707fa083879dc67c4841440e3015b4123a03/c=0-374-3745-2490/local/-/media/2017/06/26/Wilmington/Wilmington/636340820833333076-062617-BidenPool-SP729.JPG

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/11/20/14/35913026-8970247-image-m-4_1605882769599.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @Adam Smith, @Hippopotamusdrome

    Remember the mini series “V”? That first picture reminds me of one of the space lizards when they had part of their fake face ripped off.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Mike Tre

    David Icke is vindicated yet again!

  90. @Stan Adams
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Der Bidenator offers plenty of (tragi)comedic material. The road ahead will be awfully bumpy, but it will be one hell of a ride.

    Say what you will about Joltin' Joe, but he's surprisingly photogenic:

    https://www.scriberrnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/feat.jpg

    (Wrong organ, Joe. It's your heart that's supposed to bleed.)

    https://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/b1a0707fa083879dc67c4841440e3015b4123a03/c=0-374-3745-2490/local/-/media/2017/06/26/Wilmington/Wilmington/636340820833333076-062617-BidenPool-SP729.JPG

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/11/20/14/35913026-8970247-image-m-4_1605882769599.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @Adam Smith, @Hippopotamusdrome

  91. @Thirdtwin
    Early concerns about aneurysms?

    Anyway...the 70’s were a bad time for balding guys. They compensated with massive sideburns and proto-mullets, combined with the paleo combover. But I don’t know if that was any worse than today’s Scrubbing Bubble look, with the bushy beard and shiny, shaven dome.

    Replies: @Muggles

    But I don’t know if that was any worse than today’s Scrubbing Bubble look, with the bushy beard and shiny, shaven dome.

    Don’t forget the Man Buns, Mohawks, etc.

    Who knew Mad Max was the cinematic predictor of 21st century men’s fashion?

  92. @the one they call Desanex
    @Abe


    Probably the least heralded area of technological advancement of the last 30 or so years is all the gradual, incremental improvements in grooming, skincare, dentistry and minor corrective surgeries that have become common.
     
    I’ve been enjoying reruns of The Waltons on MeTV lately. I find the lank natural hair, pimples, and crooked teeth quite heartwarming. None of the Walton kids were prize-winners for beauty, but natural imperfection has a charm that fake beauty can’t match.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Known Fact

    “None of the Walton kids were prize-winners for beauty, but natural imperfection has a charm that fake beauty can’t match.” Didn’t one of the daughters pose for Playboy?

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Ron Mexico

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judy_Norton_Taylor


    Judy Norton (born January 29, 1958) is an American actress and theater director who is best known for her role as Mary Ellen Walton on The Waltons television series and subsequent Waltons TV movies.
    [...]
    Still being viewed as a child actress in her early 20s, Norton posed nude for the August 1985 issue of Playboy in a bid to shed her wholesome "family" image.
     

    http://www.allaboutthewaltons.com/cast/JudyNorton-Playboy.php

    http://www.allaboutthewaltons.com/cast/CastPics/playboy_08_1985.jpg

    http://www.allaboutthewaltons.com/cast/CastPics/playboy_pic1.jpg

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

  93. @Art Deco
    @nsa

    DiaperDon’s grandfather, Friedrich, owned a whorehouse in a mining boomtown, Monte Cristo, located above Darrington in the Cascades. When the ore ran out, Friedrich relocated his whorehouse to the mining boom in Alaska. Monte Cristo is now a ghost town. You can still hike up to the remains along the former railroad right of way. It had an interesting lodge reclaimed by the vegetation, but some vandals burned it down 30 years ago.


    I'm fascinated. Which local historian in Snohomish County, Washington maintains that Friedrich Trump's business was a whorehouse? And who has demonstrated he ever lived in Alaska?



    Fred, was a slumlord owning NY tenements. Woody Guthrie

    Why would you take Woody Guthrie seriously? You mean slums like this?

    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2015/08/17/nyregion/18APPRAISAL1/18APPRAISAL1-master1050.jpg

    Replies: @Jack D, @nsa

    Hi, Art Deco. You can wiki Friedrich Trump and obtain a brief outline of the family history…….pimping and other sordid activities. Assume you are a local located in Snoho County…so greetings. Humble nsa is agnostic re politics, as voted Green Party. Reseeded clear cuts planting trees above Darrington many years ago, and hiked Monte Cristo several times. The best trek in the state is the Elwha River across the Olympic Range to the Hoh River. Have done it many times, with horses, on foot, once with Alpacas. Crowded now though. Takes at least three days but a last remaining wilderness trek.

  94. @Hockamaw
    Objectively, the best photo of Joe Biden is that photo of him campaigning at a pool in a black area of Delaware and he’s climbed up on the lifeguard stand like a tribal god surrounded by a huge mass of adoring Afro-Americans.

    https://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/077f5b4a3e7b4c07625bbff10f5591025cb8df44/c=193-0-3518-2500/local/-/media/2017/06/26/Wilmington/Wilmington/636340820833333076-062617-BidenPool-SP729.JPG?width=520&height=390&fit=crop

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @James O'Meara, @Rob (London)

    Apocalypse Now — The Comedy

  95. @Bardon Kaldian
    Right about the 70's. I've seen Three Days of the Condor a few weeks ago. Unbelievable how the movie has aged. Conversations (especially Dunaway-Redford), pauses, fashion, music, ... atrocious.

    All the President’s Men is even worse (pompous Jason Robards).

    Very, very few movies from that era have survived.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Known Fact, @gepay, @Mr. Anon, @Ganderson, @Hiop, @Alden

    Bardon Kaldian
    Isn’t it amazing how Chinatown has more than survived. Polanksk is one sleazy male who you wouldn’t want your daughter to marry but at least he directed some really good movies.

  96. @Hockamaw
    Objectively, the best photo of Joe Biden is that photo of him campaigning at a pool in a black area of Delaware and he’s climbed up on the lifeguard stand like a tribal god surrounded by a huge mass of adoring Afro-Americans.

    https://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/077f5b4a3e7b4c07625bbff10f5591025cb8df44/c=193-0-3518-2500/local/-/media/2017/06/26/Wilmington/Wilmington/636340820833333076-062617-BidenPool-SP729.JPG?width=520&height=390&fit=crop

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @James O'Meara, @Rob (London)

    “Now he’s crossed to Cambodia with his Montagnard army, who worship the man, like a god, and follow every order however ridiculous.”

  97. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    This is more a culture thing ...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcohol_preferences_in_Europe

    https://i.redd.it/gh0jl51b28k11.png

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    This is probably also a sex thing. (BTW I don’t like to use the word “gender,” which concerns grammar and, increasingly, ridiculous political and academic ideas, when I mean male and female.)

    So, to reiterate, this is probably also a male/female thing. It would be interesting to see a breakdown of the two.

    Women tend to prefer things like wine when men drink spirits. My wife will enjoy a chardonnay while I sip bourbon. That is typical.

    It’s like cigars: you can imagine a man relaxing with one, as I used to do quite a bit, but not a woman, even though there is nothing preventing a woman from smoking a cigar except cultural norms. The same is true for spirits, though perhaps not as much. (In fact, I know that Hungarian women enjoy their palinka, which is basically a fruit spirit equivalent in strength to vodka.)

    Today in the US, though, you can bet money that women are very big on white wine. That is a big trend now. We men, on the other hand, are still enjoying our beers whiskeys.

    Tucker Carlson, to his credit, recently mentioned “angry wine ladies in yoga pants.” My wife and I laughed together at that, because those women live here, and because even my wife sometimes, she admits, matches that description. Personally, I like the yoga pants part.

  98. @Known Fact
    @Rob McX

    Much of the fun in watching 1970ish TV shows is seeing the sideburns sprout, the hair become longer and fluffier, and men's ties, lapels and shirt collars widen to absurd lengths. I think the Rubicon was crossed the day Robert (Brady Bunch) Reed showed up with a perm

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8c/The_Brady_Bunch_Robert_Reed_Florence_Henderson_1973_%28cropped%29.jpg

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    What they did to the Mad Men cast was downright cruel.

    Even sophisticated Roger was affected, though they did give him a slutty French wife for his retirement.

    But worst of all, Pete Campbell turned into Joe Biden

  99. • LOL: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Peter D. Bredon

    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/M/MV5BM2M3YWRkN2Mt[email protected]._V1_.jpg

    Replies: @Trinity

  100. @Buffalo Joe
    @Jack D

    Jack, I worked with lots of guys who liked to drink. Worked with only a few guys that could handle their drinks. Sad when mom comes to get dad at the local gin mill where he has been since work ended at 4:30 and the kids are in the station wagon hoping their drunken Irish Catholic ironworker dad doesn't puke on the seats.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

    “Mom called it ‘the gene’”

    Suicide Kings is under-rated by the way.

  101. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Jack D

    So, it's not true to say that alcohol was introduced to Northern Euros "relatively recently," even if you claim that 1,000 years ago was "recently" for the introduction of distilled spirits - because they of course had beers and the like much before that time. Hops is merely a flavoring, and does not contribute to alcohol content.

    Additionally, just because we use the Arabic loan word "alcohol" does not mean that the Arabs invented alcohol, much as the use of Arabic numerals doesn't mean that Arabs invented numbers. Meds tended to drink wine both before and after the widespread use of distillation for making spirits.

    And lastly, Gin isn't considered a health issue merely because it is distilled alcohol - rather, because Gin is heavy on added botanical flavors and additives unlike Whiskey, Gins sold on London streets likely were adulterated with harmful additives like turpentine.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

    Right, the Arabs invented distillation, which I believe is what they called “al- cohol” (just winging it here). They were looking for ways to make perfumes and essential oils. It’s sort of like the Chinese inventing gunpowder and using it for fireworks. It took the White man, like the ape in 2001, to figure out how to use them to make gin and guns so as to conquer the planet. Jury’s still out on who was the wiser.

  102. @rebel yell
    As we move into the Biden era, I like to think of how Hillary must feel about all this. Joe Biden, a dummy, and Kamala Harris, a whore, will get to be President instead of her. It is salt in the wounds Trump inflicted on her.
    She will spend the remaining years of her life with bitter recriminations, popping pills to get through the day.
    This thought will be my consolation on Joe Biden's inauguration day.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Stan Adams

    Careful! She still has two days to pull off a coup.

  103. I presume that when he married Dr. Jill in 1977 she started to exercise a salutary influence over his grooming.

    Did she talk him into the hair plugs and face lifts?

  104. @the one they call Desanex
    @Abe


    Probably the least heralded area of technological advancement of the last 30 or so years is all the gradual, incremental improvements in grooming, skincare, dentistry and minor corrective surgeries that have become common.
     
    I’ve been enjoying reruns of The Waltons on MeTV lately. I find the lank natural hair, pimples, and crooked teeth quite heartwarming. None of the Walton kids were prize-winners for beauty, but natural imperfection has a charm that fake beauty can’t match.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Known Fact

    I’ve been enjoying reruns of The Waltons on MeTV lately. I find the lank natural hair, pimples, and crooked teeth quite heartwarming.

    I think many older sports fans have a similar feeling — ballplayers used to look more like common everyday schlubs, just really good at whatever sport they were playing. Now they’re all so built, jacked and ripped.

    Also regarding the cosmetic improvements Abe mentions — people back in the 70s (women especially) may have looked fine when young but usually did not age so well. Today you can age much more gracefully and attractively if you just take a little care of yourself.

  105. My Favorite Joe Biden Photo

    This is a better shot:

    • LOL: Mr. Anon
  106. @rebel yell
    As we move into the Biden era, I like to think of how Hillary must feel about all this. Joe Biden, a dummy, and Kamala Harris, a whore, will get to be President instead of her. It is salt in the wounds Trump inflicted on her.
    She will spend the remaining years of her life with bitter recriminations, popping pills to get through the day.
    This thought will be my consolation on Joe Biden's inauguration day.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Stan Adams

    Let’s toast what might have been:

    [MORE]

    Eat, drink, and be merry!

    “Mr. President, that’s not lemonade. It’s your urine sample.”

  107. @Ron Mexico
    @the one they call Desanex

    "None of the Walton kids were prize-winners for beauty, but natural imperfection has a charm that fake beauty can’t match." Didn't one of the daughters pose for Playboy?

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judy_Norton_Taylor

    Judy Norton (born January 29, 1958) is an American actress and theater director who is best known for her role as Mary Ellen Walton on The Waltons television series and subsequent Waltons TV movies.
    […]
    Still being viewed as a child actress in her early 20s, Norton posed nude for the August 1985 issue of Playboy in a bid to shed her wholesome “family” image.

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @MEH 0910

    yeah, that's her. the "spread" wasn't bad.

  108. @Peter D. Bredon
    https://cloudimages.broadwayworld.com/upload10/945398/Screen%20Shot%202015-03-10%20at%202_50_38%20PM.jpg

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    • Replies: @Trinity
    @MEH 0910

    lolol. Oh sheeit, that there is epic and that there is Joe. I think that thing has more hair than Joe, however.

  109. Why don’t men who have lost as much hair as Biden just shave their head? The people here saying that Biden was a good looking man when he was younger? ROTFLMMFWAO. Elvis Presley was a good looking man, no homo of course. Lets see, Tom Selleck and Burt Reynolds ( with a rug on his head) was a good looking man. Donald Trump was AVERAGE in appearance when he was younger and if he wasn’t loaded he wouldn’t get a second look from someone like Melania. Joe Biden? Dude, you could give that guy Michael Landon’s hair and he still wouldn’t look good. Of course Michael Landon could have wore a piece as well. I never knew John Wayne wore a rug. When I was younger I always wanted hair like Jack Lord of Hawaii Five-O. Come to find out, good ole Jack wore a rug as well. haha.IF someone has a head of hair that looks too good to be true, often it is because they have a rug on their head. Yul Brenner, Telly Savalas, and Jason Statham are just a few guys that can pull off the cue ball look. Hair or no hair wasn’t or isn’t going to make Joe good looking.

