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From New Boston Post:

Here’s What the M.I.T. Catholic Chaplain Got Fired Over
By NBP Staff | June 19, 2020, 4:02 EDT

[Editor’s Note: Below is the text of an email message that Father Daniel Moloney, the Catholic chaplain at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, sent to Catholics at the university (a group known as the Tech Catholic Community, or TCC) on Sunday, June 7, 2020. Two days later, the Archdiocese of Boston forced him to resign because of it.]

From: Daniel P Moloney <[EMAIL ADDRESS OMITTED]>
Date: June 7, 2020 at 6:01:06 AM EDT
To: tccm <[EMAIL ADDRESS OMITTED]>
Subject: [TCCM] Blessed are the peacemakers

My brothers and sisters in Christ,

It pains me not to be able to preach at a time like this. The Gospel says one thing, and everyone else is saying partial truths, at most. George Floyd was killed by a police officer, and shouldn’t have been. He had not lived a virtuous life. He was convicted of several crimes, including armed robbery, which he seems to have committed to feed his drug habit. And he was high on drugs at the time of his arrest. But we do not kill such people. He committed sins, but we root for sinners to change their lives and convert to the Gospel. Catholics want all life protected from conception until natural death. The police officer who knelt on his neck until he died acted wrongly. I do not know what he was thinking. The charges filed against him allege dangerous negligence, but say nothing about his state of mind. He might have killed George Floyd intentionally, or not. He hasn’t told us. But he showed disregard for his life, and we cannot accept that in our law enforcement officers. It is right that he has been arrested and will be prosecuted.

In the wake of George Floyd’s death, most people in the country have framed this as an act of racism. I don’t think we know that. Many people have claimed that racism is major problem in police forces. I don’t think we know that. Police officers deal with dangerous and bad people all the time, and that often hardens them. They do this so that the rest of us can live in peace, but sometimes at a cost to their souls. Some of them certainly develop attitudes towards the people they investigate and arrest that are unjust and sinful. We should pray that never happens, but we can see how it does. Many parts of our country have been experiencing a five-year crime wave

In other words, Father Moloney knows about the Ferguson Effect.

After such knowledge, what forgiveness?

, providing some context for why the police are trained in aggressive tactics. In 2019, 150 police officers were killed in the line of duty by the violent men they were trying to arrest. That number should be zero, we can all agree. But that context does not justify being overly aggressive — their public trust requires that they exercise great restraint. Criminals have human dignity, too. That’s why we Catholics are asked to work to abolish the death penalty in this country.

Today tensions are high, with charges of racism flying over social media, and countercharges of agreeing with domestic terrorists flying back. People are unfriending and cancelling each other. I hate this. Racism is a sin, as the Catechism says (#1937). So is rash judgment (#2478). Solidarity with our fellow human beings is “a direct demand of human and Christian brotherhood… sealed by the sacrifice of redemption offered by Jesus Christ on the altar of the Cross to his heavenly Father, on behalf of sinful humanity.” (#1939). Our solidarity with one another is deeply frayed now. Everything we say (or don’t say) is treated with suspicion, rather than charity. I hate this too. I’ve talked to multiple people in the Boston area who want the protests here to stop because they are afraid of more riots and looting. I’ve talked to others who want everyone to join the protests, but are uneasy about having police present. One group says that, of course racism is bad, but the riots are really bad — 18 people have been killed, including one police officer. Others say racism is what’s really bad — look at all the victims of police aggression — and to bring up the riots is to distract from the good the protests are trying to achieve. Still others are upset that all this talk about racism has pushed violence against women, institutionalized sexism, and other types of injustice out of the national consciousness. Everyone’s mind is made up, everyone’s angry with each other — even though everyone says they’re opposed to injustices and sins. In a different moment, people strongly opposed to public violence, racism, and sexism would admire each other, despite their different emphases.

Cardinal Sean has released two statements, one a week ago and one on Friday. I wrote something that, were we able to celebrate Mass together, might have been my homily for this week, a week which saw the feast of the Ugandan martyrs bookended by the Solemnities of Pentecost and The Holy Trinity. Members of the TCC have decided to append the Chaplet of Divine Mercy to the weekly Zoom rosary on Fridays, to pray for God’s “mercy on us and on the whole world.” The problems we face are the result of sin, as I said above. And the only way to conquer sin is with prayer, grace, and holiness, by which the Holy Spirit brings us more deeply into Christ’s New Covenant with the Father.

Blessed are the peacemakers, our Lord tells us. May we all be counted among them.

Fr. Daniel Patrick Moloney, Ph.D.

Catholic Chaplain, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 
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  1. Anon[263] • Disclaimer says:

    I dont think racism is a sin in the bible. I think you have to erase the OT to get that. Stealing killing or fornicating is a sin regardless of who the victim is. But its very clear in tye bible that god made different nations. Recognizing that cant be a sin.

    • Replies: @Bill P
    @Anon

    It depends how you define it. It is sinful to hate people for being of another race - Christians are actually commanded to love all people - but there's nothing at all wrong with being partial to your own. Both Jesus and St. Paul loved their own openly and preferred their company.

    Christianity is very natural and normal that way. It never would have gotten anywhere if it conformed to contemporary woke academic standards.

    The BLM vs. "All Lives Matter" dispute is religious in nature. In many non-Christian religions the concept that all lives matter is deeply offensive. In Judaism, for example, the idea that Canaanite or German lives matter as much to God as Jews' lives is anathema.

    While I think we should respect Jews' legal right to believe this, we should also be allowed to disagree, and it seems today that there's a lot of hostility toward the Christian point of view that people have equal value in God's eyes.

    Replies: @G. Poulin

  2. I am not a Catholic.

    But in another life, I would have been, I am sure, honored and blessed to have a man such as Fr. Moloney be my religious leader.

    It is a strange and demented time in which we live, that a chaplain at one of our (formerly?) “great” seats of learning should be fired for uttering such a message.

    • Thanks: Jane Plain
    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Ben Kurtz

    And at a technological school where you might expect more rational thinking, albeit one in the People's Republic of MA.

    , @Desiderius
    @Ben Kurtz

    Went through a strikingly similar situation twenty years ago but had fortunately built a close relationship with the woman whose call it was to make over the preceding year (had just organized a dinner at her house to introduce her husband to some promising new students).

    Those institutions are not for amateurs, however meek and mild.

    , @Bill
    @Ben Kurtz

    Is that a joke? He committed a cowardly act of calumny against Chauvin. This is just the left eating its own.

    , @Pop Warner
    @Ben Kurtz

    I've been fortunate that the priest in my parish has actually spoken out against communists and statue destroyers. It helps that he's from Poland and routinely brings up life in a communist country

    , @Rapparee
    @Ben Kurtz

    I used to know Father Moloney years ago, though I haven’t seen or talked to him in a long while. He’s a good egg, even if he sometimes comes off as a bit of a stick-in-the-mud to some other people. If my soul does end up being saved in the end, one particular lecture of his will be particularly responsible- it was vital spiritual advice which pulled me through some very tough times. If he is a man who follows his own advice, he’s taking his troubles in stride.

  3. Tragic. The Chaplain sounds like a compassionate, fair and wise man.

    Alas, he had no idea what he was up against.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Clifford Brown


    Tragic. The Chaplain sounds like a compassionate, fair and wise man.

    Alas, he had no idea what he was up against.
     
    Or perhaps he did. Either way, we are up against people whose morality of unlimited aggression, if not stopped, means the destruction of all human life.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Jake

    , @Dnought
    @Clifford Brown

    "Let 'em have it".

    At least there was "pushback" after the padre in the movie was vaporized. This time...nothing.

    , @James Braxton
    @Clifford Brown

    I disagree. He claims that the police officers "killed" Mr. Floyd. This is assuming a fact (the key fact) to be true which had not yet been established by the evidence.

    Mr. Floyd died in police custody. That much is undisputed. Any further characterization is wreckless until after the matter is adjudicated in court.

    Also, I was waiting for the officers' body cam footage to be released to see what exactly was going on in between the initial detention of Floyd and when we see him being held on the ground...the judge recently said he would only allowed it to be viewed by appointment, and not released to the public. So we get media descriptions of the video instead of the video itself. Makes me think it must not make Mr. Floyd look very good.

    Don't be surprised when the officers don't get convicted.

    Although they are charging Chauvin with tax evasion, so I guess they will get their pound of flesh.

    Replies: @El Dato

  4. Blessed are the peacemakers, our Lord tells us.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    Blessed are the peacemakers
     
    No, no, no. The cheesemakers. But it's not meant to be taken literally. It can refer to any manufacturer of dairy products.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Thanks for that, Generic, but why do they show 12 sets of 5 engine gauges at 02:10 instead of 10 (plus they'd be much different sets of gauges between piston and turbojet)?

    Stupid are the moviemakers, I tells ya...

    Replies: @Technite78

  5. He said too much.

    He should have kept it brief and vague.

    • Disagree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Henry's Cat
    @Bucky


    He said too much.
     
    By saying too little. One must recite the whole creed, and nothing but the creed.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Bucky

    He should have kept it brief and vague.

    This is good advice when communicating with the general public on any issue sacred to the progressives. They won't tolerate any nuance, any fair-minded view, any deviation from strict dogma.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Bucky

    That is the correct advice for communicating in the Progressive Paradise.

    I imagine Father Moloney aspires to a different Paradise.

  6. weekly Zoom rosary

    What have we come to?

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @James Speaks

    https://i.postimg.cc/1XvBhDrs/Memories-of-Outer-Space.jpg

    "Memories of Outer Space", Enki Bilal, 1980

  7. @Clifford Brown
    Tragic. The Chaplain sounds like a compassionate, fair and wise man.

    Alas, he had no idea what he was up against.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ll_tCp_p9ow

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Dnought, @James Braxton

    Tragic. The Chaplain sounds like a compassionate, fair and wise man.

    Alas, he had no idea what he was up against.

    Or perhaps he did. Either way, we are up against people whose morality of unlimited aggression, if not stopped, means the destruction of all human life.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @ben tillman


    Either way, we are up against people whose morality of unlimited aggression, if not stopped, means the destruction of all human life.
     
    There's probably a downside too, though exactly what it might be escapes me atm.
    , @Jake
    @ben tillman

    Certainly of all decent human life and culture. They are Nihilists. They live to destroy anything and everything that is worth having.

    Replies: @Clifford Brown

  8. What a phenomenal message from an obviously very talented, thoughtful, and compassionate practitioner of the Faith. He was fired for telling the truth. He isn’t the first, and he won’t be the last. God bless him. Please join me in praying for him.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  9. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Blessed are the peacemakers, our Lord tells us.
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9kQ2X84PRvY

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Achmed E. Newman

    Blessed are the peacemakers

    No, no, no. The cheesemakers. But it’s not meant to be taken literally. It can refer to any manufacturer of dairy products.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Mr McKenna

    The cheeseheads. Sons of Lombardi.

  10. @ben tillman
    @Clifford Brown


    Tragic. The Chaplain sounds like a compassionate, fair and wise man.

    Alas, he had no idea what he was up against.
     
    Or perhaps he did. Either way, we are up against people whose morality of unlimited aggression, if not stopped, means the destruction of all human life.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Jake

    Either way, we are up against people whose morality of unlimited aggression, if not stopped, means the destruction of all human life.

    There’s probably a downside too, though exactly what it might be escapes me atm.

  11. @ben tillman
    @Clifford Brown


    Tragic. The Chaplain sounds like a compassionate, fair and wise man.

    Alas, he had no idea what he was up against.
     
    Or perhaps he did. Either way, we are up against people whose morality of unlimited aggression, if not stopped, means the destruction of all human life.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Jake

    Certainly of all decent human life and culture. They are Nihilists. They live to destroy anything and everything that is worth having.

    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
    @Jake

    Not even an Ethos.

    https://youtu.be/RUvxhhYx-ho?t=43

  12. @Clifford Brown
    Tragic. The Chaplain sounds like a compassionate, fair and wise man.

    Alas, he had no idea what he was up against.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ll_tCp_p9ow

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Dnought, @James Braxton

    “Let ’em have it“.

    At least there was “pushback” after the padre in the movie was vaporized. This time…nothing.

  13. I read this last month. One of the best statements on our current situation.

  14. Father Moloney is the perfect model of a modern conciliarist priest—that is, a pseudo-Catholic. In common with Humble Frank Bergoglio in Rome, he has found a way around the parallel injunctions of Matthew 6:24 and Luke 16:13 that a man cannot serve both God and Mammon. Namely, by pretending that Mammon is completely unrelated to “whatever is most cool, hip, and trendy in godless society,” Moloney and Bergoglio get to nod sagely and affirmatively about things that Anthony of Padua and Francis Xavier would have died sooner than affirm while the former two also claim perjuriously that those great saints and all the others would have gone along with their lies.

    For the record,

    (1) Racism is not a sin; it is a phony crime invented by (((this planet’s most accomplished racists))) to slander and manipulate Christians and ex-Christians who are too bloody conformist, witless, or cowardly to see that they are being slandered and manipulated.

    (2) Rash judgment is most definitely a sin, but Moloney’s cautions to his readers against succumbing to that vice ring hollow, coming as they do from a man who has, two paragraphs earlier, brazenly and rashly judged the cop who is accused, on evidence whose falsity grows daily more plain, of killing Saint George Floyd, a career criminal the cause of whose death has not been afforded the close forensic scrutiny that pre-woke US common and statute law requires. (Not that I would bet even a buck on the poor cop’s getting a fair shake in today’s hate-whitey prosecutorial environment.)

    (3) Moloney says that “Solidarity with our fellow human beings is ‘a direct demand of human and Christian brotherhood.’” Poppycock! Solidarity with other humans, biological or notional or woke or whatever, is not a demand of any sort. Strictly biological similarity—similarity, not solidarity, mind—is a fact of human existence, like halitosis. The sort of cheesy, trendy solidarity urged by Moloney makes nonsense of the true requirement of Christian tradition to employ fraternal correction, even where doing so entails some risk, when those around us have fallen, wittingly or otherwise, into grave error. No one denies that this requirement—elucidated in the plain language of the first three spiritual works of mercy: admonish the sinner, instruct the ignorant, counsel the doubtful—was understood by the preconciliar Catholic Church as, in effect, a counsel of perfection. One must be pretty naive to fail to recognize the real peril that might befall someone who exercises fraternal correction on the wrong person at the wrong time—and I refer to a context of “normal” circumstances, those of the not so distant, immeasurably more civilized past, wherein the current nightmare, a nightmare of black violence directed and egged on by Jewish hate, that many white and/or Christian Americans now endure was scarcely imaginable. Lastly,

    (4) On these grounds and others, I would applaud Sean Cardinal O’Malley for giving Father Moloney the boot were it not for the fact that I know with moral certainty that His Eminence is a far more worldly, more cynical, and hence un-Catholic man than Moloney (with God’s grace) is ever likely to be.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Thanks: Old Prude, Chrisnonymous
    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Pierre de Craon

    Very well said indeed.

    , @NOTA
    @Pierre de Craon

    Caring for our fellow man, of all races and all types and all levels of ability, is absolutely a requirement of Christianity. The priest's letter seemed like exactly the sort of sober and humane comment that seems to get the ideologues most worked up and angry.

    It seems bizarre for the archbishop to have disciplined him in any way for such a moderate statement.

    Replies: @Pierre de Craon

    , @anonymous 389
    @Pierre de Craon

    wwebd said - please pray for poor Sean Omalley. The poor old man has little love in his heart (he rejoiced, the arrogant little star-struck admirer of celebrities, to preside over the evil praise , at a funeral, of the evil supporter of abortion Ted Kennedy), and there is nothing sadder than the lonely life of a man like that.

    I just do not have it in my heart to be angry with the poor little fat old man, it is just so sad to know that he is what he is.

    You need to understand I do not see him the way you see him. I have lived through more than one century, with friends from at least three different centuries, and I know how much his mother suffers, seeing what a sad little creature of the zeitgeist the poor fat little old man has become.

    I do not have it in my heart to be angry at the cold-hearted evil things this man, or, to be fair, his powerful sad fat little fellow cardinals, and the evildoer Pope (God forgive him) have done. It is so so sad to know that they failed to care about their fellow Christians, and the best we can do is pray that they repent in the moments before they die.

    This world has always, and will always, belong to those who respect God, and will never ever belong to those, like O'Malley, who worship evildoers.

    Seriously, please pray for the arrogant old man. I know how much his parents loved him, and I know how much GOD wants him to repent for the evil things he has done, with so little concern for the victims of the people (Ted Kennedy is one, but there are others) he has praised. It is so sad to see these evil old Cardinals thinking they are all right with the Lord, when the simplest peasant can see the lack of love in the heart of the poor Pope and the poor Cardinals. Please pray for them all.

  15. Archbishop Carlo Vigano, who had sought the resignation of Papa Francis, has now penned this prayer for the safekeeping of a certain world leader:

    [MORE]

    Prayer for a Resurgence of Christianity in America
    and the Re-election of Donald Trump

    Almighty and Eternal God, King of Kings and Lord of Lords: graciously turn your gaze to us who invoke You with confidence.

    Bless us, citizens of the United States of America; grant peace and prosperity to our Nation; illuminate those who govern us so that they may commit themselves to the common good, in respect for Your holy Law.

    Protect those who, defending the inviolable principles of the Natural Law and Your Commandments, must face the repeated assaults of the Enemy of the human race.

    Keep in the hearts of Your children courage for the truth, love for virtue and perseverance in the midst of trials.

    Make our families grow in the example that Our Lord has given us, together with His Most Holy Mother and Saint Joseph in the home of Nazareth; give to our fathers and mothers the gift of Strength, to educate wisely the children with which you have blessed them.

    Give courage to those who, in spiritual combat, fight the good fight as soldiers of Christ against the furious forces of the children of darkness.

