The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
More Good Stuff from Frum
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

In The Atlantic, David Frum writes:

Romney ultimately lost the presidential election, of course, to the surprise and dismay of a party elite confident of victory until the very end. One might have expected this shock to force a rethink. The Republicans had now lost four out of the past six presidential elections. Another election had been won only in the Electoral College, despite the loss of the popular vote. Even their best showing, 50.7 percent of the vote in 2004, represented the closest escape of any incumbent president who won reelection since the first recorded popular vote.

And yet, within hours of Romney’s defeat, Republican donors, talkers, and officials converged on the maximally self-exculpating explanation. The problem had not been the plan to phase out Medicare for people younger than 55. Or the lack of ideas about how to raise wages. Or the commitment to ending health-insurance coverage for millions of working-age Americans. Or the anthems to wealth creation and entrepreneurship in a country increasingly skeptical of both. No, the problem was the one element of Romney’s message they had never liked anyway: immigration enforcement.

Owners of capital assets, employers of low-skill laborers, and highly compensated professionals tend to benefit economically from the arrival of immigrants. They are better positioned to enjoy the attractive cultural and social results of migration (more-interesting food!) and to protect themselves against the burdensome impacts (surges in non-English-proficient pupils in public schools). A pro-immigration policy shift was one more assertion of class interest in a party program already brimful of them.

Here’s a nice one-liner:

Remember that Republican voters care more about aligning government with their values of work and family than they care about cutting the size of government as an end in itself.

 
Hide 305 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. https://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=REV

    This chart explains why the platform of “cutting government” doesn’t work.

    It’s one thing to propose it in France, but the only developed countries taxing less than we do are…Mexico and Chile.

    If Mexico was so great, there would be immigration going that way. Fred doesn’t count.

    • Replies: @(((Owen)))
    @Maj. Kong

    "If Mexico was [sic] so great, there would be immigration going that way. Fred doesn’t count."

    Net immigration between the USA and Mexico has been in the Mexican direction every year since 2007. That counts Mexicans coming to the USA, Mexicans going back, Gringos going to Mexico, Gringos going back, and foreigners moving between both countries. If you throw out the foreigners who are citizens of neither country, the net migration is even higher toward Mexico.

    If it weren't for the astonishingly high number of family reunification visas drawing people north, the net numbers would be even higher in the southerly direction; Mexicans who are only in El Norte for work are returning home in ever higher numbers. The long backlog of family green cards will keep migration north artificially high for years still. Those arrivals will resent America for the waiting and for making them commit to a move they wouldn't even make by the time the free green card comes through.

    And Mexicans are going south because Mexico is pretty great. Political reforms, neoliberal growth policies, education policy, and environmental reforms have delivered big improvements. Mexico's life expectancy for nonsmokers is higher than the USA's. Middle class Mexicans can afford to raise a family in a good school district. Mexican men are strong and confident while women are sweet, pleasing, and not emasculating Gringa harpies. Median young college educated Mexicans earn more (adjusted for cost of living) than median USA young college grads. Oh, and December isn't miserable.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Diversity Heretic, @bomag, @The Z Blog, @syonredux, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @syonredux, @International Jew

    , @Dave Pinsen
    @Maj. Kong

    As Yglesias once pointed out, the Scandinavian countries lefties love don't pay for their generous welfare benefits by just taxing the rich; they tax everyone. Their taxes are actually flatter/more regressive than ours, even if their top rates are higher.

    W.'s income tax legislation was actually pretty stupid, even if you agree with its goal, which was to lower top marginal tax rates. He had to make the whole thing temporary, lower rates on everyone, and make the income tax more progressive than before, in order to get it passed. Then, when it was about to expire, the Dems let the one thing W. wanted most (lower top marginal rates) expire, and kept the rest.

    The GOP would actually be better off with higher rates on everyone. It will make the safety net people want more fiscally sustainable, and eventually set the stage Republicans to run on tax cutting again at some point in the future.

    , @Clyde
    @Maj. Kong


    This chart explains why the platform of “cutting government” doesn’t work.
     
    You could easily cut half the Federal workers and contractors in the greater Washingtoon DC region and no one would notice. Get rid of the 11,000 EPA workers for a start. Get rid of the Federal Department of Education which is really just a glorified jobs program for every affirmative action leech under the sun starting with women, blacks, gays, lesbians.......with (angry) Samoans and Aleutian Islanders bringing up the rear.
    Get rid of affirmative action hiring hall---Department of Labor
    Get rid of affirmative action hiring hall---Department of Health and Human Services
    Get rid of affirmative action hiring hall---Department of Housing and Urban Development

    There are 3000+ county governments, 50 State governments and one Federale Gov't. So you have to be specific about what government and what agencies can be pruned back or eliminated

    Replies: @JerseyGuy

    , @ben tillman
    @Maj. Kong


    This chart explains why the platform of “cutting government” doesn’t work.

    It’s one thing to propose it in France, but the only developed countries taxing less than we do are…Mexico and Chile.
     

    Cutting government doesn't work because the government is too well-organized and powerful to allow us to cut it. Obviously, a 90% reduction in the size of the central government would be a wonderful thing for the people of this country.

    What does the chart have to do with anything aside from correlating high taxes with high production? Where people produce a lot, the parasitic government can take more without impoverishing the people.

    , @Karl
    @Maj. Kong

    >>> If Mexico was so great, there would be immigration going that way <<<<

    It's only the dull-witted, who don't retire to a Third World country, to live like a King.

  2. OT- Does the quality/nature/viewpoint of a child say something about the parents?

    Over at Breitbart is this comment from Ivanka Trump, from an account that Disqus notes is verified as belonging to her:

    Black pride = Celebrated
    White pride = Racist

    No hypocrisy there.

    She’s defending her father and cuts through all the BS and gets to the point, a very defensible point.

    People attack Trump for being boorish but I’ve not heard any complaints about his daughter so she might be perfectly situated to withstand the point and sputter responses and take the offensive and get the critics to defend their hypocrisy. If she survives the point-and-sputter crowd, then surely all the women who follow her can see that they have permission to publicly hold crime-think positions.

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    @TangoMan

    I mocked what appeared to be a verified account of Stephen Fry a few years back. That guy takes everything personally.

    I'd bet 8:1 that this was a hacking.

    Replies: @TangoMan

    , @Harold
    @TangoMan

    Someone just called their disqus account “Ivanka Trump ✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ ᵃᶜᶜᵒᵘᶰᵗ”.

  3. @TangoMan
    OT- Does the quality/nature/viewpoint of a child say something about the parents?

    Over at Breitbart is this comment from Ivanka Trump, from an account that Disqus notes is verified as belonging to her:


    Black pride = Celebrated
    White pride = Racist

    No hypocrisy there.
     

    She's defending her father and cuts through all the BS and gets to the point, a very defensible point.

    People attack Trump for being boorish but I've not heard any complaints about his daughter so she might be perfectly situated to withstand the point and sputter responses and take the offensive and get the critics to defend their hypocrisy. If she survives the point-and-sputter crowd, then surely all the women who follow her can see that they have permission to publicly hold crime-think positions.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong, @Harold

    I mocked what appeared to be a verified account of Stephen Fry a few years back. That guy takes everything personally.

    I’d bet 8:1 that this was a hacking.

    • Replies: @TangoMan
    @Maj. Kong

    If it's a hack, then why not go outlandish, offensive, instead of defensible. Any of us here could defend that statement and make liberals cry. It's a very defensible position but elite whites are too afraid to advance it. It took a girl to do it, a girl who seems to be a chip off the old block.

    If the comment was over the top, I'd agree with you. I just don't see any upside for the hacker to chose this statement.

    Replies: @27 year old

  4. @Maj. Kong
    @TangoMan

    I mocked what appeared to be a verified account of Stephen Fry a few years back. That guy takes everything personally.

    I'd bet 8:1 that this was a hacking.

    Replies: @TangoMan

    If it’s a hack, then why not go outlandish, offensive, instead of defensible. Any of us here could defend that statement and make liberals cry. It’s a very defensible position but elite whites are too afraid to advance it. It took a girl to do it, a girl who seems to be a chip off the old block.

    If the comment was over the top, I’d agree with you. I just don’t see any upside for the hacker to chose this statement.

    • Replies: @27 year old
    @TangoMan

    Maybe it was a hack by someone who agreed with the statement.

    Anyway, let us know what else comes of this. Here's hoping this will be reported on by the usual clickbait rags as "trumps daughter posts white supremacy comment wow just wow"

  5. “They are better positioned to enjoy the attractive cultural and social results of migration (more-interesting food!)”

    More interesting food? There is nothing interesting and exotic about Chinese and Mexican food. I live in California where there are Mexican and Chinese restaurants on every street corner. These cuisines lose it’s exotic factor when there is way too much easy access to them. There is an oversaturation of Mexican and Chinese food in California.  

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @Jefferson

    Getting excited over ethnic food is so pre-2010s. More like 1990s and earlier.

    Ditto "exotic" ethnic women. Wow, short, spindly, black hair and dark brown eyes, complexion varying shades of brown. So exotic. Not.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jay Fink

    , @Gunnar von Cowtown
    @Jefferson


    More interesting food?
     
    Yeah, yeah, I know it's the one irrefutable benefit of mass immigration, but this argument never sat right with me. Why the hell do we need to import millions of Mexicans to enjoy spicy and carbo-licious Mexican food? Can't we just swap recipes?!? Is this an "elite women don't cook" status-signaling thing?

    I'm a middle-class Midwesterner with agrarian roots. My Grandma who lived 4 hours away made some ridiculously awesome casseroles. Did my Mom insist that Grandma drive 4 hours to our house and make casseroles every couple of days? Hell no. She asked for the recipes. Problem solved.

    Replies: @Jack D, @JSM, @WhatEvvs

    , @Michelle
    @Jefferson

    Au contraire! It is my opinion that there can never, ever, be too much Mexican food. Even bad Mexican food is good, a la Mexican "style" canned tamales and Rosarita refries, and Hungry Man Mexican TV dinners and "Taco Bell Chalupas" and American tacos made with ground beef and Ortega taco shells. Authentic Mexican food is, de acuerdo, vastly preferable. Like cemeteries in Boston, and ABC stores in Honolulu, there should be a Mexican restaurant on every corner in America!! As for Chinese food, it is hit or miss and bad Chinese food is just bad and often unsanitary and will go through your system like drain cleaner!

    , @Massimo Heitor
    @Jefferson


    There is nothing interesting and exotic about Chinese and Mexican food.
     
    Steaks aren't exotic, but people love eating them. There is good and bad of every food genre. Also, the genres themselves are wildly malleable, there is tons of room for interpretation for what Mexican/Chinese/Italian food even means, and those things change over the years. Lastly, restaurants are ruthlessly subject to public interest, so only popular restaurants remain open.

    Replies: @Former Darfur

  6. @TangoMan
    @Maj. Kong

    If it's a hack, then why not go outlandish, offensive, instead of defensible. Any of us here could defend that statement and make liberals cry. It's a very defensible position but elite whites are too afraid to advance it. It took a girl to do it, a girl who seems to be a chip off the old block.

    If the comment was over the top, I'd agree with you. I just don't see any upside for the hacker to chose this statement.

    Replies: @27 year old

    Maybe it was a hack by someone who agreed with the statement.

    Anyway, let us know what else comes of this. Here’s hoping this will be reported on by the usual clickbait rags as “trumps daughter posts white supremacy comment wow just wow”

    • Agree: International Jew
  7. @Maj. Kong
    https://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=REV

    This chart explains why the platform of "cutting government" doesn't work.

    It's one thing to propose it in France, but the only developed countries taxing less than we do are...Mexico and Chile.

    If Mexico was so great, there would be immigration going that way. Fred doesn't count.

    Replies: @(((Owen))), @Dave Pinsen, @Clyde, @ben tillman, @Karl

    “If Mexico was [sic] so great, there would be immigration going that way. Fred doesn’t count.”

    Net immigration between the USA and Mexico has been in the Mexican direction every year since 2007. That counts Mexicans coming to the USA, Mexicans going back, Gringos going to Mexico, Gringos going back, and foreigners moving between both countries. If you throw out the foreigners who are citizens of neither country, the net migration is even higher toward Mexico.

    If it weren’t for the astonishingly high number of family reunification visas drawing people north, the net numbers would be even higher in the southerly direction; Mexicans who are only in El Norte for work are returning home in ever higher numbers. The long backlog of family green cards will keep migration north artificially high for years still. Those arrivals will resent America for the waiting and for making them commit to a move they wouldn’t even make by the time the free green card comes through.

    And Mexicans are going south because Mexico is pretty great. Political reforms, neoliberal growth policies, education policy, and environmental reforms have delivered big improvements. Mexico’s life expectancy for nonsmokers is higher than the USA’s. Middle class Mexicans can afford to raise a family in a good school district. Mexican men are strong and confident while women are sweet, pleasing, and not emasculating Gringa harpies. Median young college educated Mexicans earn more (adjusted for cost of living) than median USA young college grads. Oh, and December isn’t miserable.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @(((Owen)))

    In 1967, I accompanied my parents to look at the American retirement colony at Lake Chapala (where Fred Reed lives now, I believe). It was pretty nice.

    Mexico is not doomed by nature to misery. It's one of the more favored landscapes on earth.

    And there are a lot of fairly easy steps to make it a better place, like more traffic stoplights.

    Replies: @(((Owen))), @George Taylor, @Tony

    , @Diversity Heretic
    @(((Owen)))

    I respect Fred Reed's choice to live in Mexico, although I have no interest in it myself. My father's neighbors escape Midwest winters in Mexico and they like it. Costa Rica is also quite nice, or so I've heard. The geography isn't the problem.

    Replies: @dearieme

    , @bomag
    @(((Owen)))

    The long backlog of family green cards will keep migration north artificially high for years still. Those arrivals will resent America for the waiting and for making them commit to a move they wouldn’t even make by the time the free green card comes through.

    So we can't win. We let in economic migrants for fear that they would hate us otherwise, but they hate us anyway because, economically, we declined from their expectations.

    Meanwhile, maybe Mexico will take in the wonderful vibrants from El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, et al; and have even more awesome levels of...whatever. But, oops, no, they get shuttled directly to that great commode in the north. Looks like it is starting to be in Mexico's interest to control transitory migration from the south; otherwise their colony in the north will begin to resemble that which they avoid.

    Replies: @(((Owen)))

    , @The Z Blog
    @(((Owen)))

    Steve's post about innumeracy comes to mind here. Whenever someone picks an oddball starting point on the time line you know they are not playing in straight. Similarly, I would bet Owen has a definition of "net immigration" that would strike most people as bizarre.

    And no Owen, I have no interest in having a long winded debate with you on it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @(((Owen))), @iSteveFan

    , @syonredux
    @(((Owen)))

    Sadly, the damage to Anglo-America has already been done:


    The Hispanic population is expected to reach about 106 million in 2050, about double what it is today, according to new U.S. Census Bureau population projections.
     
    http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/12/16/with-fewer-new-arrivals-census-lowers-hispanic-population-projections-2/
    , @Gato de la Biblioteca
    @(((Owen)))

    If the net flow of migration is southwards, how come all the border counties have been complaining about getting swamped the last two years? And why are there more and more native Spanish speakers that can't speak a goddamned single word of English every year?

    Hell, I was at Disney World a couple of weeks back, and some of the help at the Magic Kingdom couldn't speak any English at all. And I'm talking about people in greeter-type roles, not just the people scrubbing the toilets.

    The idea that Mexicans are leaving the country in droves is ludicrous on the face of it, and cannot be believed.

    Replies: @Ed

    , @syonredux
    @(((Owen)))


    The Hispanic population is expected to reach about 106 million in 2050, about double what it is today, according to new U.S. Census Bureau population projections.
     
    http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/12/16/with-fewer-new-arrivals-census-lowers-hispanic-population-projections-2/

    And those numbers do not bode well for Anglo-America:


    “Raven’s Standard Progressive Matrices test was administered to a representative sample of 920 white, Mestizo and Native Mexican Indian children aged 7–10 years in Mexico. The mean IQs in relation to a British mean of 100 obtained from the 1979 British standardization sample and adjusted for the estimated subsequent increase were: 98·0 for whites, 94·3 for Mestizos and 83·3 for Native Mexican Indians.”

    http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=266611

    And then let’s compare this to the racial composition of Mexico:

    98.0: Mexican Whites
    94.3:Mexican Mestizos
    83.3: Mexican Amerinds

    According to the CIA FACTBOOK, Mexico’s racial breakdown is:mestizo (Amerindian-Spanish) 60%, Amerindian or predominantly Amerindian 30%, white 9%, other 1%

    Things are not looking good Mexico way…..


    Now, let’s turn to real world achievements.Mexico and the Nobel prize. According to WIKIPEDIA, three people of Mexican origins have won a Nobel:

    Alfonso García Robles: With Alva Myrdal, got the Peace Prize in 1982. For what it’s worth, he looks very White in his WIKIPEDIA photo.

    Mario J. Molina: Along with Paul J. Crutzen and F. Sherwood Rowland, he got the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for studying the threat posed to the ozone layer by CFCs. Looks pretty White in his WIKIPEDIA photo.

    Octavio Paz: 1990 Nobel in Lit. Based on WIKIPEDIA photo, he might have some Amerind ancestry (or he might not).

    So, Three prizes. Total. As compared to 10 for Scotland, 15 for Australia, 23 for Canada, 74 for England , 306 for the USA, …..

    Now, all of these figures are from WIKIPEDIA, so I’m sure that one could argue about the margins…but the overall portrait of Mexican achievement is pretty dire.

    How about Fields Medalists?:

    United States 12

    France 10

    Soviet Union (3) / Russia (6) 9

    United Kingdom 7

    Japan 3
    Belgium 2

    West Germany (1) / Germany (0) 1


    Australia 1

    British Hong Kong 1

    Finland 1

    Israel 1

    Italy 1

    Norway 1

    New Zealand 1

    Sweden 1

    Vietnam 1

    Iran 1

    Brazil 1

    (None Stateless) 1

    I’ve left out Manjul Bhargava. His background is complicated.

    So, Mexico has zero.Hell, all of Latin America has exactly one, which ties them with New Zealand.


    Race creates the foundation upon which culture is built.Mexico’s racial mix produces mediocrity.In contrast, America’s overwhelming European racial stock allowed her to thrive.Mass immigration by Hispanic Amerinds and Mestizos is changing that.Soon, the USA will be as mediocre as Mexico.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Flip, @epebble

    , @International Jew
    @(((Owen)))


    Net immigration between the USA and Mexico has been in the Mexican direction every year since 2007.
     
    How do we even know how much illegal immigration there is? The usual metric -- number of ICE apprehensions -- seems silly, in that it assumes a constant level of effort on our side.
  8. @(((Owen)))
    @Maj. Kong

    "If Mexico was [sic] so great, there would be immigration going that way. Fred doesn’t count."

    Net immigration between the USA and Mexico has been in the Mexican direction every year since 2007. That counts Mexicans coming to the USA, Mexicans going back, Gringos going to Mexico, Gringos going back, and foreigners moving between both countries. If you throw out the foreigners who are citizens of neither country, the net migration is even higher toward Mexico.

    If it weren't for the astonishingly high number of family reunification visas drawing people north, the net numbers would be even higher in the southerly direction; Mexicans who are only in El Norte for work are returning home in ever higher numbers. The long backlog of family green cards will keep migration north artificially high for years still. Those arrivals will resent America for the waiting and for making them commit to a move they wouldn't even make by the time the free green card comes through.

    And Mexicans are going south because Mexico is pretty great. Political reforms, neoliberal growth policies, education policy, and environmental reforms have delivered big improvements. Mexico's life expectancy for nonsmokers is higher than the USA's. Middle class Mexicans can afford to raise a family in a good school district. Mexican men are strong and confident while women are sweet, pleasing, and not emasculating Gringa harpies. Median young college educated Mexicans earn more (adjusted for cost of living) than median USA young college grads. Oh, and December isn't miserable.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Diversity Heretic, @bomag, @The Z Blog, @syonredux, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @syonredux, @International Jew

    In 1967, I accompanied my parents to look at the American retirement colony at Lake Chapala (where Fred Reed lives now, I believe). It was pretty nice.

    Mexico is not doomed by nature to misery. It’s one of the more favored landscapes on earth.

    And there are a lot of fairly easy steps to make it a better place, like more traffic stoplights.

    • Replies: @(((Owen)))
    @Steve Sailer

    Traffic stop lights will not make a place nicer. In Mexico City, there are one hundred thousand intersections. A few percent have stop lights and a few percent more have stop signs. At all the others, you're supposed to understand based on local conditions which street might have the right of way. It works great. Not everyplace has to be a Teutonic overregulated nightmare of arbitrary rules.

    Mexico is a great place for walking. Or bicycling. Get out of that car and enjoy the lack of stop lights.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    , @George Taylor
    @Steve Sailer

    The New Urb's over at the American Conservative would be opposed to stop lights. http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/put-a-stop-to-stoplights/

    Replies: @a Newsreader

    , @Tony
    @Steve Sailer

    Looking at Fred's pictures, I think he's greeking it in Mexico.

  9. @Jefferson
    "They are better positioned to enjoy the attractive cultural and social results of migration (more-interesting food!)"

    More interesting food? There is nothing interesting and exotic about Chinese and Mexican food. I live in California where there are Mexican and Chinese restaurants on every street corner. These cuisines lose it's exotic factor when there is way too much easy access to them. There is an oversaturation of Mexican and Chinese food in California.  

    Replies: @Anonym, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Michelle, @Massimo Heitor

    Getting excited over ethnic food is so pre-2010s. More like 1990s and earlier.

    Ditto “exotic” ethnic women. Wow, short, spindly, black hair and dark brown eyes, complexion varying shades of brown. So exotic. Not.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Anonym

    "Getting excited over ethnic food is so pre-2010s. More like 1990s and earlier.

    Ditto “exotic” ethnic women. Wow, short, spindly, black hair and dark brown eyes, complexion varying shades of brown. So exotic. Not."

    I think German cuisine is more exotic than Chinese and Mexican cuisine. There are barely any German restaurants in the U.S when compared to the proportion of Germans in this country. Over 50 million Germans, yet the vast majority of shopping malls in this country do not offer German cuisine in it's food courts. There are more Indian and Vietnamese restaurants in this country than there are German ones.

    Replies: @Jack D, @dearieme, @NOTA, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @Thagomizer, @WhatEvvs, @Former Darfur, @Flip, @James Bowery

    , @Jay Fink
    @Anonym

    I have a preference for latinas because most of them try to look pretty. The white women where I live, especially the lower class, look horrible to me. Over the top plain, no sex appeal, fat, tattooed, and masculine.

  10. @(((Owen)))
    @Maj. Kong

    "If Mexico was [sic] so great, there would be immigration going that way. Fred doesn’t count."

    Net immigration between the USA and Mexico has been in the Mexican direction every year since 2007. That counts Mexicans coming to the USA, Mexicans going back, Gringos going to Mexico, Gringos going back, and foreigners moving between both countries. If you throw out the foreigners who are citizens of neither country, the net migration is even higher toward Mexico.

    If it weren't for the astonishingly high number of family reunification visas drawing people north, the net numbers would be even higher in the southerly direction; Mexicans who are only in El Norte for work are returning home in ever higher numbers. The long backlog of family green cards will keep migration north artificially high for years still. Those arrivals will resent America for the waiting and for making them commit to a move they wouldn't even make by the time the free green card comes through.

    And Mexicans are going south because Mexico is pretty great. Political reforms, neoliberal growth policies, education policy, and environmental reforms have delivered big improvements. Mexico's life expectancy for nonsmokers is higher than the USA's. Middle class Mexicans can afford to raise a family in a good school district. Mexican men are strong and confident while women are sweet, pleasing, and not emasculating Gringa harpies. Median young college educated Mexicans earn more (adjusted for cost of living) than median USA young college grads. Oh, and December isn't miserable.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Diversity Heretic, @bomag, @The Z Blog, @syonredux, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @syonredux, @International Jew

    I respect Fred Reed’s choice to live in Mexico, although I have no interest in it myself. My father’s neighbors escape Midwest winters in Mexico and they like it. Costa Rica is also quite nice, or so I’ve heard. The geography isn’t the problem.

    • Replies: @dearieme
    @Diversity Heretic

    "My father’s neighbors escape Midwest winters in Mexico": fair enough. If they speak Spanish and like the seaside they might like to consider the Canaries too. If they would prefer English-speaking, then Australia or NZ.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  11. @Steve Sailer
    @(((Owen)))

    In 1967, I accompanied my parents to look at the American retirement colony at Lake Chapala (where Fred Reed lives now, I believe). It was pretty nice.

    Mexico is not doomed by nature to misery. It's one of the more favored landscapes on earth.

    And there are a lot of fairly easy steps to make it a better place, like more traffic stoplights.

    Replies: @(((Owen))), @George Taylor, @Tony

    Traffic stop lights will not make a place nicer. In Mexico City, there are one hundred thousand intersections. A few percent have stop lights and a few percent more have stop signs. At all the others, you’re supposed to understand based on local conditions which street might have the right of way. It works great. Not everyplace has to be a Teutonic overregulated nightmare of arbitrary rules.

    Mexico is a great place for walking. Or bicycling. Get out of that car and enjoy the lack of stop lights.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @(((Owen)))

    I stayed in a hotel overlooking the main drag in Mexico City, the Paseo de la Reforma. The intersection below had no stop light even though it was one of major crossroads of the capital. It was fascinating to watch long lines of cars play Perpendicular Chicken with each other, but all the honking was kind of hard on the ears.

    Jorge Castaneda implies that things like no stoplights are justified as keeping wimpy gringos out of Mexico. He says, however, that Mexicans would find they like not having to take their lives in their hands every time they try to walk across the street.

    Replies: @(((Owen))), @Anonymous

    , @Steve Sailer
    @(((Owen)))

    I stayed in a hotel overlooking the main drag in Mexico City, the Paseo de la Reforma. The intersection below had no stop light even though it was one of major crossroads of the capital. It was fascinating to watch long lines of cars play Perpendicular Chicken with each other, but all the honking was kind of hard on the ears.

    Jorge Castaneda implies that things like no stoplights are justified as keeping wimpy gringos out of Mexico. He says, however, that Mexicans would find they like not having to take their lives in their hands every time they try to walk across the street.

    Replies: @IBC, @Name Withheld

    , @Steve Sailer
    @(((Owen)))

    Like I said, Mexico would be a pretty easy place to improve. The Mexican concern is that they if they make it less cruddy it would get overrun by gringos.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Anonymous, @Jack D, @Bernie

  12. So Frum points out that Republican insiders have been pushing wall-to-wall Latino vote strategy since 2012. They claim it’s the way back to the White House and the future of the party. And they never lose focus on that message.

    Then they suggest that mass immigration is the way to appeal to Latino voters. Of course, mass immigration harms Latino citizens more than any other demographic. There is no one with most ruined neighborhoods, worse crime, or more competition for jobs from mass immigration than Latino US citizens. Making more of something they’re uneasy about isn’t going to win them over.

    Of course, Republicans already run securely the governors’ offices, the Senate, and the House. And the national presidential race runs through states with very little Mexican-American influence. So there’s no obvious target that Republicans could reach even if they could win more Mexican-American vote.

    So why are we getting such a narrative from Republican insiders? It might be just to push the donor class status signalling immigration explosion on fence sitters. Or it could be they’re stupid and nobody cares enough to explain it to them. I doubt Frum will make any impact.

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    @(((Owen)))

    Whenever you hear the phrase "Latino voters", it helps to include following. "Asians" and "upper-middle class suburban moderates".

    Trende pointed out that even a majority of the Latino vote would not have won the election for Romney, ceteris paribus . And no Republican since the collection of polling began, has won such a majority.

    What the elites are concerned about is their own backyard. We know it as Fairfax, Prince William, and Loudon counties of Virginia.

    Places like LaCrosse, Wisconsin and Dayton, Ohio are like worlds away. There is a belief that Midwesterners in these areas actually LIKE immigration. If all you know is MI Governor Rick Snyder and the mainsteam media, it makes some sense.

    I would argue that the largest victim of mass immigration is black Americans (not recent African immigrants, a different story), not Latins. Even if it was victimizing them economically, they don't see themselves as victims.

    , @bomag
    @(((Owen)))

    Of course, Republicans already run securely the governors’ offices, the Senate, and the House.

    You should put "run" in quotes. We get governors like John Kasich; and the latest budget deal was pretty much a Democrat roll.

    Republicans in office act like Democrats that favor a slightly different slice of big business.

  13. @(((Owen)))
    @Steve Sailer

    Traffic stop lights will not make a place nicer. In Mexico City, there are one hundred thousand intersections. A few percent have stop lights and a few percent more have stop signs. At all the others, you're supposed to understand based on local conditions which street might have the right of way. It works great. Not everyplace has to be a Teutonic overregulated nightmare of arbitrary rules.

    Mexico is a great place for walking. Or bicycling. Get out of that car and enjoy the lack of stop lights.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    I stayed in a hotel overlooking the main drag in Mexico City, the Paseo de la Reforma. The intersection below had no stop light even though it was one of major crossroads of the capital. It was fascinating to watch long lines of cars play Perpendicular Chicken with each other, but all the honking was kind of hard on the ears.

    Jorge Castaneda implies that things like no stoplights are justified as keeping wimpy gringos out of Mexico. He says, however, that Mexicans would find they like not having to take their lives in their hands every time they try to walk across the street.

    • Replies: @(((Owen)))
    @Steve Sailer

    "I stayed in a hotel overlooking the main drag in Mexico City, the Paseo de la Reforma."

    Ooh. Fancy. Paseo de la Reforma is a place to go looking for two hundred plus Gringo dollar hotel rooms nowadays amongst the skyscrapers. I recommend visiting on Sunday mornings when the whole route is reserved exclusively for joggers, cyclists, and inline skaters. It's quiet and fun and you can ride or skate the whole way from Chapultepec Castle to the Basilica of Guadalupe.

    Reforma was built around 1900 by francophile dictator Porfirio Díaz to be his Champs Élysées. Along it are several monumental traffic circles, none of which are operated as traffic circles. The local drivers are determined to use them as big inconvenient intersections instead and it works much better than the awful European kind. It looks chaotic compared to the pretty but dangerous and inefficient way European ones go. Most have stop lights now, though the Cristóbal Colón monument has several unsignaled conflicts and quite a few hotels; maybe you stayed nearby.

    There is a lot of honking. I try to stay at hotels off major boulevards when I visit a city.

    "Jorge Castaneda implies that things like no stoplights are justified as keeping wimpy gringos out of Mexico."

    That would justify a lot. Gringos are determined to crash their own nation and I don't want them bringing that south. But all we really need to do is keep speaking Spanish. Gringos simply aren't willing to work at studying anything. We're invisible to their cultural map.

    No stoplights actually makes life better. Look up the woonerf concept. Moving car traffic is not the purpose of a city, though I understand how living in LA can make you forget that. Mexico is a walking city. Cars are just a status symbol that will make your life worse, like dating a supermodel.

    Castañeda is smart and writes a good piece but is too much of a prissy New Yorker to really relax in Mexico. He lived in isolated neighborhoods, went to a very, very expensive foreign high school, went abroad for college, married a foreigner, and has lived in New York for a decade now. (Rubio may be more authentic.) He's the kind of Mexican we scare into a walled estate in Huixquilucan so we won't have to deal with him and his luxury SUV.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @ben tillman, @Clyde, @reiner Tor

    , @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    So, how's the organ transplant business doing in Mexico?

    Plenty of 'beating hear cadavers' it seems.

  14. @(((Owen)))
    @Steve Sailer

    Traffic stop lights will not make a place nicer. In Mexico City, there are one hundred thousand intersections. A few percent have stop lights and a few percent more have stop signs. At all the others, you're supposed to understand based on local conditions which street might have the right of way. It works great. Not everyplace has to be a Teutonic overregulated nightmare of arbitrary rules.

    Mexico is a great place for walking. Or bicycling. Get out of that car and enjoy the lack of stop lights.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    I stayed in a hotel overlooking the main drag in Mexico City, the Paseo de la Reforma. The intersection below had no stop light even though it was one of major crossroads of the capital. It was fascinating to watch long lines of cars play Perpendicular Chicken with each other, but all the honking was kind of hard on the ears.

    Jorge Castaneda implies that things like no stoplights are justified as keeping wimpy gringos out of Mexico. He says, however, that Mexicans would find they like not having to take their lives in their hands every time they try to walk across the street.

    • Replies: @IBC
    @Steve Sailer

    When I was there a few years ago, some of the busiest places had female traffic police equipped with whistles, gloves, and fluorescent caps, making sure people could cross the street. In other fairly central places, a few drivers even chose to actually yield to me when it looked like I wanted to cross. Otherwise, the traffic was hot and heavy at times but not uniformly bad or especially hostile to people on foot --there are worse places in the US these days.

    Because of all the blind intersections and the fact that a lot of cars don't even slow down that much going through them, sometimes I actually found it harder to cross the road in the handful of smaller towns that I visited. It was easier to jaywalk (if that's a thing in Mexico) further up a street where I could see approaching vehicles in time to get out of their way (which is still what most Mexican drivers expect pedestrians to do). I think that in Mexico, using el klaxon is often viewed more as a "courtesy" (I'm coming through and wouldn't want to hit you!) than in places like NYC where it can quickly turn into a tit-for-tat chorus.

    Some city planners actually believe that having fewer road signs and signals can improve overall traffic safety. The concept is known as "shared space" --but you'll notice its main proponents are from Northern Europe and they use terms like road "vibrancy" which may not travel well to sunny Mexico and its particular driving culture...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shared_space

    , @Name Withheld
    @Steve Sailer

    I was in Davao in the Philippines, and they only have four stoplights in a city of one million. Most of the drivers are professionals and seem to have some kind of "code" between them to avoid accidents. It was a challenge to cross the street and I concede that this kind of thing probably doesn't scale to the size of Mexico City or Jakarta. IMHO Davao is actually a fairly functional city for the third world.

  15. @(((Owen)))
    @Steve Sailer

    Traffic stop lights will not make a place nicer. In Mexico City, there are one hundred thousand intersections. A few percent have stop lights and a few percent more have stop signs. At all the others, you're supposed to understand based on local conditions which street might have the right of way. It works great. Not everyplace has to be a Teutonic overregulated nightmare of arbitrary rules.

    Mexico is a great place for walking. Or bicycling. Get out of that car and enjoy the lack of stop lights.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    Like I said, Mexico would be a pretty easy place to improve. The Mexican concern is that they if they make it less cruddy it would get overrun by gringos.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Steve Sailer

    "Like I said, Mexico would be a pretty easy place to improve."

    You can't easily improve a high crime narco state like Mexico. Also Mexico's racial demographics work against them. Mexico does not even make the list of the top 5 Whitest countries in Latin America percentage wise. Mexico has a glass ceiling due to it not being a majority White country. You can't turn a country first world with only a 9 percent White population.

    Mexico is San Bernardino on a much larger and worse scale. San Bernardino goes bankrupt after political power switches from White Gringo hands to Mexican hands. Mexicans don't run cities like a well oil machine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @(((Owen))), @AP

    , @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    These days it would be more likely to be Pakistanis.

    , @Jack D
    @Steve Sailer

    Honestly, I doubt this. Mexicans certainly love gringo money if not the gringos themselves. Rather, they are doing the best that they can given the society/culture/human capital/resources that they have. That their population increased 400% since 1950 has not made things easier.

    , @Bernie
    @Steve Sailer

    How so? Isn't it very hard for non-Mexicans to get Mexican citizenship? And I would think they like having gringo tourists to make money off (and then go back).

    I don't see Mexico being overrun by anyone. And that is a big strength. Unlike some other countries in Latin America they have a black population of less than 1%. Same with Muslims. And, as far as I know, zero parties that promote open borders, multiculturalism and/or bilingual education.

    Replies: @Former Darfur

  16. @Anonym
    @Jefferson

    Getting excited over ethnic food is so pre-2010s. More like 1990s and earlier.

    Ditto "exotic" ethnic women. Wow, short, spindly, black hair and dark brown eyes, complexion varying shades of brown. So exotic. Not.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jay Fink

    “Getting excited over ethnic food is so pre-2010s. More like 1990s and earlier.

    Ditto “exotic” ethnic women. Wow, short, spindly, black hair and dark brown eyes, complexion varying shades of brown. So exotic. Not.”

    I think German cuisine is more exotic than Chinese and Mexican cuisine. There are barely any German restaurants in the U.S when compared to the proportion of Germans in this country. Over 50 million Germans, yet the vast majority of shopping malls in this country do not offer German cuisine in it’s food courts. There are more Indian and Vietnamese restaurants in this country than there are German ones.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Jefferson

    Frankfurters? Hamburgers? Aren't those German.

    To have really authentic ethnic restaurants you need fresh off the boat (plane) ethnics - #1 as chefs and #2 as customers to keep the chefs honest. All ethnic cuisines fade once immigration stops.

    German cuisine was always kind of bland and starchy and got blander as the owner and customer base of their restaurants in America got older and more Americanized. Two world wars didn't do much for the popularity of German food (which was in the 19th century, after French, probably the 2nd most popular "foreign" cuisine in America) but mostly it just went out of style as being the opposite of the kind of food that people like today. Boiled beef is not high on anyone's list. The Germans today prefer doner kebab and curry wurst plus the usual globalized stuff you see everywhere now.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Anonym, @Prof. Woland, @Mr. Anon, @SFG

    , @dearieme
    @Jefferson

    We used to enjoy a German restaurant in Soho (London). It closed decades ago. Boo! It's certainly not a fine cuisine, but it can provide delicious food as an occasional treat.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    , @NOTA
    @Jefferson

    "Exotic" only has a meaning in relation to what's around it--the fifth Thai restaurant in town doesn't seem too exotic, but the first one does.

    I can think of one German restaurant and probably a dozen Thai places close to where I live, so German seems pretty exotic.

    , @Gato de la Biblioteca
    @Jefferson

    There's a reason there aren't more German restaurants around. Ditto for the "cuisine" of the Irish, English, and various Scandinavian countries. And mega dittos for the lack of Scottish restaurants!

    These countries (England, Scotland, Ireland and Germany being the home of my forebears) all have terribly bland (at best) native food, when it comes right down to it. I sometimes wonder if the lack of interesting food isn't the reason they've done so well in the last few centuries, though I can't come up with a plausible rationale for it. Probably because I have more interesting food choices, I'm sure.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew, @Melendwyr, @Anonymous, @iSteveFan

    , @Thagomizer
    @Jefferson

    It's actually interesting. Current immigration policies favor restaurants from poor countries.

    The H1B "genius visa" is also used to bring in foreign chefs making $30k-$40k. You won't find trained German chefs willing to cross the Atlantic for that money.

    So restaurants based on european cuisine have a huge disadvantage. They can't use cheap chefs or use illegal family members for labour.

    At least Italian restaurants can take advantage of the fact that pasta is popular and cheap.

    , @WhatEvvs
    @Jefferson

    Right, German food is so Americanized that it's not ethnic. Sauerkraut, anyone? (Liberty cabbage in WWI.)

    If you come to NYC one of the most popular, line around the block restaurants is Rolf's on 3rd Ave/28th.

    The Christmas decorations are so awesome, even Peter Brimelow would approve. It's a one room pushback against the WaC in NYC!

    , @Former Darfur
    @Jefferson

    Exotic: originating in or characteristic of a distant foreign country.

    Most things we think of as "exotic" , really are quite mundane, only not to us: justas most "volatile" liquids, like water, won't burn.

    , @Flip
    @Jefferson

    I joke that my ancestors left Germany for America because they didn't like the food.

    , @James Bowery
    @Jefferson

    Circa 1993 there was a German restaurant in San Diego where the SAIC crew I worked with went quite regularly -- although not as regularly as the much-larger selection of Asian restaurants in the area. A fixture at the bar was a Jewish guy who made it clear he was a Watch Dog. He seemed nice enough but it was also clear enough he would threaten your employment if you said anything he disapproved of.

  17. @(((Owen)))
    So Frum points out that Republican insiders have been pushing wall-to-wall Latino vote strategy since 2012. They claim it's the way back to the White House and the future of the party. And they never lose focus on that message.

    Then they suggest that mass immigration is the way to appeal to Latino voters. Of course, mass immigration harms Latino citizens more than any other demographic. There is no one with most ruined neighborhoods, worse crime, or more competition for jobs from mass immigration than Latino US citizens. Making more of something they're uneasy about isn't going to win them over.

    Of course, Republicans already run securely the governors' offices, the Senate, and the House. And the national presidential race runs through states with very little Mexican-American influence. So there's no obvious target that Republicans could reach even if they could win more Mexican-American vote.

    So why are we getting such a narrative from Republican insiders? It might be just to push the donor class status signalling immigration explosion on fence sitters. Or it could be they're stupid and nobody cares enough to explain it to them. I doubt Frum will make any impact.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong, @bomag

    Whenever you hear the phrase “Latino voters”, it helps to include following. “Asians” and “upper-middle class suburban moderates”.

    Trende pointed out that even a majority of the Latino vote would not have won the election for Romney, ceteris paribus . And no Republican since the collection of polling began, has won such a majority.

    What the elites are concerned about is their own backyard. We know it as Fairfax, Prince William, and Loudon counties of Virginia.

    Places like LaCrosse, Wisconsin and Dayton, Ohio are like worlds away. There is a belief that Midwesterners in these areas actually LIKE immigration. If all you know is MI Governor Rick Snyder and the mainsteam media, it makes some sense.

    I would argue that the largest victim of mass immigration is black Americans (not recent African immigrants, a different story), not Latins. Even if it was victimizing them economically, they don’t see themselves as victims.

  18. @(((Owen)))
    @Maj. Kong

    "If Mexico was [sic] so great, there would be immigration going that way. Fred doesn’t count."

    Net immigration between the USA and Mexico has been in the Mexican direction every year since 2007. That counts Mexicans coming to the USA, Mexicans going back, Gringos going to Mexico, Gringos going back, and foreigners moving between both countries. If you throw out the foreigners who are citizens of neither country, the net migration is even higher toward Mexico.

    If it weren't for the astonishingly high number of family reunification visas drawing people north, the net numbers would be even higher in the southerly direction; Mexicans who are only in El Norte for work are returning home in ever higher numbers. The long backlog of family green cards will keep migration north artificially high for years still. Those arrivals will resent America for the waiting and for making them commit to a move they wouldn't even make by the time the free green card comes through.

    And Mexicans are going south because Mexico is pretty great. Political reforms, neoliberal growth policies, education policy, and environmental reforms have delivered big improvements. Mexico's life expectancy for nonsmokers is higher than the USA's. Middle class Mexicans can afford to raise a family in a good school district. Mexican men are strong and confident while women are sweet, pleasing, and not emasculating Gringa harpies. Median young college educated Mexicans earn more (adjusted for cost of living) than median USA young college grads. Oh, and December isn't miserable.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Diversity Heretic, @bomag, @The Z Blog, @syonredux, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @syonredux, @International Jew

    The long backlog of family green cards will keep migration north artificially high for years still. Those arrivals will resent America for the waiting and for making them commit to a move they wouldn’t even make by the time the free green card comes through.

    So we can’t win. We let in economic migrants for fear that they would hate us otherwise, but they hate us anyway because, economically, we declined from their expectations.

    Meanwhile, maybe Mexico will take in the wonderful vibrants from El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, et al; and have even more awesome levels of…whatever. But, oops, no, they get shuttled directly to that great commode in the north. Looks like it is starting to be in Mexico’s interest to control transitory migration from the south; otherwise their colony in the north will begin to resemble that which they avoid.

    • Replies: @(((Owen)))
    @bomag

    "Meanwhile, maybe Mexico will take in the wonderful vibrants from El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, et al; and have even more awesome levels of…whatever. But, oops, no, they get shuttled directly to that great commode in the north."

    We have la Bestia, the migration route north straight to Gringolandia. It's named for the freight train the the national railroad never tries to protect from thousands of informal migrants on the roof. There are shelters and supply stops organized by Mexicans and the Mexican government to help Central American migrants bypass Mexico on their way north.

    Mexico has immigration laws. It's very easy to enforce them if you want to. And it's humane, too. We don't have byzantine bureaucracy delaying everything for decades. You can walk up to the border from Guatemala and just ask for a visitors' permit and have an interview a few hours later but you can't get away with taking a higher paying Mexican job because people will rat you out and the police do care, eventually. It's the opposite of the USA where you can't come legally without a phalanx of lawyers but there's no enforcement at all if you come illegally.

    Replies: @bomag

  19. @TangoMan
    OT- Does the quality/nature/viewpoint of a child say something about the parents?

    Over at Breitbart is this comment from Ivanka Trump, from an account that Disqus notes is verified as belonging to her:


    Black pride = Celebrated
    White pride = Racist

    No hypocrisy there.
     

    She's defending her father and cuts through all the BS and gets to the point, a very defensible point.

    People attack Trump for being boorish but I've not heard any complaints about his daughter so she might be perfectly situated to withstand the point and sputter responses and take the offensive and get the critics to defend their hypocrisy. If she survives the point-and-sputter crowd, then surely all the women who follow her can see that they have permission to publicly hold crime-think positions.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong, @Harold

    Someone just called their disqus account “Ivanka Trump ✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ ᵃᶜᶜᵒᵘᶰᵗ”.

  20. @Steve Sailer
    @(((Owen)))

    Like I said, Mexico would be a pretty easy place to improve. The Mexican concern is that they if they make it less cruddy it would get overrun by gringos.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Anonymous, @Jack D, @Bernie

    “Like I said, Mexico would be a pretty easy place to improve.”

    You can’t easily improve a high crime narco state like Mexico. Also Mexico’s racial demographics work against them. Mexico does not even make the list of the top 5 Whitest countries in Latin America percentage wise. Mexico has a glass ceiling due to it not being a majority White country. You can’t turn a country first world with only a 9 percent White population.

    Mexico is San Bernardino on a much larger and worse scale. San Bernardino goes bankrupt after political power switches from White Gringo hands to Mexican hands. Mexicans don’t run cities like a well oil machine.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Jefferson

    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce. It doesn't seem like Mexico couldn't attain a Walmart level of prosperity and safety (although Owen would no doubt find it a change for the worse). Walmart itself was got off the ground by a bunch of hillbillies who figured out how to make things straightforward.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Anonymous, @jay-w, @Reg Cæsar, @Jack D

    , @(((Owen)))
    @Jefferson

    "You can’t easily improve a high crime narco state like Mexico."

    Technically, the worse a place is the easier it is to improve. The better it gets, the harder it is to improve further. But Mexico is on an upward trend so simple momentum might be enough for a while. Lately I'm enjoying the president's Telecom Reform that is hoovering cash back from Carlos Slim's wallet into mine at a pleasing pace.

    "Also Mexico’s racial demographics work against them. Mexico does not even make the list of the top 5 Whitest countries in Latin America percentage wise. Mexico has a glass ceiling due to it not being a majority White country. You can’t turn a country first world with only a 9 percent White population."

    Somebody tell Japan. And Korea, the Republic of China, Singapore, Chile, Israel, and Hong Kong.

    I bet those Japanese sure wish they could live in a whitopia like Ukraine, Chechnya, or West Virginia.

    ---

    "Mexicans don’t run cities like a well oil machine."

    What country did Guanajuato, Querétaro, León, and Aguascalientes move to?

