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From the New York Times news pages:

The C.E.O.s Who Didn’t Sign a Big Defense of Voting Rights

Hundreds of leaders and companies signed a letter opposing strict limits. They did not.

By Andrew Ross Sorkin, Jason Karaian, Sarah Kessler, Michael J. de la Merced, Lauren Hirsch and Ephrat Livni
April 14, 2021

Amazon, BlackRock, Google, Warren Buffett and hundreds of other companies and executives have signed a new statement opposing “any discriminatory legislation” that would make it harder for people to vote. The statement, which ran as a two-page ad in The Times, comes amid a flurry of voting-related proposals from Republicans that have generated competing calls for corporations to take a stand and to stay out of politics lest lawmakers retaliate, David Gelles and Andrew write in The Times. And just as notable as the names who signed the statement are those that didn’t.

 
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  1. Anonymous[216] • Disclaimer says:

    When have patriots ever organized to boycott one of these anti-White, anti-American companies?

    • Replies: @Hannah Katz
  2. If this were really about addressing fraud they could work out some compromise where we introduce anti fraud measures that make voting more difficult but counteract them with measures that make voting easier, like making vote day a holiday, voting over weekends, etc.

    Republicans are not all interested in any of that because it’s not about fraud. It’s about making it more difficult for democrats to vote. That would be a good idea if Republicans weren’t completely horrible and useless, but they are. And too many people can’t see that and think that as long as they have the GOP then the USA is worth saving.

    We need to make it easier to vote, stack the court, get rid of or ameliorate the effects of the electoral college. We need to see what this country is and has become with open eyes and move on from there.

    Give up on the GOP and the USA.

    • Agree: Supply and Demand
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Altai
    , @anon332442
  3. I’m old enough to remember when the response to politics at a company like, say, Coca-Cola would have been: “At Coca-Cola we believe the best way for all Americans to meet the true potential is to reach for a bottle of refreshing Coca-Cola. It’s the Real Thing®!”

    Which is to say, about four years ago.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Thoughts
    , @Carol
  4. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:

    The Brit CEO of Coca-Cola and the CEO of Delta were among the first to jump up and denounce the Georgia vote security law. Coke guy even went on CNBC and babbled about it, he was fortunate that the interviewers were clearly under orders not to discuss the actual law, and it was obvious he didn’t have a clue.

    In the ensuing days, the Georgia Republicans voided Coke’s vending contract in the state capitol; apparently tossed them right out. Plus it became obvious that people were pushing back by the odd chitchat on CNBC – “Some guy says he won’t fly Delta, well, how else will he get someplace out of state? Hurr Hurr!”.

    Now we see Coke and Delta shying away from signing up for more abuse. Hmm.

    A lot of businesses these days are not at all about profit, such as Disney, they are about shaping preferences and frankly Bernays-style opinion molding. Brainwashing / gaslighting, really.

    So now we have the national elites attempting to tell the Deplorables what to think, and hitting the state level elites in the process. Should be interesting. Big time billionaires like Buffet have a huge cushion, but mere UMC employees like the chairs of Delta not so much. This could be an overreach.

    Plus as a bonus, it’s easy for ordinary people to portray the elites as demanding vote fraud. Nobody is going to ask the chair of Coke or Buffet “Why do you support voting by dead people” on any of the softball interview shows, but the mere UMC servant class such as a state-level bottler can catch some real flak from his peers, especially in places like Arizona, Texas, and so forth. That’s not so good for business, even now in the conglomerated world.

    I do hope this is an overreach that bites the oligarchs via their servants.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    , @Hibernian
  5. He is a co-anchor of CNBC’s Squawk Box


    Mama’s got a
    Squawk Box,
    Daddy never sleeps at night…

    • Replies: @Rouetheday
  6. @Guy De Champlagne

    Republicans are not all interested in any of that because it’s not about fraud. It’s about making it more difficult for democrats [sic] to vote.

    There’s a difference?

    We need to make it easier to vote, stack the court, get rid of or ameliorate the effects of the electoral college.

    The Electoral College is like the monarchy– the only thing wrong with it is that it’s too weak.

    If this were really about addressing fraud they could work out some compromise…

    Here’s a compromise: All you need to register to vote is to show a firearms license. All you need to obtain a firearm is to show voter registration.

    We’ll see who’s the honest ones.

  7. @Almost Missouri

    Blacks used to avoid Coke and go for Pepsi. And not only because it tastes sweeter.

