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Esquire writer and murderer John J. Lennon (no relation to murderee John Lennon) asks in the New York Times:

“I Am Serving 28 Years to Life. Why Does One Person [the governor] Decide if I Deserve Mercy?”

Dear John J. Lennon: Just be happy that person is not me.

Two or three generations ago, it seemed like every famous writer adopted as his pet cause the release of some violent jailbird with a winning literary style: Norman Mailer and Jack Abbott, William F. Buckley and Edgar Smith, William Styron (assisted by the young George Will) and Benjamin Reid. Upon their release, all three soon committed new serious crimes, like in Evelyn Waugh’s Mr. Loveday’s Outing.

As Humbert Humbert explained in Lolita, ” You can always count on a murderer for a fancy prose style.”

 
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  1. Yes, yes, you’re gonna lose that case.
    You’re gonna looooooose that ca-ase
    You’re gonna loo-oo-oo-oo-oose that ca-ase.

    • LOL: Not Raul
  2. People, people! Let’s not judge this guy to death!

    “A murder, after all, is just an extroverted suicide.” (Graham Chapman)

    “This is supposed to be a happy occasion! Let’s not argue about who killed who..” (Michael Palin)

  3. Jack Unterweger was an Austrian in prison for killing a girl but he was a good writer so other writers and various intellectuals got him released and he went on to murder about a dozen more women.

    • Thanks: George
    • Replies: @bomag
    @eee

    The Innocence Project was in the news for awhile, using newer DNA evidence to free some convicts.

    I started hearing about some of the newly released committing new crimes; now I don't hear about the Innocence Project very much. Hmmm.

    Replies: @Feryl, @John Derbyshire

    , @AndrewR
    @eee

    Based

    , @nokangaroos
    @eee

    Beat me to it ...
    though seeing all these public intellectuals and politicians with egg
    on their faces was priceless :D

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @eee

    Too bad for John Wayne Gacy, Ted Bundy and Jeffery Dahmer. If only they had literary skills their writing could have meant freedom.

    , @Feryl
    @eee

    The impression I get is that fascination with criminals among the literati/intellectual elite is caused by the fact that most of them did not actually have sustained contact with low life street scum in their personal lives. Even if they had a lower class background, they usually did not associate with the low lives (people into reading and writing are usually too introverted and geeky to be able to associate with thugs) With black criminals there's also the racial guilt factor, and the "room brightening smile" (e.g. Asian and Mestizo criminals are boring in comparison).

    Worth noting too that people born in the 1920's-early 1940's came to find the social calm of the 1930's-1950's "boring" so they came to see the crime waves of the 60's and 70's as part of the new "vibrant" culture. It was Boomers who launched and supported the "tough on crime" culture of the 80's and 90's, even as pre-Boomer movie directors kept making movies about criminal protagonists which portrayed them as having some kind of redeemable qualities or at least intriguing moral and mental complexity. Scorsese, Micheal Mann, and Brian DePalma are all pre-Boomers, while iconic Boomers Lucas and Spielberg were eventually scorned for promoting feel good fantasy with Good Guys and Bad Guys. Pre-Boomer Robert De Niro has of course played countless assholes and losers on screen, often under the guidance of Scorsese.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  4. Let’s face it, relatively speaking, prisons these days are fairly cush compared to 100-150 years ago – a/c, heating, three squares a day, libraries, workout space etc. Let’s do away with all that crap and bring back chain gangs and other forms of hard labor. Let’s also bring back a death penalty that is actually enforced on a very timely basis. It should be someplace would be criminals would fear being sent to – maybe a little vigilante justice added here and there for some spice.

    • Agree: Kylie
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @usNthem

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6DpVYKuSfnY

    , @James Speaks
    @usNthem

    What I am going to suggest has the disadvantage of potentially executing innocent people.

    Install gallows in the court room. Execute upon conviction. Immediately.

    Now consider the advantage. Those same gallows would be present for all trials and would prove to be a useful reminder of the consequence of accidentally murdering another human.

    Also, make forcible rape a capital offense.

    , @AnotherDad
    @usNthem

    There is no reason to include people in your society that piss all over your society's norms.

    Execution or expulsion suffices. With that, you could leave your doors and cars unlocked, women could walk down our streets at anytime without fear.



    And--the obligatory add--it is very clear that after 50+ of minoritarianism we no longer are a nation with anything resembling common norms.

    So let's just make it official.

  5. I have to admire Biden‘s extemporaneous prose style (I’m trying to make this not so O/T). As you probably heard, Biden forgot the name of Australian PM Morrison, but quickly came up with “that fella down under.” Clearly, Biden could cope with any Biden senior moment. For example…

    Macron – the fella with the baguettes
    Ji Jinping – the fella with the Great Wall

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @SafeNow


    Ji Jinping – the fella with the Great Wall
     
    https://i.inews.co.uk/content/uploads/2018/09/pilkington-640x360.png

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @AnotherDad

    , @fish
    @SafeNow

    Amrullah Saleh - that fella with our airbase

    , @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @SafeNow

    Ariel Henry- That clean cut, well spoken, light skinned niggra doctor fellow who's in charge of Haiti now.

    , @James J O'Meara
    @SafeNow

    As always.... "imagine if Trump had...." Oh, the howls from the MSM for his removal.

  6. I totally agree. I looked it up and Raskolnikov only served 8 years? Weird.

    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
    @JimDandy

    Not every nation conceives of criminal penalties as occasions to indulge in sadistic fantasies (as with several commenters here). I'll bet the whole Christian thing had something to do with it, and penalties likely went up considerably under the atheists.

    How does the Manly Right reconcile this with their nostalgia for Orthodox Russia?

  7. Anon[510] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Some major behavioral genetics results have come out in the past few years based on GWAS (genome-wide association studies/scores). These have used very large databases that have been cobbled together from many smaller databases. There have been three of these databases, each larger than the prior. Now there is a fourth. Unlike the earlier databases, which anyone could download, this new version has a contractual restriction:

    I will not use these data to make comparisons across ancestral groups. Such comparisons could animate biological conceptualizations of racial superiority.

    “In the Conduct of Research with Vulnerable Populations, Researchers Must Address Concerns that Participation May Lead to Group Harm.”

    This is pretty blatant. Until now researchers would simply hold the data and not respond to emailed requests to obtain it if they had any suspicions it would be used for HBD research. I suppose with these mega-sized, international databases, too many people have control over the data and there are too many chances for it being accidentally given to the “wrong types of researchers.” So they are just coming out and saying what they have though all along: You cannot pursue this line of science. And why not? It might have extra-scientific bad side effects, such as “stigmatization of, discrimination against, or persecution of vulnerable populations [i.e., black people].”

    But beyond that, you cannot do that kind of research because it’s just scientifically incorrect, to wit:

    Such comparisons are usually scientifically confounded due to the effects of linkage disequilibrium, gene-environment correlation, gene-environment interactions, and other methodological problems.

    The funny thing is, this is just a contractual agreement without payment of any consideration, so it is probably unenforceable. And they as much as admit this when they tell you what will happen if you break your promise:

    — They will fink on you to your IRB, department chair, funder, journal editor, and so on.

    — They will block your internet IP address; take that!

    — They will publicly dis you in an attempt to raise a social media storm against you and get you fired and cancelled.

    I wonder if they spike each data download with a little bit of fake data so they can trace leaked databases if an authorized downloader decided to share his data? To get around that you would need two co-conspirators to download the data and then diff the files to make sure they are the same.

    https://emilkirkegaard.dk/en/2021/09/thou-shallt-not-look-at-the-polygenic-scores/

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri, bomag, ic1000, res
    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Anon

    Science shaming we might as well call it, and I'm sure the mean girls perched at Science and Nature will jump at the opportunity.

    Eppur si muove, bitches.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Anon

    https://twitter.com/Steve_Sailer/status/1438776413616672774

    https://twitter.com/polygenicity/status/1438644650026352641

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @res

    , @El Dato
    @Anon

    Fools and Knaves.

    The Priesthood telling people not to look at the sky because this could reveal truths irreconciliable with dogma.

    Literally Soyjak crying NOOOO!

    This is life having an addendum on the GPL disallowing software use for mafia goals.

    If they were really worried about "culnerable groups" they pack their research up and open a bar or a hedge fund.

    Kornbluth (of course) had a short story on that called "Gomez" who forgets all about the physics that may be used for the next nuke or worse.

  8. A surprisingly good writer was the Scottish serial killer responsible for one of the worst crimes I’ve ever read about: Ian Brady of the Moors Murders. He wrote a controversial book called The Gates of Janus: Serial Killing and Its Analysis. It’s surprisingly well-written considering Brady’s working class background (he left school at 15), juvenile delinquency, and psychopathy.

    Thankfully, Brady did not wish to leave prison, and everyone agreed with him on that point.

    • Replies: @kihowi
    @Pincher Martin

    Writers from not very intellectual backgrounds are the worst because they feel that they have to prove themselves with every sentence, and you end up with books like this with greek mythology in the title for no good reason.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  9. @SafeNow
    I have to admire Biden‘s extemporaneous prose style (I’m trying to make this not so O/T). As you probably heard, Biden forgot the name of Australian PM Morrison, but quickly came up with “that fella down under.” Clearly, Biden could cope with any Biden senior moment. For example…

    Macron - the fella with the baguettes
    Ji Jinping - the fella with the Great Wall

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @fish, @Jim Bob Lassiter, @James J O'Meara

    Ji Jinping – the fella with the Great Wall

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Reg Cæsar

    Karl Pilkington: anti-comedy genius.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Reg Cæsar

    Compared to what the US has on it's border, 500 years later ... it's pretty "Great".

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  10. Two or three generations ago, it seemed like every famous writer adopted as his pet cause the release of some violent jailbird with a winning literary style:

    The Murderatti.

    William Styron (assisted by the young George Will) and Benjamin Reid.

    George Will, huh? Figures. I had never heard about that before.

    Why, now I have a whole new reason to despise George F. Will.

  11. Why do serial killers have groupies?

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I don't know, but it is odd:

    https://external-preview.redd.it/Ww78DT17dw88xFAZUVyGsp01yYapdUb76K4eMQy04mY.jpg?width=960&crop=smart&auto=webp&s=29aa81b5dc5e8f1b4c84a7209cc624acf7888268

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    , @R.G. Camara
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Because women love psychopathic behavior.

    Replies: @Erik Sieven, @Hangnail Hans, @SunBakedSuburb

    , @J.Ross
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Basic evolutionary psychology. This is what real alphas did for almost all of our history.

  12. So, I want to kill
    This waitress
    She’s worked here a year
    Longer than I
    If I did it fast, then
    That’s an act of kindness

    But I believe in peace
    Yeah, I believe in peace, bitch!
    I believe in peace!!

    So, I want to kill
    This killing wish
    There’s too many stars, and
    Not enough sky
    Boys all think
    She’s living kindness…

    Ask a fellow waitress.

    Ask a fellow
    Waitress.

    — Tori Amos, “The Waitress”

    • Thanks: Rob
  13. Does Camus’s Meursault * count?

    * Macabre wordplay in the name? Like “Deathleap”.

  14. Wasn’t it Bismarck who said the solution to the Irish Question was to move them all to the Netherlands and all the Dutch to Ireland? The Dutch would quickly have Ireland thriving, while the Irish would be too busy drinking and fighting to tend to the dikes so they’d all drown.

    • LOL: R.G. Camara
    • Replies: @Ganderson
    @Thomas

    A friend of mine used to say we could make Northern Ireland the Palestinian homeland.

  15. Does anyone remember Jack Abbot? In prison for forgery he killed another inmate, escaped from prison and participated in a bank robbery. Back in the can he came to the attention of author Norman Mailer who had already gone gaga over another killer, Gary Gilmore. Apparently Abbot could really turn a phrase so Mailer and other literary critics championed his efforts at seeking parole. He was paroled in 1981 and six measly weeks later he stabbed a waiter to death in NYC. Eventually he landed back in prison. Desied parole in 2001 he did the world a favor and hung himself in his cell in 2002.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Enemy of Earth

    Murderer Gary Gilmore's brother Mikal Gilmore was a top rock critic for Rolling Stone.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @Hangnail Hans
    @Enemy of Earth

    Norman Mailer reminds me of Truman Capote falling in love with his In Cold Blood murderer.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @6dust6
    @Enemy of Earth

    Yes, I remember the parole of Jack Abbott in the early 80s, he was released mainly on the irresponsible recommendations of Norman Mailer. Mailer vouched that this violent criminal was talented enough to earn a living off of his writing. (Very few responsible people can write for a living.) I recall at the time the Mailer theory that violence and antisocial behavior were somehow a necessary ingredient to making great art. I read In The Belly of the Beast back then. I remember it was short book told in a series of vignettes. The prose was vivid, but the work was not in anyway indicative of a great writer in the making and I was sure that there were writers of deeper talent waiting in the wings for their shot and felt it was solely his criminality that allowed Abbott the opportunity to publish a book. I was also shocked that Mailer bore little responsibility for this botched case of social engineering as well was the death of that poor waiter.

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @Enemy of Earth

    These guys should be executed max 6 months after the verdict, plus some 1-2 weeks of real torture, to get the taste of their own medicine..

    End of story.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    , @6dust6
    @Enemy of Earth

    Yes, I remember the parole of Jack Abbott in the early 80s, he was released mainly on the irresponsible recommendations of Norman Mailer. Mailer vouched that this violent criminal was talented enough to earn a living off of his writing. (Very few responsible people can write for a living.) I recall at the time the Mailer theory that violence and antisocial behavior were somehow a necessary ingredient to making great art. I read In The Belly of the Beast back then and it was a short book written in a series of vignettes. The prose was vivid, but the work was not in anyway indicative of a great writer in the making and I was sure that there were writers with deeper talent waiting in the wings for their shot and felt it was mostly his background that allowed him the opportunity to publish a book. I was also shocked that Mailer bore little responsibility for this botched case of social engineering as well as the death of that poor waiter.

  16. @JohnnyWalker123
    Why do serial killers have groupies?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @R.G. Camara, @J.Ross

    I don’t know, but it is odd:

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Pincher Martin

    Nah, she was a gold digger, not a groupie. Turns out she figured if she married Charlie she would get his body when he died and she could put it on display like Lenin and charge admission.

    https://nypost.com/2015/02/08/charles-mansons-fiancee-wanted-to-marry-him-for-his-corpse-source/

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  17. @JohnnyWalker123
    Why do serial killers have groupies?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @R.G. Camara, @J.Ross

    Because women love psychopathic behavior.

    • Replies: @Erik Sieven
    @R.G. Camara

    probably only a small minority does, the same way a small minority of men and women have other weird preferences. But for those who do love psychopathic behavior it is a good idea to turn to convicted serial killers. At least they are legally certified psychopaths, and certainly not normal guys just pretending to be psychopaths.

    Replies: @SaneClownPosse

    , @Hangnail Hans
    @R.G. Camara

    Men want a good girl who will be bad only for them. Women want a bad boy who will be good only for them.

    Thus: Men and women are delusional.

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @R.G. Camara

    "Because women love psychopathic behavior,"

    I don't believe you know much about women. Do you watch a lot of porn?

  18. @Enemy of Earth
    Does anyone remember Jack Abbot? In prison for forgery he killed another inmate, escaped from prison and participated in a bank robbery. Back in the can he came to the attention of author Norman Mailer who had already gone gaga over another killer, Gary Gilmore. Apparently Abbot could really turn a phrase so Mailer and other literary critics championed his efforts at seeking parole. He was paroled in 1981 and six measly weeks later he stabbed a waiter to death in NYC. Eventually he landed back in prison. Desied parole in 2001 he did the world a favor and hung himself in his cell in 2002.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hangnail Hans, @6dust6, @Bardon Kaldian, @6dust6

    Murderer Gary Gilmore’s brother Mikal Gilmore was a top rock critic for Rolling Stone.

    • Thanks: Dnought
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer

    His other brother David was a guitarist for the Pink Floyd.

    Replies: @Jack Armstrong

  19. @usNthem
    Let’s face it, relatively speaking, prisons these days are fairly cush compared to 100-150 years ago - a/c, heating, three squares a day, libraries, workout space etc. Let’s do away with all that crap and bring back chain gangs and other forms of hard labor. Let’s also bring back a death penalty that is actually enforced on a very timely basis. It should be someplace would be criminals would fear being sent to - maybe a little vigilante justice added here and there for some spice.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @James Speaks, @AnotherDad

    • LOL: usNthem
  20. Actress Susan Sarandon was a big Jack Henry Abbott groupie. She was pregnant when Abbott went to trial for killing the waiter in a NYC restaurant after Mailer got him sprung. She named the baby after him, “Jack Henry.”

    She’s a big anti-death penalty advocate– but … some death’s are more equal than others.

  21. Oh yes, Normal Mailer, himself, nearly pulled a “Jack Abbott.”

    From Wikipedia:

    “During a November 1960 party celebrating his mayoral candidacy, American public intellectual Norman Mailer twice stabbed his wife Adele Morales with a pen-knife in a drunken altercation, nearly taking her life. The incident, thought by many accounts swept under the rug by Mailer and his associates, had a lasting impact on his public and critical legacy and persona. ”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stabbing_of_Adele_Morales_by_Norman_Mailer

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Stephen Paul Foster

    One of the funniest moments I've ever seen on any talk show happened in 1971 when Gore Vidal and Norman Mailer appeared on the Dick Cavett Show. A drunk Mailer was furious at Vidal for writing an essay entitled "Miller, Mailer, Manson" in the New York Review of Books. Mailer felt Vidal's essay played off the public's knowledge of Mailer's stabbing of his ex-wife.

    Here's the long version:

    https://youtu.be/Nb1w_qoioOk

    If you don't have the time, here's the shorter version:

    https://youtu.be/C8m9vDRe8fw

    As you can see, America's public intellectuals were probably as crazy back then as they are today, but they also were a lot more fun to listen to.

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

    , @J.Ross
    @Stephen Paul Foster

    Well there ya go, William Burroughs is a more effective Great American Novelist than Norman Mailer; the spouses he kills stay dead.

    Replies: @Joe S.Walker

  22. “I Am Serving 28 Years to Life. Why Does One Person [the governor] Decide if I Deserve Mercy?”

    Because one fine day you decided an innocent person didn’t deserve mercy.

  23. @Anon
    OT

    Some major behavioral genetics results have come out in the past few years based on GWAS (genome-wide association studies/scores). These have used very large databases that have been cobbled together from many smaller databases. There have been three of these databases, each larger than the prior. Now there is a fourth. Unlike the earlier databases, which anyone could download, this new version has a contractual restriction:

    I will not use these data to make comparisons across ancestral groups. Such comparisons could animate biological conceptualizations of racial superiority.

    "In the Conduct of Research with Vulnerable Populations, Researchers Must Address Concerns that Participation May Lead to Group Harm."
     
    This is pretty blatant. Until now researchers would simply hold the data and not respond to emailed requests to obtain it if they had any suspicions it would be used for HBD research. I suppose with these mega-sized, international databases, too many people have control over the data and there are too many chances for it being accidentally given to the "wrong types of researchers." So they are just coming out and saying what they have though all along: You cannot pursue this line of science. And why not? It might have extra-scientific bad side effects, such as "stigmatization of, discrimination against, or persecution of vulnerable populations [i.e., black people]."