    Replies: @iffen, @Jefferson, @Anonymous

    , @AP
    @Jefferson


    Mexico does not even make the list of the top 5 Whitest countries in Latin America percentage wise. Mexico has a glass ceiling due to it not being a majority White country. You can’t turn a country first world with only a 9 percent White population.
     
    Many Asian countries disprove this point.

    About 10% of Mexico's population are white. Most of the rest are a mix of whites (on average, 40% - higher in the North and lower in the South) and Natives (about 55%, with a little bit of African ancestry). The Natives are essentially Siberian Asians, with a little bit of ancient Caucasian ancestry because small numbers of Caucasians crossed the land bridge and were absorbed by the Asian majority.

    Replies: @reiner Tor

  21. @(((Owen)))
    So Frum points out that Republican insiders have been pushing wall-to-wall Latino vote strategy since 2012. They claim it's the way back to the White House and the future of the party. And they never lose focus on that message.

    Then they suggest that mass immigration is the way to appeal to Latino voters. Of course, mass immigration harms Latino citizens more than any other demographic. There is no one with most ruined neighborhoods, worse crime, or more competition for jobs from mass immigration than Latino US citizens. Making more of something they're uneasy about isn't going to win them over.

    Of course, Republicans already run securely the governors' offices, the Senate, and the House. And the national presidential race runs through states with very little Mexican-American influence. So there's no obvious target that Republicans could reach even if they could win more Mexican-American vote.

    So why are we getting such a narrative from Republican insiders? It might be just to push the donor class status signalling immigration explosion on fence sitters. Or it could be they're stupid and nobody cares enough to explain it to them. I doubt Frum will make any impact.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong, @bomag

    Of course, Republicans already run securely the governors’ offices, the Senate, and the House.

    You should put “run” in quotes. We get governors like John Kasich; and the latest budget deal was pretty much a Democrat roll.

    Republicans in office act like Democrats that favor a slightly different slice of big business.

  22. @Maj. Kong
    https://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=REV

    This chart explains why the platform of "cutting government" doesn't work.

    It's one thing to propose it in France, but the only developed countries taxing less than we do are...Mexico and Chile.

    If Mexico was so great, there would be immigration going that way. Fred doesn't count.

    Replies: @(((Owen))), @Dave Pinsen, @Clyde, @ben tillman, @Karl

    As Yglesias once pointed out, the Scandinavian countries lefties love don’t pay for their generous welfare benefits by just taxing the rich; they tax everyone. Their taxes are actually flatter/more regressive than ours, even if their top rates are higher.

    W.’s income tax legislation was actually pretty stupid, even if you agree with its goal, which was to lower top marginal tax rates. He had to make the whole thing temporary, lower rates on everyone, and make the income tax more progressive than before, in order to get it passed. Then, when it was about to expire, the Dems let the one thing W. wanted most (lower top marginal rates) expire, and kept the rest.

    The GOP would actually be better off with higher rates on everyone. It will make the safety net people want more fiscally sustainable, and eventually set the stage Republicans to run on tax cutting again at some point in the future.

    • Agree: snorlax
  23. @(((Owen)))
    @Maj. Kong

    "If Mexico was [sic] so great, there would be immigration going that way. Fred doesn’t count."

    Net immigration between the USA and Mexico has been in the Mexican direction every year since 2007. That counts Mexicans coming to the USA, Mexicans going back, Gringos going to Mexico, Gringos going back, and foreigners moving between both countries. If you throw out the foreigners who are citizens of neither country, the net migration is even higher toward Mexico.

    If it weren't for the astonishingly high number of family reunification visas drawing people north, the net numbers would be even higher in the southerly direction; Mexicans who are only in El Norte for work are returning home in ever higher numbers. The long backlog of family green cards will keep migration north artificially high for years still. Those arrivals will resent America for the waiting and for making them commit to a move they wouldn't even make by the time the free green card comes through.

    And Mexicans are going south because Mexico is pretty great. Political reforms, neoliberal growth policies, education policy, and environmental reforms have delivered big improvements. Mexico's life expectancy for nonsmokers is higher than the USA's. Middle class Mexicans can afford to raise a family in a good school district. Mexican men are strong and confident while women are sweet, pleasing, and not emasculating Gringa harpies. Median young college educated Mexicans earn more (adjusted for cost of living) than median USA young college grads. Oh, and December isn't miserable.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Diversity Heretic, @bomag, @The Z Blog, @syonredux, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @syonredux, @International Jew

    Steve’s post about innumeracy comes to mind here. Whenever someone picks an oddball starting point on the time line you know they are not playing in straight. Similarly, I would bet Owen has a definition of “net immigration” that would strike most people as bizarre.

    And no Owen, I have no interest in having a long winded debate with you on it.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @The Z Blog

    A lot of things are getting better in Mexico. For example, the last time I checked (2011), used cars were really expensive in Los Angeles because as of 2006 Mexico had opened its border to American used cars, so they were vanishing from the Los Angeles market. But that means Mexico City's fleet of cars is slowly turning into Los Angeles' old fleet of cars, and Los Angeles cars have outstanding pollution controls. So residents of Mexico City have recently started to notice for the first time in decades as the smog lifts that they are surrounded by snow capped volcanos.

    Replies: @dearieme, @5371, @Gato de la Biblioteca

    , @(((Owen)))
    @The Z Blog

    "Whenever someone picks an oddball starting point on the time line you know they are not playing in straight."

    Or 2007 was the last year with net migration north and 2008 was the first year of net migration south.

    "I have no interest in having a long winded debate with you on it."

    Likewise. Enjoy bliss.

    , @iSteveFan
    @The Z Blog

    Thank you.

  24. @Jefferson
    @Steve Sailer

    "Like I said, Mexico would be a pretty easy place to improve."

    You can't easily improve a high crime narco state like Mexico. Also Mexico's racial demographics work against them. Mexico does not even make the list of the top 5 Whitest countries in Latin America percentage wise. Mexico has a glass ceiling due to it not being a majority White country. You can't turn a country first world with only a 9 percent White population.

    Mexico is San Bernardino on a much larger and worse scale. San Bernardino goes bankrupt after political power switches from White Gringo hands to Mexican hands. Mexicans don't run cities like a well oil machine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @(((Owen))), @AP

    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce. It doesn’t seem like Mexico couldn’t attain a Walmart level of prosperity and safety (although Owen would no doubt find it a change for the worse). Walmart itself was got off the ground by a bunch of hillbillies who figured out how to make things straightforward.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Steve Sailer

    "San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce. It doesn’t seem like Mexico couldn’t attain a Walmart level of prosperity and safety"

    You associate majority Mexican San Bernardino with prosperity and safety? Even though it is the meth capital of California. No one in California who has high ambitions in life aspires to live in majority Mexican San Bernardino.

    , @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer


    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce.
     
    Minus one. And Male of the Year to boot.
    , @jay-w
    @Steve Sailer


    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce.
     
    Actually, Mexico is full of WalMarts, also.

    I am currently living in Merida, Yucatan (population ~ 1 miilion; annual homicide rate ~ 2 per 100,000) and I think we have about 4 WalMarts here as well as Costco, Sam's Club, Home Depot, Auto-Zone, Staples, Office Depot, McDonalds, Burger-King, Dairy Queen, etc., etc.

    I, personally, don't much like the heat and humidity; therefore, my (Mexican-born) wife and I are planning to eventually move back to Montana. But in terms of the people and the culture, it's a toss-up between living here versus living in the USA.

    In fact, if I had to live in some hell-hole part of the USA, like Southern California, then preferring to live in Mexico would be a no-brainer. (It's peaceful and idyllic here -- especially now that all the Mexican criminals are in the USA {sarcasm=off})

    Replies: @Thea, @Grumpy

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce.
     
    At least one of the ethnic supermarkets in St Paul's pan-Asian Frogtown ("pagodabodegas"?) uses Mexican stock boys. Is that a job young Asians won't do? Or once you go outside your ethnic group, there's no loyalty to race, at least among Asians?

    For authenticity, though, the checkout girls are all Asian.

    Replies: @Romanian, @Jack D, @Stan Adams

    , @Jack D
    @Steve Sailer

    To some extent this is happening already. Most Mexicans would rather work in a Nabisco (Mondelez) factory near their home and family instead of having to move to Chicago to work in that same factory. Even if they make less, their cost of living is lower too and they don't have to live in a cold alien place full of uptight gringos and dangerous Negros. So, it seems like net Mexican migration has slowed to a crawl or even reversed.

    The problem is that you still have Honduras, Guatemala, Nicaragua, etc. where even Wal-Mart prosperity seems out of reach. Mexico is #67 in GDP rank but you have another another 130 countries below them. Places like Liberia and Somalia where the GDP/capita is less than $3/day and the main question is not whether you can afford a cheap flat screen TV for your hut but whether you will eat today.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @iSteveFan

  25. @The Z Blog
    @(((Owen)))

    Steve's post about innumeracy comes to mind here. Whenever someone picks an oddball starting point on the time line you know they are not playing in straight. Similarly, I would bet Owen has a definition of "net immigration" that would strike most people as bizarre.

    And no Owen, I have no interest in having a long winded debate with you on it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @(((Owen))), @iSteveFan

    A lot of things are getting better in Mexico. For example, the last time I checked (2011), used cars were really expensive in Los Angeles because as of 2006 Mexico had opened its border to American used cars, so they were vanishing from the Los Angeles market. But that means Mexico City’s fleet of cars is slowly turning into Los Angeles’ old fleet of cars, and Los Angeles cars have outstanding pollution controls. So residents of Mexico City have recently started to notice for the first time in decades as the smog lifts that they are surrounded by snow capped volcanos.

    • Replies: @dearieme
    @Steve Sailer

    A fascinating observation - yours, I mean, not theirs.

    , @5371
    @Steve Sailer

    [Los Angeles cars have outstanding pollution controls]

    Bet they won't have to keep being inspected as stringently to stay on the road in Mexico, though!

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Clyde

    , @Gato de la Biblioteca
    @Steve Sailer


    A lot of things are getting better in Mexico. [snip] [T]hat means Mexico City’s fleet of cars is slowly turning into Los Angeles’ old fleet of cars, and Los Angeles cars have outstanding pollution controls. So residents of Mexico City have recently started to notice for the first time in decades as the smog lifts that they are surrounded by snow capped volcanos.
     
    Okay, so Mexico is getting better because of White American concerns for the environment, plus a minor change in Mexican import laws. Wow, that place really can be easily improved!

    Which just makes me wonder exactly how awful are Mexicans that the place is so bad that such minor things can make a big & quickly noticeable difference....

    Replies: @AnAnon

  26. @Steve Sailer
    @(((Owen)))

    I stayed in a hotel overlooking the main drag in Mexico City, the Paseo de la Reforma. The intersection below had no stop light even though it was one of major crossroads of the capital. It was fascinating to watch long lines of cars play Perpendicular Chicken with each other, but all the honking was kind of hard on the ears.

    Jorge Castaneda implies that things like no stoplights are justified as keeping wimpy gringos out of Mexico. He says, however, that Mexicans would find they like not having to take their lives in their hands every time they try to walk across the street.

    Replies: @(((Owen))), @Anonymous

    “I stayed in a hotel overlooking the main drag in Mexico City, the Paseo de la Reforma.”

    Ooh. Fancy. Paseo de la Reforma is a place to go looking for two hundred plus Gringo dollar hotel rooms nowadays amongst the skyscrapers. I recommend visiting on Sunday mornings when the whole route is reserved exclusively for joggers, cyclists, and inline skaters. It’s quiet and fun and you can ride or skate the whole way from Chapultepec Castle to the Basilica of Guadalupe.

    Reforma was built around 1900 by francophile dictator Porfirio Díaz to be his Champs Élysées. Along it are several monumental traffic circles, none of which are operated as traffic circles. The local drivers are determined to use them as big inconvenient intersections instead and it works much better than the awful European kind. It looks chaotic compared to the pretty but dangerous and inefficient way European ones go. Most have stop lights now, though the Cristóbal Colón monument has several unsignaled conflicts and quite a few hotels; maybe you stayed nearby.

    There is a lot of honking. I try to stay at hotels off major boulevards when I visit a city.

    “Jorge Castaneda implies that things like no stoplights are justified as keeping wimpy gringos out of Mexico.”

    That would justify a lot. Gringos are determined to crash their own nation and I don’t want them bringing that south. But all we really need to do is keep speaking Spanish. Gringos simply aren’t willing to work at studying anything. We’re invisible to their cultural map.

    No stoplights actually makes life better. Look up the woonerf concept. Moving car traffic is not the purpose of a city, though I understand how living in LA can make you forget that. Mexico is a walking city. Cars are just a status symbol that will make your life worse, like dating a supermodel.

    Castañeda is smart and writes a good piece but is too much of a prissy New Yorker to really relax in Mexico. He lived in isolated neighborhoods, went to a very, very expensive foreign high school, went abroad for college, married a foreigner, and has lived in New York for a decade now. (Rubio may be more authentic.) He’s the kind of Mexican we scare into a walled estate in Huixquilucan so we won’t have to deal with him and his luxury SUV.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @(((Owen)))

    Owen, just curious, any advice for a very gringo looking family (paler than snow, red or light hair, with young kids) that's dreaming about a vacation in Mexico City or some other nice Mexican city, maybe even language school?

    Replies: @Stealth, @(((Owen)))

    , @ben tillman
    @(((Owen)))


    That would justify a lot. Gringos are determined to crash their own nation and I don’t want them bringing that south. But all we really need to do is keep speaking Spanish. Gringos simply aren’t willing to work at studying anything.
     
    LOL - my high school Spanish teacher was named Owens. He was actually a math major, but he taught Spanish much better than it is taught in Texas high schools by people with names like Pacheco.
    , @Clyde
    @(((Owen)))

    Good and witty post!!! Informativo!

    , @reiner Tor
    @(((Owen)))

    Maybe you're right, but apparently Mexican traffic kills more people, especially compared to the relatively lower number of vehicles.

  27. Remember that Republican voters care more about aligning government with their values of work and family than they care about cutting the size of government as an end in itself.

    So Republicans are really just Democrats who oppose abortion? We are lost.

    • Replies: @CK
    @Jack D

    They do not oppose abortion. Without the existence of abortion on demand, there would be no need for a republican party to exist. They pay lip service in public to something they heartily approve of in private. Abortion on demand kills blacks. According to Guttmacher data, 30% of the abortions in America are to black women who are 7.3% of the total population.
    If one wonders why the black population today is 14% of the total and 50 years ago it was 13% of the total ... abortion on demand has done its part of the job; unlimited immigration from South of the border is doing the rest. The Hispanic population already exceeds the black population.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    , @asdf
    @Jack D

    "So Republicans are really just Democrats who oppose abortion? We are lost."..

    I don't know that that's what Frum was saying. But....

    What are Republicans these days? I don't recall GWB being Mr. Small government. Are the Republicans the pro war party? The party of the somewhat disgruntled about gay marriage and legal marijuana? The we-fake-Christianity-better party? The pull yourself up by the bootstraps like the Bush's did party?

    What would the average Reagan Democrat make of Jeb!?

    There were a lot of cultural reasons people voted for Reagan. I think Frum is right in saying these reasons get thinner every year. Bashing drug-taking, abortion having, Jimmy Carter loving hippies was a great strategy, what, 40 years ago?

    Anyway, the Republican party IS lost. Burn it down. Frum's right. Disagree with him all you want. It is over.

    Replies: @TangoMan

    , @AnotherDad
    @Jack D



    Remember that Republican voters care more about aligning government with their values of work and family than they care about cutting the size of government as an end in itself.

     

    So Republicans are really just Democrats who oppose abortion? We are lost.
     
    Seriously? "... aligning government with their values of work and family ..." and all you come up with is abortion?

    You were much more on the right track a day or two back with your "free stuff party" post--i.e. that the Democrats were the "free stuff party". I'd argue that the Democrats are simply the "parasite party"--the looting, rent seeking and comfy sinecures covers folks both high and low, it's not just free stuff for their Lumpenproletariat vote bank.

    In contrast, i'd point to the GI Bill and Interstate highways as two distinctly "big government" programs that have benefited my family. The one my dad *earned* with military service. The other the sort of "promote the general Welfare" project a responsible republican government can undertake taxing themselves to pay for something that makes life better for all. Ideas about benefits being "earned" or projects of a general public benefit, are easily distinguishable in many middle class folks' minds from much of what government does today.

    By default, i'm a small government guy. Government has taxing and police power and is not restrained other than by the people saying "no", so responsible folks should be telling it "no" by default. And what we have is wildly bloated. But i'm much less concerned by this or that change in my tax rates and this or that level of bloat, than by what evils the government is engendering and what sort of nation my kids inherit.

    The problem in a place like Sweden is not high taxes and a big government welfare state. It's that its elites--and apparently a large fraction of the population--bought into this "diversity" and "multiculturalism" nonsense and are *destroying* their nation. And America is not "saved" by our modestly lower tax rate, we have the same sort of foul elite who seem to harbor a contempt for Americans--particularly flyover country white gentile Americans (the folks who actually built the damn country)--and are also destroying the American nation. Tax rates, size of welfare state, just are not the key questions in determining whether a nation will survive and be a decent place for your kids.

    There are a wealth of government policies well beyond "abortion" where the government is actively hostile to hard working people's "values of work and family"--Wall Street bailouts, single mom cash welfare, bureaucratized unresponsive schools, Section 8, affirmative action, goodies for lobbyists' clients, demands for depolicing, mortgages for minorities (housing policing in general), homo "marriage" .... and most of all mass immigration, degrading the value of Americans' labor, balkanizing the nation and destroying the national patrimony to be inherited by one's children.

    Replies: @Jack D

  28. Donald Trump polls better among African American voters than he does among Hispanic voters. Which is the extreme opposite of Jeb Bush who polls better among Hispanic voters than he does among African American voters.

    And speaking of The Donald, when he faces Hillary Clinton in the general this going to be the blondest American presidential election ever. When was the last time there was a blond vs blonde U.S presidential matchup?

    The irony that the 2 major American parties will both be represented by a blond, at a time when America is becoming more Asian and Hispanic and thus less blonde and a lot more brunette.

    • Replies: @Ed
    @Jefferson

    It's odd how intensely the media hypes the Hispanic vote when their turnout rate is less than half. Small shifts in either the black or white vote can reshuffle the electoral map yet you wouldn't know that by listening to the news.

    The way the media sounds sometimes it's as if non-Hispanic voters shouldn't even bother going to the polls.

  29. “Exotic” is a meaningless word when it comes to cuisine. Mexican and Chinese cusines, when done correctly, are objectively more sophisticated and interesting than most Northern European cuisines. The best cuisines have historically generally been invented by rich ruling classes with access to a wide range of ingredients and plenty of leisure time to perfect recipes. Hence the best food comes from the Ottoman Empire, Mughal India, China, Spanish ruled Mexico (once spectacularly rich), as well as the rich merchant cities of Italy and imperial France. Why the British failed so impressively to design a rich cusine is an interesting historical story. As far as “exotic”, I lived in Kazakhstan – that is an “exotic” cuisine to be sure, it also is horrible, consisting mostly of boiled and smoked animal products with few spices, the product of a poor nomad culture. Scandinavian food is also “exotic”, and also horrible.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Peter Akuleyev

    "Why the British failed so impressively to design a rich cusine is an interesting historical story."

    I like flyover country WASP cuisine brought over by Mayflower immigrants like corn on the cob with fried chicken, as well as meat loaf with gravy and mash potatoes. Peanut butter & jelly sandwiches. All extremely WASPy foods.

    , @Jack D
    @Peter Akuleyev

    All the ex-Soviet 'stans have very limited cuisines - lamb and rice, lamb and rice. The first plov is good but it gets old fast.

    A lot of great food is not royal court food, which tends to be overly elaborate, but good honest peasant food. The Mexican, Italian & Chinese dishes that Americans love (these 3 cuisines account for probably 90% of "foreign" food eaten by Americans) are humble peasant dishes such as tacos and pasta.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    , @tbraton
    @Peter Akuleyev

    "Hence the best food comes from the Ottoman Empire, . . .As far as “exotic”, I lived in Kazakhstan – that is an “exotic” cuisine to be sure, it also is horrible, consisting mostly of boiled and smoked animal products with few spices, the product of a poor nomad culture."

    The Ottoman Turks originally came from Central Asia and were nomads. The cuisine they brought with them was quite limited. Their "exotic" cuisine was largely the product of Greek chefs and the chefs of other civilizations they conquered. Their only major contribution in the area of cuisine appears to be yoghurt, a nomadic food, which they introduced into what became the Ottoman Empire. For an empire which lasted nearly 500 years, the Turks made very little contribution to world civilization, except for the Turkish towel. Compared to Great Britain, whose empire lasted a considerably shorter time but which contributed significantly to the cultures they conquered, the Turks' cultural contribution was negligible.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Peter Akuleyev

    China's a pretty big place. I went to a restaurant in Beijing serving upscale northern dishes, and I wasn't very impressed. The farther south you go, the better the food is, so you could refine your theory to include geography.

    I would speculate that the English failure has to do with the fact that it is an island. The imperial elites went abroad to govern--a different situation than India, Ottomans, etc. I also think English food is underrated.

    Replies: @John Derbyshire

    , @AP
    @Peter Akuleyev

    The best cuisines have historically generally been invented by rich ruling classes with access to a wide range of ingredients and plenty of leisure time to perfect recipes.

    I remember a great Polish restaurant in Krakow serving fantastic noble food. Meat dishes, but much more sophisticated and well done than what one tends to find in Germany. And my friend's mother's wild boar, prepared according to an old family recipe.

    , @Gato de la Biblioteca
    @Peter Akuleyev


    The best cuisines have historically generally been invented by rich ruling classes with access to a wide range of ingredients and plenty of leisure time to perfect recipes.
     
    Maybe this is why the countries I mentioned earlier have been doing well: The elites haven't been spending their time on inventing (and supervising the creation of) exotic foods, but have spent their time elsewhere.
  30. @Steve Sailer
    @Jefferson

    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce. It doesn't seem like Mexico couldn't attain a Walmart level of prosperity and safety (although Owen would no doubt find it a change for the worse). Walmart itself was got off the ground by a bunch of hillbillies who figured out how to make things straightforward.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Anonymous, @jay-w, @Reg Cæsar, @Jack D

    “San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce. It doesn’t seem like Mexico couldn’t attain a Walmart level of prosperity and safety”

    You associate majority Mexican San Bernardino with prosperity and safety? Even though it is the meth capital of California. No one in California who has high ambitions in life aspires to live in majority Mexican San Bernardino.

  31. @Steve Sailer
    @Jefferson

    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce. It doesn't seem like Mexico couldn't attain a Walmart level of prosperity and safety (although Owen would no doubt find it a change for the worse). Walmart itself was got off the ground by a bunch of hillbillies who figured out how to make things straightforward.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Anonymous, @jay-w, @Reg Cæsar, @Jack D

    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce.

    Minus one. And Male of the Year to boot.

  32. @Jefferson
    @Anonym

    "Getting excited over ethnic food is so pre-2010s. More like 1990s and earlier.

    Ditto “exotic” ethnic women. Wow, short, spindly, black hair and dark brown eyes, complexion varying shades of brown. So exotic. Not."

    I think German cuisine is more exotic than Chinese and Mexican cuisine. There are barely any German restaurants in the U.S when compared to the proportion of Germans in this country. Over 50 million Germans, yet the vast majority of shopping malls in this country do not offer German cuisine in it's food courts. There are more Indian and Vietnamese restaurants in this country than there are German ones.

    Replies: @Jack D, @dearieme, @NOTA, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @Thagomizer, @WhatEvvs, @Former Darfur, @Flip, @James Bowery

    Frankfurters? Hamburgers? Aren’t those German.

    To have really authentic ethnic restaurants you need fresh off the boat (plane) ethnics – #1 as chefs and #2 as customers to keep the chefs honest. All ethnic cuisines fade once immigration stops.

    German cuisine was always kind of bland and starchy and got blander as the owner and customer base of their restaurants in America got older and more Americanized. Two world wars didn’t do much for the popularity of German food (which was in the 19th century, after French, probably the 2nd most popular “foreign” cuisine in America) but mostly it just went out of style as being the opposite of the kind of food that people like today. Boiled beef is not high on anyone’s list. The Germans today prefer doner kebab and curry wurst plus the usual globalized stuff you see everywhere now.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Jack D

    "Hamburgers?"

    So McDonald's is a German American fast food chain?

    "To have really authentic ethnic restaurants you need fresh off the boat (plane) ethnics – #1 as chefs and #2 as customers to keep the chefs honest. All ethnic cuisines fade once immigration stops."

    Italian immigration to the U.S stopped, yet Italian cuisine is still alive and well in this country. You can even find Italian cuisine at many shopping mall food courts. There are even non Italians who get into the Italian food business. I know of an Italian restaurant in San Francisco that is owned by a married couple from Hong Kong.

    There is a segment of upper middle class/upper class Chinese people who like Southern European cuisine like Italian and French. It is different than what they are used to eating, but they see it as different in a good way.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @snorlax, @reiner Tor

    , @Anonym
    @Jack D

    That points in the direction of Steve's marginal utility of migrants theme. Just a dribble of immigrants from diverse places for ethnic restaurant creation, nothing more.

    , @Prof. Woland
    @Jack D

    I eat Russian food 4 nights a week. My background is a WASP. What the commonality is between both cultures and those in between is the climate. Basically what you have are a disproportionate number of crops that grow below ground and grains that do well with a short growing season. Animals such as cows and pigs have a much better chance of Winter survival than chickens or other small animals. You can only do so much with a cabbage.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Jack D

    "German cuisine was always kind of bland and starchy...."

    No, not really. That description applies better to kosher food.

    "Frankfurters? Hamburgers? Aren’t those German."

    In name only. A hot-dog bears little relation to a knackwurst.

    "Boiled beef is not high on anyone’s list. "

    Boiled beef is more of an english thing, not german.

    Replies: @This Is Our Home

    , @SFG
    @Jack D

    It will probably cement everyone's contempt for my taste that I really, really like German food. Schnitzel, spaetzle, all the wursts, best beer in the world...ah.

  33. @Peter Akuleyev
    "Exotic" is a meaningless word when it comes to cuisine. Mexican and Chinese cusines, when done correctly, are objectively more sophisticated and interesting than most Northern European cuisines. The best cuisines have historically generally been invented by rich ruling classes with access to a wide range of ingredients and plenty of leisure time to perfect recipes. Hence the best food comes from the Ottoman Empire, Mughal India, China, Spanish ruled Mexico (once spectacularly rich), as well as the rich merchant cities of Italy and imperial France. Why the British failed so impressively to design a rich cusine is an interesting historical story. As far as "exotic", I lived in Kazakhstan - that is an "exotic" cuisine to be sure, it also is horrible, consisting mostly of boiled and smoked animal products with few spices, the product of a poor nomad culture. Scandinavian food is also "exotic", and also horrible.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jack D, @tbraton, @Chrisnonymous, @AP, @Gato de la Biblioteca

    “Why the British failed so impressively to design a rich cusine is an interesting historical story.”

    I like flyover country WASP cuisine brought over by Mayflower immigrants like corn on the cob with fried chicken, as well as meat loaf with gravy and mash potatoes. Peanut butter & jelly sandwiches. All extremely WASPy foods.

  34. @bomag
    @(((Owen)))

    The long backlog of family green cards will keep migration north artificially high for years still. Those arrivals will resent America for the waiting and for making them commit to a move they wouldn’t even make by the time the free green card comes through.

    So we can't win. We let in economic migrants for fear that they would hate us otherwise, but they hate us anyway because, economically, we declined from their expectations.

    Meanwhile, maybe Mexico will take in the wonderful vibrants from El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, et al; and have even more awesome levels of...whatever. But, oops, no, they get shuttled directly to that great commode in the north. Looks like it is starting to be in Mexico's interest to control transitory migration from the south; otherwise their colony in the north will begin to resemble that which they avoid.

    Replies: @(((Owen)))

    “Meanwhile, maybe Mexico will take in the wonderful vibrants from El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, et al; and have even more awesome levels of…whatever. But, oops, no, they get shuttled directly to that great commode in the north.”

    We have la Bestia, the migration route north straight to Gringolandia. It’s named for the freight train the the national railroad never tries to protect from thousands of informal migrants on the roof. There are shelters and supply stops organized by Mexicans and the Mexican government to help Central American migrants bypass Mexico on their way north.

    Mexico has immigration laws. It’s very easy to enforce them if you want to. And it’s humane, too. We don’t have byzantine bureaucracy delaying everything for decades. You can walk up to the border from Guatemala and just ask for a visitors’ permit and have an interview a few hours later but you can’t get away with taking a higher paying Mexican job because people will rat you out and the police do care, eventually. It’s the opposite of the USA where you can’t come legally without a phalanx of lawyers but there’s no enforcement at all if you come illegally.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @(((Owen)))

    There are shelters and supply stops organized by Mexicans and the Mexican government to help Central American migrants bypass Mexico on their way north.

    It is refreshing to hear your perspective that massive immigration does a country no good. One should, obviously, protect and use wisely their resources. Here in the US, our leaders and elites are gleefully setting everything on fire and telling us how wonderful is the warmth.

    But I'm not sure it is in Mexico's long term interest to provide fuel for this conflagration. A crippled but intact neighbor is better than one of smoke, ash, and desperation.

    Replies: @(((Owen)))

  35. @Peter Akuleyev
    "Exotic" is a meaningless word when it comes to cuisine. Mexican and Chinese cusines, when done correctly, are objectively more sophisticated and interesting than most Northern European cuisines. The best cuisines have historically generally been invented by rich ruling classes with access to a wide range of ingredients and plenty of leisure time to perfect recipes. Hence the best food comes from the Ottoman Empire, Mughal India, China, Spanish ruled Mexico (once spectacularly rich), as well as the rich merchant cities of Italy and imperial France. Why the British failed so impressively to design a rich cusine is an interesting historical story. As far as "exotic", I lived in Kazakhstan - that is an "exotic" cuisine to be sure, it also is horrible, consisting mostly of boiled and smoked animal products with few spices, the product of a poor nomad culture. Scandinavian food is also "exotic", and also horrible.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jack D, @tbraton, @Chrisnonymous, @AP, @Gato de la Biblioteca

    All the ex-Soviet ‘stans have very limited cuisines – lamb and rice, lamb and rice. The first plov is good but it gets old fast.

    A lot of great food is not royal court food, which tends to be overly elaborate, but good honest peasant food. The Mexican, Italian & Chinese dishes that Americans love (these 3 cuisines account for probably 90% of “foreign” food eaten by Americans) are humble peasant dishes such as tacos and pasta.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Jack D

    "All the ex-Soviet ‘stans have very limited cuisines – lamb and rice, lamb and rice. The first plov is good but it gets old fast.

    A lot of great food is not royal court food, which tends to be overly elaborate, but good honest peasant food. The Mexican, Italian & Chinese dishes that Americans love (these 3 cuisines account for probably 90% of “foreign” food eaten by Americans) are humble peasant dishes such as tacos and pasta."

    Japanese cuisine would be the fourth most popular foreign cuisine in the U.S. Every Benihana that I have ever been to is pack full of White people.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Jack D

  36. @The Z Blog
    @(((Owen)))

    Steve's post about innumeracy comes to mind here. Whenever someone picks an oddball starting point on the time line you know they are not playing in straight. Similarly, I would bet Owen has a definition of "net immigration" that would strike most people as bizarre.

    And no Owen, I have no interest in having a long winded debate with you on it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @(((Owen))), @iSteveFan

    “Whenever someone picks an oddball starting point on the time line you know they are not playing in straight.”

    Or 2007 was the last year with net migration north and 2008 was the first year of net migration south.

    “I have no interest in having a long winded debate with you on it.”

    Likewise. Enjoy bliss.

  37. @Diversity Heretic
    @(((Owen)))

    I respect Fred Reed's choice to live in Mexico, although I have no interest in it myself. My father's neighbors escape Midwest winters in Mexico and they like it. Costa Rica is also quite nice, or so I've heard. The geography isn't the problem.

    Replies: @dearieme

    “My father’s neighbors escape Midwest winters in Mexico”: fair enough. If they speak Spanish and like the seaside they might like to consider the Canaries too. If they would prefer English-speaking, then Australia or NZ.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @dearieme

    "If they would prefer English-speaking, then Australia or NZ."

    Or Malibu. Nice and peaceful, few folks around, not too much diversity, and part of the US.

    Or Maui. Another nice area to escape the winters.

  38. Went to a Viennese restauarant in NYC recently, the wurst was hot dogs wrapped in bacon, about as wurst as you can get. I lived in Vienna, that was about par for the course in that culinary backwater.

  39. @Jefferson
    @Anonym

    "Getting excited over ethnic food is so pre-2010s. More like 1990s and earlier.

    Ditto “exotic” ethnic women. Wow, short, spindly, black hair and dark brown eyes, complexion varying shades of brown. So exotic. Not."

    I think German cuisine is more exotic than Chinese and Mexican cuisine. There are barely any German restaurants in the U.S when compared to the proportion of Germans in this country. Over 50 million Germans, yet the vast majority of shopping malls in this country do not offer German cuisine in it's food courts. There are more Indian and Vietnamese restaurants in this country than there are German ones.

    Replies: @Jack D, @dearieme, @NOTA, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @Thagomizer, @WhatEvvs, @Former Darfur, @Flip, @James Bowery

    We used to enjoy a German restaurant in Soho (London). It closed decades ago. Boo! It’s certainly not a fine cuisine, but it can provide delicious food as an occasional treat.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @dearieme

    As I enjoyed the old Wursthaus in Harvard Square 25 years ago. But let's face it, the cuisine of Germany and some of the other countries nearby, like Belgium and Czech Republic, is just an accompaniment for the excellent beer.

  40. @Steve Sailer
    @The Z Blog

    A lot of things are getting better in Mexico. For example, the last time I checked (2011), used cars were really expensive in Los Angeles because as of 2006 Mexico had opened its border to American used cars, so they were vanishing from the Los Angeles market. But that means Mexico City's fleet of cars is slowly turning into Los Angeles' old fleet of cars, and Los Angeles cars have outstanding pollution controls. So residents of Mexico City have recently started to notice for the first time in decades as the smog lifts that they are surrounded by snow capped volcanos.

    Replies: @dearieme, @5371, @Gato de la Biblioteca

    A fascinating observation – yours, I mean, not theirs.

  41. @Jack D
    @Jefferson

    Frankfurters? Hamburgers? Aren't those German.

    To have really authentic ethnic restaurants you need fresh off the boat (plane) ethnics - #1 as chefs and #2 as customers to keep the chefs honest. All ethnic cuisines fade once immigration stops.

    German cuisine was always kind of bland and starchy and got blander as the owner and customer base of their restaurants in America got older and more Americanized. Two world wars didn't do much for the popularity of German food (which was in the 19th century, after French, probably the 2nd most popular "foreign" cuisine in America) but mostly it just went out of style as being the opposite of the kind of food that people like today. Boiled beef is not high on anyone's list. The Germans today prefer doner kebab and curry wurst plus the usual globalized stuff you see everywhere now.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Anonym, @Prof. Woland, @Mr. Anon, @SFG

    “Hamburgers?”

    So McDonald’s is a German American fast food chain?

    “To have really authentic ethnic restaurants you need fresh off the boat (plane) ethnics – #1 as chefs and #2 as customers to keep the chefs honest. All ethnic cuisines fade once immigration stops.”

    Italian immigration to the U.S stopped, yet Italian cuisine is still alive and well in this country. You can even find Italian cuisine at many shopping mall food courts. There are even non Italians who get into the Italian food business. I know of an Italian restaurant in San Francisco that is owned by a married couple from Hong Kong.

    There is a segment of upper middle class/upper class Chinese people who like Southern European cuisine like Italian and French. It is different than what they are used to eating, but they see it as different in a good way.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Jefferson

    Is that North Beach Restaurant? I thought it was just the maître d', which is, in and of itself, unusual.

    NBR is one of the best restaurants in the City.

    , @snorlax
    @Jefferson


    So McDonald’s is a German American fast food chain?
     
    Exactly. It is to German cuisine as Taco Bell is to Mexican, Panda Express is to Chinese or Pizza Hut is to Italian.
    , @reiner Tor
    @Jefferson

    Yeah but most Italian food in America is way crappier than back in Italy. Italian food in Italy (which is a collection of a vast array of dishes and local cuisines) is among the best in the world. (I prefer French, but I wouldn't commit suicide if someone told me from tomorrow I could only eat Italian as made in Italy.)

  42. 1st step to improve mexico is get washington out. same with syria, haiti, libya, iraq,…

  43. The Germans today prefer doner kebab and curry wurst plus the usual globalized stuff you see everywhere now.

    When they eat out maybe but they still eat their own food at home. Though even the German fast food chains at train stations have, in addition to the usual sausage-related stuff, a good variety of seafood that puts their French and American equivalents to shame.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Matra

    'Curry wurst'

    Unfortunately the effect of this rather revolting sounding - and bastardized - foodstuff on yer typical German's lager and sauerkraut stuffed alimentary canal, can best be ignored.

    Replies: @Matra

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Matra

    No matter how many times I see it, I can't help reading "doner kebab" as "donor kebab," which sounds disgusting.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

  44. @Jefferson
    @Steve Sailer

    "Like I said, Mexico would be a pretty easy place to improve."

    You can't easily improve a high crime narco state like Mexico. Also Mexico's racial demographics work against them. Mexico does not even make the list of the top 5 Whitest countries in Latin America percentage wise. Mexico has a glass ceiling due to it not being a majority White country. You can't turn a country first world with only a 9 percent White population.

    Mexico is San Bernardino on a much larger and worse scale. San Bernardino goes bankrupt after political power switches from White Gringo hands to Mexican hands. Mexicans don't run cities like a well oil machine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @(((Owen))), @AP

    “You can’t easily improve a high crime narco state like Mexico.”

    Technically, the worse a place is the easier it is to improve. The better it gets, the harder it is to improve further. But Mexico is on an upward trend so simple momentum might be enough for a while. Lately I’m enjoying the president’s Telecom Reform that is hoovering cash back from Carlos Slim’s wallet into mine at a pleasing pace.

    “Also Mexico’s racial demographics work against them. Mexico does not even make the list of the top 5 Whitest countries in Latin America percentage wise. Mexico has a glass ceiling due to it not being a majority White country. You can’t turn a country first world with only a 9 percent White population.”

    Somebody tell Japan. And Korea, the Republic of China, Singapore, Chile, Israel, and Hong Kong.

    I bet those Japanese sure wish they could live in a whitopia like Ukraine, Chechnya, or West Virginia.

    “Mexicans don’t run cities like a well oil machine.”

    What country did Guanajuato, Querétaro, León, and Aguascalientes move to?

    • Replies: @iffen
    @(((Owen)))

    “Mexicans don’t run cities like a well oil machine.”

    According to Hugh Thomas in Conquest, few of the conquistadors had ever seen a city that came anywhere close to the splendor and size of Tenochtitlan.

    , @Jefferson
    @(((Owen)))

    "Somebody tell Japan. And Korea, the Republic of China, Singapore, Chile, Israel, and Hong Kong.

    I bet those Japanese sure wish they could live in a whitopia like Ukraine, Chechnya, or West Virginia."

    Orientals and Jews are a lot smarter than Mexicans in the IQ department. Hence why their respective countries have a significantly higher human development index than Mexico.

    But hey at least Mexico produces world class public toilet cleaners. Thanks for sending them here to the U.S. But once Robots start taking over those jobs, than there is really no more use for Mexican immigrants. If Mexico disproportionately produced the world's best doctors, scientists, computer programmers, and engineers, than there would be more use for having a large Mexican population in the U.S, but they don't.

    It's funny that the vast majority of Mexican employees in Silicon Valley tech companies do not work anywhere near a computer. In Silicon Valley tech companies you are more likely to see a Mexican cleaning windows than coding. The lesson learned here is that when Spaniards and Amerindians mix on a mass scale, they produce an entire generation of mediocrity. And than when you add the 4 to 6 percent Sub Saharan African admixture in the average Mexican, that is icy on the mediocrity cake.

    , @Anonymous
    @(((Owen)))

    Chechnya is about as 'white' as Mexico is. That is, 'not at all'.

  45. @Jack D
    @Peter Akuleyev

    All the ex-Soviet 'stans have very limited cuisines - lamb and rice, lamb and rice. The first plov is good but it gets old fast.

    A lot of great food is not royal court food, which tends to be overly elaborate, but good honest peasant food. The Mexican, Italian & Chinese dishes that Americans love (these 3 cuisines account for probably 90% of "foreign" food eaten by Americans) are humble peasant dishes such as tacos and pasta.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “All the ex-Soviet ‘stans have very limited cuisines – lamb and rice, lamb and rice. The first plov is good but it gets old fast.

    A lot of great food is not royal court food, which tends to be overly elaborate, but good honest peasant food. The Mexican, Italian & Chinese dishes that Americans love (these 3 cuisines account for probably 90% of “foreign” food eaten by Americans) are humble peasant dishes such as tacos and pasta.”

    Japanese cuisine would be the fourth most popular foreign cuisine in the U.S. Every Benihana that I have ever been to is pack full of White people.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Jefferson

    Hold it, hold it. Benihana isn't authentic Japanese food. It's just a stylized way of making a form of sorta Asian something type of food. There's more to Japan than just splashing Terriyaki sauce all over the place.

    For the most part, Benihana doesn't serve Sencha, so...there you go.

    , @Jack D
    @Jefferson

    Sorry to break the news to you but Benihana is barely Japanese cuisine. What they do is more broadly called teppanyaki. This means "Japanese food for white people". Oh, sorry, just kidding, it means "iron grilled" but it might as well mean that. Here is a hint to its origin - it was first introduced in Japan in 1945.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  46. one small way to improve america is deport frum back to canada, the far, far northern part where the wolves and polar bears play

    • Replies: @BurplesonAFB
    @bondo

    Sure, but seldom is heard a discouraging word

  47. @Jefferson
    @Anonym

    "Getting excited over ethnic food is so pre-2010s. More like 1990s and earlier.

    Ditto “exotic” ethnic women. Wow, short, spindly, black hair and dark brown eyes, complexion varying shades of brown. So exotic. Not."

    I think German cuisine is more exotic than Chinese and Mexican cuisine. There are barely any German restaurants in the U.S when compared to the proportion of Germans in this country. Over 50 million Germans, yet the vast majority of shopping malls in this country do not offer German cuisine in it's food courts. There are more Indian and Vietnamese restaurants in this country than there are German ones.

    Replies: @Jack D, @dearieme, @NOTA, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @Thagomizer, @WhatEvvs, @Former Darfur, @Flip, @James Bowery

    “Exotic” only has a meaning in relation to what’s around it–the fifth Thai restaurant in town doesn’t seem too exotic, but the first one does.

    I can think of one German restaurant and probably a dozen Thai places close to where I live, so German seems pretty exotic.

  48. @Jack D

    Remember that Republican voters care more about aligning government with their values of work and family than they care about cutting the size of government as an end in itself.
     
    So Republicans are really just Democrats who oppose abortion? We are lost.

    Replies: @CK, @asdf, @AnotherDad

    They do not oppose abortion. Without the existence of abortion on demand, there would be no need for a republican party to exist. They pay lip service in public to something they heartily approve of in private. Abortion on demand kills blacks. According to Guttmacher data, 30% of the abortions in America are to black women who are 7.3% of the total population.
    If one wonders why the black population today is 14% of the total and 50 years ago it was 13% of the total … abortion on demand has done its part of the job; unlimited immigration from South of the border is doing the rest. The Hispanic population already exceeds the black population.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @CK

    Of course, this factoid plays right into the hands of Steven Levitt, author of Freakonomics and the theory that "Abortion cut the crime rate among African-Americans." If the abortion rate were to say, increase among black women to around 55% of the total number of annual abortions, wouldn't that eventually have a direct affect of bringing down the black population total of the US? One would certainly think so. Fewer people = less crime committed.

    Replies: @CK

  49. @Steve Sailer
    @(((Owen)))

    Like I said, Mexico would be a pretty easy place to improve. The Mexican concern is that they if they make it less cruddy it would get overrun by gringos.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Anonymous, @Jack D, @Bernie

    These days it would be more likely to be Pakistanis.

  50. @Matra
    The Germans today prefer doner kebab and curry wurst plus the usual globalized stuff you see everywhere now.

    When they eat out maybe but they still eat their own food at home. Though even the German fast food chains at train stations have, in addition to the usual sausage-related stuff, a good variety of seafood that puts their French and American equivalents to shame.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Chrisnonymous

    ‘Curry wurst’

    Unfortunately the effect of this rather revolting sounding – and bastardized – foodstuff on yer typical German’s lager and sauerkraut stuffed alimentary canal, can best be ignored.

    • Replies: @Matra
    @Anonymous

    The two times I had currywurst it was just sausage covered in (mild) curry flavoured ketchup with fries on the side. It seems to be enjoyed (if that's the right word) by people in a hurry or on the way home from a night of drinking.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  51. @Steve Sailer
    @(((Owen)))

    I stayed in a hotel overlooking the main drag in Mexico City, the Paseo de la Reforma. The intersection below had no stop light even though it was one of major crossroads of the capital. It was fascinating to watch long lines of cars play Perpendicular Chicken with each other, but all the honking was kind of hard on the ears.

    Jorge Castaneda implies that things like no stoplights are justified as keeping wimpy gringos out of Mexico. He says, however, that Mexicans would find they like not having to take their lives in their hands every time they try to walk across the street.

    Replies: @(((Owen))), @Anonymous

    So, how’s the organ transplant business doing in Mexico?

    Plenty of ‘beating hear cadavers’ it seems.

  52. @Matra
    The Germans today prefer doner kebab and curry wurst plus the usual globalized stuff you see everywhere now.

    When they eat out maybe but they still eat their own food at home. Though even the German fast food chains at train stations have, in addition to the usual sausage-related stuff, a good variety of seafood that puts their French and American equivalents to shame.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Chrisnonymous

    No matter how many times I see it, I can’t help reading “doner kebab” as “donor kebab,” which sounds disgusting.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Chrisnonymous



    No matter how many times I see it, I can’t help reading “doner kebab” as “donor kebab,” which sounds disgusting.

     

    In the assisted reproduction business, the customer almost never encounters the donor's skewer.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Chrisnonymous

    "Donor kebab" seems like an appropriate nickname for Donald Trump.

  53. @Jack D
    @Jefferson

    Frankfurters? Hamburgers? Aren't those German.

    To have really authentic ethnic restaurants you need fresh off the boat (plane) ethnics - #1 as chefs and #2 as customers to keep the chefs honest. All ethnic cuisines fade once immigration stops.

    German cuisine was always kind of bland and starchy and got blander as the owner and customer base of their restaurants in America got older and more Americanized. Two world wars didn't do much for the popularity of German food (which was in the 19th century, after French, probably the 2nd most popular "foreign" cuisine in America) but mostly it just went out of style as being the opposite of the kind of food that people like today. Boiled beef is not high on anyone's list. The Germans today prefer doner kebab and curry wurst plus the usual globalized stuff you see everywhere now.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Anonym, @Prof. Woland, @Mr. Anon, @SFG

    That points in the direction of Steve’s marginal utility of migrants theme. Just a dribble of immigrants from diverse places for ethnic restaurant creation, nothing more.