    Keep each one of us, O Lord, in your Most Sacred Heart, and above all him whom Your Providence has placed at the head of our Nation.

    Bless the President of the United States of America, so that aware of his responsibility and his duties, he may be a knight of justice, a defender of the oppressed, a firm bulwark against Your enemies, and a proud supporter of the children of light.

    Place the United States of America and the whole world under the mantle of the Queen of Victories, our Unconquered Leader in battle, the Immaculate Conception. It is thanks to her, and through your Mercy, that the hymn of praise rises to you, O Lord, from the children whom you have redeemed in the Most Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ.

    • Thanks: Charlotte
    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @Russ

    St. Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle. Be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the (Democrats)...

    , @Hibernian
    @Russ


    Bless the President of the United States of America, so that aware of his responsibility and his duties, he may be a knight of justice, a defender of the oppressed, a firm bulwark against Your enemies, and a proud supporter of the children of light.
     
    Immediately above is a standard issue prayer for a secular leader. The simple petitionary prayer for his re-election in the title is OK by me for the Archbishop to pray if that is what his conscience tells him.
  16. Cardinal Sean, the lord high executioner of Father Maloney, is prominently mentioned as a possible contender in the next Papal Conclave. If so, ongoing fun and games are ensured for the RC Church!

    • Agree: JimDandy
    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Dan Hayes

    Pretty ominous to have someone in the catholic hierarchy called "Cardinal Sean"

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

  17. @Anon
    I dont think racism is a sin in the bible. I think you have to erase the OT to get that. Stealing killing or fornicating is a sin regardless of who the victim is. But its very clear in tye bible that god made different nations. Recognizing that cant be a sin.

    Replies: @Bill P

    It depends how you define it. It is sinful to hate people for being of another race – Christians are actually commanded to love all people – but there’s nothing at all wrong with being partial to your own. Both Jesus and St. Paul loved their own openly and preferred their company.

    Christianity is very natural and normal that way. It never would have gotten anywhere if it conformed to contemporary woke academic standards.

    The BLM vs. “All Lives Matter” dispute is religious in nature. In many non-Christian religions the concept that all lives matter is deeply offensive. In Judaism, for example, the idea that Canaanite or German lives matter as much to God as Jews’ lives is anathema.

    While I think we should respect Jews’ legal right to believe this, we should also be allowed to disagree, and it seems today that there’s a lot of hostility toward the Christian point of view that people have equal value in God’s eyes.

    • Agree: Mr McKenna, Charlotte, TWS
    • Replies: @G. Poulin
    @Bill P

    "Christians are commanded to love all people."
    No, they aren't. "Love your neighbor" means "love those near to you", not "love everybody on the planet." The very word "neighbor" means literally "near one".

    Replies: @Alice, @Anon, @Bill, @FPD72, @Bill P

  18. Anonymous[146] • Disclaimer says:

    Funny thing is that there will be people here reading this, angry about it, yet still continue to maintain membership in and donate money to the Catholic church, or equivalent Protestant churches.

    My own sister is like this. I’ve asked her what exactly the Catholic church needs to do to get her to conclude that the seat is vacant, if there’s anywhere she’s willing to draw the line. She couldn’t think of anything.

  19. Cardinal Sean, the lord high executioner of Father Moloney, is prominently mentioned as a candidate in the next Papal Conclave. If so, ongoing fun and games are ensured for the RC Church!

  20. George Floyd was killed by a police officer, and shouldn’t have been.

    At what point did the whole world decide that we don’t need autopsies, we just believe what some television personality tells us?

    Are we really that retarded? (Narrators voice: Yes folks we really really ARE that retarded!)

  21. @James Speaks

    weekly Zoom rosary
     
    What have we come to?

    Replies: @El Dato

    “Memories of Outer Space”, Enki Bilal, 1980

  22. @Dan Hayes
    Cardinal Sean, the lord high executioner of Father Maloney, is prominently mentioned as a possible contender in the next Papal Conclave. If so, ongoing fun and games are ensured for the RC Church!

    Replies: @El Dato

    Pretty ominous to have someone in the catholic hierarchy called “Cardinal Sean”

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @El Dato

    "Cardinal Sean" and his ilk are just one small part of the transmogrified Bergoglio RC Church!

    Replies: @Bill, @Art Deco

  23. @Ben Kurtz
    I am not a Catholic.

    But in another life, I would have been, I am sure, honored and blessed to have a man such as Fr. Moloney be my religious leader.

    It is a strange and demented time in which we live, that a chaplain at one of our (formerly?) "great" seats of learning should be fired for uttering such a message.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Desiderius, @Bill, @Pop Warner, @Rapparee

    And at a technological school where you might expect more rational thinking, albeit one in the People’s Republic of MA.

  24. He wrote: “George Floyd was killed by a police officer … The police officer who knelt on his neck until he died acted wrongly. … It is right that he has been arrested and will be prosecuted.”

    We don’t know any of those things. Floyd died of a fentanyl overdose. There is no proof that the police contributed to the death. The officers may yet be acquitted. The priest was wrong to accuse the police of crimes.

    • Agree: travis, TWS
    • Replies: @SINCERITY.net
    @Roger

    Exactly. Saying that the police officer “killed George Floyd” is factually more than doubtful and violates the presumption of innocence. George Floyd died, that is all we know. The police officer allegedly killed him, but in a sane world he would not even be accused once the (covered up) autopsy is out.
    Don’t miss the funny videos about gangsters who lie they cannot breathe
    https://sincerity.net/icantbreathe/
    ”I can’t breathe” does NOT prove he cannot breathe!

    George Floyd said, a few times “I can’t breathe”, and soon thereafter died. The media’s egregious dishonesty, distortions, deceptions, and outright lies misinformed the public, like in the Rodney King case in 1992 1. The media stir up unjustified hate and anger. Thus the media’s fake news are the cause for riots, deaths, loss of job, loss of property value, destruction of businesses.

    Dishonesty #1: flawed logic, omission of alternative explanations:
    It is possible that asphyxiation happened. But it is unscientific, illogical and dishonest to affirm with certainty, that George really could not breathe, and asphyxiation caused Floyd’s death
    Dishonesty #2 basic anatomical knowledge:
    it is known and very likely that someone who is being asphyxiated cannot speak and cannot say “I can’t breathe”
    Dishonesty #3 failure to inform:
    a career criminal with years of prison experience might have learned to weaponize “I can’t breathe”. Thus s/he can intimidate police and continue resisting arrest. We see a few examples here.
    We thank Tommy Robinson news on Telegram for these videos, now on vk.
    >>> continued

    , @Jack D
    @Roger

    He was trying to be even handed and doing a sort of "Yes, but..." thing. Saying that the popo killed him is totally fine in the current context even if it is false (they are going after the cop for tax evasion because they know that the murder charge is not going to stick - the Deep State is sending that cop to prison no matter what. If they had to, they would get him for jaywalking.)

    However in the current environment you can't say that St. George did ANYTHING bad. St. George is immaculate. Might as well say that Jesus was shoplifting at the money changers' tables. THAT was the Father's mistake, not saying that the cop killed him. EVERYONE already knows that the cop killed him, even if it isn't true.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @NOTA
    @Roger

    I think the priest believed this was true, whether it was true or not. And as I understand it, there were multiple autopsies with somewhat different results. It sure *looked* like Chauvin was crushing the life out of Floyd, but deciding exactly what happened is why we have trials.

  25. @Jake
    @ben tillman

    Certainly of all decent human life and culture. They are Nihilists. They live to destroy anything and everything that is worth having.

    Replies: @Clifford Brown

    Not even an Ethos.

  26. Criminals have human dignity, too. That’s why we Catholics are asked to work to abolish the death penalty in this country.

    Minnesota abolished it in 1915, after a botched hanging in 1911. Next-door Wisconsin and Michigan (yes, Minnesota borders Michigan, which, Google Maps, is not in Canada) dropped it in the middle 19th century; they were the first:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_punishment_in_the_United_States#States_that_have_abolished_the_death_penalty

    Rhode Island and Vermont had it on the books well into the 20th century, but didn’t exercise it. US states were ahead of most of Europe in abolition. Nobody ever gives us credit (or abuse) for that. It’s like our abortion laws being much more lenient than Europe’s. It doesn’t compute, true as it may be.

    Rome not only once permitted executions, but at times carried them out herself. (Though not in the Inquisition; that was the Spanish state.)

    • Replies: @I Have Scinde
    @Reg Cæsar

    "Rome not only once permitted executions, but at times carried them out herself. (Though not in the Inquisition; that was the Spanish state.)"

    There was more than one Inquisition. The Roman Inquisition was mostly, but not entirely, bloodless.
    https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/inquisition-roman

    Replies: @Gilbert Ratchet

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks. I didn't know that about the death penalties. As I (strangely) still have occasion to argue with liberals on their own terms, it will come in useful for me.

    On the larger point, though,



    That’s why we Catholics are asked to work to abolish the death penalty in this country.
     

     
    Is this even true? The Gospel does not ask it. Maybe the Pope is asking it? If so, it's a change from prior practice. And is it all countries or only this country?

    Replies: @Anon, @JMcG, @Pierre de Craon, @Buffalo Joe

    , @Ganderson
    @Reg Cæsar

    Where does MN border MI? Through Lake Superior?

    Replies: @Hibernian

    , @Ganderson
    @Reg Cæsar

    Neither Cole, Bob and Jim Younger were executed for their part iN the Northfield, MN raid, apparently because they pleaded guilty. Bob died in Stillwater Prison, Jim and Cole were paroled after 25 years.

    , @JMcG
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Catholic Church had found capital punishment to be within the bounds of Catholic morality from the founding of the Church until about fifteen minutes ago, when that chucklehead who takes up space on the Throne of St Peter announced that it could no longer be reconciled with Church teaching.
    The Church, and the world, are in for a long, dark, night.

  27. Maybe they objected to this statement:

    George Floyd was killed by a police officer …

    which was not specifically supported by the autopsy.

  28. @Bucky
    He said too much.

    He should have kept it brief and vague.

    Replies: @Henry's Cat, @Harry Baldwin, @Almost Missouri

    He said too much.

    By saying too little. One must recite the whole creed, and nothing but the creed.

  29. @Reg Cæsar

    Criminals have human dignity, too. That’s why we Catholics are asked to work to abolish the death penalty in this country.
     
    Minnesota abolished it in 1915, after a botched hanging in 1911. Next-door Wisconsin and Michigan (yes, Minnesota borders Michigan, which, Google Maps, is not in Canada) dropped it in the middle 19th century; they were the first:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_punishment_in_the_United_States#States_that_have_abolished_the_death_penalty

    Rhode Island and Vermont had it on the books well into the 20th century, but didn't exercise it. US states were ahead of most of Europe in abolition. Nobody ever gives us credit (or abuse) for that. It's like our abortion laws being much more lenient than Europe's. It doesn't compute, true as it may be.

    Rome not only once permitted executions, but at times carried them out herself. (Though not in the Inquisition; that was the Spanish state.)

    Replies: @I Have Scinde, @Almost Missouri, @Ganderson, @Ganderson, @JMcG

    “Rome not only once permitted executions, but at times carried them out herself. (Though not in the Inquisition; that was the Spanish state.)”

    There was more than one Inquisition. The Roman Inquisition was mostly, but not entirely, bloodless.
    https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/inquisition-roman

    • Replies: @Gilbert Ratchet
    @I Have Scinde

    It's important to remember the the Pope, head of the worldwide RC church, is also the temporal sovereign of the Papal States (now sadly reduced to being the size of the Vatican City, but historically much larger). In this capacity his regime certainly carried out executions, as the career of Giovanni Battista Bugatti attests.

  30. Sounds like a bright guy, looks like it was time for him to leave the academic shithole he’s been slumming in and move on to better things.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Bumpkin

    Colleges should very seldom have f/t chaplains. There simply is not the manpower for that sort of ministry any more.

    Replies: @NOTA

  31. The police officer who knelt on his neck until he died acted wrongly.

    I am surprised that everybody seems to be so sure of two things: That Chauvin killed Floyd with his knee and that Chauvin should have acted differently.

    One of the things that transcripts of the body cam makes clear is that Floyd started to beg for his life immediately after he was arrested, as he feared being shot. He also repeatedly claimed he couldn’t breathe while still standing. So how should the cops have known he really couldn’t breathe?

    Also, a knee in the neck doesn’t obstruct the respiratory tracts. The Minneapolis police chief stated that Chauvin had had training on how to act in such situations so he should have known better. But I wonder if Chauvin wasn’t acting the way he did because of this training. Restrain the suspect and get an ambulance, but don’t use a choke hold.

    The cops asked for an ambulance with high emergency: code 2. Their request got dispatched to an ambulance as a call with no emergency: code 3. I frankly consider that a major factor in the death of Floyd.

    Sources: Transcript of Lane’s body cam and the charges against Chauvin.

    • Thanks: ic1000, Charlotte
    • Replies: @travis
    @backup

    All the evidence points to the fact that Floyd had taken a drug overdose so strong that his imminent death could hardly have been prevented. Blood samples collected before Floyd died, tested positive for the following: Fentanyl 11 ng/mL, Norfentanyl 5.6 ng/mL, … Methamphetamine 19 ng/mL … 86 ng/mL of morphine...This fentanyl concentration, including its norfentanyl metabolite at its molecular weight, was 20.6 ng/mL That is over three times the lethal overdose.

    Replies: @Alden

  32. I dont think racism is a sin in the bible.

    Actually, I think it is sometimes mandatory. Ask an Amalek about that.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Hypnotoad666


    Actually, I think it is sometimes mandatory. Ask an Amalek about that.
     
    Or a Samaritan.

    https://youtu.be/OIVB3DdRgqU

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  33. Convicted of showing an abundance of compassion, and insufficient hatred.

    Well, what do you expect with a communist pope in the Vatican?

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  34. As someone who attended Catholic schools from first through ninth grade, but who is not Catholic, but yet sends his daughters to Catholic schools (wtf?!? Lol!), I find all of this to be hilarious!!! You’re telling me that someone in today’s Catholic Church thought he could be politically non-correct, or that he could not bow-down to the religion of anti-racism??? Ha!!! I guess this guy thought he was Martin Luther or something. Lol!!!

    • Agree: Hibernian
  35. Anonymous[379] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    I dont think racism is a sin in the bible.
     
    Actually, I think it is sometimes mandatory. Ask an Amalek about that.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Actually, I think it is sometimes mandatory. Ask an Amalek about that.

    Or a Samaritan.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anonymous

    Very Monty Python-esqe, but it's not. I had to look it up. It's from That Mitchell and Webb Look comedy show. Never heard of it. Thank you, #379. That was hilarious!

  36. @Bucky
    He said too much.

    He should have kept it brief and vague.

    Replies: @Henry's Cat, @Harry Baldwin, @Almost Missouri

    He should have kept it brief and vague.

    This is good advice when communicating with the general public on any issue sacred to the progressives. They won’t tolerate any nuance, any fair-minded view, any deviation from strict dogma.

  37. He clearly didn’t read the New Franciscan Catechism. This is no longer your father’s Catholic Church.

    • Agree: Hibernian
  38. Sorry, I don’t buy into any of his tripe. Platitudes. Universalism? Phooey! I’m too much a naturalist to confuse a sub-Saharan black with a northern European or a Japanese. I don’t share his conviction that all humanity is One. We are all at different stages of evolution, occupy different niches, different branches on the World Tree. And that’s how God intended it to be. We share basic drives and needs but to fulfill our needs for belonging and companionship, we, of necessity become partial to our own kind. Birds of a feather.

    The Holy Catholic (universal) Church? Count me out. I’ll atone for my own sins, thank you. You’re not pinning nailing that guy on a cross on me. I had nothing to do with it so don’t imply that I owe him for any debt he paid on my behalf.

    • LOL: YetAnotherAnon
  39. @Bucky
    He said too much.

    He should have kept it brief and vague.

    Replies: @Henry's Cat, @Harry Baldwin, @Almost Missouri

    That is the correct advice for communicating in the Progressive Paradise.

    I imagine Father Moloney aspires to a different Paradise.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon, NOTA
  40. @Reg Cæsar

    Criminals have human dignity, too. That’s why we Catholics are asked to work to abolish the death penalty in this country.
     
    Minnesota abolished it in 1915, after a botched hanging in 1911. Next-door Wisconsin and Michigan (yes, Minnesota borders Michigan, which, Google Maps, is not in Canada) dropped it in the middle 19th century; they were the first:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_punishment_in_the_United_States#States_that_have_abolished_the_death_penalty

    Rhode Island and Vermont had it on the books well into the 20th century, but didn't exercise it. US states were ahead of most of Europe in abolition. Nobody ever gives us credit (or abuse) for that. It's like our abortion laws being much more lenient than Europe's. It doesn't compute, true as it may be.

    Rome not only once permitted executions, but at times carried them out herself. (Though not in the Inquisition; that was the Spanish state.)

    Replies: @I Have Scinde, @Almost Missouri, @Ganderson, @Ganderson, @JMcG

    Thanks. I didn’t know that about the death penalties. As I (strangely) still have occasion to argue with liberals on their own terms, it will come in useful for me.

    On the larger point, though,

    That’s why we Catholics are asked to work to abolish the death penalty in this country.

    Is this even true? The Gospel does not ask it. Maybe the Pope is asking it? If so, it’s a change from prior practice. And is it all countries or only this country?

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Almost Missouri

    This is a complicated one, but the bottom line is that the death penalty is not held to be inherently immoral.

    , @JMcG
    @Almost Missouri

    Catholic doctrine allowed application of the death penalty until the Francis disallowed it soon after maneuvering Benedict XVI off the throne of St Peter.