  110. @MEH 0910
    @Peter D. Bredon

    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/M/MV5BM2M3YWRkN2Mt[email protected]._V1_.jpg

    Replies: @Trinity

    lolol. Oh sheeit, that there is epic and that there is Joe. I think that thing has more hair than Joe, however.

  111. Rush refers to Joe as “plugs”…..

  112. @Mike Tre
    @Stan Adams

    Remember the mini series “V”? That first picture reminds me of one of the space lizards when they had part of their fake face ripped off.

    https://media.agonybooth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/21171127/v-the-original-miniseries-1983-splash.jpg

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    David Icke is vindicated yet again!

  113. @Johnny Smoggins
    Up until just a few years ago Biden looked great for a man his age. Now he has that hoary, wasted, vacant look that anyone with a fading elderly relative has seen before. The White House will be receiving deliveries of Depends by the pallet.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

    Whory and wasted? Sounds like some of my best weekends as a single guy.

  114. The Bidenbot has the bearing of a decisive leader:

    Women want him and men want to be him:

    Hail to the chief!

  115. I presume that when he married Dr. Jill in 1977 she started to exercise a salutary influence over his grooming.

    Yes, but it took a while.

    They were married on June 17 . This was taken on June 28:

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Stan Adams

    Thanks.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    , @MEH 0910
    @Stan Adams

    Lost Video Of Joe Biden Expressing His Segregationist Anti-Busing Views To The Media In 1977
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S970NoYPKWs


    Lost Video Of Joe Biden Expressing His Segregationist Anti-Busing Views To The Media In 1977

    Follow ThePoliClips on Twitter:
    https://twitter.com/THEPOLICLIPS
     

    https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/video/joe-biden-school-busing-amendment-1977-64016335

    Transcript for What Joe Biden said about school busing amendment in 1977

    The net effect is that there are will be fewer children. Reassigned schools. Ostensibly because. Findings by EGW Department of Education welfare but there's an imbalance in their school system. Misnomer that most people haven't they think most children that are being called bus are being bused to constitute as a consequence the court orders and that's just not true. There are more children on buses. As a consequence of eight GW's threats to withhold funds. To a school district unless they and there are as a consequence the court order. And it and that's why I think that that senator broke with justifiably concerned about him if you were proponent of busing. You should be worried about. Quote victory because it as. A much broader effect than most people think it had. Or. And court. It. More court ordered. I. I think not because this so called Byrd amendment which was an outgrowth of the so called Hyde amendment. Stood for almost two years about one challenge to it. And then on May 25 the attorney general of the United States of America wrote an opinion saying that it didn't have any effect. But everyone thought it had the effect and it stopped HEW from being involved in. Threatening to withhold funds they didn't do that anymore for the past two years in knowing challenge that not that I'm aware. On at least there was no court that ordered busing as a consequence of any challenge so the I think that is you know. That's a re hearing it's just not the case at least it wasn't for the past eighteen months to years I don't think it should be left to any bureaucrat any agency including even if a word the Justice Department which is the legal arm of the executive branch to make a determination the constitutional violation exists. Without having to make that judgment and go through a court to get that determination. You think president made by GW where no grievance seasons. I don't know I you know it depends on who will who says his agreements HEW they're very there's agreements someone complains or HEW administrator goes in and says. We think there's an imbalance or we think HEW. Thinks that there's a constitutional violation. All I'm saying is off Tom Eagleton said senator Eagleton said was HE WS no power to. And that is a power that should not be given to a bureaucratic gates we have courts there the district court any individual. Any school district any group of people can go into a federal district court and say we believe there's a constitutional violation the court decide. Are you infinity ego thing the court to Delaware. Hillary. Should be laughing. You would never vote for the game favorite goes do. Yes that is correct if they decided under the present ruling the Supreme Court which says the most recent ruling as a yes they would says there must be finding of signatory intent to discriminate. Very good. Or surety but that's for the course of the site is in. Network that's the whole issue the court. Yesterday if you I still oppose it yes because it is not in line with. The highest court in the lands ruling. A district court would be abusing their discretion if they did not find in my opinion clearly now under that. Under the cases of yesterday the last day in an opinion say. We specifically far too with the specifics angered Torre intent on the part of XYZ. To preclude. Blacks or Spanish speaking Americans or whomever from attending. This school therefore their constitutional rights were violated look folks we keep talking about this thing is being north vs south that's not the issue. It is rural vs urban and most of the Boston is taking place today is taking place in rural areas whether it be administratively ordered or court order. Now we're moving into applying the same standards to urban areas and is a standard that doesn't make sense it doesn't apply it doesn't hold. We're moving from trying to in this in in in urban areas we've had its integrated facilities but segregated neighborhoods. In an rural Ares we've traditionally had integrated neighborhood that segregated facilities. And to apply the same standard the same test for this north south thing is not really the issue. As professor Nathan Glazer at Harvard is indicated as doctor. Armored Rand Corp. James Coleman it. I just tell three days a year into today's hearings in Judiciary Committee and another bill life beyond this deal is bus. And there a uniform opinion of those testified that it is not a north south it's an urban rural question distinction. But you're everywhere your intent there're going to be. Segregated saying it. The question race you sat back movement. Desegregation and school when humans. Anyway answer that is I predict that the young black leadership of America will overwhelming to decide with me. I predict that in 1980. And 84 in my position will be totally vindicated by the sociologist and buys Civil Rights Act not come from that side of the track. That's where I'm from I was a defense lawyer I am a civil rights cases I sat in on route forty I mean not you know I'm not an a from the other side of this. And I happen to think that the one way to be ensure that you sent to civil rights movement in America further back is to continue to push bossy. Because it's a bankrupt policy. And that's that's that's that that's why I think will be vindicated I don't I don't include myself with pro or anti busing fourth I think the only group that can determine. Whether or not a constitutional violation existed the federal courts the United States America no one else has that right secondly. A federal court the United States American determining a violation. Of the constitution with regard school desegregation cases must find. That there is a specific intent to segregate before they can order bus. That I abide by that I legislate by that I hold up. And there's there the standards we should prepare to who. It's difficult to establish intent but it's clearly possible factually can be established the court has the Supreme Court 820. Eight to zero ruled yesterday that they must find. And you very well knows this carpet covering this area's long as you have that. There is there aren't legal standards by which you bring in burdens of proof to establish whether or not there was a specific intent. And a court confined.

    This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.
     

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Curle, @AceDeuce

  116. @MEH 0910
    @Ron Mexico

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judy_Norton_Taylor


    Judy Norton (born January 29, 1958) is an American actress and theater director who is best known for her role as Mary Ellen Walton on The Waltons television series and subsequent Waltons TV movies.
    [...]
    Still being viewed as a child actress in her early 20s, Norton posed nude for the August 1985 issue of Playboy in a bid to shed her wholesome "family" image.
     

    http://www.allaboutthewaltons.com/cast/JudyNorton-Playboy.php

    http://www.allaboutthewaltons.com/cast/CastPics/playboy_08_1985.jpg

    http://www.allaboutthewaltons.com/cast/CastPics/playboy_pic1.jpg

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

    yeah, that’s her. the “spread” wasn’t bad.

  117. @Bardon Kaldian
    Right about the 70's. I've seen Three Days of the Condor a few weeks ago. Unbelievable how the movie has aged. Conversations (especially Dunaway-Redford), pauses, fashion, music, ... atrocious.

    All the President’s Men is even worse (pompous Jason Robards).

    Very, very few movies from that era have survived.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Known Fact, @gepay, @Mr. Anon, @Ganderson, @Hiop, @Alden

    Right about the 70’s. I’ve seen Three Days of the Condor a few weeks ago. Unbelievable how the movie has aged. Conversations (especially Dunaway-Redford), pauses, fashion, music, … atrocious.

    Yeah, what it really needs are are some fireballs, wokeness, and lines like “We have a situation here” and “Let’s do this!”.

    I find 70s movies to be, often, far and away better than the trite crap that gets made today.

    I might add, you clearly have no taste.

  118. @Bardon Kaldian
    Right about the 70's. I've seen Three Days of the Condor a few weeks ago. Unbelievable how the movie has aged. Conversations (especially Dunaway-Redford), pauses, fashion, music, ... atrocious.

    All the President’s Men is even worse (pompous Jason Robards).

    Very, very few movies from that era have survived.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Known Fact, @gepay, @Mr. Anon, @Ganderson, @Hiop, @Alden

    Respectfully disagree. Fashion in the 70s, at least for men, WAS awful, but a lot of good movies were made between 1967and 1978- my favorite might be “The Last Detail”. Chinatown’s pretty damn good as well. That posted list from ‘74 has some quality.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Ganderson

    I only saw The Last Detail once, but it seemed great. Seems forgotten for some reason.

    Replies: @ganderson, @MEH 0910

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @Ganderson

    As usual, agree & disagree. I won't go into details, just ...

    1) the 70's movies are frequently fresh, there is something exhilaratingly "new" in many of them

    2) also, they tend to be highly tendentious & ideologized. Even non-political topics are treated politically. They are unabashedly extremely leftist & obscurantist in most of their "messages" - anti-civilization, if you wish. Rousseau stoned, plus a touch of paranoia & loathing of any civilized society. Fake exaltation of punks as unconventional free spirits.

    3) fashion is more ostentatious than in any other decade. One can easily identify the 70's movie just by looking how men dress. Compare The Third Man with Cliff Robertson in Three Days of the Condor

    4) ...

    Replies: @ganderson

  119. @AndrewR
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Are you Trusting the Plan?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Are you Trusting the Plan?

    Where we go one, we go all.

  120. @Ganderson
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Respectfully disagree. Fashion in the 70s, at least for men, WAS awful, but a lot of good movies were made between 1967and 1978- my favorite might be “The Last Detail”. Chinatown’s pretty damn good as well. That posted list from ‘74 has some quality.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Bardon Kaldian

    I only saw The Last Detail once, but it seemed great. Seems forgotten for some reason.

    • Replies: @ganderson
    @Steve Sailer

    Hal Ashby, the director did a bunch of great movies- Shampoo, Being There, Harold and Maude, among others. He also did Coming Home, which was bit overwrought, I thought.

    I watched the Last Detail again a couple years ago- I think it holds up pretty well- some great "oh that guy" turns by Clifton James, Michael Moriarity, and Carol Kane. (Moriarity and Kane went on to achieve more than just "oh, that guy/gal" status.) Randy Quaid is priceless as the pathetic kleptomaniac.

    , @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer

    The Last Detail Theatrical Trailer
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZUfuN2DNJ0


    A 1973 film starring Jack Nicholson, directed by Hal Ashby (Shampoo). Also featuring Otis Young and a very young Randy Quaid. Very, very funny with an undertone of seriousness that catches up to the main characters by the end of the film. Nicholson is fantastic, as usual, but it's one of his smaller films that was immediately overshadowed by "Chinatown" and "Cuckoo's Nest" that followed in the next two years, respectively. At the time of the film's release, it was a huge success and Nicholson's performance was regarded highly. Columbia then pulled the film from release, rereleasing it closer to Oscar time, but any buzz that had been generated had worn off by that time. Still, Nicholson was nominated as was Robert Towne, the great screenwriter, and Randy Quaid for Best Supporting Actor. Based on the novel by Darryl Ponicsan. Highly recommended.
     

    The Last Detail
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1pdy4MFlq4

    A scene from the 1973 film The Last Detail directed by Hal Ashby.
     
    The Last Detail Bathroom Scene HQ
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dsw_a8jYm5g

    My favourite scene from one of my favourite movies. Inter-service rivalry at its finest!
     

    Replies: @Anonymous, @AceDeuce

  121. @Stan Adams

    I presume that when he married Dr. Jill in 1977 she started to exercise a salutary influence over his grooming.
     
    Yes, but it took a while.

    They were married on June 17 . This was taken on June 28:

    https://i.ibb.co/YLQVyGW/biden-1977.png

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @MEH 0910

    Thanks.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Steve Sailer

    You're welcome, as always.

    Here's a shot from 1973, taken from a film of Biden's swearing-in ceremony:
    https://i.ibb.co/t2Lhb2Q/1973-01-05.png

    Video:
    https://archive.org/details/1973-01-05_202101

    Hunter had darker hair than Beau:
    https://i.ibb.co/kg5WQB1/biden-hair.png

  122. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    Didn't the Pilgrims carry beer on the Mayflower? Wasn't this customary on long sailing voyages at the time? I understand it was a way of maintaining a sanitary supply of water during ocean crossings, never mind the alcohol. If true, it's an interesting thought...

    Replies: @Cortes, @Jack D, @Expletive Deleted

    The beer ration on the Mayflower was a gallon per day per person. And not “small beer” which would not have withstood the voyage but full strength beer. Some believe that the Mayflower landed at Plymouth Rock because they were running out of beer. The captain needed enough beer to make it back home and was anxious to offload his passengers so he could begin the return voyage with enough beer in the hold to make it back. In the end, he ended up staying the winter because his crew (as well as the passengers) were devastated by disease. Only half the passengers were alive a year after they sailed.

    By the way, last November marked 400 years since the Pilgrims landed. There must have been massive celebrations of this momentous event in American history but I missed them because I was mourning a fentanyl addicted career criminal who ODed.

    • Thanks: Polistra
    • Replies: @Alden
    @Jack D

    It was about 2/3 died. And it was diphtheria. The women and children who lived in the ship died more than the men who spent the day and many nights on the shore. Good thing more men survived because the Indians weren’t happy with these illegal immigrants.

