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MIT Cancels Lecture on Exoplanets' Climates Over the Scientist's Lack of Faith in DEI
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From MIT’s official website, accessed via the Wayback Machine as of September 13, 2021:

The John Carlson Lecture

The John Carlson Lecture communicates exciting new results in climate science to the general public. Free of charge and open to the general public, the lecture is made possible by a generous gift from MIT alumnus John H. Carlson to the Lorenz Center in the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, MIT. For more information please contact Angela Ellis: [email protected]

This year’s lecture by Dorian Abbot of the U. of Chicago sounds like a fun one:

Climate and the potential for life on other planets

Understanding planetary habitability is key to understanding how and why life developed on Earth as well as whether life is present on planets that orbit different stars (exoplanets). Whether a planet could be habitable is determined primarily by the planet’s climate. I will talk about how insights we’ve gained from studying Earth’s climate have been used to make predictions about which exoplanets might be habitable, and how astronomical observations indicate the possibility of new climatic regimes not found on modern Earth. Finally, I will bring things back to Earth and the future of humanity by discussing what’s called the Fermi paradox: it seems like life could develop on many planets, so why haven’t we detected extraterrestrial life yet? One possible answer is that civilizations tend to destroy themselves through mechanisms such as environmental damage and nuclear war

THIS YEAR’S SPEAKER: Professor Dorian Abbot (University of Chicago)

Dorian Abbot received his undergraduate degree in physics (2004, Harvard) and PhD in applied math (2008, Harvard). He came to the University of Chicago as a Chamberlin Fellow in 2009 and stayed on as a faculty member in 2011. In his research, Dorian uses mathematical and computational models to understand and explain fundamental problems in Earth and Planetary Sciences. He has worked on problems related to climate, paleoclimate, the cryosphere, planetary habitability, exoplanets, and planetary dynamics.

Details for the 2021 fall lecture forthcoming.

But Professor Abbot is not a true believer in DEI. Back in August he wrote an opinion piece in Newsweek with Stanford accounting professor Ivan Marinovic that concluded:

Viewed objectively, American universities already are incredibly diverse. They feature people from all countries, races and ethnicities (for example, one of us was born and raised in Chile, and is classified as Hispanic by his university).

Amusingly, Abbot and Marinovic leave the question of which benefits from the privilege on non-whiteness unanswered.

This is in stark contrast with most universities in Europe, Asia and South America. American universities are diverse not because of DEI, but because they have been extremely competitive at attracting talent from all over the world. Ninety years ago Germany had the best universities in the world. Then an ideological regime obsessed with race came to power and drove many of the best scholars out, gutting the faculties and leading to sustained decay that German universities never fully recovered from. We should view this as a warning of the consequences of viewing group membership as more important than merit, and correct our course before it is too late.

The Volunteer Auxiliary Thought Police were, of course, incensed at anybody suggesting they ask themselves: “Are we the baddies?” and set out to have the crimethinkers cancelled.

How dare MIT let a leading scientist give a lecture about planets circling other stars when he is a known dissenter?

So Abbot’s lecture has apparently been cancelled by MIT.

Maybe the explanation for Fermi’s Paradox isn’t nuclear war or environmental damage, it’s Wokeness.

 
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  1. Escher says:

    Christine Chen probably secretly has the hots for Prof. Abbott.

    • Replies: @Hangnail Hans
    , @AnotherDad
  2. anon[190] • Disclaimer says:

    DIE sounds better, and is more truthful. We should include it in our rhetoric.

    Diversity, Inclusion, Equality: DIE

    Translation: Let all diverse peoples in, mandate that they are included equal to their demographic numbers in all fields, no matter their lack of elite competences.
    China and others will pass us up in ensuing generations. We are killing patriotism now.

  3. LOL.

  4. Has anyone here ever been to a continental European university?

    Can you describe your experience there?

  5. Thomm says:

    Two comments :

    1) I always wondered how the woke lunatics would wedge their way into astronomy. This answers that question.

    It is safe to say that nearly 100% of the people interested in the finer points of exoplanets are male, yet the female SJW is the one canceling him.

    Forget MIT and just post the lecture online. More people will see it that way.

    2) The existence of a space program is an indicator of whether feminism has gained too much power in a society or not. As such incidents pile up and space programs recede into the distance, we thus receive an accurate indicator of too many women are being paid to do nothing but suppress actual human advancement.

    (for example, one of us was born and raised in Chile, and is classified as Hispanic by his university).

    I often say that the best way for a white or Asian person to gain some points in the AA hierarchy is to learn Spanish and pretend to be Hispanic, since Hispanic is not a race. Learning Spanish isn’t that hard, and it is the best way to hack this game. Remember that even Mitt Romney could be Hispanic if he wanted to, since his father was born in Mexico. Not having a Hispanic last name is no barrier.

  6. El Dato says:

    Who is “Christine Y. Chen”, why does she write cruddy opinions on a microtext messageboard which is basically the blue, satanic mill of Woke Capital – and and why should anyone care what she thinks is “harmful”?

    • Agree: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  7. Good riddance to this racist xenophobe!

    This guy probably calls exo-life “alien” — I wouldn’t put it past him.

    Let Shaniqua & Demetrius explain his mathematical and computational models n sheeit.

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
  8. 2BR says:

    Very smart and bold move to tie the Left obsession with race to the Nazi obsession with race, while noting that this obsession led to a decline in standards – in Germany. Always good to put your Left opponents on the side of the Nazis. Probably confuses them.

  9. Ya gotta love the Marxist purity spirals. It’s hitting them all.

  10. Daniel H says:

    With the fixed, front-on gaze in the accompanying image Marinovic could pass for “Latino”. Googling the net brings up images of his rightful representation, south Slavic. Knowing nothing else about him, I would guess that he is part of the post WW2 Croatian diaspora (a markedly successful Latin American demographic) ; his grandparents got out or Croatia while the going was still good.

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Anonymous
  11. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:

    views per se are never harmful unlike something else that rhymes with “views”.

  12. JimDandy says:

    “American universities are diverse not because of DEI, but because they have been extremely competitive at attracting talent from all over the world.”

    Well, DEI is part of the reason American universities are as diverse as they are, unfortunately.

    “Ninety years ago Germany had the best universities in the world. Then an ideological regime obsessed with race came to power and drove many of the best scholars out, gutting the faculties and leading to sustained decay that German universities never fully recovered from. ”

    I’m going to go ahead and read this as a dogwhistling Easter Egg Trojan Horsey ironic origin story of how the Frankfurt School came to infect American universities with DEI.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  13. El Dato says:
    @Thomm

    The last thing you will see in orbit are pink satellites looking like female parts and named after hidden figures.

    Random thoughts:

    “The Moon is a Harsh Mistress”. The strong AI computer helping the lunar revolution along is outed as “female” in the book, and performs a trans operation on itself by changing mannerism. Yet, on this, we only have the say-so of the revoluzzer heroine to go by, who starts to call Mike “Michelle”. She is wrong. Mike is the prototypical “insider bureaucrat” – he is male.

    “2001 – A Space Odyssey”. HAL 9000 is given a male personality. That is wrong. Far from having mission success as prime objective, inner feels are a prime objective, to the point where it cancels the entire crew after being doubted. One could probably re-analyze the movie in detail and find out that that is the True Message of Kubrick: “beware the female attitude”, rather than a message right out of a philippine shoe factory saying “Help! I’m being forced to secretly film a Moon Landing Hoax in an undergound military base”.

  14. El Dato says:
    @2BR

    Ideologues are NEVER confused.

    In fact, after the destruction of the math department at Heidelberg through the purging of Jews, a Nazi functionary was pretty proud of the results and said as much to Hilbert. Hilbert was unconvinced.

    The war was already lost.

    • Replies: @ABCDE
    , @Jack D
  15. anon[735] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    …mandate that they are included equal to their demographic numbers in all fields, no matter their lack of elite competences…

    excellent idea. too bad for the 2%.

  16. pyrrhus says:

    What’s the over/under on how long the approaching Dark Age lasts? I’ll guess 500 years…

  17. @JohnnyWalker123

    They’re trying their darnedest to keep up with US colleges in the Wokestakes (at least the German and French ones I’ve been to) but you know, moving target and all.

  18. Wilkey says:

    Who is Christine Y. Chen, and why isn’t she more interested in “diversity, inclusion, and equity” in her ancestral homeland of China? When are we going to start to hear lectures about why China needs more diverse peoples from Africa and El Salvador?

  19. @Thomm

    I always wondered how the woke lunatics would wedge their way into astronomy. This answers that question.

    They’ve been infiltrating for quite a while. Look at the agenda of any American Astronomical Society meeting in the past several years.

    I notice that Christine Y. Chen gave a presentation at last December’s American Geophysical Union meeting: “Higher education teaching resources on imperialism and scientific racism in the geosciences, from past to present.” Yeah, she’s a baizuo.

    • Replies: @Hermes
  20. @Escher

    Welcome to the Current Year, in which an accusation from a random POC is tantamount to a conviction in a court of law, only much faster and includes the sentencing phase as well. The convicted has no rights, just a heapin’ helping of that white privilege we hear so much about.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
    • Thanks: GeneralRipper
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  21. Christine Y. Chen, who has taken umbrage, is a post-doctoral researcher at Lawrence Livermore lab, a geologist, with a Ph.D. from MIT.

    Coincidentally, there is also a Christine H. Chen, who is a tenured exoplanetary scientist at the Space Telescope institute with degrees from Caltech and UCLA. She is in the same field as Professor Abbott. She seems to have nothing to say on the matter.

  22. @Wilkey

    When are we going to start to hear lectures about why China needs more diverse peoples from Africa and El Salvador?

    • LOL: GeneralRipper
  23. @2BR

    Except that one of the Jews’ dirty little secrets is that they are just as racist as the Nazis were, and in many of the same ways. Rights in Israel can even be determined by blood tests!

    Anyway the upshot of this is that the slightest hint will be responded to with saturation bombing, because it’s a sensitive issue. What with the total hypocrisy it exposes..

  24. Is she wearing wax teeth in that profile pic?

    I went to the mirror to see if I could show so much gum – without success.

  25. Romanian says: • Website

    DIE is an interesting acronym, but DEI is also revealing, because it means “of God”, as in Opus Dei.

    A quiet nod to the messianic convictions of its practitioners?

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Expletive deleted
  26. Apparently even other planetary systems are not far enough away to escape this nonsense.

  27. @PiltdownMan

    Thanks.

    From CYC’s bio at the link:

    “I have completed extensive training with Conflict [email protected] and serve as a graduate student mediator (EAPS REFS) to provide confidential conflict coaching to members of my department. I have also created and facilitated workshops on effective management and leadership training of future faculty (resources page coming soon).”

    Like so many invaders, she’s destroying her way to the top.

  28. @Wilkey

    “When are we going to start to hear lectures about why China needs more diverse peoples from Africa and El Salvador?”

    Around the same time as we hear that Israel needs more diverse peoples from Africa and El Salvador?

  29. Amusingly, Abbot and Marinovic leave the question of which benefits from the privilege on non-whiteness unanswered.

    Yeah, because that’s a different lecture. It’s called “Who, Whom’s on first?”

    “You dunno the guy’s name who gets the grant when they write out the grant?”

    (Together): “Third base!”

    • Thanks: Charon
    • LOL: Almost Missouri
  30. One possible answer is that civilizations tend to destroy themselves through mechanisms such as environmental damage and nuclear war.

    It’s also been theorized that there have been other civilizations that were so tortured by Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity that they purposefully destroyed themselves with environmental damage and nuclear war as the “easy way out”. These societies do radiate electromagnetic radiation, but the signals are so confusing as to blend in to the background noise emanating from the core of the Universe since the Big Bang.

  31. @Pat Kittle

    Let Shaniqua & Demetrius explain his mathematical and computational models n sheeit.

    The old standard for negro names is upended. Those two have nothing on Buk Buk who apparently just capped a fellow African named Aaron (wtf?) in Moron Salt Lake City. This is immediately after Buk Buk got off with a probationary sentence for an armed robbery.

    You know that you live in a first world country when you have news stories like this.

    https://www.ksl.com/article/50254594/man-with-violent-history-arrested-in-shooting-death-of-university-of-utah-football-player

  32. I. Racist says:

    He’s made a nice career for himself by promoting climate hysteria. Live by the sword…

    • Troll: jamie b.
  33. @JimDandy

    The point is that there are, I think, two statements leading to confusions, but basically wrongly interpreted.

    1. German universities’ high eminence was real, but let us just focus on the most influential fields, theoretical physics and mathematics. I think I won’t be wrong to say that the 1920s to the 1940s was a grand golden era of discovery of basic things about nature, and that era’s brilliance has not been repeated since. As I speak, in the past 40-50 years nothing fundamental in physics has happened. The 50s to 70s, mostly American and I’d say 70% American Jewish, from quantum electrodynamics to quantum chromodynamics, was the last effusion of the 30s glory.