  54. @Peter Akuleyev
    "Exotic" is a meaningless word when it comes to cuisine. Mexican and Chinese cusines, when done correctly, are objectively more sophisticated and interesting than most Northern European cuisines. The best cuisines have historically generally been invented by rich ruling classes with access to a wide range of ingredients and plenty of leisure time to perfect recipes. Hence the best food comes from the Ottoman Empire, Mughal India, China, Spanish ruled Mexico (once spectacularly rich), as well as the rich merchant cities of Italy and imperial France. Why the British failed so impressively to design a rich cusine is an interesting historical story. As far as "exotic", I lived in Kazakhstan - that is an "exotic" cuisine to be sure, it also is horrible, consisting mostly of boiled and smoked animal products with few spices, the product of a poor nomad culture. Scandinavian food is also "exotic", and also horrible.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jack D, @tbraton, @Chrisnonymous, @AP, @Gato de la Biblioteca

    “Hence the best food comes from the Ottoman Empire, . . .As far as “exotic”, I lived in Kazakhstan – that is an “exotic” cuisine to be sure, it also is horrible, consisting mostly of boiled and smoked animal products with few spices, the product of a poor nomad culture.”

    The Ottoman Turks originally came from Central Asia and were nomads. The cuisine they brought with them was quite limited. Their “exotic” cuisine was largely the product of Greek chefs and the chefs of other civilizations they conquered. Their only major contribution in the area of cuisine appears to be yoghurt, a nomadic food, which they introduced into what became the Ottoman Empire. For an empire which lasted nearly 500 years, the Turks made very little contribution to world civilization, except for the Turkish towel. Compared to Great Britain, whose empire lasted a considerably shorter time but which contributed significantly to the cultures they conquered, the Turks’ cultural contribution was negligible.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @tbraton

    You misunderstand how an empire is supposed to work if it is working properly. Contributions are made by ALL the ethnic groups of the empire, not just by the group that is (nominally) in charge. We know that because of HBD and other reasons, different groups are better at different things - Turks were better horsemen, Byzantine Greeks were better chefs, etc. In a functioning empire everyone gets to do the thing that they are best at.

  55. @Peter Akuleyev
    "Exotic" is a meaningless word when it comes to cuisine. Mexican and Chinese cusines, when done correctly, are objectively more sophisticated and interesting than most Northern European cuisines. The best cuisines have historically generally been invented by rich ruling classes with access to a wide range of ingredients and plenty of leisure time to perfect recipes. Hence the best food comes from the Ottoman Empire, Mughal India, China, Spanish ruled Mexico (once spectacularly rich), as well as the rich merchant cities of Italy and imperial France. Why the British failed so impressively to design a rich cusine is an interesting historical story. As far as "exotic", I lived in Kazakhstan - that is an "exotic" cuisine to be sure, it also is horrible, consisting mostly of boiled and smoked animal products with few spices, the product of a poor nomad culture. Scandinavian food is also "exotic", and also horrible.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jack D, @tbraton, @Chrisnonymous, @AP, @Gato de la Biblioteca

    China’s a pretty big place. I went to a restaurant in Beijing serving upscale northern dishes, and I wasn’t very impressed. The farther south you go, the better the food is, so you could refine your theory to include geography.

    I would speculate that the English failure has to do with the fact that it is an island. The imperial elites went abroad to govern–a different situation than India, Ottomans, etc. I also think English food is underrated.

    • Replies: @John Derbyshire
    @Chrisnonymous


    I also think English food is underrated.
     
    For sure.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Stealth, @a Newsreader, @Jack D

  56. @Peter Akuleyev
    "Exotic" is a meaningless word when it comes to cuisine. Mexican and Chinese cusines, when done correctly, are objectively more sophisticated and interesting than most Northern European cuisines. The best cuisines have historically generally been invented by rich ruling classes with access to a wide range of ingredients and plenty of leisure time to perfect recipes. Hence the best food comes from the Ottoman Empire, Mughal India, China, Spanish ruled Mexico (once spectacularly rich), as well as the rich merchant cities of Italy and imperial France. Why the British failed so impressively to design a rich cusine is an interesting historical story. As far as "exotic", I lived in Kazakhstan - that is an "exotic" cuisine to be sure, it also is horrible, consisting mostly of boiled and smoked animal products with few spices, the product of a poor nomad culture. Scandinavian food is also "exotic", and also horrible.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jack D, @tbraton, @Chrisnonymous, @AP, @Gato de la Biblioteca

    The best cuisines have historically generally been invented by rich ruling classes with access to a wide range of ingredients and plenty of leisure time to perfect recipes.

    I remember a great Polish restaurant in Krakow serving fantastic noble food. Meat dishes, but much more sophisticated and well done than what one tends to find in Germany. And my friend’s mother’s wild boar, prepared according to an old family recipe.

  57. @Jefferson
    "They are better positioned to enjoy the attractive cultural and social results of migration (more-interesting food!)"

    More interesting food? There is nothing interesting and exotic about Chinese and Mexican food. I live in California where there are Mexican and Chinese restaurants on every street corner. These cuisines lose it's exotic factor when there is way too much easy access to them. There is an oversaturation of Mexican and Chinese food in California.  

    Replies: @Anonym, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Michelle, @Massimo Heitor

    More interesting food?

    Yeah, yeah, I know it’s the one irrefutable benefit of mass immigration, but this argument never sat right with me. Why the hell do we need to import millions of Mexicans to enjoy spicy and carbo-licious Mexican food? Can’t we just swap recipes?!? Is this an “elite women don’t cook” status-signaling thing?

    I’m a middle-class Midwesterner with agrarian roots. My Grandma who lived 4 hours away made some ridiculously awesome casseroles. Did my Mom insist that Grandma drive 4 hours to our house and make casseroles every couple of days? Hell no. She asked for the recipes. Problem solved.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Gunnar von Cowtown

    This only works so far. Say one day you get a craving to cook Ghanaian cuisine for some reason and you look up some recipes. They call for shitto sauce, unrefined palm oil, fufu, cassava, etc. Your local supermarket doesn't have any of these. And even if you could get your hands on the ingredients, unless you had tasted the real thing, you really wouldn't know how far off the mark you were. Printed recipes, even YouTube videos, are no substitute for "Fingerspitzengefühle" - finger tip feeling, which is what skilled cooks of a particular cuisine know by taste bud memory - this is why such cooks hardly even measure.

    I'm not saying that it's a good idea to let millions of Ghanaians into your country just so you can reap the dubious benefits of eating fufu (not a big improvement on mashed potatoes) but you aren't really going to get authentic foreign food without authentic foreigners to provide a customer base for ethnic shops, restaurants, etc. Maybe it's not worth turning your country into something unrecognizable just so you can get a plate of jollof rice, but don't imagine that all you need is the Time-Life "Food of Africa" book and you're in business.

    Replies: @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Ed, @reiner Tor, @Veracitor, @sb

    , @JSM
    @Gunnar von Cowtown

    Even *if* this is an "elite women don't cook" signaling thing, why do we have to import the Mexicans? Can't we just have White chefs go to Mexico and get the recipes and cook them back here for us in their own restaurants? I mean, is it a Fundamental Law of Physics that you have to be of Mexican descent to be able to figure out how to roast green chilis, or something?

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @neutral, @AnAnon, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Anonymous

    , @WhatEvvs
    @Gunnar von Cowtown


    Is this an “elite women don’t cook” status-signaling thing?
     
    Where do you guys come from? I mean, what world do you live in? Elite women cook - not only do they cook, but they cook with much greater passion and expertise than the supposedly contented housewives of the 1950s cooked. They cook like grandma (actually great grandma) but with science and better equipment.

    In fact, it's a status marker of elite women to be expert cooks. A fully appointed kitchen with All-Clad cookware, Viking stove, KitchenAids, Brevilles, yada yada, is part of the equipment of the modern married woman. They prepare natural smoothies for their babies & toddlers, complicated sandwiches for their kids (that SWPL guy made fun of this), and elaborate meals for their husbands. Get a clue.
  58. @Jefferson
    @Steve Sailer

    "Like I said, Mexico would be a pretty easy place to improve."

    You can't easily improve a high crime narco state like Mexico. Also Mexico's racial demographics work against them. Mexico does not even make the list of the top 5 Whitest countries in Latin America percentage wise. Mexico has a glass ceiling due to it not being a majority White country. You can't turn a country first world with only a 9 percent White population.

    Mexico is San Bernardino on a much larger and worse scale. San Bernardino goes bankrupt after political power switches from White Gringo hands to Mexican hands. Mexicans don't run cities like a well oil machine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @(((Owen))), @AP

    Mexico does not even make the list of the top 5 Whitest countries in Latin America percentage wise. Mexico has a glass ceiling due to it not being a majority White country. You can’t turn a country first world with only a 9 percent White population.

    Many Asian countries disprove this point.

    About 10% of Mexico’s population are white. Most of the rest are a mix of whites (on average, 40% – higher in the North and lower in the South) and Natives (about 55%, with a little bit of African ancestry). The Natives are essentially Siberian Asians, with a little bit of ancient Caucasian ancestry because small numbers of Caucasians crossed the land bridge and were absorbed by the Asian majority.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    @AP


    The Natives are essentially Siberian Asians
     
    But with a very different selection environment than Siberian Asians faced. E.g. Central American Indians (natives) have smaller head circumferences because they're closer to the equator (though the difference is not nearly as pronounced as between Africans and Europeans or Northeast Asians), but probably the most important problem is that they didn't spend enough time in a proper civilization.

    Replies: @AP

  59. Romney lost because he was an investment banker running in the wake of a financial crisis. Usually the incumbent gets blamed for a bad economy, but the GOP figured out a way to hand that issue to the HCO.

    • Replies: @Curle
    @Jean Cocteausten

    That and the Republican Party establishment agrees with Peter Lee and the New York Times, that their voters are racists and buffoons. With that attitude, the goal of a campaign is to survive a moral drubbing all the while hoping you can eek out a win if the voters are mad enough at the other guy. The very idea of fighting fire with fire, hitting them between the eyes the way Trump is doing is unthinkable. Thus candidates like Romney.

    Peter Lee is simply characteristic of a type I'm encountering all the time now that a Republican fighter is in the race. The moralizing Lefty who cannot believe someone would question the moral uprightness of the Lefty cause. Or that a Republican would presume to occupy the moral high ground. They expect Republicans to grovel.

  60. @Steve Sailer
    @The Z Blog

    A lot of things are getting better in Mexico. For example, the last time I checked (2011), used cars were really expensive in Los Angeles because as of 2006 Mexico had opened its border to American used cars, so they were vanishing from the Los Angeles market. But that means Mexico City's fleet of cars is slowly turning into Los Angeles' old fleet of cars, and Los Angeles cars have outstanding pollution controls. So residents of Mexico City have recently started to notice for the first time in decades as the smog lifts that they are surrounded by snow capped volcanos.

    Replies: @dearieme, @5371, @Gato de la Biblioteca

    [Los Angeles cars have outstanding pollution controls]

    Bet they won’t have to keep being inspected as stringently to stay on the road in Mexico, though!

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @5371


    Bet they won’t have to keep being inspected as stringently to stay on the road in Mexico, though!
     
    When I lived in Georgia 25 years ago, the state did not require cars to be inspected.
    , @Clyde
    @5371


    [Los Angeles cars have outstanding pollution controls]
    Bet they won’t have to keep being inspected as stringently to stay on the road in Mexico, though!
     
    Good observation meaning that if/when the cat converter fails it will be chopped off for its palladium/platinum. Same for any other pollution controls and concerns. And if I were in Mexico I would do the same.
    Mexico is the "tragedy of the commons" (G Hardin) writ large and we are moving in the same direction. One manifestation being when your business is structured to privatize profits and socialize loses.........

    aka dumping your effluent on the boobs_peasantry_tax payers in a common area.

    Replies: @ben tillman

  61. @(((Owen)))
    @Maj. Kong

    "If Mexico was [sic] so great, there would be immigration going that way. Fred doesn’t count."

    Net immigration between the USA and Mexico has been in the Mexican direction every year since 2007. That counts Mexicans coming to the USA, Mexicans going back, Gringos going to Mexico, Gringos going back, and foreigners moving between both countries. If you throw out the foreigners who are citizens of neither country, the net migration is even higher toward Mexico.

    If it weren't for the astonishingly high number of family reunification visas drawing people north, the net numbers would be even higher in the southerly direction; Mexicans who are only in El Norte for work are returning home in ever higher numbers. The long backlog of family green cards will keep migration north artificially high for years still. Those arrivals will resent America for the waiting and for making them commit to a move they wouldn't even make by the time the free green card comes through.

    And Mexicans are going south because Mexico is pretty great. Political reforms, neoliberal growth policies, education policy, and environmental reforms have delivered big improvements. Mexico's life expectancy for nonsmokers is higher than the USA's. Middle class Mexicans can afford to raise a family in a good school district. Mexican men are strong and confident while women are sweet, pleasing, and not emasculating Gringa harpies. Median young college educated Mexicans earn more (adjusted for cost of living) than median USA young college grads. Oh, and December isn't miserable.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Diversity Heretic, @bomag, @The Z Blog, @syonredux, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @syonredux, @International Jew

    Sadly, the damage to Anglo-America has already been done:

    The Hispanic population is expected to reach about 106 million in 2050, about double what it is today, according to new U.S. Census Bureau population projections.

    http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/12/16/with-fewer-new-arrivals-census-lowers-hispanic-population-projections-2/

  62. @(((Owen)))
    @Maj. Kong

    "If Mexico was [sic] so great, there would be immigration going that way. Fred doesn’t count."

    Net immigration between the USA and Mexico has been in the Mexican direction every year since 2007. That counts Mexicans coming to the USA, Mexicans going back, Gringos going to Mexico, Gringos going back, and foreigners moving between both countries. If you throw out the foreigners who are citizens of neither country, the net migration is even higher toward Mexico.

    If it weren't for the astonishingly high number of family reunification visas drawing people north, the net numbers would be even higher in the southerly direction; Mexicans who are only in El Norte for work are returning home in ever higher numbers. The long backlog of family green cards will keep migration north artificially high for years still. Those arrivals will resent America for the waiting and for making them commit to a move they wouldn't even make by the time the free green card comes through.

    And Mexicans are going south because Mexico is pretty great. Political reforms, neoliberal growth policies, education policy, and environmental reforms have delivered big improvements. Mexico's life expectancy for nonsmokers is higher than the USA's. Middle class Mexicans can afford to raise a family in a good school district. Mexican men are strong and confident while women are sweet, pleasing, and not emasculating Gringa harpies. Median young college educated Mexicans earn more (adjusted for cost of living) than median USA young college grads. Oh, and December isn't miserable.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Diversity Heretic, @bomag, @The Z Blog, @syonredux, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @syonredux, @International Jew

    If the net flow of migration is southwards, how come all the border counties have been complaining about getting swamped the last two years? And why are there more and more native Spanish speakers that can’t speak a goddamned single word of English every year?

    Hell, I was at Disney World a couple of weeks back, and some of the help at the Magic Kingdom couldn’t speak any English at all. And I’m talking about people in greeter-type roles, not just the people scrubbing the toilets.

    The idea that Mexicans are leaving the country in droves is ludicrous on the face of it, and cannot be believed.

    • Replies: @Ed
    @Gato de la Biblioteca

    "If the net flow of migration is southwards, how come all the border counties have been complaining about getting swamped the last two years? And why are there more and more native Spanish speakers that can’t speak a goddamned single word of English every year?"

    All from Central America. As a commentator (Owen?) described earlier, the Mexican government puts migrants from Central America on trains and routes them right up to its northern border.

  63. @Steve Sailer
    @Jefferson

    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce. It doesn't seem like Mexico couldn't attain a Walmart level of prosperity and safety (although Owen would no doubt find it a change for the worse). Walmart itself was got off the ground by a bunch of hillbillies who figured out how to make things straightforward.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Anonymous, @jay-w, @Reg Cæsar, @Jack D

    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce.

    Actually, Mexico is full of WalMarts, also.

    I am currently living in Merida, Yucatan (population ~ 1 miilion; annual homicide rate ~ 2 per 100,000) and I think we have about 4 WalMarts here as well as Costco, Sam’s Club, Home Depot, Auto-Zone, Staples, Office Depot, McDonalds, Burger-King, Dairy Queen, etc., etc.

    I, personally, don’t much like the heat and humidity; therefore, my (Mexican-born) wife and I are planning to eventually move back to Montana. But in terms of the people and the culture, it’s a toss-up between living here versus living in the USA.

    In fact, if I had to live in some hell-hole part of the USA, like Southern California, then preferring to live in Mexico would be a no-brainer. (It’s peaceful and idyllic here — especially now that all the Mexican criminals are in the USA {sarcasm=off})

    • Replies: @Thea
    @jay-w

    Every time I shop in Walmart I feel like I live in the Soviet Union due to the Long lines with ugly architecture.

    I guess the stocked shelves are a bonus but I know they were shocked at 2am for low wages.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jack D

    , @Grumpy
    @jay-w


    Actually, Mexico is full of WalMarts, also... I think we have about 4 WalMarts here as well as Costco, Sam’s Club, Home Depot, Auto-Zone, Staples, Office Depot, McDonalds, Burger-King, Dairy Queen, etc., etc.
     
    America and Mexico are looking more and more alike in every way.

    Replies: @Foreign Expert

  64. @Jack D
    @Jefferson

    Frankfurters? Hamburgers? Aren't those German.

    To have really authentic ethnic restaurants you need fresh off the boat (plane) ethnics - #1 as chefs and #2 as customers to keep the chefs honest. All ethnic cuisines fade once immigration stops.

    German cuisine was always kind of bland and starchy and got blander as the owner and customer base of their restaurants in America got older and more Americanized. Two world wars didn't do much for the popularity of German food (which was in the 19th century, after French, probably the 2nd most popular "foreign" cuisine in America) but mostly it just went out of style as being the opposite of the kind of food that people like today. Boiled beef is not high on anyone's list. The Germans today prefer doner kebab and curry wurst plus the usual globalized stuff you see everywhere now.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Anonym, @Prof. Woland, @Mr. Anon, @SFG

    I eat Russian food 4 nights a week. My background is a WASP. What the commonality is between both cultures and those in between is the climate. Basically what you have are a disproportionate number of crops that grow below ground and grains that do well with a short growing season. Animals such as cows and pigs have a much better chance of Winter survival than chickens or other small animals. You can only do so much with a cabbage.

  65. @(((Owen)))
    @Maj. Kong

    "If Mexico was [sic] so great, there would be immigration going that way. Fred doesn’t count."

    Net immigration between the USA and Mexico has been in the Mexican direction every year since 2007. That counts Mexicans coming to the USA, Mexicans going back, Gringos going to Mexico, Gringos going back, and foreigners moving between both countries. If you throw out the foreigners who are citizens of neither country, the net migration is even higher toward Mexico.

    If it weren't for the astonishingly high number of family reunification visas drawing people north, the net numbers would be even higher in the southerly direction; Mexicans who are only in El Norte for work are returning home in ever higher numbers. The long backlog of family green cards will keep migration north artificially high for years still. Those arrivals will resent America for the waiting and for making them commit to a move they wouldn't even make by the time the free green card comes through.

    And Mexicans are going south because Mexico is pretty great. Political reforms, neoliberal growth policies, education policy, and environmental reforms have delivered big improvements. Mexico's life expectancy for nonsmokers is higher than the USA's. Middle class Mexicans can afford to raise a family in a good school district. Mexican men are strong and confident while women are sweet, pleasing, and not emasculating Gringa harpies. Median young college educated Mexicans earn more (adjusted for cost of living) than median USA young college grads. Oh, and December isn't miserable.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Diversity Heretic, @bomag, @The Z Blog, @syonredux, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @syonredux, @International Jew

    The Hispanic population is expected to reach about 106 million in 2050, about double what it is today, according to new U.S. Census Bureau population projections.

    http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/12/16/with-fewer-new-arrivals-census-lowers-hispanic-population-projections-2/

    And those numbers do not bode well for Anglo-America:

    “Raven’s Standard Progressive Matrices test was administered to a representative sample of 920 white, Mestizo and Native Mexican Indian children aged 7–10 years in Mexico. The mean IQs in relation to a British mean of 100 obtained from the 1979 British standardization sample and adjusted for the estimated subsequent increase were: 98·0 for whites, 94·3 for Mestizos and 83·3 for Native Mexican Indians.”

    http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=266611

    And then let’s compare this to the racial composition of Mexico:

    98.0: Mexican Whites
    94.3:Mexican Mestizos
    83.3: Mexican Amerinds

    According to the CIA FACTBOOK, Mexico’s racial breakdown is:mestizo (Amerindian-Spanish) 60%, Amerindian or predominantly Amerindian 30%, white 9%, other 1%

    Things are not looking good Mexico way…..

    Now, let’s turn to real world achievements.Mexico and the Nobel prize. According to WIKIPEDIA, three people of Mexican origins have won a Nobel:

    Alfonso García Robles: With Alva Myrdal, got the Peace Prize in 1982. For what it’s worth, he looks very White in his WIKIPEDIA photo.

    Mario J. Molina: Along with Paul J. Crutzen and F. Sherwood Rowland, he got the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for studying the threat posed to the ozone layer by CFCs. Looks pretty White in his WIKIPEDIA photo.

    Octavio Paz: 1990 Nobel in Lit. Based on WIKIPEDIA photo, he might have some Amerind ancestry (or he might not).

    So, Three prizes. Total. As compared to 10 for Scotland, 15 for Australia, 23 for Canada, 74 for England , 306 for the USA, …..

    Now, all of these figures are from WIKIPEDIA, so I’m sure that one could argue about the margins…but the overall portrait of Mexican achievement is pretty dire.

    How about Fields Medalists?:

    United States 12

    France 10

    Soviet Union (3) / Russia (6) 9

    United Kingdom 7

    Japan 3
    Belgium 2

    West Germany (1) / Germany (0) 1

    Australia 1

    British Hong Kong 1

    Finland 1

    Israel 1

    Italy 1

    Norway 1

    New Zealand 1

    Sweden 1

    Vietnam 1

    Iran 1

    Brazil 1

    (None Stateless) 1

    I’ve left out Manjul Bhargava. His background is complicated.

    So, Mexico has zero.Hell, all of Latin America has exactly one, which ties them with New Zealand.

    Race creates the foundation upon which culture is built.Mexico’s racial mix produces mediocrity.In contrast, America’s overwhelming European racial stock allowed her to thrive.Mass immigration by Hispanic Amerinds and Mestizos is changing that.Soon, the USA will be as mediocre as Mexico.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @syonredux

    "Race creates the foundation upon which culture is built.Mexico’s racial mix produces mediocrity.In contrast, America’s overwhelming European racial stock allowed her to thrive.Mass immigration by Hispanic Amerinds and Mestizos is changing that.Soon, the USA will be as mediocre as Mexico."

    The Mexican government never allowed massive European immigration Ellis Island style to overwhelm and outnumber the country's local Amerindian and Mestizo populationm

    The Mexican government never had any ambitions of trying to make Mexico as White as The United States and Canada. The Mexican elites thnk it is a lot easier to run a corrupt government with a Brown majority than it is with a White majority, because lower IQ Amerindians/Mestizos are a lot less likely to question and stand up to corrupt government authority. The less Whites you have among the general mass population, the less likely you will see populous types like Donald Trump popping up to challenge the status quo.

    , @Flip
    @syonredux

    "In North America, where the population is prevalently Teutonic, and where those elements intermingled with the inferior race only to a very small degree, we have a quality of mankind and a civilization which are different from those of Central and South America. In these latter countries the immigrants – who mainly belonged to the Latin races – mated with the aborigines, sometimes to a very large extent indeed. In this case we have a clear and decisive example of the effect produced by the mixture of races. But in North America the Teutonic element, which has kept its racial stock pure and did not mix it with any other racial stock, has come to dominate the American Continent and will remain master of it as long as that element does not fall a victim to the habit of adulterating its blood. "

    , @epebble
    @syonredux

    "Manjul Bhargava. His background is complicated."

    He is an Indian (dot, not feather).

  66. Frum: “Recognize that the gimmick of mobilizing the base with culture-war outrages stopped working at least a decade ago.”

    Huh? So gay marriage, the “war on women,” the multiple episodes of racial healing we’ve experienced recently – that was all a clever plot by the Republican elites to mobilize the base?

    Frum is good but he has his blind spots.

  67. @Jefferson
    @Anonym

    "Getting excited over ethnic food is so pre-2010s. More like 1990s and earlier.

    Ditto “exotic” ethnic women. Wow, short, spindly, black hair and dark brown eyes, complexion varying shades of brown. So exotic. Not."

    I think German cuisine is more exotic than Chinese and Mexican cuisine. There are barely any German restaurants in the U.S when compared to the proportion of Germans in this country. Over 50 million Germans, yet the vast majority of shopping malls in this country do not offer German cuisine in it's food courts. There are more Indian and Vietnamese restaurants in this country than there are German ones.

    Replies: @Jack D, @dearieme, @NOTA, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @Thagomizer, @WhatEvvs, @Former Darfur, @Flip, @James Bowery

    There’s a reason there aren’t more German restaurants around. Ditto for the “cuisine” of the Irish, English, and various Scandinavian countries. And mega dittos for the lack of Scottish restaurants!

    These countries (England, Scotland, Ireland and Germany being the home of my forebears) all have terribly bland (at best) native food, when it comes right down to it. I sometimes wonder if the lack of interesting food isn’t the reason they’ve done so well in the last few centuries, though I can’t come up with a plausible rationale for it. Probably because I have more interesting food choices, I’m sure.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    @Gato de la Biblioteca

    "These countries (England, Scotland, Ireland and Germany being the home of my forebears) all have terribly bland (at best) native food"

    Steak pie, chips and beans is NOT bland. Haggis is NOT bland. A full English breakfast or a full Sunday Roast is NOT bland. A Welsh lamb stew is not bland either.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cawl



    And don't the Scandinavians eat stuff like fermented shark? Sounds pretty disgusting to me, but probably not bland.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%A1karl

    Replies: @Massimo Heitor, @Anonymous

    , @Melendwyr
    @Gato de la Biblioteca

    Tropical countries have spicier food because they have spicier plants. Colder European countries simply don't have the climates which favor the production of edible botanical defenses, so their native cuisines are relatively blander. For a very long time, the hottest spice available to them was mustard.

    , @Anonymous
    @Gato de la Biblioteca

    Scandinavia was quite poor until the 20th century, and the Irish haven't done well, even though around the time of the Famine, the average Irishman was eating 15 lbs of potatoes per day and subsisting almost entirely on potatoes, roasted over a fire or boiled.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @iSteveFan
    @Gato de la Biblioteca

    What about their pastries? Don't some of these northern European and Eastern European cultures have some pretty good pastries even if their regular food is bland?

    Replies: @LondonBob

  68. @Peter Akuleyev
    "Exotic" is a meaningless word when it comes to cuisine. Mexican and Chinese cusines, when done correctly, are objectively more sophisticated and interesting than most Northern European cuisines. The best cuisines have historically generally been invented by rich ruling classes with access to a wide range of ingredients and plenty of leisure time to perfect recipes. Hence the best food comes from the Ottoman Empire, Mughal India, China, Spanish ruled Mexico (once spectacularly rich), as well as the rich merchant cities of Italy and imperial France. Why the British failed so impressively to design a rich cusine is an interesting historical story. As far as "exotic", I lived in Kazakhstan - that is an "exotic" cuisine to be sure, it also is horrible, consisting mostly of boiled and smoked animal products with few spices, the product of a poor nomad culture. Scandinavian food is also "exotic", and also horrible.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jack D, @tbraton, @Chrisnonymous, @AP, @Gato de la Biblioteca

    The best cuisines have historically generally been invented by rich ruling classes with access to a wide range of ingredients and plenty of leisure time to perfect recipes.

    Maybe this is why the countries I mentioned earlier have been doing well: The elites haven’t been spending their time on inventing (and supervising the creation of) exotic foods, but have spent their time elsewhere.

  69. @Gunnar von Cowtown
    @Jefferson


    More interesting food?
     
    Yeah, yeah, I know it's the one irrefutable benefit of mass immigration, but this argument never sat right with me. Why the hell do we need to import millions of Mexicans to enjoy spicy and carbo-licious Mexican food? Can't we just swap recipes?!? Is this an "elite women don't cook" status-signaling thing?

    I'm a middle-class Midwesterner with agrarian roots. My Grandma who lived 4 hours away made some ridiculously awesome casseroles. Did my Mom insist that Grandma drive 4 hours to our house and make casseroles every couple of days? Hell no. She asked for the recipes. Problem solved.

    Replies: @Jack D, @JSM, @WhatEvvs

    This only works so far. Say one day you get a craving to cook Ghanaian cuisine for some reason and you look up some recipes. They call for shitto sauce, unrefined palm oil, fufu, cassava, etc. Your local supermarket doesn’t have any of these. And even if you could get your hands on the ingredients, unless you had tasted the real thing, you really wouldn’t know how far off the mark you were. Printed recipes, even YouTube videos, are no substitute for “Fingerspitzengefühle” – finger tip feeling, which is what skilled cooks of a particular cuisine know by taste bud memory – this is why such cooks hardly even measure.

    I’m not saying that it’s a good idea to let millions of Ghanaians into your country just so you can reap the dubious benefits of eating fufu (not a big improvement on mashed potatoes) but you aren’t really going to get authentic foreign food without authentic foreigners to provide a customer base for ethnic shops, restaurants, etc. Maybe it’s not worth turning your country into something unrecognizable just so you can get a plate of jollof rice, but don’t imagine that all you need is the Time-Life “Food of Africa” book and you’re in business.

    • Replies: @Gunnar von Cowtown
    @Jack D

    Short Term: Fair point. But still, it seems easier and cheaper to send chefs to Ghana to learn the mysteries of fufu first hand than importing hundreds of Ghanaians and their extended families.

    Long Term: Authentic America > Authentic Exotic Cuisine

    , @Ed
    @Jack D

    I'm Ghanaian-American and I don't even like Ghanaian food lol.

    Replies: @nglaer

    , @reiner Tor
    @Jack D

    What you wrote is true, it's more complicated than simply printing out the recipes. You need to send your cooks there.

    I read somewhere that there was an Italian food contest somewhere, and a Japanese chef won it - he learned his trade in Italy, but only to move back to Japan to open an Italian restaurant there. I'd bet he can now teach other Japanese cooks on how to cook Italian.

    You might argue that cooking Italian (Ghanaian, whatever) is not exactly rocket science (although in the case of haute cuisine it might be closer to that), but even if it was rocket science - well, rocket science itself could be copied by other countries, couldn't it?

    , @Veracitor
    @Jack D

    In a few years robot cooks will have all the "Fukengrüvenfurzfähigkeit" needed to prepare most ethnic foods. American restaurants will still employ immigrants, but as waitresses (for the jiggle) and busboys (because a cleaning robot would cost as much as a cooking robot but produce less value, so chef robots will be deployed first).

    , @sb
    @Jack D

    Very difficult to find authentic shitto sauce .

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jack D

  70. @Steve Sailer
    @The Z Blog

    A lot of things are getting better in Mexico. For example, the last time I checked (2011), used cars were really expensive in Los Angeles because as of 2006 Mexico had opened its border to American used cars, so they were vanishing from the Los Angeles market. But that means Mexico City's fleet of cars is slowly turning into Los Angeles' old fleet of cars, and Los Angeles cars have outstanding pollution controls. So residents of Mexico City have recently started to notice for the first time in decades as the smog lifts that they are surrounded by snow capped volcanos.

    Replies: @dearieme, @5371, @Gato de la Biblioteca

    A lot of things are getting better in Mexico. [snip] [T]hat means Mexico City’s fleet of cars is slowly turning into Los Angeles’ old fleet of cars, and Los Angeles cars have outstanding pollution controls. So residents of Mexico City have recently started to notice for the first time in decades as the smog lifts that they are surrounded by snow capped volcanos.

    Okay, so Mexico is getting better because of White American concerns for the environment, plus a minor change in Mexican import laws. Wow, that place really can be easily improved!

    Which just makes me wonder exactly how awful are Mexicans that the place is so bad that such minor things can make a big & quickly noticeable difference….

    • Replies: @AnAnon
    @Gato de la Biblioteca

    And taking between 30 and 50 million Mexicans off their hands.

  71. @Jack D
    @Gunnar von Cowtown

    This only works so far. Say one day you get a craving to cook Ghanaian cuisine for some reason and you look up some recipes. They call for shitto sauce, unrefined palm oil, fufu, cassava, etc. Your local supermarket doesn't have any of these. And even if you could get your hands on the ingredients, unless you had tasted the real thing, you really wouldn't know how far off the mark you were. Printed recipes, even YouTube videos, are no substitute for "Fingerspitzengefühle" - finger tip feeling, which is what skilled cooks of a particular cuisine know by taste bud memory - this is why such cooks hardly even measure.

    I'm not saying that it's a good idea to let millions of Ghanaians into your country just so you can reap the dubious benefits of eating fufu (not a big improvement on mashed potatoes) but you aren't really going to get authentic foreign food without authentic foreigners to provide a customer base for ethnic shops, restaurants, etc. Maybe it's not worth turning your country into something unrecognizable just so you can get a plate of jollof rice, but don't imagine that all you need is the Time-Life "Food of Africa" book and you're in business.

    Replies: @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Ed, @reiner Tor, @Veracitor, @sb

    Short Term: Fair point. But still, it seems easier and cheaper to send chefs to Ghana to learn the mysteries of fufu first hand than importing hundreds of Ghanaians and their extended families.

    Long Term: Authentic America > Authentic Exotic Cuisine

  72. @Steve Sailer
    @(((Owen)))

    Like I said, Mexico would be a pretty easy place to improve. The Mexican concern is that they if they make it less cruddy it would get overrun by gringos.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Anonymous, @Jack D, @Bernie

    Honestly, I doubt this. Mexicans certainly love gringo money if not the gringos themselves. Rather, they are doing the best that they can given the society/culture/human capital/resources that they have. That their population increased 400% since 1950 has not made things easier.

  73. More Good Stuff from Frum

    Has David written about South Africa? The headline could be God Stuff from Frum to Tutu.

    O is the cross-dresser among vowels, isn’t it?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Reg Cæsar

    The headline could be God Stuff from Frum to Tutu.

    This reminds me of a line I saw in National Review decades years ago: "If they gave Martin Luther King two Nobel Prizes, shouldn't they give two to Tutu too?"

  74. @Jefferson
    "They are better positioned to enjoy the attractive cultural and social results of migration (more-interesting food!)"

    More interesting food? There is nothing interesting and exotic about Chinese and Mexican food. I live in California where there are Mexican and Chinese restaurants on every street corner. These cuisines lose it's exotic factor when there is way too much easy access to them. There is an oversaturation of Mexican and Chinese food in California.  

    Replies: @Anonym, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Michelle, @Massimo Heitor

    Au contraire! It is my opinion that there can never, ever, be too much Mexican food. Even bad Mexican food is good, a la Mexican “style” canned tamales and Rosarita refries, and Hungry Man Mexican TV dinners and “Taco Bell Chalupas” and American tacos made with ground beef and Ortega taco shells. Authentic Mexican food is, de acuerdo, vastly preferable. Like cemeteries in Boston, and ABC stores in Honolulu, there should be a Mexican restaurant on every corner in America!! As for Chinese food, it is hit or miss and bad Chinese food is just bad and often unsanitary and will go through your system like drain cleaner!

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  75. @Jack D
    @Jefferson

    Frankfurters? Hamburgers? Aren't those German.

    To have really authentic ethnic restaurants you need fresh off the boat (plane) ethnics - #1 as chefs and #2 as customers to keep the chefs honest. All ethnic cuisines fade once immigration stops.

    German cuisine was always kind of bland and starchy and got blander as the owner and customer base of their restaurants in America got older and more Americanized. Two world wars didn't do much for the popularity of German food (which was in the 19th century, after French, probably the 2nd most popular "foreign" cuisine in America) but mostly it just went out of style as being the opposite of the kind of food that people like today. Boiled beef is not high on anyone's list. The Germans today prefer doner kebab and curry wurst plus the usual globalized stuff you see everywhere now.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Anonym, @Prof. Woland, @Mr. Anon, @SFG

    “German cuisine was always kind of bland and starchy….”

    No, not really. That description applies better to kosher food.

    “Frankfurters? Hamburgers? Aren’t those German.”

    In name only. A hot-dog bears little relation to a knackwurst.

    “Boiled beef is not high on anyone’s list. ”

    Boiled beef is more of an english thing, not german.

    • Replies: @This Is Our Home
    @Mr. Anon


    Boiled beef is more of an english thing, not german.
     
    I'm English and have never had nor seen boiled beef.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew

  76. @Steve Sailer
    @Jefferson

    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce. It doesn't seem like Mexico couldn't attain a Walmart level of prosperity and safety (although Owen would no doubt find it a change for the worse). Walmart itself was got off the ground by a bunch of hillbillies who figured out how to make things straightforward.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Anonymous, @jay-w, @Reg Cæsar, @Jack D

    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce.

    At least one of the ethnic supermarkets in St Paul’s pan-Asian Frogtown (“pagodabodegas”?) uses Mexican stock boys. Is that a job young Asians won’t do? Or once you go outside your ethnic group, there’s no loyalty to race, at least among Asians?

    For authenticity, though, the checkout girls are all Asian.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    @Reg Cæsar

    Someone has to be able to figure out the change.

    Mr. Frum seems to be on a roll. Does this mean he has repented for his cuckservatism in the eleventh hour?

    , @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    In my Philadelphia suburban area, someone opened a Vietnamese restaurant. The chefs were Vietnamese but when they first opened they recruited the waitstaff from the local population of 20 somethings who are mostly not Asian. It was disastrous - the food was good but the service really sucked - they lost orders, if you asked them for water or some other item they would not bring it, etc. After a few months and a bunch of bad Yelp reviews management must have learned its lesson and now the waitstaff is all Asian too and everything flows smoothly. It's all a matter of economics - Asian owned businesses, like any other, try to hire the cheapest staff that they can recruit and get away with. Maybe for stocking shelves Mexicans are good enough.

    There have been a few times when I have been at a fast food restaurant or supermarket where the cashier has punched in the wrong bill to make change from (say $50 instead of $5) and now has to figure it out herself and they just can't do it, especially not in their head. They get out a piece of paper and start writing it out and even then they can't get it. It's both sad and funny. This has never happened to me with an Asian cashier.

    Replies: @Thagomizer, @Ed, @Hacienda

    , @Stan Adams
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Chinese restaurant nearest me seems to hire only Chinese, or maybe only Asians. Even the elderly man who mops the floor is Asian.

    (He always asks me to move so he can mop under my table, even if I'm in the middle of a meal. It bugs the hell out of me, but the food's good enough for me to overlook it.)

    A Chinese guy took over the local Dairy Queen several years ago. I haven't seen any round-eyes working there since.

    Replies: @iffen, @Clyde

  77. @Steve Sailer
    @Jefferson

    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce. It doesn't seem like Mexico couldn't attain a Walmart level of prosperity and safety (although Owen would no doubt find it a change for the worse). Walmart itself was got off the ground by a bunch of hillbillies who figured out how to make things straightforward.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Anonymous, @jay-w, @Reg Cæsar, @Jack D

    To some extent this is happening already. Most Mexicans would rather work in a Nabisco (Mondelez) factory near their home and family instead of having to move to Chicago to work in that same factory. Even if they make less, their cost of living is lower too and they don’t have to live in a cold alien place full of uptight gringos and dangerous Negros. So, it seems like net Mexican migration has slowed to a crawl or even reversed.

    The problem is that you still have Honduras, Guatemala, Nicaragua, etc. where even Wal-Mart prosperity seems out of reach. Mexico is #67 in GDP rank but you have another another 130 countries below them. Places like Liberia and Somalia where the GDP/capita is less than $3/day and the main question is not whether you can afford a cheap flat screen TV for your hut but whether you will eat today.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    Trump frequently complained about Nabisco moving its factory to Mexico a few months ago during his stump speeches. I oppose immigration and support protectionism, but making Nilla wafers probably isn't a high priority industry that needs to be protected. And having lots of factory jobs making cookies in Mexico probably isn't a bad idea in terms of drawing potential migrants away from the US, as well as acclimating Mexicans into a more regimented First World style of work and living.

    Replies: @TangoMan, @Dave Pinsen

    , @iSteveFan
    @Jack D


    So, it seems like net Mexican migration has slowed to a crawl or even reversed.
     
    I am sorry, but I get tired of hearing this. Is saying that Mexican migration has slowed to a crawl supposed to make us feel like everything is OK? Mexico has sent approximately 11 million people into the US since 1980. That's just counting since 1980, BTW, and not any prior. How does that 11 million stack up to what others have sent? Since 1607 until the present, we have had approximately 7 million Germans and 6 million Italians, our two formerly leading immigrant source nations. So Mexico has sent almost as many immigrants in 35 years as the next two leading nations combined have sent in 400!

    Saying that it has now slowed to a crawl after what we've have been through is a little like closing the barn door after the horse has left. We still need to erect proper barriers on the border and enforce immigration and labor laws. Mexico is the type of country where it would not be unexpected for them to take a turn for the worse. And when that next cycle happens, I want us to be prepared so as to not have to go through another such immivasion as we've just had.

    Replies: @JSM

  78. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce.
     
    At least one of the ethnic supermarkets in St Paul's pan-Asian Frogtown ("pagodabodegas"?) uses Mexican stock boys. Is that a job young Asians won't do? Or once you go outside your ethnic group, there's no loyalty to race, at least among Asians?

    For authenticity, though, the checkout girls are all Asian.

    Replies: @Romanian, @Jack D, @Stan Adams

    Someone has to be able to figure out the change.

    Mr. Frum seems to be on a roll. Does this mean he has repented for his cuckservatism in the eleventh hour?

  79. The problem facing the US isn’t NAMs, isn’t Muslims, LGBT activists, isn’t anti-fascist SJW unstable sorts…. The problem was never Abbie Hoffman, Barney Frank, Andrea Dworkin or the Black Panthers… The problem was and remains Gary Hart, Steve Forbes, Gerry and Betty Ford and their ilk. Wealthy or upper middle class, socially liberal and economically d-bag whites along with the straight up A-holes who run the South.

    The cultural Left would make no progress in this county, 20 years of Bush-Clinton rule, the social decay and pain amongst the poor, 42 million dollar gas stations in Afghanistan, all of this would have never happened without the support or acquiescence of our white professional and elite classes.

    The 1% has much to answer for, but so does the top 10% and 25%.

    • Agree: iffen
  80. AP Poll: Islamic State conflict voted top news story of 2015

    4: MASS SHOOTINGS: Throughout the year, mass shootings brought grief to communities across the U.S. and deepened frustration over the failure to curtail them. There were 14 victims in San Bernardino. Nine blacks were killed by a white gunman at a Charleston, South Carolina, church; a professor and eight students died at an Oregon community college. In Chattanooga, four Marines and a sailor were killed by a Kuwaiti-born engineer; three people, including a policeman, were shot dead at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado.

    Hilarious. It’s like they want us to notice how they operate:

    “There were 14 victims in San Bernardino.” Islamic fanatics? What are they?

    “Nine blacks were killed by a white gunman.” Wow, specificity makes a stunning comeback in the next sentence!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Svigor


    Hilarious. It’s like they want us to notice how they operate:

    “There were 14 victims in San Bernardino.” Islamic fanatics? What are they?

    “Nine blacks were killed by a white gunman.” Wow, specificity makes a stunning comeback in the next sentence!
     
    That is pretty amazing.
  81. What is Frum trying to be intelligent and honest again or something?

  82. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce.
     
    At least one of the ethnic supermarkets in St Paul's pan-Asian Frogtown ("pagodabodegas"?) uses Mexican stock boys. Is that a job young Asians won't do? Or once you go outside your ethnic group, there's no loyalty to race, at least among Asians?

    For authenticity, though, the checkout girls are all Asian.

    Replies: @Romanian, @Jack D, @Stan Adams

    In my Philadelphia suburban area, someone opened a Vietnamese restaurant. The chefs were Vietnamese but when they first opened they recruited the waitstaff from the local population of 20 somethings who are mostly not Asian. It was disastrous – the food was good but the service really sucked – they lost orders, if you asked them for water or some other item they would not bring it, etc. After a few months and a bunch of bad Yelp reviews management must have learned its lesson and now the waitstaff is all Asian too and everything flows smoothly. It’s all a matter of economics – Asian owned businesses, like any other, try to hire the cheapest staff that they can recruit and get away with. Maybe for stocking shelves Mexicans are good enough.

    There have been a few times when I have been at a fast food restaurant or supermarket where the cashier has punched in the wrong bill to make change from (say $50 instead of $5) and now has to figure it out herself and they just can’t do it, especially not in their head. They get out a piece of paper and start writing it out and even then they can’t get it. It’s both sad and funny. This has never happened to me with an Asian cashier.

    • Replies: @Thagomizer
    @Jack D

    Once a gay Asian cashier at Starbucks once visibly panicked when I paid for a $2 coffee with 8 quarters.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Hacienda

    , @Ed
    @Jack D

    There's a part of this story that is missing: the demographics of the waitstaff from local population. We're they mostly white, black or Puerto Rican.

    , @Hacienda
    @Jack D

    If they can't give you change for a dollar, then probably they can't exist as cashiers.
    I get into problems when I give a bill and change, expecting some round number
    change back. I don't do this anymore with a dull looking Hispanic cashiers. Asians, no problem!

  83. @The Z Blog
    @(((Owen)))

    Steve's post about innumeracy comes to mind here. Whenever someone picks an oddball starting point on the time line you know they are not playing in straight. Similarly, I would bet Owen has a definition of "net immigration" that would strike most people as bizarre.

    And no Owen, I have no interest in having a long winded debate with you on it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @(((Owen))), @iSteveFan

    Thank you.

  84. I thought Romney lost the election because he was promising war with Iran over its nuclear ambitions. That and the incredibly lame performance put in by Paul Ryan in the VP debate. But he makes excellent points about republicans not having a credible health care plan that enables low income Americans to get the care they need.

  85. @Jefferson
    @Anonym

    "Getting excited over ethnic food is so pre-2010s. More like 1990s and earlier.

    Ditto “exotic” ethnic women. Wow, short, spindly, black hair and dark brown eyes, complexion varying shades of brown. So exotic. Not."

    I think German cuisine is more exotic than Chinese and Mexican cuisine. There are barely any German restaurants in the U.S when compared to the proportion of Germans in this country. Over 50 million Germans, yet the vast majority of shopping malls in this country do not offer German cuisine in it's food courts. There are more Indian and Vietnamese restaurants in this country than there are German ones.

    Replies: @Jack D, @dearieme, @NOTA, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @Thagomizer, @WhatEvvs, @Former Darfur, @Flip, @James Bowery

    It’s actually interesting. Current immigration policies favor restaurants from poor countries.

    The H1B “genius visa” is also used to bring in foreign chefs making $30k-$40k. You won’t find trained German chefs willing to cross the Atlantic for that money.

    So restaurants based on european cuisine have a huge disadvantage. They can’t use cheap chefs or use illegal family members for labour.

    At least Italian restaurants can take advantage of the fact that pasta is popular and cheap.