  8. Anonymous[234] • Disclaimer says:

    Smart move by the commies. It’s going to be effective. This plus increasing boycott of Georgia will prevent most states from securing elections. Add the coming amnesty and it’s pretty much over. Good bye, USA.

  9. Altai says:
    @Guy De Champlagne

    That may be true (It’s hard to gauge how much of it is voter suppression and how much of it is genuine concern for illegal voters) but it’s also a set of law changes that should be unstoppable despite the consequences. How can you oppose ID verification except that you’d like people without IDs to vote? You say lots of depressed marginalised legal voters won’t have IDs? Tough, nobody is stopping them getting one or having the huge get out the vote apparatus from helping them to get them. How can you have a rule of eligibility without also checking it? I can’t think of a single country in Europe, including the social democratic ones, that doesn’t have at least the possibility of you being asked to present ID if not it being outright required. This isn’t a poll tax.

    It’s like complaining your enemy has a human shield and killing them both anyway. The human shield is supposed to work.

    To have a total meltdown because of laws that states the law that already exists should be upheld, which are highly popular because you fear the consequences of it despite the mechanism being highly kosher is weird. You can say it’s a ploy but it’s a ploy that should have worked. That it has elicited such an unhinged response is interesting in itself and is more or less what we’re talking about rather than the law itself. It’s another manifestation of the sense of illegitimacy that the urban upper middle classes view anything done by their political opponents. They no longer just feel this illegitimacy, they act on it.

    • Agree: Gabe Ruth
  10. @Reg Cæsar

    Why not try to make a functioning worthwhile country rather than trying to cling to power by limiting voting to shrinking minority of rural gun owners with the proper ID and form filing abilities? What is the appeal of the American nation and the Republican party that their continued existence trumps every other goal?

    And as far as I can tell you don’t even have the balls to propose limiting votes to whites on an anonymous forum, how do you think you’ll have the stomach for the kind of violence necessary to maintain your race-blind extreme minoritarian government in the real world?

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @Reg Cæsar
  11. @Altai

    . You can say it’s a ploy but it’s a ploy that should have worked.

    Republicans have been trying and failing to do this for decades. And they make a push in Georgia right after a close senate election that attracted weeks of media attention and was held up as an example of political transformation that would start turning states blue across the country.

    Why should it have worked?

  12. @Guy De Champlagne

    What do you mean “give up”? Give up on democracy? Move back to Europe?

    • Replies: @Guy De Champlagne
  13. After decades of minding the world’s business, the American Right are apparently stunned to discover that the Empire Strikes Back, always.

    That is what you guys deserve for not ‘conserving’ Washington and Adams’ fine advice to mind your damn business.

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Replies: @J.Ross
  14. anon[133] • Disclaimer says:
    @Altai

    To have a total meltdown because of laws that states the law that already exists should be upheld, which are highly popular because you fear the consequences of it despite the mechanism being highly kosher is weird.

    Yeah, it’s strange to pick this as a hill to fight on. Can I get on a Delta flight without Real ID? lol, no. Why should I be able to fill out some number of absentee ballots without any sort of proof of identity?

    Because stacks of fake absentee ballots are a serious issue for future elections?

    Most people are ignorant, but c’mon, man anyone can understand “dead people should not vote”.

    This just shows brainlessly inferior and flat out ignorant our alleged “bidness elites” really are.

  15. @anon332442

    I mean focusing on building a first rate country rather than maneuvering to exercise outsized control (or more accurately the illusion of control) over a basketcase that’s falling apart.

    If I had my way, that would mean limiting immigration and procreation to qualified white christians in as large a portion of the US as possible and then expanding those borders into the rest of the supercontinent after a generation or two.

    But maybe it’ll mean moving back to Europe and warning them.

  16. El Dato says:
    @Guy De Champlagne

    This is low-grade trolling but

    by limiting voting to shrinking minority of rural gun owners with the proper ID and form filing abilities

    If you can’t even fill out a form, you shouldn’t be allowed to vote.

    If you can’t manage to obtain a shooter, you shouldn’t be allowed to vote.

    This is no longer primal ape country where obtaining any necessary skills by 21 is extremely hard because the next teacher is 30 km away by pony express and anyway you have to till the fields.

    Next up: CocaColaCompany issues a “Coca Vota” in red (votes Democrat, tastes good) or blue (votes Republican, tastes like Pepsi) (other colors are not supported!) which automatically votes for you via the Internet-of-Things and Bezos Computing Infrastructure as you pull the tab. It then installs diabetes. The more you buy, the more you vote!