    But beyond that, you cannot do that kind of research because it's just scientifically incorrect, to wit:

    Such comparisons are usually scientifically confounded due to the effects of linkage disequilibrium, gene-environment correlation, gene-environment interactions, and other methodological problems.
     
    The funny thing is, this is just a contractual agreement without payment of any consideration, so it is probably unenforceable. And they as much as admit this when they tell you what will happen if you break your promise:

    -- They will fink on you to your IRB, department chair, funder, journal editor, and so on.

    -- They will block your internet IP address; take that!

    -- They will publicly dis you in an attempt to raise a social media storm against you and get you fired and cancelled.

    I wonder if they spike each data download with a little bit of fake data so they can trace leaked databases if an authorized downloader decided to share his data? To get around that you would need two co-conspirators to download the data and then diff the files to make sure they are the same.

    https://emilkirkegaard.dk/en/2021/09/thou-shallt-not-look-at-the-polygenic-scores/

    Replies: @Pericles, @Almost Missouri, @El Dato

    Science shaming we might as well call it, and I’m sure the mean girls perched at Science and Nature will jump at the opportunity.

    Eppur si muove, bitches.

  24. @R.G. Camara
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Because women love psychopathic behavior.

    Replies: @Erik Sieven, @Hangnail Hans, @SunBakedSuburb

    probably only a small minority does, the same way a small minority of men and women have other weird preferences. But for those who do love psychopathic behavior it is a good idea to turn to convicted serial killers. At least they are legally certified psychopaths, and certainly not normal guys just pretending to be psychopaths.

    • Replies: @SaneClownPosse
    @Erik Sieven

    And in most cases he will be locked up forever, meaning the groupie won't be ever be alone in the woods with her boy toy.

  25. @Stephen Paul Foster
    Oh yes, Normal Mailer, himself, nearly pulled a "Jack Abbott."

    From Wikipedia:

    "During a November 1960 party celebrating his mayoral candidacy, American public intellectual Norman Mailer twice stabbed his wife Adele Morales with a pen-knife in a drunken altercation, nearly taking her life. The incident, thought by many accounts swept under the rug by Mailer and his associates, had a lasting impact on his public and critical legacy and persona. "

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stabbing_of_Adele_Morales_by_Norman_Mailer

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @J.Ross

    One of the funniest moments I’ve ever seen on any talk show happened in 1971 when Gore Vidal and Norman Mailer appeared on the Dick Cavett Show. A drunk Mailer was furious at Vidal for writing an essay entitled “Miller, Mailer, Manson” in the New York Review of Books. Mailer felt Vidal’s essay played off the public’s knowledge of Mailer’s stabbing of his ex-wife.

    Here’s the long version:

    If you don’t have the time, here’s the shorter version:

    As you can see, America’s public intellectuals were probably as crazy back then as they are today, but they also were a lot more fun to listen to.

    • Replies: @Hangnail Hans
    @Pincher Martin

    Norman Mailer reminds me of certain prickly, childish egotists in other places and times, like ours. He probably never forgave Cavett for taking sides against him, even though he clearly asked for it. The aggrieved victim--everything is always someone else's fault.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Pincher Martin

  26. @R.G. Camara
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Because women love psychopathic behavior.

    Replies: @Erik Sieven, @Hangnail Hans, @SunBakedSuburb

    Men want a good girl who will be bad only for them. Women want a bad boy who will be good only for them.

    Thus: Men and women are delusional.

    • Agree: Mark G., fish, Rich
    • LOL: Jus' Sayin'...
  27. @Enemy of Earth
    Does anyone remember Jack Abbot? In prison for forgery he killed another inmate, escaped from prison and participated in a bank robbery. Back in the can he came to the attention of author Norman Mailer who had already gone gaga over another killer, Gary Gilmore. Apparently Abbot could really turn a phrase so Mailer and other literary critics championed his efforts at seeking parole. He was paroled in 1981 and six measly weeks later he stabbed a waiter to death in NYC. Eventually he landed back in prison. Desied parole in 2001 he did the world a favor and hung himself in his cell in 2002.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hangnail Hans, @6dust6, @Bardon Kaldian, @6dust6

    Norman Mailer reminds me of Truman Capote falling in love with his In Cold Blood murderer.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Hangnail Hans

    Capote had a gay crush on one of the "In Cold Blood" murderers, but it didn't seem to warp his judgment they deserved what was coming to them. From my review of the 2005 movie "Capote" with the late Philip Seymour Hoffman:

    Capote helped the pair get a good lawyer to craft their first appeal against the death penalty. But after he'd completed most of his manuscript and realized how strong it was, his need for a dramatic ending (such as, say, their hangings) made him increasingly impatient with their endless appeals.

    Screenwriter Dan Futterman attacks Capote for being a heartless monster who manipulated poor Miller into telling him his secrets even though Capote eventually hoped for his execution.

    In reality, of course, the true monsters were the murderers, who had decided days before their home invasion to shotgun the whole family to eliminate all witnesses. With his conventional liberal bias against capital punishment, Futterman doesn't realize that without the death penalty, repeat offenders, who face long prison terms if convicted of robbery, would more often find it logical to kill their robbery victims to keep their identities secret.
     

    Replies: @JimDandy

  28. @Pincher Martin
    @Stephen Paul Foster

    One of the funniest moments I've ever seen on any talk show happened in 1971 when Gore Vidal and Norman Mailer appeared on the Dick Cavett Show. A drunk Mailer was furious at Vidal for writing an essay entitled "Miller, Mailer, Manson" in the New York Review of Books. Mailer felt Vidal's essay played off the public's knowledge of Mailer's stabbing of his ex-wife.

    Here's the long version:

    https://youtu.be/Nb1w_qoioOk

    If you don't have the time, here's the shorter version:

    https://youtu.be/C8m9vDRe8fw

    As you can see, America's public intellectuals were probably as crazy back then as they are today, but they also were a lot more fun to listen to.

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

    Norman Mailer reminds me of certain prickly, childish egotists in other places and times, like ours. He probably never forgave Cavett for taking sides against him, even though he clearly asked for it. The aggrieved victim–everything is always someone else’s fault.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Hangnail Hans

    Norman Mailer was such an enormous screw-up that I started to like him after awhile.

    , @Pincher Martin
    @Hangnail Hans

    Actually, after the show, Mailer got on well with both Cavett and Vidal. I think it took s a few years to repair his relationship with Vidal, but Mailer was not one to hold grudges.

    For such an insane man, Mailer could be disarmingly charming and even objective about his own flaws. You can even see flashes of that trait in the longer video, such as when he compliments Vidal for being a serious politician in comparison to Mailer's own amateurish attempt at public office. (In truth, neither one was a serious politician, but the point is that even in a fight Mailer was willing to concede points to his opponent.)

    But he was insane.

    Here's the infamous fight between Mailer and actor Rip Torn that took place on the set of one of Mailer's sad attempts at movie-making. Torn, who appears to be as insane as Mailer in this clip, tried to improvise a scene where he attacks Mailer's character with a hammer and things got out of hand.

    https://youtu.be/6AzmhorISf4

    Mailer bit part of Torn's ear off during the fight.

    Replies: @Jack D

  29. (Insert old SNL skit “Prose and Cons” here)

  30. @Hangnail Hans
    @Pincher Martin

    Norman Mailer reminds me of certain prickly, childish egotists in other places and times, like ours. He probably never forgave Cavett for taking sides against him, even though he clearly asked for it. The aggrieved victim--everything is always someone else's fault.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Pincher Martin

    Norman Mailer was such an enormous screw-up that I started to like him after awhile.

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
  31. @usNthem
    Let’s face it, relatively speaking, prisons these days are fairly cush compared to 100-150 years ago - a/c, heating, three squares a day, libraries, workout space etc. Let’s do away with all that crap and bring back chain gangs and other forms of hard labor. Let’s also bring back a death penalty that is actually enforced on a very timely basis. It should be someplace would be criminals would fear being sent to - maybe a little vigilante justice added here and there for some spice.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @James Speaks, @AnotherDad

    What I am going to suggest has the disadvantage of potentially executing innocent people.

    Install gallows in the court room. Execute upon conviction. Immediately.

    Now consider the advantage. Those same gallows would be present for all trials and would prove to be a useful reminder of the consequence of accidentally murdering another human.

    Also, make forcible rape a capital offense.

    • Agree: usNthem
  32. @Hangnail Hans
    @Enemy of Earth

    Norman Mailer reminds me of Truman Capote falling in love with his In Cold Blood murderer.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Capote had a gay crush on one of the “In Cold Blood” murderers, but it didn’t seem to warp his judgment they deserved what was coming to them. From my review of the 2005 movie “Capote” with the late Philip Seymour Hoffman:

    Capote helped the pair get a good lawyer to craft their first appeal against the death penalty. But after he’d completed most of his manuscript and realized how strong it was, his need for a dramatic ending (such as, say, their hangings) made him increasingly impatient with their endless appeals.

    Screenwriter Dan Futterman attacks Capote for being a heartless monster who manipulated poor Miller into telling him his secrets even though Capote eventually hoped for his execution.

    In reality, of course, the true monsters were the murderers, who had decided days before their home invasion to shotgun the whole family to eliminate all witnesses. With his conventional liberal bias against capital punishment, Futterman doesn’t realize that without the death penalty, repeat offenders, who face long prison terms if convicted of robbery, would more often find it logical to kill their robbery victims to keep their identities secret.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Steve Sailer

    I read some things that led me to believe that he actually had sexual relations with Perry. But I forget the exact details.

  33. Neocons – Mass Murderers with Fancy Prose Styles

    Too bad Lennon didn’t do his crime for Israel.

    He could be sitting by the pool with Pollard.

    • Agree: JMcG
  34. Anonymous[324] • Disclaimer says:

    Deep down inside, it wasn’t so much that the likes of Buckley were convinced of innocence but affected by professional courtesy that men of higher intelligence are above conventional norms.

    The creative world’s protection of Polanski. Same logic.

    People care more for Hannibal Lecter than his victims.

    Alex of ACO became a folk hero.

    In the case of Gore Vidal and McVeigh, it wasn’t about innocence but empathy. Gov can drive you crazy.
    Vidal has a poison pen to fight with. McVeigh had a bomb.
    Still, similar kinds of anti-establishmentarianism.

  35. @JohnnyWalker123
    Why do serial killers have groupies?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @R.G. Camara, @J.Ross

    Basic evolutionary psychology. This is what real alphas did for almost all of our history.

  36. @Anon
    OT

    Some major behavioral genetics results have come out in the past few years based on GWAS (genome-wide association studies/scores). These have used very large databases that have been cobbled together from many smaller databases. There have been three of these databases, each larger than the prior. Now there is a fourth. Unlike the earlier databases, which anyone could download, this new version has a contractual restriction:

    I will not use these data to make comparisons across ancestral groups. Such comparisons could animate biological conceptualizations of racial superiority.

    "In the Conduct of Research with Vulnerable Populations, Researchers Must Address Concerns that Participation May Lead to Group Harm."
     
    This is pretty blatant. Until now researchers would simply hold the data and not respond to emailed requests to obtain it if they had any suspicions it would be used for HBD research. I suppose with these mega-sized, international databases, too many people have control over the data and there are too many chances for it being accidentally given to the "wrong types of researchers." So they are just coming out and saying what they have though all along: You cannot pursue this line of science. And why not? It might have extra-scientific bad side effects, such as "stigmatization of, discrimination against, or persecution of vulnerable populations [i.e., black people]."

    But beyond that, you cannot do that kind of research because it's just scientifically incorrect, to wit:

    Such comparisons are usually scientifically confounded due to the effects of linkage disequilibrium, gene-environment correlation, gene-environment interactions, and other methodological problems.
     
    The funny thing is, this is just a contractual agreement without payment of any consideration, so it is probably unenforceable. And they as much as admit this when they tell you what will happen if you break your promise:

    -- They will fink on you to your IRB, department chair, funder, journal editor, and so on.

    -- They will block your internet IP address; take that!

    -- They will publicly dis you in an attempt to raise a social media storm against you and get you fired and cancelled.

    I wonder if they spike each data download with a little bit of fake data so they can trace leaked databases if an authorized downloader decided to share his data? To get around that you would need two co-conspirators to download the data and then diff the files to make sure they are the same.

    https://emilkirkegaard.dk/en/2021/09/thou-shallt-not-look-at-the-polygenic-scores/

    Replies: @Pericles, @Almost Missouri, @El Dato

    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @Almost Missouri

    "I think we can all agree that steps to limit the proliferation of racist, pseudoscience are a good thing."

    They just keep taunting us, but they'll be surprised the day someone -- preferably a lot of someones -- says "In fact, I don't agree. What's wrong with racism?"

    , @res
    @Almost Missouri

    Great tweet from Steve. Thanks.

  37. I recently read a curious little essay by George Bernard Shaw, who as was typical of him argued a rather outlandish position. It is titled “The Crime of Punishment,” and in it Shaw suggests death for the vicious, the insane, all the ones that it would be just too much of a pain to put up with. But he says that imprisonment is crueler than most of the crimes that it is applied to. Not having been in prison myself, I hesitate to take a strong stand. I’m more in line with Thomas Szasz, who wrote that the purpose of punishment is to award those who obey the rules.

  38. OT/Movies
    Hugh Hewitt has been keeping up his obligation as a “reasonable” conservative to hate America and promote the propaganda of our enemies in his energetic and frequent talking-up of the Clint Eastwood effort “One Picture which will make you say Forget Having Borders or Laws” (or “Cry Macho”). It’s Friday, OPWWMYSFHBOL is out on both HBO and meatspace screens, and Hugh has his movie critic on to discuss what to watch over the weekend. They lovingly trashed it, and not on ideological grounds. They actually compared it to the Biden administration. tldr beautiful photography, interesting writing, and a nonagenarian pretending to not just ride but break a horse inbetween all the sex and fistfights.

  39. Well, if we’re expected to believe that advancing murderers with deft prose styles is a good thing, isn’t it even a better thing to advance unrecognized and underrecognized prose stylists who’ve murdered no one?

    If I had a \$25,000 grant to offer a struggling writer or artist of any type, the hoosegow would likely not be my first go-to place.

    I understand the publishers’ motives, of course, in hawking transgressors’ literature: cha-ching. Imagine two manuscripts of similar quality, one by a moonlighting community college prof, one by a killer doing hard time. Which manuscript gives you stronger sales by virtue of notoriety of the author?

  40. @Pincher Martin
    A surprisingly good writer was the Scottish serial killer responsible for one of the worst crimes I've ever read about: Ian Brady of the Moors Murders. He wrote a controversial book called The Gates of Janus: Serial Killing and Its Analysis. It's surprisingly well-written considering Brady's working class background (he left school at 15), juvenile delinquency, and psychopathy.

    Thankfully, Brady did not wish to leave prison, and everyone agreed with him on that point.

    Replies: @kihowi

    Writers from not very intellectual backgrounds are the worst because they feel that they have to prove themselves with every sentence, and you end up with books like this with greek mythology in the title for no good reason.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @kihowi

    I think your comment has some merit when talking about the unfortunate title of Brady's book - although it was common back then for even many well-educated writers to make hackneyed classical allusions. But I don't think it has merit for his text. His prose was shorn of any excess or jargon. It's direct and compelling.

    Here is how one BBC journalist, who had a long-time correspondence with Brady, described his writing:


    [His letters] ran to many pages, initially on prison notepaper, then sheets of lined A4, the kind with very narrow spacing. They were always written with a ballpoint pen in a very neat hand, words precisely on the lines, with good grammar and correct spelling.

    He did at least have the benefit of going through the Scottish education system at a time when mastering the three Rs mattered.
     
    The content of Brady's writing is crap, of course. He justifies the murders he committed by making silly comments on the moral relativism of society. But the writing is good.

    Replies: @Sean

  41. @Thomas
    Wasn't it Bismarck who said the solution to the Irish Question was to move them all to the Netherlands and all the Dutch to Ireland? The Dutch would quickly have Ireland thriving, while the Irish would be too busy drinking and fighting to tend to the dikes so they'd all drown.

    Replies: @Ganderson

    A friend of mine used to say we could make Northern Ireland the Palestinian homeland.

  42. @SafeNow
    I have to admire Biden‘s extemporaneous prose style (I’m trying to make this not so O/T). As you probably heard, Biden forgot the name of Australian PM Morrison, but quickly came up with “that fella down under.” Clearly, Biden could cope with any Biden senior moment. For example…

    Macron - the fella with the baguettes
    Ji Jinping - the fella with the Great Wall

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @fish, @Jim Bob Lassiter, @James J O'Meara

    Amrullah Saleh – that fella with our airbase

  43. OT:

    Wednesday in Colorado at my alma mater:

    Colorado Governor Jared Polis, left, marries First Gentleman Marlon Reis, right, as Rabbi Tirzah Firestone looks on as marriage vows were read at a private wedding ceremony at the Mary Rippon Outdoor Theater at the University of Colorado.

    • Replies: @SafeNow
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Does anyone know what the small, white pillow is that the Rabbi-gal is holding? It still has a wash-instructions tag attached. Just curious. In any case, I want to wish these two guys the best. Not too many things about the US have gotten better since I grew up long ago, but one of these is increased tolerance for a gay couple; live and let live.

    Replies: @epebble

    , @Muggles
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I guess despite the trappings, Sodom & Gomorrah are just too Old School for this pair.

    At least the good Rabbi Tirzah didn't have to turn into a pillar of salt.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Buzz Mohawk

    That not-too-old joke has already been surpassed by reality:


    Q: What is the difference between a Conservative Jewish wedding, an Orthodox Jewish wedding, and a Reform Jewish wedding?

    A: At a Conservative wedding the bride is pregnant. At an Orthodox wedding the bride's mother is pregnant. At a Reform wedding the rabbi is pregnant.
     
    , @Inquiring Mind
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Then there is that photo of Mike Pence officiating at Steve Mnuchin's wedding:

    https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&ccid=enBW08Qe&id=6026D4249E4A05AB35B163DC2927F74E039BC2F8&thid=OIP.enBW08QelqOY4gjJLNzm5QHaFj&mediaurl=https%3a%2f%2fi.pinimg.com%2foriginals%2f7f%2ff0%2fc7%2f7ff0c7d0126a8267ed90c257b61ef1d9.jpg&cdnurl=https%3a%2f%2fth.bing.com%2fth%2fid%2fR.7a7056d3c41e96a398e208c92cdce6e5%3frik%3d%252bMKbA073JyncYw%26pid%3dImgRaw%26r%3d0&exph=744&expw=992&q=mnuchin+wedding&simid=608034624704750617&FORM=IRPRST&ck=5FC4E6DB7929E3C5625D372EFDF2E5B9&selectedIndex=0&ajaxhist=0&ajaxserp=0

    I had absolutely no idea that Mike Pence was a rabbi?

  44. @eee
    Jack Unterweger was an Austrian in prison for killing a girl but he was a good writer so other writers and various intellectuals got him released and he went on to murder about a dozen more women.

    Replies: @bomag, @AndrewR, @nokangaroos, @Buffalo Joe, @Feryl

    The Innocence Project was in the news for awhile, using newer DNA evidence to free some convicts.

    I started hearing about some of the newly released committing new crimes; now I don’t hear about the Innocence Project very much. Hmmm.

    • Replies: @Feryl
    @bomag

    The reality is that even if the convicted didn't commit the crime for which they were sentenced, the reason the cops pursued them to begin with is that convicted criminals are not exactly nice upstanding people. So the quest to free all these "innocent people" is often going to backfire.

