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Mostly Peaceful Protests Return to the Jewelry Stores of So Cal
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This is the same modus operandi (and perhaps the same participants) as the criminals who smashed and grabbed their way through Southern California’s jewelry stores during the 2020 Mostly Peaceful Protests in honor of the late George Floyd:

https://unz.com/isteve/more-on -cristalnacht-in-west-hollywood/

 
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  1. Now that Roe is overturned, I guess it is too late to do post-birth abortions of its supporters.

  2. So this is our latest political practice: if there is an unpopular event, stores will get robbed.

    • Replies: @Ebony Obelisk
    @bomag

    They have insurance

    I says a lot about you guys that you are more concerned about predatory businesses than with justice. You can it expect people to be abused lying down

    I fell bad for you guys. You gaursntreed riots. That did not happen

    We will vote later. We are angry. Thus was your last gasp. You will lose

    I look at way too much lien. I am envcarsed by it. But I casnit stil. I stay I had the internet Tsushima away Turin. It’s ruining my ire

    I have a ready small one dang

    Replies: @fish, @TWS, @tyrone

    , @JimDandy
    @bomag

    Their hypocrisy is biting them in the ass right now--they are engaging in literal insurrection in parts of America and prominent Dem leaders are calling for more insurrection... while the show trial for the not-insurrection takes place.

    , @Legba
    @bomag

    That's crazy talk. Stores will get robbed after popular events, too!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  3. 11, how many I saw, is not an army, and they make plenty of pistol magazines that hold more than that many rounds. What an opportunity missed.

    I wonder how difficult it is to fence all that jewelry. If it were pretty specialized in some way, perhaps the jewelers of the area could get together on-line and be on the look-out. It’s not like black people have the patience to hold onto it for a couple of years.

    Finally, those didn’t look like typical black person cars. Car-jacked, rented, or what? (Yeah, you still need to give out lots of info to rent them – stolen off the rental lot with the help of an employee who hs the keys?)

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Manhattan Beach is part of LA County, and thus in the jurisdiction of DA George Gascon. You would be in serious trouble if you shot looters.

    As to your other point, it appears that it's not that hard to fence the haul from organized smash-and-grab operations.


    Once items are stolen, there are several ways to sell them -- all extremely easy and with little regulation and monitoring from law enforcement, experts said. Most items grabbed in such cases have no serial numbers, making tracing them almost impossible, Eliadis said.

    "It is incredibly easy to sell stolen merchandise online through e-commerce platforms," Buel said. "E-commerce has really taken off as the place to sell stolen goods."

    Other thieves don't need to sell their stolen goods on Craigslist or eBay. They can also use flea markets, pawn shops and street vendors. Thieves can sell expensive items at slashed prices, meaning there's no shortage of buyers, Eliadis added.
     
    Auto theft has become an increasing problem in the NYC area and car-theft rings have fairly sophisticated ways to disposing of the haul. Stolen cars are driven to Newark, put in containers, and shipped to Africa. Lots of info on the internet about this:

    https://www.nj.com/news/2012/05/international_high-end_car_the.html

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @kaganovitch

    , @JimB
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I wonder how difficult it is to fence all that jewelry. If it were pretty specialized in some way, perhaps the jewelers of the area could get together on-line and be on the look-out. It’s not like black people have the patience to hold onto it for a couple of years.
     
    The blacks sell to Chinese immigrant fences who have the patience to hang onto jewelry. The fences sell most of it in the Chinese community during festive times, especially around celebrations like the Moon Festival, Chinese New Year, and UC commencement ceremonies. Usually the money is laundered using small businesses in Chinese shopping malls, usually anchored by a Ranch 99.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    , @Paul Rise
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Its probably all insured and why would you want the liability if your shot goes wild and damages other property, or injures or kills a bystander.

    In a different set of circumstances I might feel differently but I dont think its a good idea to just open up on a bunch of property criminals in a dense retail area.

    Also not a good idea to elect leftist scum like Gascon. Wonder who the jewelry store owners voted for?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Achmed E. Newman


    11, how many I saw, is not an army, and they make plenty of pistol magazines that hold more than that many rounds. What an opportunity missed.
     
    Achmed, it's officially The People's Republic of New York, a place where ALL gun laws are to make subjects vulnerable to the criminal Democratic Party's Minority Militias.

    The NY SAFE Act prohibits possession of a magazine that has the capacity to hold more than ten (10) rounds of ammunition regardless of when it was manufactured or when it was obtained. It also prohibits possession of a magazine if it is loaded with more than seven (7) rounds of ammunition, unless you are at a range.

    https://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/downloads/pdf/permits/ny_safe_act_letter_re_lcafd_2013_05_v9.pdf
     

    The 2A community in NYS needs to ramp up a campaign as the communist cosmopolitans change their gun laws there to accommodate the recent USSC decision. Each NEW gun owner that is forced to jump through the circus flaming hoops of their gun control laws, pay $$$ for the privilege of being licensed and firearms registered for eventual confiscation, need to contact their useless representative and ask WHY they must do this, when SANE states don't have to.

    You will undoubtedly loose the first few years, but the influx of NEW gun owners provides an expanding base of political support. Remember, the homos got their homo marriage after a century, and there is absolutely nothing more despised in the cosmopolitan circles than unwashed gun owners.


    Two of the lawyers responsible for a major victory for gun rights forces at the Supreme Court on Thursday are parting with their prominent law firm after it announced it would no longer handle Second Amendment litigation.

    https://www.politico.com/news/2022/06/23/lawyers-gun-rights-supreme-court-00041909
     

    Replies: @PseudoNhymm

    , @Joe S.Walker
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I wonder how difficult it is to fence all that jewelry.
     
    Who says they took it to fence? I'd be on the lookout for gangsta types bedecked in pearl necklaces and diamond bracelets.

    Replies: @Onebelowall

    , @Forbes
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Well, at least two of the license plates were caught on the ABC7 video, so how long does it take the cops to find the cars? Before they're torched?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  4. Why let a crisis go to waste.

  5. Steve, I know you have an interest in criminology, so you must be aware that prison doesn’t solve the problem of violent Negro felons. What I’d like to see happen is these low-lifes lose their citizenship and be deported. The Constitution should be amended to allow this. Once these Negroes see their cousins shipped to Africa they may think twice about ripping off a jewelery store. What do you think?

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @PseudoNhymm
    @Meretricious

    We used to do something like this. When someone demonstrated, repeatedly, that they had no respect for the law, they were placed outside the legal protections of the law. They were an "out-law", and anyone was free to shoot them without consequence (and maybe a little reward)

    , @rebel yell
    @Meretricious


    What I’d like to see happen is these low-lifes lose their citizenship and be deported. The Constitution should be amended to allow this.
     
    Meretricious, I agree that deportation (and/or sterilization) is the solution for chronic criminals. I also agree that doing this to criminals would mostly impact blacks and reduce the black population. But a change of that magnitude in public policy can only happen if conditions are desperate, as in a time of war, economic collapse, etc. The likely reality is that we will just keep slowly declining into Brazil.
    A middle class democracy in a time of relative peace and prosperity cannot make the tough decisions. That is how we got into this mess in the first place.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Meretricious

    Mere, fencing stolen jewelery is not the same as selling it on line. A fence will give you a percentage of the wholesale value of the items, not the retail value. Should not be too hard to find someone selling Rolexes online at retail prices. Same with engagement rings. If you really wanted to catch the thieves.

    Replies: @Bernard

    , @AnotherDad
    @Meretricious

    We are so far from any sort of rational discussion of the idea of society being owned by the productive people who make it function. Much less about genetics and eugenics. Obviously--to me--criminals and other parasites who are blight on the people who do the actual work, should just be tossed out. An island or two or three in the Aleutians could do the trick.

    But, if--"in the current year"--blacks are being allowed to loot because of their exalted "oppressed" minority status, then jewelry stores are where they should do their looting.

    Jewelers are in the business of ripping people off. (The only thing more ludicrous is the whole "designer" thing where women pay $$$ for some bag with < a yard of leather and fabric.) And people that can afford to waste thousands of dollars on pretty stones and some metal ... if they have to pay twice as much to cover jewelers now atmospheric insurance premiums, who cares. They are the people who should pay these "reparations". Regular working folks are going to be cutting back to make rent, pay the heating bill and put gas in their car to get to work.

    Sure, I would like "reparations with repatriation". But until will have an outbreak of rational real talk, if ripping off jewelers and these "designer" stores serves as reparations--great.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Mactoul
    @Meretricious

    Deported where?
    Why would any country be obliged to take American citizens?

    Replies: @Meretricious, @Known Fact, @Detroit Refugee

  6. @Achmed E. Newman
    11, how many I saw, is not an army, and they make plenty of pistol magazines that hold more than that many rounds. What an opportunity missed.

    I wonder how difficult it is to fence all that jewelry. If it were pretty specialized in some way, perhaps the jewelers of the area could get together on-line and be on the look-out. It's not like black people have the patience to hold onto it for a couple of years.

    Finally, those didn't look like typical black person cars. Car-jacked, rented, or what? (Yeah, you still need to give out lots of info to rent them - stolen off the rental lot with the help of an employee who hs the keys?)

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @JimB, @Paul Rise, @Joe Stalin, @Joe S.Walker, @Forbes

    Manhattan Beach is part of LA County, and thus in the jurisdiction of DA George Gascon. You would be in serious trouble if you shot looters.

    As to your other point, it appears that it’s not that hard to fence the haul from organized smash-and-grab operations.

    Once items are stolen, there are several ways to sell them — all extremely easy and with little regulation and monitoring from law enforcement, experts said. Most items grabbed in such cases have no serial numbers, making tracing them almost impossible, Eliadis said.

    “It is incredibly easy to sell stolen merchandise online through e-commerce platforms,” Buel said. “E-commerce has really taken off as the place to sell stolen goods.”

    Other thieves don’t need to sell their stolen goods on Craigslist or eBay. They can also use flea markets, pawn shops and street vendors. Thieves can sell expensive items at slashed prices, meaning there’s no shortage of buyers, Eliadis added.

    Auto theft has become an increasing problem in the NYC area and car-theft rings have fairly sophisticated ways to disposing of the haul. Stolen cars are driven to Newark, put in containers, and shipped to Africa. Lots of info on the internet about this:

    https://www.nj.com/news/2012/05/international_high-end_car_the.html

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Harry Baldwin


    Stolen cars are driven to Newark, put in containers, and shipped to Africa
     
    I wondered what happened to hot cars now that all the Mexican criminals have moved here.
    , @kaganovitch
    @Harry Baldwin

    Stolen cars are driven to Newark, put in containers, and shipped to Africa. Lots of info on the internet about this:


    See, they're already skilling up and glomming on to these 'digital value chains'. It's working!

  7. Judgjng from the raw foot speed, ease of changing direction, and overall awareness while in motion, I’m thinking there’s some good defensive back potential there.

    Do they have a “combine” for hood criminals?

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Farenheit


    I’m thinking there’s some good defensive back potential there.
     
    Maybe we should start using "cornerback" as a demographic identifier.
  8. @Achmed E. Newman
    11, how many I saw, is not an army, and they make plenty of pistol magazines that hold more than that many rounds. What an opportunity missed.

    I wonder how difficult it is to fence all that jewelry. If it were pretty specialized in some way, perhaps the jewelers of the area could get together on-line and be on the look-out. It's not like black people have the patience to hold onto it for a couple of years.

    Finally, those didn't look like typical black person cars. Car-jacked, rented, or what? (Yeah, you still need to give out lots of info to rent them - stolen off the rental lot with the help of an employee who hs the keys?)

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @JimB, @Paul Rise, @Joe Stalin, @Joe S.Walker, @Forbes

    I wonder how difficult it is to fence all that jewelry. If it were pretty specialized in some way, perhaps the jewelers of the area could get together on-line and be on the look-out. It’s not like black people have the patience to hold onto it for a couple of years.

    The blacks sell to Chinese immigrant fences who have the patience to hang onto jewelry. The fences sell most of it in the Chinese community during festive times, especially around celebrations like the Moon Festival, Chinese New Year, and UC commencement ceremonies. Usually the money is laundered using small businesses in Chinese shopping malls, usually anchored by a Ranch 99.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @JimB

    There was an entertaining court case in Bradford, Yorkshire recently. Some bad eggs correctly deduced that Chinese businesses like to deal in cash to avoid Western imperialist taxation. So they watched Chinese owned businesses, worked out the owners addresses, than put GPS trackers on their cars.

    Waited for them to leave home with a full car, then straight into the houses, where large amounts of sterling, euros and RMB were found.

    https://www.thetelegraphandargus.co.uk/news/20221296.bradford-car-tracker-gang-targeted-leeds-chinese-takeaways-jailed/


    Police first became aware of the trackers on December 22, 2020, when the owner of a Chinese takeaway’s home was burgled in Tingley, Leeds, after he left for about an hour.

    Every room in the house had been ransacked, including the loft, while amounts of cash in sterling, euros, dollars and Chinese currency were stolen.

    The victim told the attending officer that two days before the burglary someone had been seen going under their vehicle outside the takeaway business. They had checked at the time but found nothing untoward.

    When the officer looked under the car, he found a small black box attached to the car’s rear axle with magnets. Inside the case was a tracking device.
     

    Replies: @stillCARealist

  9. @Achmed E. Newman
    11, how many I saw, is not an army, and they make plenty of pistol magazines that hold more than that many rounds. What an opportunity missed.

    I wonder how difficult it is to fence all that jewelry. If it were pretty specialized in some way, perhaps the jewelers of the area could get together on-line and be on the look-out. It's not like black people have the patience to hold onto it for a couple of years.

    Finally, those didn't look like typical black person cars. Car-jacked, rented, or what? (Yeah, you still need to give out lots of info to rent them - stolen off the rental lot with the help of an employee who hs the keys?)

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @JimB, @Paul Rise, @Joe Stalin, @Joe S.Walker, @Forbes

    Its probably all insured and why would you want the liability if your shot goes wild and damages other property, or injures or kills a bystander.

    In a different set of circumstances I might feel differently but I dont think its a good idea to just open up on a bunch of property criminals in a dense retail area.

    Also not a good idea to elect leftist scum like Gascon. Wonder who the jewelry store owners voted for?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Paul Rise

    Those are all good points, Paul, as are Harry's. I was saying this was a missed opportunity nonetheless. These thugs will only learn the hard way, and killing 11 of them would probably prevent a few hundred serious crimes in the future.

    I could never see being in that business to begin with. Jewelry is a scam, especially the diamond business. There's not any quantifiable real value in that stuff.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

  10. By my count about 1/4 of all the houses have this sign or a similar sentiment in the front yard:

    The city is 0.8% black.
    These two numbers are NOT independent of each other.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @JimB
    @Alfa158

    The only sign in my yard says “Chemicals on my lawn may be hazardous to your dogs health.”

    , @Known Fact
    @Alfa158

    Couldn't they squeeze in Hate Has No Home Here? (I also like "Jesus Didn't Believe in Borders," the most memorable quote I got interviewing an activist nun)

    Replies: @Alfa158

    , @interesting
    @Alfa158

    page blocked by an extension

    , @Carbon blob
    @Alfa158

    No matter where you’re from, we’re glad you’re somebody else’s neighbor

    , @Muggles
    @Alfa158

    That's odd.

    Years back when wife and I took one of those "famous Hollywood homes" tours, it seemed like practically every big house had an "Armed Response" security sign in front.

    I guess the D.I.E. population there is a bit larger than 0.8%.

    Unless now banned by the Woke commie government, I suspect many are still there.

    An honest sign by liberal Wokesters would read:

    "We support BLM but if you come on our property uninvited, we will shoot you."

    Replies: @Pixo

    , @bomag
    @Alfa158

    Not sure about "Science is Real". What passes for science today is plenty fake.

    The other statements are demonstrably false.

  11. @Alfa158
    By my count about 1/4 of all the houses have this sign or a similar sentiment in the front yard:

    https://www.amazon.com/H-Frame-Believe-Equality-Resistant-Corrugated/dp/B08JH3V7QF/ref=asc_df_B08JH3V7QF?tag=bingshoppinga-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=80745495247719&hvnetw=o&hvqmt=e&hvbmt=be&hvdev=m&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=&hvtargid=pla-4584345026272464&psc=1#immersive-view_1656168696106

    The city is 0.8% black.
    These two numbers are NOT independent of each other.

    Replies: @JimB, @Known Fact, @interesting, @Carbon blob, @Muggles, @bomag

    The only sign in my yard says “Chemicals on my lawn may be hazardous to your dogs health.”

    • LOL: Detroit Refugee
  12. The progs are always going on about how America needs a racial reckoning…and I agree but not in the way they mean.

    • Agree: Paul Mendez, AnotherDad
    • LOL: Hypnotoad666, bomag
  13. What does this have to do with protests?

    They’re garden variety thieves.

  14. Much like Lebron James, those looters are properly really nice people. They shouldn’t be judged by anything other than how entertaining they are.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Mike Tre

    LOL

    I'll suggest:

    "Much like George Floyd, these looters are really nice people; just in the process of getting their lives together; we just need to keep showering them with encouragement and forgiveness; so they can soar high, high! into the sky."

    , @Ahdindu Nuffin
    @Mike Tre

    They are indeed very nice people, and they do not deserve to be punished. However, it might be best for all parties if they were removed from our society and given a place of their own to settle. I'm told there's a beautiful tropical island, completely uninhabited, that's just over the horizon from Los Angeles. It's only a short helicopter ride away. Perhaps they could be resettled there.

    Replies: @Detroit Refugee

  15. For context this is the equivalent ecologically to Armenian and Persian Americans of what burning down the Amazon is to jaguars.

    • LOL: Abe
  16. SoCal is not a jewelry desert yet?

  17. Smash-and-grab is long established practice. The only relationship to the rioting is the consequent retreat of the police has made it easier to get away with.

    What’s happening now is looting no longer requires a riot for the subsequent lawlessness–the lawlessness is now normal; has anyone taken up this angle? These crimes should be seen as looting of wealth enabled by the new anarcho-tyranny.

  18. @Alfa158
    By my count about 1/4 of all the houses have this sign or a similar sentiment in the front yard:

    https://www.amazon.com/H-Frame-Believe-Equality-Resistant-Corrugated/dp/B08JH3V7QF/ref=asc_df_B08JH3V7QF?tag=bingshoppinga-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=80745495247719&hvnetw=o&hvqmt=e&hvbmt=be&hvdev=m&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=&hvtargid=pla-4584345026272464&psc=1#immersive-view_1656168696106

    The city is 0.8% black.
    These two numbers are NOT independent of each other.

    Replies: @JimB, @Known Fact, @interesting, @Carbon blob, @Muggles, @bomag

    Couldn’t they squeeze in Hate Has No Home Here? (I also like “Jesus Didn’t Believe in Borders,” the most memorable quote I got interviewing an activist nun)

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @Known Fact

    That’s one of the alternatives, or a simple BLM sign, portrait of Floyd etc. Even the sign I pasted in had minor variants such as adding the line “water is life” (?) Don’t quite get that line.

  19. @Achmed E. Newman
    11, how many I saw, is not an army, and they make plenty of pistol magazines that hold more than that many rounds. What an opportunity missed.

    I wonder how difficult it is to fence all that jewelry. If it were pretty specialized in some way, perhaps the jewelers of the area could get together on-line and be on the look-out. It's not like black people have the patience to hold onto it for a couple of years.

    Finally, those didn't look like typical black person cars. Car-jacked, rented, or what? (Yeah, you still need to give out lots of info to rent them - stolen off the rental lot with the help of an employee who hs the keys?)

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @JimB, @Paul Rise, @Joe Stalin, @Joe S.Walker, @Forbes

    11, how many I saw, is not an army, and they make plenty of pistol magazines that hold more than that many rounds. What an opportunity missed.

    Achmed, it’s officially The People’s Republic of New York, a place where ALL gun laws are to make subjects vulnerable to the criminal Democratic Party’s Minority Militias.

    The NY SAFE Act prohibits possession of a magazine that has the capacity to hold more than ten (10) rounds of ammunition regardless of when it was manufactured or when it was obtained. It also prohibits possession of a magazine if it is loaded with more than seven (7) rounds of ammunition, unless you are at a range.

    https://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/downloads/pdf/permits/ny_safe_act_letter_re_lcafd_2013_05_v9.pdf

    The 2A community in NYS needs to ramp up a campaign as the communist cosmopolitans change their gun laws there to accommodate the recent USSC decision. Each NEW gun owner that is forced to jump through the circus flaming hoops of their gun control laws, pay \$\$\$ for the privilege of being licensed and firearms registered for eventual confiscation, need to contact their useless representative and ask WHY they must do this, when SANE states don’t have to.

    You will undoubtedly loose the first few years, but the influx of NEW gun owners provides an expanding base of political support. Remember, the homos got their homo marriage after a century, and there is absolutely nothing more despised in the cosmopolitan circles than unwashed gun owners.