  86. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    In my Philadelphia suburban area, someone opened a Vietnamese restaurant. The chefs were Vietnamese but when they first opened they recruited the waitstaff from the local population of 20 somethings who are mostly not Asian. It was disastrous - the food was good but the service really sucked - they lost orders, if you asked them for water or some other item they would not bring it, etc. After a few months and a bunch of bad Yelp reviews management must have learned its lesson and now the waitstaff is all Asian too and everything flows smoothly. It's all a matter of economics - Asian owned businesses, like any other, try to hire the cheapest staff that they can recruit and get away with. Maybe for stocking shelves Mexicans are good enough.

    There have been a few times when I have been at a fast food restaurant or supermarket where the cashier has punched in the wrong bill to make change from (say $50 instead of $5) and now has to figure it out herself and they just can't do it, especially not in their head. They get out a piece of paper and start writing it out and even then they can't get it. It's both sad and funny. This has never happened to me with an Asian cashier.

    Replies: @Thagomizer, @Ed, @Hacienda

    Once a gay Asian cashier at Starbucks once visibly panicked when I paid for a $2 coffee with 8 quarters.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Thagomizer

    Yeah, I recently handed a cashier $10.45 for a $5.43 charge, told her I did not want the pennies, and she looked at me like I was insane. I was taught how to make change in grade school; I guess that, like Civics, has been tossed as too raaaaacist. Or something.

    , @Hacienda
    @Thagomizer

    Why? Is that some secret sign in the gay community?

  87. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    In my Philadelphia suburban area, someone opened a Vietnamese restaurant. The chefs were Vietnamese but when they first opened they recruited the waitstaff from the local population of 20 somethings who are mostly not Asian. It was disastrous - the food was good but the service really sucked - they lost orders, if you asked them for water or some other item they would not bring it, etc. After a few months and a bunch of bad Yelp reviews management must have learned its lesson and now the waitstaff is all Asian too and everything flows smoothly. It's all a matter of economics - Asian owned businesses, like any other, try to hire the cheapest staff that they can recruit and get away with. Maybe for stocking shelves Mexicans are good enough.

    There have been a few times when I have been at a fast food restaurant or supermarket where the cashier has punched in the wrong bill to make change from (say $50 instead of $5) and now has to figure it out herself and they just can't do it, especially not in their head. They get out a piece of paper and start writing it out and even then they can't get it. It's both sad and funny. This has never happened to me with an Asian cashier.

    Replies: @Thagomizer, @Ed, @Hacienda

    There’s a part of this story that is missing: the demographics of the waitstaff from local population. We’re they mostly white, black or Puerto Rican.

  88. @Jack D
    @Gunnar von Cowtown

    This only works so far. Say one day you get a craving to cook Ghanaian cuisine for some reason and you look up some recipes. They call for shitto sauce, unrefined palm oil, fufu, cassava, etc. Your local supermarket doesn't have any of these. And even if you could get your hands on the ingredients, unless you had tasted the real thing, you really wouldn't know how far off the mark you were. Printed recipes, even YouTube videos, are no substitute for "Fingerspitzengefühle" - finger tip feeling, which is what skilled cooks of a particular cuisine know by taste bud memory - this is why such cooks hardly even measure.

    I'm not saying that it's a good idea to let millions of Ghanaians into your country just so you can reap the dubious benefits of eating fufu (not a big improvement on mashed potatoes) but you aren't really going to get authentic foreign food without authentic foreigners to provide a customer base for ethnic shops, restaurants, etc. Maybe it's not worth turning your country into something unrecognizable just so you can get a plate of jollof rice, but don't imagine that all you need is the Time-Life "Food of Africa" book and you're in business.

    Replies: @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Ed, @reiner Tor, @Veracitor, @sb

    I’m Ghanaian-American and I don’t even like Ghanaian food lol.

    • Replies: @nglaer
    @Ed

    Cool, a Ghanian at isteve. I know another one, who works at my tennis club doing everything from accounting, to hitting, to making games, to answering the phone. Smart, outgoing guy. It makes me think Africa could make it, if smart people didn't emigrate.

  89. @Jack D
    @Gunnar von Cowtown

    This only works so far. Say one day you get a craving to cook Ghanaian cuisine for some reason and you look up some recipes. They call for shitto sauce, unrefined palm oil, fufu, cassava, etc. Your local supermarket doesn't have any of these. And even if you could get your hands on the ingredients, unless you had tasted the real thing, you really wouldn't know how far off the mark you were. Printed recipes, even YouTube videos, are no substitute for "Fingerspitzengefühle" - finger tip feeling, which is what skilled cooks of a particular cuisine know by taste bud memory - this is why such cooks hardly even measure.

    I'm not saying that it's a good idea to let millions of Ghanaians into your country just so you can reap the dubious benefits of eating fufu (not a big improvement on mashed potatoes) but you aren't really going to get authentic foreign food without authentic foreigners to provide a customer base for ethnic shops, restaurants, etc. Maybe it's not worth turning your country into something unrecognizable just so you can get a plate of jollof rice, but don't imagine that all you need is the Time-Life "Food of Africa" book and you're in business.

    Replies: @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Ed, @reiner Tor, @Veracitor, @sb

    What you wrote is true, it’s more complicated than simply printing out the recipes. You need to send your cooks there.

    I read somewhere that there was an Italian food contest somewhere, and a Japanese chef won it – he learned his trade in Italy, but only to move back to Japan to open an Italian restaurant there. I’d bet he can now teach other Japanese cooks on how to cook Italian.

    You might argue that cooking Italian (Ghanaian, whatever) is not exactly rocket science (although in the case of haute cuisine it might be closer to that), but even if it was rocket science – well, rocket science itself could be copied by other countries, couldn’t it?

  90. @Maj. Kong
    https://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=REV

    This chart explains why the platform of "cutting government" doesn't work.

    It's one thing to propose it in France, but the only developed countries taxing less than we do are...Mexico and Chile.

    If Mexico was so great, there would be immigration going that way. Fred doesn't count.

    Replies: @(((Owen))), @Dave Pinsen, @Clyde, @ben tillman, @Karl

    This chart explains why the platform of “cutting government” doesn’t work.

    You could easily cut half the Federal workers and contractors in the greater Washingtoon DC region and no one would notice. Get rid of the 11,000 EPA workers for a start. Get rid of the Federal Department of Education which is really just a glorified jobs program for every affirmative action leech under the sun starting with women, blacks, gays, lesbians…….with (angry) Samoans and Aleutian Islanders bringing up the rear.
    Get rid of affirmative action hiring hall—Department of Labor
    Get rid of affirmative action hiring hall—Department of Health and Human Services
    Get rid of affirmative action hiring hall—Department of Housing and Urban Development

    There are 3000+ county governments, 50 State governments and one Federale Gov’t. So you have to be specific about what government and what agencies can be pruned back or eliminated

    • Replies: @JerseyGuy
    @Clyde

    Clyde,

    I think the one problem we have in the United States is that we have just so many layers of government relative to Europe. The United States is such a complex entity at this point is that it is basically not "reformable". As I've moved on from my "Big vs. Small" government phase, I've come to the conclusion that there are a lot of "Big Government" programs that actually work quite well (high speed internet comes to mind) but cannot be implemented under our current system.

    In short, the US is probably just too big at this point and would do better (and people would be much happier) if the US were to just break apart. Easier said than done of course but certainly worth putting the ideas out there.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic

  91. Its a good analysis, but lacks one important point. If Republicans do go into a defensive crouch, time is not on their side. The youth, and every demographic gaining numbers is not Republican. So their ability to block change will erode with time. They have to figure out how to come to grops witht he future. They can neither go back, not prevent the future from happening.

    • Replies: @anowow
    @Tiny Duck

    Well, the whole getting young people to be wage slaves to subsidize old people might have to be rethought. Strangely enough, people are opposed to a two-tiered system with benefits grandfathered-in for people who helped, or stood by, while the system got screwed up. The UAW talks are proof of that. Hillary's supporters (basically Democratic Carly Fiorinas) vs. Sanders are further proof.

    Ryan's tone-deaf destruction of government pensions for everybody under 55 ain't gonna work. And Rubio's tax credits for Guatemalan single-moms and Mama June Shannon ain't gonna work either.

    If Trump gave some promises on student loan relief and gave proofs that he might make the market less competitive for younger professionals, I suspect many young people would vote for him. And I include non-white young people. He'd lock that vote solid, even if nobody would admit to voting for him on facebook. He wouldn't get their vote the first go round, but he could for the reelection.

    But the GOP will never do that. They are an alliance of the wealthy, military and contractor parasites, and a few trade guilds like the AMA, enabled by religious fanatical Evangelical heretic and mouth-breather shock troops and the AARP brigades who are grimly determined to ring every cent they "earned" out of the rest of us.

    Replies: @TangoMan

  92. @Gunnar von Cowtown
    @Jefferson


    More interesting food?
     
    Yeah, yeah, I know it's the one irrefutable benefit of mass immigration, but this argument never sat right with me. Why the hell do we need to import millions of Mexicans to enjoy spicy and carbo-licious Mexican food? Can't we just swap recipes?!? Is this an "elite women don't cook" status-signaling thing?

    I'm a middle-class Midwesterner with agrarian roots. My Grandma who lived 4 hours away made some ridiculously awesome casseroles. Did my Mom insist that Grandma drive 4 hours to our house and make casseroles every couple of days? Hell no. She asked for the recipes. Problem solved.

    Replies: @Jack D, @JSM, @WhatEvvs

    Even *if* this is an “elite women don’t cook” signaling thing, why do we have to import the Mexicans? Can’t we just have White chefs go to Mexico and get the recipes and cook them back here for us in their own restaurants? I mean, is it a Fundamental Law of Physics that you have to be of Mexican descent to be able to figure out how to roast green chilis, or something?

    • Replies: @iSteveFan
    @JSM

    This pasty white gringo is among the best Mexican chefs in America. He went there, learned the culture and cuisine, and now recreates those dishes here.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    , @neutral
    @JSM

    Its the same in Britain, there was a story a few months back that there was a shortage of curry chefs, this was taken as an excuse to get more immigrants. I do believe that things like IQ and sports ability have a biological component, I don't believe that cooking does, nor am I aware of any alt righter or hard right who believes this. However, despite all their equality talk, for left wingers only people from South Asia are able to make curries.

    , @AnAnon
    @JSM

    "No we can't 'Just get the recipe.' "

    "Maybe for stocking shelves Mexicans are good enough." - The CIS has found that two areas of employment had a native born youth resurgence after, I think, 2005: food preparation and stocking clerks.

    , @Gunnar von Cowtown
    @JSM

    Agree to agree. See Jack D, Ghana and fufu.

    , @Anonymous
    @JSM

    The economics don't work out. Restaurants are a very low margin business who make most of their money on beverages and alcoholic drinks if they serve them. It's only worth it for a handful of white chefs to specialize in foreign cuisine at upscale restaurants. Without importing cheap labor, foreign cuisine and eating out more generally would be the preserve of the wealthy. But that's been the case historically, and most people opposed to immigration are not major foodies and foreign cuisine isn't a priority for them.

  93. @JSM
    @Gunnar von Cowtown

    Even *if* this is an "elite women don't cook" signaling thing, why do we have to import the Mexicans? Can't we just have White chefs go to Mexico and get the recipes and cook them back here for us in their own restaurants? I mean, is it a Fundamental Law of Physics that you have to be of Mexican descent to be able to figure out how to roast green chilis, or something?

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @neutral, @AnAnon, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Anonymous

    This pasty white gringo is among the best Mexican chefs in America. He went there, learned the culture and cuisine, and now recreates those dishes here.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @iSteveFan

    Among? Nope, he is. His Mundo in Vegas was one of the few places there to get a excellent meal, but Vegas being Vegas, people prefer to hit the buffet.

  94. More Good Stuff from Frum

    Despite what Frum writes now, I still think he is scum. Has he ever come around to apologize to the so-called “unpatriotic” conservatives whom he once called out as traitors? Does he give them credit for their positions that he now seems to push? Go back to Canada.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
    @iSteveFan

    I don't like Frum at all and I find Steve's strange new respect for him somewhat misguided but cmon people are routinely accuses of being disloyal to America on this site all the time. That's what leaping frogging loyalties is all about and I never see you complain then. The Paleocon fixation on nugatory events from decades ago like that Frum article and that time William Bennett got to head the NEA instead of Mel Bradford is just silly.

    Replies: @nglaer, @iSteveFan, @5371

  95. My thoughts on the Frum piece, as they occurred:

    – tribalism (fissures) within the parties mirror the more lurid colour-coding of America race-wise, under Obama, doesn’t it?
    – immigration… as now constituted looks a lot like slavery; elites in favour (bonded, cheap labour). But palpable terrorist threat throws this ‘history repeats’ model into the air, doesn’t it? In capturing fears of poor whites (slaves’ first victims) and in appearing to be the only strong man in the room/race over Islamic imports, Trump scores twice, doesn’t he? (Did Frum pen this before San Bernardino?)
    – Frum’s last option is a chimera: once GOP tacks to centre, the centre will move…further to the left. GOP has been consistently and successfully tarred as the heartless party; moving Democrat-wards will only see more ransom being extracted from them.
    – bad timing: desperation on this scale may be a reverse indicator. Just when GOP and Dems converge (former capitulates) on idea of govt doing more/very little less, well, along comes $18trillion of public debt to effectively neuter activist government! That stark reality was veiled by zero rates for Obama’s reign; but the truth (the costs, and the eternal fact of scarcity of resources) will become plain as rates rise. Arguably GOP just has to stay ‘on message’ – government the problem not the solution – and the election success will follow. Of course, they have to find a way to spin this better. (Why don’t they talk more about ‘the children’, who’ll face the ‘centrist’ bill, in the ‘fairness’ debate? ‘Atlas Shrugged’ is still the best selling ‘business’ book of all time – someone on the GOP should discuss.)
    – Trump: aside from two boosts above (related to immigration), isn’t The Donald just another example of the lust for a strong man after a failed recovery from a catastrophic depression? There are bloodier examples on this (European) side of the pond. And the most egregious was ‘Trump-like’ in his ‘whatever it takes’ attitude to ‘solutions’; high theory got you into a concentration camp as often as not.
    – “Americans love the crush of competition, the hard-fought struggle, the long-slogging race”; I think the legacy of the Obama putsch is: ‘not so much’. He has moved America Europe-wards. How is that for Democrats’ respect of ‘the centre’?!

    I think events will shape the election. As a businessman – at least surrounded by more clever people willing to question whether the Emperor has any clothes – Trump looks ahead more naturally; my money would be on events (another San Bernardino; another Hillary scandal; economic downturn) coming to him. I mistrust the polls that have him 5+ points behind Hillary. The arguably equally ‘outside’ (the political spectrum anyway) Goldwater was blitzed in 64 by a Kennedy sympathy vote and because events were on Johnson’s side (Vietnam not yet a running sore; economy still on sugar rush of ‘benign’ state expansion). Trump faces no similar headwinds. If he can keep his comb-over in place in cross-winds, he has a chance.

    • Replies: @TangoMan
    @Johnny English

    - “Americans love the crush of competition, the hard-fought struggle, the long-slogging race”

    What is the entity called "Americans" of which Frum writes? Is he talking about the Somalian who moved to Lewiston? That Somalian seems to prefer welfare to the crush of competition.

    There is no such thing as American anymore, there is pre-65 white American and that stock is changing as the social welfare state and loosened morals work their magic on the character of that group.

    There is no magic dirt which makes people into Americans such that we can assign traits to these people.

  96. @Tiny Duck
    Its a good analysis, but lacks one important point. If Republicans do go into a defensive crouch, time is not on their side. The youth, and every demographic gaining numbers is not Republican. So their ability to block change will erode with time. They have to figure out how to come to grops witht he future. They can neither go back, not prevent the future from happening.

    Replies: @anowow

    Well, the whole getting young people to be wage slaves to subsidize old people might have to be rethought. Strangely enough, people are opposed to a two-tiered system with benefits grandfathered-in for people who helped, or stood by, while the system got screwed up. The UAW talks are proof of that. Hillary’s supporters (basically Democratic Carly Fiorinas) vs. Sanders are further proof.

    Ryan’s tone-deaf destruction of government pensions for everybody under 55 ain’t gonna work. And Rubio’s tax credits for Guatemalan single-moms and Mama June Shannon ain’t gonna work either.

    If Trump gave some promises on student loan relief and gave proofs that he might make the market less competitive for younger professionals, I suspect many young people would vote for him. And I include non-white young people. He’d lock that vote solid, even if nobody would admit to voting for him on facebook. He wouldn’t get their vote the first go round, but he could for the reelection.

    But the GOP will never do that. They are an alliance of the wealthy, military and contractor parasites, and a few trade guilds like the AMA, enabled by religious fanatical Evangelical heretic and mouth-breather shock troops and the AARP brigades who are grimly determined to ring every cent they “earned” out of the rest of us.

    • Replies: @TangoMan
    @anowow

    Trump's a businessman so, hopefully, he will get around to seeing this point - net tax consumers versus net tax contributors. The whole of society is better off if we decrease the former and increase the latter. This means hard, cold, calculating culling where we can cull - immigrants, infiltrators, and maybe even Green Card holders - get deported because they're a burden on the public purse.

    Think about where we would be today if this event hadn't intervened between the 60s and present day:


    These advances are especially impressive because the massive immigration of unskilled Hispanic workers inflated the ranks of the poor. From 1990 to 2007, the entire increase in official poverty was among Hispanics.
     
    A rising tide can't lift all boats if the passengers in the boats are drilling holes into the hull as the tide is rising.

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @ben tillman

  97. @JSM
    @Gunnar von Cowtown

    Even *if* this is an "elite women don't cook" signaling thing, why do we have to import the Mexicans? Can't we just have White chefs go to Mexico and get the recipes and cook them back here for us in their own restaurants? I mean, is it a Fundamental Law of Physics that you have to be of Mexican descent to be able to figure out how to roast green chilis, or something?

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @neutral, @AnAnon, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Anonymous

    Its the same in Britain, there was a story a few months back that there was a shortage of curry chefs, this was taken as an excuse to get more immigrants. I do believe that things like IQ and sports ability have a biological component, I don’t believe that cooking does, nor am I aware of any alt righter or hard right who believes this. However, despite all their equality talk, for left wingers only people from South Asia are able to make curries.

  98. @Jack D
    @Gunnar von Cowtown

    This only works so far. Say one day you get a craving to cook Ghanaian cuisine for some reason and you look up some recipes. They call for shitto sauce, unrefined palm oil, fufu, cassava, etc. Your local supermarket doesn't have any of these. And even if you could get your hands on the ingredients, unless you had tasted the real thing, you really wouldn't know how far off the mark you were. Printed recipes, even YouTube videos, are no substitute for "Fingerspitzengefühle" - finger tip feeling, which is what skilled cooks of a particular cuisine know by taste bud memory - this is why such cooks hardly even measure.

    I'm not saying that it's a good idea to let millions of Ghanaians into your country just so you can reap the dubious benefits of eating fufu (not a big improvement on mashed potatoes) but you aren't really going to get authentic foreign food without authentic foreigners to provide a customer base for ethnic shops, restaurants, etc. Maybe it's not worth turning your country into something unrecognizable just so you can get a plate of jollof rice, but don't imagine that all you need is the Time-Life "Food of Africa" book and you're in business.

    Replies: @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Ed, @reiner Tor, @Veracitor, @sb

    In a few years robot cooks will have all the “Fukengrüvenfurzfähigkeit” needed to prepare most ethnic foods. American restaurants will still employ immigrants, but as waitresses (for the jiggle) and busboys (because a cleaning robot would cost as much as a cooking robot but produce less value, so chef robots will be deployed first).

  99. @iSteveFan

    More Good Stuff from Frum
     
    Despite what Frum writes now, I still think he is scum. Has he ever come around to apologize to the so-called "unpatriotic" conservatives whom he once called out as traitors? Does he give them credit for their positions that he now seems to push? Go back to Canada.

    Replies: @Sam Haysom

    I don’t like Frum at all and I find Steve’s strange new respect for him somewhat misguided but cmon people are routinely accuses of being disloyal to America on this site all the time. That’s what leaping frogging loyalties is all about and I never see you complain then. The Paleocon fixation on nugatory events from decades ago like that Frum article and that time William Bennett got to head the NEA instead of Mel Bradford is just silly.

    • Replies: @nglaer
    @Sam Haysom

    One could easily forget the Unpatriotic Conservatives thing if there was evidence that he regretted it or changed. Question is, is Frum still an Israel-first guy who is basically advising the GOP how to be better on domestic issues so it can better "invade the world" or has he also rethought his foreign policy views? Don't see evidence of the latter, but maybe it's there.

    Replies: @AP

    , @iSteveFan
    @Sam Haysom

    Are you kidding me? You think whether or not we should have plunged ourselves into the Iraq War was a nugatory event? That might be the greatest strategic blunder in our history and we'll be feeling the effects of it for quite sometime. It all was avoidable, of course, and was completely unnecessary.

    While the paleos correctly saw the real threat to America was demographic and economic, Frum attacked them for not wanting to partake in that disaster. Frum helped contribute to the delay in addressing our gravest issues, while getting us sidetracked on something that never should have been. All that wasted blood and treasure and it is still not over.

    , @5371
    @Sam Haysom

    [ leaping frogging loyalties]

    Is English your native language?

  100. @Svigor
    AP Poll: Islamic State conflict voted top news story of 2015

    4: MASS SHOOTINGS: Throughout the year, mass shootings brought grief to communities across the U.S. and deepened frustration over the failure to curtail them. There were 14 victims in San Bernardino. Nine blacks were killed by a white gunman at a Charleston, South Carolina, church; a professor and eight students died at an Oregon community college. In Chattanooga, four Marines and a sailor were killed by a Kuwaiti-born engineer; three people, including a policeman, were shot dead at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado.
     
    Hilarious. It's like they want us to notice how they operate:

    "There were 14 victims in San Bernardino." Islamic fanatics? What are they?

    "Nine blacks were killed by a white gunman." Wow, specificity makes a stunning comeback in the next sentence!

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Hilarious. It’s like they want us to notice how they operate:

    “There were 14 victims in San Bernardino.” Islamic fanatics? What are they?

    “Nine blacks were killed by a white gunman.” Wow, specificity makes a stunning comeback in the next sentence!

    That is pretty amazing.

  101. @jay-w
    @Steve Sailer


    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce.
     
    Actually, Mexico is full of WalMarts, also.

    I am currently living in Merida, Yucatan (population ~ 1 miilion; annual homicide rate ~ 2 per 100,000) and I think we have about 4 WalMarts here as well as Costco, Sam's Club, Home Depot, Auto-Zone, Staples, Office Depot, McDonalds, Burger-King, Dairy Queen, etc., etc.

    I, personally, don't much like the heat and humidity; therefore, my (Mexican-born) wife and I are planning to eventually move back to Montana. But in terms of the people and the culture, it's a toss-up between living here versus living in the USA.

    In fact, if I had to live in some hell-hole part of the USA, like Southern California, then preferring to live in Mexico would be a no-brainer. (It's peaceful and idyllic here -- especially now that all the Mexican criminals are in the USA {sarcasm=off})

    Replies: @Thea, @Grumpy

    Every time I shop in Walmart I feel like I live in the Soviet Union due to the Long lines with ugly architecture.

    I guess the stocked shelves are a bonus but I know they were shocked at 2am for low wages.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Thea

    "Every time I shop in Walmart I feel like I live in the Soviet Union due to the Long lines with ugly architecture.

    I guess the stocked shelves are a bonus but I know they were shocked at 2am for low wages."

    Target's interior architecture looks more 1st World, while Walmart's interior architecture looks more 3rd World.

    , @Jack D
    @Thea

    Something like a Wal-Mart existed in the Soviet Union only in their wildest dreams. If a Soviet saw those stacks and stacks of toilet paper and other goods, they would have thought that they had died and gone to heaven. You have no idea how good you have it.

    Replies: @AP

  102. @Clyde
    @Maj. Kong


    This chart explains why the platform of “cutting government” doesn’t work.
     
    You could easily cut half the Federal workers and contractors in the greater Washingtoon DC region and no one would notice. Get rid of the 11,000 EPA workers for a start. Get rid of the Federal Department of Education which is really just a glorified jobs program for every affirmative action leech under the sun starting with women, blacks, gays, lesbians.......with (angry) Samoans and Aleutian Islanders bringing up the rear.
    Get rid of affirmative action hiring hall---Department of Labor
    Get rid of affirmative action hiring hall---Department of Health and Human Services
    Get rid of affirmative action hiring hall---Department of Housing and Urban Development

    There are 3000+ county governments, 50 State governments and one Federale Gov't. So you have to be specific about what government and what agencies can be pruned back or eliminated

    Replies: @JerseyGuy

    Clyde,

    I think the one problem we have in the United States is that we have just so many layers of government relative to Europe. The United States is such a complex entity at this point is that it is basically not “reformable”. As I’ve moved on from my “Big vs. Small” government phase, I’ve come to the conclusion that there are a lot of “Big Government” programs that actually work quite well (high speed internet comes to mind) but cannot be implemented under our current system.

    In short, the US is probably just too big at this point and would do better (and people would be much happier) if the US were to just break apart. Easier said than done of course but certainly worth putting the ideas out there.

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    @JerseyGuy

    George Kennan had exactly this idea in his book, Around the Cragged Hill, although his objective was a group of autonomous regions, each of which would have the capacity for self-defense, but none of which would have the capacity to intervene in its neighbor's affairs.

    The geography of dissolution is, however, awfully complex and I'd don't see how it could be done without significant internal migration and economic dislocation. Still, an entity such as the U.S. is too large to govern centrally, even with the technology of the 21st Century, and planting the idea that there doesn't need to be a United States of the present 50 states is a good plan. Carry on!!

  103. @(((Owen)))
    @Steve Sailer

    "I stayed in a hotel overlooking the main drag in Mexico City, the Paseo de la Reforma."

    Ooh. Fancy. Paseo de la Reforma is a place to go looking for two hundred plus Gringo dollar hotel rooms nowadays amongst the skyscrapers. I recommend visiting on Sunday mornings when the whole route is reserved exclusively for joggers, cyclists, and inline skaters. It's quiet and fun and you can ride or skate the whole way from Chapultepec Castle to the Basilica of Guadalupe.

    Reforma was built around 1900 by francophile dictator Porfirio Díaz to be his Champs Élysées. Along it are several monumental traffic circles, none of which are operated as traffic circles. The local drivers are determined to use them as big inconvenient intersections instead and it works much better than the awful European kind. It looks chaotic compared to the pretty but dangerous and inefficient way European ones go. Most have stop lights now, though the Cristóbal Colón monument has several unsignaled conflicts and quite a few hotels; maybe you stayed nearby.

    There is a lot of honking. I try to stay at hotels off major boulevards when I visit a city.

    "Jorge Castaneda implies that things like no stoplights are justified as keeping wimpy gringos out of Mexico."

    That would justify a lot. Gringos are determined to crash their own nation and I don't want them bringing that south. But all we really need to do is keep speaking Spanish. Gringos simply aren't willing to work at studying anything. We're invisible to their cultural map.

    No stoplights actually makes life better. Look up the woonerf concept. Moving car traffic is not the purpose of a city, though I understand how living in LA can make you forget that. Mexico is a walking city. Cars are just a status symbol that will make your life worse, like dating a supermodel.

    Castañeda is smart and writes a good piece but is too much of a prissy New Yorker to really relax in Mexico. He lived in isolated neighborhoods, went to a very, very expensive foreign high school, went abroad for college, married a foreigner, and has lived in New York for a decade now. (Rubio may be more authentic.) He's the kind of Mexican we scare into a walled estate in Huixquilucan so we won't have to deal with him and his luxury SUV.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @ben tillman, @Clyde, @reiner Tor

    Owen, just curious, any advice for a very gringo looking family (paler than snow, red or light hair, with young kids) that’s dreaming about a vacation in Mexico City or some other nice Mexican city, maybe even language school?

    • Replies: @Stealth
    @Anonymous

    Write to this guy:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sa%C3%BAl_%C3%81lvarez

    I'm sure he can tell you everything you need to know about having red hair while in Mexico.

    , @(((Owen)))
    @Anonymous

    Yes, BC, much advice. But I'd need to know more. How old are the young kids? Do you like big cities like New York City or San Francisco or small towns like Boulder or Santa Fe? Nature in a formal park or a big mountain or urbane culture in a Broadway show and gallery stroll? How long do you have -- language school implies sticking around for three to six weeks or more? Do any of you speak any Spanish now? (I can't recommend live theatre or antiquarian bookstore shopping if you don't.) Do you want full cultural immersion or lots of Gringo influence? How much native Mexican influence and deep history do you want to see -- would you prefer to see twenty-first century vanguard Mexico? How active are you -- can I send you to climb a 400m hill for the view or to try safe kayaks in flat water or bicycle across town? (Mexico City has more people living on canals than Venice.)

    I'd take really young kids to San Cristóbal de las Casas or Guanajuato unless they already love city life. Maybe Taxco. Taxco or Guanajuato could be combined on a 10+ day trip with Mexico City if four hours on a luxury bus doesn't make your kids miserable (get Dramamine -- there are hills).

    The real big city life happens in Mexico City, though. If you go there, be sure to see the Ballet Folklórico and stroll around the adjacent Alameda Central park and the historic buildings east of it -- where they filmed the latest 007. (Don't try to drive there like Steve did -- take the subway.) Maybe try an AirB&B or a hotel in a neighborhood. Roma Norte neighborhood in Mexico City has a few nice economical hotels in the Hotel Roosevelt and the Hotel Embassy and maybe others. It's a relaxed nice city neighborhood with classic architecture, a gallery scene, a few colleges that give short language classes, top world class restaurants (try La Tecla -- order the flaming crepes dessert for the kids) and reliable street food -- on the same block, and pretty parks (not one of the 50 richest fancy neighborhoods in the city, but in the richest 20%). Also it's very safe -- I walk around after midnight all the time. Mexico is pretty kid friendly for such a big city now that I think about it.

    These two short articles aren't bad:

    http://thepointsguy.com/2015/10/guide-to-mexico-city/

    http://thepointsguy.com/2015/12/visit-these-small-towns-in-mexico/

    And indulgent travel fantasies should always include the latest Lonely Planet, of course.

  104. @Thagomizer
    @Jack D

    Once a gay Asian cashier at Starbucks once visibly panicked when I paid for a $2 coffee with 8 quarters.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Hacienda

    Yeah, I recently handed a cashier $10.45 for a $5.43 charge, told her I did not want the pennies, and she looked at me like I was insane. I was taught how to make change in grade school; I guess that, like Civics, has been tossed as too raaaaacist. Or something.

  105. @Chrisnonymous
    @Peter Akuleyev

    China's a pretty big place. I went to a restaurant in Beijing serving upscale northern dishes, and I wasn't very impressed. The farther south you go, the better the food is, so you could refine your theory to include geography.

    I would speculate that the English failure has to do with the fact that it is an island. The imperial elites went abroad to govern--a different situation than India, Ottomans, etc. I also think English food is underrated.

    Replies: @John Derbyshire

    I also think English food is underrated.

    For sure.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @John Derbyshire

    Thanks for the link. Speaking of halva and poor desserts, when my brother was in elementary school, they had some kind of diversity fair, and he determined to bring a dessert called barfi, which is from Nepal if I remember correctly. My mother found some recipes and slaved over it for him, but predictably the other kids started exclaiming at the name "barfi" and no one would try it. We had a lot of barfi at home that week. Who knew 7-8-year-olds could commit microaggressions?

    , @Stealth
    @John Derbyshire

    White folks in the South used to eat chitlins, Derb. The practice pretty much ended in the nineties, though. The only places where I've eaten chitlins in the past ten years have been soul food or Chinese restaurants.

    When I was a kid, my father and his friends would have chitlin cookouts several time a year. What was left over was refrigerated to be made into sandwiches and such in the days after the festivities. I had a small bowl of them a few weeks ago. I asked the black proprietor who cooked them why I don't see them served as much as I used to. She said it was simply too much work to be done on a regular basis. I can't argue with that since I've seen them being cleaned. I doubt they'll be a soul food staple for too much longer.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    , @a Newsreader
    @John Derbyshire

    I learned how to make a Bakewell Tart. I am a fan.

    , @Jack D
    @John Derbyshire


    Worst of all are Jewish desserts. Halva! — a waste by-product
     
    Anti-semite!

    Seriously, there are very few specifically "Jewish" foods and halvah isn't one of them. Generally speaking, Jews eat a subset of whatever the locals eat wherever they are located - this was especially true back in the day, when either you ate local food or none at all. I say a subset because obviously (observant) Jews can't eat those local items (pork, seafood, etc.) that are forbidden by the requirements of keeping kosher. But otherwise, Italian Jews ate Italian food, Polish Jews ate Polish food, etc. Halvah is an Ottoman item that (like pastrami) made its way into Ashkenazi cuisine thru ex-Ottoman territories in the southeastern corners of Europe (e.g. Romania).

    Much of the antipathy between Jews and non-Jews (on both sides) related to the "narcissism of small differences" as Freud called it. When you see Northern Irish Catholics and Protestants or Serbs and Croats, you are hard pressed to tell them apart (or at least I am), but if you ask one of them, they will tell you the million ways in which noble Serbs are far superior to the bestial Croats, who are barely human (or vice versa depending on who you ask). The best "Jewish" rye bread I ever had was in Krakow, which is nowadays very short on Jews. It turns out that flour (and dessert) doesn't really care what religion you are.

    Replies: @Jefferson

  106. This second Frum article not nearly as good as the first one. The alternatives he lays out for the Republican party struck me as incoherent. Which is fine with me since I would like to see a new Republican party that I might actually support. I guess that makes me a Trumpian.

    • Replies: @nglaer
    @Luke Lea

    Frum's alternative #3 is for a somewhat Trumpian party. Does anyone know what happened to Frum? He was such a knee-jerk neocon for so long. I'm not sure if he's changed his foreign policy views at all (a la Peter Beinart) but his domestic positions lately very lucid.

    Replies: @snorlax

  107. “Remember that Republican voters care more about aligning government with their values of work and family than they care about cutting the size of government as an end in itself.”

    Steve – Lion of the Blogosphere has graciously re-posted one of my comments:

    https://lionoftheblogosphere.wordpress.com/2015/12/21/jerseyguys-update-on-the-declining-u-s-computer-software-industry/

    Contrary to what the Republican establishment thinks (and this includes most of the Republican think-tanks), most Republicans actually don’t hate “Big Government”. Why? Because without a strong government working on behalf of actual Americans, we get the mass outsourcing that I’ve written about above.

    In fact, the whole re-shoring of manufacturing that what supposed to take place? Yea, that’s a myth too: http://globaleconomicanalysis.blogspot.com/2015/12/reshoring-myth-explodes-ofshoring.html

    Face it National Review crowd (and I am registered Republican): Big Government isn’t always a bad thing and most people like it for non-sinister and even non-selfish reasons. David Frum gets that.

  108. @Ed
    @Jack D

    I'm Ghanaian-American and I don't even like Ghanaian food lol.

    Replies: @nglaer

    Cool, a Ghanian at isteve. I know another one, who works at my tennis club doing everything from accounting, to hitting, to making games, to answering the phone. Smart, outgoing guy. It makes me think Africa could make it, if smart people didn’t emigrate.

  109. @(((Owen)))
    @Jefferson

    "You can’t easily improve a high crime narco state like Mexico."

    Technically, the worse a place is the easier it is to improve. The better it gets, the harder it is to improve further. But Mexico is on an upward trend so simple momentum might be enough for a while. Lately I'm enjoying the president's Telecom Reform that is hoovering cash back from Carlos Slim's wallet into mine at a pleasing pace.

    "Also Mexico’s racial demographics work against them. Mexico does not even make the list of the top 5 Whitest countries in Latin America percentage wise. Mexico has a glass ceiling due to it not being a majority White country. You can’t turn a country first world with only a 9 percent White population."

    Somebody tell Japan. And Korea, the Republic of China, Singapore, Chile, Israel, and Hong Kong.

    I bet those Japanese sure wish they could live in a whitopia like Ukraine, Chechnya, or West Virginia.

    ---

    "Mexicans don’t run cities like a well oil machine."

    What country did Guanajuato, Querétaro, León, and Aguascalientes move to?

    Replies: @iffen, @Jefferson, @Anonymous

    “Mexicans don’t run cities like a well oil machine.”

    According to Hugh Thomas in Conquest, few of the conquistadors had ever seen a city that came anywhere close to the splendor and size of Tenochtitlan.

  110. @Luke Lea
    This second Frum article not nearly as good as the first one. The alternatives he lays out for the Republican party struck me as incoherent. Which is fine with me since I would like to see a new Republican party that I might actually support. I guess that makes me a Trumpian.

    Replies: @nglaer

    Frum’s alternative #3 is for a somewhat Trumpian party. Does anyone know what happened to Frum? He was such a knee-jerk neocon for so long. I’m not sure if he’s changed his foreign policy views at all (a la Peter Beinart) but his domestic positions lately very lucid.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    @nglaer

    I'm pretty sure he's been consistent in his views (although more willing to compromise on foreign policy for immigration restriction now, since he recognizes that in the long term American support for Israel depends on preventing a non-white majority).

    What's changed is the libertarian-flavored alt-right has given way to the Trumpian alt-right, and thus people who once seemed like bitter enemies now are allies, and vice versa.

    Replies: @Clyde

  111. @Thagomizer
    @Jack D

    Once a gay Asian cashier at Starbucks once visibly panicked when I paid for a $2 coffee with 8 quarters.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Hacienda

    Why? Is that some secret sign in the gay community?

  112. @Steve Sailer
    @(((Owen)))

    I stayed in a hotel overlooking the main drag in Mexico City, the Paseo de la Reforma. The intersection below had no stop light even though it was one of major crossroads of the capital. It was fascinating to watch long lines of cars play Perpendicular Chicken with each other, but all the honking was kind of hard on the ears.

    Jorge Castaneda implies that things like no stoplights are justified as keeping wimpy gringos out of Mexico. He says, however, that Mexicans would find they like not having to take their lives in their hands every time they try to walk across the street.

    Replies: @IBC, @Name Withheld

    When I was there a few years ago, some of the busiest places had female traffic police equipped with whistles, gloves, and fluorescent caps, making sure people could cross the street. In other fairly central places, a few drivers even chose to actually yield to me when it looked like I wanted to cross. Otherwise, the traffic was hot and heavy at times but not uniformly bad or especially hostile to people on foot –there are worse places in the US these days.

    Because of all the blind intersections and the fact that a lot of cars don’t even slow down that much going through them, sometimes I actually found it harder to cross the road in the handful of smaller towns that I visited. It was easier to jaywalk (if that’s a thing in Mexico) further up a street where I could see approaching vehicles in time to get out of their way (which is still what most Mexican drivers expect pedestrians to do). I think that in Mexico, using el klaxon is often viewed more as a “courtesy” (I’m coming through and wouldn’t want to hit you!) than in places like NYC where it can quickly turn into a tit-for-tat chorus.

    Some city planners actually believe that having fewer road signs and signals can improve overall traffic safety. The concept is known as “shared space” –but you’ll notice its main proponents are from Northern Europe and they use terms like road “vibrancy” which may not travel well to sunny Mexico and its particular driving culture…

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shared_space

  113. @Sam Haysom
    @iSteveFan

    I don't like Frum at all and I find Steve's strange new respect for him somewhat misguided but cmon people are routinely accuses of being disloyal to America on this site all the time. That's what leaping frogging loyalties is all about and I never see you complain then. The Paleocon fixation on nugatory events from decades ago like that Frum article and that time William Bennett got to head the NEA instead of Mel Bradford is just silly.

    Replies: @nglaer, @iSteveFan, @5371

    One could easily forget the Unpatriotic Conservatives thing if there was evidence that he regretted it or changed. Question is, is Frum still an Israel-first guy who is basically advising the GOP how to be better on domestic issues so it can better “invade the world” or has he also rethought his foreign policy views? Don’t see evidence of the latter, but maybe it’s there.

    • Replies: @AP
    @nglaer

    The guy is Jewish and is loyal to his people and his heritage, while still being thoughtful and useful with respect to other issues. Take his middle-eastern opinions with a grain of salt given his personal background, but don't necessarily let them invalidate his other ideas.

  114. iSteveFan says:
    @Sam Haysom
    @iSteveFan

    I don't like Frum at all and I find Steve's strange new respect for him somewhat misguided but cmon people are routinely accuses of being disloyal to America on this site all the time. That's what leaping frogging loyalties is all about and I never see you complain then. The Paleocon fixation on nugatory events from decades ago like that Frum article and that time William Bennett got to head the NEA instead of Mel Bradford is just silly.

    Replies: @nglaer, @iSteveFan, @5371

    Are you kidding me? You think whether or not we should have plunged ourselves into the Iraq War was a nugatory event? That might be the greatest strategic blunder in our history and we’ll be feeling the effects of it for quite sometime. It all was avoidable, of course, and was completely unnecessary.

    While the paleos correctly saw the real threat to America was demographic and economic, Frum attacked them for not wanting to partake in that disaster. Frum helped contribute to the delay in addressing our gravest issues, while getting us sidetracked on something that never should have been. All that wasted blood and treasure and it is still not over.

    • Agree: Chrisnonymous
  115. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    In my Philadelphia suburban area, someone opened a Vietnamese restaurant. The chefs were Vietnamese but when they first opened they recruited the waitstaff from the local population of 20 somethings who are mostly not Asian. It was disastrous - the food was good but the service really sucked - they lost orders, if you asked them for water or some other item they would not bring it, etc. After a few months and a bunch of bad Yelp reviews management must have learned its lesson and now the waitstaff is all Asian too and everything flows smoothly. It's all a matter of economics - Asian owned businesses, like any other, try to hire the cheapest staff that they can recruit and get away with. Maybe for stocking shelves Mexicans are good enough.

    There have been a few times when I have been at a fast food restaurant or supermarket where the cashier has punched in the wrong bill to make change from (say $50 instead of $5) and now has to figure it out herself and they just can't do it, especially not in their head. They get out a piece of paper and start writing it out and even then they can't get it. It's both sad and funny. This has never happened to me with an Asian cashier.

    Replies: @Thagomizer, @Ed, @Hacienda

    If they can’t give you change for a dollar, then probably they can’t exist as cashiers.
    I get into problems when I give a bill and change, expecting some round number
    change back. I don’t do this anymore with a dull looking Hispanic cashiers. Asians, no problem!

  116. @Gato de la Biblioteca
    @Steve Sailer


    A lot of things are getting better in Mexico. [snip] [T]hat means Mexico City’s fleet of cars is slowly turning into Los Angeles’ old fleet of cars, and Los Angeles cars have outstanding pollution controls. So residents of Mexico City have recently started to notice for the first time in decades as the smog lifts that they are surrounded by snow capped volcanos.
     
    Okay, so Mexico is getting better because of White American concerns for the environment, plus a minor change in Mexican import laws. Wow, that place really can be easily improved!

    Which just makes me wonder exactly how awful are Mexicans that the place is so bad that such minor things can make a big & quickly noticeable difference....

    Replies: @AnAnon

    And taking between 30 and 50 million Mexicans off their hands.

  117. @JSM
    @Gunnar von Cowtown

    Even *if* this is an "elite women don't cook" signaling thing, why do we have to import the Mexicans? Can't we just have White chefs go to Mexico and get the recipes and cook them back here for us in their own restaurants? I mean, is it a Fundamental Law of Physics that you have to be of Mexican descent to be able to figure out how to roast green chilis, or something?

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @neutral, @AnAnon, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Anonymous

    “No we can’t ‘Just get the recipe.’ ”

    “Maybe for stocking shelves Mexicans are good enough.” – The CIS has found that two areas of employment had a native born youth resurgence after, I think, 2005: food preparation and stocking clerks.

  118. OT: Poverty stunts IQ in the US but not in other developed countries

    “When they separated the data by location, the authors found that the brute force of poverty in the US clearly pushed aside genetic influence on intelligence. But, the same relationship was not seen in any of the other countries.”

    Large Cross-National Differences in Gene × Socioeconomic Status Interaction on Intelligence

    http://pss.sagepub.com/content/early/2015/12/14/0956797615612727.abstract

  119. @JSM
    @Gunnar von Cowtown

    Even *if* this is an "elite women don't cook" signaling thing, why do we have to import the Mexicans? Can't we just have White chefs go to Mexico and get the recipes and cook them back here for us in their own restaurants? I mean, is it a Fundamental Law of Physics that you have to be of Mexican descent to be able to figure out how to roast green chilis, or something?

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @neutral, @AnAnon, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Anonymous

    Agree to agree. See Jack D, Ghana and fufu.

  120. @Gato de la Biblioteca
    @(((Owen)))

    If the net flow of migration is southwards, how come all the border counties have been complaining about getting swamped the last two years? And why are there more and more native Spanish speakers that can't speak a goddamned single word of English every year?

    Hell, I was at Disney World a couple of weeks back, and some of the help at the Magic Kingdom couldn't speak any English at all. And I'm talking about people in greeter-type roles, not just the people scrubbing the toilets.

    The idea that Mexicans are leaving the country in droves is ludicrous on the face of it, and cannot be believed.

    Replies: @Ed

    “If the net flow of migration is southwards, how come all the border counties have been complaining about getting swamped the last two years? And why are there more and more native Spanish speakers that can’t speak a goddamned single word of English every year?”

    All from Central America. As a commentator (Owen?) described earlier, the Mexican government puts migrants from Central America on trains and routes them right up to its northern border.

  121. WhatEvvs [AKA "Internet Addict"] says:
    @Jefferson
    @Anonym

    "Getting excited over ethnic food is so pre-2010s. More like 1990s and earlier.

    Ditto “exotic” ethnic women. Wow, short, spindly, black hair and dark brown eyes, complexion varying shades of brown. So exotic. Not."

    I think German cuisine is more exotic than Chinese and Mexican cuisine. There are barely any German restaurants in the U.S when compared to the proportion of Germans in this country. Over 50 million Germans, yet the vast majority of shopping malls in this country do not offer German cuisine in it's food courts. There are more Indian and Vietnamese restaurants in this country than there are German ones.

    Replies: @Jack D, @dearieme, @NOTA, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @Thagomizer, @WhatEvvs, @Former Darfur, @Flip, @James Bowery

    Right, German food is so Americanized that it’s not ethnic. Sauerkraut, anyone? (Liberty cabbage in WWI.)

    If you come to NYC one of the most popular, line around the block restaurants is Rolf’s on 3rd Ave/28th.

    The Christmas decorations are so awesome, even Peter Brimelow would approve. It’s a one room pushback against the WaC in NYC!

  122. Is there really an oversaturation of Mexican and Chinese restaurants in California?

    OT: http://freebeacon.com/issues/feds-fund-plays-about-food-stamps-gun-control-activist-lesbians/

    A play about food stamps, a performance by a San Francisco drag queen, and the production of Cocked, the tale of two anti-gun lesbians, each made the list of projects backed by the taxpayer-funded National Endowment of the Arts.

    Yep, your taxes at work.

  123. @Gunnar von Cowtown
    @Jefferson


    More interesting food?
     
    Yeah, yeah, I know it's the one irrefutable benefit of mass immigration, but this argument never sat right with me. Why the hell do we need to import millions of Mexicans to enjoy spicy and carbo-licious Mexican food? Can't we just swap recipes?!? Is this an "elite women don't cook" status-signaling thing?

