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From the San Francisco Chronicle:

Muhammad makes list of top 10 baby names in the U.S. for first time
By Amy Graff, SFGATE Updated 12:28 pm PST, Tuesday, December 3, 2019

… Revealing a rise in Arabic names, Muhammad and Aaliyah made the top 10 for the first time, replacing Mason and Layla.

Okaaaaay …

Now, you might say: “Well, that doesn’t mean much. It’s just that Muslims always name their sons Muhammad.”

But is the fact that a huge fraction of Muhammadens are named Muhammad reassuring? Or is it indicative that Islam tends to take up a lot of space in the brains of Muslims?

I’m out of touch with baby name trends. I hadn’t known that “Layla” was so popular.

It’s interesting how pop music-derived names lag decades behind the hits. Dylan became a huge boy’s name about 25 years after Bob Dylan became famous. Layla took 40+ years after Eric Clapton’s song.

White Americans strike me as having pretty good taste in baby names: they don’t jump on some new celebrity’s name, they pick their grandpa’s favorite FM track for their daughter’s name.

Here are the current top 10 baby girl names:

1. Sophia
2. Olivia
3. Emma
4. Ava
5. Aria
6. Isabella
7. Amelia
8. Mia
9. Riley
10. Aaliyah

Hard to argue against the top 3, which are lovely to the ear and redolent of fine culture.

Sophia has roots in the ancient Greeks, in the delightful heroine of Fielding’s Tom Jones, and in Sophia Loren (now 85 — girls’ names tend to go out of fashion when their most prominent examples hit middle age, then come back into fashion as they reach old age.)

Olivia is a Shakespearean heroine and is redolent of Olivia de Havilland of Gone With the Wind, who is now 103 and still suing. (She won a landmark lawsuit against the monopsonistic employment contracts of the Hollywood studios in 1943, making her the Curt Flood of movie stars, if Curt Flood had won his lawsuit against baseball). The Norman surname de Havilland was doubly glamorous in mid-Century Anglo-America because Olivia’s cousin Geoffrey de Havilland’s firm built a famous warplane and the ill-fated first jetliner.

Emma is a Jane Austen heroine.

Ava is too dependent upon one’s opinion of movie star Ava Garner, as is Mia and Mia Farrow. I like Amelia, and nobody dislikes the doomed aviatrix.

Isabella is a lovely name and is associated with Columbus’ patroness. Riley is too tomboyish.

 
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  1. Excuse me gentlemen, I need to purchase some ammo…lots of ammo.

    • Replies: @Mike Jones
    So you are going to commit violence based on People of Color having and naming children?

    That says a lot about you



    https://www.ajc.com/blog/luckovich/mike-luckovich-who-the-threat/cMmd1H9PIwyJr3I01katgJ/
    , @Cagey Beast
    It should be clear to us all by now that Americans' easy access to firearms and ammunition isn't going to make a difference when it comes to this. When it comes to immigration policy, you might as well stock up on baseball cards, cake recipes or fire extinguishers for all the difference it makes.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    Don't get too carried away. If it comes down to a shooting war, think realistically about how many firefights you're likely to survive.
  2. “Mohammad” just goes along with the 15 y/o trend for boys names. Any old last name, not just those of famous men, may be used as a first name now: Connor, Tanner, Benson, Carlin, Tyler, Hays, Paxton, and so on. I assume Mohammad was the prophet’s last name, although the Moslems don’t seem to cuss enough for me to find out his first name or middle initial. Is it like Madonna, Cher, Sting, or The Edge?

    At least it can be shortened to Moe to save time. If you’re neither towel-head nor beaner, yet still want to name your son after a man of the cloth, there’s always the old stand-by, Amos Moses.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    We don't know for certain, obviously, but it is very possible "Muhammad" was a chieftain title rather than his birth name. Of course, after kicking off his revolution, it became a common birth name for Arab boys, just like many other historically important figures in other cultures.

    Within the Qu'ran, the recipient-who is conventionally inferred to be Muhammad-is not generally addressed by his name, but is called a prophet, a warner, a messenager of God, a slave of God, etc. That's the only written piece of evidence dating from his lifetime we have got of him: the hadiths come from centuries later and represent Iliad-esque oral tradition put down into writing.

    , @Lurker

    Is it like Madonna, Cher, Sting, or The Edge?
     
    Or 'The' as he's known to his oldest friends.
    , @Rosie

    Connor, Tanner, Benson, Carlin, Tyler, Hays, Paxton, and so on.
     
    I can't stand that! I love that "Sophia" is number 1, though.
    , @Leo D
    Mohamed bin Abdullah...
  3. “Ava” and “Farrah” are each completely traceable to one specific movie/TV star, as is “Gary”. Wolfram Alpha will give you a graph of how popular a name is, at least in the United States.

    Foreign language names, derivations of popular names and names popular in other parts of the Anglosphere but not here add some confusion to the mix, of course.

    As are surnames made into first names. Shelby is now a popular female first name, from Carroll Shelby, but “Carroll” is not , for males or females. Morgan was trendy for girls for a while, as was Taylor.

    Songs occasionally drive names. Rhiannon was popular for a while. It would be interesting to know if country hits drove rural names (Jolene, Elvira, Adalida).

    Catholicism and Mormonism both drive certain names, but Mormons get odd sometimes in ways that to not directly invoke Mormonism. Catholics were expected always to use the name of a saint as a first or middle name, although Old Testament names were sometimes popular though not so much as among certain strains of Protestants. There, there were a lot of Calvins, Martins, Luthers and Wesleys though. Freemasons used Hiram a lot, and one oddity of that is that since a disproportionate number of ham radio operators were also Freemasons, any old callbook will have a lot of Hirams, to say nothing of the ARRL being founded by Hiram Percy Maxim.

    Then there are odd names that come up when someone of that name becomes notorious. I kind of doubt that “Ghislane” will become popular, inasmuch as she is popularly thought to be an Israeli spymaster and/or a female pimp. But the blacks could decide it be cool.

    Then there are names that are otherwise unremarkable but which go along with a surname in some way, perhaps a brand name. Mercedes Benz, Harley Davidson, Halsey Taylor, etc. Some people just can not resist.

    • Replies: @68W58
    It would be nice to think that some of the children named "Shelby" were named in honor of the great American hero Isaac Shelby, but I doubt that many are.
    , @Anonymouse
    It occurs to me that Ghislaine (lovely name) Maxwell has gone to ground in Israel. Her father the notorious Sir Robert Maxwell was unquestionably an Israeli asset.
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    Mercedes IS a girl's name, a Spanish one. It's the equivalent (well, the plural) of the old Puritan name Mercy.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mar%C3%ADa_de_las_Mercedes


    But Mohammed in the top ten is the proverbial cloud no bigger than a man's hand.


    https://biblehub.com/1_kings/18-44.htm

    , @njguy73
    Hormel Chavez, Frito Pendejo, Formica Davis, and Dwayne Elizondo Mountain Dew Herbert Camacho.
    , @obwandiyag
    There was a surge of "Liesls" for a while there. Imagine that.

    I think Shelby comes from the restaurant.
    , @Peter Johnson
    Back in the old days (pre-1980s) Roman Catholics were expected to have a saints name as either first or middle name, for the baptism ceremony. In some national Catholic traditions (such as in France) the "Saints Day" associated with a person's name was noted and very quietly celebrated. The bare remnants of the Roman Catholic Church still remaining have lost most of those rich old traditions, for better or worse.
  4. One thing I have noticed about Muslim names is that they are often very long. When they come up with these lists, are they including all of a person’s given names, or are they just counting the first listed name?

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    The Arabs typically include information about both paternal and maternal lineage within the name because that's their tradition dating back to pre-Islamic times where illiterate Bedouin bards memorized the heroic deeds of their ancestors. Other Islamic cultures do not. They might ape the structure-the Malays do-but they won't include all of it.

    I've noticed that this also tends to happen a lot in Spanish-speaking countries.

    , @jim jones
    The Malaysian family who moved in next door said I should call their son "Al"
    , @Danindc
    They try to be as annoying as possible. It’s in the Koran.
  5. Remember, there are a lot of African-Americans who tend to give their offspring Arabic names, Muhammad and Aaliyah being no exception (e.g. NE’s WR Muhammad Sunu, as one example). Aaliyah was an African-American hip hop star who was related to legendary soul artist Gladys Knight.

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @syonredux

    Remember, there are a lot of African-Americans who tend to give their offspring Arabic names, Muhammad and Aaliyah being no exception (e.g. NE’s WR Muhammad Sunu, as one example). Aaliyah was an African-American hip hop star who was related to legendary soul artist Gladys Knight.
     
    Yeah, I'm pretty sure that a huge percentage of the girls named Aaliyah are Black.
    , @Spangel
    Agree. Layla just seems like a new spelling of Leila, which was an Arabic name anyways. But probably not always indicative that the person who had the name was Muslim or middle eastern. It’s a nice sounding name.
    , @Massimo Heitor

    Remember, there are a lot of African-Americans who tend to give their offspring Arabic names, Muhammad and Aaliyah...
     
    The baby name Aaliyah is a reference to the black R&B singer. Sure, the name also has Arabic/Hebrew history, but that's really irrelevant to it's modern use.

    Similarly with the name Beyonce. That's a reference to the famous R&B singer, not the old Franco French roots of the name.
    , @Father O'Hara
    Aaliyah's career nose dived.
  6. From the article:

    Luke and Anakin from the “Skywalker” saga are down.

    Was that really a thing? Anakin? Are there really a bunch of Anakins out there? Naming your kid after Luke is one thing – at least that is just a regular name that happened to also be a Star Wars character – but Anakin? Was that even a name that existed before Star Wars? I always assumed Lucas made it up.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Well, I mean, .. the 1st lady a few years back was named after that furry creature from the same movie ... or ... am I mis-remembering .. or reading too many Conservative web sites?
  7. As Steve points out, Isabella is a famous Hispanic name, but several of the other names here have a Hispanic tinge to them.

    For example Mia can be a diminutive of the Spanish name Maria (Mary) and is also the abbreviation for the world’s number one airport for Hispanics.

    Ava is a variation on Eve, a Biblical name for the first woman.

    Emma is a name from Jane Austen, but also the name of actresses Emma Thompson and Emma Watson, of Harry Potter fame. (Perhaps we will soon see Potter as a popular name for boys.)

    Aria is an interesting one as arias have been mainly the interest of opera fans, but the word is related to ‘air’ and is synonymous with Melody. It is also a Jewish name, meaning ‘lion(ess)’.

    Riley is an interesting one, being the name of an extinct British car:

    and the name of an old music call comedy act about an elderly Irish woman played by a man. But no relation to Bill O’Reilly.

    • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    Funly enough, Riley cars had Bendix brakes, and William Bendix got his big break when he was chosen to star in the American TV series The Life of Riley.
    https://wpr-public.s3.amazonaws.com/wprorg/styles/resp_orig_custom_user_narrow_1x/s3/shows/Life%20of%20Riley.jpg?itok=c5HafkRZ&timestamp=1570805128
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Ava is a variation on Eve, a Biblical name for the first woman.
     
    It could also be from the Latin for bird, similarly altered. Either way, the parents aren't too fussy.

    There was an old radio-then-TV show in the US called The Life of Riley. It won the very first Emmy.


    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Life_of_Riley

    Right up Steve's alley:

    The reworked script cast Bendix as blundering Chester A. Riley, a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California.
    , @Hypnotoad666
    Maybe American parents are naming their daughters as an homage to character actor John C. Riley.

    https://www.onthisday.com/images/people/john-c-reilly-medium.jpg
    , @SIMPLEPseudonymicHandle
    Aria, spelled Arya, is the name of a major character from Game of Thrones.
    , @Father O'Hara
    Isn't Isabella tainted by anti-Semitism?
    As for Riley, I think that comes from this cult-like devotion that has arisen among teenage girls for William Bendix.
    They're just wild about him.
  8. The UK’s Office of National Statistics has a tool that lets you track the ranking of the top 100 baby names in England and Wales, year by year, for the last 120 years.

    It is Figure 1 in the page linked to below, an interactive graphing tool.

    https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/livebirths/bulletins/babynamesenglandandwales/2018#choices-of-baby-names-vary-by-age-of-mother

  9. I like Amelia, and nobody dislikes the doomed aviatrix.

    I like the name Amelia, but Earhart was a dangerously incompetent fame-whore and paid the price.

    • Agree: BB753, Thea
  10. It’s incredible to me that Olivia de Havilland is still with us. Her slightly younger sister Joan Fontaine (née Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland) was a good friend–I never figured out quite how good–of my paternal grandfather’s. He’s been in the ground for as long as the Berlin wall has been absent, and Wikipedia says Joan Fontaine died in 2013.

    My grandfather was about twenty years older than the de Havilland sisters, having been born in St. Paul in 1896 along with his contemporary and acquaintance F. Scott Fitzgerald (speaking of Normans). But despite the age difference, Olivia de Havilland’s continuing refusal to die affords us one last closing window on a generation that’s now so remote as to be foreign.

    • Replies: @ChrisZ
    Interesting comment, Slumber, with an elegant final sentence.
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Kirk Douglas, also 103, is still alive as well. Although Kirk isn’t in the top 10 names for boys in 2019.
    , @Joe Stalin
    Vera Lynn (Dr. Strangelove) is still with us; wonder what she thinks of 2019 UK (Gonna be Great!)?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5C4meGkNyc
  11. @Richard of Fallbrook
    Excuse me gentlemen, I need to purchase some ammo...lots of ammo.

    So you are going to commit violence based on People of Color having and naming children?

    That says a lot about you

    https://www.ajc.com/blog/luckovich/mike-luckovich-who-the-threat/cMmd1H9PIwyJr3I01katgJ/

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    Funny, your comic strip shows all these people just loitering around harmlessly, none of them with their teeth bared.

    For example, you didn't depict the Muslim guy stabbing two innocent people on a bridge, or the gay men blaming Ronald Reagan for all the health problems consequent from buggery, or the mixed-race couple black man leaving his wife with two babies or stabbing her to death in rage at her wanting to leave him, or the Jewish guy as a felonious Wall Street swindler or a communist spy.

    No, in your cartoonish world, not only are all of these people innocent of any evil intentions, but their mingling doesn't even give rise to discomfort from jostling into one another in their striving for the good life.

    Good grief.

    , @RadicalCenter
    Is this yet another instance of lefties / multicultis pretending not to know what is meant?

    Do you truly have have knowledge of the way that Muslims treat nonMuslims when Muslims gain sufficient strength and numbers in a society? You need to read more and get out more.
    , @TWS
    Quacks like a duck...
    , @The Plutonium Kid
    Yessiree, it's them white working class males ya gotta watch out for. They're the only real monsters in this world.

    You ass.
    , @Ficticious
    In Richard's case, buying bullets and weapons is a defensive posture. It is logical to assume that the many Muslims named Mohammed will one day grow up and seek to commit violence against him, in obedience to Allah's commands to destroy infidels, as recorded in the "holy" Koran.
  12. @Jonathan Mason
    As Steve points out, Isabella is a famous Hispanic name, but several of the other names here have a Hispanic tinge to them.

    For example Mia can be a diminutive of the Spanish name Maria (Mary) and is also the abbreviation for the world's number one airport for Hispanics.

    Ava is a variation on Eve, a Biblical name for the first woman.

    Emma is a name from Jane Austen, but also the name of actresses Emma Thompson and Emma Watson, of Harry Potter fame. (Perhaps we will soon see Potter as a popular name for boys.)

    Aria is an interesting one as arias have been mainly the interest of opera fans, but the word is related to 'air' and is synonymous with Melody. It is also a Jewish name, meaning 'lion(ess)'.

    Riley is an interesting one, being the name of an extinct British car:

    https://car-from-uk.com/ebay/carphotos/full/ebay420869.jpg

    and the name of an old music call comedy act about an elderly Irish woman played by a man. But no relation to Bill O'Reilly.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpyNzwEi7Po

    Funly enough, Riley cars had Bendix brakes, and William Bendix got his big break when he was chosen to star in the American TV series The Life of Riley.

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    William Bendix. Probably the only person I ever met. I was only two years old at the time.
  13. One place where Muhammad will likely never make the top 10 baby boy names list:

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.nytimes.com/2017/04/25/world/asia/china-xinjiang-ban-muslim-names-muhammad-jihad.amp.html

    BEIJING — The Chinese government, further tightening its grip on Muslims in western China, has prohibited parents from choosing names like “Muhammad,” “Arafat” and “Jihad” for their children.

    Officials described the ban, introduced this month, as part of an effort to “curb religious fervor” in the western region of Xinjiang, home to more than 10 million Uighurs, a mostly Muslim minority group.

    The government considers Xinjiang a hotbed of Islamic extremism, violence and separatist thought. But many Uighurs say the government’s strict limits on worship and speech are responsible for tensions in the region.

    The list of names, a copy of which was provided to The New York Times by Uighur activists, is titled, “List of Banned Ethnic Minority Names.” It bans more than two dozen names, including “Mujahid” and “Medina.”

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Good for the Chinese. They are not naïve schmucks and will not let Islam gain more of a foothold there.
    , @J
    The Spanish conquerors imposed Spanish names on Amerindians and Phillipine natives. The Chinese are forcing Chinese names on the Uyghurs. In one generation they will forget who they are. America did not need these policies because immigrants spontaneously Americanized their names, Drumff becoming Trump. But it appears that it is not working the same way for the Muslims.
    , @Ficticious
    This proves the Chinese really are the smartest people in the world. Not like our dumb @as Western politicians who keep on importing trouble into our countries.
  14. The Ummah and their dhimmi pets will arrive to tell us how great and all-American this is in T-minus 3 minutes and counting…

  15. @slumber_j
    It's incredible to me that Olivia de Havilland is still with us. Her slightly younger sister Joan Fontaine (née Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland) was a good friend--I never figured out quite how good--of my paternal grandfather's. He's been in the ground for as long as the Berlin wall has been absent, and Wikipedia says Joan Fontaine died in 2013.

    My grandfather was about twenty years older than the de Havilland sisters, having been born in St. Paul in 1896 along with his contemporary and acquaintance F. Scott Fitzgerald (speaking of Normans). But despite the age difference, Olivia de Havilland's continuing refusal to die affords us one last closing window on a generation that's now so remote as to be foreign.

    Interesting comment, Slumber, with an elegant final sentence.

  16. Agree with your analysis. “Riley” sounds like something one would name his Irish setter or golden retriever.

    “Aaliyah” sounds like some three year old’s creation.

  17. https://www.thebump.com/b/aaliyah-baby-name

    “Aaliyah is a variation of the name Aliyah, which means “rising” in Hebrew and “exalted or lofty” in Arabic. Other variations include Alia, Aleah, Aleia, Alya and Aliyya. (The latter is sometimes considered the feminine form of Ali, one of the 99 names of Allah in Islam.) Aaliyah is the most popular and preferred spelling of this name—and indelibly connected to hip-hop singer Aaliyah, who died in a plane crash in 2001 at age 22.“

    So, a sort-of Hebrew, sort-of Arabic name with a little creative spelling. I was thinking every Aaliyah baby now would be black, but maybe there are a few Semitic baby Aaliyahs. The graph at the link shows there were a few Aaliyahs at the start of the time-line in 1976, but then the name takes off about 1994.

    I learned a few fun-facts about hip-hop singer Aaliyah from Wikipedia. Illegally married to R. Kelly (who seems to keep getting into trouble involving underage girls) at age 15. The plane crash that killed her has its own Wikipedia page

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_Aaliyah

    and was a comically stupid fiasco. Unlicensed coke head pilot who didn’t want to take off because Aaliyah and her entourage had overloaded the Cessna by 700 pounds and an extra passenger. Passengers insist he take off anyway.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    Just dropping in to post a gratuitous pic of Aaliyah:

    http://www.time2grind.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Aaliyah-aaliyah-137625_950_750.jpg

    Yum!

    , @fish

    "….Aaliyah and her entourage had overloaded the Cessna by 700 pounds and an extra passenger. Passengers insist he take off anyway."
     
    Looks like the pilot got the last laugh…..
  18. Emma was the name of the queen of England in the early 11th century. I prefer to believe that is why it is popular although I know I’m wrong.

  19. Good old Muhammed Coudenhove-Kalergi-Warburg-Baruch-Rothschild – https://imgur.com/ypx04hz

  20. Stop With the Golems, Already! – https://www.takimag.com/article/stop-with-the-golems-already/

    Muslim terrorists murdered twenty Filipino Christians as they attended services in their church two months ago, and do you recall the response from local Muslim leaders? Was it “We must address the anti-Christian bigotry in our community?” Or “We must stand in solidarity with our Christian countrymen?” Nope. It was “Well, to stop us from killing more Christians, let us carve a Muslim-only autonomous region in the country.” That’s literally like whites responding to the New Zealand massacre by saying, “Well, the solution is to keep New Zealand white and Christian. If we don’t have to mix, we won’t have any more race- or religion-based mass shootings.”