    Replies: @Neuday

    , @Pierre de Craon
    @Almost Missouri

    You are right to question the implication you were meant to take; namely, that working to abolish the death penalty is something Catholics must do as a condition of being Catholic. The sentence is artfully worded, however, so as to deceive all but the wariest.

    Note the use of the passive voice. It leaves the directing authority deliberately in doubt, in the hope that you will fill in the blank with the desired choice, not necessarily the correct one. The desired fill-in choice is "immemorial Catholic teaching and practice"; the correct choice is "insincere, secularist, and fallen-away Catholics who identify their own feelings and conformist desires with the will of God."

    Indeed, the orthodox view of capital punishment is that there are occasions when it alone is sufficient to demonstrate that the proposition that "criminals have human dignity, too" is taken seriously. In moral theory, one who committed a truly capital crime was executed for two reasons: (1) as punishment condign to the offense committed and hence indicative of the offense's precise gravity, and (2) as representing Christian society's genuine solicitude for the criminal's immortal soul; that is to say, commission of a capital offense might be taken as clear indication that the sole stimulus strong enough to persuade the offender to sincerely repent his sins and form a right conscience would be the certain loss of his own life. This second reason is memorably embodied in Dr. Johnson's famous comment to Boswell, "Depend upon it, sir, when a man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully."

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Almost Missouri

    Almost, 14 protestors have chained themselves to the gate at Gov. Newsum's mansion. They demand the release of all prisoners currently in California prisons. They are distraught that a prisoner on Death Row died (reportedly) from Covid-19. Covid-19 in prison is now a death sentence.

  41. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Blessed are the peacemakers, our Lord tells us.
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9kQ2X84PRvY

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Achmed E. Newman

    Thanks for that, Generic, but why do they show 12 sets of 5 engine gauges at 02:10 instead of 10 (plus they’d be much different sets of gauges between piston and turbojet)?

    Stupid are the moviemakers, I tells ya…

    • Replies: @Technite78
    @Achmed E. Newman

    From what I can tell, that is an actual flight engineer's control panel on the B-36. The 12 sets of 5 are actually 2 sets of 6x5 gauge panels... 10 gauges for each of the 6 piston engines. The radial piston engines required far more instrumentation and control than jet engines... for example the flight engineers needed to control fuel mixture, water injection, propeller pitch, air cooling ducts, etc. Also, the jet engines were a later feature, and wasn't part of the original design of the engineer's console.

  42. Aha! I found out the Chaplain’s error. It was that “feast of the Ugandan martyrs” part. I looked it up, and this was a massacre of 22 Anglican and 23 Catholic Africans by the King of Buganda (the name likely being a conjunction of “buggery” and “Uganda”. Wiki says:

    The Uganda Martyrs are a group of 23 Anglican and 22 Catholic converts to Christianity in the historical kingdom of Buganda, now part of Uganda, who were executed between 31 January 1885 and 27 January 1887.

    They were killed on orders of Mwanga II, the Kabaka (King) of Buganda [heh!]. The deaths took place at a time when there was a three-way religious struggle for political influence at the Buganda royal court. The episode also occurred against the backdrop of the “Scramble for Africa” – the invasion, occupation, division, colonization and annexation of African territory by European powers.

    This remembrance brings up the colonial era. You don’t bring up the colonial era. You don’t mention anything about black people of any kind ever doing anything bad. Don’t make the black parishioners angry.

    The guy could have brought up ANY OTHER massacre on ANY OTHER continent, but NO, he had to go and write about something bad that happened in Africa. THINK before you write, people!

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Sucking up will not save you. They attack the weak, not the strong.

  43. @Russ
    Archbishop Carlo Vigano, who had sought the resignation of Papa Francis, has now penned this prayer for the safekeeping of a certain world leader:

    Prayer for a Resurgence of Christianity in America
    and the Re-election of Donald Trump

    Almighty and Eternal God, King of Kings and Lord of Lords: graciously turn your gaze to us who invoke You with confidence.

    Bless us, citizens of the United States of America; grant peace and prosperity to our Nation; illuminate those who govern us so that they may commit themselves to the common good, in respect for Your holy Law.

    Protect those who, defending the inviolable principles of the Natural Law and Your Commandments, must face the repeated assaults of the Enemy of the human race.

    Keep in the hearts of Your children courage for the truth, love for virtue and perseverance in the midst of trials.

    Make our families grow in the example that Our Lord has given us, together with His Most Holy Mother and Saint Joseph in the home of Nazareth; give to our fathers and mothers the gift of Strength, to educate wisely the children with which you have blessed them.

    Give courage to those who, in spiritual combat, fight the good fight as soldiers of Christ against the furious forces of the children of darkness.

    Keep each one of us, O Lord, in your Most Sacred Heart, and above all him whom Your Providence has placed at the head of our Nation.

    Bless the President of the United States of America, so that aware of his responsibility and his duties, he may be a knight of justice, a defender of the oppressed, a firm bulwark against Your enemies, and a proud supporter of the children of light.

    Place the United States of America and the whole world under the mantle of the Queen of Victories, our Unconquered Leader in battle, the Immaculate Conception. It is thanks to her, and through your Mercy, that the hymn of praise rises to you, O Lord, from the children whom you have redeemed in the Most Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ.
     

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Hibernian

    St. Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle. Be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the (Democrats)…

  44. @Anonymous
    @Hypnotoad666


    Actually, I think it is sometimes mandatory. Ask an Amalek about that.
     
    Or a Samaritan.

    https://youtu.be/OIVB3DdRgqU

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Very Monty Python-esqe, but it’s not. I had to look it up. It’s from That Mitchell and Webb Look comedy show. Never heard of it. Thank you, #379. That was hilarious!

  45. @Roger
    He wrote: "George Floyd was killed by a police officer ... The police officer who knelt on his neck until he died acted wrongly. ... It is right that he has been arrested and will be prosecuted."

    We don't know any of those things. Floyd died of a fentanyl overdose. There is no proof that the police contributed to the death. The officers may yet be acquitted. The priest was wrong to accuse the police of crimes.

    Replies: @SINCERITY.net, @Jack D, @NOTA

    Exactly. Saying that the police officer “killed George Floyd” is factually more than doubtful and violates the presumption of innocence. George Floyd died, that is all we know. The police officer allegedly killed him, but in a sane world he would not even be accused once the (covered up) autopsy is out.
    Don’t miss the funny videos about gangsters who lie they cannot breathe
    https://sincerity.net/icantbreathe/
    ”I can’t breathe” does NOT prove he cannot breathe!

    George Floyd said, a few times “I can’t breathe”, and soon thereafter died. The media’s egregious dishonesty, distortions, deceptions, and outright lies misinformed the public, like in the Rodney King case in 1992 1. The media stir up unjustified hate and anger. Thus the media’s fake news are the cause for riots, deaths, loss of job, loss of property value, destruction of businesses.

    Dishonesty #1: flawed logic, omission of alternative explanations:
    It is possible that asphyxiation happened. But it is unscientific, illogical and dishonest to affirm with certainty, that George really could not breathe, and asphyxiation caused Floyd’s death
    Dishonesty #2 basic anatomical knowledge:
    it is known and very likely that someone who is being asphyxiated cannot speak and cannot say “I can’t breathe”
    Dishonesty #3 failure to inform:
    a career criminal with years of prison experience might have learned to weaponize “I can’t breathe”. Thus s/he can intimidate police and continue resisting arrest. We see a few examples here.
    We thank Tommy Robinson news on Telegram for these videos, now on vk.
    >>> continued

  46. Eh, lawyers are worthless shitheads. Who cares if more useless knobjockeys join their ranks?

    • Replies: @Lockean Proviso
    @Anon


    Who cares if more useless knobjockeys join their ranks?
     
    Because it may be that someday, after our assets are taken for reparations, we end up indigent, and we find ourselves unjustly accused of a hate crime for defending against being set on fire or having our last scrap of food stolen while sleeping under a bridge, we will need our court-appointed attorney to be competent. A less competent bar means less justice for the wrongfully accused.
    , @Clyde
    @Anon

    Now I know what a knobjockey is.

  47. @El Dato
    @Dan Hayes

    Pretty ominous to have someone in the catholic hierarchy called "Cardinal Sean"

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    “Cardinal Sean” and his ilk are just one small part of the transmogrified Bergoglio RC Church!

    • Replies: @Bill
    @Dan Hayes

    Of course, he was made a cardinal by Pope Benedict.

    , @Art Deco
    @Dan Hayes

    He was appointed by John Paul and has held four sees over the last 35 years. He's awaiting a replacement as he's past retirement age.

    NB, in three of the four appointments he's had, he was presented as the man to clean up scandals. This is the chap the Congregation of Bishops and the nuncio wants you to think is the cream.

  48. @Bill P
    @Anon

    It depends how you define it. It is sinful to hate people for being of another race - Christians are actually commanded to love all people - but there's nothing at all wrong with being partial to your own. Both Jesus and St. Paul loved their own openly and preferred their company.

    Christianity is very natural and normal that way. It never would have gotten anywhere if it conformed to contemporary woke academic standards.

    The BLM vs. "All Lives Matter" dispute is religious in nature. In many non-Christian religions the concept that all lives matter is deeply offensive. In Judaism, for example, the idea that Canaanite or German lives matter as much to God as Jews' lives is anathema.

    While I think we should respect Jews' legal right to believe this, we should also be allowed to disagree, and it seems today that there's a lot of hostility toward the Christian point of view that people have equal value in God's eyes.

    Replies: @G. Poulin

    “Christians are commanded to love all people.”
    No, they aren’t. “Love your neighbor” means “love those near to you”, not “love everybody on the planet.” The very word “neighbor” means literally “near one”.

    • Replies: @Alice
    @G. Poulin

    ‘Teacher,’ he said, ‘what must I do to inherit eternal life?’ He said to him, ‘What is written in the law? What do you read there?’ He answered, ‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbour as yourself.’ And he said to him, ‘You have given the right answer; do this, and you will live.’

    But wanting to justify himself, he asked Jesus, ‘And who is my neighbour?’ Jesus replied, ‘A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell into the hands of robbers, who stripped him, beat him, and went away, leaving him half dead. Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a Samaritan while travelling came near him; and when he saw him, he was moved with pity. He went to him and bandaged his wounds, having poured oil and wine on them. Then he put him on his own animal, brought him to an inn, and took care of him. The next day he took out two denarii, gave them to the innkeeper, and said, “Take care of him; and when I come back, I will repay you whatever more you spend.” Which of these three, do you think, was a neighbour to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers?’ He said, ‘The one who showed him mercy.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Go and do likewise.’

    Replies: @Neuday, @G. Poulin

    , @Anon
    @G. Poulin

    Who is my neighbor...

    Also. Love your enemy

    , @Bill
    @G. Poulin

    Uh. Our Lord was asked who our neighbors are, and He gave a pretty expansive answer. His contemporaries were no doubt shocked to find out that Samaritans were their neighbors.

    , @FPD72
    @G. Poulin


    Christians are commanded to love all people.”
    No, they aren’t. “Love your neighbor” means “love those near to you”, not “love everybody on the planet.” The very word “neighbor” means literally “near one”.
     
    It’s true that the Greek noun translated as “neighbor” in Luke 10:27, πλησίον, is derived from a word that means “near.” But when Jesus is asked in verse 29, “Who is my neighbor?” He tells the story of The Good Samaritan in verses 30-37.

    Of course, the command to love ones neighbor was cited by a Jewish lawyer as a follow up to the lawyer’s question in verse 25, “ Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” Since the lawyer had emphasized his own works by his question and was thinking in terms of works righteousness, Jesus then asked the lawyer what did the Law require. That was when the lawyer spoke of the commands from Deuteronomy 6:5 and Leviticus 19:18 about loving God and ones neighbor. The Jewish understanding of “neighbor” (רֵעַ) was a fellow Israelite. With the parable, Jesus expanded the meaning of neighbor to include all people whom one might contact, even those despised Samaritans. The ultimate point Jesus was making was the impossibility of Law righteousness, since nobody is capable of that type of universal love. That this was Jesus’ point is made clear by Luke’s editorial comment in verse 29, “But the lawyer, wanting to justify himself, asked Jesus...”

    Bottom line: followers of Jesus have a responsibility to honor and do good to all people but this is not a condition for salvation (which is by grace through faith) but rather salvation’s result.

    Replies: @G. Poulin, @Cortes

    , @Bill P
    @G. Poulin

    There's also that "love your enemy" part.

    Replies: @G. Poulin

  49. @Clifford Brown
    Tragic. The Chaplain sounds like a compassionate, fair and wise man.

    Alas, he had no idea what he was up against.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ll_tCp_p9ow

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Dnought, @James Braxton

    I disagree. He claims that the police officers “killed” Mr. Floyd. This is assuming a fact (the key fact) to be true which had not yet been established by the evidence.

    Mr. Floyd died in police custody. That much is undisputed. Any further characterization is wreckless until after the matter is adjudicated in court.

    Also, I was waiting for the officers’ body cam footage to be released to see what exactly was going on in between the initial detention of Floyd and when we see him being held on the ground…the judge recently said he would only allowed it to be viewed by appointment, and not released to the public. So we get media descriptions of the video instead of the video itself. Makes me think it must not make Mr. Floyd look very good.

    Don’t be surprised when the officers don’t get convicted.

    Although they are charging Chauvin with tax evasion, so I guess they will get their pound of flesh.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @James Braxton

    https://newbostonpost.com/2020/06/17/m-i-t-catholic-chaplain-forced-out-over-email-message-about-george-floyd/


    An university administrator [Suzy Nelson] wrote a letter condemning Father Moloney’s email message.

    “The message from Father Moloney was deeply disturbing. Those who wrote me [i.e. a few students on the Professional Outrage PhD track] and other senior leaders [who?] were outraged, and many felt abandoned and alienated by their faith,” wrote Suzy Nelson, vice president and dean for student life. “By devaluing and disparaging George Floyd’s character [which we know to be impeccable and sacrosanct], Father Moloney’s message failed to acknowledge the dignity of each human being and the devastating impact of systemic racism — especially within the criminal justice system — on African Americans, people of African descent, and communities of color [left out transgender people, I see a forthcoming resignation, Miss Nelson]. Moreover, his message dismissed the need for urgent action and change in America [really!!]. Now more than ever, we need people in positions of power and influence to call upon each one of us to examine the ruinous impact of hate and racial violence in America, to strengthen our commitment to healing our relations with others, and to unite in bringing about systemic equity and justice for Black people in every sector of society.” [proceeds to behave like a mentally disturbed maoist in must]

     

    From

    https://palladiummag.com/2019/08/05/the-real-problem-at-yale-is-not-free-speech/


    Current Yale administrators have a sense of self-preservation for themselves and their corporation, but not for what made them great in the first place. They are quick to appease students, when they go along with the new zeitgeist, as if students and the latest wokeness were the preservers of cultural knowledge. This is the key to understanding why beloved faculty members can end up purged, against all public sentiment. Whether out of ideological commitment or hard-nosed realpolitik, these apparatchik administrators, bolstered by a minority of students, have effectively outmaneuvered their rivals. In doing so, they have also accelerated the tearing down of Yale’s institutional legacy and undermined its historical mission.

    If they were confronting a university and student body with a powerful commitment to that mission, things might be different. But they aren’t. As we’ve seen, the classes represented at Yale have themselves opened up a massive ideological vacuum. Shrinking back from their position and opportunities, they have lost the ability to coordinate.
     

    The required actions were called de-nazification and de-stalinization, I think.

    Replies: @Charlotte, @AnotherDad

  50. @Reg Cæsar

    Criminals have human dignity, too. That’s why we Catholics are asked to work to abolish the death penalty in this country.
     
    Minnesota abolished it in 1915, after a botched hanging in 1911. Next-door Wisconsin and Michigan (yes, Minnesota borders Michigan, which, Google Maps, is not in Canada) dropped it in the middle 19th century; they were the first:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_punishment_in_the_United_States#States_that_have_abolished_the_death_penalty

    Rhode Island and Vermont had it on the books well into the 20th century, but didn't exercise it. US states were ahead of most of Europe in abolition. Nobody ever gives us credit (or abuse) for that. It's like our abortion laws being much more lenient than Europe's. It doesn't compute, true as it may be.

    Rome not only once permitted executions, but at times carried them out herself. (Though not in the Inquisition; that was the Spanish state.)

    Replies: @I Have Scinde, @Almost Missouri, @Ganderson, @Ganderson, @JMcG

    Where does MN border MI? Through Lake Superior?

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Ganderson

    Yes, and IL borders MI through Lake Michigan. WI has both land and underwater boundaries with MI. Land boundary is with the Upper Peninsula.

  51. @Reg Cæsar

    Criminals have human dignity, too. That’s why we Catholics are asked to work to abolish the death penalty in this country.
     
    Minnesota abolished it in 1915, after a botched hanging in 1911. Next-door Wisconsin and Michigan (yes, Minnesota borders Michigan, which, Google Maps, is not in Canada) dropped it in the middle 19th century; they were the first:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_punishment_in_the_United_States#States_that_have_abolished_the_death_penalty

    Rhode Island and Vermont had it on the books well into the 20th century, but didn't exercise it. US states were ahead of most of Europe in abolition. Nobody ever gives us credit (or abuse) for that. It's like our abortion laws being much more lenient than Europe's. It doesn't compute, true as it may be.

    Rome not only once permitted executions, but at times carried them out herself. (Though not in the Inquisition; that was the Spanish state.)

    Replies: @I Have Scinde, @Almost Missouri, @Ganderson, @Ganderson, @JMcG

    Neither Cole, Bob and Jim Younger were executed for their part iN the Northfield, MN raid, apparently because they pleaded guilty. Bob died in Stillwater Prison, Jim and Cole were paroled after 25 years.

  52. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Thanks for that, Generic, but why do they show 12 sets of 5 engine gauges at 02:10 instead of 10 (plus they'd be much different sets of gauges between piston and turbojet)?