    Two of the lawyers responsible for a major victory for gun rights forces at the Supreme Court on Thursday are parting with their prominent law firm after it announced it would no longer handle Second Amendment litigation.

    https://www.politico.com/news/2022/06/23/lawyers-gun-rights-supreme-court-00041909

    • Replies: @PseudoNhymm
    @Joe Stalin

    Manhattan Beach CA, not Manhattan NY. Dealer could have gotten a permit.... maybe

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

  20. How small is the smallest lo-jack type of device? Would it fit inside a pendant hanging from a super-gaudy-looking necklace of fake diamonds? Other methods (appointment-only, armed guard, etc.) merely deter. Lo-jack jewelry would actually catch the gang.

  21. OT

    Uh oh, exception to Sailer’s Law of Mass Shootings: 2 dead, 21 injured.

    But maybe he’s a very dark Middle Easterner?

    Or maybe, since the targets were homosexual, “injured” includes “severely scuffed manicure while fleeing”.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Almost Missouri

    I would cancel the Pride Day too, were I a Norwegian authority. 2 dead out of 23? That kind of shooting is nothing to be proud of. Allah too would be ashamed. You may get those 72 virgins in Heaven, but like a Social Security check in 2030, the deal might not be all it was cracked (get it?) up to be.

    "Yes, I promised 72 virgins. I never said they'd be below extended Social Security retirement age. Have at it!"

    (OK, that was bad...)

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

  22. @Achmed E. Newman
    11, how many I saw, is not an army, and they make plenty of pistol magazines that hold more than that many rounds. What an opportunity missed.

    I wonder how difficult it is to fence all that jewelry. If it were pretty specialized in some way, perhaps the jewelers of the area could get together on-line and be on the look-out. It's not like black people have the patience to hold onto it for a couple of years.

    Finally, those didn't look like typical black person cars. Car-jacked, rented, or what? (Yeah, you still need to give out lots of info to rent them - stolen off the rental lot with the help of an employee who hs the keys?)

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @JimB, @Paul Rise, @Joe Stalin, @Joe S.Walker, @Forbes

    I wonder how difficult it is to fence all that jewelry.

    Who says they took it to fence? I’d be on the lookout for gangsta types bedecked in pearl necklaces and diamond bracelets.

    • Replies: @Onebelowall
    @Joe S.Walker

    Heh. Pearl necklaces...

  23. @Alfa158
    By my count about 1/4 of all the houses have this sign or a similar sentiment in the front yard:

    https://www.amazon.com/H-Frame-Believe-Equality-Resistant-Corrugated/dp/B08JH3V7QF/ref=asc_df_B08JH3V7QF?tag=bingshoppinga-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=80745495247719&hvnetw=o&hvqmt=e&hvbmt=be&hvdev=m&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=&hvtargid=pla-4584345026272464&psc=1#immersive-view_1656168696106

    The city is 0.8% black.
    These two numbers are NOT independent of each other.

    Replies: @JimB, @Known Fact, @interesting, @Carbon blob, @Muggles, @bomag

    page blocked by an extension

  24. I have decided that if they won’t defend their property, even though it risks prosecution, I don’t give a sh** any longer about the shop-owners. Just keep paying the insurance if they are fine with it, then so am I.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @Yancey Ward

    But then everyone pays a higher price due to higher insurances premiums on everyone. However, the liability insurance probably will not cover them if they accidentally shot the wrong person.

  25. All I will do is advocate for jury nullification if they do act and shoot some of these criminals dead, otherwise stop the complaining about the police and courts not actually doing their jobs.

    • Agree: AnotherDad
  26. @Achmed E. Newman
    11, how many I saw, is not an army, and they make plenty of pistol magazines that hold more than that many rounds. What an opportunity missed.

    I wonder how difficult it is to fence all that jewelry. If it were pretty specialized in some way, perhaps the jewelers of the area could get together on-line and be on the look-out. It's not like black people have the patience to hold onto it for a couple of years.

    Finally, those didn't look like typical black person cars. Car-jacked, rented, or what? (Yeah, you still need to give out lots of info to rent them - stolen off the rental lot with the help of an employee who hs the keys?)

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @JimB, @Paul Rise, @Joe Stalin, @Joe S.Walker, @Forbes

    Well, at least two of the license plates were caught on the ABC7 video, so how long does it take the cops to find the cars? Before they’re torched?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Forbes

    I doubt they are their own cars, Forbes. They don't look like they'd be, for one thing. More importantly, since these guys made an effort to fully hide their identities, would they be that stupid to drive their own cars? Probably not ... You gotta get the cars somewhere though, and that's where the chain of identity could begin.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Forbes

  27. A few months ago, when these smash-and-grab robberies became commonplace, I saw a TV news story about one such robbery of a jewelry store in SoCal, followed by an annoying commercia, with a cast of trendy, shallow-looking metrosexual people, for this place, “The Real Real”, an online reseller of luxury items:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_RealReal

    https://www.therealreal.com/

    And then I thought, so that’s how these smash-and-grabbers are unloading their loot.

    • Replies: @Sick n' Tired
    @Mr. Anon

    The Real Real, Poshmark, Ebay, OfferUp, and a ton of other second hand sites allow people to sell stolen goods like clothes, jewelry, tools, etc with no questions asked or proof of legitimate ownership. With things like custom jewelry that could be identified, they usually pop the stones out and sell/melt down the metal.

  28. @Forbes
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Well, at least two of the license plates were caught on the ABC7 video, so how long does it take the cops to find the cars? Before they're torched?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I doubt they are their own cars, Forbes. They don’t look like they’d be, for one thing. More importantly, since these guys made an effort to fully hide their identities, would they be that stupid to drive their own cars? Probably not … You gotta get the cars somewhere though, and that’s where the chain of identity could begin.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Achmed E. Newman


    You gotta get the cars somewhere though, and that’s where the chain of identity could begin.
     
    The cars looked like a Camry, a Nissan Altima, and VW Jetta(?). I don't think they were rental cars as the Altima looked like it was dented in the back. And they weren't the thieves' own cars because they didn't bother to cover the license plates. (Except maybe the VW, which was either covered or a dealer plate). They could have been stolen but, interestingly, all the cars had the windows tinted (which the thieves may have done themselves before the job).

    So, three different cars are potentially traceable as to the time and place they were separated from their owners. And three window-tinting jobs are also involved (probably with home kits bought off Amazon). Three cars plus ten or twelve young black guys from nearby South-Central creates a lot of potential connections. Once one is caught he can roll up the whole gang.

    The problem is, detective work takes time and attention, and the cops in Southern California are laaaaazy in the extreme. Unless a crime involves a celebrity or a high-profile murder, they can't be bothered. Maybe the news exposure bumps this crime up the list. But I doubt it.

    Replies: @Anon, @Pixo

    , @Forbes
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I'm sure they're not their own cars. But for any investigation to go anywhere, you start with the evidence you have. From where they were "borrowed" (or whatev) could come in handy in the investigation. The increased ubiquity of video surveillance cameras, license plate readers, etc. I'd be pretty sure this gang never imagined someone would film them from across the street, and follow to the alley where the getaway cars awaited. The smash and grab captured on video is pretty amazing.

  29. @Paul Rise
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Its probably all insured and why would you want the liability if your shot goes wild and damages other property, or injures or kills a bystander.

    In a different set of circumstances I might feel differently but I dont think its a good idea to just open up on a bunch of property criminals in a dense retail area.

    Also not a good idea to elect leftist scum like Gascon. Wonder who the jewelry store owners voted for?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Those are all good points, Paul, as are Harry’s. I was saying this was a missed opportunity nonetheless. These thugs will only learn the hard way, and killing 11 of them would probably prevent a few hundred serious crimes in the future.

    I could never see being in that business to begin with. Jewelry is a scam, especially the diamond business. There’s not any quantifiable real value in that stuff.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "There's not any quantifiable real value in that stuff."

    The Dollar, in 4 to 5 years? Better days ahead, Achmed: Your consciousness will be plugged into a three foot worm floating in thick nutritious liquid in a climate controlled drawer. You are your own food. You're a self-contained unit. No worries, other than the power going out in your drawer.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Sam Malone

  30. @Almost Missouri
    OT

    Uh oh, exception to Sailer's Law of Mass Shootings: 2 dead, 21 injured.

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1540651896393842688

    But maybe he's a very dark Middle Easterner?

    Or maybe, since the targets were homosexual, "injured" includes "severely scuffed manicure while fleeing".

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I would cancel the Pride Day too, were I a Norwegian authority. 2 dead out of 23? That kind of shooting is nothing to be proud of. Allah too would be ashamed. You may get those 72 virgins in Heaven, but like a Social Security check in 2030, the deal might not be all it was cracked (get it?) up to be.

    “Yes, I promised 72 virgins. I never said they’d be below extended Social Security retirement age. Have at it!”

    (OK, that was bad…)

    • LOL: Angharad
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    So bad, it's good.

  31. @Harry Baldwin
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Manhattan Beach is part of LA County, and thus in the jurisdiction of DA George Gascon. You would be in serious trouble if you shot looters.

    As to your other point, it appears that it's not that hard to fence the haul from organized smash-and-grab operations.


    Once items are stolen, there are several ways to sell them -- all extremely easy and with little regulation and monitoring from law enforcement, experts said. Most items grabbed in such cases have no serial numbers, making tracing them almost impossible, Eliadis said.

    "It is incredibly easy to sell stolen merchandise online through e-commerce platforms," Buel said. "E-commerce has really taken off as the place to sell stolen goods."

    Other thieves don't need to sell their stolen goods on Craigslist or eBay. They can also use flea markets, pawn shops and street vendors. Thieves can sell expensive items at slashed prices, meaning there's no shortage of buyers, Eliadis added.
     
    Auto theft has become an increasing problem in the NYC area and car-theft rings have fairly sophisticated ways to disposing of the haul. Stolen cars are driven to Newark, put in containers, and shipped to Africa. Lots of info on the internet about this:

    https://www.nj.com/news/2012/05/international_high-end_car_the.html

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @kaganovitch

    Stolen cars are driven to Newark, put in containers, and shipped to Africa

    I wondered what happened to hot cars now that all the Mexican criminals have moved here.

  32. You guys need to relax and enjoy this spectacle; in thirty years or less there will be movies about these guys and their brave exploits—and the troubled women who love and stand behind them. The equivalent of Redford and Newman will play them, the equivalent of Fay Dunaway will play their gal, etc. There are rappers right now composing ballads to honor their bravery, insouciance and their gifts to the community.

    And don’t miss the BET annual awards show tomorrow. It is always really swell.

  33. @Meretricious
    Steve, I know you have an interest in criminology, so you must be aware that prison doesn't solve the problem of violent Negro felons. What I'd like to see happen is these low-lifes lose their citizenship and be deported. The Constitution should be amended to allow this. Once these Negroes see their cousins shipped to Africa they may think twice about ripping off a jewelery store. What do you think?

    Replies: @PseudoNhymm, @rebel yell, @Buffalo Joe, @AnotherDad, @Mactoul

    We used to do something like this. When someone demonstrated, repeatedly, that they had no respect for the law, they were placed outside the legal protections of the law. They were an “out-law”, and anyone was free to shoot them without consequence (and maybe a little reward)

  34. I’ve lived in Manhattan Beach my entire life (except when I went off to college). I’m blocks from where this snatch and grab took place. Watching the video of the getaway is comical to an old local like me. The store is 4 blocks from city hall and the police station. It’s one block up from the pier with all the lifeguards and firefighters. The getaway cars were parked in an alley headed south. There is no efficient way out of the city from that direction. They were headed straight into the walk streets and it is at least 12 blocks east to hit a major thoroughfare (Sepulveda or, newly renamed PCH). Further, the direction they were headed was straight into extremely narrow streets (places where it is absolutely common for cars to have to pull all the way over to let one side pass and then take turns going). The fact that these guys didn’t get caught within 10 minutes is beyond a joke. There is no will to enforce laws, even high-profile jewelry heists. I remember watching a private screening of “Reservoir Dogs” at Video Archives, the local video rental place where Quentin Tarantino worked before his big break back when it came out. Quentin narrated the screening and it was interesting to hear his thoughts as we watched (this was long before DVD director commentaries). Shame we couldn’t have gotten a local LEO response to jewelry thieves like Quentin envisioned in his film.

    I’ve been watching more and more of this crap for the past 2 years. In town there is currently a race to see who can construct the first and most elaborate shrine to BLM at 26th Street and Highland with the whole Bruce’s Beach nonsense. The county is trying to get theirs done, but the local city council is trying to get theirs done first. We now get pilgrimages of black bikers coming by the dozens and into the hundreds coming to pay homage to the new Mecca. I’ve always hated surfing 26th St., so it’s no personal loss to me and my family, but I would never go north of 21st Street with all that nonsense now. It’s really a shame. We had paradise on Earth, and I’ve watched it pissed away over the past 25 years. Didn’t seem like it was all that difficult for neighbors to keep an eye on everyone. We had no crime when it was all surfers and aerospeace engineers living in town. The hedge funds managers and lawyer assholes that have replaced the old residents can’t be bothered to wave at neighbors, so we have tremendous amounts of home invasions.

    I can’t imagine living away from the ocean. But it breaks my heart to see what has happened and it’s only going to get worse. I’m hoping that with the new Supreme Court verdict I will be able to apply for my CCW in the near future. Hopefully the worm will turn.

    • Thanks: Jim Don Bob, bomag, Listener
    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Beach Jim

    "We had paradise on Earth, and I've watched it pissed away over the past 25 years."

    The same can be said for the USA.

    Replies: @Detroit Refugee

    , @Anon
    @Beach Jim

    I feel for you. Rust belt cities have already been through this. The only thing constructive you can do for yourself is to move away. Elections, courts, police are for show now.

    , @SafeNow
    @Beach Jim

    Your description of the streets reminded me of my two rules for safe escape places. This location should have been safe from blacks, if my residential rules apply to businesses. My rules: (1) live 5 to10 miles from any interstate, or freeway; and (2) Your town has confusing winding roads, not a grid. (Extra points for lack of street signs.)

    Manhattan Beach is not too freeway-close. But mainly, even after a bad guy gets there, look at the mess he faces with narrow streets, walk streets etc.

    p.s. The good part about your surfing is that you are 100% safe from blacks, guaranteed. (While out in the water; different story when you get out.)

    Replies: @Beach Jim

    , @anonymous
    @Beach Jim

    I know what you mean about the MB "paradise." I was there in 1980, and even though I was from SF which was sorta paradise, I was thinking to myself, "how can I get here?"

    Around 2016 when the Apple Store robberies started to occur, I was getting coffee in a NorCal McDonald's and there was a black guy in his 70's wearing a Dodger cap. We began talking baseball and he said he was a Dodger fan because of Jackie Robinson. He said he'd grown up in North Carolina and that, "we weren't allowed to go anywhere." I wanted to say, "now do you understand why?" but he was so friendly that I couldn't bring myself to do it.

    , @Detroit Refugee
    @Beach Jim

    Sorry to hear about a wonderful place going to shit. Get your weapon anyways. Screw em.
    What's more important, your life and those of your loved ones, or city councils approval?

    , @tyrone
    @Beach Jim


    currently a race to see who can construct the first and most elaborate shrine to BLM
     
    ........so you can see why it's hard to get the old give-a-fuck meter moving for the rest of us.

    Replies: @Beach Jim

  35. @Joe Stalin
    @Achmed E. Newman


    11, how many I saw, is not an army, and they make plenty of pistol magazines that hold more than that many rounds. What an opportunity missed.
     
    Achmed, it's officially The People's Republic of New York, a place where ALL gun laws are to make subjects vulnerable to the criminal Democratic Party's Minority Militias.

    The NY SAFE Act prohibits possession of a magazine that has the capacity to hold more than ten (10) rounds of ammunition regardless of when it was manufactured or when it was obtained. It also prohibits possession of a magazine if it is loaded with more than seven (7) rounds of ammunition, unless you are at a range.

    https://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/downloads/pdf/permits/ny_safe_act_letter_re_lcafd_2013_05_v9.pdf
     

    The 2A community in NYS needs to ramp up a campaign as the communist cosmopolitans change their gun laws there to accommodate the recent USSC decision. Each NEW gun owner that is forced to jump through the circus flaming hoops of their gun control laws, pay $$$ for the privilege of being licensed and firearms registered for eventual confiscation, need to contact their useless representative and ask WHY they must do this, when SANE states don't have to.

    You will undoubtedly loose the first few years, but the influx of NEW gun owners provides an expanding base of political support. Remember, the homos got their homo marriage after a century, and there is absolutely nothing more despised in the cosmopolitan circles than unwashed gun owners.


    Two of the lawyers responsible for a major victory for gun rights forces at the Supreme Court on Thursday are parting with their prominent law firm after it announced it would no longer handle Second Amendment litigation.

    https://www.politico.com/news/2022/06/23/lawyers-gun-rights-supreme-court-00041909
     

    Replies: @PseudoNhymm

    Manhattan Beach CA, not Manhattan NY. Dealer could have gotten a permit…. maybe

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @PseudoNhymm

    Aw crap... that'll teach me for not slowing down reading...


    What this means for anyone residing in California is that the possession of a magazine that holds over ten rounds is unlawful. It does not matter if the magazine was purchased or possessed prior to this law.

    https://www.californiacriminaldefenselawyerblog.com/high-capacity-magazines-are-now-illegal-in-california/#:~:text=What%20this%20means%20for%20anyone,possessed%20prior%20to%20this%20law.
     
    But you're still screwed cause 11 people > 10 rounds, so you are going to have to reload.

    In Chicago, it's 15 rounds for the mag. Interestingly, that's the standard mag capacity of the Beretta M92 US Army pistol.

    And by law the handgun of the official NO CCW IL sign.

    https://news.wttw.com/sites/default/files/field/image/CCWProhibitedAreaSign.jpg
  36. @Alfa158
    By my count about 1/4 of all the houses have this sign or a similar sentiment in the front yard:

    https://www.amazon.com/H-Frame-Believe-Equality-Resistant-Corrugated/dp/B08JH3V7QF/ref=asc_df_B08JH3V7QF?tag=bingshoppinga-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=80745495247719&hvnetw=o&hvqmt=e&hvbmt=be&hvdev=m&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=&hvtargid=pla-4584345026272464&psc=1#immersive-view_1656168696106

    The city is 0.8% black.
    These two numbers are NOT independent of each other.

    Replies: @JimB, @Known Fact, @interesting, @Carbon blob, @Muggles, @bomag

    No matter where you’re from, we’re glad you’re somebody else’s neighbor

  37. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Almost Missouri

    I would cancel the Pride Day too, were I a Norwegian authority. 2 dead out of 23? That kind of shooting is nothing to be proud of. Allah too would be ashamed. You may get those 72 virgins in Heaven, but like a Social Security check in 2030, the deal might not be all it was cracked (get it?) up to be.

    "Yes, I promised 72 virgins. I never said they'd be below extended Social Security retirement age. Have at it!"

    (OK, that was bad...)

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    So bad, it’s good.

  38. @Farenheit
    Judgjng from the raw foot speed, ease of changing direction, and overall awareness while in motion, I'm thinking there's some good defensive back potential there.

    Do they have a "combine" for hood criminals?

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    I’m thinking there’s some good defensive back potential there.

    Maybe we should start using “cornerback” as a demographic identifier.

  39. @bomag
    So this is our latest political practice: if there is an unpopular event, stores will get robbed.

    Replies: @Ebony Obelisk, @JimDandy, @Legba

    They have insurance

    I says a lot about you guys that you are more concerned about predatory businesses than with justice. You can it expect people to be abused lying down

    I fell bad for you guys. You gaursntreed riots. That did not happen

    We will vote later. We are angry. Thus was your last gasp. You will lose

    I look at way too much lien. I am envcarsed by it. But I casnit stil. I stay I had the internet Tsushima away Turin. It’s ruining my ire

    I have a ready small one dang

    • Replies: @fish
    @Ebony Obelisk

    Obelisks…..you sound just like that female BLM activist from Chicago.


    “ Dey hab surance….dey hab surance….it donts mater cuz dey hab surance!
     
    No word yet as to whether she’s been able to turn that eloquence into a mansion in Topanga Canyon.
    , @TWS
    @Ebony Obelisk

    Not just a chat bot, but apparently one programmed in a language other than English.

    , @tyrone
    @Ebony Obelisk


    gaursntreed
     
    .......no,no,no, tiny ,gaurs are a large bovid , never gets treed ,coons on the other hand get treed all the time and shot ,like a thieving coon deserves........come to the country sometime.
  40. @Alfa158
    By my count about 1/4 of all the houses have this sign or a similar sentiment in the front yard:

    https://www.amazon.com/H-Frame-Believe-Equality-Resistant-Corrugated/dp/B08JH3V7QF/ref=asc_df_B08JH3V7QF?tag=bingshoppinga-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=80745495247719&hvnetw=o&hvqmt=e&hvbmt=be&hvdev=m&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=&hvtargid=pla-4584345026272464&psc=1#immersive-view_1656168696106

    The city is 0.8% black.
    These two numbers are NOT independent of each other.

    Replies: @JimB, @Known Fact, @interesting, @Carbon blob, @Muggles, @bomag

    That’s odd.