    , @John Derbyshire
    @bomag

    https://www.johnderbyshire.com/Opinions/Culture/cops.html#innocent

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  45. @Enemy of Earth
    Does anyone remember Jack Abbot? In prison for forgery he killed another inmate, escaped from prison and participated in a bank robbery. Back in the can he came to the attention of author Norman Mailer who had already gone gaga over another killer, Gary Gilmore. Apparently Abbot could really turn a phrase so Mailer and other literary critics championed his efforts at seeking parole. He was paroled in 1981 and six measly weeks later he stabbed a waiter to death in NYC. Eventually he landed back in prison. Desied parole in 2001 he did the world a favor and hung himself in his cell in 2002.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hangnail Hans, @6dust6, @Bardon Kaldian, @6dust6

    Yes, I remember the parole of Jack Abbott in the early 80s, he was released mainly on the irresponsible recommendations of Norman Mailer. Mailer vouched that this violent criminal was talented enough to earn a living off of his writing. (Very few responsible people can write for a living.) I recall at the time the Mailer theory that violence and antisocial behavior were somehow a necessary ingredient to making great art. I read In The Belly of the Beast back then. I remember it was short book told in a series of vignettes. The prose was vivid, but the work was not in anyway indicative of a great writer in the making and I was sure that there were writers of deeper talent waiting in the wings for their shot and felt it was solely his criminality that allowed Abbott the opportunity to publish a book. I was also shocked that Mailer bore little responsibility for this botched case of social engineering as well was the death of that poor waiter.

  46. @SafeNow
    I have to admire Biden‘s extemporaneous prose style (I’m trying to make this not so O/T). As you probably heard, Biden forgot the name of Australian PM Morrison, but quickly came up with “that fella down under.” Clearly, Biden could cope with any Biden senior moment. For example…

    Macron - the fella with the baguettes
    Ji Jinping - the fella with the Great Wall

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @fish, @Jim Bob Lassiter, @James J O'Meara

    Ariel Henry- That clean cut, well spoken, light skinned niggra doctor fellow who’s in charge of Haiti now.

  47. @Steve Sailer
    @Enemy of Earth

    Murderer Gary Gilmore's brother Mikal Gilmore was a top rock critic for Rolling Stone.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    His other brother David was a guitarist for the Pink Floyd.

    • Replies: @Jack Armstrong
    @Jonathan Mason

    Were the Gilmore Girls his sisters?

  48. Not many people can get away with murder but it seems like good writers belong to an exclusive group that includes the president of the United States and James Bond 007.

    If we include fictional characters then the number of writers who has killed off people can be considerably expanded. For example Agatha Christie killed Roger Ackroyd And John Updike delivered the coup de grace to Rabbit Angstrom.

    Killing off people and having them come back from the dead is a special trick. Everybody knows about Jesus, but Sherlock Holmes is another such case.

    In the case of those murderers who killed, were then imprisoned, and then were pardoned, and then killed again, it seems like they became addicted to the publicity.

    Lee Harvey Oswald seemed to have a desire to shock people. How many people in their lifetime have both defecting to Russia and also killing a US president on their resume in that order?

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Jonathan Mason

    "Everybody knows about Jesus"

    Who?

    "Sherlock Holmes"

    I know about that guy.

    "Lee Harvey Oswald"

    Who?

    , @Peter D. Bredon
    @Jonathan Mason

    "How many people in their lifetime have both defecting to Russia and also killing a US president on their resume in that order?"

    Not many, but at least it seems plausible -- defects to enemy nation, returns and kills president. What' impressive about Lee Harvey is that he defected, returned, and no one noticed or cared; until he killed the president (supposedly). Now that's accomplishment!

    , @James J O'Meara
    @Jonathan Mason

    "Everybody knows about Jesus, but Sherlock Holmes is another such case."

    As discussed in Zach Dundas' The Great Detective: The Amazing Rise and Immortal Life of Sherlock Holmes, which I reviewed today here:

    https://counter-currents.com/2021/09/sherlock-holmes-superstar/

  49. Putting aside whether murderers like John J. Lennon deserve a public platform (they don’t) , he raises an interesting question in his essay.

    Should a corrupt hack like Cuomo be able to, single handedly, grant clemency to murderers as his parting FU gift to the people of NY?

    OTOH, vesting clemency in the hand of the governor or President is a sort of court of last resort for people who may have been prosecuted for political reasons, such as Bannon, who would never be pardoned if this was left in the hands of some committee so it is an invaluable constitutional right and one more check on the power of the Permanent Government.

    I would say, let’s split the baby in half and leave the power of pardon with governors for non-violent offenses, but violent offenders could be pardoned only if BOTH a committee recommended it AND the governor approved. I don’t think this is what Lennon wants (he wants a committee stacked with bleeding hearts to have sole authority), but it was good of him to raise this issue.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  50. @Enemy of Earth
    Does anyone remember Jack Abbot? In prison for forgery he killed another inmate, escaped from prison and participated in a bank robbery. Back in the can he came to the attention of author Norman Mailer who had already gone gaga over another killer, Gary Gilmore. Apparently Abbot could really turn a phrase so Mailer and other literary critics championed his efforts at seeking parole. He was paroled in 1981 and six measly weeks later he stabbed a waiter to death in NYC. Eventually he landed back in prison. Desied parole in 2001 he did the world a favor and hung himself in his cell in 2002.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hangnail Hans, @6dust6, @Bardon Kaldian, @6dust6

    These guys should be executed max 6 months after the verdict, plus some 1-2 weeks of real torture, to get the taste of their own medicine..

    End of story.

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I’m all in favor of quick (e.g. same day) executions, but not when lawyer-prosecutors and judges get paid even for sloppy convictions.

    Of course the criminal justice system is all about making mistakes, so as to maximize the amount of billable lawyer-hours used for appeals, re-tries, etc. and to increase the demand for courtrooms and (often politically appointed) lawyer-judges to fill them.

  51. @Pincher Martin
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I don't know, but it is odd:

    https://external-preview.redd.it/Ww78DT17dw88xFAZUVyGsp01yYapdUb76K4eMQy04mY.jpg?width=960&crop=smart&auto=webp&s=29aa81b5dc5e8f1b4c84a7209cc624acf7888268

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Nah, she was a gold digger, not a groupie. Turns out she figured if she married Charlie she would get his body when he died and she could put it on display like Lenin and charge admission.

    https://nypost.com/2015/02/08/charles-mansons-fiancee-wanted-to-marry-him-for-his-corpse-source/

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Harry Baldwin

    There have to be many easier ways to be a gold digger. What typical twenty-five-year with above average looks and a mercenary interest in marriage would ever set her sights on an eighty-year-old Charles Manson in the first place with the thought: "Well, that's how I can make some good money"?

    And when I looked more into her story, I read that she started corresponding with Manson when she was seventeen and left home a year later to be with him. At one point, she shaved off her hair, carved an "X" into her forehead, and started calling herself "Star." She flipped burgers for work at a joint near his prison so she could visit him as often as possible. And, then, even after her plan was foiled and the marriage did not take place, she still attended his funeral.

    Why? Was she weeping over the loss of her potential income?

    No, I think her interest in Manson was obviously more than pecuniary. She was just a weirdo fascinated by an even bigger weirdo.

    Replies: @Jack D

  52. Classic sociopath screws up after committing murder and now whines about his circumstances. He’ll get plenty of sympathy on the left. What does that say about them? His excuse can be he was born twisted.
    A good friend of mine from high school became convinced a drug addict murderer was falsely convicted. No matter that he confessed. The physical evidence wasn’t real compelling but he woke up from a blackout in an apartment with two dead bodies. My friend is an artist and believes in the goodness of humanity. I just hope she isn’t the next victim.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Dan Smith

    Isnt this the scenario of The Fugitive.

    He probably got framed by a White Supremacist, too.

  53. @Erik Sieven
    @R.G. Camara

    probably only a small minority does, the same way a small minority of men and women have other weird preferences. But for those who do love psychopathic behavior it is a good idea to turn to convicted serial killers. At least they are legally certified psychopaths, and certainly not normal guys just pretending to be psychopaths.

    Replies: @SaneClownPosse

    And in most cases he will be locked up forever, meaning the groupie won’t be ever be alone in the woods with her boy toy.

  54. @Reg Cæsar
    @SafeNow


    Ji Jinping – the fella with the Great Wall
     
    https://i.inews.co.uk/content/uploads/2018/09/pilkington-640x360.png

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @AnotherDad

    Karl Pilkington: anti-comedy genius.

  55. @Jonathan Mason
    Not many people can get away with murder but it seems like good writers belong to an exclusive group that includes the president of the United States and James Bond 007.

    If we include fictional characters then the number of writers who has killed off people can be considerably expanded. For example Agatha Christie killed Roger Ackroyd And John Updike delivered the coup de grace to Rabbit Angstrom.

    Killing off people and having them come back from the dead is a special trick. Everybody knows about Jesus, but Sherlock Holmes is another such case.

    In the case of those murderers who killed, were then imprisoned, and then were pardoned, and then killed again, it seems like they became addicted to the publicity.

    Lee Harvey Oswald seemed to have a desire to shock people. How many people in their lifetime have both defecting to Russia and also killing a US president on their resume in that order?

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Peter D. Bredon, @James J O'Meara

    “Everybody knows about Jesus”

    Who?

    “Sherlock Holmes”

    I know about that guy.

    “Lee Harvey Oswald”

    Who?

  56. @R.G. Camara
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Because women love psychopathic behavior.

    Replies: @Erik Sieven, @Hangnail Hans, @SunBakedSuburb

    “Because women love psychopathic behavior,”

    I don’t believe you know much about women. Do you watch a lot of porn?

    • Troll: R.G. Camara
  57. @Harry Baldwin
    @Pincher Martin

    Nah, she was a gold digger, not a groupie. Turns out she figured if she married Charlie she would get his body when he died and she could put it on display like Lenin and charge admission.

    https://nypost.com/2015/02/08/charles-mansons-fiancee-wanted-to-marry-him-for-his-corpse-source/

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    There have to be many easier ways to be a gold digger. What typical twenty-five-year with above average looks and a mercenary interest in marriage would ever set her sights on an eighty-year-old Charles Manson in the first place with the thought: “Well, that’s how I can make some good money”?

    And when I looked more into her story, I read that she started corresponding with Manson when she was seventeen and left home a year later to be with him. At one point, she shaved off her hair, carved an “X” into her forehead, and started calling herself “Star.” She flipped burgers for work at a joint near his prison so she could visit him as often as possible. And, then, even after her plan was foiled and the marriage did not take place, she still attended his funeral.

    Why? Was she weeping over the loss of her potential income?

    No, I think her interest in Manson was obviously more than pecuniary. She was just a weirdo fascinated by an even bigger weirdo.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Pincher Martin

    Porque no los dos?

    Humans are complicated. People here seem to feel as if every action can have only ONE motivation. For example, they say that everything that Jews do is for the sole purpose of destroying Western Civilization. In truth, someone like Soros can be motivated BOTH by the desire to make money AND by the desire to destroy Western Civilization, so it's more complicated than you anti-Semites say.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @epebble

  58. Charles Manson was no writer, but he was a fascinating talker. He really could have been a politician.

    But most murderers who write about it are pretentious midwits. They think they have some special insight into human behaviour, but the truth is they’re just midwits who happen to have killed people.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Joe S.Walker

    Charles Manson was no writer, but he was a fascinating talker.

    I should be embarrassed to admit it, but I've watched some of his interviews and parole hearings that are on YouTube and found them interesting.

    , @AceDeuce
    @Joe S.Walker

    Fun Fact: A young Manson took, and graduated from, a Dale Carneige course while in prison.

  59. @SafeNow
    I have to admire Biden‘s extemporaneous prose style (I’m trying to make this not so O/T). As you probably heard, Biden forgot the name of Australian PM Morrison, but quickly came up with “that fella down under.” Clearly, Biden could cope with any Biden senior moment. For example…

    Macron - the fella with the baguettes
    Ji Jinping - the fella with the Great Wall

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @fish, @Jim Bob Lassiter, @James J O'Meara

    As always…. “imagine if Trump had….” Oh, the howls from the MSM for his removal.

  60. @JimDandy
    I totally agree. I looked it up and Raskolnikov only served 8 years? Weird.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara

    Not every nation conceives of criminal penalties as occasions to indulge in sadistic fantasies (as with several commenters here). I’ll bet the whole Christian thing had something to do with it, and penalties likely went up considerably under the atheists.

    How does the Manly Right reconcile this with their nostalgia for Orthodox Russia?

  61. @Stephen Paul Foster
    Oh yes, Normal Mailer, himself, nearly pulled a "Jack Abbott."

    From Wikipedia:

    "During a November 1960 party celebrating his mayoral candidacy, American public intellectual Norman Mailer twice stabbed his wife Adele Morales with a pen-knife in a drunken altercation, nearly taking her life. The incident, thought by many accounts swept under the rug by Mailer and his associates, had a lasting impact on his public and critical legacy and persona. "

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stabbing_of_Adele_Morales_by_Norman_Mailer

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @J.Ross

    Well there ya go, William Burroughs is a more effective Great American Novelist than Norman Mailer; the spouses he kills stay dead.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Joe S.Walker
    @J.Ross

    In shooting his wife Burroughs was guilty of criminal recklessness, but nothing worse. And she put the glass on her head and invited him to shoot it off, which nowadays would earn her a Darwin Award.

  62. @Pincher Martin
    @Harry Baldwin

    There have to be many easier ways to be a gold digger. What typical twenty-five-year with above average looks and a mercenary interest in marriage would ever set her sights on an eighty-year-old Charles Manson in the first place with the thought: "Well, that's how I can make some good money"?

    And when I looked more into her story, I read that she started corresponding with Manson when she was seventeen and left home a year later to be with him. At one point, she shaved off her hair, carved an "X" into her forehead, and started calling herself "Star." She flipped burgers for work at a joint near his prison so she could visit him as often as possible. And, then, even after her plan was foiled and the marriage did not take place, she still attended his funeral.

    Why? Was she weeping over the loss of her potential income?

    No, I think her interest in Manson was obviously more than pecuniary. She was just a weirdo fascinated by an even bigger weirdo.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Porque no los dos?

    Humans are complicated. People here seem to feel as if every action can have only ONE motivation. For example, they say that everything that Jews do is for the sole purpose of destroying Western Civilization. In truth, someone like Soros can be motivated BOTH by the desire to make money AND by the desire to destroy Western Civilization, so it’s more complicated than you anti-Semites say.

    • Troll: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Jack D

    Of course she could have more than one motive. So most likely do all groupies. But I don't think this woman's motivation was all that complicated.

    A seventeen-year-old doesn't start writing letters to Charles Manson because she sees a pot of gold at the end of the relationship when his corpse is cold.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @epebble
    @Jack D

    desire to destroy Western Civilization

    Even that is irrational. He (Soros) has a an extreme libertarian view of what a society should be that it may appear to some as that. Oversimplification can lead to absurdities.

    Democrats support Abortion Rights --> Democrats want to kill as many babies as possible
    Republicans Support Second Amendment ---> Republicans want to kill as many Adults as possible
    Republican politicians oppose vaccine mandates --> Republican politicians want as many people as possible to die or at least become chronically sick.
    Some Democrats support immigration --> Democrats hate White people
    Some Republicans oppose immigration --> Republicans hate non-White people.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  63. @Almost Missouri
    @Anon

    https://twitter.com/Steve_Sailer/status/1438776413616672774

    https://twitter.com/polygenicity/status/1438644650026352641

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @res

    “I think we can all agree that steps to limit the proliferation of racist, pseudoscience are a good thing.”

    They just keep taunting us, but they’ll be surprised the day someone — preferably a lot of someones — says “In fact, I don’t agree. What’s wrong with racism?”

  64. @Jonathan Mason
    Not many people can get away with murder but it seems like good writers belong to an exclusive group that includes the president of the United States and James Bond 007.

    If we include fictional characters then the number of writers who has killed off people can be considerably expanded. For example Agatha Christie killed Roger Ackroyd And John Updike delivered the coup de grace to Rabbit Angstrom.

    Killing off people and having them come back from the dead is a special trick. Everybody knows about Jesus, but Sherlock Holmes is another such case.

    In the case of those murderers who killed, were then imprisoned, and then were pardoned, and then killed again, it seems like they became addicted to the publicity.

    Lee Harvey Oswald seemed to have a desire to shock people. How many people in their lifetime have both defecting to Russia and also killing a US president on their resume in that order?

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Peter D. Bredon, @James J O'Meara

    “How many people in their lifetime have both defecting to Russia and also killing a US president on their resume in that order?”

    Not many, but at least it seems plausible — defects to enemy nation, returns and kills president. What’ impressive about Lee Harvey is that he defected, returned, and no one noticed or cared; until he killed the president (supposedly). Now that’s accomplishment!

  65. @Hangnail Hans
    @Pincher Martin

    Norman Mailer reminds me of certain prickly, childish egotists in other places and times, like ours. He probably never forgave Cavett for taking sides against him, even though he clearly asked for it. The aggrieved victim--everything is always someone else's fault.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Pincher Martin

    Actually, after the show, Mailer got on well with both Cavett and Vidal. I think it took s a few years to repair his relationship with Vidal, but Mailer was not one to hold grudges.

    For such an insane man, Mailer could be disarmingly charming and even objective about his own flaws. You can even see flashes of that trait in the longer video, such as when he compliments Vidal for being a serious politician in comparison to Mailer’s own amateurish attempt at public office. (In truth, neither one was a serious politician, but the point is that even in a fight Mailer was willing to concede points to his opponent.)

    But he was insane.

    Here’s the infamous fight between Mailer and actor Rip Torn that took place on the set of one of Mailer’s sad attempts at movie-making. Torn, who appears to be as insane as Mailer in this clip, tried to improvise a scene where he attacks Mailer’s character with a hammer and things got out of hand.

    Mailer bit part of Torn’s ear off during the fight.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Pincher Martin

    At least at one time some of our (white) authors were manly men who were not unfamiliar with (and not unwilling to engage in) physical combat and not JUST a bunch of limp wristed homos. At least it was 50/50.

    Nowadays, I don't think the society would accept a white male author who was so quick with his fists. Mailer had been drafted into WWII and did not go willingly (it's a myth that the Greatest Generation were all eager to sign up for combat, though some did) but once he was in, he served honorably and volunteered to go on combat patrols behind enemy lines instead of sticking to his typist job*. He counted this as his greatest formative experience. Nowadays, it's rare for a Harvard man to serve in the military.

    *Another myth is that if American college students hadn't evaded the draft, they would have ended up slogging thru some jungle in Vietnam with the Viet Cong taking pot shots at them. In fact the Army is a huge bureaucracy that is always in need of people who can read and write and more importantly TYPE. The vast majority of draftees who were college material could have gotten themselves some posting that was far from combat and where the biggest danger would have been paper cuts.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  66. @Jack D
    @Pincher Martin

    Porque no los dos?

    Humans are complicated. People here seem to feel as if every action can have only ONE motivation. For example, they say that everything that Jews do is for the sole purpose of destroying Western Civilization. In truth, someone like Soros can be motivated BOTH by the desire to make money AND by the desire to destroy Western Civilization, so it's more complicated than you anti-Semites say.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @epebble

    Of course she could have more than one motive. So most likely do all groupies. But I don’t think this woman’s motivation was all that complicated.