    Stupid are the moviemakers, I tells ya...

    Replies: @Technite78

    From what I can tell, that is an actual flight engineer’s control panel on the B-36. The 12 sets of 5 are actually 2 sets of 6×5 gauge panels… 10 gauges for each of the 6 piston engines. The radial piston engines required far more instrumentation and control than jet engines… for example the flight engineers needed to control fuel mixture, water injection, propeller pitch, air cooling ducts, etc. Also, the jet engines were a later feature, and wasn’t part of the original design of the engineer’s console.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  53. @G. Poulin
    @Bill P

    "Christians are commanded to love all people."
    No, they aren't. "Love your neighbor" means "love those near to you", not "love everybody on the planet." The very word "neighbor" means literally "near one".

    Replies: @Alice, @Anon, @Bill, @FPD72, @Bill P

    ‘Teacher,’ he said, ‘what must I do to inherit eternal life?’ He said to him, ‘What is written in the law? What do you read there?’ He answered, ‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbour as yourself.’ And he said to him, ‘You have given the right answer; do this, and you will live.’

    But wanting to justify himself, he asked Jesus, ‘And who is my neighbour?’ Jesus replied, ‘A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell into the hands of robbers, who stripped him, beat him, and went away, leaving him half dead. Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a Samaritan while travelling came near him; and when he saw him, he was moved with pity. He went to him and bandaged his wounds, having poured oil and wine on them. Then he put him on his own animal, brought him to an inn, and took care of him. The next day he took out two denarii, gave them to the innkeeper, and said, “Take care of him; and when I come back, I will repay you whatever more you spend.” Which of these three, do you think, was a neighbour to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers?’ He said, ‘The one who showed him mercy.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Go and do likewise.’

    • Thanks: Buffalo Joe
    • Replies: @Neuday
    @Alice

    So the crazy female response to the parable of the Good Samaritan is to make victims of everyone who isn't a White Heterosexual Christian and be moved by pity and take care of them, on someone else's dime.

    , @G. Poulin
    @Alice

    Jesus' answer to the lawyer's question "who is my neighbor?" is "Good Samaritans are your neighbors." Not everyone. Not even guys in ditches. Good Samaritans, that is, people who do you a solid. Need to brush up on your reading comprehension skills.

  54. @Ben Kurtz
    I am not a Catholic.

    But in another life, I would have been, I am sure, honored and blessed to have a man such as Fr. Moloney be my religious leader.

    It is a strange and demented time in which we live, that a chaplain at one of our (formerly?) "great" seats of learning should be fired for uttering such a message.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Desiderius, @Bill, @Pop Warner, @Rapparee

    Went through a strikingly similar situation twenty years ago but had fortunately built a close relationship with the woman whose call it was to make over the preceding year (had just organized a dinner at her house to introduce her husband to some promising new students).

    Those institutions are not for amateurs, however meek and mild.

  55. @Achmed E. Newman
    Aha! I found out the Chaplain's error. It was that "feast of the Ugandan martyrs" part. I looked it up, and this was a massacre of 22 Anglican and 23 Catholic Africans by the King of Buganda (the name likely being a conjunction of "buggery" and "Uganda". Wiki says:

    The Uganda Martyrs are a group of 23 Anglican and 22 Catholic converts to Christianity in the historical kingdom of Buganda, now part of Uganda, who were executed between 31 January 1885 and 27 January 1887.

    They were killed on orders of Mwanga II, the Kabaka (King) of Buganda [heh!]. The deaths took place at a time when there was a three-way religious struggle for political influence at the Buganda royal court. The episode also occurred against the backdrop of the "Scramble for Africa" – the invasion, occupation, division, colonization and annexation of African territory by European powers.
     

    This remembrance brings up the colonial era. You don't bring up the colonial era. You don't mention anything about black people of any kind ever doing anything bad. Don't make the black parishioners angry.

    The guy could have brought up ANY OTHER massacre on ANY OTHER continent, but NO, he had to go and write about something bad that happened in Africa. THINK before you write, people!

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Sucking up will not save you. They attack the weak, not the strong.

  56. Thanks for moving this up front, Steve. It has been a month, and letters to MIT or the Arch of Boston got less attention that your blog post did.

    The MIT Chaplain runs interfaith denominational services at MIT. Fr. Moloney offered Catholic mass in their spaceship chapel, but also stepped adeptly to unite other Christians. He was appointed because he is light on sticking his finger into wounds like abrasive details of the canon and large on ecumenism. He had beem there a few years.

    I put it in a thread related to the removal of the SAT because some folks assume the pureness of intellectual endeavor in sciences will hold the line. Fr. Moloney’s letter was a sign of compassion to the student body that fits the old idea of Mens et Manus. The kids became a mob because he did not grovel enough that Black Lives Matter. They threw a tantrum and the adults on campus fled.

    MIT has already fallen.

    if you want a feel for the hysteria, here’s another example.

    https://www.collegeboard.org. No, really, go there.

    I think more of your discussions about superstitious ness in African communities might be relevant here.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Alice


    We are not OK. We are in terrible fear for the safety of our own children and the students we serve. We know how quickly Black children go from being cute to being targets. The recent killings of Black Americans in the street and in their homes by the police and others have haunted all of us with the worst memories from our own lives. Our country needs to do so much better. Covid-19 has already taken a disproportionate number of our elders and some of our younger brothers and sisters. Black students everywhere will navigate a harsher future stained by violence and loss. How many more promising futures will be lost in the days, months, and years to come? We have assembled to grieve, and we will now assemble to act.
     
    If some people are in need of industrial supply of Prozac, here they are.

    Guess people have really internalized "Black Django".

    Replies: @Alice

  57. @G. Poulin
    @Bill P

    "Christians are commanded to love all people."
    No, they aren't. "Love your neighbor" means "love those near to you", not "love everybody on the planet." The very word "neighbor" means literally "near one".

    Replies: @Alice, @Anon, @Bill, @FPD72, @Bill P

    Who is my neighbor…

    Also. Love your enemy

  58. @Almost Missouri
    @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks. I didn't know that about the death penalties. As I (strangely) still have occasion to argue with liberals on their own terms, it will come in useful for me.

    On the larger point, though,



    That’s why we Catholics are asked to work to abolish the death penalty in this country.
     

     
    Is this even true? The Gospel does not ask it. Maybe the Pope is asking it? If so, it's a change from prior practice. And is it all countries or only this country?

    Replies: @Anon, @JMcG, @Pierre de Craon, @Buffalo Joe

    This is a complicated one, but the bottom line is that the death penalty is not held to be inherently immoral.

  59. @G. Poulin
    @Bill P

    "Christians are commanded to love all people."
    No, they aren't. "Love your neighbor" means "love those near to you", not "love everybody on the planet." The very word "neighbor" means literally "near one".

    Replies: @Alice, @Anon, @Bill, @FPD72, @Bill P

    Uh. Our Lord was asked who our neighbors are, and He gave a pretty expansive answer. His contemporaries were no doubt shocked to find out that Samaritans were their neighbors.

  60. @James Braxton
    @Clifford Brown

    I disagree. He claims that the police officers "killed" Mr. Floyd. This is assuming a fact (the key fact) to be true which had not yet been established by the evidence.

    Mr. Floyd died in police custody. That much is undisputed. Any further characterization is wreckless until after the matter is adjudicated in court.

    Also, I was waiting for the officers' body cam footage to be released to see what exactly was going on in between the initial detention of Floyd and when we see him being held on the ground...the judge recently said he would only allowed it to be viewed by appointment, and not released to the public. So we get media descriptions of the video instead of the video itself. Makes me think it must not make Mr. Floyd look very good.

    Don't be surprised when the officers don't get convicted.

    Although they are charging Chauvin with tax evasion, so I guess they will get their pound of flesh.

    Replies: @El Dato

    https://newbostonpost.com/2020/06/17/m-i-t-catholic-chaplain-forced-out-over-email-message-about-george-floyd/

    An university administrator [Suzy Nelson] wrote a letter condemning Father Moloney’s email message.

    “The message from Father Moloney was deeply disturbing. Those who wrote me [i.e. a few students on the Professional Outrage PhD track] and other senior leaders [who?] were outraged, and many felt abandoned and alienated by their faith,” wrote Suzy Nelson, vice president and dean for student life. “By devaluing and disparaging George Floyd’s character [which we know to be impeccable and sacrosanct], Father Moloney’s message failed to acknowledge the dignity of each human being and the devastating impact of systemic racism — especially within the criminal justice system — on African Americans, people of African descent, and communities of color [left out transgender people, I see a forthcoming resignation, Miss Nelson]. Moreover, his message dismissed the need for urgent action and change in America [really!!]. Now more than ever, we need people in positions of power and influence to call upon each one of us to examine the ruinous impact of hate and racial violence in America, to strengthen our commitment to healing our relations with others, and to unite in bringing about systemic equity and justice for Black people in every sector of society.” [proceeds to behave like a mentally disturbed maoist in must]

    From

    https://palladiummag.com/2019/08/05/the-real-problem-at-yale-is-not-free-speech/

    Current Yale administrators have a sense of self-preservation for themselves and their corporation, but not for what made them great in the first place. They are quick to appease students, when they go along with the new zeitgeist, as if students and the latest wokeness were the preservers of cultural knowledge. This is the key to understanding why beloved faculty members can end up purged, against all public sentiment. Whether out of ideological commitment or hard-nosed realpolitik, these apparatchik administrators, bolstered by a minority of students, have effectively outmaneuvered their rivals. In doing so, they have also accelerated the tearing down of Yale’s institutional legacy and undermined its historical mission.

    If they were confronting a university and student body with a powerful commitment to that mission, things might be different. But they aren’t. As we’ve seen, the classes represented at Yale have themselves opened up a massive ideological vacuum. Shrinking back from their position and opportunities, they have lost the ability to coordinate.

    The required actions were called de-nazification and de-stalinization, I think.

    • Replies: @Charlotte
    @El Dato


    wrote Suzy Nelson, vice president and dean for student life. “By devaluing and disparaging George Floyd’s character, Father Moloney’s message failed to acknowledge the dignity of each human being”
     
    Moloney made precisely the opposite point in his message. MIT’s Dean for Student Life is implying that people have dignity only if their bad acts are overlooked or covered up. I wonder how many MIT students noticed the contradiction?

    Replies: @NOTA, @Art Deco, @Alice

    , @AnotherDad
    @El Dato

    Late to this thread.

    But the notable issue here is the degradation and corruption of our traditional institutions.

    The Boy Scouts sent me--a long time scouter (adult leader)--a message in June and it was an obsequious, foul, utterly craven piece of nonsense. An insult to scouting, which for the record has been a completely open, non-racially-discriminating organization from the get go. Literally zero to apologize for.

    Our cultures institutions are supposed to be inherently *conservative*. They exist to precisely to conserve the core norms and values of our culture and pass them on intact to following generations.


    Unfortunately, minoritarianism has been hugely successful in convincing foolish and weak minded "progressives" that Western Civilization is horribly corrupt and shameful and all white gentiles ought to run around apologizing for our "sins". When in fact, the West has been a beacon of freedom, rationality, progress and human advance and it's the minoritarians who are cancerous curse upon having a decent, prosperous, free and civilized life for all.

    Conservatives are simply going to have to find a way to take back or regrow our own actually and explicitly conservative institutions--zero tolerance for "progressives" or the slightest whiff of minoritarianism or the West will simply vanish.

  61. @Dan Hayes
    @El Dato

    "Cardinal Sean" and his ilk are just one small part of the transmogrified Bergoglio RC Church!

    Replies: @Bill, @Art Deco

    Of course, he was made a cardinal by Pope Benedict.

  62. @Ben Kurtz
    I am not a Catholic.

    But in another life, I would have been, I am sure, honored and blessed to have a man such as Fr. Moloney be my religious leader.

    It is a strange and demented time in which we live, that a chaplain at one of our (formerly?) "great" seats of learning should be fired for uttering such a message.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Desiderius, @Bill, @Pop Warner, @Rapparee

    Is that a joke? He committed a cowardly act of calumny against Chauvin. This is just the left eating its own.

  63. I assume he’s posted to the campus by the archdiocesan chancery, but he’s there on the sufferance of the dean of students. I would wager the dean is behind it. Of course, Abp. O’Malley is perfectly capable of acts of cravenness if not treachery.

    • Replies: @Alice
    @Art Deco

    if you read the news article, you can see how despicably the arch behaved. Their denunciation of Fr. Moloney has the full blm obeisance.

    https://newbostonpost.com/2020/06/17/m-i-t-catholic-chaplain-forced-out-over-email-message-about-george-floyd/

    Replies: @Art Deco

  64. @Bumpkin
    Sounds like a bright guy, looks like it was time for him to leave the academic shithole he's been slumming in and move on to better things.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Colleges should very seldom have f/t chaplains. There simply is not the manpower for that sort of ministry any more.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    @Art Deco

    Depends on the university--some have large parishes that are mostly but not entirely students, and enough demand to more than justify a full-time priest.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  65. @Pierre de Craon
    Father Moloney is the perfect model of a modern conciliarist priest—that is, a pseudo-Catholic. In common with Humble Frank Bergoglio in Rome, he has found a way around the parallel injunctions of Matthew 6:24 and Luke 16:13 that a man cannot serve both God and Mammon. Namely, by pretending that Mammon is completely unrelated to "whatever is most cool, hip, and trendy in godless society," Moloney and Bergoglio get to nod sagely and affirmatively about things that Anthony of Padua and Francis Xavier would have died sooner than affirm while the former two also claim perjuriously that those great saints and all the others would have gone along with their lies.

    For the record,

    (1) Racism is not a sin; it is a phony crime invented by (((this planet's most accomplished racists))) to slander and manipulate Christians and ex-Christians who are too bloody conformist, witless, or cowardly to see that they are being slandered and manipulated.

    (2) Rash judgment is most definitely a sin, but Moloney's cautions to his readers against succumbing to that vice ring hollow, coming as they do from a man who has, two paragraphs earlier, brazenly and rashly judged the cop who is accused, on evidence whose falsity grows daily more plain, of killing Saint George Floyd, a career criminal the cause of whose death has not been afforded the close forensic scrutiny that pre-woke US common and statute law requires. (Not that I would bet even a buck on the poor cop's getting a fair shake in today's hate-whitey prosecutorial environment.)

    (3) Moloney says that "Solidarity with our fellow human beings is 'a direct demand of human and Christian brotherhood.'" Poppycock! Solidarity with other humans, biological or notional or woke or whatever, is not a demand of any sort. Strictly biological similarity—similarity, not solidarity, mind—is a fact of human existence, like halitosis. The sort of cheesy, trendy solidarity urged by Moloney makes nonsense of the true requirement of Christian tradition to employ fraternal correction, even where doing so entails some risk, when those around us have fallen, wittingly or otherwise, into grave error. No one denies that this requirement—elucidated in the plain language of the first three spiritual works of mercy: admonish the sinner, instruct the ignorant, counsel the doubtful—was understood by the preconciliar Catholic Church as, in effect, a counsel of perfection. One must be pretty naive to fail to recognize the real peril that might befall someone who exercises fraternal correction on the wrong person at the wrong time—and I refer to a context of "normal" circumstances, those of the not so distant, immeasurably more civilized past, wherein the current nightmare, a nightmare of black violence directed and egged on by Jewish hate, that many white and/or Christian Americans now endure was scarcely imaginable. Lastly,

    (4) On these grounds and others, I would applaud Sean Cardinal O'Malley for giving Father Moloney the boot were it not for the fact that I know with moral certainty that His Eminence is a far more worldly, more cynical, and hence un-Catholic man than Moloney (with God's grace) is ever likely to be.

    Replies: @JMcG, @NOTA, @anonymous 389

    Very well said indeed.

    • Thanks: Pierre de Craon
  66. @Art Deco
    I assume he's posted to the campus by the archdiocesan chancery, but he's there on the sufferance of the dean of students. I would wager the dean is behind it. Of course, Abp. O'Malley is perfectly capable of acts of cravenness if not treachery.

    Replies: @Alice

    if you read the news article, you can see how despicably the arch behaved. Their denunciation of Fr. Moloney has the full blm obeisance.

    https://newbostonpost.com/2020/06/17/m-i-t-catholic-chaplain-forced-out-over-email-message-about-george-floyd/

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Alice

    No surprise. You're surprised when your bishop isn't a waste of space.

  67. @Reg Cæsar

    Criminals have human dignity, too. That’s why we Catholics are asked to work to abolish the death penalty in this country.
     
    Minnesota abolished it in 1915, after a botched hanging in 1911. Next-door Wisconsin and Michigan (yes, Minnesota borders Michigan, which, Google Maps, is not in Canada) dropped it in the middle 19th century; they were the first:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_punishment_in_the_United_States#States_that_have_abolished_the_death_penalty

    Rhode Island and Vermont had it on the books well into the 20th century, but didn't exercise it. US states were ahead of most of Europe in abolition. Nobody ever gives us credit (or abuse) for that. It's like our abortion laws being much more lenient than Europe's. It doesn't compute, true as it may be.

    Rome not only once permitted executions, but at times carried them out herself. (Though not in the Inquisition; that was the Spanish state.)

    Replies: @I Have Scinde, @Almost Missouri, @Ganderson, @Ganderson, @JMcG

    The Catholic Church had found capital punishment to be within the bounds of Catholic morality from the founding of the Church until about fifteen minutes ago, when that chucklehead who takes up space on the Throne of St Peter announced that it could no longer be reconciled with Church teaching.
    The Church, and the world, are in for a long, dark, night.

  68. @Almost Missouri
    @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks. I didn't know that about the death penalties. As I (strangely) still have occasion to argue with liberals on their own terms, it will come in useful for me.