    They landed in the first place they could.

    Diphtheria rampant throughout the world till the 1930s when a major vaccine campaign eradicated it.

    Replies: @Father O'Hara, @Ancient Briton

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    Indeed we all were mourning George Floyd when the 400 year mark passed. I vaguely remember one reference to the Pilgrims somewhere, perhaps in a local newspaper. I gave a moment's thought to Cape Cod...

    There on the Cape in 1983, I camped by the beach with a college girlfriend who was from Boston. I had flown out from Colorado that summer. (I must have really liked that girl.) We came upon a bronze plaque along a bushy path, among wild blueberries we had been picking.

    The plaque marked the spot where the Pilgrims first found fresh water in the New World. There was a small spring there, not far from our campground.

    There was also a nude beach nearby, which was more important to us at the time.

    https://npplan.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Cape-Cod-162-590x738.jpg

    , @Johann Ricke
    @Jack D


    By the way, last November marked 400 years since the Pilgrims landed. There must have been massive celebrations of this momentous event in American history but I missed them because I was mourning a fentanyl addicted career criminal who ODed.
     
    I get the impression we're not supposed to celebrate the Pilgrims any more. Gotta wonder when they're gonna do away with Thanksgiving. Maybe they'll replace it with Kwanzaa. Perhaps Kamala will put in a good word for Diwali (or Deepavali, since her forebears are from the South - not that South - the other South).

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @danand
    @Jack D

    "...last November marked 400 years since the Pilgrims landed."

    As a minor way of celebrating, purchased sheets of the these stamps. Sent them out to under 30 relatives and acquaintances. For some, I might guess, a sheet of letter stamps will make for a lifetime supply.

    https://flic.kr/p/2ktK6SK

    Would imagine the 2020 stamps celebrating passage of our 19 amendment (women suffrage) a century back proved more popular. I lieu of Mayflowers, sent these to the lone pussy hat demonstrator I’m acquainted with.

    Wonder how well Gwen Ifill’s stamp did, I had forgotten she was gone. Guess she took it with her as to whether or not she was an original hoaxer. Hoax or no, she gave hope and inspiration to the “Jussie Smolletts” who were to follow:

    “While at Simmons College, Ifill interned for the Boston Herald-American. One day at work, she discovered a note on her desk that read, "Nigger go home." After showing the note to editors at the newspaper, who "were horrified", they offered her a job when she graduated from college in 1977. Ifill's close friend Michele Norris stated that Ifill said "that was really unfortunate, but I have work to do. And that's how she got the job. She didn't get the job out of sympathy. She got the job because she didn't let that slow her down."”

    https://flic.kr/p/2ktEW1e

    (Got a sheet of Palmar's for my own mailings.)

    Replies: @Polistra

  123. @Stan Adams

    I presume that when he married Dr. Jill in 1977 she started to exercise a salutary influence over his grooming.
     
    Yes, but it took a while.

    They were married on June 17 . This was taken on June 28:

    https://i.ibb.co/YLQVyGW/biden-1977.png

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @MEH 0910

    Lost Video Of Joe Biden Expressing His Segregationist Anti-Busing Views To The Media In 1977

    Lost Video Of Joe Biden Expressing His Segregationist Anti-Busing Views To The Media In 1977

    Follow ThePoliClips on Twitter:
    https://twitter.com/THEPOLICLIPS

    [MORE]

    https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/video/joe-biden-school-busing-amendment-1977-64016335

    Transcript for What Joe Biden said about school busing amendment in 1977

    The net effect is that there are will be fewer children. Reassigned schools. Ostensibly because. Findings by EGW Department of Education welfare but there’s an imbalance in their school system. Misnomer that most people haven’t they think most children that are being called bus are being bused to constitute as a consequence the court orders and that’s just not true. There are more children on buses. As a consequence of eight GW’s threats to withhold funds. To a school district unless they and there are as a consequence the court order. And it and that’s why I think that that senator broke with justifiably concerned about him if you were proponent of busing. You should be worried about. Quote victory because it as. A much broader effect than most people think it had. Or. And court. It. More court ordered. I. I think not because this so called Byrd amendment which was an outgrowth of the so called Hyde amendment. Stood for almost two years about one challenge to it. And then on May 25 the attorney general of the United States of America wrote an opinion saying that it didn’t have any effect. But everyone thought it had the effect and it stopped HEW from being involved in. Threatening to withhold funds they didn’t do that anymore for the past two years in knowing challenge that not that I’m aware. On at least there was no court that ordered busing as a consequence of any challenge so the I think that is you know. That’s a re hearing it’s just not the case at least it wasn’t for the past eighteen months to years I don’t think it should be left to any bureaucrat any agency including even if a word the Justice Department which is the legal arm of the executive branch to make a determination the constitutional violation exists. Without having to make that judgment and go through a court to get that determination. You think president made by GW where no grievance seasons. I don’t know I you know it depends on who will who says his agreements HEW they’re very there’s agreements someone complains or HEW administrator goes in and says. We think there’s an imbalance or we think HEW. Thinks that there’s a constitutional violation. All I’m saying is off Tom Eagleton said senator Eagleton said was HE WS no power to. And that is a power that should not be given to a bureaucratic gates we have courts there the district court any individual. Any school district any group of people can go into a federal district court and say we believe there’s a constitutional violation the court decide. Are you infinity ego thing the court to Delaware. Hillary. Should be laughing. You would never vote for the game favorite goes do. Yes that is correct if they decided under the present ruling the Supreme Court which says the most recent ruling as a yes they would says there must be finding of signatory intent to discriminate. Very good. Or surety but that’s for the course of the site is in. Network that’s the whole issue the court. Yesterday if you I still oppose it yes because it is not in line with. The highest court in the lands ruling. A district court would be abusing their discretion if they did not find in my opinion clearly now under that. Under the cases of yesterday the last day in an opinion say. We specifically far too with the specifics angered Torre intent on the part of XYZ. To preclude. Blacks or Spanish speaking Americans or whomever from attending. This school therefore their constitutional rights were violated look folks we keep talking about this thing is being north vs south that’s not the issue. It is rural vs urban and most of the Boston is taking place today is taking place in rural areas whether it be administratively ordered or court order. Now we’re moving into applying the same standards to urban areas and is a standard that doesn’t make sense it doesn’t apply it doesn’t hold. We’re moving from trying to in this in in in urban areas we’ve had its integrated facilities but segregated neighborhoods. In an rural Ares we’ve traditionally had integrated neighborhood that segregated facilities. And to apply the same standard the same test for this north south thing is not really the issue. As professor Nathan Glazer at Harvard is indicated as doctor. Armored Rand Corp. James Coleman it. I just tell three days a year into today’s hearings in Judiciary Committee and another bill life beyond this deal is bus. And there a uniform opinion of those testified that it is not a north south it’s an urban rural question distinction. But you’re everywhere your intent there’re going to be. Segregated saying it. The question race you sat back movement. Desegregation and school when humans. Anyway answer that is I predict that the young black leadership of America will overwhelming to decide with me. I predict that in 1980. And 84 in my position will be totally vindicated by the sociologist and buys Civil Rights Act not come from that side of the track. That’s where I’m from I was a defense lawyer I am a civil rights cases I sat in on route forty I mean not you know I’m not an a from the other side of this. And I happen to think that the one way to be ensure that you sent to civil rights movement in America further back is to continue to push bossy. Because it’s a bankrupt policy. And that’s that’s that’s that that’s why I think will be vindicated I don’t I don’t include myself with pro or anti busing fourth I think the only group that can determine. Whether or not a constitutional violation existed the federal courts the United States America no one else has that right secondly. A federal court the United States American determining a violation. Of the constitution with regard school desegregation cases must find. That there is a specific intent to segregate before they can order bus. That I abide by that I legislate by that I hold up. And there’s there the standards we should prepare to who. It’s difficult to establish intent but it’s clearly possible factually can be established the court has the Supreme Court 820. Eight to zero ruled yesterday that they must find. And you very well knows this carpet covering this area’s long as you have that. There is there aren’t legal standards by which you bring in burdens of proof to establish whether or not there was a specific intent. And a court confined.

    This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @MEH 0910

    Here is a longer version. Go to 2:28:
    https://archive.org/details/1977-06-28

    , @Curle
    @MEH 0910

    No need to conflate segregation with anti-busing. Two different things.

    , @AceDeuce
    @MEH 0910

    Pedo Joe, Hillary and the rest were right about this stuff and the superpredator thing too.

    Busing RUINED several cities that hadn't been yet ruined by negroes. Working class Whites were fooked with a sharp stick. And no one sided with them. There's a lot of smug Boomer/Gen X twigbois and Karens ( not to mention their hopeless beanbag kids) who grew up in safe White suburbs thanks to their "racist" parents/grandparents getting out while the getting was good, and who would have benefitted from a year or two on one of those buses.

  124. @MEH 0910
    @Stan Adams

    Lost Video Of Joe Biden Expressing His Segregationist Anti-Busing Views To The Media In 1977
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S970NoYPKWs


    Lost Video Of Joe Biden Expressing His Segregationist Anti-Busing Views To The Media In 1977

    Follow ThePoliClips on Twitter:
    https://twitter.com/THEPOLICLIPS
     

    https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/video/joe-biden-school-busing-amendment-1977-64016335

    Transcript for What Joe Biden said about school busing amendment in 1977

    The net effect is that there are will be fewer children. Reassigned schools. Ostensibly because. Findings by EGW Department of Education welfare but there's an imbalance in their school system. Misnomer that most people haven't they think most children that are being called bus are being bused to constitute as a consequence the court orders and that's just not true. There are more children on buses. As a consequence of eight GW's threats to withhold funds. To a school district unless they and there are as a consequence the court order. And it and that's why I think that that senator broke with justifiably concerned about him if you were proponent of busing. You should be worried about. Quote victory because it as. A much broader effect than most people think it had. Or. And court. It. More court ordered. I. I think not because this so called Byrd amendment which was an outgrowth of the so called Hyde amendment. Stood for almost two years about one challenge to it. And then on May 25 the attorney general of the United States of America wrote an opinion saying that it didn't have any effect. But everyone thought it had the effect and it stopped HEW from being involved in. Threatening to withhold funds they didn't do that anymore for the past two years in knowing challenge that not that I'm aware. On at least there was no court that ordered busing as a consequence of any challenge so the I think that is you know. That's a re hearing it's just not the case at least it wasn't for the past eighteen months to years I don't think it should be left to any bureaucrat any agency including even if a word the Justice Department which is the legal arm of the executive branch to make a determination the constitutional violation exists. Without having to make that judgment and go through a court to get that determination. You think president made by GW where no grievance seasons. I don't know I you know it depends on who will who says his agreements HEW they're very there's agreements someone complains or HEW administrator goes in and says. We think there's an imbalance or we think HEW. Thinks that there's a constitutional violation. All I'm saying is off Tom Eagleton said senator Eagleton said was HE WS no power to. And that is a power that should not be given to a bureaucratic gates we have courts there the district court any individual. Any school district any group of people can go into a federal district court and say we believe there's a constitutional violation the court decide. Are you infinity ego thing the court to Delaware. Hillary. Should be laughing. You would never vote for the game favorite goes do. Yes that is correct if they decided under the present ruling the Supreme Court which says the most recent ruling as a yes they would says there must be finding of signatory intent to discriminate. Very good. Or surety but that's for the course of the site is in. Network that's the whole issue the court. Yesterday if you I still oppose it yes because it is not in line with. The highest court in the lands ruling. A district court would be abusing their discretion if they did not find in my opinion clearly now under that. Under the cases of yesterday the last day in an opinion say. We specifically far too with the specifics angered Torre intent on the part of XYZ. To preclude. Blacks or Spanish speaking Americans or whomever from attending. This school therefore their constitutional rights were violated look folks we keep talking about this thing is being north vs south that's not the issue. It is rural vs urban and most of the Boston is taking place today is taking place in rural areas whether it be administratively ordered or court order. Now we're moving into applying the same standards to urban areas and is a standard that doesn't make sense it doesn't apply it doesn't hold. We're moving from trying to in this in in in urban areas we've had its integrated facilities but segregated neighborhoods. In an rural Ares we've traditionally had integrated neighborhood that segregated facilities. And to apply the same standard the same test for this north south thing is not really the issue. As professor Nathan Glazer at Harvard is indicated as doctor. Armored Rand Corp. James Coleman it. I just tell three days a year into today's hearings in Judiciary Committee and another bill life beyond this deal is bus. And there a uniform opinion of those testified that it is not a north south it's an urban rural question distinction. But you're everywhere your intent there're going to be. Segregated saying it. The question race you sat back movement. Desegregation and school when humans. Anyway answer that is I predict that the young black leadership of America will overwhelming to decide with me. I predict that in 1980. And 84 in my position will be totally vindicated by the sociologist and buys Civil Rights Act not come from that side of the track. That's where I'm from I was a defense lawyer I am a civil rights cases I sat in on route forty I mean not you know I'm not an a from the other side of this. And I happen to think that the one way to be ensure that you sent to civil rights movement in America further back is to continue to push bossy. Because it's a bankrupt policy. And that's that's that's that that's why I think will be vindicated I don't I don't include myself with pro or anti busing fourth I think the only group that can determine. Whether or not a constitutional violation existed the federal courts the United States America no one else has that right secondly. A federal court the United States American determining a violation. Of the constitution with regard school desegregation cases must find. That there is a specific intent to segregate before they can order bus. That I abide by that I legislate by that I hold up. And there's there the standards we should prepare to who. It's difficult to establish intent but it's clearly possible factually can be established the court has the Supreme Court 820. Eight to zero ruled yesterday that they must find. And you very well knows this carpet covering this area's long as you have that. There is there aren't legal standards by which you bring in burdens of proof to establish whether or not there was a specific intent. And a court confined.