    A seventeen-year-old doesn’t start writing letters to Charles Manson because she sees a pot of gold at the end of the relationship when his corpse is cold.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Pincher Martin

    Star apparently had a boyfriend on the outside who was closer to her age in addition to Manson. I'm guessing that the exhibiting the corpse for $ idea was the boyfriend's.

  67. @Pincher Martin
    @Hangnail Hans

    Actually, after the show, Mailer got on well with both Cavett and Vidal. I think it took s a few years to repair his relationship with Vidal, but Mailer was not one to hold grudges.

    For such an insane man, Mailer could be disarmingly charming and even objective about his own flaws. You can even see flashes of that trait in the longer video, such as when he compliments Vidal for being a serious politician in comparison to Mailer's own amateurish attempt at public office. (In truth, neither one was a serious politician, but the point is that even in a fight Mailer was willing to concede points to his opponent.)

    But he was insane.

    Here's the infamous fight between Mailer and actor Rip Torn that took place on the set of one of Mailer's sad attempts at movie-making. Torn, who appears to be as insane as Mailer in this clip, tried to improvise a scene where he attacks Mailer's character with a hammer and things got out of hand.

    https://youtu.be/6AzmhorISf4

    Mailer bit part of Torn's ear off during the fight.

    Replies: @Jack D

    At least at one time some of our (white) authors were manly men who were not unfamiliar with (and not unwilling to engage in) physical combat and not JUST a bunch of limp wristed homos. At least it was 50/50.

    Nowadays, I don’t think the society would accept a white male author who was so quick with his fists. Mailer had been drafted into WWII and did not go willingly (it’s a myth that the Greatest Generation were all eager to sign up for combat, though some did) but once he was in, he served honorably and volunteered to go on combat patrols behind enemy lines instead of sticking to his typist job*. He counted this as his greatest formative experience. Nowadays, it’s rare for a Harvard man to serve in the military.

    *Another myth is that if American college students hadn’t evaded the draft, they would have ended up slogging thru some jungle in Vietnam with the Viet Cong taking pot shots at them. In fact the Army is a huge bureaucracy that is always in need of people who can read and write and more importantly TYPE. The vast majority of draftees who were college material could have gotten themselves some posting that was far from combat and where the biggest danger would have been paper cuts.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Jack D


    At least at one time some of our (white) authors were manly men who were not unfamiliar with (and not unwilling to engage in) physical combat and not JUST a bunch of limp wristed homos. At least it was 50/50.

    Nowadays, I don’t think the society would accept a white male author who was so quick with his fists.
     

    It's hard to say because the kind of writer that Norman Mailer aspired to be no longer exists. Younger generations of American readers today think of someone like Stephen King and George R. R. Martin when they think of great writers. In other words, writers of commercial fiction. Or, if they are well-educated and well-informed, they might name someone like Michael Chabon or Jonathan Franzen.

    Mailer had been drafted into WWII and did not go willingly (it’s a myth that the Greatest Generation were all eager to sign up for combat, though some did)...
     
    I'll have to look it up, but I think that's wrong. I believe Mailer was eager to join the war because he saw it as something that would provide great material for him as a novelist, which he was already keen on doing. That turned out to be the case.

    It's been a long time since I've read a biography of Mailer, though, so maybe my memory is faulty.

    Replies: @Jack D

  68. @Pincher Martin
    @Jack D

    Of course she could have more than one motive. So most likely do all groupies. But I don't think this woman's motivation was all that complicated.

    A seventeen-year-old doesn't start writing letters to Charles Manson because she sees a pot of gold at the end of the relationship when his corpse is cold.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Star apparently had a boyfriend on the outside who was closer to her age in addition to Manson. I’m guessing that the exhibiting the corpse for \$ idea was the boyfriend’s.

    • Agree: Pincher Martin
  69. @Buzz Mohawk
    OT:

    Wednesday in Colorado at my alma mater:


    https://lede-admin.coloradosun.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/15/2021/09/GovernorJaredPolisFirstGentlemanMarlonReis-Wedding-PhotoCreditJocelynAugustino.jpg?w=963


    Colorado Governor Jared Polis, left, marries First Gentleman Marlon Reis, right, as Rabbi Tirzah Firestone looks on as marriage vows were read at a private wedding ceremony at the Mary Rippon Outdoor Theater at the University of Colorado.

    Replies: @SafeNow, @Muggles, @Harry Baldwin, @Inquiring Mind

    Does anyone know what the small, white pillow is that the Rabbi-gal is holding? It still has a wash-instructions tag attached. Just curious. In any case, I want to wish these two guys the best. Not too many things about the US have gotten better since I grew up long ago, but one of these is increased tolerance for a gay couple; live and let live.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @SafeNow

    A wedding ring cushion or ring bearer pillow is a small pillow on which the wedding rings are carried in a traditional Western white wedding. They are frequently carried by a junior member of the bridal party known as the ringbearer frequently a younger male relative or friend.

    During the process, the ring bearer carries the rings on the pillow down the aisle to the officiant.

    Wedding ring cushions are generally small, ornate pillows that reflect the wedding's colors or white silk pillows. In less traditional Western weddings they can be whimsical or thematic containers that reflect the couple's personal tastes.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wedding_ring_cushion

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  70. @Jonathan Mason
    Not many people can get away with murder but it seems like good writers belong to an exclusive group that includes the president of the United States and James Bond 007.

    If we include fictional characters then the number of writers who has killed off people can be considerably expanded. For example Agatha Christie killed Roger Ackroyd And John Updike delivered the coup de grace to Rabbit Angstrom.

    Killing off people and having them come back from the dead is a special trick. Everybody knows about Jesus, but Sherlock Holmes is another such case.

    In the case of those murderers who killed, were then imprisoned, and then were pardoned, and then killed again, it seems like they became addicted to the publicity.

    Lee Harvey Oswald seemed to have a desire to shock people. How many people in their lifetime have both defecting to Russia and also killing a US president on their resume in that order?

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Peter D. Bredon, @James J O'Meara

    “Everybody knows about Jesus, but Sherlock Holmes is another such case.”

    As discussed in Zach Dundas’ The Great Detective: The Amazing Rise and Immortal Life of Sherlock Holmes, which I reviewed today here:

    https://counter-currents.com/2021/09/sherlock-holmes-superstar/

  71. Prison should be a deterrent to murder, since being sentenced to death doesn’t have any real meaning anymore. It’s way too cushy of a gig now.

    We simply don’t have prisons that are brutal enough like Strangeways, Manchester used to be. The practice of shitting and pissing in a bucket (“slopping out,” Victorian style) doesn’t exist anymore. I knew someone subject to those conditions, and it kept him on the straight and narrow. If prison was brutal enough like the old days, it might serve as a deterrent to committing murder, since the criminal class is very knowledgable about prison conditions.

  72. @Enemy of Earth
    Does anyone remember Jack Abbot? In prison for forgery he killed another inmate, escaped from prison and participated in a bank robbery. Back in the can he came to the attention of author Norman Mailer who had already gone gaga over another killer, Gary Gilmore. Apparently Abbot could really turn a phrase so Mailer and other literary critics championed his efforts at seeking parole. He was paroled in 1981 and six measly weeks later he stabbed a waiter to death in NYC. Eventually he landed back in prison. Desied parole in 2001 he did the world a favor and hung himself in his cell in 2002.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hangnail Hans, @6dust6, @Bardon Kaldian, @6dust6

    Yes, I remember the parole of Jack Abbott in the early 80s, he was released mainly on the irresponsible recommendations of Norman Mailer. Mailer vouched that this violent criminal was talented enough to earn a living off of his writing. (Very few responsible people can write for a living.) I recall at the time the Mailer theory that violence and antisocial behavior were somehow a necessary ingredient to making great art. I read In The Belly of the Beast back then and it was a short book written in a series of vignettes. The prose was vivid, but the work was not in anyway indicative of a great writer in the making and I was sure that there were writers with deeper talent waiting in the wings for their shot and felt it was mostly his background that allowed him the opportunity to publish a book. I was also shocked that Mailer bore little responsibility for this botched case of social engineering as well as the death of that poor waiter.

  73. @eee
    Jack Unterweger was an Austrian in prison for killing a girl but he was a good writer so other writers and various intellectuals got him released and he went on to murder about a dozen more women.

    Replies: @bomag, @AndrewR, @nokangaroos, @Buffalo Joe, @Feryl

    Based

  74. “I Am Serving 28 Years to Life. Why Does One Person [the governor] Decide if I Deserve Mercy?”

    Why did one person (you) get to decide if your victim deserved mercy? That’s the way it works sometimes.

    Governors, and others with such power, probably understand that clemency (in the broad meaning of the word) towards violent criminals creates a lot of ill will among the public towards politicians and the correctional industry, so they employ it sparingly. Here’s someone who shouldn’t have been pardoned:

    https://nypost.com/2013/04/02/outrage-101-radical-jailed-in-slay-now-columbia-prof/

  75. Murder Of The USA is a book being written by Joe Biden and Kamala Harris and the Democrat Party.

    ANARCHO-TYRANNY in action on the USA border:

  76. why in the name of God have you even read Lolita?

    as tony the tiger says, “GRRRRR-OSS!”

    steve would hang the murderes and fete the chimos.

    sad.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @anon

    Why? Because Nabokov was a genius and it's one of the greatest works of fiction of the 20th century.

    Here's a hint: Lolita is a fictional character and no actual children were harmed in the making of this novel.

    While you contemplate this, here is another work of genius, the story of which involves not one but HUNDREDS of underage women, kidnapped from their homes and held as captives to be raped by their master:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrFbiw77_90

    Why would you want to listen to THIS?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @kihowi
    @anon

    It's not gross at all. I read it as a teenager, excited by the terrible evil I was going to immerse myself in, and I got a study of a shlemiel who got played by a little girl.

    I also saw Salo and it's equally boring. When are things that are supposed to be scandalous actually scandalous?

    Replies: @Ed Case

  77. @Anon
    OT

    Some major behavioral genetics results have come out in the past few years based on GWAS (genome-wide association studies/scores). These have used very large databases that have been cobbled together from many smaller databases. There have been three of these databases, each larger than the prior. Now there is a fourth. Unlike the earlier databases, which anyone could download, this new version has a contractual restriction:

    I will not use these data to make comparisons across ancestral groups. Such comparisons could animate biological conceptualizations of racial superiority.

    "In the Conduct of Research with Vulnerable Populations, Researchers Must Address Concerns that Participation May Lead to Group Harm."
     
    This is pretty blatant. Until now researchers would simply hold the data and not respond to emailed requests to obtain it if they had any suspicions it would be used for HBD research. I suppose with these mega-sized, international databases, too many people have control over the data and there are too many chances for it being accidentally given to the "wrong types of researchers." So they are just coming out and saying what they have though all along: You cannot pursue this line of science. And why not? It might have extra-scientific bad side effects, such as "stigmatization of, discrimination against, or persecution of vulnerable populations [i.e., black people]."

    But beyond that, you cannot do that kind of research because it's just scientifically incorrect, to wit:

    Such comparisons are usually scientifically confounded due to the effects of linkage disequilibrium, gene-environment correlation, gene-environment interactions, and other methodological problems.
     
    The funny thing is, this is just a contractual agreement without payment of any consideration, so it is probably unenforceable. And they as much as admit this when they tell you what will happen if you break your promise:

    -- They will fink on you to your IRB, department chair, funder, journal editor, and so on.

    -- They will block your internet IP address; take that!

    -- They will publicly dis you in an attempt to raise a social media storm against you and get you fired and cancelled.

    I wonder if they spike each data download with a little bit of fake data so they can trace leaked databases if an authorized downloader decided to share his data? To get around that you would need two co-conspirators to download the data and then diff the files to make sure they are the same.

    https://emilkirkegaard.dk/en/2021/09/thou-shallt-not-look-at-the-polygenic-scores/

    Replies: @Pericles, @Almost Missouri, @El Dato

    Fools and Knaves.

    The Priesthood telling people not to look at the sky because this could reveal truths irreconciliable with dogma.

    Literally Soyjak crying NOOOO!

    This is life having an addendum on the GPL disallowing software use for mafia goals.

    If they were really worried about “culnerable groups” they pack their research up and open a bar or a hedge fund.

    Kornbluth (of course) had a short story on that called “Gomez” who forgets all about the physics that may be used for the next nuke or worse.

  78. @Buzz Mohawk
    OT:

    Wednesday in Colorado at my alma mater:


    https://lede-admin.coloradosun.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/15/2021/09/GovernorJaredPolisFirstGentlemanMarlonReis-Wedding-PhotoCreditJocelynAugustino.jpg?w=963


    Colorado Governor Jared Polis, left, marries First Gentleman Marlon Reis, right, as Rabbi Tirzah Firestone looks on as marriage vows were read at a private wedding ceremony at the Mary Rippon Outdoor Theater at the University of Colorado.

    Replies: @SafeNow, @Muggles, @Harry Baldwin, @Inquiring Mind

    I guess despite the trappings, Sodom & Gomorrah are just too Old School for this pair.

    At least the good Rabbi Tirzah didn’t have to turn into a pillar of salt.

  79. @eee
    Jack Unterweger was an Austrian in prison for killing a girl but he was a good writer so other writers and various intellectuals got him released and he went on to murder about a dozen more women.

    Replies: @bomag, @AndrewR, @nokangaroos, @Buffalo Joe, @Feryl

    Beat me to it …
    though seeing all these public intellectuals and politicians with egg
    on their faces was priceless 😀

  80. @Dan Smith
    Classic sociopath screws up after committing murder and now whines about his circumstances. He’ll get plenty of sympathy on the left. What does that say about them? His excuse can be he was born twisted.
    A good friend of mine from high school became convinced a drug addict murderer was falsely convicted. No matter that he confessed. The physical evidence wasn’t real compelling but he woke up from a blackout in an apartment with two dead bodies. My friend is an artist and believes in the goodness of humanity. I just hope she isn’t the next victim.

    Replies: @El Dato

    Isnt this the scenario of The Fugitive.

    He probably got framed by a White Supremacist, too.

  81. Women and gays can’t get enough of murderers. Particularly those of White people. The two dudes who killed their wives, Drew and Scott Pearson (not related) got tons of letters and propositions from hot chicks who had their pick of men.

    The more brutal and repellent the violence, the hotter the groupies the murderer gets. Of course, this does not scale up, and it is why normal societies repress women’s sexuality good and hard. Otherwise a society endures as psychopath race to the bottom as among Muslims, Africans, etc. There is enough evidence that once the race to the bottom in terms of male violence gets started, “turning it off” is simply impossible for that group of people.

    This is also why of course normal societies keep gays so deep in the closet they are behind R. Kelly. Gays are a constant threat to normal White guys, which is why they are viscerally disliked. Evolution has built in repulsion and disgust and dislike to rotting food, feces, and gays for the same reason — they are a disease vector both physically and culturally.

  82. “I Am Serving 28 Years to Life. Why Does One Person [the governor] Decide if I Deserve Mercy?”

    You already got mercy, J. J. The thing you’re looking for is freedom.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Thirdtwin

    I suppose the job could be better done by a computer. Just feed it the information and it can decide whether to execute the death penalty or not, based on the data, and then print out the death warrant at the same time as well as the invitation cards for the ceremony.

  83. @Joe S.Walker
    Charles Manson was no writer, but he was a fascinating talker. He really could have been a politician.

    But most murderers who write about it are pretentious midwits. They think they have some special insight into human behaviour, but the truth is they're just midwits who happen to have killed people.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @AceDeuce

    Charles Manson was no writer, but he was a fascinating talker.

    I should be embarrassed to admit it, but I’ve watched some of his interviews and parole hearings that are on YouTube and found them interesting.

  84. @Buzz Mohawk
    OT:

    Wednesday in Colorado at my alma mater:


    https://lede-admin.coloradosun.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/15/2021/09/GovernorJaredPolisFirstGentlemanMarlonReis-Wedding-PhotoCreditJocelynAugustino.jpg?w=963


    Colorado Governor Jared Polis, left, marries First Gentleman Marlon Reis, right, as Rabbi Tirzah Firestone looks on as marriage vows were read at a private wedding ceremony at the Mary Rippon Outdoor Theater at the University of Colorado.

    Replies: @SafeNow, @Muggles, @Harry Baldwin, @Inquiring Mind

    That not-too-old joke has already been surpassed by reality:

    Q: What is the difference between a Conservative Jewish wedding, an Orthodox Jewish wedding, and a Reform Jewish wedding?

    A: At a Conservative wedding the bride is pregnant. At an Orthodox wedding the bride’s mother is pregnant. At a Reform wedding the rabbi is pregnant.

  85. @anon
    why in the name of God have you even read Lolita?

    as tony the tiger says, "GRRRRR-OSS!"

    steve would hang the murderes and fete the chimos.

    sad.

    Replies: @Jack D, @kihowi

    Why? Because Nabokov was a genius and it’s one of the greatest works of fiction of the 20th century.

    Here’s a hint: Lolita is a fictional character and no actual children were harmed in the making of this novel.

    While you contemplate this, here is another work of genius, the story of which involves not one but HUNDREDS of underage women, kidnapped from their homes and held as captives to be raped by their master:

    Why would you want to listen to THIS?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    I've always found Lolita the character to be a representation of what America was when Nabokov wrote the novel.

    She is young, uncultured, but coming up rapidly and seductive to the man who represents the Old World, Humbert Humbert. He gets lost in her. She turns his world upside down, however absurd that seems. She is America in all its bubble-gum-chewing adolescence.

    Maybe that's what Nabokov saw.

    Replies: @Jack D

  86. @kihowi
    @Pincher Martin

    Writers from not very intellectual backgrounds are the worst because they feel that they have to prove themselves with every sentence, and you end up with books like this with greek mythology in the title for no good reason.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    I think your comment has some merit when talking about the unfortunate title of Brady’s book – although it was common back then for even many well-educated writers to make hackneyed classical allusions. But I don’t think it has merit for his text. His prose was shorn of any excess or jargon. It’s direct and compelling.

    Here is how one BBC journalist, who had a long-time correspondence with Brady, described his writing:

    [His letters] ran to many pages, initially on prison notepaper, then sheets of lined A4, the kind with very narrow spacing. They were always written with a ballpoint pen in a very neat hand, words precisely on the lines, with good grammar and correct spelling.

    He did at least have the benefit of going through the Scottish education system at a time when mastering the three Rs mattered.

    The content of Brady’s writing is crap, of course. He justifies the murders he committed by making silly comments on the moral relativism of society. But the writing is good.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @Pincher Martin

    No one has a choice as to the family (or country) they are born, into or their genetic endowment; how then can anyone be responsible for what they do?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  87. @Jack D
    @Pincher Martin

    At least at one time some of our (white) authors were manly men who were not unfamiliar with (and not unwilling to engage in) physical combat and not JUST a bunch of limp wristed homos. At least it was 50/50.

    Nowadays, I don't think the society would accept a white male author who was so quick with his fists. Mailer had been drafted into WWII and did not go willingly (it's a myth that the Greatest Generation were all eager to sign up for combat, though some did) but once he was in, he served honorably and volunteered to go on combat patrols behind enemy lines instead of sticking to his typist job*. He counted this as his greatest formative experience. Nowadays, it's rare for a Harvard man to serve in the military.