    On the larger point, though,



    That’s why we Catholics are asked to work to abolish the death penalty in this country.
     

     
    Is this even true? The Gospel does not ask it. Maybe the Pope is asking it? If so, it's a change from prior practice. And is it all countries or only this country?

    Replies: @Anon, @JMcG, @Pierre de Craon, @Buffalo Joe

    Catholic doctrine allowed application of the death penalty until the Francis disallowed it soon after maneuvering Benedict XVI off the throne of St Peter.

    • Replies: @Neuday
    @JMcG


    Catholic doctrine allowed application of the death penalty until the Francis disallowed it soon after maneuvering Benedict XVI off the throne of St Peter.
     
    Though Catholic, I'm appalled at this commie gay-loving Pope, so I'll take what Acquinas, a Doctor of the Church, has to say of the death penalty. Here's the money quote: "The life of certain pestiferous men is an impediment to the common good which is the concord of human society. Therefore, certain men must be removed by death from the society of men."

    The following is a summary of Summa Contra Gentiles, Book 3, Chapter 146, which was written by Aquinas prior to writing the Summa Theologica. St. Thomas was a vocal supporter of the death penalty. This was based on the theory (found in natural moral law), that the state has not only the right, but the duty to protect its citizens from enemies, both from within, and without.

    For those who have been appropriately appointed, there is no sin in administering punishment. For those who refuse to obey God's laws, it is correct for society to rebuke them with civil and criminal sanctions. No one sins working for justice and within the law. Actions that are necessary to preserve the good of society are not inherently evil. The common good of the whole society is greater and better than the good of any particular person. "The life of certain pestiferous men is an impediment to the common good which is the concord of human society. Therefore, certain men must be removed by death from the society of men." This is likened to the physician who must amputate a diseased limb, or a cancer, for the good of the whole person.

    He based this on I Corinthians 5, 6: "You know that a little leaven corrupts the whole lump of dough?" and I Corinthians 5, 13: "Put away the evil one from among yourselves"; Romans 13,4: "[it is said of earthly power that] he bears not the sword in vain: for he is God's minister, an avenger to execute wrath upon him that does evil"; I Peter 2, 13-14: "Be subjected therefore to every human creature for God's sake: whether to be on the king as excelling, or to governors as sent by him for the punishment of evildoers and for the praise of good." He believed these passages superseded the text of Exodus 20,13: "Thou shall not kill." This is mentioned again in Matthew 5,21. Also, it is argued that Matthew 13, 30: "Suffer both the weeds and the wheat to grow until the harvest." The harvest was interpreted as meaning the end of the world. This is explained by Matthew 13,38-40.

    Aquinas acknowledged these passages could also be interpreted as meaning there should be no use of the death penalty if there was a chance of injuring the innocent. The prohibition "Thou shall not kill", was superseded by Exodus 22,18: "Wrongdoers you shall not suffer to live." The argument that evildoers should be allowed to live in the hope that they might be redeemed was rejected by Aquinas as frivolous. If they would not repent in the face of death, it was unreasonable to assume they would ever repent. "How many people are we to allow to be murdered while waiting for the repentance of the wrongdoer?", he asked, rhetorically. Using the death penalty for revenge, or retribution is a violation of natural moral law.

    Many believe the correct interpretation of the commandment to be "Thou shalt not murder." This interpretation allows for Aquinas' belief that the death penalty is an acceptable practice as delivered by those in authority over such things, such as government, which is divinely appointed as to God's will.

    Replies: @backup

  69. @Ben Kurtz
    I am not a Catholic.

    But in another life, I would have been, I am sure, honored and blessed to have a man such as Fr. Moloney be my religious leader.

    It is a strange and demented time in which we live, that a chaplain at one of our (formerly?) "great" seats of learning should be fired for uttering such a message.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Desiderius, @Bill, @Pop Warner, @Rapparee

    I’ve been fortunate that the priest in my parish has actually spoken out against communists and statue destroyers. It helps that he’s from Poland and routinely brings up life in a communist country

    • Thanks: Hibernian
  70. Churches are just like government bureaucracies—only interested in where the next dollars will come from, and in the case of churches, how large those donations will be.

  71. @I Have Scinde
    @Reg Cæsar

    "Rome not only once permitted executions, but at times carried them out herself. (Though not in the Inquisition; that was the Spanish state.)"

    There was more than one Inquisition. The Roman Inquisition was mostly, but not entirely, bloodless.
    https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/inquisition-roman

    Replies: @Gilbert Ratchet

    It’s important to remember the the Pope, head of the worldwide RC church, is also the temporal sovereign of the Papal States (now sadly reduced to being the size of the Vatican City, but historically much larger). In this capacity his regime certainly carried out executions, as the career of Giovanni Battista Bugatti attests.

  72. @G. Poulin
    @Bill P

    "Christians are commanded to love all people."
    No, they aren't. "Love your neighbor" means "love those near to you", not "love everybody on the planet." The very word "neighbor" means literally "near one".

    Replies: @Alice, @Anon, @Bill, @FPD72, @Bill P

    Christians are commanded to love all people.”
    No, they aren’t. “Love your neighbor” means “love those near to you”, not “love everybody on the planet.” The very word “neighbor” means literally “near one”.

    It’s true that the Greek noun translated as “neighbor” in Luke 10:27, πλησίον, is derived from a word that means “near.” But when Jesus is asked in verse 29, “Who is my neighbor?” He tells the story of The Good Samaritan in verses 30-37.

    Of course, the command to love ones neighbor was cited by a Jewish lawyer as a follow up to the lawyer’s question in verse 25, “ Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” Since the lawyer had emphasized his own works by his question and was thinking in terms of works righteousness, Jesus then asked the lawyer what did the Law require. That was when the lawyer spoke of the commands from Deuteronomy 6:5 and Leviticus 19:18 about loving God and ones neighbor. The Jewish understanding of “neighbor” (רֵעַ) was a fellow Israelite. With the parable, Jesus expanded the meaning of neighbor to include all people whom one might contact, even those despised Samaritans. The ultimate point Jesus was making was the impossibility of Law righteousness, since nobody is capable of that type of universal love. That this was Jesus’ point is made clear by Luke’s editorial comment in verse 29, “But the lawyer, wanting to justify himself, asked Jesus…”

    Bottom line: followers of Jesus have a responsibility to honor and do good to all people but this is not a condition for salvation (which is by grace through faith) but rather salvation’s result.

    • Replies: @G. Poulin
    @FPD72

    No, not all people you might come in contact with. Rather, all people who are just, kind, God-fearing, and merciful. The lawyer is expected to see himself as like the man in the ditch, looking to see who will be his neighbor. That would be the Good Samaritan.

    , @Cortes
    @FPD72

    The “neighbour principle” (as expressed in the case founding the basis of modern UK approach to delict/tort of negligence) was set out by Lord Atkin, beginning with the Good Samaritan story:

    https://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803100227619

  73. The chaplain apostacized the present-day Americcan religion of Negro Veneration and for that sin he must atone.

  74. Finally a Catholic will face the inquisition for being too Catholic.
    Torquemada had nothing on these wackos.

    • LOL: Bumpkin
  75. @Roger
    He wrote: "George Floyd was killed by a police officer ... The police officer who knelt on his neck until he died acted wrongly. ... It is right that he has been arrested and will be prosecuted."

    We don't know any of those things. Floyd died of a fentanyl overdose. There is no proof that the police contributed to the death. The officers may yet be acquitted. The priest was wrong to accuse the police of crimes.

    Replies: @SINCERITY.net, @Jack D, @NOTA

    He was trying to be even handed and doing a sort of “Yes, but…” thing. Saying that the popo killed him is totally fine in the current context even if it is false (they are going after the cop for tax evasion because they know that the murder charge is not going to stick – the Deep State is sending that cop to prison no matter what. If they had to, they would get him for jaywalking.)

    However in the current environment you can’t say that St. George did ANYTHING bad. St. George is immaculate. Might as well say that Jesus was shoplifting at the money changers’ tables. THAT was the Father’s mistake, not saying that the cop killed him. EVERYONE already knows that the cop killed him, even if it isn’t true.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Jack D

    Exactly my thoughts. Unlike the MSM he mentioned St George Fentanyl was a criminal and implied St George resisted arrest. Implied there was a reason police had to restrain him.

    That’s what got Fr Moloney into trouble. The entire email is the standard clergy critter of all religions trying to be even handed with goody goody platitudes.

  76. @Pierre de Craon
    Father Moloney is the perfect model of a modern conciliarist priest—that is, a pseudo-Catholic. In common with Humble Frank Bergoglio in Rome, he has found a way around the parallel injunctions of Matthew 6:24 and Luke 16:13 that a man cannot serve both God and Mammon. Namely, by pretending that Mammon is completely unrelated to "whatever is most cool, hip, and trendy in godless society," Moloney and Bergoglio get to nod sagely and affirmatively about things that Anthony of Padua and Francis Xavier would have died sooner than affirm while the former two also claim perjuriously that those great saints and all the others would have gone along with their lies.

    For the record,

    (1) Racism is not a sin; it is a phony crime invented by (((this planet's most accomplished racists))) to slander and manipulate Christians and ex-Christians who are too bloody conformist, witless, or cowardly to see that they are being slandered and manipulated.

    (2) Rash judgment is most definitely a sin, but Moloney's cautions to his readers against succumbing to that vice ring hollow, coming as they do from a man who has, two paragraphs earlier, brazenly and rashly judged the cop who is accused, on evidence whose falsity grows daily more plain, of killing Saint George Floyd, a career criminal the cause of whose death has not been afforded the close forensic scrutiny that pre-woke US common and statute law requires. (Not that I would bet even a buck on the poor cop's getting a fair shake in today's hate-whitey prosecutorial environment.)

    (3) Moloney says that "Solidarity with our fellow human beings is 'a direct demand of human and Christian brotherhood.'" Poppycock! Solidarity with other humans, biological or notional or woke or whatever, is not a demand of any sort. Strictly biological similarity—similarity, not solidarity, mind—is a fact of human existence, like halitosis. The sort of cheesy, trendy solidarity urged by Moloney makes nonsense of the true requirement of Christian tradition to employ fraternal correction, even where doing so entails some risk, when those around us have fallen, wittingly or otherwise, into grave error. No one denies that this requirement—elucidated in the plain language of the first three spiritual works of mercy: admonish the sinner, instruct the ignorant, counsel the doubtful—was understood by the preconciliar Catholic Church as, in effect, a counsel of perfection. One must be pretty naive to fail to recognize the real peril that might befall someone who exercises fraternal correction on the wrong person at the wrong time—and I refer to a context of "normal" circumstances, those of the not so distant, immeasurably more civilized past, wherein the current nightmare, a nightmare of black violence directed and egged on by Jewish hate, that many white and/or Christian Americans now endure was scarcely imaginable. Lastly,

    (4) On these grounds and others, I would applaud Sean Cardinal O'Malley for giving Father Moloney the boot were it not for the fact that I know with moral certainty that His Eminence is a far more worldly, more cynical, and hence un-Catholic man than Moloney (with God's grace) is ever likely to be.

    Replies: @JMcG, @NOTA, @anonymous 389

    Caring for our fellow man, of all races and all types and all levels of ability, is absolutely a requirement of Christianity. The priest’s letter seemed like exactly the sort of sober and humane comment that seems to get the ideologues most worked up and angry.

    It seems bizarre for the archbishop to have disciplined him in any way for such a moderate statement.

    • Replies: @Pierre de Craon
    @NOTA


    Caring for our fellow man, of all races and all types and all levels of ability, is absolutely a requirement of Christianity.
     
    As stated, the sentence above is far too generalized in character to have useful meaning. It sounds more like the gospel of Dickens's Mrs. Jellyby than the Gospel of Our Lord. To be specific, it turns the illustrative example of the Good Samaritan into a species of nondescript well-wishing whereby mere empty expressions of sympathy become virtue-conferring substitutes for concrete assistance.

    There is nothing in the Christian message that is consonant with Father Moloney's call, however hedged, for sympathy for black people's soi-disant oppression given that that call explicitly accepts as true a slanderous murder accusation against the white cop who was present at Floyd's death and at least implicitly affirms a dozen other duplicitous BLM and antifa assertions about white people and their history.

    As God is Living and Eternal Truth, those consecrated to God's service have an even profounder obligation than the rest of us to proclaim the truth, no matter how small its initial t might be, in its entirety, whatever the consequences. Sean Cardinal O'Malley has certainly earned the contempt accorded him for his dismissal of Moloney for failing to lie to a sufficient extent and with sufficient shamelessness. Nonetheless, there is no virtue in praising Moloney for lying somewhat less than O'Malley did—put otherwise, for his restraint in insulting God only a little.
  77. @Roger
    He wrote: "George Floyd was killed by a police officer ... The police officer who knelt on his neck until he died acted wrongly. ... It is right that he has been arrested and will be prosecuted."

    We don't know any of those things. Floyd died of a fentanyl overdose. There is no proof that the police contributed to the death. The officers may yet be acquitted. The priest was wrong to accuse the police of crimes.

    Replies: @SINCERITY.net, @Jack D, @NOTA

    I think the priest believed this was true, whether it was true or not. And as I understand it, there were multiple autopsies with somewhat different results. It sure *looked* like Chauvin was crushing the life out of Floyd, but deciding exactly what happened is why we have trials.

  78. @Art Deco
    @Bumpkin

    Colleges should very seldom have f/t chaplains. There simply is not the manpower for that sort of ministry any more.

    Replies: @NOTA

    Depends on the university–some have large parishes that are mostly but not entirely students, and enough demand to more than justify a full-time priest.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @NOTA

    The number of ordinations per year is such that we can expect (if there's no further deterioration) the census of secular clergy below retirement age will fall to about 13,000. That's about 1 priest for every 1,500 Catholics who show up at Mass. About 6% of the general population are Mass-going Catholics; unmarried people past the age of 17 are about the least observant segment of the population. Maybe you can justify a f/t priest-chaplain at UT Austin or NYU or USC. Not at an ordinary school.

  79. @G. Poulin
    @Bill P

    "Christians are commanded to love all people."
    No, they aren't. "Love your neighbor" means "love those near to you", not "love everybody on the planet." The very word "neighbor" means literally "near one".

    Replies: @Alice, @Anon, @Bill, @FPD72, @Bill P

    There’s also that “love your enemy” part.

    • Replies: @G. Poulin
    @Bill P

    If you look at the examples that Jesus provides of enmity (slaps on the cheek, taking your cloak, etc.), you see that he's not talking about enemies the way we generally think of enemies. He's not talking about mortal enemies, he's talking about people who do you some minor injustice. The word should probably be translated as "opponents" to avoid confusion. And even if you were to love all your opponents, that still wouldn't be everybody on the planet, would it?

  80. “But the power of Rex Mundi could not be undone”

  81. @Alice
    Thanks for moving this up front, Steve. It has been a month, and letters to MIT or the Arch of Boston got less attention that your blog post did.

    The MIT Chaplain runs interfaith denominational services at MIT. Fr. Moloney offered Catholic mass in their spaceship chapel, but also stepped adeptly to unite other Christians. He was appointed because he is light on sticking his finger into wounds like abrasive details of the canon and large on ecumenism. He had beem there a few years.

    I put it in a thread related to the removal of the SAT because some folks assume the pureness of intellectual endeavor in sciences will hold the line. Fr. Moloney's letter was a sign of compassion to the student body that fits the old idea of Mens et Manus. The kids became a mob because he did not grovel enough that Black Lives Matter. They threw a tantrum and the adults on campus fled.

    MIT has already fallen.

    if you want a feel for the hysteria, here's another example.

    https://www.collegeboard.org. No, really, go there.

    I think more of your discussions about superstitious ness in African communities might be relevant here.

    Replies: @El Dato

    We are not OK. We are in terrible fear for the safety of our own children and the students we serve. We know how quickly Black children go from being cute to being targets. The recent killings of Black Americans in the street and in their homes by the police and others have haunted all of us with the worst memories from our own lives. Our country needs to do so much better. Covid-19 has already taken a disproportionate number of our elders and some of our younger brothers and sisters. Black students everywhere will navigate a harsher future stained by violence and loss. How many more promising futures will be lost in the days, months, and years to come? We have assembled to grieve, and we will now assemble to act.

    If some people are in need of industrial supply of Prozac, here they are.

    Guess people have really internalized “Black Django”.

    • Agree: Alice
    • Replies: @Alice
    @El Dato

    seems they need to come down from their bad trip, more.

  82. I would second the comments above that with the torso in the prone position and the head turned to the right, as was in the case with Mr. Floyd at the time of his loss of consciousness and possibly his actual time of death, a knee on essentially the right and rear of the neck would not constrict the victim’s airway. Further, the victim spoke while in this situation, as has been pointed out. Further, the claim by some that his carotid arteries were occluded is impossible for both vessels and most likely for either. Furthermore, there are two arteries (the vertebral arteries) protected within bony processes of the spine in the neck. The autopsy report does not indicate any damage to these processes protecting these arteries, thus no occlusion of blood via these vessels should have occurred due to the maneuver employed by the policeman. All four arteries (that is, carotid and vertebral aa.) meet in a structure called the Circle of Willis that redistributes their contributory arterial flows as a failsafe for supplying blood to the brain. Mr. Floyd appears to have likely caused his own death with, principally, Fentanyl. His behavior subsequent to his own choice to use this drug (I assume for now that this will be established in evidence) must be seriously entertained as culpably causal to the events involving his restraint and his death. Frankly, the more that I reflect upon this police maneuver, the more that I believe that it is appropriate, though I am no friend of police abuse and bullying. I missed the report about former Officer Chauvin’s being accused by the tax authorities of tax evasion. I do not have sufficient information or competence to discuss this matter. However, as per Sydney Powell’s assertion that America is suffering from a spate of prosecutorial misconduct, if it can be judged that the government’s tax attorneys are conducting an uneven persecution of Mr. Chauvin, I would hope that an excellent attorney would come forward to represent Mr. Chauvin and seek damages and that the government tax and DOJ attorneys would be investigated should credible cause exist. What is more, I hope that there are both the legal instruments and adequate legal counsel to seek damages for false and hasty accusations by significant, public figures. I also affirm the comments above, by Pierre de Craon, regarding the chaplain’s ill-conceived and misdirected remarks. The supposed “sin of racism” is nonexistent. If ever there is true mistreatment of individuals, there are precise categories of sin and vice to describe those wrongdoings. This make-believe sin, one popular with, and promulgated by, then, Pope John Paul II, is in ways parallel with the fake notion of “hate crime.” Mere erroneous misconceptions, mis-categorizations or failures of logic that a person contemplates prior to a willful act of wrongdoing and sin towards an individual cannot be described as ‘sins’ or ‘crimes’. (I have a modest amount of experience teaching cadaver anatomy, experience assisting in experimental surgeries involving cannulation of the vertebral arteries and many occasions performing CPR in the emergency room. I am Catholic.)