    • Replies: @Cortes
  17. It’s a William Gibson novel come to life.

    I wonder what libertarians have to say about this?

    Edit: I checked reason.com: nothing yet. But we do find them defending Johnson & Johnson and their vaccine against the FDA, which I guess shouldn’t have been a surprise.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
  18. Geez, they’re just gilding the lily. As if, right now, you can’t fix any election at all that comes down the pike like gangbusters in nothing flat.

  19. Of course, Coca~Cola, Delta, and the rest know better already, but the good people in the Georgia legislature ought to put it this way: We’re not trying to stop Georgians from voting – we’re just trying to stop them from voting multiple times.

  20. AndrewR says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Idk bro. Imagine Prince Harry as absolute monarch. *shudders*

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Bill Jones
  21. @anon

    This just shows brainlessly inferior and flat out ignorant our alleged “bidness elites” really are.

    They are not brainless, #133. The Big Biz elites go along with every single thing that is anti-White now. They are complete cowards, so they do this for the same reason as they enforce”zero tolerance” policies, which mean “making mountains out of mole hills”. They can’t go wrong in the eyes of the Establishment by being against the White People.

    It is cowardice and sometimes evil, not usually stupidity.

    • Agree: El Dato
  22. @Reg Cæsar

    I recently heard that old Who song being played at a restaurant and I was tempted to explain its meaning to my young waitress. Then I remembered the disgusted reaction I got a few years ago from another young waitress to whom I had explained the true meaning of another ’70’s gem playing on her restaurant’s P.A.- Melanie’s “Brand New Key”.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  23. Firefinga says:

    Corporate hypocrisy at it’s best, as usual. Not only are some of these companies exploiting “brown” people in places like Asia, are usually not too fond of unions, but do business in places like Europe where voter-IDs are pretty much mandatory.

  24. Thoughts says:
    @Almost Missouri

    They’ve been political since I entered high school. And that was a VERY long time ago.

    It started with the stupid We are the World, We are the Children diversity commericals, which even as a teenager I was like ‘Oh wtf is this?’

  25. TyRade says:

    I marvel that Joe Kernan does not lose it more often with Mr Sorkin on Squawk Box. From what I can tell his CNBC leftism is softer than his knuckle-duster hard-woke NY Times output, so that might explain it.

  26. @anon

    Nobody is going to ask the chair of Coke or Buffet “Why do you support voting by dead people” on any of the softball interview shows….

    No, but if you have a share in the company, you can ask at the Annual General Meeting.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @William Badwhite
  27. J.Ross says:
    @Nigerian Nationalist

    So your point is that neocons should … drink Coke? Is that what we were going for here?

    • Thanks: GeneralRipper
  28. Hibernian says:
    @anon

    “Some guy says he won’t fly Delta, well, how else will he get someplace out of state? Hurr Hurr!”.

    Southwest goes everywhere.

  29. Cortes says:
    @El Dato

    See

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Space_Merchants

    Perhaps the most prescient description of the modern world. A terrific work.

  30. Mr. Sailer, Ibram X. Kendi has written the Bible on this subject and has made clear that if you are not actively antiracist, then you are racist. There is no “nonracist” category. My 95-year-old aunt who watches a little TV every day and spends most of her time asleep is as much to blame as Hitler.

    • Agree: Supply and Demand
  31. @Anonymous

    That is what they are counting on. They can trash us and our families until the cows come home and they hardly feel any blowback. We are too busy working and raising our families and they know it. Plus some have no clue what is going on and continue to buy from those that are attempting to cut their throats. Sad…

  32. @Reg Cæsar

    Or make folks produce a COVID-19 vaccination passport to vote, since the left loves those things. The left would be like the fella whose wife ran off with another man, not knowing how to feel.

  33. In 1990 Jesse Helms was running for reelection as US Senator from North Carolina. The most famous alumnus of UNC is Michael Jordan, so he was asked to endorse Helms’ opponent. Jordan’s famous response was

    Republicans buy sneakers, too.

    • Replies: @anon
  34. AKAHorace says:

    And just as notable as the names who signed the statement are those that didn’t.

    The difference between authoritarian regimes and totalitarian ones is that an authoritarian regimes don’t allow freedom of speach, totalitarian ones don’t allow freedom of silence. No one is allowed to stay out of politics and mind their own business.

  35. 3g4me says:

    Hmnnn, “Sorkin” “Kessler” “Hirsch” “Livni”
    How heartwarming to see ‘fellow White people’ . . . nah, I can’t come up with anything appropriately sarcastic, particularly when my feelings are not sarcastic but enraged loathing.