    *Another myth is that if American college students hadn't evaded the draft, they would have ended up slogging thru some jungle in Vietnam with the Viet Cong taking pot shots at them. In fact the Army is a huge bureaucracy that is always in need of people who can read and write and more importantly TYPE. The vast majority of draftees who were college material could have gotten themselves some posting that was far from combat and where the biggest danger would have been paper cuts.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    At least at one time some of our (white) authors were manly men who were not unfamiliar with (and not unwilling to engage in) physical combat and not JUST a bunch of limp wristed homos. At least it was 50/50.

    Nowadays, I don’t think the society would accept a white male author who was so quick with his fists.

    It’s hard to say because the kind of writer that Norman Mailer aspired to be no longer exists. Younger generations of American readers today think of someone like Stephen King and George R. R. Martin when they think of great writers. In other words, writers of commercial fiction. Or, if they are well-educated and well-informed, they might name someone like Michael Chabon or Jonathan Franzen.

    Mailer had been drafted into WWII and did not go willingly (it’s a myth that the Greatest Generation were all eager to sign up for combat, though some did)…

    I’ll have to look it up, but I think that’s wrong. I believe Mailer was eager to join the war because he saw it as something that would provide great material for him as a novelist, which he was already keen on doing. That turned out to be the case.

    It’s been a long time since I’ve read a biography of Mailer, though, so maybe my memory is faulty.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Pincher Martin


    ....the twenty-year-old Mailer sought to defer his entry into the Army on the grounds that he was finishing “an important literary work” whose analysis of the fascist and democratic minds might have “some relevance to the war effort.” At the time, he was a recent Harvard graduate who’d won a national short-story prize and written hundreds of thousands of unpublished words but done nothing to suggest his work in progress would have world-historical significance. When the deferral was denied he gave that work up, but he was already telling his first wife of his plans for “THE war novel” before he arrived at Fort Bragg for basic training.
     
    https://harpers.org/archive/2013/12/does-mailer-matter/?single=1

    Who is to know what is really true but Mailer was the kind of guy who would try to make lemonade out of lemons. Most people who become famous are very talented but also very ambitious and self promoters. Recently there have been some "shocking revelations" about how hard and actively Philip Roth lobbied among his fellow literati for various prizes. I for one am not shocked. Maybe somewhere in the world there are guys like Grigori Pearlman who turned the bearers of good news away when they came to his mother's apartment (where he lived) to tell him that he had won the Fields Medal but most successful artists are not like this.

    I assume Mailer gave up his typing job to patrol behind enemy lines because he must have realized that a story about typing (80 words per minute!) was not going to cut it as THE great War Novel.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Pincher Martin

  88. @anon
    why in the name of God have you even read Lolita?

    as tony the tiger says, "GRRRRR-OSS!"

    steve would hang the murderes and fete the chimos.

    sad.

    Replies: @Jack D, @kihowi

    It’s not gross at all. I read it as a teenager, excited by the terrible evil I was going to immerse myself in, and I got a study of a shlemiel who got played by a little girl.

    I also saw Salo and it’s equally boring. When are things that are supposed to be scandalous actually scandalous?

    • Replies: @Ed Case
    @kihowi


    I also saw Salo and it’s equally boring.
     
    That seemed to be the reaction of quite a few in the audience when I saw it.
    Were you expecting a sex film?

    When are things that are supposed to be scandalous actually scandalous?
     
    It was scandalous that Salo was made and released, but the subject matter is timeless and deeply disturbing.
  89. @Pincher Martin
    @Jack D


    At least at one time some of our (white) authors were manly men who were not unfamiliar with (and not unwilling to engage in) physical combat and not JUST a bunch of limp wristed homos. At least it was 50/50.

    Nowadays, I don’t think the society would accept a white male author who was so quick with his fists.
     

    It's hard to say because the kind of writer that Norman Mailer aspired to be no longer exists. Younger generations of American readers today think of someone like Stephen King and George R. R. Martin when they think of great writers. In other words, writers of commercial fiction. Or, if they are well-educated and well-informed, they might name someone like Michael Chabon or Jonathan Franzen.

    Mailer had been drafted into WWII and did not go willingly (it’s a myth that the Greatest Generation were all eager to sign up for combat, though some did)...
     
    I'll have to look it up, but I think that's wrong. I believe Mailer was eager to join the war because he saw it as something that would provide great material for him as a novelist, which he was already keen on doing. That turned out to be the case.

    It's been a long time since I've read a biography of Mailer, though, so maybe my memory is faulty.

    Replies: @Jack D

    ….the twenty-year-old Mailer sought to defer his entry into the Army on the grounds that he was finishing “an important literary work” whose analysis of the fascist and democratic minds might have “some relevance to the war effort.” At the time, he was a recent Harvard graduate who’d won a national short-story prize and written hundreds of thousands of unpublished words but done nothing to suggest his work in progress would have world-historical significance. When the deferral was denied he gave that work up, but he was already telling his first wife of his plans for “THE war novel” before he arrived at Fort Bragg for basic training.

    https://harpers.org/archive/2013/12/does-mailer-matter/?single=1

    Who is to know what is really true but Mailer was the kind of guy who would try to make lemonade out of lemons. Most people who become famous are very talented but also very ambitious and self promoters. Recently there have been some “shocking revelations” about how hard and actively Philip Roth lobbied among his fellow literati for various prizes. I for one am not shocked. Maybe somewhere in the world there are guys like Grigori Pearlman who turned the bearers of good news away when they came to his mother’s apartment (where he lived) to tell him that he had won the Fields Medal but most successful artists are not like this.

    I assume Mailer gave up his typing job to patrol behind enemy lines because he must have realized that a story about typing (80 words per minute!) was not going to cut it as THE great War Novel.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D


    I assume Mailer gave up his typing job to patrol behind enemy lines because he must have realized that a story about typing (80 words per minute!) was not going to cut it as THE great War Novel.
     
    Funny you should mention Mailer and typing. This thread about him made me think of one of his original manuscripts. I don't remember which book it was for, but I stumbled on a photo-realistic copy of it at my college library. It was his typewritten pages for the book, copied in real-size and appearance, bound and sitting on a shelf.

    It was fascinating to look at.

    What I noticed was how many typos, misspellings, punctuation errors and the like there were. Not an outrageous amount, mind you, but enough for me to notice as I read. It seemed that he must have worked fast and that his editor cleaned it up for him. I did not and am not blaming him. In fact, I have long found that experience reassuring to me when I write. I was first employed as a writer after graduating that very college, and I had to be far more careful about my work than Mailer was when he typed that book.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Pincher Martin
    @Jack D

    Well, your source suggests that even if Mailer wasn't immediately enthusiastic about joining the war, he soon changed his mind.

    Which makes sense. Every young author worth a damn back then was trying to write _the_ novel about WW2. Mailer's own judgment was that James Jones succeeded the best among their generation's writers in achieving that aim with From Here to Eternity. Mailer also liked Irwin Shaw's The Young Lions, a novel I don't think many people read anymore.

    But even the refined Vidal wrote a war novel called Williwaw based on his WW2 military experience spent in the Aleutians. I didn't much care for it.

  90. @Pincher Martin
    @kihowi

    I think your comment has some merit when talking about the unfortunate title of Brady's book - although it was common back then for even many well-educated writers to make hackneyed classical allusions. But I don't think it has merit for his text. His prose was shorn of any excess or jargon. It's direct and compelling.

    Here is how one BBC journalist, who had a long-time correspondence with Brady, described his writing:


    [His letters] ran to many pages, initially on prison notepaper, then sheets of lined A4, the kind with very narrow spacing. They were always written with a ballpoint pen in a very neat hand, words precisely on the lines, with good grammar and correct spelling.

    He did at least have the benefit of going through the Scottish education system at a time when mastering the three Rs mattered.
     
    The content of Brady's writing is crap, of course. He justifies the murders he committed by making silly comments on the moral relativism of society. But the writing is good.

    Replies: @Sean

    No one has a choice as to the family (or country) they are born, into or their genetic endowment; how then can anyone be responsible for what they do?

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Sean

    I'm not sure if you're being sarcastic, but if not, then let me respond by saying that I, too, can't control my feelings about wanting to put such criminals to death. It's just part of my genetic endowment.

    Replies: @Sean

  91. @Jack D
    @Pincher Martin


    ....the twenty-year-old Mailer sought to defer his entry into the Army on the grounds that he was finishing “an important literary work” whose analysis of the fascist and democratic minds might have “some relevance to the war effort.” At the time, he was a recent Harvard graduate who’d won a national short-story prize and written hundreds of thousands of unpublished words but done nothing to suggest his work in progress would have world-historical significance. When the deferral was denied he gave that work up, but he was already telling his first wife of his plans for “THE war novel” before he arrived at Fort Bragg for basic training.
     
    https://harpers.org/archive/2013/12/does-mailer-matter/?single=1

    Who is to know what is really true but Mailer was the kind of guy who would try to make lemonade out of lemons. Most people who become famous are very talented but also very ambitious and self promoters. Recently there have been some "shocking revelations" about how hard and actively Philip Roth lobbied among his fellow literati for various prizes. I for one am not shocked. Maybe somewhere in the world there are guys like Grigori Pearlman who turned the bearers of good news away when they came to his mother's apartment (where he lived) to tell him that he had won the Fields Medal but most successful artists are not like this.

    I assume Mailer gave up his typing job to patrol behind enemy lines because he must have realized that a story about typing (80 words per minute!) was not going to cut it as THE great War Novel.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Pincher Martin

    I assume Mailer gave up his typing job to patrol behind enemy lines because he must have realized that a story about typing (80 words per minute!) was not going to cut it as THE great War Novel.

    Funny you should mention Mailer and typing. This thread about him made me think of one of his original manuscripts. I don’t remember which book it was for, but I stumbled on a photo-realistic copy of it at my college library. It was his typewritten pages for the book, copied in real-size and appearance, bound and sitting on a shelf.

    It was fascinating to look at.

    What I noticed was how many typos, misspellings, punctuation errors and the like there were. Not an outrageous amount, mind you, but enough for me to notice as I read. It seemed that he must have worked fast and that his editor cleaned it up for him. I did not and am not blaming him. In fact, I have long found that experience reassuring to me when I write. I was first employed as a writer after graduating that very college, and I had to be far more careful about my work than Mailer was when he typed that book.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Published authors usually have both an editor (who may suggest sweeping changes) and a copy editor who concentrates on spelling, grammar and punctuation, so the author's first draft may be considerably different from what gets printed on the page.

    Different authors have different styles - some guys are very laborious and turn out only a few pages a day but every page is note perfect while others (I think Mailer fell in this category) vomit up a torrent of words as fast as their fingers can fly - for them what's most important is to get their thoughts onto paper and the refinements can come later.

  92. @J.Ross
    @Stephen Paul Foster

    Well there ya go, William Burroughs is a more effective Great American Novelist than Norman Mailer; the spouses he kills stay dead.

    Replies: @Joe S.Walker

    In shooting his wife Burroughs was guilty of criminal recklessness, but nothing worse. And she put the glass on her head and invited him to shoot it off, which nowadays would earn her a Darwin Award.

  93. Speaking of murder…

    Now that the Biden Administration has admitted to killing an innocent aid worker and a bunch of others folks with their drone attack…

    Extradite Biden to Afghanistan!

    If I had intentionally killed a bunch of innocent people, the only question would be life in prison or the death penalty.

    Lock him up! Or worse.

    Hold the murderer accountable!

    Or don’t Afghan lives count?

    Afghan lives matter!

    ALM!

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @PhysicistDave

    It is okay for presidents to kill small foreign children with drones. The supreme court has looked it up in the Constitution, and, sure enough, it is there in the small print.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  94. Speaking of murders ,the pentagon admits drone attack in Kabul kills aid worker and his family……I hope Biden is enjoying his ice cream.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
  95. On the subject of murderers’ writing styles, does anyone know how the late Charles Manson fared with the pen and paper? Anyone? How would Manson stack up compared to his fellow homicidal authors?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    The Beach Boys recorded one of Manson's songs.

    Replies: @petit bourgeois, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Reg Cæsar

  96. @Jack D
    @anon

    Why? Because Nabokov was a genius and it's one of the greatest works of fiction of the 20th century.

    Here's a hint: Lolita is a fictional character and no actual children were harmed in the making of this novel.

    While you contemplate this, here is another work of genius, the story of which involves not one but HUNDREDS of underage women, kidnapped from their homes and held as captives to be raped by their master:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrFbiw77_90

    Why would you want to listen to THIS?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    I’ve always found Lolita the character to be a representation of what America was when Nabokov wrote the novel.

    She is young, uncultured, but coming up rapidly and seductive to the man who represents the Old World, Humbert Humbert. He gets lost in her. She turns his world upside down, however absurd that seems. She is America in all its bubble-gum-chewing adolescence.

    Maybe that’s what Nabokov saw.

    • Agree: JackOH
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk

    It's an interesting thought, but there is evidence that Nabokov was toying with Lolita type scenarios as early as the 1930s when he was still living in Germany.

    Nabokov himself said (but he said many things) that the book was the record of his love affair with the English language. That Nabokov was able to write this work of genius in a language not his own was even more remarkable.

    However, Nabokov was in love with English literature but not with America. The minute he earned some significant money from the publication of Lolita, he took a suite in the Montreux Palace Hotel in Switzerland, which he had visited in his fabulously wealthy pre-Revolutionary Russian youth, and stayed there for the rest of his life.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  97. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    On the subject of murderers' writing styles, does anyone know how the late Charles Manson fared with the pen and paper? Anyone? How would Manson stack up compared to his fellow homicidal authors?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The Beach Boys recorded one of Manson’s songs.

    • Replies: @petit bourgeois
    @Steve Sailer

    My friend had this Manson song on vinyl. It has to be worth a fortune. I'll never forget the first time we dropped the needle on it and listened:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3GC2ubGjkiM&ab_channel=CaluCapel

    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    My dad interviewed Charles Manson in the late '50's (pre-fame, obviously).

    He got married the day before the string of murders occurred in LA (dad got married before the murder spree, not Manson).

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    The Beach Boys recorded one of Manson’s songs.

     

    It was Dennis, the wild Wilson, who got mixed up with him, after having picked up a couple of hitchhikers who were in his harem. (Girls thumbed rides in '60s L.A.?)

    Throw Doris Day into the mix, or at least her son, Terry Melcher, who produced their records. He disliked Manson and helped wean Dennis from his influence.
  98. @eee
    Jack Unterweger was an Austrian in prison for killing a girl but he was a good writer so other writers and various intellectuals got him released and he went on to murder about a dozen more women.

    Replies: @bomag, @AndrewR, @nokangaroos, @Buffalo Joe, @Feryl

    Too bad for John Wayne Gacy, Ted Bundy and Jeffery Dahmer. If only they had literary skills their writing could have meant freedom.

  99. Anonymous[279] • Disclaimer says:

    John Lennon(the dead one) also had a pet cause with a murderer, a black one.

    And Dylan made a big fuss about Hurricane Carter who probably was the murderer.
    Dylan also penned ‘Joey’ about some lowlife(depicted in The Irishman as a punk with no redeemable qualities) as some kind of misunderstood saint.

    And the Birdman of Alcatraz guy was far worse than depicted in the movie.

    At any rate, this John J. Lennon is somewhat different from other killers. Others fooled famous people into believing in their innocence. They were not only psycho-killers but psychopathic liars.

    This John J. Lennon isn’t denying his guilt in the murder. Nor is he pulling an ‘Aaron’. He’s not pleading for innocence but leniency. Does he deserve it given the circumstances? He seemed he killed another scumbag who had it coming to him.

    And some people do change over time.

    But looking at the photos, he seems a dark soul.

    Anyway, there are murderers and murderers. Some murders are so beyond the pale that only sickos could have done it. But there are other murders that could have been done by non-psychos given the circumstances. Everyone was surely tempted to off someone who had it coming but had enough sense to cool his/her head and not do it.

    Question is, Is this Lennon a natural born killer or a killer by circumstance?
    Maybe somewhere in the middle.

    Personally, I don’t like the way he looks. Keep him locked up and throw away the key.

  100. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    The Beach Boys recorded one of Manson's songs.

    Replies: @petit bourgeois, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Reg Cæsar

    My friend had this Manson song on vinyl. It has to be worth a fortune. I’ll never forget the first time we dropped the needle on it and listened:

  101. “I Am Serving 28 Years to Life. Why Does One Person [the governor] Decide if I Deserve Mercy?”

    (I think I know this one.)

    Because you haven’t murdered him yet?

  102. @Buzz Mohawk
    OT:

    Wednesday in Colorado at my alma mater:


    https://lede-admin.coloradosun.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/15/2021/09/GovernorJaredPolisFirstGentlemanMarlonReis-Wedding-PhotoCreditJocelynAugustino.jpg?w=963


    Colorado Governor Jared Polis, left, marries First Gentleman Marlon Reis, right, as Rabbi Tirzah Firestone looks on as marriage vows were read at a private wedding ceremony at the Mary Rippon Outdoor Theater at the University of Colorado.

    Replies: @SafeNow, @Muggles, @Harry Baldwin, @Inquiring Mind

  103. @Jack D
    @Pincher Martin


    ....the twenty-year-old Mailer sought to defer his entry into the Army on the grounds that he was finishing “an important literary work” whose analysis of the fascist and democratic minds might have “some relevance to the war effort.” At the time, he was a recent Harvard graduate who’d won a national short-story prize and written hundreds of thousands of unpublished words but done nothing to suggest his work in progress would have world-historical significance. When the deferral was denied he gave that work up, but he was already telling his first wife of his plans for “THE war novel” before he arrived at Fort Bragg for basic training.
     
    https://harpers.org/archive/2013/12/does-mailer-matter/?single=1

    Who is to know what is really true but Mailer was the kind of guy who would try to make lemonade out of lemons. Most people who become famous are very talented but also very ambitious and self promoters. Recently there have been some "shocking revelations" about how hard and actively Philip Roth lobbied among his fellow literati for various prizes. I for one am not shocked. Maybe somewhere in the world there are guys like Grigori Pearlman who turned the bearers of good news away when they came to his mother's apartment (where he lived) to tell him that he had won the Fields Medal but most successful artists are not like this.

    I assume Mailer gave up his typing job to patrol behind enemy lines because he must have realized that a story about typing (80 words per minute!) was not going to cut it as THE great War Novel.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Pincher Martin

    Well, your source suggests that even if Mailer wasn’t immediately enthusiastic about joining the war, he soon changed his mind.

    Which makes sense. Every young author worth a damn back then was trying to write _the_ novel about WW2. Mailer’s own judgment was that James Jones succeeded the best among their generation’s writers in achieving that aim with From Here to Eternity. Mailer also liked Irwin Shaw’s The Young Lions, a novel I don’t think many people read anymore.

    But even the refined Vidal wrote a war novel called Williwaw based on his WW2 military experience spent in the Aleutians. I didn’t much care for it.

  104. @Sean
    @Pincher Martin

    No one has a choice as to the family (or country) they are born, into or their genetic endowment; how then can anyone be responsible for what they do?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    I’m not sure if you’re being sarcastic, but if not, then let me respond by saying that I, too, can’t control my feelings about wanting to put such criminals to death. It’s just part of my genetic endowment.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @Pincher Martin

    https://youtu.be/IIDb0pYnrbc?t=2493

    Adaptation to setting up lynchings is the basis of all human achievement.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  105. why should you be punished for a crime someone else….noticed.

  106. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    The Beach Boys recorded one of Manson's songs.