    So, German universities did it so well because of the flourishing of German culture and creativity, something unpredictable.

    Nazi purges got rid Germany and Austria of all Jews, who were important in many areas- but not crucial. After all, totalitarian Nazi Germany succeeded in creating two revolutionary weapons, rockets and jet planes, while fundamental mathematics and physics somehow stagnated. There is a good chance they would have made A bomb too, were it not for the totalitarian nature of the regime with its whims and vulnerability of Germany to air raids, as well as limitations of sources.

    The Manhattan project is frequently presented as some sort of almost miracle, but it is evident any country with so much resources and safe from others’ interference would do it too.

    In other fields- what did American universities do to produce anything close in eminence and achievement of Heidegger, Spengler or Snell? Nothing, because it was not repeatable, just a lucky moment in history.

    2. as for US universities, their big contribution (not just bells and whistles) comes from foreigners who constitute perhaps close to 50% of the best experts in any significant field. And these foreigners came to the US because the US offered them more money and opportunity to work in well-funded projects. They are not part of any DIE/DEI scheme when they’re good; if they are DEI mostly, then say goodbye to any progress. Here, comparison with Germany is instructive. In the golden age of German achievement, ca. 90% of its accomplishment was home-grown. In the case of the US, probably less than 50% of the biggies are locals.

    I would say the big advantage of the US science-technology community and American society at large, was its openness to criticism and discourse, as well as physical safety and liberty of expression given to creative individuals. So, STEALTH technology, which is mostly Russian-invented (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ufimtsev),could flourish only in a free society.

    Take away freedom, and you will face stagnation and eventual collapse, with perhaps 2-4 partial exceptions, as the Nazi Germany example shows.

  34. @Thomm

    I had the Hispanic ploy at the back of my mind when my son was born.
    But my wife realized what I was up to when I suggested naming him Charles Oliver,

  35. @Wilkey

    When are we going to start to hear lectures about why China needs more diverse peoples from Africa and El Salvador?

    When the Jews succeed with “My fellow Yellow People…”

  36. El Trumpo was supposed to defund this nonsense.

    Using moralistic arguments is flawed. In fact people facilitating the current dispossession use Germany’s alleged original sin.

  37. bomag says:
    @2BR

    The digital world has allowed the left to rewrite history faster than ever.

    If the comparisons become too obvious, one of their functionaries will announce, in the middle of a speech denouncing Nazis, that the Nazis have always been good guys; merely victims smeared by cis-gendered patriarchal White men, etc. etc.

  38. Won’t the Really Smart people at MIT stand up against this? Don’t they have any moral courage.

    Just kidding, we know they quiver like kittens.

    • Replies: @GeneralRipper
  39. Dr. Abbott needs to show the astrological effects that exoplanets have, and a certain number of DIE females will ignore his crimethink.

  40. dearieme says:

    American universities are diverse not because of DEI, but because that’s where the money is.

    Ninety years ago Germany had the best universities in the world. Nearly but not quite. Germany had the best university system as was universally acknowledged. But it didn’t have the best university which was, at the time, Cambridge.

    You might say that in the sixties California had the best university system but not the best university (which was, I suppose, MIT).

    • Agree: AnotherDad
    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    , @Jack D
  41. Anon[381] • Disclaimer says:

    Was just at a University function. It was no place for white men.

  42. Altai says:

    Don’t make the non-binary kids angry.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  43. @anon

    Earth to Christine: Do you read?
    Master K’ung has long planted that seed
    Your Imperial State
    Grew to make China great.
    Reward for True Merit‘s the creed.

    • Thanks: Harry Baldwin
  44. I used to work at MIT when I was a teenager, designing computer games and interfaces, but as a contractor not a student… after I got temporarily kicked out of the place down the street for being part of a drunken brawl. MIT used to cater lunch for us every day, (viz they brought it right to us, we didn’t have to go to some cafeteria), which led some math geek to crack a grin at me one day and say, “You see, kid? There IS such a thing as a free lunch!” I was going to explain the economics of the thing to him, but I didn’t have the heart to spoil what was probably the first joke of his life.

    But now I see that DIE guarantees that there really IS a free lunch! But again, it’s not really free: it just comes out of whitey’s pocket instead.

  45. Anonymous[338] • Disclaimer says:

    OT:

    Steve, don’t you think Belichick made sure Brady won the game in Foxboro last night? You send out your injured 36-year old kicker to kick a 56-yard field goal, his longest, which he’s done only one time before— 11 years ago in his prime. But, you make him do it in a heavy rain, with wind. And even if he does make it you’ve given Brady almost a full minute, needing only a field goal to win it. And you don’t give the young quarterback, whose been spectacular, making play after play, a chance to go for it on 4th and 3.

    Now it all makes sense why Belichick consciously or subconsciously wanted Brady to win. The future.

    I’m guessing he probably offered Brady a Pats front office spot. GM?

  46. @Buzz Mohawk

    If Jean-Luc Picard could drop dead
    The Starfleet Diversity Head
    Would select Yeoman Chang
    “Crash the Ship with a Bang”
    Notiki-Noshirti instead.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  47. @Hangnail Hans

    Well put.

    20 years ago:

    “It’s just a few activist faculty. Just ignore them.”

    10 years ago:

    “It’s just the Humanities Departments. They don’t matter.”

    5 years ago:

    “It’s just Humanities and and Social Sciences, but the hard sciences are immune.”

    Last week:

    “It’s just academia on this corrupt Earth, but we can still be free on planets orbiting other stars.”

    This morning:

    Welp…

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Thanks: Coemgen
    • Replies: @Wade Hampton
  48. @Romanian

    Dies irae ..
    Cave iram Dei.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
  49. @pyrrhus

    Kill off enough white people and I don’t see why we can’t make it permanent. We say a lot around here about how Europe and the United States are sliding back toward third world status.

    But that’s just today. Why should it stop there? Why not all the way back to the Neolithic Era? Give it time.

    After all, that’s where Africa was before the white man showed up, and we have four billion Africans on the way, each of whom has a realistic expectation of being treated as a Holy One in western countries.

    Asia will likely be the only surviving repository of human advancement, to [re]state the obvious.

    • Replies: @Anon
  50. @2BR

    Yeah, this Abbott guy really embodies the Chicago Principles.

    He’s not just defending free speech on his campus, he’s actively going out and sewing consternation among the enemy.

    I wonder though how long the University of Chicago’s principles will hold out?

    https://freeexpression.uchicago.edu/

    Will those neogothic crenellations behind President Alivisotos become literal battlements as Chicago defends against the woke mob? Or is it more likely that congenitally conformist academics will go along to get along and ultimately just capitulate?

    To ask is to answer, I’m afraid.

    • Agree: Charon, ic1000
  51. Art Deco says:

    The department chairman cancelled his talk ‘under pressure’. Dr. Abbot is being all collegial about in public fora.

    Cancel culture doesn’t work unless those in gatekeeper positions cave into the creeps. If the complainers were campus evangelicals, they’d be ignored. Your problem is the culture and psychology of the gatekeepers.

  52. @blake121666

    I went to the mirror to see if I could show so much gum – without success.

    Probably because neither of your parents was a horse.

  53. “Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us.” – Bill Watterson, Calvin and Hobbes

    • Thanks: Buffalo Joe
  54. @anon

    From our perspective, “die” is right. From theirs, “dei” is right, meaning “of God”. As in “Robin DiAngelo is their Angele Dei.”

  55. @Almost Missouri

    5 years ago: “I just got this crazy email about diversity training from the HR department.”

  56. Anonymous[831] • Disclaimer says:
    @Art Deco

    Cancel culture doesn’t work unless those in gatekeeper positions cave into the creeps. If the complainers were campus evangelicals, they’d be ignored. Your problem is the culture and psychology of the gatekeepers.

    Quite so, I do wonder what sort of leverage the complainers have? On the face of it, a swift ‘fuck off’ would seem to be the solution but one hardly ever hears of that happening.

    • Agree: Sick 'n Tired
  57. @Art Deco

    “Your problem is the culture and psychology of the gatekeepers.”

    Your real problem, I regret to say, nearly always starts with a J.

    Culture and psychology of the gatekeepers? Do you know what the word “congruent” means?

    • Agree: Ben tillman
  58. Stogumber says:

    Abbott maintains: “Then an ideological regime obsessed with race came to power and drove many of the best scholars out, gutting the faculties and leading to sustained decay that German universities never fully recovered from.”
    That is a pious belief, but is it confirmed by reality? Of course, before 1933 Germany had (by percent) more Jewish professors than the United States, a ratio which slowly changed. But a lot of the Jewish professors in Germany, above all in “Humanities”, were cronies of the leftist parties and had been tenured just therefore, independent of ability – party affiliations were extremely important in the Weimar Republic.

    The only name of a scientist which is is endlessly repeated is Einstein – but Einstein’s creative years were already gone. As for the other specialists of nuclear warfaring, Germany would have had enough of them to do its own bomb if only the government had agreed. There remains the much more interesting question of peaceful technologies – but nearly the whole corps of engineers stayed in Germany. At the end of the war there was no “technological gap” between Germany and the Allies. Things changed only when the United States confiscated the whole knowledge and the German patents, that is after the war and independent from racial conflicts.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  59. @Art Deco

    I agree, and hearing about this coming from a place like MIT is particularly disappointing.

  60. JMcG says:
    @pyrrhus

    Most of Asia isn’t facing a dark age. The decline of the West is accelerating and unstoppable. The Roman Empire had the advantage of being invaded by Europeans. We have no such advantage. Some European homes will be using candles for light, at least some of the time, within twenty years.

    • Replies: @gandydancer
  61. Anonymous[406] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    MIT is a clown show these days. Cluttered with high IQ types, but even more dismally woke than Yale, let alone, of course, U Chicago. It’s interesting how stupid scientists can be on political matters.

  62. @Expletive deleted

    Dammit made an arse of me u/n.
    Capital D
    Into mod hell (infernam moderatem, or something along those lines; I hope some educated correspondent will correct me).

  63. @anon

    It’s just another form of the always losing dr3 strategy. You cant win when you let your opponents set the rules of the game.

    As long as pattern recognition is considered a bad thing, the right will lose.

  64. SafeNow says:

    Are any universities immune from woke nonsense like this? At, say, The U of Alabama, would a young man from a blue state enjoy a non-woke curricular and extra-curricular experience? I have read that there exist small cities in which it is still 1962, but are there universities where it is still 1962?

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  65. Why is DEI the religion of the State and therefor America?

    Answer:White CEO billionaire control of the State+racial voting power of post-1965 Immigration Reform Act passage nonwhites

    It always was and still is about bashing the brains out of the Native Born White American Working Class…

    We now have modern day blasphemy laws and the modern equivalent of Salem Witch Trials…..Which Monty Python’s Eric Idle is openly onboard with……if you follow his twitter comments….

  66. Jack D says:

    This sequence reminds me of Norm Macdonald’s joke about the time that Marlon Brando got in trouble for saying that the Jews controlled Hollywood. Norm said that Marlon then met with the Antidefamation League and apologized and that they accepted his apology and told him that he was allowed to work again.

    If Dorian Abbot apologized to the Woke, would they let him work again?

  67. Kaz says:

    They completely proved him right…

  68. @El Dato

    “2001 – A Space Odyssey”. HAL 9000 is given a male personality. That is wrong.

    But they fixed that in 2010 with the introduction of SAL 9000:

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  69. Art Deco says:
    @Jack D

    He has tenure. And he’s at the University of Chicago where administrators are less inclined to pander to loosely-wired people. His appointment is in the geophysics faculty, but his actual degree is in applied math. He’s employable outside of academe if they contrive a way to can him. Not sure if he’s taken actuarial examinations or not.

  70. ABCDE says:
    @El Dato

    The response back to the Woke critics should be: “These two are so bad that they, and all the students they want admitted or who agree with them, should be sent to away to special places, in the country, where they cannot infect the general population. We need to concentrate them there, away from all of us.

    That might be answered by a very eager “yes”.

  71. @blake121666

    Dorian Abbot:

    Whether a planet could be habitable is determined primarily by the planet’s climate. I will talk about how insights we’ve gained from studying Earth’s climate have been used to make predictions about which exoplanets might be habitable …

    One possible answer is that civilizations tend to destroy themselves through mechanisms such as environmental damage …

    Choppers Chen did us a service, really. It seems the lecture was basically another global warming FUD fest to be cited by the Get In The Pod, Eat The Bugs crowd.

  72. @Buzz Mohawk

    I agree, and hearing about this coming from a place like MIT is particularly disappointing.

    MIT has been getting converged for a long time, decades, including back to the late period of the Cold War where Reagan’s genuine threat to a USSR victory was intolerable, and echoing Jack D.’s following comment has been run by an outsider Jew since 2012.

    Has in fact been run by outsiders, people who did not earn their undergraduate degree at the Institute since 1990. That is not an accident, its governing body the MIT Corporation has to have gotten captured by that time. More evidence of that goes back to the mid 1980s or so when a lot of very overt initiatives were started to change its culture, one excuse back then was that “MIT graduates end up working for Harvard graduates.”