    • Agree: Pierre de Craon
    • Thanks: Alden, JMcG
    • Replies: @Too Long Didn't Read
    @David Schmitt, Ph.D.

    When you were writing your PhD dissertation did you ever use the "paragraph'?

    Replies: @David Schmitt, Ph.D.

  83. @backup

    The police officer who knelt on his neck until he died acted wrongly.
     
    I am surprised that everybody seems to be so sure of two things: That Chauvin killed Floyd with his knee and that Chauvin should have acted differently.

    One of the things that transcripts of the body cam makes clear is that Floyd started to beg for his life immediately after he was arrested, as he feared being shot. He also repeatedly claimed he couldn't breathe while still standing. So how should the cops have known he really couldn't breathe?

    Also, a knee in the neck doesn't obstruct the respiratory tracts. The Minneapolis police chief stated that Chauvin had had training on how to act in such situations so he should have known better. But I wonder if Chauvin wasn't acting the way he did because of this training. Restrain the suspect and get an ambulance, but don't use a choke hold.

    The cops asked for an ambulance with high emergency: code 2. Their request got dispatched to an ambulance as a call with no emergency: code 3. I frankly consider that a major factor in the death of Floyd.

    Sources: Transcript of Lane's body cam and the charges against Chauvin.

    Replies: @travis

    All the evidence points to the fact that Floyd had taken a drug overdose so strong that his imminent death could hardly have been prevented. Blood samples collected before Floyd died, tested positive for the following: Fentanyl 11 ng/mL, Norfentanyl 5.6 ng/mL, … Methamphetamine 19 ng/mL … 86 ng/mL of morphine…This fentanyl concentration, including its norfentanyl metabolite at its molecular weight, was 20.6 ng/mL That is over three times the lethal overdose.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @travis

    There was fentanyl and meth in his rectum. Because the lining is only one cell thick, insertion of meds and illegal drugs works very very fast, fast as direct injection into the muscles

    Before syringes insertion of meds into the rectum was standard. One cell thick is also why sodomy causes AIDS and numerous other STDS

    Replies: @anon

  84. @Alice
    @Art Deco

    if you read the news article, you can see how despicably the arch behaved. Their denunciation of Fr. Moloney has the full blm obeisance.

    https://newbostonpost.com/2020/06/17/m-i-t-catholic-chaplain-forced-out-over-email-message-about-george-floyd/

    Replies: @Art Deco

    No surprise. You’re surprised when your bishop isn’t a waste of space.

  85. @Mr McKenna
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    Blessed are the peacemakers
     
    No, no, no. The cheesemakers. But it's not meant to be taken literally. It can refer to any manufacturer of dairy products.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    The cheeseheads. Sons of Lombardi.

  86. @NOTA
    @Art Deco

    Depends on the university--some have large parishes that are mostly but not entirely students, and enough demand to more than justify a full-time priest.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    The number of ordinations per year is such that we can expect (if there’s no further deterioration) the census of secular clergy below retirement age will fall to about 13,000. That’s about 1 priest for every 1,500 Catholics who show up at Mass. About 6% of the general population are Mass-going Catholics; unmarried people past the age of 17 are about the least observant segment of the population. Maybe you can justify a f/t priest-chaplain at UT Austin or NYU or USC. Not at an ordinary school.

  87. @Russ
    Archbishop Carlo Vigano, who had sought the resignation of Papa Francis, has now penned this prayer for the safekeeping of a certain world leader:

    Prayer for a Resurgence of Christianity in America
    and the Re-election of Donald Trump

    Almighty and Eternal God, King of Kings and Lord of Lords: graciously turn your gaze to us who invoke You with confidence.

    Bless us, citizens of the United States of America; grant peace and prosperity to our Nation; illuminate those who govern us so that they may commit themselves to the common good, in respect for Your holy Law.

    Protect those who, defending the inviolable principles of the Natural Law and Your Commandments, must face the repeated assaults of the Enemy of the human race.

    Keep in the hearts of Your children courage for the truth, love for virtue and perseverance in the midst of trials.

    Make our families grow in the example that Our Lord has given us, together with His Most Holy Mother and Saint Joseph in the home of Nazareth; give to our fathers and mothers the gift of Strength, to educate wisely the children with which you have blessed them.

    Give courage to those who, in spiritual combat, fight the good fight as soldiers of Christ against the furious forces of the children of darkness.

    Keep each one of us, O Lord, in your Most Sacred Heart, and above all him whom Your Providence has placed at the head of our Nation.

    Bless the President of the United States of America, so that aware of his responsibility and his duties, he may be a knight of justice, a defender of the oppressed, a firm bulwark against Your enemies, and a proud supporter of the children of light.

    Place the United States of America and the whole world under the mantle of the Queen of Victories, our Unconquered Leader in battle, the Immaculate Conception. It is thanks to her, and through your Mercy, that the hymn of praise rises to you, O Lord, from the children whom you have redeemed in the Most Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ.
     

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Hibernian

    Bless the President of the United States of America, so that aware of his responsibility and his duties, he may be a knight of justice, a defender of the oppressed, a firm bulwark against Your enemies, and a proud supporter of the children of light.

    Immediately above is a standard issue prayer for a secular leader. The simple petitionary prayer for his re-election in the title is OK by me for the Archbishop to pray if that is what his conscience tells him.

  88. @Dan Hayes
    @El Dato

    "Cardinal Sean" and his ilk are just one small part of the transmogrified Bergoglio RC Church!

    Replies: @Bill, @Art Deco

    He was appointed by John Paul and has held four sees over the last 35 years. He’s awaiting a replacement as he’s past retirement age.

    NB, in three of the four appointments he’s had, he was presented as the man to clean up scandals. This is the chap the Congregation of Bishops and the nuncio wants you to think is the cream.

  89. @Ganderson
    @Reg Cæsar

    Where does MN border MI? Through Lake Superior?

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Yes, and IL borders MI through Lake Michigan. WI has both land and underwater boundaries with MI. Land boundary is with the Upper Peninsula.

  90. Anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:

    Meanwhile…

    “I’m a nice young woman from Wisconsin, and you guys are fucking prices of shit,” said the not that nice, not that young, ugly little woman from Wisconsin.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anonymous

    At 1:12 on the top vid she plaintively whines "can't breath. Can't breath" then "I can not breath!"

    lol

    At 1:17 in the bottom vid the second girl is trying to push a cop with her flip-flop clad foot. Then deals out her final line as she's detained.

    Lulz, sure honey, all the nize gurls from Wisconsin have potty mouths. Show us your tats!

    It's probably the first time in their lives a man has told them "no" and made it stick. Hence the outrage! Outrage!

    lolz.

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Anonymous

    The police at all levels have shown remarkable restraint. Since they are not allowed to give these assholes the beating they so richly deserve (broken ribs, anyone?), I think I might have been tempted to take a cattle prod along and surreptitiously give them a jolt or two. Especially the mouthy bitches.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    “I’m a nice young woman from Wisconsin...
     
    Jeffrey Dahmer was a nice young man from Wisconsin.

    ...you guys are 🖕 pieces of 💩!”
     
    That's not how nice young 👩 talk in 🇺🇸's 🐄land.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  91. @JMcG
    @Almost Missouri

    Catholic doctrine allowed application of the death penalty until the Francis disallowed it soon after maneuvering Benedict XVI off the throne of St Peter.

    Replies: @Neuday

    Catholic doctrine allowed application of the death penalty until the Francis disallowed it soon after maneuvering Benedict XVI off the throne of St Peter.

    Though Catholic, I’m appalled at this commie gay-loving Pope, so I’ll take what Acquinas, a Doctor of the Church, has to say of the death penalty. Here’s the money quote: “The life of certain pestiferous men is an impediment to the common good which is the concord of human society. Therefore, certain men must be removed by death from the society of men.”

    The following is a summary of Summa Contra Gentiles, Book 3, Chapter 146, which was written by Aquinas prior to writing the Summa Theologica. St. Thomas was a vocal supporter of the death penalty. This was based on the theory (found in natural moral law), that the state has not only the right, but the duty to protect its citizens from enemies, both from within, and without.

    [MORE]

    For those who have been appropriately appointed, there is no sin in administering punishment. For those who refuse to obey God’s laws, it is correct for society to rebuke them with civil and criminal sanctions. No one sins working for justice and within the law. Actions that are necessary to preserve the good of society are not inherently evil. The common good of the whole society is greater and better than the good of any particular person. “The life of certain pestiferous men is an impediment to the common good which is the concord of human society. Therefore, certain men must be removed by death from the society of men.” This is likened to the physician who must amputate a diseased limb, or a cancer, for the good of the whole person.

    He based this on I Corinthians 5, 6: “You know that a little leaven corrupts the whole lump of dough?” and I Corinthians 5, 13: “Put away the evil one from among yourselves”; Romans 13,4: “[it is said of earthly power that] he bears not the sword in vain: for he is God’s minister, an avenger to execute wrath upon him that does evil”; I Peter 2, 13-14: “Be subjected therefore to every human creature for God’s sake: whether to be on the king as excelling, or to governors as sent by him for the punishment of evildoers and for the praise of good.” He believed these passages superseded the text of Exodus 20,13: “Thou shall not kill.” This is mentioned again in Matthew 5,21. Also, it is argued that Matthew 13, 30: “Suffer both the weeds and the wheat to grow until the harvest.” The harvest was interpreted as meaning the end of the world. This is explained by Matthew 13,38-40.

    Aquinas acknowledged these passages could also be interpreted as meaning there should be no use of the death penalty if there was a chance of injuring the innocent. The prohibition “Thou shall not kill”, was superseded by Exodus 22,18: “Wrongdoers you shall not suffer to live.” The argument that evildoers should be allowed to live in the hope that they might be redeemed was rejected by Aquinas as frivolous. If they would not repent in the face of death, it was unreasonable to assume they would ever repent. “How many people are we to allow to be murdered while waiting for the repentance of the wrongdoer?”, he asked, rhetorically. Using the death penalty for revenge, or retribution is a violation of natural moral law.

    Many believe the correct interpretation of the commandment to be “Thou shalt not murder.” This interpretation allows for Aquinas’ belief that the death penalty is an acceptable practice as delivered by those in authority over such things, such as government, which is divinely appointed as to God’s will.

    • Thanks: JMcG
    • Replies: @backup
    @Neuday

    Yes, the case for an antipope is growing.

  92. @Alice
    @G. Poulin

    ‘Teacher,’ he said, ‘what must I do to inherit eternal life?’ He said to him, ‘What is written in the law? What do you read there?’ He answered, ‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbour as yourself.’ And he said to him, ‘You have given the right answer; do this, and you will live.’

    But wanting to justify himself, he asked Jesus, ‘And who is my neighbour?’ Jesus replied, ‘A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell into the hands of robbers, who stripped him, beat him, and went away, leaving him half dead. Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a Samaritan while travelling came near him; and when he saw him, he was moved with pity. He went to him and bandaged his wounds, having poured oil and wine on them. Then he put him on his own animal, brought him to an inn, and took care of him. The next day he took out two denarii, gave them to the innkeeper, and said, “Take care of him; and when I come back, I will repay you whatever more you spend.” Which of these three, do you think, was a neighbour to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers?’ He said, ‘The one who showed him mercy.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Go and do likewise.’

    Replies: @Neuday, @G. Poulin

    So the crazy female response to the parable of the Good Samaritan is to make victims of everyone who isn’t a White Heterosexual Christian and be moved by pity and take care of them, on someone else’s dime.

  93. @Almost Missouri
    @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks. I didn't know that about the death penalties. As I (strangely) still have occasion to argue with liberals on their own terms, it will come in useful for me.

    On the larger point, though,



    That’s why we Catholics are asked to work to abolish the death penalty in this country.
     

     
    Is this even true? The Gospel does not ask it. Maybe the Pope is asking it? If so, it's a change from prior practice. And is it all countries or only this country?

    Replies: @Anon, @JMcG, @Pierre de Craon, @Buffalo Joe

    You are right to question the implication you were meant to take; namely, that working to abolish the death penalty is something Catholics must do as a condition of being Catholic. The sentence is artfully worded, however, so as to deceive all but the wariest.

    Note the use of the passive voice. It leaves the directing authority deliberately in doubt, in the hope that you will fill in the blank with the desired choice, not necessarily the correct one. The desired fill-in choice is “immemorial Catholic teaching and practice”; the correct choice is “insincere, secularist, and fallen-away Catholics who identify their own feelings and conformist desires with the will of God.”

    Indeed, the orthodox view of capital punishment is that there are occasions when it alone is sufficient to demonstrate that the proposition that “criminals have human dignity, too” is taken seriously. In moral theory, one who committed a truly capital crime was executed for two reasons: (1) as punishment condign to the offense committed and hence indicative of the offense’s precise gravity, and (2) as representing Christian society’s genuine solicitude for the criminal’s immortal soul; that is to say, commission of a capital offense might be taken as clear indication that the sole stimulus strong enough to persuade the offender to sincerely repent his sins and form a right conscience would be the certain loss of his own life. This second reason is memorably embodied in Dr. Johnson’s famous comment to Boswell, “Depend upon it, sir, when a man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully.”

  94. Nothing was done about this firing, so we can expect more, except insofar as people get the message that political conformity is more important than competence.

  95. Let us first ask what Mexican Hamburger Hitler would do.
    https://postimg.cc/mhLbVFp9

  96. Good speech.
    But here’s nothing un-Catholic about the death penalty. In fact, its part of Natural Law. And Council Vatican II did not abolish Natural Law.

  97. @Alice
    @G. Poulin

    ‘Teacher,’ he said, ‘what must I do to inherit eternal life?’ He said to him, ‘What is written in the law? What do you read there?’ He answered, ‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbour as yourself.’ And he said to him, ‘You have given the right answer; do this, and you will live.’

    But wanting to justify himself, he asked Jesus, ‘And who is my neighbour?’ Jesus replied, ‘A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell into the hands of robbers, who stripped him, beat him, and went away, leaving him half dead. Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a Samaritan while travelling came near him; and when he saw him, he was moved with pity. He went to him and bandaged his wounds, having poured oil and wine on them. Then he put him on his own animal, brought him to an inn, and took care of him. The next day he took out two denarii, gave them to the innkeeper, and said, “Take care of him; and when I come back, I will repay you whatever more you spend.” Which of these three, do you think, was a neighbour to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers?’ He said, ‘The one who showed him mercy.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Go and do likewise.’

    Replies: @Neuday, @G. Poulin

    Jesus’ answer to the lawyer’s question “who is my neighbor?” is “Good Samaritans are your neighbors.” Not everyone. Not even guys in ditches. Good Samaritans, that is, people who do you a solid. Need to brush up on your reading comprehension skills.

  98. The Roman Catholic Church became culturally irrelevant when it neutered itself at the Second Vatican Council. It traded creedal orthodoxy for a feminized, feel-good theology and centuries of magnificent liturgical music for folk music which sounded like it was composed by morons sitting around a fire at summer camp. The seduction by Liberation theology was not far behind.

    The Mainstream Protestant churches continued their abandonment of “the faith which was once for all delivered to the saints” by wholesale adoption of Historical criticism as well as the influence of the so-called “Social Gospel.”

    Evangelical/fundamentalism tried to resist apostasy but was fractured and splintered by the secondary separation and modernist/fundamentalist battles waged in the conservative denominations and their seminaries.

    The American “Church” has been fatally compromised and can no longer speak with a prophetic voice against of the errors of modern culture. I am not surprised that the MIT chaplain was censured for his remarks, even if they were fairly tepid and non-confrontational.

  99. @FPD72
    @G. Poulin


    Christians are commanded to love all people.”
    No, they aren’t. “Love your neighbor” means “love those near to you”, not “love everybody on the planet.” The very word “neighbor” means literally “near one”.
     
    It’s true that the Greek noun translated as “neighbor” in Luke 10:27, πλησίον, is derived from a word that means “near.” But when Jesus is asked in verse 29, “Who is my neighbor?” He tells the story of The Good Samaritan in verses 30-37.

    Of course, the command to love ones neighbor was cited by a Jewish lawyer as a follow up to the lawyer’s question in verse 25, “ Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” Since the lawyer had emphasized his own works by his question and was thinking in terms of works righteousness, Jesus then asked the lawyer what did the Law require. That was when the lawyer spoke of the commands from Deuteronomy 6:5 and Leviticus 19:18 about loving God and ones neighbor. The Jewish understanding of “neighbor” (רֵעַ) was a fellow Israelite. With the parable, Jesus expanded the meaning of neighbor to include all people whom one might contact, even those despised Samaritans. The ultimate point Jesus was making was the impossibility of Law righteousness, since nobody is capable of that type of universal love. That this was Jesus’ point is made clear by Luke’s editorial comment in verse 29, “But the lawyer, wanting to justify himself, asked Jesus...”