  36. anon[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @ScarletNumber

    In 1990

    That was over 30 years ago.

  37. Anonymous[735] • Disclaimer says:

    Ohhhhhh, ok. So the companies that denounced the Georgia law were prodded to do so by an organization yet-unnamed by the article.

    And now the ones who politely declined are getting publicly smeared. That’s extortion and racketeering. I know, I know, extortion and racketeering are the stock and trade of the ADL and SPLC. The Matt Gaetz extortion. The Project Veritas CNN video. The media hoaxes and rabble-rousing come fast and heavy. But will prosecutors do anything about these crimes? No.

    Darren Beattie is correct that this American regime is too corrupt to defend. No good-hearted Americans should ever join the military again. Root for Russia or China to come in and restore order and rule of law.

  38. “If you’re not part of the solution, you’re part of the problem.” VISTA* advertisement 1967

    * Volunteers In Service To America

    They’ve been peddling this meme for a long time. The difference is that the heat is up on the boiler and reaction rates are increasing. Under stress the masses are demanding that the government “Do something!”

    A system under stress will react in a direction to relieve the stress. – Le Chatelier

    We are morphing into a dictatorship, which many think is the only solution to our problems. I would not presume to predict whether it will come from the Left or the Right, but I will predict that the blunt force of it will be transmitted through a bureaucracy – a faceless, unfeeling, autonomous bureaucracy.

    The people on top will not care for fairness, or freedom, but they will care that the lid stays on the boiler. “Solutions” will not matter, keeping the lid down will matter. Can they do it?

    We are approaching a bifurcation.

    Interesting times.

  39. @Rouetheday

    Then I remembered the disgusted reaction I got a few years ago from another young waitress to whom I had explained the true meaning of another ’70’s gem playing on her restaurant’s P.A.- Melanie’s “Brand New Key”.

    Like “Puff” and “Lucy”, the “real” meaning of “Brand New Key” is at face value. Nobody claims the Carpenters’ “Crystal Lullaby” was about N,α-dimethylphenethylamine. (Well, this guy might.

    “Squeeze Box” is another story, written as it was by a cyberporn addict who once said Mick Jagger was not only sufficiently hung, but “extremely tasty” as well. (Like MLK with Abernathy, he was probably joking, but Who knows?)

    If Melanie can’t be innocent, who can? She broke the law at the Powder Ridge Festival so her ticket-buyers wouldn’t be cheated. Like Springsteen, John Sebastian, Laura Nyro, and Madonna, and unlike Billy Joel, she’s half-Italian. The rest of the rock world was on drugs in those days, but her NYC was on bubble gum.

  40. @AndrewR

    Idk bro. Imagine Prince Harry as absolute monarch. *shudders*

    Relax. He’s sixth in line. And the monarchy was never as absolute as Parliament is today.

  41. @Guy De Champlagne

    And as far as I can tell you don’t even have the balls to propose limiting votes to whites on an anonymous forum…

    I have so, indirectly. By limiting residence to whites. People who can’t be trusted with a vote or a firearm don’t belong in a white man’s country. (Sorry, VP Calhoun and VP Stephens, you were dead wrong about this. As was Abe, who had it right the first time re Panama.)

    If that means truncating the country to match the nation, so be it.

    • Replies: @Guy De Champlagne
  42. There was one mediocre Midwestern guy who used to fill in for Rush, and the one prescient point he always made back then was “You will be made to care.” There will be no quiet place you can go to sit out the PC parade — you must stand and cheer in affirmation like a good North Korean. At this rate there will be about 42 states that are being boycotted for something or other.

  43. Carol says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Historically Coke was the Democrat cola corp and Pepsi the Republican counterpart.

    No idea why but the pols knew it. Something to do with unions IIRC

  44. Buycotter says:

    What a nothingburger of an article. I got that I should shop at Home Depot, but could the NYT really not give us a complete list?

  45. Elsewhere says:
    @anon

    anyone can understand “dead people should not vote”

    It’s not that dead people should not vote, rather dead people cannot vote. If a dead person is on record as a voter, then someone committed intentional fraud.

    Far from writing off these stories of dead people voting as a miniscule number, each one should be fully investigated to find the culprit and make a public example. If fraud is perpetrated in easy-to-detect ways, then this is likely just the tip of the iceberg for fraud. The fact that such fraud is not only not investigated, but covered for with propaganda, shows how untrustworthy our democracy is.