    I'm a middle-class Midwesterner with agrarian roots. My Grandma who lived 4 hours away made some ridiculously awesome casseroles. Did my Mom insist that Grandma drive 4 hours to our house and make casseroles every couple of days? Hell no. She asked for the recipes. Problem solved.

    Replies: @Jack D, @JSM, @WhatEvvs

    Is this an “elite women don’t cook” status-signaling thing?

    Where do you guys come from? I mean, what world do you live in? Elite women cook – not only do they cook, but they cook with much greater passion and expertise than the supposedly contented housewives of the 1950s cooked. They cook like grandma (actually great grandma) but with science and better equipment.

    In fact, it’s a status marker of elite women to be expert cooks. A fully appointed kitchen with All-Clad cookware, Viking stove, KitchenAids, Brevilles, yada yada, is part of the equipment of the modern married woman. They prepare natural smoothies for their babies & toddlers, complicated sandwiches for their kids (that SWPL guy made fun of this), and elaborate meals for their husbands. Get a clue.

    • Agree: Harold
  124. @Anonymous
    @Matra

    'Curry wurst'

    Unfortunately the effect of this rather revolting sounding - and bastardized - foodstuff on yer typical German's lager and sauerkraut stuffed alimentary canal, can best be ignored.

    Replies: @Matra

    The two times I had currywurst it was just sausage covered in (mild) curry flavoured ketchup with fries on the side. It seems to be enjoyed (if that’s the right word) by people in a hurry or on the way home from a night of drinking.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Matra

    Yeah, I've had it before and that's what it seems to be. Sausage with ketchup that's been sprinkled with some curry seasoning.

    Replies: @Brutusale

  125. @jay-w
    @Steve Sailer


    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce.
     
    Actually, Mexico is full of WalMarts, also.

    I am currently living in Merida, Yucatan (population ~ 1 miilion; annual homicide rate ~ 2 per 100,000) and I think we have about 4 WalMarts here as well as Costco, Sam's Club, Home Depot, Auto-Zone, Staples, Office Depot, McDonalds, Burger-King, Dairy Queen, etc., etc.

    I, personally, don't much like the heat and humidity; therefore, my (Mexican-born) wife and I are planning to eventually move back to Montana. But in terms of the people and the culture, it's a toss-up between living here versus living in the USA.

    In fact, if I had to live in some hell-hole part of the USA, like Southern California, then preferring to live in Mexico would be a no-brainer. (It's peaceful and idyllic here -- especially now that all the Mexican criminals are in the USA {sarcasm=off})

    Replies: @Thea, @Grumpy

    Actually, Mexico is full of WalMarts, also… I think we have about 4 WalMarts here as well as Costco, Sam’s Club, Home Depot, Auto-Zone, Staples, Office Depot, McDonalds, Burger-King, Dairy Queen, etc., etc.

    America and Mexico are looking more and more alike in every way.

    • Replies: @Foreign Expert
    @Grumpy


    America and Mexico are looking more and more alike in every way.
     
    Not just Mexico. Most of those options are available in Thailand and the Philippines too.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  126. Mexico absent some catastrophic events is not going to make much more progress in livability. The problem is low-trust and high levels of violence and corruption as the state is weak compared to America and many European nations. Drug and other gangs run things, with various business Oligarchs aligned but subservient. Constant churn and competition among the gangs makes the place a violent mess, and this has been the major theme since the War of Independence against the Spanish — Mexican on Mexican violence based on corrupt gangs.

    Drugs are relatively new, but the violence would be familiar to any student of Mexican history.

    Mexico is a failure because it only produces men like Lopez Santa Anna, good at corruption, not so good at organizing and leading an Army to keep Texas. Mexico seems unable to produce an Ike or an FDR let alone a Washington; and that is the function of the low trust and tribalism/clannish-ness and lack of patriotism and self-denial in service to the nation.

    I don’t see that changing any time soon.

  127. @Jefferson
    Donald Trump polls better among African American voters than he does among Hispanic voters. Which is the extreme opposite of Jeb Bush who polls better among Hispanic voters than he does among African American voters.

    And speaking of The Donald, when he faces Hillary Clinton in the general this going to be the blondest American presidential election ever. When was the last time there was a blond vs blonde U.S presidential matchup?

    The irony that the 2 major American parties will both be represented by a blond, at a time when America is becoming more Asian and Hispanic and thus less blonde and a lot more brunette.

    Replies: @Ed

    It’s odd how intensely the media hypes the Hispanic vote when their turnout rate is less than half. Small shifts in either the black or white vote can reshuffle the electoral map yet you wouldn’t know that by listening to the news.

    The way the media sounds sometimes it’s as if non-Hispanic voters shouldn’t even bother going to the polls.

  128. @CK
    @Jack D

    They do not oppose abortion. Without the existence of abortion on demand, there would be no need for a republican party to exist. They pay lip service in public to something they heartily approve of in private. Abortion on demand kills blacks. According to Guttmacher data, 30% of the abortions in America are to black women who are 7.3% of the total population.
    If one wonders why the black population today is 14% of the total and 50 years ago it was 13% of the total ... abortion on demand has done its part of the job; unlimited immigration from South of the border is doing the rest. The Hispanic population already exceeds the black population.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Of course, this factoid plays right into the hands of Steven Levitt, author of Freakonomics and the theory that “Abortion cut the crime rate among African-Americans.” If the abortion rate were to say, increase among black women to around 55% of the total number of annual abortions, wouldn’t that eventually have a direct affect of bringing down the black population total of the US? One would certainly think so. Fewer people = less crime committed.

    • Replies: @CK
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    AOD kills blacks, female and male. The never-born do not commit crimes. I am remiss in never having bothered to read Freakonomics; if you have cited him accurately then his conclusion is partially accurate.

  129. @Reg Cæsar

    More Good Stuff from Frum

     
    Has David written about South Africa? The headline could be God Stuff from Frum to Tutu.

    O is the cross-dresser among vowels, isn't it?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    The headline could be God Stuff from Frum to Tutu.

    This reminds me of a line I saw in National Review decades years ago: “If they gave Martin Luther King two Nobel Prizes, shouldn’t they give two to Tutu too?”

  130. @Jefferson
    @Jack D

    "All the ex-Soviet ‘stans have very limited cuisines – lamb and rice, lamb and rice. The first plov is good but it gets old fast.

    A lot of great food is not royal court food, which tends to be overly elaborate, but good honest peasant food. The Mexican, Italian & Chinese dishes that Americans love (these 3 cuisines account for probably 90% of “foreign” food eaten by Americans) are humble peasant dishes such as tacos and pasta."

    Japanese cuisine would be the fourth most popular foreign cuisine in the U.S. Every Benihana that I have ever been to is pack full of White people.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Jack D

    Hold it, hold it. Benihana isn’t authentic Japanese food. It’s just a stylized way of making a form of sorta Asian something type of food. There’s more to Japan than just splashing Terriyaki sauce all over the place.

    For the most part, Benihana doesn’t serve Sencha, so…there you go.

  131. @dearieme
    @Diversity Heretic

    "My father’s neighbors escape Midwest winters in Mexico": fair enough. If they speak Spanish and like the seaside they might like to consider the Canaries too. If they would prefer English-speaking, then Australia or NZ.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    “If they would prefer English-speaking, then Australia or NZ.”

    Or Malibu. Nice and peaceful, few folks around, not too much diversity, and part of the US.

    Or Maui. Another nice area to escape the winters.

  132. @(((Owen)))
    @Maj. Kong

    "If Mexico was [sic] so great, there would be immigration going that way. Fred doesn’t count."

    Net immigration between the USA and Mexico has been in the Mexican direction every year since 2007. That counts Mexicans coming to the USA, Mexicans going back, Gringos going to Mexico, Gringos going back, and foreigners moving between both countries. If you throw out the foreigners who are citizens of neither country, the net migration is even higher toward Mexico.

    If it weren't for the astonishingly high number of family reunification visas drawing people north, the net numbers would be even higher in the southerly direction; Mexicans who are only in El Norte for work are returning home in ever higher numbers. The long backlog of family green cards will keep migration north artificially high for years still. Those arrivals will resent America for the waiting and for making them commit to a move they wouldn't even make by the time the free green card comes through.

    And Mexicans are going south because Mexico is pretty great. Political reforms, neoliberal growth policies, education policy, and environmental reforms have delivered big improvements. Mexico's life expectancy for nonsmokers is higher than the USA's. Middle class Mexicans can afford to raise a family in a good school district. Mexican men are strong and confident while women are sweet, pleasing, and not emasculating Gringa harpies. Median young college educated Mexicans earn more (adjusted for cost of living) than median USA young college grads. Oh, and December isn't miserable.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Diversity Heretic, @bomag, @The Z Blog, @syonredux, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @syonredux, @International Jew

    Net immigration between the USA and Mexico has been in the Mexican direction every year since 2007.

    How do we even know how much illegal immigration there is? The usual metric — number of ICE apprehensions — seems silly, in that it assumes a constant level of effort on our side.

  133. @Johnny English
    My thoughts on the Frum piece, as they occurred:

    - tribalism (fissures) within the parties mirror the more lurid colour-coding of America race-wise, under Obama, doesn't it?
    - immigration... as now constituted looks a lot like slavery; elites in favour (bonded, cheap labour). But palpable terrorist threat throws this 'history repeats' model into the air, doesn't it? In capturing fears of poor whites (slaves' first victims) and in appearing to be the only strong man in the room/race over Islamic imports, Trump scores twice, doesn't he? (Did Frum pen this before San Bernardino?)
    - Frum's last option is a chimera: once GOP tacks to centre, the centre will move...further to the left. GOP has been consistently and successfully tarred as the heartless party; moving Democrat-wards will only see more ransom being extracted from them.
    - bad timing: desperation on this scale may be a reverse indicator. Just when GOP and Dems converge (former capitulates) on idea of govt doing more/very little less, well, along comes $18trillion of public debt to effectively neuter activist government! That stark reality was veiled by zero rates for Obama's reign; but the truth (the costs, and the eternal fact of scarcity of resources) will become plain as rates rise. Arguably GOP just has to stay 'on message' - government the problem not the solution - and the election success will follow. Of course, they have to find a way to spin this better. (Why don't they talk more about 'the children', who'll face the 'centrist' bill, in the 'fairness' debate? ‘Atlas Shrugged’ is still the best selling 'business' book of all time - someone on the GOP should discuss.)
    - Trump: aside from two boosts above (related to immigration), isn't The Donald just another example of the lust for a strong man after a failed recovery from a catastrophic depression? There are bloodier examples on this (European) side of the pond. And the most egregious was 'Trump-like' in his 'whatever it takes' attitude to 'solutions'; high theory got you into a concentration camp as often as not.
    - "Americans love the crush of competition, the hard-fought struggle, the long-slogging race"; I think the legacy of the Obama putsch is: 'not so much'. He has moved America Europe-wards. How is that for Democrats' respect of 'the centre'?!

    I think events will shape the election. As a businessman - at least surrounded by more clever people willing to question whether the Emperor has any clothes - Trump looks ahead more naturally; my money would be on events (another San Bernardino; another Hillary scandal; economic downturn) coming to him. I mistrust the polls that have him 5+ points behind Hillary. The arguably equally 'outside' (the political spectrum anyway) Goldwater was blitzed in 64 by a Kennedy sympathy vote and because events were on Johnson's side (Vietnam not yet a running sore; economy still on sugar rush of 'benign' state expansion). Trump faces no similar headwinds. If he can keep his comb-over in place in cross-winds, he has a chance.

    Replies: @TangoMan

    – “Americans love the crush of competition, the hard-fought struggle, the long-slogging race”

    What is the entity called “Americans” of which Frum writes? Is he talking about the Somalian who moved to Lewiston? That Somalian seems to prefer welfare to the crush of competition.

    There is no such thing as American anymore, there is pre-65 white American and that stock is changing as the social welfare state and loosened morals work their magic on the character of that group.

    There is no magic dirt which makes people into Americans such that we can assign traits to these people.

  134. @anowow
    @Tiny Duck

    Well, the whole getting young people to be wage slaves to subsidize old people might have to be rethought. Strangely enough, people are opposed to a two-tiered system with benefits grandfathered-in for people who helped, or stood by, while the system got screwed up. The UAW talks are proof of that. Hillary's supporters (basically Democratic Carly Fiorinas) vs. Sanders are further proof.

    Ryan's tone-deaf destruction of government pensions for everybody under 55 ain't gonna work. And Rubio's tax credits for Guatemalan single-moms and Mama June Shannon ain't gonna work either.

    If Trump gave some promises on student loan relief and gave proofs that he might make the market less competitive for younger professionals, I suspect many young people would vote for him. And I include non-white young people. He'd lock that vote solid, even if nobody would admit to voting for him on facebook. He wouldn't get their vote the first go round, but he could for the reelection.

    But the GOP will never do that. They are an alliance of the wealthy, military and contractor parasites, and a few trade guilds like the AMA, enabled by religious fanatical Evangelical heretic and mouth-breather shock troops and the AARP brigades who are grimly determined to ring every cent they "earned" out of the rest of us.

    Replies: @TangoMan

    Trump’s a businessman so, hopefully, he will get around to seeing this point – net tax consumers versus net tax contributors. The whole of society is better off if we decrease the former and increase the latter. This means hard, cold, calculating culling where we can cull – immigrants, infiltrators, and maybe even Green Card holders – get deported because they’re a burden on the public purse.

    Think about where we would be today if this event hadn’t intervened between the 60s and present day:

    These advances are especially impressive because the massive immigration of unskilled Hispanic workers inflated the ranks of the poor. From 1990 to 2007, the entire increase in official poverty was among Hispanics.

    A rising tide can’t lift all boats if the passengers in the boats are drilling holes into the hull as the tide is rising.

    • Replies: @iSteveFan
    @TangoMan


    These advances are especially impressive because the massive immigration of unskilled Hispanic workers inflated the ranks of the poor. From 1990 to 2007, the entire increase in official poverty was among Hispanics.
     
    Just another self-inflicted problem caused by our betters who were supposed to be smart enough to avoid such mistakes. If someone was intent on running this nation into the ground, could they have been any more successful?
    , @ben tillman
    @TangoMan


    Trump’s a businessman so, hopefully, he will get around to seeing this point – net tax consumers versus net tax contributors. The whole of society is better off if we decrease the former and increase the latter.
     
    Actually, we don't want "net tax contributors". We don't want people producing things for a government that will use them against us.

    What we want are net producers who produce positive externalities that inure to the benefit of the American people (though there's more to it than that because of opportunity cost).
  135. Merry Currysmas

  136. @Steve Sailer
    @(((Owen)))

    Like I said, Mexico would be a pretty easy place to improve. The Mexican concern is that they if they make it less cruddy it would get overrun by gringos.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Anonymous, @Jack D, @Bernie

    How so? Isn’t it very hard for non-Mexicans to get Mexican citizenship? And I would think they like having gringo tourists to make money off (and then go back).

    I don’t see Mexico being overrun by anyone. And that is a big strength. Unlike some other countries in Latin America they have a black population of less than 1%. Same with Muslims. And, as far as I know, zero parties that promote open borders, multiculturalism and/or bilingual education.

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    @Bernie

    It is quite difficult, but theoretically possible to legitimately acquire Mexican citizenship. It is more common to just "get yourself born there after the fact" via a substantial bribe. This is done through a Mexican lawyer: DIY attempts will probably get you in a Mexican jail. I only know because I had an uncle that did that, having retired to the Mexican highlands with a pretty young Basque Spanish wife and a fat pair of pensions. After he died of natural causes, she was able to maintain the fiction of his survival long enough to get both their children, born in Los Angeles hospitals, into college on those pensions.

    She's wanted in the US for fraud by the feds, but Spain doesn't care.

  137. Remember that Republican voters care more about aligning government with their values of work and family than they care about cutting the size of government as an end in itself.

    Corollary:

    Remember that Latino voters DO NOT care more about aligning government with their values of work and family; they prefer a government that promotes their economic interests through redistribution of wealth.

    This is why Latinos who have traditional and religious values do not vote for GOP. They are NOT “natural conservatives” in the ideological sense.

  138. @John Derbyshire
    @Chrisnonymous


    I also think English food is underrated.
     
    For sure.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Stealth, @a Newsreader, @Jack D

    Thanks for the link. Speaking of halva and poor desserts, when my brother was in elementary school, they had some kind of diversity fair, and he determined to bring a dessert called barfi, which is from Nepal if I remember correctly. My mother found some recipes and slaved over it for him, but predictably the other kids started exclaiming at the name “barfi” and no one would try it. We had a lot of barfi at home that week. Who knew 7-8-year-olds could commit microaggressions?

  139. @Jefferson
    @Jack D

    "All the ex-Soviet ‘stans have very limited cuisines – lamb and rice, lamb and rice. The first plov is good but it gets old fast.

    A lot of great food is not royal court food, which tends to be overly elaborate, but good honest peasant food. The Mexican, Italian & Chinese dishes that Americans love (these 3 cuisines account for probably 90% of “foreign” food eaten by Americans) are humble peasant dishes such as tacos and pasta."

    Japanese cuisine would be the fourth most popular foreign cuisine in the U.S. Every Benihana that I have ever been to is pack full of White people.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Jack D

    Sorry to break the news to you but Benihana is barely Japanese cuisine. What they do is more broadly called teppanyaki. This means “Japanese food for white people”. Oh, sorry, just kidding, it means “iron grilled” but it might as well mean that. Here is a hint to its origin – it was first introduced in Japan in 1945.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    teppanyaki. This means “Japanese food for white people”.
     
    Just about every imported cuisine is altered to suit American tastes. Chop suey, chow mein, fortune cookies and egg rolls were pretty much invented in San Francisco. Taco Bell's tacos are twice the size of those I ate in Tijuana, and their tostada half the size of the one I got in Long Beach. We like everything the same size-- to fit through the drive-thru window.

    It goes the other way, too. You can get beer at McDonald's in Germany, and you don't even have to be 21.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  140. iSteveFan says:
    @TangoMan
    @anowow

    Trump's a businessman so, hopefully, he will get around to seeing this point - net tax consumers versus net tax contributors. The whole of society is better off if we decrease the former and increase the latter. This means hard, cold, calculating culling where we can cull - immigrants, infiltrators, and maybe even Green Card holders - get deported because they're a burden on the public purse.

    Think about where we would be today if this event hadn't intervened between the 60s and present day:


    These advances are especially impressive because the massive immigration of unskilled Hispanic workers inflated the ranks of the poor. From 1990 to 2007, the entire increase in official poverty was among Hispanics.
     
    A rising tide can't lift all boats if the passengers in the boats are drilling holes into the hull as the tide is rising.

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @ben tillman

    These advances are especially impressive because the massive immigration of unskilled Hispanic workers inflated the ranks of the poor. From 1990 to 2007, the entire increase in official poverty was among Hispanics.

    Just another self-inflicted problem caused by our betters who were supposed to be smart enough to avoid such mistakes. If someone was intent on running this nation into the ground, could they have been any more successful?

  141. @Maj. Kong
    https://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=REV

    This chart explains why the platform of "cutting government" doesn't work.

    It's one thing to propose it in France, but the only developed countries taxing less than we do are...Mexico and Chile.

    If Mexico was so great, there would be immigration going that way. Fred doesn't count.

    Replies: @(((Owen))), @Dave Pinsen, @Clyde, @ben tillman, @Karl

    This chart explains why the platform of “cutting government” doesn’t work.

    It’s one thing to propose it in France, but the only developed countries taxing less than we do are…Mexico and Chile.

    Cutting government doesn’t work because the government is too well-organized and powerful to allow us to cut it. Obviously, a 90% reduction in the size of the central government would be a wonderful thing for the people of this country.

    What does the chart have to do with anything aside from correlating high taxes with high production? Where people produce a lot, the parasitic government can take more without impoverishing the people.

  142. @dearieme
    @Jefferson

    We used to enjoy a German restaurant in Soho (London). It closed decades ago. Boo! It's certainly not a fine cuisine, but it can provide delicious food as an occasional treat.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    As I enjoyed the old Wursthaus in Harvard Square 25 years ago. But let’s face it, the cuisine of Germany and some of the other countries nearby, like Belgium and Czech Republic, is just an accompaniment for the excellent beer.

  143. @Sam Haysom
    @iSteveFan

    I don't like Frum at all and I find Steve's strange new respect for him somewhat misguided but cmon people are routinely accuses of being disloyal to America on this site all the time. That's what leaping frogging loyalties is all about and I never see you complain then. The Paleocon fixation on nugatory events from decades ago like that Frum article and that time William Bennett got to head the NEA instead of Mel Bradford is just silly.

    Replies: @nglaer, @iSteveFan, @5371

    [ leaping frogging loyalties]

    Is English your native language?

  144. @Chrisnonymous
    @Matra

    No matter how many times I see it, I can't help reading "doner kebab" as "donor kebab," which sounds disgusting.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    No matter how many times I see it, I can’t help reading “doner kebab” as “donor kebab,” which sounds disgusting.

    In the assisted reproduction business, the customer almost never encounters the donor’s skewer.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    In my mind, it's as in "organ donor," but it's gross either way.

  145. @Jack D
    @Jefferson

    Sorry to break the news to you but Benihana is barely Japanese cuisine. What they do is more broadly called teppanyaki. This means "Japanese food for white people". Oh, sorry, just kidding, it means "iron grilled" but it might as well mean that. Here is a hint to its origin - it was first introduced in Japan in 1945.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    teppanyaki. This means “Japanese food for white people”.

    Just about every imported cuisine is altered to suit American tastes. Chop suey, chow mein, fortune cookies and egg rolls were pretty much invented in San Francisco. Taco Bell’s tacos are twice the size of those I ate in Tijuana, and their tostada half the size of the one I got in Long Beach. We like everything the same size– to fit through the drive-thru window.

    It goes the other way, too. You can get beer at McDonald’s in Germany, and you don’t even have to be 21.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Reg Cæsar

    And you don't want to know what the Cantonese eat back home in Canton!!

  146. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    teppanyaki. This means “Japanese food for white people”.
     
    Just about every imported cuisine is altered to suit American tastes. Chop suey, chow mein, fortune cookies and egg rolls were pretty much invented in San Francisco. Taco Bell's tacos are twice the size of those I ate in Tijuana, and their tostada half the size of the one I got in Long Beach. We like everything the same size-- to fit through the drive-thru window.

    It goes the other way, too. You can get beer at McDonald's in Germany, and you don't even have to be 21.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    And you don’t want to know what the Cantonese eat back home in Canton!!

  147. @Gato de la Biblioteca
    @Jefferson

    There's a reason there aren't more German restaurants around. Ditto for the "cuisine" of the Irish, English, and various Scandinavian countries. And mega dittos for the lack of Scottish restaurants!

    These countries (England, Scotland, Ireland and Germany being the home of my forebears) all have terribly bland (at best) native food, when it comes right down to it. I sometimes wonder if the lack of interesting food isn't the reason they've done so well in the last few centuries, though I can't come up with a plausible rationale for it. Probably because I have more interesting food choices, I'm sure.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew, @Melendwyr, @Anonymous, @iSteveFan

    “These countries (England, Scotland, Ireland and Germany being the home of my forebears) all have terribly bland (at best) native food”

    Steak pie, chips and beans is NOT bland. Haggis is NOT bland. A full English breakfast or a full Sunday Roast is NOT bland. A Welsh lamb stew is not bland either.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cawl

    And don’t the Scandinavians eat stuff like fermented shark? Sounds pretty disgusting to me, but probably not bland.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%A1karl

    • Replies: @Massimo Heitor
    @Anonymous Nephew


    Steak pie, chips and beans is NOT bland. Haggis is NOT bland. A full English breakfast or a full Sunday Roast is NOT bland. A Welsh lamb stew is not bland either.
     
    Those things aren't bland, but they aren't what today's westerners want to eat and they aren't what today's food pioneers are passionate about creating. To pick a semi-random example, Steve Ellis, is a completely non-hispanic white guy who doesn't care about the haggis of his ancestors, and channeled his passion into founding the successful Chipotle chain with a Mexican ethnic theme. And many people prefer eating there over somewhere "authentic".

    Modern westerners still like English style breakfasts, teas, and english muffins, sure. Also most serious food innovators draw on classic ethnic foods as inspirations, but they need to innovate rather than cling to tradition.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Brutusale

    , @Anonymous
    @Anonymous Nephew

    I love full English breakfasts, pub food, etc. But it is bland compared to most other cuisines. It's basically starch and fatty meat that isn't adorned or altered too much.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew

  148. @Chrisnonymous
    @Matra

    No matter how many times I see it, I can't help reading "doner kebab" as "donor kebab," which sounds disgusting.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    “Donor kebab” seems like an appropriate nickname for Donald Trump.

  149. One of the side effects of building a wall is that the benefits will be visible to all. People will see with their own eyes those who cannot get in. For those of us on this side, we will rejoice. For people on the other side despair. Either way, it will produce tangible results.

    Employer verification will be the opposite. There will be no protests or visible displays of big eyed hungry children standing (or throwing rocks) just a few feet from our country. Illegals (and their employers) will simply get a letter telling them that they are in violation of the law and that if they continue they will be taxed severely (employers) or thrown in prison and taxed. This will be done one employee at a time so there will be no mass protests or police arrests, just people quietly self-deporting in the dead of night.

  150. @iSteveFan
    @JSM

    This pasty white gringo is among the best Mexican chefs in America. He went there, learned the culture and cuisine, and now recreates those dishes here.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Among? Nope, he is. His Mundo in Vegas was one of the few places there to get a excellent meal, but Vegas being Vegas, people prefer to hit the buffet.

  151. @Jefferson
    "They are better positioned to enjoy the attractive cultural and social results of migration (more-interesting food!)"

    More interesting food? There is nothing interesting and exotic about Chinese and Mexican food. I live in California where there are Mexican and Chinese restaurants on every street corner. These cuisines lose it's exotic factor when there is way too much easy access to them. There is an oversaturation of Mexican and Chinese food in California.  

    Replies: @Anonym, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Michelle, @Massimo Heitor

    There is nothing interesting and exotic about Chinese and Mexican food.

    Steaks aren’t exotic, but people love eating them. There is good and bad of every food genre. Also, the genres themselves are wildly malleable, there is tons of room for interpretation for what Mexican/Chinese/Italian food even means, and those things change over the years. Lastly, restaurants are ruthlessly subject to public interest, so only popular restaurants remain open.

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    @Massimo Heitor

    Chinese restaurants are widespread because Chinese immigrants can run them profitably and staff them with other, fresher Chinese immigrants, not because there is an especially high market demand for Chinese food. Their food costs are low, their labor costs are low, and they usually locate in buildings in which other restaurant entrepreneurs have failed and are "damaged goods" to others.

    My sister is a food inspector and has put me permanently off eating Chinese, except for the supermarket cafeteria, which actually follows the health laws.

    Replies: @Massimo Heitor, @Jack D

  152. One of the all time stupid vote losing Republican policy ideas is privatizing Social Security. Thanks, but no thanks, Cato Institute and Club for Growth. Goes hand in hand with open border libertarian BS.

  153. @Anonymous Nephew
    @Gato de la Biblioteca

    "These countries (England, Scotland, Ireland and Germany being the home of my forebears) all have terribly bland (at best) native food"

    Steak pie, chips and beans is NOT bland. Haggis is NOT bland. A full English breakfast or a full Sunday Roast is NOT bland. A Welsh lamb stew is not bland either.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cawl



    And don't the Scandinavians eat stuff like fermented shark? Sounds pretty disgusting to me, but probably not bland.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%A1karl

    Replies: @Massimo Heitor, @Anonymous

    Steak pie, chips and beans is NOT bland. Haggis is NOT bland. A full English breakfast or a full Sunday Roast is NOT bland. A Welsh lamb stew is not bland either.

    Those things aren’t bland, but they aren’t what today’s westerners want to eat and they aren’t what today’s food pioneers are passionate about creating. To pick a semi-random example, Steve Ellis, is a completely non-hispanic white guy who doesn’t care about the haggis of his ancestors, and channeled his passion into founding the successful Chipotle chain with a Mexican ethnic theme. And many people prefer eating there over somewhere “authentic”.

    Modern westerners still like English style breakfasts, teas, and english muffins, sure. Also most serious food innovators draw on classic ethnic foods as inspirations, but they need to innovate rather than cling to tradition.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Massimo Heitor


    Steve Ellis, is a completely non-hispanic white guy who doesn’t care about the haggis of his ancestors…
     
    Mexican haggis would be the ultimate fusion. Or Chinese haggis, using stray dog.
    , @Brutusale
    @Massimo Heitor

    Someone should teach Ellis that e coli isn't a necessary ingredient!

  154. @Gato de la Biblioteca
    @Jefferson

    There's a reason there aren't more German restaurants around. Ditto for the "cuisine" of the Irish, English, and various Scandinavian countries. And mega dittos for the lack of Scottish restaurants!

    These countries (England, Scotland, Ireland and Germany being the home of my forebears) all have terribly bland (at best) native food, when it comes right down to it. I sometimes wonder if the lack of interesting food isn't the reason they've done so well in the last few centuries, though I can't come up with a plausible rationale for it. Probably because I have more interesting food choices, I'm sure.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew, @Melendwyr, @Anonymous, @iSteveFan

    Tropical countries have spicier food because they have spicier plants. Colder European countries simply don’t have the climates which favor the production of edible botanical defenses, so their native cuisines are relatively blander. For a very long time, the hottest spice available to them was mustard.

  155. @Jefferson
    @Anonym

    "Getting excited over ethnic food is so pre-2010s. More like 1990s and earlier.

    Ditto “exotic” ethnic women. Wow, short, spindly, black hair and dark brown eyes, complexion varying shades of brown. So exotic. Not."

    I think German cuisine is more exotic than Chinese and Mexican cuisine. There are barely any German restaurants in the U.S when compared to the proportion of Germans in this country. Over 50 million Germans, yet the vast majority of shopping malls in this country do not offer German cuisine in it's food courts. There are more Indian and Vietnamese restaurants in this country than there are German ones.

    Replies: @Jack D, @dearieme, @NOTA, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @Thagomizer, @WhatEvvs, @Former Darfur, @Flip, @James Bowery

    Exotic: originating in or characteristic of a distant foreign country.

    Most things we think of as “exotic” , really are quite mundane, only not to us: justas most “volatile” liquids, like water, won’t burn.

  156. @Matra
    @Anonymous

    The two times I had currywurst it was just sausage covered in (mild) curry flavoured ketchup with fries on the side. It seems to be enjoyed (if that's the right word) by people in a hurry or on the way home from a night of drinking.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Yeah, I’ve had it before and that’s what it seems to be. Sausage with ketchup that’s been sprinkled with some curry seasoning.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Anonymous

    Jeffrey Steingarten, food editor for Vogue and celebrity judge on Food Network shows, said that, in his experience, it's the rare Michelin-starred restaurant in Paris that DOESN'T have a large ketchup bottle in the kitchen.

    Replies: @Jack D

  157. • Replies: @SFG
    @Shaq

    Stuff like that is why I no longer call myself on the left.

  158. @Massimo Heitor
    @Jefferson


    There is nothing interesting and exotic about Chinese and Mexican food.
     
    Steaks aren't exotic, but people love eating them. There is good and bad of every food genre. Also, the genres themselves are wildly malleable, there is tons of room for interpretation for what Mexican/Chinese/Italian food even means, and those things change over the years. Lastly, restaurants are ruthlessly subject to public interest, so only popular restaurants remain open.

    Replies: @Former Darfur

    Chinese restaurants are widespread because Chinese immigrants can run them profitably and staff them with other, fresher Chinese immigrants, not because there is an especially high market demand for Chinese food. Their food costs are low, their labor costs are low, and they usually locate in buildings in which other restaurant entrepreneurs have failed and are “damaged goods” to others.

    My sister is a food inspector and has put me permanently off eating Chinese, except for the supermarket cafeteria, which actually follows the health laws.

    • Replies: @Massimo Heitor
    @Former Darfur


    Chinese restaurants are widespread because Chinese immigrants can run them profitably and staff them with other, fresher Chinese immigrants, not because there is an especially high market demand for Chinese food.
     
    Sure, family restaurants are driven my worker motivation. Many ethnic groups don't want to do food service work. Chinese have large numbers of people that are willing to do food service work.

    Their food costs are low, their labor costs are low, and they usually locate in buildings in which other restaurant entrepreneurs have failed and are “damaged goods” to others.
     
    Most businesses want low costs for rent and materials and worthwhile margins.

    If you don't like it, don't eat it. Consumers in the west have a dazzling array of innovative food options. I know some dirty Chinese spots I won't eat at, but I know amazing Chinese food spots. Often Chinese food eaters just want a healthy and tasty rice+veggie+sauce stir fry, not necessarily some ethnic experience.
    , @Jack D
    @Former Darfur

    China supports a population of a billion+ people without benefit of American food inspectors (and not much refrigeration - at Chinese farmer's markets, the pork sits out on the counter and the only sanitation measure is that they have a little motorized fly whisk to keep the flies off). The secret is this - Chinese don't let cooked food sit around - you cook it to a safe temperature and you eat it immediately. And they don't eat raw or rare foods - no salads, no rare steak. American restaurants often do "cook and hold". Bacteria multiply exponentially over time so after a week that potato salad will kill you.

  159. @Jefferson
    @Anonym

    "Getting excited over ethnic food is so pre-2010s. More like 1990s and earlier.

    Ditto “exotic” ethnic women. Wow, short, spindly, black hair and dark brown eyes, complexion varying shades of brown. So exotic. Not."

    I think German cuisine is more exotic than Chinese and Mexican cuisine. There are barely any German restaurants in the U.S when compared to the proportion of Germans in this country. Over 50 million Germans, yet the vast majority of shopping malls in this country do not offer German cuisine in it's food courts. There are more Indian and Vietnamese restaurants in this country than there are German ones.

    Replies: @Jack D, @dearieme, @NOTA, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @Thagomizer, @WhatEvvs, @Former Darfur, @Flip, @James Bowery

    I joke that my ancestors left Germany for America because they didn’t like the food.

  160. @TangoMan
    @anowow

    Trump's a businessman so, hopefully, he will get around to seeing this point - net tax consumers versus net tax contributors. The whole of society is better off if we decrease the former and increase the latter. This means hard, cold, calculating culling where we can cull - immigrants, infiltrators, and maybe even Green Card holders - get deported because they're a burden on the public purse.

    Think about where we would be today if this event hadn't intervened between the 60s and present day:


    These advances are especially impressive because the massive immigration of unskilled Hispanic workers inflated the ranks of the poor. From 1990 to 2007, the entire increase in official poverty was among Hispanics.
     
    A rising tide can't lift all boats if the passengers in the boats are drilling holes into the hull as the tide is rising.

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @ben tillman

    Trump’s a businessman so, hopefully, he will get around to seeing this point – net tax consumers versus net tax contributors. The whole of society is better off if we decrease the former and increase the latter.

    Actually, we don’t want “net tax contributors”. We don’t want people producing things for a government that will use them against us.

    What we want are net producers who produce positive externalities that inure to the benefit of the American people (though there’s more to it than that because of opportunity cost).

  161. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @JSM
    @Gunnar von Cowtown

    Even *if* this is an "elite women don't cook" signaling thing, why do we have to import the Mexicans? Can't we just have White chefs go to Mexico and get the recipes and cook them back here for us in their own restaurants? I mean, is it a Fundamental Law of Physics that you have to be of Mexican descent to be able to figure out how to roast green chilis, or something?

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @neutral, @AnAnon, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Anonymous

    The economics don’t work out. Restaurants are a very low margin business who make most of their money on beverages and alcoholic drinks if they serve them. It’s only worth it for a handful of white chefs to specialize in foreign cuisine at upscale restaurants. Without importing cheap labor, foreign cuisine and eating out more generally would be the preserve of the wealthy. But that’s been the case historically, and most people opposed to immigration are not major foodies and foreign cuisine isn’t a priority for them.

  162. @(((Owen)))
    @Jefferson

    "You can’t easily improve a high crime narco state like Mexico."

    Technically, the worse a place is the easier it is to improve. The better it gets, the harder it is to improve further. But Mexico is on an upward trend so simple momentum might be enough for a while. Lately I'm enjoying the president's Telecom Reform that is hoovering cash back from Carlos Slim's wallet into mine at a pleasing pace.

    "Also Mexico’s racial demographics work against them. Mexico does not even make the list of the top 5 Whitest countries in Latin America percentage wise. Mexico has a glass ceiling due to it not being a majority White country. You can’t turn a country first world with only a 9 percent White population."

    Somebody tell Japan. And Korea, the Republic of China, Singapore, Chile, Israel, and Hong Kong.

    I bet those Japanese sure wish they could live in a whitopia like Ukraine, Chechnya, or West Virginia.

    ---

    "Mexicans don’t run cities like a well oil machine."

    What country did Guanajuato, Querétaro, León, and Aguascalientes move to?

    Replies: @iffen, @Jefferson, @Anonymous

    “Somebody tell Japan. And Korea, the Republic of China, Singapore, Chile, Israel, and Hong Kong.

    I bet those Japanese sure wish they could live in a whitopia like Ukraine, Chechnya, or West Virginia.”

    Orientals and Jews are a lot smarter than Mexicans in the IQ department. Hence why their respective countries have a significantly higher human development index than Mexico.

    But hey at least Mexico produces world class public toilet cleaners. Thanks for sending them here to the U.S. But once Robots start taking over those jobs, than there is really no more use for Mexican immigrants. If Mexico disproportionately produced the world’s best doctors, scientists, computer programmers, and engineers, than there would be more use for having a large Mexican population in the U.S, but they don’t.

    It’s funny that the vast majority of Mexican employees in Silicon Valley tech companies do not work anywhere near a computer. In Silicon Valley tech companies you are more likely to see a Mexican cleaning windows than coding. The lesson learned here is that when Spaniards and Amerindians mix on a mass scale, they produce an entire generation of mediocrity. And than when you add the 4 to 6 percent Sub Saharan African admixture in the average Mexican, that is icy on the mediocrity cake.

  163. Great article from Frum but notice nary a word about the Republican base disagreeing with the neocon foreign policy agenda that Frum also is a big believer in.

    Republican foreign policy – what is good for Israel, Netenyahu is always right, and Iran/Hizbollah are eeeevil and must be destroyed.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Anon

    Is Frum still a big believer in that foreign policy agenda? I'm not sure he is. Really, few are today, outside of nutters like John McCain, Lindsey Graham, Marco Rubio, etc.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  164. @Gato de la Biblioteca
    @Jefferson

    There's a reason there aren't more German restaurants around. Ditto for the "cuisine" of the Irish, English, and various Scandinavian countries. And mega dittos for the lack of Scottish restaurants!

    These countries (England, Scotland, Ireland and Germany being the home of my forebears) all have terribly bland (at best) native food, when it comes right down to it. I sometimes wonder if the lack of interesting food isn't the reason they've done so well in the last few centuries, though I can't come up with a plausible rationale for it. Probably because I have more interesting food choices, I'm sure.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew, @Melendwyr, @Anonymous, @iSteveFan

    Scandinavia was quite poor until the 20th century, and the Irish haven’t done well, even though around the time of the Famine, the average Irishman was eating 15 lbs of potatoes per day and subsisting almost entirely on potatoes, roasted over a fire or boiled.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Potatoes have 350 calories per lb. so if they were eating 15 lbs. a day they were getting over 5,000 calories / day or about twice as many as you need. Look at a 5 lb. bag of potatoes and tell me you could eat it in one meal even if you ate nothing else. Either they would have been really, really fat or that statistic is bogus. I vote for the latter.

  165. @Steve Sailer
    @(((Owen)))

    In 1967, I accompanied my parents to look at the American retirement colony at Lake Chapala (where Fred Reed lives now, I believe). It was pretty nice.

    Mexico is not doomed by nature to misery. It's one of the more favored landscapes on earth.

    And there are a lot of fairly easy steps to make it a better place, like more traffic stoplights.

    Replies: @(((Owen))), @George Taylor, @Tony

    The New Urb’s over at the American Conservative would be opposed to stop lights. http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/put-a-stop-to-stoplights/

    • Replies: @a Newsreader
    @George Taylor

    As usual among liberal reformers (and libertarian reformers) there is a hidden assumption that people will naturally work together for the common good. What they won't acknowledge is that unwritten rules work great only when there is a unified culture. Diversity necessitates heavyhandedness to maintain order.

    Replies: @TangoMan

  166. @(((Owen)))
    @Steve Sailer

    "I stayed in a hotel overlooking the main drag in Mexico City, the Paseo de la Reforma."

    Ooh. Fancy. Paseo de la Reforma is a place to go looking for two hundred plus Gringo dollar hotel rooms nowadays amongst the skyscrapers. I recommend visiting on Sunday mornings when the whole route is reserved exclusively for joggers, cyclists, and inline skaters. It's quiet and fun and you can ride or skate the whole way from Chapultepec Castle to the Basilica of Guadalupe.

    Reforma was built around 1900 by francophile dictator Porfirio Díaz to be his Champs Élysées. Along it are several monumental traffic circles, none of which are operated as traffic circles. The local drivers are determined to use them as big inconvenient intersections instead and it works much better than the awful European kind. It looks chaotic compared to the pretty but dangerous and inefficient way European ones go. Most have stop lights now, though the Cristóbal Colón monument has several unsignaled conflicts and quite a few hotels; maybe you stayed nearby.

    There is a lot of honking. I try to stay at hotels off major boulevards when I visit a city.

    "Jorge Castaneda implies that things like no stoplights are justified as keeping wimpy gringos out of Mexico."

    That would justify a lot. Gringos are determined to crash their own nation and I don't want them bringing that south. But all we really need to do is keep speaking Spanish. Gringos simply aren't willing to work at studying anything. We're invisible to their cultural map.

    No stoplights actually makes life better. Look up the woonerf concept. Moving car traffic is not the purpose of a city, though I understand how living in LA can make you forget that. Mexico is a walking city. Cars are just a status symbol that will make your life worse, like dating a supermodel.

    Castañeda is smart and writes a good piece but is too much of a prissy New Yorker to really relax in Mexico. He lived in isolated neighborhoods, went to a very, very expensive foreign high school, went abroad for college, married a foreigner, and has lived in New York for a decade now. (Rubio may be more authentic.) He's the kind of Mexican we scare into a walled estate in Huixquilucan so we won't have to deal with him and his luxury SUV.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @ben tillman, @Clyde, @reiner Tor

    That would justify a lot. Gringos are determined to crash their own nation and I don’t want them bringing that south. But all we really need to do is keep speaking Spanish. Gringos simply aren’t willing to work at studying anything.

    LOL – my high school Spanish teacher was named Owens. He was actually a math major, but he taught Spanish much better than it is taught in Texas high schools by people with names like Pacheco.

  167. @Bernie
    @Steve Sailer

    How so? Isn't it very hard for non-Mexicans to get Mexican citizenship? And I would think they like having gringo tourists to make money off (and then go back).

    I don't see Mexico being overrun by anyone. And that is a big strength. Unlike some other countries in Latin America they have a black population of less than 1%. Same with Muslims. And, as far as I know, zero parties that promote open borders, multiculturalism and/or bilingual education.

    Replies: @Former Darfur

    It is quite difficult, but theoretically possible to legitimately acquire Mexican citizenship. It is more common to just “get yourself born there after the fact” via a substantial bribe. This is done through a Mexican lawyer: DIY attempts will probably get you in a Mexican jail. I only know because I had an uncle that did that, having retired to the Mexican highlands with a pretty young Basque Spanish wife and a fat pair of pensions. After he died of natural causes, she was able to maintain the fiction of his survival long enough to get both their children, born in Los Angeles hospitals, into college on those pensions.

    She’s wanted in the US for fraud by the feds, but Spain doesn’t care.

  168. @Gato de la Biblioteca
    @Jefferson

    There's a reason there aren't more German restaurants around. Ditto for the "cuisine" of the Irish, English, and various Scandinavian countries. And mega dittos for the lack of Scottish restaurants!

    These countries (England, Scotland, Ireland and Germany being the home of my forebears) all have terribly bland (at best) native food, when it comes right down to it. I sometimes wonder if the lack of interesting food isn't the reason they've done so well in the last few centuries, though I can't come up with a plausible rationale for it. Probably because I have more interesting food choices, I'm sure.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew, @Melendwyr, @Anonymous, @iSteveFan

    What about their pastries? Don’t some of these northern European and Eastern European cultures have some pretty good pastries even if their regular food is bland?

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @iSteveFan

    English desserts are top notch as Mr Derbyshire has noted. English food has had a big revival at home with both gastropubs as well as high end restaurants.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  169. @5371
    @Steve Sailer

    [Los Angeles cars have outstanding pollution controls]

    Bet they won't have to keep being inspected as stringently to stay on the road in Mexico, though!

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Clyde

    Bet they won’t have to keep being inspected as stringently to stay on the road in Mexico, though!

    When I lived in Georgia 25 years ago, the state did not require cars to be inspected.

  170. @syonredux
    @(((Owen)))


    The Hispanic population is expected to reach about 106 million in 2050, about double what it is today, according to new U.S. Census Bureau population projections.
     
    http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/12/16/with-fewer-new-arrivals-census-lowers-hispanic-population-projections-2/

    And those numbers do not bode well for Anglo-America:


    “Raven’s Standard Progressive Matrices test was administered to a representative sample of 920 white, Mestizo and Native Mexican Indian children aged 7–10 years in Mexico. The mean IQs in relation to a British mean of 100 obtained from the 1979 British standardization sample and adjusted for the estimated subsequent increase were: 98·0 for whites, 94·3 for Mestizos and 83·3 for Native Mexican Indians.”

    http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=266611

    And then let’s compare this to the racial composition of Mexico:

    98.0: Mexican Whites
    94.3:Mexican Mestizos
    83.3: Mexican Amerinds

    According to the CIA FACTBOOK, Mexico’s racial breakdown is:mestizo (Amerindian-Spanish) 60%, Amerindian or predominantly Amerindian 30%, white 9%, other 1%

    Things are not looking good Mexico way…..


    Now, let’s turn to real world achievements.Mexico and the Nobel prize. According to WIKIPEDIA, three people of Mexican origins have won a Nobel:

    Alfonso García Robles: With Alva Myrdal, got the Peace Prize in 1982. For what it’s worth, he looks very White in his WIKIPEDIA photo.

    Mario J. Molina: Along with Paul J. Crutzen and F. Sherwood Rowland, he got the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for studying the threat posed to the ozone layer by CFCs. Looks pretty White in his WIKIPEDIA photo.

    Octavio Paz: 1990 Nobel in Lit. Based on WIKIPEDIA photo, he might have some Amerind ancestry (or he might not).

    So, Three prizes. Total. As compared to 10 for Scotland, 15 for Australia, 23 for Canada, 74 for England , 306 for the USA, …..

    Now, all of these figures are from WIKIPEDIA, so I’m sure that one could argue about the margins…but the overall portrait of Mexican achievement is pretty dire.

    How about Fields Medalists?:

    United States 12

    France 10

    Soviet Union (3) / Russia (6) 9

    United Kingdom 7

    Japan 3
    Belgium 2

    West Germany (1) / Germany (0) 1


    Australia 1

    British Hong Kong 1

    Finland 1

    Israel 1

    Italy 1

    Norway 1

    New Zealand 1

    Sweden 1

    Vietnam 1

    Iran 1

    Brazil 1

    (None Stateless) 1

    I’ve left out Manjul Bhargava. His background is complicated.