    Years back when wife and I took one of those “famous Hollywood homes” tours, it seemed like practically every big house had an “Armed Response” security sign in front.

    I guess the D.I.E. population there is a bit larger than 0.8%.

    Unless now banned by the Woke commie government, I suspect many are still there.

    An honest sign by liberal Wokesters would read:

    “We support BLM but if you come on our property uninvited, we will shoot you.”

    • Replies: @Pixo
    @Muggles

    “ I guess the D.I.E. population there is a bit larger than 0.8%.”

    There are a few rural enclave ultrarich places like Sherwood Forest, Los Altos (SF) Bel Air, Malibu (LA) and Rancho Santa Fe (San Diego) that are fully free of low IQ populations. But most wealthy areas in California like Manhattan Beach are dotted with crappy apartment blocks rented by hardworking hispanics. The lazy Hispanics can’t afford these apartments and wouldn’t see any reason to pay a premium to be close to jobs servicing elites with good public schools.

    The excellent and educational comedy, The Slums of Beverly Hills, shows late 1970s life in these complexes. BH complexes like those featured in the movie, which are airy and not too crowded with pools, have sometimes been gentrified. More typical of “Mexicans in rich area housing” are ugly 2-3 floor small stucco apartment complex with no amenities built in the 60s to 80s.

    Replies: @Bernard

  41. Official Ukrainian HIMARS rocket artillery video.

    HIMARS apparently used in deep strikes.

  42. @Yancey Ward
    I have decided that if they won't defend their property, even though it risks prosecution, I don't give a sh** any longer about the shop-owners. Just keep paying the insurance if they are fine with it, then so am I.

    Replies: @guest007

    But then everyone pays a higher price due to higher insurances premiums on everyone. However, the liability insurance probably will not cover them if they accidentally shot the wrong person.

  43. @Mr. Anon
    A few months ago, when these smash-and-grab robberies became commonplace, I saw a TV news story about one such robbery of a jewelry store in SoCal, followed by an annoying commercia, with a cast of trendy, shallow-looking metrosexual people, for this place, "The Real Real", an online reseller of luxury items:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_RealReal

    https://www.therealreal.com/

    And then I thought, so that's how these smash-and-grabbers are unloading their loot.

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired

    The Real Real, Poshmark, Ebay, OfferUp, and a ton of other second hand sites allow people to sell stolen goods like clothes, jewelry, tools, etc with no questions asked or proof of legitimate ownership. With things like custom jewelry that could be identified, they usually pop the stones out and sell/melt down the metal.

  44. @Muggles
    @Alfa158

    That's odd.

    Years back when wife and I took one of those "famous Hollywood homes" tours, it seemed like practically every big house had an "Armed Response" security sign in front.

    I guess the D.I.E. population there is a bit larger than 0.8%.

    Unless now banned by the Woke commie government, I suspect many are still there.

    An honest sign by liberal Wokesters would read:

    "We support BLM but if you come on our property uninvited, we will shoot you."

    Replies: @Pixo

    “ I guess the D.I.E. population there is a bit larger than 0.8%.”

    There are a few rural enclave ultrarich places like Sherwood Forest, Los Altos (SF) Bel Air, Malibu (LA) and Rancho Santa Fe (San Diego) that are fully free of low IQ populations. But most wealthy areas in California like Manhattan Beach are dotted with crappy apartment blocks rented by hardworking hispanics. The lazy Hispanics can’t afford these apartments and wouldn’t see any reason to pay a premium to be close to jobs servicing elites with good public schools.

    The excellent and educational comedy, The Slums of Beverly Hills, shows late 1970s life in these complexes. BH complexes like those featured in the movie, which are airy and not too crowded with pools, have sometimes been gentrified. More typical of “Mexicans in rich area housing” are ugly 2-3 floor small stucco apartment complex with no amenities built in the 60s to 80s.

    • Replies: @Bernard
    @Pixo


    There are a few rural enclave ultrarich places like Sherwood Forest, Los Altos (SF) Bel Air, Malibu (LA) and Rancho Santa Fe (San Diego) that are fully free of low IQ populations. But most wealthy areas in California like Manhattan Beach are dotted with crappy apartment blocks rented by hardworking hispanics
     
    Manhattan Beach is 100% nice. The apartment buildings you are referring to do not exist. A horrible apartment in the city is at least $2500 a month. Those type of criminals are not indigenous to the area. But luckily for the town’s residents, on a good day and without traffic, the worst areas of LA are just a few short minutes away.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  45. OT Steve should do one of his famous google searches for the occurrence of the word “famine” in the legit press.

    I’ll bet since the Regan/Thatcher revolution there hasn’t been much reporting about famine in the world. I seem to remember that in the old days famines were viewed like airplane accidents, tragedy but to some extent unavoidable.

    I’ll bet it starts turning up because our woke statesmen do not seem to understand how anything works in reality.

  46. @Meretricious
    Steve, I know you have an interest in criminology, so you must be aware that prison doesn't solve the problem of violent Negro felons. What I'd like to see happen is these low-lifes lose their citizenship and be deported. The Constitution should be amended to allow this. Once these Negroes see their cousins shipped to Africa they may think twice about ripping off a jewelery store. What do you think?

    Replies: @PseudoNhymm, @rebel yell, @Buffalo Joe, @AnotherDad, @Mactoul

    What I’d like to see happen is these low-lifes lose their citizenship and be deported. The Constitution should be amended to allow this.

    Meretricious, I agree that deportation (and/or sterilization) is the solution for chronic criminals. I also agree that doing this to criminals would mostly impact blacks and reduce the black population. But a change of that magnitude in public policy can only happen if conditions are desperate, as in a time of war, economic collapse, etc. The likely reality is that we will just keep slowly declining into Brazil.
    A middle class democracy in a time of relative peace and prosperity cannot make the tough decisions. That is how we got into this mess in the first place.

    • Disagree: Meretricious
  47. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Forbes

    I doubt they are their own cars, Forbes. They don't look like they'd be, for one thing. More importantly, since these guys made an effort to fully hide their identities, would they be that stupid to drive their own cars? Probably not ... You gotta get the cars somewhere though, and that's where the chain of identity could begin.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Forbes

    You gotta get the cars somewhere though, and that’s where the chain of identity could begin.

    The cars looked like a Camry, a Nissan Altima, and VW Jetta(?). I don’t think they were rental cars as the Altima looked like it was dented in the back. And they weren’t the thieves’ own cars because they didn’t bother to cover the license plates. (Except maybe the VW, which was either covered or a dealer plate). They could have been stolen but, interestingly, all the cars had the windows tinted (which the thieves may have done themselves before the job).

    So, three different cars are potentially traceable as to the time and place they were separated from their owners. And three window-tinting jobs are also involved (probably with home kits bought off Amazon). Three cars plus ten or twelve young black guys from nearby South-Central creates a lot of potential connections. Once one is caught he can roll up the whole gang.

    The problem is, detective work takes time and attention, and the cops in Southern California are laaaaazy in the extreme. Unless a crime involves a celebrity or a high-profile murder, they can’t be bothered. Maybe the news exposure bumps this crime up the list. But I doubt it.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Hypnotoad666


    Three cars plus ten or twelve young black guys from nearby South-Central creates a lot of potential connections. Once one is caught he can roll up the whole gang.
     
    Do you have any familiarly with modern American law enforcement? I do and can guarantee you more assiduity will go into looking for overtime details and pension plans than looking for the jewelry bandits.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7acD4q0lp0

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Mr. Anon

    , @Pixo
    @Hypnotoad666

    “ the cops in Southern California are laaaaazy in the extreme”

    Why do you say that?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  48. OT: Shouldn’t the unleashing of negroes as retribution upon your enemies be defined as an act of war? What’s the difference between unleashing negroes and biological warfare, aside from the far-reaching effects of “negro-bombing” being far more insidious?

    Spain should get what warplanes they have and initiate some old fashioned bombing runs. Strategizing negroes as bio weapons should be denounced by all nato members, as well as being outlawed by the Geneva convention.

    Attacking, and annexing Tijuana would certainly get Mexico’s attention. They have tens of thousands of the new bio weapons they’re launching at us daily. Mexico’s unrelenting attacks on the United States should be labeled as such.

    https://www.npr.org/2022/06/25/1107620889/morocco-migrants-die-stampede-spain-border-fence

  49. I wonder how difficult it is to fence all that jewelry.

    Fencing it, I would guess they get about 5 cents on the retail dollar for the stash. Probably, most of the stuff they keep to flash or spread around the harem.

  50. @JimB
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I wonder how difficult it is to fence all that jewelry. If it were pretty specialized in some way, perhaps the jewelers of the area could get together on-line and be on the look-out. It’s not like black people have the patience to hold onto it for a couple of years.
     
    The blacks sell to Chinese immigrant fences who have the patience to hang onto jewelry. The fences sell most of it in the Chinese community during festive times, especially around celebrations like the Moon Festival, Chinese New Year, and UC commencement ceremonies. Usually the money is laundered using small businesses in Chinese shopping malls, usually anchored by a Ranch 99.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    There was an entertaining court case in Bradford, Yorkshire recently. Some bad eggs correctly deduced that Chinese businesses like to deal in cash to avoid Western imperialist taxation. So they watched Chinese owned businesses, worked out the owners addresses, than put GPS trackers on their cars.

    Waited for them to leave home with a full car, then straight into the houses, where large amounts of sterling, euros and RMB were found.

    https://www.thetelegraphandargus.co.uk/news/20221296.bradford-car-tracker-gang-targeted-leeds-chinese-takeaways-jailed/

    Police first became aware of the trackers on December 22, 2020, when the owner of a Chinese takeaway’s home was burgled in Tingley, Leeds, after he left for about an hour.

    Every room in the house had been ransacked, including the loft, while amounts of cash in sterling, euros, dollars and Chinese currency were stolen.

    The victim told the attending officer that two days before the burglary someone had been seen going under their vehicle outside the takeaway business. They had checked at the time but found nothing untoward.

    When the officer looked under the car, he found a small black box attached to the car’s rear axle with magnets. Inside the case was a tracking device.

    • Thanks: bomag
    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @YetAnotherAnon

    In my small, extremely law-abiding world I'm suddenly encountering tons of cash-only economics. We (and plenty of family and friends) are paying for all kinds of services with green cash, straight up. I've never seen this much in 30 some years of business dealings. Is anybody paying taxes anymore?

    On the jewelry front, an old friend is an artist/jeweler from way back. He and his wife run a small and successful store in a wealthy town. She tells me they are unable to hire a goldsmith for any price. Their guess is that the goldsmiths can make far more money doing cash/illegal business than they can working for a legit jeweler.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Luddite in Chief

  51. @Meretricious
    Steve, I know you have an interest in criminology, so you must be aware that prison doesn't solve the problem of violent Negro felons. What I'd like to see happen is these low-lifes lose their citizenship and be deported. The Constitution should be amended to allow this. Once these Negroes see their cousins shipped to Africa they may think twice about ripping off a jewelery store. What do you think?

    Replies: @PseudoNhymm, @rebel yell, @Buffalo Joe, @AnotherDad, @Mactoul

    Mere, fencing stolen jewelery is not the same as selling it on line. A fence will give you a percentage of the wholesale value of the items, not the retail value. Should not be too hard to find someone selling Rolexes online at retail prices. Same with engagement rings. If you really wanted to catch the thieves.

    • Thanks: Meretricious
    • Replies: @Bernard
    @Buffalo Joe


    Mere, fencing stolen jewelery is not the same as selling it on line. A fence will give you a percentage of the wholesale value of the items, not the retail value. Should not be too hard to find someone selling Rolexes online at retail prices. Same with engagement rings. If you really wanted to catch the thieves.
     
    Rolex’s for one are quite easy to trace, all have serial numbers on the case and movement. If stolen there is a database which will alert anyone who services the watch of that. Being a mechanical watch, they will all eventually need service. It’s like most things, you can wear a stolen watch until you cant. In most cases, those fools who would be foolish enough to buy a cheap Rolex from a thief or a fence will eventually be involved with the police anyway.

    Rolex goes to extraordinary lengths to protect its brand. They do not sell online, or allow authorized dealers to do so. If you see a new Rolex for sale online, it’s a grey market piece at best.

    If I’m not mistaken, diamonds also have serial numbers etched into them.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @J.Ross

  52. Anon[369] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hypnotoad666
    @Achmed E. Newman


    You gotta get the cars somewhere though, and that’s where the chain of identity could begin.
     
    The cars looked like a Camry, a Nissan Altima, and VW Jetta(?). I don't think they were rental cars as the Altima looked like it was dented in the back. And they weren't the thieves' own cars because they didn't bother to cover the license plates. (Except maybe the VW, which was either covered or a dealer plate). They could have been stolen but, interestingly, all the cars had the windows tinted (which the thieves may have done themselves before the job).

    So, three different cars are potentially traceable as to the time and place they were separated from their owners. And three window-tinting jobs are also involved (probably with home kits bought off Amazon). Three cars plus ten or twelve young black guys from nearby South-Central creates a lot of potential connections. Once one is caught he can roll up the whole gang.

    The problem is, detective work takes time and attention, and the cops in Southern California are laaaaazy in the extreme. Unless a crime involves a celebrity or a high-profile murder, they can't be bothered. Maybe the news exposure bumps this crime up the list. But I doubt it.

    Replies: @Anon, @Pixo

    Three cars plus ten or twelve young black guys from nearby South-Central creates a lot of potential connections. Once one is caught he can roll up the whole gang.

    Do you have any familiarly with modern American law enforcement? I do and can guarantee you more assiduity will go into looking for overtime details and pension plans than looking for the jewelry bandits.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anon

    • Great Minds: @ Achmed E. Newman

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Anon

    The most important thing is that they can go home to their 401k at the end of their shift.

  53. @Hypnotoad666
    @Achmed E. Newman


    You gotta get the cars somewhere though, and that’s where the chain of identity could begin.
     
    The cars looked like a Camry, a Nissan Altima, and VW Jetta(?). I don't think they were rental cars as the Altima looked like it was dented in the back. And they weren't the thieves' own cars because they didn't bother to cover the license plates. (Except maybe the VW, which was either covered or a dealer plate). They could have been stolen but, interestingly, all the cars had the windows tinted (which the thieves may have done themselves before the job).

    So, three different cars are potentially traceable as to the time and place they were separated from their owners. And three window-tinting jobs are also involved (probably with home kits bought off Amazon). Three cars plus ten or twelve young black guys from nearby South-Central creates a lot of potential connections. Once one is caught he can roll up the whole gang.

    The problem is, detective work takes time and attention, and the cops in Southern California are laaaaazy in the extreme. Unless a crime involves a celebrity or a high-profile murder, they can't be bothered. Maybe the news exposure bumps this crime up the list. But I doubt it.

    Replies: @Anon, @Pixo

    “ the cops in Southern California are laaaaazy in the extreme”

    Why do you say that?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Pixo

    From the movies?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7acD4q0lp0

    Replies: @John Johnson

  54. @Pixo
    @Hypnotoad666

    “ the cops in Southern California are laaaaazy in the extreme”

    Why do you say that?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    From the movies?

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    That scene really shows what it is like to live in the city. Auto theft is considered an insurance issue. They aren't going to go and look for your car and in fact they will get annoyed if you ask about it. Normally you take the insurance money and move on. The poor get hammered as usual because they often have basic insurance that doesn't cover theft. Criminals will look for certain types of cars that they know how to steal and they tend to be older.

    I now live in a small town where the police will investigate anything since they aren't spending the day chasing violent felons. They are 1-2 minutes from my house for any call.

    But even when I was in the city I didn't resent the police for spending so much time in *cough* diversified areas. The police enforce the will of the mayor which on some level is really the will of the people. The police are on the frontlines of race denial. White liberals and conservatives exchange race denial based political theories in the burbs while police, first responders, social workers and other professionals have to face the unfortunate reality. Police are basically butchers that see where meat comes from while Whites in the burbs just buy steaks and cook them.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  55. On the bright side, because of their wise use of masks, no one needs to fear COVID infection while being robbed.

    • LOL: fish
  56. @Buffalo Joe
    @Meretricious

    Mere, fencing stolen jewelery is not the same as selling it on line. A fence will give you a percentage of the wholesale value of the items, not the retail value. Should not be too hard to find someone selling Rolexes online at retail prices. Same with engagement rings. If you really wanted to catch the thieves.

    Replies: @Bernard

    Mere, fencing stolen jewelery is not the same as selling it on line. A fence will give you a percentage of the wholesale value of the items, not the retail value. Should not be too hard to find someone selling Rolexes online at retail prices. Same with engagement rings. If you really wanted to catch the thieves.

    Rolex’s for one are quite easy to trace, all have serial numbers on the case and movement. If stolen there is a database which will alert anyone who services the watch of that. Being a mechanical watch, they will all eventually need service. It’s like most things, you can wear a stolen watch until you cant. In most cases, those fools who would be foolish enough to buy a cheap Rolex from a thief or a fence will eventually be involved with the police anyway.

    Rolex goes to extraordinary lengths to protect its brand. They do not sell online, or allow authorized dealers to do so. If you see a new Rolex for sale online, it’s a grey market piece at best.

    If I’m not mistaken, diamonds also have serial numbers etched into them.

    • Replies: @Luddite in Chief
    @Bernard


    Rolex goes to extraordinary lengths to protect its brand.
     
    Does it do them any good, though?

    I remember reading a brief article in Harper's two decades ago that had a comment from someone at Rolex (a company not known for making public statements). The comment said, in effect:

    The Chinese attend the same industry trade shows and purchase the same machines we do. We hope that when people choose a watch, they will choose the quality and attention to detail that is part of the Rolex name.
     
    That was two decades ago. I should think the problem has, if anything, gotten worse since that time. However, for all I know, the Rolex folks may have attained De Beers' level of effectiveness when it comes to maintaining the scarcity and desirability of their products.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    , @J.Ross
    @Bernard

    During the Arbusto Recession I was in a coin shop where somebody was trying to resell a watch and the owner, who had already earned my trust, said, I'm not even looking at any watch unless it's Rolex or Patek Phillipe.

  57. @Pixo
    @Muggles

    “ I guess the D.I.E. population there is a bit larger than 0.8%.”

    There are a few rural enclave ultrarich places like Sherwood Forest, Los Altos (SF) Bel Air, Malibu (LA) and Rancho Santa Fe (San Diego) that are fully free of low IQ populations. But most wealthy areas in California like Manhattan Beach are dotted with crappy apartment blocks rented by hardworking hispanics. The lazy Hispanics can’t afford these apartments and wouldn’t see any reason to pay a premium to be close to jobs servicing elites with good public schools.

    The excellent and educational comedy, The Slums of Beverly Hills, shows late 1970s life in these complexes. BH complexes like those featured in the movie, which are airy and not too crowded with pools, have sometimes been gentrified. More typical of “Mexicans in rich area housing” are ugly 2-3 floor small stucco apartment complex with no amenities built in the 60s to 80s.

    Replies: @Bernard

    There are a few rural enclave ultrarich places like Sherwood Forest, Los Altos (SF) Bel Air, Malibu (LA) and Rancho Santa Fe (San Diego) that are fully free of low IQ populations. But most wealthy areas in California like Manhattan Beach are dotted with crappy apartment blocks rented by hardworking hispanics

    Manhattan Beach is 100% nice. The apartment buildings you are referring to do not exist. A horrible apartment in the city is at least \$2500 a month. Those type of criminals are not indigenous to the area. But luckily for the town’s residents, on a good day and without traffic, the worst areas of LA are just a few short minutes away.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Bernard

    Manhattan Beach is for athletic frequent fliers who like living near LAX and can afford high costs. Much of the L.A. NHL hockey team lives there. It's more jock than Santa Monica.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Beach Jim

  58. @Meretricious
    Steve, I know you have an interest in criminology, so you must be aware that prison doesn't solve the problem of violent Negro felons. What I'd like to see happen is these low-lifes lose their citizenship and be deported. The Constitution should be amended to allow this. Once these Negroes see their cousins shipped to Africa they may think twice about ripping off a jewelery store. What do you think?

    Replies: @PseudoNhymm, @rebel yell, @Buffalo Joe, @AnotherDad, @Mactoul

    We are so far from any sort of rational discussion of the idea of society being owned by the productive people who make it function. Much less about genetics and eugenics. Obviously–to me–criminals and other parasites who are blight on the people who do the actual work, should just be tossed out. An island or two or three in the Aleutians could do the trick.

    But, if–“in the current year”–blacks are being allowed to loot because of their exalted “oppressed” minority status, then jewelry stores are where they should do their looting.

    Jewelers are in the business of ripping people off. (The only thing more ludicrous is the whole “designer” thing where women pay \$\$\$ for some bag with < a yard of leather and fabric.) And people that can afford to waste thousands of dollars on pretty stones and some metal … if they have to pay twice as much to cover jewelers now atmospheric insurance premiums, who cares. They are the people who should pay these "reparations". Regular working folks are going to be cutting back to make rent, pay the heating bill and put gas in their car to get to work.

    Sure, I would like "reparations with repatriation". But until will have an outbreak of rational real talk, if ripping off jewelers and these "designer" stores serves as reparations–great.

    • Thanks: Meretricious
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @AnotherDad

    Great comments, A.D., this one and your subsequent one. I feel sorry for neither the jewelry store owners nor the homeowners with the signs.

    Did you take the long road trip? It's gotta be nice to lose ~20 F.

  59. @bomag
    So this is our latest political practice: if there is an unpopular event, stores will get robbed.

    Replies: @Ebony Obelisk, @JimDandy, @Legba

    Their hypocrisy is biting them in the ass right now–they are engaging in literal insurrection in parts of America and prominent Dem leaders are calling for more insurrection… while the show trial for the not-insurrection takes place.

  60. @Bernard
    @Pixo


    There are a few rural enclave ultrarich places like Sherwood Forest, Los Altos (SF) Bel Air, Malibu (LA) and Rancho Santa Fe (San Diego) that are fully free of low IQ populations. But most wealthy areas in California like Manhattan Beach are dotted with crappy apartment blocks rented by hardworking hispanics
     
    Manhattan Beach is 100% nice. The apartment buildings you are referring to do not exist. A horrible apartment in the city is at least $2500 a month. Those type of criminals are not indigenous to the area. But luckily for the town’s residents, on a good day and without traffic, the worst areas of LA are just a few short minutes away.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Manhattan Beach is for athletic frequent fliers who like living near LAX and can afford high costs. Much of the L.A. NHL hockey team lives there. It’s more jock than Santa Monica.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Steve Sailer

    "It's more jock than Santa Monica."

    Santa Monica is jock? Well, you know more about jocks than I do.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Beach Jim
    @Steve Sailer

    You're 100 percent correct, Steve. Nomar Garciaparra and his wife, Mia Hamm live just up the block from me. So does Chip Kelly, the coach for the UCLA football team.

    I remember the transition from sleepy beach town to athlete hot spot. I was paying for college delivering pizzas and Marty McSorley of the LA Kings used to order from a local bar quite frequently. There were about 10 delivery drivers for Domino's back then, and 3 of us quickly memorized the phone number and approximate time when McSorley would call because he was always good for a $50 tip. As nice as that was to a young college student, I wish he would have never discovered the place. He told his buddies on the Kings that Manhattan Beach was great. Close enough to get to the Fabulous Forum (and even close enough when they moved to the Staples Center), but out of the flight path of LAX and away from the riff raff in Inglewood and the surrounding areas. The Kings slowly moved in, followed by Eric Karros and Mike Piazza of the Dodgers (Karros still lives in town, not sure about Piazza). Kurt Rambis of the Lakers moved in. Him, and surprisingly, his sons were great tippers and frequent pizza customers. His wife was always a zero tip (actually wanted the 10 to 35 cents change back, hehehe). By then the cat was fully out of the bag and the Hollywood guys started moving in. Vince Vaughn moved in, along with several other actors. This brought in the strivers and social climbers, like the hedge fund guys and the lawyers. Utterly ruined the place.
    For all the appreciation in property values and supposed amenities, I'd give my left arm for it to be the sleepy beach town of my childhood again. I wish my wife and kids could have seen it in its glory.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anonymous, @bomag

  61. @Anon
    @Hypnotoad666


    Three cars plus ten or twelve young black guys from nearby South-Central creates a lot of potential connections. Once one is caught he can roll up the whole gang.
     
    Do you have any familiarly with modern American law enforcement? I do and can guarantee you more assiduity will go into looking for overtime details and pension plans than looking for the jewelry bandits.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7acD4q0lp0

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Mr. Anon

    • Great Minds: @ Achmed E. Newman

  62. @AnotherDad
    @Meretricious

    We are so far from any sort of rational discussion of the idea of society being owned by the productive people who make it function. Much less about genetics and eugenics. Obviously--to me--criminals and other parasites who are blight on the people who do the actual work, should just be tossed out. An island or two or three in the Aleutians could do the trick.

    But, if--"in the current year"--blacks are being allowed to loot because of their exalted "oppressed" minority status, then jewelry stores are where they should do their looting.

    Jewelers are in the business of ripping people off. (The only thing more ludicrous is the whole "designer" thing where women pay $$$ for some bag with < a yard of leather and fabric.) And people that can afford to waste thousands of dollars on pretty stones and some metal ... if they have to pay twice as much to cover jewelers now atmospheric insurance premiums, who cares. They are the people who should pay these "reparations". Regular working folks are going to be cutting back to make rent, pay the heating bill and put gas in their car to get to work.

    Sure, I would like "reparations with repatriation". But until will have an outbreak of rational real talk, if ripping off jewelers and these "designer" stores serves as reparations--great.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Great comments, A.D., this one and your subsequent one. I feel sorry for neither the jewelry store owners nor the homeowners with the signs.

    Did you take the long road trip? It’s gotta be nice to lose ~20 F.

  63. @Beach Jim
    I've lived in Manhattan Beach my entire life (except when I went off to college). I'm blocks from where this snatch and grab took place. Watching the video of the getaway is comical to an old local like me. The store is 4 blocks from city hall and the police station. It's one block up from the pier with all the lifeguards and firefighters. The getaway cars were parked in an alley headed south. There is no efficient way out of the city from that direction. They were headed straight into the walk streets and it is at least 12 blocks east to hit a major thoroughfare (Sepulveda or, newly renamed PCH). Further, the direction they were headed was straight into extremely narrow streets (places where it is absolutely common for cars to have to pull all the way over to let one side pass and then take turns going). The fact that these guys didn't get caught within 10 minutes is beyond a joke. There is no will to enforce laws, even high-profile jewelry heists. I remember watching a private screening of "Reservoir Dogs" at Video Archives, the local video rental place where Quentin Tarantino worked before his big break back when it came out. Quentin narrated the screening and it was interesting to hear his thoughts as we watched (this was long before DVD director commentaries). Shame we couldn't have gotten a local LEO response to jewelry thieves like Quentin envisioned in his film.

    I've been watching more and more of this crap for the past 2 years. In town there is currently a race to see who can construct the first and most elaborate shrine to BLM at 26th Street and Highland with the whole Bruce's Beach nonsense. The county is trying to get theirs done, but the local city council is trying to get theirs done first. We now get pilgrimages of black bikers coming by the dozens and into the hundreds coming to pay homage to the new Mecca. I've always hated surfing 26th St., so it's no personal loss to me and my family, but I would never go north of 21st Street with all that nonsense now. It's really a shame. We had paradise on Earth, and I've watched it pissed away over the past 25 years. Didn't seem like it was all that difficult for neighbors to keep an eye on everyone. We had no crime when it was all surfers and aerospeace engineers living in town. The hedge funds managers and lawyer assholes that have replaced the old residents can't be bothered to wave at neighbors, so we have tremendous amounts of home invasions.

    I can't imagine living away from the ocean. But it breaks my heart to see what has happened and it's only going to get worse. I'm hoping that with the new Supreme Court verdict I will be able to apply for my CCW in the near future. Hopefully the worm will turn.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Anon, @SafeNow, @anonymous, @Detroit Refugee, @tyrone

    “We had paradise on Earth, and I’ve watched it pissed away over the past 25 years.”

    The same can be said for the USA.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob, Sam Malone
    • Replies: @Detroit Refugee
    @SunBakedSuburb

    My hometown was THE best place in Wayne County, MI. It's gone to crap not because of blacks, but an influx of what I call "newcomers". White leftists that are on a mission to out PC each other. I barely recognize anything. A visit 2 weeks ago was painful

  64. @Steve Sailer
    @Bernard

    Manhattan Beach is for athletic frequent fliers who like living near LAX and can afford high costs. Much of the L.A. NHL hockey team lives there. It's more jock than Santa Monica.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Beach Jim

    “It’s more jock than Santa Monica.”

    Santa Monica is jock? Well, you know more about jocks than I do.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Both Santa Monica and Manhattan Beach are full of physical fitness fanatics. Santa Monica skews entertainment industry, Manhattan Beach is more business, yuppie, corporate. Professional athletes like NHL players like the culture of Manhattan Beach more than Santa Monica.

    Replies: @guest007

  65. @Meretricious
    Steve, I know you have an interest in criminology, so you must be aware that prison doesn't solve the problem of violent Negro felons. What I'd like to see happen is these low-lifes lose their citizenship and be deported. The Constitution should be amended to allow this. Once these Negroes see their cousins shipped to Africa they may think twice about ripping off a jewelery store. What do you think?

    Replies: @PseudoNhymm, @rebel yell, @Buffalo Joe, @AnotherDad, @Mactoul

    Deported where?
    Why would any country be obliged to take American citizens?

    • Replies: @Meretricious
    @Mactoul

    US would purchase a few islands and have military supervise so that criminals weren't exploited. Easy pezy

    , @Known Fact
    @Mactoul


    Deported where?
    Why would any country be obliged to take American citizens?
     
    I assume we'd pay them handsomely for the privilege, albeit in increasingly worthless Yankee dollars.

    60 years ago The Outer Limits explored this idea in its Zanti Misfits episode -- The aliens pressure Earth into taking a shipload of dangerous criminals, since the Zantis don't believe in capital punishment. ("We are incapable of executing our own species. But you are not," the head Zanti tells us, "You are practiced executioners." Of course they're foot-long bug-eyed ants, not garden variety American thugs

    Replies: @Paul Mendez

    , @Detroit Refugee
    @Mactoul

    Agreed. I doubt an African country would want the U.S. Africans.

  66. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Steve Sailer

    "It's more jock than Santa Monica."

    Santa Monica is jock? Well, you know more about jocks than I do.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Both Santa Monica and Manhattan Beach are full of physical fitness fanatics. Santa Monica skews entertainment industry, Manhattan Beach is more business, yuppie, corporate. Professional athletes like NHL players like the culture of Manhattan Beach more than Santa Monica.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @Steve Sailer

    Manhattan Beach is also 80% non-Hispanic whites. Compare that to the rest of Los Angeles County.

  67. @Beach Jim
    I've lived in Manhattan Beach my entire life (except when I went off to college). I'm blocks from where this snatch and grab took place. Watching the video of the getaway is comical to an old local like me. The store is 4 blocks from city hall and the police station. It's one block up from the pier with all the lifeguards and firefighters. The getaway cars were parked in an alley headed south. There is no efficient way out of the city from that direction. They were headed straight into the walk streets and it is at least 12 blocks east to hit a major thoroughfare (Sepulveda or, newly renamed PCH). Further, the direction they were headed was straight into extremely narrow streets (places where it is absolutely common for cars to have to pull all the way over to let one side pass and then take turns going). The fact that these guys didn't get caught within 10 minutes is beyond a joke. There is no will to enforce laws, even high-profile jewelry heists. I remember watching a private screening of "Reservoir Dogs" at Video Archives, the local video rental place where Quentin Tarantino worked before his big break back when it came out. Quentin narrated the screening and it was interesting to hear his thoughts as we watched (this was long before DVD director commentaries). Shame we couldn't have gotten a local LEO response to jewelry thieves like Quentin envisioned in his film.

    I've been watching more and more of this crap for the past 2 years. In town there is currently a race to see who can construct the first and most elaborate shrine to BLM at 26th Street and Highland with the whole Bruce's Beach nonsense. The county is trying to get theirs done, but the local city council is trying to get theirs done first. We now get pilgrimages of black bikers coming by the dozens and into the hundreds coming to pay homage to the new Mecca. I've always hated surfing 26th St., so it's no personal loss to me and my family, but I would never go north of 21st Street with all that nonsense now. It's really a shame. We had paradise on Earth, and I've watched it pissed away over the past 25 years. Didn't seem like it was all that difficult for neighbors to keep an eye on everyone. We had no crime when it was all surfers and aerospeace engineers living in town. The hedge funds managers and lawyer assholes that have replaced the old residents can't be bothered to wave at neighbors, so we have tremendous amounts of home invasions.

    I can't imagine living away from the ocean. But it breaks my heart to see what has happened and it's only going to get worse. I'm hoping that with the new Supreme Court verdict I will be able to apply for my CCW in the near future. Hopefully the worm will turn.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Anon, @SafeNow, @anonymous, @Detroit Refugee, @tyrone

    I feel for you. Rust belt cities have already been through this. The only thing constructive you can do for yourself is to move away. Elections, courts, police are for show now.

    • Agree: Detroit Refugee
  68. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Paul Rise

    Those are all good points, Paul, as are Harry's. I was saying this was a missed opportunity nonetheless. These thugs will only learn the hard way, and killing 11 of them would probably prevent a few hundred serious crimes in the future.

    I could never see being in that business to begin with. Jewelry is a scam, especially the diamond business. There's not any quantifiable real value in that stuff.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “There’s not any quantifiable real value in that stuff.”

    The Dollar, in 4 to 5 years? Better days ahead, Achmed: Your consciousness will be plugged into a three foot worm floating in thick nutritious liquid in a climate controlled drawer. You are your own food. You’re a self-contained unit. No worries, other than the power going out in your drawer.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @SunBakedSuburb

    You don't need to tell me about the US Dollar, SBS. I'm on, well, getting off, that.

    However, the diamond business is a monopoly scam of DeBeers, like nothing else I've ever heard about. Almost 5 years ago I wrote a 3-part review of a great on-line book about it all by one Edward Jay Epstein, probably no relation to the late Jeff Epstein of such islands as Fantasy Island, in late 1978, no less.

    "You've got a friend in the diamond business" is the title of the Peak Stupidity review - Part 1 -- Part 2 and Part 3. That book is great reading - you'd need half a day or so.

    As for my drawer, thanks for the words of hope. I'm looking forward to it. I can blog from there, right?

    Replies: @Paul Mendez

    , @Sam Malone
    @SunBakedSuburb

    "You will own nothing and you will be happy."
    - the creatures who own us all

    Wealth is collecting into the hands of the oligarchs and corporations and away from the middle class.

    You used to buy a new copy of Microsoft Word. Then like 10 years ago it seemed like you couldn't buy it anymore, only sort of rent it, you had to pay a monthly fee forever, supposedly in exchange for continued product service and improvement. But you had no choice. That's the first time I heard of that.

  69. @Beach Jim
    I've lived in Manhattan Beach my entire life (except when I went off to college). I'm blocks from where this snatch and grab took place. Watching the video of the getaway is comical to an old local like me. The store is 4 blocks from city hall and the police station. It's one block up from the pier with all the lifeguards and firefighters. The getaway cars were parked in an alley headed south. There is no efficient way out of the city from that direction. They were headed straight into the walk streets and it is at least 12 blocks east to hit a major thoroughfare (Sepulveda or, newly renamed PCH). Further, the direction they were headed was straight into extremely narrow streets (places where it is absolutely common for cars to have to pull all the way over to let one side pass and then take turns going). The fact that these guys didn't get caught within 10 minutes is beyond a joke. There is no will to enforce laws, even high-profile jewelry heists. I remember watching a private screening of "Reservoir Dogs" at Video Archives, the local video rental place where Quentin Tarantino worked before his big break back when it came out. Quentin narrated the screening and it was interesting to hear his thoughts as we watched (this was long before DVD director commentaries). Shame we couldn't have gotten a local LEO response to jewelry thieves like Quentin envisioned in his film.

    I've been watching more and more of this crap for the past 2 years. In town there is currently a race to see who can construct the first and most elaborate shrine to BLM at 26th Street and Highland with the whole Bruce's Beach nonsense. The county is trying to get theirs done, but the local city council is trying to get theirs done first. We now get pilgrimages of black bikers coming by the dozens and into the hundreds coming to pay homage to the new Mecca. I've always hated surfing 26th St., so it's no personal loss to me and my family, but I would never go north of 21st Street with all that nonsense now. It's really a shame. We had paradise on Earth, and I've watched it pissed away over the past 25 years. Didn't seem like it was all that difficult for neighbors to keep an eye on everyone. We had no crime when it was all surfers and aerospeace engineers living in town. The hedge funds managers and lawyer assholes that have replaced the old residents can't be bothered to wave at neighbors, so we have tremendous amounts of home invasions.

    I can't imagine living away from the ocean. But it breaks my heart to see what has happened and it's only going to get worse. I'm hoping that with the new Supreme Court verdict I will be able to apply for my CCW in the near future. Hopefully the worm will turn.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Anon, @SafeNow, @anonymous, @Detroit Refugee, @tyrone

    Your description of the streets reminded me of my two rules for safe escape places. This location should have been safe from blacks, if my residential rules apply to businesses. My rules: (1) live 5 to10 miles from any interstate, or freeway; and (2) Your town has confusing winding roads, not a grid. (Extra points for lack of street signs.)

    Manhattan Beach is not too freeway-close. But mainly, even after a bad guy gets there, look at the mess he faces with narrow streets, walk streets etc.

    p.s. The good part about your surfing is that you are 100% safe from blacks, guaranteed. (While out in the water; different story when you get out.)

    • Replies: @Beach Jim
    @SafeNow

    You're not wrong, Safe. There has been a huge increase in the number of black visitors to MB in the past 2 years. However, I have not noticed any increase in the number of black swimmers, surfers, etc.

  70. @Ebony Obelisk
    @bomag

    They have insurance

    I says a lot about you guys that you are more concerned about predatory businesses than with justice. You can it expect people to be abused lying down

    I fell bad for you guys. You gaursntreed riots. That did not happen

    We will vote later. We are angry. Thus was your last gasp. You will lose

    I look at way too much lien. I am envcarsed by it. But I casnit stil. I stay I had the internet Tsushima away Turin. It’s ruining my ire

    I have a ready small one dang

    Replies: @fish, @TWS, @tyrone

    Obelisks…..you sound just like that female BLM activist from Chicago.

    “ Dey hab surance….dey hab surance….it donts mater cuz dey hab surance!

    No word yet as to whether she’s been able to turn that eloquence into a mansion in Topanga Canyon.

    • LOL: Detroit Refugee
  71. @Anon
    @Hypnotoad666


    Three cars plus ten or twelve young black guys from nearby South-Central creates a lot of potential connections. Once one is caught he can roll up the whole gang.
     
    Do you have any familiarly with modern American law enforcement? I do and can guarantee you more assiduity will go into looking for overtime details and pension plans than looking for the jewelry bandits.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7acD4q0lp0

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Mr. Anon

    The most important thing is that they can go home to their 401k at the end of their shift.

  72. @bomag
    So this is our latest political practice: if there is an unpopular event, stores will get robbed.

    Replies: @Ebony Obelisk, @JimDandy, @Legba

    That’s crazy talk. Stores will get robbed after popular events, too!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Legba


    That’s crazy talk. Stores will get robbed after popular events, too!
     
    Remember that recent spring when St Louis and Toronto won championships, and all the violence occurred in the latter? Gee, what might the difference have been...?
  73. Meanwhile, Antifa Incels outwitted the LAPD, and took over the 110 freeway, threatening random motorists with violence. Note the sociopath on the bicycle getting his bike lock ready to bash windshields if one car dares to pass by them.

    Inadvertently, they’re making the Trump trial circus all the more laughable, while strengthening the resolve for his next run for the presidency.

    I’m not a young man, and I’ve never seen such committed aimless stupidity with such depth. It’s almost like they are supermen in this respect. Can stupidity be a superpower? If so, who or what can save us from this retarded siege? Do we fight fire with fire? Should we raise a floodlight signal for “Retarded Batman,” and wait for something retarded and angry to crawl out from the Bronson Caves to rescue us?

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Zoos

    Blue people trashing blue cities in blue states where the abortion laws won't change. Yep, that really makes a difference.

    , @J.Ross
    @Zoos

    The wisdom of Bill Hicks still applies.

    , @tyrone
    @Zoos

    And why should LAPD do anything ,Gas-coin will just turn them loose ,maybe even indict the policeman, when and if (massive Dem steal) the Republicans take congress expect this to be ten times worst .........if Trump wins in 2024 ......2020 on steroids.

  74. @PseudoNhymm
    @Joe Stalin

    Manhattan Beach CA, not Manhattan NY. Dealer could have gotten a permit.... maybe

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    Aw crap… that’ll teach me for not slowing down reading…

    What this means for anyone residing in California is that the possession of a magazine that holds over ten rounds is unlawful. It does not matter if the magazine was purchased or possessed prior to this law.

    https://www.californiacriminaldefenselawyerblog.com/high-capacity-magazines-are-now-illegal-in-california/#:~:text=What%20this%20means%20for%20anyone,possessed%20prior%20to%20this%20law.

    But you’re still screwed cause 11 people > 10 rounds, so you are going to have to reload.

    In Chicago, it’s 15 rounds for the mag. Interestingly, that’s the standard mag capacity of the Beretta M92 US Army pistol.

    And by law the handgun of the official NO CCW IL sign.

  75. anonymous[215] • Disclaimer says:
    @Beach Jim
    I've lived in Manhattan Beach my entire life (except when I went off to college). I'm blocks from where this snatch and grab took place. Watching the video of the getaway is comical to an old local like me. The store is 4 blocks from city hall and the police station. It's one block up from the pier with all the lifeguards and firefighters. The getaway cars were parked in an alley headed south. There is no efficient way out of the city from that direction. They were headed straight into the walk streets and it is at least 12 blocks east to hit a major thoroughfare (Sepulveda or, newly renamed PCH). Further, the direction they were headed was straight into extremely narrow streets (places where it is absolutely common for cars to have to pull all the way over to let one side pass and then take turns going). The fact that these guys didn't get caught within 10 minutes is beyond a joke. There is no will to enforce laws, even high-profile jewelry heists. I remember watching a private screening of "Reservoir Dogs" at Video Archives, the local video rental place where Quentin Tarantino worked before his big break back when it came out. Quentin narrated the screening and it was interesting to hear his thoughts as we watched (this was long before DVD director commentaries). Shame we couldn't have gotten a local LEO response to jewelry thieves like Quentin envisioned in his film.

    I've been watching more and more of this crap for the past 2 years. In town there is currently a race to see who can construct the first and most elaborate shrine to BLM at 26th Street and Highland with the whole Bruce's Beach nonsense. The county is trying to get theirs done, but the local city council is trying to get theirs done first. We now get pilgrimages of black bikers coming by the dozens and into the hundreds coming to pay homage to the new Mecca. I've always hated surfing 26th St., so it's no personal loss to me and my family, but I would never go north of 21st Street with all that nonsense now. It's really a shame. We had paradise on Earth, and I've watched it pissed away over the past 25 years. Didn't seem like it was all that difficult for neighbors to keep an eye on everyone. We had no crime when it was all surfers and aerospeace engineers living in town. The hedge funds managers and lawyer assholes that have replaced the old residents can't be bothered to wave at neighbors, so we have tremendous amounts of home invasions.

    I can't imagine living away from the ocean. But it breaks my heart to see what has happened and it's only going to get worse. I'm hoping that with the new Supreme Court verdict I will be able to apply for my CCW in the near future. Hopefully the worm will turn.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Anon, @SafeNow, @anonymous, @Detroit Refugee, @tyrone

    I know what you mean about the MB “paradise.” I was there in 1980, and even though I was from SF which was sorta paradise, I was thinking to myself, “how can I get here?”

    Around 2016 when the Apple Store robberies started to occur, I was getting coffee in a NorCal McDonald’s and there was a black guy in his 70’s wearing a Dodger cap. We began talking baseball and he said he was a Dodger fan because of Jackie Robinson. He said he’d grown up in North Carolina and that, “we weren’t allowed to go anywhere.” I wanted to say, “now do you understand why?” but he was so friendly that I couldn’t bring myself to do it.

    • Agree: bomag
  76. Why did Al’s sharpies burn down Freddie’s Fashion Mart when they could have emptied it?

  77. @Bernard
    @Buffalo Joe


    Mere, fencing stolen jewelery is not the same as selling it on line. A fence will give you a percentage of the wholesale value of the items, not the retail value. Should not be too hard to find someone selling Rolexes online at retail prices. Same with engagement rings. If you really wanted to catch the thieves.
     
    Rolex’s for one are quite easy to trace, all have serial numbers on the case and movement. If stolen there is a database which will alert anyone who services the watch of that. Being a mechanical watch, they will all eventually need service. It’s like most things, you can wear a stolen watch until you cant. In most cases, those fools who would be foolish enough to buy a cheap Rolex from a thief or a fence will eventually be involved with the police anyway.

    Rolex goes to extraordinary lengths to protect its brand. They do not sell online, or allow authorized dealers to do so. If you see a new Rolex for sale online, it’s a grey market piece at best.

    If I’m not mistaken, diamonds also have serial numbers etched into them.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @J.Ross

    Rolex goes to extraordinary lengths to protect its brand.

    Does it do them any good, though?

    I remember reading a brief article in Harper’s two decades ago that had a comment from someone at Rolex (a company not known for making public statements). The comment said, in effect:

    The Chinese attend the same industry trade shows and purchase the same machines we do. We hope that when people choose a watch, they will choose the quality and attention to detail that is part of the Rolex name.

    That was two decades ago. I should think the problem has, if anything, gotten worse since that time. However, for all I know, the Rolex folks may have attained De Beers’ level of effectiveness when it comes to maintaining the scarcity and desirability of their products.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Luddite in Chief

    Ten years back fake Rolexes made in China were all over the UK. Quite useful if you followed the advice of anon on the perfume thread

    "single man needs two things, name-brand cologne and a $1000-plus fine watch"

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @stari_momak

  78. @Legba
    @bomag

    That's crazy talk. Stores will get robbed after popular events, too!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    That’s crazy talk. Stores will get robbed after popular events, too!

    Remember that recent spring when St Louis and Toronto won championships, and all the violence occurred in the latter? Gee, what might the difference have been…?

  79. @Harry Baldwin
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Manhattan Beach is part of LA County, and thus in the jurisdiction of DA George Gascon. You would be in serious trouble if you shot looters.

    As to your other point, it appears that it's not that hard to fence the haul from organized smash-and-grab operations.


    Once items are stolen, there are several ways to sell them -- all extremely easy and with little regulation and monitoring from law enforcement, experts said. Most items grabbed in such cases have no serial numbers, making tracing them almost impossible, Eliadis said.

    "It is incredibly easy to sell stolen merchandise online through e-commerce platforms," Buel said. "E-commerce has really taken off as the place to sell stolen goods."

    Other thieves don't need to sell their stolen goods on Craigslist or eBay. They can also use flea markets, pawn shops and street vendors. Thieves can sell expensive items at slashed prices, meaning there's no shortage of buyers, Eliadis added.
     
    Auto theft has become an increasing problem in the NYC area and car-theft rings have fairly sophisticated ways to disposing of the haul. Stolen cars are driven to Newark, put in containers, and shipped to Africa. Lots of info on the internet about this:

    https://www.nj.com/news/2012/05/international_high-end_car_the.html

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @kaganovitch

    Stolen cars are driven to Newark, put in containers, and shipped to Africa. Lots of info on the internet about this:

    See, they’re already skilling up and glomming on to these ‘digital value chains’. It’s working!

    • Agree: bomag
  80. @Steve Sailer
    @Bernard

    Manhattan Beach is for athletic frequent fliers who like living near LAX and can afford high costs. Much of the L.A. NHL hockey team lives there. It's more jock than Santa Monica.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Beach Jim

    You’re 100 percent correct, Steve. Nomar Garciaparra and his wife, Mia Hamm live just up the block from me. So does Chip Kelly, the coach for the UCLA football team.

    I remember the transition from sleepy beach town to athlete hot spot. I was paying for college delivering pizzas and Marty McSorley of the LA Kings used to order from a local bar quite frequently. There were about 10 delivery drivers for Domino’s back then, and 3 of us quickly memorized the phone number and approximate time when McSorley would call because he was always good for a \$50 tip. As nice as that was to a young college student, I wish he would have never discovered the place. He told his buddies on the Kings that Manhattan Beach was great. Close enough to get to the Fabulous Forum (and even close enough when they moved to the Staples Center), but out of the flight path of LAX and away from the riff raff in Inglewood and the surrounding areas. The Kings slowly moved in, followed by Eric Karros and Mike Piazza of the Dodgers (Karros still lives in town, not sure about Piazza). Kurt Rambis of the Lakers moved in. Him, and surprisingly, his sons were great tippers and frequent pizza customers. His wife was always a zero tip (actually wanted the 10 to 35 cents change back, hehehe). By then the cat was fully out of the bag and the Hollywood guys started moving in. Vince Vaughn moved in, along with several other actors. This brought in the strivers and social climbers, like the hedge fund guys and the lawyers. Utterly ruined the place.
    For all the appreciation in property values and supposed amenities, I’d give my left arm for it to be the sleepy beach town of my childhood again. I wish my wife and kids could have seen it in its glory.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Beach Jim

    Thanks.

    Los Angeles is a rare coastal city that didn't develop from the coast inland. Instead, it started 20 miles inland because what's now downtown L.A. was the only place with with year round flowing water in the L.A. River. Then when the trains arrived in the 1880s and real estate boomed, the first suburb for the well to do was Pasadena 30 miles inland, which was popular for the low humidity climate in an era of tuberculosis. Much of the growth was inland from Pasadena because that was the orange grove belt. Wealthy Midwesterners were into buying orange groves the way Silicon Valley people are into buying vineyards.

    Then L.A. started moving west, but there was a reluctance to go too far near the coast due to the fogs giving you TB. So the coastal communities (Bay City in Chandler novels) were laid out with smallish houses. My impression is that the beach cities have fairly high population densities due to smallish lot sizes.

    After penicillin emerged in 1945 and the TB threat went away, the beach communities were during the Beach Boys era one of the great bargains in American history, especially after LAX opened in 1962 and you could live near the beach and next to, but not under the flightpath of, a major airport.

    But all good things come to an end. As it got expensive in the 1970s, Santa Monica started moving to the left in the 1970s as renters realized that they could use leftist ideology to justify rent control.

    Interestingly, Manhattan Beach emerged as the cultural pole of Santa Monica with athletes and entertainers like Vince Vaughn who aren't culturally set attuned to Santa Monica.

    Replies: @Beach Jim

    , @anonymous
    @Beach Jim

    Milo Goes To College is one of the greatest albums of all time.

    , @bomag
    @Beach Jim

    Good story.

    So the California ethos ruined California; moves to other states and degrades them.

    The current global question: are nice places sustainable?

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @rebel yell

  81. @SafeNow
    @Beach Jim

    Your description of the streets reminded me of my two rules for safe escape places. This location should have been safe from blacks, if my residential rules apply to businesses. My rules: (1) live 5 to10 miles from any interstate, or freeway; and (2) Your town has confusing winding roads, not a grid. (Extra points for lack of street signs.)

    Manhattan Beach is not too freeway-close. But mainly, even after a bad guy gets there, look at the mess he faces with narrow streets, walk streets etc.

    p.s. The good part about your surfing is that you are 100% safe from blacks, guaranteed. (While out in the water; different story when you get out.)

    Replies: @Beach Jim

    You’re not wrong, Safe. There has been a huge increase in the number of black visitors to MB in the past 2 years. However, I have not noticed any increase in the number of black swimmers, surfers, etc.

  82. @Beach Jim
    @Steve Sailer

    You're 100 percent correct, Steve. Nomar Garciaparra and his wife, Mia Hamm live just up the block from me. So does Chip Kelly, the coach for the UCLA football team.

    I remember the transition from sleepy beach town to athlete hot spot. I was paying for college delivering pizzas and Marty McSorley of the LA Kings used to order from a local bar quite frequently. There were about 10 delivery drivers for Domino's back then, and 3 of us quickly memorized the phone number and approximate time when McSorley would call because he was always good for a $50 tip. As nice as that was to a young college student, I wish he would have never discovered the place. He told his buddies on the Kings that Manhattan Beach was great. Close enough to get to the Fabulous Forum (and even close enough when they moved to the Staples Center), but out of the flight path of LAX and away from the riff raff in Inglewood and the surrounding areas. The Kings slowly moved in, followed by Eric Karros and Mike Piazza of the Dodgers (Karros still lives in town, not sure about Piazza). Kurt Rambis of the Lakers moved in. Him, and surprisingly, his sons were great tippers and frequent pizza customers. His wife was always a zero tip (actually wanted the 10 to 35 cents change back, hehehe). By then the cat was fully out of the bag and the Hollywood guys started moving in. Vince Vaughn moved in, along with several other actors. This brought in the strivers and social climbers, like the hedge fund guys and the lawyers. Utterly ruined the place.
    For all the appreciation in property values and supposed amenities, I'd give my left arm for it to be the sleepy beach town of my childhood again. I wish my wife and kids could have seen it in its glory.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anonymous, @bomag

    Thanks.

    Los Angeles is a rare coastal city that didn’t develop from the coast inland. Instead, it started 20 miles inland because what’s now downtown L.A. was the only place with with year round flowing water in the L.A. River. Then when the trains arrived in the 1880s and real estate boomed, the first suburb for the well to do was Pasadena 30 miles inland, which was popular for the low humidity climate in an era of tuberculosis. Much of the growth was inland from Pasadena because that was the orange grove belt. Wealthy Midwesterners were into buying orange groves the way Silicon Valley people are into buying vineyards.

    Then L.A. started moving west, but there was a reluctance to go too far near the coast due to the fogs giving you TB. So the coastal communities (Bay City in Chandler novels) were laid out with smallish houses. My impression is that the beach cities have fairly high population densities due to smallish lot sizes.

    After penicillin emerged in 1945 and the TB threat went away, the beach communities were during the Beach Boys era one of the great bargains in American history, especially after LAX opened in 1962 and you could live near the beach and next to, but not under the flightpath of, a major airport.

    But all good things come to an end. As it got expensive in the 1970s, Santa Monica started moving to the left in the 1970s as renters realized that they could use leftist ideology to justify rent control.

    Interestingly, Manhattan Beach emerged as the cultural pole of Santa Monica with athletes and entertainers like Vince Vaughn who aren’t culturally set attuned to Santa Monica.

    • Thanks: Sam Malone
    • Replies: @Beach Jim
    @Steve Sailer

    As always, your knowledge of LA's local history is spot on. In fact, you described how my parents first bought in Manhattan Beach to a T. My dad was a high school teacher who got a summer gig working for US Customs during the busy travel months while he was on summer break. After one summer of doing it, he inquired about how to go full time. One year later, he jumped from teaching to US Customs. My parents bought in Manhattan Beach because it was affordable, nice, and close enough to LAX for my dad to work, but out of the flight path.

    I don't remember it getting particularly expensive in the 1970s (or, really, the 80s for that matter). My best friend's mom sold her place in 1997 for $300k. I'm not sure how much above average that was for the time (I know it was a bit, but not how much). I had just purchased a house a few months before she announced, so I was strapped for cash, otherwise I would have bought the place. Our house in Long Beach has appreciated nicely over the years, but nothing compared to my friend's place in MB.

    I knew about Pasadena and TB, but I didn't know that the beach fog was associated with TB. I absolutely love the fog. It's my favorite weather condition. I love driving west on the 105 coming home from work and hitting the fog bank around LAX and then taking Vista Del Mar home in the soup.

    Thanks for the history lesson.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  83. @Zoos
    Meanwhile, Antifa Incels outwitted the LAPD, and took over the 110 freeway, threatening random motorists with violence. Note the sociopath on the bicycle getting his bike lock ready to bash windshields if one car dares to pass by them.

    Inadvertently, they’re making the Trump trial circus all the more laughable, while strengthening the resolve for his next run for the presidency.

    I’m not a young man, and I’ve never seen such committed aimless stupidity with such depth. It’s almost like they are supermen in this respect. Can stupidity be a superpower? If so, who or what can save us from this retarded siege? Do we fight fire with fire? Should we raise a floodlight signal for "Retarded Batman," and wait for something retarded and angry to crawl out from the Bronson Caves to rescue us?

    https://twitter.com/AnthonyCabassa_/status/1540515299409031168?s=20&t=WgJ_uYPvPAfewCEB3BYLnw

    Replies: @Anon, @J.Ross, @tyrone

    Blue people trashing blue cities in blue states where the abortion laws won’t change. Yep, that really makes a difference.

  84. anonymous[197] • Disclaimer says:
    @Beach Jim
    @Steve Sailer

    You're 100 percent correct, Steve. Nomar Garciaparra and his wife, Mia Hamm live just up the block from me. So does Chip Kelly, the coach for the UCLA football team.

    I remember the transition from sleepy beach town to athlete hot spot. I was paying for college delivering pizzas and Marty McSorley of the LA Kings used to order from a local bar quite frequently. There were about 10 delivery drivers for Domino's back then, and 3 of us quickly memorized the phone number and approximate time when McSorley would call because he was always good for a $50 tip. As nice as that was to a young college student, I wish he would have never discovered the place. He told his buddies on the Kings that Manhattan Beach was great. Close enough to get to the Fabulous Forum (and even close enough when they moved to the Staples Center), but out of the flight path of LAX and away from the riff raff in Inglewood and the surrounding areas. The Kings slowly moved in, followed by Eric Karros and Mike Piazza of the Dodgers (Karros still lives in town, not sure about Piazza). Kurt Rambis of the Lakers moved in. Him, and surprisingly, his sons were great tippers and frequent pizza customers. His wife was always a zero tip (actually wanted the 10 to 35 cents change back, hehehe). By then the cat was fully out of the bag and the Hollywood guys started moving in. Vince Vaughn moved in, along with several other actors. This brought in the strivers and social climbers, like the hedge fund guys and the lawyers. Utterly ruined the place.
    For all the appreciation in property values and supposed amenities, I'd give my left arm for it to be the sleepy beach town of my childhood again. I wish my wife and kids could have seen it in its glory.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anonymous, @bomag

    Milo Goes To College is one of the greatest albums of all time.

  85. @Beach Jim
    @Steve Sailer

    You're 100 percent correct, Steve. Nomar Garciaparra and his wife, Mia Hamm live just up the block from me. So does Chip Kelly, the coach for the UCLA football team.

    I remember the transition from sleepy beach town to athlete hot spot. I was paying for college delivering pizzas and Marty McSorley of the LA Kings used to order from a local bar quite frequently. There were about 10 delivery drivers for Domino's back then, and 3 of us quickly memorized the phone number and approximate time when McSorley would call because he was always good for a $50 tip. As nice as that was to a young college student, I wish he would have never discovered the place. He told his buddies on the Kings that Manhattan Beach was great. Close enough to get to the Fabulous Forum (and even close enough when they moved to the Staples Center), but out of the flight path of LAX and away from the riff raff in Inglewood and the surrounding areas. The Kings slowly moved in, followed by Eric Karros and Mike Piazza of the Dodgers (Karros still lives in town, not sure about Piazza). Kurt Rambis of the Lakers moved in. Him, and surprisingly, his sons were great tippers and frequent pizza customers. His wife was always a zero tip (actually wanted the 10 to 35 cents change back, hehehe). By then the cat was fully out of the bag and the Hollywood guys started moving in. Vince Vaughn moved in, along with several other actors. This brought in the strivers and social climbers, like the hedge fund guys and the lawyers. Utterly ruined the place.
    For all the appreciation in property values and supposed amenities, I'd give my left arm for it to be the sleepy beach town of my childhood again. I wish my wife and kids could have seen it in its glory.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anonymous, @bomag

    Good story.

    So the California ethos ruined California; moves to other states and degrades them.

    The current global question: are nice places sustainable?

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
    @bomag


    The current global question: are nice places sustainable?
     
    Only if the nice people who live in the nice places don’t have the financial wherewithal to move.

    Conservatives are typically practical problem-solvers who want to be left alone and enjoy their lives. They’ll pull up stakes and move somewhere that’s still nice rather than enlist their families in a grinding siege war to defend the perimeter.

    In the past, big northeastern cities had pockets of civility where the (usually white, ethnic) homeowners couldn’t afford to move to the suburbs. In the future, declining wealth and fewer options might make nice people more willing to fight to to keep their nice places.
    , @rebel yell
    @bomag


    The current global question: are nice places sustainable?
     
    The nice place has to have something about it that is appalling to liberals and corporate executives so they don't want to live there. And it has to be a place that is a No-Go zone for blacks.
    The Ozarks meet those criteria (for the most part). Are the Ozarks a nice place? I think so, but to each his own.
  86. @Alfa158
    By my count about 1/4 of all the houses have this sign or a similar sentiment in the front yard:

    https://www.amazon.com/H-Frame-Believe-Equality-Resistant-Corrugated/dp/B08JH3V7QF/ref=asc_df_B08JH3V7QF?tag=bingshoppinga-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=80745495247719&hvnetw=o&hvqmt=e&hvbmt=be&hvdev=m&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=&hvtargid=pla-4584345026272464&psc=1#immersive-view_1656168696106

    The city is 0.8% black.
    These two numbers are NOT independent of each other.

    Replies: @JimB, @Known Fact, @interesting, @Carbon blob, @Muggles, @bomag

    Not sure about “Science is Real”. What passes for science today is plenty fake.

    The other statements are demonstrably false.

  87. @Mike Tre
    Much like Lebron James, those looters are properly really nice people. They shouldn’t be judged by anything other than how entertaining they are.

    Replies: @bomag, @Ahdindu Nuffin

    LOL

    I’ll suggest:

    “Much like George Floyd, these looters are really nice people; just in the process of getting their lives together; we just need to keep showering them with encouragement and forgiveness; so they can soar high, high! into the sky.”

  88. @Mike Tre
    Much like Lebron James, those looters are properly really nice people. They shouldn’t be judged by anything other than how entertaining they are.

    Replies: @bomag, @Ahdindu Nuffin

    They are indeed very nice people, and they do not deserve to be punished. However, it might be best for all parties if they were removed from our society and given a place of their own to settle. I’m told there’s a beautiful tropical island, completely uninhabited, that’s just over the horizon from Los Angeles. It’s only a short helicopter ride away. Perhaps they could be resettled there.

    • Replies: @Detroit Refugee
    @Ahdindu Nuffin

    They have an entire content with their name on it. Plus it's loaded with gold and diamonds as well as plenty of other natural resources.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

  89. @Steve Sailer
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Both Santa Monica and Manhattan Beach are full of physical fitness fanatics. Santa Monica skews entertainment industry, Manhattan Beach is more business, yuppie, corporate. Professional athletes like NHL players like the culture of Manhattan Beach more than Santa Monica.

    Replies: @guest007

    Manhattan Beach is also 80% non-Hispanic whites. Compare that to the rest of Los Angeles County.

  90. The best pizza you’ll ever have is the one you toast yourself.
    Every last one of those bastards has the weather, time and money to build a wood-fired brick outdoor oven.
    And they order.
    And then they don’t tip.
    The Styx plan or the Earthquake or Nibiru.

  91. @Zoos
    Meanwhile, Antifa Incels outwitted the LAPD, and took over the 110 freeway, threatening random motorists with violence. Note the sociopath on the bicycle getting his bike lock ready to bash windshields if one car dares to pass by them.

    Inadvertently, they’re making the Trump trial circus all the more laughable, while strengthening the resolve for his next run for the presidency.

    I’m not a young man, and I’ve never seen such committed aimless stupidity with such depth. It’s almost like they are supermen in this respect. Can stupidity be a superpower? If so, who or what can save us from this retarded siege? Do we fight fire with fire? Should we raise a floodlight signal for "Retarded Batman," and wait for something retarded and angry to crawl out from the Bronson Caves to rescue us?

    https://twitter.com/AnthonyCabassa_/status/1540515299409031168?s=20&t=WgJ_uYPvPAfewCEB3BYLnw

    Replies: @Anon, @J.Ross, @tyrone

    The wisdom of Bill Hicks still applies.

  92. @Bernard
    @Buffalo Joe


    Mere, fencing stolen jewelery is not the same as selling it on line. A fence will give you a percentage of the wholesale value of the items, not the retail value. Should not be too hard to find someone selling Rolexes online at retail prices. Same with engagement rings. If you really wanted to catch the thieves.
     
    Rolex’s for one are quite easy to trace, all have serial numbers on the case and movement. If stolen there is a database which will alert anyone who services the watch of that. Being a mechanical watch, they will all eventually need service. It’s like most things, you can wear a stolen watch until you cant. In most cases, those fools who would be foolish enough to buy a cheap Rolex from a thief or a fence will eventually be involved with the police anyway.

    Rolex goes to extraordinary lengths to protect its brand. They do not sell online, or allow authorized dealers to do so. If you see a new Rolex for sale online, it’s a grey market piece at best.

    If I’m not mistaken, diamonds also have serial numbers etched into them.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @J.Ross

    During the Arbusto Recession I was in a coin shop where somebody was trying to resell a watch and the owner, who had already earned my trust, said, I’m not even looking at any watch unless it’s Rolex or Patek Phillipe.

  93. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "There's not any quantifiable real value in that stuff."

    The Dollar, in 4 to 5 years? Better days ahead, Achmed: Your consciousness will be plugged into a three foot worm floating in thick nutritious liquid in a climate controlled drawer. You are your own food. You're a self-contained unit. No worries, other than the power going out in your drawer.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Sam Malone

    You don’t need to tell me about the US Dollar, SBS. I’m on, well, getting off, that.

    However, the diamond business is a monopoly scam of DeBeers, like nothing else I’ve ever heard about. Almost 5 years ago I wrote a 3-part review of a great on-line book about it all by one Edward Jay Epstein, probably no relation to the late Jeff Epstein of such islands as Fantasy Island, in late 1978, no less.

    “You’ve got a friend in the diamond business” is the title of the Peak Stupidity review – Part 1Part 2 and Part 3. That book is great reading – you’d need half a day or so.

    As for my drawer, thanks for the words of hope. I’m looking forward to it. I can blog from there, right?

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
    @Achmed E. Newman


    “However, the diamond business is a monopoly scam of DeBeers…”
     
    A middle-aged woman I knew who was in the jewelry business told me this 50 years ago. She flipped her diamonds as quickly as possible, but was holding onto colored stones for her retirement.

    To paraphrase Keynes, “markets can stay manipulated longer than you can stay alive.”

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  94. So the coastal communities (Bay City in Chandler novels) were laid out with smallish houses. My impression is that the beach cities have fairly high population densities due to smallish lot sizes.

    That seems true of a lot of places. South Florida, e.g.

    And some of inland LA county. In 1985, I had an unexpected layover and stayed at an uncle’s older relative’s place in Burbank. Their neighborhood consisted of tiny narrow lots and could have passed for parts of Brooklyn or Queens near their beaches.

    She had moved there as a child ca. 60 years before, and the family had paid to have an aerial photograph of their spread. The house we were in was the only one present, surrounded by farmscape. Now it was just one of hundreds just like it.

  95. @Known Fact
    @Alfa158

    Couldn't they squeeze in Hate Has No Home Here? (I also like "Jesus Didn't Believe in Borders," the most memorable quote I got interviewing an activist nun)

    Replies: @Alfa158

    That’s one of the alternatives, or a simple BLM sign, portrait of Floyd etc. Even the sign I pasted in had minor variants such as adding the line “water is life” (?) Don’t quite get that line.

  96. @YetAnotherAnon
    @JimB

    There was an entertaining court case in Bradford, Yorkshire recently. Some bad eggs correctly deduced that Chinese businesses like to deal in cash to avoid Western imperialist taxation. So they watched Chinese owned businesses, worked out the owners addresses, than put GPS trackers on their cars.

    Waited for them to leave home with a full car, then straight into the houses, where large amounts of sterling, euros and RMB were found.

    https://www.thetelegraphandargus.co.uk/news/20221296.bradford-car-tracker-gang-targeted-leeds-chinese-takeaways-jailed/


    Police first became aware of the trackers on December 22, 2020, when the owner of a Chinese takeaway’s home was burgled in Tingley, Leeds, after he left for about an hour.

    Every room in the house had been ransacked, including the loft, while amounts of cash in sterling, euros, dollars and Chinese currency were stolen.

    The victim told the attending officer that two days before the burglary someone had been seen going under their vehicle outside the takeaway business. They had checked at the time but found nothing untoward.

    When the officer looked under the car, he found a small black box attached to the car’s rear axle with magnets. Inside the case was a tracking device.
     

    Replies: @stillCARealist

    In my small, extremely law-abiding world I’m suddenly encountering tons of cash-only economics. We (and plenty of family and friends) are paying for all kinds of services with green cash, straight up. I’ve never seen this much in 30 some years of business dealings. Is anybody paying taxes anymore?

    On the jewelry front, an old friend is an artist/jeweler from way back. He and his wife run a small and successful store in a wealthy town. She tells me they are unable to hire a goldsmith for any price. Their guess is that the goldsmiths can make far more money doing cash/illegal business than they can working for a legit jeweler.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @stillCARealist

    I'm always reading how "cash is dying" and that everyone's using cards or phones.

    Yet when I go to the local wholesaler, all the Asian and Chinese customers are paying cash.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    , @Luddite in Chief
    @stillCARealist


    We (and plenty of family and friends) are paying for all kinds of services with green cash, straight up. I’ve never seen this much in 30 some years of business dealings. Is anybody paying taxes anymore?
     
    Alternatively, this may be the result of the card companies slashing credit lines.

    The impression I have of the US economy is that a lot of people are maxed out* on their credit cards. When hard times hit, the card companies start chasing balances and reducing tradelines to manage risk (and not always wisely, alas).

    I cannot say I have been paying close attention, but it has become obvious even to me that the unsecured credit industry is getting nervous and attempting to lock the barn door. Your guess is as good as mine as to where the horse might be at this point.



    *This could be a worthy Big Data topic for Steve: what percentage of US CC users are currently maxed out/nearly maxed out on their cards.

    Replies: @John Johnson

  97. @Mactoul
    @Meretricious

    Deported where?
    Why would any country be obliged to take American citizens?

    Replies: @Meretricious, @Known Fact, @Detroit Refugee

    US would purchase a few islands and have military supervise so that criminals weren’t exploited. Easy pezy

  98. @Ebony Obelisk
    @bomag

    They have insurance

    I says a lot about you guys that you are more concerned about predatory businesses than with justice. You can it expect people to be abused lying down

    I fell bad for you guys. You gaursntreed riots. That did not happen

    We will vote later. We are angry. Thus was your last gasp. You will lose

    I look at way too much lien. I am envcarsed by it. But I casnit stil. I stay I had the internet Tsushima away Turin. It’s ruining my ire

    I have a ready small one dang

    Replies: @fish, @TWS, @tyrone

    Not just a chat bot, but apparently one programmed in a language other than English.

  99. @Mactoul
    @Meretricious

    Deported where?
    Why would any country be obliged to take American citizens?

    Replies: @Meretricious, @Known Fact, @Detroit Refugee

    Deported where?
    Why would any country be obliged to take American citizens?

    I assume we’d pay them handsomely for the privilege, albeit in increasingly worthless Yankee dollars.

    60 years ago The Outer Limits explored this idea in its Zanti Misfits episode — The aliens pressure Earth into taking a shipload of dangerous criminals, since the Zantis don’t believe in capital punishment. (“We are incapable of executing our own species. But you are not,” the head Zanti tells us, “You are practiced executioners.” Of course they’re foot-long bug-eyed ants, not garden variety American thugs

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
    @Known Fact

    That episode gave me nightmares as a kid!

  100. It’s LA, right? Can’t the gang just set up a couple of cameras and a boom mike outside the store, and have a white guy in a baseball cap shout some directions during the getaway — so when the action erupts everyone just assumes it’s a movie shoot?

    In fact that kind of sounds like a movie idea

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Known Fact

    That's the end of a Nabokov novel written in Russian in the 1930s.

  101. @Beach Jim
    I've lived in Manhattan Beach my entire life (except when I went off to college). I'm blocks from where this snatch and grab took place. Watching the video of the getaway is comical to an old local like me. The store is 4 blocks from city hall and the police station. It's one block up from the pier with all the lifeguards and firefighters. The getaway cars were parked in an alley headed south. There is no efficient way out of the city from that direction. They were headed straight into the walk streets and it is at least 12 blocks east to hit a major thoroughfare (Sepulveda or, newly renamed PCH). Further, the direction they were headed was straight into extremely narrow streets (places where it is absolutely common for cars to have to pull all the way over to let one side pass and then take turns going). The fact that these guys didn't get caught within 10 minutes is beyond a joke. There is no will to enforce laws, even high-profile jewelry heists. I remember watching a private screening of "Reservoir Dogs" at Video Archives, the local video rental place where Quentin Tarantino worked before his big break back when it came out. Quentin narrated the screening and it was interesting to hear his thoughts as we watched (this was long before DVD director commentaries). Shame we couldn't have gotten a local LEO response to jewelry thieves like Quentin envisioned in his film.

    I've been watching more and more of this crap for the past 2 years. In town there is currently a race to see who can construct the first and most elaborate shrine to BLM at 26th Street and Highland with the whole Bruce's Beach nonsense. The county is trying to get theirs done, but the local city council is trying to get theirs done first. We now get pilgrimages of black bikers coming by the dozens and into the hundreds coming to pay homage to the new Mecca. I've always hated surfing 26th St., so it's no personal loss to me and my family, but I would never go north of 21st Street with all that nonsense now. It's really a shame. We had paradise on Earth, and I've watched it pissed away over the past 25 years. Didn't seem like it was all that difficult for neighbors to keep an eye on everyone. We had no crime when it was all surfers and aerospeace engineers living in town. The hedge funds managers and lawyer assholes that have replaced the old residents can't be bothered to wave at neighbors, so we have tremendous amounts of home invasions.

    I can't imagine living away from the ocean. But it breaks my heart to see what has happened and it's only going to get worse. I'm hoping that with the new Supreme Court verdict I will be able to apply for my CCW in the near future. Hopefully the worm will turn.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Anon, @SafeNow, @anonymous, @Detroit Refugee, @tyrone

    Sorry to hear about a wonderful place going to shit. Get your weapon anyways. Screw em.
    What’s more important, your life and those of your loved ones, or city councils approval?

  102. @Ahdindu Nuffin
    @Mike Tre

    They are indeed very nice people, and they do not deserve to be punished. However, it might be best for all parties if they were removed from our society and given a place of their own to settle. I'm told there's a beautiful tropical island, completely uninhabited, that's just over the horizon from Los Angeles. It's only a short helicopter ride away. Perhaps they could be resettled there.

    Replies: @Detroit Refugee

    They have an entire content with their name on it. Plus it’s loaded with gold and diamonds as well as plenty of other natural resources.

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @Detroit Refugee

    Is AIDS a natural resource?

    Nevermind - Don't hate; repatriate.

  103. @stillCARealist
    @YetAnotherAnon

    In my small, extremely law-abiding world I'm suddenly encountering tons of cash-only economics. We (and plenty of family and friends) are paying for all kinds of services with green cash, straight up. I've never seen this much in 30 some years of business dealings. Is anybody paying taxes anymore?

    On the jewelry front, an old friend is an artist/jeweler from way back. He and his wife run a small and successful store in a wealthy town. She tells me they are unable to hire a goldsmith for any price. Their guess is that the goldsmiths can make far more money doing cash/illegal business than they can working for a legit jeweler.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Luddite in Chief

    I’m always reading how “cash is dying” and that everyone’s using cards or phones.

    Yet when I go to the local wholesaler, all the Asian and Chinese customers are paying cash.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @YetAnotherAnon

    The Beast wants cash to die so it can have total control. I remember years ago there was this downright sadistic, malicious tone in a smartphone commercial, in which a Christmas elf drops a laptop down a trapdoor and snarls, "Bye-bye, computer!" In the same time period there was another commercial depicting users of cash as thoughtless and boorish, since it took so long to make change. And we were going to have cats that drove themselves. Here we are using cash and laptops and facing a tricker shortage.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Luddite in Chief

  104. @Mactoul
    @Meretricious

    Deported where?
    Why would any country be obliged to take American citizens?

    Replies: @Meretricious, @Known Fact, @Detroit Refugee

    Agreed. I doubt an African country would want the U.S. Africans.

  105. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Beach Jim

    "We had paradise on Earth, and I've watched it pissed away over the past 25 years."

    The same can be said for the USA.

    Replies: @Detroit Refugee

    My hometown was THE best place in Wayne County, MI. It’s gone to crap not because of blacks, but an influx of what I call “newcomers”. White leftists that are on a mission to out PC each other. I barely recognize anything. A visit 2 weeks ago was painful

  106. @Luddite in Chief
    @Bernard


    Rolex goes to extraordinary lengths to protect its brand.
     
    Does it do them any good, though?

    I remember reading a brief article in Harper's two decades ago that had a comment from someone at Rolex (a company not known for making public statements). The comment said, in effect:

    The Chinese attend the same industry trade shows and purchase the same machines we do. We hope that when people choose a watch, they will choose the quality and attention to detail that is part of the Rolex name.
     
    That was two decades ago. I should think the problem has, if anything, gotten worse since that time. However, for all I know, the Rolex folks may have attained De Beers' level of effectiveness when it comes to maintaining the scarcity and desirability of their products.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    Ten years back fake Rolexes made in China were all over the UK. Quite useful if you followed the advice of anon on the perfume thread

    “single man needs two things, name-brand cologne and a \$1000-plus fine watch”

    • Replies: @Luddite in Chief
    @YetAnotherAnon


    Ten years back fake Rolexes made in China were all over the UK.
     
    Years ago, the "tell" for fake Rolexes was that the second hand on fakes "stuttered." The second hand on the genuine article swept smoothly.

    I have no idea what the "tell" is these days, or if one even exists. I dimly recall reading something online about "look for the paperwork that comes with a genuine watch," which seemed a bit silly to me (the Chinese can fake a watch, but cannot fake paperwork?).

    In any event, my impression of the Chinese and pirated products in the year 2020
    is that they simply do not care. Once a country becomes economically powerful enough, they may more or less do as they wish. If there is a meaningful way for the World Trade Organisation to punish China at this point, I do not know what it would be.

    Replies: @Bernard

    , @stari_momak
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Shoes. Take my word for it, eligible women look at shoes first, and it isn't (mainly) for any alleged correlation with other body parts.

  107. @Known Fact
    It's LA, right? Can't the gang just set up a couple of cameras and a boom mike outside the store, and have a white guy in a baseball cap shout some directions during the getaway -- so when the action erupts everyone just assumes it's a movie shoot?

    In fact that kind of sounds like a movie idea

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    That’s the end of a Nabokov novel written in Russian in the 1930s.

  108. @Detroit Refugee
    @Ahdindu Nuffin

    They have an entire content with their name on it. Plus it's loaded with gold and diamonds as well as plenty of other natural resources.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    Is AIDS a natural resource?

    Nevermind – Don’t hate; repatriate.

  109. It’s Chi-town, Jake. . .

    “I’ve had multiple colleagues mugged at gunpoint. I’ve had a colleague stabbed on the way to work. Countless issues of burglary. I mean, that’s a really difficult backdrop with which to draw talent to your city from.” https://t.co/U8YEiMDbyX— Josh Kraushaar (@HotlineJosh) June 23, 2022

  110. @bomag
    @Beach Jim

    Good story.

    So the California ethos ruined California; moves to other states and degrades them.

    The current global question: are nice places sustainable?

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @rebel yell

    The current global question: are nice places sustainable?

    Only if the nice people who live in the nice places don’t have the financial wherewithal to move.

    Conservatives are typically practical problem-solvers who want to be left alone and enjoy their lives. They’ll pull up stakes and move somewhere that’s still nice rather than enlist their families in a grinding siege war to defend the perimeter.

    In the past, big northeastern cities had pockets of civility where the (usually white, ethnic) homeowners couldn’t afford to move to the suburbs. In the future, declining wealth and fewer options might make nice people more willing to fight to to keep their nice places.

  111. @Achmed E. Newman
    @SunBakedSuburb

    You don't need to tell me about the US Dollar, SBS. I'm on, well, getting off, that.

    However, the diamond business is a monopoly scam of DeBeers, like nothing else I've ever heard about. Almost 5 years ago I wrote a 3-part review of a great on-line book about it all by one Edward Jay Epstein, probably no relation to the late Jeff Epstein of such islands as Fantasy Island, in late 1978, no less.

    "You've got a friend in the diamond business" is the title of the Peak Stupidity review - Part 1 -- Part 2 and Part 3. That book is great reading - you'd need half a day or so.

    As for my drawer, thanks for the words of hope. I'm looking forward to it. I can blog from there, right?

    Replies: @Paul Mendez

    “However, the diamond business is a monopoly scam of DeBeers…”

    A middle-aged woman I knew who was in the jewelry business told me this 50 years ago. She flipped her diamonds as quickly as possible, but was holding onto colored stones for her retirement.

    To paraphrase Keynes, “markets can stay manipulated longer than you can stay alive.”

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Paul Mendez

    Thanks, Paul. Regarding John Maynard Keynes, Peak Stupidity sees somewhat of a problem with one of his other famous lines: "It's the long run, but we ain't dead." The post has to do with deficits, inflation, interest rates, and the Federal budget. (Hey, don't roll your eyes at me, Honky!)

  112. @Known Fact
    @Mactoul


    Deported where?
    Why would any country be obliged to take American citizens?
     
    I assume we'd pay them handsomely for the privilege, albeit in increasingly worthless Yankee dollars.

    60 years ago The Outer Limits explored this idea in its Zanti Misfits episode -- The aliens pressure Earth into taking a shipload of dangerous criminals, since the Zantis don't believe in capital punishment. ("We are incapable of executing our own species. But you are not," the head Zanti tells us, "You are practiced executioners." Of course they're foot-long bug-eyed ants, not garden variety American thugs

    Replies: @Paul Mendez

    That episode gave me nightmares as a kid!

  113. @bomag
    @Beach Jim

    Good story.

    So the California ethos ruined California; moves to other states and degrades them.

    The current global question: are nice places sustainable?

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @rebel yell

    The current global question: are nice places sustainable?

    The nice place has to have something about it that is appalling to liberals and corporate executives so they don’t want to live there. And it has to be a place that is a No-Go zone for blacks.
    The Ozarks meet those criteria (for the most part). Are the Ozarks a nice place? I think so, but to each his own.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  114. Are the Ozarks a nice place?

    I don’t know what this list means, but was surprised to see the name Kansas City, Missouri at the top of the list. It is among only two cities from U.S. that make the list, the other being, San Diego (hurts for this ex-San Diegan ?)

    https://www.nbcchicago.com/news/local/best-city-in-the-world-to-work-remotely-travel-is-in-the-midwest-list-shows/2866206/

  115. @Beach Jim
    I've lived in Manhattan Beach my entire life (except when I went off to college). I'm blocks from where this snatch and grab took place. Watching the video of the getaway is comical to an old local like me. The store is 4 blocks from city hall and the police station. It's one block up from the pier with all the lifeguards and firefighters. The getaway cars were parked in an alley headed south. There is no efficient way out of the city from that direction. They were headed straight into the walk streets and it is at least 12 blocks east to hit a major thoroughfare (Sepulveda or, newly renamed PCH). Further, the direction they were headed was straight into extremely narrow streets (places where it is absolutely common for cars to have to pull all the way over to let one side pass and then take turns going). The fact that these guys didn't get caught within 10 minutes is beyond a joke. There is no will to enforce laws, even high-profile jewelry heists. I remember watching a private screening of "Reservoir Dogs" at Video Archives, the local video rental place where Quentin Tarantino worked before his big break back when it came out. Quentin narrated the screening and it was interesting to hear his thoughts as we watched (this was long before DVD director commentaries). Shame we couldn't have gotten a local LEO response to jewelry thieves like Quentin envisioned in his film.

    I've been watching more and more of this crap for the past 2 years. In town there is currently a race to see who can construct the first and most elaborate shrine to BLM at 26th Street and Highland with the whole Bruce's Beach nonsense. The county is trying to get theirs done, but the local city council is trying to get theirs done first. We now get pilgrimages of black bikers coming by the dozens and into the hundreds coming to pay homage to the new Mecca. I've always hated surfing 26th St., so it's no personal loss to me and my family, but I would never go north of 21st Street with all that nonsense now. It's really a shame. We had paradise on Earth, and I've watched it pissed away over the past 25 years. Didn't seem like it was all that difficult for neighbors to keep an eye on everyone. We had no crime when it was all surfers and aerospeace engineers living in town. The hedge funds managers and lawyer assholes that have replaced the old residents can't be bothered to wave at neighbors, so we have tremendous amounts of home invasions.

    I can't imagine living away from the ocean. But it breaks my heart to see what has happened and it's only going to get worse. I'm hoping that with the new Supreme Court verdict I will be able to apply for my CCW in the near future. Hopefully the worm will turn.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Anon, @SafeNow, @anonymous, @Detroit Refugee, @tyrone

    currently a race to see who can construct the first and most elaborate shrine to BLM

    ……..so you can see why it’s hard to get the old give-a-fuck meter moving for the rest of us.

    • Replies: @Beach Jim
    @tyrone

    I totally see it. And, even as a resident, I totally agree with you. I've watched the smash and grab video on all the local newscasts and without exception the on the scene reporter says something to the effect, "Residents are shocked and outraged at the event." I'm neither shocked nor outraged. I've been expecting this for years. I fully expect for it to get worse. I'm just sad to watch my little slice of home in our Republic finally succumbing to the same nonsense I've been watching from a distance happen in countless other places across the country.

  116. @Paul Mendez
    @Achmed E. Newman


    “However, the diamond business is a monopoly scam of DeBeers…”
     
    A middle-aged woman I knew who was in the jewelry business told me this 50 years ago. She flipped her diamonds as quickly as possible, but was holding onto colored stones for her retirement.

    To paraphrase Keynes, “markets can stay manipulated longer than you can stay alive.”

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Thanks, Paul. Regarding John Maynard Keynes, Peak Stupidity sees somewhat of a problem with one of his other famous lines: “It’s the long run, but we ain’t dead.” The post has to do with deficits, inflation, interest rates, and the Federal budget. (Hey, don’t roll your eyes at me, Honky!)

  117. @YetAnotherAnon
    @stillCARealist

    I'm always reading how "cash is dying" and that everyone's using cards or phones.

    Yet when I go to the local wholesaler, all the Asian and Chinese customers are paying cash.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    The Beast wants cash to die so it can have total control. I remember years ago there was this downright sadistic, malicious tone in a smartphone commercial, in which a Christmas elf drops a laptop down a trapdoor and snarls, “Bye-bye, computer!” In the same time period there was another commercial depicting users of cash as thoughtless and boorish, since it took so long to make change. And we were going to have cats that drove themselves. Here we are using cash and laptops and facing a tricker shortage.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @J.Ross

    I remember some of those commercials, Mr. Ross. It doesn't really work that way except for with the (granted growing quickly) number of cashiers who can't do any arithmetic.

    Real life: "It didn't take - swipe it again." "Oh, it's got a chip. You gotta stick in in" (Yes, that IS "what she said".) "It's not doing anything." [Lady reaches over to do it.] "It's axeing if you want to donate to Pride Week." "OK, nah, thanks." "Remove it now?" "Not yet." "OK, pull it out." (Hey, I'm just the commenter - that IS "what she said".) [/Michael Scott mode for this comment]

    You are right about the reason of Government control, and I have had it out recently with places that told me they wouldn't take cash.

    Here's the difference between the Chinese people and me. I'm against it, because I don't want this country to be like China, which is in Revelation Chapter 13 mode as we speak. The Chinese people are against it because they don't want to pay taxes, so they can save money. I too don't want to pay taxes, but mostly so I can fuck the US Government before it fucks me. [/Pesci mode]

    , @Luddite in Chief
    @J.Ross


    Here we are using cash and laptops and facing a tricker shortage.
     
    Sorry, a what shortage?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @J.Ross, @Harry Baldwin

  118. @J.Ross
    @YetAnotherAnon

    The Beast wants cash to die so it can have total control. I remember years ago there was this downright sadistic, malicious tone in a smartphone commercial, in which a Christmas elf drops a laptop down a trapdoor and snarls, "Bye-bye, computer!" In the same time period there was another commercial depicting users of cash as thoughtless and boorish, since it took so long to make change. And we were going to have cats that drove themselves. Here we are using cash and laptops and facing a tricker shortage.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Luddite in Chief

    I remember some of those commercials, Mr. Ross. It doesn’t really work that way except for with the (granted growing quickly) number of cashiers who can’t do any arithmetic.

    Real life: “It didn’t take – swipe it again.” “Oh, it’s got a chip. You gotta stick in in” (Yes, that IS “what she said”.) “It’s not doing anything.” [Lady reaches over to do it.] “It’s axeing if you want to donate to Pride Week.” “OK, nah, thanks.” “Remove it now?” “Not yet.” “OK, pull it out.” (Hey, I’m just the commenter – that IS “what she said”.) [/Michael Scott mode for this comment]

    You are right about the reason of Government control, and I have had it out recently with places that told me they wouldn’t take cash.

    Here’s the difference between the Chinese people and me. I’m against it, because I don’t want this country to be like China, which is in Revelation Chapter 13 mode as we speak. The Chinese people are against it because they don’t want to pay taxes, so they can save money. I too don’t want to pay taxes, but mostly so I can fuck the US Government before it fucks me. [/Pesci mode]

  119. @J.Ross
    @YetAnotherAnon

    The Beast wants cash to die so it can have total control. I remember years ago there was this downright sadistic, malicious tone in a smartphone commercial, in which a Christmas elf drops a laptop down a trapdoor and snarls, "Bye-bye, computer!" In the same time period there was another commercial depicting users of cash as thoughtless and boorish, since it took so long to make change. And we were going to have cats that drove themselves. Here we are using cash and laptops and facing a tricker shortage.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Luddite in Chief

    Here we are using cash and laptops and facing a tricker shortage.

    Sorry, a what shortage?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Luddite in Chief

    Of all the shortages we've run into in 2022, a tricker shortage was the last one I expected.

    , @J.Ross
    @Luddite in Chief

    Should've been "cars that drove themselves" and a "trucker shortage." I like that one better though, it appears to be about prostitution?

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Luddite in Chief

    It was "And we were going to have cats that drove themselves" that interested me the most. Not to the vet, that's for sure.

  120. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Luddite in Chief

    Ten years back fake Rolexes made in China were all over the UK. Quite useful if you followed the advice of anon on the perfume thread

    "single man needs two things, name-brand cologne and a $1000-plus fine watch"

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @stari_momak

    Ten years back fake Rolexes made in China were all over the UK.

    Years ago, the “tell” for fake Rolexes was that the second hand on fakes “stuttered.” The second hand on the genuine article swept smoothly.

    I have no idea what the “tell” is these days, or if one even exists. I dimly recall reading something online about “look for the paperwork that comes with a genuine watch,” which seemed a bit silly to me (the Chinese can fake a watch, but cannot fake paperwork?).

    In any event, my impression of the Chinese and pirated products in the year 2020
    is that they simply do not care. Once a country becomes economically powerful enough, they may more or less do as they wish. If there is a meaningful way for the World Trade Organisation to punish China at this point, I do not know what it would be.

    • Replies: @Bernard
    @Luddite in Chief


    Years ago, the “tell” for fake Rolexes was that the second hand on fakes “stuttered.” The second hand on the genuine article swept smoothly.

    I have no idea what the “tell” is these days, or if one even exists. I dimly recall reading something online about “look for the paperwork that comes with a genuine watch,” which seemed a bit silly to me (the Chinese can fake a watch, but cannot fake paperwork?).
     
    For anyone who owns one, it’s not hard to tell. The difference in quality is quite easy to spot and even more so as the fakes age. Though many will argue that a Rolex is quite overpriced, the effort in construction and quality of materials is plainly obvious. Chinese fakes may pass at a quick glance, but not much more.
  121. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Luddite in Chief

    Ten years back fake Rolexes made in China were all over the UK. Quite useful if you followed the advice of anon on the perfume thread

    "single man needs two things, name-brand cologne and a $1000-plus fine watch"

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @stari_momak

    Shoes. Take my word for it, eligible women look at shoes first, and it isn’t (mainly) for any alleged correlation with other body parts.

  122. Not gonna get upset at this. Store is probably owned by a ‘gold chainer’ from in or around the Caucus region. And WTF is a high end jewelry store doing in Manhattan Beach anyhow…used to be an area were working class or just out of college whites could affordably live by the sea.

  123. @Steve Sailer
    @Beach Jim

    Thanks.

    Los Angeles is a rare coastal city that didn't develop from the coast inland. Instead, it started 20 miles inland because what's now downtown L.A. was the only place with with year round flowing water in the L.A. River. Then when the trains arrived in the 1880s and real estate boomed, the first suburb for the well to do was Pasadena 30 miles inland, which was popular for the low humidity climate in an era of tuberculosis. Much of the growth was inland from Pasadena because that was the orange grove belt. Wealthy Midwesterners were into buying orange groves the way Silicon Valley people are into buying vineyards.

    Then L.A. started moving west, but there was a reluctance to go too far near the coast due to the fogs giving you TB. So the coastal communities (Bay City in Chandler novels) were laid out with smallish houses. My impression is that the beach cities have fairly high population densities due to smallish lot sizes.

    After penicillin emerged in 1945 and the TB threat went away, the beach communities were during the Beach Boys era one of the great bargains in American history, especially after LAX opened in 1962 and you could live near the beach and next to, but not under the flightpath of, a major airport.

    But all good things come to an end. As it got expensive in the 1970s, Santa Monica started moving to the left in the 1970s as renters realized that they could use leftist ideology to justify rent control.

    Interestingly, Manhattan Beach emerged as the cultural pole of Santa Monica with athletes and entertainers like Vince Vaughn who aren't culturally set attuned to Santa Monica.

    Replies: @Beach Jim

    As always, your knowledge of LA’s local history is spot on. In fact, you described how my parents first bought in Manhattan Beach to a T. My dad was a high school teacher who got a summer gig working for US Customs during the busy travel months while he was on summer break. After one summer of doing it, he inquired about how to go full time. One year later, he jumped from teaching to US Customs. My parents bought in Manhattan Beach because it was affordable, nice, and close enough to LAX for my dad to work, but out of the flight path.

    I don’t remember it getting particularly expensive in the 1970s (or, really, the 80s for that matter). My best friend’s mom sold her place in 1997 for \$300k. I’m not sure how much above average that was for the time (I know it was a bit, but not how much). I had just purchased a house a few months before she announced, so I was strapped for cash, otherwise I would have bought the place. Our house in Long Beach has appreciated nicely over the years, but nothing compared to my friend’s place in MB.

    I knew about Pasadena and TB, but I didn’t know that the beach fog was associated with TB. I absolutely love the fog. It’s my favorite weather condition. I love driving west on the 105 coming home from work and hitting the fog bank around LAX and then taking Vista Del Mar home in the soup.

    Thanks for the history lesson.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Beach Jim

    My parents were worried about my health when I moved to damp Santa Monica in 1981. It took me about 10 years to figure out they were worried about tuberculosis.

    My paternal grandfather was a health nut, so he retired from Oak Park, IL to Altadena (above Pasadena) in 1929 to raise his own food. He looked at Palos Verde high above the Pacific but that was out of the way back then. Then the smog arrived around 1943 and inland declined. The Chinese moved in cheap, and then the smog went away.

    I remember when fog used to close down LAX not infrequently. Now they have giant lights to cut through the fog, so I don't think it almost never gets closed, which is one reason it's such a colossal hub for international traffic.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

  124. @tyrone
    @Beach Jim


    currently a race to see who can construct the first and most elaborate shrine to BLM
     
    ........so you can see why it's hard to get the old give-a-fuck meter moving for the rest of us.

    Replies: @Beach Jim

    I totally see it. And, even as a resident, I totally agree with you. I’ve watched the smash and grab video on all the local newscasts and without exception the on the scene reporter says something to the effect, “Residents are shocked and outraged at the event.” I’m neither shocked nor outraged. I’ve been expecting this for years. I fully expect for it to get worse. I’m just sad to watch my little slice of home in our Republic finally succumbing to the same nonsense I’ve been watching from a distance happen in countless other places across the country.

  125. @Luddite in Chief
    @J.Ross


    Here we are using cash and laptops and facing a tricker shortage.
     
    Sorry, a what shortage?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @J.Ross, @Harry Baldwin

    Of all the shortages we’ve run into in 2022, a tricker shortage was the last one I expected.

  126. @Beach Jim
    @Steve Sailer

    As always, your knowledge of LA's local history is spot on. In fact, you described how my parents first bought in Manhattan Beach to a T. My dad was a high school teacher who got a summer gig working for US Customs during the busy travel months while he was on summer break. After one summer of doing it, he inquired about how to go full time. One year later, he jumped from teaching to US Customs. My parents bought in Manhattan Beach because it was affordable, nice, and close enough to LAX for my dad to work, but out of the flight path.

    I don't remember it getting particularly expensive in the 1970s (or, really, the 80s for that matter). My best friend's mom sold her place in 1997 for $300k. I'm not sure how much above average that was for the time (I know it was a bit, but not how much). I had just purchased a house a few months before she announced, so I was strapped for cash, otherwise I would have bought the place. Our house in Long Beach has appreciated nicely over the years, but nothing compared to my friend's place in MB.

    I knew about Pasadena and TB, but I didn't know that the beach fog was associated with TB. I absolutely love the fog. It's my favorite weather condition. I love driving west on the 105 coming home from work and hitting the fog bank around LAX and then taking Vista Del Mar home in the soup.

    Thanks for the history lesson.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    My parents were worried about my health when I moved to damp Santa Monica in 1981. It took me about 10 years to figure out they were worried about tuberculosis.

    My paternal grandfather was a health nut, so he retired from Oak Park, IL to Altadena (above Pasadena) in 1929 to raise his own food. He looked at Palos Verde high above the Pacific but that was out of the way back then. Then the smog arrived around 1943 and inland declined. The Chinese moved in cheap, and then the smog went away.

    I remember when fog used to close down LAX not infrequently. Now they have giant lights to cut through the fog, so I don’t think it almost never gets closed, which is one reason it’s such a colossal hub for international traffic.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Steve Sailer

    The Fauci--more precisely the political reactions--has scrambled the busiest airports list.

    LAX was routinely 2 or 3 contending with O'Hare. It's been passed by the last couple of years--by a wide margin--by the Dallas and Denver hubs. And even Charlotte, Orlando, Vegas and Phoenix are nipping at its heels only a few million passengers behind in 2021.

    LA has a few alternative airports ringing it, but LA has a whole lot of well off people who presumably like to fly, so one would expect it to bounce back strongly. But maybe that doesn't happen until flying to Asia--specifically China--gets zipping again.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

  127. @Luddite in Chief
    @J.Ross


    Here we are using cash and laptops and facing a tricker shortage.
     
    Sorry, a what shortage?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @J.Ross, @Harry Baldwin

    Should’ve been “cars that drove themselves” and a “trucker shortage.” I like that one better though, it appears to be about prostitution?

    • Replies: @Luddite in Chief
    @J.Ross


    Should’ve been “cars that drove themselves” and a “trucker shortage.”
     
    Ah, trucker. I should have guessed. Thank you for sorting me out.

    And we were going to have cats that drove themselves.
     
    Now this image was a very vivid one indeed.

    I would have thoroughly enjoyed seeing Steve come up with a cat vs. human driver traffic fatalities graph broken down into tabby, siamese, calico, etc.
  128. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "There's not any quantifiable real value in that stuff."

    The Dollar, in 4 to 5 years? Better days ahead, Achmed: Your consciousness will be plugged into a three foot worm floating in thick nutritious liquid in a climate controlled drawer. You are your own food. You're a self-contained unit. No worries, other than the power going out in your drawer.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Sam Malone

    “You will own nothing and you will be happy.”
    – the creatures who own us all

    Wealth is collecting into the hands of the oligarchs and corporations and away from the middle class.

    You used to buy a new copy of Microsoft Word. Then like 10 years ago it seemed like you couldn’t buy it anymore, only sort of rent it, you had to pay a monthly fee forever, supposedly in exchange for continued product service and improvement. But you had no choice. That’s the first time I heard of that.

  129. @J.Ross
    @Luddite in Chief

    Should've been "cars that drove themselves" and a "trucker shortage." I like that one better though, it appears to be about prostitution?

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief

    Should’ve been “cars that drove themselves” and a “trucker shortage.”

    Ah, trucker. I should have guessed. Thank you for sorting me out.

    And we were going to have cats that drove themselves.

    Now this image was a very vivid one indeed.

    I would have thoroughly enjoyed seeing Steve come up with a cat vs. human driver traffic fatalities graph broken down into tabby, siamese, calico, etc.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  130. @stillCARealist
    @YetAnotherAnon

    In my small, extremely law-abiding world I'm suddenly encountering tons of cash-only economics. We (and plenty of family and friends) are paying for all kinds of services with green cash, straight up. I've never seen this much in 30 some years of business dealings. Is anybody paying taxes anymore?

    On the jewelry front, an old friend is an artist/jeweler from way back. He and his wife run a small and successful store in a wealthy town. She tells me they are unable to hire a goldsmith for any price. Their guess is that the goldsmiths can make far more money doing cash/illegal business than they can working for a legit jeweler.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Luddite in Chief

    We (and plenty of family and friends) are paying for all kinds of services with green cash, straight up. I’ve never seen this much in 30 some years of business dealings. Is anybody paying taxes anymore?

    Alternatively, this may be the result of the card companies slashing credit lines.

    The impression I have of the US economy is that a lot of people are maxed out* on their credit cards. When hard times hit, the card companies start chasing balances and reducing tradelines to manage risk (and not always wisely, alas).

    I cannot say I have been paying close attention, but it has become obvious even to me that the unsecured credit industry is getting nervous and attempting to lock the barn door. Your guess is as good as mine as to where the horse might be at this point.

    *This could be a worthy Big Data topic for Steve: what percentage of US CC users are currently maxed out/nearly maxed out on their cards.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Luddite in Chief

    The impression I have of the US economy is that a lot of people are maxed out* on their credit cards. When hard times hit, the card companies start chasing balances and reducing tradelines to manage risk (and not always wisely, alas).

    Credit card companies are untouchable in the US. It is unreal as to how both parties grant them a free pass. Biden was actually a credit cardy lobby whore until he left the senate. The left actually hated him before he ran for president since he sided with Republicans on the bankruptcy bill.

    Some honorable Democrats have actually gone after payday loan companies on a local level. I will give them credit for that. It's a sick industry that entirely exists to exploit the poor.

    But overall this is the land of uninhibited usury. Unbelievable that Christians have been talked into it.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  131. @Luddite in Chief
    @YetAnotherAnon


    Ten years back fake Rolexes made in China were all over the UK.
     
    Years ago, the "tell" for fake Rolexes was that the second hand on fakes "stuttered." The second hand on the genuine article swept smoothly.

    I have no idea what the "tell" is these days, or if one even exists. I dimly recall reading something online about "look for the paperwork that comes with a genuine watch," which seemed a bit silly to me (the Chinese can fake a watch, but cannot fake paperwork?).

    In any event, my impression of the Chinese and pirated products in the year 2020
    is that they simply do not care. Once a country becomes economically powerful enough, they may more or less do as they wish. If there is a meaningful way for the World Trade Organisation to punish China at this point, I do not know what it would be.

    Replies: @Bernard

    Years ago, the “tell” for fake Rolexes was that the second hand on fakes “stuttered.” The second hand on the genuine article swept smoothly.

    I have no idea what the “tell” is these days, or if one even exists. I dimly recall reading something online about “look for the paperwork that comes with a genuine watch,” which seemed a bit silly to me (the Chinese can fake a watch, but cannot fake paperwork?).

    For anyone who owns one, it’s not hard to tell. The difference in quality is quite easy to spot and even more so as the fakes age. Though many will argue that a Rolex is quite overpriced, the effort in construction and quality of materials is plainly obvious. Chinese fakes may pass at a quick glance, but not much more.