    This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.
     

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Curle, @AceDeuce

    Here is a longer version. Go to 2:28:
    https://archive.org/details/1977-06-28

    • Thanks: MEH 0910
  125. @Darwin's Sh-tlist
    The Z-Man remarked last year that Joe Biden seems a guy perfectly suited to selling Cadillacs in Florida. That's about the best summation I've heard.

    Replies: @Curle

    Weird he says that because when I think of a young Joe Biden I think of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom the car salesman protagonist of John Updike’s 1960 novel Rabbit Run. Joe just seems to have that ‘what’s going on?’ look that I associate with Rabbit Angstrom.

  126. @MEH 0910
    @Stan Adams

    Lost Video Of Joe Biden Expressing His Segregationist Anti-Busing Views To The Media In 1977
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S970NoYPKWs


    Lost Video Of Joe Biden Expressing His Segregationist Anti-Busing Views To The Media In 1977

    Follow ThePoliClips on Twitter:
    https://twitter.com/THEPOLICLIPS
     

    https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/video/joe-biden-school-busing-amendment-1977-64016335

    Transcript for What Joe Biden said about school busing amendment in 1977

    The net effect is that there are will be fewer children. Reassigned schools. Ostensibly because. Findings by EGW Department of Education welfare but there's an imbalance in their school system. Misnomer that most people haven't they think most children that are being called bus are being bused to constitute as a consequence the court orders and that's just not true. There are more children on buses. As a consequence of eight GW's threats to withhold funds. To a school district unless they and there are as a consequence the court order. And it and that's why I think that that senator broke with justifiably concerned about him if you were proponent of busing. You should be worried about. Quote victory because it as. A much broader effect than most people think it had. Or. And court. It. More court ordered. I. I think not because this so called Byrd amendment which was an outgrowth of the so called Hyde amendment. Stood for almost two years about one challenge to it. And then on May 25 the attorney general of the United States of America wrote an opinion saying that it didn't have any effect. But everyone thought it had the effect and it stopped HEW from being involved in. Threatening to withhold funds they didn't do that anymore for the past two years in knowing challenge that not that I'm aware. On at least there was no court that ordered busing as a consequence of any challenge so the I think that is you know. That's a re hearing it's just not the case at least it wasn't for the past eighteen months to years I don't think it should be left to any bureaucrat any agency including even if a word the Justice Department which is the legal arm of the executive branch to make a determination the constitutional violation exists. Without having to make that judgment and go through a court to get that determination. You think president made by GW where no grievance seasons. I don't know I you know it depends on who will who says his agreements HEW they're very there's agreements someone complains or HEW administrator goes in and says. We think there's an imbalance or we think HEW. Thinks that there's a constitutional violation. All I'm saying is off Tom Eagleton said senator Eagleton said was HE WS no power to. And that is a power that should not be given to a bureaucratic gates we have courts there the district court any individual. Any school district any group of people can go into a federal district court and say we believe there's a constitutional violation the court decide. Are you infinity ego thing the court to Delaware. Hillary. Should be laughing. You would never vote for the game favorite goes do. Yes that is correct if they decided under the present ruling the Supreme Court which says the most recent ruling as a yes they would says there must be finding of signatory intent to discriminate. Very good. Or surety but that's for the course of the site is in. Network that's the whole issue the court. Yesterday if you I still oppose it yes because it is not in line with. The highest court in the lands ruling. A district court would be abusing their discretion if they did not find in my opinion clearly now under that. Under the cases of yesterday the last day in an opinion say. We specifically far too with the specifics angered Torre intent on the part of XYZ. To preclude. Blacks or Spanish speaking Americans or whomever from attending. This school therefore their constitutional rights were violated look folks we keep talking about this thing is being north vs south that's not the issue. It is rural vs urban and most of the Boston is taking place today is taking place in rural areas whether it be administratively ordered or court order. Now we're moving into applying the same standards to urban areas and is a standard that doesn't make sense it doesn't apply it doesn't hold. We're moving from trying to in this in in in urban areas we've had its integrated facilities but segregated neighborhoods. In an rural Ares we've traditionally had integrated neighborhood that segregated facilities. And to apply the same standard the same test for this north south thing is not really the issue. As professor Nathan Glazer at Harvard is indicated as doctor. Armored Rand Corp. James Coleman it. I just tell three days a year into today's hearings in Judiciary Committee and another bill life beyond this deal is bus. And there a uniform opinion of those testified that it is not a north south it's an urban rural question distinction. But you're everywhere your intent there're going to be. Segregated saying it. The question race you sat back movement. Desegregation and school when humans. Anyway answer that is I predict that the young black leadership of America will overwhelming to decide with me. I predict that in 1980. And 84 in my position will be totally vindicated by the sociologist and buys Civil Rights Act not come from that side of the track. That's where I'm from I was a defense lawyer I am a civil rights cases I sat in on route forty I mean not you know I'm not an a from the other side of this. And I happen to think that the one way to be ensure that you sent to civil rights movement in America further back is to continue to push bossy. Because it's a bankrupt policy. And that's that's that's that that's why I think will be vindicated I don't I don't include myself with pro or anti busing fourth I think the only group that can determine. Whether or not a constitutional violation existed the federal courts the United States America no one else has that right secondly. A federal court the United States American determining a violation. Of the constitution with regard school desegregation cases must find. That there is a specific intent to segregate before they can order bus. That I abide by that I legislate by that I hold up. And there's there the standards we should prepare to who. It's difficult to establish intent but it's clearly possible factually can be established the court has the Supreme Court 820. Eight to zero ruled yesterday that they must find. And you very well knows this carpet covering this area's long as you have that. There is there aren't legal standards by which you bring in burdens of proof to establish whether or not there was a specific intent. And a court confined.

    This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.
     

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Curle, @AceDeuce

    No need to conflate segregation with anti-busing. Two different things.

  127. @Jack D
    @Art Deco

    No one seriously disputes that Friedrich Trump was an innkeeper in the Klondike Gold Rush:

    https://www.bloomberg.com/features/2016-trump-family-fortune/

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/trump-canada-yukon-1.3235254

    https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2015/08/the-man-who-made-trump-who-he-is-121647

    Trump used to lie about being Swedish but AFAIK he's never denied Friedrich's well documented biography. (BTW, Friedrich tried to go back to Germany but they threw him out as a draft evader - history might have been different). BTW, Friedrich's partner in the hotel business was one Ernest Levin so the Trumps have rubbed shoulders with Jews in N. America right from the beginning. As was standard for frontier hotels, the Arctic would have also served as a restaurant, saloon and a whorehouse. The rooms (or cubicles - the Arctic was not very big) also featured scales so that the miners could pay for the lady's services in gold dust.


    I assume that Trump is proud of his enterprising grandfather who came to America a penniless immigrant and was able, using only his wits, to amass a sizable stake. Trump himself was in the hotel business and I'm sure that they weren't checking IDs to make sure that only married white Christian couples stayed at a Trump Hotel. There was a brief interlude perhaps from the 1st World War until the 1960s where hoteliers were concerned with respectability and making sure that no ladies of the evening or Jews or other undesirables stayed at their hotels, but in fact that was not the norm in American history and Trump has nothing to be ashamed of, not that the man has any sense of shame anyway.

    Replies: @Alden, @Buzz Mohawk

    My grandfather went to the Alaska Gold rush and stayed in Alaska till about 1908. His name was mentioned in some newspaper articles as living in Dawson. I wonder if they ever met or my grandfather stayed in a Trump tavern or hotel. Or if my grandfather built any Trump hotels Then he went to San Francisco and caught the building boom after the fire. He was Canadian from Quebec. Decades later in the 1950s, he informed grandma that his Canadien wife had died. They were legally married but he was a bigamist all those years. Which explained why grandma never met any Canadian relatives. Quite a shock for a respectable lady. They snuck off to Tahoe for a quickie Nevada wedding big big secret.

    Most interesting ancestors are husband’s ancestor who came to San Francisco a little before the Gold Rush. He and his sister were very young teen orphans, like 14 and 15 in Boston. They had no money or relatives. Only future was her being a maid and him unskilled labor competing with the Irish. No money to buy an apprenticeship.

    They really wanted to go to Oregon. But had no money to join a wagon train or even get to St Louis. So the converted to Mormonism and joined a Mormon wagon train. The Mormons knew many of the converts only converted to get on a wagon train going west. So the real sincere Mormons kept guard at night to keep the false Mormons from deserting.

    They waited till the opportunity rose. They stole a string of horses and lit out for California with Mormons in pursuit. They ended up near San Jose and sold the horses. Then “ Gold!!! there’s gold st Sutter’s Mill!!!!” He went up to the mountains and mined gold.

    Then the most ballsy, macho job ever. He went to the Carson City silver strike and became a blaster. A blaster uses a hand drill to make a hole, puts a stick of dynamite in the hole and runs like hell before the dynamite goes off. He came back to San Francisco and somewhat settled down.

    They’re Scotch but obviously Viking descendants. Traced them back to the 1200s in Scotland. They were border bandit cattle rustlers extortionists kidnappers of heiresses and despised by both English and Scots governments. King James deported them to N Ireland 1610? to genocide the Catholic Irish. That was part of the deal for James to become king of England. Do something about the border bandits. N. Ireland must have been too civilized for them so they came to Massachusetts.

    Europeans never drank water. It caused at best diarrhea vomiting and stomach flu. At worst death from dysentery. So watered wine and weak beer was what they drank right up to 1900. There’s enough alcohol in like a 1 alcohol to 3 or 4 parts water to kill most of the germs. Imagine serving your 3 year olds weak beer and ale.

    Major reason the early American settlers thrived and had those big families was clean water and lots of almost free protein for the hunting.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Alden

    You would have thought that the Europeans, like the Chinese, would have at some point figured out that boiling water makes it safe and it's a lot cheaper to boil water than to make beer (where you have to boil the water anyway plus add lots of grain).

    I think adding unsafe water to beer yields an unsafe mixture - not enough alcohol. What they did instead was make "small beer" - this was a low alcohol beer made with less grain. But since it goes thru the same boiling process as regular beer it's safe especially for immediate consumption. Small beer was served at all meals including breakfast and was served to small children, the elderly, etc.

  128. @Steve Sailer
    @Stan Adams

    Thanks.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    You’re welcome, as always.

    Here’s a shot from 1973, taken from a film of Biden’s swearing-in ceremony:

    Video:
    https://archive.org/details/1973-01-05_202101

    Hunter had darker hair than Beau:

  129. @Jack D
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)


    beer, whiskey, schnaps, cider
     
    Of these, only beer and cider would have predated relatively modern times (12th to 15th century) when the still was introduced to Europe from the Arabs (the word alcohol itself is Arabic). Freeze distillation (true applejack) may have been done earlier in the cold northern lands but the concentration of alcohol is not as high as for true distillation, nor is it possible to remove impurities using freeze distillation, with the result that the stuff gives you a nasty hangover. While it is certainly possible to get drunk on cider and unhopped beer (hops are first mentioned in connection with brewing in the 9th century), distilled beverages get the job done a lot faster and lead to more alcoholism. The N. European working classes always drank but only after the introduction of distilled beverages such as gin, abisinthe, whiskey, rum, etc. did alcohol create a true "drug problem" in Europe.

    Beer was seen as almost a health beverage compared to gin which lead to debauchery:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1e/Beer-street-and-Gin-lane.jpg

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Buzz Mohawk, @Alden

    I dunno, there’s some evidence that the Irish Scots and Scandinavians were making some form of whiskey 2,000 years ago. Certainly the notorious Celt German drinking recorded by Greeks 2,500 years ago couldn’t have been beer and ale.

    being a historian I am very very very cynical about the Muslim Arabs invented everything lies. They blasted into the Mediterranean after the Justinian Plague and took over the legacy of Egypt Greece Carthage Rome etc. the Arabs were no more responsible for the prior achievements of civilizations they conquered than Raleigh and Rolfe were responsible for tobacco. Or the Spanish created potatoes tomatoes corn chili peppers etc.

    The Arabs invented everything is lies by the anti medieval catholic enlightenment Protestants with apologies to you anti White Jews and marxists. Even earlier the Greeks and Romans considered them barbarians

    The pre Roman conquest Celts of Austria had the exact same reaper McCormack re invented in the 1830s 40s.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Alden

    The evidence that distilled spirits existed in Europe before the Middle Ages is very scant. If they had really existed, there would have been more evidence - accounts in literature, pictures, archeological remains of stills, etc. but there is nothing like that. Compare that with, for example, wine which is amply documented in Roman literature, frescoes, amphorae found in shipwrecks, surviving metal accessories such as wine goblets and strainers, etc.

    You're right that the Arabs copied from the Greeks and Romans and didn't start fresh, but at least they were interested in what the Greeks and Romans had done with math, architecture, medicine, bathing, etc. and tried to build on their work further at a time when the Europeans had lost all interest in the classical world. It's really hard for us to conceive of Arabs (in reality more often subject people of the Arabs - Jews, Persians, etc.) as being intellectual leaders but for a time they were ahead of Europe. Avicenna's works on medicine were the standard textbooks in Europe until the 18th century.

  130. @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The beer ration on the Mayflower was a gallon per day per person. And not "small beer" which would not have withstood the voyage but full strength beer. Some believe that the Mayflower landed at Plymouth Rock because they were running out of beer. The captain needed enough beer to make it back home and was anxious to offload his passengers so he could begin the return voyage with enough beer in the hold to make it back. In the end, he ended up staying the winter because his crew (as well as the passengers) were devastated by disease. Only half the passengers were alive a year after they sailed.

    By the way, last November marked 400 years since the Pilgrims landed. There must have been massive celebrations of this momentous event in American history but I missed them because I was mourning a fentanyl addicted career criminal who ODed.

    Replies: @Alden, @Buzz Mohawk, @Johann Ricke, @danand

    It was about 2/3 died. And it was diphtheria. The women and children who lived in the ship died more than the men who spent the day and many nights on the shore. Good thing more men survived because the Indians weren’t happy with these illegal immigrants.

    They landed in the first place they could.

    Diphtheria rampant throughout the world till the 1930s when a major vaccine campaign eradicated it.

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    @Alden

    They kept the women on board because the Indians kept asking,"Where white women at?"

    , @Ancient Briton
    @Alden

    King James granted a charter for the Pilgrims and others to settle, so not illegal.

    Replies: @Alden, @Alden

  131. @Alden
    @Jack D

    It was about 2/3 died. And it was diphtheria. The women and children who lived in the ship died more than the men who spent the day and many nights on the shore. Good thing more men survived because the Indians weren’t happy with these illegal immigrants.

    They landed in the first place they could.

    Diphtheria rampant throughout the world till the 1930s when a major vaccine campaign eradicated it.

    Replies: @Father O'Hara, @Ancient Briton

    They kept the women on board because the Indians kept asking,”Where white women at?”

  132. @Anonymous
    @MEH 0910

    In England, that particular tonsorial variant is popularly known as 'the Max Wall hair cut'.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    In popular British culture, the couplet of a Max Wall haircut is a ‘Blackadder’ haircut, named after the topiary atrocity sported by the actor Rowan Atkinson in the first BBC TV series of that name.

  133. @Jack D
    It looks like a Band-Aid with a strand of hair stuck under it. Joe got drunk the night before and bashed his head. When he got home he put on a bandage but he was still a little drunk and didn't notice the strand of hair.

    It wouldn't be surprising if Joe took to drink after the loss of his wife and child but we never hear about this. Where are the "Joe drowned his sorrow in the bottle" stories? There are lots of Presidents who had alcoholics in their families or maybe drank a bit too much themselves. Northern Europeans have a tendency toward alcoholism, perhaps because, like Indians, alcohol was introduced to them relatively recently vs. the wine drinking peoples of the Mediterranean who have consumed wine (in moderation) since antiquity. Often (as in the case of Trump) they react by staying completely away from alcohol. What is the relationship between Joe and alcohol?

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Jonathan Mason, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Buffalo Joe, @Expletive Deleted

    Brits and Irish, and by extension their near-Continental forebears have been boozing heroically since at least the late neolithic. It’s an almost inevitable concomitant of grain agriculture, spoiled granaries/pit silos, mouldy porridge and so on.
    I wouldn’t like to be in a hut-full of them after they’d been caning it on the strong ale they doped with fly agaric, henbane, and other mind-melters. Can’t really blame them, Orkney or the Hebrides in winter isn’t much fun.

    Thank goodness the undocumented dreamers arriving from the east in the mid-3rd millennium BC seem to have brought some sort of linden/meadowsweet(clue’s in the name)-flavoured strong mead/bragget with them, along with metallurgy, wheels and possibly horses. And a tiny bit of genocide. It was traditional back then.

  134. Now I’m not saying this is true,but if it is,its just incredible!
    This is a rumor that has been flying around for days,to wit: Tom Hanks has been arrested,his penis was REMOVED and attached to Kamala Harris so she can ride Dr. Jill like she’s a buckin’ bronco! All for the pleasure of Joe! This was arranged by the Pope.
    Most people are unaware that Hanks,belying his folksy good guy image,is hung like a Clydesdale,in effect a bio-freak.

  135. @Ganderson
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Respectfully disagree. Fashion in the 70s, at least for men, WAS awful, but a lot of good movies were made between 1967and 1978- my favorite might be “The Last Detail”. Chinatown’s pretty damn good as well. That posted list from ‘74 has some quality.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Bardon Kaldian

    As usual, agree & disagree. I won’t go into details, just …

    1) the 70’s movies are frequently fresh, there is something exhilaratingly “new” in many of them

    2) also, they tend to be highly tendentious & ideologized. Even non-political topics are treated politically. They are unabashedly extremely leftist & obscurantist in most of their “messages” – anti-civilization, if you wish. Rousseau stoned, plus a touch of paranoia & loathing of any civilized society. Fake exaltation of punks as unconventional free spirits.

    3) fashion is more ostentatious than in any other decade. One can easily identify the 70’s movie just by looking how men dress. Compare The Third Man with Cliff Robertson in Three Days of the Condor

    4) …

    • Replies: @ganderson
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Bardon, dunno how old you are, but I had to wear those clothes... fortunately by 1979 good sense had returned; the 80's were a pretty good men's fashion decade, on the whole.

    As for 70's movies, my own theory (to be taken with a grain of salt; I was young then, and I am not immune to "rose covered glasses-ism") is that, in the late 60's and early 70's, the studio system and the Hays Code began to break down. A whole bunch of directors lept into the breach- and made a bunch of good movies. Or I may just be an old fart remembering things that never happened!

    When my boys were still home I'd get a movie I'd seen as a youth, and we'd watch to see how well it held up. I remember that "The Taking of Pelham 1,2,3" with Walter Matthau, Robert Shaw and Martin Balsam still seemed fresh, while "Bananas", a movie I thought was the funniest thing ever at the time, sucked.

    Mel Brooks' good movies, "Blazing Saddles", "Young Frankenstein", and the sadly forgotten "The Twelve Chairs" were all made in the early to mid '70s

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  136. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    Didn't the Pilgrims carry beer on the Mayflower? Wasn't this customary on long sailing voyages at the time? I understand it was a way of maintaining a sanitary supply of water during ocean crossings, never mind the alcohol. If true, it's an interesting thought...

    Replies: @Cortes, @Jack D, @Expletive Deleted

    The hipsters’ favourite gargle, IPA, started off as India Pale Ale, or Export. Brewed as “dry” and low-sugar as they could to stop the constant agitation reinitiating fermentation onboard (with spectacular consequences), fined to try and get as much trub and yeast out and relatively heavily doped with expensive but mildly antibacteriological hops.

    It was supposed to withstand pitching about in one of His Majesty’s foul “floating prisons” all the way round the Cape and across the ocean. In a fairly successful bid to keep the troops free of dysentery, which always incapacitated and even killed far more redcoats everywhere than any war.

    The sailors sanitised their frequently disgusting water ration with (compulsory) equal parts of (very strong) dark rum, which kept indefinitely, and of course the infamous limes, if available.

  137. @Alden
    @Jack D

    My grandfather went to the Alaska Gold rush and stayed in Alaska till about 1908. His name was mentioned in some newspaper articles as living in Dawson. I wonder if they ever met or my grandfather stayed in a Trump tavern or hotel. Or if my grandfather built any Trump hotels Then he went to San Francisco and caught the building boom after the fire. He was Canadian from Quebec. Decades later in the 1950s, he informed grandma that his Canadien wife had died. They were legally married but he was a bigamist all those years. Which explained why grandma never met any Canadian relatives. Quite a shock for a respectable lady. They snuck off to Tahoe for a quickie Nevada wedding big big secret.

    Most interesting ancestors are husband’s ancestor who came to San Francisco a little before the Gold Rush. He and his sister were very young teen orphans, like 14 and 15 in Boston. They had no money or relatives. Only future was her being a maid and him unskilled labor competing with the Irish. No money to buy an apprenticeship.

    They really wanted to go to Oregon. But had no money to join a wagon train or even get to St Louis. So the converted to Mormonism and joined a Mormon wagon train. The Mormons knew many of the converts only converted to get on a wagon train going west. So the real sincere Mormons kept guard at night to keep the false Mormons from deserting.

    They waited till the opportunity rose. They stole a string of horses and lit out for California with Mormons in pursuit. They ended up near San Jose and sold the horses. Then “ Gold!!! there’s gold st Sutter’s Mill!!!!” He went up to the mountains and mined gold.

    Then the most ballsy, macho job ever. He went to the Carson City silver strike and became a blaster. A blaster uses a hand drill to make a hole, puts a stick of dynamite in the hole and runs like hell before the dynamite goes off. He came back to San Francisco and somewhat settled down.

    They’re Scotch but obviously Viking descendants. Traced them back to the 1200s in Scotland. They were border bandit cattle rustlers extortionists kidnappers of heiresses and despised by both English and Scots governments. King James deported them to N Ireland 1610? to genocide the Catholic Irish. That was part of the deal for James to become king of England. Do something about the border bandits. N. Ireland must have been too civilized for them so they came to Massachusetts.

    Europeans never drank water. It caused at best diarrhea vomiting and stomach flu. At worst death from dysentery. So watered wine and weak beer was what they drank right up to 1900. There’s enough alcohol in like a 1 alcohol to 3 or 4 parts water to kill most of the germs. Imagine serving your 3 year olds weak beer and ale.

    Major reason the early American settlers thrived and had those big families was clean water and lots of almost free protein for the hunting.

    Replies: @Jack D

    You would have thought that the Europeans, like the Chinese, would have at some point figured out that boiling water makes it safe and it’s a lot cheaper to boil water than to make beer (where you have to boil the water anyway plus add lots of grain).

    I think adding unsafe water to beer yields an unsafe mixture – not enough alcohol. What they did instead was make “small beer” – this was a low alcohol beer made with less grain. But since it goes thru the same boiling process as regular beer it’s safe especially for immediate consumption. Small beer was served at all meals including breakfast and was served to small children, the elderly, etc.

  138. @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The beer ration on the Mayflower was a gallon per day per person. And not "small beer" which would not have withstood the voyage but full strength beer. Some believe that the Mayflower landed at Plymouth Rock because they were running out of beer. The captain needed enough beer to make it back home and was anxious to offload his passengers so he could begin the return voyage with enough beer in the hold to make it back. In the end, he ended up staying the winter because his crew (as well as the passengers) were devastated by disease. Only half the passengers were alive a year after they sailed.

    By the way, last November marked 400 years since the Pilgrims landed. There must have been massive celebrations of this momentous event in American history but I missed them because I was mourning a fentanyl addicted career criminal who ODed.

    Replies: @Alden, @Buzz Mohawk, @Johann Ricke, @danand

    Indeed we all were mourning George Floyd when the 400 year mark passed. I vaguely remember one reference to the Pilgrims somewhere, perhaps in a local newspaper. I gave a moment’s thought to Cape Cod…

    There on the Cape in 1983, I camped by the beach with a college girlfriend who was from Boston. I had flown out from Colorado that summer. (I must have really liked that girl.) We came upon a bronze plaque along a bushy path, among wild blueberries we had been picking.

    The plaque marked the spot where the Pilgrims first found fresh water in the New World. There was a small spring there, not far from our campground.

    There was also a nude beach nearby, which was more important to us at the time.

  139. @Alden
    @Jack D

    I dunno, there’s some evidence that the Irish Scots and Scandinavians were making some form of whiskey 2,000 years ago. Certainly the notorious Celt German drinking recorded by Greeks 2,500 years ago couldn’t have been beer and ale.

    being a historian I am very very very cynical about the Muslim Arabs invented everything lies. They blasted into the Mediterranean after the Justinian Plague and took over the legacy of Egypt Greece Carthage Rome etc. the Arabs were no more responsible for the prior achievements of civilizations they conquered than Raleigh and Rolfe were responsible for tobacco. Or the Spanish created potatoes tomatoes corn chili peppers etc.

    The Arabs invented everything is lies by the anti medieval catholic enlightenment Protestants with apologies to you anti White Jews and marxists. Even earlier the Greeks and Romans considered them barbarians

    The pre Roman conquest Celts of Austria had the exact same reaper McCormack re invented in the 1830s 40s.

    Replies: @Jack D

    The evidence that distilled spirits existed in Europe before the Middle Ages is very scant. If they had really existed, there would have been more evidence – accounts in literature, pictures, archeological remains of stills, etc. but there is nothing like that. Compare that with, for example, wine which is amply documented in Roman literature, frescoes, amphorae found in shipwrecks, surviving metal accessories such as wine goblets and strainers, etc.

    You’re right that the Arabs copied from the Greeks and Romans and didn’t start fresh, but at least they were interested in what the Greeks and Romans had done with math, architecture, medicine, bathing, etc. and tried to build on their work further at a time when the Europeans had lost all interest in the classical world. It’s really hard for us to conceive of Arabs (in reality more often subject people of the Arabs – Jews, Persians, etc.) as being intellectual leaders but for a time they were ahead of Europe. Avicenna’s works on medicine were the standard textbooks in Europe until the 18th century.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
  140. @Jack D
    @Art Deco

    No one seriously disputes that Friedrich Trump was an innkeeper in the Klondike Gold Rush:

    https://www.bloomberg.com/features/2016-trump-family-fortune/

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/trump-canada-yukon-1.3235254

    https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2015/08/the-man-who-made-trump-who-he-is-121647

    Trump used to lie about being Swedish but AFAIK he's never denied Friedrich's well documented biography. (BTW, Friedrich tried to go back to Germany but they threw him out as a draft evader - history might have been different). BTW, Friedrich's partner in the hotel business was one Ernest Levin so the Trumps have rubbed shoulders with Jews in N. America right from the beginning. As was standard for frontier hotels, the Arctic would have also served as a restaurant, saloon and a whorehouse. The rooms (or cubicles - the Arctic was not very big) also featured scales so that the miners could pay for the lady's services in gold dust.


    I assume that Trump is proud of his enterprising grandfather who came to America a penniless immigrant and was able, using only his wits, to amass a sizable stake. Trump himself was in the hotel business and I'm sure that they weren't checking IDs to make sure that only married white Christian couples stayed at a Trump Hotel. There was a brief interlude perhaps from the 1st World War until the 1960s where hoteliers were concerned with respectability and making sure that no ladies of the evening or Jews or other undesirables stayed at their hotels, but in fact that was not the norm in American history and Trump has nothing to be ashamed of, not that the man has any sense of shame anyway.

    Replies: @Alden, @Buzz Mohawk

    Trump has nothing to be ashamed of, not that the man has any sense of shame anyway.

    You know, Jack, that could be the man’s epitaph — deeply engraved and heavily layered with gold leaf, of course.

    Let’s put that alongside another favorite, just for you, one mythically belonging to W.C. Fields but not actually appearing on his grave: “All in all, I’d rather be in Philadelphia.”

  141. @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The beer ration on the Mayflower was a gallon per day per person. And not "small beer" which would not have withstood the voyage but full strength beer. Some believe that the Mayflower landed at Plymouth Rock because they were running out of beer. The captain needed enough beer to make it back home and was anxious to offload his passengers so he could begin the return voyage with enough beer in the hold to make it back. In the end, he ended up staying the winter because his crew (as well as the passengers) were devastated by disease. Only half the passengers were alive a year after they sailed.

    By the way, last November marked 400 years since the Pilgrims landed. There must have been massive celebrations of this momentous event in American history but I missed them because I was mourning a fentanyl addicted career criminal who ODed.

    Replies: @Alden, @Buzz Mohawk, @Johann Ricke, @danand

    By the way, last November marked 400 years since the Pilgrims landed. There must have been massive celebrations of this momentous event in American history but I missed them because I was mourning a fentanyl addicted career criminal who ODed.

    I get the impression we’re not supposed to celebrate the Pilgrims any more. Gotta wonder when they’re gonna do away with Thanksgiving. Maybe they’ll replace it with Kwanzaa. Perhaps Kamala will put in a good word for Diwali (or Deepavali, since her forebears are from the South – not that South – the other South).

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Johann Ricke

    I think this is how Thanksgiving will be retconned in future America:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v9UIDDlnSgA

    Contra Marx, history repeats itself, first as comedy, then as tragedy.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  142. @Steve Sailer
    @Ganderson

    I only saw The Last Detail once, but it seemed great. Seems forgotten for some reason.

    Replies: @ganderson, @MEH 0910

    Hal Ashby, the director did a bunch of great movies- Shampoo, Being There, Harold and Maude, among others. He also did Coming Home, which was bit overwrought, I thought.

    I watched the Last Detail again a couple years ago- I think it holds up pretty well- some great “oh that guy” turns by Clifton James, Michael Moriarity, and Carol Kane. (Moriarity and Kane went on to achieve more than just “oh, that guy/gal” status.) Randy Quaid is priceless as the pathetic kleptomaniac.

  143. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Jack D


    It wouldn’t be surprising if Joe took to drink after the loss of his wife and child but we never hear about this. Where are the “Joe drowned his sorrow in the bottle” stories? There are lots of Presidents who had alcoholics in their families or maybe drank a bit too much themselves.
     
    IIRC, Biden is teetotal and drank a Non-Alcoholic Beer at the "Beer Summit" with that Cambridge Police Officer who responded to the Home of Henry Louis Gates. I don't know when or why, but it's been that way for quite a while. He would have been a natural fit with the Kennedy-Dodd Democratic Senate Party Caucus, but apparently didn't indulge.

    Northern Europeans have a tendency toward alcoholism, perhaps because, like Indians, alcohol was introduced to them relatively recently vs. the wine drinking peoples of the Mediterranean who have consumed wine (in moderation) since antiquity. Often (as in the case of Trump) they react by staying completely away from alcohol. What is the relationship between Joe and alcohol?
     
    This is incorrect. American Indians utterly lacked the enzymes to process alcohol, which Northern Europeans certainly do not lack. Northern Europeans have been making alcohol in various forms for as long as the Meds, but the theory goes that parts of Europe which were effectively colonized by the Romans introduced a moderate, wine drinking culture, while those parts which remained free of Roman rule or which were far away enough from Rome and later to Roman rule retained their extant binge drinking cultures where alcohol was produced from grains or fruits (beer, whiskey, schnaps, cider etc). There is, of course, overlap between these cultures in various parts of Europe.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Bardon Kaldian, @Observator

    We once had an alcoholic president, the tragic Frank Pierce, who was killed by cirrhosis less than a dozen years after he left office. Worse, his successor James Buchanan is so much like Biden, a third-rate hack who ended up in the presidency after decades in politics, just because he was a wily nonentity with great endurance, and had made himself into a useful tool for special interests.

    Into the leadership vacuum of the 1850s stepped the most determined enemies of the American people, moving unopposed into positions of power everywhere in the national government, packing the Supreme Court, silencing voices of reason in the south, diverting weapons from US arsenals in the north to the south, for the war they long plotted to dismember the world’s only experiment in self-government, once they lost control of it.

    Those who yammer on today about a new civil war may unfortunately be right after all.

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @Observator

    That was also the decade the Whigs died and a new party was born. It could get real interesting.

  144. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Ganderson

    As usual, agree & disagree. I won't go into details, just ...

    1) the 70's movies are frequently fresh, there is something exhilaratingly "new" in many of them

    2) also, they tend to be highly tendentious & ideologized. Even non-political topics are treated politically. They are unabashedly extremely leftist & obscurantist in most of their "messages" - anti-civilization, if you wish. Rousseau stoned, plus a touch of paranoia & loathing of any civilized society. Fake exaltation of punks as unconventional free spirits.

    3) fashion is more ostentatious than in any other decade. One can easily identify the 70's movie just by looking how men dress. Compare The Third Man with Cliff Robertson in Three Days of the Condor

    4) ...

    Replies: @ganderson

    Bardon, dunno how old you are, but I had to wear those clothes… fortunately by 1979 good sense had returned; the 80’s were a pretty good men’s fashion decade, on the whole.

    As for 70’s movies, my own theory (to be taken with a grain of salt; I was young then, and I am not immune to “rose covered glasses-ism”) is that, in the late 60’s and early 70’s, the studio system and the Hays Code began to break down. A whole bunch of directors lept into the breach- and made a bunch of good movies. Or I may just be an old fart remembering things that never happened!

    When my boys were still home I’d get a movie I’d seen as a youth, and we’d watch to see how well it held up. I remember that “The Taking of Pelham 1,2,3” with Walter Matthau, Robert Shaw and Martin Balsam still seemed fresh, while “Bananas”, a movie I thought was the funniest thing ever at the time, sucked.

    Mel Brooks’ good movies, “Blazing Saddles”, “Young Frankenstein”, and the sadly forgotten “The Twelve Chairs” were all made in the early to mid ’70s

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @ganderson


    in the late 60’s and early 70’s, the studio system and the Hays Code began to break down
     
    This is exactly why movies started to become good at that point. Movies like My Fair Lady and The Sound of Music were certainly memorable, but I don't know if they qualify as good, and never would have been made in the 70's

    “The Taking of Pelham 1,2,3” with Walter Matthau, Robert Shaw and Martin Balsam still seemed fresh, while “Bananas”, a movie I thought was the funniest thing ever at the time, sucked
     
    The Taking of Pelham 1-2-3 is helped tremendously by its score, which was composed by David Shire, ex-husband of Talia and current husband of Didi Conn (Frenchy from Grease).

    I wouldn't say Bananas sucked, but it is definitely dated. This was before Allen teamed up with Marshall Brickman, so it lacked a certain maturity. The courtroom scene has some good lines in it, though.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8a3mk9sp0oE
  145. I was sure it would be this pic:

  146. @Johann Ricke
    @Jack D


    By the way, last November marked 400 years since the Pilgrims landed. There must have been massive celebrations of this momentous event in American history but I missed them because I was mourning a fentanyl addicted career criminal who ODed.
     
    I get the impression we're not supposed to celebrate the Pilgrims any more. Gotta wonder when they're gonna do away with Thanksgiving. Maybe they'll replace it with Kwanzaa. Perhaps Kamala will put in a good word for Diwali (or Deepavali, since her forebears are from the South - not that South - the other South).

    Replies: @Jack D

    I think this is how Thanksgiving will be retconned in future America:

    Contra Marx, history repeats itself, first as comedy, then as tragedy.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    The smartest thing the Pilgrims ever did was kill the chief of a tribe that was planning to attack them -- and leave his head on a pole above the entrance to their village for months, even years, afterward for all those who would do them harm to see.

  147. @Jack D
    @Johann Ricke

    I think this is how Thanksgiving will be retconned in future America:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v9UIDDlnSgA

    Contra Marx, history repeats itself, first as comedy, then as tragedy.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    The smartest thing the Pilgrims ever did was kill the chief of a tribe that was planning to attack them — and leave his head on a pole above the entrance to their village for months, even years, afterward for all those who would do them harm to see.

  148. @Steve Sailer
    @Ganderson

    I only saw The Last Detail once, but it seemed great. Seems forgotten for some reason.

    Replies: @ganderson, @MEH 0910

    The Last Detail Theatrical Trailer

    A 1973 film starring Jack Nicholson, directed by Hal Ashby (Shampoo). Also featuring Otis Young and a very young Randy Quaid. Very, very funny with an undertone of seriousness that catches up to the main characters by the end of the film. Nicholson is fantastic, as usual, but it’s one of his smaller films that was immediately overshadowed by “Chinatown” and “Cuckoo’s Nest” that followed in the next two years, respectively. At the time of the film’s release, it was a huge success and Nicholson’s performance was regarded highly. Columbia then pulled the film from release, rereleasing it closer to Oscar time, but any buzz that had been generated had worn off by that time. Still, Nicholson was nominated as was Robert Towne, the great screenwriter, and Randy Quaid for Best Supporting Actor. Based on the novel by Darryl Ponicsan. Highly recommended.

    [MORE]

    The Last Detail

    A scene from the 1973 film The Last Detail directed by Hal Ashby.

    The Last Detail Bathroom Scene HQ

    My favourite scene from one of my favourite movies. Inter-service rivalry at its finest!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @MEH 0910

    It was broadcast on UK TV - back in the day when the BBC and ITV actually used to show recent Hollywood films - in the 1980s.

    , @AceDeuce
    @MEH 0910

    Also has a very young Gilda Radner. As well as Carol Kane and Michael Moriarty.

    Fun fact: Quaid (who was excellent) beat out a young kid named John Travolta for the role of the hapless sailor going to prison.

    Darryl Ponicsan is/was a very interesting writer. He was in the Navy himself.

  149. @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The beer ration on the Mayflower was a gallon per day per person. And not "small beer" which would not have withstood the voyage but full strength beer. Some believe that the Mayflower landed at Plymouth Rock because they were running out of beer. The captain needed enough beer to make it back home and was anxious to offload his passengers so he could begin the return voyage with enough beer in the hold to make it back. In the end, he ended up staying the winter because his crew (as well as the passengers) were devastated by disease. Only half the passengers were alive a year after they sailed.

    By the way, last November marked 400 years since the Pilgrims landed. There must have been massive celebrations of this momentous event in American history but I missed them because I was mourning a fentanyl addicted career criminal who ODed.

    Replies: @Alden, @Buzz Mohawk, @Johann Ricke, @danand

    “…last November marked 400 years since the Pilgrims landed.”

    As a minor way of celebrating, purchased sheets of the these stamps. Sent them out to under 30 relatives and acquaintances. For some, I might guess, a sheet of letter stamps will make for a lifetime supply.

    B837B08A-74A1-49B4-B14B-58DE25FC8BB6

    Would imagine the 2020 stamps celebrating passage of our 19 amendment (women suffrage) a century back proved more popular. I lieu of Mayflowers, sent these to the lone pussy hat demonstrator I’m acquainted with.

    Wonder how well Gwen Ifill’s stamp did, I had forgotten she was gone. Guess she took it with her as to whether or not she was an original hoaxer. Hoax or no, she gave hope and inspiration to the “Jussie Smolletts” who were to follow:

    “While at Simmons College, Ifill interned for the Boston Herald-American. One day at work, she discovered a note on her desk that read, “Nigger go home.” After showing the note to editors at the newspaper, who “were horrified”, they offered her a job when she graduated from college in 1977. Ifill’s close friend Michele Norris stated that Ifill said “that was really unfortunate, but I have work to do. And that’s how she got the job. She didn’t get the job out of sympathy. She got the job because she didn’t let that slow her down.””

    DC2BD53C-4219-4DE6-8C69-AFD94005BFFA

    (Got a sheet of Palmar’s for my own mailings.)

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @danand

    Can't believe there's a stamp for Gwen Ifill, but what do I know. I do know that it's an open secret that a successful hate hoax is the ticket to rewards for every POC who gets away with it, which is about 99% of them.

  150. @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer

    The Last Detail Theatrical Trailer
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZUfuN2DNJ0


    A 1973 film starring Jack Nicholson, directed by Hal Ashby (Shampoo). Also featuring Otis Young and a very young Randy Quaid. Very, very funny with an undertone of seriousness that catches up to the main characters by the end of the film. Nicholson is fantastic, as usual, but it's one of his smaller films that was immediately overshadowed by "Chinatown" and "Cuckoo's Nest" that followed in the next two years, respectively. At the time of the film's release, it was a huge success and Nicholson's performance was regarded highly. Columbia then pulled the film from release, rereleasing it closer to Oscar time, but any buzz that had been generated had worn off by that time. Still, Nicholson was nominated as was Robert Towne, the great screenwriter, and Randy Quaid for Best Supporting Actor. Based on the novel by Darryl Ponicsan. Highly recommended.
     