    So, Mexico has zero.Hell, all of Latin America has exactly one, which ties them with New Zealand.


    Race creates the foundation upon which culture is built.Mexico’s racial mix produces mediocrity.In contrast, America’s overwhelming European racial stock allowed her to thrive.Mass immigration by Hispanic Amerinds and Mestizos is changing that.Soon, the USA will be as mediocre as Mexico.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Flip, @epebble

    “Race creates the foundation upon which culture is built.Mexico’s racial mix produces mediocrity.In contrast, America’s overwhelming European racial stock allowed her to thrive.Mass immigration by Hispanic Amerinds and Mestizos is changing that.Soon, the USA will be as mediocre as Mexico.”

    The Mexican government never allowed massive European immigration Ellis Island style to overwhelm and outnumber the country’s local Amerindian and Mestizo populationm

    The Mexican government never had any ambitions of trying to make Mexico as White as The United States and Canada. The Mexican elites thnk it is a lot easier to run a corrupt government with a Brown majority than it is with a White majority, because lower IQ Amerindians/Mestizos are a lot less likely to question and stand up to corrupt government authority. The less Whites you have among the general mass population, the less likely you will see populous types like Donald Trump popping up to challenge the status quo.

  171. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    @Steve Sailer

    To some extent this is happening already. Most Mexicans would rather work in a Nabisco (Mondelez) factory near their home and family instead of having to move to Chicago to work in that same factory. Even if they make less, their cost of living is lower too and they don't have to live in a cold alien place full of uptight gringos and dangerous Negros. So, it seems like net Mexican migration has slowed to a crawl or even reversed.

    The problem is that you still have Honduras, Guatemala, Nicaragua, etc. where even Wal-Mart prosperity seems out of reach. Mexico is #67 in GDP rank but you have another another 130 countries below them. Places like Liberia and Somalia where the GDP/capita is less than $3/day and the main question is not whether you can afford a cheap flat screen TV for your hut but whether you will eat today.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @iSteveFan

    Trump frequently complained about Nabisco moving its factory to Mexico a few months ago during his stump speeches. I oppose immigration and support protectionism, but making Nilla wafers probably isn’t a high priority industry that needs to be protected. And having lots of factory jobs making cookies in Mexico probably isn’t a bad idea in terms of drawing potential migrants away from the US, as well as acclimating Mexicans into a more regimented First World style of work and living.

    • Replies: @TangoMan
    @Anonymous

    but making Nilla wafers probably isn’t a high priority industry that needs to be protected.

    Look after the pennies and the dollars take care of themselves. We have people here how are incapable of producing a lot of value in the job market, so working in a cookie factory might be their only opportunity to engage in the labor market such that they produce value for their employer.

    If they're working, then they're not on welfare. Let Mexico deal with its own problems.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Anonymous

    , @Dave Pinsen
    @Anonymous

    There are also well-paid food scientists working for Nabisco. There's a Nabisco food tech building at Rutgers University ( http://whereru.rutgers.edu/gigapans/226/Nabisco-Advanced-Food-Technology-Institute ). The thing about losing factories is that you often also lose the higher-end engineering and R&D work too, since it all clusters together.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  172. I think the “media-democrat industrial complex” as the late Andrew Breitbart might said is to something as well to igonore the third parties candidates like Gary Johnson in 2012 played a role as well. https://democracychronicles.com/third-party-candidates-struggle-to-break-media-blackout/ Could be possible then allowing other parties at debates might give some difference?

  173. @Anonymous Nephew
    @Gato de la Biblioteca

    "These countries (England, Scotland, Ireland and Germany being the home of my forebears) all have terribly bland (at best) native food"

    Steak pie, chips and beans is NOT bland. Haggis is NOT bland. A full English breakfast or a full Sunday Roast is NOT bland. A Welsh lamb stew is not bland either.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cawl



    And don't the Scandinavians eat stuff like fermented shark? Sounds pretty disgusting to me, but probably not bland.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%A1karl

    Replies: @Massimo Heitor, @Anonymous

    I love full English breakfasts, pub food, etc. But it is bland compared to most other cuisines. It’s basically starch and fatty meat that isn’t adorned or altered too much.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    @Anonymous

    "It’s basically starch and fatty meat that isn’t adorned or altered too much."

    One consequence of England being historically one of the wealthiest nations is that we didn't need to adorn or alter our basics of meat and veg too much. In Asturias last summer we tried their national dish - very nice but basically cowboy food - bean stew with bits of meat. Makes you realise how much poorer the place was than the UK in times past.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fabada_asturiana

  174. @John Derbyshire
    @Chrisnonymous


    I also think English food is underrated.
     
    For sure.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Stealth, @a Newsreader, @Jack D

    White folks in the South used to eat chitlins, Derb. The practice pretty much ended in the nineties, though. The only places where I’ve eaten chitlins in the past ten years have been soul food or Chinese restaurants.

    When I was a kid, my father and his friends would have chitlin cookouts several time a year. What was left over was refrigerated to be made into sandwiches and such in the days after the festivities. I had a small bowl of them a few weeks ago. I asked the black proprietor who cooked them why I don’t see them served as much as I used to. She said it was simply too much work to be done on a regular basis. I can’t argue with that since I’ve seen them being cleaned. I doubt they’ll be a soul food staple for too much longer.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Stealth


    I asked the black proprietor who cooked them why I don’t see them served as much as I used to. She said it was simply too much work to be done on a regular basis. I can’t argue with that since I’ve seen them being cleaned.
     
    Having done this twice, I agree.
  175. @syonredux
    @(((Owen)))


    The Hispanic population is expected to reach about 106 million in 2050, about double what it is today, according to new U.S. Census Bureau population projections.
     
    http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/12/16/with-fewer-new-arrivals-census-lowers-hispanic-population-projections-2/

    And those numbers do not bode well for Anglo-America:


    “Raven’s Standard Progressive Matrices test was administered to a representative sample of 920 white, Mestizo and Native Mexican Indian children aged 7–10 years in Mexico. The mean IQs in relation to a British mean of 100 obtained from the 1979 British standardization sample and adjusted for the estimated subsequent increase were: 98·0 for whites, 94·3 for Mestizos and 83·3 for Native Mexican Indians.”

    http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=266611

    And then let’s compare this to the racial composition of Mexico:

    98.0: Mexican Whites
    94.3:Mexican Mestizos
    83.3: Mexican Amerinds

    According to the CIA FACTBOOK, Mexico’s racial breakdown is:mestizo (Amerindian-Spanish) 60%, Amerindian or predominantly Amerindian 30%, white 9%, other 1%

    Things are not looking good Mexico way…..


    Now, let’s turn to real world achievements.Mexico and the Nobel prize. According to WIKIPEDIA, three people of Mexican origins have won a Nobel:

    Alfonso García Robles: With Alva Myrdal, got the Peace Prize in 1982. For what it’s worth, he looks very White in his WIKIPEDIA photo.

    Mario J. Molina: Along with Paul J. Crutzen and F. Sherwood Rowland, he got the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for studying the threat posed to the ozone layer by CFCs. Looks pretty White in his WIKIPEDIA photo.

    Octavio Paz: 1990 Nobel in Lit. Based on WIKIPEDIA photo, he might have some Amerind ancestry (or he might not).

    So, Three prizes. Total. As compared to 10 for Scotland, 15 for Australia, 23 for Canada, 74 for England , 306 for the USA, …..

    Now, all of these figures are from WIKIPEDIA, so I’m sure that one could argue about the margins…but the overall portrait of Mexican achievement is pretty dire.

    How about Fields Medalists?:

    United States 12

    France 10

    Soviet Union (3) / Russia (6) 9

    United Kingdom 7

    Japan 3
    Belgium 2

    West Germany (1) / Germany (0) 1


    Australia 1

    British Hong Kong 1

    Finland 1

    Israel 1

    Italy 1

    Norway 1

    New Zealand 1

    Sweden 1

    Vietnam 1

    Iran 1

    Brazil 1

    (None Stateless) 1

    I’ve left out Manjul Bhargava. His background is complicated.

    So, Mexico has zero.Hell, all of Latin America has exactly one, which ties them with New Zealand.


    Race creates the foundation upon which culture is built.Mexico’s racial mix produces mediocrity.In contrast, America’s overwhelming European racial stock allowed her to thrive.Mass immigration by Hispanic Amerinds and Mestizos is changing that.Soon, the USA will be as mediocre as Mexico.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Flip, @epebble

    “In North America, where the population is prevalently Teutonic, and where those elements intermingled with the inferior race only to a very small degree, we have a quality of mankind and a civilization which are different from those of Central and South America. In these latter countries the immigrants – who mainly belonged to the Latin races – mated with the aborigines, sometimes to a very large extent indeed. In this case we have a clear and decisive example of the effect produced by the mixture of races. But in North America the Teutonic element, which has kept its racial stock pure and did not mix it with any other racial stock, has come to dominate the American Continent and will remain master of it as long as that element does not fall a victim to the habit of adulterating its blood. ”

  176. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    San Bernardino is full of Walmarts and other national chains that are decently run by a mostly Mexican workforce.
     
    At least one of the ethnic supermarkets in St Paul's pan-Asian Frogtown ("pagodabodegas"?) uses Mexican stock boys. Is that a job young Asians won't do? Or once you go outside your ethnic group, there's no loyalty to race, at least among Asians?

    For authenticity, though, the checkout girls are all Asian.

    Replies: @Romanian, @Jack D, @Stan Adams

    The Chinese restaurant nearest me seems to hire only Chinese, or maybe only Asians. Even the elderly man who mops the floor is Asian.

    (He always asks me to move so he can mop under my table, even if I’m in the middle of a meal. It bugs the hell out of me, but the food’s good enough for me to overlook it.)

    A Chinese guy took over the local Dairy Queen several years ago. I haven’t seen any round-eyes working there since.

    • Replies: @iffen
    @Stan Adams

    The Chinese restaurant that I used to go to had a Chinese owner and wait staff. All of the cooks and kitchen help were Mexicans.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    , @Clyde
    @Stan Adams


    The Chinese restaurant nearest me seems to hire only Chinese, or maybe only Asians. Even the elderly man who mops the floor is Asian.
    (He always asks me to move so he can mop under my table, even if I’m in the middle of a meal. It bugs the hell out of me, but the food’s good enough for me to overlook it.)
     
    He is messing with you so why not mess around with him? Get on the internet and find some choice Chinese words and practice yr pronunciation. Something like "Bugger off old man"
    I would do this!
    But unfortunately the Chinese are always very nice to me in their eating places and I reciprocate..
  177. @Anonymous
    @(((Owen)))

    Owen, just curious, any advice for a very gringo looking family (paler than snow, red or light hair, with young kids) that's dreaming about a vacation in Mexico City or some other nice Mexican city, maybe even language school?

    Replies: @Stealth, @(((Owen)))

    Write to this guy:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sa%C3%BAl_%C3%81lvarez

    I’m sure he can tell you everything you need to know about having red hair while in Mexico.

  178. @Shaq
    OT

    Salon: White men must be stopped

    http://www.salon.com/2015/12/22/white_men_must_be_stopped_the_very_future_of_the_planet_depends_on_it_partner/

    Replies: @SFG

    Stuff like that is why I no longer call myself on the left.

  179. @Jack D
    @Jefferson

    Frankfurters? Hamburgers? Aren't those German.

    To have really authentic ethnic restaurants you need fresh off the boat (plane) ethnics - #1 as chefs and #2 as customers to keep the chefs honest. All ethnic cuisines fade once immigration stops.

    German cuisine was always kind of bland and starchy and got blander as the owner and customer base of their restaurants in America got older and more Americanized. Two world wars didn't do much for the popularity of German food (which was in the 19th century, after French, probably the 2nd most popular "foreign" cuisine in America) but mostly it just went out of style as being the opposite of the kind of food that people like today. Boiled beef is not high on anyone's list. The Germans today prefer doner kebab and curry wurst plus the usual globalized stuff you see everywhere now.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Anonym, @Prof. Woland, @Mr. Anon, @SFG

    It will probably cement everyone’s contempt for my taste that I really, really like German food. Schnitzel, spaetzle, all the wursts, best beer in the world…ah.

    • Agree: 27 year old
  180. Because the Chinese tend to eat out so often in their native country as it is so cheap, therefore they are frequently quite awful cooks in their own home.

  181. Here’s a nice one-liner:

    Remember that Republican voters care more about aligning government with their values of work and family than they care about cutting the size of government as an end in itself.

    That is so sad, because “aligning government with their values” is an euphemism for harnessing the police power of the State to force other people to do as they desire. They don’t care what the few government employees do; they care about the many a government order can make do.

    Maybe Republicans are so debased by power lust to want that, but I have no goals for other people to share my values of work and family. They may have their own values and as long as they refrain from using the state to try to control me, I’m good.

    America used to allow people freedom, even little people, and was rewarded by becoming the richest and most powerful nation on the planet.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @scrivener3


    That is so sad, because “aligning government with their values” is an euphemism for harnessing the police power of the State to force other people to do as they desire.
     
    I think it means having the government subsidize (or at least not tax) things they value.
  182. @Jean Cocteausten
    Romney lost because he was an investment banker running in the wake of a financial crisis. Usually the incumbent gets blamed for a bad economy, but the GOP figured out a way to hand that issue to the HCO.

    Replies: @Curle

    That and the Republican Party establishment agrees with Peter Lee and the New York Times, that their voters are racists and buffoons. With that attitude, the goal of a campaign is to survive a moral drubbing all the while hoping you can eek out a win if the voters are mad enough at the other guy. The very idea of fighting fire with fire, hitting them between the eyes the way Trump is doing is unthinkable. Thus candidates like Romney.

    Peter Lee is simply characteristic of a type I’m encountering all the time now that a Republican fighter is in the race. The moralizing Lefty who cannot believe someone would question the moral uprightness of the Lefty cause. Or that a Republican would presume to occupy the moral high ground. They expect Republicans to grovel.

  183. @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    Trump frequently complained about Nabisco moving its factory to Mexico a few months ago during his stump speeches. I oppose immigration and support protectionism, but making Nilla wafers probably isn't a high priority industry that needs to be protected. And having lots of factory jobs making cookies in Mexico probably isn't a bad idea in terms of drawing potential migrants away from the US, as well as acclimating Mexicans into a more regimented First World style of work and living.

    Replies: @TangoMan, @Dave Pinsen

    but making Nilla wafers probably isn’t a high priority industry that needs to be protected.

    Look after the pennies and the dollars take care of themselves. We have people here how are incapable of producing a lot of value in the job market, so working in a cookie factory might be their only opportunity to engage in the labor market such that they produce value for their employer.

    If they’re working, then they’re not on welfare. Let Mexico deal with its own problems.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @TangoMan

    Nabisco might have stayed if they could pay their workers $10 or $12 /yr vs. $3 in Mexico. But what if a union has raised the stakes so that the US workers get $30+/hr including benefits?

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @TangoMan, @JohnnyWalker123

    , @Anonymous
    @TangoMan

    Just because it might sound nice to have cooking baking jobs as a welfare program doesn't mean it will actually happen if we mandate that corporations bake cookies in the US. Cookie factories in the US aren't going to hire many people unless wages fall significantly. Cookie factories in the US will only be profitable with greater automation and hiring fewer people.

    Replies: @TangoMan

  184. @tbraton
    @Peter Akuleyev

    "Hence the best food comes from the Ottoman Empire, . . .As far as “exotic”, I lived in Kazakhstan – that is an “exotic” cuisine to be sure, it also is horrible, consisting mostly of boiled and smoked animal products with few spices, the product of a poor nomad culture."

    The Ottoman Turks originally came from Central Asia and were nomads. The cuisine they brought with them was quite limited. Their "exotic" cuisine was largely the product of Greek chefs and the chefs of other civilizations they conquered. Their only major contribution in the area of cuisine appears to be yoghurt, a nomadic food, which they introduced into what became the Ottoman Empire. For an empire which lasted nearly 500 years, the Turks made very little contribution to world civilization, except for the Turkish towel. Compared to Great Britain, whose empire lasted a considerably shorter time but which contributed significantly to the cultures they conquered, the Turks' cultural contribution was negligible.

    Replies: @Jack D

    You misunderstand how an empire is supposed to work if it is working properly. Contributions are made by ALL the ethnic groups of the empire, not just by the group that is (nominally) in charge. We know that because of HBD and other reasons, different groups are better at different things – Turks were better horsemen, Byzantine Greeks were better chefs, etc. In a functioning empire everyone gets to do the thing that they are best at.

  185. iSteveFan says:
    @Jack D
    @Steve Sailer

    To some extent this is happening already. Most Mexicans would rather work in a Nabisco (Mondelez) factory near their home and family instead of having to move to Chicago to work in that same factory. Even if they make less, their cost of living is lower too and they don't have to live in a cold alien place full of uptight gringos and dangerous Negros. So, it seems like net Mexican migration has slowed to a crawl or even reversed.

    The problem is that you still have Honduras, Guatemala, Nicaragua, etc. where even Wal-Mart prosperity seems out of reach. Mexico is #67 in GDP rank but you have another another 130 countries below them. Places like Liberia and Somalia where the GDP/capita is less than $3/day and the main question is not whether you can afford a cheap flat screen TV for your hut but whether you will eat today.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @iSteveFan

    So, it seems like net Mexican migration has slowed to a crawl or even reversed.

    I am sorry, but I get tired of hearing this. Is saying that Mexican migration has slowed to a crawl supposed to make us feel like everything is OK? Mexico has sent approximately 11 million people into the US since 1980. That’s just counting since 1980, BTW, and not any prior. How does that 11 million stack up to what others have sent? Since 1607 until the present, we have had approximately 7 million Germans and 6 million Italians, our two formerly leading immigrant source nations. So Mexico has sent almost as many immigrants in 35 years as the next two leading nations combined have sent in 400!

    Saying that it has now slowed to a crawl after what we’ve have been through is a little like closing the barn door after the horse has left. We still need to erect proper barriers on the border and enforce immigration and labor laws. Mexico is the type of country where it would not be unexpected for them to take a turn for the worse. And when that next cycle happens, I want us to be prepared so as to not have to go through another such immivasion as we’ve just had.

    • Replies: @JSM
    @iSteveFan

    Mexico has sent approximately 11 million people into the US since 1980.
    I agree with your point. I would just amend to say, there's more like 30 million, even 50 million, people of Mexican descent here, including all illegals and their anchor babies, who ought not be here.

    I used to live in SoCal. I once read an article that INS reckoned it caught a million illegals a year, and that that was only about half of the them coming across. So that means a million a year getting in since 1980, 36 years = 36 million. Add in the anchor baby boom, yeah, 50 million sounds right. And meets with the evidence of my lying eyes... Mexicans speaking Spanish everywhere you go, here in former Whitopia of Wyoming.


    Mr. Trump, Build Up This Wall!!!!

  186. @TangoMan
    @Anonymous

    but making Nilla wafers probably isn’t a high priority industry that needs to be protected.

    Look after the pennies and the dollars take care of themselves. We have people here how are incapable of producing a lot of value in the job market, so working in a cookie factory might be their only opportunity to engage in the labor market such that they produce value for their employer.

    If they're working, then they're not on welfare. Let Mexico deal with its own problems.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Anonymous

    Nabisco might have stayed if they could pay their workers $10 or $12 /yr vs. $3 in Mexico. But what if a union has raised the stakes so that the US workers get $30+/hr including benefits?

    • Replies: @iSteveFan
    @Jack D


    Nabisco might have stayed if they could pay their workers $10 or $12 /yr vs. $3 in Mexico. But what if a union has raised the stakes so that the US workers get $30+/hr including benefits?
     
    Or Nabisco might have stayed if they were not able to freely import their products from Mexico in the USA.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Anonymous

    , @TangoMan
    @Jack D

    I'm just shooting from the hip here, but my sense is that there is a growing call for protectionism in the US such that measures protect jobs and boost pay. As job cuts and off-shoring move further up the value ladder, the model of cutting American jobs, save those of the executives, and having the work performed for less outside the US and then importing the good to sell in the American market is going to be harder to defend as being in the national interest. I expect to see that there will arise measures trying to link value of American labor as a percent of sales or profits or some similar metric.

    Unions are good until they're overplaying their hand and then they risk destroying the entire enterprise. The American union model is presently dysfunctional.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Jack D

    Then we eat more expensive cookies, but we have high-paying jobs.

  187. iSteveFan says:
    @Jack D
    @TangoMan

    Nabisco might have stayed if they could pay their workers $10 or $12 /yr vs. $3 in Mexico. But what if a union has raised the stakes so that the US workers get $30+/hr including benefits?

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @TangoMan, @JohnnyWalker123

    Nabisco might have stayed if they could pay their workers $10 or $12 /yr vs. $3 in Mexico. But what if a union has raised the stakes so that the US workers get $30+/hr including benefits?

    Or Nabisco might have stayed if they were not able to freely import their products from Mexico in the USA.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @iSteveFan


    Or Nabisco might have stayed if they were not able to freely import their products from Mexico in the USA.

     

    The Mexicans themselves might have stayed-- in Mexico-- had they not been able to import Bimbo cookies into the USA. Bodegas are full of junk food from Mexico.
    , @Anonymous
    @iSteveFan

    That amounts to the same thing.

  188. OT, but Hillary Clinton’s campaign just laid an egg:

  189. @John Derbyshire
    @Chrisnonymous


    I also think English food is underrated.
     
    For sure.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Stealth, @a Newsreader, @Jack D

    I learned how to make a Bakewell Tart. I am a fan.

  190. @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    Trump frequently complained about Nabisco moving its factory to Mexico a few months ago during his stump speeches. I oppose immigration and support protectionism, but making Nilla wafers probably isn't a high priority industry that needs to be protected. And having lots of factory jobs making cookies in Mexico probably isn't a bad idea in terms of drawing potential migrants away from the US, as well as acclimating Mexicans into a more regimented First World style of work and living.

    Replies: @TangoMan, @Dave Pinsen

    There are also well-paid food scientists working for Nabisco. There’s a Nabisco food tech building at Rutgers University ( http://whereru.rutgers.edu/gigapans/226/Nabisco-Advanced-Food-Technology-Institute ). The thing about losing factories is that you often also lose the higher-end engineering and R&D work too, since it all clusters together.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Dave Pinsen

    That's less the case. Rutgers is in New Jersey, and the Nabisco plant was in Chicago, so they didn't even cluster together in the US. German and Japanese automakers have factorise all over the world, but keep much of their engineering and R&D at home.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

  191. @iSteveFan
    @Jack D


    Nabisco might have stayed if they could pay their workers $10 or $12 /yr vs. $3 in Mexico. But what if a union has raised the stakes so that the US workers get $30+/hr including benefits?
     
    Or Nabisco might have stayed if they were not able to freely import their products from Mexico in the USA.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Anonymous

    Or Nabisco might have stayed if they were not able to freely import their products from Mexico in the USA.

    The Mexicans themselves might have stayed– in Mexico– had they not been able to import Bimbo cookies into the USA. Bodegas are full of junk food from Mexico.

  192. @George Taylor
    @Steve Sailer

    The New Urb's over at the American Conservative would be opposed to stop lights. http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/put-a-stop-to-stoplights/

    Replies: @a Newsreader

    As usual among liberal reformers (and libertarian reformers) there is a hidden assumption that people will naturally work together for the common good. What they won’t acknowledge is that unwritten rules work great only when there is a unified culture. Diversity necessitates heavyhandedness to maintain order.

    • Agree: TangoMan
    • Replies: @TangoMan
    @a Newsreader

    What they won’t acknowledge is that unwritten rules work great only when there is a unified culture. Diversity necessitates heavyhandedness to maintain order.

    I recall a few incidents where I've had real-life conversations with Bernie Sanders fans and they're going on and on about his plan to bring Danish socialism to America and I ask them to clarify a few things that I don't understand. I ask them why I've never heard them, or Sanders, talk about how they're going to ethnically cleanse America to bring about the racial homogeneity which is a necessary precondition to having a sharing society. Then I keep a blank expression on my face and await an answer, looking as though I'm genuinely curious. Suffice to say that after a few rounds they can't point to a diverse society that makes their desired socialism work and they're frustrated that reality is kicking them in the nads.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Reg Cæsar

  193. @Jack D
    @TangoMan

    Nabisco might have stayed if they could pay their workers $10 or $12 /yr vs. $3 in Mexico. But what if a union has raised the stakes so that the US workers get $30+/hr including benefits?

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @TangoMan, @JohnnyWalker123

    I’m just shooting from the hip here, but my sense is that there is a growing call for protectionism in the US such that measures protect jobs and boost pay. As job cuts and off-shoring move further up the value ladder, the model of cutting American jobs, save those of the executives, and having the work performed for less outside the US and then importing the good to sell in the American market is going to be harder to defend as being in the national interest. I expect to see that there will arise measures trying to link value of American labor as a percent of sales or profits or some similar metric.

    Unions are good until they’re overplaying their hand and then they risk destroying the entire enterprise. The American union model is presently dysfunctional.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @TangoMan

    I wish someone in the Trump camp would discover the Richmans' case for balanced trade: https://www.overdrive.com/media/1735602/balanced-trade

    They point out the legality, benefit, and logic of it, but Trump would immediately grok the "art of the deal" in this: we are the world's largest consumer market, by $, and the power to limit access to that market gives us enormous leverage.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  194. @Jefferson
    @Jack D

    "Hamburgers?"

    So McDonald's is a German American fast food chain?

    "To have really authentic ethnic restaurants you need fresh off the boat (plane) ethnics – #1 as chefs and #2 as customers to keep the chefs honest. All ethnic cuisines fade once immigration stops."

    Italian immigration to the U.S stopped, yet Italian cuisine is still alive and well in this country. You can even find Italian cuisine at many shopping mall food courts. There are even non Italians who get into the Italian food business. I know of an Italian restaurant in San Francisco that is owned by a married couple from Hong Kong.

    There is a segment of upper middle class/upper class Chinese people who like Southern European cuisine like Italian and French. It is different than what they are used to eating, but they see it as different in a good way.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @snorlax, @reiner Tor

    Is that North Beach Restaurant? I thought it was just the maître d’, which is, in and of itself, unusual.

    NBR is one of the best restaurants in the City.

  195. Uh-oh, the media is finally tired of the uppity public humiliating them in their own comment boxes, so the big newspapers in Canada are suspending the privilege:

    “We have finally realized that the kind of person who devotes his day to arguing with strangers anonymously on the Internet is not necessarily representative of a large swath of public opinion or necessarily good at articulating anything”

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/books-and-media/russell-smith-say-bye-to-the-online-comment-section-as-you-know-it/article27906890/

    But what about that whole pesky democracy thing? It allows racists like Trump and Le Pen to wield government power. Something Must Be Done.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @George Glass


    “We have finally realized that the kind of person who devotes his day to arguing with strangers anonymously on the Internet is not necessarily representative of a large swath of public opinion or necessarily good at articulating anything”
     
    Is it chutzpah or a complete lack of connection to reality? In either case, it should be obvious that the Canadian mainstream newspapers are not "necessarily representative of a large swath of public opinion", and, to the extent there is any correspondence between the two, it is due to indoctrination by the papers.
  196. @Jack D

    Remember that Republican voters care more about aligning government with their values of work and family than they care about cutting the size of government as an end in itself.
     
    So Republicans are really just Democrats who oppose abortion? We are lost.

    Replies: @CK, @asdf, @AnotherDad

    “So Republicans are really just Democrats who oppose abortion? We are lost.”..

    I don’t know that that’s what Frum was saying. But….

    What are Republicans these days? I don’t recall GWB being Mr. Small government. Are the Republicans the pro war party? The party of the somewhat disgruntled about gay marriage and legal marijuana? The we-fake-Christianity-better party? The pull yourself up by the bootstraps like the Bush’s did party?

    What would the average Reagan Democrat make of Jeb!?

    There were a lot of cultural reasons people voted for Reagan. I think Frum is right in saying these reasons get thinner every year. Bashing drug-taking, abortion having, Jimmy Carter loving hippies was a great strategy, what, 40 years ago?

    Anyway, the Republican party IS lost. Burn it down. Frum’s right. Disagree with him all you want. It is over.

    • Replies: @TangoMan
    @asdf

    What are Republicans these days?

    Life becomes immeasurably simpler for Republicans if they come to terms with the fact that they're the White People's Party, or as Steve puts it, the Party of the Core. Trump is leading the party to this promised land. Once they accept who they are representing, then sensible policies can flow like water because there would be a connection between party purpose and party policy.

  197. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @TangoMan
    @Anonymous

    but making Nilla wafers probably isn’t a high priority industry that needs to be protected.

    Look after the pennies and the dollars take care of themselves. We have people here how are incapable of producing a lot of value in the job market, so working in a cookie factory might be their only opportunity to engage in the labor market such that they produce value for their employer.

    If they're working, then they're not on welfare. Let Mexico deal with its own problems.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Anonymous

    Just because it might sound nice to have cooking baking jobs as a welfare program doesn’t mean it will actually happen if we mandate that corporations bake cookies in the US. Cookie factories in the US aren’t going to hire many people unless wages fall significantly. Cookie factories in the US will only be profitable with greater automation and hiring fewer people.

    • Replies: @TangoMan
    @Anonymous

    Cookie factories in the US will only be profitable with greater automation and hiring fewer people.

    This is the formula for the entire economy:


    Economist Philip Martin of the University of California likes to tell a story about the state's tomato industry. In the early 1960s, growers relied on seasonal Mexican laborers, brought in under the government's "bracero" program. The Mexicans picked the tomatoes that were then processed into ketchup and other products. In 1964 Congress killed the program despite growers' warnings that its abolition would doom their industry. What happened? Well, plant scientists developed oblong tomatoes that could be harvested by machine. Since then, California's tomato output has risen fivefold.
     
    Come the reckoning, when robots become ubiquitous, all of these peon laborers that we're importing to be citizens will need welfare support. We're stuck with low human capital American citizens, but we can do something about imported foreigners. The goal is to split the coming welfare pie into fewer pieces so that each piece is larger in dollar amounts rather than splitting that welfare pie into a larger denominator of people needing support because they don't have skills which can be used to create value for employers while simultaneously earning enough to live in the US.

    Without job creation pressure focused on employers, they'll ALWAYS take the path of least resistance, which is to privatize the gains and socialize the losses. Those people who are laid off don't disappear, they become a burden on all of us.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  198. @TangoMan
    @Jack D

    I'm just shooting from the hip here, but my sense is that there is a growing call for protectionism in the US such that measures protect jobs and boost pay. As job cuts and off-shoring move further up the value ladder, the model of cutting American jobs, save those of the executives, and having the work performed for less outside the US and then importing the good to sell in the American market is going to be harder to defend as being in the national interest. I expect to see that there will arise measures trying to link value of American labor as a percent of sales or profits or some similar metric.

    Unions are good until they're overplaying their hand and then they risk destroying the entire enterprise. The American union model is presently dysfunctional.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    I wish someone in the Trump camp would discover the Richmans’ case for balanced trade: https://www.overdrive.com/media/1735602/balanced-trade

    They point out the legality, benefit, and logic of it, but Trump would immediately grok the “art of the deal” in this: we are the world’s largest consumer market, by $, and the power to limit access to that market gives us enormous leverage.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Dave Pinsen

    That's what we had until Reagan. It's called Keynesianism. Trade deficits equal "leakages" in aggregate demand, and maintaining aggregate demand is the priority in Keynesianism. This led to the much ballyhooed inflation of the 70s, which was actually a great period for the working class and a time of increasing wealth and prosperity for them as the real value of their mortgage and other debts declined while prices for consumer and other goods they produced and their wages went up. Of course this was bad for the wealthy and elites who live off of financial assets, as well as for many professionals, which is why it's depicted as a disaster that Reagan and Thatcher in the UK, when in reality they dismantled Keynesianism and previous trade policy in order to benefit wealthy financial asset holders.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

  199. @iSteveFan
    @Jack D


    Nabisco might have stayed if they could pay their workers $10 or $12 /yr vs. $3 in Mexico. But what if a union has raised the stakes so that the US workers get $30+/hr including benefits?
     
    Or Nabisco might have stayed if they were not able to freely import their products from Mexico in the USA.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Anonymous

    That amounts to the same thing.

  200. @Steve Sailer
    @(((Owen)))

    I stayed in a hotel overlooking the main drag in Mexico City, the Paseo de la Reforma. The intersection below had no stop light even though it was one of major crossroads of the capital. It was fascinating to watch long lines of cars play Perpendicular Chicken with each other, but all the honking was kind of hard on the ears.

    Jorge Castaneda implies that things like no stoplights are justified as keeping wimpy gringos out of Mexico. He says, however, that Mexicans would find they like not having to take their lives in their hands every time they try to walk across the street.

    Replies: @IBC, @Name Withheld

    I was in Davao in the Philippines, and they only have four stoplights in a city of one million. Most of the drivers are professionals and seem to have some kind of “code” between them to avoid accidents. It was a challenge to cross the street and I concede that this kind of thing probably doesn’t scale to the size of Mexico City or Jakarta. IMHO Davao is actually a fairly functional city for the third world.

  201. @Dave Pinsen
    @Anonymous

    There are also well-paid food scientists working for Nabisco. There's a Nabisco food tech building at Rutgers University ( http://whereru.rutgers.edu/gigapans/226/Nabisco-Advanced-Food-Technology-Institute ). The thing about losing factories is that you often also lose the higher-end engineering and R&D work too, since it all clusters together.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    That’s less the case. Rutgers is in New Jersey, and the Nabisco plant was in Chicago, so they didn’t even cluster together in the US. German and Japanese automakers have factorise all over the world, but keep much of their engineering and R&D at home.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Anonymous

    They have a facility which I think is both a factory and R&D site near me in Fair Lawn, NJ. I don't think the Chicago plant was their only one.

  202. @Grumpy
    @jay-w


    Actually, Mexico is full of WalMarts, also... I think we have about 4 WalMarts here as well as Costco, Sam’s Club, Home Depot, Auto-Zone, Staples, Office Depot, McDonalds, Burger-King, Dairy Queen, etc., etc.
     
    America and Mexico are looking more and more alike in every way.

    Replies: @Foreign Expert

    America and Mexico are looking more and more alike in every way.

    Not just Mexico. Most of those options are available in Thailand and the Philippines too.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Foreign Expert

    And they have Costco near Kyoto now, too, as well as ¥100 shops ($1 stores) full of cheap crap everywhere.

  203. @Steve Sailer
    @(((Owen)))

    In 1967, I accompanied my parents to look at the American retirement colony at Lake Chapala (where Fred Reed lives now, I believe). It was pretty nice.

    Mexico is not doomed by nature to misery. It's one of the more favored landscapes on earth.

    And there are a lot of fairly easy steps to make it a better place, like more traffic stoplights.

    Replies: @(((Owen))), @George Taylor, @Tony

    Looking at Fred’s pictures, I think he’s greeking it in Mexico.

  204. @nglaer
    @Sam Haysom

    One could easily forget the Unpatriotic Conservatives thing if there was evidence that he regretted it or changed. Question is, is Frum still an Israel-first guy who is basically advising the GOP how to be better on domestic issues so it can better "invade the world" or has he also rethought his foreign policy views? Don't see evidence of the latter, but maybe it's there.

    Replies: @AP

    The guy is Jewish and is loyal to his people and his heritage, while still being thoughtful and useful with respect to other issues. Take his middle-eastern opinions with a grain of salt given his personal background, but don’t necessarily let them invalidate his other ideas.

  205. Leftist conservative [AKA "the preacher who will freeze you to make you immortal"] says: • Website

    the Dissident Right is moving more and more Left on economics…. a welcome move as far as I am concerned. But, Steve, aren’t afraid of alienating your target audience?

    Also, HBD related:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/21/sports/basketball/jordan-kilganon-best-dunk-youtube.html

  206. @syonredux
    @(((Owen)))


    The Hispanic population is expected to reach about 106 million in 2050, about double what it is today, according to new U.S. Census Bureau population projections.
     
    http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/12/16/with-fewer-new-arrivals-census-lowers-hispanic-population-projections-2/

    And those numbers do not bode well for Anglo-America:


    “Raven’s Standard Progressive Matrices test was administered to a representative sample of 920 white, Mestizo and Native Mexican Indian children aged 7–10 years in Mexico. The mean IQs in relation to a British mean of 100 obtained from the 1979 British standardization sample and adjusted for the estimated subsequent increase were: 98·0 for whites, 94·3 for Mestizos and 83·3 for Native Mexican Indians.”

    http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=266611

    And then let’s compare this to the racial composition of Mexico:

    98.0: Mexican Whites
    94.3:Mexican Mestizos
    83.3: Mexican Amerinds

    According to the CIA FACTBOOK, Mexico’s racial breakdown is:mestizo (Amerindian-Spanish) 60%, Amerindian or predominantly Amerindian 30%, white 9%, other 1%

    Things are not looking good Mexico way…..


    Now, let’s turn to real world achievements.Mexico and the Nobel prize. According to WIKIPEDIA, three people of Mexican origins have won a Nobel:

    Alfonso García Robles: With Alva Myrdal, got the Peace Prize in 1982. For what it’s worth, he looks very White in his WIKIPEDIA photo.

    Mario J. Molina: Along with Paul J. Crutzen and F. Sherwood Rowland, he got the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for studying the threat posed to the ozone layer by CFCs. Looks pretty White in his WIKIPEDIA photo.

    Octavio Paz: 1990 Nobel in Lit. Based on WIKIPEDIA photo, he might have some Amerind ancestry (or he might not).

    So, Three prizes. Total. As compared to 10 for Scotland, 15 for Australia, 23 for Canada, 74 for England , 306 for the USA, …..

    Now, all of these figures are from WIKIPEDIA, so I’m sure that one could argue about the margins…but the overall portrait of Mexican achievement is pretty dire.

    How about Fields Medalists?:

    United States 12

    France 10

    Soviet Union (3) / Russia (6) 9

    United Kingdom 7

    Japan 3
    Belgium 2

    West Germany (1) / Germany (0) 1


    Australia 1

    British Hong Kong 1

    Finland 1

    Israel 1

    Italy 1

    Norway 1

    New Zealand 1

    Sweden 1

    Vietnam 1

    Iran 1

    Brazil 1

    (None Stateless) 1

    I’ve left out Manjul Bhargava. His background is complicated.

    So, Mexico has zero.Hell, all of Latin America has exactly one, which ties them with New Zealand.


    Race creates the foundation upon which culture is built.Mexico’s racial mix produces mediocrity.In contrast, America’s overwhelming European racial stock allowed her to thrive.Mass immigration by Hispanic Amerinds and Mestizos is changing that.Soon, the USA will be as mediocre as Mexico.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Flip, @epebble

    “Manjul Bhargava. His background is complicated.”

    He is an Indian (dot, not feather).

  207. @Anonymous
    @TangoMan

    Just because it might sound nice to have cooking baking jobs as a welfare program doesn't mean it will actually happen if we mandate that corporations bake cookies in the US. Cookie factories in the US aren't going to hire many people unless wages fall significantly. Cookie factories in the US will only be profitable with greater automation and hiring fewer people.

    Replies: @TangoMan

    Cookie factories in the US will only be profitable with greater automation and hiring fewer people.

    This is the formula for the entire economy:

    Economist Philip Martin of the University of California likes to tell a story about the state’s tomato industry. In the early 1960s, growers relied on seasonal Mexican laborers, brought in under the government’s “bracero” program. The Mexicans picked the tomatoes that were then processed into ketchup and other products. In 1964 Congress killed the program despite growers’ warnings that its abolition would doom their industry. What happened? Well, plant scientists developed oblong tomatoes that could be harvested by machine. Since then, California’s tomato output has risen fivefold.

    Come the reckoning, when robots become ubiquitous, all of these peon laborers that we’re importing to be citizens will need welfare support. We’re stuck with low human capital American citizens, but we can do something about imported foreigners. The goal is to split the coming welfare pie into fewer pieces so that each piece is larger in dollar amounts rather than splitting that welfare pie into a larger denominator of people needing support because they don’t have skills which can be used to create value for employers while simultaneously earning enough to live in the US.

    Without job creation pressure focused on employers, they’ll ALWAYS take the path of least resistance, which is to privatize the gains and socialize the losses. Those people who are laid off don’t disappear, they become a burden on all of us.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @TangoMan

    That's all fine and good, but doesn't have anything to do with my point, which is that how much labor is hired is driven by labor costs.

    Replies: @TangoMan

  208. @asdf
    @Jack D

    "So Republicans are really just Democrats who oppose abortion? We are lost."..

    I don't know that that's what Frum was saying. But....

    What are Republicans these days? I don't recall GWB being Mr. Small government. Are the Republicans the pro war party? The party of the somewhat disgruntled about gay marriage and legal marijuana? The we-fake-Christianity-better party? The pull yourself up by the bootstraps like the Bush's did party?

    What would the average Reagan Democrat make of Jeb!?

    There were a lot of cultural reasons people voted for Reagan. I think Frum is right in saying these reasons get thinner every year. Bashing drug-taking, abortion having, Jimmy Carter loving hippies was a great strategy, what, 40 years ago?

    Anyway, the Republican party IS lost. Burn it down. Frum's right. Disagree with him all you want. It is over.

    Replies: @TangoMan

    What are Republicans these days?

    Life becomes immeasurably simpler for Republicans if they come to terms with the fact that they’re the White People’s Party, or as Steve puts it, the Party of the Core. Trump is leading the party to this promised land. Once they accept who they are representing, then sensible policies can flow like water because there would be a connection between party purpose and party policy.

  209. @scrivener3

    Here’s a nice one-liner:

    Remember that Republican voters care more about aligning government with their values of work and family than they care about cutting the size of government as an end in itself.
     

    That is so sad, because "aligning government with their values" is an euphemism for harnessing the police power of the State to force other people to do as they desire. They don't care what the few government employees do; they care about the many a government order can make do.

    Maybe Republicans are so debased by power lust to want that, but I have no goals for other people to share my values of work and family. They may have their own values and as long as they refrain from using the state to try to control me, I'm good.

    America used to allow people freedom, even little people, and was rewarded by becoming the richest and most powerful nation on the planet.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    That is so sad, because “aligning government with their values” is an euphemism for harnessing the police power of the State to force other people to do as they desire.

    I think it means having the government subsidize (or at least not tax) things they value.

  210. @a Newsreader
    @George Taylor

    As usual among liberal reformers (and libertarian reformers) there is a hidden assumption that people will naturally work together for the common good. What they won't acknowledge is that unwritten rules work great only when there is a unified culture. Diversity necessitates heavyhandedness to maintain order.

    Replies: @TangoMan

    What they won’t acknowledge is that unwritten rules work great only when there is a unified culture. Diversity necessitates heavyhandedness to maintain order.

    I recall a few incidents where I’ve had real-life conversations with Bernie Sanders fans and they’re going on and on about his plan to bring Danish socialism to America and I ask them to clarify a few things that I don’t understand. I ask them why I’ve never heard them, or Sanders, talk about how they’re going to ethnically cleanse America to bring about the racial homogeneity which is a necessary precondition to having a sharing society. Then I keep a blank expression on my face and await an answer, looking as though I’m genuinely curious. Suffice to say that after a few rounds they can’t point to a diverse society that makes their desired socialism work and they’re frustrated that reality is kicking them in the nads.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @TangoMan

    I gave two Irish couples an Uber ride from NJ to their homes in Queens over the weekend. They were soused from a friend's Christmas party. After I dropped off the first couple, I took the second couple across Queens, which is huge, to their building. The man kept pointing out the ends of one ethnic neighborhood and the beginnings of another. Then, in his thick Irish brogue, he says, "America the melting pot -- what a crock of sh*t.".

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @TangoMan


    …Bernie Sanders fans and they’re going on and on about his plan to bring Danish socialism to America and I ask them to clarify a few things…
     
    One thing they might clarify is how exactly is Denmark "socialist"? Even the airline and much of the country's fire protection is in private hands. Maersk, Novo Nordisk, Carlsberg, and Lego were always in little danger of being nationalized-- unlike GM.

    Replies: @TangoMan

  211. @Anonymous
    @Dave Pinsen

    That's less the case. Rutgers is in New Jersey, and the Nabisco plant was in Chicago, so they didn't even cluster together in the US. German and Japanese automakers have factorise all over the world, but keep much of their engineering and R&D at home.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    They have a facility which I think is both a factory and R&D site near me in Fair Lawn, NJ. I don’t think the Chicago plant was their only one.

  212. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    @TangoMan

    I wish someone in the Trump camp would discover the Richmans' case for balanced trade: https://www.overdrive.com/media/1735602/balanced-trade

    They point out the legality, benefit, and logic of it, but Trump would immediately grok the "art of the deal" in this: we are the world's largest consumer market, by $, and the power to limit access to that market gives us enormous leverage.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    That’s what we had until Reagan. It’s called Keynesianism. Trade deficits equal “leakages” in aggregate demand, and maintaining aggregate demand is the priority in Keynesianism. This led to the much ballyhooed inflation of the 70s, which was actually a great period for the working class and a time of increasing wealth and prosperity for them as the real value of their mortgage and other debts declined while prices for consumer and other goods they produced and their wages went up. Of course this was bad for the wealthy and elites who live off of financial assets, as well as for many professionals, which is why it’s depicted as a disaster that Reagan and Thatcher in the UK, when in reality they dismantled Keynesianism and previous trade policy in order to benefit wealthy financial asset holders.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Anonymous

    Balanced trade isn't the same thing as Keynesianism, but Keynesian stimulus certainly works a lot better when you don't have a trade deficit, as I noted in a letter to the FT a few years back on the limits of the Obama stimulus: http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/d4d495ec-a763-11e0-beda-00144feabdc0.html

    And Reagan isn't to blame for our trade deficits. Our last annual trade surplus was in 1975. We moved away from protectionism after World War II, in an effort to prop up our Cold War allies, as Ian Fletcher explained here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ian-fletcher/america-was-founded-as-a_b_713521.html

    Our trade surpluses continued for another couple of decades, but as our oil production dropped, our oil consumption rose, and exporters like Japan started to climb the value chain, we slipped into persistent trade deficits.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  213. @TangoMan
    @a Newsreader

    What they won’t acknowledge is that unwritten rules work great only when there is a unified culture. Diversity necessitates heavyhandedness to maintain order.

    I recall a few incidents where I've had real-life conversations with Bernie Sanders fans and they're going on and on about his plan to bring Danish socialism to America and I ask them to clarify a few things that I don't understand. I ask them why I've never heard them, or Sanders, talk about how they're going to ethnically cleanse America to bring about the racial homogeneity which is a necessary precondition to having a sharing society. Then I keep a blank expression on my face and await an answer, looking as though I'm genuinely curious. Suffice to say that after a few rounds they can't point to a diverse society that makes their desired socialism work and they're frustrated that reality is kicking them in the nads.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Reg Cæsar

    I gave two Irish couples an Uber ride from NJ to their homes in Queens over the weekend. They were soused from a friend’s Christmas party. After I dropped off the first couple, I took the second couple across Queens, which is huge, to their building. The man kept pointing out the ends of one ethnic neighborhood and the beginnings of another. Then, in his thick Irish brogue, he says, “America the melting pot — what a crock of sh*t.”.

  214. @Reg Cæsar
    @Chrisnonymous



    No matter how many times I see it, I can’t help reading “doner kebab” as “donor kebab,” which sounds disgusting.