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Rex Little
  73. Brutusale says:
    @El Dato

    In a later novel, Heinlein has the characters putting Mike together with the “female” computer to bring Mike out of his cybernetic catatonia.

  74. Jack D says:
    @El Dato

    The lesson from the Nazis is that in order to get rid of the ideologues you have to completely and utterly defeat and discredit them and their ideology and purge them from the universities. (After you have fired them all, after a decent interval you can hire back some of the ones that actually have scientific chops on the condition that they keep their mouth shut about their former politics and pretend that they were never down with the program). This worked out OK in post-war Germany (although as Abbott says, German universities were never quite the same again – with the Jews gone and the most hard core Nazis gone too, what was left was no longer top class) but I just don’t see that happening here.

  75. Anon[105] • Disclaimer says:

    White men at universities have not learned the fine art of keeping their mouths shut while making occasional mm-hmm noises when some crazy obsessive is going on about their opinions.

    Men have been doing it to their wives for generations. It’s a basic survival skill in life.

    It’s the beta males who are falling into the trap of let’s get ahead of the Crazy Train. They’re doing it to promote their careers without realizing someone’s who is even more devious and careerist is going to twist their words and use them to hammer them back down.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  76. Thomas Perlmann, Secretary of the Nobel Assembly and the Nobel Committee, announces the winners of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine during a press conference at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, Monday, Oct. 4, 2021. The Nobel Prize in the field of physiology or medicine has been awarded to U.S. scientists David Julius and Ardem Patapoutian. They were cited for their discovery of receptors for temperature and touch. The winners were announced Monday by Thomas Perlmann, secretary-general of the Nobel Committee. (Jessica Gow/TT via AP)

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  77. OFF TOPIC — Just a traffic accident …

    STOCKHOLM (AP) — Swedish artist Lars Vilks, who had lived under police protection since making a sketch of the Prophet Muhammad with a dog’s body in 2007, died in a weekend car crash along with two police bodyguards, police said Monday. He was 75.

    Vilks and two plainclothes officers were killed in a head-on crash with a truck on Sunday afternoon, said Carina Persson, the police chief for southern Sweden. All three died on the spot. The 45-year-old truck driver was flown to a hospital with serious injuries.

    Persson said the police car, which was being driven by one of the bodyguards, had left Stockholm and was heading south when it veered into the path of the truck. Both vehicles then burst into flames. The accident occurred near Markaryd, 100 kilometers (60 miles) northeast of Malmo, Sweden’s third-largest city.

    “There is nothing else for now that indicates that it was something else but a traffic accident,” Persson told a press conference.

    Sweden’s top police chief, Anders Thornberg, said an investigation would take place, but was expected “to take a relatively long time.”

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  78. JimB says:
    @Thomm

    I always wondered how the woke lunatics would wedge their way into astronomy. This answers that question.

    Where have you been? Woke lunatics wedged their way into astronomy in 2015 when they got UC Berkeley to cancel exoplanetary pioneer Geoff Marcy over complaints from fan girl former students who changed their minds and decided Geoff’s accessibility and willingness to support women scientists were really creepy sexual harassment. Marcy was knocked off track to get a Nobel prize.

    • Replies: @JimB
  79. epebble says:

    One possible answer is that civilizations tend to destroy themselves through mechanisms such as environmental damage and nuclear war

    They mention nuclear war and not impact due to superbolides? Strange. We have evidence on earth (K-Pg extinction); don’t even have to look at the Moon (or Mercury, looking at recent pictures).

  80. Jack D says:
    @That Would Be Telling

    I guess Reif is as “outsider” as you can get. Not only are none of his degrees from MIT but he is from Venezuela also and speaks with a distinct Spanish accent (son of Jews who got out of E. Europe in the late ’30s.) Apparently when he left Venezuela to do grad school at Stanford he spoke little to no English.

    OTOH, by the time he became the head of MIT he had been there for 32 years so at what point do you lose your “outsider” status?

    MIT , located in super blue Cambridge, certainly is woke but not as woke as it could be. The vast majority of undergrads are STEM majors and there are very few places for 105 IQ Kendi type guys to hide. Of course they do AA but their AA consists mostly of taking blacks with low 700s SATs instead of high 700s SATs like the white people and 800s like the Asians. Maybe these blacks should really be at Northeastern and not MIT but they are not totally unqualified.

  81. Anonymous[140] • Disclaimer says:

    Maybe the explanation for Fermi’s Paradox isn’t nuclear war or environmental damage, it’s Wokeness.

    Uh, sure Steve. It’s that and not another word beginning with “W” but ending with “men.”

    FAANG has got to be champing at the bit to hire some of these “DEI workers” off Twitter after the WSJ glamour profile of that Midwestern MBA lady who leaked Instaberg’s corrupt-the-young Powerpoints. “Equity” has the sound of a popular girl’s name by 2030 in the Anglo-she-who-must-be-obeyed-sphere. There’ll be so much building back better, you’ll be tired of your bettering

  82. Fox says:

    Of course, this account leaves out the fact that about 5000 German university professors were purged directly after the war, i.e., lost their job and were forbidden to work not only in their field of specialty in Germany. In addition, Germans had not any longer a seat in the Nobel Committees. This, all the while the Allies carried off and disappeared into their own secret chambers German patents, forced German scientists to write FIAT reports (these were accounts of research in Germany from industry, government programs to academia). In addition German scientists, manufacturing and production methods, industrial works were taken and transferred to east, west, and as far away as Australia. On top of it, the most sweeping program of book burning occurred after the war at the hand of the Allies.
    So. did German intellectual accomplishments actually suffer during the time of the NS? Perhaps the fact that German universities are now at most mediocre is owed to the effects of wholesale destruction, purges and confiscation, tying Germans’ hands at every turn and not to the loss of ‘valuable talent during the years 1933- 1945’.

    • Replies: @Inselaffen
  83. @JohnnyWalker123

    In Austria pretty much anyone can get in to university, but you have to demonstrate some competence in German, which tends to reduce the DEI factor significantly.

    Another aspect of many programs in Austria is that they will let anyone in, but then flunk low performers out after Year 1. That actually strikes me as a very fair way to provide “equality of opportunity”.

    Of course, in the US that wouldn’t work because the diverse people who flunk out would no doubt sue the university for not providing them enough emotional support, grading unfairly, etc.

  84. Lurker says:
    @2BR

    Very smart and bold move to tie the Left obsession with race to the Nazi obsession with race

    No it isn’t. It never works. Ever.

    No leftist ever got cancelled, fired or vilified or changed their mind because someone on the right said they were a ‘nazi’ or a ‘racist’.

    Sure, you’ll get some love from a few conservatives but that’s all. It has no effect on the left whatsoever.

  85. Jack D says:
    @Daniel H

    his grandparents got out or Croatia while the going was still good.

    Depends what you mean by “still good”. Tito’s people did not look kindly on Croats who had collaborated with the Nazis so if you got out with your life and the clothes on your back that would count as good. Italy is not far away by land or sea. The border was, especially in the immediate post-war days, not as tightly sealed as for example the W/E German border would become later and the Catholic Church was sympathetic.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  86. @Jack D

    This sequence reminds me of Norm Macdonald’s joke about the time that Marlon Brando got in trouble for saying that the Jews controlled Hollywood.

    Joel Stein wrote a remarkably frank piece on this topic in 2008. It begins:

    I have never been so upset by a poll in my life. Only 22% of Americans now believe “the movie and television industries are pretty much run by Jews,” down from nearly 50% in 1964. The Anti-Defamation League, which released the poll results last month, sees in these numbers a victory against stereotyping. Actually, it just shows how dumb America has gotten. Jews totally run Hollywood.

    https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2008-dec-19-oe-stein19-story.html

    • Replies: @Francis Miville
  87. 2BR says:
    @Lurker

    Well yes, it will not get anyone fired (I agree 100%) but it seems to drive them a bit mad. They certainly hate it. This woman called it out for special attention. I would keep doing it just for that. And there may be some non-political types, live and let live, in the audience, who might just begin to think about it.

    Seeing the accusers in the mob themselves accused of witchcraft has its satisfactions.

  88. Good to hear. Bloviating about life on other planets is pure speculation and doesn’t belong in the science department of any legitimate university. There is no, zero evidence here on Earth that life ever has or ever could spontaneously arise from a puddle somewhere. Stupid!

  89. Old Prude says:
    @2BR

    I always get a kick out of inking a swastika on the forehead of whatever lefty’s photo is on the front page of the newspaper laying around in the break room.

    Like you say, 2BR: It makes them crazy. A politician here in Maine compared our leftist governor to Dr. Mengele in reference to vaccine mandates. The screeching was heard a few states away.

    The nazis were assholes, and these woke folks are, too; I think its completely fair and reasonable to call them out as such.

    That having been said, one must have a somewhat refined sense of irony when using the broken cross to mock one’s enemies. I wouldn’t spray paint it anywhere…

  90. J1234 says:

    “…posted several youtube videos expressing similar harmful views…MIT, you gonna fix this?”

    Nope, nothing very Nazi-like about that sentiment.

  91. JimB says:
    @JimB

    Marcy was knocked off track to get a Nobel prize.

    The Nobel prize committee shoehorned in James Peebles to take Marcy’s place in 2019 award recognizing the discovery of exoplanets.

  92. Diversity

    The Religion of White Genocide

    Imported starting in Oct 1965….The passage of the 1965 Native Born White American Extermination Act…

    • Agree: Ben tillman
  93. The Lizard-Aliens who run the Cabal didn’t want this dude potentially publicly pinpointing their points of origin in an academic setting where he might have some impact. They figure he can take to wearing a tin-foil hat and giving his lecture on park benches now that he has been academically cancelled.

  94. jb says:

    Is there any particular reason to think that the cancellation of the lecture was related somehow to the Newsweek article? If there is it should have been included in this post. As far as we know the cancellation may have had nothing to do with wokeness.

    • Replies: @gandydancer
  95. Ragno says:

    For a good decade or more, the glass-half-full contingent has clung to the hard-sciences rigor of MIT as the sword and shield, if not the last standing bulwark, against socialist chaos (and subsequent collapse that would follow).

    Maybe it’s time we stop pretending sanity and stability are right around the corner (thus there’s no real cause for alarm): MIT has fallen, and the glass that was once half-full is now cracked and filthy and crawling with lichen – even if it were full to the top, you’d have to be a lunatic to hold it up to your mouth.

    Do you want peace and prosperity? Then prepare for war and mobocracy. The Left already has.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
  96. Look like she’s locked her Twitter account.

  97. @Escher

    Minoritarianism–a middle man minority ideology–is logically ridiculous and self-destructive to any entity–nation, community, race, civilization–that absorbs it.

    But what we’ve seen in the past decade or two is just how destructive it is to super-charge that with women’s “you can’t say that!” mentality.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  98. Anonymous[950] • Disclaimer says:
    @blake121666

    Yikes.

    Poor little loser. She’s going to have a tough week on the internets. Particularly when they focus on her poor chicklets teeth. Her memes will be many. If she can afford MIT, why can’t she afford a competent dentist? Her teeth are rural Chinese hillbilly.

    You’d think the old Chinese communist cliche of outing people for discipline by those in power would be something she’d want to avoid. Too many Americans really still do hate that here. Especially real Chinese Americans who busted their asses to make it here. They reeeeally hate that shit.

    Would anyone with a brain want to work with her knowing she could go “body snatchers” at her whim? You’re digging up dirt samples at some shithole moonscape in the Andes, you say something off the cuff, next thing you know, this crazy bitch is pointing and screaming, her chicklet nubbins extending out of her bleeding gum line. Not a pretty picture.

  99. @blake121666

    Should be baking cookies.

    Seriously, her PhD program indicates she has some smarts. She looks healthy and attractive enough. She’d make a fine wife for some nerd boy.

    She is studying something reasonable and interesting. But somewhere along the way she decided paleo-climate wasn’t melting her butter, and she was drawn to something more emotionally feminine–and sadly we have this DIE crap available.

    She–and we–would be much better off if she–and all the others like her–were getting their feminine emotional fix in the biologically appropriate manner–by getting knocked up and popping out some babies. The emotional fix from that is a hell of a lot bigger and better than DIE, and actually socially positive instead of destructive.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @mc23
  100. Jack D says:
    @AnotherDad

    Minoritarianism–a middle man minority ideology

    Did you have any particular “middle man minority” in mind? You sound like the Nazis who used to prattle on about Jew Bolshevism. Using thinly veiled euphemisms doesn’t make it better. Some Jews support what you call Minoritarianism. Others don’t. OTOH, there are plenty of non-Jews who do support it.

    If Minoritarianism is bad then it doesn’t need any more adjectives and condemn its supporters regardless of race, creed or color and don’t focus on any particular group of them. The Biden Administration is sort of the last hurrah of the Jewish liberals. From now on, it’s going to be AOC and Rashida Talib and Coates and Kendi. None of these people particularly like Jews any more than you do.

  101. @El Dato

    “HAL 9000 is given a male personality.”

    An effeminate, passive-aggressive male personality. I’d rather a butch lesbian run the ship.

    “the True Message of Kubrick:”

    You’ll never figure out my lighting tricks.

  102. From now on, it’s going to be AOC and Rashida Talib and Coates and Kendi.

    I think you exaggerate their real weight, significance & endurance.

    • Agree: mc23
  103. @Lurker

    No leftist ever got cancelled, fired or vilified or changed their mind because someone on the right said they were a ‘nazi’ or a ‘racist’.

    But didn’t you hear what happened to Justin Trudeau and Ralph Northam?

    • LOL: Ben tillman
  104. As a once-proud alum of MIT, it is pathetic to see what’s happened to the leadership of the school.

    Contrast this with what the President of The University of Chicago (where Abbot teaches) said when the Dorian Abbot thing blew up there about ten months ago:

    From time to time, faculty members at the University share opinions and scholarship that provoke spirited debate and disagreement, and in some cases offend members of the University community.

    As articulated in the Chicago Principles, the University of Chicago is deeply committed to the values of academic freedom and the free expression of ideas, and these values have been consistent throughout our history. We believe universities have an important role as places where novel and even controversial ideas can be proposed, tested and debated. For this reason, the University does not limit the comments of faculty members, mandate apologies, or impose other disciplinary consequences for such comments, unless there has been a violation of University policy or the law. Faculty are free to agree or disagree with any policy or approach of the University, its departments, schools or divisions without being subject to discipline, reprimand or other form of punishment.

    https://president.uchicago.edu/from-the-president/announcements/112920-free-expression

    That’s what any grown-up should want the president of their university to say.

    • Thanks: Voltarde
    • Replies: @Hibernian
  105. @pyrrhus

    That’s above my life span.

  106. Completely OT, but Not The Bee claims that the “Otago Daily Times,” apparently some Kiwi rag, reports that the transgender gal/guy who competed women’s weightlifting in the Olympics has been named “Otago Sportswoman of the Year.”
    The Daily Times paper also notes, in what must be an act of subversion by its editors, that “The 43-year-old was eliminated from the event when she [sic] failed to make a successful lift in the snatch.”

    There is a really good joke there somewhere, but in my dim way, I cannot quite grasp it.

    No snatch, no medal.
    Eliminated for not having a snatch…etc.
    All contributions are welcome.

  107. Well, at least they’re not Brutalist.

  108. Jack D says:
    @Lurker

    It has no effect on the left whatsoever.

    Of course it has no effect on the True Believers. They are (by definition) absolutely convinced of the rightness of their cause. If you ask them to consider whether they are the baddies, they will dismiss you out of hand without a moment’s consideration.

    However, the Left does not consist only of True Believers. There are still some folks, mostly older, who grew up in a different America and it’s good to instill doubt in them about the excesses in their own party. Maybe you can’t talk to AOC but you can talk to Joe Manchin. If people like that don’t every hear from other sane people they may begin to buy completely into the Woke talk.

  109. Clyde says:
    @Jack D

    He is like a broken record with his minoritarianism. I got his point after the first three times. Now I mostly skim past Another Dud. He’s run out of material.

  110. Clyde says:

    From MIT’s official website, accessed via the Wayback Machine as of September 13, 2021:

    The John Carlson Lecture

    I get the joke. Due to run amuck Wokism you have to use the Wayback Machine to get something from two weeks ago, instead of seven years ago.

  111. https://www.yahoo.com/news/facebook-whistleblower-says-mark-zuckerberg-050000571.html

    A former Facebook employee who has leaked internal documents to the press revealed herself on Sunday and shared more critiques about the social media giant and its chief executive.

    In an interview with “60 Minutes,” Frances Haugen described the harm she believes is perpetuated by Facebook, including not properly addressing hate on the platform, contributing to eating disorders and suicidal thoughts, and making decisions in its own best interest rather than that of the public.

    She called out founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg, saying his actions cause harm despite his initial intentions for Facebook.

    “I have a lot of empathy for Mark,” she said, adding that he “never set out to make a hateful platform.”

    “But he has allowed choices to be made where the side effects of those choices are that hateful, polarizing content gets more distribution and more reach,” Haugen said.

    Normal people, when they take notice of FB, complain about its censorship.

    The majority, perhaps, complain that there is no censorship enough ….

  112. We’re always hearing that the US has the “best” universities in the world because they are so diverse and attract the best talent in the world. The same people who do the ratings drink the bathwater of the administrators of those same universities and vice-versa, so how can we believe anything they say.
    The statement that German universities 90 years ago were fantastic just like American universities today, is the giveaway. Germany, 90 years ago was in the time of the Weimar Republic, one of the darkest times in German history, high unemployment, high inflation, a society that was basically being torn apart with the left fighting the right in the streets, very similar to the United States today. A society on the verge of collapse.

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    , @2BR
  113. @blake121666

    ‘Christine’ Chen is writing in a White language, has an adopted White name, is wearing a clothing style invented by Whites, lives in a White land, studies in an educational system developed by Whites, and sticks her nose into the White culture war. She’s an obnoxious Westernophile.

    Very poor form for a guest.

  114. @Jack D

    Looks like AOC found out who funds her campaign and writes her positions during that teary eyed “present” vote on funding Israeli defenses.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  115. MIT Cancels Lecture on Exoplanets’ Climates Over the Scientist’s Lack of Faith in DEI

    Would they dare do this if the lecture was on our own planet’s climate? Irresistable fad hits immovable belief.

  116. @Jack D

    “Forget it, Jack. It’s gornisht helfen.”

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
  117. @Jack D

    Italy is not far away by land or sea. The border was, especially in the immediate post-war days, not as tightly sealed as for example the W/E German border would become later and the Catholic Church was sympathetic.

    There is a funicular-tram line between Trieste and Opicina on the border with Sežana. It would not only have been possible to leave, it would have been rather entertaining to do so.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  118. Joseph A. says:

    They deserve their mediocrity.

  119. @Fox

    It’s pretty obvious the main reason German universities suffered was because of the destruction unleashed during WWII rather than prewar purges.

    That didn’t just affect German Universities but Euro universities in general, Steve himself has speculated in the past that the continent-wide loss of status of Euro universities (including places like the Sorbonne) and dominance of US-UK universities was down to a postwar prestige thing.

    Anyway, these guys are only writing what they did to smear their opponents in a ‘akshually, yuo are teh real Nazis’ kind of way. Personally, I think German Universities would have been just fine even with the purges; maybe some Physics would have taken a little longer to work out, but that loss would be more than offset by the removal of dangerous subversives like Adorno et al (unfortunately, they found a new host where they could spread their tendrils wider…)

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Jack D
  120. @Joe Paluka

    Germany, 90 years ago was in the time of the Weimar Republic, one of the darkest times in German history, high unemployment, high inflation, a society that was basically being torn apart with the left fighting the right in the streets, very similar to the United States today.

    Bad history. The Weimar Republic was a time of significant economic growth from about 1923 to 1929. It collapsed because of the Great Depression and the stubborn and stupid austerity policy of Chancellor Bruening. Far from a dark time, the Weimar Republic was one of extraordinary cultural, scientific and technological creativity. The social unrest was real but also somewhat artificial – stirred up by Soviet agents on the one hand and disgruntled and displaced military officers and monarchists on the other. And outside of certain working class neighborhoods in large cities, street fighting was not a concern in German daily life. Of course, the loss of historical German territories to Slavs and the French were a real humiliation and that probably did more to undermine Weimar legitimacy than any of the factors you mentioned.

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @Joe Paluka
    , @Art Deco
  121. GeneralRipper [AKA "The Griffins"] says:
    @RichardTaylor

    Exactly.

    It’s amazing how stupid and well indoctrinated ( and greedy ) the “well-educated” folks are.

    They lack the common sense of a 10 year old, but they do as they’re told for the most part.

  122. Anonymous[831] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack Armstrong

    The Nobel Prize in the field of physiology or medicine has been awarded to U.S. scientists David Julius and Ardem Patapoutian.

    #NobelsSoWhite

  123. J.Ross says:

    facebook down no DNS possibly all data lost
    facebook down possibly \$7B in value lost
    facebook down mark zuckerberg reacting violently
    GIVE ME BACK MY EAGLES

  124. Anonymous[950] • Disclaimer says:

    Meanwhile, another black Fake Nooser was actually arrested for her fake noosing!

    Apparently, Georgians believe that you can terrorize a black neighborhood, even if you’re black!

    https://thegeorgiagazette.com/douglas/terresha-lucas/

  125. @dearieme

    Cambridge? In 1910? Not even close.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  126. Art Deco says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Your real problem, I regret to say, nearly always starts with a J.

    You mean they’re Jedi-mind tricking all the goy administrators into caving in?

  127. @El Dato

    El, we allow brillant people to be cancelled by nitwits. So sad and real knowledge is also cancelled.

  128. 2BR says:
    @Joe Paluka

    Germany used to file a lot more innovative patents, win a lot more Nobels, have more world famous professors, attract students from all over the world to their universities. Something happened to their universities.

    However Germany today is far wealthier per capita and wealthier relative to the world than it was then. So does it matter that their universities are not #1? Doesn’t seem to. Other things: efficiency, low military spending, hard work, decent universities, good engineering, a smart monetary policy, smart currency policy seem to matter even more. Not to say we do not need great innovative universities but it is not the only thing.

  129. Jack D says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    I think if you look the train they might check your papers. It was more like sneaking across the border on foot at night, which was doable. Nowadays with EU and Schengen, the border barely exists – you’re driving down the street and you see a little “Italia” sign and that’s how you know you’ve crossed the border. If you blink you might not notice. It’s really crazy in relation to what it was like during the Cold War, although Yugoslavia was never as locked down as other Communist countries.

  130. As noted in the second comment above, DIE stands for “diversity, equity, and inclusion”. But you can’t actually assume everyone knows this, Steve. I had to look it up, since you didn’t explicate this.

  131. Jack D says:
    @Professional Slav

    Those weren’t exactly tears of joy. Her heart said vote no but her wallet said vote present. I don’t know who that fooled. Yes, it turns out that she really needs Jews for the present but this is only going to deepen her resentment and make her look forward to (and try to speed the day) when she doesn’t.

  132. @Jack Armstrong

    I remember the rightwing Austrian leader Jorg Haider died in a car crash, too.

    Someone sabotaged the steering? Was the bodyguard at the wheel called Ahmed or Mohammed, perhaps?

    an investigation would take place, but was expected “to take a relatively long time.”

    Maybe 50 years? They never solved the Olaf Palme murder AFAIK.

    Meanwhile, this noose is bad noose.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-10057379/Givenchy-criticised-featuring-necklace-resembling-NOOSE-Paris-Fashion-Week-collection.html

    It’s Black History Month in the UK, so here’s a bit of Black History.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murders_of_Channon_Christian_and_Christopher_Newsom

    If anyone’s into volcanos, the firework show on La Palma in the Canary Islands is spectacular.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  133. @Stogumber

    The only name of a scientist which is is endlessly repeated is Einstein – but Einstein’s creative years were already gone.

    How many people can name any other 20th Century scientist? You objection here is ludicrous as anyone who’s studied The Making of the Atomic Bomb would know; for example see below.

    As for the other specialists of nuclear warfaring, Germany would have had enough of them to do its own bomb if only the government had agreed.

    The scientists made too many mistakes, in a condition of serious war where the attention of German leadership was focused elsewhere. This ranges from sending out invitation to the wrong seminar/presentation to dismissing graphite as a moderator without trying hard enough to purify it of neutron poisons, something we had a devil of a time doing. That narrowed their reactor effort to heavy water, which I’m sure we’re all familiar with was thoroughly sabotaged. A really big problem was Heisenberg having too much influence, he wasn’t practical enough.

    As far as I know no one else had the fast neutrons insight that was described in the Frisch–Peierls memorandum, it had to be stolen or proof of us making devices small enough to drop from airplanes forced it. Peierls was born in Berlin, happened to be working in the Cavendish Laboratory at the University of Cambridge which the Nazis came to power which was a if not the happening place for a lot of the relevant basic physics experimentation like the discovery of the neutron (Wikipedia says 30 Nobelists came out of that lab, although that would include Watson and Crick for DNA). Frisch was born in Vienna.

    As Jews, the former decided not to return, the latter was forced out of his position and worked in the U.K., then five years with Bohr, and then back to the U.K. just before the war broke out. Frisch also prior to that had worked out with his aunt, also forced out of her academic position, how fission worked, gave it that name etc. after the aunt was the first recipient of former collaborator Otto Hahn’s radiochemistry work demonstrated nothing else could be happening when uranium was bombarded with neutrons.

  134. @SafeNow

    SafeNow, a young man from a blue state or red state could have whatever he wanted at U of Alabama if he started on their number one ranked football team…Roll Tide.

    • LOL: SafeNow
  135. @Anon

    White men at universities have not learned the fine art of keeping their mouths shut while making occasional mm-hmm noises when some crazy obsessive is going on about their opinions.

    Men have been doing it to their wives for generations. It’s a basic survival skill in life.

    It’s also completely incompatible with being a productive scientist, with very rare exceptions that prove the rule.

  136. Rob says:

    I’ve said this before and have not gotten any feedback, which could mean people agree, disagree, or think it’s just boring, but the reason the elite is all in on DIE is because “meritocracy” does not hold water with non-Asian minorities. If you are black, you are likely full Dunning-Kruger, and do not realize that your dumb, but you know “you don’t test well.” To NAMs, all meritocracy means is “not them.” White people have mostly accepted that very unequal societies resulting from meritocracy is “fair.” Minorities will make no such concession. Whether working-class and formerly middle-class whites will continue to believe meritocracy is “fair” when the elite drone on about how the SAT just measures privilege remains to be seen. The Coleman Scholastic non-Aptitude Test that has flayed the skin off of the SAT and wears it as a suit.

    [MORE]

    Regardless of how non-elite whites think, minorities both want in on the ruling class and do not recognize the current selection process as valid. That’s a mighty unstable situation to have in your dramatically unequal and rigged society. Right now, the various brands of non-whites can think that once more of their brethren have arrived, whites will be knocked off their pedestal. That is likely the case for lower whites, who thrive on a free society with competent neighbors and coworkers. But elite whites are not going anywhere. They will rule in progressive Hell. Eventually, as whites are a smaller and smaller minority, but the productive class of the country is shrinking, for some reason, non-whites will realize that expanding the brand has not and will never make them elite.

    They will not be happy. They need to be in on the system in lower levels. That means AAed into jobs they could not keep on merit. That’s a feature, not a bug. They are not meant to “grow” into the job. When the elite, DIE-loving white establishment falls, all those associate assistant director of being Mexican jobs are going away. They will never come back. That puts the relatively high ability minorities in the elite tent, but not not part of the elite.

    Right where the establishment wants them.

  137. The struggle is real.

  138. Going for a stroll.

    • Replies: @Prester John
  139. @pyrrhus

    What’s the over/under on how long the approaching Dark Age lasts? I’ll guess 500 years…

    There isn’t going to be a “dark age”.

    The East Asians in one form or another will keep chugging along. Europeans let the cat out of the bag. Any nation with competent people–some combo of IQ and conscientiousness–can keep chugging along just fine, if they don’t swallow the minoritarian swill. (And minoritarianism is at root a Jewish attack on white gentiles, which has been effective because of some combo of our genetics and Christian culture. It is logically ridiculous–self-cancellation–and no Asian culture is really going to buy it, though they may have problems with fertility and then immigration.)

    No what we’re facing is not a dark age, but the a failure of white gentiles to police their culture and demographics, which if not halted will simply mean the end of the West period.

    • Agree: ziggurat
  140. @JMcG

    Some European homes will be using candles for light, at least some of the time, within twenty years.

    Never mind Europeans, I had to do that in California last year during the shutoffs, for a week at a time..

    I searched Larry Elder’s website for any mention of this, but he was apparently too PC to bring it up. Instead the one ad I say from him nattered on about some (D) tax increase, as if the voters hadn’t already priced that in when Gov. Gruesome was elected in a landslide. Elder used his 5 min of fame as the leading choice to replace Gruesome to natter on about charter schools and the Welfare State. ..zzzzzzzz….

    • Replies: @JMcG
  141. Anonymous[472] • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel H

    Most Croats in Latin America, especially the large community in Chile, are actually descendants of 19th century migrants. So more like his great-great-grandparents moved to Chile when they couldn’t take the hunger anymore. They’ve been there for many generations and are by now only part Croat, and usually don’t know or care much about that heritage, except for the elderly who were born at a time when people still preferred to marry within the community.

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian
  142. @Jack D

    Jack we agree all sorts of people have absorbed and are acolytes of minoritarianism. (If you are a minority there’s a certain logic to that although it may not actually be beneficial for you long term–if you wreck your nation for your children. If you are a good white, there have been and are now very strong social, psychological and career drivers.)

    But you–being Jewish–are simply in denial that American Jews have been the creators and leading ideologues and propagandists of minoritarianism driving it to success in the United States and out to the world. (Again, being a minority and given their history that most Jews thought/think it is “what’s good for the Jews” isn’t really a big surprise.)

    Both the timeline of the rise of minoritarianism in the US, and its quite quite different nature from early 20th century WASP progressivism–which i’d sum up as “everyone should behave like a middle class WASP”–are my evidence. Beyond that you’re talking about intellectual history–names and ideas.

    I have no confusion that a lot of success of minoritarianism as an ideology in the US and broader West relate the the genetic nature of white gentiles–openness, highest affective-empathy in the world, (de-tribalized) individualism–and Christian universalism and ideas of fairness. It has a lot less traction in other regions of the world.

    But as to it’s source. Pretty clear to me.

    In short: we just disagree.

  143. OT? A brand called Crazy Gringa sounds admirably diverse to me. Sadly, it is not long for this world.

    Omaha Farmers Market favorite calling it quits after 8 years of ‘Keeping it Spicy’

    When St George ale was discontinued in 2007, I went around to various stores to fetch the last bottles. Unsurprisingly, other brewers have jumped at the chance to use the name. It’s like Jamaican Me Crazy coffee.

  144. @AnotherDad

    But as to [its] source. Pretty clear to me.

    And to St Paul.

  145. @jb

    As far as we know the cancellation may have had nothing to do with wokeness.

    Well, we do. See https://legalinsurrection.com/2021/10/mit-cancels-lecture-by-u-chicago-geophysicist-dorian-abbot-over-under-pressure-from-campus-mob/

    I thought Sailer was remarkably cavalier about establishing the connection between the tweet and the cancellation, as well a failing to footnote where he got the idea for this post from. And, as I noted already, he didn’t even bother to explain the acronym “DEI”. All in all, a slapdash effort, but it was at least a heads-up to us and I will not complain further. Perhaps there were time pressures.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
  146. @AnotherDad

    A corollary:

    Everyone has more difficulty being objective about themselves, their family, their ethnic group. But i’d say Jews are out in front in that on the “ethnic group” department.

    Jack, you’re a fairly big Jewish cheerleader on Steve’s pages. The “1/3 of Nobel Prizes” thing comes to mind. Occasionally, you lapse close to “mud huttism”–i.e. if it wasn’t for us … (Laughable considering American Jews are overwhelmingly descended from people who arrived after the US was already the nation with the largest economy and highest living standard in the world.)

    But when it comes to cultural and political matters, somehow the Jews … didn’t do nuthin’.

    It doesn’t come across anymore credibly than the black version.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  147. Who is this Chen woman anyway?

  148. JimB says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Captain Kirk, now 90 years old, is slated to go to space on October 12:

    Yes, but he’s traveling only 60 miles above the earth at less than shuttle craft velocities so he won’t have to worry about being ensnared in the Tholian’s web

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
  149. @Gary in Gramercy

    “Forget it, Jack. It’s gornisht helfen.”

    Hope springs eternal.

  150. @The Wild Geese Howard

    An example of cinematic whitewashing. Chandra was Indian in the novel but American (ambiguously Jewish?) in the movie.

    HAL’s voice actor was Canadian. Kubrick originally hired Martin Balsam but decided that he sounded too American. If I’m not mistaken, many of the key members of the cast (including the actors portraying Poole and Borman) were Canadian as well.

    SAL was voiced by Candice Bergen. Again, in the novel, the character had an Indian accent.

    Bergen’s voice is not unappealing. I’d rather listen to her than the Wells Fargo customer-service rep in Bangalore.

    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
  151. The Fermi Paradox resolved: at some point, every intelligent species allows their females to vote. Shortly, thereafter, civilization collapses.

  152. @Prester John

    Next Monday is the thirtieth anniversary of Foxx’s death. He suffered a heart attack on the set of … the show he was working on at the time. Everyone laughed because they thought it was just another variation on his “It’s the big one!” routine.

  153. @Bardon Kaldian

    The Manhattan project is frequently presented as some sort of almost miracle, but it is evident any country with so much resources and safe from others’ interference would do it too.

    Getting it done before the end of the war was no mean feat of science, engineering and superb management once Leslie Groves was put in charge of it, and picked the unlikely Oppenheimer to head up the bomb portion of it, one of a huge number of correct decisions he made. There are a huge number of ways it could have failed or gone down a wrong path; really, you should read the book by Rhodes and then Groves’ Now It Can Be Told.

    Besides the graphite moderator purity issue I’ve mentioned, suppose the first reactor to be built at the U. of Chicago due to a union strike had a meltdown (Fermi was too careful and paranoid). Suppose insufficient margin had been designed into the Hanford reactors to that allowed them to accommodate neutron poisons during operation?

    Implosion was hard, but required for reactor bred plutonium, and they didn’t know that until they got their first shipment from Hanford. One key to getting it right the first time for Trinity was using an ultra-radioactive isotope of I forget what they also bred to film at very high speed the actual implosion process minus the plutonium. Also required some hard math that couldn’t be solved, had to be approximated with the computers of the day, women operating electromechanical scientific calculators. I can go on….

  154. Hibernian says:
    @Thomm

    It is safe to say that nearly 100% of the people interested in the finer points of exoplanets are male, yet the female SJW is the one canceling him.

    A girl who was a high school and college classmate of mine in the early to mid ’70s graduated from college (Iowa State) with a degree in Physics concentrating in astrophysics and became a computer programmer at the National Radio Astronomy lab in WV and then just plain computer programmer.

  155. Hibernian says:
    @Recently Based

    U of C has plenty of its own problems with Wokeness.

    • Replies: @Recently Based
  156. @Bardon Kaldian

    Cambridge? In 1910? Not even close.

    For experimental physics? You could make a very good case for the Cavendish Laboratory. With one of the founders being James Clerk Maxwell in 1874, that’s where the electron was discovered in 1897, Wikipedia also mentions the cloud chamber which initially perfected in 1911. But it did take Rutherford becoming the director in 1919 to really take off and discover a great deal of the most basic physics associated with things nuclear. Using generally rather very simple apparatus, it’s an amazing story. Again, you need to read Rhodes’ The Making of the Atomic Bomb, the first half covers the foundation of the scientific developments that led to it.

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  157. Art Deco says:
    @Inselaffen

    It’s pretty obvious the main reason German universities suffered was because of the destruction unleashed during WWII rather than prewar purges.

    It isn’t a reason at all. War reconstruction was complete in West Germany by 1959 and levels of per capita product by that time were as high as they had ever been and had returned to those expected from long term trend lines. This was true in Britain and in France as well.

  158. OT: The black Ozy grifter was on the Today show this morning. I changed channels as soon as he said “I didn’t know about that”, or something.

    From a former employee, “The classic demographic for Ozy was a retired female white teacher who used Ozy to stay young and stay woke and loved learning about the world from it,” the former employee said.”

  159. Jack D says:
    @AnotherDad

    I’d be ok with Jews taking the blame for our current predicament in the same % as they take Nobel Prizes (which BTW is more like 20% than 1/3, but still remarkable given that Jews are a tiny fraction of the population). It’s for the same reason (and the flip side of why blacks are 10x overrepresented as murderers) – Jews find themselves in high places in a meritocratic society because of their high IQ. It seems to me that certain people (you included) assign 100% of the blame to Jews and never name names as to who is responsible for the other 80%. People go looking for all sorts of social and environmental and religious and whatever reasons when it is all basically predetermined by HBD. This is why no amount of government tinkering ever seems to change the outcomes.

    Look the US existed without the Jews in significant #s ( the colonial population of Jews was tiny and Sephardic and not big enough to run the entire slave trade) and would exist in the future without them too. Germany has done well without many Jews post WWII (although its universities never regained their prewar prominence). Jews were never that involved with heavy industry such as the car business in either the US or Germany (although “Mercedes” was the daughter of an early French Jewish backer of Daimler). However it is undeniable that in certain fields (maybe 1st and foremost nuclear weapons) having Jews speeded up the process by at least a couple of years if not permanently (and losing a million GIs in the invasion of Japan would not have been chopped liver).

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  160. Jack D says:
    @Inselaffen

    maybe some Physics would have taken a little longer to work out

    Or maybe never. Deutsche Physik was opposed to Einstein’s Theory of Relativity and quantum mechanics and maintained the existence of the luminiferous aether. This is like saying that it would have taken “a little longer” to get to the moon if we rejected the work of Galileo and Newton.

  161. Jack D says:
    @AnotherDad

    I have no confusion that a lot of success of minoritarianism as an ideology in the US and broader West relate the the genetic nature of white gentiles–openness, highest affective-empathy in the world, (de-tribalized) individualism–and Christian universalism and ideas of fairness.

    And you’re the one who keeps saying that people can’t be objective about their own people. You’re also like the guy at the job interview who, when asked what is worst quality is, say “I tend to work too hard.” You also make white people sound like rubes who easily get the wool pulled over their eyes by the clever Jews. I don’t think that the Anglo-Saxons who conquered North America and pushed out not only the Indians but the Dutch, the French, the Spanish and everyone else did so by being a bunch of overly trusting rubes. Put it this way – if you were to ask Native Americans what the # attribute of white people is, would they say “Christian universalism and ideas of fairness”?

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  162. @James N. Kennett

    They would have answered yes they do at 82% but 60% obey the law of omerta.

  163. the Negroes may be at an advantage now. Bottom line: no one wants to live with them, especially Hispanics. Long term, Negroes lose–big time

  164. @That Would Be Telling

    As much as I appreciate Rutherford, Thomson, Kelvin, Ramanujan, …(I am speaking of the Belle Epoque)- they pale in comparison with Planck, Einstein, Sommerfeld, Hilbert, Hermann Weyl, Minkowski, Caratheodory, Felix Klein, Hausdorff, Cantor, Roentgen, ..

  165. mc23 says:
    @AnotherDad

    She hasn’t figured out that would be the most important thing she will do in her life, same as the rest of us.

  166. @Jack D

    maybe some Physics would have taken a little longer to work out

    Or maybe never. Deutsche Physik was opposed to Einstein’s Theory of Relativity and quantum mechanics and maintained the existence of the luminiferous aether.

    Except of course Deutsche Physik didn’t really get that far, and classical physics was in the meantime sufficient to continue to accomplish a great deal. Didn’t help that they targeted Heisenberg, who in addition to his stature had gone to school with Himmler as I recall, and a phone call from Hisenberg’s mother to Himmler’s mother really got things rolling in the wrong direction for them.

    One general thing to remember is that the Nazis were a lot more pragmatic than polemicists like to paint them, Hitler believed Germany was in an 11th hour predicament and wasn’t excessively particular about people willing to help, as long as they weren’t Jewish or made jokes about him.

  167. @That Would Be Telling

    Be as it may- it happened due to a confluence of circumstances, the most important among them putting the right type of manager in the right place, similar with Speer & armament in Germany.

  168. @Jack D

    I’d be ok with Jews taking the blame for our current predicament in the same % as they take Nobel Prizes

    Weyl and Possony totaled up the many fields in which American Jews were overrepresented, often by a factor of 4- or 5-1. But in the interest of honesty, they had to admit that their 11-1 ratio in Communist Party membership was problematic.

    In their defense, though, Irishmen and Finns were also overrepresented in the CPUSA– Gus Hall was a Finn. One common thread is that discontents in America couldn’t “go home”, because someone else controlled their country of birth. Many Germans and Italians did go back.

    The Geography of Intellect

  169. Mr. Anon says:

    MIT Technology Review is the most sickening globalist rag you can imagine. It looks like the kind of thing that Klaus Schwab would read while holding it in one hand, in a closet.

    • Agree: Recently Based
  170. Hermes says:
    @Herp McDerp

    Didn’t Derbyshire do a column on this once? These nonwhite women get boosted by affirmative action into fields where they’re supposedly “underrepresented,” on the justification that their “diverse” perspectives will strengthen the field and lead to even better original research and new breakthroughs. But once they get rubber-stamped with their Ph.D., they proceed to build a career in which they don’t actually advance the field at all, but rather all their “research” and teaching is about how to get more women and nonwhites into the field.

  171. @Jack D

    ‘…You also make white people sound like rubes who easily get the wool pulled over their eyes by the clever Jews…’

    They seem to.

    But maybe I’ll be proved wrong. We’ll see.

  172. @That Would Be Telling

    A continuing mystery is how Iran, which has produced some pretty decent engineers, is still laboring after 20 years to produce a fission bomb given that the Manhattan group did it with slide rules, log tables, and a theory that it might be possible. Is the whole Iran-is-on-the-brink- of -joining-the-nuclear-club just propaganda designed to justify military/intelligence/corporate budgets, he asked rhetorically?

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  173. Jack D says:
    @dearieme

    There was no “system” in Germany. There were individual universities that were great – certainly on par with Cambridge if not ahead. Göttingen with Hilbert and Born and where Oppenheimer went to study after a mixed experience at Cambridge. In 1933, Born, Victor Goldschmidt, James Franck, Eugene Wigner, Leó Szilárd, Edward Teller, Edmund Landau, Emmy Noether, and Richard Courant were all ousted from Göttingen as Jews. This group alone was half the Manhattan Project and outweighed the Cambridge gang.

    According to legend, following the great purge, Hilbert met with Bernhard Rust, the Nazi minister of education. Rust asked, “How is mathematics at Göttingen, now that it is free from the Jewish influence?” Hilbert replied, “There is no mathematics in Göttingen anymore.”

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
  174. @Doctor Lugoff

    A continuing mystery is how Iran, which has produced some pretty decent engineers, is still laboring after 20 years to produce a fission bomb given that the Manhattan group did it with slide rules, log tables, and a theory that it might be possible.

    You left out the hardest part, or a Bohr put it to Teller upon visiting the US, “I told you it couldn’t be done without turning the whole country into a factory.” Getting the weapons grade fissionables required is a massive undertaking.

  175. Will the WokeReich last a thousand years?
    One has one’s doubts.

  176. The Woke zealots, in their utter refusal to debate, to argue and defend their beliefs, and their intractable refutation of the possibility of learning through exchange, are, indeed, Savanarola type obscurants. As is usual, a process of unnatural selection for the most rabid is in full spate, and each new generation of totalitarians is more fanatic than the previous. Inevitably they will turn on each other, then many will become extreme reactionaries, just like the Jewish Trots who transmogrified into neo-conservatives. Imagine an academe replete with David Horowitz clones.

  177. @That Would Be Telling

    Nutterdammerung will be amusing, as they turn on each other. Poor sods.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  178. @That Would Be Telling

    The problem is that Iran is not after a nuke. The Great Leader has declared it ‘unIslamic’, but it is definitely not ‘unJudaic’. Quite the contrary.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  179. ziggurat says:
    @Lurker

    Very smart and bold move to tie the Left obsession with race to the Nazi obsession with race

    No it isn’t. It never works. Ever.

    No leftist ever got cancelled, fired or vilified or changed their mind because someone on the right said they were a ‘nazi’ or a ‘racist’.

    Sure, you’ll get some love from a few conservatives but that’s all. It has no effect on the left whatsoever.

    It is a well-worn meme for the Right to refer to the Left as the “real racists” or “real Nazis”.

    But it does not even persuade the independents or normies. This is because words like “racist” and “Nazi” immediately invoke images of a white guy being mean to a non-white person. Also, it keeps these powerful words in circulation, which supports their story.

    We can flip this around by calling them “anti-white”. Suddenly, they’re the villains in our story, while we’re the heroes defending a group that’s being attacked.

    They can try to defend themselves, but it’s difficult, just as it’s difficult to prove you’re not a racist. “Oh, so some of your best friends are white. Ha, ha.”

    Also, they make it easy. They say things like “whiteness should be erased”. But you can clearly show that if you replace the word “whiteness” with “blackness”, this would sound genocidal. E.g., I read an article that stated that there’s “too much whiteness” in Vermont. But who would say there’s “too much blackness” in Detroit?

    Also, the more that the word “anti-white” is in circulation, the more that whites start to see themselves as a group being attacked. This is the “Sapir-Whorf” hypothesis, which is words create new concepts and perceptions. Suddenly with this new word, whites will be able to see the attacks everywhere.
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/orwells-version-of-sapir-whorf-theory-vindicated/

    If the word “anti-whiteism” sounds silly, then I’m sure “anti-semitism” sounded silly once too. Not anymore. There’s almost nothing worse than being called an “anti-semite” engaged in “anti-semitism”. Someday, “anti-white” and “anti-whiteism” could be that powerful too.

    The word “anti-white” could unite a deracinated race to fight for a just cause. Suddenly, people start thinking about “white” as a group of people that need to work together (internationally) to defend themselves against a common enemy, the anti-whites.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
  180. Fox says:
    @Jack D

    Einstein’s “theory” is in the words of some bad philosophy. Is it physics? To start with a speculative thought, define a constant that is obviously not a constant (c), laugh off cotradictions as “paradoxes” and repeat mantrically that you have a theory. So it has its many difficulties but also a cult status. It certainly has not helped advance human knowledge (or can you give an instance of a field of engineering or any advance based on Einstein’s theory (and I am not talking about the photoelectric effect or his explanation of Brownian motion)?. It seems to be the province of people who fancy themselves an elite.
    Deutsche Physik is now made out to be ridiculous, but is this an argument against it or just the helpless scoffing of ideologues who need to be securely held warm in their cocoon of their beliefs which they like to be guarded by the police and military might?

    Inselaffen’s comments fails to address the effect of dismissing after the war a good part of the German university teaching ad research staff for political reasons and replacing them with malleable, people who had the right attitude, politically, that is. The loss of Einstein was not a blow to German science, but that people like Teller or Oppenheimer learned physics in Germany was a definite a blow to it.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    , @Jack D
  181. JMcG says:
    @gandydancer

    Your point is well made. I plan on spending half my time in this country after retirement, depending on where my kids settle. I’ll have a whole house generator and a 2000 gallon propane tank installed before then. The tank to be buried, of course. I’ll have plenty of candles as well.
    What a hash we’ve made of our inheritance.

  182. JMcG says:
    @That Would Be Telling

    Well, since the A Bomb ended the war, it was naturally finished before war’s end. It’s been a long time since I read Rhodes’ (Terrific) books, but I think he touched on the circumspection that was apparent among the leading scientists when they realized that the bomb wouldn’t be used on Germany, but on Japan.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  183. JMcG says:
    @Jack D

    I don’t disagree Jack, but my physicist buddy has started saying that Dark Matter is starting to look like this century’s Luminiferous aEther. Or perhaps Phlogiston. Interesting times.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  184. @Peter Akuleyev

    I guess it’s how you look at it. I’m not denying that there were innovative things being done in German cinema (Metropolis and Nosferatu) and scientific research was productive (First Sulfa drug Prontosil). A lot of negative things were happening that I think eclipse the positive. A lot of people barely had enough to eat, they were being kicked out their housing by those who had bought up all the real estate at fire sale prices. Pornography was rife, with depraved actors like Peter Lorre acting in films that portrayed child molesters. Representative art became meaningless squiggles and blotches as did architecture, this era brought us the monstrous Bauhaus style which birthed it’s bastard child, Brutalism, which plagues us to the present day. This era also brought us the Frankfurt School whose “intellectuals” escaped Hitler like so many drowning rats and came to the United States to spawn so much of the degeneracy we have in our society today.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  185. @Fox

    This is almost completely wrong. Almost- because I tend to be irritated by Einstein’s publicity stunts. I’m in a good company of Fermi & some others, who found Einstein’s showbiz gags a bit annoying.

    But no informed person denies that Einstein was the last universal physicist, and the part the great physics trinity, along with Newton and Maxwell.

    Einstein’s works- at least a part of them- resulted in quantum field theory, which gives us so much; GRT gives us GPS; then, lasers (stimulated emission); then, EBC in atomic clocks, https://www.nature.com/articles/news.2010.163 and, possibly, in quantum computing; then his influence on the whole solid state physics area: https://arxiv.org/pdf/physics/0508237.pdf

    What is frequently annoying is his public glorification as some universal humanist sage who knew about “deep life stuff”, particularly religion- while he was clueless about these matters. His politics was also frequently naive.

    But- this has nothing to do with his accomplishment.

    And the entire approach is questionable.

    What is of “practical value” in, say, Evariste Galois’ or Sophus Lie’s works? Nothing- until ….

    That’s just the wrong way to tackle these things.

    • Replies: @Fox
  186. Jack D says:
    @mulga mumblebrain

    Iran is not after a nuke.

    Right. All those centrifuges are for peaceful purposes. I make you special deal on rug.

  187. Jack D says:
    @Fox

    or can you give an instance of a field of engineering or any advance based on Einstein’s theory

    Yes. The GPS system is designed to take relativity into account. If relativity was not accounted for then the system would not work.

    http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~pogge/Ast162/Unit5/gps.html

    Relativity has nothing to do with philosophy and is just as sciency as Newtonian physics. It’s real for elites and it’s real for idiots whether you believe in it or not.

    The loss of Einstein was not a blow to German science,

    Those grapes were sour anyway.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @blake121666
  188. Art Deco says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Germany only returned to pre-war standards of living in 1928, just in time for the Depression. The political establishment in Germany managed to ruin its standing with a succession of constituencies – they lost the war, they ejected the German monarchies without popular consent, they instituted a constitution which failed to address important defects in German political life and added some new ones too, they ruined the currency in 1922-23 in a pig headed response to the occupation of the Rhineland, then they refused to devalue the currency during the period running from 1929 to 1932 (while industrial production imploded). Nothing extraordinary at all. Just the flailing about of a ruling class with a propensity for making bad choices.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  189. Jack D says:
    @Art Deco

    But the subsequent experience shows how easy it is to go from bad to worse. That’s why what is happening in Weimaramerica is so scary. When lack of good leadership creates popular discontent, you never know who is going to fill that vacuum. It tends to be a “kicking ass and taking names” kind of guy but will it be a Salazar of Portugal type guy or will it be Hitler?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  190. Brutusale says:
    @Lurker

    I don’t use Nazi or Commie. Subtlety works better.