    How do you think the media would have responded to that? Or the U.N.? Or most Western politicians? But in fact, the world response (and the response from media organs like CNN and the BBC) to the Muzz demand was essentially “Yes! Yes! Give them an autonomous region, so that they needn’t mix with those damn Christians.”…

    This is a point that bears repeating: A white Christian kills a bunch of Muslims in New Zealand, and the response is “More diversity! More mixing! Force them damn intolerant whiteys to get along, or jail their asses as racists.” Muslims in the Philippines massacre a bunch of Christians, and the response is “Let the Muslims be autonomous! Let them live free of mixing, free of diversity! Let them never have to see another Christian again!”

    Jews should be particularly afraid of their new Islamic golems. Muzzies might not be smarter than Jews, but they’re stronger and more numerous, and their level of “batshit crazy” is off the charts. Of all the golems the Hebraic high-IQ dunces have created—from the communist state they helped birth in 1917, which later turned on them, to the integration craze they helped create here in the U.S., which now forces them to flee public schools—the Muzz golem has the potential to be the most destructive one yet.

    In a perfect world, these rabbinical Rain Men would finally get the fuck over the Holocaust and end their war of hostility against the West. They’d see that whites are no longer the enemy, but indeed the opposite. They’d see that importing foreign mud to mold golem after golem in traditionally white regions of the U.S. is bad strategy.

    • Agree: ThreeCranes, Dtbb
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The deciders behind Modern Jewishness actually want and desire so called “anti-semitism” because it keeps the little Jews in line. Of course it’s hubris and will bite them big time. It will make whites racially conscious too once they get enough muzzie mayhem.

    Some whites won’t learn, it sucks to be them. Eventually enough will.
    , @Clyde
    Your witty post and I like the word "Muzz".
  21. Layla is actually a Persian name. Clapton said he took it from a very old Persian poem.

    • Replies: @bjondo
    Could be.

    Arabs, Persians enjoy what is enjoyable.

    Unlike Jew who needs to originate all.

    https://www.behindthename.com/name/layla

    5ds
  22. I’ve been waiting for this moment since I first saw Superbad. (And Muhammed and it’s variants were in the top 10 in the UK and Netherlands at the time but not the US)

  23. What groups use “Muhammad” and what groups use “Mohammed” ?

    • Replies: @Lurker
    The tribes of the Dyslexia mountains?
  24. @slumber_j
    It's incredible to me that Olivia de Havilland is still with us. Her slightly younger sister Joan Fontaine (née Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland) was a good friend--I never figured out quite how good--of my paternal grandfather's. He's been in the ground for as long as the Berlin wall has been absent, and Wikipedia says Joan Fontaine died in 2013.

    My grandfather was about twenty years older than the de Havilland sisters, having been born in St. Paul in 1896 along with his contemporary and acquaintance F. Scott Fitzgerald (speaking of Normans). But despite the age difference, Olivia de Havilland's continuing refusal to die affords us one last closing window on a generation that's now so remote as to be foreign.

    Kirk Douglas, also 103, is still alive as well. Although Kirk isn’t in the top 10 names for boys in 2019.

  25. Still better than if everyone started to apply Bosniak naming ways.

    And that way is indistinguishable from blacks but instead of trying to just make it sound randomly african or latin (why?), they make apsurd turkish and arab-sounding names. There’s a meme here that says that with every day you can learn a new bosnian name, each one dumber than the previous

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    I love the names of my ethnic Serb coworkers: Zarko, Slavko, Bobo, Biljana. Nenad, not so much.
  26. Maybe SFGATE is full of malarkey (Biden-ism)? FWIW I did not see a release of 2019 data by the actually SS administration. Who ya gonna trust Good House Keeping (Cis white females) or SFGate (woke gays + nerds and homeless all devoted to creating obstructions to residential real estate development)

    The Most Popular Baby Names of 2019 so Far

    Liam
    Noah
    William
    James
    Oliver
    Benjamin
    Elijah
    Lucas
    Mason
    Logan

    https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/life/parenting/g25336854/most-popular-baby-names-2019/

    Often the statistics for the Prophet’s name, peace be onto him, are consolidated across multiple spellings.

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    They get them from movies and TV.

    Liam is Liam Neeson
    Noah is probably Noah Centineo

    Oliver Hudson?
    Benjamin Button, maybe?
    Elijah is Elijah Wood

    Mason Dye maybe?

    Logan is Wolverine
  27. @Jonathan Mason
    As Steve points out, Isabella is a famous Hispanic name, but several of the other names here have a Hispanic tinge to them.

    For example Mia can be a diminutive of the Spanish name Maria (Mary) and is also the abbreviation for the world's number one airport for Hispanics.

    Ava is a variation on Eve, a Biblical name for the first woman.

    Emma is a name from Jane Austen, but also the name of actresses Emma Thompson and Emma Watson, of Harry Potter fame. (Perhaps we will soon see Potter as a popular name for boys.)

    Aria is an interesting one as arias have been mainly the interest of opera fans, but the word is related to 'air' and is synonymous with Melody. It is also a Jewish name, meaning 'lion(ess)'.

    Riley is an interesting one, being the name of an extinct British car:

    https://car-from-uk.com/ebay/carphotos/full/ebay420869.jpg

    and the name of an old music call comedy act about an elderly Irish woman played by a man. But no relation to Bill O'Reilly.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpyNzwEi7Po

    Ava is a variation on Eve, a Biblical name for the first woman.

    It could also be from the Latin for bird, similarly altered. Either way, the parents aren’t too fussy.

    There was an old radio-then-TV show in the US called The Life of Riley. It won the very first Emmy.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Life_of_Riley

    Right up Steve’s alley:

    The reworked script cast Bendix as blundering Chester A. Riley, a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California.

  28. Except for Isabella (a Spanish version of Elizabeth) it looks like a decisive turning away from biblical names, especially by whites.

    • Replies: @Andrey illyich
    Isabella is actually the Italian version of the name. The Spanish version is Isabel
  29. @Achmed E. Newman
    "Mohammad" just goes along with the 15 y/o trend for boys names. Any old last name, not just those of famous men, may be used as a first name now: Connor, Tanner, Benson, Carlin, Tyler, Hays, Paxton, and so on. I assume Mohammad was the prophet's last name, although the Moslems don't seem to cuss enough for me to find out his first name or middle initial. Is it like Madonna, Cher, Sting, or The Edge?

    At least it can be shortened to Moe to save time. If you're neither towel-head nor beaner, yet still want to name your son after a man of the cloth, there's always the old stand-by, Amos Moses.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n7GyLr7Cz2g

    We don’t know for certain, obviously, but it is very possible “Muhammad” was a chieftain title rather than his birth name. Of course, after kicking off his revolution, it became a common birth name for Arab boys, just like many other historically important figures in other cultures.

    Within the Qu’ran, the recipient-who is conventionally inferred to be Muhammad-is not generally addressed by his name, but is called a prophet, a warner, a messenager of God, a slave of God, etc. That’s the only written piece of evidence dating from his lifetime we have got of him: the hadiths come from centuries later and represent Iliad-esque oral tradition put down into writing.

  30. “Layla” is one of the cuckiest songs ever written. Clapton had some toxic one-itis. And the famous riff was written by Duane Allman anyway.

    Nevertheless, “Layla” the album is one of rock’s greatest achievements.

  31. Now, you might say: “Well, that doesn’t mean much. It’s just that Muslims always name their sons Muhammad.”

    Without knowing the distribution of names it’s hard to tell if it means much; do 10% of the kids get name #10, or do 0.01% of the kids get name #10 ?

  32. This is misleading, it only includes people who submitted baby names to the Baby Center website. The Social Security Office, using data submitted to them, doesn’t even have Muhammad in the top 50 for 2018. The various spellings of Muhammad, Mohammad, and Mohammed are ranked 605, 627 and 345. Even combining them all, it wouldn’t even come close to the top ten.

    https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/

    • Replies: @AnonAnon

    The Social Security Office, using data submitted to them, doesn’t even have Muhammad in the top 50 for 2018.
     
    Thank God.
  33. @jon
    One thing I have noticed about Muslim names is that they are often very long. When they come up with these lists, are they including all of a person's given names, or are they just counting the first listed name?

    The Arabs typically include information about both paternal and maternal lineage within the name because that’s their tradition dating back to pre-Islamic times where illiterate Bedouin bards memorized the heroic deeds of their ancestors. Other Islamic cultures do not. They might ape the structure-the Malays do-but they won’t include all of it.

    I’ve noticed that this also tends to happen a lot in Spanish-speaking countries.

    • Replies: @Anon
    A Spanish woman traditionally did not take the name of her husband upon marriage and the children received both names; typically only the father's is passed on to the third generation.
  34. Out of the Gate, a critical point:

    The online parenting and pregnancy destination compiled the names of babies born to some 600,000 registered U.S. users in 2019 and combined those that sound the same but have different spellings (such as Sophia and Sofia) to create a true measure of popularity. The Social Security Administration also generates a list, pulling from the names of all babies born in the U.S., but the agency treats each unique spelling as a separate name.

    Someone named Steve (Stephen/Steven) should be sensitive to this! On the SSA list, names with varied spellings will finish further down the list than equally popular names by sound, but with a consistent written form.

    Also, this is a smaller and selected sample compared to SSA’s, which covers every reported birth in the US, and is released yearly on the Friday before Mother’s Day.The

    Still, it is good to have a large survey using the other methodology, for comparison. It will be some time before Mr M appears on the SSA top hundred. “Muhammad” is at 345, “Mohammed” at 627, “Mohammad” 605, and “Mohamed” 454.

  35. More and more boys are naméd Muhammad;
    Ay-rab names, up our asses, are cramméd.

    Sometimes spelt and pronouncéd Mahomet;
    (I feel queasy, as though I may vomit).

    Muslim names have been spreading like viruses;
    Not “Ah! Leah!”, like Donnie Iris’es

    Hit song, but Aaliyah for girl kids;
    (No, really, I’m fixing to hurl, kids).

  36. @donvonburg
    "Ava" and "Farrah" are each completely traceable to one specific movie/TV star, as is "Gary". Wolfram Alpha will give you a graph of how popular a name is, at least in the United States.

    Foreign language names, derivations of popular names and names popular in other parts of the Anglosphere but not here add some confusion to the mix, of course.

    As are surnames made into first names. Shelby is now a popular female first name, from Carroll Shelby, but "Carroll" is not , for males or females. Morgan was trendy for girls for a while, as was Taylor.

    Songs occasionally drive names. Rhiannon was popular for a while. It would be interesting to know if country hits drove rural names (Jolene, Elvira, Adalida).

    Catholicism and Mormonism both drive certain names, but Mormons get odd sometimes in ways that to not directly invoke Mormonism. Catholics were expected always to use the name of a saint as a first or middle name, although Old Testament names were sometimes popular though not so much as among certain strains of Protestants. There, there were a lot of Calvins, Martins, Luthers and Wesleys though. Freemasons used Hiram a lot, and one oddity of that is that since a disproportionate number of ham radio operators were also Freemasons, any old callbook will have a lot of Hirams, to say nothing of the ARRL being founded by Hiram Percy Maxim.

    Then there are odd names that come up when someone of that name becomes notorious. I kind of doubt that "Ghislane" will become popular, inasmuch as she is popularly thought to be an Israeli spymaster and/or a female pimp. But the blacks could decide it be cool.

    Then there are names that are otherwise unremarkable but which go along with a surname in some way, perhaps a brand name. Mercedes Benz, Harley Davidson, Halsey Taylor, etc. Some people just can not resist.

    It would be nice to think that some of the children named “Shelby” were named in honor of the great American hero Isaac Shelby, but I doubt that many are.

  37. How’s that multiculturalism thing working out in London? Does the ADL want more of it anywhere (the indigenous Palestinian people for example) except Israel (formerly Palestine)?

  38. This is very bad news and Steve and commentators are taking it lightly.

    I had thought that the 2-3-? million Moslem American citizens were integrating themselves into American culture AND FOR THAT REASON would opt for non-religious names for their kids = Hashem for example or Leila (black eyes) – just as sane American negroes do not name their daughters Shitedde.

    Odd that Steve does not supply the numbers behind the listing.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    Hashem (השם) as an example of a non-religious name?

    HTML needs to get a <sarc> tag into its spec, because it's all getting waaaay too subtle for me.
    , @MBlanc46
    What on Earth gave you the idea that Muslim immigrants are integrating into American culture?
  39. @donvonburg
    "Ava" and "Farrah" are each completely traceable to one specific movie/TV star, as is "Gary". Wolfram Alpha will give you a graph of how popular a name is, at least in the United States.

    Foreign language names, derivations of popular names and names popular in other parts of the Anglosphere but not here add some confusion to the mix, of course.

    As are surnames made into first names. Shelby is now a popular female first name, from Carroll Shelby, but "Carroll" is not , for males or females. Morgan was trendy for girls for a while, as was Taylor.

    Songs occasionally drive names. Rhiannon was popular for a while. It would be interesting to know if country hits drove rural names (Jolene, Elvira, Adalida).

    Catholicism and Mormonism both drive certain names, but Mormons get odd sometimes in ways that to not directly invoke Mormonism. Catholics were expected always to use the name of a saint as a first or middle name, although Old Testament names were sometimes popular though not so much as among certain strains of Protestants. There, there were a lot of Calvins, Martins, Luthers and Wesleys though. Freemasons used Hiram a lot, and one oddity of that is that since a disproportionate number of ham radio operators were also Freemasons, any old callbook will have a lot of Hirams, to say nothing of the ARRL being founded by Hiram Percy Maxim.

    Then there are odd names that come up when someone of that name becomes notorious. I kind of doubt that "Ghislane" will become popular, inasmuch as she is popularly thought to be an Israeli spymaster and/or a female pimp. But the blacks could decide it be cool.

    Then there are names that are otherwise unremarkable but which go along with a surname in some way, perhaps a brand name. Mercedes Benz, Harley Davidson, Halsey Taylor, etc. Some people just can not resist.

    It occurs to me that Ghislaine (lovely name) Maxwell has gone to ground in Israel. Her father the notorious Sir Robert Maxwell was unquestionably an Israeli asset.

  40. Muhammad and Aaliyah… replacing Mason and Layla.

    Well at least she admits it.

  41. Isn’t the granddaughter of Elvis named “Riley”……?

  42. @slumber_j
    It's incredible to me that Olivia de Havilland is still with us. Her slightly younger sister Joan Fontaine (née Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland) was a good friend--I never figured out quite how good--of my paternal grandfather's. He's been in the ground for as long as the Berlin wall has been absent, and Wikipedia says Joan Fontaine died in 2013.

    My grandfather was about twenty years older than the de Havilland sisters, having been born in St. Paul in 1896 along with his contemporary and acquaintance F. Scott Fitzgerald (speaking of Normans). But despite the age difference, Olivia de Havilland's continuing refusal to die affords us one last closing window on a generation that's now so remote as to be foreign.

    Vera Lynn (Dr. Strangelove) is still with us; wonder what she thinks of 2019 UK (Gonna be Great!)?

    • Replies: @Ozymandias
    Here's a song about that song:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=dg0G8C4s5JM
  43. It’s interesting how pop music-derived names lag decades behind the hits. Dylan became a huge boy’s name about 25 years after Bob Dylan became famous. Layla took 40+ years after Eric Clapton’s song.

    How many of the people who are naming their daughters Layla are Clapton fans?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Layla_al-Akhyaliyya

  44. Americans name baby girls Aaliyah in association with the R&B musician/celebrity from Detroit, who wasn’t a religious figure at all: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaliyah. The name does have ancient Arabic/Hebrew/Semitic etymology, but that’s not relevant to its present day cultural connotation. It’s popularly considered a name affiliated with black R&B music and Detroit, not Islam or Arab/Hebrew history.

    The name Mohammed, OTOH, is currently affiliated with the religion of Islam.

    I like the trend of “vintage” classically beautiful names like Sophia, Olivia, and Emma. I briefly planned to name my daughter Sophia, until I realized how popular it was, and I didn’t want a super-common top-ten (or top twenty) name.

  45. Layla is also Arabic in origin.

  46. I’m out of touch with baby name trends. I hadn’t known that “Layla” was so popular.

    Do the opposite of Arabic (and Hebrew) and ignore the consonants. It’s ay-uh, the same as the crazy-popular Kayla, which may or may not be related to the many, many misspellings of Michaela, which is Steven/Stephen on steroids.

    Ay-ee names are even more popular. That can ruin it for a more classically-oriented choice like Haydee/Haïdee which is unfairly declassed by sharing those vowels.

    Remember how Ryan replaced Brian around 1970? Love Story aside, a lot of people drawn to Brian likely hesitated at its apparent faddishness. So they inadvertently jumped on the next fad.

    …girls’ names tend to go out of fashion when their most prominent examples hit middle age, then come back into fashion as they reach old age.

    That depends on the name. Evelyn and Eleanor returned rather quickly, but most ladies are dead before their name returns, at least in America. Florence has been popular in Britain for years, Louise before that. Florence just reëntered the top 1000 last year after a 35-year absence. Louise performs marginally better.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Florence has been popular in Britain for years, Louise before that. Florence just reëntered the top 1000 last year after a 35-year absence.
     
    Florence presumably originated from Florence Nightingale, died 1910, a name well-known to all in the medical profession. Nightingale was thus named because she was born in the Italian city of Firenze, known in English as Florence.

    Had she been born in Jeddah, she might have been known as Florence of Arabia.

    The names of my grandmother's era, such as Agatha, Agnes, Beryl, Daisy, Edith, Gladys, Gertrude, Hazel, Mabel, Adelaide, Harriet, Mavis, Nellie, Phoebe, Violet, Viola, Victoria, Alberta,and Winifred were overused, but are overdue for a revival, especially Harriet after the Tubman movie.

    Constance, Faith, Hope, Charity, Chastity, Prudence, Blanche, Fannie, and Hester, may have a harder time getting in the frame, though Lady Chatterley was a Constance.

    If in doubt it is always safe to name your child after a state ending in -a if a girl, for example Georgia, Dakota, or Virginia, or any other state if a boy such as Mich, Louis, or Tex. Boys may also be Indiana.

    Twins may be West and Virginia, South and Carolina, or Missie and Sippie.

    For boys my tips for the top are Tesla, Archie, Oscar, Bram, Bruno, Frank, Kristoff, and Zeus.
  47. USA top 10 boys names, 2100:

    1. Jinping
    2. Mohammed
    3. Muhammed
    4. Mohamed
    5. Mohamad
    6. Muhamad
    7. Muhammet
    8. Muhammadu
    9. Mohammet
    10. Mahomet

    • Replies: @bruce county
    Mohammed, could you please come to the front of the classroom.
    , @RadicalCenter
    You'll need to add Jose or the like, at the top.
    , @Marquandian Hero
    You forgot the inevitable illiterate black misspellings. "Mo'Hommed" "Mo-Ha-Med" etc.
  48. USA Top 10 girls names (Park Slope, Brooklyn*)

    1. James
    2. Shiloh
    2. Marley
    3. Equity
    4. Hillary
    5. Single-Payer
    6. Lakshmi
    7. Justice
    8. Alexandria
    9. Hayden
    10. Ghislaine

    *overheard at J.J. Byrne playground(most of them)

    • LOL: RadicalCenter
  49. @jon
    One thing I have noticed about Muslim names is that they are often very long. When they come up with these lists, are they including all of a person's given names, or are they just counting the first listed name?

    The Malaysian family who moved in next door said I should call their son “Al”

  50. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    USA top 10 boys names, 2100:

    1. Jinping
    2. Mohammed
    3. Muhammed
    4. Mohamed
    5. Mohamad
    6. Muhamad
    7. Muhammet
    8. Muhammadu
    9. Mohammet
    10. Mahomet

    Mohammed, could you please come to the front of the classroom.

  51. RE: Choosing names for a baby,

    My advice is simple: the older, the better. So, look to the Bible , Graeco-Roman classics and traditional Anglo names:

    Boys: John, James, David, Alexander, Matthew, Joshua, Philip, Mark, Alexander, Richard, Robert, Edward, etc

    Girls: Sarah, Julia, Rebecca, Rachel, Alexandra, Elizabeth, Jane, Katharine, etc.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    My advice: give the kid a real name, not a nickname.

    I'm amazed by how many of my contemporaries have ignored this rule. You can always immediately start calling the child by the desired nickname if you like, but at least down the road your adult offspring will have the opportunity to use a more grown-up and dignified name if he or she chooses.
    , @Desiderius
    I wanted that but my wife wanted something euphonious. We ended up with Thomas Reid (after the Scottish Common Sense philosopher) and William Rowan (after the mathematician/physicist William Rowan Hamilton), but the boys go by their middle names.
  52. anonymous[188] • Disclaimer says:

    Anti-Whites don’t reject ethnic nationalism in general, only for Whites.

    Non-Whites get the Privilege of self preference and preservation (‘racism’), borders, homogeneity.

    A 100% Black or Asian country/population is exempt from mass immigration and assimilation. They are already ‘diverse enough’.

    Diversity is a strength really says ‘White people are a weakness’.