     

    In the assisted reproduction business, the customer almost never encounters the donor's skewer.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    In my mind, it’s as in “organ donor,” but it’s gross either way.

  215. @Foreign Expert
    @Grumpy


    America and Mexico are looking more and more alike in every way.
     
    Not just Mexico. Most of those options are available in Thailand and the Philippines too.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    And they have Costco near Kyoto now, too, as well as ¥100 shops ($1 stores) full of cheap crap everywhere.

  216. Jawas took over Star Wars.

  217. Paglia on the homo-agenda from 2003.

  218. @TangoMan
    @Anonymous

    Cookie factories in the US will only be profitable with greater automation and hiring fewer people.

    This is the formula for the entire economy:


    Economist Philip Martin of the University of California likes to tell a story about the state's tomato industry. In the early 1960s, growers relied on seasonal Mexican laborers, brought in under the government's "bracero" program. The Mexicans picked the tomatoes that were then processed into ketchup and other products. In 1964 Congress killed the program despite growers' warnings that its abolition would doom their industry. What happened? Well, plant scientists developed oblong tomatoes that could be harvested by machine. Since then, California's tomato output has risen fivefold.
     
    Come the reckoning, when robots become ubiquitous, all of these peon laborers that we're importing to be citizens will need welfare support. We're stuck with low human capital American citizens, but we can do something about imported foreigners. The goal is to split the coming welfare pie into fewer pieces so that each piece is larger in dollar amounts rather than splitting that welfare pie into a larger denominator of people needing support because they don't have skills which can be used to create value for employers while simultaneously earning enough to live in the US.

    Without job creation pressure focused on employers, they'll ALWAYS take the path of least resistance, which is to privatize the gains and socialize the losses. Those people who are laid off don't disappear, they become a burden on all of us.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    That’s all fine and good, but doesn’t have anything to do with my point, which is that how much labor is hired is driven by labor costs.

    • Replies: @TangoMan
    @Anonymous

    which is that how much labor is hired is driven by labor costs.

    How much is a product worth, when manufactured with cheap labor, if the product can't be sold?

    The rules of the marketplace (not the dynamics of economic theory) are truly a social construction and social constructions can be modified. The 8-hr day is a social construction, workers comp premiums are a social construction, allowing imports to compete with domestic production is a social construction, the marketplace is shaped by law and it's within this space that reform (bounded by profitability, supply/demand,) takes shape.

    Directly to your point - check this graph - there's been a decline in Labor's share of productivity gains and this has benefited Capital. An enterprise needs to hire as much labor as necessary in order to complete a task and must pay market rate for that labor and will do so so long as the enterprise can profit. The level of profit is the slack that is the focus here. What's needed is a lever of some sort to induce hiring in America and raise wage levels. Another lever is needed to reduce labor supply.

  219. @Anon
    Great article from Frum but notice nary a word about the Republican base disagreeing with the neocon foreign policy agenda that Frum also is a big believer in.

    Republican foreign policy - what is good for Israel, Netenyahu is always right, and Iran/Hizbollah are eeeevil and must be destroyed.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    Is Frum still a big believer in that foreign policy agenda? I’m not sure he is. Really, few are today, outside of nutters like John McCain, Lindsey Graham, Marco Rubio, etc.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Dave Pinsen

    Yes:

    http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2014/07/russia-has-become-dangerous-again/374687/

    http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/25/opinion/frum-us-iran-deal/index.html

    He's also not only pro-gun control, but fundamentally hostile to the Second Amendment and engages in intellectual dishonesty about it and tries to associate it with black radicalism in order to put off ordinary Americans from it:

    http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/343794/flippant-frummery-kevin-d-williamson

  220. @Former Darfur
    @Massimo Heitor

    Chinese restaurants are widespread because Chinese immigrants can run them profitably and staff them with other, fresher Chinese immigrants, not because there is an especially high market demand for Chinese food. Their food costs are low, their labor costs are low, and they usually locate in buildings in which other restaurant entrepreneurs have failed and are "damaged goods" to others.

    My sister is a food inspector and has put me permanently off eating Chinese, except for the supermarket cafeteria, which actually follows the health laws.

    Replies: @Massimo Heitor, @Jack D

    Chinese restaurants are widespread because Chinese immigrants can run them profitably and staff them with other, fresher Chinese immigrants, not because there is an especially high market demand for Chinese food.

    Sure, family restaurants are driven my worker motivation. Many ethnic groups don’t want to do food service work. Chinese have large numbers of people that are willing to do food service work.

    Their food costs are low, their labor costs are low, and they usually locate in buildings in which other restaurant entrepreneurs have failed and are “damaged goods” to others.

    Most businesses want low costs for rent and materials and worthwhile margins.

    If you don’t like it, don’t eat it. Consumers in the west have a dazzling array of innovative food options. I know some dirty Chinese spots I won’t eat at, but I know amazing Chinese food spots. Often Chinese food eaters just want a healthy and tasty rice+veggie+sauce stir fry, not necessarily some ethnic experience.

  221. @Jack D
    @Gunnar von Cowtown

    This only works so far. Say one day you get a craving to cook Ghanaian cuisine for some reason and you look up some recipes. They call for shitto sauce, unrefined palm oil, fufu, cassava, etc. Your local supermarket doesn't have any of these. And even if you could get your hands on the ingredients, unless you had tasted the real thing, you really wouldn't know how far off the mark you were. Printed recipes, even YouTube videos, are no substitute for "Fingerspitzengefühle" - finger tip feeling, which is what skilled cooks of a particular cuisine know by taste bud memory - this is why such cooks hardly even measure.

    I'm not saying that it's a good idea to let millions of Ghanaians into your country just so you can reap the dubious benefits of eating fufu (not a big improvement on mashed potatoes) but you aren't really going to get authentic foreign food without authentic foreigners to provide a customer base for ethnic shops, restaurants, etc. Maybe it's not worth turning your country into something unrecognizable just so you can get a plate of jollof rice, but don't imagine that all you need is the Time-Life "Food of Africa" book and you're in business.

    Replies: @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Ed, @reiner Tor, @Veracitor, @sb

    Very difficult to find authentic shitto sauce .

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @sb



    Very difficult to find authentic shitto sauce .

     

    It's kept in the back with the rapeseed oil, the shiitake, the pupu platters, and other items with embarrassing names. You have to whisper for it.
    , @Jack D
    @sb

    I have a jar of it in my fridge. It tastes like.....


    chili peppers.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  222. @bondo
    one small way to improve america is deport frum back to canada, the far, far northern part where the wolves and polar bears play

    Replies: @BurplesonAFB

    Sure, but seldom is heard a discouraging word

  223. @Anonymous
    @Dave Pinsen

    That's what we had until Reagan. It's called Keynesianism. Trade deficits equal "leakages" in aggregate demand, and maintaining aggregate demand is the priority in Keynesianism. This led to the much ballyhooed inflation of the 70s, which was actually a great period for the working class and a time of increasing wealth and prosperity for them as the real value of their mortgage and other debts declined while prices for consumer and other goods they produced and their wages went up. Of course this was bad for the wealthy and elites who live off of financial assets, as well as for many professionals, which is why it's depicted as a disaster that Reagan and Thatcher in the UK, when in reality they dismantled Keynesianism and previous trade policy in order to benefit wealthy financial asset holders.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    Balanced trade isn’t the same thing as Keynesianism, but Keynesian stimulus certainly works a lot better when you don’t have a trade deficit, as I noted in a letter to the FT a few years back on the limits of the Obama stimulus: http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/d4d495ec-a763-11e0-beda-00144feabdc0.html

    And Reagan isn’t to blame for our trade deficits. Our last annual trade surplus was in 1975. We moved away from protectionism after World War II, in an effort to prop up our Cold War allies, as Ian Fletcher explained here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ian-fletcher/america-was-founded-as-a_b_713521.html

    Our trade surpluses continued for another couple of decades, but as our oil production dropped, our oil consumption rose, and exporters like Japan started to climb the value chain, we slipped into persistent trade deficits.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Dave Pinsen

    I never said that balanced trade is the same thing as Keynesianism. I said that because trade deficits represent aggregate demand "leakages" in Keynesianism, they're regarded as bad and something to be avoided.

    Reagan along with the Republicans and Democrats after him absolutely are to blame. After WW2, other countries were major American export destinations. See Thomas Palley's work on this:

    http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2012/04/from-financial-crisis-to-stagnation-an-interview-with-thomas-palley.html


    My argument is that around 1980 the U.S. adopted a fundamentally flawed economic paradigm. From 1945 through to the mid-1970s the U.S. economy was characterized by a “virtuous circle” Keynesian growth model built on full employment and wage growth tied to productivity growth. The political triumph of Ronald Reagan enshrined a new economic paradigm that abandoned full employment and severed the link between wages and productivity growth.

    The new paradigm was fundamentally flawed. One flaw was that it relied on debt and asset price inflation to fuel growth instead of wages. A second flaw was the model of globalization which created an economic gash in the form of leakage of spending on imports (the trade deficit), leakage of investment spending offshore, and leakage of manufacturing jobs offshore. These twin flaws created a growing demand gap.

    That is where finance enters the picture as its role was to fill the demand gap. Financial deregulation, regulatory forbearance, financial innovation, financial mania, and plain vanilla financial fraud kept the economy going by making ever more credit available, However, as the economy cannibalized itself by undercutting income distribution and accumulating debt, it needed ever larger speculative bubbles to grow. The house price bubble was simply the last and biggest bubble and was effectively the only way around the stagnation that would otherwise have developed in 2001.
     

    Replies: @Nico

  224. @Dave Pinsen
    @Anon

    Is Frum still a big believer in that foreign policy agenda? I'm not sure he is. Really, few are today, outside of nutters like John McCain, Lindsey Graham, Marco Rubio, etc.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Yes:

    http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2014/07/russia-has-become-dangerous-again/374687/

    http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/25/opinion/frum-us-iran-deal/index.html

    He’s also not only pro-gun control, but fundamentally hostile to the Second Amendment and engages in intellectual dishonesty about it and tries to associate it with black radicalism in order to put off ordinary Americans from it:

    http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/343794/flippant-frummery-kevin-d-williamson

  225. @(((Owen)))
    @bomag

    "Meanwhile, maybe Mexico will take in the wonderful vibrants from El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, et al; and have even more awesome levels of…whatever. But, oops, no, they get shuttled directly to that great commode in the north."

    We have la Bestia, the migration route north straight to Gringolandia. It's named for the freight train the the national railroad never tries to protect from thousands of informal migrants on the roof. There are shelters and supply stops organized by Mexicans and the Mexican government to help Central American migrants bypass Mexico on their way north.

    Mexico has immigration laws. It's very easy to enforce them if you want to. And it's humane, too. We don't have byzantine bureaucracy delaying everything for decades. You can walk up to the border from Guatemala and just ask for a visitors' permit and have an interview a few hours later but you can't get away with taking a higher paying Mexican job because people will rat you out and the police do care, eventually. It's the opposite of the USA where you can't come legally without a phalanx of lawyers but there's no enforcement at all if you come illegally.

    Replies: @bomag

    There are shelters and supply stops organized by Mexicans and the Mexican government to help Central American migrants bypass Mexico on their way north.

    It is refreshing to hear your perspective that massive immigration does a country no good. One should, obviously, protect and use wisely their resources. Here in the US, our leaders and elites are gleefully setting everything on fire and telling us how wonderful is the warmth.

    But I’m not sure it is in Mexico’s long term interest to provide fuel for this conflagration. A crippled but intact neighbor is better than one of smoke, ash, and desperation.

    • Replies: @(((Owen)))
    @bomag

    "But I’m not sure it is in Mexico’s long term interest to provide fuel for this conflagration."

    How is Mexico supposed to stop Americans from sucking mass migration into their country using Mexico as a straw when the American people insist on having no immigration enforcement? The Democrats produce Obama and Clinton and the Republicans produce Bush and Rubio or Cruz because immigration enforcement is so unpopular that Americans refuse to vote for anyone who might do it. Mexico can't help America if America won't help itself.

    Replies: @bomag, @bomag

  226. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    @Anonymous

    Balanced trade isn't the same thing as Keynesianism, but Keynesian stimulus certainly works a lot better when you don't have a trade deficit, as I noted in a letter to the FT a few years back on the limits of the Obama stimulus: http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/d4d495ec-a763-11e0-beda-00144feabdc0.html

    And Reagan isn't to blame for our trade deficits. Our last annual trade surplus was in 1975. We moved away from protectionism after World War II, in an effort to prop up our Cold War allies, as Ian Fletcher explained here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ian-fletcher/america-was-founded-as-a_b_713521.html

    Our trade surpluses continued for another couple of decades, but as our oil production dropped, our oil consumption rose, and exporters like Japan started to climb the value chain, we slipped into persistent trade deficits.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I never said that balanced trade is the same thing as Keynesianism. I said that because trade deficits represent aggregate demand “leakages” in Keynesianism, they’re regarded as bad and something to be avoided.

    Reagan along with the Republicans and Democrats after him absolutely are to blame. After WW2, other countries were major American export destinations. See Thomas Palley’s work on this:

    http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2012/04/from-financial-crisis-to-stagnation-an-interview-with-thomas-palley.html

    My argument is that around 1980 the U.S. adopted a fundamentally flawed economic paradigm. From 1945 through to the mid-1970s the U.S. economy was characterized by a “virtuous circle” Keynesian growth model built on full employment and wage growth tied to productivity growth. The political triumph of Ronald Reagan enshrined a new economic paradigm that abandoned full employment and severed the link between wages and productivity growth.

    The new paradigm was fundamentally flawed. One flaw was that it relied on debt and asset price inflation to fuel growth instead of wages. A second flaw was the model of globalization which created an economic gash in the form of leakage of spending on imports (the trade deficit), leakage of investment spending offshore, and leakage of manufacturing jobs offshore. These twin flaws created a growing demand gap.

    That is where finance enters the picture as its role was to fill the demand gap. Financial deregulation, regulatory forbearance, financial innovation, financial mania, and plain vanilla financial fraud kept the economy going by making ever more credit available, However, as the economy cannibalized itself by undercutting income distribution and accumulating debt, it needed ever larger speculative bubbles to grow. The house price bubble was simply the last and biggest bubble and was effectively the only way around the stagnation that would otherwise have developed in 2001.

    • Replies: @Nico
    @Anonymous


    The political triumph of Ronald Reagan enshrined a new economic paradigm that... severed the link between wages and productivity growth.
     
    The argument here seems to be excessively distributive-centric, i.e. that trade deficits are only bad because economic growth is decoupled from wage growth. That is true to some extent when one accepts the Douglas argument that "Systems were made for man, not man for systems" but it becomes highly dangerous in the hands of left-liberal polemicists who imagine based on paper accounting that the U.S. is still a "rich" country in real and meaningful terms. Balanced trade is an end in itself, because trade deficits erode a country's real wealth and excessive trade surpluses pose a risk for Dutch disease, especially when they are based on something so artificial as Bretton Woods. It is not possible, today, to implement a purely Keynesian solution that would either redress inequitability or would again make the U.S. a net exporter: U.S. industry was never quite as competitive and efficient as it was chalked up to be, and this was made painfully clear in the automotive sector once Japan and the E.E.C. had recovered sufficiently from World War II to force an end to America's Exorbitant Privilege.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  227. @Anonymous
    @(((Owen)))

    Owen, just curious, any advice for a very gringo looking family (paler than snow, red or light hair, with young kids) that's dreaming about a vacation in Mexico City or some other nice Mexican city, maybe even language school?

    Replies: @Stealth, @(((Owen)))

    Yes, BC, much advice. But I’d need to know more. How old are the young kids? Do you like big cities like New York City or San Francisco or small towns like Boulder or Santa Fe? Nature in a formal park or a big mountain or urbane culture in a Broadway show and gallery stroll? How long do you have — language school implies sticking around for three to six weeks or more? Do any of you speak any Spanish now? (I can’t recommend live theatre or antiquarian bookstore shopping if you don’t.) Do you want full cultural immersion or lots of Gringo influence? How much native Mexican influence and deep history do you want to see — would you prefer to see twenty-first century vanguard Mexico? How active are you — can I send you to climb a 400m hill for the view or to try safe kayaks in flat water or bicycle across town? (Mexico City has more people living on canals than Venice.)

    I’d take really young kids to San Cristóbal de las Casas or Guanajuato unless they already love city life. Maybe Taxco. Taxco or Guanajuato could be combined on a 10+ day trip with Mexico City if four hours on a luxury bus doesn’t make your kids miserable (get Dramamine — there are hills).

    The real big city life happens in Mexico City, though. If you go there, be sure to see the Ballet Folklórico and stroll around the adjacent Alameda Central park and the historic buildings east of it — where they filmed the latest 007. (Don’t try to drive there like Steve did — take the subway.) Maybe try an AirB&B or a hotel in a neighborhood. Roma Norte neighborhood in Mexico City has a few nice economical hotels in the Hotel Roosevelt and the Hotel Embassy and maybe others. It’s a relaxed nice city neighborhood with classic architecture, a gallery scene, a few colleges that give short language classes, top world class restaurants (try La Tecla — order the flaming crepes dessert for the kids) and reliable street food — on the same block, and pretty parks (not one of the 50 richest fancy neighborhoods in the city, but in the richest 20%). Also it’s very safe — I walk around after midnight all the time. Mexico is pretty kid friendly for such a big city now that I think about it.

    These two short articles aren’t bad:

    http://thepointsguy.com/2015/10/guide-to-mexico-city/

    http://thepointsguy.com/2015/12/visit-these-small-towns-in-mexico/

    And indulgent travel fantasies should always include the latest Lonely Planet, of course.

  228. @Thea
    @jay-w

    Every time I shop in Walmart I feel like I live in the Soviet Union due to the Long lines with ugly architecture.

    I guess the stocked shelves are a bonus but I know they were shocked at 2am for low wages.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jack D

    “Every time I shop in Walmart I feel like I live in the Soviet Union due to the Long lines with ugly architecture.

    I guess the stocked shelves are a bonus but I know they were shocked at 2am for low wages.”

    Target’s interior architecture looks more 1st World, while Walmart’s interior architecture looks more 3rd World.

  229. @Massimo Heitor
    @Anonymous Nephew


    Steak pie, chips and beans is NOT bland. Haggis is NOT bland. A full English breakfast or a full Sunday Roast is NOT bland. A Welsh lamb stew is not bland either.
     
    Those things aren't bland, but they aren't what today's westerners want to eat and they aren't what today's food pioneers are passionate about creating. To pick a semi-random example, Steve Ellis, is a completely non-hispanic white guy who doesn't care about the haggis of his ancestors, and channeled his passion into founding the successful Chipotle chain with a Mexican ethnic theme. And many people prefer eating there over somewhere "authentic".

    Modern westerners still like English style breakfasts, teas, and english muffins, sure. Also most serious food innovators draw on classic ethnic foods as inspirations, but they need to innovate rather than cling to tradition.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Brutusale

    Steve Ellis, is a completely non-hispanic white guy who doesn’t care about the haggis of his ancestors…

    Mexican haggis would be the ultimate fusion. Or Chinese haggis, using stray dog.

  230. @TangoMan
    @a Newsreader

    What they won’t acknowledge is that unwritten rules work great only when there is a unified culture. Diversity necessitates heavyhandedness to maintain order.

    I recall a few incidents where I've had real-life conversations with Bernie Sanders fans and they're going on and on about his plan to bring Danish socialism to America and I ask them to clarify a few things that I don't understand. I ask them why I've never heard them, or Sanders, talk about how they're going to ethnically cleanse America to bring about the racial homogeneity which is a necessary precondition to having a sharing society. Then I keep a blank expression on my face and await an answer, looking as though I'm genuinely curious. Suffice to say that after a few rounds they can't point to a diverse society that makes their desired socialism work and they're frustrated that reality is kicking them in the nads.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Reg Cæsar

    …Bernie Sanders fans and they’re going on and on about his plan to bring Danish socialism to America and I ask them to clarify a few things…

    One thing they might clarify is how exactly is Denmark “socialist”? Even the airline and much of the country’s fire protection is in private hands. Maersk, Novo Nordisk, Carlsberg, and Lego were always in little danger of being nationalized– unlike GM.

    • Replies: @TangoMan
    @Reg Cæsar

    One thing they might clarify is how exactly is Denmark “socialist”? Even the airline and much of the country’s fire protection is in private hands. Maersk, Novo Nordisk, Carlsberg, and Lego were always in little danger of being nationalized– unlike GM.

    Why confuse the issue? I don't care about getting them to think about socialism, I trying to get them to understand how corrosive diversity and multiculturalism is to the dream of their socialist nirvana in whichever form it takes. I want to be the pebble in their shoe, the messenger of a hate-fact that they can't ignore.

  231. @Anonymous
    @TangoMan

    That's all fine and good, but doesn't have anything to do with my point, which is that how much labor is hired is driven by labor costs.

    Replies: @TangoMan

    which is that how much labor is hired is driven by labor costs.

    How much is a product worth, when manufactured with cheap labor, if the product can’t be sold?

    The rules of the marketplace (not the dynamics of economic theory) are truly a social construction and social constructions can be modified. The 8-hr day is a social construction, workers comp premiums are a social construction, allowing imports to compete with domestic production is a social construction, the marketplace is shaped by law and it’s within this space that reform (bounded by profitability, supply/demand,) takes shape.

    Directly to your point – check this graph – there’s been a decline in Labor’s share of productivity gains and this has benefited Capital. An enterprise needs to hire as much labor as necessary in order to complete a task and must pay market rate for that labor and will do so so long as the enterprise can profit. The level of profit is the slack that is the focus here. What’s needed is a lever of some sort to induce hiring in America and raise wage levels. Another lever is needed to reduce labor supply.

  232. @iSteveFan
    @Jack D


    So, it seems like net Mexican migration has slowed to a crawl or even reversed.
     
    I am sorry, but I get tired of hearing this. Is saying that Mexican migration has slowed to a crawl supposed to make us feel like everything is OK? Mexico has sent approximately 11 million people into the US since 1980. That's just counting since 1980, BTW, and not any prior. How does that 11 million stack up to what others have sent? Since 1607 until the present, we have had approximately 7 million Germans and 6 million Italians, our two formerly leading immigrant source nations. So Mexico has sent almost as many immigrants in 35 years as the next two leading nations combined have sent in 400!

    Saying that it has now slowed to a crawl after what we've have been through is a little like closing the barn door after the horse has left. We still need to erect proper barriers on the border and enforce immigration and labor laws. Mexico is the type of country where it would not be unexpected for them to take a turn for the worse. And when that next cycle happens, I want us to be prepared so as to not have to go through another such immivasion as we've just had.

    Replies: @JSM

    Mexico has sent approximately 11 million people into the US since 1980.
    I agree with your point. I would just amend to say, there’s more like 30 million, even 50 million, people of Mexican descent here, including all illegals and their anchor babies, who ought not be here.

    I used to live in SoCal. I once read an article that INS reckoned it caught a million illegals a year, and that that was only about half of the them coming across. So that means a million a year getting in since 1980, 36 years = 36 million. Add in the anchor baby boom, yeah, 50 million sounds right. And meets with the evidence of my lying eyes… Mexicans speaking Spanish everywhere you go, here in former Whitopia of Wyoming.

    Mr. Trump, Build Up This Wall!!!!

  233. @5371
    @Steve Sailer

    [Los Angeles cars have outstanding pollution controls]

    Bet they won't have to keep being inspected as stringently to stay on the road in Mexico, though!

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Clyde

    [Los Angeles cars have outstanding pollution controls]
    Bet they won’t have to keep being inspected as stringently to stay on the road in Mexico, though!

    Good observation meaning that if/when the cat converter fails it will be chopped off for its palladium/platinum. Same for any other pollution controls and concerns. And if I were in Mexico I would do the same.
    Mexico is the “tragedy of the commons” (G Hardin) writ large and we are moving in the same direction. One manifestation being when your business is structured to privatize profits and socialize loses………

    aka dumping your effluent on the boobs_peasantry_tax payers in a common area.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Clyde


    Mexico is the “tragedy of the commons” (G Hardin) writ large and we are moving in the same direction.
     
    That’s the thing about mass immigration: It turns the country into a giant commons. And “grab what you can” is the inevitable response to a commons. See Garret Hardin’s original formulation (The Tragedy of the Commons or Matt Ridley’s discussion in The Origins of Virtue: Human Instincts aned the Evolution of Cooperation).

    One fundamental difference between Republican voters and Democrat voters is that Democrats generally view the country as a commons, while Republican voters are committed to the perpetuation of the country as a going concern. This ties in with Steve’s views on affordable family formation, as those who live where family formation is affordable are more likely to view the country as a going concern, although the arrow of causation can also point in the other direction as those predisposed to the going-concern viewpoint will re-locate to where the environment is more suitable for their productive (and reproductive) project.

    Replies: @Clyde

  234. @bomag
    @(((Owen)))

    There are shelters and supply stops organized by Mexicans and the Mexican government to help Central American migrants bypass Mexico on their way north.

    It is refreshing to hear your perspective that massive immigration does a country no good. One should, obviously, protect and use wisely their resources. Here in the US, our leaders and elites are gleefully setting everything on fire and telling us how wonderful is the warmth.

    But I'm not sure it is in Mexico's long term interest to provide fuel for this conflagration. A crippled but intact neighbor is better than one of smoke, ash, and desperation.

    Replies: @(((Owen)))

    “But I’m not sure it is in Mexico’s long term interest to provide fuel for this conflagration.”

    How is Mexico supposed to stop Americans from sucking mass migration into their country using Mexico as a straw when the American people insist on having no immigration enforcement? The Democrats produce Obama and Clinton and the Republicans produce Bush and Rubio or Cruz because immigration enforcement is so unpopular that Americans refuse to vote for anyone who might do it. Mexico can’t help America if America won’t help itself.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @(((Owen)))

    shelters and supply stops organized by Mexicans and the Mexican government ...

    This is drug dealer morality. You actively foist a deleterious product on your fellow man, then claim, "hey, he begged me to sell. How am I supposed to stop him from sucking this damaging product into his system?"

    It lessens the total quality of civilization.

    , @bomag
    @(((Owen)))

    How is Mexico supposed to stop Americans from sucking mass migration into their country using Mexico as a straw when the American people insist on having no immigration enforcement?

    The "people" have always polled against no immigration enforcement. It is something foisted upon us by our central authorities and taste makers who have managed to insulate themselves from mass opinion. This is our current illness, and it would help if our neighbors would not take advantage of our infirmity to demographically sodomize us.

    Mexico doesn't have to let itself be used as a straw for this pass through migration. It would help the situation here, and protect the "brand", such as it is, for all the Mexican citizens colonizing this place.

  235. @sb
    @Jack D

    Very difficult to find authentic shitto sauce .

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jack D

    Very difficult to find authentic shitto sauce .

    It’s kept in the back with the rapeseed oil, the shiitake, the pupu platters, and other items with embarrassing names. You have to whisper for it.

  236. @(((Owen)))
    @Jefferson

    "You can’t easily improve a high crime narco state like Mexico."

    Technically, the worse a place is the easier it is to improve. The better it gets, the harder it is to improve further. But Mexico is on an upward trend so simple momentum might be enough for a while. Lately I'm enjoying the president's Telecom Reform that is hoovering cash back from Carlos Slim's wallet into mine at a pleasing pace.

    "Also Mexico’s racial demographics work against them. Mexico does not even make the list of the top 5 Whitest countries in Latin America percentage wise. Mexico has a glass ceiling due to it not being a majority White country. You can’t turn a country first world with only a 9 percent White population."

    Somebody tell Japan. And Korea, the Republic of China, Singapore, Chile, Israel, and Hong Kong.

    I bet those Japanese sure wish they could live in a whitopia like Ukraine, Chechnya, or West Virginia.

    ---

    "Mexicans don’t run cities like a well oil machine."

    What country did Guanajuato, Querétaro, León, and Aguascalientes move to?

    Replies: @iffen, @Jefferson, @Anonymous

    Chechnya is about as ‘white’ as Mexico is. That is, ‘not at all’.

  237. @Reg Cæsar
    @TangoMan


    …Bernie Sanders fans and they’re going on and on about his plan to bring Danish socialism to America and I ask them to clarify a few things…
     
    One thing they might clarify is how exactly is Denmark "socialist"? Even the airline and much of the country's fire protection is in private hands. Maersk, Novo Nordisk, Carlsberg, and Lego were always in little danger of being nationalized-- unlike GM.

    Replies: @TangoMan

    One thing they might clarify is how exactly is Denmark “socialist”? Even the airline and much of the country’s fire protection is in private hands. Maersk, Novo Nordisk, Carlsberg, and Lego were always in little danger of being nationalized– unlike GM.

    Why confuse the issue? I don’t care about getting them to think about socialism, I trying to get them to understand how corrosive diversity and multiculturalism is to the dream of their socialist nirvana in whichever form it takes. I want to be the pebble in their shoe, the messenger of a hate-fact that they can’t ignore.

  238. @(((Owen)))
    @Steve Sailer

    "I stayed in a hotel overlooking the main drag in Mexico City, the Paseo de la Reforma."

    Ooh. Fancy. Paseo de la Reforma is a place to go looking for two hundred plus Gringo dollar hotel rooms nowadays amongst the skyscrapers. I recommend visiting on Sunday mornings when the whole route is reserved exclusively for joggers, cyclists, and inline skaters. It's quiet and fun and you can ride or skate the whole way from Chapultepec Castle to the Basilica of Guadalupe.

    Reforma was built around 1900 by francophile dictator Porfirio Díaz to be his Champs Élysées. Along it are several monumental traffic circles, none of which are operated as traffic circles. The local drivers are determined to use them as big inconvenient intersections instead and it works much better than the awful European kind. It looks chaotic compared to the pretty but dangerous and inefficient way European ones go. Most have stop lights now, though the Cristóbal Colón monument has several unsignaled conflicts and quite a few hotels; maybe you stayed nearby.

    There is a lot of honking. I try to stay at hotels off major boulevards when I visit a city.

    "Jorge Castaneda implies that things like no stoplights are justified as keeping wimpy gringos out of Mexico."

    That would justify a lot. Gringos are determined to crash their own nation and I don't want them bringing that south. But all we really need to do is keep speaking Spanish. Gringos simply aren't willing to work at studying anything. We're invisible to their cultural map.

    No stoplights actually makes life better. Look up the woonerf concept. Moving car traffic is not the purpose of a city, though I understand how living in LA can make you forget that. Mexico is a walking city. Cars are just a status symbol that will make your life worse, like dating a supermodel.

    Castañeda is smart and writes a good piece but is too much of a prissy New Yorker to really relax in Mexico. He lived in isolated neighborhoods, went to a very, very expensive foreign high school, went abroad for college, married a foreigner, and has lived in New York for a decade now. (Rubio may be more authentic.) He's the kind of Mexican we scare into a walled estate in Huixquilucan so we won't have to deal with him and his luxury SUV.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @ben tillman, @Clyde, @reiner Tor

    Good and witty post!!! Informativo!

  239. @Jefferson
    @Jack D

    "Hamburgers?"

    So McDonald's is a German American fast food chain?

    "To have really authentic ethnic restaurants you need fresh off the boat (plane) ethnics – #1 as chefs and #2 as customers to keep the chefs honest. All ethnic cuisines fade once immigration stops."

    Italian immigration to the U.S stopped, yet Italian cuisine is still alive and well in this country. You can even find Italian cuisine at many shopping mall food courts. There are even non Italians who get into the Italian food business. I know of an Italian restaurant in San Francisco that is owned by a married couple from Hong Kong.

    There is a segment of upper middle class/upper class Chinese people who like Southern European cuisine like Italian and French. It is different than what they are used to eating, but they see it as different in a good way.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @snorlax, @reiner Tor

    So McDonald’s is a German American fast food chain?

    Exactly. It is to German cuisine as Taco Bell is to Mexican, Panda Express is to Chinese or Pizza Hut is to Italian.

  240. @(((Owen)))
    @Steve Sailer

    "I stayed in a hotel overlooking the main drag in Mexico City, the Paseo de la Reforma."

    Ooh. Fancy. Paseo de la Reforma is a place to go looking for two hundred plus Gringo dollar hotel rooms nowadays amongst the skyscrapers. I recommend visiting on Sunday mornings when the whole route is reserved exclusively for joggers, cyclists, and inline skaters. It's quiet and fun and you can ride or skate the whole way from Chapultepec Castle to the Basilica of Guadalupe.

    Reforma was built around 1900 by francophile dictator Porfirio Díaz to be his Champs Élysées. Along it are several monumental traffic circles, none of which are operated as traffic circles. The local drivers are determined to use them as big inconvenient intersections instead and it works much better than the awful European kind. It looks chaotic compared to the pretty but dangerous and inefficient way European ones go. Most have stop lights now, though the Cristóbal Colón monument has several unsignaled conflicts and quite a few hotels; maybe you stayed nearby.

    There is a lot of honking. I try to stay at hotels off major boulevards when I visit a city.

    "Jorge Castaneda implies that things like no stoplights are justified as keeping wimpy gringos out of Mexico."

    That would justify a lot. Gringos are determined to crash their own nation and I don't want them bringing that south. But all we really need to do is keep speaking Spanish. Gringos simply aren't willing to work at studying anything. We're invisible to their cultural map.

    No stoplights actually makes life better. Look up the woonerf concept. Moving car traffic is not the purpose of a city, though I understand how living in LA can make you forget that. Mexico is a walking city. Cars are just a status symbol that will make your life worse, like dating a supermodel.

    Castañeda is smart and writes a good piece but is too much of a prissy New Yorker to really relax in Mexico. He lived in isolated neighborhoods, went to a very, very expensive foreign high school, went abroad for college, married a foreigner, and has lived in New York for a decade now. (Rubio may be more authentic.) He's the kind of Mexican we scare into a walled estate in Huixquilucan so we won't have to deal with him and his luxury SUV.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @ben tillman, @Clyde, @reiner Tor

    Maybe you’re right, but apparently Mexican traffic kills more people, especially compared to the relatively lower number of vehicles.

  241. Frum is just as much of a neocon asswipe as he was 15 years ago. All that’s different is that now he’s deathly afraid of all those NATURAL REPUBLICANS voting against permanent war and Pax Americana, and indirectly endangered the job prospects for Frum and his ilk.

    He’s not our friend.

  242. @Jefferson
    @Jack D

    "Hamburgers?"

    So McDonald's is a German American fast food chain?

    "To have really authentic ethnic restaurants you need fresh off the boat (plane) ethnics – #1 as chefs and #2 as customers to keep the chefs honest. All ethnic cuisines fade once immigration stops."

    Italian immigration to the U.S stopped, yet Italian cuisine is still alive and well in this country. You can even find Italian cuisine at many shopping mall food courts. There are even non Italians who get into the Italian food business. I know of an Italian restaurant in San Francisco that is owned by a married couple from Hong Kong.

    There is a segment of upper middle class/upper class Chinese people who like Southern European cuisine like Italian and French. It is different than what they are used to eating, but they see it as different in a good way.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @snorlax, @reiner Tor

    Yeah but most Italian food in America is way crappier than back in Italy. Italian food in Italy (which is a collection of a vast array of dishes and local cuisines) is among the best in the world. (I prefer French, but I wouldn’t commit suicide if someone told me from tomorrow I could only eat Italian as made in Italy.)

  243. @Anonymous
    @Dave Pinsen

    I never said that balanced trade is the same thing as Keynesianism. I said that because trade deficits represent aggregate demand "leakages" in Keynesianism, they're regarded as bad and something to be avoided.

    Reagan along with the Republicans and Democrats after him absolutely are to blame. After WW2, other countries were major American export destinations. See Thomas Palley's work on this:

    http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2012/04/from-financial-crisis-to-stagnation-an-interview-with-thomas-palley.html


    My argument is that around 1980 the U.S. adopted a fundamentally flawed economic paradigm. From 1945 through to the mid-1970s the U.S. economy was characterized by a “virtuous circle” Keynesian growth model built on full employment and wage growth tied to productivity growth. The political triumph of Ronald Reagan enshrined a new economic paradigm that abandoned full employment and severed the link between wages and productivity growth.

    The new paradigm was fundamentally flawed. One flaw was that it relied on debt and asset price inflation to fuel growth instead of wages. A second flaw was the model of globalization which created an economic gash in the form of leakage of spending on imports (the trade deficit), leakage of investment spending offshore, and leakage of manufacturing jobs offshore. These twin flaws created a growing demand gap.

    That is where finance enters the picture as its role was to fill the demand gap. Financial deregulation, regulatory forbearance, financial innovation, financial mania, and plain vanilla financial fraud kept the economy going by making ever more credit available, However, as the economy cannibalized itself by undercutting income distribution and accumulating debt, it needed ever larger speculative bubbles to grow. The house price bubble was simply the last and biggest bubble and was effectively the only way around the stagnation that would otherwise have developed in 2001.
     

    Replies: @Nico

    The political triumph of Ronald Reagan enshrined a new economic paradigm that… severed the link between wages and productivity growth.

    The argument here seems to be excessively distributive-centric, i.e. that trade deficits are only bad because economic growth is decoupled from wage growth. That is true to some extent when one accepts the Douglas argument that “Systems were made for man, not man for systems” but it becomes highly dangerous in the hands of left-liberal polemicists who imagine based on paper accounting that the U.S. is still a “rich” country in real and meaningful terms. Balanced trade is an end in itself, because trade deficits erode a country’s real wealth and excessive trade surpluses pose a risk for Dutch disease, especially when they are based on something so artificial as Bretton Woods. It is not possible, today, to implement a purely Keynesian solution that would either redress inequitability or would again make the U.S. a net exporter: U.S. industry was never quite as competitive and efficient as it was chalked up to be, and this was made painfully clear in the automotive sector once Japan and the E.E.C. had recovered sufficiently from World War II to force an end to America’s Exorbitant Privilege.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Nico

    America is still a very rich country in real terms. The postwar Keynesian regime that prevailed until the 80s is not feasible for political reasons, not for any fundamental economic reasons. As far as cars go, the European automakers have never surpassed US automakers in terms of basic quality and reliability and have relied on brand value on the global market.

  244. @JerseyGuy
    @Clyde

    Clyde,

    I think the one problem we have in the United States is that we have just so many layers of government relative to Europe. The United States is such a complex entity at this point is that it is basically not "reformable". As I've moved on from my "Big vs. Small" government phase, I've come to the conclusion that there are a lot of "Big Government" programs that actually work quite well (high speed internet comes to mind) but cannot be implemented under our current system.

    In short, the US is probably just too big at this point and would do better (and people would be much happier) if the US were to just break apart. Easier said than done of course but certainly worth putting the ideas out there.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic

    George Kennan had exactly this idea in his book, Around the Cragged Hill, although his objective was a group of autonomous regions, each of which would have the capacity for self-defense, but none of which would have the capacity to intervene in its neighbor’s affairs.

    The geography of dissolution is, however, awfully complex and I’d don’t see how it could be done without significant internal migration and economic dislocation. Still, an entity such as the U.S. is too large to govern centrally, even with the technology of the 21st Century, and planting the idea that there doesn’t need to be a United States of the present 50 states is a good plan. Carry on!!

  245. @AP
    @Jefferson


    Mexico does not even make the list of the top 5 Whitest countries in Latin America percentage wise. Mexico has a glass ceiling due to it not being a majority White country. You can’t turn a country first world with only a 9 percent White population.
     
    Many Asian countries disprove this point.

    About 10% of Mexico's population are white. Most of the rest are a mix of whites (on average, 40% - higher in the North and lower in the South) and Natives (about 55%, with a little bit of African ancestry). The Natives are essentially Siberian Asians, with a little bit of ancient Caucasian ancestry because small numbers of Caucasians crossed the land bridge and were absorbed by the Asian majority.

    Replies: @reiner Tor

    The Natives are essentially Siberian Asians

    But with a very different selection environment than Siberian Asians faced. E.g. Central American Indians (natives) have smaller head circumferences because they’re closer to the equator (though the difference is not nearly as pronounced as between Africans and Europeans or Northeast Asians), but probably the most important problem is that they didn’t spend enough time in a proper civilization.

    • Replies: @AP
    @reiner Tor


    but probably the most important problem is that they didn’t spend enough time in a proper civilization.
     
    Aztecs, Mayans and Inca were civilized longer (at least, on a sort of bronze age level) than were northern Europeans. Little difference between North American natives and, say, Yakuts or other Asian Russian natives in terms of civilization length.
  246. @Mr. Anon
    @Jack D

    "German cuisine was always kind of bland and starchy...."

    No, not really. That description applies better to kosher food.

    "Frankfurters? Hamburgers? Aren’t those German."

    In name only. A hot-dog bears little relation to a knackwurst.

    "Boiled beef is not high on anyone’s list. "

    Boiled beef is more of an english thing, not german.

    Replies: @This Is Our Home

    Boiled beef is more of an english thing, not german.

    I’m English and have never had nor seen boiled beef.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    @This Is Our Home

    "I’m English and have never had nor seen boiled beef."

    Back in the day, when not everyone could roast, boiled beef and carrots was a favourite dish.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mIMIUqAa3w

    http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/2543/boiled-beef-and-carrots-with-parsley-dumplings

    "When I was a nipper only six months old
    My Mother and my Father too
    They didn't know what to wean me on
    They were both in a dreadful stew
    They thought of tripe, they thought of steak
    Or a little bit of old cod's roe
    I said, “Pop round to the old cook-shop
    I know what'll make me grow.

    Chorus: Boiled beef and carrots, Boiled beef and carrots
    That's the stuff for your 'darby-kel'
    Makes you fat and it keeps you well
    Don't live like vegetarians, on the stuff they give to parrots
    From morn till night, blow out your kite
    On boiled beef and carrots.

    When I got married to Eliza Brown
    A funny little girl next door
    We went to Brighton for the week
    Then we both toddled home once more
    My pals all met me in the pub
    Said a feller to me, “Watcha Fred!
    What did you have for your honeymoon?'
    And just for a lark I said,

    (Chorus)

    We've got a lodger he's an artful cove
    “I'm very, very queer.' he said
    We sent for the doctor, he came round
    And told him to jump in bed
    The poor chap said, “I do feel bad'
    Then my Mother with a tear replied
    “What would you like for a pick-me-up?'
    He jumped out of bed and cried,

    (Chorus)

    I am the Father of a lovely pair
    Of kiddies, and they're nice fat boys
    They're twins, you can't tell which is which
    Like a pair of saveloys
    We had them christened in the week
    When the Parson put them on his knee
    I said, “As they've got ginger hair,
    I want their names to be,

    (Chorus)"

  247. @This Is Our Home
    @Mr. Anon


    Boiled beef is more of an english thing, not german.
     
    I'm English and have never had nor seen boiled beef.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew

    “I’m English and have never had nor seen boiled beef.”

    Back in the day, when not everyone could roast, boiled beef and carrots was a favourite dish.

    http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/2543/boiled-beef-and-carrots-with-parsley-dumplings

    “When I was a nipper only six months old
    My Mother and my Father too
    They didn’t know what to wean me on
    They were both in a dreadful stew
    They thought of tripe, they thought of steak
    Or a little bit of old cod’s roe
    I said, “Pop round to the old cook-shop
    I know what’ll make me grow.

    Chorus: Boiled beef and carrots, Boiled beef and carrots
    That’s the stuff for your ‘darby-kel’
    Makes you fat and it keeps you well
    Don’t live like vegetarians, on the stuff they give to parrots
    From morn till night, blow out your kite
    On boiled beef and carrots.

    When I got married to Eliza Brown
    A funny little girl next door
    We went to Brighton for the week
    Then we both toddled home once more
    My pals all met me in the pub
    Said a feller to me, “Watcha Fred!
    What did you have for your honeymoon?’
    And just for a lark I said,

    (Chorus)

    We’ve got a lodger he’s an artful cove
    “I’m very, very queer.’ he said
    We sent for the doctor, he came round
    And told him to jump in bed
    The poor chap said, “I do feel bad’
    Then my Mother with a tear replied
    “What would you like for a pick-me-up?’
    He jumped out of bed and cried,

    (Chorus)

    I am the Father of a lovely pair
    Of kiddies, and they’re nice fat boys
    They’re twins, you can’t tell which is which
    Like a pair of saveloys
    We had them christened in the week
    When the Parson put them on his knee
    I said, “As they’ve got ginger hair,
    I want their names to be,

    (Chorus)”

  248. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous Nephew

    I love full English breakfasts, pub food, etc. But it is bland compared to most other cuisines. It's basically starch and fatty meat that isn't adorned or altered too much.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew

    “It’s basically starch and fatty meat that isn’t adorned or altered too much.”

    One consequence of England being historically one of the wealthiest nations is that we didn’t need to adorn or alter our basics of meat and veg too much. In Asturias last summer we tried their national dish – very nice but basically cowboy food – bean stew with bits of meat. Makes you realise how much poorer the place was than the UK in times past.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fabada_asturiana

  249. @nglaer
    @Luke Lea

    Frum's alternative #3 is for a somewhat Trumpian party. Does anyone know what happened to Frum? He was such a knee-jerk neocon for so long. I'm not sure if he's changed his foreign policy views at all (a la Peter Beinart) but his domestic positions lately very lucid.

    Replies: @snorlax

    I’m pretty sure he’s been consistent in his views (although more willing to compromise on foreign policy for immigration restriction now, since he recognizes that in the long term American support for Israel depends on preventing a non-white majority).

    What’s changed is the libertarian-flavored alt-right has given way to the Trumpian alt-right, and thus people who once seemed like bitter enemies now are allies, and vice versa.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @snorlax


    What’s changed is the libertarian-flavored alt-right has given way to the Trumpian alt-right, and thus people who once seemed like bitter enemies now are allies, and vice versa.
     
    All to get rid of WashingtonDC-Centric Obama-ism that a President Hillary will only build on such as super open borders and harsher Federal hate crime laws
    One example being>>> Beefs about Jews and Israel and APAIC are being put on hold to get Trump elected. Alt-Right knows demographic tides and knows that Donald Trump is our last best chance to put much of Federally enforced Obama-ism into reverse drive.

    When Trump trumpets that he will nullify hundreds of Obama's executive orders on his first day in office, I do not doubt him!

    Replies: @nglaer

  250. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @CK

    Of course, this factoid plays right into the hands of Steven Levitt, author of Freakonomics and the theory that "Abortion cut the crime rate among African-Americans." If the abortion rate were to say, increase among black women to around 55% of the total number of annual abortions, wouldn't that eventually have a direct affect of bringing down the black population total of the US? One would certainly think so. Fewer people = less crime committed.

    Replies: @CK

    AOD kills blacks, female and male. The never-born do not commit crimes. I am remiss in never having bothered to read Freakonomics; if you have cited him accurately then his conclusion is partially accurate.

  251. @Former Darfur
    @Massimo Heitor

    Chinese restaurants are widespread because Chinese immigrants can run them profitably and staff them with other, fresher Chinese immigrants, not because there is an especially high market demand for Chinese food. Their food costs are low, their labor costs are low, and they usually locate in buildings in which other restaurant entrepreneurs have failed and are "damaged goods" to others.

    My sister is a food inspector and has put me permanently off eating Chinese, except for the supermarket cafeteria, which actually follows the health laws.