    When I was picking up the mail at my SWPLville post office last week, I had to make my way past three women and a guy, all fully face diapered, standing in front of the door.

    Me: Excuse me.
    Green mask lady, pointing to sign: You need a mask.
    Me: Read the sign. Masking recommended. It’s not mandatory. Anyway, I’m a Covid survivor.
    Blue mask lady: You can still get sick!
    Me, pushing through the door: Sure can. I’m just 7 to 13 times less likely than you smug vaccinated types. Follow the science.

    Me, leaving through the dagger glares: I know, you’d like to send me to the camps! Not yet!

    A lot of sputtering, but no comeback.

  191. @Hibernian

    Very true, unfortunately.

    But I think we should applaud principled, high-profile resistance to cancellation when we see it.

  192. Brutusale says:
    @gandydancer

    Slapdash effort is someone whining TWICE in one thread about something that takes 3 seconds to check!

  193. guest007 says:

    maybe someday conservative whites will learn how to use African-Americans dislike of diversity and equity for others against the Democratic Party.

    https://wtop.com/prince-georges-county/2021/10/prince-georges-latino-leaders-accuse-alsobrooks-of-stubbornly-refusing-to-diversify-her-team/

    How many whites who have ever been in the military, the federal civil service, local education ever experience the black manager who over a short time convert their office staff to 100% black?

  194. Erik L says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    “…but it is evident any country with so much resources and safe from others’ interference would do it too.” Yet no other country has made nuclear weapons without the fruits of espionage.

  195. @That Would Be Telling

    MIT has been getting converged for a long time

    I’ve noticed this, and as an alumnus of the place (class of 1970) it saddens me. It especially struck me that over 40% of their undergrads are women now, vs. about 10% when I was there.

    Even when I was there, however, leftist student activism was rampant. More than anyplace except Berkeley, by some accounts.

  196. @JMcG

    Well, since the A Bomb ended the war, it was naturally finished before war’s end.

    Not my point. As a serious student of WWII military history, recently (this century) focusing on the Pacific theater, if they’d finished as little as a year and a half later we probably would have ended our fight with Japan, and in general Japan as a nation and people. And again I emphasize the quality of management that allowed bombs to be dropped so quickly, for example Groves decreasing the cycle time of plutonium creation, costing the process total amount of product to get some ASAP (there wasn’t going to be much more uranium any time soon, as it was, the Little Boy used a lot of less than 95% U-235 (plus U234 I just read on Wikipedia, it’s 1.7% of weapons grade uranium)).

    It’s been a long time since I read Rhodes’ (Terrific) books, but I think he touched on the circumspection that was apparent among the leading scientists when they realized that the bomb wouldn’t be used on Germany, but on Japan.

    I’ve read the primary book more recently, don’t remember that but wouldn’t necessarily have (sounds like the sort of thing that might have been covered in his political book on fusion devices). But they should have done a better job of thinking it through, at least by the time of the February-March 1945 Battle of Iwo Jima.

    Funny thing, the only project with a higher priority was a Super-Mulberry for the second stage of the invasion of Japan, off the coast of the main island and the Kanto plain that includes Tokyo. I forget at which time, but the Japanese military intelligence service(s) outdid themselves and accurately predicted when and when the first stage in the southern main island of Kyuushuu was going to happen, primarily based on logistics constraints like landing boats and ships.

    And moved nine divisions to the island to counter it, and I think unknown at the time reverted to their throw off the invasion at the landing beach strategy vs. the fight for every inch used at Iwo Jima and Okinawa. And it might well have worked given the raw numbers, plus the effectiveness of kamikazes. Of which they had a lot more than we realized, like around 8,000, and without the constraint of flying for a long time to get to Okinawa from the main islands.

    Everyone but MacArthur accepted that the initial plan was blown, he ordered just the first batch of Purple Hearts that would be needed and we’re still using those. The planners who didn’t know about the Manhattan Project proceeded to plan on liberal use of chemical weapons, and I’ve seen one reference I haven’t yet tried to double check started moving them into the theater. A number of Fat Man bombs were dedicated to the invasion, probably starting with #2, which in any case would have been delayed when that post-surrender massive typhoon destroyed a lot of the pre-positioned supplies on Okinawa.

    It would have been a colossal and soul crushing mess, made worse by Leftist propaganda after the main enemy shifted from Nazi Germany to just as Nazi where it matters America. See how much we’re still being guilt tripped over the bombings, which saved the lives of millions of Japanese, not to mention at the time of surrender 400,000 subjects of what was left of the Greater East Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere were dying a month. If you want to read more on all this I highly recommend Hell to Pay: Operation Downfall and the Invasion of Japan, 1945-1947.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  197. @JMcG

    my physicist buddy has started saying that Dark Matter is starting to look like this century’s Luminiferous aEther. Or perhaps Phlogiston.

    I’ve not studied them at all, but dark matter and dark energy sure have the smell of epicycles about them. I don’t think Luminiferous aEther was as badly conceived as epicycles, not sure about phlogiston. Especially since it and phlogiston were easy to falsify.

    • Thanks: JMcG
  198. @Stan Adams

    Since Kubrick had a reason for everything, I suppose Canadians provided the required blandness of future people. The voice of HAL was Douglas Rain, a fairly prominent actor at Stratford, Ontario’s Shakespeare festival, but he could convincingly do dull. However, if you listen carefully, you can distinguish his voice from the astronauts’ as being ironically more humane, which adds pathos to the disconnect scene, even before he slows down.

    The blandest of them all is William Sylvester, actually an American, who had a career playing Americans in British films such as Gorgo and Devil Doll (both, along with his later US TV appearance in Gemini Man, were MST’d).

    I don’t know how Kubrick found him, but I like to think of him in a damp London theater watching Devil Doll and shouting “That’s him, that’s my Heywood Floyd!” If you listen/watch carefully, you’ll see his Devil Doll co-“star” as the astronaut’s father in the birthday video. (The astronauts are so bland I can’t recall which is which).

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  199. “Ninety years ago Germany had the best universities in the world. Then an ideological regime obsessed with race came to power and drove many of the best scholars out, gutting the faculties and leading to sustained decay that German universities never fully recovered from. ”

    Obsessed with race, unlike a certain ethnic group. As per usual, Jews do their ethnic networking thing, and anyone daring to push back gets “Why are YOU obsessed with race?”

    And again, the “What would you do without Jews” trope.

    How much of Jewish “achievement” is simply due to networking (i.e. conspiring to keep goyim out of the universities, grants, jobs,etc.)? Do we see this happening in the Ivy League, hmmm?

    Dr. Goebbels answered this “irreplaceable” canard at the time; it is a misunderstanding of how science works. It doesn’t matter if Einstein is in Berlin or Buenos Aires, his work gets published and then everyone can make use of it. The difference is that if he’s in BA, it’s Argentines who get squeezed out of their rightful places in the nation’s universities.

    Given what they accomplished when Judenfrei — jets, TV, rockets — its quite plausible German science and technology would have gotten along fine without “whatever rattles around inside that kike skull” (Barton Fink).

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  200. Again, the A Bomb myth (or canard, if you will)

    Like Freud and Marx, and the Frankfurters who combined both, Einstein’s “contributions” are dubious. Like putting black crime etc. on the other side of the scale when figuring reparations for slavery, we need to include negative Jewish affects as well.

    What Einstein contributed was not science but lending his “prestige” to forcing FDR to produce the bomb, “because Hitler” (as we know say). German scientists were quite able to produce a bomb, but deliberately dragged their feet, because the weapon seemed to be “un-Aryan”. Chivalry and all that. The Jews of course had no such compunction.

    We see this today: Israel has its “secret” nuke arsenal, while constantly clamoring for Iran to be destroyed, “because bomb”; meanwhile, the Counsel of Imams or whatever has proclaimed the Bomb to be “un-Islamic” and forbidden its use or development. Who is the barbarian?

  201. Art Deco says:
    @Jack D

    They went from bad to worse after 1938. Prior to that, there were wretched abuses, but also some accomplishments.

    1. The presence of Hjalmar Schacht in the cabinet from 1932 to 1937 (antedating Hitler) was tonic. Germany’s economic recovery during the period running from 1932 to 1939 was the most rapid in the occidental world and incorporated a labor market recovery that largely eluded the Roosevelt Administration. A dear friend of mine, who was at that time immersed in the red-haze left, told me of meeting a German Jewish refugee in 1938. (IIRC, my friend’s father – from a prominent Roumanian Jewish family in New York – was active in philanthropic ventures on behalf of Jewish refugees). He said the man told him, “Hitler is doing wonderful things for Germany. If only he’d left ME alone”. (My friend was aghast).

    2. There were other accomplishments which, unlike the economic recovery, actually drew on Hitler’s decision-making. By the end of 1938, Germany had managed to capture every piece of Germanophone territory in Europe that it was practicable to acquire and hold with the exceptions of the Danzig, Memelland, and the South Tyrol borderlands, and they did it without firing a shot. Danzig was a de facto dependency of Germany from 1935 onward and Memelland was actually seized by Germany in March 1939 while Britain and France were distracted. (The German zone in South Tyrol had fewer than 600,000 residents and acquiring it would have required a deal with Mussolini). The Versailles treaty was all but officially abrogated by 1935 and Germany could re-arm. The reparations were not paid.

    The trouble was that Hitler actually believed all the vicious hooey about da Joos and lebensraum. Kristallnacht occurred just five weeks after the Munich Agreement was concluded and was followed by the imprisonment of a five-digit population of Jews qua Jews, something novel up to that point. Bohemia and Moravia were seized four months later. All three events were indications that practical men were not in charge.

    A quibble. Salazar was a skilled technician drawn from Portugal’s professoriate. The men on horseback hired him and were later outmaneuvered and displaced by him. Germany’s problem was that the man on horseback was the senescent Paul von Hindenburg.

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian
    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
  202. AndrewR says:
    @blake121666

    I have never understood why anyone would pose for a photo with an open mouthed smile when their smile looks like that. My smile is much nicer (read: you can’t see my upper gums) and I never pose open mouthed

  203. @mulga mumblebrain

    Nutterdammerung will be amusing, as they turn on each other.

    Nutterdammerung is a wonderful coinage: Thanks!

  204. Fox says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Of “practical value” is, for example, thermodynamics, electromagnetism (Clausius, Maxwell, Helmholtz, Gibbs, Planck), mechanics (Newton of course), quantum mechanics (Planck, Bohr, Heisenberg). Especially in quantum mechanics it is to this day possible to discuss the “hidden variable theory or postulate” without being dragged through the mud by the establishment believers and be fired. Not so in Einstein’s universe as established by his blind followers (and I don’t know whether he himself would have tolerated firing people because they don’t see eye to eye with his theory).
    Anyway, what is the practical engineering outcome of Einstein’s theory (excepting the photoelectric effect or Brownian motion writings)?
    Electromagnetic theory, thermodynamics, mechanics, quantum mechanics led to chains of reasoning resulting in such phenomena as you driving down the road with your car, powered by a combustion engine, talking to your sister on another continent by wireless, using nmr spectroscopy to get a diagnosis in a clinic or determining chemical structures of organic compounds, putting satellites in orbit, etc.
    Since you want to make a point of practicality with mathematicians, then I’ll point to Leibniz, the creator and inventor of differential calculus as we know and use it. Without his notation, it would likely have not advanced very well, or very far. Newton also invented differential calculus along in the course of formulating rational laws governing mechanics. There you have examples which fit the bill of being practical.
    Is GPS only working because of “Einstein” or is it a location device that relies on triangulation and time measurements?
    Deification of mere mortals always leads down the wrong path.

  205. @Jack D

    As Paul Feyerabend (former Luftwaffe pilot, crippled in the war, later philosopher of science at LSE) insisted, the only rule of scientific methodology is “anything goes.”

    When Jews dominate any field, they infect it with their materialism and Talmudic numerology; whether it’s literature, politics or physics. Everyone here sees the results, except in physics.

    Jewish domination means non-Talmudic research programs are off the table, and mocked (as in the comments of Jack D).

    Such worldviews can only be evaluated after research programs are allowed to proceed. Let NS Germany conduct its research, and then we can meaningfully evaluate its potential. 12 years under wartime conditions is no test.

    BTW, Newton replaced ether with occult action at a distance. through a vacuum, which embarrassed physics for centuries. One reason for acceptance of Einstein was that his flexible space/time provided the missing ether. As the American philosopher Quine said, you can make any theory sound as smart or as stupid as you want.