    The Last Detail
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1pdy4MFlq4

    A scene from the 1973 film The Last Detail directed by Hal Ashby.
     
    The Last Detail Bathroom Scene HQ
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dsw_a8jYm5g

    My favourite scene from one of my favourite movies. Inter-service rivalry at its finest!
     

    Replies: @Anonymous, @AceDeuce

    It was broadcast on UK TV – back in the day when the BBC and ITV actually used to show recent Hollywood films – in the 1980s.

  151. @Observator
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    We once had an alcoholic president, the tragic Frank Pierce, who was killed by cirrhosis less than a dozen years after he left office. Worse, his successor James Buchanan is so much like Biden, a third-rate hack who ended up in the presidency after decades in politics, just because he was a wily nonentity with great endurance, and had made himself into a useful tool for special interests.

    Into the leadership vacuum of the 1850s stepped the most determined enemies of the American people, moving unopposed into positions of power everywhere in the national government, packing the Supreme Court, silencing voices of reason in the south, diverting weapons from US arsenals in the north to the south, for the war they long plotted to dismember the world’s only experiment in self-government, once they lost control of it.

    Those who yammer on today about a new civil war may unfortunately be right after all.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

    That was also the decade the Whigs died and a new party was born. It could get real interesting.

  152. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Hockamaw

    My barber was trying to retire anyway. A guy in his seventies who restores Corvette cars, he was having trouble finding a young man to take on loyal customers like me. He just couldn't quit on us. This has given him the opportunity.

    God bless him, and Bye Bye to another piece of American Pie.
    .
    https://s1.cdn.autoevolution.com/images/news/gallery/tuxedo-black-1967-chevrolet-corvette-l88-convertible-is-the-only-one-of-its-kind_18.jpg
    Yes, I know Joe Biden has one, but so does my barber, and it looks just like this, side pipes and all.

    Replies: @danand

    “…I know Joe Biden has one…”

    Fortunately Joe can no longer recall where he left the keys.

    D4EB00B5-5E53-45BB-9269-E3CC38EAD773

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
  153. @Alden
    @Jack D

    It was about 2/3 died. And it was diphtheria. The women and children who lived in the ship died more than the men who spent the day and many nights on the shore. Good thing more men survived because the Indians weren’t happy with these illegal immigrants.

    They landed in the first place they could.

    Diphtheria rampant throughout the world till the 1930s when a major vaccine campaign eradicated it.

    Replies: @Father O'Hara, @Ancient Briton

    King James granted a charter for the Pilgrims and others to settle, so not illegal.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Ancient Briton

    The Indians considered the English arrivals illegal. Did James give the pilgrims or the Virginia company the charter? Was the charter for their planned destination What’s now Maryland or where they ended up Mass?

    , @Alden
    @Ancient Briton

    You can read the charter on historyisfun. org.
    The charter was to the Virginia Company, not the pilgrims.

    The Virginia Company drew up a contract. In exchange for the trip to the America and supplies for the first couple years, the pilgrims would work for the Virginia Company 5 days a week, themselves 1 day a week and one day for their sabbath. There wasn’t any provision for this arrangement to end after the Virginia company was re paid. The contract would just continue with no end.

    The pilgrims realized they would be starving serfs. So they rejected the Virginia Company and financed the voyage and bought the supplies themselves. The major financier was William Mullins who sold his home/workshop and other real estate for 280 marks. The others who had real estate also sold up and contributed to rent the ships and buy the supplies.

    So they sailed without any official charter from King James or tied to the Virginia Company

    When I googled the charter I saw the title of a NYTimes article about us. “ The vicious reality behind the first Thanksgiving” Shows how far advanced the Jewish genocide against Whites has advanced. Only 13 years ago there was a big celebration for the Jamestown settlement. The Queen even came over. 2020 Mayflower nothing but hatred for us.

    Thanks for the information. Adds to my knowledge about the settlement.

  154. @Stan Adams
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Der Bidenator offers plenty of (tragi)comedic material. The road ahead will be awfully bumpy, but it will be one hell of a ride.

    Say what you will about Joltin' Joe, but he's surprisingly photogenic:

    https://www.scriberrnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/feat.jpg

    (Wrong organ, Joe. It's your heart that's supposed to bleed.)

    https://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/b1a0707fa083879dc67c4841440e3015b4123a03/c=0-374-3745-2490/local/-/media/2017/06/26/Wilmington/Wilmington/636340820833333076-062617-BidenPool-SP729.JPG

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/11/20/14/35913026-8970247-image-m-4_1605882769599.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @Adam Smith, @Hippopotamusdrome

  155. @danand
    @Jack D

    "...last November marked 400 years since the Pilgrims landed."

    As a minor way of celebrating, purchased sheets of the these stamps. Sent them out to under 30 relatives and acquaintances. For some, I might guess, a sheet of letter stamps will make for a lifetime supply.

    https://flic.kr/p/2ktK6SK

    Would imagine the 2020 stamps celebrating passage of our 19 amendment (women suffrage) a century back proved more popular. I lieu of Mayflowers, sent these to the lone pussy hat demonstrator I’m acquainted with.

    Wonder how well Gwen Ifill’s stamp did, I had forgotten she was gone. Guess she took it with her as to whether or not she was an original hoaxer. Hoax or no, she gave hope and inspiration to the “Jussie Smolletts” who were to follow:

    “While at Simmons College, Ifill interned for the Boston Herald-American. One day at work, she discovered a note on her desk that read, "Nigger go home." After showing the note to editors at the newspaper, who "were horrified", they offered her a job when she graduated from college in 1977. Ifill's close friend Michele Norris stated that Ifill said "that was really unfortunate, but I have work to do. And that's how she got the job. She didn't get the job out of sympathy. She got the job because she didn't let that slow her down."”

    https://flic.kr/p/2ktEW1e

    (Got a sheet of Palmar's for my own mailings.)

    Replies: @Polistra

    Can’t believe there’s a stamp for Gwen Ifill, but what do I know. I do know that it’s an open secret that a successful hate hoax is the ticket to rewards for every POC who gets away with it, which is about 99% of them.

  156. @Abe
    @Londoner


    How would you rate Gary Oldman versus Christian Bale?
     
    I love Gary Oldman! He also has an amazing ability to blend into a role (cf. his blackish pimp character in TRUE ROMANCE, or his equally wonderful- and wonderfully unrecognizable- performance in Coppola’s DRACULA). With that said he’s never been able to truly pull of the movie star bit and in recent years his performances have all had a sort of scene-chewy bluster to them, so despite his overall greatness (and in spite of his being ideologically one of us) I still have to give the edge to Bale.

    Replies: @Sick 'n Tired

    Gary Oldman is a great actor who seems to be able to morph into almost any role, Bale as a method actor changes his entire physical form for his roles, to the point he is almost unrecognizable. From becoming almost a human skeleton in the Machinist, a skinny crackhead in The Fighter, being in peak physical shape for 3 Batman films, to gaining 70lbs to play Dick Cheney, he takes the cake.

  157. @Anonymous
    We're not gonna make it... are we.

    Replies: @Rob (London)

    I re-watched T2 for the first time in several years last night. I still love it, but for the first time its weaknesses felt glaring. Namely, Linda Hamilton’s limited acting ability (she’s not terrible, but…), nearly every scene with Robert Furlong in it, and the voice-overs. Any movie that relies on narrative voice-overs has failed to some extent, and this isn’t an exception.

    Arnold, Robert and every action scene, though – still amazing.

    • Replies: @Hiop
    @Rob (London)

    I like T2, but the first one is way better. I agree, Furlong is awful.

  158. @AceDeuce
    Denis Leary once opined (which means that Bill Hicks probably said it first) that guys in the 70s were in the middle of the Sexual Revolution and wore clothes that guaranteed they wouldn't get laid.

    Not true, BTW, there was lots of getting laid....; )--although I thought then as well as now that the styles were rather cringeworthy.

    Although, I just saw some wedding pictures of a family member from the mid 70s, and while clothes and hair were in the 70s styles, they weren't terrible, and the people sure looked a lot better and more capable than the downtrodden mopish muppetlike schmoos wandering around nowadays. Happy, together White people who weren't about to take much schitt off of anyone--that's what you had then. (Off topic--my beloved grandmother looked so young in the pictures that I just saw--I did the math and realized that she was only a couple of years older than I am now, Sigh).

    Happy White folks are Public Enemy # 1 now, and it looks like the plots against them worked.

    BTW--one thing about Pedo Joezheimer's Biden. When I lived in DC in the 80s, insiders tabbed the Sniffer as one of the dumbest members of Congress, which is like calling someone the tallest guy in the NBA, and they also said that he was one of the meanest, with a foul temper and high-handed attitude to his staff and others "below" him.

    And you mention his athletic exploits without talking about his Vietnam draft-induced "asthma", which arrived out of the blue, got him ( I think) five medical deferments, and then miraculously "healed" after the war.

    Replies: @Rob (London)

    Sounds like Biden has quite a few key (negative) attributes in common with the guy he’s replacing, then.

  159. @Hockamaw
    Objectively, the best photo of Joe Biden is that photo of him campaigning at a pool in a black area of Delaware and he’s climbed up on the lifeguard stand like a tribal god surrounded by a huge mass of adoring Afro-Americans.

    https://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/077f5b4a3e7b4c07625bbff10f5591025cb8df44/c=193-0-3518-2500/local/-/media/2017/06/26/Wilmington/Wilmington/636340820833333076-062617-BidenPool-SP729.JPG?width=520&height=390&fit=crop

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @James O'Meara, @Rob (London)

    It’s C-3PO pretending to be an Ewok god in “Return of the Jedi”. Uncannily so.

  160. @turtle
    Creepy Joe today:
    https://cdni.rt.com/files/2021.01/article/6005bac985f5405dbc5ad668.JPG

    Replies: @Buck Ransom

    Saint Joe

  161. @MEH 0910
    @Stan Adams

    Lost Video Of Joe Biden Expressing His Segregationist Anti-Busing Views To The Media In 1977
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S970NoYPKWs


    Lost Video Of Joe Biden Expressing His Segregationist Anti-Busing Views To The Media In 1977

    Follow ThePoliClips on Twitter:
    https://twitter.com/THEPOLICLIPS
     

    https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/video/joe-biden-school-busing-amendment-1977-64016335

    Transcript for What Joe Biden said about school busing amendment in 1977

    The net effect is that there are will be fewer children. Reassigned schools. Ostensibly because. Findings by EGW Department of Education welfare but there's an imbalance in their school system. Misnomer that most people haven't they think most children that are being called bus are being bused to constitute as a consequence the court orders and that's just not true. There are more children on buses. As a consequence of eight GW's threats to withhold funds. To a school district unless they and there are as a consequence the court order. And it and that's why I think that that senator broke with justifiably concerned about him if you were proponent of busing. You should be worried about. Quote victory because it as. A much broader effect than most people think it had. Or. And court. It. More court ordered. I. I think not because this so called Byrd amendment which was an outgrowth of the so called Hyde amendment. Stood for almost two years about one challenge to it. And then on May 25 the attorney general of the United States of America wrote an opinion saying that it didn't have any effect. But everyone thought it had the effect and it stopped HEW from being involved in. Threatening to withhold funds they didn't do that anymore for the past two years in knowing challenge that not that I'm aware. On at least there was no court that ordered busing as a consequence of any challenge so the I think that is you know. That's a re hearing it's just not the case at least it wasn't for the past eighteen months to years I don't think it should be left to any bureaucrat any agency including even if a word the Justice Department which is the legal arm of the executive branch to make a determination the constitutional violation exists. Without having to make that judgment and go through a court to get that determination. You think president made by GW where no grievance seasons. I don't know I you know it depends on who will who says his agreements HEW they're very there's agreements someone complains or HEW administrator goes in and says. We think there's an imbalance or we think HEW. Thinks that there's a constitutional violation. All I'm saying is off Tom Eagleton said senator Eagleton said was HE WS no power to. And that is a power that should not be given to a bureaucratic gates we have courts there the district court any individual. Any school district any group of people can go into a federal district court and say we believe there's a constitutional violation the court decide. Are you infinity ego thing the court to Delaware. Hillary. Should be laughing. You would never vote for the game favorite goes do. Yes that is correct if they decided under the present ruling the Supreme Court which says the most recent ruling as a yes they would says there must be finding of signatory intent to discriminate. Very good. Or surety but that's for the course of the site is in. Network that's the whole issue the court. Yesterday if you I still oppose it yes because it is not in line with. The highest court in the lands ruling. A district court would be abusing their discretion if they did not find in my opinion clearly now under that. Under the cases of yesterday the last day in an opinion say. We specifically far too with the specifics angered Torre intent on the part of XYZ. To preclude. Blacks or Spanish speaking Americans or whomever from attending. This school therefore their constitutional rights were violated look folks we keep talking about this thing is being north vs south that's not the issue. It is rural vs urban and most of the Boston is taking place today is taking place in rural areas whether it be administratively ordered or court order. Now we're moving into applying the same standards to urban areas and is a standard that doesn't make sense it doesn't apply it doesn't hold. We're moving from trying to in this in in in urban areas we've had its integrated facilities but segregated neighborhoods. In an rural Ares we've traditionally had integrated neighborhood that segregated facilities. And to apply the same standard the same test for this north south thing is not really the issue. As professor Nathan Glazer at Harvard is indicated as doctor. Armored Rand Corp. James Coleman it. I just tell three days a year into today's hearings in Judiciary Committee and another bill life beyond this deal is bus. And there a uniform opinion of those testified that it is not a north south it's an urban rural question distinction. But you're everywhere your intent there're going to be. Segregated saying it. The question race you sat back movement. Desegregation and school when humans. Anyway answer that is I predict that the young black leadership of America will overwhelming to decide with me. I predict that in 1980. And 84 in my position will be totally vindicated by the sociologist and buys Civil Rights Act not come from that side of the track. That's where I'm from I was a defense lawyer I am a civil rights cases I sat in on route forty I mean not you know I'm not an a from the other side of this. And I happen to think that the one way to be ensure that you sent to civil rights movement in America further back is to continue to push bossy. Because it's a bankrupt policy. And that's that's that's that that's why I think will be vindicated I don't I don't include myself with pro or anti busing fourth I think the only group that can determine. Whether or not a constitutional violation existed the federal courts the United States America no one else has that right secondly. A federal court the United States American determining a violation. Of the constitution with regard school desegregation cases must find. That there is a specific intent to segregate before they can order bus. That I abide by that I legislate by that I hold up. And there's there the standards we should prepare to who. It's difficult to establish intent but it's clearly possible factually can be established the court has the Supreme Court 820. Eight to zero ruled yesterday that they must find. And you very well knows this carpet covering this area's long as you have that. There is there aren't legal standards by which you bring in burdens of proof to establish whether or not there was a specific intent. And a court confined.