    Bottom line: followers of Jesus have a responsibility to honor and do good to all people but this is not a condition for salvation (which is by grace through faith) but rather salvation’s result.

    Replies: @G. Poulin, @Cortes

    No, not all people you might come in contact with. Rather, all people who are just, kind, God-fearing, and merciful. The lawyer is expected to see himself as like the man in the ditch, looking to see who will be his neighbor. That would be the Good Samaritan.

  100. @Bill P
    @G. Poulin

    There's also that "love your enemy" part.

    Replies: @G. Poulin

    If you look at the examples that Jesus provides of enmity (slaps on the cheek, taking your cloak, etc.), you see that he’s not talking about enemies the way we generally think of enemies. He’s not talking about mortal enemies, he’s talking about people who do you some minor injustice. The word should probably be translated as “opponents” to avoid confusion. And even if you were to love all your opponents, that still wouldn’t be everybody on the planet, would it?

  101. @Almost Missouri
    @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks. I didn't know that about the death penalties. As I (strangely) still have occasion to argue with liberals on their own terms, it will come in useful for me.

    On the larger point, though,



    That’s why we Catholics are asked to work to abolish the death penalty in this country.
     

     
    Is this even true? The Gospel does not ask it. Maybe the Pope is asking it? If so, it's a change from prior practice. And is it all countries or only this country?

    Replies: @Anon, @JMcG, @Pierre de Craon, @Buffalo Joe

    Almost, 14 protestors have chained themselves to the gate at Gov. Newsum’s mansion. They demand the release of all prisoners currently in California prisons. They are distraught that a prisoner on Death Row died (reportedly) from Covid-19. Covid-19 in prison is now a death sentence.

    • LOL: S. Anonyia
  102. @El Dato
    @James Braxton

    https://newbostonpost.com/2020/06/17/m-i-t-catholic-chaplain-forced-out-over-email-message-about-george-floyd/


    An university administrator [Suzy Nelson] wrote a letter condemning Father Moloney’s email message.

    “The message from Father Moloney was deeply disturbing. Those who wrote me [i.e. a few students on the Professional Outrage PhD track] and other senior leaders [who?] were outraged, and many felt abandoned and alienated by their faith,” wrote Suzy Nelson, vice president and dean for student life. “By devaluing and disparaging George Floyd’s character [which we know to be impeccable and sacrosanct], Father Moloney’s message failed to acknowledge the dignity of each human being and the devastating impact of systemic racism — especially within the criminal justice system — on African Americans, people of African descent, and communities of color [left out transgender people, I see a forthcoming resignation, Miss Nelson]. Moreover, his message dismissed the need for urgent action and change in America [really!!]. Now more than ever, we need people in positions of power and influence to call upon each one of us to examine the ruinous impact of hate and racial violence in America, to strengthen our commitment to healing our relations with others, and to unite in bringing about systemic equity and justice for Black people in every sector of society.” [proceeds to behave like a mentally disturbed maoist in must]

     

    From

    https://palladiummag.com/2019/08/05/the-real-problem-at-yale-is-not-free-speech/


    Current Yale administrators have a sense of self-preservation for themselves and their corporation, but not for what made them great in the first place. They are quick to appease students, when they go along with the new zeitgeist, as if students and the latest wokeness were the preservers of cultural knowledge. This is the key to understanding why beloved faculty members can end up purged, against all public sentiment. Whether out of ideological commitment or hard-nosed realpolitik, these apparatchik administrators, bolstered by a minority of students, have effectively outmaneuvered their rivals. In doing so, they have also accelerated the tearing down of Yale’s institutional legacy and undermined its historical mission.

    If they were confronting a university and student body with a powerful commitment to that mission, things might be different. But they aren’t. As we’ve seen, the classes represented at Yale have themselves opened up a massive ideological vacuum. Shrinking back from their position and opportunities, they have lost the ability to coordinate.
     

    The required actions were called de-nazification and de-stalinization, I think.

    Replies: @Charlotte, @AnotherDad

    wrote Suzy Nelson, vice president and dean for student life. “By devaluing and disparaging George Floyd’s character, Father Moloney’s message failed to acknowledge the dignity of each human being”

    Moloney made precisely the opposite point in his message. MIT’s Dean for Student Life is implying that people have dignity only if their bad acts are overlooked or covered up. I wonder how many MIT students noticed the contradiction?

    • Replies: @NOTA
    @Charlotte

    How many people bothered to read his note?

    , @Art Deco
    @Charlotte

    As always with progtrash, you cannot tell if they're stupid or lying.

    , @Alice
    @Charlotte

    Well, none of the ones she wants becoming scientist or engineers noticed. And that's game, set, and match to the Woke.

  103. @Anon
    Eh, lawyers are worthless shitheads. Who cares if more useless knobjockeys join their ranks?

    Replies: @Lockean Proviso, @Clyde

    Who cares if more useless knobjockeys join their ranks?

    Because it may be that someday, after our assets are taken for reparations, we end up indigent, and we find ourselves unjustly accused of a hate crime for defending against being set on fire or having our last scrap of food stolen while sleeping under a bridge, we will need our court-appointed attorney to be competent. A less competent bar means less justice for the wrongfully accused.

    • Agree: Alden
  104. Covid-19 in prison is now a death sentence.

    No, it is not. That is false.

  105. @David Schmitt, Ph.D.
    I would second the comments above that with the torso in the prone position and the head turned to the right, as was in the case with Mr. Floyd at the time of his loss of consciousness and possibly his actual time of death, a knee on essentially the right and rear of the neck would not constrict the victim's airway. Further, the victim spoke while in this situation, as has been pointed out. Further, the claim by some that his carotid arteries were occluded is impossible for both vessels and most likely for either. Furthermore, there are two arteries (the vertebral arteries) protected within bony processes of the spine in the neck. The autopsy report does not indicate any damage to these processes protecting these arteries, thus no occlusion of blood via these vessels should have occurred due to the maneuver employed by the policeman. All four arteries (that is, carotid and vertebral aa.) meet in a structure called the Circle of Willis that redistributes their contributory arterial flows as a failsafe for supplying blood to the brain. Mr. Floyd appears to have likely caused his own death with, principally, Fentanyl. His behavior subsequent to his own choice to use this drug (I assume for now that this will be established in evidence) must be seriously entertained as culpably causal to the events involving his restraint and his death. Frankly, the more that I reflect upon this police maneuver, the more that I believe that it is appropriate, though I am no friend of police abuse and bullying. I missed the report about former Officer Chauvin's being accused by the tax authorities of tax evasion. I do not have sufficient information or competence to discuss this matter. However, as per Sydney Powell's assertion that America is suffering from a spate of prosecutorial misconduct, if it can be judged that the government's tax attorneys are conducting an uneven persecution of Mr. Chauvin, I would hope that an excellent attorney would come forward to represent Mr. Chauvin and seek damages and that the government tax and DOJ attorneys would be investigated should credible cause exist. What is more, I hope that there are both the legal instruments and adequate legal counsel to seek damages for false and hasty accusations by significant, public figures. I also affirm the comments above, by Pierre de Craon, regarding the chaplain's ill-conceived and misdirected remarks. The supposed "sin of racism" is nonexistent. If ever there is true mistreatment of individuals, there are precise categories of sin and vice to describe those wrongdoings. This make-believe sin, one popular with, and promulgated by, then, Pope John Paul II, is in ways parallel with the fake notion of "hate crime." Mere erroneous misconceptions, mis-categorizations or failures of logic that a person contemplates prior to a willful act of wrongdoing and sin towards an individual cannot be described as 'sins' or 'crimes'. (I have a modest amount of experience teaching cadaver anatomy, experience assisting in experimental surgeries involving cannulation of the vertebral arteries and many occasions performing CPR in the emergency room. I am Catholic.)

    Replies: @Too Long Didn't Read

    When you were writing your PhD dissertation did you ever use the “paragraph’?

    • LOL: Hibernian
    • Replies: @David Schmitt, Ph.D.
    @Too Long Didn't Read

    ¶ 1/2. Sorry, bloke, I got as far as "When you were..." and dozed off. B.t.w., tell @Hibernian not to laugh at just everything---but Leprechauns do LOL at almost anything.

    ¶2/2. Seriously, thanks for the chiding. I will see if I cannot check my White verbosity, just as I have had to check my White privilege.

    Replies: @Pierre de Craon, @Too Long Didn't Read

  106. I went to MIT. I support this chaplain.

  107. @FPD72
    @G. Poulin


    Christians are commanded to love all people.”
    No, they aren’t. “Love your neighbor” means “love those near to you”, not “love everybody on the planet.” The very word “neighbor” means literally “near one”.
     
    It’s true that the Greek noun translated as “neighbor” in Luke 10:27, πλησίον, is derived from a word that means “near.” But when Jesus is asked in verse 29, “Who is my neighbor?” He tells the story of The Good Samaritan in verses 30-37.

    Of course, the command to love ones neighbor was cited by a Jewish lawyer as a follow up to the lawyer’s question in verse 25, “ Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” Since the lawyer had emphasized his own works by his question and was thinking in terms of works righteousness, Jesus then asked the lawyer what did the Law require. That was when the lawyer spoke of the commands from Deuteronomy 6:5 and Leviticus 19:18 about loving God and ones neighbor. The Jewish understanding of “neighbor” (רֵעַ) was a fellow Israelite. With the parable, Jesus expanded the meaning of neighbor to include all people whom one might contact, even those despised Samaritans. The ultimate point Jesus was making was the impossibility of Law righteousness, since nobody is capable of that type of universal love. That this was Jesus’ point is made clear by Luke’s editorial comment in verse 29, “But the lawyer, wanting to justify himself, asked Jesus...”

    Bottom line: followers of Jesus have a responsibility to honor and do good to all people but this is not a condition for salvation (which is by grace through faith) but rather salvation’s result.

    Replies: @G. Poulin, @Cortes

    The “neighbour principle” (as expressed in the case founding the basis of modern UK approach to delict/tort of negligence) was set out by Lord Atkin, beginning with the Good Samaritan story:

    https://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803100227619

  108. @Anon
    Eh, lawyers are worthless shitheads. Who cares if more useless knobjockeys join their ranks?

    Replies: @Lockean Proviso, @Clyde

    Now I know what a knobjockey is.

  109. @Charlotte
    @El Dato


    wrote Suzy Nelson, vice president and dean for student life. “By devaluing and disparaging George Floyd’s character, Father Moloney’s message failed to acknowledge the dignity of each human being”
     
    Moloney made precisely the opposite point in his message. MIT’s Dean for Student Life is implying that people have dignity only if their bad acts are overlooked or covered up. I wonder how many MIT students noticed the contradiction?

    Replies: @NOTA, @Art Deco, @Alice

    How many people bothered to read his note?

  110. anon[297] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Meanwhile...

    "I’m a nice young woman from Wisconsin, and you guys are fucking prices of shit," said the not that nice, not that young, ugly little woman from Wisconsin.

    https://twitter.com/ShelbyTalcott/status/1287670341938995201?s=20

    Replies: @anon, @Jim Don Bob, @Reg Cæsar

    At 1:12 on the top vid she plaintively whines “can’t breath. Can’t breath” then “I can not breath!”

    lol

    At 1:17 in the bottom vid the second girl is trying to push a cop with her flip-flop clad foot. Then deals out her final line as she’s detained.

    Lulz, sure honey, all the nize gurls from Wisconsin have potty mouths. Show us your tats!

    It’s probably the first time in their lives a man has told them “no” and made it stick. Hence the outrage! Outrage!

    lolz.

  111. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile...

    "I’m a nice young woman from Wisconsin, and you guys are fucking prices of shit," said the not that nice, not that young, ugly little woman from Wisconsin.

    https://twitter.com/ShelbyTalcott/status/1287670341938995201?s=20

    Replies: @anon, @Jim Don Bob, @Reg Cæsar

    The police at all levels have shown remarkable restraint. Since they are not allowed to give these assholes the beating they so richly deserve (broken ribs, anyone?), I think I might have been tempted to take a cattle prod along and surreptitiously give them a jolt or two. Especially the mouthy bitches.

  112. In addition to to the text of Father Moloney’s e-mail, the New Boston Post has another article assessing the e-mail:

    https://newbostonpost.com/2020/06/19/fact-checking-father-daniel-moloneys-email-message-to-m-i-t-catholics/

  113. @NOTA
    @Pierre de Craon

    Caring for our fellow man, of all races and all types and all levels of ability, is absolutely a requirement of Christianity. The priest's letter seemed like exactly the sort of sober and humane comment that seems to get the ideologues most worked up and angry.

    It seems bizarre for the archbishop to have disciplined him in any way for such a moderate statement.

    Replies: @Pierre de Craon

    Caring for our fellow man, of all races and all types and all levels of ability, is absolutely a requirement of Christianity.

    As stated, the sentence above is far too generalized in character to have useful meaning. It sounds more like the gospel of Dickens’s Mrs. Jellyby than the Gospel of Our Lord. To be specific, it turns the illustrative example of the Good Samaritan into a species of nondescript well-wishing whereby mere empty expressions of sympathy become virtue-conferring substitutes for concrete assistance.

    There is nothing in the Christian message that is consonant with Father Moloney’s call, however hedged, for sympathy for black people’s soi-disant oppression given that that call explicitly accepts as true a slanderous murder accusation against the white cop who was present at Floyd’s death and at least implicitly affirms a dozen other duplicitous BLM and antifa assertions about white people and their history.

    As God is Living and Eternal Truth, those consecrated to God’s service have an even profounder obligation than the rest of us to proclaim the truth, no matter how small its initial t might be, in its entirety, whatever the consequences. Sean Cardinal O’Malley has certainly earned the contempt accorded him for his dismissal of Moloney for failing to lie to a sufficient extent and with sufficient shamelessness. Nonetheless, there is no virtue in praising Moloney for lying somewhat less than O’Malley did—put otherwise, for his restraint in insulting God only a little.

  114. @Too Long Didn't Read
    @David Schmitt, Ph.D.

    When you were writing your PhD dissertation did you ever use the "paragraph'?

    Replies: @David Schmitt, Ph.D.

    ¶ 1/2. Sorry, bloke, I got as far as “When you were…” and dozed off. B.t.w., tell not to laugh at just everything—but Leprechauns do LOL at almost anything.

    ¶2/2. Seriously, thanks for the chiding. I will see if I cannot check my White verbosity, just as I have had to check my White privilege.

    • Replies: @Pierre de Craon
    @David Schmitt, Ph.D.

    Don't beat yourself up. It was a good comment. You have nothing to apologize for.

    , @Too Long Didn't Read
    @David Schmitt, Ph.D.

    ¶ 1/2. Sorry, bloke, I got as far as “When you were…” and dozed off.

    Totally understandable.

    I will see if I cannot check my White verbosity,

    Try this, maybe it can hlep.

    http://www.clipartbest.com/cliparts/niB/Mx4/niBMx4eXT.png

  115. @Charlotte
    @El Dato


    wrote Suzy Nelson, vice president and dean for student life. “By devaluing and disparaging George Floyd’s character, Father Moloney’s message failed to acknowledge the dignity of each human being”
     
    Moloney made precisely the opposite point in his message. MIT’s Dean for Student Life is implying that people have dignity only if their bad acts are overlooked or covered up. I wonder how many MIT students noticed the contradiction?

    Replies: @NOTA, @Art Deco, @Alice

    As always with progtrash, you cannot tell if they’re stupid or lying.

  116. @El Dato
    @Alice


    We are not OK. We are in terrible fear for the safety of our own children and the students we serve. We know how quickly Black children go from being cute to being targets. The recent killings of Black Americans in the street and in their homes by the police and others have haunted all of us with the worst memories from our own lives. Our country needs to do so much better. Covid-19 has already taken a disproportionate number of our elders and some of our younger brothers and sisters. Black students everywhere will navigate a harsher future stained by violence and loss. How many more promising futures will be lost in the days, months, and years to come? We have assembled to grieve, and we will now assemble to act.
     
    If some people are in need of industrial supply of Prozac, here they are.

    Guess people have really internalized "Black Django".

    Replies: @Alice

    seems they need to come down from their bad trip, more.

  117. @Charlotte
    @El Dato


    wrote Suzy Nelson, vice president and dean for student life. “By devaluing and disparaging George Floyd’s character, Father Moloney’s message failed to acknowledge the dignity of each human being”
     
    Moloney made precisely the opposite point in his message. MIT’s Dean for Student Life is implying that people have dignity only if their bad acts are overlooked or covered up. I wonder how many MIT students noticed the contradiction?

    Replies: @NOTA, @Art Deco, @Alice

    Well, none of the ones she wants becoming scientist or engineers noticed. And that’s game, set, and match to the Woke.

  118. @David Schmitt, Ph.D.
    @Too Long Didn't Read

    ¶ 1/2. Sorry, bloke, I got as far as "When you were..." and dozed off. B.t.w., tell @Hibernian not to laugh at just everything---but Leprechauns do LOL at almost anything.

    ¶2/2. Seriously, thanks for the chiding. I will see if I cannot check my White verbosity, just as I have had to check my White privilege.

    Replies: @Pierre de Craon, @Too Long Didn't Read

    Don’t beat yourself up. It was a good comment. You have nothing to apologize for.