    When the 90% of the world we call ‘minorities’ becomes 100%, we’ll be ‘diverse enough’.

    We’re not fixing the ‘race’ problem, we’re fixing the ‘WHITE’ problem.

    Anywhere outside the West, this would be called G…

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Anti-Whites don’t reject ethnic nationalism in general, only for Whites.
     
    But in moving to the West, their children become deracinated globians. They attack 'white nationalism' to gain access to the West. They hate defensive 'white nationalism' more than offensive Western neo-imperialism because their #1 priority is Entry to the West than

    Defense of My Home-Nation
     
    . How many Muslim-Americans get all worked up about what the West has done to the Middle East? Not much protest there. But they do get all worked up about 'white nationalists' who want to defend the West from further invasion.

    Their anti-white antics is just cover for the shame that they prefer white-everything over their own kind.
  53. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Remember, there are a lot of African-Americans who tend to give their offspring Arabic names, Muhammad and Aaliyah being no exception (e.g. NE's WR Muhammad Sunu, as one example). Aaliyah was an African-American hip hop star who was related to legendary soul artist Gladys Knight.

    Remember, there are a lot of African-Americans who tend to give their offspring Arabic names, Muhammad and Aaliyah being no exception (e.g. NE’s WR Muhammad Sunu, as one example). Aaliyah was an African-American hip hop star who was related to legendary soul artist Gladys Knight.

    Yeah, I’m pretty sure that a huge percentage of the girls named Aaliyah are Black.

  54. Let’s look at America’s two most famous 103-year-olds, Olivia de Havilland and Beverly Cleary.

    Olivia spent the first half of the 20th century in the 200s, troughed at 543 in 1971, and entered the top 100 in 1990 and the top 10 in 2001. She’s more a fashion than a fad.

    Beverly (often a boy’s name before 1900) shows up at #933 in 1905, and is at #948 in 1999, her last year in the top 1000. She peaked at #14 in 1937. Beverley follows a similar trajectory, further down the rankings.

    Amazingly, boy Beverlys make the top 1000 most years up to 1954.

    Kirk Douglas joins the 103 club in a few days. Ironically, Kirk left the top 1000 in 1916, the year these three were born– Douglas as Issur– not to return until 1924, at precisely #1000. He peaked in 1963 at #138, and dropped out of the top 1000 by 2003.

    Parents tend to play it safe with boy’s names, at least until recently. Kirk seems to be an ideal compromise between “safe” and “cool”, so why it didn’t catch on is curious. Parents prefer green to plaid, I guess.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Parents tend to play it safe with boy’s names, at least until recently.

     

    Maybe that's why the names for boys are so sick-making. Parents aren't playing it safe these days....


    1. Liam
    2. Jackson
    3. Noah
    4. Aiden
    5. Grayson
    6. Caden
    7. Lucas
    8. Elijah
    9. Oliver
    10. Muhammad


    Aiden? Caden? Those sound right out of a soap opera. Grayson? Are there that many Robin/Nightwing fans out there?Liam? Just name your son William and use Liam as a nickname, fergodsakes....
    , @Anonymous
    Beverly and Laurie were still manly men’s names in the UK well into modern times.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Regarding old names becoming new again, does anyone remember any Sylvias? Sylvias are either over 75 years old or little girls under 10. As far as Sylvia's mother goes, well she probably goes back to the 19th century, and that song is just too depressing to even embed here.
  55. @Reg Cæsar
    Let's look at America's two most famous 103-year-olds, Olivia de Havilland and Beverly Cleary.

    Olivia spent the first half of the 20th century in the 200s, troughed at 543 in 1971, and entered the top 100 in 1990 and the top 10 in 2001. She's more a fashion than a fad.

    Beverly (often a boy's name before 1900) shows up at #933 in 1905, and is at #948 in 1999, her last year in the top 1000. She peaked at #14 in 1937. Beverley follows a similar trajectory, further down the rankings.

    Amazingly, boy Beverlys make the top 1000 most years up to 1954.

    Kirk Douglas joins the 103 club in a few days. Ironically, Kirk left the top 1000 in 1916, the year these three were born-- Douglas as Issur-- not to return until 1924, at precisely #1000. He peaked in 1963 at #138, and dropped out of the top 1000 by 2003.

    Parents tend to play it safe with boy's names, at least until recently. Kirk seems to be an ideal compromise between "safe" and "cool", so why it didn't catch on is curious. Parents prefer green to plaid, I guess.

    Parents tend to play it safe with boy’s names, at least until recently.

    Maybe that’s why the names for boys are so sick-making. Parents aren’t playing it safe these days….

    1. Liam
    2. Jackson
    3. Noah
    4. Aiden
    5. Grayson
    6. Caden
    7. Lucas
    8. Elijah
    9. Oliver
    10. Muhammad

    Aiden? Caden? Those sound right out of a soap opera. Grayson? Are there that many Robin/Nightwing fans out there?Liam? Just name your son William and use Liam as a nickname, fergodsakes….

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Aiden? Caden?
     
    Aidan has some history:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aidan_of_Lindisfarne


    http://www.pravoslavie.ru/sas/image/102134/213420.b.jpg
    https://catholicexchange.com/five-things-to-know-about-st-aidan-of-lindisfarne

    , @BB753
    How long will it take for Muhammad to reach number one? Two or three generations? Any bets?
    , @HammerJack
    Only one of them doesn't sound like one of Cletus and Brandine's brood...

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=QDYF_nu2I4M

    If the scene were remade today, I'm sure Muhammad would be included.

    , @Corn
    I dislike Liam. First if you’re an American you should have an English name. Liam is too Irish

    Secondly, Liam sounds awful close to “lame” in my ear. The name sounds weak to me.

    With all apologies to Liam Neeson.
  56. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Remember, there are a lot of African-Americans who tend to give their offspring Arabic names, Muhammad and Aaliyah being no exception (e.g. NE's WR Muhammad Sunu, as one example). Aaliyah was an African-American hip hop star who was related to legendary soul artist Gladys Knight.

    Agree. Layla just seems like a new spelling of Leila, which was an Arabic name anyways. But probably not always indicative that the person who had the name was Muslim or middle eastern. It’s a nice sounding name.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    Eric Clapton composed Layla in late 1970, weeks after the Palestinian Leila Khaled was much in the news for the September 1970 multiple hijackings. I remember wondering, later, if that’s where he got the name. It wasn’t, then, and isn’t, now, a common name outside the Middle East.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leila_Khaled


    https://images-haarets-co-il.cdn.ampproject.org/i/s/images.haarets.co.il/image/fetch/w_1482,h_856,x_24,y_117,c_crop,g_north_west/w_609,h_343,q_auto,c_fill,f_auto/fl_any_format.preserve_transparency.progressive:none/https://www.haaretz.com/polopoly_fs/1.5687059.1515442434!/image/1018316866.jpg
  57. @syonredux

    Parents tend to play it safe with boy’s names, at least until recently.

     

    Maybe that's why the names for boys are so sick-making. Parents aren't playing it safe these days....


    1. Liam
    2. Jackson
    3. Noah
    4. Aiden
    5. Grayson
    6. Caden
    7. Lucas
    8. Elijah
    9. Oliver
    10. Muhammad


    Aiden? Caden? Those sound right out of a soap opera. Grayson? Are there that many Robin/Nightwing fans out there?Liam? Just name your son William and use Liam as a nickname, fergodsakes....
    • Replies: @syonredux
    Aidan has some history:
     I strongly doubt that the proles naming their sons Aiden are consciously invoking an historical prototype. As with Caden, they just like the sound.
  58. If only Jack Merritt had lived to see this momentous day!

    • Agree: HammerJack
    • LOL: Bragadocious
  59. @Achmed E. Newman
    "Mohammad" just goes along with the 15 y/o trend for boys names. Any old last name, not just those of famous men, may be used as a first name now: Connor, Tanner, Benson, Carlin, Tyler, Hays, Paxton, and so on. I assume Mohammad was the prophet's last name, although the Moslems don't seem to cuss enough for me to find out his first name or middle initial. Is it like Madonna, Cher, Sting, or The Edge?

    At least it can be shortened to Moe to save time. If you're neither towel-head nor beaner, yet still want to name your son after a man of the cloth, there's always the old stand-by, Amos Moses.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n7GyLr7Cz2g

    Is it like Madonna, Cher, Sting, or The Edge?

    Or ‘The’ as he’s known to his oldest friends.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Heh! I'd meant to write Bono. Yes, Mr. Edge demands respect, and only those friends, his bandmates (except the drummer, of course), and his tax accountant are allowed to use the informal "The".
  60. Cuck is the #1 name in Congress.

    Hopefully, the Muslims will not assimilate into Anglo-cuckery to Zion, which is esp pathetic since the Tribe’s agenda is meant to castrate and humiliate the Anglo-Americans.

  61. @Anonymous
    What groups use “Muhammad” and what groups use “Mohammed” ?

    The tribes of the Dyslexia mountains?

  62. @Scott in PA
    Except for Isabella (a Spanish version of Elizabeth) it looks like a decisive turning away from biblical names, especially by whites.

    Isabella is actually the Italian version of the name. The Spanish version is Isabel

  63. Quick! The camel’s nose is under the tent!

  64. @Mike Jones
    So you are going to commit violence based on People of Color having and naming children?

    That says a lot about you



    https://www.ajc.com/blog/luckovich/mike-luckovich-who-the-threat/cMmd1H9PIwyJr3I01katgJ/

    Funny, your comic strip shows all these people just loitering around harmlessly, none of them with their teeth bared.

    For example, you didn’t depict the Muslim guy stabbing two innocent people on a bridge, or the gay men blaming Ronald Reagan for all the health problems consequent from buggery, or the mixed-race couple black man leaving his wife with two babies or stabbing her to death in rage at her wanting to leave him, or the Jewish guy as a felonious Wall Street swindler or a communist spy.

    No, in your cartoonish world, not only are all of these people innocent of any evil intentions, but their mingling doesn’t even give rise to discomfort from jostling into one another in their striving for the good life.

    Good grief.

  65. Olivia’s cousin Geoffrey de Havilland’s firm built a famous warplane and the ill-fated first jetliner.

    The Mosquito really was a great plane.

  66. @donvonburg
    "Ava" and "Farrah" are each completely traceable to one specific movie/TV star, as is "Gary". Wolfram Alpha will give you a graph of how popular a name is, at least in the United States.

    Foreign language names, derivations of popular names and names popular in other parts of the Anglosphere but not here add some confusion to the mix, of course.

    As are surnames made into first names. Shelby is now a popular female first name, from Carroll Shelby, but "Carroll" is not , for males or females. Morgan was trendy for girls for a while, as was Taylor.

    Songs occasionally drive names. Rhiannon was popular for a while. It would be interesting to know if country hits drove rural names (Jolene, Elvira, Adalida).

    Catholicism and Mormonism both drive certain names, but Mormons get odd sometimes in ways that to not directly invoke Mormonism. Catholics were expected always to use the name of a saint as a first or middle name, although Old Testament names were sometimes popular though not so much as among certain strains of Protestants. There, there were a lot of Calvins, Martins, Luthers and Wesleys though. Freemasons used Hiram a lot, and one oddity of that is that since a disproportionate number of ham radio operators were also Freemasons, any old callbook will have a lot of Hirams, to say nothing of the ARRL being founded by Hiram Percy Maxim.

    Then there are odd names that come up when someone of that name becomes notorious. I kind of doubt that "Ghislane" will become popular, inasmuch as she is popularly thought to be an Israeli spymaster and/or a female pimp. But the blacks could decide it be cool.

    Then there are names that are otherwise unremarkable but which go along with a surname in some way, perhaps a brand name. Mercedes Benz, Harley Davidson, Halsey Taylor, etc. Some people just can not resist.

    Mercedes IS a girl’s name, a Spanish one. It’s the equivalent (well, the plural) of the old Puritan name Mercy.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mar%C3%ADa_de_las_Mercedes

    But Mohammed in the top ten is the proverbial cloud no bigger than a man’s hand.

    https://biblehub.com/1_kings/18-44.htm

    • Replies: @prosa123
    Mercedes IS a girl’s name, a Spanish one. It’s the equivalent (well, the plural) of the old Puritan name Mercy.

    Mercedes was the name of the daughter of one of Gottlieb Daimler's business partners.
  67. @syonredux

    Parents tend to play it safe with boy’s names, at least until recently.

     

    Maybe that's why the names for boys are so sick-making. Parents aren't playing it safe these days....


    1. Liam
    2. Jackson
    3. Noah
    4. Aiden
    5. Grayson
    6. Caden
    7. Lucas
    8. Elijah
    9. Oliver
    10. Muhammad


    Aiden? Caden? Those sound right out of a soap opera. Grayson? Are there that many Robin/Nightwing fans out there?Liam? Just name your son William and use Liam as a nickname, fergodsakes....

    How long will it take for Muhammad to reach number one? Two or three generations? Any bets?

  68. @donvonburg
    "Ava" and "Farrah" are each completely traceable to one specific movie/TV star, as is "Gary". Wolfram Alpha will give you a graph of how popular a name is, at least in the United States.

    Foreign language names, derivations of popular names and names popular in other parts of the Anglosphere but not here add some confusion to the mix, of course.

    As are surnames made into first names. Shelby is now a popular female first name, from Carroll Shelby, but "Carroll" is not , for males or females. Morgan was trendy for girls for a while, as was Taylor.

    Songs occasionally drive names. Rhiannon was popular for a while. It would be interesting to know if country hits drove rural names (Jolene, Elvira, Adalida).

    Catholicism and Mormonism both drive certain names, but Mormons get odd sometimes in ways that to not directly invoke Mormonism. Catholics were expected always to use the name of a saint as a first or middle name, although Old Testament names were sometimes popular though not so much as among certain strains of Protestants. There, there were a lot of Calvins, Martins, Luthers and Wesleys though. Freemasons used Hiram a lot, and one oddity of that is that since a disproportionate number of ham radio operators were also Freemasons, any old callbook will have a lot of Hirams, to say nothing of the ARRL being founded by Hiram Percy Maxim.

    Then there are odd names that come up when someone of that name becomes notorious. I kind of doubt that "Ghislane" will become popular, inasmuch as she is popularly thought to be an Israeli spymaster and/or a female pimp. But the blacks could decide it be cool.

    Then there are names that are otherwise unremarkable but which go along with a surname in some way, perhaps a brand name. Mercedes Benz, Harley Davidson, Halsey Taylor, etc. Some people just can not resist.

    Hormel Chavez, Frito Pendejo, Formica Davis, and Dwayne Elizondo Mountain Dew Herbert Camacho.

  69. @Reg Cæsar

    naméd...
    cramméd...
    pronouncéd...
     
    Whether you view the situation as acute or grave, your accents should be the latter.

    This is explainèd further here:


    https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/344455/are-èd-adjectives-still-usèd-words


    https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/35347/what-does-the-grave-accent-mark-on-words-mean

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grave_accent#English

    https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/how-to-use-and-understand-diacritics-diacritical-marks/what-is-a-diacritic-anyway

    Are you talkin’ to me?

    Anyway, you’re right, smarty-pants. Thanks for the advice.

  70. Anonymous[405] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hans
    Stop With the Golems, Already! - https://www.takimag.com/article/stop-with-the-golems-already/

    Muslim terrorists murdered twenty Filipino Christians as they attended services in their church two months ago, and do you recall the response from local Muslim leaders? Was it “We must address the anti-Christian bigotry in our community?” Or “We must stand in solidarity with our Christian countrymen?” Nope. It was “Well, to stop us from killing more Christians, let us carve a Muslim-only autonomous region in the country.” That’s literally like whites responding to the New Zealand massacre by saying, “Well, the solution is to keep New Zealand white and Christian. If we don’t have to mix, we won’t have any more race- or religion-based mass shootings.”

    How do you think the media would have responded to that? Or the U.N.? Or most Western politicians? But in fact, the world response (and the response from media organs like CNN and the BBC) to the Muzz demand was essentially “Yes! Yes! Give them an autonomous region, so that they needn’t mix with those damn Christians.”...

    This is a point that bears repeating: A white Christian kills a bunch of Muslims in New Zealand, and the response is “More diversity! More mixing! Force them damn intolerant whiteys to get along, or jail their asses as racists.” Muslims in the Philippines massacre a bunch of Christians, and the response is “Let the Muslims be autonomous! Let them live free of mixing, free of diversity! Let them never have to see another Christian again!”

    Jews should be particularly afraid of their new Islamic golems. Muzzies might not be smarter than Jews, but they’re stronger and more numerous, and their level of “batshit crazy” is off the charts. Of all the golems the Hebraic high-IQ dunces have created—from the communist state they helped birth in 1917, which later turned on them, to the integration craze they helped create here in the U.S., which now forces them to flee public schools—the Muzz golem has the potential to be the most destructive one yet.

    In a perfect world, these rabbinical Rain Men would finally get the fuck over the Holocaust and end their war of hostility against the West. They’d see that whites are no longer the enemy, but indeed the opposite. They’d see that importing foreign mud to mold golem after golem in traditionally white regions of the U.S. is bad strategy.

    The deciders behind Modern Jewishness actually want and desire so called “anti-semitism” because it keeps the little Jews in line. Of course it’s hubris and will bite them big time. It will make whites racially conscious too once they get enough muzzie mayhem.

    Some whites won’t learn, it sucks to be them. Eventually enough will.

  71. @Calvin Hobbes
    https://www.thebump.com/b/aaliyah-baby-name

    “Aaliyah is a variation of the name Aliyah, which means “rising” in Hebrew and “exalted or lofty” in Arabic. Other variations include Alia, Aleah, Aleia, Alya and Aliyya. (The latter is sometimes considered the feminine form of Ali, one of the 99 names of Allah in Islam.) Aaliyah is the most popular and preferred spelling of this name—and indelibly connected to hip-hop singer Aaliyah, who died in a plane crash in 2001 at age 22.“

    So, a sort-of Hebrew, sort-of Arabic name with a little creative spelling. I was thinking every Aaliyah baby now would be black, but maybe there are a few Semitic baby Aaliyahs. The graph at the link shows there were a few Aaliyahs at the start of the time-line in 1976, but then the name takes off about 1994.

    I learned a few fun-facts about hip-hop singer Aaliyah from Wikipedia. Illegally married to R. Kelly (who seems to keep getting into trouble involving underage girls) at age 15. The plane crash that killed her has its own Wikipedia page

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_Aaliyah

    and was a comically stupid fiasco. Unlicensed coke head pilot who didn’t want to take off because Aaliyah and her entourage had overloaded the Cessna by 700 pounds and an extra passenger. Passengers insist he take off anyway.

    Just dropping in to post a gratuitous pic of Aaliyah:

    Yum!

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    Let's talk about her hair.
  72. @Reg Cæsar
    Let's look at America's two most famous 103-year-olds, Olivia de Havilland and Beverly Cleary.

    Olivia spent the first half of the 20th century in the 200s, troughed at 543 in 1971, and entered the top 100 in 1990 and the top 10 in 2001. She's more a fashion than a fad.

    Beverly (often a boy's name before 1900) shows up at #933 in 1905, and is at #948 in 1999, her last year in the top 1000. She peaked at #14 in 1937. Beverley follows a similar trajectory, further down the rankings.

    Amazingly, boy Beverlys make the top 1000 most years up to 1954.

    Kirk Douglas joins the 103 club in a few days. Ironically, Kirk left the top 1000 in 1916, the year these three were born-- Douglas as Issur-- not to return until 1924, at precisely #1000. He peaked in 1963 at #138, and dropped out of the top 1000 by 2003.

    Parents tend to play it safe with boy's names, at least until recently. Kirk seems to be an ideal compromise between "safe" and "cool", so why it didn't catch on is curious. Parents prefer green to plaid, I guess.

    Beverly and Laurie were still manly men’s names in the UK well into modern times.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Beverly and Laurie were still manly men’s names in the UK well into modern times.
     
    Laurie is their Larry.


    BritishBabyNames.com: NAME OF THE WEEK: LAURENCE

    Once ours, too.


    https://littlewomen.fandom.com/wiki/Theodore_Laurence
    https://www.shmoop.com/little-women/laurie.html

  73. @Reg Cæsar

    Aiden? Caden?
     
    Aidan has some history:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aidan_of_Lindisfarne


    http://www.pravoslavie.ru/sas/image/102134/213420.b.jpg
    https://catholicexchange.com/five-things-to-know-about-st-aidan-of-lindisfarne

    Aidan has some history:

    I strongly doubt that the proles naming their sons Aiden are consciously invoking an historical prototype. As with Caden, they just like the sound.

  74. I can tell you all 10 are currently very popular in Porn Valley……

  75. @jon
    One thing I have noticed about Muslim names is that they are often very long. When they come up with these lists, are they including all of a person's given names, or are they just counting the first listed name?

    They try to be as annoying as possible. It’s in the Koran.

  76. How many girls names were once boys names? I will start with Evelyn Waugh and Leslie Charteris…

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    How many girls names were once boys names? I will start with Evelyn Waugh and Leslie Charteris…
     
    In England Leslie was always a male name, and Lesley a female name, but the same does not seem to have applied in the US.

    Les (male) is or was an extremely common name in England.

    Les Paul live:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJaNMZmBR6E

  77. It’s interesting how pop music-derived names lag decades behind the hits. Dylan became a huge boy’s name about 25 years after Bob Dylan became famous. Layla took 40+ years after Eric Clapton’s song.

    Dylan became popular because of the Dylan McKay character played by Luke Perry on Beverley Hills 90210, it had nothing to do with Bob Dylan. (I’m even more skeptical that Layla has anything to do with Clapton.)

    Source: I was a freshman in high school when that show took off and wondered why all the cute girls in class were suddenly talking about me. And then a few years later as an early Usenet troll in college under my real name I was glad that the my early indiscretions were eventually buried under the internet footprint of the 90210 kids.

    • Replies: @Lot
    Dylan Thomas!
  78. Note the terribly unwoke ‘a’ ending of 8 of 10 of the girls to ten (or 9 of 10 if you count ‘ah’).

    Seems to me the names should be

    Sophix
    Olivix
    Emmx

    und so weiter…

  79. @Anonymous
    Beverly and Laurie were still manly men’s names in the UK well into modern times.

    Beverly and Laurie were still manly men’s names in the UK well into modern times.

    Laurie is their Larry.

    BritishBabyNames.com: NAME OF THE WEEK: LAURENCE

    Once ours, too.

    https://littlewomen.fandom.com/wiki/Theodore_Laurence
    https://www.shmoop.com/little-women/laurie.html

  80. So will this resemble U.S. armed forces in 20 years?

    • Replies: @Rapparee
    An American Carol was a dire, night-unwatchable picture, but had about a dozen or so very funny gags that deserved to be surgically removed and grafted onto a better flick. This was one of them.

    I also started to guffaw when Paris Hilton began to announce the winner of "The Leni Riefenstahl Award", but immediately stopped when the script began to ham-handedly overexplain the joke for the benefit of the idiots watching.
  81. @Joe Stalin
    Vera Lynn (Dr. Strangelove) is still with us; wonder what she thinks of 2019 UK (Gonna be Great!)?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5C4meGkNyc

    Here’s a song about that song:

  82. OT

    Jewish tax leech public defender lobbying to prevent the deportation of a black murderer.

    • Replies: @HammerJack

    Helped youth understand impact of gun violence.
     
    That's a good one. "There's two ways we can do this...."

    I'll see your OT and raise you a Battalion of Marines. Whose side are they on?

    Monday's arrest comes as several other Marines stationed at Camp Pendleton are facing human trafficking charges. Six out of two dozen Marines recently pled guilty to human trafficking and drug charges at military court-martials.

    Officials did not release the names of the arrested Marines...

    https://www.foxnews.com/us/marine-arrested-for-alleged-smuggling-after-chinese-woman-found-in-car-trunk

    https://www.foxnews.com/us/16-marines-arrested-human-smuggling-drugs

     

    , @eah
    OT

    Sexually aberrant Jewish law professor mentions Trump's minor son at the bogus impeachment hearings (wtf? -- and why is she testifying?), gets reprimanded by a congressman.

    Perhaps some are aware that TruNews put out a video uproariously titled Jew Coup: Seditious Jews Orchestrating Trump Impeachment Lynching, where they basically just reviewed, via news headlines/stories, all the Jews pushing this impeachment farce (there are a lot of them) -- initially available on JewYouTube, it was quickly yanked -- anyone interested can watch it here --> link

    https://twitter.com/ForAmerica/status/1202333689092476929
    , @Owen C.
    I wonder where the association of the name "Tyrone" with blacks comes from. It's originally an Irish name, as far as I remember. There's even a county in Ireland called Tyrone.
  83. @Jonathan Mason
    As Steve points out, Isabella is a famous Hispanic name, but several of the other names here have a Hispanic tinge to them.

    For example Mia can be a diminutive of the Spanish name Maria (Mary) and is also the abbreviation for the world's number one airport for Hispanics.

    Ava is a variation on Eve, a Biblical name for the first woman.

    Emma is a name from Jane Austen, but also the name of actresses Emma Thompson and Emma Watson, of Harry Potter fame. (Perhaps we will soon see Potter as a popular name for boys.)

    Aria is an interesting one as arias have been mainly the interest of opera fans, but the word is related to 'air' and is synonymous with Melody. It is also a Jewish name, meaning 'lion(ess)'.

    Riley is an interesting one, being the name of an extinct British car:

    https://car-from-uk.com/ebay/carphotos/full/ebay420869.jpg

    and the name of an old music call comedy act about an elderly Irish woman played by a man. But no relation to Bill O'Reilly.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpyNzwEi7Po

    Maybe American parents are naming their daughters as an homage to character actor John C. Riley.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Usually parents name daughters after people with the same sexual orientation. It's more likely this guy (delivery room nurses are notoriously bad spellers.)

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/Charles_Nelson_Reilly.jpg
  84. @The Wild Geese Howard
    Just dropping in to post a gratuitous pic of Aaliyah:

    http://www.time2grind.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Aaliyah-aaliyah-137625_950_750.jpg

    Yum!

    Let’s talk about her hair.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    I'd love to make it all crusty?
  85. Muhammed is the most common given name in the world, so, no surprise.

    Chan is the most common surname.

  86. @Mike Jones
    So you are going to commit violence based on People of Color having and naming children?

    That says a lot about you



    https://www.ajc.com/blog/luckovich/mike-luckovich-who-the-threat/cMmd1H9PIwyJr3I01katgJ/

    Is this yet another instance of lefties / multicultis pretending not to know what is meant?

    Do you truly have have knowledge of the way that Muslims treat nonMuslims when Muslims gain sufficient strength and numbers in a society? You need to read more and get out more.

  87. Here’s what happened.

    In the 60s, everybody was told they had to be “creative.” Whether they were or not. (Before that, other things, more substantive, important things, things like tradition and family heritage held sway.)

    So then, in the 60s and thereafter everybody got creative with the naming. Only, they weren’t creative, and so they all got creative in exactly the same way.

    Thus, the absolute deluge of Jasons and Joshes and Jeremies, the Ians and the Shawns and the Shawnas, the Nicoles and Ericas and Danielles.

    All names that sound creative to non-creative people but really aren’t.

    I’ll tell you what’s creative. Mildred. Ethel. Bertha.

    Hispanics are much better than Americans at naming. They give their children all sorts of interesting and unusual, but not made-up, names, from history, (Nelson), myth (Hector), or just plain good taste (Berthe).

    Here’s a suggestion. Name your children after a beloved ancestor. Grandma Harriet. Uncle Elmer. That’s actually what you are supposed to do. If you are a real American human being that has a real family, that is, and not some holographic simulacrum thereof.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Bertha. That one's got a lot of bad connotations. I bet nobody here but the Dead Heads can even picture a Bertha with a Body Mass Index under 45.

    That's why, if you please,
    I am on my bended knees.
    Berth don't you come around here,
    anymore.

    Jerry plays a wonderful 2 minute solo at 02:50 in ... be patient!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V72qQhm12K8
  88. @Coag
    One place where Muhammad will likely never make the top 10 baby boy names list:

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.nytimes.com/2017/04/25/world/asia/china-xinjiang-ban-muslim-names-muhammad-jihad.amp.html


    BEIJING — The Chinese government, further tightening its grip on Muslims in western China, has prohibited parents from choosing names like “Muhammad,” “Arafat” and “Jihad” for their children.

    Officials described the ban, introduced this month, as part of an effort to “curb religious fervor” in the western region of Xinjiang, home to more than 10 million Uighurs, a mostly Muslim minority group.

    The government considers Xinjiang a hotbed of Islamic extremism, violence and separatist thought. But many Uighurs say the government’s strict limits on worship and speech are responsible for tensions in the region.

    The list of names, a copy of which was provided to The New York Times by Uighur activists, is titled, “List of Banned Ethnic Minority Names.” It bans more than two dozen names, including “Mujahid” and “Medina.”
     

    Good for the Chinese. They are not naïve schmucks and will not let Islam gain more of a foothold there.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    Correct.

    Our Han bros are leading the way in fighting back against the Ummah.
    , @Clyde

    Good for the Chinese. They are not naïve schmucks and will not let Islam gain more of a foothold there.
     
    "Hapless schmuck" is the phrase you want and can look this up to confirm.
  89. @donvonburg
    "Ava" and "Farrah" are each completely traceable to one specific movie/TV star, as is "Gary". Wolfram Alpha will give you a graph of how popular a name is, at least in the United States.

    Foreign language names, derivations of popular names and names popular in other parts of the Anglosphere but not here add some confusion to the mix, of course.

    As are surnames made into first names. Shelby is now a popular female first name, from Carroll Shelby, but "Carroll" is not , for males or females. Morgan was trendy for girls for a while, as was Taylor.

    Songs occasionally drive names. Rhiannon was popular for a while. It would be interesting to know if country hits drove rural names (Jolene, Elvira, Adalida).

    Catholicism and Mormonism both drive certain names, but Mormons get odd sometimes in ways that to not directly invoke Mormonism. Catholics were expected always to use the name of a saint as a first or middle name, although Old Testament names were sometimes popular though not so much as among certain strains of Protestants. There, there were a lot of Calvins, Martins, Luthers and Wesleys though. Freemasons used Hiram a lot, and one oddity of that is that since a disproportionate number of ham radio operators were also Freemasons, any old callbook will have a lot of Hirams, to say nothing of the ARRL being founded by Hiram Percy Maxim.

    Then there are odd names that come up when someone of that name becomes notorious. I kind of doubt that "Ghislane" will become popular, inasmuch as she is popularly thought to be an Israeli spymaster and/or a female pimp. But the blacks could decide it be cool.

    Then there are names that are otherwise unremarkable but which go along with a surname in some way, perhaps a brand name. Mercedes Benz, Harley Davidson, Halsey Taylor, etc. Some people just can not resist.

    There was a surge of “Liesls” for a while there. Imagine that.

    I think Shelby comes from the restaurant.

  90. @Mike Jones
    So you are going to commit violence based on People of Color having and naming children?

    That says a lot about you



    https://www.ajc.com/blog/luckovich/mike-luckovich-who-the-threat/cMmd1H9PIwyJr3I01katgJ/

    Quacks like a duck…

  91. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    USA top 10 boys names, 2100:

    1. Jinping
    2. Mohammed
    3. Muhammed
    4. Mohamed
    5. Mohamad
    6. Muhamad
    7. Muhammet
    8. Muhammadu
    9. Mohammet
    10. Mahomet

    You’ll need to add Jose or the like, at the top.

  92. I know someone about to name their daughter Aaliyah, she is a black Christian.

  93. @Lurker

    Is it like Madonna, Cher, Sting, or The Edge?
     
    Or 'The' as he's known to his oldest friends.

    Heh! I’d meant to write Bono. Yes, Mr. Edge demands respect, and only those friends, his bandmates (except the drummer, of course), and his tax accountant are allowed to use the informal “The”.

  94. @Hypnotoad666
    Maybe American parents are naming their daughters as an homage to character actor John C. Riley.

    https://www.onthisday.com/images/people/john-c-reilly-medium.jpg

    Usually parents name daughters after people with the same sexual orientation. It’s more likely this guy (delivery room nurses are notoriously bad spellers.)

  95. @Reg Cæsar
    Let's look at America's two most famous 103-year-olds, Olivia de Havilland and Beverly Cleary.

    Olivia spent the first half of the 20th century in the 200s, troughed at 543 in 1971, and entered the top 100 in 1990 and the top 10 in 2001. She's more a fashion than a fad.

    Beverly (often a boy's name before 1900) shows up at #933 in 1905, and is at #948 in 1999, her last year in the top 1000. She peaked at #14 in 1937. Beverley follows a similar trajectory, further down the rankings.

    Amazingly, boy Beverlys make the top 1000 most years up to 1954.

    Kirk Douglas joins the 103 club in a few days. Ironically, Kirk left the top 1000 in 1916, the year these three were born-- Douglas as Issur-- not to return until 1924, at precisely #1000. He peaked in 1963 at #138, and dropped out of the top 1000 by 2003.

    Parents tend to play it safe with boy's names, at least until recently. Kirk seems to be an ideal compromise between "safe" and "cool", so why it didn't catch on is curious. Parents prefer green to plaid, I guess.

    Regarding old names becoming new again, does anyone remember any Sylvias? Sylvias are either over 75 years old or little girls under 10. As far as Sylvia’s mother goes, well she probably goes back to the 19th century, and that song is just too depressing to even embed here.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    "Sylvia's mother" was a nicely-constructed Dr hook song when I was a kiddie...

    Sylvia's mother says "Sylvia's happy so why don't you leave her alone?"
    And the operator says
    "Forty cents more, for the next three minutes"
     
    And Fountains of Wayne were correct when they said Stacy's Mom has got it goin' on, but they spelt Stacie wrong.
    , @Mr. XYZ
    What about the name Lillian?
    , @ben tillman

    Regarding old names becoming new again, does anyone remember any Sylvias? Sylvias are either over 75 years old or little girls under 10.
     
    Not in Slovakia, apparently. I hooked up with a 20-something Slovakian Sylvia in Prague back in the '90's. I also have a 60-ish neighbor from New Orleans named Sylvia.
  96. @donvonburg
    "Ava" and "Farrah" are each completely traceable to one specific movie/TV star, as is "Gary". Wolfram Alpha will give you a graph of how popular a name is, at least in the United States.

    Foreign language names, derivations of popular names and names popular in other parts of the Anglosphere but not here add some confusion to the mix, of course.

    As are surnames made into first names. Shelby is now a popular female first name, from Carroll Shelby, but "Carroll" is not , for males or females. Morgan was trendy for girls for a while, as was Taylor.

    Songs occasionally drive names. Rhiannon was popular for a while. It would be interesting to know if country hits drove rural names (Jolene, Elvira, Adalida).

    Catholicism and Mormonism both drive certain names, but Mormons get odd sometimes in ways that to not directly invoke Mormonism. Catholics were expected always to use the name of a saint as a first or middle name, although Old Testament names were sometimes popular though not so much as among certain strains of Protestants. There, there were a lot of Calvins, Martins, Luthers and Wesleys though. Freemasons used Hiram a lot, and one oddity of that is that since a disproportionate number of ham radio operators were also Freemasons, any old callbook will have a lot of Hirams, to say nothing of the ARRL being founded by Hiram Percy Maxim.

    Then there are odd names that come up when someone of that name becomes notorious. I kind of doubt that "Ghislane" will become popular, inasmuch as she is popularly thought to be an Israeli spymaster and/or a female pimp. But the blacks could decide it be cool.

    Then there are names that are otherwise unremarkable but which go along with a surname in some way, perhaps a brand name. Mercedes Benz, Harley Davidson, Halsey Taylor, etc. Some people just can not resist.

    Back in the old days (pre-1980s) Roman Catholics were expected to have a saints name as either first or middle name, for the baptism ceremony. In some national Catholic traditions (such as in France) the “Saints Day” associated with a person’s name was noted and very quietly celebrated. The bare remnants of the Roman Catholic Church still remaining have lost most of those rich old traditions, for better or worse.

  97. But is the fact that a huge fraction of Muhammadens are named Muhammad reassuring? Or is it indicative that Islam tends to take up a lot of space in the brains of Muslims?

    Simple answer is because it’s easy; the name has two other variations (deriving from the triliteral root “ḥ-m-d”) Ahmad and Mahmoud, and it’s a well-known name from their holy book. Most people aren’t very creative when it comes to naming their children, so they tend to go with safe options.

    Does Christianity take up a lot of space in the brains of Christians (or Westerners in general) if they name their kids “Michael” or “John” or “Paul” or “Mary” or “Joseph”? I highly doubt it. They’re popular because they’re from the Bible, so parents have a safe source of names for their kids if they’re feeling particularly creative.

    Even with the popularity of Mohammad, Arabs stil tend to give their kids strange names, such as “tree” or “mister.”

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    Nobody names their kids Paul or Mary or Joseph any more. And only a few Michaels and Johns.

    Not fake movie-starry sounding enough.
  98. @Anonymouse
    This is very bad news and Steve and commentators are taking it lightly.

    I had thought that the 2-3-? million Moslem American citizens were integrating themselves into American culture AND FOR THAT REASON would opt for non-religious names for their kids = Hashem for example or Leila (black eyes) - just as sane American negroes do not name their daughters Shitedde.

    Odd that Steve does not supply the numbers behind the listing.

    Hashem (השם) as an example of a non-religious name?

    HTML needs to get a <sarc> tag into its spec, because it’s all getting waaaay too subtle for me.

    • Replies: @Anonymouse
    >Hashem (השם) as an example of a non-religious name?

    I was under the apprehension that Hashem was an Arabic name. There was an Arab gent of that name who used to defend the Arab position against his usual opponent, a Jewish type guy defending the Israeli position on the PBS tv news program. translate.google.com translates Hashem as God. Now I think of it, Hashem in Hebrew should mean The Name, because it is sacriligous to say the name of God השם

    The name of God is Jehova which is written using 4 characters in the torah (hence the Tetragram) but is not spoken out loud when reading. The reader when she comes to that word supplies a euphemism like Adonai (The Lord). In Hebrew the word Jehova is יהוה
  99. @Achmed E. Newman
    Regarding old names becoming new again, does anyone remember any Sylvias? Sylvias are either over 75 years old or little girls under 10. As far as Sylvia's mother goes, well she probably goes back to the 19th century, and that song is just too depressing to even embed here.

    “Sylvia’s mother” was a nicely-constructed Dr hook song when I was a kiddie…

    Sylvia’s mother says “Sylvia’s happy so why don’t you leave her alone?”
    And the operator says
    “Forty cents more, for the next three minutes”

    And Fountains of Wayne were correct when they said Stacy’s Mom has got it goin’ on, but they spelt Stacie wrong.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    “Sylvia’s mother” was a nicely-constructed Dr hook song when I was a kiddie…
     
    By Shel Silverstein, who'd had a crush on a real Sylvia. Not Shel at his best.

    Around the same time another Sylvia inspired another, much better "Sylvia", composed by the "Hocus Pocus" yodeler, and played here by Melody Maker readers' choice for Best Guitarist in the World:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=OznS7X9BOxs

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    I'd never seen that Fountains of Wayne video until just a few years ago. YES she has!

    Your 3 lyric lines alone have got me feeling that depression, Krato. What a Debbie Downer of a song! Maybe Seasons in the Sun has got it beat. There should be an FCC requirement for any radios stations (that are left) to play any AC/DC song immediately after either of those 2 songs to, you know, save the children... and some adults too. Particularly, It's a Long Way to the Top (if you wanna Rock & Roll) would be appropriate.

    Let's just try it, shall we?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7LXpnNKNxJI

    "No, operator, stay on the line... I haven't cut the whole wrist yet ... I may be OK ... stay on for a bit longer though, will you ... WHAT?! 40 cents for 3 minutes?! Who pays roaming anymore - especially on 911? This is bullshit ... No, hang on though ...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-sUXMzkh-jI

    "What?? Oh, 911, right, I forgot. No, I'm good. Sure, yeah, much better, and no, you'll get that 4o cents about the time hell freezes over, bitchez! Rock & Roll!!!
  100. @syonredux

    Parents tend to play it safe with boy’s names, at least until recently.

     

    Maybe that's why the names for boys are so sick-making. Parents aren't playing it safe these days....


    1. Liam
    2. Jackson
    3. Noah
    4. Aiden
    5. Grayson
    6. Caden
    7. Lucas
    8. Elijah
    9. Oliver
    10. Muhammad


    Aiden? Caden? Those sound right out of a soap opera. Grayson? Are there that many Robin/Nightwing fans out there?Liam? Just name your son William and use Liam as a nickname, fergodsakes....

    Only one of them doesn’t sound like one of Cletus and Brandine’s brood…

    If the scene were remade today, I’m sure Muhammad would be included.

  101. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    USA top 10 boys names, 2100:

    1. Jinping
    2. Mohammed
    3. Muhammed
    4. Mohamed
    5. Mohamad
    6. Muhamad
    7. Muhammet
    8. Muhammadu
    9. Mohammet
    10. Mahomet

    You forgot the inevitable illiterate black misspellings. “Mo’Hommed” “Mo-Ha-Med” etc.

  102. Isobel necessary on a bicycle?

  103. @eah
    OT

    Jewish tax leech public defender lobbying to prevent the deportation of a black murderer.

    https://twitter.com/ScottHech/status/1202069514621456384

    Helped youth understand impact of gun violence.

    That’s a good one. “There’s two ways we can do this….”

    I’ll see your OT and raise you a Battalion of Marines. Whose side are they on?

    Monday’s arrest comes as several other Marines stationed at Camp Pendleton are facing human trafficking charges. Six out of two dozen Marines recently pled guilty to human trafficking and drug charges at military court-martials.

    Officials did not release the names of the arrested Marines…

    https://www.foxnews.com/us/marine-arrested-for-alleged-smuggling-after-chinese-woman-found-in-car-trunk

    https://www.foxnews.com/us/16-marines-arrested-human-smuggling-drugs

    • Replies: @eah
    "Two of the migrants admitted they planned to pay more than $8,000 to get into the States and expected to settle in New Jersey and Los Angeles, court documents state."

    Thanks -- I lived in SD for a few years, and at first was shocked at the crime stories coming out of Camp Pendleton ('The Few, the Proud, the Marines'), which generally received only local coverage -- but after a while I got used to it -- after that point, and up until today, nothing surprises me.
  104. @Mike Jones
    So you are going to commit violence based on People of Color having and naming children?

    That says a lot about you



    https://www.ajc.com/blog/luckovich/mike-luckovich-who-the-threat/cMmd1H9PIwyJr3I01katgJ/

    Yessiree, it’s them white working class males ya gotta watch out for. They’re the only real monsters in this world.

    You ass.

  105. This is to go with my Marines post. The Russians do it better:

    https://www.rt.com/russia/475013-fake-russia-finland-border/

  106. @nebulafox
    The Arabs typically include information about both paternal and maternal lineage within the name because that's their tradition dating back to pre-Islamic times where illiterate Bedouin bards memorized the heroic deeds of their ancestors. Other Islamic cultures do not. They might ape the structure-the Malays do-but they won't include all of it.

    I've noticed that this also tends to happen a lot in Spanish-speaking countries.

    A Spanish woman traditionally did not take the name of her husband upon marriage and the children received both names; typically only the father’s is passed on to the third generation.

  107. @Richard of Fallbrook
    Excuse me gentlemen, I need to purchase some ammo...lots of ammo.

    It should be clear to us all by now that Americans’ easy access to firearms and ammunition isn’t going to make a difference when it comes to this. When it comes to immigration policy, you might as well stock up on baseball cards, cake recipes or fire extinguishers for all the difference it makes.

    • Agree: Matra
  108. The single most common name for Muslims worldwide is Mohammad Mohammad. Also the single most common name for NYC taxi drivers. (I checked this years ago myself).

    There are many common ways to spell it, so its popularity is understated by the #10 ranking.

    The taxi driver dataset was also full of Mohamed Muhammed names with two different spellings within the same name.

    Canadian immigration officials at some point informed Indian Sikhs they could not all use Singh as a surname for every male. That policy was shot down however because das raciss.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The taxi driver dataset was also full of Mohamed Muhammed names with two different spellings within the same name.
     
    Mohamed and Mohamud are different names. I knew a Mohamed Mohamud, and asked him.

    Mohamud wasn't his surname, but his grandfather's given name. In between, of course, was his father's name. The Arab, or in this case Somali, equivalent of notable IIIs such as William Henry Gates, Alexander Baldwin, Loudon Wainwright, or Marshall Mathers would be Mohamed Mohamed Mohamed.
  109. Looks like the US has joined the party. I believe that “Muhammad” is the most popular name throughout the rest of the world.

    Ahh globalism!

  110. Isabella Rossillini

    I rest my case.

  111. @Reg Cæsar

    I’m out of touch with baby name trends. I hadn’t known that “Layla” was so popular.
     
    Do the opposite of Arabic (and Hebrew) and ignore the consonants. It's ay-uh, the same as the crazy-popular Kayla, which may or may not be related to the many, many misspellings of Michaela, which is Steven/Stephen on steroids.

    Ay-ee names are even more popular. That can ruin it for a more classically-oriented choice like Haydee/Haïdee which is unfairly declassed by sharing those vowels.

    Remember how Ryan replaced Brian around 1970? Love Story aside, a lot of people drawn to Brian likely hesitated at its apparent faddishness. So they inadvertently jumped on the next fad.

    ...girls’ names tend to go out of fashion when their most prominent examples hit middle age, then come back into fashion as they reach old age.
     
    That depends on the name. Evelyn and Eleanor returned rather quickly, but most ladies are dead before their name returns, at least in America. Florence has been popular in Britain for years, Louise before that. Florence just reëntered the top 1000 last year after a 35-year absence. Louise performs marginally better.

    Florence has been popular in Britain for years, Louise before that. Florence just reëntered the top 1000 last year after a 35-year absence.

    Florence presumably originated from Florence Nightingale, died 1910, a name well-known to all in the medical profession. Nightingale was thus named because she was born in the Italian city of Firenze, known in English as Florence.

    Had she been born in Jeddah, she might have been known as Florence of Arabia.

    The names of my grandmother’s era, such as Agatha, Agnes, Beryl, Daisy, Edith, Gladys, Gertrude, Hazel, Mabel, Adelaide, Harriet, Mavis, Nellie, Phoebe, Violet, Viola, Victoria, Alberta,and Winifred were overused, but are overdue for a revival, especially Harriet after the Tubman movie.

    Constance, Faith, Hope, Charity, Chastity, Prudence, Blanche, Fannie, and Hester, may have a harder time getting in the frame, though Lady Chatterley was a Constance.

    If in doubt it is always safe to name your child after a state ending in -a if a girl, for example Georgia, Dakota, or Virginia, or any other state if a boy such as Mich, Louis, or Tex. Boys may also be Indiana.

    Twins may be West and Virginia, South and Carolina, or Missie and Sippie.

    For boys my tips for the top are Tesla, Archie, Oscar, Bram, Bruno, Frank, Kristoff, and Zeus.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Violet, Viola
     
    Violet (in my family tree) is coming back strong in America. Viola (in my wife's) is not. Viola Davis is popular now, so maybe one is "white" and one is "black", like Jake and DeShawn.

    Constance, Faith, Hope, Charity, Chastity, Prudence...
     
    One Puritan name you won't see return anytime soon is Experience.


    https://slate.com/human-interest/2013/09/puritan-names-lists-of-bizarre-religious-nomenclature-used-by-puritans.html

    Those notorious hyphenated whole-sentence names belonged to Puritans in England, who wanted to stick it to the established church. In New England, where they had freedom of (their own) religion, they stuc, thankfully, to single words. Like Thankful.
    , @danand

    “For boys my tips for the top are Tesla, Archie, Oscar, Bram, Bruno, Frank, Kristoff, and Zeus.”

     
    Mr. Mason, was it an intentional omission not to include Barron in that list?

    https://youtu.be/ilNRG-SgrhM

    For myself the name Barron brings to mind the famed Beechcraft, as Tesla does for battery electric transportation.
  112. @Spangel
    Agree. Layla just seems like a new spelling of Leila, which was an Arabic name anyways. But probably not always indicative that the person who had the name was Muslim or middle eastern. It’s a nice sounding name.

    Eric Clapton composed Layla in late 1970, weeks after the Palestinian Leila Khaled was much in the news for the September 1970 multiple hijackings. I remember wondering, later, if that’s where he got the name. It wasn’t, then, and isn’t, now, a common name outside the Middle East.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leila_Khaled

    • Replies: @Aladdin Sane
    He got it from the old Perso-Arabic folk tale Layla & Majnūn, which tells the story of Majnūn (né Qays), who’s driven mad (“majnūn”) by his forbidden love for Layla, who is married to Ward. This appealed to Clapton because he was enamored of George Harrison’s wife, Pattie Boyd.

    While Majnūn died alone in the desert, Clapton got his Layla, who divorced Harrison, at least for a decade—until they divorced because he was an abusive drunk. Modern times being relatively devoid of high Romance.

  113. @Dtbb
    How many girls names were once boys names? I will start with Evelyn Waugh and Leslie Charteris...

    How many girls names were once boys names? I will start with Evelyn Waugh and Leslie Charteris…

    In England Leslie was always a male name, and Lesley a female name, but the same does not seem to have applied in the US.

    Les (male) is or was an extremely common name in England.

    Les Paul live:

  114. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:

    White Americans strike me as having pretty good taste in baby names: they don’t jump on some new celebrity’s name, they pick their grandpa’s favorite FM track for their daughter’s name.

    The boys’ list is pretty bad.

    Liam is Irish for William, and a lot of these people naming their boys Liam are going to have little or no Irish roots. It’s like naming them Guillaume or Guillermo.

    Using surnames as first names is an upper crust affectation. Upper class WASP types would use typically use surnames of relations as first names, not random surnames they thought sounded good. Most of these people naming their sons “Jackson” don’t have Jacksons in their family. Moreover, Jackson is a Scots-Irish name and generally wasn’t an upper class WASP name that would frequently end up as a first name.

    Same deal with Grayson and Lucas, which are surnames, or also in the case of Lucas just the Latin version of Luke. Luke is perfectly serviceable as the English version of Lucas.

    Caden is basically a made up name.

    Aiden is a very Irish name that traditionally isn’t even common among Irish Americans, and I don’t think that common among Irish either. And most of the people naming their sons Aiden probably don’t even know where the name comes from. They are probably the same people that think “Jaden” is a cool name.

  115. @eah
    OT

    Jewish tax leech public defender lobbying to prevent the deportation of a black murderer.

    https://twitter.com/ScottHech/status/1202069514621456384

    OT

    Sexually aberrant Jewish law professor mentions Trump’s minor son at the bogus impeachment hearings (wtf? — and why is she testifying?), gets reprimanded by a congressman.

    Perhaps some are aware that TruNews put out a video uproariously titled Jew Coup: Seditious Jews Orchestrating Trump Impeachment Lynching, where they basically just reviewed, via news headlines/stories, all the Jews pushing this impeachment farce (there are a lot of them) — initially available on JewYouTube, it was quickly yanked — anyone interested can watch it here –> link

  116. There was a news item recently about China enlisting AI to solve the easiest problem computing has ever faced: Identifying potential terrorists. Let’s see, first on the list is Muhammad– DING DING DING we have a terrorist!

  117. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous
    Anti-Whites don't reject ethnic nationalism in general, only for Whites.

    Non-Whites get the Privilege of self preference and preservation ('racism'), borders, homogeneity.

    A 100% Black or Asian country/population is exempt from mass immigration and assimilation. They are already 'diverse enough'.

    Diversity is a strength really says 'White people are a weakness'.

    When the 90% of the world we call 'minorities' becomes 100%, we'll be 'diverse enough'.

    We're not fixing the 'race' problem, we're fixing the 'WHITE' problem.

    Anywhere outside the West, this would be called G...

    Anti-Whites don’t reject ethnic nationalism in general, only for Whites.

    But in moving to the West, their children become deracinated globians. They attack ‘white nationalism’ to gain access to the West. They hate defensive ‘white nationalism’ more than offensive Western neo-imperialism because their #1 priority is Entry to the West than

    Defense of My Home-Nation

    . How many Muslim-Americans get all worked up about what the West has done to the Middle East? Not much protest there. But they do get all worked up about ‘white nationalists’ who want to defend the West from further invasion.

    Their anti-white antics is just cover for the shame that they prefer white-everything over their own kind.

  118. @YetAnotherAnon
    Mercedes IS a girl's name, a Spanish one. It's the equivalent (well, the plural) of the old Puritan name Mercy.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mar%C3%ADa_de_las_Mercedes


    But Mohammed in the top ten is the proverbial cloud no bigger than a man's hand.


    https://biblehub.com/1_kings/18-44.htm

    Mercedes IS a girl’s name, a Spanish one. It’s the equivalent (well, the plural) of the old Puritan name Mercy.

    Mercedes was the name of the daughter of one of Gottlieb Daimler’s business partners.

  119. There was a huge trend in the mid-late 70s of naming girls “Jessica.” I’ve wondered whether it was inspired by actress Jessica Lange, or by the Allman Brothers song by that name.

  120. I never would have guessed that any of those names were top 10 baby girl names. I guess it’s a sign of the times. When I think of female names I tend to think of family names like Elizabeth or Katherine. Victoria is one of my favorite female names because often the hottest girl in school was named victoria. Sarah is a pretty popular name that tends to also be Arabic and jewish, I’m surprised aliyah is above that. Aliyah sounds more like an African American name to me. Olivia is a fine name, but Sofia and Emma sound like even bigger old lady names than Betty and Rose. Ava, aria, and Mia sound like the worst names hipster parents could come up with. Isabella and Amelia are fine names, but I never would have guessed in a million years that the were top 10 names. This is probably a consequence of the internet and top 10 name lists. Hipster parents want to name their babies something obscure and not on a top 10 list. Thus top 10 lists become crowded out by the likes of Mia, or aria, or Riley. Riley is a good name for a boy, or a good unisex middle name, but is a bad first name for a girl. These names are perplexing, and to me this says that black people and insufferable hipsters are mostly the ones having children.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Yes, I'd imagine that there are Arab names that have their equivalents in Christendom due to overlap in the Bible. Lebanese Christians like Danny Thomas don't have much trouble coming up with names that honor their own heritage while being spellable to average Americans.
  121. @Jonathan Mason
    As Steve points out, Isabella is a famous Hispanic name, but several of the other names here have a Hispanic tinge to them.

    For example Mia can be a diminutive of the Spanish name Maria (Mary) and is also the abbreviation for the world's number one airport for Hispanics.

    Ava is a variation on Eve, a Biblical name for the first woman.

    Emma is a name from Jane Austen, but also the name of actresses Emma Thompson and Emma Watson, of Harry Potter fame. (Perhaps we will soon see Potter as a popular name for boys.)

    Aria is an interesting one as arias have been mainly the interest of opera fans, but the word is related to 'air' and is synonymous with Melody. It is also a Jewish name, meaning 'lion(ess)'.

    Riley is an interesting one, being the name of an extinct British car:

    https://car-from-uk.com/ebay/carphotos/full/ebay420869.jpg

    and the name of an old music call comedy act about an elderly Irish woman played by a man. But no relation to Bill O'Reilly.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpyNzwEi7Po

    Aria, spelled Arya, is the name of a major character from Game of Thrones.

  122. White suburban southerners are terrible about giving their kids low-class names that are almost as bad as ghetto names. Girls get tomboy names: Madison, Riley, Taylor, Courtney, Cory, Riley, Tyler, Ensley etc. They also love to insert y’s in the place of i’s. Boys get names reminiscent of medieval occupations: Stone, Mason, Tanner, Asher, Hunter, Carter, Cooper etc. “Blaze” is also surprisingly common among both boys and girls.

    • Replies: @Lot
    “ White suburban southerners are terrible about giving their kids low-class names that are almost as bad as ghetto names. Girls get tomboy names: Madison, Riley, Taylor, Courtney, Cory, Riley, Tyler, Ensley etc. They also love to insert y’s in the place of i’s. Boys get names reminiscent of medieval occupations: Stone, Mason, Tanner, Asher, Hunter, Carter, Cooper ”

    I knew kids with nearly all those names in the suburban midwest. Multiple Courtneys, Masons and Hunters. The exceptions are Ensley, Stone, and Asher. And Tyler and Taylor were boys.

    I think Asher is more of a 80s NE Jewish name.
    , @RadicalCenter
    Not my style, but don't see how they're "low class" at all. Perhaps you feel that you are somehow superior to southern whites? Otherwise, why the condescension and use of the term "low class" for perfectly normal names?

    As for Blaze, nah.
  123. @Jonathan Mason

    Florence has been popular in Britain for years, Louise before that. Florence just reëntered the top 1000 last year after a 35-year absence.
     
    Florence presumably originated from Florence Nightingale, died 1910, a name well-known to all in the medical profession. Nightingale was thus named because she was born in the Italian city of Firenze, known in English as Florence.

    Had she been born in Jeddah, she might have been known as Florence of Arabia.

    The names of my grandmother's era, such as Agatha, Agnes, Beryl, Daisy, Edith, Gladys, Gertrude, Hazel, Mabel, Adelaide, Harriet, Mavis, Nellie, Phoebe, Violet, Viola, Victoria, Alberta,and Winifred were overused, but are overdue for a revival, especially Harriet after the Tubman movie.

    Constance, Faith, Hope, Charity, Chastity, Prudence, Blanche, Fannie, and Hester, may have a harder time getting in the frame, though Lady Chatterley was a Constance.

    If in doubt it is always safe to name your child after a state ending in -a if a girl, for example Georgia, Dakota, or Virginia, or any other state if a boy such as Mich, Louis, or Tex. Boys may also be Indiana.

    Twins may be West and Virginia, South and Carolina, or Missie and Sippie.

    For boys my tips for the top are Tesla, Archie, Oscar, Bram, Bruno, Frank, Kristoff, and Zeus.

    Violet, Viola

    Violet (in my family tree) is coming back strong in America. Viola (in my wife’s) is not. Viola Davis is popular now, so maybe one is “white” and one is “black”, like Jake and DeShawn.

    Constance, Faith, Hope, Charity, Chastity, Prudence…

    One Puritan name you won’t see return anytime soon is Experience.

    https://slate.com/human-interest/2013/09/puritan-names-lists-of-bizarre-religious-nomenclature-used-by-puritans.html

    Those notorious hyphenated whole-sentence names belonged to Puritans in England, who wanted to stick it to the established church. In New England, where they had freedom of (their own) religion, they stuc, thankfully, to single words. Like Thankful.

  124. @Achmed E. Newman
    "Mohammad" just goes along with the 15 y/o trend for boys names. Any old last name, not just those of famous men, may be used as a first name now: Connor, Tanner, Benson, Carlin, Tyler, Hays, Paxton, and so on. I assume Mohammad was the prophet's last name, although the Moslems don't seem to cuss enough for me to find out his first name or middle initial. Is it like Madonna, Cher, Sting, or The Edge?

    At least it can be shortened to Moe to save time. If you're neither towel-head nor beaner, yet still want to name your son after a man of the cloth, there's always the old stand-by, Amos Moses.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n7GyLr7Cz2g

    Connor, Tanner, Benson, Carlin, Tyler, Hays, Paxton, and so on.

    I can’t stand that! I love that “Sophia” is number 1, though.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Yeah, I like that one too. There are 3 big "E" names now for the girls - Emma, Etta, and Ellie/Ella. New parents: Name your girls with names starting with D or higher in the alphabet - get ahead of the game.
  125. @Calvin Hobbes
    https://www.thebump.com/b/aaliyah-baby-name

    “Aaliyah is a variation of the name Aliyah, which means “rising” in Hebrew and “exalted or lofty” in Arabic. Other variations include Alia, Aleah, Aleia, Alya and Aliyya. (The latter is sometimes considered the feminine form of Ali, one of the 99 names of Allah in Islam.) Aaliyah is the most popular and preferred spelling of this name—and indelibly connected to hip-hop singer Aaliyah, who died in a plane crash in 2001 at age 22.“

    So, a sort-of Hebrew, sort-of Arabic name with a little creative spelling. I was thinking every Aaliyah baby now would be black, but maybe there are a few Semitic baby Aaliyahs. The graph at the link shows there were a few Aaliyahs at the start of the time-line in 1976, but then the name takes off about 1994.

    I learned a few fun-facts about hip-hop singer Aaliyah from Wikipedia. Illegally married to R. Kelly (who seems to keep getting into trouble involving underage girls) at age 15. The plane crash that killed her has its own Wikipedia page

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_Aaliyah

    and was a comically stupid fiasco. Unlicensed coke head pilot who didn’t want to take off because Aaliyah and her entourage had overloaded the Cessna by 700 pounds and an extra passenger. Passengers insist he take off anyway.

    “….Aaliyah and her entourage had overloaded the Cessna by 700 pounds and an extra passenger. Passengers insist he take off anyway.”

    Looks like the pilot got the last laugh…..

  126. @Jonathan Mason

    Florence has been popular in Britain for years, Louise before that. Florence just reëntered the top 1000 last year after a 35-year absence.
     
    Florence presumably originated from Florence Nightingale, died 1910, a name well-known to all in the medical profession. Nightingale was thus named because she was born in the Italian city of Firenze, known in English as Florence.

    Had she been born in Jeddah, she might have been known as Florence of Arabia.

    The names of my grandmother's era, such as Agatha, Agnes, Beryl, Daisy, Edith, Gladys, Gertrude, Hazel, Mabel, Adelaide, Harriet, Mavis, Nellie, Phoebe, Violet, Viola, Victoria, Alberta,and Winifred were overused, but are overdue for a revival, especially Harriet after the Tubman movie.

    Constance, Faith, Hope, Charity, Chastity, Prudence, Blanche, Fannie, and Hester, may have a harder time getting in the frame, though Lady Chatterley was a Constance.

    If in doubt it is always safe to name your child after a state ending in -a if a girl, for example Georgia, Dakota, or Virginia, or any other state if a boy such as Mich, Louis, or Tex. Boys may also be Indiana.

    Twins may be West and Virginia, South and Carolina, or Missie and Sippie.

    For boys my tips for the top are Tesla, Archie, Oscar, Bram, Bruno, Frank, Kristoff, and Zeus.

    “For boys my tips for the top are Tesla, Archie, Oscar, Bram, Bruno, Frank, Kristoff, and Zeus.”

    Mr. Mason, was it an intentional omission not to include Barron in that list?

    For myself the name Barron brings to mind the famed Beechcraft, as Tesla does for battery electric transportation.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Beech twins were Duchess, Duke, Baron and Queen/King Air. There was also the original round engine Twin Beech and a Twin Bonanza.
  127. @eah
    OT

    Jewish tax leech public defender lobbying to prevent the deportation of a black murderer.

    https://twitter.com/ScottHech/status/1202069514621456384

    I wonder where the association of the name “Tyrone” with blacks comes from. It’s originally an Irish name, as far as I remember. There’s even a county in Ireland called Tyrone.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I wonder where the association of the name “Tyrone” with blacks comes from.
     
    Tyrone is an Irish place name, as you say. Tyrone Power was a swashbuckling Hollywood movie star (or dynasty).
  128. @Kratoklastes
    "Sylvia's mother" was a nicely-constructed Dr hook song when I was a kiddie...

    Sylvia's mother says "Sylvia's happy so why don't you leave her alone?"
    And the operator says
    "Forty cents more, for the next three minutes"
     
    And Fountains of Wayne were correct when they said Stacy's Mom has got it goin' on, but they spelt Stacie wrong.

    “Sylvia’s mother” was a nicely-constructed Dr hook song when I was a kiddie…

    By Shel Silverstein, who’d had a crush on a real Sylvia. Not Shel at his best.

    Around the same time another Sylvia inspired another, much better “Sylvia”, composed by the “Hocus Pocus” yodeler, and played here by Melody Maker readers’ choice for Best Guitarist in the World:

  129. @Hypnotoad666
    Let's talk about her hair.

    I’d love to make it all crusty?

  130. @Lot
    The single most common name for Muslims worldwide is Mohammad Mohammad. Also the single most common name for NYC taxi drivers. (I checked this years ago myself).

    There are many common ways to spell it, so its popularity is understated by the #10 ranking.

    The taxi driver dataset was also full of Mohamed Muhammed names with two different spellings within the same name.

    Canadian immigration officials at some point informed Indian Sikhs they could not all use Singh as a surname for every male. That policy was shot down however because das raciss.

    The taxi driver dataset was also full of Mohamed Muhammed names with two different spellings within the same name.

    Mohamed and Mohamud are different names. I knew a Mohamed Mohamud, and asked him.

    Mohamud wasn’t his surname, but his grandfather’s given name. In between, of course, was his father’s name. The Arab, or in this case Somali, equivalent of notable IIIs such as William Henry Gates, Alexander Baldwin, Loudon Wainwright, or Marshall Mathers would be Mohamed Mohamed Mohamed.

  131. @RadicalCenter
    Good for the Chinese. They are not naïve schmucks and will not let Islam gain more of a foothold there.

    Correct.

    Our Han bros are leading the way in fighting back against the Ummah.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    They're not my brothers and I don't trust them as far as I can throw them. Just giving them credit for not being terminally naïve about Islam like our rulers are.
  132. @Kratoklastes
    Hashem (השם) as an example of a non-religious name?

    HTML needs to get a <sarc> tag into its spec, because it's all getting waaaay too subtle for me.

    >Hashem (השם) as an example of a non-religious name?

    I was under the apprehension that Hashem was an Arabic name. There was an Arab gent of that name who used to defend the Arab position against his usual opponent, a Jewish type guy defending the Israeli position on the PBS tv news program. translate.google.com translates Hashem as God. Now I think of it, Hashem in Hebrew should mean The Name, because it is sacriligous to say the name of God השם

    The name of God is Jehova which is written using 4 characters in the torah (hence the Tetragram) but is not spoken out loud when reading. The reader when she comes to that word supplies a euphemism like Adonai (The Lord). In Hebrew the word Jehova is יהוה

  133. @Hans
    Stop With the Golems, Already! - https://www.takimag.com/article/stop-with-the-golems-already/

    Muslim terrorists murdered twenty Filipino Christians as they attended services in their church two months ago, and do you recall the response from local Muslim leaders? Was it “We must address the anti-Christian bigotry in our community?” Or “We must stand in solidarity with our Christian countrymen?” Nope. It was “Well, to stop us from killing more Christians, let us carve a Muslim-only autonomous region in the country.” That’s literally like whites responding to the New Zealand massacre by saying, “Well, the solution is to keep New Zealand white and Christian. If we don’t have to mix, we won’t have any more race- or religion-based mass shootings.”

    How do you think the media would have responded to that? Or the U.N.? Or most Western politicians? But in fact, the world response (and the response from media organs like CNN and the BBC) to the Muzz demand was essentially “Yes! Yes! Give them an autonomous region, so that they needn’t mix with those damn Christians.”...

    This is a point that bears repeating: A white Christian kills a bunch of Muslims in New Zealand, and the response is “More diversity! More mixing! Force them damn intolerant whiteys to get along, or jail their asses as racists.” Muslims in the Philippines massacre a bunch of Christians, and the response is “Let the Muslims be autonomous! Let them live free of mixing, free of diversity! Let them never have to see another Christian again!”

    Jews should be particularly afraid of their new Islamic golems. Muzzies might not be smarter than Jews, but they’re stronger and more numerous, and their level of “batshit crazy” is off the charts. Of all the golems the Hebraic high-IQ dunces have created—from the communist state they helped birth in 1917, which later turned on them, to the integration craze they helped create here in the U.S., which now forces them to flee public schools—the Muzz golem has the potential to be the most destructive one yet.

    In a perfect world, these rabbinical Rain Men would finally get the fuck over the Holocaust and end their war of hostility against the West. They’d see that whites are no longer the enemy, but indeed the opposite. They’d see that importing foreign mud to mold golem after golem in traditionally white regions of the U.S. is bad strategy.

    Your witty post and I like the word “Muzz”.

  134. @PiltdownMan
    Eric Clapton composed Layla in late 1970, weeks after the Palestinian Leila Khaled was much in the news for the September 1970 multiple hijackings. I remember wondering, later, if that’s where he got the name. It wasn’t, then, and isn’t, now, a common name outside the Middle East.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leila_Khaled


    https://images-haarets-co-il.cdn.ampproject.org/i/s/images.haarets.co.il/image/fetch/w_1482,h_856,x_24,y_117,c_crop,g_north_west/w_609,h_343,q_auto,c_fill,f_auto/fl_any_format.preserve_transparency.progressive:none/https://www.haaretz.com/polopoly_fs/1.5687059.1515442434!/image/1018316866.jpg

    He got it from the old Perso-Arabic folk tale Layla & Majnūn, which tells the story of Majnūn (né Qays), who’s driven mad (“majnūn”) by his forbidden love for Layla, who is married to Ward. This appealed to Clapton because he was enamored of George Harrison’s wife, Pattie Boyd.

    While Majnūn died alone in the desert, Clapton got his Layla, who divorced Harrison, at least for a decade—until they divorced because he was an abusive drunk. Modern times being relatively devoid of high Romance.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    Makes sense. I'd heard about the Patty Boyd story, and Majnun-Leila is probably the best known Eastern folk tale outside of the Arabian Nights.

    Leila Khaled was the world's most notorious Palestinian militant/hijacker after her first exploit in 1969, and the spectacular quadruple hijacking in 1970 in the Jordanian desert started with her commandeering a plane on September 6th, three days before Clapton went into the recording studio. I do remember that she was all over the news, not least because she was young and female.

    I see all that was just coincidence and spurious correlation.
  135. @jon
    From the article:

    Luke and Anakin from the "Skywalker" saga are down.
     
    Was that really a thing? Anakin? Are there really a bunch of Anakins out there? Naming your kid after Luke is one thing - at least that is just a regular name that happened to also be a Star Wars character - but Anakin? Was that even a name that existed before Star Wars? I always assumed Lucas made it up.

    Well, I mean, .. the 1st lady a few years back was named after that furry creature from the same movie … or … am I mis-remembering .. or reading too many Conservative web sites?

  136. @Kratoklastes
    "Sylvia's mother" was a nicely-constructed Dr hook song when I was a kiddie...

    Sylvia's mother says "Sylvia's happy so why don't you leave her alone?"
    And the operator says
    "Forty cents more, for the next three minutes"
     
    And Fountains of Wayne were correct when they said Stacy's Mom has got it goin' on, but they spelt Stacie wrong.

    I’d never seen that Fountains of Wayne video until just a few years ago. YES she has!

    Your 3 lyric lines alone have got me feeling that depression, Krato. What a Debbie Downer of a song! Maybe Seasons in the Sun has got it beat. There should be an FCC requirement for any radios stations (that are left) to play any AC/DC song immediately after either of those 2 songs to, you know, save the children… and some adults too. Particularly, It’s a Long Way to the Top (if you wanna Rock & Roll) would be appropriate.

    Let’s just try it, shall we?

    “No, operator, stay on the line… I haven’t cut the whole wrist yet … I may be OK … stay on for a bit longer though, will you … WHAT?! 40 cents for 3 minutes?! Who pays roaming anymore – especially on 911? This is bullshit … No, hang on though …

    “What?? Oh, 911, right, I forgot. No, I’m good. Sure, yeah, much better, and no, you’ll get that 4o cents about the time hell freezes over, bitchez! Rock & Roll!!!

  137. @al-Gharaniq

    But is the fact that a huge fraction of Muhammadens are named Muhammad reassuring? Or is it indicative that Islam tends to take up a lot of space in the brains of Muslims?
     
    Simple answer is because it's easy; the name has two other variations (deriving from the triliteral root "ḥ-m-d") Ahmad and Mahmoud, and it's a well-known name from their holy book. Most people aren't very creative when it comes to naming their children, so they tend to go with safe options.

    Does Christianity take up a lot of space in the brains of Christians (or Westerners in general) if they name their kids "Michael" or "John" or "Paul" or "Mary" or "Joseph"? I highly doubt it. They're popular because they're from the Bible, so parents have a safe source of names for their kids if they're feeling particularly creative.

    Even with the popularity of Mohammad, Arabs stil tend to give their kids strange names, such as "tree" or "mister."

    Nobody names their kids Paul or Mary or Joseph any more. And only a few Michaels and Johns.

    Not fake movie-starry sounding enough.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Nobody names their kids Paul or Mary or Joseph any more. And only a few Michaels and Johns.
     
    In England first names used to be, and probably still are for many people, referred to as "Christian names", however the term is probably falling out of favor for official purposes, and indeed Christian names from the Bible and the saints are falling out of favor too, in English speaking countries.

    My step-daughter is 11 and named Maria, but she prefers to be called Mary.

    In Spanish-speaking countries the equivalent names, Pablo, Jose, Miguel, and Maria are still pretty common.

    In some countries like France and Sweden there are some legal restrictions on what names may be chosen and how they are spelled.
    , @Old Prude
    Nailed it again O-wag.
  138. 19 years ago i named one of my twin daughters samantha not hearing the name much growing up other than on bewitched i thought it wasnt too common.
    I didnt know about the slutty sam on sex and the city.Sammys everywhere i turn…still like the name though.
    http://Www.lawrencepoints.com

  139. @obwandiyag
    Here's what happened.

    In the 60s, everybody was told they had to be "creative." Whether they were or not. (Before that, other things, more substantive, important things, things like tradition and family heritage held sway.)

    So then, in the 60s and thereafter everybody got creative with the naming. Only, they weren't creative, and so they all got creative in exactly the same way.

    Thus, the absolute deluge of Jasons and Joshes and Jeremies, the Ians and the Shawns and the Shawnas, the Nicoles and Ericas and Danielles.

    All names that sound creative to non-creative people but really aren't.

    I'll tell you what's creative. Mildred. Ethel. Bertha.

    Hispanics are much better than Americans at naming. They give their children all sorts of interesting and unusual, but not made-up, names, from history, (Nelson), myth (Hector), or just plain good taste (Berthe).

    Here's a suggestion. Name your children after a beloved ancestor. Grandma Harriet. Uncle Elmer. That's actually what you are supposed to do. If you are a real American human being that has a real family, that is, and not some holographic simulacrum thereof.

    Bertha. That one’s got a lot of bad connotations. I bet nobody here but the Dead Heads can even picture a Bertha with a Body Mass Index under 45.

    That’s why, if you please,
    I am on my bended knees.
    Berth don’t you come around here,
    anymore.

    Jerry plays a wonderful 2 minute solo at 02:50 in … be patient!

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Bertha. That one’s got a lot of bad connotations.
     
    Big Bertha, was a German siege howitzer built by Krupp AG and fielded by the Imperial German Army from 1914 to 1918. The M-Gerät had a 42-centimetre calibre barrel, making it one of the largest artillery pieces ever fielded.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Bertha. That one’s got a lot of bad connotations. I bet nobody here but the Dead Heads can even picture a Bertha with a Body Mass Index under 45.
     
    See my reply to Jonathan. My next daughter will be a Bertha.

    This was a very popular name 125 years ago, when people were more cognizant of history. A young Roberta who sailed on the Titanic preferred to go by the more fashionable (and feminine) Bertha.

    If we don't like the name today, the fault is with us, not the name.

    I'm surprised you didn't link to the Grateful Dead tune. Not on your 350-strong playlist? But, as you said, I prefer still photos, and here's one of the fetching young Barbara Hershey in her Corman days:


    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/xz0AAOSw5UZY~qoS/s-l400.jpg

    Anyone care to estimate this Bertha's BMI?

  140. @George
    Maybe SFGATE is full of malarkey (Biden-ism)? FWIW I did not see a release of 2019 data by the actually SS administration. Who ya gonna trust Good House Keeping (Cis white females) or SFGate (woke gays + nerds and homeless all devoted to creating obstructions to residential real estate development)

    The Most Popular Baby Names of 2019 so Far

    Liam
    Noah
    William
    James
    Oliver
    Benjamin
    Elijah
    Lucas
    Mason
    Logan

    https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/life/parenting/g25336854/most-popular-baby-names-2019/

    Often the statistics for the Prophet's name, peace be onto him, are consolidated across multiple spellings.

    They get them from movies and TV.

    Liam is Liam Neeson
    Noah is probably Noah Centineo

    Oliver Hudson?
    Benjamin Button, maybe?
    Elijah is Elijah Wood

    Mason Dye maybe?

    Logan is Wolverine

  141. @syonredux
    RE: Choosing names for a baby,

    My advice is simple: the older, the better. So, look to the Bible , Graeco-Roman classics and traditional Anglo names:

    Boys: John, James, David, Alexander, Matthew, Joshua, Philip, Mark, Alexander, Richard, Robert, Edward, etc

    Girls: Sarah, Julia, Rebecca, Rachel, Alexandra, Elizabeth, Jane, Katharine, etc.

    My advice: give the kid a real name, not a nickname.

    I’m amazed by how many of my contemporaries have ignored this rule. You can always immediately start calling the child by the desired nickname if you like, but at least down the road your adult offspring will have the opportunity to use a more grown-up and dignified name if he or she chooses.

  142. Whatever happened to Susan and Jane and Karen? Those were big ones for girls in my youth. And John and Michael and Richard for boys.

    • Replies: @Clyde

    Whatever happened to Susan and Jane and Karen? Those were big ones for girls in my youth. And John and Michael and Richard for boys.
     
    Too pedestrian-ordinary. The new crop of popular boys an girls names are the SWPL equivalents of the black world's Shaniquas. Like SWPL's Noah, even though it is honest and Biblical. I knew no Noahs when I was little except for Noah's Ark.
  143. @the one they call Desanex
    Funly enough, Riley cars had Bendix brakes, and William Bendix got his big break when he was chosen to star in the American TV series The Life of Riley.
    https://wpr-public.s3.amazonaws.com/wprorg/styles/resp_orig_custom_user_narrow_1x/s3/shows/Life%20of%20Riley.jpg?itok=c5HafkRZ&timestamp=1570805128

    William Bendix. Probably the only person I ever met. I was only two years old at the time.

  144. @RadicalCenter
    Good for the Chinese. They are not naïve schmucks and will not let Islam gain more of a foothold there.

    Good for the Chinese. They are not naïve schmucks and will not let Islam gain more of a foothold there.

    “Hapless schmuck” is the phrase you want and can look this up to confirm.

    • LOL: RadicalCenter
  145. @MBlanc46
    Whatever happened to Susan and Jane and Karen? Those were big ones for girls in my youth. And John and Michael and Richard for boys.

    Whatever happened to Susan and Jane and Karen? Those were big ones for girls in my youth. And John and Michael and Richard for boys.

    Too pedestrian-ordinary. The new crop of popular boys an girls names are the SWPL equivalents of the black world’s Shaniquas. Like SWPL’s Noah, even though it is honest and Biblical. I knew no Noahs when I was little except for Noah’s Ark.

  146. @Kyle
    I never would have guessed that any of those names were top 10 baby girl names. I guess it’s a sign of the times. When I think of female names I tend to think of family names like Elizabeth or Katherine. Victoria is one of my favorite female names because often the hottest girl in school was named victoria. Sarah is a pretty popular name that tends to also be Arabic and jewish, I’m surprised aliyah is above that. Aliyah sounds more like an African American name to me. Olivia is a fine name, but Sofia and Emma sound like even bigger old lady names than Betty and Rose. Ava, aria, and Mia sound like the worst names hipster parents could come up with. Isabella and Amelia are fine names, but I never would have guessed in a million years that the were top 10 names. This is probably a consequence of the internet and top 10 name lists. Hipster parents want to name their babies something obscure and not on a top 10 list. Thus top 10 lists become crowded out by the likes of Mia, or aria, or Riley. Riley is a good name for a boy, or a good unisex middle name, but is a bad first name for a girl. These names are perplexing, and to me this says that black people and insufferable hipsters are mostly the ones having children.

    Yes, I’d imagine that there are Arab names that have their equivalents in Christendom due to overlap in the Bible. Lebanese Christians like Danny Thomas don’t have much trouble coming up with names that honor their own heritage while being spellable to average Americans.

  147. @Anonymouse
    This is very bad news and Steve and commentators are taking it lightly.

    I had thought that the 2-3-? million Moslem American citizens were integrating themselves into American culture AND FOR THAT REASON would opt for non-religious names for their kids = Hashem for example or Leila (black eyes) - just as sane American negroes do not name their daughters Shitedde.

    Odd that Steve does not supply the numbers behind the listing.

    What on Earth gave you the idea that Muslim immigrants are integrating into American culture?

  148. @Achmed E. Newman
    Regarding old names becoming new again, does anyone remember any Sylvias? Sylvias are either over 75 years old or little girls under 10. As far as Sylvia's mother goes, well she probably goes back to the 19th century, and that song is just too depressing to even embed here.

    What about the name Lillian?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Ditto, XYZ. Coming back after most of a century.
  149. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Remember, there are a lot of African-Americans who tend to give their offspring Arabic names, Muhammad and Aaliyah being no exception (e.g. NE's WR Muhammad Sunu, as one example). Aaliyah was an African-American hip hop star who was related to legendary soul artist Gladys Knight.

    Remember, there are a lot of African-Americans who tend to give their offspring Arabic names, Muhammad and Aaliyah…

    The baby name Aaliyah is a reference to the black R&B singer. Sure, the name also has Arabic/Hebrew history, but that’s really irrelevant to it’s modern use.

    Similarly with the name Beyonce. That’s a reference to the famous R&B singer, not the old Franco French roots of the name.

  150. @Aladdin Sane
    He got it from the old Perso-Arabic folk tale Layla & Majnūn, which tells the story of Majnūn (né Qays), who’s driven mad (“majnūn”) by his forbidden love for Layla, who is married to Ward. This appealed to Clapton because he was enamored of George Harrison’s wife, Pattie Boyd.

    While Majnūn died alone in the desert, Clapton got his Layla, who divorced Harrison, at least for a decade—until they divorced because he was an abusive drunk. Modern times being relatively devoid of high Romance.

    Makes sense. I’d heard about the Patty Boyd story, and Majnun-Leila is probably the best known Eastern folk tale outside of the Arabian Nights.

    Leila Khaled was the world’s most notorious Palestinian militant/hijacker after her first exploit in 1969, and the spectacular quadruple hijacking in 1970 in the Jordanian desert started with her commandeering a plane on September 6th, three days before Clapton went into the recording studio. I do remember that she was all over the news, not least because she was young and female.

    I see all that was just coincidence and spurious correlation.

  151. @Roger Sweeny
    Layla is actually a Persian name. Clapton said he took it from a very old Persian poem.

    Could be.

    Arabs, Persians enjoy what is enjoyable.

    Unlike Jew who needs to originate all.

    https://www.behindthename.com/name/layla

    5ds

  152. @Owen C.
    I wonder where the association of the name "Tyrone" with blacks comes from. It's originally an Irish name, as far as I remember. There's even a county in Ireland called Tyrone.

    I wonder where the association of the name “Tyrone” with blacks comes from.

    Tyrone is an Irish place name, as you say. Tyrone Power was a swashbuckling Hollywood movie star (or dynasty).

  153. @S. Anonyia
    White suburban southerners are terrible about giving their kids low-class names that are almost as bad as ghetto names. Girls get tomboy names: Madison, Riley, Taylor, Courtney, Cory, Riley, Tyler, Ensley etc. They also love to insert y’s in the place of i’s. Boys get names reminiscent of medieval occupations: Stone, Mason, Tanner, Asher, Hunter, Carter, Cooper etc. “Blaze” is also surprisingly common among both boys and girls.

    “ White suburban southerners are terrible about giving their kids low-class names that are almost as bad as ghetto names. Girls get tomboy names: Madison, Riley, Taylor, Courtney, Cory, Riley, Tyler, Ensley etc. They also love to insert y’s in the place of i’s. Boys get names reminiscent of medieval occupations: Stone, Mason, Tanner, Asher, Hunter, Carter, Cooper ”

    I knew kids with nearly all those names in the suburban midwest. Multiple Courtneys, Masons and Hunters. The exceptions are Ensley, Stone, and Asher. And Tyler and Taylor were boys.

    I think Asher is more of a 80s NE Jewish name.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Arthur Asher Miller, 1915-2005.

    Playwright, radical, and last husband of Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962).

    Not necessarily in that order.
  154. @Achmed E. Newman
    Bertha. That one's got a lot of bad connotations. I bet nobody here but the Dead Heads can even picture a Bertha with a Body Mass Index under 45.

    That's why, if you please,
    I am on my bended knees.
    Berth don't you come around here,
    anymore.

    Jerry plays a wonderful 2 minute solo at 02:50 in ... be patient!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V72qQhm12K8

    Bertha. That one’s got a lot of bad connotations.

    Big Bertha, was a German siege howitzer built by Krupp AG and fielded by the Imperial German Army from 1914 to 1918. The M-Gerät had a 42-centimetre calibre barrel, making it one of the largest artillery pieces ever fielded.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Big Bertha, was a German siege howitzer built by Krupp AG and fielded by the Imperial German Army from 1914 to 1918.
     
    Named for the boss's daughter. It sounds even worse in German, dicke Bertha.

    But its namesake didn't look bad at all, for a German.

    https://images.fineartamerica.com/images-medium-large-5/bertha-krupp-daughter-of-friedrich-mary-evans-picture-library.jpg

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51HJGTHCSSL._SX319_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

  155. @obwandiyag
    Nobody names their kids Paul or Mary or Joseph any more. And only a few Michaels and Johns.

    Not fake movie-starry sounding enough.

    Nobody names their kids Paul or Mary or Joseph any more. And only a few Michaels and Johns.

    In England first names used to be, and probably still are for many people, referred to as “Christian names”, however the term is probably falling out of favor for official purposes, and indeed Christian names from the Bible and the saints are falling out of favor too, in English speaking countries.

    My step-daughter is 11 and named Maria, but she prefers to be called Mary.

    In Spanish-speaking countries the equivalent names, Pablo, Jose, Miguel, and Maria are still pretty common.

    In some countries like France and Sweden there are some legal restrictions on what names may be chosen and how they are spelled.

    • Replies: @Pierre de Craon

    … the term [Christian names] is probably falling out of favor for official purposes, and indeed Christian names from the Bible and the saints are falling out of favor too, in English speaking countries.
     
    Indeed. The phenomenon is called Christophobia, and the naming pattern that is the subject of Steve's article is no more and no less than a manifestation of Christophobia's hard-core version. So, too, is the unconcealed exultation in the soi-disant reporting of that pattern.

    Steve's response, unfortunately, is indicative of his own squishy preference for a society that retains little more than a Christian veneer whose thickness is measurable in angstroms. Unsurprisingly, the overwhelming majority of the commenters saunter in lockstep.

    Faint heart never won fair maid, nor will smug hipness ever suffice to retake the West from its Jewish overlords and their Mohammedan grunts.

  156. @danand

    “For boys my tips for the top are Tesla, Archie, Oscar, Bram, Bruno, Frank, Kristoff, and Zeus.”

     
    Mr. Mason, was it an intentional omission not to include Barron in that list?

    https://youtu.be/ilNRG-SgrhM

    For myself the name Barron brings to mind the famed Beechcraft, as Tesla does for battery electric transportation.

    Beech twins were Duchess, Duke, Baron and Queen/King Air. There was also the original round engine Twin Beech and a Twin Bonanza.

  157. I suspect one good way to measure a group’s assimilibility (if that’s even a word) is to measure how likely they are to give their American-born child a traditional American (i.e., English) first or middle name. Pretty common among Hispanics and East Asians, less common among non-Muslim South Asians, and least common of all among Muslims. And among all groups the tendency to do so seems to be in pretty dramatic decline. When I was a child most every kid of immigrant parents had an American first or middle name they went by. The percentage now seems to be far lower.

    Muslim immigrants don’t give their children English names, don’t adopt our religion, seldom even socialize with non-Muslims, don’t want their kids to intermarry, and marry a large percentage of their children off to foreigners. That’s not immigration, but colonization.

    • Agree: Lot
  158. @Jonathan Mason
    As Steve points out, Isabella is a famous Hispanic name, but several of the other names here have a Hispanic tinge to them.

    For example Mia can be a diminutive of the Spanish name Maria (Mary) and is also the abbreviation for the world's number one airport for Hispanics.

    Ava is a variation on Eve, a Biblical name for the first woman.

    Emma is a name from Jane Austen, but also the name of actresses Emma Thompson and Emma Watson, of Harry Potter fame. (Perhaps we will soon see Potter as a popular name for boys.)

    Aria is an interesting one as arias have been mainly the interest of opera fans, but the word is related to 'air' and is synonymous with Melody. It is also a Jewish name, meaning 'lion(ess)'.

    Riley is an interesting one, being the name of an extinct British car:

    https://car-from-uk.com/ebay/carphotos/full/ebay420869.jpg

    and the name of an old music call comedy act about an elderly Irish woman played by a man. But no relation to Bill O'Reilly.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpyNzwEi7Po

    Isn’t Isabella tainted by anti-Semitism?
    As for Riley, I think that comes from this cult-like devotion that has arisen among teenage girls for William Bendix.
    They’re just wild about him.

  159. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Remember, there are a lot of African-Americans who tend to give their offspring Arabic names, Muhammad and Aaliyah being no exception (e.g. NE's WR Muhammad Sunu, as one example). Aaliyah was an African-American hip hop star who was related to legendary soul artist Gladys Knight.

    Aaliyah’s career nose dived.

  160. @Richard of Fallbrook
    Excuse me gentlemen, I need to purchase some ammo...lots of ammo.

    Don’t get too carried away. If it comes down to a shooting war, think realistically about how many firefights you’re likely to survive.

  161. @Bragadocious
    So will this resemble U.S. armed forces in 20 years?

    https://youtu.be/nT-UkhEP-1g

    An American Carol was a dire, night-unwatchable picture, but had about a dozen or so very funny gags that deserved to be surgically removed and grafted onto a better flick. This was one of them.

    I also started to guffaw when Paris Hilton began to announce the winner of “The Leni Riefenstahl Award“, but immediately stopped when the script began to ham-handedly overexplain the joke for the benefit of the idiots watching.

  162. @syonredux
    RE: Choosing names for a baby,

    My advice is simple: the older, the better. So, look to the Bible , Graeco-Roman classics and traditional Anglo names:

    Boys: John, James, David, Alexander, Matthew, Joshua, Philip, Mark, Alexander, Richard, Robert, Edward, etc

    Girls: Sarah, Julia, Rebecca, Rachel, Alexandra, Elizabeth, Jane, Katharine, etc.

    I wanted that but my wife wanted something euphonious. We ended up with Thomas Reid (after the Scottish Common Sense philosopher) and William Rowan (after the mathematician/physicist William Rowan Hamilton), but the boys go by their middle names.

    • Replies: @Lot
    Classy as heck.

    Which Scotch empiricist philosopher wore it better?

    https://trinities.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/thomas-reid-1710-96.jpg

    https://www.thefamouspeople.com/profiles/images/david-hume-10.jpg
  163. J says: • Website
    @Coag
    One place where Muhammad will likely never make the top 10 baby boy names list:

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.nytimes.com/2017/04/25/world/asia/china-xinjiang-ban-muslim-names-muhammad-jihad.amp.html


    BEIJING — The Chinese government, further tightening its grip on Muslims in western China, has prohibited parents from choosing names like “Muhammad,” “Arafat” and “Jihad” for their children.

    Officials described the ban, introduced this month, as part of an effort to “curb religious fervor” in the western region of Xinjiang, home to more than 10 million Uighurs, a mostly Muslim minority group.

    The government considers Xinjiang a hotbed of Islamic extremism, violence and separatist thought. But many Uighurs say the government’s strict limits on worship and speech are responsible for tensions in the region.

    The list of names, a copy of which was provided to The New York Times by Uighur activists, is titled, “List of Banned Ethnic Minority Names.” It bans more than two dozen names, including “Mujahid” and “Medina.”
     

    The Spanish conquerors imposed Spanish names on Amerindians and Phillipine natives. The Chinese are forcing Chinese names on the Uyghurs. In one generation they will forget who they are. America did not need these policies because immigrants spontaneously Americanized their names, Drumff becoming Trump. But it appears that it is not working the same way for the Muslims.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    Some immigrants Americanized faster than others.

    Still waiting for the Amish to assimilate.
    , @Jack D

    Drumff becoming Trump
     
    This was a lie propagated by his political enemies. The name has not be Drumpf for 300 years, long before the Trumps landed in America. Anyway I thought that Democrats liked immigrants and were not supposed to make fun of their foreign sounding names?

    In any case, people were much more relaxed about exact spellings in the past. Everyone except the priest might be illiterate and so the priest would sound the name out based upon what he heard when you told him your child's name at his baptism. The local church register lists the family name as Drumb, Tromb, Tromp, Trum, Trumpff, Dromb , etc.

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/jan/29/kallstadt-germany-on-the-trail-of-the-donald-in-the-trump-ancestral-home



    OTOH, Trump used to say that he was Swedish.
  164. @Jonathan Mason

    Bertha. That one’s got a lot of bad connotations.
     
    Big Bertha, was a German siege howitzer built by Krupp AG and fielded by the Imperial German Army from 1914 to 1918. The M-Gerät had a 42-centimetre calibre barrel, making it one of the largest artillery pieces ever fielded.

    Big Bertha, was a German siege howitzer built by Krupp AG and fielded by the Imperial German Army from 1914 to 1918.

    Named for the boss’s daughter. It sounds even worse in German, dicke Bertha.

    But its namesake didn’t look bad at all, for a German.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Good-looking "for a German?" By my standards, Germans are certainly better-looking, on average, than most of the world. But that's subjective, and I am part German after all ;)

    As for "big Bertha", wouldn't that be "grosse Bertha"?

    "Dick" means "fat."
    (In German-speaking countries, Laurel and Hardy were known as "Dick und Doof", Fat and Dumb)
  165. @Barnard
    This is misleading, it only includes people who submitted baby names to the Baby Center website. The Social Security Office, using data submitted to them, doesn't even have Muhammad in the top 50 for 2018. The various spellings of Muhammad, Mohammad, and Mohammed are ranked 605, 627 and 345. Even combining them all, it wouldn't even come close to the top ten.

    https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/

    The Social Security Office, using data submitted to them, doesn’t even have Muhammad in the top 50 for 2018.

    Thank God.

  166. @Achmed E. Newman
    Bertha. That one's got a lot of bad connotations. I bet nobody here but the Dead Heads can even picture a Bertha with a Body Mass Index under 45.

    That's why, if you please,
    I am on my bended knees.
    Berth don't you come around here,
    anymore.

    Jerry plays a wonderful 2 minute solo at 02:50 in ... be patient!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V72qQhm12K8

    Bertha. That one’s got a lot of bad connotations. I bet nobody here but the Dead Heads can even picture a Bertha with a Body Mass Index under 45.

    See my reply to Jonathan. My next daughter will be a Bertha.

    This was a very popular name 125 years ago, when people were more cognizant of history. A young Roberta who sailed on the Titanic preferred to go by the more fashionable (and feminine) Bertha.

    If we don’t like the name today, the fault is with us, not the name.

    I’m surprised you didn’t link to the Grateful Dead tune. Not on your 350-strong playlist? But, as you said, I prefer still photos, and here’s one of the fetching young Barbara Hershey in her Corman days:

    Anyone care to estimate this Bertha’s BMI?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I’m surprised you didn’t link to the Grateful Dead tune. Not on your 350-strong playlist?
     
    Your browser may have problems, or else, who do you think that smiling bearded chubby guitarist is?

    BTW, your hottie there, she wasn't any kin to Boxcar Willie, was she?
    , @Spangel
    You sure you want to do that to your daughter?

    My mother in law is a Bertha and she swears her parents chose this name to forever shame her.
  167. “Muhammad Makes List of Top 10 Baby Names in the U.S. for First Time”

    And if you really want to get depressed, look at the last names.

    https://www.thoughtco.com/most-common-us-surnames-1422656

    I posted something on this site several years ago stating (with alarm) that Garcia was something like #14 or 15 in the US. Now it’s #6, more popular than Miller and Davis.

    #9 through #13 are all Hispanic. This means of the top 13 most common surnames in the US, nearly half are Hispanic. And then when you count undocumented people?

    • Replies: @J1234
    And by contrast, here are the top 200 surnames in Mexico. At a glance, not one non-Hispanic name, as far as I can tell.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_most_common_surnames_in_North_America#Mexico_(Mexican)
  168. No Thor? No Freyr? Ah, well…

  169. @J1234

    "Muhammad Makes List of Top 10 Baby Names in the U.S. for First Time"
     
    And if you really want to get depressed, look at the last names.

    https://www.thoughtco.com/most-common-us-surnames-1422656

    I posted something on this site several years ago stating (with alarm) that Garcia was something like #14 or 15 in the US. Now it's #6, more popular than Miller and Davis.

    #9 through #13 are all Hispanic. This means of the top 13 most common surnames in the US, nearly half are Hispanic. And then when you count undocumented people?

    And by contrast, here are the top 200 surnames in Mexico. At a glance, not one non-Hispanic name, as far as I can tell.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_most_common_surnames_in_North_America#Mexico_(Mexican)

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    Actually, it is worse than that, because although many Spanish names mean "son of" someone, or are based on place names, some common Hispanic names are a direct translation of English names, or have direct equivalents, but have not been changed to match their English forms, as many German occupational names were. For example many German Backers became Bakers, Mullers became Millers, and Schmidts became Smiths.

    For example:

    Herrero, Ferrero = Smith
    Moreno = Brown
    Cruz = Cross
    Reyes = King
    Reina = Queen
    Castillo = Castle
    Flores = Flowers
    Rivera = Banks
    Silva =Forester
    Rios =Rivers
    Rosas =Rose
    Molina = Miller
    Blanco = White
    Iglesias = Church, Kirk.

    Rubio could be translated as Whitehead.
  170. I know three young couples who each named their son Odin. I know a woman named Veronica because her parents liked Archie comics, and I recently met a woman who was named Jamie in tribute to the bionic woman. Naming your kid after the prophet seems somewhat classier.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Chris Stein and his wife Barbara named a daughter Valentina after the cosmonaut.
  171. @obwandiyag
    Nobody names their kids Paul or Mary or Joseph any more. And only a few Michaels and Johns.

    Not fake movie-starry sounding enough.

    Nailed it again O-wag.

  172. @Svevlad
    Still better than if everyone started to apply Bosniak naming ways.

    And that way is indistinguishable from blacks but instead of trying to just make it sound randomly african or latin (why?), they make apsurd turkish and arab-sounding names. There's a meme here that says that with every day you can learn a new bosnian name, each one dumber than the previous

    I love the names of my ethnic Serb coworkers: Zarko, Slavko, Bobo, Biljana. Nenad, not so much.

    • Replies: @Svevlad
    Yeah, they're often simple enough

    On the other hand, let me give an example of the kind of shit our unfortunate neighbors do

    THey name their son Benjamin, after Benjamin Kallay, a Jew whose only contribution to Bosnia is that he was the first to attempt the Bosniak Muslim ethnogenesis. Fine enough, strange name but not bad.

    Then, they have second child. So how do they name him? Senjamin, of course, so it fits with his brother. Laughter ensues

    On the other hand many of the names you presented are very old, and can have their meanings easily deduced roughly

    Zarko - ember, Slavko - glory, biljana - plant, nenad - no hope (as in takes hope from enemies)

    Bobo on the other hand is mysterious. Probably from Boban, but that's from some old word I don't know

    A shame English basically has no old names anymore. It's all biblical now

  173. @HammerJack

    Helped youth understand impact of gun violence.
     
    That's a good one. "There's two ways we can do this...."

    I'll see your OT and raise you a Battalion of Marines. Whose side are they on?

    Monday's arrest comes as several other Marines stationed at Camp Pendleton are facing human trafficking charges. Six out of two dozen Marines recently pled guilty to human trafficking and drug charges at military court-martials.

    Officials did not release the names of the arrested Marines...

    https://www.foxnews.com/us/marine-arrested-for-alleged-smuggling-after-chinese-woman-found-in-car-trunk

    https://www.foxnews.com/us/16-marines-arrested-human-smuggling-drugs

     

    “Two of the migrants admitted they planned to pay more than $8,000 to get into the States and expected to settle in New Jersey and Los Angeles, court documents state.”

    Thanks — I lived in SD for a few years, and at first was shocked at the crime stories coming out of Camp Pendleton (‘The Few, the Proud, the Marines’), which generally received only local coverage — but after a while I got used to it — after that point, and up until today, nothing surprises me.

    • Agree: HammerJack
  174. @Rosie

    Connor, Tanner, Benson, Carlin, Tyler, Hays, Paxton, and so on.
     
    I can't stand that! I love that "Sophia" is number 1, though.

    Yeah, I like that one too. There are 3 big “E” names now for the girls – Emma, Etta, and Ellie/Ella. New parents: Name your girls with names starting with D or higher in the alphabet – get ahead of the game.

  175. @Mr. XYZ
    What about the name Lillian?

    Ditto, XYZ. Coming back after most of a century.

  176. @Reg Cæsar

    Bertha. That one’s got a lot of bad connotations. I bet nobody here but the Dead Heads can even picture a Bertha with a Body Mass Index under 45.
     
    See my reply to Jonathan. My next daughter will be a Bertha.

    This was a very popular name 125 years ago, when people were more cognizant of history. A young Roberta who sailed on the Titanic preferred to go by the more fashionable (and feminine) Bertha.

    If we don't like the name today, the fault is with us, not the name.

    I'm surprised you didn't link to the Grateful Dead tune. Not on your 350-strong playlist? But, as you said, I prefer still photos, and here's one of the fetching young Barbara Hershey in her Corman days:


    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/xz0AAOSw5UZY~qoS/s-l400.jpg

    Anyone care to estimate this Bertha's BMI?

    I’m surprised you didn’t link to the Grateful Dead tune. Not on your 350-strong playlist?

    Your browser may have problems, or else, who do you think that smiling bearded chubby guitarist is?

    BTW, your hottie there, she wasn’t any kin to Boxcar Willie, was she?

  177. @Old Prude
    I love the names of my ethnic Serb coworkers: Zarko, Slavko, Bobo, Biljana. Nenad, not so much.

    Yeah, they’re often simple enough

    On the other hand, let me give an example of the kind of shit our unfortunate neighbors do

    THey name their son Benjamin, after Benjamin Kallay, a Jew whose only contribution to Bosnia is that he was the first to attempt the Bosniak Muslim ethnogenesis. Fine enough, strange name but not bad.

    Then, they have second child. So how do they name him? Senjamin, of course, so it fits with his brother. Laughter ensues

    On the other hand many of the names you presented are very old, and can have their meanings easily deduced roughly

    Zarko – ember, Slavko – glory, biljana – plant, nenad – no hope (as in takes hope from enemies)

    Bobo on the other hand is mysterious. Probably from Boban, but that’s from some old word I don’t know

    A shame English basically has no old names anymore. It’s all biblical now

  178. @Mike Jones
    So you are going to commit violence based on People of Color having and naming children?

    That says a lot about you



    https://www.ajc.com/blog/luckovich/mike-luckovich-who-the-threat/cMmd1H9PIwyJr3I01katgJ/

    In Richard’s case, buying bullets and weapons is a defensive posture. It is logical to assume that the many Muslims named Mohammed will one day grow up and seek to commit violence against him, in obedience to Allah’s commands to destroy infidels, as recorded in the “holy” Koran.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
  179. @Coag
    One place where Muhammad will likely never make the top 10 baby boy names list:

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.nytimes.com/2017/04/25/world/asia/china-xinjiang-ban-muslim-names-muhammad-jihad.amp.html


    BEIJING — The Chinese government, further tightening its grip on Muslims in western China, has prohibited parents from choosing names like “Muhammad,” “Arafat” and “Jihad” for their children.

    Officials described the ban, introduced this month, as part of an effort to “curb religious fervor” in the western region of Xinjiang, home to more than 10 million Uighurs, a mostly Muslim minority group.

    The government considers Xinjiang a hotbed of Islamic extremism, violence and separatist thought. But many Uighurs say the government’s strict limits on worship and speech are responsible for tensions in the region.

    The list of names, a copy of which was provided to The New York Times by Uighur activists, is titled, “List of Banned Ethnic Minority Names.” It bans more than two dozen names, including “Mujahid” and “Medina.”
     

    This proves the Chinese really are the smartest people in the world. Not like our dumb @as Western politicians who keep on importing trouble into our countries.

  180. @Lot
    “ White suburban southerners are terrible about giving their kids low-class names that are almost as bad as ghetto names. Girls get tomboy names: Madison, Riley, Taylor, Courtney, Cory, Riley, Tyler, Ensley etc. They also love to insert y’s in the place of i’s. Boys get names reminiscent of medieval occupations: Stone, Mason, Tanner, Asher, Hunter, Carter, Cooper ”

    I knew kids with nearly all those names in the suburban midwest. Multiple Courtneys, Masons and Hunters. The exceptions are Ensley, Stone, and Asher. And Tyler and Taylor were boys.

    I think Asher is more of a 80s NE Jewish name.

    Arthur Asher Miller, 1915-2005.

    Playwright, radical, and last husband of Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962).

    Not necessarily in that order.

  181. @Old Prude
    I know three young couples who each named their son Odin. I know a woman named Veronica because her parents liked Archie comics, and I recently met a woman who was named Jamie in tribute to the bionic woman. Naming your kid after the prophet seems somewhat classier.

    Chris Stein and his wife Barbara named a daughter Valentina after the cosmonaut.

  182. @Achmed E. Newman
    Regarding old names becoming new again, does anyone remember any Sylvias? Sylvias are either over 75 years old or little girls under 10. As far as Sylvia's mother goes, well she probably goes back to the 19th century, and that song is just too depressing to even embed here.

    Regarding old names becoming new again, does anyone remember any Sylvias? Sylvias are either over 75 years old or little girls under 10.

    Not in Slovakia, apparently. I hooked up with a 20-something Slovakian Sylvia in Prague back in the ’90’s. I also have a 60-ish neighbor from New Orleans named Sylvia.

  183. “Muhammad Makes List of Top 10 Baby Names in the U.S. for First Time”


    Died 2016.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Beau Ideal - African division.
  184. @J1234
    And by contrast, here are the top 200 surnames in Mexico. At a glance, not one non-Hispanic name, as far as I can tell.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_most_common_surnames_in_North_America#Mexico_(Mexican)

    Actually, it is worse than that, because although many Spanish names mean “son of” someone, or are based on place names, some common Hispanic names are a direct translation of English names, or have direct equivalents, but have not been changed to match their English forms, as many German occupational names were. For example many German Backers became Bakers, Mullers became Millers, and Schmidts became Smiths.

    For example:

    Herrero, Ferrero = Smith
    Moreno = Brown
    Cruz = Cross
    Reyes = King
    Reina = Queen
    Castillo = Castle
    Flores = Flowers
    Rivera = Banks
    Silva =Forester
    Rios =Rivers
    Rosas =Rose
    Molina = Miller
    Blanco = White
    Iglesias = Church, Kirk.

    Rubio could be translated as Whitehead.

    • Replies: @Lot
    I’ve never seen Reina as a surname.
  185. @syonredux

    Parents tend to play it safe with boy’s names, at least until recently.

     

    Maybe that's why the names for boys are so sick-making. Parents aren't playing it safe these days....


    1. Liam
    2. Jackson
    3. Noah
    4. Aiden
    5. Grayson
    6. Caden
    7. Lucas
    8. Elijah
    9. Oliver
    10. Muhammad


    Aiden? Caden? Those sound right out of a soap opera. Grayson? Are there that many Robin/Nightwing fans out there?Liam? Just name your son William and use Liam as a nickname, fergodsakes....

    I dislike Liam. First if you’re an American you should have an English name. Liam is too Irish

    Secondly, Liam sounds awful close to “lame” in my ear. The name sounds weak to me.

    With all apologies to Liam Neeson.

  186. @Achmed E. Newman
    "Mohammad" just goes along with the 15 y/o trend for boys names. Any old last name, not just those of famous men, may be used as a first name now: Connor, Tanner, Benson, Carlin, Tyler, Hays, Paxton, and so on. I assume Mohammad was the prophet's last name, although the Moslems don't seem to cuss enough for me to find out his first name or middle initial. Is it like Madonna, Cher, Sting, or The Edge?

    At least it can be shortened to Moe to save time. If you're neither towel-head nor beaner, yet still want to name your son after a man of the cloth, there's always the old stand-by, Amos Moses.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n7GyLr7Cz2g

    Mohamed bin Abdullah…

  187. @Dylan

    It’s interesting how pop music-derived names lag decades behind the hits. Dylan became a huge boy’s name about 25 years after Bob Dylan became famous. Layla took 40+ years after Eric Clapton’s song.
     
    Dylan became popular because of the Dylan McKay character played by Luke Perry on Beverley Hills 90210, it had nothing to do with Bob Dylan. (I'm even more skeptical that Layla has anything to do with Clapton.)

    Source: I was a freshman in high school when that show took off and wondered why all the cute girls in class were suddenly talking about me. And then a few years later as an early Usenet troll in college under my real name I was glad that the my early indiscretions were eventually buried under the internet footprint of the 90210 kids.

    Dylan Thomas!

  188. @Jonathan Mason
    Actually, it is worse than that, because although many Spanish names mean "son of" someone, or are based on place names, some common Hispanic names are a direct translation of English names, or have direct equivalents, but have not been changed to match their English forms, as many German occupational names were. For example many German Backers became Bakers, Mullers became Millers, and Schmidts became Smiths.

    For example:

    Herrero, Ferrero = Smith
    Moreno = Brown
    Cruz = Cross
    Reyes = King
    Reina = Queen
    Castillo = Castle
    Flores = Flowers
    Rivera = Banks
    Silva =Forester
    Rios =Rivers
    Rosas =Rose
    Molina = Miller
    Blanco = White
    Iglesias = Church, Kirk.

    Rubio could be translated as Whitehead.

    I’ve never seen Reina as a surname.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I’ve never seen Reina as a surname.
     
    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/aQnAFhEGL1Q/hqdefault.jpg


    José Manuel "Pepe" Reina Páez (Spanish pronunciation: [xoˈse maˈnwel ˈpepe ˈreina ˈpa.eθ]; born 31 August 1982) is a Spanish footballer who plays as a goalkeeper for Italian club A.C. Milan and the Spanish national team.

    The son of famed Barcelona and Atlético Madrid goalkeeper Miguel Reina, Pepe Reina began his career with the Barcelona youth team and made his La Liga debut in the 2000–01 season. He signed for Villarreal in 2002, winning the UEFA Intertoto Cup twice. Reina moved on to Liverpool and made his debut in the 2005 UEFA Super Cup, which Liverpool won. He instantly became first-choice goalkeeper and went on to win both the FA Cup – where he saved three out of four West Ham United penalties in the final – and the FA Community Shield. In 2007, he reached the Champions League Final with Liverpool, matching the feat achieved by his father in 1974, but Liverpool lost to Milan.

    Following eight consecutive seasons as Liverpool's first-choice keeper, Reina spent the 2013–14 season on loan at Napoli, where he was reunited with Rafael Benítez, the coach who signed him to play for Liverpool in 2005. During his loan tenure in Naples, Reina was part of the side that won the 2014 Coppa Italia.

    At international level, Reina played for Spain's youth team, winning the UEFA European Under-17 Football Championship in 1999. He made his senior debut in 2005, and has generally been selected as the second-choice keeper behind Iker Casillas. He was part of the Spain squad for the 2006 FIFA World Cup and made one appearance in their victorious UEFA Euro 2008 campaign, earning him his first international honour. He was later part of the Spain squads that won their first ever World Cup in 2010 and their third UEFA European Championship in 2012, as well as featuring at the 2014 and 2018 World Cups.

    Reina is also the record holder for appearances by a Spanish player in the Premier League, with more than 200 appearances in just his first five seasons, 108 of the 219 appearances being clean sheets


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pepe_Reina
  189. @Desiderius
    I wanted that but my wife wanted something euphonious. We ended up with Thomas Reid (after the Scottish Common Sense philosopher) and William Rowan (after the mathematician/physicist William Rowan Hamilton), but the boys go by their middle names.

    Classy as heck.

    Which Scotch empiricist philosopher wore it better?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Heh. Whichever. Reid wore Hume out on a daily basis is all I know.

    Couldn't have happened to a more self-satisfied epistemological neophyte.
  190. @Lot
    I’ve never seen Reina as a surname.

    I’ve never seen Reina as a surname.

    José Manuel “Pepe” Reina Páez (Spanish pronunciation: [xoˈse maˈnwel ˈpepe ˈreina ˈpa.eθ]; born 31 August 1982) is a Spanish footballer who plays as a goalkeeper for Italian club A.C. Milan and the Spanish national team.

    The son of famed Barcelona and Atlético Madrid goalkeeper Miguel Reina, Pepe Reina began his career with the Barcelona youth team and made his La Liga debut in the 2000–01 season. He signed for Villarreal in 2002, winning the UEFA Intertoto Cup twice. Reina moved on to Liverpool and made his debut in the 2005 UEFA Super Cup, which Liverpool won. He instantly became first-choice goalkeeper and went on to win both the FA Cup – where he saved three out of four West Ham United penalties in the final – and the FA Community Shield. In 2007, he reached the Champions League Final with Liverpool, matching the feat achieved by his father in 1974, but Liverpool lost to Milan.

    Following eight consecutive seasons as Liverpool’s first-choice keeper, Reina spent the 2013–14 season on loan at Napoli, where he was reunited with Rafael Benítez, the coach who signed him to play for Liverpool in 2005. During his loan tenure in Naples, Reina was part of the side that won the 2014 Coppa Italia.

    At international level, Reina played for Spain’s youth team, winning the UEFA European Under-17 Football Championship in 1999. He made his senior debut in 2005, and has generally been selected as the second-choice keeper behind Iker Casillas. He was part of the Spain squad for the 2006 FIFA World Cup and made one appearance in their victorious UEFA Euro 2008 campaign, earning him his first international honour. He was later part of the Spain squads that won their first ever World Cup in 2010 and their third UEFA European Championship in 2012, as well as featuring at the 2014 and 2018 World Cups.

    Reina is also the record holder for appearances by a Spanish player in the Premier League, with more than 200 appearances in just his first five seasons, 108 of the 219 appearances being clean sheets

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pepe_Reina

  191. @Reg Cæsar

    Bertha. That one’s got a lot of bad connotations. I bet nobody here but the Dead Heads can even picture a Bertha with a Body Mass Index under 45.
     
    See my reply to Jonathan. My next daughter will be a Bertha.

    This was a very popular name 125 years ago, when people were more cognizant of history. A young Roberta who sailed on the Titanic preferred to go by the more fashionable (and feminine) Bertha.

    If we don't like the name today, the fault is with us, not the name.

    I'm surprised you didn't link to the Grateful Dead tune. Not on your 350-strong playlist? But, as you said, I prefer still photos, and here's one of the fetching young Barbara Hershey in her Corman days:


    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/xz0AAOSw5UZY~qoS/s-l400.jpg

    Anyone care to estimate this Bertha's BMI?

    You sure you want to do that to your daughter?

    My mother in law is a Bertha and she swears her parents chose this name to forever shame her.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    My mother in law is a Bertha and she swears her parents chose this name to forever shame her.
     
    She should hold her head high:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_of_Kent

    http://catholicencyclopedia.newadvent.com/cathen/02519a.htm

    https://peoplepill.com/people/bertrada-of-laon/

    If it's good enough or Charles Martel's daughter-in-law, it's good enough for me.


    Like I said, the problem is with us, not the name. We have sunk far.
  192. @The Wild Geese Howard
    Correct.

    Our Han bros are leading the way in fighting back against the Ummah.

    They’re not my brothers and I don’t trust them as far as I can throw them. Just giving them credit for not being terminally naïve about Islam like our rulers are.

  193. @S. Anonyia
    White suburban southerners are terrible about giving their kids low-class names that are almost as bad as ghetto names. Girls get tomboy names: Madison, Riley, Taylor, Courtney, Cory, Riley, Tyler, Ensley etc. They also love to insert y’s in the place of i’s. Boys get names reminiscent of medieval occupations: Stone, Mason, Tanner, Asher, Hunter, Carter, Cooper etc. “Blaze” is also surprisingly common among both boys and girls.

    Not my style, but don’t see how they’re “low class” at all. Perhaps you feel that you are somehow superior to southern whites? Otherwise, why the condescension and use of the term “low class” for perfectly normal names?

    As for Blaze, nah.

  194. @Reg Cæsar

    Big Bertha, was a German siege howitzer built by Krupp AG and fielded by the Imperial German Army from 1914 to 1918.
     
    Named for the boss's daughter. It sounds even worse in German, dicke Bertha.

    But its namesake didn't look bad at all, for a German.

    https://images.fineartamerica.com/images-medium-large-5/bertha-krupp-daughter-of-friedrich-mary-evans-picture-library.jpg

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51HJGTHCSSL._SX319_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

    Good-looking “for a German?” By my standards, Germans are certainly better-looking, on average, than most of the world. But that’s subjective, and I am part German after all 😉

    As for “big Bertha”, wouldn’t that be “grosse Bertha”?

    “Dick” means “fat.”
    (In German-speaking countries, Laurel and Hardy were known as “Dick und Doof”, Fat and Dumb)

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    https://www.wissen.de/lexikon/dicke-berta

    https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/dicke_bertha


    https://weaponews.com/images/2017/02/08/f1e841064957b84ed999ed8eeae5b3ce.jpg

    https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/smw/images/thumb/9/9c/Dicke_Bertha_IMG.jpg/200px-Dicke_Bertha_IMG.jpg

    http://www.bildarchivaustria.at/Preview/8153140.jpg
    , @Desiderius
    Thicc works.

    Cognate languages.
  195. @J
    The Spanish conquerors imposed Spanish names on Amerindians and Phillipine natives. The Chinese are forcing Chinese names on the Uyghurs. In one generation they will forget who they are. America did not need these policies because immigrants spontaneously Americanized their names, Drumff becoming Trump. But it appears that it is not working the same way for the Muslims.

    Some immigrants Americanized faster than others.

    Still waiting for the Amish to assimilate.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    We're slowly assimilating to the Amish.
  196. @Lot
    Classy as heck.

    Which Scotch empiricist philosopher wore it better?

    https://trinities.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/thomas-reid-1710-96.jpg

    https://www.thefamouspeople.com/profiles/images/david-hume-10.jpg

    Heh. Whichever. Reid wore Hume out on a daily basis is all I know.

    Couldn’t have happened to a more self-satisfied epistemological neophyte.

  197. @Paleo Liberal
    Some immigrants Americanized faster than others.

    Still waiting for the Amish to assimilate.

    We’re slowly assimilating to the Amish.

    • LOL: Paleo Liberal
  198. Riley is a ridiculous name for a girl.

  199. @Spangel
    You sure you want to do that to your daughter?

    My mother in law is a Bertha and she swears her parents chose this name to forever shame her.

    My mother in law is a Bertha and she swears her parents chose this name to forever shame her.

    She should hold her head high:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_of_Kent

    http://catholicencyclopedia.newadvent.com/cathen/02519a.htm

    https://peoplepill.com/people/bertrada-of-laon/

    If it’s good enough or Charles Martel’s daughter-in-law, it’s good enough for me.

    Like I said, the problem is with us, not the name. We have sunk far.

  200. @RadicalCenter
    Good-looking "for a German?" By my standards, Germans are certainly better-looking, on average, than most of the world. But that's subjective, and I am part German after all ;)

    As for "big Bertha", wouldn't that be "grosse Bertha"?

    "Dick" means "fat."
    (In German-speaking countries, Laurel and Hardy were known as "Dick und Doof", Fat and Dumb)
  201. @J
    The Spanish conquerors imposed Spanish names on Amerindians and Phillipine natives. The Chinese are forcing Chinese names on the Uyghurs. In one generation they will forget who they are. America did not need these policies because immigrants spontaneously Americanized their names, Drumff becoming Trump. But it appears that it is not working the same way for the Muslims.

    Drumff becoming Trump

    This was a lie propagated by his political enemies. The name has not be Drumpf for 300 years, long before the Trumps landed in America. Anyway I thought that Democrats liked immigrants and were not supposed to make fun of their foreign sounding names?

    In any case, people were much more relaxed about exact spellings in the past. Everyone except the priest might be illiterate and so the priest would sound the name out based upon what he heard when you told him your child’s name at his baptism. The local church register lists the family name as Drumb, Tromb, Tromp, Trum, Trumpff, Dromb , etc.

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/jan/29/kallstadt-germany-on-the-trail-of-the-donald-in-the-trump-ancestral-home

    OTOH, Trump used to say that he was Swedish.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    We see similar over here. People who believe Somalis become British instantly, through contact with the magic dirt, also like to bitch about how the Royal family is actually German.
  202. Trivial. If:

    M= # Muslim boy newborns, and
    W= # WASP bn, and
    W= 10*M

    Whites are unbiased in the top-50 choices of boy names.

    Muslims are highly biased in favor of a certain name.

    For every 100 W, the most favored:

    • White names will number in the range of 2-3 selections.

    • Muslim names will be in the same range.

  203. @Jonathan Mason

    “Muhammad Makes List of Top 10 Baby Names in the U.S. for First Time”
     
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/89/Muhammad_Ali_NYWTS.jpg/220px-Muhammad_Ali_NYWTS.jpg

    Died 2016.

    Beau Ideal – African division.

  204. @RadicalCenter
    Good-looking "for a German?" By my standards, Germans are certainly better-looking, on average, than most of the world. But that's subjective, and I am part German after all ;)

    As for "big Bertha", wouldn't that be "grosse Bertha"?

    "Dick" means "fat."
    (In German-speaking countries, Laurel and Hardy were known as "Dick und Doof", Fat and Dumb)

    Thicc works.

    Cognate languages.

  205. @Jack D

    Drumff becoming Trump
     
    This was a lie propagated by his political enemies. The name has not be Drumpf for 300 years, long before the Trumps landed in America. Anyway I thought that Democrats liked immigrants and were not supposed to make fun of their foreign sounding names?

    In any case, people were much more relaxed about exact spellings in the past. Everyone except the priest might be illiterate and so the priest would sound the name out based upon what he heard when you told him your child's name at his baptism. The local church register lists the family name as Drumb, Tromb, Tromp, Trum, Trumpff, Dromb , etc.

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/jan/29/kallstadt-germany-on-the-trail-of-the-donald-in-the-trump-ancestral-home



    OTOH, Trump used to say that he was Swedish.

    We see similar over here. People who believe Somalis become British instantly, through contact with the magic dirt, also like to bitch about how the Royal family is actually German.

  206. Why no Hispanic names? And what happened to ‘Mary’? Has Catholicism sunk that low?

    Decorator names are decadent. I’m for every man Jack.

    As for Muhammad, I am pleased that there are more people who are unlikely to donate to AIPAC.

  207. White Americans strike me as having pretty good taste in baby names…

    Except for Mormons:

    https://www.thinkinghousewife.com/2013/09/the-world-of-mormon-names/

    • Replies: @Anon
    Never thought I'd see Mrs. Wood quoted here (linked, quoted, whatever). Nice.
  208. But is the fact that a huge fraction of Muhammadens are named Muhammad reassuring? Or is it indicative that Islam tends to take up a lot of space in the brains of Muslims?

    I can’t make sense of this. Is it not the case for any religion that it will “take up a lot of space in the brains” of those who follow it seriously?

    And “reassuring” of what?

    Perhaps there is something that went over my head here.

  209. @Jonathan Mason

    Nobody names their kids Paul or Mary or Joseph any more. And only a few Michaels and Johns.
     
    In England first names used to be, and probably still are for many people, referred to as "Christian names", however the term is probably falling out of favor for official purposes, and indeed Christian names from the Bible and the saints are falling out of favor too, in English speaking countries.

    My step-daughter is 11 and named Maria, but she prefers to be called Mary.

    In Spanish-speaking countries the equivalent names, Pablo, Jose, Miguel, and Maria are still pretty common.

    In some countries like France and Sweden there are some legal restrictions on what names may be chosen and how they are spelled.

    … the term [Christian names] is probably falling out of favor for official purposes, and indeed Christian names from the Bible and the saints are falling out of favor too, in English speaking countries.

    Indeed. The phenomenon is called Christophobia, and the naming pattern that is the subject of Steve’s article is no more and no less than a manifestation of Christophobia’s hard-core version. So, too, is the unconcealed exultation in the soi-disant reporting of that pattern.

    Steve’s response, unfortunately, is indicative of his own squishy preference for a society that retains little more than a Christian veneer whose thickness is measurable in angstroms. Unsurprisingly, the overwhelming majority of the commenters saunter in lockstep.

    Faint heart never won fair maid, nor will smug hipness ever suffice to retake the West from its Jewish overlords and their Mohammedan grunts.

  210. @Ian M.

    White Americans strike me as having pretty good taste in baby names...
     
    Except for Mormons:

    https://www.thinkinghousewife.com/2013/09/the-world-of-mormon-names/

    Never thought I’d see Mrs. Wood quoted here (linked, quoted, whatever). Nice.

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