  206. @Joe Paluka

    A narrow minded view.

    Weimar Germany (1918-1933) was not reducible to decadent faqqotry & similar stuff, nor were German Jews some dominant manipulative force behind it all. In fact, Weimar Germany (which also, as a cultural sphere includes Austria of the period) was one of the pinnacles of creativity, close in eminence to Periclean Athens (of course this is an exaggeration, but I have no other reference point except Medicis’ Florence. Anyway, this was a great creative time). It was the time of greatest modern German painting, film, literature (Mann, Broch, Rilke, Musil, Hesse, Kafka, ..), music (Schoenberg, Berg, Orff, Hindemith, …), architecture, science, especially physics & mathematics (Heisenberg, Schroedinger, Pauli, Weyl, Noether, …), but also chemistry, medicine, philosophy (Husserl, Heidegger, Spengler, Scheler, Hartmann, Cassirer, Schmitt …), various other social sciences, engineering, finances etc. etc.

    So, widespread opinion among right-wingers that is was mostly decadence, prostitution, Jewish & homo depravity is an extremely shallow view. Weimar Germany birthed titanic works of high modern culture & whole modern world.

    Defaming Weimar Germany is like saying that the 50s US was decadent because of Kinsey’s “scientific research”.

  207. @YetAnotherAnon

    Amazing shot of the volcano last night from a street in La Palma. Imagine leaving the bar at night, you look up and THAT is looking down the road at you.

  208. @James J O'Meara

    It turns out that both astronaut actors are American.

    [MORE]

    The birthday boy was Frank Poole – the one who died. He was portrayed by Gary Lockwood – the same actor who got zapped by the “galactic barrier” in the pilot episode of Star Trek. He was the first person ever killed on-screen by Captain Kirk.

    (Technically. The first episode shot was the third episode broadcast on TV. But whatever.)

    Keir Dullea – the “Dave” of “Sorry, Dave, I can’t do that” fame – is from Cleveland. He barely aged a day from 1968 to 1984. He looks pretty much the same in both 2001 and 2010.

    Kubrick dismissed 2010 as “Ten Past Eight” – a hack job by Peter Hyams.

    Harlan Ellison once wrote a withering critique of Hyams’ Outland, a remake of High Noon in space with Sean Connery in the Gary Cooper role.

  209. turtle says:
    @James J O'Meara

    German scientists were quite able to produce a bomb, but deliberately dragged their feet, because the weapon seemed to be “un-Aryan”

    .
    No, that is bullshit. Germany made a conscious decision to put its efforts into rocketry and other advanced weapons technologies because Heisenberg advised Hitler the earliest they could expect a workable nuclear weapon would be 1946, and everyone expected the war to be over by then.

    Heisenberg made a special trip to Copenhagen to inform Bohr of this fact, early in the war (I believe 1942). Bohr certainly would not have kept this information from his professional colleagues in Los Alamos, which means that the Manhattan Project proceeded under a false premise.

    Ask your own questions, draw you own conclusions.
    Q1: Did FDR know, or was he kept in the dark?
    Q2: How about General Groves?

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  210. @James J O'Meara

    How much of Jewish “achievement” is simply due to networking (i.e. conspiring to keep goyim out of the universities, grants, jobs,etc.)? Do we see this happening in the Ivy League, hmmm?

    Strangely enough, our website host has written an excellent essay on this subject, “The Myth of American Meritocracy.” Something he extracted out of a book, which I went to the trouble to confirm because it likely would today prevent me from getting accepted by my alma mater, is:

    One of Ephanshade’s most striking findings was that excelling in certain types of completely mainstream high school activities actually reduced a student’s admission chances by 60–65 percent, apparently because teenagers with such interests were regarded with considerable disfavor by the sort of people employed in admissions; these were ROTC, 4-H Clubs, Future Farmers of America, and various similar organizations. Consider that these reported activities were totally mainstream, innocuous, and non-ideological, yet might easily get an applicant rejected, presumably for being cultural markers.

    Back to you:

    Dr. Goebbels answered this “irreplaceable” canard at the time; it is a misunderstanding of how science works. It doesn’t matter if Einstein is in Berlin or Buenos Aires, his work gets published and then everyone can make use of it.

    He had a point, prior to the war starting; a German radiochemist even provided a key clue and got a Chemistry Nobel for it (Frisch and his aunt would not have been eligible for that prize). The Frisch–Peierls memorandum I previously mentioned was written in March 1940, per Wikipedia “Peierls typed it himself. One carbon copy was made.” and yes, it was that sensitive, although as “Peierls later observed,” it was mostly asking the question based on an insight of Bohr, what if you used pure U-235 instead of almost entirely natural U-238? And of course WWII was quickly followed by the Cold War.

  211. @James J O'Meara

    German scientists were quite able to produce a bomb, but deliberately dragged their feet, because the weapon seemed to be “un-Aryan”.

    Completely, totally, catastrophically and amazingly false; you get a Troll and Ignore Commenter after this because you’re so pig ignorant even after this has been discussed in this topic.

    Ultimately, it turns out a passel of relevant scientists including Heisenberg plus Otto Hahn, that German radiochemist, were being monitored, as in “bugged” after Leslie Groves’ intelligence operation nabbed them and anything else Nazi Germany had WRT things nuclear. In August they learned along with everyone else that we in the US had figured it out when they couldn’t. If you knew anything about STEM, you would be able to read the transcripts and see how unequipped theorist Heisenberg was for figuring it out, but they did eventually. (There was only one first class physicist of the period who was both a major theorist and experimenter, Fermi.) Of course, what Heisenberg said later painted quite a different picture….

    For anyone else reading this who may have missed out on my portrayal from 50,000 feet, search on “graphite” and see my comments #136 and #157. And the first book to read is by Rhodes, which is linked to at the top of #136.

  212. jamie b. says:
    @Thomm

    I always wondered how the woke lunatics would wedge their way into astronomy.

    https://classes.cornell.edu/browse/roster/SP21/class/ASTRO/2034

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    , @turtle
  213. @Jack D

    The relevance of GR to GPS is a widely touted falsity. The experimental fudge factor added to GPS calculations is a much greater contributor to getting the right answer than any GR contribution – by 2 orders of magnitude. The belief that GPS needs GR is a false one because of this. People saying otherwise have never looked into EXACTLY where the actual numbers one uses come from. GR’s contribution is undeniably insignificant – given the fudges that need to be used (which are much greater than any GR contribution).

  214. @turtle

    Heisenberg made a special trip to Copenhagen to inform Bohr of this fact, early in the war (I believe 1942). Bohr certainly would not have kept this information from his professional colleagues in Los Alamos, which means that the Manhattan Project proceeded under a false premise.

    Oh, yeah, a German scientist just happens to tell the most prominent theoretical nuclear physicist in the world, “Oh, you absolutely don’t have to worry about us making a nuclear bomb!” Groves was put in charge of the Manhattan Project in September 1942; the only sane reaction by this very sane leader to this information I’m sure he received would be “Oh, shit!” and redoubling his efforts.

    That said, the intelligence effort also lead by Groves become increasingly convinced Germany wasn’t going to be able to create a bomb before the end of the war, but didn’t exactly want to bet the fate of the US etc. on that, plus you completely ignore the actual value of nuclear weapons. Like giving the emperor of Japan sufficient cause to intervene in the surrender decision without getting assassinated. Part of their intelligence operation in occupied Germany was to confirm their deductions and methods were correct.

    Again, I highly recommend his 1962 Now It Can Be Told book, it fills in many important gaps from everything else I’ve read on all this, which I’ve been studying since elementary school in the early 1970s.

  215. @Rex Little

    MIT has been getting converged for a long time

    I’ve noticed this, and as an alumnus of the place (class of 1970) it saddens me. It especially struck me that over 40% of their undergrads are women now, vs. about 10% when I was there.

    Was maybe 30% by the time I showed up a decade later. Was the alumni magazine (Technology Review) dedicated to telling you everything you learned and were doing was evil by the time you started reading it? (And the Institute wondered why contributions were low compared to comparable schools.)

    Even when I was there, however, leftist student activism was rampant. More than anyplace except Berkeley, by some accounts.

    I have to wonder if that largely stopped after either the draft ended or the Vietnam War. It was quite noticeable and often violent by the time I showed up, but “rampant” let alone anything like UC Berkeley doesn’t describe what I witnessed and heard about in the 1980s. Stage a riot with lots of outside agitators (like from Harvard etc.) when George H. W. Bush gives a talk to alumni I think it was, damaging a section of Mass Ave? Your physics professor who’s your Ph.D. advisor personally tears down posters advertising the SDI lecture you arranged by Lieutenant General Daniel O. Graham? Fully dedicated to the USSR winning the Cold War? Sure. But nothing like in “the ’60s” from what I heard.

    • Replies: @Recently Based
  216. The Leaders and Best at Michigan Engineering in Ann Arbor are way ahead of those losers at MIT when it comes to DIE education:

    https://www.engin.umich.edu/2021/08/dei-education-for-all-at-michigan-engineering

    DIE DEI education for all at Michigan Engineering

    In a sweeping step forward for diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) in engineering, Michigan Engineering leaders have approved plans for how to educate all members of the College community on DEI starting with a focus on race, ethnicity and bias.

    RIP

  217. @That Would Be Telling

    I was also at MIT in the 80s, and remember each of those incidents clearly (well, not the specific physicist tearing down the posters, but I remember that lecture and the controversy surrounding it — along with endless hand-wringing editorials by undergraduates in The Tech).

    I remember the environment at that time being exactly as you describe. Mostly, the undergraduates found political activity to be a farce, and those involved in it as pursuing an eccentric and vaguely risible hobby. We thought of political marches and the like as some kind of patchouli-smelling throwback to the 60s, and just kid of lame. There was one especially funny protest manque in which a group of students marched on the President’s office chanting “We’re perturbed.” It was as much a mockery of protest marches as anything else.

    • Thanks: That Would Be Telling
  218. JMcG says:
    @That Would Be Telling

    Sorry, I was being flip. I’ve read a great deal over the years on the Second World War. Honestly, the more I’ve read, the more circumspect I’ve become over the entire Strategic Bombing Campaign, in both theaters, from start to finish.
    I was a child when the British series – The World at War- was broadcast here in the US. It began with an examination of Ouradour-sur-Glane. That was the French town where the SS Armored Division, Das Reich, massacred a bunch of French civilians out of frustration with the delays imposed on its March to Normandy by the French resistance.
    They locked some 500 men, women, and children in the church, then set it on fire.
    Left unsaid was that German men, women, and children were being burned to death in their thousands every night in Germany by the RAF. One set of men were, rightfully, condemned as monsters, the other hailed as heroes.
    I’ve never forgotten reading, in one of St. Exupery’s books, that the smoke one sees rising from burning cities in newsreels, is fed by the burning bodies of little children.

  219. JR Ewing says:
    @2BR

    Always good to put your Left opponents on the side of the Nazis. Probably confuses them.

    No. As Steve mentioned above, that just gives them more ammo to demonstrate you’re a bad person because you have compared their wholesome and good faith DEI initiatives with (gasp!) EVIL NAZIS! Not only do you disagree with their philosophy, you think they are bad people! That can’t stand!

    They are rubber and you are glue.

  220. @Jack D

    Another Dad has a macro key for the word “minoratarianism.”

  221. The picture of Dorian Abbot got a bit younger. How’d that happen?

  222. Anon[406] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hangnail Hans

    I don’t believe sub Sahara black Africa had advanced to the neolithic age when the Portuguese showed up in the 1,400s.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  223. @Anon

    Bantus have been an iron age culture for 3000 years or so.

  224. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    So show us how to stand up to the little shits, my fine Christian gentleman friend.

  225. Oh, what a thing to say.

    Go read some Blake and get over yusseff.

  226. MEH 0910 says:

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    , @MEH 0910
  227. MEH 0910 says:
    @MEH 0910


    [MORE]

  228. turtle says:
    @Rex Little

    Even when I was there, however, leftist student activism was rampant.

    Disciples of Prof. Chomsky. Michael Albert, George Katsiaficas, et. al. All members of the “Rosa Luxemburg Chapter of SDS.” Strident and obnoxious, but certainly not dominant. Most folks I knew just wanted to complete their degree programs and find a legit way to avoid Vietnam. ROTC was considered honorable. 1- Y deferments were plentiful, unlike some areas of the U.S.

    My recollection of M/F ratio was more like 17/1, limited by capacity of McCormick Hall. There were no officially coed dorms at that time. But yes, you could keep your mistress in old East Campus, never mind what the (by then old) song said. Nobody paid much, if any, mind to Dean Wadleigh’s pronouncements, that I can recall.

  229. turtle says:
    @jamie b.

    I suppose the next “woke” jihad will push to rename black body radiation, because, you know, “rayciss.” Maybe have “cross cultural seminars” debating whether or not “ultraviolet catastrophe” is a “European cultural construct.”

    Dios mio. Que bullshit.

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