    Replies: @petit bourgeois, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Reg Cæsar

    My dad interviewed Charles Manson in the late ’50’s (pre-fame, obviously).

    He got married the day before the string of murders occurred in LA (dad got married before the murder spree, not Manson).

  107. @Reg Cæsar
    @SafeNow


    Ji Jinping – the fella with the Great Wall
     
    https://i.inews.co.uk/content/uploads/2018/09/pilkington-640x360.png

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @AnotherDad

    Compared to what the US has on it’s border, 500 years later … it’s pretty “Great”.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad


    Compared to what the US has on it’s border, 500 years later … it’s pretty “Great”.
     
    Behorsed Mongoloids might not have scaled the thing, but your average Mexican sure could. Fat Western tourists are walking all over it!

    And, no, it is not visible from space. But Holland, another creation of man, is.


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b3/NetherlandsReclamation1300-2000.gif/220px-NetherlandsReclamation1300-2000.gif

  108. @usNthem
    Let’s face it, relatively speaking, prisons these days are fairly cush compared to 100-150 years ago - a/c, heating, three squares a day, libraries, workout space etc. Let’s do away with all that crap and bring back chain gangs and other forms of hard labor. Let’s also bring back a death penalty that is actually enforced on a very timely basis. It should be someplace would be criminals would fear being sent to - maybe a little vigilante justice added here and there for some spice.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @James Speaks, @AnotherDad

    There is no reason to include people in your society that piss all over your society’s norms.

    Execution or expulsion suffices. With that, you could leave your doors and cars unlocked, women could walk down our streets at anytime without fear.

    [MORE]

    And–the obligatory add–it is very clear that after 50+ of minoritarianism we no longer are a nation with anything resembling common norms.

    So let’s just make it official.

  109. @SafeNow
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Does anyone know what the small, white pillow is that the Rabbi-gal is holding? It still has a wash-instructions tag attached. Just curious. In any case, I want to wish these two guys the best. Not too many things about the US have gotten better since I grew up long ago, but one of these is increased tolerance for a gay couple; live and let live.

    Replies: @epebble

    A wedding ring cushion or ring bearer pillow is a small pillow on which the wedding rings are carried in a traditional Western white wedding. They are frequently carried by a junior member of the bridal party known as the ringbearer frequently a younger male relative or friend.

    During the process, the ring bearer carries the rings on the pillow down the aisle to the officiant.

    Wedding ring cushions are generally small, ornate pillows that reflect the wedding’s colors or white silk pillows. In less traditional Western weddings they can be whimsical or thematic containers that reflect the couple’s personal tastes.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wedding_ring_cushion

    • Thanks: SafeNow
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @epebble

    At our wedding, my friend carried The ring in his pocket (an exact one carrot, G color, VS1 grade) but it was a casual wedding, held on the balcony of my friend's house at the beach, where Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller had stayed years before...

    (As far as my own ring, I barely even remember how it came about, but I certainly remember it was not part of our beachside ceremony. My beloved and I worked that out between ourselves.) But yes, my friend owned and lived in the house Marilyn and Arthur had stayed in, and he hosted our wedding on his balcony overlooking Long Island Sound. (Am I bragging? Yes.)

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  110. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Enemy of Earth

    These guys should be executed max 6 months after the verdict, plus some 1-2 weeks of real torture, to get the taste of their own medicine..

    End of story.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    I’m all in favor of quick (e.g. same day) executions, but not when lawyer-prosecutors and judges get paid even for sloppy convictions.

    Of course the criminal justice system is all about making mistakes, so as to maximize the amount of billable lawyer-hours used for appeals, re-tries, etc. and to increase the demand for courtrooms and (often politically appointed) lawyer-judges to fill them.

  111. So nasty, Mr. Blogger.

  112. @Jack D
    @Pincher Martin

    Porque no los dos?

    Humans are complicated. People here seem to feel as if every action can have only ONE motivation. For example, they say that everything that Jews do is for the sole purpose of destroying Western Civilization. In truth, someone like Soros can be motivated BOTH by the desire to make money AND by the desire to destroy Western Civilization, so it's more complicated than you anti-Semites say.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @epebble

    desire to destroy Western Civilization

    Even that is irrational. He (Soros) has a an extreme libertarian view of what a society should be that it may appear to some as that. Oversimplification can lead to absurdities.

    Democrats support Abortion Rights –> Democrats want to kill as many babies as possible
    Republicans Support Second Amendment —> Republicans want to kill as many Adults as possible
    Republican politicians oppose vaccine mandates –> Republican politicians want as many people as possible to die or at least become chronically sick.
    Some Democrats support immigration –> Democrats hate White people
    Some Republicans oppose immigration –> Republicans hate non-White people.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @epebble

    "He (Soros) has a an extreme libertarian view of what a society should be that it may appear to some as that."

    Na-no, Soros is a Leftist liberal with some economic libertarian leanings.


    "Democrats support Abortion Rights –> Democrats want to kill as many babies as possible"

    No, Democrats only want to kill as many white babies as possible. Probably do suffer some pangs of conscience if they were to actually see the stats, namely that about 30-40% of total annual abortions in the US are done by POCs.


    "Some Democrats support immigration –> Democrats hate White people"

    But Democrats do hate white people. The last few years post-Ferguson bear this out in public policy. The entire BLM movement is a direct insult as well as an assault on white people in general. Toppling of statues on government lands, where ca.99% of them depict white people? BLM and Antifa rioting and burning down property, much of it owned by white people? Numerous instances of interracial crime (vast majority of blacks assaulting whites)? Whether it is thru immigration or another policy, the end result is the same---reduce the share of white people in the US and make them die out sooner rather than later. Supposedly the SPLC has a graph showing the decline of white people as a percentage of the US day by day. If any public figure publicly showed a graph charting the decline of POCs in the US, that would be the end of their career.

    For the most part, cancel culture is totally employed vs. white people.

    What are these and other things too numerous to mention but a direct assault on white people in general? As the opposite of love is hate so therefore yes, ultimately the policies espoused by the Democratic party (growing more explicit with each passing year) are designed against white people as a specific group. It isn't just the Democratic party, they are merely more explicit in their goals and the means to which they employ.

    And of course domestic terrorist extremists (which are named as white people in general) are now considered to be the number one threat by the US government.

    A functional adult would have to be near comatose, blind, slow, or stupid not to have noticed these and other obvious occurrences that are taking place in US society at large with each passing year.

    Replies: @epebble

  113. @AnotherDad
    @Reg Cæsar

    Compared to what the US has on it's border, 500 years later ... it's pretty "Great".

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Compared to what the US has on it’s border, 500 years later … it’s pretty “Great”.

    Behorsed Mongoloids might not have scaled the thing, but your average Mexican sure could. Fat Western tourists are walking all over it!

    And, no, it is not visible from space. But Holland, another creation of man, is.

  114. @Steve Sailer
    @Hangnail Hans

    Capote had a gay crush on one of the "In Cold Blood" murderers, but it didn't seem to warp his judgment they deserved what was coming to them. From my review of the 2005 movie "Capote" with the late Philip Seymour Hoffman:

    Capote helped the pair get a good lawyer to craft their first appeal against the death penalty. But after he'd completed most of his manuscript and realized how strong it was, his need for a dramatic ending (such as, say, their hangings) made him increasingly impatient with their endless appeals.

    Screenwriter Dan Futterman attacks Capote for being a heartless monster who manipulated poor Miller into telling him his secrets even though Capote eventually hoped for his execution.

    In reality, of course, the true monsters were the murderers, who had decided days before their home invasion to shotgun the whole family to eliminate all witnesses. With his conventional liberal bias against capital punishment, Futterman doesn't realize that without the death penalty, repeat offenders, who face long prison terms if convicted of robbery, would more often find it logical to kill their robbery victims to keep their identities secret.
     

    Replies: @JimDandy

    I read some things that led me to believe that he actually had sexual relations with Perry. But I forget the exact details.

  115. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    I've always found Lolita the character to be a representation of what America was when Nabokov wrote the novel.

    She is young, uncultured, but coming up rapidly and seductive to the man who represents the Old World, Humbert Humbert. He gets lost in her. She turns his world upside down, however absurd that seems. She is America in all its bubble-gum-chewing adolescence.

    Maybe that's what Nabokov saw.

    Replies: @Jack D

    It’s an interesting thought, but there is evidence that Nabokov was toying with Lolita type scenarios as early as the 1930s when he was still living in Germany.

    Nabokov himself said (but he said many things) that the book was the record of his love affair with the English language. That Nabokov was able to write this work of genius in a language not his own was even more remarkable.

    However, Nabokov was in love with English literature but not with America. The minute he earned some significant money from the publication of Lolita, he took a suite in the Montreux Palace Hotel in Switzerland, which he had visited in his fabulously wealthy pre-Revolutionary Russian youth, and stayed there for the rest of his life.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    The minute he earned some significant money from the publication of Lolita, he took a suite in the Montreux Palace Hotel in Switzerland...
     
    To make records with a mobile?



    https://images.genius.com/2382a1f17a6f4be0e831aabd5221b39e.1000x996x1.jpg

    Replies: @Jack D

  116. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D


    I assume Mailer gave up his typing job to patrol behind enemy lines because he must have realized that a story about typing (80 words per minute!) was not going to cut it as THE great War Novel.
     
    Funny you should mention Mailer and typing. This thread about him made me think of one of his original manuscripts. I don't remember which book it was for, but I stumbled on a photo-realistic copy of it at my college library. It was his typewritten pages for the book, copied in real-size and appearance, bound and sitting on a shelf.

    It was fascinating to look at.

    What I noticed was how many typos, misspellings, punctuation errors and the like there were. Not an outrageous amount, mind you, but enough for me to notice as I read. It seemed that he must have worked fast and that his editor cleaned it up for him. I did not and am not blaming him. In fact, I have long found that experience reassuring to me when I write. I was first employed as a writer after graduating that very college, and I had to be far more careful about my work than Mailer was when he typed that book.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Published authors usually have both an editor (who may suggest sweeping changes) and a copy editor who concentrates on spelling, grammar and punctuation, so the author’s first draft may be considerably different from what gets printed on the page.

    Different authors have different styles – some guys are very laborious and turn out only a few pages a day but every page is note perfect while others (I think Mailer fell in this category) vomit up a torrent of words as fast as their fingers can fly – for them what’s most important is to get their thoughts onto paper and the refinements can come later.

  117. @Pincher Martin
    @Sean

    I'm not sure if you're being sarcastic, but if not, then let me respond by saying that I, too, can't control my feelings about wanting to put such criminals to death. It's just part of my genetic endowment.

    Replies: @Sean

    Adaptation to setting up lynchings is the basis of all human achievement.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Sean

    I'm a strong believer in culling the herd of the most despicable members of our species, and Gerald Gallego, whose crimes I know well because I was growing up in the Sacramento region during the time he committed them, certainly qualifies. (I also knew about his father.)

    But executing for petty crimes? I doubt it has much effect. It might even be detrimental by killing off some useful traits like nonconformity. I have no data to back it up, but I've always suspected that some East Asian populations were perhaps a little too quick in meting out severe punishments for mild offenses and ended up with very smart populations with less in the way of creativity than one would expect based on their IQ.

    Replies: @Sean

  118. @epebble
    @Jack D

    desire to destroy Western Civilization

    Even that is irrational. He (Soros) has a an extreme libertarian view of what a society should be that it may appear to some as that. Oversimplification can lead to absurdities.

    Democrats support Abortion Rights --> Democrats want to kill as many babies as possible
    Republicans Support Second Amendment ---> Republicans want to kill as many Adults as possible
    Republican politicians oppose vaccine mandates --> Republican politicians want as many people as possible to die or at least become chronically sick.
    Some Democrats support immigration --> Democrats hate White people
    Some Republicans oppose immigration --> Republicans hate non-White people.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    “He (Soros) has a an extreme libertarian view of what a society should be that it may appear to some as that.”

    Na-no, Soros is a Leftist liberal with some economic libertarian leanings.

    “Democrats support Abortion Rights –> Democrats want to kill as many babies as possible”

    No, Democrats only want to kill as many white babies as possible. Probably do suffer some pangs of conscience if they were to actually see the stats, namely that about 30-40% of total annual abortions in the US are done by POCs.

    “Some Democrats support immigration –> Democrats hate White people”

    But Democrats do hate white people. The last few years post-Ferguson bear this out in public policy. The entire BLM movement is a direct insult as well as an assault on white people in general. Toppling of statues on government lands, where ca.99% of them depict white people? BLM and Antifa rioting and burning down property, much of it owned by white people? Numerous instances of interracial crime (vast majority of blacks assaulting whites)? Whether it is thru immigration or another policy, the end result is the same—reduce the share of white people in the US and make them die out sooner rather than later. Supposedly the SPLC has a graph showing the decline of white people as a percentage of the US day by day. If any public figure publicly showed a graph charting the decline of POCs in the US, that would be the end of their career.

    For the most part, cancel culture is totally employed vs. white people.

    What are these and other things too numerous to mention but a direct assault on white people in general? As the opposite of love is hate so therefore yes, ultimately the policies espoused by the Democratic party (growing more explicit with each passing year) are designed against white people as a specific group. It isn’t just the Democratic party, they are merely more explicit in their goals and the means to which they employ.

    And of course domestic terrorist extremists (which are named as white people in general) are now considered to be the number one threat by the US government.

    A functional adult would have to be near comatose, blind, slow, or stupid not to have noticed these and other obvious occurrences that are taking place in US society at large with each passing year.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    But Democrats do hate white people.

    With 60% of Democrats being White, that assertion is a tough sell. But, rest of your argument is reasonable. You come closer to consistency if you reformulate it as Democrats ignore White people in the sense that they feel they don't have to cater to White people's concerns (or you can also say they put non-White people's concerns above White peoples concerns.)

  119. @Thirdtwin
    “I Am Serving 28 Years to Life. Why Does One Person [the governor] Decide if I Deserve Mercy?”

    You already got mercy, J. J. The thing you’re looking for is freedom.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I suppose the job could be better done by a computer. Just feed it the information and it can decide whether to execute the death penalty or not, based on the data, and then print out the death warrant at the same time as well as the invitation cards for the ceremony.

  120. @PhysicistDave
    Speaking of murder...

    Now that the Biden Administration has admitted to killing an innocent aid worker and a bunch of others folks with their drone attack...

    Extradite Biden to Afghanistan!

    If I had intentionally killed a bunch of innocent people, the only question would be life in prison or the death penalty.

    Lock him up! Or worse.

    Hold the murderer accountable!

    Or don't Afghan lives count?

    Afghan lives matter!

    ALM!

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    It is okay for presidents to kill small foreign children with drones. The supreme court has looked it up in the Constitution, and, sure enough, it is there in the small print.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    It is okay for presidents to kill small foreign children with drones. The supreme court has looked it up in the Constitution, and, sure enough, it is there in the small print.

     

    We all know who set that precedent. Some very sick people still view him as a hero:





    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/26/Avenue_Franklin_Roosevelt%2C_Paris_8.jpg

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Jack D


  121. Before he was executed for the murder of two cops in separate incidents, he fathered a child (who he never saw) with a woman who who had many prostitutes and prostitutes and child molesters in her tree. Albert Gallego’s son grew up to be the serial killer of young girls, and abuser of his own daughters, Gerald Gallego, who fathered multiple children. Executing men for petty crime works because it stops them reproducing. A paper by Peter Frost and Henry Harpending that got roughly handled by Ron Unz.

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25748943/

    Through its monopoly on violence, the State tends to pacify social relations. Such pacification proceeded slowly in Western Europe between the 5th and 11th centuries, being hindered by the rudimentary nature of law enforcement, the belief in a man’s right to settle personal disputes as he saw fit, and the Church’s opposition to the death penalty. These hindrances began to dissolve in the 11th century with a consensus by Church and State that the wicked should be punished so that the good may live in peace. Courts imposed the death penalty more and more often and, by the late Middle Ages, were condemning to death between 0.5 and 1.0% of all men of each generation, with perhaps just as many offenders dying at the scene of the crime or in prison while awaiting trial. Meanwhile, the homicide rate plummeted from the 14th century to the 20th

    I think the fall in the birthrate is the primary factor in the modern era, because a lot of young men in a society cause trouble, but abortion’s effect may not be trivial.

  122. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    The Beach Boys recorded one of Manson's songs.

    Replies: @petit bourgeois, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Reg Cæsar

    The Beach Boys recorded one of Manson’s songs.

    It was Dennis, the wild Wilson, who got mixed up with him, after having picked up a couple of hitchhikers who were in his harem. (Girls thumbed rides in ’60s L.A.?)

    Throw Doris Day into the mix, or at least her son, Terry Melcher, who produced their records. He disliked Manson and helped wean Dennis from his influence.

  123. @kihowi
    @anon

    It's not gross at all. I read it as a teenager, excited by the terrible evil I was going to immerse myself in, and I got a study of a shlemiel who got played by a little girl.

    I also saw Salo and it's equally boring. When are things that are supposed to be scandalous actually scandalous?

    Replies: @Ed Case

    I also saw Salo and it’s equally boring.

    That seemed to be the reaction of quite a few in the audience when I saw it.
    Were you expecting a sex film?

    When are things that are supposed to be scandalous actually scandalous?

    It was scandalous that Salo was made and released, but the subject matter is timeless and deeply disturbing.

  124. @Jonathan Mason
    @PhysicistDave

    It is okay for presidents to kill small foreign children with drones. The supreme court has looked it up in the Constitution, and, sure enough, it is there in the small print.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    It is okay for presidents to kill small foreign children with drones. The supreme court has looked it up in the Constitution, and, sure enough, it is there in the small print.

    We all know who set that precedent. Some very sick people still view him as a hero:

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Reg Cæsar

    So Franklin D. Roosevelt was a hero of the French revolution?

    It is always good to know how traditions started.

    For example, a lot of people don't know that one of the Founding Fathers started the US tradition of waging War on Terror. Yes, that's right, Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, as soon as he got his feet under the desk at the newly-built White House, decided that he wanted to wage a War on Terror against the Barbary Pirates who infested (pirates always infest the places where they live) the coast of North Africa for centuries and took captured many white people from coastal Europe and sold them as slaves.

    In Jefferson's time, they had also captured and enslaved hundreds of white American sailors.

    Jefferson had tried to negotiate with the pirate leaders who charmingly explained that the "right" to take slaves was "founded on the Laws of the Prophet, that it was written in their Koran that all nations who should not have answered their authority were sinners, that it was their right and duty to make war upon them wherever they could be found, and to make slaves of all they could take as prisoners, and that every Mussulman who should be slain in battle was sure to go to Paradise".

    "Shit" said Jefferson. "They envy us our freedoms, that's what it is. I shall send an aircraft carrier to punish them and get back our hostages!"

    Jefferson was advised by cooler heads that the US did not yet have aircraft carriers, because there were no aircraft, and that in fact the US did not even have a proper navy to speak of.

    This was a problem because American shipping was no longer protected by the British Navy. However, the resourceful Jefferson, himself an owner of slaves, soon cobbled together a makeshift navy and sent some gunboats off to the Mediterranean to bomb Tripoli from offshore under the auspices of Stephen Decatur.

    "US Navy has fair wind to blow away ye Barbarians" looked like a good headline for the 90-day news cycle, thought Jefferson, although technically the opponents were Berberian rug merchants and not actual Barbarians.

    The US navy being what it was, one of its main ships, The Philadelphia, ran aground off Tripoli, its crew was captured, and the military equipment on the ship fell into the hands of the pirates. Fortunately Stephen Decatur, inspired by an episode in the Hornblower novels was able to recapture the Philadelphia, kill the skeleton crew of Berbers, and set fire to that ship to prevent any further loss of American military secrets, and thus inspiring many Romantic painters to produce images of the colorful scene.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a2/Burning_of_the_uss_philadelphia.jpg/800px-Burning_of_the_uss_philadelphia.jpg

    However a number of coastal cities were soon bombed from offshore, and the crew and hostages were ransomed and Jefferson waved his hat in the air and declared that the Mission was Accomplished, and that the US navy would now take on the French.

    Anyway since those days of yore, US presidents have always taken their cue from Jefferson in terms of gunboat diplomacy, updated with aircraft carrier diplomacy and airbase diplomacy, to as to keep foreign rascals in their place.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    , @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    FDR killed small foreign children with drones? Who knew?

    Why did he pick on the small ones in particular? Did the drone technology of the day make this feasible?* Did he have a preference in favor of large foreign children?


    *OT, when Israel killed Iran's top nuclear weapons scientist last year, the Iranians came out with several conflicting stories of how this was done. One of them was some face saving cock and bull story about how he was assassinated by an AI killer robot which then self destructed so that his security team wasn't able to prevent the attack. Yah, sure, I thought - a killer robot ate my nuclear scientist. What a lame excuse. It wouldn't even fly with my 4th grade teacher. Well, it turns out that he really was assassinated by an AI killer robot which then self destructed, at least according to a story in today's NY Times.

    At first glance it was just a stock machine gun refitted for remote control, which any 12th grader could rig up as a high school science project - a joystick to aim left-right and up and down and a trigger button and a camera as a sight. As far back as WWII, the B-29 had remote control machine guns. BUT, since this one was controlled by satellite (introducing a delay of almost 2 seconds) and mounted on a truck bed which shakes with every recoil, and had to track a moving target (a car), it was not that simple so that's where the AI came in. The Iranians think that it might have also had facial recognition software. In any case it was good enough that the nuclear weapons scientist was killed and his wife who was sitting next to him in the car was completely uninjured.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/18/world/middleeast/iran-nuclear-fakhrizadeh-assassination-israel.html

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  125. Back in 1970 Jane Fonda, Bob Dylan, Dr. Spock, Linus Pauling , Pete Seeger and a whole host of other white people worthier than any of us were championing the cause of the sociopath career armed robber and published author George Jackson.

  126. @Sean
    @Pincher Martin

    https://youtu.be/IIDb0pYnrbc?t=2493

    Adaptation to setting up lynchings is the basis of all human achievement.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    I’m a strong believer in culling the herd of the most despicable members of our species, and Gerald Gallego, whose crimes I know well because I was growing up in the Sacramento region during the time he committed them, certainly qualifies. (I also knew about his father.)

    But executing for petty crimes? I doubt it has much effect. It might even be detrimental by killing off some useful traits like nonconformity. I have no data to back it up, but I’ve always suspected that some East Asian populations were perhaps a little too quick in meting out severe punishments for mild offenses and ended up with very smart populations with less in the way of creativity than one would expect based on their IQ.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @Pincher Martin

    The genes that when they come through to expression result in somewhat eccentric or unconventional people may be individually valuable, but I don't see actual nonconformity in behavior is much more than the red flag for a strong tendency to schizophrenia that counteracts the genes for any superior intelligence that a person also happens to have by giving the person faulty thought processes. Gallego's girlfriend who served 20 years for helping him (gave birth to his child while in custody BTW) had an IQ of 150 and she was from an affluent background, but her father had been born into the working class and she was wild from a very young age.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  127. @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk

    It's an interesting thought, but there is evidence that Nabokov was toying with Lolita type scenarios as early as the 1930s when he was still living in Germany.

    Nabokov himself said (but he said many things) that the book was the record of his love affair with the English language. That Nabokov was able to write this work of genius in a language not his own was even more remarkable.

    However, Nabokov was in love with English literature but not with America. The minute he earned some significant money from the publication of Lolita, he took a suite in the Montreux Palace Hotel in Switzerland, which he had visited in his fabulously wealthy pre-Revolutionary Russian youth, and stayed there for the rest of his life.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The minute he earned some significant money from the publication of Lolita, he took a suite in the Montreux Palace Hotel in Switzerland…

    To make records with a mobile?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    I hear that Nabokov has an uncredited solo on balalaika on that album.

  128. @Pincher Martin
    @Sean

    I'm a strong believer in culling the herd of the most despicable members of our species, and Gerald Gallego, whose crimes I know well because I was growing up in the Sacramento region during the time he committed them, certainly qualifies. (I also knew about his father.)

    But executing for petty crimes? I doubt it has much effect. It might even be detrimental by killing off some useful traits like nonconformity. I have no data to back it up, but I've always suspected that some East Asian populations were perhaps a little too quick in meting out severe punishments for mild offenses and ended up with very smart populations with less in the way of creativity than one would expect based on their IQ.

    Replies: @Sean

    The genes that when they come through to expression result in somewhat eccentric or unconventional people may be individually valuable, but I don’t see actual nonconformity in behavior is much more than the red flag for a strong tendency to schizophrenia that counteracts the genes for any superior intelligence that a person also happens to have by giving the person faulty thought processes. Gallego’s girlfriend who served 20 years for helping him (gave birth to his child while in custody BTW) had an IQ of 150 and she was from an affluent background, but her father had been born into the working class and she was wild from a very young age.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Sean


    The genes that when they come through to expression result in somewhat eccentric or unconventional people may be individually valuable, but I don’t see actual nonconformity in behavior is much more than the red flag for a strong tendency to schizophrenia that counteracts the genes for any superior intelligence that a person also happens to have by giving the person faulty thought processes.
     
    You're much too severe. A higher level of mental illness might be one extreme expression, just as a higher level of individual genius that leads to useful scientific discoveries would be the other. But the more widespread identifiable trait in such a population would probably be a higher level of individualism that was neither harmful nor useful. More girls who dye their hair a new color or wear a daring new fashion, for example. Or more young men who popularize a new sport or dance move.

    You are, after all, still killing off violent people, just not those who commit "petty crimes."

    And there are socially useful behaviors beyond novel scientific discoveries for a population with more individualism. Think of the Age of Exploration or the exploration of the American West. Many of those men were borderline criminals in polite society. Some were actual criminals. A few were privateers. Even the gentlemen aristocratic leaders among the early explorers were not so gentlemanly. They had debts in a society which took debt far more seriously than we do today. They took risks which were not often calculated to their highest advantage for surviving. They often made rash decisions which led to the death of their own men.

    Their contributions to the expansion of the West, however, were immense. It takes a special kind of mind to leave one's home behind and strike out on an adventure in which death is more likely than riches. Think of the mountain men who explored the American West without government dispensation. (Not everyone was Lewis and Clark.) Yes, beaver pelts were valuable, but money is not what motivated the most famous of those men. They just had an itch.

    So not every expression of eccentric or unconventional behavior leads to serial killing or mental illness (or novel scientific discoveries). You should recognize that since you're engaged right now in what most people in our society would say was anti-social behavior and at a website which publishes many anti-social thoughts.

    Replies: @Sean

  129. @eee
    Jack Unterweger was an Austrian in prison for killing a girl but he was a good writer so other writers and various intellectuals got him released and he went on to murder about a dozen more women.

    Replies: @bomag, @AndrewR, @nokangaroos, @Buffalo Joe, @Feryl

    The impression I get is that fascination with criminals among the literati/intellectual elite is caused by the fact that most of them did not actually have sustained contact with low life street scum in their personal lives. Even if they had a lower class background, they usually did not associate with the low lives (people into reading and writing are usually too introverted and geeky to be able to associate with thugs) With black criminals there’s also the racial guilt factor, and the “room brightening smile” (e.g. Asian and Mestizo criminals are boring in comparison).

    Worth noting too that people born in the 1920’s-early 1940’s came to find the social calm of the 1930’s-1950’s “boring” so they came to see the crime waves of the 60’s and 70’s as part of the new “vibrant” culture. It was Boomers who launched and supported the “tough on crime” culture of the 80’s and 90’s, even as pre-Boomer movie directors kept making movies about criminal protagonists which portrayed them as having some kind of redeemable qualities or at least intriguing moral and mental complexity. Scorsese, Micheal Mann, and Brian DePalma are all pre-Boomers, while iconic Boomers Lucas and Spielberg were eventually scorned for promoting feel good fantasy with Good Guys and Bad Guys. Pre-Boomer Robert De Niro has of course played countless assholes and losers on screen, often under the guidance of Scorsese.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Feryl

    Robert De Niro has of course played countless assholes and losers on screen, often under the guidance of Scorsese.

    Robert De Niro has also played countless assholes and losers in real life, under no guidance but his own.

  130. @bomag
    @eee

    The Innocence Project was in the news for awhile, using newer DNA evidence to free some convicts.

    I started hearing about some of the newly released committing new crimes; now I don't hear about the Innocence Project very much. Hmmm.

    Replies: @Feryl, @John Derbyshire

    The reality is that even if the convicted didn’t commit the crime for which they were sentenced, the reason the cops pursued them to begin with is that convicted criminals are not exactly nice upstanding people. So the quest to free all these “innocent people” is often going to backfire.

  131. @Sean
    @Pincher Martin

    The genes that when they come through to expression result in somewhat eccentric or unconventional people may be individually valuable, but I don't see actual nonconformity in behavior is much more than the red flag for a strong tendency to schizophrenia that counteracts the genes for any superior intelligence that a person also happens to have by giving the person faulty thought processes. Gallego's girlfriend who served 20 years for helping him (gave birth to his child while in custody BTW) had an IQ of 150 and she was from an affluent background, but her father had been born into the working class and she was wild from a very young age.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    The genes that when they come through to expression result in somewhat eccentric or unconventional people may be individually valuable, but I don’t see actual nonconformity in behavior is much more than the red flag for a strong tendency to schizophrenia that counteracts the genes for any superior intelligence that a person also happens to have by giving the person faulty thought processes.

    You’re much too severe. A higher level of mental illness might be one extreme expression, just as a higher level of individual genius that leads to useful scientific discoveries would be the other. But the more widespread identifiable trait in such a population would probably be a higher level of individualism that was neither harmful nor useful. More girls who dye their hair a new color or wear a daring new fashion, for example. Or more young men who popularize a new sport or dance move.

    You are, after all, still killing off violent people, just not those who commit “petty crimes.”

    And there are socially useful behaviors beyond novel scientific discoveries for a population with more individualism. Think of the Age of Exploration or the exploration of the American West. Many of those men were borderline criminals in polite society. Some were actual criminals. A few were privateers. Even the gentlemen aristocratic leaders among the early explorers were not so gentlemanly. They had debts in a society which took debt far more seriously than we do today. They took risks which were not often calculated to their highest advantage for surviving. They often made rash decisions which led to the death of their own men.

    Their contributions to the expansion of the West, however, were immense. It takes a special kind of mind to leave one’s home behind and strike out on an adventure in which death is more likely than riches. Think of the mountain men who explored the American West without government dispensation. (Not everyone was Lewis and Clark.) Yes, beaver pelts were valuable, but money is not what motivated the most famous of those men. They just had an itch.

    So not every expression of eccentric or unconventional behavior leads to serial killing or mental illness (or novel scientific discoveries). You should recognize that since you’re engaged right now in what most people in our society would say was anti-social behavior and at a website which publishes many anti-social thoughts.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @Pincher Martin


    Their contributions to the expansion of the West, however, were immense.
     
    Pursuing a risky strategy is not at all pathological if you have no safer option, such as an inheritance or sinecure, I think you need a screw loose to end up in prison for serious time. Many of the best soldiers are from highly religious backgrounds.

    I wasn't talking about the death penalty for fashion mistakes, but about permanently removing criminals from the gene pool while they are still young adults and haven't reproduced. There is a obvious connection between violence and heterosexuality in men, so it is not like those genes will naturally decline if left alone. Quite the opposite I have heard men say they got into a gang to get girls to notice them.

    I am sure there is a connection between schizophrenia and artistic talent. Science maybe, maybe not.

    Ex Internal Revenue Service agent, millionaire real estate investor and bumpstock mass murderer Stephen Paddock? His father was a bank robber.

    Many, perhaps most, people that comment on this site believe things that seem quite fantastic to me.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  132. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    It is okay for presidents to kill small foreign children with drones. The supreme court has looked it up in the Constitution, and, sure enough, it is there in the small print.

     

    We all know who set that precedent. Some very sick people still view him as a hero:





    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/26/Avenue_Franklin_Roosevelt%2C_Paris_8.jpg

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Jack D

    So Franklin D. Roosevelt was a hero of the French revolution?

    It is always good to know how traditions started.

    For example, a lot of people don’t know that one of the Founding Fathers started the US tradition of waging War on Terror. Yes, that’s right, Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, as soon as he got his feet under the desk at the newly-built White House, decided that he wanted to wage a War on Terror against the Barbary Pirates who infested (pirates always infest the places where they live) the coast of North Africa for centuries and took captured many white people from coastal Europe and sold them as slaves.

    In Jefferson’s time, they had also captured and enslaved hundreds of white American sailors.

    Jefferson had tried to negotiate with the pirate leaders who charmingly explained that the “right” to take slaves was “founded on the Laws of the Prophet, that it was written in their Koran that all nations who should not have answered their authority were sinners, that it was their right and duty to make war upon them wherever they could be found, and to make slaves of all they could take as prisoners, and that every Mussulman who should be slain in battle was sure to go to Paradise”.

    “Shit” said Jefferson. “They envy us our freedoms, that’s what it is. I shall send an aircraft carrier to punish them and get back our hostages!”

    Jefferson was advised by cooler heads that the US did not yet have aircraft carriers, because there were no aircraft, and that in fact the US did not even have a proper navy to speak of.

    This was a problem because American shipping was no longer protected by the British Navy. However, the resourceful Jefferson, himself an owner of slaves, soon cobbled together a makeshift navy and sent some gunboats off to the Mediterranean to bomb Tripoli from offshore under the auspices of Stephen Decatur.

    “US Navy has fair wind to blow away ye Barbarians” looked like a good headline for the 90-day news cycle, thought Jefferson, although technically the opponents were Berberian rug merchants and not actual Barbarians.

    The US navy being what it was, one of its main ships, The Philadelphia, ran aground off Tripoli, its crew was captured, and the military equipment on the ship fell into the hands of the pirates. Fortunately Stephen Decatur, inspired by an episode in the Hornblower novels was able to recapture the Philadelphia, kill the skeleton crew of Berbers, and set fire to that ship to prevent any further loss of American military secrets, and thus inspiring many Romantic painters to produce images of the colorful scene.

    However a number of coastal cities were soon bombed from offshore, and the crew and hostages were ransomed and Jefferson waved his hat in the air and declared that the Mission was Accomplished, and that the US navy would now take on the French.

    Anyway since those days of yore, US presidents have always taken their cue from Jefferson in terms of gunboat diplomacy, updated with aircraft carrier diplomacy and airbase diplomacy, to as to keep foreign rascals in their place.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Jonathan Mason

    Hooray for Ole Tom Jefferson!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ii-iyNEQFTw

  133. @Feryl
    @eee

    The impression I get is that fascination with criminals among the literati/intellectual elite is caused by the fact that most of them did not actually have sustained contact with low life street scum in their personal lives. Even if they had a lower class background, they usually did not associate with the low lives (people into reading and writing are usually too introverted and geeky to be able to associate with thugs) With black criminals there's also the racial guilt factor, and the "room brightening smile" (e.g. Asian and Mestizo criminals are boring in comparison).

    Worth noting too that people born in the 1920's-early 1940's came to find the social calm of the 1930's-1950's "boring" so they came to see the crime waves of the 60's and 70's as part of the new "vibrant" culture. It was Boomers who launched and supported the "tough on crime" culture of the 80's and 90's, even as pre-Boomer movie directors kept making movies about criminal protagonists which portrayed them as having some kind of redeemable qualities or at least intriguing moral and mental complexity. Scorsese, Micheal Mann, and Brian DePalma are all pre-Boomers, while iconic Boomers Lucas and Spielberg were eventually scorned for promoting feel good fantasy with Good Guys and Bad Guys. Pre-Boomer Robert De Niro has of course played countless assholes and losers on screen, often under the guidance of Scorsese.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Robert De Niro has of course played countless assholes and losers on screen, often under the guidance of Scorsese.

    Robert De Niro has also played countless assholes and losers in real life, under no guidance but his own.

  134. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    The minute he earned some significant money from the publication of Lolita, he took a suite in the Montreux Palace Hotel in Switzerland...
     
    To make records with a mobile?



    https://images.genius.com/2382a1f17a6f4be0e831aabd5221b39e.1000x996x1.jpg

    Replies: @Jack D

    I hear that Nabokov has an uncredited solo on balalaika on that album.

  135. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    It is okay for presidents to kill small foreign children with drones. The supreme court has looked it up in the Constitution, and, sure enough, it is there in the small print.

     

    We all know who set that precedent. Some very sick people still view him as a hero:





    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/26/Avenue_Franklin_Roosevelt%2C_Paris_8.jpg

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Jack D

    FDR killed small foreign children with drones? Who knew?

    Why did he pick on the small ones in particular? Did the drone technology of the day make this feasible?* Did he have a preference in favor of large foreign children?

    *OT, when Israel killed Iran’s top nuclear weapons scientist last year, the Iranians came out with several conflicting stories of how this was done. One of them was some face saving cock and bull story about how he was assassinated by an AI killer robot which then self destructed so that his security team wasn’t able to prevent the attack. Yah, sure, I thought – a killer robot ate my nuclear scientist. What a lame excuse. It wouldn’t even fly with my 4th grade teacher. Well, it turns out that he really was assassinated by an AI killer robot which then self destructed, at least according to a story in today’s NY Times.

    At first glance it was just a stock machine gun refitted for remote control, which any 12th grader could rig up as a high school science project – a joystick to aim left-right and up and down and a trigger button and a camera as a sight. As far back as WWII, the B-29 had remote control machine guns. BUT, since this one was controlled by satellite (introducing a delay of almost 2 seconds) and mounted on a truck bed which shakes with every recoil, and had to track a moving target (a car), it was not that simple so that’s where the AI came in. The Iranians think that it might have also had facial recognition software. In any case it was good enough that the nuclear weapons scientist was killed and his wife who was sitting next to him in the car was completely uninjured.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/18/world/middleeast/iran-nuclear-fakhrizadeh-assassination-israel.html

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    FDR killed small foreign children with drones? Who knew?
     
    No, he killed them with Jimmy Stewart and George McGovern.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

  136. @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer

    His other brother David was a guitarist for the Pink Floyd.

    Replies: @Jack Armstrong

    Were the Gilmore Girls his sisters?

  137. @Jonathan Mason
    @Reg Cæsar

    So Franklin D. Roosevelt was a hero of the French revolution?

    It is always good to know how traditions started.

    For example, a lot of people don't know that one of the Founding Fathers started the US tradition of waging War on Terror. Yes, that's right, Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, as soon as he got his feet under the desk at the newly-built White House, decided that he wanted to wage a War on Terror against the Barbary Pirates who infested (pirates always infest the places where they live) the coast of North Africa for centuries and took captured many white people from coastal Europe and sold them as slaves.

    In Jefferson's time, they had also captured and enslaved hundreds of white American sailors.

    Jefferson had tried to negotiate with the pirate leaders who charmingly explained that the "right" to take slaves was "founded on the Laws of the Prophet, that it was written in their Koran that all nations who should not have answered their authority were sinners, that it was their right and duty to make war upon them wherever they could be found, and to make slaves of all they could take as prisoners, and that every Mussulman who should be slain in battle was sure to go to Paradise".

    "Shit" said Jefferson. "They envy us our freedoms, that's what it is. I shall send an aircraft carrier to punish them and get back our hostages!"

    Jefferson was advised by cooler heads that the US did not yet have aircraft carriers, because there were no aircraft, and that in fact the US did not even have a proper navy to speak of.

    This was a problem because American shipping was no longer protected by the British Navy. However, the resourceful Jefferson, himself an owner of slaves, soon cobbled together a makeshift navy and sent some gunboats off to the Mediterranean to bomb Tripoli from offshore under the auspices of Stephen Decatur.

    "US Navy has fair wind to blow away ye Barbarians" looked like a good headline for the 90-day news cycle, thought Jefferson, although technically the opponents were Berberian rug merchants and not actual Barbarians.

    The US navy being what it was, one of its main ships, The Philadelphia, ran aground off Tripoli, its crew was captured, and the military equipment on the ship fell into the hands of the pirates. Fortunately Stephen Decatur, inspired by an episode in the Hornblower novels was able to recapture the Philadelphia, kill the skeleton crew of Berbers, and set fire to that ship to prevent any further loss of American military secrets, and thus inspiring many Romantic painters to produce images of the colorful scene.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a2/Burning_of_the_uss_philadelphia.jpg/800px-Burning_of_the_uss_philadelphia.jpg

    However a number of coastal cities were soon bombed from offshore, and the crew and hostages were ransomed and Jefferson waved his hat in the air and declared that the Mission was Accomplished, and that the US navy would now take on the French.

    Anyway since those days of yore, US presidents have always taken their cue from Jefferson in terms of gunboat diplomacy, updated with aircraft carrier diplomacy and airbase diplomacy, to as to keep foreign rascals in their place.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    Hooray for Ole Tom Jefferson!

  138. @bomag
    @eee

    The Innocence Project was in the news for awhile, using newer DNA evidence to free some convicts.

    I started hearing about some of the newly released committing new crimes; now I don't hear about the Innocence Project very much. Hmmm.

    Replies: @Feryl, @John Derbyshire

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @John Derbyshire


    For those not familiar with the concept of Narrative Collapse, here is my description from a column where I defined it:

    Innocent black person going about his/her private business is accosted/harassed/beaten/killed by evil racist white cop/vigilante.

    Media report the incident thus, based solely on testimony of victim/friends/black witnesses, stirring up widespread resentment about white racism.

    Actual facts emerge, placing the victim in a much more dubious light and showing that the white offender was responding legitimately to bad/violent/crazy behavior.

    Media reports the revised story without apology.
     
    As often as not, Step Four includes an immediate change of subject. After Eric Holder's Justice Department looked into Michael Brown's death and found nothing with which they could charge Officer Darren Wilson, I tuned into All Things Considered to see how folks there would handle the collapse of the narrative they'd been pushing for a year or more. They immediately transitioned to Holder's findings that some cops had shared racially insensitive jokes in their email and that blacks were getting more speeding tickets than whites. So cops still bad!
  139. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @epebble

    "He (Soros) has a an extreme libertarian view of what a society should be that it may appear to some as that."

    Na-no, Soros is a Leftist liberal with some economic libertarian leanings.


    "Democrats support Abortion Rights –> Democrats want to kill as many babies as possible"

    No, Democrats only want to kill as many white babies as possible. Probably do suffer some pangs of conscience if they were to actually see the stats, namely that about 30-40% of total annual abortions in the US are done by POCs.


    "Some Democrats support immigration –> Democrats hate White people"

    But Democrats do hate white people. The last few years post-Ferguson bear this out in public policy. The entire BLM movement is a direct insult as well as an assault on white people in general. Toppling of statues on government lands, where ca.99% of them depict white people? BLM and Antifa rioting and burning down property, much of it owned by white people? Numerous instances of interracial crime (vast majority of blacks assaulting whites)? Whether it is thru immigration or another policy, the end result is the same---reduce the share of white people in the US and make them die out sooner rather than later. Supposedly the SPLC has a graph showing the decline of white people as a percentage of the US day by day. If any public figure publicly showed a graph charting the decline of POCs in the US, that would be the end of their career.

    For the most part, cancel culture is totally employed vs. white people.

    What are these and other things too numerous to mention but a direct assault on white people in general? As the opposite of love is hate so therefore yes, ultimately the policies espoused by the Democratic party (growing more explicit with each passing year) are designed against white people as a specific group. It isn't just the Democratic party, they are merely more explicit in their goals and the means to which they employ.

    And of course domestic terrorist extremists (which are named as white people in general) are now considered to be the number one threat by the US government.

    A functional adult would have to be near comatose, blind, slow, or stupid not to have noticed these and other obvious occurrences that are taking place in US society at large with each passing year.

    Replies: @epebble

    But Democrats do hate white people.

    With 60% of Democrats being White, that assertion is a tough sell. But, rest of your argument is reasonable. You come closer to consistency if you reformulate it as Democrats ignore White people in the sense that they feel they don’t have to cater to White people’s concerns (or you can also say they put non-White people’s concerns above White peoples concerns.)

  140. @John Derbyshire
    @bomag

    https://www.johnderbyshire.com/Opinions/Culture/cops.html#innocent

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    For those not familiar with the concept of Narrative Collapse, here is my description from a column where I defined it:

    Innocent black person going about his/her private business is accosted/harassed/beaten/killed by evil racist white cop/vigilante.

    Media report the incident thus, based solely on testimony of victim/friends/black witnesses, stirring up widespread resentment about white racism.

    Actual facts emerge, placing the victim in a much more dubious light and showing that the white offender was responding legitimately to bad/violent/crazy behavior.

    Media reports the revised story without apology.

    As often as not, Step Four includes an immediate change of subject. After Eric Holder’s Justice Department looked into Michael Brown’s death and found nothing with which they could charge Officer Darren Wilson, I tuned into All Things Considered to see how folks there would handle the collapse of the narrative they’d been pushing for a year or more. They immediately transitioned to Holder’s findings that some cops had shared racially insensitive jokes in their email and that blacks were getting more speeding tickets than whites. So cops still bad!

  141. @Joe S.Walker
    Charles Manson was no writer, but he was a fascinating talker. He really could have been a politician.

    But most murderers who write about it are pretentious midwits. They think they have some special insight into human behaviour, but the truth is they're just midwits who happen to have killed people.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @AceDeuce

    Fun Fact: A young Manson took, and graduated from, a Dale Carneige course while in prison.

  142. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    FDR killed small foreign children with drones? Who knew?

    Why did he pick on the small ones in particular? Did the drone technology of the day make this feasible?* Did he have a preference in favor of large foreign children?


    *OT, when Israel killed Iran's top nuclear weapons scientist last year, the Iranians came out with several conflicting stories of how this was done. One of them was some face saving cock and bull story about how he was assassinated by an AI killer robot which then self destructed so that his security team wasn't able to prevent the attack. Yah, sure, I thought - a killer robot ate my nuclear scientist. What a lame excuse. It wouldn't even fly with my 4th grade teacher. Well, it turns out that he really was assassinated by an AI killer robot which then self destructed, at least according to a story in today's NY Times.

    At first glance it was just a stock machine gun refitted for remote control, which any 12th grader could rig up as a high school science project - a joystick to aim left-right and up and down and a trigger button and a camera as a sight. As far back as WWII, the B-29 had remote control machine guns. BUT, since this one was controlled by satellite (introducing a delay of almost 2 seconds) and mounted on a truck bed which shakes with every recoil, and had to track a moving target (a car), it was not that simple so that's where the AI came in. The Iranians think that it might have also had facial recognition software. In any case it was good enough that the nuclear weapons scientist was killed and his wife who was sitting next to him in the car was completely uninjured.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/18/world/middleeast/iran-nuclear-fakhrizadeh-assassination-israel.html

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    FDR killed small foreign children with drones? Who knew?

    No, he killed them with Jimmy Stewart and George McGovern.

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Reg Cæsar

    "FDR killed small foreign children with drones? Who knew?

    No, he killed them with Jimmy Stewart and George McGovern."

    I always just thought he killed them by droning on and on.

  143. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    FDR killed small foreign children with drones? Who knew?
     
    No, he killed them with Jimmy Stewart and George McGovern.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “FDR killed small foreign children with drones? Who knew?

    No, he killed them with Jimmy Stewart and George McGovern.”

    I always just thought he killed them by droning on and on.

  144. @Pincher Martin
    @Sean


    The genes that when they come through to expression result in somewhat eccentric or unconventional people may be individually valuable, but I don’t see actual nonconformity in behavior is much more than the red flag for a strong tendency to schizophrenia that counteracts the genes for any superior intelligence that a person also happens to have by giving the person faulty thought processes.
     
    You're much too severe. A higher level of mental illness might be one extreme expression, just as a higher level of individual genius that leads to useful scientific discoveries would be the other. But the more widespread identifiable trait in such a population would probably be a higher level of individualism that was neither harmful nor useful. More girls who dye their hair a new color or wear a daring new fashion, for example. Or more young men who popularize a new sport or dance move.

    You are, after all, still killing off violent people, just not those who commit "petty crimes."

    And there are socially useful behaviors beyond novel scientific discoveries for a population with more individualism. Think of the Age of Exploration or the exploration of the American West. Many of those men were borderline criminals in polite society. Some were actual criminals. A few were privateers. Even the gentlemen aristocratic leaders among the early explorers were not so gentlemanly. They had debts in a society which took debt far more seriously than we do today. They took risks which were not often calculated to their highest advantage for surviving. They often made rash decisions which led to the death of their own men.

    Their contributions to the expansion of the West, however, were immense. It takes a special kind of mind to leave one's home behind and strike out on an adventure in which death is more likely than riches. Think of the mountain men who explored the American West without government dispensation. (Not everyone was Lewis and Clark.) Yes, beaver pelts were valuable, but money is not what motivated the most famous of those men. They just had an itch.

    So not every expression of eccentric or unconventional behavior leads to serial killing or mental illness (or novel scientific discoveries). You should recognize that since you're engaged right now in what most people in our society would say was anti-social behavior and at a website which publishes many anti-social thoughts.

    Replies: @Sean

    Their contributions to the expansion of the West, however, were immense.

    Pursuing a risky strategy is not at all pathological if you have no safer option, such as an inheritance or sinecure, I think you need a screw loose to end up in prison for serious time. Many of the best soldiers are from highly religious backgrounds.

    I wasn’t talking about the death penalty for fashion mistakes, but about permanently removing criminals from the gene pool while they are still young adults and haven’t reproduced. There is a obvious connection between violence and heterosexuality in men, so it is not like those genes will naturally decline if left alone. Quite the opposite I have heard men say they got into a gang to get girls to notice them.

    I am sure there is a connection between schizophrenia and artistic talent. Science maybe, maybe not.

    Ex Internal Revenue Service agent, millionaire real estate investor and bumpstock mass murderer Stephen Paddock? His father was a bank robber.

    Many, perhaps most, people that comment on this site believe things that seem quite fantastic to me.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Sean


    Pursuing a risky strategy is not at all pathological if you have no safer option, such as an inheritance or sinecure,
     
    Do you really think a handful of American men willingly went into Indian country without any protection because they had no better options? You don't think there were safe, decent-paying jobs back East?

    I think you need a screw loose to end up in prison for serious time.
     
    Do Michael Milken, Bernie Maddow, Elizabeth Theranos, Jeff Skilling, Bernie Ebbers, Dennis Kozlowski, Sam Waksal, Walter Forbes, Sanjay Kumar, John Rigas and Martin Grass strike you as being low-IQ people with an obvious "screw loose" that you could have predicted would commit crimes before they were charged with them?

    You should read up on the link between psychopathy and corporate leadership.

    Or read about the Kennedy family if you want to see how a well-connected family can skirt the law for generations. The patriarch was almost certainly a bootlegger and probably committed many other business and financial crimes during his life. One of his sons left the scene of an accident which resulted in a woman's death and refused to report it for many hours. He was never charged with a crime. His most famous son, JFK, serially abused young women in such a way that, had the details been known, would have ruined his reputation with the public far worse than if it had come out he was a tax cheat or a serial pilferer.

    Closer to the present, one Kennedy cousin was charged with murder, another Kennedy with rape, another with sleeping with his 14-year-old babysitter. Every one of them escaped prison despite the charges being quite credible. And that's not to mention all the Kennedys who suffered overdoses or had to go through rehabilitation after drug abuse of illegal substances (heroin, cocaine) back in the day when the possession of those drugs in significant amounts would've landed them jail time.

    I think there are countless examples of distinguished families like the Kennedys whose public successes compete with checkered backgrounds. One such prominent local family of lawyers in South Carolina is being exposed now. I'm for getting tough on the actual criminals in these families. But executing them before they can breed?


    I wasn’t talking about the death penalty for fashion mistakes, but about permanently removing criminals from the gene pool while they are still young adults and haven’t reproduced.
     
    No, you spoke about executing people for "petty crimes" and then later added that you "don't see actual nonconformity in behavior is much more than the red flag" for mental illness and other IQ-reducing genes.
  145. @epebble
    @SafeNow

    A wedding ring cushion or ring bearer pillow is a small pillow on which the wedding rings are carried in a traditional Western white wedding. They are frequently carried by a junior member of the bridal party known as the ringbearer frequently a younger male relative or friend.

    During the process, the ring bearer carries the rings on the pillow down the aisle to the officiant.

    Wedding ring cushions are generally small, ornate pillows that reflect the wedding's colors or white silk pillows. In less traditional Western weddings they can be whimsical or thematic containers that reflect the couple's personal tastes.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wedding_ring_cushion

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    At our wedding, my friend carried The ring in his pocket (an exact one carrot, G color, VS1 grade) but it was a casual wedding, held on the balcony of my friend’s house at the beach, where Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller had stayed years before…

    (As far as my own ring, I barely even remember how it came about, but I certainly remember it was not part of our beachside ceremony. My beloved and I worked that out between ourselves.) But yes, my friend owned and lived in the house Marilyn and Arthur had stayed in, and he hosted our wedding on his balcony overlooking Long Island Sound. (Am I bragging? Yes.)

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Sorry about another personal comment. It doesn't need to be here. I got carried away again. My bad.

  146. @Sean
    @Pincher Martin


    Their contributions to the expansion of the West, however, were immense.
     
    Pursuing a risky strategy is not at all pathological if you have no safer option, such as an inheritance or sinecure, I think you need a screw loose to end up in prison for serious time. Many of the best soldiers are from highly religious backgrounds.

    I wasn't talking about the death penalty for fashion mistakes, but about permanently removing criminals from the gene pool while they are still young adults and haven't reproduced. There is a obvious connection between violence and heterosexuality in men, so it is not like those genes will naturally decline if left alone. Quite the opposite I have heard men say they got into a gang to get girls to notice them.

    I am sure there is a connection between schizophrenia and artistic talent. Science maybe, maybe not.

    Ex Internal Revenue Service agent, millionaire real estate investor and bumpstock mass murderer Stephen Paddock? His father was a bank robber.

    Many, perhaps most, people that comment on this site believe things that seem quite fantastic to me.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    Pursuing a risky strategy is not at all pathological if you have no safer option, such as an inheritance or sinecure,

    Do you really think a handful of American men willingly went into Indian country without any protection because they had no better options? You don’t think there were safe, decent-paying jobs back East?

    I think you need a screw loose to end up in prison for serious time.

    Do Michael Milken, Bernie Maddow, Elizabeth Theranos, Jeff Skilling, Bernie Ebbers, Dennis Kozlowski, Sam Waksal, Walter Forbes, Sanjay Kumar, John Rigas and Martin Grass strike you as being low-IQ people with an obvious “screw loose” that you could have predicted would commit crimes before they were charged with them?

    You should read up on the link between psychopathy and corporate leadership.

    Or read about the Kennedy family if you want to see how a well-connected family can skirt the law for generations. The patriarch was almost certainly a bootlegger and probably committed many other business and financial crimes during his life. One of his sons left the scene of an accident which resulted in a woman’s death and refused to report it for many hours. He was never charged with a crime. His most famous son, JFK, serially abused young women in such a way that, had the details been known, would have ruined his reputation with the public far worse than if it had come out he was a tax cheat or a serial pilferer.

    Closer to the present, one Kennedy cousin was charged with murder, another Kennedy with rape, another with sleeping with his 14-year-old babysitter. Every one of them escaped prison despite the charges being quite credible. And that’s not to mention all the Kennedys who suffered overdoses or had to go through rehabilitation after drug abuse of illegal substances (heroin, cocaine) back in the day when the possession of those drugs in significant amounts would’ve landed them jail time.

    I think there are countless examples of distinguished families like the Kennedys whose public successes compete with checkered backgrounds. One such prominent local family of lawyers in South Carolina is being exposed now. I’m for getting tough on the actual criminals in these families. But executing them before they can breed?

    I wasn’t talking about the death penalty for fashion mistakes, but about permanently removing criminals from the gene pool while they are still young adults and haven’t reproduced.

    No, you spoke about executing people for “petty crimes” and then later added that you “don’t see actual nonconformity in behavior is much more than the red flag” for mental illness and other IQ-reducing genes.

  147. @Almost Missouri
    @Anon

    https://twitter.com/Steve_Sailer/status/1438776413616672774

    https://twitter.com/polygenicity/status/1438644650026352641

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @res

    Great tweet from Steve. Thanks.

  148. Two or three generations ago, it seemed like every famous writer adopted as his pet cause the release of some violent jailbird with a winning literary style

    If I remember correctly, Johnny Cash (songwriter) got a murderous psycho pardoned from prison, who went on to murder again.

    Cash, FWIW, felt terrible about it.

  149. A Wikipedia search on Frank Pakenham took me to this explanation of why Brady preferred to remain in prison.

    We seraphim and peers of the realm are bounden in duty to take the part of those less fortunate than ourselves. Foxes, for instance. How would you like to be a fox? How would you feel if you were being pursued by a pack of hounds, urged on by garishly dressed stable boys and townie part-time hunters mounted on horseback in contravention of European rulings on…

    • Thanks: Pincher Martin
  150. @Buzz Mohawk
    @epebble

    At our wedding, my friend carried The ring in his pocket (an exact one carrot, G color, VS1 grade) but it was a casual wedding, held on the balcony of my friend's house at the beach, where Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller had stayed years before...

    (As far as my own ring, I barely even remember how it came about, but I certainly remember it was not part of our beachside ceremony. My beloved and I worked that out between ourselves.) But yes, my friend owned and lived in the house Marilyn and Arthur had stayed in, and he hosted our wedding on his balcony overlooking Long Island Sound. (Am I bragging? Yes.)

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Sorry about another personal comment. It doesn’t need to be here. I got carried away again. My bad.

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PastClassics
The Shaping Event of Our Modern World
The Hidden Information in Our Government Archives
Analyzing the History of a Controversial Movement
The unspoken statistical reality of urban crime over the last quarter century.
How America was neoconned into World War IV