  46. I’m sure someone has suggested this but how about a law simply refusing permission for any business in the state to demand a form of ID more onerous than that required to register to vote?

    Call it the Poor Peoples Economic Enfranchisement Act.

    That should kick up a fuss about all the Feds “Know your Customer” crap.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Art Deco
  47. Is the NYT saying all these missing-in-action heads of large corporations were contacted and offered the chance to sign on?

    That’s one big hidden conspiracy. Who would have the juice to organize something like this, and what else have they done?

    Who’s brainchild was this, anyway?

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
  48. @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    “Reason” is to libertarianism what Paris Hilton is to chastity.

    Their spell checker mis-corrected “Libertinism”.

  49. @AndrewR

    It’s very kind of the Royals to take an interest in Diana’s bastard by-blow but they never get anywhere near power,

  50. anon[393] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Alarmist

    No, but if you have a share in the company, you can ask at the Annual General Meeting.

    Wanna bet?

  51. @The Alarmist

    No, but if you have a share in the company, you can ask at the Annual General Meeting.

    Dang it, I should have thought of this before I sold all my KO shares in response to their idiocy.

  52. ATBOTL says:

    By Andrew Ross Sorkin, Jason Karaian, Sarah Kessler, Michael J. de la Merced, Lauren Hirsch and Ephrat Livni

    This speaks for itself.

  53. @Altai

    Can’t the tragically marginalized folks of our vibrant urban areas simply present their shiny new Vaccination Passports to get a ballot?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  54. Anonymous[216] • Disclaimer says:
    @Carol

    Coke is a Southern institution.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  55. @Reg Cæsar

    So it sounds like we agree and you’re interested in majority rule in a functioning country rather than minority rule in a shithole.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Reg Cæsar
  56. FPD72 says:
    @Carol

    Historically Coke was the Democrat cola corp and Pepsi the Republican counterpart.

    Prior to the mid 1980s, only Pepsi was licensed in the USSR. Then in 1984 or 1985, Coke also worked out a licensing agreement with the Soviets, which led to a great RC Cola commercial in 1985 that showed rural folks in the frozen tundra having a joyful party while drinking RC, only to be found out by KGB types at the very end.

  57. @Anonymous

    Coke is a Southern institution.

    So is Tyson. Neither sounds like a point of pride.

    San Pellegrino is better for you anyway.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  58. @Guy De Champlagne

    …rather than minority rule in a 💩⛳.

    That’s redundant.

    There has never been a multiracial civilization. That’s like putting the toilet in the kitchen. Nothing good can ever come of it.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  59. @Buck Ransom

    Can’t the tragically marginalized folks of our vibrant urban areas simply present their shiny new Vaccination Passports to get a ballot?

    Hedrick Smith, the NYT‘s old USSR correspondent, was once asked to settle an argument between two old Russian ladies. They asked him if we also had internal passports. He said, no, of course not.

    One of the ladies crowed to her friend, “See! I told you they don’t have freedom of movement in the USA!”

  60. Anonymous[272] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    I used to know a little old lady from that part of the world. Even pushing 90 and living in a nursing home she kept a stash of little coke bottles (not cans) in the fridge which she would regularly take out and drink. She loved that stuff.

  61. @Carol

    Perhaps (though Reg Cæsar says blacks vote Pepsi), but I can’t remember Coke (or Pepsi) ever publicly taking a side in a political dispute before.

    Business corporations, especially in mass markets, hate taking political positions publicly because no matter what side you take, you’re going to alienate at least 40% of the market.

    • Replies: @anon
  62. Corvinus says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    “There has never been a multiracial civilization”.

    The United States, Europe, Asia, Africa…it’s as if you purposely ignore history.

    • Troll: Buzz Mohawk
  63. Gabe Ruth says:

    I don’t understand anything about the technical details, but reading the claims of cryptocurrency people it sounds like “the blockchain” would be a natural tool for election integrity. Security without trust is just what the doctor ordered.

  64. anon[368] • Disclaimer says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Business corporations, especially in mass markets, hate taking political positions publicly because no matter what side you take, you’re going to alienate at least 40% of the market.

    Yet many companies from Hewlitt Packard to Coke to Delta to the NASDAQ are doing just that.

    They are willing to sacrifice profits for politics, it is obvious. This tells me it is not about money. It’s not about the money.

    Not. The. Money.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  65. @anon

    Right. That was my point. They have a fiduciary duty to make money for their shareholders, yet they are sacrificing that easier path in order to show the regime that they are onside with the new religion.

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