    • Agree: Liberty Mike
  119. Anonymous[214] • Disclaimer says:

    This letter seems mostly quite thoughtful and even courageous, inasmuch as the writer perhaps knows that telling the truth might yield adverse results.
    The main point on which I’d differ is the contention that “racism is a sin”. Insofar as this piece of speech captures a truth (and I agree that it partially does, even if it also encompassses dastardly falsehood), it is entirely captured by the following claim that “rash judgement is a sin”.
    Rash judgement is one of the errors every one of us will make, and for all sorts of reasons. It is good to get better at recognizing when we succumb to it. But this is an intellectual and moral error that is not unique to any “racial” group. (In some situations, quick judgement is crucial, but in others it is quite bad…)

    On a broader note, I think the “racism” charge is a tool of evil people, but it “hooks” many who are among the most decent, and maybe it would be good to sort out the utter nonsense from the underyling pieces that get at actual moral errors that are possible for any human. (And I think this moral reflection is entirely tangential to intellectual reflection on racial and cultural differences… which are obviously real in some ways, if easily misunderstood…)

  120. @Neuday
    @JMcG


    Catholic doctrine allowed application of the death penalty until the Francis disallowed it soon after maneuvering Benedict XVI off the throne of St Peter.
     
    Though Catholic, I'm appalled at this commie gay-loving Pope, so I'll take what Acquinas, a Doctor of the Church, has to say of the death penalty. Here's the money quote: "The life of certain pestiferous men is an impediment to the common good which is the concord of human society. Therefore, certain men must be removed by death from the society of men."

    The following is a summary of Summa Contra Gentiles, Book 3, Chapter 146, which was written by Aquinas prior to writing the Summa Theologica. St. Thomas was a vocal supporter of the death penalty. This was based on the theory (found in natural moral law), that the state has not only the right, but the duty to protect its citizens from enemies, both from within, and without.

    For those who have been appropriately appointed, there is no sin in administering punishment. For those who refuse to obey God's laws, it is correct for society to rebuke them with civil and criminal sanctions. No one sins working for justice and within the law. Actions that are necessary to preserve the good of society are not inherently evil. The common good of the whole society is greater and better than the good of any particular person. "The life of certain pestiferous men is an impediment to the common good which is the concord of human society. Therefore, certain men must be removed by death from the society of men." This is likened to the physician who must amputate a diseased limb, or a cancer, for the good of the whole person.

    He based this on I Corinthians 5, 6: "You know that a little leaven corrupts the whole lump of dough?" and I Corinthians 5, 13: "Put away the evil one from among yourselves"; Romans 13,4: "[it is said of earthly power that] he bears not the sword in vain: for he is God's minister, an avenger to execute wrath upon him that does evil"; I Peter 2, 13-14: "Be subjected therefore to every human creature for God's sake: whether to be on the king as excelling, or to governors as sent by him for the punishment of evildoers and for the praise of good." He believed these passages superseded the text of Exodus 20,13: "Thou shall not kill." This is mentioned again in Matthew 5,21. Also, it is argued that Matthew 13, 30: "Suffer both the weeds and the wheat to grow until the harvest." The harvest was interpreted as meaning the end of the world. This is explained by Matthew 13,38-40.

    Aquinas acknowledged these passages could also be interpreted as meaning there should be no use of the death penalty if there was a chance of injuring the innocent. The prohibition "Thou shall not kill", was superseded by Exodus 22,18: "Wrongdoers you shall not suffer to live." The argument that evildoers should be allowed to live in the hope that they might be redeemed was rejected by Aquinas as frivolous. If they would not repent in the face of death, it was unreasonable to assume they would ever repent. "How many people are we to allow to be murdered while waiting for the repentance of the wrongdoer?", he asked, rhetorically. Using the death penalty for revenge, or retribution is a violation of natural moral law.

    Many believe the correct interpretation of the commandment to be "Thou shalt not murder." This interpretation allows for Aquinas' belief that the death penalty is an acceptable practice as delivered by those in authority over such things, such as government, which is divinely appointed as to God's will.

    Replies: @backup

    Yes, the case for an antipope is growing.

  121. @Jack D
    @Roger

    He was trying to be even handed and doing a sort of "Yes, but..." thing. Saying that the popo killed him is totally fine in the current context even if it is false (they are going after the cop for tax evasion because they know that the murder charge is not going to stick - the Deep State is sending that cop to prison no matter what. If they had to, they would get him for jaywalking.)

    However in the current environment you can't say that St. George did ANYTHING bad. St. George is immaculate. Might as well say that Jesus was shoplifting at the money changers' tables. THAT was the Father's mistake, not saying that the cop killed him. EVERYONE already knows that the cop killed him, even if it isn't true.

    Replies: @Alden

    Exactly my thoughts. Unlike the MSM he mentioned St George Fentanyl was a criminal and implied St George resisted arrest. Implied there was a reason police had to restrain him.

    That’s what got Fr Moloney into trouble. The entire email is the standard clergy critter of all religions trying to be even handed with goody goody platitudes.

  122. @travis
    @backup

    All the evidence points to the fact that Floyd had taken a drug overdose so strong that his imminent death could hardly have been prevented. Blood samples collected before Floyd died, tested positive for the following: Fentanyl 11 ng/mL, Norfentanyl 5.6 ng/mL, … Methamphetamine 19 ng/mL … 86 ng/mL of morphine...This fentanyl concentration, including its norfentanyl metabolite at its molecular weight, was 20.6 ng/mL That is over three times the lethal overdose.

    Replies: @Alden

    There was fentanyl and meth in his rectum. Because the lining is only one cell thick, insertion of meds and illegal drugs works very very fast, fast as direct injection into the muscles

    Before syringes insertion of meds into the rectum was standard. One cell thick is also why sodomy causes AIDS and numerous other STDS

    • Replies: @anon
    @Alden

    There was fentanyl and meth in his rectum.

    How do you know that?

  123. @David Schmitt, Ph.D.
    @Too Long Didn't Read

    ¶ 1/2. Sorry, bloke, I got as far as "When you were..." and dozed off. B.t.w., tell @Hibernian not to laugh at just everything---but Leprechauns do LOL at almost anything.

    ¶2/2. Seriously, thanks for the chiding. I will see if I cannot check my White verbosity, just as I have had to check my White privilege.

    Replies: @Pierre de Craon, @Too Long Didn't Read

    ¶ 1/2. Sorry, bloke, I got as far as “When you were…” and dozed off.

    Totally understandable.

    I will see if I cannot check my White verbosity,

    Try this, maybe it can hlep.

  124. @El Dato
    @James Braxton

    https://newbostonpost.com/2020/06/17/m-i-t-catholic-chaplain-forced-out-over-email-message-about-george-floyd/


    An university administrator [Suzy Nelson] wrote a letter condemning Father Moloney’s email message.

    “The message from Father Moloney was deeply disturbing. Those who wrote me [i.e. a few students on the Professional Outrage PhD track] and other senior leaders [who?] were outraged, and many felt abandoned and alienated by their faith,” wrote Suzy Nelson, vice president and dean for student life. “By devaluing and disparaging George Floyd’s character [which we know to be impeccable and sacrosanct], Father Moloney’s message failed to acknowledge the dignity of each human being and the devastating impact of systemic racism — especially within the criminal justice system — on African Americans, people of African descent, and communities of color [left out transgender people, I see a forthcoming resignation, Miss Nelson]. Moreover, his message dismissed the need for urgent action and change in America [really!!]. Now more than ever, we need people in positions of power and influence to call upon each one of us to examine the ruinous impact of hate and racial violence in America, to strengthen our commitment to healing our relations with others, and to unite in bringing about systemic equity and justice for Black people in every sector of society.” [proceeds to behave like a mentally disturbed maoist in must]

     

    From

    https://palladiummag.com/2019/08/05/the-real-problem-at-yale-is-not-free-speech/


    Current Yale administrators have a sense of self-preservation for themselves and their corporation, but not for what made them great in the first place. They are quick to appease students, when they go along with the new zeitgeist, as if students and the latest wokeness were the preservers of cultural knowledge. This is the key to understanding why beloved faculty members can end up purged, against all public sentiment. Whether out of ideological commitment or hard-nosed realpolitik, these apparatchik administrators, bolstered by a minority of students, have effectively outmaneuvered their rivals. In doing so, they have also accelerated the tearing down of Yale’s institutional legacy and undermined its historical mission.

    If they were confronting a university and student body with a powerful commitment to that mission, things might be different. But they aren’t. As we’ve seen, the classes represented at Yale have themselves opened up a massive ideological vacuum. Shrinking back from their position and opportunities, they have lost the ability to coordinate.
     

    The required actions were called de-nazification and de-stalinization, I think.

    Replies: @Charlotte, @AnotherDad

    Late to this thread.

    But the notable issue here is the degradation and corruption of our traditional institutions.

    The Boy Scouts sent me–a long time scouter (adult leader)–a message in June and it was an obsequious, foul, utterly craven piece of nonsense. An insult to scouting, which for the record has been a completely open, non-racially-discriminating organization from the get go. Literally zero to apologize for.

    Our cultures institutions are supposed to be inherently *conservative*. They exist to precisely to conserve the core norms and values of our culture and pass them on intact to following generations.

    Unfortunately, minoritarianism has been hugely successful in convincing foolish and weak minded “progressives” that Western Civilization is horribly corrupt and shameful and all white gentiles ought to run around apologizing for our “sins”. When in fact, the West has been a beacon of freedom, rationality, progress and human advance and it’s the minoritarians who are cancerous curse upon having a decent, prosperous, free and civilized life for all.

    Conservatives are simply going to have to find a way to take back or regrow our own actually and explicitly conservative institutions–zero tolerance for “progressives” or the slightest whiff of minoritarianism or the West will simply vanish.

  125. @Alden
    @travis

    There was fentanyl and meth in his rectum. Because the lining is only one cell thick, insertion of meds and illegal drugs works very very fast, fast as direct injection into the muscles

    Before syringes insertion of meds into the rectum was standard. One cell thick is also why sodomy causes AIDS and numerous other STDS

    Replies: @anon

    There was fentanyl and meth in his rectum.

    How do you know that?

  126. @Ben Kurtz
    I am not a Catholic.

    But in another life, I would have been, I am sure, honored and blessed to have a man such as Fr. Moloney be my religious leader.

    It is a strange and demented time in which we live, that a chaplain at one of our (formerly?) "great" seats of learning should be fired for uttering such a message.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Desiderius, @Bill, @Pop Warner, @Rapparee

    I used to know Father Moloney years ago, though I haven’t seen or talked to him in a long while. He’s a good egg, even if he sometimes comes off as a bit of a stick-in-the-mud to some other people. If my soul does end up being saved in the end, one particular lecture of his will be particularly responsible- it was vital spiritual advice which pulled me through some very tough times. If he is a man who follows his own advice, he’s taking his troubles in stride.

  127. @Pierre de Craon
    Father Moloney is the perfect model of a modern conciliarist priest—that is, a pseudo-Catholic. In common with Humble Frank Bergoglio in Rome, he has found a way around the parallel injunctions of Matthew 6:24 and Luke 16:13 that a man cannot serve both God and Mammon. Namely, by pretending that Mammon is completely unrelated to "whatever is most cool, hip, and trendy in godless society," Moloney and Bergoglio get to nod sagely and affirmatively about things that Anthony of Padua and Francis Xavier would have died sooner than affirm while the former two also claim perjuriously that those great saints and all the others would have gone along with their lies.

    For the record,

    (1) Racism is not a sin; it is a phony crime invented by (((this planet's most accomplished racists))) to slander and manipulate Christians and ex-Christians who are too bloody conformist, witless, or cowardly to see that they are being slandered and manipulated.

    (2) Rash judgment is most definitely a sin, but Moloney's cautions to his readers against succumbing to that vice ring hollow, coming as they do from a man who has, two paragraphs earlier, brazenly and rashly judged the cop who is accused, on evidence whose falsity grows daily more plain, of killing Saint George Floyd, a career criminal the cause of whose death has not been afforded the close forensic scrutiny that pre-woke US common and statute law requires. (Not that I would bet even a buck on the poor cop's getting a fair shake in today's hate-whitey prosecutorial environment.)

    (3) Moloney says that "Solidarity with our fellow human beings is 'a direct demand of human and Christian brotherhood.'" Poppycock! Solidarity with other humans, biological or notional or woke or whatever, is not a demand of any sort. Strictly biological similarity—similarity, not solidarity, mind—is a fact of human existence, like halitosis. The sort of cheesy, trendy solidarity urged by Moloney makes nonsense of the true requirement of Christian tradition to employ fraternal correction, even where doing so entails some risk, when those around us have fallen, wittingly or otherwise, into grave error. No one denies that this requirement—elucidated in the plain language of the first three spiritual works of mercy: admonish the sinner, instruct the ignorant, counsel the doubtful—was understood by the preconciliar Catholic Church as, in effect, a counsel of perfection. One must be pretty naive to fail to recognize the real peril that might befall someone who exercises fraternal correction on the wrong person at the wrong time—and I refer to a context of "normal" circumstances, those of the not so distant, immeasurably more civilized past, wherein the current nightmare, a nightmare of black violence directed and egged on by Jewish hate, that many white and/or Christian Americans now endure was scarcely imaginable. Lastly,

    (4) On these grounds and others, I would applaud Sean Cardinal O'Malley for giving Father Moloney the boot were it not for the fact that I know with moral certainty that His Eminence is a far more worldly, more cynical, and hence un-Catholic man than Moloney (with God's grace) is ever likely to be.

    Replies: @JMcG, @NOTA, @anonymous 389

    wwebd said – please pray for poor Sean Omalley. The poor old man has little love in his heart (he rejoiced, the arrogant little star-struck admirer of celebrities, to preside over the evil praise , at a funeral, of the evil supporter of abortion Ted Kennedy), and there is nothing sadder than the lonely life of a man like that.

    I just do not have it in my heart to be angry with the poor little fat old man, it is just so sad to know that he is what he is.

    You need to understand I do not see him the way you see him. I have lived through more than one century, with friends from at least three different centuries, and I know how much his mother suffers, seeing what a sad little creature of the zeitgeist the poor fat little old man has become.

    I do not have it in my heart to be angry at the cold-hearted evil things this man, or, to be fair, his powerful sad fat little fellow cardinals, and the evildoer Pope (God forgive him) have done. It is so so sad to know that they failed to care about their fellow Christians, and the best we can do is pray that they repent in the moments before they die.

    This world has always, and will always, belong to those who respect God, and will never ever belong to those, like O’Malley, who worship evildoers.

    Seriously, please pray for the arrogant old man. I know how much his parents loved him, and I know how much GOD wants him to repent for the evil things he has done, with so little concern for the victims of the people (Ted Kennedy is one, but there are others) he has praised. It is so sad to see these evil old Cardinals thinking they are all right with the Lord, when the simplest peasant can see the lack of love in the heart of the poor Pope and the poor Cardinals. Please pray for them all.

  128. CCZ says:

    “Residents of Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia, and other southern states will soon see their nighttime skylines replaced by an enormous rotating hologram of George Floyd’s face, projected above the vandalized sites of former Confederate statues and monuments.”

  129. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile...

    "I’m a nice young woman from Wisconsin, and you guys are fucking prices of shit," said the not that nice, not that young, ugly little woman from Wisconsin.

    https://twitter.com/ShelbyTalcott/status/1287670341938995201?s=20

    Replies: @anon, @Jim Don Bob, @Reg Cæsar

    “I’m a nice young woman from Wisconsin…

    Jeffrey Dahmer was a nice young man from Wisconsin.

    …you guys are 🖕 pieces of 💩!”

    That’s not how nice young 👩 talk in 🇺🇸’s 🐄land.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Reg Cæsar

    Jeffrey Dahmer was a nice young man from Wisconsin.

    Actually, the guy was schizoid and not able to form friendships in any venue. His family just put up with him. His father was in a continual state of dismay about him for a dozen years or more and his step-mother regarded him as a very creepy, very damaged, very untrustworthy human being.

  130. Wow, get accused of pederasty and it takes years for the church leadership to discipline you, if they ever get around to it. Write a thoughtful letter or burn an LGBT flag though and they’ll have you out in a day.

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @SimpleSong

    Wow, get accused of pederasty and it takes years for the church leadership to discipline you,

    No it doesn't. Accusations against priests are usually made ten or fifteen years after the fact, when bits of information you might use to evaluate them have long disappeared. The most notorious case in Syracuse was a lawsuit filed in 2003 making allegations that a certain priest had done x, y, and z during the period running from 1963 to 1970. Another splashy case concerned a priest who had retired in 1991. The first accusation was lodged in 1998 about an incident from 1989 (to which he confessed). The next four arrived during the period running from 2002-04 (and he denied those). One concerned an incident which had supposedly occurred in 1949; another concerned incidents in 1962-63.

  131. @SimpleSong
    Wow, get accused of pederasty and it takes years for the church leadership to discipline you, if they ever get around to it. Write a thoughtful letter or burn an LGBT flag though and they'll have you out in a day.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Wow, get accused of pederasty and it takes years for the church leadership to discipline you,

    No it doesn’t. Accusations against priests are usually made ten or fifteen years after the fact, when bits of information you might use to evaluate them have long disappeared. The most notorious case in Syracuse was a lawsuit filed in 2003 making allegations that a certain priest had done x, y, and z during the period running from 1963 to 1970. Another splashy case concerned a priest who had retired in 1991. The first accusation was lodged in 1998 about an incident from 1989 (to which he confessed). The next four arrived during the period running from 2002-04 (and he denied those). One concerned an incident which had supposedly occurred in 1949; another concerned incidents in 1962-63.

  132. @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    “I’m a nice young woman from Wisconsin...
     
    Jeffrey Dahmer was a nice young man from Wisconsin.

    ...you guys are 🖕 pieces of 💩!”
     
    That's not how nice young 👩 talk in 🇺🇸's 🐄land.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Jeffrey Dahmer was a nice young man from Wisconsin.

    Actually, the guy was schizoid and not able to form friendships in any venue. His family just put up with him. His father was in a continual state of dismay about him for a dozen years or more and his step-mother regarded him as a very creepy, very damaged, very untrustworthy human being.

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