  132. @Joe S.Walker
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I wonder how difficult it is to fence all that jewelry.
     
    Who says they took it to fence? I'd be on the lookout for gangsta types bedecked in pearl necklaces and diamond bracelets.

    Replies: @Onebelowall

    Heh. Pearl necklaces…

  133. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Forbes

    I doubt they are their own cars, Forbes. They don't look like they'd be, for one thing. More importantly, since these guys made an effort to fully hide their identities, would they be that stupid to drive their own cars? Probably not ... You gotta get the cars somewhere though, and that's where the chain of identity could begin.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Forbes

    I’m sure they’re not their own cars. But for any investigation to go anywhere, you start with the evidence you have. From where they were “borrowed” (or whatev) could come in handy in the investigation. The increased ubiquity of video surveillance cameras, license plate readers, etc. I’d be pretty sure this gang never imagined someone would film them from across the street, and follow to the alley where the getaway cars awaited. The smash and grab captured on video is pretty amazing.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  134. @Luddite in Chief
    @J.Ross


    Here we are using cash and laptops and facing a tricker shortage.
     
    Sorry, a what shortage?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @J.Ross, @Harry Baldwin

    It was “And we were going to have cats that drove themselves” that interested me the most. Not to the vet, that’s for sure.

  135. Equating protest against injustice with criminal activity is a classic propaganda tool of tyranny to delegitimize its critics. Play on! Before you know it we can have our civil war, and America can look like Donbass too!

  136. @Ebony Obelisk
    @bomag

    They have insurance

    I says a lot about you guys that you are more concerned about predatory businesses than with justice. You can it expect people to be abused lying down

    I fell bad for you guys. You gaursntreed riots. That did not happen

    We will vote later. We are angry. Thus was your last gasp. You will lose

    I look at way too much lien. I am envcarsed by it. But I casnit stil. I stay I had the internet Tsushima away Turin. It’s ruining my ire

    I have a ready small one dang

    Replies: @fish, @TWS, @tyrone

    gaursntreed

    …….no,no,no, tiny ,gaurs are a large bovid , never gets treed ,coons on the other hand get treed all the time and shot ,like a thieving coon deserves……..come to the country sometime.

  137. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Pixo

    From the movies?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7acD4q0lp0

    Replies: @John Johnson

    That scene really shows what it is like to live in the city. Auto theft is considered an insurance issue. They aren’t going to go and look for your car and in fact they will get annoyed if you ask about it. Normally you take the insurance money and move on. The poor get hammered as usual because they often have basic insurance that doesn’t cover theft. Criminals will look for certain types of cars that they know how to steal and they tend to be older.

    I now live in a small town where the police will investigate anything since they aren’t spending the day chasing violent felons. They are 1-2 minutes from my house for any call.

    But even when I was in the city I didn’t resent the police for spending so much time in *cough* diversified areas. The police enforce the will of the mayor which on some level is really the will of the people. The police are on the frontlines of race denial. White liberals and conservatives exchange race denial based political theories in the burbs while police, first responders, social workers and other professionals have to face the unfortunate reality. Police are basically butchers that see where meat comes from while Whites in the burbs just buy steaks and cook them.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @John Johnson

    Thanks. Been there, John, and done that. I did report it, and then for about 4 years afterwards I'd get a letter from the cops every 6 months asking if I'd found my car. How would I? It was a pro job. I wrote them back one time and told them that was their job.

    The thing is, I had one possible lead (speaking of the funny video clip from The Big Lebowski). The cop said something like "we don't want to go causing any trouble, you know". I had to get on my bike and check it out myself. That part, the why of this possible lead, is another story, but I didn't find anything there that was untoward - it was already about 15 hours later though.

    It's a bad feeling when you are pretty sure where you parked your car the previous night, and it's not over there.

    I was not poor, but I had nothing but the State-required liability insurance also. It's what I did with all the older vehicles, and, even after what happened, I felt that was the right call.

    (No way will you get an older vehicle to match the one you had from the insurance company money.)

  138. @Luddite in Chief
    @stillCARealist


    We (and plenty of family and friends) are paying for all kinds of services with green cash, straight up. I’ve never seen this much in 30 some years of business dealings. Is anybody paying taxes anymore?
     
    Alternatively, this may be the result of the card companies slashing credit lines.

    The impression I have of the US economy is that a lot of people are maxed out* on their credit cards. When hard times hit, the card companies start chasing balances and reducing tradelines to manage risk (and not always wisely, alas).

    I cannot say I have been paying close attention, but it has become obvious even to me that the unsecured credit industry is getting nervous and attempting to lock the barn door. Your guess is as good as mine as to where the horse might be at this point.



    *This could be a worthy Big Data topic for Steve: what percentage of US CC users are currently maxed out/nearly maxed out on their cards.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    The impression I have of the US economy is that a lot of people are maxed out* on their credit cards. When hard times hit, the card companies start chasing balances and reducing tradelines to manage risk (and not always wisely, alas).

    Credit card companies are untouchable in the US. It is unreal as to how both parties grant them a free pass. Biden was actually a credit cardy lobby whore until he left the senate. The left actually hated him before he ran for president since he sided with Republicans on the bankruptcy bill.

    Some honorable Democrats have actually gone after payday loan companies on a local level. I will give them credit for that. It’s a sick industry that entirely exists to exploit the poor.

    But overall this is the land of uninhibited usury. Unbelievable that Christians have been talked into it.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @John Johnson

    From agreement to strong disagreement with the flip of a comment, ha!

    The CC companies have EVERY RIGHT to market cards at exorbitant interest rates. Nobody forces anyone to get them. I accumulated a shit-ton of interest on only one card in my life, and that was one used as a loan in a financial emergency situation. (And then, I ended up paying about 1/2 back.*) For the rest of my life, I avoided the CC's as soon as Debit Cards came around.

    Hey, just like the lottery is a tax on stupidity, these cards are a surcharge on stupidity.

    Yeah, like the title loan companies, I want nothing to do with it, and I do think it's kind of sick. It's a free country though. There should be no government involvement unless there is actual fraud. Being charged for being an irresponsible dumbass is not fraud.

    .

    * The thing is, I was ready to pay it all back at that point, as I had been catching up to within about $3,000. They wanted to make a deal to get their money NOW, even if only 1/2 of that amount, as they didn't trust me. Who were the suckers in this situation? Don't want to trust me? OK, fine. You're not my wife or kid, so I don't care.

    Replies: @John Johnson

  139. @Zoos
    Meanwhile, Antifa Incels outwitted the LAPD, and took over the 110 freeway, threatening random motorists with violence. Note the sociopath on the bicycle getting his bike lock ready to bash windshields if one car dares to pass by them.

    Inadvertently, they’re making the Trump trial circus all the more laughable, while strengthening the resolve for his next run for the presidency.

    I’m not a young man, and I’ve never seen such committed aimless stupidity with such depth. It’s almost like they are supermen in this respect. Can stupidity be a superpower? If so, who or what can save us from this retarded siege? Do we fight fire with fire? Should we raise a floodlight signal for "Retarded Batman," and wait for something retarded and angry to crawl out from the Bronson Caves to rescue us?

    https://twitter.com/AnthonyCabassa_/status/1540515299409031168?s=20&t=WgJ_uYPvPAfewCEB3BYLnw

    Replies: @Anon, @J.Ross, @tyrone

    And why should LAPD do anything ,Gas-coin will just turn them loose ,maybe even indict the policeman, when and if (massive Dem steal) the Republicans take congress expect this to be ten times worst ………if Trump wins in 2024 ……2020 on steroids.

  140. @Steve Sailer
    @Beach Jim

    My parents were worried about my health when I moved to damp Santa Monica in 1981. It took me about 10 years to figure out they were worried about tuberculosis.

    My paternal grandfather was a health nut, so he retired from Oak Park, IL to Altadena (above Pasadena) in 1929 to raise his own food. He looked at Palos Verde high above the Pacific but that was out of the way back then. Then the smog arrived around 1943 and inland declined. The Chinese moved in cheap, and then the smog went away.

    I remember when fog used to close down LAX not infrequently. Now they have giant lights to cut through the fog, so I don't think it almost never gets closed, which is one reason it's such a colossal hub for international traffic.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    The Fauci–more precisely the political reactions–has scrambled the busiest airports list.

    LAX was routinely 2 or 3 contending with O’Hare. It’s been passed by the last couple of years–by a wide margin–by the Dallas and Denver hubs. And even Charlotte, Orlando, Vegas and Phoenix are nipping at its heels only a few million passengers behind in 2021.

    LA has a few alternative airports ringing it, but LA has a whole lot of well off people who presumably like to fly, so one would expect it to bounce back strongly. But maybe that doesn’t happen until flying to Asia–specifically China–gets zipping again.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @AnotherDad

    How could you possibly leave out Atlanta Hartsfield? Except for being barely ousted by CAN (Guangzhou, the city formerly known as Canton) for a year or so due to the Fauci Follies, ATL has been at the head of the list for 2 decades now in both passenger traffic and in aircraft operations*.

    That airport has it made, with 5 || E-W runways (9,000 ft to 12,000ft) that would only be unusable if the wind blew hard out of the north or south with snow on the ground (not bloody likely) or a REALLY strong wind out of those directions with dry/wet conditions. Yeah, and thunderstorms...

    They have LOTS of ramp space, organized taxiways, all perpendicular and parallel as opposed to O'Hare, and they are working on a loop around the W end of the S-side T/O runway, to get the landing traffic off of 9R/27L to the gates with no runway crossings as they already have for the N side.

    Yeah, it's far from Asia, and farther from W. Europe by 1 1/2 hours than New York is.

    Atlanta Hartsfield went from a 2-decade slow rise up to 110 million passengers to 75 million right now.

    .

    * In aircraft movements Chicago O'Hare was 2% higher for just one year in there, '14.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @AnotherDad

    OK, maybe you made the assumption everyone knew ATL was at the top (American and World lists).

    BTW, the top 22 in the world include 8 Chinese airports and 12 American ones. Also, when in the hell did they change McCarran Field to Henry Reid? Screw that. It's McCarran Field. (Little Rock has been under pressure to drop the "Clinton" moniker - it's Adams or something.)

  141. @AnotherDad
    @Steve Sailer

    The Fauci--more precisely the political reactions--has scrambled the busiest airports list.

    LAX was routinely 2 or 3 contending with O'Hare. It's been passed by the last couple of years--by a wide margin--by the Dallas and Denver hubs. And even Charlotte, Orlando, Vegas and Phoenix are nipping at its heels only a few million passengers behind in 2021.

    LA has a few alternative airports ringing it, but LA has a whole lot of well off people who presumably like to fly, so one would expect it to bounce back strongly. But maybe that doesn't happen until flying to Asia--specifically China--gets zipping again.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

    How could you possibly leave out Atlanta Hartsfield? Except for being barely ousted by CAN (Guangzhou, the city formerly known as Canton) for a year or so due to the Fauci Follies, ATL has been at the head of the list for 2 decades now in both passenger traffic and in aircraft operations*.

    That airport has it made, with 5 || E-W runways (9,000 ft to 12,000ft) that would only be unusable if the wind blew hard out of the north or south with snow on the ground (not bloody likely) or a REALLY strong wind out of those directions with dry/wet conditions. Yeah, and thunderstorms…

    They have LOTS of ramp space, organized taxiways, all perpendicular and parallel as opposed to O’Hare, and they are working on a loop around the W end of the S-side T/O runway, to get the landing traffic off of 9R/27L to the gates with no runway crossings as they already have for the N side.

    Yeah, it’s far from Asia, and farther from W. Europe by 1 1/2 hours than New York is.

    Atlanta Hartsfield went from a 2-decade slow rise up to 110 million passengers to 75 million right now.

    .

    * In aircraft movements Chicago O’Hare was 2% higher for just one year in there, ’14.

  142. @AnotherDad
    @Steve Sailer

    The Fauci--more precisely the political reactions--has scrambled the busiest airports list.

    LAX was routinely 2 or 3 contending with O'Hare. It's been passed by the last couple of years--by a wide margin--by the Dallas and Denver hubs. And even Charlotte, Orlando, Vegas and Phoenix are nipping at its heels only a few million passengers behind in 2021.

    LA has a few alternative airports ringing it, but LA has a whole lot of well off people who presumably like to fly, so one would expect it to bounce back strongly. But maybe that doesn't happen until flying to Asia--specifically China--gets zipping again.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

    OK, maybe you made the assumption everyone knew ATL was at the top (American and World lists).

    BTW, the top 22 in the world include 8 Chinese airports and 12 American ones. Also, when in the hell did they change McCarran Field to Henry Reid? Screw that. It’s McCarran Field. (Little Rock has been under pressure to drop the “Clinton” moniker – it’s Adams or something.)

  143. @John Johnson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    That scene really shows what it is like to live in the city. Auto theft is considered an insurance issue. They aren't going to go and look for your car and in fact they will get annoyed if you ask about it. Normally you take the insurance money and move on. The poor get hammered as usual because they often have basic insurance that doesn't cover theft. Criminals will look for certain types of cars that they know how to steal and they tend to be older.

    I now live in a small town where the police will investigate anything since they aren't spending the day chasing violent felons. They are 1-2 minutes from my house for any call.

    But even when I was in the city I didn't resent the police for spending so much time in *cough* diversified areas. The police enforce the will of the mayor which on some level is really the will of the people. The police are on the frontlines of race denial. White liberals and conservatives exchange race denial based political theories in the burbs while police, first responders, social workers and other professionals have to face the unfortunate reality. Police are basically butchers that see where meat comes from while Whites in the burbs just buy steaks and cook them.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Thanks. Been there, John, and done that. I did report it, and then for about 4 years afterwards I’d get a letter from the cops every 6 months asking if I’d found my car. How would I? It was a pro job. I wrote them back one time and told them that was their job.

    The thing is, I had one possible lead (speaking of the funny video clip from The Big Lebowski). The cop said something like “we don’t want to go causing any trouble, you know”. I had to get on my bike and check it out myself. That part, the why of this possible lead, is another story, but I didn’t find anything there that was untoward – it was already about 15 hours later though.

    It’s a bad feeling when you are pretty sure where you parked your car the previous night, and it’s not over there.

    I was not poor, but I had nothing but the State-required liability insurance also. It’s what I did with all the older vehicles, and, even after what happened, I felt that was the right call.

    (No way will you get an older vehicle to match the one you had from the insurance company money.)

  144. @John Johnson
    @Luddite in Chief

    The impression I have of the US economy is that a lot of people are maxed out* on their credit cards. When hard times hit, the card companies start chasing balances and reducing tradelines to manage risk (and not always wisely, alas).

    Credit card companies are untouchable in the US. It is unreal as to how both parties grant them a free pass. Biden was actually a credit cardy lobby whore until he left the senate. The left actually hated him before he ran for president since he sided with Republicans on the bankruptcy bill.

    Some honorable Democrats have actually gone after payday loan companies on a local level. I will give them credit for that. It's a sick industry that entirely exists to exploit the poor.

    But overall this is the land of uninhibited usury. Unbelievable that Christians have been talked into it.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    From agreement to strong disagreement with the flip of a comment, ha!

    The CC companies have EVERY RIGHT to market cards at exorbitant interest rates. Nobody forces anyone to get them. I accumulated a shit-ton of interest on only one card in my life, and that was one used as a loan in a financial emergency situation. (And then, I ended up paying about 1/2 back.*) For the rest of my life, I avoided the CC’s as soon as Debit Cards came around.

    Hey, just like the lottery is a tax on stupidity, these cards are a surcharge on stupidity.

    Yeah, like the title loan companies, I want nothing to do with it, and I do think it’s kind of sick. It’s a free country though. There should be no government involvement unless there is actual fraud. Being charged for being an irresponsible dumbass is not fraud.

    .

    * The thing is, I was ready to pay it all back at that point, as I had been catching up to within about \$3,000. They wanted to make a deal to get their money NOW, even if only 1/2 of that amount, as they didn’t trust me. Who were the suckers in this situation? Don’t want to trust me? OK, fine. You’re not my wife or kid, so I don’t care.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Hey, just like the lottery is a tax on stupidity, these cards are a surcharge on stupidity.

    Yea I get the attitude and once agreed. That was when I was more libertarian/conservative.

    But I now see it as Wall St putting a vacuum tube on rural communities. Voluntary or not it is a lot of money that leaves rural areas and goes to NYC. I'd rather cap interest and reduce the outflow to Wall St. It's a dirty business where they profit from not just poor decision making but also bad luck.

    I didn't have a problem with the lottery until I learned about how people will actually spend hundreds of dollars on them. So it isn't just a buck here or there at the gas station. The state is aware if these heavy gamblers (often poor) and depends on them. A lot that money goes to public education which is half-indoctrination.

    So the state is basically selling a fantasy of wealth so it can pay to tell liberal fantasies in the classroom. Yuck.

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired

  145. @Achmed E. Newman
    @John Johnson

    From agreement to strong disagreement with the flip of a comment, ha!

    The CC companies have EVERY RIGHT to market cards at exorbitant interest rates. Nobody forces anyone to get them. I accumulated a shit-ton of interest on only one card in my life, and that was one used as a loan in a financial emergency situation. (And then, I ended up paying about 1/2 back.*) For the rest of my life, I avoided the CC's as soon as Debit Cards came around.

    Hey, just like the lottery is a tax on stupidity, these cards are a surcharge on stupidity.

    Yeah, like the title loan companies, I want nothing to do with it, and I do think it's kind of sick. It's a free country though. There should be no government involvement unless there is actual fraud. Being charged for being an irresponsible dumbass is not fraud.

    .

    * The thing is, I was ready to pay it all back at that point, as I had been catching up to within about $3,000. They wanted to make a deal to get their money NOW, even if only 1/2 of that amount, as they didn't trust me. Who were the suckers in this situation? Don't want to trust me? OK, fine. You're not my wife or kid, so I don't care.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    Hey, just like the lottery is a tax on stupidity, these cards are a surcharge on stupidity.

    Yea I get the attitude and once agreed. That was when I was more libertarian/conservative.

    But I now see it as Wall St putting a vacuum tube on rural communities. Voluntary or not it is a lot of money that leaves rural areas and goes to NYC. I’d rather cap interest and reduce the outflow to Wall St. It’s a dirty business where they profit from not just poor decision making but also bad luck.

    I didn’t have a problem with the lottery until I learned about how people will actually spend hundreds of dollars on them. So it isn’t just a buck here or there at the gas station. The state is aware if these heavy gamblers (often poor) and depends on them. A lot that money goes to public education which is half-indoctrination.

    So the state is basically selling a fantasy of wealth so it can pay to tell liberal fantasies in the classroom. Yuck.

    • Replies: @Sick n' Tired
    @John Johnson

    The clerk at the gas station was scanning a STACK of daily numbers tickets for a customer for about 15 minutes the other day. All the clerks knew him and said he buys & plays the same amount of tickets every day....$257 worth.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  146. Well, I can agree to differ on the problem if it’s voluntary, but I do agree with your take on government education and partially on the lottery. Gambling is illegal unless the State runs it? That’s bull, and that’s why I was against these lotteries from the get-go.

    Oh, one more reason I picked up on later: Because there’s not been many gas stations in which you don’t have to prepay since ’08, and I’d rather get the cash price*, I need to go inside twice to fill the tank up. I don’t mind that, but I hate waiting behind some sucker who keeps scratching shit off and getting new cards … uggghh.

    .

    * I am not sure about the debit card price sometimes.

  147. @John Johnson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Hey, just like the lottery is a tax on stupidity, these cards are a surcharge on stupidity.

    Yea I get the attitude and once agreed. That was when I was more libertarian/conservative.

    But I now see it as Wall St putting a vacuum tube on rural communities. Voluntary or not it is a lot of money that leaves rural areas and goes to NYC. I'd rather cap interest and reduce the outflow to Wall St. It's a dirty business where they profit from not just poor decision making but also bad luck.

    I didn't have a problem with the lottery until I learned about how people will actually spend hundreds of dollars on them. So it isn't just a buck here or there at the gas station. The state is aware if these heavy gamblers (often poor) and depends on them. A lot that money goes to public education which is half-indoctrination.

    So the state is basically selling a fantasy of wealth so it can pay to tell liberal fantasies in the classroom. Yuck.

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired

    The clerk at the gas station was scanning a STACK of daily numbers tickets for a customer for about 15 minutes the other day. All the clerks knew him and said he buys & plays the same amount of tickets every day….\$257 worth.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Sick n' Tired

    I buy a Powerball or MegaMillions ticket once a week just to randomize my life, but I too see people spending $20 on tickets who don't look they have $20 to spare.

  148. @Sick n' Tired
    @John Johnson

    The clerk at the gas station was scanning a STACK of daily numbers tickets for a customer for about 15 minutes the other day. All the clerks knew him and said he buys & plays the same amount of tickets every day....$257 worth.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    I buy a Powerball or MegaMillions ticket once a week just to randomize my life, but I too see people spending \$20 on tickets who don’t look they have \$20 to spare.

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