    This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.
     

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Curle, @AceDeuce

    Pedo Joe, Hillary and the rest were right about this stuff and the superpredator thing too.

    Busing RUINED several cities that hadn’t been yet ruined by negroes. Working class Whites were fooked with a sharp stick. And no one sided with them. There’s a lot of smug Boomer/Gen X twigbois and Karens ( not to mention their hopeless beanbag kids) who grew up in safe White suburbs thanks to their “racist” parents/grandparents getting out while the getting was good, and who would have benefitted from a year or two on one of those buses.

  162. @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer

    The Last Detail Theatrical Trailer
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZUfuN2DNJ0


    A 1973 film starring Jack Nicholson, directed by Hal Ashby (Shampoo). Also featuring Otis Young and a very young Randy Quaid. Very, very funny with an undertone of seriousness that catches up to the main characters by the end of the film. Nicholson is fantastic, as usual, but it's one of his smaller films that was immediately overshadowed by "Chinatown" and "Cuckoo's Nest" that followed in the next two years, respectively. At the time of the film's release, it was a huge success and Nicholson's performance was regarded highly. Columbia then pulled the film from release, rereleasing it closer to Oscar time, but any buzz that had been generated had worn off by that time. Still, Nicholson was nominated as was Robert Towne, the great screenwriter, and Randy Quaid for Best Supporting Actor. Based on the novel by Darryl Ponicsan. Highly recommended.
     

    The Last Detail
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1pdy4MFlq4

    A scene from the 1973 film The Last Detail directed by Hal Ashby.
     
    The Last Detail Bathroom Scene HQ
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dsw_a8jYm5g

    My favourite scene from one of my favourite movies. Inter-service rivalry at its finest!
     

    Replies: @Anonymous, @AceDeuce

    Also has a very young Gilda Radner. As well as Carol Kane and Michael Moriarty.

    Fun fact: Quaid (who was excellent) beat out a young kid named John Travolta for the role of the hapless sailor going to prison.

    Darryl Ponicsan is/was a very interesting writer. He was in the Navy himself.

  163. @Bardon Kaldian
    Right about the 70's. I've seen Three Days of the Condor a few weeks ago. Unbelievable how the movie has aged. Conversations (especially Dunaway-Redford), pauses, fashion, music, ... atrocious.

    All the President’s Men is even worse (pompous Jason Robards).

    Very, very few movies from that era have survived.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Known Fact, @gepay, @Mr. Anon, @Ganderson, @Hiop, @Alden

    The average 70s flick is superior to almost everything that contemporary Hollywood produces. 70s fashions and aesthics are heavenly compared to the present. I’ll take comb overs, sideburns, and leisure suits any day over: obesity, tattoos, rainbow hair, and droopy drawers. I don’t even want to think about the music industry. Every aspect of society has been ruined.

  164. @Rob (London)
    @Anonymous

    I re-watched T2 for the first time in several years last night. I still love it, but for the first time its weaknesses felt glaring. Namely, Linda Hamilton's limited acting ability (she's not terrible, but...), nearly every scene with Robert Furlong in it, and the voice-overs. Any movie that relies on narrative voice-overs has failed to some extent, and this isn't an exception.

    Arnold, Robert and every action scene, though - still amazing.

    Replies: @Hiop

    I like T2, but the first one is way better. I agree, Furlong is awful.

  165. @James O'Meara
    @Abe

    "The thing is- the large majority of people do not have the beautifully-symmetrical facial features necessary to pull off the simple hairstyles of that decade (basically long hair with a part right down the middle). "

    True that. There's a book called I think "Shag" that deals with the 70s and they made the illuminating point that everything was about "natural" which was interpreted to mean shaggy, from carpet (even in the bathroom; I've been in condos in NYC that survive from that era) to hair (face, head, and, um, elsewhere). Also avocado, banana and burnt sienna colors for furniture and appliances.

    I'm less outraged by 70s hairstyles, but improved dentistry is a no-brainer, a real deal-breaker for "let's go back to the good old days" of the 60s or 1800s. I like to say that "Everyone is a Traditionalist until they need dental work."

    I love Bill Murray but he's just a mess. Maybe he didn't have any work done and the makeup and camera work are what improved?

    Replies: @Abe, @Ozymandias

    Also avocado, banana and burnt sienna colors for furniture and appliances.

    Avocado Green, Harvest Gold, Cerulean Blue. Dig it, man.

  166. @Abe
    @Rob McX


    Actually, men’s 1970s fashions and hairstyles tend to make guys look sleazy in retrospect.
     
    1976 may as well have been 476 in terms of hair technology. AMERICAN HUSTLE very knowingly goofed on men’s grooming and fashion from this era by making its two male A-list stars look as distasteful as possible, cramming Bradley Cooper into a ridiculous Jewfro in addition to a pair of ridiculously high-waisted, ridiculously-tight polyester disco pants. However I rest my case for why Christian Bale is the best actor of our era (yes, even better than Daniel Day-Lewis) by how in that flick he totally melts into the role of the sleezeball con artist with a comb-over (who else can do that AND own Batman?)

    The thing is- the large majority of people do not have the beautifully-symmetrical facial features necessary to pull off the simple hairstyles of that decade (basically long hair with a part right down the middle). Even the return of “Tin-Tin”/boy-band male hairstyles in the early Aughts, where product is used to sculpt hair into a semi-chaotic series of spiky ridges and wavy swoops, is a marked improvement as it distracts from the facial irregularities most people are burdened with.

    Probably the least heralded area of technological advancement of the last 30 or so years is all the gradual, incremental improvements in grooming, skincare, dentistry and minor corrective surgeries that have become common. Example- watched SCROOGED with my family right before Christmas. In HD. 2nd worst upgrade-to-HD viewing mistake I’ve ever made (worst being rewatching SONG REMAINS THE SAME and realizing Robert Plant definitely did not wear underwear in 1973). The craters on Murray’s face on a 70” TV in HD are so ginormous I was afraid I was going to lose my car keys in one of them. I am pretty sure I saw ST. VINCENT in HD and the pockmarks on his face are MUCH LESS pronounced, maybe even effectively gone, so clearly he had some sensible, corrective “work” done in that area over the last 10-15 years and like all the other advancements I’m thinking of was sensible, did its job fairly well, and did not draw undue attention to itself.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Reg Cæsar, @Londoner, @Rob McX, @the one they call Desanex, @ScarletNumber

    Does anybody remember laughter?

  167. @Cortes
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Perhaps it was really small beer?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_beer

    Drinking untreated water would be a likely shortcut to severe health problems even for the hardy people who had reached the relatively safe age of 5 in the days of primitive sanitation. Hence the use of infusions and beer.

    The Armada survivor whose account of time in Ireland is preserved in “God’s Obvious Design” * remarked that nobody drank water despite it seeming to him to be the best he’d ever tasted - buttermilk was what everyone drank.

    * A collection of papers from a symposium in 1988, editor Patrick Gallagher.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @ScarletNumber

    I don’t drink water; fish fuck in it.

  168. @ganderson
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Bardon, dunno how old you are, but I had to wear those clothes... fortunately by 1979 good sense had returned; the 80's were a pretty good men's fashion decade, on the whole.

    As for 70's movies, my own theory (to be taken with a grain of salt; I was young then, and I am not immune to "rose covered glasses-ism") is that, in the late 60's and early 70's, the studio system and the Hays Code began to break down. A whole bunch of directors lept into the breach- and made a bunch of good movies. Or I may just be an old fart remembering things that never happened!

    When my boys were still home I'd get a movie I'd seen as a youth, and we'd watch to see how well it held up. I remember that "The Taking of Pelham 1,2,3" with Walter Matthau, Robert Shaw and Martin Balsam still seemed fresh, while "Bananas", a movie I thought was the funniest thing ever at the time, sucked.

    Mel Brooks' good movies, "Blazing Saddles", "Young Frankenstein", and the sadly forgotten "The Twelve Chairs" were all made in the early to mid '70s

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    in the late 60’s and early 70’s, the studio system and the Hays Code began to break down

    This is exactly why movies started to become good at that point. Movies like My Fair Lady and The Sound of Music were certainly memorable, but I don’t know if they qualify as good, and never would have been made in the 70’s

    “The Taking of Pelham 1,2,3” with Walter Matthau, Robert Shaw and Martin Balsam still seemed fresh, while “Bananas”, a movie I thought was the funniest thing ever at the time, sucked

    The Taking of Pelham 1-2-3 is helped tremendously by its score, which was composed by David Shire, ex-husband of Talia and current husband of Didi Conn (Frenchy from Grease).

    I wouldn’t say Bananas sucked, but it is definitely dated. This was before Allen teamed up with Marshall Brickman, so it lacked a certain maturity. The courtroom scene has some good lines in it, though.

  169. Joe Biden is nothing. He is as mentally and physically deserted as a WalMart parking lot on a Sunday morning. Just some Happy Meal garbage drifting along in the wind, but that’s about all that there is to him…

    As a fraudulent President and despicable puppet of his Democratic handlers, he will make the following 3 crucial errors:

    1. He will go after the gun owners!
    After the riots and arson in Seattle and Portland and over 200 other American cities in 2020, people all over America are buying guns and ammo’ hand over fist, so going after all those evil AR-15’s is just the right ticket for a civil war. Now, leaving those gun owners alone would calm down things quite a bit for 2022, but to hell with that! The Democrats must have a clearly defined public enemy, and the NRA is just the right target. Until it all blows up in their faces again…

    2. He will go all Green Deal, in other words studiously pandering to AOC and her Lunatic Left, hoping to corral enough of those airhead activists and students to vote for him (or her..) in 2022.

    3. He will go total MMT (Marxist Monetary Theory), in other words to print as many new dollars as the economy needs to prop up the stock markets and to avoid an enonomic melt-down before the 2022 mid-term elections. But the Chinese may have other plans for just that, as they are hoarding gold by the hundreds of tons…

    So whatever happens, Congratulations to America, you are now officially a Banana Republic..

  170. I was going to mention how this hairstyle analysis represents the unserious logical dead end of Sailerism (assessing people by their physical features), and I was going to ask whether you think Biden is an ectomorph. Then I realized that you already went there:

    “cocky high school football star (skinny split end subtype) he was in c. 1960.”

  171. @Bardon Kaldian
    Right about the 70's. I've seen Three Days of the Condor a few weeks ago. Unbelievable how the movie has aged. Conversations (especially Dunaway-Redford), pauses, fashion, music, ... atrocious.

    All the President’s Men is even worse (pompous Jason Robards).

    Very, very few movies from that era have survived.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Known Fact, @gepay, @Mr. Anon, @Ganderson, @Hiop, @Alden

    I tried to watch Day of the Condor on TV several times. I just couldn’t last more than the first half hour.

  172. @Ancient Briton
    @Alden

    King James granted a charter for the Pilgrims and others to settle, so not illegal.

    Replies: @Alden, @Alden

    The Indians considered the English arrivals illegal. Did James give the pilgrims or the Virginia company the charter? Was the charter for their planned destination What’s now Maryland or where they ended up Mass?

  173. @Ancient Briton
    @Alden

    King James granted a charter for the Pilgrims and others to settle, so not illegal.

    Replies: @Alden, @Alden

    You can read the charter on historyisfun. org.
    The charter was to the Virginia Company, not the pilgrims.

    The Virginia Company drew up a contract. In exchange for the trip to the America and supplies for the first couple years, the pilgrims would work for the Virginia Company 5 days a week, themselves 1 day a week and one day for their sabbath. There wasn’t any provision for this arrangement to end after the Virginia company was re paid. The contract would just continue with no end.

    The pilgrims realized they would be starving serfs. So they rejected the Virginia Company and financed the voyage and bought the supplies themselves. The major financier was William Mullins who sold his home/workshop and other real estate for 280 marks. The others who had real estate also sold up and contributed to rent the ships and buy the supplies.

    So they sailed without any official charter from King James or tied to the Virginia Company

    When I googled the charter I saw the title of a NYTimes article about us. “ The vicious reality behind the first Thanksgiving” Shows how far advanced the Jewish genocide against Whites has advanced. Only 13 years ago there was a big celebration for the Jamestown settlement. The Queen even came over. 2020 Mayflower nothing but hatred for us.

    Thanks for the information. Adds to my knowledge about the settlement.

  174. They say you end up with the face you deserve as you get older. In his case it appears he had the face he deserved, or more accurately a face that revealed his nature at a fairly young age, but then lost it. He looks harmlessly avuncular now, but you could see at a glance that he was a weasel in his younger years.

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