    Replies: @Massimo Heitor, @Jack D

    China supports a population of a billion+ people without benefit of American food inspectors (and not much refrigeration – at Chinese farmer’s markets, the pork sits out on the counter and the only sanitation measure is that they have a little motorized fly whisk to keep the flies off). The secret is this – Chinese don’t let cooked food sit around – you cook it to a safe temperature and you eat it immediately. And they don’t eat raw or rare foods – no salads, no rare steak. American restaurants often do “cook and hold”. Bacteria multiply exponentially over time so after a week that potato salad will kill you.

  252. @reiner Tor
    @AP


    The Natives are essentially Siberian Asians
     
    But with a very different selection environment than Siberian Asians faced. E.g. Central American Indians (natives) have smaller head circumferences because they're closer to the equator (though the difference is not nearly as pronounced as between Africans and Europeans or Northeast Asians), but probably the most important problem is that they didn't spend enough time in a proper civilization.

    Replies: @AP

    but probably the most important problem is that they didn’t spend enough time in a proper civilization.

    Aztecs, Mayans and Inca were civilized longer (at least, on a sort of bronze age level) than were northern Europeans. Little difference between North American natives and, say, Yakuts or other Asian Russian natives in terms of civilization length.

  253. @Anonymous
    @Gato de la Biblioteca

    Scandinavia was quite poor until the 20th century, and the Irish haven't done well, even though around the time of the Famine, the average Irishman was eating 15 lbs of potatoes per day and subsisting almost entirely on potatoes, roasted over a fire or boiled.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Potatoes have 350 calories per lb. so if they were eating 15 lbs. a day they were getting over 5,000 calories / day or about twice as many as you need. Look at a 5 lb. bag of potatoes and tell me you could eat it in one meal even if you ate nothing else. Either they would have been really, really fat or that statistic is bogus. I vote for the latter.

  254. @sb
    @Jack D

    Very difficult to find authentic shitto sauce .

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jack D

    I have a jar of it in my fridge. It tastes like…..

    chili peppers.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    I have a jar of it in my fridge. It tastes like…..

    chili peppers.
     
    There's the name for your tribute band: Red Hot Shitto Sauce.
  255. @Thea
    @jay-w

    Every time I shop in Walmart I feel like I live in the Soviet Union due to the Long lines with ugly architecture.

    I guess the stocked shelves are a bonus but I know they were shocked at 2am for low wages.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jack D

    Something like a Wal-Mart existed in the Soviet Union only in their wildest dreams. If a Soviet saw those stacks and stacks of toilet paper and other goods, they would have thought that they had died and gone to heaven. You have no idea how good you have it.

    • Agree: Kylie, snorlax
    • Replies: @AP
    @Jack D

    I don't think a Soviet's idea of heaven would be endless stacks of toilet paper.

    Replies: @Jack D, @anowow

  256. @Stan Adams
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Chinese restaurant nearest me seems to hire only Chinese, or maybe only Asians. Even the elderly man who mops the floor is Asian.

    (He always asks me to move so he can mop under my table, even if I'm in the middle of a meal. It bugs the hell out of me, but the food's good enough for me to overlook it.)

    A Chinese guy took over the local Dairy Queen several years ago. I haven't seen any round-eyes working there since.

    Replies: @iffen, @Clyde

    The Chinese restaurant that I used to go to had a Chinese owner and wait staff. All of the cooks and kitchen help were Mexicans.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @iffen

    "The Chinese restaurant that I used to go to had a Chinese owner and wait staff. All of the cooks and kitchen help were Mexicans."

    If you are a Chinese restaurant owner in a majority Mexican city like San Bernardino or Fresno for example, you have no choice but to hire Mexican cooks.

  257. @Massimo Heitor
    @Anonymous Nephew


    Steak pie, chips and beans is NOT bland. Haggis is NOT bland. A full English breakfast or a full Sunday Roast is NOT bland. A Welsh lamb stew is not bland either.
     
    Those things aren't bland, but they aren't what today's westerners want to eat and they aren't what today's food pioneers are passionate about creating. To pick a semi-random example, Steve Ellis, is a completely non-hispanic white guy who doesn't care about the haggis of his ancestors, and channeled his passion into founding the successful Chipotle chain with a Mexican ethnic theme. And many people prefer eating there over somewhere "authentic".

    Modern westerners still like English style breakfasts, teas, and english muffins, sure. Also most serious food innovators draw on classic ethnic foods as inspirations, but they need to innovate rather than cling to tradition.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Brutusale

    Someone should teach Ellis that e coli isn’t a necessary ingredient!

  258. @Anonymous
    @Matra

    Yeah, I've had it before and that's what it seems to be. Sausage with ketchup that's been sprinkled with some curry seasoning.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Jeffrey Steingarten, food editor for Vogue and celebrity judge on Food Network shows, said that, in his experience, it’s the rare Michelin-starred restaurant in Paris that DOESN’T have a large ketchup bottle in the kitchen.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Brutusale

    If you ever have a recipe that calls for a tablespoon or two of tomato paste and you don't feel like opening a can and letting the rest go moldy in your fridge , then just use ketchup - tomato paste is the main ingredient. Plus a little sugar, which never hurt a dish either.

  259. @Jefferson
    @Anonym

    "Getting excited over ethnic food is so pre-2010s. More like 1990s and earlier.

    Ditto “exotic” ethnic women. Wow, short, spindly, black hair and dark brown eyes, complexion varying shades of brown. So exotic. Not."

    I think German cuisine is more exotic than Chinese and Mexican cuisine. There are barely any German restaurants in the U.S when compared to the proportion of Germans in this country. Over 50 million Germans, yet the vast majority of shopping malls in this country do not offer German cuisine in it's food courts. There are more Indian and Vietnamese restaurants in this country than there are German ones.

    Replies: @Jack D, @dearieme, @NOTA, @Gato de la Biblioteca, @Thagomizer, @WhatEvvs, @Former Darfur, @Flip, @James Bowery

    Circa 1993 there was a German restaurant in San Diego where the SAIC crew I worked with went quite regularly — although not as regularly as the much-larger selection of Asian restaurants in the area. A fixture at the bar was a Jewish guy who made it clear he was a Watch Dog. He seemed nice enough but it was also clear enough he would threaten your employment if you said anything he disapproved of.

  260. @(((Owen)))
    @bomag

    "But I’m not sure it is in Mexico’s long term interest to provide fuel for this conflagration."

    How is Mexico supposed to stop Americans from sucking mass migration into their country using Mexico as a straw when the American people insist on having no immigration enforcement? The Democrats produce Obama and Clinton and the Republicans produce Bush and Rubio or Cruz because immigration enforcement is so unpopular that Americans refuse to vote for anyone who might do it. Mexico can't help America if America won't help itself.

    Replies: @bomag, @bomag

    shelters and supply stops organized by Mexicans and the Mexican government …

    This is drug dealer morality. You actively foist a deleterious product on your fellow man, then claim, “hey, he begged me to sell. How am I supposed to stop him from sucking this damaging product into his system?”

    It lessens the total quality of civilization.

  261. I don’t know why you like Frum’s piece so much. On the issue of greatest interest here, he says

    Severed from a larger agenda…immigration populism looks at best like pandering, and at worst like identity politics for white voters. In a society that is and always has been multiethnic and polyglot, any national party must compete more broadly than that.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    @International Jew

    Necessary boilerplate to get the article published in the Atlantic.

  262. @Jack D
    @TangoMan

    Nabisco might have stayed if they could pay their workers $10 or $12 /yr vs. $3 in Mexico. But what if a union has raised the stakes so that the US workers get $30+/hr including benefits?

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @TangoMan, @JohnnyWalker123

    Then we eat more expensive cookies, but we have high-paying jobs.

  263. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Nico
    @Anonymous


    The political triumph of Ronald Reagan enshrined a new economic paradigm that... severed the link between wages and productivity growth.
     
    The argument here seems to be excessively distributive-centric, i.e. that trade deficits are only bad because economic growth is decoupled from wage growth. That is true to some extent when one accepts the Douglas argument that "Systems were made for man, not man for systems" but it becomes highly dangerous in the hands of left-liberal polemicists who imagine based on paper accounting that the U.S. is still a "rich" country in real and meaningful terms. Balanced trade is an end in itself, because trade deficits erode a country's real wealth and excessive trade surpluses pose a risk for Dutch disease, especially when they are based on something so artificial as Bretton Woods. It is not possible, today, to implement a purely Keynesian solution that would either redress inequitability or would again make the U.S. a net exporter: U.S. industry was never quite as competitive and efficient as it was chalked up to be, and this was made painfully clear in the automotive sector once Japan and the E.E.C. had recovered sufficiently from World War II to force an end to America's Exorbitant Privilege.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    America is still a very rich country in real terms. The postwar Keynesian regime that prevailed until the 80s is not feasible for political reasons, not for any fundamental economic reasons. As far as cars go, the European automakers have never surpassed US automakers in terms of basic quality and reliability and have relied on brand value on the global market.

  264. @Jack D

    Remember that Republican voters care more about aligning government with their values of work and family than they care about cutting the size of government as an end in itself.
     
    So Republicans are really just Democrats who oppose abortion? We are lost.

    Replies: @CK, @asdf, @AnotherDad

    Remember that Republican voters care more about aligning government with their values of work and family than they care about cutting the size of government as an end in itself.

    So Republicans are really just Democrats who oppose abortion? We are lost.

    Seriously? “… aligning government with their values of work and family …” and all you come up with is abortion?

    You were much more on the right track a day or two back with your “free stuff party” post–i.e. that the Democrats were the “free stuff party”. I’d argue that the Democrats are simply the “parasite party”–the looting, rent seeking and comfy sinecures covers folks both high and low, it’s not just free stuff for their Lumpenproletariat vote bank.

    In contrast, i’d point to the GI Bill and Interstate highways as two distinctly “big government” programs that have benefited my family. The one my dad *earned* with military service. The other the sort of “promote the general Welfare” project a responsible republican government can undertake taxing themselves to pay for something that makes life better for all. Ideas about benefits being “earned” or projects of a general public benefit, are easily distinguishable in many middle class folks’ minds from much of what government does today.

    By default, i’m a small government guy. Government has taxing and police power and is not restrained other than by the people saying “no”, so responsible folks should be telling it “no” by default. And what we have is wildly bloated. But i’m much less concerned by this or that change in my tax rates and this or that level of bloat, than by what evils the government is engendering and what sort of nation my kids inherit.

    The problem in a place like Sweden is not high taxes and a big government welfare state. It’s that its elites–and apparently a large fraction of the population–bought into this “diversity” and “multiculturalism” nonsense and are *destroying* their nation. And America is not “saved” by our modestly lower tax rate, we have the same sort of foul elite who seem to harbor a contempt for Americans–particularly flyover country white gentile Americans (the folks who actually built the damn country)–and are also destroying the American nation. Tax rates, size of welfare state, just are not the key questions in determining whether a nation will survive and be a decent place for your kids.

    There are a wealth of government policies well beyond “abortion” where the government is actively hostile to hard working people’s “values of work and family”–Wall Street bailouts, single mom cash welfare, bureaucratized unresponsive schools, Section 8, affirmative action, goodies for lobbyists’ clients, demands for depolicing, mortgages for minorities (housing policing in general), homo “marriage” …. and most of all mass immigration, degrading the value of Americans’ labor, balkanizing the nation and destroying the national patrimony to be inherited by one’s children.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @AnotherDad

    Sorry - to me this is just rationalization . The big government subsidies that I and my family benefit from - GI Bill, Social Security , etc. - THOSE were earned. The ones that YOU get, you don't deserve one bit. ALL of the big government programs , whether they are the ones you like and benefit from or not, are wildly beyond what the Founding Fathers had in mind under "promote the general welfare".

    I agree with you that it's much easier to run a welfare state if your country is filled with people just like you. Then you can say "there but for the grace of God go I - these are people just like me who have fallen on hard times." But if your country is heterogenous (and especially if one group benefits disproportionately) then it's easier to think of the beneficiaries as undeserving leaches. This is why Democrats are constantly mentioning that white people are the major beneficiaries of (for example) food stamps. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/02/28/food-stamp-demographics_n_6771938.html. Never mind that on per capita terms blacks draw at more than 2x the rate.

  265. @John Derbyshire
    @Chrisnonymous


    I also think English food is underrated.
     
    For sure.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Stealth, @a Newsreader, @Jack D

    Worst of all are Jewish desserts. Halva! — a waste by-product

    Anti-semite!

    Seriously, there are very few specifically “Jewish” foods and halvah isn’t one of them. Generally speaking, Jews eat a subset of whatever the locals eat wherever they are located – this was especially true back in the day, when either you ate local food or none at all. I say a subset because obviously (observant) Jews can’t eat those local items (pork, seafood, etc.) that are forbidden by the requirements of keeping kosher. But otherwise, Italian Jews ate Italian food, Polish Jews ate Polish food, etc. Halvah is an Ottoman item that (like pastrami) made its way into Ashkenazi cuisine thru ex-Ottoman territories in the southeastern corners of Europe (e.g. Romania).

    Much of the antipathy between Jews and non-Jews (on both sides) related to the “narcissism of small differences” as Freud called it. When you see Northern Irish Catholics and Protestants or Serbs and Croats, you are hard pressed to tell them apart (or at least I am), but if you ask one of them, they will tell you the million ways in which noble Serbs are far superior to the bestial Croats, who are barely human (or vice versa depending on who you ask). The best “Jewish” rye bread I ever had was in Krakow, which is nowadays very short on Jews. It turns out that flour (and dessert) doesn’t really care what religion you are.

    • Agree: SPMoore8
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Jack D

    " Jews eat a subset of whatever the locals eat wherever they are located – this was especially true back in the day, when either you ate local food or none at all. I say a subset because obviously (observant) Jews can’t eat those local items (pork, seafood, etc.) that are forbidden by the requirements of keeping kosher"

    A couple of years ago a Jewish friend of mine on Facebook posted a picture on his timeline page of a guy with a Yarmulke and a Star Of David chain eating a bacon cheeseburger and drinking a milkshake. Breaking all of the Kosher rules of mixing dairy and meat together as well as eating pork. It was some funny shit. He has quite a sense of humor when it comes to poking fun of Judaism. A more PC Jew would likely call him a self hating Jew.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Reg Cæsar, @snorlax

  266. @(((Owen)))
    @bomag

    "But I’m not sure it is in Mexico’s long term interest to provide fuel for this conflagration."

    How is Mexico supposed to stop Americans from sucking mass migration into their country using Mexico as a straw when the American people insist on having no immigration enforcement? The Democrats produce Obama and Clinton and the Republicans produce Bush and Rubio or Cruz because immigration enforcement is so unpopular that Americans refuse to vote for anyone who might do it. Mexico can't help America if America won't help itself.

    Replies: @bomag, @bomag

    How is Mexico supposed to stop Americans from sucking mass migration into their country using Mexico as a straw when the American people insist on having no immigration enforcement?

    The “people” have always polled against no immigration enforcement. It is something foisted upon us by our central authorities and taste makers who have managed to insulate themselves from mass opinion. This is our current illness, and it would help if our neighbors would not take advantage of our infirmity to demographically sodomize us.

    Mexico doesn’t have to let itself be used as a straw for this pass through migration. It would help the situation here, and protect the “brand”, such as it is, for all the Mexican citizens colonizing this place.

  267. Speaking of immigration, did you notice that the New York Times now agrees with Steve and that the Wet Foot Dry Foot policy regarding Cuban migrants should end?

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/21/opinion/a-new-cuban-exodus.html?_r=1

  268. @AnotherDad
    @Jack D



    Remember that Republican voters care more about aligning government with their values of work and family than they care about cutting the size of government as an end in itself.

     

    So Republicans are really just Democrats who oppose abortion? We are lost.
     
    Seriously? "... aligning government with their values of work and family ..." and all you come up with is abortion?

    You were much more on the right track a day or two back with your "free stuff party" post--i.e. that the Democrats were the "free stuff party". I'd argue that the Democrats are simply the "parasite party"--the looting, rent seeking and comfy sinecures covers folks both high and low, it's not just free stuff for their Lumpenproletariat vote bank.

    In contrast, i'd point to the GI Bill and Interstate highways as two distinctly "big government" programs that have benefited my family. The one my dad *earned* with military service. The other the sort of "promote the general Welfare" project a responsible republican government can undertake taxing themselves to pay for something that makes life better for all. Ideas about benefits being "earned" or projects of a general public benefit, are easily distinguishable in many middle class folks' minds from much of what government does today.

    By default, i'm a small government guy. Government has taxing and police power and is not restrained other than by the people saying "no", so responsible folks should be telling it "no" by default. And what we have is wildly bloated. But i'm much less concerned by this or that change in my tax rates and this or that level of bloat, than by what evils the government is engendering and what sort of nation my kids inherit.

    The problem in a place like Sweden is not high taxes and a big government welfare state. It's that its elites--and apparently a large fraction of the population--bought into this "diversity" and "multiculturalism" nonsense and are *destroying* their nation. And America is not "saved" by our modestly lower tax rate, we have the same sort of foul elite who seem to harbor a contempt for Americans--particularly flyover country white gentile Americans (the folks who actually built the damn country)--and are also destroying the American nation. Tax rates, size of welfare state, just are not the key questions in determining whether a nation will survive and be a decent place for your kids.

    There are a wealth of government policies well beyond "abortion" where the government is actively hostile to hard working people's "values of work and family"--Wall Street bailouts, single mom cash welfare, bureaucratized unresponsive schools, Section 8, affirmative action, goodies for lobbyists' clients, demands for depolicing, mortgages for minorities (housing policing in general), homo "marriage" .... and most of all mass immigration, degrading the value of Americans' labor, balkanizing the nation and destroying the national patrimony to be inherited by one's children.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Sorry – to me this is just rationalization . The big government subsidies that I and my family benefit from – GI Bill, Social Security , etc. – THOSE were earned. The ones that YOU get, you don’t deserve one bit. ALL of the big government programs , whether they are the ones you like and benefit from or not, are wildly beyond what the Founding Fathers had in mind under “promote the general welfare”.

    I agree with you that it’s much easier to run a welfare state if your country is filled with people just like you. Then you can say “there but for the grace of God go I – these are people just like me who have fallen on hard times.” But if your country is heterogenous (and especially if one group benefits disproportionately) then it’s easier to think of the beneficiaries as undeserving leaches. This is why Democrats are constantly mentioning that white people are the major beneficiaries of (for example) food stamps. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/02/28/food-stamp-demographics_n_6771938.html. Never mind that on per capita terms blacks draw at more than 2x the rate.

  269. @iSteveFan
    @Gato de la Biblioteca

    What about their pastries? Don't some of these northern European and Eastern European cultures have some pretty good pastries even if their regular food is bland?

    Replies: @LondonBob

    English desserts are top notch as Mr Derbyshire has noted. English food has had a big revival at home with both gastropubs as well as high end restaurants.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @LondonBob

    http://www.johnderbyshire.com/Opinions/Britain/spotteddick.html

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  270. @Jack D
    @Thea

    Something like a Wal-Mart existed in the Soviet Union only in their wildest dreams. If a Soviet saw those stacks and stacks of toilet paper and other goods, they would have thought that they had died and gone to heaven. You have no idea how good you have it.

    Replies: @AP

    I don’t think a Soviet’s idea of heaven would be endless stacks of toilet paper.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @AP

    Not having any is hell.

    I had the pleasure of taking a Soviet 2nd cousin of my wife's to an American supermarket on his 1st day in America, just before the dissolution of the Soviet Union. Naturally he had never seen anything like it. He was familiar with some of the product categories but the variety and abundance was overwhelming. For example, he told me that there was a corn flake factory in the Soviet Union, built as a turn key operation with Italian food processing equipment (this was a common setup for Soviet industry when they weren't confident about just stealing the technology). When the factory was working and they weren't waiting for spare parts from Italy, there were cornflakes in the store now and then, especially in Moscow, which got 1st dibs on the best stuff. But one day they might disappear from the shelves and you wouldn't see them again for many months or maybe never. Maybe the corn supplier had filled its five year plan for corn and wouldn't send any more to the factory until the next 5 year plan. He said it was like living in the desert and once in a while a caravan would appear with goods and then it would be gone again. The closest thing in American experience is trying to buy milk or bread just before a big snow storm. Someone must have gotten some, but by the time you get there the shelves are somehow empty. Imagine that EVERY day is like that with respect to every item in the store.

    , @anowow
    @AP

    But it would involve good quality meat, chocolate and vodka.

  271. @Brutusale
    @Anonymous

    Jeffrey Steingarten, food editor for Vogue and celebrity judge on Food Network shows, said that, in his experience, it's the rare Michelin-starred restaurant in Paris that DOESN'T have a large ketchup bottle in the kitchen.

    Replies: @Jack D

    If you ever have a recipe that calls for a tablespoon or two of tomato paste and you don’t feel like opening a can and letting the rest go moldy in your fridge , then just use ketchup – tomato paste is the main ingredient. Plus a little sugar, which never hurt a dish either.

  272. @AP
    @Jack D

    I don't think a Soviet's idea of heaven would be endless stacks of toilet paper.

    Replies: @Jack D, @anowow

    Not having any is hell.

    I had the pleasure of taking a Soviet 2nd cousin of my wife’s to an American supermarket on his 1st day in America, just before the dissolution of the Soviet Union. Naturally he had never seen anything like it. He was familiar with some of the product categories but the variety and abundance was overwhelming. For example, he told me that there was a corn flake factory in the Soviet Union, built as a turn key operation with Italian food processing equipment (this was a common setup for Soviet industry when they weren’t confident about just stealing the technology). When the factory was working and they weren’t waiting for spare parts from Italy, there were cornflakes in the store now and then, especially in Moscow, which got 1st dibs on the best stuff. But one day they might disappear from the shelves and you wouldn’t see them again for many months or maybe never. Maybe the corn supplier had filled its five year plan for corn and wouldn’t send any more to the factory until the next 5 year plan. He said it was like living in the desert and once in a while a caravan would appear with goods and then it would be gone again. The closest thing in American experience is trying to buy milk or bread just before a big snow storm. Someone must have gotten some, but by the time you get there the shelves are somehow empty. Imagine that EVERY day is like that with respect to every item in the store.

  273. @AP
    @Jack D

    I don't think a Soviet's idea of heaven would be endless stacks of toilet paper.

    Replies: @Jack D, @anowow

    But it would involve good quality meat, chocolate and vodka.

  274. @Stealth
    @John Derbyshire

    White folks in the South used to eat chitlins, Derb. The practice pretty much ended in the nineties, though. The only places where I've eaten chitlins in the past ten years have been soul food or Chinese restaurants.

    When I was a kid, my father and his friends would have chitlin cookouts several time a year. What was left over was refrigerated to be made into sandwiches and such in the days after the festivities. I had a small bowl of them a few weeks ago. I asked the black proprietor who cooked them why I don't see them served as much as I used to. She said it was simply too much work to be done on a regular basis. I can't argue with that since I've seen them being cleaned. I doubt they'll be a soul food staple for too much longer.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    I asked the black proprietor who cooked them why I don’t see them served as much as I used to. She said it was simply too much work to be done on a regular basis. I can’t argue with that since I’ve seen them being cleaned.

    Having done this twice, I agree.

  275. @International Jew
    I don't know why you like Frum's piece so much. On the issue of greatest interest here, he says

    Severed from a larger agenda...immigration populism looks at best like pandering, and at worst like identity politics for white voters. In a society that is and always has been multiethnic and polyglot, any national party must compete more broadly than that.
     

    Replies: @snorlax

    Necessary boilerplate to get the article published in the Atlantic.

  276. @LondonBob
    @iSteveFan

    English desserts are top notch as Mr Derbyshire has noted. English food has had a big revival at home with both gastropubs as well as high end restaurants.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    Oops, link already posted by Derb himself. I should have read the whole thread.

  277. @iffen
    @Stan Adams

    The Chinese restaurant that I used to go to had a Chinese owner and wait staff. All of the cooks and kitchen help were Mexicans.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “The Chinese restaurant that I used to go to had a Chinese owner and wait staff. All of the cooks and kitchen help were Mexicans.”

    If you are a Chinese restaurant owner in a majority Mexican city like San Bernardino or Fresno for example, you have no choice but to hire Mexican cooks.

  278. @Jack D
    @John Derbyshire


    Worst of all are Jewish desserts. Halva! — a waste by-product
     
    Anti-semite!

    Seriously, there are very few specifically "Jewish" foods and halvah isn't one of them. Generally speaking, Jews eat a subset of whatever the locals eat wherever they are located - this was especially true back in the day, when either you ate local food or none at all. I say a subset because obviously (observant) Jews can't eat those local items (pork, seafood, etc.) that are forbidden by the requirements of keeping kosher. But otherwise, Italian Jews ate Italian food, Polish Jews ate Polish food, etc. Halvah is an Ottoman item that (like pastrami) made its way into Ashkenazi cuisine thru ex-Ottoman territories in the southeastern corners of Europe (e.g. Romania).

    Much of the antipathy between Jews and non-Jews (on both sides) related to the "narcissism of small differences" as Freud called it. When you see Northern Irish Catholics and Protestants or Serbs and Croats, you are hard pressed to tell them apart (or at least I am), but if you ask one of them, they will tell you the million ways in which noble Serbs are far superior to the bestial Croats, who are barely human (or vice versa depending on who you ask). The best "Jewish" rye bread I ever had was in Krakow, which is nowadays very short on Jews. It turns out that flour (and dessert) doesn't really care what religion you are.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    ” Jews eat a subset of whatever the locals eat wherever they are located – this was especially true back in the day, when either you ate local food or none at all. I say a subset because obviously (observant) Jews can’t eat those local items (pork, seafood, etc.) that are forbidden by the requirements of keeping kosher”

    A couple of years ago a Jewish friend of mine on Facebook posted a picture on his timeline page of a guy with a Yarmulke and a Star Of David chain eating a bacon cheeseburger and drinking a milkshake. Breaking all of the Kosher rules of mixing dairy and meat together as well as eating pork. It was some funny shit. He has quite a sense of humor when it comes to poking fun of Judaism. A more PC Jew would likely call him a self hating Jew.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Jefferson

    Somehow the humor of this completely escapes me. If you posted a picture of a Catholic eating meat on a Friday during Lent would this be funny?

    Dietary restrictions were a feature of most religions (including Christianity) throughout history. They are a strong human impulse that even transcend religion - see the large number of vegetarians and vegans who are around today despite not having any religion in many cases. Each religion or belief system had its own list of what not to eat ever or at certain times but any civilized person could understand that abstinence is a necessary part of self discipline and is part of what separates us from animals who act on their every impulse. It's only in our modern "anything goes" age that dietary restrictions are considered to be something weird.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jefferson


    A couple of years ago a Jewish friend of mine on Facebook posted a picture on his timeline page of a guy with a Yarmulke and a Star Of David chain eating a bacon cheeseburger and drinking a milkshake.
     
    The IDF was trolling Facebook a few years back. Religious women are exempt from the draft. But some of them posted shots of themselves outside totally treif shellfish restaurants, which put their exemptions in serious jeopardy, and exposed them to charges of criminal fraud.

    I suppose a man could get out of Israel's draft by pretending to be an Arab.
    , @snorlax
    @Jefferson


    A more PC Jew would likely call him a self hating Jew.
     
    You must not know many Jews. Amongst Jews, mocking Judaism the religion is a status signal of "PC"-ness. Jews who follow the dietary restrictions or otherwise take Judaism seriously are a small minority and an overwhelmingly Republican group.
  279. @George Glass
    Uh-oh, the media is finally tired of the uppity public humiliating them in their own comment boxes, so the big newspapers in Canada are suspending the privilege:

    "We have finally realized that the kind of person who devotes his day to arguing with strangers anonymously on the Internet is not necessarily representative of a large swath of public opinion or necessarily good at articulating anything"

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/books-and-media/russell-smith-say-bye-to-the-online-comment-section-as-you-know-it/article27906890/

    But what about that whole pesky democracy thing? It allows racists like Trump and Le Pen to wield government power. Something Must Be Done.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    “We have finally realized that the kind of person who devotes his day to arguing with strangers anonymously on the Internet is not necessarily representative of a large swath of public opinion or necessarily good at articulating anything”

    Is it chutzpah or a complete lack of connection to reality? In either case, it should be obvious that the Canadian mainstream newspapers are not “necessarily representative of a large swath of public opinion”, and, to the extent there is any correspondence between the two, it is due to indoctrination by the papers.

  280. @Clyde
    @5371


    [Los Angeles cars have outstanding pollution controls]
    Bet they won’t have to keep being inspected as stringently to stay on the road in Mexico, though!
     
    Good observation meaning that if/when the cat converter fails it will be chopped off for its palladium/platinum. Same for any other pollution controls and concerns. And if I were in Mexico I would do the same.
    Mexico is the "tragedy of the commons" (G Hardin) writ large and we are moving in the same direction. One manifestation being when your business is structured to privatize profits and socialize loses.........

    aka dumping your effluent on the boobs_peasantry_tax payers in a common area.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    Mexico is the “tragedy of the commons” (G Hardin) writ large and we are moving in the same direction.

    That’s the thing about mass immigration: It turns the country into a giant commons. And “grab what you can” is the inevitable response to a commons. See Garret Hardin’s original formulation (The Tragedy of the Commons or Matt Ridley’s discussion in The Origins of Virtue: Human Instincts aned the Evolution of Cooperation).

    One fundamental difference between Republican voters and Democrat voters is that Democrats generally view the country as a commons, while Republican voters are committed to the perpetuation of the country as a going concern. This ties in with Steve’s views on affordable family formation, as those who live where family formation is affordable are more likely to view the country as a going concern, although the arrow of causation can also point in the other direction as those predisposed to the going-concern viewpoint will re-locate to where the environment is more suitable for their productive (and reproductive) project.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @ben tillman

    Erudite! My comment is that Republicans want more private ownership of *everything* because we have observed how Democrats are the ones who will always ruin a commons. Generalizing of course but this is what I see.
    What can be less commons oriented than buying a home in an expensive gated community? Dems and Republicans love this way of shielding themselves from the fallout that their open borders policies produce. The ultimate trashing of America's great national commons is being done via Obama's open borders policies. Right now we have a rise in Central American "families and unaccompanied teens" streaming though without the Border Patrol stopping them in any way.

  281. @MEH 0910
    @LondonBob

    http://www.johnderbyshire.com/Opinions/Britain/spotteddick.html

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    Oops, link already posted by Derb himself. I should have read the whole thread.

  282. From an HDB point of view, what should be done with sociopaths/psychopaths? Forcible sterilization?

    • Replies: @bomag
    @DQDF

    First, let us get a proper definition of psychopath/sociopath. Too often it comes across as a slur against people someone doesn't like for political reasons.

    Second, don't let the central gov't overtly subsidize their reproduction.

    This should do it. If not, we can debate policy further.

  283. @snorlax
    @nglaer

    I'm pretty sure he's been consistent in his views (although more willing to compromise on foreign policy for immigration restriction now, since he recognizes that in the long term American support for Israel depends on preventing a non-white majority).

    What's changed is the libertarian-flavored alt-right has given way to the Trumpian alt-right, and thus people who once seemed like bitter enemies now are allies, and vice versa.

    Replies: @Clyde

    What’s changed is the libertarian-flavored alt-right has given way to the Trumpian alt-right, and thus people who once seemed like bitter enemies now are allies, and vice versa.

    All to get rid of WashingtonDC-Centric Obama-ism that a President Hillary will only build on such as super open borders and harsher Federal hate crime laws
    One example being>>> Beefs about Jews and Israel and APAIC are being put on hold to get Trump elected. Alt-Right knows demographic tides and knows that Donald Trump is our last best chance to put much of Federally enforced Obama-ism into reverse drive.

    When Trump trumpets that he will nullify hundreds of Obama’s executive orders on his first day in office, I do not doubt him!

    • Replies: @nglaer
    @Clyde

    Beefs about Jews and Israel and APAIC are being put on hold to get Trump elected.

    Interesting if true. What would one have to read to confirm that impression?
    For me, I read today that Israel wants to start a war with ISIS enemy Hezbollah, and Netanyahu is talking about stripping 250,000 Palestinians of their Jerusalem residency permits. So I will continue to not like Israel no matter what Trump solidarity demands.

    Replies: @Clyde

  284. @ben tillman
    @Clyde


    Mexico is the “tragedy of the commons” (G Hardin) writ large and we are moving in the same direction.
     
    That’s the thing about mass immigration: It turns the country into a giant commons. And “grab what you can” is the inevitable response to a commons. See Garret Hardin’s original formulation (The Tragedy of the Commons or Matt Ridley’s discussion in The Origins of Virtue: Human Instincts aned the Evolution of Cooperation).

    One fundamental difference between Republican voters and Democrat voters is that Democrats generally view the country as a commons, while Republican voters are committed to the perpetuation of the country as a going concern. This ties in with Steve’s views on affordable family formation, as those who live where family formation is affordable are more likely to view the country as a going concern, although the arrow of causation can also point in the other direction as those predisposed to the going-concern viewpoint will re-locate to where the environment is more suitable for their productive (and reproductive) project.

    Replies: @Clyde

    Erudite! My comment is that Republicans want more private ownership of *everything* because we have observed how Democrats are the ones who will always ruin a commons. Generalizing of course but this is what I see.
    What can be less commons oriented than buying a home in an expensive gated community? Dems and Republicans love this way of shielding themselves from the fallout that their open borders policies produce. The ultimate trashing of America’s great national commons is being done via Obama’s open borders policies. Right now we have a rise in Central American “families and unaccompanied teens” streaming though without the Border Patrol stopping them in any way.

  285. I, uh, don’t have the time to read all 289 comments yet posted, so I’ll make a point about Frum’s post which may or may not have already been made.

    While Frum seems to “understand” the concerns of middle/working class Republicans, he doesn’t really seem to feel himself to be a part of them, or very sympathetic to them. Instead he seems to be treating them as just one more group whose wishes need to be considered, and gives their concerns – concerns about rewarding indolence, graft, and illegality – no moral weight whatsoever. The white middle class is only important because of their share of the voting base, not because their ideals are any better than those of Wall Street banksters, champagne socialists, or welfare queens.

    Just as bad, and just plain damn naive, is how Frum seems to think that Wall Street support for open borders is just some minor policy point which they’d be willing to discard if “GOLLY GEE, THEY ONLY JUST UNDERSTOOD THE CONCERNS OF REGULAR AMERICANS A LITTLE BIT BETTER.”

    That’s laughable. Wall Street has been committed to open borders since at least the George H. W. Bush Administration. Since the early 2000s that support has gone into overdrive. They are obsessed with driving down American wages, obsessed with increasing their customer base, and obsessed with disenfranchising the middle class Americans who have stymied them in the past. It is a central tenet of their ideology. It is non-negotiable. Does Frum really think that all the lies and betrayals on immigration by the elite, and the open, decade-long push by them to eliminate our borders, even in the face of extreme national security concerns, are just the result of some simple misunderstandings? He’s got to be high.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Wilkey

    Now this is one of the best comments for all of Steve's immigration posts for 2015. Succinctly put and right to the heart of the matter.

    Frum is of course a neocon and one of the main architects of W.'s "Axis of Evil" ideology in relation to the Iraq War. Before that, he wrote disparagingly about the '90's Conservatives (social/religious ones in particular) with dispassionate disdain.

    The idea that Frum really cares about the immigration issue as it relates to the white working class is of course an illusion. But it does make for interesting reading in the Atlantic. In other words Frum, perhaps unintentionally has elevated some of the issues that Trump in particular has campaigned on for the past half year only now it is reaching the pages of polite and respectable opinion.

    And remember, for the Atlantic, Frum's article and its contents is simply shocking, daring, and totally outrageous.

  286. @Jefferson
    @Jack D

    " Jews eat a subset of whatever the locals eat wherever they are located – this was especially true back in the day, when either you ate local food or none at all. I say a subset because obviously (observant) Jews can’t eat those local items (pork, seafood, etc.) that are forbidden by the requirements of keeping kosher"

    A couple of years ago a Jewish friend of mine on Facebook posted a picture on his timeline page of a guy with a Yarmulke and a Star Of David chain eating a bacon cheeseburger and drinking a milkshake. Breaking all of the Kosher rules of mixing dairy and meat together as well as eating pork. It was some funny shit. He has quite a sense of humor when it comes to poking fun of Judaism. A more PC Jew would likely call him a self hating Jew.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Reg Cæsar, @snorlax

    Somehow the humor of this completely escapes me. If you posted a picture of a Catholic eating meat on a Friday during Lent would this be funny?

    Dietary restrictions were a feature of most religions (including Christianity) throughout history. They are a strong human impulse that even transcend religion – see the large number of vegetarians and vegans who are around today despite not having any religion in many cases. Each religion or belief system had its own list of what not to eat ever or at certain times but any civilized person could understand that abstinence is a necessary part of self discipline and is part of what separates us from animals who act on their every impulse. It’s only in our modern “anything goes” age that dietary restrictions are considered to be something weird.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Jack D

    "Somehow the humor of this completely escapes me. If you posted a picture of a Catholic eating meat on a Friday during Lent would this be funny?"

    A guy blantantly showing his Jewishness on his sleeve with a Yamulke and a Star Of David gold chain, while at the same time eating Non Kosher Goy food is quite funny. It is saying oh I love a being a Jew, except when it comes Judaism's strict dietary laws. The guy is being a cafeteria Jew, as he picks which laws of Judaism he wants to follow and which ones he doesn't want to follow. He might as well get a tattoo next after eating his bacon cheeseburger and ruin his chances of being buried in a Jewish cemetery when he dies.

  287. @Clyde
    @snorlax


    What’s changed is the libertarian-flavored alt-right has given way to the Trumpian alt-right, and thus people who once seemed like bitter enemies now are allies, and vice versa.
     
    All to get rid of WashingtonDC-Centric Obama-ism that a President Hillary will only build on such as super open borders and harsher Federal hate crime laws
    One example being>>> Beefs about Jews and Israel and APAIC are being put on hold to get Trump elected. Alt-Right knows demographic tides and knows that Donald Trump is our last best chance to put much of Federally enforced Obama-ism into reverse drive.

    When Trump trumpets that he will nullify hundreds of Obama's executive orders on his first day in office, I do not doubt him!

    Replies: @nglaer

    Beefs about Jews and Israel and APAIC are being put on hold to get Trump elected.

    Interesting if true. What would one have to read to confirm that impression?
    For me, I read today that Israel wants to start a war with ISIS enemy Hezbollah, and Netanyahu is talking about stripping 250,000 Palestinians of their Jerusalem residency permits. So I will continue to not like Israel no matter what Trump solidarity demands.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @nglaer

    Well and good but on November 8th 2016 will you go vote Trump or will you sit it out?

  288. @DQDF
    From an HDB point of view, what should be done with sociopaths/psychopaths? Forcible sterilization?

    Replies: @bomag

    First, let us get a proper definition of psychopath/sociopath. Too often it comes across as a slur against people someone doesn’t like for political reasons.

    Second, don’t let the central gov’t overtly subsidize their reproduction.

    This should do it. If not, we can debate policy further.

  289. @Anonym
    @Jefferson

    Getting excited over ethnic food is so pre-2010s. More like 1990s and earlier.

    Ditto "exotic" ethnic women. Wow, short, spindly, black hair and dark brown eyes, complexion varying shades of brown. So exotic. Not.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jay Fink

    I have a preference for latinas because most of them try to look pretty. The white women where I live, especially the lower class, look horrible to me. Over the top plain, no sex appeal, fat, tattooed, and masculine.

  290. @nglaer
    @Clyde

    Beefs about Jews and Israel and APAIC are being put on hold to get Trump elected.

    Interesting if true. What would one have to read to confirm that impression?
    For me, I read today that Israel wants to start a war with ISIS enemy Hezbollah, and Netanyahu is talking about stripping 250,000 Palestinians of their Jerusalem residency permits. So I will continue to not like Israel no matter what Trump solidarity demands.

    Replies: @Clyde

    Well and good but on November 8th 2016 will you go vote Trump or will you sit it out?

  291. @Jack D
    @sb

    I have a jar of it in my fridge. It tastes like.....


    chili peppers.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I have a jar of it in my fridge. It tastes like…..

    chili peppers.

    There’s the name for your tribute band: Red Hot Shitto Sauce.

  292. Apparently Mr. Frump and the GOP don’t like the hoi polloi voting base that gets their hands dirty and breaks their non-manicured nails. What do you call a Political Party without voters? I think they call it the Stupid Party.
    Democracy is War for Chickens. I like my chickens rotisserie.

  293. @Jefferson
    @Jack D

    " Jews eat a subset of whatever the locals eat wherever they are located – this was especially true back in the day, when either you ate local food or none at all. I say a subset because obviously (observant) Jews can’t eat those local items (pork, seafood, etc.) that are forbidden by the requirements of keeping kosher"

    A couple of years ago a Jewish friend of mine on Facebook posted a picture on his timeline page of a guy with a Yarmulke and a Star Of David chain eating a bacon cheeseburger and drinking a milkshake. Breaking all of the Kosher rules of mixing dairy and meat together as well as eating pork. It was some funny shit. He has quite a sense of humor when it comes to poking fun of Judaism. A more PC Jew would likely call him a self hating Jew.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Reg Cæsar, @snorlax

    A couple of years ago a Jewish friend of mine on Facebook posted a picture on his timeline page of a guy with a Yarmulke and a Star Of David chain eating a bacon cheeseburger and drinking a milkshake.

    The IDF was trolling Facebook a few years back. Religious women are exempt from the draft. But some of them posted shots of themselves outside totally treif shellfish restaurants, which put their exemptions in serious jeopardy, and exposed them to charges of criminal fraud.

    I suppose a man could get out of Israel’s draft by pretending to be an Arab.

  294. @Jefferson
    @Jack D

    " Jews eat a subset of whatever the locals eat wherever they are located – this was especially true back in the day, when either you ate local food or none at all. I say a subset because obviously (observant) Jews can’t eat those local items (pork, seafood, etc.) that are forbidden by the requirements of keeping kosher"

    A couple of years ago a Jewish friend of mine on Facebook posted a picture on his timeline page of a guy with a Yarmulke and a Star Of David chain eating a bacon cheeseburger and drinking a milkshake. Breaking all of the Kosher rules of mixing dairy and meat together as well as eating pork. It was some funny shit. He has quite a sense of humor when it comes to poking fun of Judaism. A more PC Jew would likely call him a self hating Jew.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Reg Cæsar, @snorlax

    A more PC Jew would likely call him a self hating Jew.

    You must not know many Jews. Amongst Jews, mocking Judaism the religion is a status signal of “PC”-ness. Jews who follow the dietary restrictions or otherwise take Judaism seriously are a small minority and an overwhelmingly Republican group.

  295. @Jack D
    @Jefferson

    Somehow the humor of this completely escapes me. If you posted a picture of a Catholic eating meat on a Friday during Lent would this be funny?

    Dietary restrictions were a feature of most religions (including Christianity) throughout history. They are a strong human impulse that even transcend religion - see the large number of vegetarians and vegans who are around today despite not having any religion in many cases. Each religion or belief system had its own list of what not to eat ever or at certain times but any civilized person could understand that abstinence is a necessary part of self discipline and is part of what separates us from animals who act on their every impulse. It's only in our modern "anything goes" age that dietary restrictions are considered to be something weird.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “Somehow the humor of this completely escapes me. If you posted a picture of a Catholic eating meat on a Friday during Lent would this be funny?”

    A guy blantantly showing his Jewishness on his sleeve with a Yamulke and a Star Of David gold chain, while at the same time eating Non Kosher Goy food is quite funny. It is saying oh I love a being a Jew, except when it comes Judaism’s strict dietary laws. The guy is being a cafeteria Jew, as he picks which laws of Judaism he wants to follow and which ones he doesn’t want to follow. He might as well get a tattoo next after eating his bacon cheeseburger and ruin his chances of being buried in a Jewish cemetery when he dies.

  296. @Wilkey
    I, uh, don't have the time to read all 289 comments yet posted, so I'll make a point about Frum's post which may or may not have already been made.

    While Frum seems to "understand" the concerns of middle/working class Republicans, he doesn't really seem to feel himself to be a part of them, or very sympathetic to them. Instead he seems to be treating them as just one more group whose wishes need to be considered, and gives their concerns - concerns about rewarding indolence, graft, and illegality - no moral weight whatsoever. The white middle class is only important because of their share of the voting base, not because their ideals are any better than those of Wall Street banksters, champagne socialists, or welfare queens.

    Just as bad, and just plain damn naive, is how Frum seems to think that Wall Street support for open borders is just some minor policy point which they'd be willing to discard if "GOLLY GEE, THEY ONLY JUST UNDERSTOOD THE CONCERNS OF REGULAR AMERICANS A LITTLE BIT BETTER."

    That's laughable. Wall Street has been committed to open borders since at least the George H. W. Bush Administration. Since the early 2000s that support has gone into overdrive. They are obsessed with driving down American wages, obsessed with increasing their customer base, and obsessed with disenfranchising the middle class Americans who have stymied them in the past. It is a central tenet of their ideology. It is non-negotiable. Does Frum really think that all the lies and betrayals on immigration by the elite, and the open, decade-long push by them to eliminate our borders, even in the face of extreme national security concerns, are just the result of some simple misunderstandings? He's got to be high.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Now this is one of the best comments for all of Steve’s immigration posts for 2015. Succinctly put and right to the heart of the matter.

    Frum is of course a neocon and one of the main architects of W.’s “Axis of Evil” ideology in relation to the Iraq War. Before that, he wrote disparagingly about the ’90’s Conservatives (social/religious ones in particular) with dispassionate disdain.

    The idea that Frum really cares about the immigration issue as it relates to the white working class is of course an illusion. But it does make for interesting reading in the Atlantic. In other words Frum, perhaps unintentionally has elevated some of the issues that Trump in particular has campaigned on for the past half year only now it is reaching the pages of polite and respectable opinion.

    And remember, for the Atlantic, Frum’s article and its contents is simply shocking, daring, and totally outrageous.

  297. @Stan Adams
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Chinese restaurant nearest me seems to hire only Chinese, or maybe only Asians. Even the elderly man who mops the floor is Asian.

    (He always asks me to move so he can mop under my table, even if I'm in the middle of a meal. It bugs the hell out of me, but the food's good enough for me to overlook it.)

    A Chinese guy took over the local Dairy Queen several years ago. I haven't seen any round-eyes working there since.

    Replies: @iffen, @Clyde

    The Chinese restaurant nearest me seems to hire only Chinese, or maybe only Asians. Even the elderly man who mops the floor is Asian.
    (He always asks me to move so he can mop under my table, even if I’m in the middle of a meal. It bugs the hell out of me, but the food’s good enough for me to overlook it.)

    He is messing with you so why not mess around with him? Get on the internet and find some choice Chinese words and practice yr pronunciation. Something like “Bugger off old man”
    I would do this!
    But unfortunately the Chinese are always very nice to me in their eating places and I reciprocate..

  298. @Maj. Kong
    https://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=REV

    This chart explains why the platform of "cutting government" doesn't work.

    It's one thing to propose it in France, but the only developed countries taxing less than we do are...Mexico and Chile.

    If Mexico was so great, there would be immigration going that way. Fred doesn't count.

    Replies: @(((Owen))), @Dave Pinsen, @Clyde, @ben tillman, @Karl

    >>> If Mexico was so great, there would be immigration going that way <<<<

    It's only the dull-witted, who don't retire to a Third World country, to live like a King.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS