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From NBC News:

Every branch of the military is struggling to make its 2022 recruiting goals, officials say

With a record low number of Americans eligible to serve, and few of those willing to do it, this “is the year we question the sustainability of the all-volunteer force,” said an expert.

June 27, 2022, 1:30 AM PDT
By Courtney Kube and Molly Boigon

Every branch of the U.S. military is struggling to meet its fiscal year 2022 recruiting goals, say multiple U.S. military and defense officials, and numbers obtained by NBC News show both a record low percentage of young Americans eligible to serve and an even tinier fraction willing to consider it. …

The pool of those eligible to join the military continues to shrink, with more young men and women than ever disqualified for obesity, drug use or criminal records. Last month, Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville testified before Congress that only 23% of Americans ages 17-24 are qualified to serve without a waiver to join, down from 29% in recent years.

An internal Defense Department survey obtained by NBC News found that only 9% of those young Americans eligible to serve in the military had any inclination to do so, the lowest number since 2007.

And that probably doesn’t yet include much of the upcoming effect of the Russia-Ukraine war on attitudes toward enlistment, but a 21st Century land war in Europe doesn’t look fun at all. Modern precision weapons don’t miss often enough to give combatants a fighting chance of surviving the war. There are probably some Armenians in the U.S. who knew that already a couple of years ago …

I’m reading William Makepeace Thackeray’s highly entertaining 1840s bestseller “Vanity Fair,” in which many of the male characters are British Army officers in the run-up to the battle of Waterloo. They are all nervous over whether they’ll be brave, survive, and win, but on the other hand, the upcoming war turned out to be for most just one day of carnage and then it was over. The economy of 1815 couldn’t afford long battles.

The survey sheds light on how both Americans’ view of the military and the growing civilian-military divide may also be factors in slumping recruitment, and how public attitudes could cause recruiting struggles for years to come.

More than half of the young Americans who answered the survey — about 57% — think they would have emotional or psychological problems after serving in the military.

Americans are raised to be fragile these days.

Nearly half think they would have physical problems.

“They think they’re going to be physically or emotionally broken after serving,” said one senior U.S. military official familiar with the recruiting issues, who believes a lack of familiarity with military service contributes to that perception.

Among Americans surveyed by the Pentagon who were in the target age range for recruiting, only 13% had parents who had served in the military, down from approximately 40% in 1995. The military considers parents one of the biggest influencers for service.

… Overall confidence in U.S. government institutions is also decreasing, and that has hit the U.S. military as well. In 2021 the annual Reagan National Defense Survey, conducted by the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Institute, found that just 45% of Americans had a great deal of trust and confidence in the military, down 25 points since 2018.

 
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  1. Smedley Butler was right.

    War is a racket.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Mr. Anon

    What's with these snowflakes? They don't want to sign up for a woke anti-white anti-male anti-American gay trans military to kill and be killed while fighting proxy wars for Israel? They're afraid of coming home with stumps for legs and being confined to a wheelchair when I know for a fact that this one organization that has commercials on Fox will buy some of them their own wheelchair-house? I'm disgusted by this generation of touchy-feely little pencil-necked cowards who are too wimpy to put their lives on the line for Zionists who hate them. Not signing up for the military is the ultimate act of anti-semitic, racist, sexist, trans-phobic toxic masculinity. If only there was some way to FORCE these punks to check their privilege and do their duty.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Rooster16

    , @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Mr. Anon

    I live Northern Virginia. Trust me, the military - war or peace - is a racket. I've had many a neighbor sucking on that teat. Retired military who had easy jobs in military with sweet pensions. Ex-military with government jobs because they get preference. IT guys working for government contractors who have security clearance so they can't get fired.

    The list goes on and on.

    Ironically, most the men who serve in combat only stay in the military a short time. It's the other guys - especially blacks - who get all the goodies.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @JohnnyWalker123

    , @lavoisier
    @Mr. Anon


    Smedley Butler was right.

    War is a racket.
     
    And the young white males are waking up to that fact.

    Not good for the globalists. They might have to fight their own wars.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

  2. 1. It has been a good job market, and there are easier ways to make a living thsn being in the military.
    2. The US military is a leftist captured institution that pushes the woke religion, and any normal person who joins up is being a servant to the queer empire that hates normal people.
    3. The US Military and leadership have not exactly covered themselves in glory in recent years, eg the Afghan debacle.

    I don’t know which of these factors, or others, are the main drivers of the enlistment situation.

    • Agree: Old Prude, JR Ewing, Bernie
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Mike_from_SGV

    The openly pro-BLM and pro-CRT stances the military has taken has not exactly endeared it to its historical backbone: conservative white males. And of course there's the absurdity of the pro-LGBT stuff, but I think this is a negligible factor.

    The hysterical overreaction to January 6th, when thousands of troops were stationed in our nation's capital in unpleasant conditions probably didn't make service seem any more desirable.

    But I think the vaccine mandates are the main issue. Then the Afghan debacle. Then the instigation of this war with Russia.

    The real question is: why is anyone still enlisting?

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Jack P, @Farenheit

    , @JR Ewing
    @Mike_from_SGV


    2. The US military is a leftist captured institution that pushes the woke religion, and any normal person who joins up is being a servant to the queer empire that hates normal people.
     
    I used to find it comforting that even though the rest of society is swirling around the shitter, at least the military is full of “normal guys” who didn’t buy into the bullshit and who - if it ever came to that - would be the final barricade between America and the totalitarian nonsense. Much like the Oathkeepers, the Normal rank and file would refuse the ultimate orders if it came to that.

    I guess in a way, it’s somewhat still reassuring that those normal guys are no longer signing up now that the wokerati have captured the military as well.

    However, that is more than offset by the fact that the wokerati have the tanks and other weapons that could eventually be used in service of totalitarianism and they most likely wouldn’t be afraid to use them if need be against “racists” and “fascists”. There are plenty of examples in fiction where this has been foreseen, from the Turner Diaries to the Schlichter books.

    Maybe it’s not that reassuring now that I think about it.
    , @pyrrhus
    @Mike_from_SGV

    And then there's the mandatory jab or three....

    Replies: @Mike_from_SGV

  3. How could this possibly have happened? Milley, hand more Blackhawks over to your Chinese friends! Vanilli, yell at white folk more! Joe, escalate the completely avoidable Ukraine conflict and hand over more money!

  4. There’s no mystery, Steve. It has NOTHING to do with the Ukraine war. Force soldiers to vaccinate with an unpopular (and useless) vaccine. Promote women, gays and trannies in the military. Turn the whole thing into some type of Woke Academy. Then how can you wonder why numbers would be down?!?

    Sometimes I wonder if the people who analyze things are really that dumb, or they are just pretending to be.

    • Replies: @Mr Mox
    @Dumbo

    Force soldiers to vaccinate with an unpopular (and useless) vaccine. Promote women, gays and trannies in the military. Turn the whole thing into some type of Woke Academy.

    In other words: scare away the very type of people a functioning army is build upon. Once the psy-ops are over and all the smart bombs have been dropped, you will still need boots on the ground - not stiletto heels.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Farenheit

    , @S. Anonyia
    @Dumbo

    You really think the prospect of eventually being deployed to fight in Ukraine or somewhere else in Eastern Europe won’t also have an effect on enlistment? You’re underestimating how much young people are pissed about U.S throwing indefinite billions at the conflict. Especially considering there is a very clear connection between worsening inflation/supply chain issues and the start of the war in late February.

    , @Couch scientist
    @Dumbo

    100%

    , @NOTA
    @Dumbo

    I think the decisionmakers here are all concerned 100% with gaining and keeping power. What happens to US military readiness or whether schoolkids learn to read or whether the power grid stays up are all secondary concerns at best, and with luck failures there can be blamed on someone else.

  5. Worrying about post-service physical problems is actually somewhat legitimate. Infantry carries a lot of gear, and unlike in the past, troops aren’t allowed to ditch the items they don’t think they’re going to need. A relatively large number of ex-grunts are on full or partial disability due to ruined joints.
    Most military jobs don’t have that issue, though.

    • Agree: Kronos
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    It is often said that an infantryman's pack has never gotten lighter since Roman legionnaire times.

    I wouldn't be surprised if it's significantly heavier in these days of automatic weapons when the amount of ammunition that can be carried can be decisive. I'm guessing Roman troops likely weighed in the 130 to 140 pound range. And the Roman army was really smart about not overburdening their men. I read Edward Luttwak's book "The Grand Strategy of Rome" and he emphasized how the legions could march for 1000 miles or more and arrive in better shape than when they left. They only marched 4 or 5 hours per day and had lots of techniques for ensuring that they ate and slept well en route.

    Replies: @John Henry, @Almost Missouri, @Joe Stalin, @GeologyAnonMk6, @Kronos

    , @Mike Tre
    @Redneck farmer

    Infantry might carry more gear, but the total number of miles they hump is probably less than ever. After basic training, they are getting moved via motorized, mechanized, or even airborne transport.

    , @AceDeuce
    @Redneck farmer

    For every vet with a valid disability claim, there are five with faked/exaggerated claims getting paid.

    It's an open secret. Most of the claimants with no real problems are non-Whites gaming the system, though with the drop-off in honor and integrity over the past few decades, many White vets these days are doing it, too. It's sickening.

    , @Kronos
    @Redneck farmer

    There are so many stories of patrols hiking for days with 80lbs rucks. It's no wonder there's such a high number of foot, knee, and back problems. Had a family friend who worked at the local VA who'd talk about it occasionally.

    BTW, Mystery Ranch backpacks are awesome!

    https://youtu.be/PETJgpWTrVA

  6. “They think they’re going to be physically or emotionally broken after serving,” said one senior U.S. military official familiar with the recruiting issues, who believes a lack of familiarity with military service contributes to that perception.

    Yeah., how silly!

    Like how could anyone think that going into battle, being shot at, having an artillery round or a grenade land on top of you, etc. could result in being “physically or emotionally broken”?

    Silly young people!

    • Replies: @bomag
    @PhysicistDave

    Note here the lack of familiarity with military service contributes to that perception.

    The military today is largely sold as a social program with benefits after service.

    , @lavoisier
    @PhysicistDave


    Like how could anyone think that going into battle, being shot at, having an artillery round or a grenade land on top of you, etc. could result in being “physically or emotionally broken”?
     
    Or killing someone without any good reason!
  7. We got out of Afghanistan. We can probably get out of a few more places too. Let’s have smaller armed forces.

    Anyway, Trump and Marjorie Taylor Greene think you’re a sucker for joining.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Cheesemaster2000

    This comment brought to you by the CCP.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @anonymous

    , @Wj
    @Cheesemaster2000

    I feel bad for people that volunteered for anything other than personal interest . The people that volunteered for patriotic reasons are suckers

    Replies: @Mark G.

  8. I guess the enthusiasm for being errand boys for bankers is finally starting to wain, even among the decreasing portion of the American population deemed fit to serve. I think that the solution will be to import African and Asian mercenaries to fill out the ranks–they won’t mind being errand boys for bankers, especially if the enemy is white America.

    • Replies: @dearieme
    @Diversity Heretic

    Your remark might make a cynic think that the recruitment struggle would form cover for the hiring of foreign mercenaries.

    The Romans did that: it worked for a while and then it didn't. Many of the German barbarians who took over Western Europe had been Roman troops.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Diversity Heretic


    the solution will be to import African and Asian mercenaries to fill out the ranks–they won’t mind being errand boys for bankers, especially if the enemy is white America.
     
    They've already started doing this, though the Asian and African military imports I've met (mostly a decade or more ago) have been pretty well disposed toward white America. But I know they're working on changing that.

    Replies: @BB753

  9. Americans are raised to be fragile these days.

    It is possible that the people who claim, “the military would probably damage me” are more smart than fragile.

    The primary problem with serving in the US military (or any military for that matter) is that they own you in a way that a civilian employer never would. If someone in, say, the army tells you, “we are moving your barracks/desk/slit trench downwind from a burn pit,” then you can look forward to inhaling smoke (and God knows what else) for as long as the military feels like having you do it.

    While being handed a rifle and being sent overseas is about as bad a deal as it gets, you do not necessarily have to be handed a rifle in the military to have your health record turned into a very sad story indeed. At this point, the US military’s reputation may be proceeding it with regards to how it treats its “employees,” hence the prevailing attitude of “no thanks.”

    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Luddite in Chief

    I'm 99.9999999% sure Sailer has never mentioned serving in the military.

    Steve, why didn't you join?

    Psychological trauma from military service is well publicized. Some causes would be worth the risk, but why should anyone want to go risk their mental and physical health, if not their life, in order to serve Israel and Halliburton? If it's "fragility" then what was your excuse?

    , @SaneClownPosse
    @Luddite in Chief

    Signing up requires signing your rights away. Your body and soul belong to the military for however long you serve. Uncle Sam can use a service member as he/she/xe sees fit.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Luddite in Chief


    The primary problem with serving in the US military (or any military for that matter) is that they own you in a way that a civilian employer never would. If someone in, say, the army tells you, “we are moving your barracks/desk/slit trench downwind from a burn pit,” then you can look forward to inhaling smoke (and God knows what else) for as long as the military feels like having you do it.
     
    The long forward deployments during Operation Forever War will lead to lots of GIs developing lung cancer from exposure to burn-pit smoke. Perhaps that was true in Vietnam too and it was just unrecognized. Maybe it got chalked up to Agent Orange.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  10. Demobilization, anyone?

    By Courtney Kube and Molly Boigon

    Quite different approaches to impending war can be seen on the expressions of Courtney Kube’s twin sons:

    A third doesn’t hurt:

    https://biographymask.com/courtney-kube/

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Wow, those kids are ugly as hell.

    , @For what it's worth
    @Reg Cæsar

    Wtf is the point of posting photos of the children of the author?

    Replies: @Anon, @Reg Cæsar, @Wency

  11. Perhaps young Americans are following tweets (or toks) from Ukrainian megafauna?

    “Zoo XII Months white rhinoceros, Archie, sits in his enclosure on a recent summer day. Many of the big animals at the zoo have become afraid of loud noises and explosions since the beginning of the war.”

    Ukraine’s zoos struggle to stay afloat during war, with traumatized animals and dwindling resources

  12. It’s a combination of greater and greater proportions of the population going to college as a life script and maybe, just maybe, has something to do with all the crazy neocon wars and a decline in the proportion of young men who feel like they own the country they were born in.

    • Replies: @Arclight
    @Altai

    Exactly this. Thanks!

    , @Bill Jones
    @Altai

    https://rense.com/1.mpicons/slider20200710/mm.jpg

    Replies: @anonymous

    , @McFly
    @Altai

    Correct. I put all of the blame on the military as an institution and the civilian establishment leadership, and none of it on today’s young people. I would not encourage a young person to join the military, and after Afghanistan, Iraq, and Vietnam, it’s surprising the numbers still as high as they are.

    , @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Altai

    Actually white men are more likely to enlist in the military today compared to 2010. Back in 2010 there were 1.1 million whites in the military. Today there are 1 million whites in the military. Yet we have 9 million less whites of military age today , so a much higher share of eligible whites are in the military in 2022 compared to 2010.

    Back in 2010 70% of the active duty military was white. Today 68% of the active military is white. Back in 2010 the pool of potential recruits was 60% white compared to just 55% white today. More significant to recruitment goals is the fact that the pool has shrunk from 27 million whites down to 23 million whites over the past decade. We are running out of whites , as the white population continues to decline each year.

    When we consider the decline in the number of whites the share of whites enlisting in the military is actually higher today than in 2010. The military is having trouble enlisting men because we have less White men today compared to a decade ago. The White population is in rapid decline and it can be observed by looking at the significant decline in the number of whites under the age of 40.

    Replies: @Cool Daddy Jimbo

  13. @Mike_from_SGV
    1. It has been a good job market, and there are easier ways to make a living thsn being in the military.
    2. The US military is a leftist captured institution that pushes the woke religion, and any normal person who joins up is being a servant to the queer empire that hates normal people.
    3. The US Military and leadership have not exactly covered themselves in glory in recent years, eg the Afghan debacle.

    I don't know which of these factors, or others, are the main drivers of the enlistment situation.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @JR Ewing, @pyrrhus

    The openly pro-BLM and pro-CRT stances the military has taken has not exactly endeared it to its historical backbone: conservative white males. And of course there’s the absurdity of the pro-LGBT stuff, but I think this is a negligible factor.

    The hysterical overreaction to January 6th, when thousands of troops were stationed in our nation’s capital in unpleasant conditions probably didn’t make service seem any more desirable.

    But I think the vaccine mandates are the main issue. Then the Afghan debacle. Then the instigation of this war with Russia.

    The real question is: why is anyone still enlisting?

    • Agree: Bernie
    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @AndrewR

    Lots of lower middle class white kids in the South and Midwest who see it as a way to get training and get paid. Better than working at the local Autozone.

    Now, do they want to fight? Probably not. The military is just another corporation to them. They also don't want to stay long term.

    Replies: @bro3886

    , @Jack P
    @AndrewR

    I can't imagine the LGBT garbage is a "negligible" factor. The current regime is all in and hopefully most likely recruits are not.

    , @Farenheit
    @AndrewR


    LGBT stuff, but I think this is a negligible factor.
     
    "Wars are won in the temples, before they're won on the battlefields"-S Tzu
  14. @Reg Cæsar
    Demobilization, anyone?

    By Courtney Kube and Molly Boigon
     
    Quite different approaches to impending war can be seen on the expressions of Courtney Kube's twin sons:



    https://biographymask.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/Courtney-Kube-The-Blast.jpg


    A third doesn't hurt:


    https://biographymask.com/courtney-kube/


    https://media-cldnry.s-nbcnews.com/image/upload/t_fit-1120w,f_auto,q_auto:best/newscms/2021_39/3509086/pregnant_withaj.jpg

    Replies: @Anon, @For what it's worth

    Wow, those kids are ugly as hell.

    • Agree: Blodgie, Kratoklastes
    • LOL: AndrewR
  15. @Redneck farmer
    Worrying about post-service physical problems is actually somewhat legitimate. Infantry carries a lot of gear, and unlike in the past, troops aren't allowed to ditch the items they don't think they're going to need. A relatively large number of ex-grunts are on full or partial disability due to ruined joints.
    Most military jobs don't have that issue, though.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mike Tre, @AceDeuce, @Kronos

    It is often said that an infantryman’s pack has never gotten lighter since Roman legionnaire times.

    I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s significantly heavier in these days of automatic weapons when the amount of ammunition that can be carried can be decisive. I’m guessing Roman troops likely weighed in the 130 to 140 pound range. And the Roman army was really smart about not overburdening their men. I read Edward Luttwak’s book “The Grand Strategy of Rome” and he emphasized how the legions could march for 1000 miles or more and arrive in better shape than when they left. They only marched 4 or 5 hours per day and had lots of techniques for ensuring that they ate and slept well en route.

    • Thanks: HammerJack
    • Replies: @John Henry
    @Steve Sailer


    significantly heavier in these days of automatic weapons when the amount of ammunition that can be carried can be decisive.
     
    I've long thought this was the reason we went from a main battle rifle of .308 and 30-06 (NATO 7.62X51) to 5.56mm (X45). The latter of which is fired from a gun not much more in weight than the Johnny Eagle.
    , @Almost Missouri
    @Steve Sailer


    lots of techniques for ensuring that they ate and slept well en route.
     
    As I recall, the main technique was: have the world's most epic logistical system since the dawn of civilization.

    But I never finished The Grand Strategy, so there's probably more in the later chapters.
    , @Joe Stalin
    @Steve Sailer

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-5dY1uqQAk
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4b6fZsaRbn8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dsbn93lT8eo

    , @GeologyAnonMk6
    @Steve Sailer

    Average legionaire in Hadraians time carried 60lb of gear while on a March, and slightly less when in battle order. A M249 gunner carries 120lb, and a regular rifleman ~90lb. The NGSW program spent a few billion dollars with the project objective of delivering a lighter but more lethal weapon, original prototypes+ammo were 40% lighter than M249 and 5x100 ammo belts, but somehow SIG won the contract with a gun that is heavier than the M4 it replaces, substantially, with no weight savings in ammunition, a much heavier optic, and smaller magazines and significantly reduced total ammo count carried. Idiotic.

    , @Kronos
    @Steve Sailer

    I think that's why DOD is playing around with robot pack mules and exoskeletons.

    https://www.dogster.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/cujo-robotic-dog-2.jpg

    https://www.dogster.com/lifestyle/robot-dog-cujo-military-marines-training-missions-videos-pictures-photos

    https://news-cdn.softpedia.com/images/news2/Lockheed-Begins-Military-Testing-of-Robotic-Exoskeleton-2.jpg

  16. @Cheesemaster2000
    We got out of Afghanistan. We can probably get out of a few more places too. Let's have smaller armed forces.

    Anyway, Trump and Marjorie Taylor Greene think you're a sucker for joining.

    Replies: @Anon, @Wj

    This comment brought to you by the CCP.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Anon

    Anon[238] wrote to Cheesemaster2000:



    [Cheesemaster2000] We got out of Afghanistan. We can probably get out of a few more places too. Let’s have smaller armed forces.
     
    [Anon] This comment brought to you by the CCP.
     
    Or just maybe the CCP rather likes the idea of the US wasting its blood and treasure fighting other people's wars, while China is busy using trade and economics to dominate the planet.

    Just maybe?

    Replies: @Anon, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    , @anonymous
    @Anon

    Does that mean you support staying in the Middle East and fighting the Iran War?

  17. Ask yourself ,would you want a demented old idiot as your commander and chief?

  18. In related news, ten members of the Kansas City Royals refused the mandatory ‘vaccination’ to enter Canada and are missing their team’s four game series against the Toronto Blue Jays. They were put on the restricted list which removes them from the 40 man roster temporarily.

    Young healthy people refusing the mRNA jab is a good story whether it involves ballplayers or members of the armed forces.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Slim

    More evidence that we need to annex Canada immediately. The only argument against it is "the US and Canada are too culturally different for that," which is obviously negated by a quick glance at immigration statistics. If cultural differences mattered that much then we wouldn't have any Somalians, South Asians or Chinese in North America.

    , @Jay Fink
    @Slim

    and the Royals won the first game in the series despite being -400 underdogs due to their shortage of available players.

  19. Americans are raised to be fragile these days.

    Or maybe they’ve been paying attention to all the wounded, mentally afflicted, and traumatized soldiers who’ve been returning home from our endless foreign wars.

    A good discussion of the true costs of our foreign wars.

    Watch a movie called “Born on the 4th of July” to gain more perspective on this issue. The 1989 film was directed by Oliver Stone, who (unlike the various draft-dodging presidents that we’ve had in recent years) actually served in a war.

    Why die in a foreign war so some draft-dodger can get reelected in 2004?
    Why die in a foreign war to enrich the war profiteers of Haliburton?
    Why die in a foreign war to advance Israeli national security?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Oliver Stone volunteered for two tours of combat in Vietnam and was wounded twice and won the Bronze Star once for heroism. I always felt he was more than entitled to offer his opinion of his country's foreign policy.

    Replies: @Blodgie, @AceDeuce, @Vetman, @Bill Jones, @Sick n' Tired, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Mike Tre
    @JohnnyWalker123

    My mom went to high school with Caroline Kava.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    , @BB753
    @JohnnyWalker123

    You want more recruits? Rise the wages. Nobody joins the military out of patriotism.

    , @VivaLaMigra
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Ann Jones recounts the horrors of war on the Afghani [note: an "Afghan" is a type of blanket, not a person] population but fails to mention that during a mere two decades of American occupation of that region [it's inaccurate to call that god-forsaken expanse of near bone-dry and mountainous terrain a "nation" or "country" as it's just a bunch of tribes with an artificial boundary arbitrarily drawn around it] the population exploded from just 20 million to 40 million. How did this happen in a region with piss-poor resources and a nearly illiterate population? One could rightly conclude that far from being a catastrophe for the people there, American presence, or more specifically, the billions of US dollars flushed down that toilet was a positive boon to the inhabitants. Afghani women are pooping out babies at a truly sickening rate. There's only one product that shithole can produce with a market demand sufficient to sustain their out-of-control population growth: opium.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Reg Cæsar

  20. @Anon
    @Cheesemaster2000

    This comment brought to you by the CCP.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @anonymous

    Anon[238] wrote to Cheesemaster2000:

    [Cheesemaster2000] We got out of Afghanistan. We can probably get out of a few more places too. Let’s have smaller armed forces.

    [Anon] This comment brought to you by the CCP.

    Or just maybe the CCP rather likes the idea of the US wasting its blood and treasure fighting other people’s wars, while China is busy using trade and economics to dominate the planet.

    Just maybe?

    • Replies: @Anon
    @PhysicistDave


    Or just maybe the CCP rather likes the idea of the US wasting its blood and treasure fighting other people’s wars
     
    The US lost rougly 3500 men in Afghanistan over the 20 year period of the war. That's nothing. The mortality rate was slightly higher than civilian life back home in America is today. Get a grip you frickin' Nancy, combat casualties were never an argument against the war.

    Replies: @Vetman, @Drive-by poster, @Almost Missouri, @Wj, @Thea, @PhysicistDave

    , @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @PhysicistDave

    The United States expanded from the 13 colonies all the way to the Western Pacific under the flag of manifest destiny. This geopolitical strategy has served well for American prosperity, but simply now it is a spent force.

    The proverbial expression is 强弩之末 the arrow from the strongest bow becomes weak after flying its assigned distance.

    https://eng.ichacha.net/强弩之末.html

    PRC's geopolitical strategy is Eurasia integration. If there are no wars in Afghanistan and Ukraine, the heart of Eurasia, the Chinese would sooner build a high-speed rail commerce network connecting West Asia and Europe. The US would become more marginalized, the dollar weaker, and a less appealing destination for the world's best and brightest.

    That's the tradeoff.

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Dave from Oz

  21. @PhysicistDave

    “They think they’re going to be physically or emotionally broken after serving,” said one senior U.S. military official familiar with the recruiting issues, who believes a lack of familiarity with military service contributes to that perception.
     
    Yeah., how silly!

    Like how could anyone think that going into battle, being shot at, having an artillery round or a grenade land on top of you, etc. could result in being "physically or emotionally broken"?

    Silly young people!

    Replies: @bomag, @lavoisier

    Note here the lack of familiarity with military service contributes to that perception.

    The military today is largely sold as a social program with benefits after service.

  22. The vast majority of the US military is made up of John Lee Pettimores (with a sprinkling of Jamals and Jose’s). The country has spent the past ten years telling John Lee how much it hates him. I can’t really blame John Lee for not signing up. Jamal, Jose’, you got it, fellas. Good luck.

    • Agree: Pop Warner
    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    @Cool Daddy Jimbo


    John Lee Pettimores
     
    Same's his Daddy and his Daddy before, unless I miss my guess.

    The thing that characterises a lot of the John Lee Pettimore types is that they have absolutely no misconceptions about the military, and post-service they are (ahem) diffident in their approach to "law enforcement".

    Fucking awesome lyrics...

    Volunteered for the army on my birthday
    They draft the white trash first 'round here anyway
    I done two tours of duty in Vietnam
    I came home with a brand new plan
    I take the seed from Colombia and Mexico
    Just plant it up the holler down Copperhead Road

    Now the D.E.A's got a chopper in the air
    I wake up screaming like I'm back over there
    But I learned a thing or two from Charlie don't you know
    You better stay away from Copperhead Road
     

    It should go without saying that I'm referencing Steve Earle, not whatever faggot wrote the utterly-derivative, lyricless recent thing.

    That whole album is terrific - "Nothing But A Child" brings tears to my eyes, and I'm a depopulationist atheist. The only letdown was in the CD cover, where Earle write "If you don't vote, don't bitch", which shows a breathtaking naïveté regarding elections.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xvaEJzoaYZk

    Then again, one of my favourite recording artists of all time is Roger Miller - celebrating white-trash Americana with a wry smile.

    Replies: @Cool Daddy Jimbo, @beavertales

  23. I don’t think it’s as big as the other factors, the woke BS, the anti-White attitude, and the realization that the US Military does not do defense of the United States, but the forced vaccination business is probably a significant factor too. See, it’s not just this one, but once you join up, the military will be free to jab you with something any time some higher up (Mrs. Milly?) decides so.

    The mandatory Kung Flu vaccine has played a small part in the current major pilot shortage. The airlines have conveniently dropped all vaccine requirements for getting employed and staying employed, cause, “this is stupid, and we need people”. However, some pilots, mostly the ones closer to retirement age, went ahead and retired earlier due to this threat.

    I also know of one late-50s pilot through a friend who got the vaccine due to his wife’s nagging – she wasn’t worried about his health, but just that he’d get terminated soon if he didn’t – and he can no longer pass the resting EKG so will not fly anymore.

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I think that you're on to something vis-à-vis resistance to the vaccine mandate. Anyone informed enough to be an interesting recruit is probably at least vaguely aware that young men seem to suffer the most adverse effects (myocarditis and periocarditis). If he's wavering the vaccine mandate may end up being the deciding factor in a decision not to enlist.

    , @sayless
    @Achmed E. Newman

    That's horrible.

  24. @JohnnyWalker123

    Americans are raised to be fragile these days.

     

    Or maybe they've been paying attention to all the wounded, mentally afflicted, and traumatized soldiers who've been returning home from our endless foreign wars.

    A good discussion of the true costs of our foreign wars.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLXrgmz-0lo

    Watch a movie called "Born on the 4th of July" to gain more perspective on this issue. The 1989 film was directed by Oliver Stone, who (unlike the various draft-dodging presidents that we've had in recent years) actually served in a war.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jk_07yseiDA

    Why die in a foreign war so some draft-dodger can get reelected in 2004?
    Why die in a foreign war to enrich the war profiteers of Haliburton?
    Why die in a foreign war to advance Israeli national security?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mike Tre, @BB753, @VivaLaMigra

    Oliver Stone volunteered for two tours of combat in Vietnam and was wounded twice and won the Bronze Star once for heroism. I always felt he was more than entitled to offer his opinion of his country’s foreign policy.

    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @Blodgie
    @Steve Sailer

    I can’t stand this extremely Boomer concept that if you never “served” you can’t say anything about how the US military is no place for someone with an IQ over 90.

    , @AceDeuce
    @Steve Sailer


    Oliver Stone volunteered for two tours of combat in Vietnam and was wounded twice and won the Bronze Star once for heroism. I always felt he was more than entitled to offer his opinion of his country’s foreign policy.
     
    Tim McVeigh was awarded a Bronze Star, as well. Does that lend credence to his views?

    Replies: @GeologyAnonMk6

    , @Vetman
    @Steve Sailer

    Fully agree; however, Stone did a single tour in SVN, Sep 67-Nov 68 with the 25 ID. You are correct about his Bronze Star for Valor and 2 PHs. He paid his dues.

    , @Bill Jones
    @Steve Sailer


    I always felt he was more than entitled to offer his opinion of his country’s foreign policy.
     
    Why?

    Because he supported the biggest foreign policy fuck-up of the century?

    Myself I don't think stupid ignorant bravado is much of a qualification for anything.
    , @Sick n' Tired
    @Steve Sailer

    He's been on Joe Rogan's podcast twice, gave very good in depth interviews. Definitely worth a listen.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Oliver Stone volunteered for two tours of combat in Vietnam and was wounded twice and won the Bronze Star once for heroism. I always felt he was more than entitled to offer his opinion of his country’s foreign policy.
     
    Joyce Kilmer has a rest stop named in his honor in his native New Jersey. He supported entering the war in print, then nobly (if stupidly) enlisted himself. He was killed in action.

    Though remembered for his arborist doggerel, he is honored for his service. Never forget that.

    And how appropriate that it offers full-service gasoline!


    https://www.theconcordinsider.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/20120904_nature.jpg


    Top two reviews on Foursquare:

    Ethar El-Katatney May 24, 2013
    Surprisingly comprehensive rest area. Restaurants, Starbucks, market, spotless bathrooms. Full service gas station. But best of all: all the employees are Egyptian!

    Vinny Vodka-Tonic September 30, 2015
    Great place! I even bought a gold watch from a guy in the bathroom. It turns my wrist a little green but I think it's a special kind of gold or something.

    https://foursquare.com/v/joyce-kilmer-travel-plaza/4bb754db46d4a593414fc7c0
     
    (It's been asserted that New Jersey boasts both the best and the worst toll road in the US, but I can never remember which of the two is which.)

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  25. Maybe the lack of qualified manpower will FINALLY force the US to stop meddling around the world. It is to be sincerely wished for. Being bankrupt, continually losing hasn’t done the job.

    Let’s just hope that happens before the dopes get a ship sunk, or a plane shot down.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @Old Prude

    This will be seen as a cause for more immigration; recently arrived Americans doing the jobs native Americans won't do.

    There are literally 1000's of rifles rusting in the armory.

  26. It’s almost as if there was a reason for the draft. Maybe not a good reason, but a reason.

  27. @Dumbo
    There's no mystery, Steve. It has NOTHING to do with the Ukraine war. Force soldiers to vaccinate with an unpopular (and useless) vaccine. Promote women, gays and trannies in the military. Turn the whole thing into some type of Woke Academy. Then how can you wonder why numbers would be down?!?

    Sometimes I wonder if the people who analyze things are really that dumb, or they are just pretending to be.

    Replies: @Mr Mox, @S. Anonyia, @Couch scientist, @NOTA

    Force soldiers to vaccinate with an unpopular (and useless) vaccine. Promote women, gays and trannies in the military. Turn the whole thing into some type of Woke Academy.

    In other words: scare away the very type of people a functioning army is build upon. Once the psy-ops are over and all the smart bombs have been dropped, you will still need boots on the ground – not stiletto heels.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Mr Mox


    In other words: scare away the very type of people a functioning army is build upon.
     
    Well, just imagine the comedy goldmine that will appear when the regime lands us in a three-front WW3 against Russia, China, and Iran.
    , @Farenheit
    @Mr Mox


    scare away the very type of people a functioning army is build upon. Once the psy-ops are over and all the smart bombs have been dropped, you will still need boots on the ground – not stiletto heels.
     
    Word on the street is the Army just released its new policy on fingernail polish for males, clear only, for those of you keeping score at home.

    Replies: @Alden

  28. Third-world population = third-world country = third-world military. There’s no way third-world America is going to remain a super power (outside of nukes). So the decline and fall of the American military is inevitable. Fools who join and fight today are like the U.S. soldiers in Vietnam who fought and died during the period of “Vietnamization”, dying for the vanity of politicians in a hopeless cause.

    The military leadership plays the same dirty game other ruling trash groups are playing, keeping the top white and competent so the system keeps running while throwing the white peons under the bus. (The black professor who is given a class in black studies but is kept far, far away from the mathematics department because that’s money.) But it can’t go on too much longer, soon the demographic changes will force changes at the top and the result will be a hot mess of third-world incompetence. (Plus the New Americans would sensibly rather pocket the soon-to-be-diminishing money government goons extract from the white serfs than waste it on adventures for Israel and other overseas boutique fads of the ruling class.) Who will want to fight for that?

    But the real issue is moral, if you’re white, especially if you’re a white Southerner or Midwesterner, don’t fight for a regime that hates you, regardless of who holds the Presidency. Don’t fight for a system that openly states that disempowering you, enslaving you, and then exterminating you are its highest moral goals. When will white idiots learn, if you can’t help yourselves then at least don’t help the bear.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @bro3886

    Excellent comment, Bro!

    Also, big [Agree] with Old Prude too.

    Let me add something to this great paragraph:


    ... if you’re white, especially if you’re a white Southerner or Midwesterner, don’t fight for a regime that hates you, regardless of who holds the Presidency. Don’t fight for a system that openly states that disempowering you, enslaving you, and then exterminating you are its highest moral goals. When will white idiots learn, if you can’t help yourselves then at least don’t help the bear.
     
    It's weird how many people have a certain kind of courage, to take their chances among bullets, shells, and IEDs, yet it's either too much politeness, or the lack of a different kind of courage to just resist they enemy at home.

    Next time they force your group into the Diversity Enrichment seminar, you just say NO. Yes, they will aim to fire you instead of AT you, but just as on a battlefield, you need to stick together. It's a different kind of war.

    Replies: @JR Ewing

  29. Vanity Fair is wonderful – Becky Sharp is a wonderful female character and very modern.

    Barry Lyndon from a few years earlier is pretty much the same with a male character – it is good but Vanity Fair is better.
    All versions of both I have seen read or heard (films, books and BBC radio plays) have been excellent.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @michael droy

    The BBC does Radio Plays and Nature Documentaries very well. The Planet Earth series may be the best TV ever produced.

  30. Anon[887] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave
    @Anon

    Anon[238] wrote to Cheesemaster2000:



    [Cheesemaster2000] We got out of Afghanistan. We can probably get out of a few more places too. Let’s have smaller armed forces.
     
    [Anon] This comment brought to you by the CCP.
     
    Or just maybe the CCP rather likes the idea of the US wasting its blood and treasure fighting other people's wars, while China is busy using trade and economics to dominate the planet.

    Just maybe?

    Replies: @Anon, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    Or just maybe the CCP rather likes the idea of the US wasting its blood and treasure fighting other people’s wars

    The US lost rougly 3500 men in Afghanistan over the 20 year period of the war. That’s nothing. The mortality rate was slightly higher than civilian life back home in America is today. Get a grip you frickin’ Nancy, combat casualties were never an argument against the war.

    • Troll: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Vetman
    @Anon

    I guess it is NOTHING to someone who wasn’t putting their comrades in body bags. And here I thought I was cynical, jaded and crass after 6 visits to Afghanistan/Iraq.

    , @Drive-by poster
    @Anon


    The US lost rougly 3500 men in Afghanistan over the 20 year period of the war. That’s nothing.
     
    It is only "nothing" if your kid wasn't one of the 3500.

    Also, that figure of 3500 only reflects those killed. You can safely triple that if you include those who were wounded, and came away from the campaign minus an arm or leg, or those who will never feel quite right again between their ears.

    https://pics.me.me/the-war-is-over-my-boy-forget-it-life-magazine-43517979.png

    The mortality rate was slightly higher than civilian life back home in America is today.
     
    Mortality rates are only one cost of warfare. There are many other costs, some of which cannot be seen and counted as easily.

    It is possible for your body to remain in one piece while your mind is long gone.

    If you think going to war is something that soldiers and Marines can simply shrug off once they go home, you haven't been around very many. Wars can continue to be fought, again and again, in the minds of those who were doing the fighting long after the war itself has ended.

    America may have buried its dead from the war, but it will be paying the price of Afghanistan for many decades to come. We will have to wait and see whether the warmongers succeed in talking the Americans into going to war again less than a year after the end of the two-decade long war in Afghanistan.

    Replies: @Anon, @Harry Baldwin

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Anon


    The US lost rougly 3500 men in Afghanistan over the 20 year period of the war. That’s nothing.
     
    Casualty accounting usually neglects to count private military contractors (i.e., soldiers rehired at higher pay but whose demise is off the Pentagon's books). Casualty totals approximately double if you include those.

    Also, a lot of men who would have been KIA in previous wars end up being badly WIA thanks to rapid evac and modern medical techniques. In the World Wars, the WIA:KIA ratio was something like 2:1 or 3:1. This century it has been more like 10:1. A lot of the difference is made up of very dire cases. Some of those later opt for suicide, but again that's off the Pentagon's books.

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    , @Wj
    @Anon

    The number of casualties is just one of the reason Afghanistan and Iraq were terrible ideas. Just plain stupid wars

    , @Thea
    @Anon

    The death of one decent American soldier for these worthless wars was too many. All the while Bush pursued this nonsense, our southern border was completely unprotected. These same soldiers could have been employed in much more meaningful ways.

    You don’t mention the living vets missing an arm or leg.


    Don’t forget the trillions of dollars that could have been put to better use taking care of our people and securing our borders.

    Replies: @Anon, @Wilkey

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Anon

    Anon[887] wrote to me:


    The US lost rougly 3500 men in Afghanistan over the 20 year period of the war. That’s nothing. The mortality rate was slightly higher than civilian life back home in America is today. Get a grip you frickin’ Nancy, combat casualties were never an argument against the war.
     
    If the 3500 American dead in Afghanistan do not matter, then I suppose the slightly less than 3000 dead on 9/11 did not matter either?

    A thousand here, a thousand there, who cares, right??

    One of the 9/11 victims was an old college friend of mine -- Bryan Jack. I'm pretty sure that to Bryan's family his death did matter.

    And the same for each of the combat deaths in Afghanistan.

    Of course, if that war had served any legitimate purpose for the well-being of the American people, you might have a point.

    But it didn't.

    You frickin' Nancy.

    Frickin' anonymous Nancy, who lacks the guts to even give your own name.

    Dave Miller in Sacramento

  31. I have to say that your view of the Battle of Waterloo is unusual. It’s normally considered the final battle of the Napoleonic Wars, which lasted from 1803-1815. So wars did go on for years in the early 1800s, regardless of the economy.

    • Replies: @tyrone
    @GSH

    "or' the hills and or' the plains through FLANDERS,PORTUGAL and SPAIN " so the song goes......you are right .

    , @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @GSH

    British forces were only one fourth of Wellington's coalition (the rest mostly German), its officer corps suffered heavy casualties at the battle, which according to Wellington, was "the nearest-run thing you ever saw in your life", "give me night, or give me Blücher."

    But at the end of the battle out of chivalry the British invited the remaining French forces to surrender, the answer given was "merde!" (shit). This was the time before total war, of gas attacks, terror bombing, and many many more.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wd0M1IBwpyM

    , @Dmon
    @GSH

    I agree. In fact, you could pretty much say that by Waterloo, Britian had been more or less continuously at war since 1756. Granted it wasn't what we would consider Total War today, but still. For me, the takeaway from comparisons between war then and now is the death of noblesse oblige. The Waterloo British officer corps were aristocrats to a man. In return for a life of comfort and privilege, when war came around, they were expected to put on a bright red uniform, sit on a large horse right out in the very front, and act as a big, visible target. Compare that to today. The modern American ruling class has wealth and power undreamed of by any British aristocrat, attained mostly by luck and fortuitous timing, and they are asked nothing in return (other than a steady stream of payola in money and kind to the right politicians). Very few of them get anywhere near any kind of danger, or even render any public service beyond photo ops. When they decide to express their inner Bismarck, part of their cannon fodder's subconscious calculus is "Hunter's the one getting rich off Ukraine, not me. Let him go fight for it".
    And before anyone brings up Beau, he was a lawyer. As David Hackworth put it (paraphrasing), any time he saw an officer with a bronze star but no purple heart or CIB, he figured it was bullsh!#.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Bill Jones

  32. Steve, when you having finished reading Vanity Fair, I recommend you take a look at the 1998 BBC TV adaptation of the novel.

    That version features the delectable Natasha Little as Becky Sharp, a casting choice that has not been bettered in the many other adaptations before or since.

    Best avoid the 2004 movie version (starring Reese Witherspoon), directed by an Indian woman.

  33. I’m reading William Makepeace Thackeray’s highly entertaining 1840s bestseller “Vanity Fair,”

    I’m reading that book too. It’s very clever how he doesn’t describe any of the battle but instead concentrates on the shenanigans surrounding the relatives in Brussels waiting on the outcome. I think that is the best chapter in the book, very atmospheric.

  34. Do everything possible to dissuade any young man to join our military.

    Ask him ‘why would you want to fight for AOC and Pelosi ?’

  35. If you can see it, you can kill it with PGMs. When the British started bombing Germany in WW2, they were dropping bombs 5 miles off target. They got better when they had Mosquitos with radar drop flares on the target.

    Modern weapons have a CEP of 10 meters of less, which mean you are dead if you are anywhere near by. And many can be fired at standoff range so you never see them coming. See any of the videos from Ukraine that show Russian tanks sitting there and then BOOM.

  36. This is excellent news.

    Why anyone, ever, would want to join a murder racket boggles the mind.

    Something deep inside us loves murder and war: as Patton said “God help me, I do love it so.”

    • Replies: @lavoisier
    @Blodgie

    Something deep inside us loves murder and war: as Patton said “God help me, I do love it so.”

    Nietzsche described it as "The love of the knife."

    I think it gets to the primal, to the evil inside all of us and all of live itself.

  37. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Oliver Stone volunteered for two tours of combat in Vietnam and was wounded twice and won the Bronze Star once for heroism. I always felt he was more than entitled to offer his opinion of his country's foreign policy.

    Replies: @Blodgie, @AceDeuce, @Vetman, @Bill Jones, @Sick n' Tired, @Reg Cæsar

    I can’t stand this extremely Boomer concept that if you never “served” you can’t say anything about how the US military is no place for someone with an IQ over 90.

    • Troll: GeologyAnonMk6
  38. Only 13% had parents who served compared to 40% in 1995 who had parents in the military. This is due to the low fertility of whites. Back in 1995 there were ~27 million whites between the ages of 18-28 and today just ~23 million whites between the ages of 18-28

    The pool of potential soldiers has gotten smaller due to demographic changes…back in 1995 just 9% of the pool of potential soldiers were mestizos compared to 22% today. Mestizos are less able to pass the required tests to qualify for the US army due to their lower levels of intelligence.

    The continued decline in the number of whites will make it more difficult to maintain our military forces at current levels. Asians may have the intelligence to join the military but are the least likely to enlist. Mestizos have a strong desire to enlist but are not qualified due to their lower intelligence and higher rates of obesity. The white population will continue to decline , resulting in a smaller military. The number of Whites between the ages of 18-28 will fall below 20 million within the next 10 years. This is a significant decline from the current 23 million potential pool of white recruits.

  39. I personally wonder about the statistics for broken out for officers alone.

    Royal Navy, 1804–1815:

    killed in action: 6,663
    shipwrecks, drownings, fire: 13,621
    wounds, disease: 72,102
    Total: 92,386.[15]

    British Army, 1804–1815:

    killed in action: 25,569
    wounds, accidents, disease: 193,851
    Total: 219,420[15]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napoleonic_Wars_casualties

    The Spithead and Nore mutinies were two major mutinies by sailors of the Royal Navy in 1797. They were the first in an increasing series of outbreaks of maritime radicalism in the Atlantic World.[1] Despite their temporal proximity, the mutinies differed in character. The Spithead mutiny was a simple, peaceful, successful strike action to address economic grievances, while the Nore mutiny was a more radical action, articulating political ideals as well, which failed.[2]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spithead_and_Nore_mutinies

  40. @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    It is often said that an infantryman's pack has never gotten lighter since Roman legionnaire times.

    I wouldn't be surprised if it's significantly heavier in these days of automatic weapons when the amount of ammunition that can be carried can be decisive. I'm guessing Roman troops likely weighed in the 130 to 140 pound range. And the Roman army was really smart about not overburdening their men. I read Edward Luttwak's book "The Grand Strategy of Rome" and he emphasized how the legions could march for 1000 miles or more and arrive in better shape than when they left. They only marched 4 or 5 hours per day and had lots of techniques for ensuring that they ate and slept well en route.

    Replies: @John Henry, @Almost Missouri, @Joe Stalin, @GeologyAnonMk6, @Kronos

    significantly heavier in these days of automatic weapons when the amount of ammunition that can be carried can be decisive.

    I’ve long thought this was the reason we went from a main battle rifle of .308 and 30-06 (NATO 7.62X51) to 5.56mm (X45). The latter of which is fired from a gun not much more in weight than the Johnny Eagle.

  41. Why would a White man want to serve the rainbow flag? For the pay check? He can get a pay check without getting shot at.

  42. The best national defense strategy is making sure every citizen has an AR-15 in their home and some other goodies as well. The worst defense strategy is disarming Americans while throwing our lot in with European maniacs (who, not coincidentally, want to see Americans disarmed).

  43. @GSH
    I have to say that your view of the Battle of Waterloo is unusual. It's normally considered the final battle of the Napoleonic Wars, which lasted from 1803-1815. So wars did go on for years in the early 1800s, regardless of the economy.

    Replies: @tyrone, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @Dmon

    “or’ the hills and or’ the plains through FLANDERS,PORTUGAL and SPAIN ” so the song goes……you are right .

  44. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Oliver Stone volunteered for two tours of combat in Vietnam and was wounded twice and won the Bronze Star once for heroism. I always felt he was more than entitled to offer his opinion of his country's foreign policy.

    Replies: @Blodgie, @AceDeuce, @Vetman, @Bill Jones, @Sick n' Tired, @Reg Cæsar

    Oliver Stone volunteered for two tours of combat in Vietnam and was wounded twice and won the Bronze Star once for heroism. I always felt he was more than entitled to offer his opinion of his country’s foreign policy.

    Tim McVeigh was awarded a Bronze Star, as well. Does that lend credence to his views?

    • Replies: @GeologyAnonMk6
    @AceDeuce

    I'm positive you have never read either his manifesto or reviewed the court records of his trial. He very eloquently skewered the hypocrisy of how he military decorated him for Valor in Iraq with how they vilified him for actually holding true to his oath later. Maybe don't talk about stuff you have zero idea about.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

  45. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Oliver Stone volunteered for two tours of combat in Vietnam and was wounded twice and won the Bronze Star once for heroism. I always felt he was more than entitled to offer his opinion of his country's foreign policy.

    Replies: @Blodgie, @AceDeuce, @Vetman, @Bill Jones, @Sick n' Tired, @Reg Cæsar

    Fully agree; however, Stone did a single tour in SVN, Sep 67-Nov 68 with the 25 ID. You are correct about his Bronze Star for Valor and 2 PHs. He paid his dues.

  46. @Luddite in Chief

    Americans are raised to be fragile these days.
     
    It is possible that the people who claim, "the military would probably damage me" are more smart than fragile.

    The primary problem with serving in the US military (or any military for that matter) is that they own you in a way that a civilian employer never would. If someone in, say, the army tells you, "we are moving your barracks/desk/slit trench downwind from a burn pit," then you can look forward to inhaling smoke (and God knows what else) for as long as the military feels like having you do it.

    While being handed a rifle and being sent overseas is about as bad a deal as it gets, you do not necessarily have to be handed a rifle in the military to have your health record turned into a very sad story indeed. At this point, the US military's reputation may be proceeding it with regards to how it treats its "employees," hence the prevailing attitude of "no thanks."

    Replies: @AndrewR, @SaneClownPosse, @Mr. Anon

    I’m 99.9999999% sure Sailer has never mentioned serving in the military.

    Steve, why didn’t you join?

    Psychological trauma from military service is well publicized. Some causes would be worth the risk, but why should anyone want to go risk their mental and physical health, if not their life, in order to serve Israel and Halliburton? If it’s “fragility” then what was your excuse?

  47. @Slim
    In related news, ten members of the Kansas City Royals refused the mandatory 'vaccination' to enter Canada and are missing their team's four game series against the Toronto Blue Jays. They were put on the restricted list which removes them from the 40 man roster temporarily.

    Young healthy people refusing the mRNA jab is a good story whether it involves ballplayers or members of the armed forces.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Jay Fink

    More evidence that we need to annex Canada immediately. The only argument against it is “the US and Canada are too culturally different for that,” which is obviously negated by a quick glance at immigration statistics. If cultural differences mattered that much then we wouldn’t have any Somalians, South Asians or Chinese in North America.

  48. @Altai
    It's a combination of greater and greater proportions of the population going to college as a life script and maybe, just maybe, has something to do with all the crazy neocon wars and a decline in the proportion of young men who feel like they own the country they were born in.

    Replies: @Arclight, @Bill Jones, @McFly, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    Exactly this. Thanks!

  49. @Anon
    @PhysicistDave


    Or just maybe the CCP rather likes the idea of the US wasting its blood and treasure fighting other people’s wars
     
    The US lost rougly 3500 men in Afghanistan over the 20 year period of the war. That's nothing. The mortality rate was slightly higher than civilian life back home in America is today. Get a grip you frickin' Nancy, combat casualties were never an argument against the war.

    Replies: @Vetman, @Drive-by poster, @Almost Missouri, @Wj, @Thea, @PhysicistDave

    I guess it is NOTHING to someone who wasn’t putting their comrades in body bags. And here I thought I was cynical, jaded and crass after 6 visits to Afghanistan/Iraq.

    • Thanks: sayless
  50. This is why I chuckle when I read commenters stating: “You can’t oppose the US Government with small arms because they’ll just send in the military to smoke you! Nah Nah.”

    A few more years of this and no, they won’t. They won’t be able to. There won’t be a plane in the air or a greenback who can read a map.

    Many of the actual fighters – white males from the Midwest – are beginning to avoid the service. When intra-US bullets start flying, I’ll take five young hunters from PA with bolt actions rifles against a squad of Quan’eshas every. single. time.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Rob Lee

    I'm sure with some Midwest ingenuity they could make some narly IEDs.

    Replies: @FPD72

    , @Corvinus
    @Rob Lee

    Will you be joining that group, pretend Cowboy, or will you be sitting in the sidelines?

    That’s why I have to laugh when someone here comes across as a patriot who can’t wait for the impending collapse and the bullets whizzing by “citizen soldiers”.

    (Civil) war is a racket.

  51. @Diversity Heretic
    I guess the enthusiasm for being errand boys for bankers is finally starting to wain, even among the decreasing portion of the American population deemed fit to serve. I think that the solution will be to import African and Asian mercenaries to fill out the ranks--they won't mind being errand boys for bankers, especially if the enemy is white America.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Almost Missouri

    Your remark might make a cynic think that the recruitment struggle would form cover for the hiring of foreign mercenaries.

    The Romans did that: it worked for a while and then it didn’t. Many of the German barbarians who took over Western Europe had been Roman troops.

  52. A lot of conservatives will admit our military is a social welfare jobs program. If you look at what’s actually going on, we have tons of people promoted right up to general who are incompetent.

    White males die at about twice the rate of others in combat. And young white men have realized they are dying for a system that hates them.

    In an actual peer-to-peer war (as opposed to the 3rd world countries we’ve attacked for 50 years), what good is a lot of our equipment anyway? Aircraft carriers look like targets to be destroyed in the first 10 minutes of war with a real country. I have no idea if most airplanes would valuable in a conflict with China years down the road. I’m guessing not. We won’t be fighting WWII style against a first world power in 2022.

    The main value of the US military to our elites is to impose gay rights and globalism on the world. Probably not the kind of thing masculine young men dream of.

    • Agree: Bernie
  53. The most desirable potential enlistee who can walk into a USCG recruiting station today is someone with a culinary degree. All branches should strive toward this. The USN has long recognized the motivating effect of “sub grub” – – lobster and inch-thick slabs of roast beef. Great food is cheaper than aircraft carriers and fighter jets.

  54. @Altai
    It's a combination of greater and greater proportions of the population going to college as a life script and maybe, just maybe, has something to do with all the crazy neocon wars and a decline in the proportion of young men who feel like they own the country they were born in.

    Replies: @Arclight, @Bill Jones, @McFly, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Bill Jones

    The Pentagon still doesn't allow troops whose gender identity is nonbinary (they/them) to serve openly.

  55. @Mike_from_SGV
    1. It has been a good job market, and there are easier ways to make a living thsn being in the military.
    2. The US military is a leftist captured institution that pushes the woke religion, and any normal person who joins up is being a servant to the queer empire that hates normal people.
    3. The US Military and leadership have not exactly covered themselves in glory in recent years, eg the Afghan debacle.

    I don't know which of these factors, or others, are the main drivers of the enlistment situation.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @JR Ewing, @pyrrhus

    2. The US military is a leftist captured institution that pushes the woke religion, and any normal person who joins up is being a servant to the queer empire that hates normal people.

    I used to find it comforting that even though the rest of society is swirling around the shitter, at least the military is full of “normal guys” who didn’t buy into the bullshit and who – if it ever came to that – would be the final barricade between America and the totalitarian nonsense. Much like the Oathkeepers, the Normal rank and file would refuse the ultimate orders if it came to that.

    I guess in a way, it’s somewhat still reassuring that those normal guys are no longer signing up now that the wokerati have captured the military as well.

    However, that is more than offset by the fact that the wokerati have the tanks and other weapons that could eventually be used in service of totalitarianism and they most likely wouldn’t be afraid to use them if need be against “racists” and “fascists”. There are plenty of examples in fiction where this has been foreseen, from the Turner Diaries to the Schlichter books.

    Maybe it’s not that reassuring now that I think about it.

    • Agree: AceDeuce
  56. @Mr. Anon
    Smedley Butler was right.

    War is a racket.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @lavoisier

    What’s with these snowflakes? They don’t want to sign up for a woke anti-white anti-male anti-American gay trans military to kill and be killed while fighting proxy wars for Israel? They’re afraid of coming home with stumps for legs and being confined to a wheelchair when I know for a fact that this one organization that has commercials on Fox will buy some of them their own wheelchair-house? I’m disgusted by this generation of touchy-feely little pencil-necked cowards who are too wimpy to put their lives on the line for Zionists who hate them. Not signing up for the military is the ultimate act of anti-semitic, racist, sexist, trans-phobic toxic masculinity. If only there was some way to FORCE these punks to check their privilege and do their duty.

    • LOL: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @JimDandy


    If only there was some way to FORCE these punks to check their privilege and do their duty.
     
    If there's a lesson of the last few years it is that today's satire is tomorrow's dreary reality.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    , @Rooster16
    @JimDandy

    I routinely ask why a straight White male would enlist in the armed services? I also ask why a White person would vote democrat. Typically this leaves the other person mouth-agape. When you breach the third wall of race in discussion, most people have no come back.

  57. @Dumbo
    There's no mystery, Steve. It has NOTHING to do with the Ukraine war. Force soldiers to vaccinate with an unpopular (and useless) vaccine. Promote women, gays and trannies in the military. Turn the whole thing into some type of Woke Academy. Then how can you wonder why numbers would be down?!?

    Sometimes I wonder if the people who analyze things are really that dumb, or they are just pretending to be.

    Replies: @Mr Mox, @S. Anonyia, @Couch scientist, @NOTA

    You really think the prospect of eventually being deployed to fight in Ukraine or somewhere else in Eastern Europe won’t also have an effect on enlistment? You’re underestimating how much young people are pissed about U.S throwing indefinite billions at the conflict. Especially considering there is a very clear connection between worsening inflation/supply chain issues and the start of the war in late February.

  58. @Mr Mox
    @Dumbo

    Force soldiers to vaccinate with an unpopular (and useless) vaccine. Promote women, gays and trannies in the military. Turn the whole thing into some type of Woke Academy.

    In other words: scare away the very type of people a functioning army is build upon. Once the psy-ops are over and all the smart bombs have been dropped, you will still need boots on the ground - not stiletto heels.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Farenheit

    In other words: scare away the very type of people a functioning army is build upon.

    Well, just imagine the comedy goldmine that will appear when the regime lands us in a three-front WW3 against Russia, China, and Iran.

    • Agree: Kronos
  59. @bro3886
    Third-world population = third-world country = third-world military. There's no way third-world America is going to remain a super power (outside of nukes). So the decline and fall of the American military is inevitable. Fools who join and fight today are like the U.S. soldiers in Vietnam who fought and died during the period of "Vietnamization", dying for the vanity of politicians in a hopeless cause.

    The military leadership plays the same dirty game other ruling trash groups are playing, keeping the top white and competent so the system keeps running while throwing the white peons under the bus. (The black professor who is given a class in black studies but is kept far, far away from the mathematics department because that's money.) But it can't go on too much longer, soon the demographic changes will force changes at the top and the result will be a hot mess of third-world incompetence. (Plus the New Americans would sensibly rather pocket the soon-to-be-diminishing money government goons extract from the white serfs than waste it on adventures for Israel and other overseas boutique fads of the ruling class.) Who will want to fight for that?

    But the real issue is moral, if you're white, especially if you're a white Southerner or Midwesterner, don't fight for a regime that hates you, regardless of who holds the Presidency. Don't fight for a system that openly states that disempowering you, enslaving you, and then exterminating you are its highest moral goals. When will white idiots learn, if you can't help yourselves then at least don't help the bear.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Excellent comment, Bro!

    Also, big [Agree] with Old Prude too.

    Let me add something to this great paragraph:

    … if you’re white, especially if you’re a white Southerner or Midwesterner, don’t fight for a regime that hates you, regardless of who holds the Presidency. Don’t fight for a system that openly states that disempowering you, enslaving you, and then exterminating you are its highest moral goals. When will white idiots learn, if you can’t help yourselves then at least don’t help the bear.

    It’s weird how many people have a certain kind of courage, to take their chances among bullets, shells, and IEDs, yet it’s either too much politeness, or the lack of a different kind of courage to just resist they enemy at home.

    Next time they force your group into the Diversity Enrichment seminar, you just say NO. Yes, they will aim to fire you instead of AT you, but just as on a battlefield, you need to stick together. It’s a different kind of war.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Next time they force your group into the Diversity Enrichment seminar, you just say NO. Yes, they will aim to fire you instead of AT you, but just as on a battlefield, you need to stick together. It’s a different kind of war.
     
    I quit my last corporate job about 15 years ago. Have since been 100x more successful working for myself than I ever would have been working for someone else.

    Nonetheless, before I quit, I dodged mandatory “diversity training” for an entire year. At least 6-8 times by my count. Kept signing up and then coming up with excuses not to go at the last minute. (And truthfully, the excuses were legit - my time was much more valuable and important than sitting in a classroom doing bullshit indoctrination stuff)

    By the time I finally resigned to pursue other opportunities, the training situation had progressed to “possible discipline up to and including termination”. Despite all the money I made them and everything else I accomplished at that company, I still consider avoiding that “training” to be my greatest accomplishment during my time there.

    Replies: @Lurker, @Achmed E. Newman, @Almost Missouri

  60. @Anon
    @PhysicistDave


    Or just maybe the CCP rather likes the idea of the US wasting its blood and treasure fighting other people’s wars
     
    The US lost rougly 3500 men in Afghanistan over the 20 year period of the war. That's nothing. The mortality rate was slightly higher than civilian life back home in America is today. Get a grip you frickin' Nancy, combat casualties were never an argument against the war.

    Replies: @Vetman, @Drive-by poster, @Almost Missouri, @Wj, @Thea, @PhysicistDave

    The US lost rougly 3500 men in Afghanistan over the 20 year period of the war. That’s nothing.

    It is only “nothing” if your kid wasn’t one of the 3500.

    Also, that figure of 3500 only reflects those killed. You can safely triple that if you include those who were wounded, and came away from the campaign minus an arm or leg, or those who will never feel quite right again between their ears.

    The mortality rate was slightly higher than civilian life back home in America is today.

    Mortality rates are only one cost of warfare. There are many other costs, some of which cannot be seen and counted as easily.

    It is possible for your body to remain in one piece while your mind is long gone.

    If you think going to war is something that soldiers and Marines can simply shrug off once they go home, you haven’t been around very many. Wars can continue to be fought, again and again, in the minds of those who were doing the fighting long after the war itself has ended.

    America may have buried its dead from the war, but it will be paying the price of Afghanistan for many decades to come. We will have to wait and see whether the warmongers succeed in talking the Americans into going to war again less than a year after the end of the two-decade long war in Afghanistan.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Drive-by poster

    I assure you the rate of injuries in Afghanistan was lower than in Vietnam or WW2.


    War is a racket... In your demented mind. War is a charity. Get drafted, cuck boy.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Drive-by poster

    A very good book on the lasting psychological effect of war is What It Is Like to Go to War by Karl Marlantes. Marlantes is a highly-decorated Marine who fought in Vietnam. He is also a Rhodes scholar.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Drive-by poster

  61. @Achmed E. Newman
    @bro3886

    Excellent comment, Bro!

    Also, big [Agree] with Old Prude too.

    Let me add something to this great paragraph:


    ... if you’re white, especially if you’re a white Southerner or Midwesterner, don’t fight for a regime that hates you, regardless of who holds the Presidency. Don’t fight for a system that openly states that disempowering you, enslaving you, and then exterminating you are its highest moral goals. When will white idiots learn, if you can’t help yourselves then at least don’t help the bear.
     
    It's weird how many people have a certain kind of courage, to take their chances among bullets, shells, and IEDs, yet it's either too much politeness, or the lack of a different kind of courage to just resist they enemy at home.

    Next time they force your group into the Diversity Enrichment seminar, you just say NO. Yes, they will aim to fire you instead of AT you, but just as on a battlefield, you need to stick together. It's a different kind of war.

    Replies: @JR Ewing

    Next time they force your group into the Diversity Enrichment seminar, you just say NO. Yes, they will aim to fire you instead of AT you, but just as on a battlefield, you need to stick together. It’s a different kind of war.

    I quit my last corporate job about 15 years ago. Have since been 100x more successful working for myself than I ever would have been working for someone else.

    Nonetheless, before I quit, I dodged mandatory “diversity training” for an entire year. At least 6-8 times by my count. Kept signing up and then coming up with excuses not to go at the last minute. (And truthfully, the excuses were legit – my time was much more valuable and important than sitting in a classroom doing bullshit indoctrination stuff)

    By the time I finally resigned to pursue other opportunities, the training situation had progressed to “possible discipline up to and including termination”. Despite all the money I made them and everything else I accomplished at that company, I still consider avoiding that “training” to be my greatest accomplishment during my time there.

    • Agree: Bernie
    • Thanks: Calvin Hobbes
    • LOL: Kronos
    • Replies: @Lurker
    @JR Ewing

    Well played sir!

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @JR Ewing

    Nice job, JR! Your story is uplifting to me. I wish more Americans would take a stand, even if just a small one.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @JR Ewing

    When I was last suffering in corporate America under mandatory diversity training, I was amused that a black lady friend at work hated it even more than I did. (The eternal contradictions of liberalism: they make "diversity training" to be nice to blacks but then blacks end up hating it even more than whites.) Anyhow, she flat out told the boss she wouldn't attend the mandatory training anymore.

    And the boss ...

    ... did nothing.

    He wasn't going to lose his one really good black female employee over some BS corporate mandate. Whether his sentiment was shared all the way of the hierarchy or whether he just forged her attendance signature and swept it under the rug, I don't know. But I still felt a sense of liberation-by-proxy that she could just defy the woke directive, even if I knew the same option wasn't open to me.

    Replies: @Sam Malone

  62. @Mr. Anon
    Smedley Butler was right.

    War is a racket.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @lavoisier

    I live Northern Virginia. Trust me, the military – war or peace – is a racket. I’ve had many a neighbor sucking on that teat. Retired military who had easy jobs in military with sweet pensions. Ex-military with government jobs because they get preference. IT guys working for government contractors who have security clearance so they can’t get fired.

    The list goes on and on.

    Ironically, most the men who serve in combat only stay in the military a short time. It’s the other guys – especially blacks – who get all the goodies.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    "-- especially blacks --"

    With fewer blacks able to meet the measly standards of globalhomo operative General Milley's Army due to obesity and criminal records and illiteracy who will fill the ranks at the post office, DMV, and EDD?

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    Ironically, most the men who serve in combat only stay in the military a short time. It’s the other guys – especially blacks – who get all the goodies.

     

    Blacks are very talented at gaming the system. They know how to grab the maximum amount of loot, while investing the minimum amount of effort. More than anything else, that explains why so many Blacks are in back-office positions in the military.

    For similar reasons, Blacks are highly overrepresented in many government-related jobs.

    Blacks are pretty nepotistic too. However, due to their poor work ethic and incompetence, Black hiring networks tend to have difficulty expanding into lucrative private-sector niches (like IT/software and finance). That's why their networks are limited to certain govt niches (typically those in which producing results is not important) and corporate HR/diversity.

  63. anon[200] • Disclaimer says:

    solution to the problem: MORE IMMIGRATION!

    especially illegal.

    Since illegal aliens are all valedictorians and brain surgeons, they can figure out how to win wars faster just like Wellington won Waterloo in one day.

    And, they will be more fertile (per Jeb!) when they come home, a new baby boom. Because the economy.

    Yeah, that’s the ticket.

  64. @PhysicistDave
    @Anon

    Anon[238] wrote to Cheesemaster2000:



    [Cheesemaster2000] We got out of Afghanistan. We can probably get out of a few more places too. Let’s have smaller armed forces.
     
    [Anon] This comment brought to you by the CCP.
     
    Or just maybe the CCP rather likes the idea of the US wasting its blood and treasure fighting other people's wars, while China is busy using trade and economics to dominate the planet.

    Just maybe?

    Replies: @Anon, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    The United States expanded from the 13 colonies all the way to the Western Pacific under the flag of manifest destiny. This geopolitical strategy has served well for American prosperity, but simply now it is a spent force.

    The proverbial expression is 强弩之末 the arrow from the strongest bow becomes weak after flying its assigned distance.

    https://eng.ichacha.net/强弩之末.html

    PRC’s geopolitical strategy is Eurasia integration. If there are no wars in Afghanistan and Ukraine, the heart of Eurasia, the Chinese would sooner build a high-speed rail commerce network connecting West Asia and Europe. The US would become more marginalized, the dollar weaker, and a less appealing destination for the world’s best and brightest.

    That’s the tradeoff.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    At the end of the day, Halford Mackinder was right.
    The American Century is over. The World Island Millennium is here.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    , @Dave from Oz
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms


    … the Chinese would sooner build a high-speed rail commerce network connecting West Asia and Europe.
     
    The next war will be to annexe a strip of the eastern section of Khazakstan, to create a rail corridor between Russia and China around the western side of the Altai (Altay) mountains. Not kidding. Watch that space https://goo.gl/maps/8pcY225xnv1P2u2G8 .
  65. Anon[370] • Disclaimer says:

    I think it’s way down because your average 18-year old doesn’t want to end up in Ukraine fighting the Russians. With Biden, there’s a real fear that this may happen. Every 18-year old considering some time in the army knows what happened to Napoleon and Hitler when they tried fighting a winter war in that area.

    Biden is too stupid to stay out of trouble. He is on the path of mission creep ala Vietnam. We started out there with ‘advisors’ and ended up sending in regular troops. Biden has already signaled that he’s too stubborn and committed to quit, and he refuses to start any sort peace talks with the Russians.

    Biden doesn’t want peace, and he won’t accept partition of Ukraine. The only option acceptable to him is to defeat the Russians in battle and force them completely out of Ukraine. This won’t work, and Biden is too stubborn and egoistical to admit it. The only way it could work is a major commitment of US troops and our full arsenal of hardware. In other words, a land war with Russia one-on-one. World War 3, no less.

    But Biden is too incompetent to run a war. Everybody knows that. He couldn’t even manage a peaceful withdrawal in Afghanistan. There’s no way we’re winning WW 3 with Biden in charge.

    Keep in mind that the military tends to run in families. Any kids with military parents are being told not to join up right now because Biden is such a retarded chucklehead who knows what might happen.

    • Agree: S. Anonyia
    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    @Anon


    Keep in mind that the military tends to run in families. Any kids with military parents are being told not to join up right now because Biden is such a retarded chucklehead who knows what might happen.
     
    Its not just Biden. It's the Great Replacement, it's DIE, it's the overt hostility towards normal Americans coming from most institutions of power, and yes it is Biden's malevolent administration.

    The Badwhites have had at least one person in every generation going back to the French & Indian War serve in the military. My oldest brother is a member of The Society of the Cincinnati.

    Of the current military age generation none are currently serving, nor will they be encouraged to.

    Replies: @Bernie

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Anon


    Biden is too stupid to stay out of trouble.
     
    He is the guy who said that Hunter was the smartest man he knows.

    But this is beside the point. Other than what flavor of ice cream he wants for dessert, Biden is not deciding anything.

    , @Corvinus
    @Anon

    "The only option acceptable to him is to defeat the Russians in battle and force them completely out of Ukraine. This won’t work, and Biden is too stubborn and egoistical to admit it. The only way it could work is a major commitment of US troops and our full arsenal of hardware. In other words, a land war with Russia one-on-one. World War 3, no less."

    Cool story, bro. You should write fiction. You would make a bundle.

    , @BB753
    @Anon

    It's not Biden. It's his neocon handlers who want to win a proxy war against Russia. Biden is gone. Certifiably demented.
    https://youtu.be/6kSgsP-penk

    , @AnotherDad
    @Anon


    Biden doesn’t want peace, and he won’t accept partition of Ukraine. The only option acceptable to him is to defeat the Russians in battle and force them completely out of Ukraine.
     
    I really don't want to encourage falling into the Ukraine rathole.

    Pretty much the only thing i'd give Biden some--very modest--credit for is stating up front that the US will defend NATO allies, but not get directly involved in Ukraine. (Ukrainians who want independence will have to fight for it themselves.)

    This is the Cold War paradigm. Some number of Russian pilots did fly against the US in the Korean War. But otherwise, while the US or Soviet Union would supply the other's enemy (e.g. Vietnam, Afghanistan), they avoided directly fighting each other. (Occasionally sucky for proxies, but better for the world.)

    Biden presumably wants Ukraine to win. But since he isn't going to send the US to fight, he's already implicitly accepting whatever settlement Putin decides to impose. Biden can work to make it more or less costly and he doesn't have to officially recognize it, but it's a done deal. This again is well understood from the post-War situation in Eastern Europe. The US accepted that they were Russian colonies even if it did not like it or think it was legitimate.

    ~~~

    Note: I'd like to see some more serious engagement with Russia, particularly the likely post-Putin leadership/elites, make sure we understand Russia's point-of-view and concerns and do our best to accommodate their legitimate interests.

    But what I wrote above seems to be the state of play and it certainly is not forcing a Russian defeat.
    , @nebulafox
    @Anon

    IMO, it is more complicated than that, though you aren't wrong: why on Earth would you want to entrust your fate to someone like Mark Milley and a White House dominated by HR drones? Wokeness obviously isn't helping with the usual demographics for military recruitment, at least among the enlisted rank and file. Then there's the fact that a majority of American kids are barred from enlistment, whether for good or for silly reasons. The over-arching culture of "safety-ism" that has infected all areas of American society is proving particularly disastrous in the military, as the exodus of long-serving NCOs would have told you over the past decade.

    On another note: one thing I intensely dislike about our current gerontocracy and their moralistic reasoning on Ukraine is that these are the same people who threw massive hissy fits over intervening in Vietnam when it was their turn, a conflict where we deployed similarly shitty moralistic and geopolitical reasoning in getting involved in that one. The result was a lot bloodier and visibly destructive, but it probably is going to be less geopolitical disastrous than the combination of moves recently made over the past couple of years for the US in the long haul: on the whole, we managed to bounce back from the Vietnam quagmire by the 1980s. I'm less sanguine about this, unless things change soon.

    But that's not what disgusts me: what disgusts me is that their lionization of Zelensky ("the new George Washington") was exactly the same treatment *the North Vietnamese* got from these same people back then.

    Yes, I realize that without the draft, they are just impoverishing the American people rather than sending them to die. But the hypocrisy is nevertheless stunning, if you look at their stated reasons for intervention and compare that to the Vietnam era. Especially when you consider that when it comes to human rights violations, the Indochinese Communists make Putin today look like a schoolboy. But then, these are the same people selling our oil reserves to China at a time of economic crisis, and trumpeting solar panels that are only affordable because they are built by slave laborers as an "answer" to our problems.

  66. @Altai
    It's a combination of greater and greater proportions of the population going to college as a life script and maybe, just maybe, has something to do with all the crazy neocon wars and a decline in the proportion of young men who feel like they own the country they were born in.

    Replies: @Arclight, @Bill Jones, @McFly, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    Correct. I put all of the blame on the military as an institution and the civilian establishment leadership, and none of it on today’s young people. I would not encourage a young person to join the military, and after Afghanistan, Iraq, and Vietnam, it’s surprising the numbers still as high as they are.

  67. @Diversity Heretic
    I guess the enthusiasm for being errand boys for bankers is finally starting to wain, even among the decreasing portion of the American population deemed fit to serve. I think that the solution will be to import African and Asian mercenaries to fill out the ranks--they won't mind being errand boys for bankers, especially if the enemy is white America.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Almost Missouri

    the solution will be to import African and Asian mercenaries to fill out the ranks–they won’t mind being errand boys for bankers, especially if the enemy is white America.

    They’ve already started doing this, though the Asian and African military imports I’ve met (mostly a decade or more ago) have been pretty well disposed toward white America. But I know they’re working on changing that.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Almost Missouri

    How about Mexicans? Why can't they recruit more Mexicans?

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  68. @AndrewR
    @Mike_from_SGV

    The openly pro-BLM and pro-CRT stances the military has taken has not exactly endeared it to its historical backbone: conservative white males. And of course there's the absurdity of the pro-LGBT stuff, but I think this is a negligible factor.

    The hysterical overreaction to January 6th, when thousands of troops were stationed in our nation's capital in unpleasant conditions probably didn't make service seem any more desirable.

    But I think the vaccine mandates are the main issue. Then the Afghan debacle. Then the instigation of this war with Russia.

    The real question is: why is anyone still enlisting?

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Jack P, @Farenheit

    Lots of lower middle class white kids in the South and Midwest who see it as a way to get training and get paid. Better than working at the local Autozone.

    Now, do they want to fight? Probably not. The military is just another corporation to them. They also don’t want to stay long term.

    • Replies: @bro3886
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Partially true. But a lot of young white men purposely volunteer for the combat arms. The poor man's safari, as it's been called. Till the future DOJ death squads kick in you won't get much use out of that 11b training. There are lots of reasons for this volunteering and I think one of them is that white males are continuously emasculated by the Empire, and joining the combat arms part of the military is a way of assuaging the pain of that emasculation, of denying it. They say that Irish and Scottish units were always among the best in the British army, trying to prove their worth in the face of subjugation.

    Replies: @Anon

  69. @GSH
    I have to say that your view of the Battle of Waterloo is unusual. It's normally considered the final battle of the Napoleonic Wars, which lasted from 1803-1815. So wars did go on for years in the early 1800s, regardless of the economy.

    Replies: @tyrone, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @Dmon

    British forces were only one fourth of Wellington’s coalition (the rest mostly German), its officer corps suffered heavy casualties at the battle, which according to Wellington, was “the nearest-run thing you ever saw in your life”, “give me night, or give me Blücher.”

    But at the end of the battle out of chivalry the British invited the remaining French forces to surrender, the answer given was “merde!” (shit). This was the time before total war, of gas attacks, terror bombing, and many many more.

  70. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Oliver Stone volunteered for two tours of combat in Vietnam and was wounded twice and won the Bronze Star once for heroism. I always felt he was more than entitled to offer his opinion of his country's foreign policy.

    Replies: @Blodgie, @AceDeuce, @Vetman, @Bill Jones, @Sick n' Tired, @Reg Cæsar

    I always felt he was more than entitled to offer his opinion of his country’s foreign policy.

    Why?

    Because he supported the biggest foreign policy fuck-up of the century?

    Myself I don’t think stupid ignorant bravado is much of a qualification for anything.

  71. @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    It is often said that an infantryman's pack has never gotten lighter since Roman legionnaire times.

    I wouldn't be surprised if it's significantly heavier in these days of automatic weapons when the amount of ammunition that can be carried can be decisive. I'm guessing Roman troops likely weighed in the 130 to 140 pound range. And the Roman army was really smart about not overburdening their men. I read Edward Luttwak's book "The Grand Strategy of Rome" and he emphasized how the legions could march for 1000 miles or more and arrive in better shape than when they left. They only marched 4 or 5 hours per day and had lots of techniques for ensuring that they ate and slept well en route.

    Replies: @John Henry, @Almost Missouri, @Joe Stalin, @GeologyAnonMk6, @Kronos

    lots of techniques for ensuring that they ate and slept well en route.

    As I recall, the main technique was: have the world’s most epic logistical system since the dawn of civilization.

    But I never finished The Grand Strategy, so there’s probably more in the later chapters.

  72. The Air Force tweeted favorably about “transgenders”. The Marines went in on “pride” month. The current regime constantly sticks its finger in the eye of patriotic Americans. So it’s a credit to young people that they aren’t signing up to serve this regime. This is good news.

    The next Republican president needs to fire every single person in any sort of leadership position in our military.

    • Agree: Farenheit, Old Prude
  73. @AndrewR
    @Mike_from_SGV

    The openly pro-BLM and pro-CRT stances the military has taken has not exactly endeared it to its historical backbone: conservative white males. And of course there's the absurdity of the pro-LGBT stuff, but I think this is a negligible factor.

    The hysterical overreaction to January 6th, when thousands of troops were stationed in our nation's capital in unpleasant conditions probably didn't make service seem any more desirable.

    But I think the vaccine mandates are the main issue. Then the Afghan debacle. Then the instigation of this war with Russia.

    The real question is: why is anyone still enlisting?

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Jack P, @Farenheit

    I can’t imagine the LGBT garbage is a “negligible” factor. The current regime is all in and hopefully most likely recruits are not.

  74. @Reg Cæsar
    Demobilization, anyone?

    By Courtney Kube and Molly Boigon
     
    Quite different approaches to impending war can be seen on the expressions of Courtney Kube's twin sons:



    https://biographymask.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/Courtney-Kube-The-Blast.jpg


    A third doesn't hurt:


    https://biographymask.com/courtney-kube/


    https://media-cldnry.s-nbcnews.com/image/upload/t_fit-1120w,f_auto,q_auto:best/newscms/2021_39/3509086/pregnant_withaj.jpg

    Replies: @Anon, @For what it's worth

    Wtf is the point of posting photos of the children of the author?

    • Thanks: Bill Jones
    • Replies: @Anon
    @For what it's worth

    I think Reg Caesar is just a cuck with some kind of mental illness.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @For what it's worth


    Wtf is the point of posting photos of the children of the author?
     
    She's a "journalist"* specializing in Pentagon issues. The article said right up front that recruiting issues can make an all-volunteer force untenable. (Well, duh, when you're overextended.)

    It's a common trope across the political spectrum that our élites are far less likely to have family members at risk in the service. With three sons, five if you count her stepsons, Courtney Kube is very much an exception to this rule. Good for her!

    Grunts and tars come in two varieties: the enlistee and the draftee. (The feminine ending -ee is unintentionally ironic for this subject.) The twins' expressions in the first picture perfectly embody the difference in attitude of the men who enter service via these two routes.

    We've had none of the latter in Miss† Kube's lifetime, but the fact that her family would be seriously exposed should conscription return is an important point, and one which is relevant to anything she has to say on the subject.

    * NB: The scare quotes are not meant to demean her in particular, just the contemporary inflated job title. She may even deserve the more trustworthy term reporter.

    † She's still wed to the father of her children, just not using her married name in her career. I think this is more a feature than a bug for career women: it offers them an option for more privacy not available to most men. ((Though Jimmy Van Heusen's pilot's license and passport carried his real name, Edward Chester Babcock. But not his grave marker.)

    At any rate, Miss is more respectful than the generic and bureaucratic Ms.

    (Back in the '90s, I noticed that many credit and bank cards held by young British women still used Miss. Was this bank practice, or the customer's choice? Either way, it was most refreshing to see.)

    , @Wency
    @For what it's worth

    Don't care. Childbearing needs to be high-status again. Making this happen will involve a lot of things that look stupid, but I'm not going to knock it.

  75. @Anon
    @PhysicistDave


    Or just maybe the CCP rather likes the idea of the US wasting its blood and treasure fighting other people’s wars
     
    The US lost rougly 3500 men in Afghanistan over the 20 year period of the war. That's nothing. The mortality rate was slightly higher than civilian life back home in America is today. Get a grip you frickin' Nancy, combat casualties were never an argument against the war.

    Replies: @Vetman, @Drive-by poster, @Almost Missouri, @Wj, @Thea, @PhysicistDave

    The US lost rougly 3500 men in Afghanistan over the 20 year period of the war. That’s nothing.

    Casualty accounting usually neglects to count private military contractors (i.e., soldiers rehired at higher pay but whose demise is off the Pentagon’s books). Casualty totals approximately double if you include those.

    Also, a lot of men who would have been KIA in previous wars end up being badly WIA thanks to rapid evac and modern medical techniques. In the World Wars, the WIA:KIA ratio was something like 2:1 or 3:1. This century it has been more like 10:1. A lot of the difference is made up of very dire cases. Some of those later opt for suicide, but again that’s off the Pentagon’s books.

    • Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Almost Missouri

    So we lost about 10,000 white men fighting in Afghanistan. During the same time frame we lost 450,000 white men to drugs and lost 9 million white men due to a decline in white births.

    From 2002 to 2022 the under 40 white population declined by 20% so we have 9 million less white men under the age of 40 than we did in 2002 and 9 million less whites females compared to 2002. No wonder the military is having difficulty finding new recruits. The population of potential recruits is falling rapidly due to a decline in white births combined with increased obesity and drug use which further reduced the pool of potential soldiers.

  76. @GSH
    I have to say that your view of the Battle of Waterloo is unusual. It's normally considered the final battle of the Napoleonic Wars, which lasted from 1803-1815. So wars did go on for years in the early 1800s, regardless of the economy.

    Replies: @tyrone, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @Dmon

    I agree. In fact, you could pretty much say that by Waterloo, Britian had been more or less continuously at war since 1756. Granted it wasn’t what we would consider Total War today, but still. For me, the takeaway from comparisons between war then and now is the death of noblesse oblige. The Waterloo British officer corps were aristocrats to a man. In return for a life of comfort and privilege, when war came around, they were expected to put on a bright red uniform, sit on a large horse right out in the very front, and act as a big, visible target. Compare that to today. The modern American ruling class has wealth and power undreamed of by any British aristocrat, attained mostly by luck and fortuitous timing, and they are asked nothing in return (other than a steady stream of payola in money and kind to the right politicians). Very few of them get anywhere near any kind of danger, or even render any public service beyond photo ops. When they decide to express their inner Bismarck, part of their cannon fodder’s subconscious calculus is “Hunter’s the one getting rich off Ukraine, not me. Let him go fight for it”.
    And before anyone brings up Beau, he was a lawyer. As David Hackworth put it (paraphrasing), any time he saw an officer with a bronze star but no purple heart or CIB, he figured it was bullsh!#.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Thanks: Bill Jones
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Dmon


    As David Hackworth put it (paraphrasing), any time he saw an officer with a bronze star but no purple heart or CIB, he figured it was bullsh!#.
     
    Most of the politician-soldiers nowadays seemed to have been either JAG officers (I've heard that real soldiers refer to them as JAG-OFFS) or military intelligence (usually naval intelligence). Comfortable billets that don't involve getting shot at - just enough service to put on a resume and get a "thank you for your service" call out.

    There are exceptions of course (Eye-patch Dan, Alan West). But even then I don't care. I don't care if they got shot at or shot up. Their military experience is not a veto they get to impose over my opinions. The concept of America, as it was founded, is that you get a say in how your country is governed including its military and foreign policy, and you get that say whether you have been in the military or not.

    As far as all that thankyou-for-your-service/support-the-troops/they're-fighting-for-our-freedom bulls**t goes.......................I'm over it.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    , @Bill Jones
    @Dmon

    Even as late as WWI it still existed, 25% of the 1918 graduation class at Oxford were dead by then. I had a couple of great Aunts who never married because "The man I was supposed to marry died".

  77. @AndrewR
    @Mike_from_SGV

    The openly pro-BLM and pro-CRT stances the military has taken has not exactly endeared it to its historical backbone: conservative white males. And of course there's the absurdity of the pro-LGBT stuff, but I think this is a negligible factor.

    The hysterical overreaction to January 6th, when thousands of troops were stationed in our nation's capital in unpleasant conditions probably didn't make service seem any more desirable.

    But I think the vaccine mandates are the main issue. Then the Afghan debacle. Then the instigation of this war with Russia.

    The real question is: why is anyone still enlisting?

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Jack P, @Farenheit

    LGBT stuff, but I think this is a negligible factor.

    “Wars are won in the temples, before they’re won on the battlefields”-S Tzu

  78. @Achmed E. Newman
    I don't think it's as big as the other factors, the woke BS, the anti-White attitude, and the realization that the US Military does not do defense of the United States, but the forced vaccination business is probably a significant factor too. See, it's not just this one, but once you join up, the military will be free to jab you with something any time some higher up (Mrs. Milly?) decides so.

    The mandatory Kung Flu vaccine has played a small part in the current major pilot shortage. The airlines have conveniently dropped all vaccine requirements for getting employed and staying employed, cause, "this is stupid, and we need people". However, some pilots, mostly the ones closer to retirement age, went ahead and retired earlier due to this threat.

    I also know of one late-50s pilot through a friend who got the vaccine due to his wife's nagging - she wasn't worried about his health, but just that he'd get terminated soon if he didn't - and he can no longer pass the resting EKG so will not fly anymore.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @sayless

    I think that you’re on to something vis-à-vis resistance to the vaccine mandate. Anyone informed enough to be an interesting recruit is probably at least vaguely aware that young men seem to suffer the most adverse effects (myocarditis and periocarditis). If he’s wavering the vaccine mandate may end up being the deciding factor in a decision not to enlist.

    • Agree: Mark G.
  79. @Luddite in Chief

    Americans are raised to be fragile these days.
     
    It is possible that the people who claim, "the military would probably damage me" are more smart than fragile.

    The primary problem with serving in the US military (or any military for that matter) is that they own you in a way that a civilian employer never would. If someone in, say, the army tells you, "we are moving your barracks/desk/slit trench downwind from a burn pit," then you can look forward to inhaling smoke (and God knows what else) for as long as the military feels like having you do it.

    While being handed a rifle and being sent overseas is about as bad a deal as it gets, you do not necessarily have to be handed a rifle in the military to have your health record turned into a very sad story indeed. At this point, the US military's reputation may be proceeding it with regards to how it treats its "employees," hence the prevailing attitude of "no thanks."

    Replies: @AndrewR, @SaneClownPosse, @Mr. Anon

    Signing up requires signing your rights away. Your body and soul belong to the military for however long you serve. Uncle Sam can use a service member as he/she/xe sees fit.

  80. @Cheesemaster2000
    We got out of Afghanistan. We can probably get out of a few more places too. Let's have smaller armed forces.

    Anyway, Trump and Marjorie Taylor Greene think you're a sucker for joining.

    Replies: @Anon, @Wj

    I feel bad for people that volunteered for anything other than personal interest . The people that volunteered for patriotic reasons are suckers

    • Replies: @Mark G.
    @Wj


    I feel bad for people that volunteered for anything other than personal interest. The people that volunteered for patriotic reasons are suckers.
     
    I joined the civilian side of the military, military accounting, forty years ago. I'm a libertarian but not an anarchist so I think having a military is a valid function of government and I was not doing anything morally wrong by going to work for them. I took an oath to defend the Constitution, a document I admire, from all enemies foreign and domestic. I saw joining them as a way to earn a living but also defend a country I love.

    I'm 66 now and near the end of my career. If I was in my twenties now, I don't think I would join them. Affirmative action is out of control on both the civilian side and military side of the DoD. When I started working for them in 1981, I thought we had learned our lesson from Vietnam and wouldn't get into any more overseas wars, but I was wrong. The military-industrial complex always has to be creating new enemies to justify continued high budgets. I watched as the military tried to cover up vaccine injuries to soldiers by saying the medical database that showed that was only showing it because of a "major computer glitch" that went undetected for 5 years. After working with DoD computers for 40 years I know a major computer glitch wouldn't go undetected for five years and they are liars. If a young man asked me for advice, I would discourage him from working for either the military or civilian side of the DoD.
  81. @Mr Mox
    @Dumbo

    Force soldiers to vaccinate with an unpopular (and useless) vaccine. Promote women, gays and trannies in the military. Turn the whole thing into some type of Woke Academy.

    In other words: scare away the very type of people a functioning army is build upon. Once the psy-ops are over and all the smart bombs have been dropped, you will still need boots on the ground - not stiletto heels.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Farenheit

    scare away the very type of people a functioning army is build upon. Once the psy-ops are over and all the smart bombs have been dropped, you will still need boots on the ground – not stiletto heels.

    Word on the street is the Army just released its new policy on fingernail polish for males, clear only, for those of you keeping score at home.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Farenheit

    But how does the army distinguish men from women? Garbage in, garbage out. Or why the last time America won a war was August 1945.

    Replies: @Farenheit

  82. @Anon
    @PhysicistDave


    Or just maybe the CCP rather likes the idea of the US wasting its blood and treasure fighting other people’s wars
     
    The US lost rougly 3500 men in Afghanistan over the 20 year period of the war. That's nothing. The mortality rate was slightly higher than civilian life back home in America is today. Get a grip you frickin' Nancy, combat casualties were never an argument against the war.

    Replies: @Vetman, @Drive-by poster, @Almost Missouri, @Wj, @Thea, @PhysicistDave

    The number of casualties is just one of the reason Afghanistan and Iraq were terrible ideas. Just plain stupid wars

    • Agree: Mark G.
  83. I saw an interesting comment suggesting that having draftees was good for the military — As a pissed-off captive audience not invested in a military career they were more likely to call BS on BS. Today’s military has become too soft and woke because it lacks this reality check.

  84. @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    It is often said that an infantryman's pack has never gotten lighter since Roman legionnaire times.

    I wouldn't be surprised if it's significantly heavier in these days of automatic weapons when the amount of ammunition that can be carried can be decisive. I'm guessing Roman troops likely weighed in the 130 to 140 pound range. And the Roman army was really smart about not overburdening their men. I read Edward Luttwak's book "The Grand Strategy of Rome" and he emphasized how the legions could march for 1000 miles or more and arrive in better shape than when they left. They only marched 4 or 5 hours per day and had lots of techniques for ensuring that they ate and slept well en route.

    Replies: @John Henry, @Almost Missouri, @Joe Stalin, @GeologyAnonMk6, @Kronos

  85. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Oliver Stone volunteered for two tours of combat in Vietnam and was wounded twice and won the Bronze Star once for heroism. I always felt he was more than entitled to offer his opinion of his country's foreign policy.

    Replies: @Blodgie, @AceDeuce, @Vetman, @Bill Jones, @Sick n' Tired, @Reg Cæsar

    He’s been on Joe Rogan’s podcast twice, gave very good in depth interviews. Definitely worth a listen.

  86. The pool of those eligible to join the military continues to shrink, with more young men and women than ever disqualified for obesity, drug use or criminal records. Last month, Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville testified before Congress that only 23% of Americans ages 17-24 are qualified to serve without a waiver to join, down from 29% in recent years.

    Holy cow. What a nation! Eugenics anyone?

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @AnotherDad

    Dysgenic Fertility is America's Greatest Strength!

    , @AnotherDad
    @AnotherDad



    More than half of the young Americans who answered the survey — about 57% — think they would have emotional or psychological problems after serving in the military.
     
    Americans are raised to be fragile these days.

    Nearly half think they would have physical problems.
     

     
    A society should strive for "un-fragile".

    In my alternative (non-rainbow) utopia, military service would be expected for young men, but not required. Military service would strive as well as military and practical skills, to instill non-fragility. Veterans would be the militia called upon to defend the nation, but also would be its only true citizens/voters. Those who were unfit or chose to skip could live their lives but would not vote, make decisions, be leaders.

    Replies: @Houston 1992

  87. @Redneck farmer
    Worrying about post-service physical problems is actually somewhat legitimate. Infantry carries a lot of gear, and unlike in the past, troops aren't allowed to ditch the items they don't think they're going to need. A relatively large number of ex-grunts are on full or partial disability due to ruined joints.
    Most military jobs don't have that issue, though.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mike Tre, @AceDeuce, @Kronos

    Infantry might carry more gear, but the total number of miles they hump is probably less than ever. After basic training, they are getting moved via motorized, mechanized, or even airborne transport.

  88. @Almost Missouri
    @Anon


    The US lost rougly 3500 men in Afghanistan over the 20 year period of the war. That’s nothing.
     
    Casualty accounting usually neglects to count private military contractors (i.e., soldiers rehired at higher pay but whose demise is off the Pentagon's books). Casualty totals approximately double if you include those.

    Also, a lot of men who would have been KIA in previous wars end up being badly WIA thanks to rapid evac and modern medical techniques. In the World Wars, the WIA:KIA ratio was something like 2:1 or 3:1. This century it has been more like 10:1. A lot of the difference is made up of very dire cases. Some of those later opt for suicide, but again that's off the Pentagon's books.

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    So we lost about 10,000 white men fighting in Afghanistan. During the same time frame we lost 450,000 white men to drugs and lost 9 million white men due to a decline in white births.

    From 2002 to 2022 the under 40 white population declined by 20% so we have 9 million less white men under the age of 40 than we did in 2002 and 9 million less whites females compared to 2002. No wonder the military is having difficulty finding new recruits. The population of potential recruits is falling rapidly due to a decline in white births combined with increased obesity and drug use which further reduced the pool of potential soldiers.

    • Thanks: Houston 1992
  89. @JohnnyWalker123

    Americans are raised to be fragile these days.

     

    Or maybe they've been paying attention to all the wounded, mentally afflicted, and traumatized soldiers who've been returning home from our endless foreign wars.

    A good discussion of the true costs of our foreign wars.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLXrgmz-0lo

    Watch a movie called "Born on the 4th of July" to gain more perspective on this issue. The 1989 film was directed by Oliver Stone, who (unlike the various draft-dodging presidents that we've had in recent years) actually served in a war.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jk_07yseiDA

    Why die in a foreign war so some draft-dodger can get reelected in 2004?
    Why die in a foreign war to enrich the war profiteers of Haliburton?
    Why die in a foreign war to advance Israeli national security?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mike Tre, @BB753, @VivaLaMigra

    My mom went to high school with Caroline Kava.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Mike Tre

    No kidding! It must've been interesting to see her old classmate become a movie star.

    Thanks for sharing.

  90. @Luddite in Chief

    Americans are raised to be fragile these days.
     
    It is possible that the people who claim, "the military would probably damage me" are more smart than fragile.

    The primary problem with serving in the US military (or any military for that matter) is that they own you in a way that a civilian employer never would. If someone in, say, the army tells you, "we are moving your barracks/desk/slit trench downwind from a burn pit," then you can look forward to inhaling smoke (and God knows what else) for as long as the military feels like having you do it.

    While being handed a rifle and being sent overseas is about as bad a deal as it gets, you do not necessarily have to be handed a rifle in the military to have your health record turned into a very sad story indeed. At this point, the US military's reputation may be proceeding it with regards to how it treats its "employees," hence the prevailing attitude of "no thanks."

    Replies: @AndrewR, @SaneClownPosse, @Mr. Anon

    The primary problem with serving in the US military (or any military for that matter) is that they own you in a way that a civilian employer never would. If someone in, say, the army tells you, “we are moving your barracks/desk/slit trench downwind from a burn pit,” then you can look forward to inhaling smoke (and God knows what else) for as long as the military feels like having you do it.

    The long forward deployments during Operation Forever War will lead to lots of GIs developing lung cancer from exposure to burn-pit smoke. Perhaps that was true in Vietnam too and it was just unrecognized. Maybe it got chalked up to Agent Orange.

    • Agree: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Mr. Anon

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/beau-biden-burn-pits-cancer-b2004619.html


    Biden says burn pits killed his son. More than 261,000 vets are sick. So why isn’t the US doing anything?

    Vast open-air pits where trash burned around the clock were simply part of life on deployment for troops in America’s post-9/11 wars. Now, thousands are sick and dying because of the toxic exposure and feel abandoned by the country that they fought for, writes Rachel Sharp.
     
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10752035/Bidens-burn-pit-push-tribute-Beau-Veterans-Affairs-add-nine-rare-respiratory-cancers.html

    Biden has said he believes there could be a connection to the burn pits Beau was stationed near and his illness. Beau Biden died of brain cancer in 2015.

     


    Biden's late son Beau was exposed to toxic burn pits during his military service in Iraq.
     

    Replies: @Ralph L

  91. @For what it's worth
    @Reg Cæsar

    Wtf is the point of posting photos of the children of the author?

    Replies: @Anon, @Reg Cæsar, @Wency

    I think Reg Caesar is just a cuck with some kind of mental illness.

  92. My relative who joined the Marines wanted to do so from age 10, and did at 18. They kicked him out honorably a few weeks into basic training on discovering a latent heart defect.

    A veteran already at 18 years and two months, he found himself an incredibly hot girlfriend way out of his league and they are living happily ever after in a \$70,000 4-bedroom house in the Rustbelt.

  93. @Drive-by poster
    @Anon


    The US lost rougly 3500 men in Afghanistan over the 20 year period of the war. That’s nothing.
     
    It is only "nothing" if your kid wasn't one of the 3500.

    Also, that figure of 3500 only reflects those killed. You can safely triple that if you include those who were wounded, and came away from the campaign minus an arm or leg, or those who will never feel quite right again between their ears.

    https://pics.me.me/the-war-is-over-my-boy-forget-it-life-magazine-43517979.png

    The mortality rate was slightly higher than civilian life back home in America is today.
     
    Mortality rates are only one cost of warfare. There are many other costs, some of which cannot be seen and counted as easily.

    It is possible for your body to remain in one piece while your mind is long gone.

    If you think going to war is something that soldiers and Marines can simply shrug off once they go home, you haven't been around very many. Wars can continue to be fought, again and again, in the minds of those who were doing the fighting long after the war itself has ended.

    America may have buried its dead from the war, but it will be paying the price of Afghanistan for many decades to come. We will have to wait and see whether the warmongers succeed in talking the Americans into going to war again less than a year after the end of the two-decade long war in Afghanistan.

    Replies: @Anon, @Harry Baldwin

    I assure you the rate of injuries in Afghanistan was lower than in Vietnam or WW2.

    War is a racket… In your demented mind. War is a charity. Get drafted, cuck boy.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Anon

    We lost about 8x as many men in Vietnam in the year 1968 by itself than we did during the whole Afghan war. The scale of carnage-for the locals as much as for the Americans, FWIW, you still see people in Vietnam today who are deaf, dumb, and blind thanks to Agent Orange-wasn't even in the same ballpark.

    The differences don't stop there. We had an all professional army rather than draftees, the rules of engagement in dealing with the locals were much stricter, both in Iraq and in Afghanistan. For all the flaws of both occupations-and there were plenty-the kind of ill-trained frustration that exploded into outright massacres like My Lai would have been unthinkable in both.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

  94. @Old Prude
    Maybe the lack of qualified manpower will FINALLY force the US to stop meddling around the world. It is to be sincerely wished for. Being bankrupt, continually losing hasn't done the job.

    Let's just hope that happens before the dopes get a ship sunk, or a plane shot down.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    This will be seen as a cause for more immigration; recently arrived Americans doing the jobs native Americans won’t do.

    There are literally 1000’s of rifles rusting in the armory.

  95. Anon[202] • Disclaimer says:

    George Floyd Riots is the number one reason.

    When our military would not step in and stop that for partisan political reasons, they lost our trust. What in the he’ll do you have a military for? BLM and Antifa openly blocking interstates, burning businesses, and physically attacking passers-by hurting real Americans on their own soil but Mark Milley says it’s nothing.

    Force-vaxxing with myocarditis/cardiac jabs is #2.

    Woke indoctrination is #3.

    Endless wars for nothing with too many wounded warriors coming back is #4.

    Not stepping in when their was clear electoral fraud in 2020 is #5.

    Why on earth would a white man serve a government that hates him and lies about him comstantly?

    • Replies: @sayless
    @Anon

    Who would want to tell their friends, family, or their date that they served on the USS Harvey Milk?

    Replies: @captflee

  96. @Dmon
    @GSH

    I agree. In fact, you could pretty much say that by Waterloo, Britian had been more or less continuously at war since 1756. Granted it wasn't what we would consider Total War today, but still. For me, the takeaway from comparisons between war then and now is the death of noblesse oblige. The Waterloo British officer corps were aristocrats to a man. In return for a life of comfort and privilege, when war came around, they were expected to put on a bright red uniform, sit on a large horse right out in the very front, and act as a big, visible target. Compare that to today. The modern American ruling class has wealth and power undreamed of by any British aristocrat, attained mostly by luck and fortuitous timing, and they are asked nothing in return (other than a steady stream of payola in money and kind to the right politicians). Very few of them get anywhere near any kind of danger, or even render any public service beyond photo ops. When they decide to express their inner Bismarck, part of their cannon fodder's subconscious calculus is "Hunter's the one getting rich off Ukraine, not me. Let him go fight for it".
    And before anyone brings up Beau, he was a lawyer. As David Hackworth put it (paraphrasing), any time he saw an officer with a bronze star but no purple heart or CIB, he figured it was bullsh!#.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Bill Jones

    As David Hackworth put it (paraphrasing), any time he saw an officer with a bronze star but no purple heart or CIB, he figured it was bullsh!#.

    Most of the politician-soldiers nowadays seemed to have been either JAG officers (I’ve heard that real soldiers refer to them as JAG-OFFS) or military intelligence (usually naval intelligence). Comfortable billets that don’t involve getting shot at – just enough service to put on a resume and get a “thank you for your service” call out.

    There are exceptions of course (Eye-patch Dan, Alan West). But even then I don’t care. I don’t care if they got shot at or shot up. Their military experience is not a veto they get to impose over my opinions. The concept of America, as it was founded, is that you get a say in how your country is governed including its military and foreign policy, and you get that say whether you have been in the military or not.

    As far as all that thankyou-for-your-service/support-the-troops/they’re-fighting-for-our-freedom bulls**t goes…………………..I’m over it.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Mr. Anon


    The concept of America, as it was founded, is that you get a say in how your country is governed including its military and foreign policy, and you get that say whether you have been in the military or not.
     
    Kind of. I keep having to remind everyone that "America, as it was founded" included, in most states, mandatory service in the local militia along with mandatory owning of an assault weapon, usually a musket, in order to vote. Local rules varied, but the foregoing was often a minimum requirement, as well as not being on the public dole.

    I expect that after the national collapse, this will once again be the way of things (except the "musket" will be more modern). As I also keep saying, elections are proxies for combat, so it is natural that those who make a state will be the ones to decide its disposition.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

  97. ‘…They are all nervous over whether they’ll be brave, survive, and win, but on the other hand, the upcoming war turned out to be for most just one day of carnage and then it was over. The economy of 1815 couldn’t afford long battles…’

    This really is the big difference between pre- and post-1914 warfare.

    Tactics evolve to meet the deadliness of firepower, and the First Day of the Somme was no deadlier than Pickett’s Charge. The distinction is that there could be a second day of the Somme, and a third, and a fourth, and a fifth, and so on through the Summer and into the Fall. Both sides could just keep pumping in more arms, ammunition, and replacements.

    After your basic Gettysburg, everyone was more or less out of ammunition and fresh troops for a while. Round Two would be in a few months at best, not next week.

  98. “Were you or your family injured by the toxic water at Camp Lejeune?”

    That’s a law-firm ad I keep hearing now — Now there’s a real recruiting inducement!

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Known Fact

    My dad served there from time to time, on maneuvers, July '55 to October '57. His permanent duty station was Cherry Point NAS (now Cherry Point MCAS.)

  99. @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @PhysicistDave

    The United States expanded from the 13 colonies all the way to the Western Pacific under the flag of manifest destiny. This geopolitical strategy has served well for American prosperity, but simply now it is a spent force.

    The proverbial expression is 强弩之末 the arrow from the strongest bow becomes weak after flying its assigned distance.

    https://eng.ichacha.net/强弩之末.html

    PRC's geopolitical strategy is Eurasia integration. If there are no wars in Afghanistan and Ukraine, the heart of Eurasia, the Chinese would sooner build a high-speed rail commerce network connecting West Asia and Europe. The US would become more marginalized, the dollar weaker, and a less appealing destination for the world's best and brightest.

    That's the tradeoff.

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Dave from Oz

    At the end of the day, Halford Mackinder was right.
    The American Century is over. The World Island Millennium is here.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Bill Jones


    At the end of the day, Halford Mackinder was right.
    The American Century is over. The World Island Millennium is here.
     
    Mackinder was dead wrong for a century, the most international century since the Crusades if not antiquity, and now all of a sudden he's right? Kazakhstan is more critical than the Red Sea or the Straits of Malacca?

    By this token, the Austrian, Ottoman, and Russian Empires outshine the British, Dutch, and Portuguese. Yeah, right...

    , @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @Bill Jones

    I would say Six Millennia of Eurasia beginning in Mesopotamia, succeed by Five Centuries of Thalassocracy beginning in 15 CE with European Age of Discovery:
    https://i.postimg.cc/9MQWhjGn/Age-of-Discovery-explorations-in-English.png

  100. I’m reading William Makepeace Thackeray’s highly entertaining 1840s bestseller “Vanity Fair,”

    Great book!

    Why isn’t Becky supposed to receive Dr. Johnson’s Dictionary?

  101. @Anon
    I think it's way down because your average 18-year old doesn't want to end up in Ukraine fighting the Russians. With Biden, there's a real fear that this may happen. Every 18-year old considering some time in the army knows what happened to Napoleon and Hitler when they tried fighting a winter war in that area.

    Biden is too stupid to stay out of trouble. He is on the path of mission creep ala Vietnam. We started out there with 'advisors' and ended up sending in regular troops. Biden has already signaled that he's too stubborn and committed to quit, and he refuses to start any sort peace talks with the Russians.

    Biden doesn't want peace, and he won't accept partition of Ukraine. The only option acceptable to him is to defeat the Russians in battle and force them completely out of Ukraine. This won't work, and Biden is too stubborn and egoistical to admit it. The only way it could work is a major commitment of US troops and our full arsenal of hardware. In other words, a land war with Russia one-on-one. World War 3, no less.

    But Biden is too incompetent to run a war. Everybody knows that. He couldn't even manage a peaceful withdrawal in Afghanistan. There's no way we're winning WW 3 with Biden in charge.

    Keep in mind that the military tends to run in families. Any kids with military parents are being told not to join up right now because Biden is such a retarded chucklehead who knows what might happen.

    Replies: @William Badwhite, @Mr. Anon, @Corvinus, @BB753, @AnotherDad, @nebulafox

    Keep in mind that the military tends to run in families. Any kids with military parents are being told not to join up right now because Biden is such a retarded chucklehead who knows what might happen.

    Its not just Biden. It’s the Great Replacement, it’s DIE, it’s the overt hostility towards normal Americans coming from most institutions of power, and yes it is Biden’s malevolent administration.

    The Badwhites have had at least one person in every generation going back to the French & Indian War serve in the military. My oldest brother is a member of The Society of the Cincinnati.

    Of the current military age generation none are currently serving, nor will they be encouraged to.

    • Replies: @Bernie
    @William Badwhite

    Same here. Me and my brothers served but none of our kids will be allowed to enlist in racist, anti-white military.

    Replies: @Houston 1992

  102. “Americans are raised to be fragile these days.”

    Previous generations, including the cynical X sobs, sought adventure whilst approaching manhood. A stint in the military was one way to own your cojones. There was no thought of emotional or psychological trauma, tho as one made their way out of basic/boot and into MOS training there were some brief musings regarding physical damage.

    • Agree: AceDeuce
  103. The current regime has no qualms about unleashing violence against patriotic Americans and using the military to do it. So patriotic Americans need to steer clear until there is house cleaning.

    A more interesting question is what should patriotic young American men do instead. I think red states need to cultivate state militias and recruit these patriotic young men, for when the globalists come for real.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Jack P

    This interview by the great Scott Horton of Diego Rivera of Defend the Guard and especially the Effective Activism piece may interest you.

    https://podcastaddict.com/episode/142031831

  104. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Mr. Anon

    I live Northern Virginia. Trust me, the military - war or peace - is a racket. I've had many a neighbor sucking on that teat. Retired military who had easy jobs in military with sweet pensions. Ex-military with government jobs because they get preference. IT guys working for government contractors who have security clearance so they can't get fired.

    The list goes on and on.

    Ironically, most the men who serve in combat only stay in the military a short time. It's the other guys - especially blacks - who get all the goodies.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @JohnnyWalker123

    “– especially blacks –”

    With fewer blacks able to meet the measly standards of globalhomo operative General Milley’s Army due to obesity and criminal records and illiteracy who will fill the ranks at the post office, DMV, and EDD?

  105. @Farenheit
    @Mr Mox


    scare away the very type of people a functioning army is build upon. Once the psy-ops are over and all the smart bombs have been dropped, you will still need boots on the ground – not stiletto heels.
     
    Word on the street is the Army just released its new policy on fingernail polish for males, clear only, for those of you keeping score at home.

    Replies: @Alden

    But how does the army distinguish men from women? Garbage in, garbage out. Or why the last time America won a war was August 1945.

    • Replies: @Farenheit
    @Alden

    Fingers crossed on this Ukie proxy war!,

  106. @Anon
    I think it's way down because your average 18-year old doesn't want to end up in Ukraine fighting the Russians. With Biden, there's a real fear that this may happen. Every 18-year old considering some time in the army knows what happened to Napoleon and Hitler when they tried fighting a winter war in that area.

    Biden is too stupid to stay out of trouble. He is on the path of mission creep ala Vietnam. We started out there with 'advisors' and ended up sending in regular troops. Biden has already signaled that he's too stubborn and committed to quit, and he refuses to start any sort peace talks with the Russians.

    Biden doesn't want peace, and he won't accept partition of Ukraine. The only option acceptable to him is to defeat the Russians in battle and force them completely out of Ukraine. This won't work, and Biden is too stubborn and egoistical to admit it. The only way it could work is a major commitment of US troops and our full arsenal of hardware. In other words, a land war with Russia one-on-one. World War 3, no less.

    But Biden is too incompetent to run a war. Everybody knows that. He couldn't even manage a peaceful withdrawal in Afghanistan. There's no way we're winning WW 3 with Biden in charge.

    Keep in mind that the military tends to run in families. Any kids with military parents are being told not to join up right now because Biden is such a retarded chucklehead who knows what might happen.

    Replies: @William Badwhite, @Mr. Anon, @Corvinus, @BB753, @AnotherDad, @nebulafox

    Biden is too stupid to stay out of trouble.

    He is the guy who said that Hunter was the smartest man he knows.

    But this is beside the point. Other than what flavor of ice cream he wants for dessert, Biden is not deciding anything.

  107. @For what it's worth
    @Reg Cæsar

    Wtf is the point of posting photos of the children of the author?

    Replies: @Anon, @Reg Cæsar, @Wency

    Wtf is the point of posting photos of the children of the author?

    She’s a “journalist”* specializing in Pentagon issues. The article said right up front that recruiting issues can make an all-volunteer force untenable. (Well, duh, when you’re overextended.)

    It’s a common trope across the political spectrum that our élites are far less likely to have family members at risk in the service. With three sons, five if you count her stepsons, Courtney Kube is very much an exception to this rule. Good for her!

    Grunts and tars come in two varieties: the enlistee and the draftee. (The feminine ending -ee is unintentionally ironic for this subject.) The twins’ expressions in the first picture perfectly embody the difference in attitude of the men who enter service via these two routes.

    We’ve had none of the latter in Miss† Kube’s lifetime, but the fact that her family would be seriously exposed should conscription return is an important point, and one which is relevant to anything she has to say on the subject.

    * NB: The scare quotes are not meant to demean her in particular, just the contemporary inflated job title. She may even deserve the more trustworthy term reporter.

    † She’s still wed to the father of her children, just not using her married name in her career. I think this is more a feature than a bug for career women: it offers them an option for more privacy not available to most men. ((Though Jimmy Van Heusen’s pilot’s license and passport carried his real name, Edward Chester Babcock. But not his grave marker.)

    At any rate, Miss is more respectful than the generic and bureaucratic Ms.

    (Back in the ’90s, I noticed that many credit and bank cards held by young British women still used Miss. Was this bank practice, or the customer’s choice? Either way, it was most refreshing to see.)

  108. @Anon
    I think it's way down because your average 18-year old doesn't want to end up in Ukraine fighting the Russians. With Biden, there's a real fear that this may happen. Every 18-year old considering some time in the army knows what happened to Napoleon and Hitler when they tried fighting a winter war in that area.

    Biden is too stupid to stay out of trouble. He is on the path of mission creep ala Vietnam. We started out there with 'advisors' and ended up sending in regular troops. Biden has already signaled that he's too stubborn and committed to quit, and he refuses to start any sort peace talks with the Russians.

    Biden doesn't want peace, and he won't accept partition of Ukraine. The only option acceptable to him is to defeat the Russians in battle and force them completely out of Ukraine. This won't work, and Biden is too stubborn and egoistical to admit it. The only way it could work is a major commitment of US troops and our full arsenal of hardware. In other words, a land war with Russia one-on-one. World War 3, no less.

    But Biden is too incompetent to run a war. Everybody knows that. He couldn't even manage a peaceful withdrawal in Afghanistan. There's no way we're winning WW 3 with Biden in charge.

    Keep in mind that the military tends to run in families. Any kids with military parents are being told not to join up right now because Biden is such a retarded chucklehead who knows what might happen.

    Replies: @William Badwhite, @Mr. Anon, @Corvinus, @BB753, @AnotherDad, @nebulafox

    “The only option acceptable to him is to defeat the Russians in battle and force them completely out of Ukraine. This won’t work, and Biden is too stubborn and egoistical to admit it. The only way it could work is a major commitment of US troops and our full arsenal of hardware. In other words, a land war with Russia one-on-one. World War 3, no less.”

    Cool story, bro. You should write fiction. You would make a bundle.

  109. @Anon
    I think it's way down because your average 18-year old doesn't want to end up in Ukraine fighting the Russians. With Biden, there's a real fear that this may happen. Every 18-year old considering some time in the army knows what happened to Napoleon and Hitler when they tried fighting a winter war in that area.

    Biden is too stupid to stay out of trouble. He is on the path of mission creep ala Vietnam. We started out there with 'advisors' and ended up sending in regular troops. Biden has already signaled that he's too stubborn and committed to quit, and he refuses to start any sort peace talks with the Russians.

    Biden doesn't want peace, and he won't accept partition of Ukraine. The only option acceptable to him is to defeat the Russians in battle and force them completely out of Ukraine. This won't work, and Biden is too stubborn and egoistical to admit it. The only way it could work is a major commitment of US troops and our full arsenal of hardware. In other words, a land war with Russia one-on-one. World War 3, no less.

    But Biden is too incompetent to run a war. Everybody knows that. He couldn't even manage a peaceful withdrawal in Afghanistan. There's no way we're winning WW 3 with Biden in charge.

    Keep in mind that the military tends to run in families. Any kids with military parents are being told not to join up right now because Biden is such a retarded chucklehead who knows what might happen.

    Replies: @William Badwhite, @Mr. Anon, @Corvinus, @BB753, @AnotherDad, @nebulafox

    It’s not Biden. It’s his neocon handlers who want to win a proxy war against Russia. Biden is gone. Certifiably demented.

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
  110. @JohnnyWalker123

    Americans are raised to be fragile these days.

     

    Or maybe they've been paying attention to all the wounded, mentally afflicted, and traumatized soldiers who've been returning home from our endless foreign wars.

    A good discussion of the true costs of our foreign wars.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLXrgmz-0lo

    Watch a movie called "Born on the 4th of July" to gain more perspective on this issue. The 1989 film was directed by Oliver Stone, who (unlike the various draft-dodging presidents that we've had in recent years) actually served in a war.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jk_07yseiDA

    Why die in a foreign war so some draft-dodger can get reelected in 2004?
    Why die in a foreign war to enrich the war profiteers of Haliburton?
    Why die in a foreign war to advance Israeli national security?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mike Tre, @BB753, @VivaLaMigra

    You want more recruits? Rise the wages. Nobody joins the military out of patriotism.

  111. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Oliver Stone volunteered for two tours of combat in Vietnam and was wounded twice and won the Bronze Star once for heroism. I always felt he was more than entitled to offer his opinion of his country's foreign policy.

    Replies: @Blodgie, @AceDeuce, @Vetman, @Bill Jones, @Sick n' Tired, @Reg Cæsar

    Oliver Stone volunteered for two tours of combat in Vietnam and was wounded twice and won the Bronze Star once for heroism. I always felt he was more than entitled to offer his opinion of his country’s foreign policy.

    Joyce Kilmer has a rest stop named in his honor in his native New Jersey. He supported entering the war in print, then nobly (if stupidly) enlisted himself. He was killed in action.

    Though remembered for his arborist doggerel, he is honored for his service. Never forget that.

    And how appropriate that it offers full-service gasoline!

    Top two reviews on Foursquare:

    Ethar El-Katatney May 24, 2013
    Surprisingly comprehensive rest area. Restaurants, Starbucks, market, spotless bathrooms. Full service gas station. But best of all: all the employees are Egyptian!

    Vinny Vodka-Tonic September 30, 2015
    Great place! I even bought a gold watch from a guy in the bathroom. It turns my wrist a little green but I think it’s a special kind of gold or something.

    https://foursquare.com/v/joyce-kilmer-travel-plaza/4bb754db46d4a593414fc7c0

    (It’s been asserted that New Jersey boasts both the best and the worst toll road in the US, but I can never remember which of the two is which.)

    • LOL: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Reg Cæsar

    I have driven the NJT for years and just now I find out Joyce Kilmer was a man!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Hibernian

  112. @AnotherDad

    The pool of those eligible to join the military continues to shrink, with more young men and women than ever disqualified for obesity, drug use or criminal records. Last month, Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville testified before Congress that only 23% of Americans ages 17-24 are qualified to serve without a waiver to join, down from 29% in recent years.
     
    Holy cow. What a nation! Eugenics anyone?

    Replies: @Adam Smith, @AnotherDad

    Dysgenic Fertility is America’s Greatest Strength!

  113. @Mike_from_SGV
    1. It has been a good job market, and there are easier ways to make a living thsn being in the military.
    2. The US military is a leftist captured institution that pushes the woke religion, and any normal person who joins up is being a servant to the queer empire that hates normal people.
    3. The US Military and leadership have not exactly covered themselves in glory in recent years, eg the Afghan debacle.

    I don't know which of these factors, or others, are the main drivers of the enlistment situation.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @JR Ewing, @pyrrhus

    And then there’s the mandatory jab or three….

    • Replies: @Mike_from_SGV
    @pyrrhus

    Yeah that didn't occur to me, but it is an obstacle to a lot of people.

  114. @AnotherDad

    The pool of those eligible to join the military continues to shrink, with more young men and women than ever disqualified for obesity, drug use or criminal records. Last month, Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville testified before Congress that only 23% of Americans ages 17-24 are qualified to serve without a waiver to join, down from 29% in recent years.
     
    Holy cow. What a nation! Eugenics anyone?

    Replies: @Adam Smith, @AnotherDad

    More than half of the young Americans who answered the survey — about 57% — think they would have emotional or psychological problems after serving in the military.

    Americans are raised to be fragile these days.

    Nearly half think they would have physical problems.

    A society should strive for “un-fragile”.

    In my alternative (non-rainbow) utopia, military service would be expected for young men, but not required. Military service would strive as well as military and practical skills, to instill non-fragility. Veterans would be the militia called upon to defend the nation, but also would be its only true citizens/voters. Those who were unfit or chose to skip could live their lives but would not vote, make decisions, be leaders.

    • Replies: @Houston 1992
    @AnotherDad

    Unz-ites should encourage young Whites with few options to join the Coast Guard to stop illegal immigration and drug importation. Little chance of death, but same benefits later.
    (As logistics comes to matter more and more, perhaps Merchant Marine would also be good idea for the same reasons...)

    2) will the neo Cons start promoting White women registering for the draft -- coupled with suitable draft deferments /exemptions for academic program enrollees where their lessors are enrolled?

    Replies: @captflee

  115. Mamas don’t let your white boys (or girls) join the Woke Military! Nothing good will come out of it except humiliation or dishonorable discharge. When a nation’s sports examples of leadership take a kneel to our flag & the spectators continue to financially support such kneeling insurrection, our nation doesn’t deserve mamas’ white kids service and intelligence. Let the Left continue to lead from behind with its own kind. Birds of a feather flock together. Can anyone imagine being part of the Biden’s Administration’s DOD with people like Gen. Milly in charge of the US military—a soldier who said he would warn China if the American President planned a first attack? Scrub DC clean in November. I know…but it’s a lovely thought!

  116. @JimDandy
    @Mr. Anon

    What's with these snowflakes? They don't want to sign up for a woke anti-white anti-male anti-American gay trans military to kill and be killed while fighting proxy wars for Israel? They're afraid of coming home with stumps for legs and being confined to a wheelchair when I know for a fact that this one organization that has commercials on Fox will buy some of them their own wheelchair-house? I'm disgusted by this generation of touchy-feely little pencil-necked cowards who are too wimpy to put their lives on the line for Zionists who hate them. Not signing up for the military is the ultimate act of anti-semitic, racist, sexist, trans-phobic toxic masculinity. If only there was some way to FORCE these punks to check their privilege and do their duty.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Rooster16

    If only there was some way to FORCE these punks to check their privilege and do their duty.

    If there’s a lesson of the last few years it is that today’s satire is tomorrow’s dreary reality.

    • Agree: JimDandy
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Almost Missouri


    If there’s a lesson of the last few years it is that today’s satire is tomorrow’s dreary reality.
     
    Truly. I thought that Steve had lost his marbles when he started banging on about World War T not so long ago. It turns out he was prescient about what is now part of the Received Wisdom.
  117. @Anon
    I think it's way down because your average 18-year old doesn't want to end up in Ukraine fighting the Russians. With Biden, there's a real fear that this may happen. Every 18-year old considering some time in the army knows what happened to Napoleon and Hitler when they tried fighting a winter war in that area.

    Biden is too stupid to stay out of trouble. He is on the path of mission creep ala Vietnam. We started out there with 'advisors' and ended up sending in regular troops. Biden has already signaled that he's too stubborn and committed to quit, and he refuses to start any sort peace talks with the Russians.

    Biden doesn't want peace, and he won't accept partition of Ukraine. The only option acceptable to him is to defeat the Russians in battle and force them completely out of Ukraine. This won't work, and Biden is too stubborn and egoistical to admit it. The only way it could work is a major commitment of US troops and our full arsenal of hardware. In other words, a land war with Russia one-on-one. World War 3, no less.

    But Biden is too incompetent to run a war. Everybody knows that. He couldn't even manage a peaceful withdrawal in Afghanistan. There's no way we're winning WW 3 with Biden in charge.

    Keep in mind that the military tends to run in families. Any kids with military parents are being told not to join up right now because Biden is such a retarded chucklehead who knows what might happen.

    Replies: @William Badwhite, @Mr. Anon, @Corvinus, @BB753, @AnotherDad, @nebulafox

    Biden doesn’t want peace, and he won’t accept partition of Ukraine. The only option acceptable to him is to defeat the Russians in battle and force them completely out of Ukraine.

    I really don’t want to encourage falling into the Ukraine rathole.

    Pretty much the only thing i’d give Biden some–very modest–credit for is stating up front that the US will defend NATO allies, but not get directly involved in Ukraine. (Ukrainians who want independence will have to fight for it themselves.)

    This is the Cold War paradigm. Some number of Russian pilots did fly against the US in the Korean War. But otherwise, while the US or Soviet Union would supply the other’s enemy (e.g. Vietnam, Afghanistan), they avoided directly fighting each other. (Occasionally sucky for proxies, but better for the world.)

    Biden presumably wants Ukraine to win. But since he isn’t going to send the US to fight, he’s already implicitly accepting whatever settlement Putin decides to impose. Biden can work to make it more or less costly and he doesn’t have to officially recognize it, but it’s a done deal. This again is well understood from the post-War situation in Eastern Europe. The US accepted that they were Russian colonies even if it did not like it or think it was legitimate.

    ~~~

    Note: I’d like to see some more serious engagement with Russia, particularly the likely post-Putin leadership/elites, make sure we understand Russia’s point-of-view and concerns and do our best to accommodate their legitimate interests.

    But what I wrote above seems to be the state of play and it certainly is not forcing a Russian defeat.

  118. @JR Ewing
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Next time they force your group into the Diversity Enrichment seminar, you just say NO. Yes, they will aim to fire you instead of AT you, but just as on a battlefield, you need to stick together. It’s a different kind of war.
     
    I quit my last corporate job about 15 years ago. Have since been 100x more successful working for myself than I ever would have been working for someone else.

    Nonetheless, before I quit, I dodged mandatory “diversity training” for an entire year. At least 6-8 times by my count. Kept signing up and then coming up with excuses not to go at the last minute. (And truthfully, the excuses were legit - my time was much more valuable and important than sitting in a classroom doing bullshit indoctrination stuff)

    By the time I finally resigned to pursue other opportunities, the training situation had progressed to “possible discipline up to and including termination”. Despite all the money I made them and everything else I accomplished at that company, I still consider avoiding that “training” to be my greatest accomplishment during my time there.

    Replies: @Lurker, @Achmed E. Newman, @Almost Missouri

    Well played sir!

  119. @Wj
    @Cheesemaster2000

    I feel bad for people that volunteered for anything other than personal interest . The people that volunteered for patriotic reasons are suckers

    Replies: @Mark G.

    I feel bad for people that volunteered for anything other than personal interest. The people that volunteered for patriotic reasons are suckers.

    I joined the civilian side of the military, military accounting, forty years ago. I’m a libertarian but not an anarchist so I think having a military is a valid function of government and I was not doing anything morally wrong by going to work for them. I took an oath to defend the Constitution, a document I admire, from all enemies foreign and domestic. I saw joining them as a way to earn a living but also defend a country I love.

    I’m 66 now and near the end of my career. If I was in my twenties now, I don’t think I would join them. Affirmative action is out of control on both the civilian side and military side of the DoD. When I started working for them in 1981, I thought we had learned our lesson from Vietnam and wouldn’t get into any more overseas wars, but I was wrong. The military-industrial complex always has to be creating new enemies to justify continued high budgets. I watched as the military tried to cover up vaccine injuries to soldiers by saying the medical database that showed that was only showing it because of a “major computer glitch” that went undetected for 5 years. After working with DoD computers for 40 years I know a major computer glitch wouldn’t go undetected for five years and they are liars. If a young man asked me for advice, I would discourage him from working for either the military or civilian side of the DoD.

  120. @JimDandy
    @Mr. Anon

    What's with these snowflakes? They don't want to sign up for a woke anti-white anti-male anti-American gay trans military to kill and be killed while fighting proxy wars for Israel? They're afraid of coming home with stumps for legs and being confined to a wheelchair when I know for a fact that this one organization that has commercials on Fox will buy some of them their own wheelchair-house? I'm disgusted by this generation of touchy-feely little pencil-necked cowards who are too wimpy to put their lives on the line for Zionists who hate them. Not signing up for the military is the ultimate act of anti-semitic, racist, sexist, trans-phobic toxic masculinity. If only there was some way to FORCE these punks to check their privilege and do their duty.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Rooster16

    I routinely ask why a straight White male would enlist in the armed services? I also ask why a White person would vote democrat. Typically this leaves the other person mouth-agape. When you breach the third wall of race in discussion, most people have no come back.

  121. @Dmon
    @GSH

    I agree. In fact, you could pretty much say that by Waterloo, Britian had been more or less continuously at war since 1756. Granted it wasn't what we would consider Total War today, but still. For me, the takeaway from comparisons between war then and now is the death of noblesse oblige. The Waterloo British officer corps were aristocrats to a man. In return for a life of comfort and privilege, when war came around, they were expected to put on a bright red uniform, sit on a large horse right out in the very front, and act as a big, visible target. Compare that to today. The modern American ruling class has wealth and power undreamed of by any British aristocrat, attained mostly by luck and fortuitous timing, and they are asked nothing in return (other than a steady stream of payola in money and kind to the right politicians). Very few of them get anywhere near any kind of danger, or even render any public service beyond photo ops. When they decide to express their inner Bismarck, part of their cannon fodder's subconscious calculus is "Hunter's the one getting rich off Ukraine, not me. Let him go fight for it".
    And before anyone brings up Beau, he was a lawyer. As David Hackworth put it (paraphrasing), any time he saw an officer with a bronze star but no purple heart or CIB, he figured it was bullsh!#.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Bill Jones

    Even as late as WWI it still existed, 25% of the 1918 graduation class at Oxford were dead by then. I had a couple of great Aunts who never married because “The man I was supposed to marry died”.

  122. @Anon
    I think it's way down because your average 18-year old doesn't want to end up in Ukraine fighting the Russians. With Biden, there's a real fear that this may happen. Every 18-year old considering some time in the army knows what happened to Napoleon and Hitler when they tried fighting a winter war in that area.

    Biden is too stupid to stay out of trouble. He is on the path of mission creep ala Vietnam. We started out there with 'advisors' and ended up sending in regular troops. Biden has already signaled that he's too stubborn and committed to quit, and he refuses to start any sort peace talks with the Russians.

    Biden doesn't want peace, and he won't accept partition of Ukraine. The only option acceptable to him is to defeat the Russians in battle and force them completely out of Ukraine. This won't work, and Biden is too stubborn and egoistical to admit it. The only way it could work is a major commitment of US troops and our full arsenal of hardware. In other words, a land war with Russia one-on-one. World War 3, no less.

    But Biden is too incompetent to run a war. Everybody knows that. He couldn't even manage a peaceful withdrawal in Afghanistan. There's no way we're winning WW 3 with Biden in charge.

    Keep in mind that the military tends to run in families. Any kids with military parents are being told not to join up right now because Biden is such a retarded chucklehead who knows what might happen.

    Replies: @William Badwhite, @Mr. Anon, @Corvinus, @BB753, @AnotherDad, @nebulafox

    IMO, it is more complicated than that, though you aren’t wrong: why on Earth would you want to entrust your fate to someone like Mark Milley and a White House dominated by HR drones? Wokeness obviously isn’t helping with the usual demographics for military recruitment, at least among the enlisted rank and file. Then there’s the fact that a majority of American kids are barred from enlistment, whether for good or for silly reasons. The over-arching culture of “safety-ism” that has infected all areas of American society is proving particularly disastrous in the military, as the exodus of long-serving NCOs would have told you over the past decade.

    On another note: one thing I intensely dislike about our current gerontocracy and their moralistic reasoning on Ukraine is that these are the same people who threw massive hissy fits over intervening in Vietnam when it was their turn, a conflict where we deployed similarly shitty moralistic and geopolitical reasoning in getting involved in that one. The result was a lot bloodier and visibly destructive, but it probably is going to be less geopolitical disastrous than the combination of moves recently made over the past couple of years for the US in the long haul: on the whole, we managed to bounce back from the Vietnam quagmire by the 1980s. I’m less sanguine about this, unless things change soon.

    But that’s not what disgusts me: what disgusts me is that their lionization of Zelensky (“the new George Washington”) was exactly the same treatment *the North Vietnamese* got from these same people back then.

    Yes, I realize that without the draft, they are just impoverishing the American people rather than sending them to die. But the hypocrisy is nevertheless stunning, if you look at their stated reasons for intervention and compare that to the Vietnam era. Especially when you consider that when it comes to human rights violations, the Indochinese Communists make Putin today look like a schoolboy. But then, these are the same people selling our oil reserves to China at a time of economic crisis, and trumpeting solar panels that are only affordable because they are built by slave laborers as an “answer” to our problems.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
  123. @AnotherDad
    @AnotherDad



    More than half of the young Americans who answered the survey — about 57% — think they would have emotional or psychological problems after serving in the military.
     
    Americans are raised to be fragile these days.

    Nearly half think they would have physical problems.
     

     
    A society should strive for "un-fragile".

    In my alternative (non-rainbow) utopia, military service would be expected for young men, but not required. Military service would strive as well as military and practical skills, to instill non-fragility. Veterans would be the militia called upon to defend the nation, but also would be its only true citizens/voters. Those who were unfit or chose to skip could live their lives but would not vote, make decisions, be leaders.

    Replies: @Houston 1992

    Unz-ites should encourage young Whites with few options to join the Coast Guard to stop illegal immigration and drug importation. Little chance of death, but same benefits later.
    (As logistics comes to matter more and more, perhaps Merchant Marine would also be good idea for the same reasons…)

    2) will the neo Cons start promoting White women registering for the draft — coupled with suitable draft deferments /exemptions for academic program enrollees where their lessors are enrolled?

    • Replies: @captflee
    @Houston 1992

    Perhaps not so little as you might think...I lost friends on USCGC Blackthorn. Going to sea in any form is an inherently dangerous undertaking, as the crew of SS El Faro might tell you, were they not all drowned. Eventually we're going to meet a near peer adversary with aircraft and warships, and will possibly be treated to a replay of WWII, during which the Merchant Marine suffered a fatality rate of 3.9%. Rates for other services were: USMC 2.9%, Army 2.1%, USN 0.9%, USCG 0.2%.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  124. @Anon
    @Drive-by poster

    I assure you the rate of injuries in Afghanistan was lower than in Vietnam or WW2.


    War is a racket... In your demented mind. War is a charity. Get drafted, cuck boy.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    We lost about 8x as many men in Vietnam in the year 1968 by itself than we did during the whole Afghan war. The scale of carnage-for the locals as much as for the Americans, FWIW, you still see people in Vietnam today who are deaf, dumb, and blind thanks to Agent Orange-wasn’t even in the same ballpark.

    The differences don’t stop there. We had an all professional army rather than draftees, the rules of engagement in dealing with the locals were much stricter, both in Iraq and in Afghanistan. For all the flaws of both occupations-and there were plenty-the kind of ill-trained frustration that exploded into outright massacres like My Lai would have been unthinkable in both.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    @nebulafox


    the rules of engagement in dealing with the locals were much stricter, both in Iraq and in Afghanistan

     

    LOL... even the BBC has stopped trying to catapult that nonsense.

    The recent Panorama episode entitled "Death Squads Exposed - A British War Crime" is the second or third broadcast about widespread unlawful killings of unarmed - and restrained - non-combatants.

    Now obviously you're not going to see stuff like that in Yankistan, because the only people with the money to make such a program, are strongly disincentivised to do so.

    For the same reason, you won't see anything about PAIDS (Pfizer-Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) on the nightly news... brought to you by Pfizer.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L2LQW1TY0lY

  125. @Cool Daddy Jimbo
    The vast majority of the US military is made up of John Lee Pettimores (with a sprinkling of Jamals and Jose's). The country has spent the past ten years telling John Lee how much it hates him. I can't really blame John Lee for not signing up. Jamal, Jose', you got it, fellas. Good luck.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

    John Lee Pettimores

    Same’s his Daddy and his Daddy before, unless I miss my guess.

    The thing that characterises a lot of the John Lee Pettimore types is that they have absolutely no misconceptions about the military, and post-service they are (ahem) diffident in their approach to “law enforcement”.

    Fucking awesome lyrics…

    Volunteered for the army on my birthday
    They draft the white trash first ’round here anyway
    I done two tours of duty in Vietnam
    I came home with a brand new plan
    I take the seed from Colombia and Mexico
    Just plant it up the holler down Copperhead Road

    Now the D.E.A’s got a chopper in the air
    I wake up screaming like I’m back over there
    But I learned a thing or two from Charlie don’t you know
    You better stay away from Copperhead Road

    It should go without saying that I’m referencing Steve Earle, not whatever faggot wrote the utterly-derivative, lyricless recent thing.

    That whole album is terrific – “Nothing But A Child” brings tears to my eyes, and I’m a depopulationist atheist. The only letdown was in the CD cover, where Earle write “If you don’t vote, don’t bitch“, which shows a breathtaking naïveté regarding elections.

    Then again, one of my favourite recording artists of all time is Roger Miller – celebrating white-trash Americana with a wry smile.

    • Agree: Cool Daddy Jimbo
    • Replies: @Cool Daddy Jimbo
    @Kratoklastes

    Here's an interesting version:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jccnkfGSjm0

    , @beavertales
    @Kratoklastes

    The young Steve Earle dismissed Shania Twain as just a singing lap-dancer.

    The older Steve Earle came out for woke-banning the confederate flag.

    So many artists of that era, like Bruce Springsteen (Born in the USA) , aged into meek, progressive conformity. They haven't gotten wiser, they just never had a good grasp of why their anthems of rebellion were immortal. Their music is aging better than them.

    The new revolutionaries opposing the man are conservatives, and this doesn't fit the boomer leftist script.

    I look forward to modern leftists composing folk songs about the righteousness of joining the army to spread democracy and gay rights abroad. I dare them to try.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  126. anonymous[875] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    @Cheesemaster2000

    This comment brought to you by the CCP.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @anonymous

    Does that mean you support staying in the Middle East and fighting the Iran War?

  127. @nebulafox
    @Anon

    We lost about 8x as many men in Vietnam in the year 1968 by itself than we did during the whole Afghan war. The scale of carnage-for the locals as much as for the Americans, FWIW, you still see people in Vietnam today who are deaf, dumb, and blind thanks to Agent Orange-wasn't even in the same ballpark.

    The differences don't stop there. We had an all professional army rather than draftees, the rules of engagement in dealing with the locals were much stricter, both in Iraq and in Afghanistan. For all the flaws of both occupations-and there were plenty-the kind of ill-trained frustration that exploded into outright massacres like My Lai would have been unthinkable in both.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

    the rules of engagement in dealing with the locals were much stricter, both in Iraq and in Afghanistan

    LOL… even the BBC has stopped trying to catapult that nonsense.

    The recent Panorama episode entitled “Death Squads Exposed – A British War Crime” is the second or third broadcast about widespread unlawful killings of unarmed – and restrained – non-combatants.

    Now obviously you’re not going to see stuff like that in Yankistan, because the only people with the money to make such a program, are strongly disincentivised to do so.

    For the same reason, you won’t see anything about PAIDS (Pfizer-Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) on the nightly news… brought to you by Pfizer.

    • Agree: BB753
  128. anonymous[628] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill Jones
    @Altai

    https://rense.com/1.mpicons/slider20200710/mm.jpg

    Replies: @anonymous

    The Pentagon still doesn’t allow troops whose gender identity is nonbinary (they/them) to serve openly.

  129. @michael droy
    Vanity Fair is wonderful - Becky Sharp is a wonderful female character and very modern.

    Barry Lyndon from a few years earlier is pretty much the same with a male character - it is good but Vanity Fair is better.
    All versions of both I have seen read or heard (films, books and BBC radio plays) have been excellent.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    The BBC does Radio Plays and Nature Documentaries very well. The Planet Earth series may be the best TV ever produced.

  130. @Alden
    @Farenheit

    But how does the army distinguish men from women? Garbage in, garbage out. Or why the last time America won a war was August 1945.

    Replies: @Farenheit

    Fingers crossed on this Ukie proxy war!,

  131. @Jack P
    The current regime has no qualms about unleashing violence against patriotic Americans and using the military to do it. So patriotic Americans need to steer clear until there is house cleaning.

    A more interesting question is what should patriotic young American men do instead. I think red states need to cultivate state militias and recruit these patriotic young men, for when the globalists come for real.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    This interview by the great Scott Horton of Diego Rivera of Defend the Guard and especially the Effective Activism piece may interest you.

    https://podcastaddict.com/episode/142031831

  132. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Mr. Anon

    I live Northern Virginia. Trust me, the military - war or peace - is a racket. I've had many a neighbor sucking on that teat. Retired military who had easy jobs in military with sweet pensions. Ex-military with government jobs because they get preference. IT guys working for government contractors who have security clearance so they can't get fired.

    The list goes on and on.

    Ironically, most the men who serve in combat only stay in the military a short time. It's the other guys - especially blacks - who get all the goodies.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @JohnnyWalker123

    Ironically, most the men who serve in combat only stay in the military a short time. It’s the other guys – especially blacks – who get all the goodies.

    Blacks are very talented at gaming the system. They know how to grab the maximum amount of loot, while investing the minimum amount of effort. More than anything else, that explains why so many Blacks are in back-office positions in the military.

    For similar reasons, Blacks are highly overrepresented in many government-related jobs.

    Blacks are pretty nepotistic too. However, due to their poor work ethic and incompetence, Black hiring networks tend to have difficulty expanding into lucrative private-sector niches (like IT/software and finance). That’s why their networks are limited to certain govt niches (typically those in which producing results is not important) and corporate HR/diversity.

  133. For all the hand-wringing about g and IQ, at least we know the increasingly diverse US population is smart enough to know not to sign up to get their nuts blown off.

  134. If I had a son of military age, there’s no way I’d have him enlist to serve under a Total PoS like Creepy/Crazy/Crooked Uncle Joe O’Brandon.

  135. @Slim
    In related news, ten members of the Kansas City Royals refused the mandatory 'vaccination' to enter Canada and are missing their team's four game series against the Toronto Blue Jays. They were put on the restricted list which removes them from the 40 man roster temporarily.

    Young healthy people refusing the mRNA jab is a good story whether it involves ballplayers or members of the armed forces.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Jay Fink

    and the Royals won the first game in the series despite being -400 underdogs due to their shortage of available players.

  136. In 2021 the annual Reagan National Defense Survey, conducted by the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Institute, found that just 45% of Americans had a great deal of trust and confidence in the military, down 25 points since 2018.

    Losing a war is bad for morale.

    Afghanistan had been pretty much forgotten by 2018. It wasn’t going well; but few civilians knew that.

    The fall of Kabul was a demoralizing shock to many in the poorly informed majority.

    • Thanks: Houston 1992
    • Replies: @epebble
    @Not Raul

    The fall of Kabul was a demoralizing shock to many in the poorly informed majority.

    But 70% of Americans had a great deal of trust and confidence in the military after the fall of Baghdad?

    I am curious what were the numbers before/after fall of Saigon.

  137. @William Badwhite
    @Anon


    Keep in mind that the military tends to run in families. Any kids with military parents are being told not to join up right now because Biden is such a retarded chucklehead who knows what might happen.
     
    Its not just Biden. It's the Great Replacement, it's DIE, it's the overt hostility towards normal Americans coming from most institutions of power, and yes it is Biden's malevolent administration.

    The Badwhites have had at least one person in every generation going back to the French & Indian War serve in the military. My oldest brother is a member of The Society of the Cincinnati.

    Of the current military age generation none are currently serving, nor will they be encouraged to.

    Replies: @Bernie

    Same here. Me and my brothers served but none of our kids will be allowed to enlist in racist, anti-white military.

    • Replies: @Houston 1992
    @Bernie

    what about lower risk Coast Guard?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  138. @JR Ewing
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Next time they force your group into the Diversity Enrichment seminar, you just say NO. Yes, they will aim to fire you instead of AT you, but just as on a battlefield, you need to stick together. It’s a different kind of war.
     
    I quit my last corporate job about 15 years ago. Have since been 100x more successful working for myself than I ever would have been working for someone else.

    Nonetheless, before I quit, I dodged mandatory “diversity training” for an entire year. At least 6-8 times by my count. Kept signing up and then coming up with excuses not to go at the last minute. (And truthfully, the excuses were legit - my time was much more valuable and important than sitting in a classroom doing bullshit indoctrination stuff)

    By the time I finally resigned to pursue other opportunities, the training situation had progressed to “possible discipline up to and including termination”. Despite all the money I made them and everything else I accomplished at that company, I still consider avoiding that “training” to be my greatest accomplishment during my time there.

    Replies: @Lurker, @Achmed E. Newman, @Almost Missouri

    Nice job, JR! Your story is uplifting to me. I wish more Americans would take a stand, even if just a small one.

  139. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Oliver Stone volunteered for two tours of combat in Vietnam and was wounded twice and won the Bronze Star once for heroism. I always felt he was more than entitled to offer his opinion of his country’s foreign policy.
     
    Joyce Kilmer has a rest stop named in his honor in his native New Jersey. He supported entering the war in print, then nobly (if stupidly) enlisted himself. He was killed in action.

    Though remembered for his arborist doggerel, he is honored for his service. Never forget that.

    And how appropriate that it offers full-service gasoline!


    https://www.theconcordinsider.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/20120904_nature.jpg


    Top two reviews on Foursquare:

    Ethar El-Katatney May 24, 2013
    Surprisingly comprehensive rest area. Restaurants, Starbucks, market, spotless bathrooms. Full service gas station. But best of all: all the employees are Egyptian!

    Vinny Vodka-Tonic September 30, 2015
    Great place! I even bought a gold watch from a guy in the bathroom. It turns my wrist a little green but I think it's a special kind of gold or something.

    https://foursquare.com/v/joyce-kilmer-travel-plaza/4bb754db46d4a593414fc7c0
     
    (It's been asserted that New Jersey boasts both the best and the worst toll road in the US, but I can never remember which of the two is which.)

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    I have driven the NJT for years and just now I find out Joyce Kilmer was a man!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jim Don Bob


    I have driven the NJT for years and just now I find out Joyce Kilmer was a man!
     
    He was the Pat Tillman of his day!

    I vaguely remember being in grade school with his granddaughter one year.
    , @Hibernian
    @Jim Don Bob

    I think that I shall never see
    A poem as lovely as a tree
    For poems are made by fools like me
    But only God can make a tree

  140. @Almost Missouri
    @JimDandy


    If only there was some way to FORCE these punks to check their privilege and do their duty.
     
    If there's a lesson of the last few years it is that today's satire is tomorrow's dreary reality.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    If there’s a lesson of the last few years it is that today’s satire is tomorrow’s dreary reality.

    Truly. I thought that Steve had lost his marbles when he started banging on about World War T not so long ago. It turns out he was prescient about what is now part of the Received Wisdom.

  141. Good!

    Anything to slow down the chicken hawks from invading another sandpit or starting WWIII is welcome news.

  142. @Known Fact
    "Were you or your family injured by the toxic water at Camp Lejeune?"

    That's a law-firm ad I keep hearing now -- Now there's a real recruiting inducement!

    Replies: @Hibernian

    My dad served there from time to time, on maneuvers, July ’55 to October ’57. His permanent duty station was Cherry Point NAS (now Cherry Point MCAS.)

  143. @JohnnyWalker123

    Americans are raised to be fragile these days.

     

    Or maybe they've been paying attention to all the wounded, mentally afflicted, and traumatized soldiers who've been returning home from our endless foreign wars.

    A good discussion of the true costs of our foreign wars.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLXrgmz-0lo

    Watch a movie called "Born on the 4th of July" to gain more perspective on this issue. The 1989 film was directed by Oliver Stone, who (unlike the various draft-dodging presidents that we've had in recent years) actually served in a war.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jk_07yseiDA

    Why die in a foreign war so some draft-dodger can get reelected in 2004?
    Why die in a foreign war to enrich the war profiteers of Haliburton?
    Why die in a foreign war to advance Israeli national security?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mike Tre, @BB753, @VivaLaMigra

    Ann Jones recounts the horrors of war on the Afghani [note: an “Afghan” is a type of blanket, not a person] population but fails to mention that during a mere two decades of American occupation of that region [it’s inaccurate to call that god-forsaken expanse of near bone-dry and mountainous terrain a “nation” or “country” as it’s just a bunch of tribes with an artificial boundary arbitrarily drawn around it] the population exploded from just 20 million to 40 million. How did this happen in a region with piss-poor resources and a nearly illiterate population? One could rightly conclude that far from being a catastrophe for the people there, American presence, or more specifically, the billions of US dollars flushed down that toilet was a positive boon to the inhabitants. Afghani women are pooping out babies at a truly sickening rate. There’s only one product that shithole can produce with a market demand sufficient to sustain their out-of-control population growth: opium.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @VivaLaMigra

    Well, her focus is mostly on the suffering endured by US troops.

    Here's a good description.

    https://www.perlego.com/book/566499/they-were-soldiers-how-the-wounded-return-from-americas-wars-the-untold-story-pdf


    Ann Jones shines a much-needed light on the dead, mutilated, brain-damaged, drug-addicted, suicidal, homicidal casualties of our distant wars, taking us on a stunning journey from the devastating moment an American soldier is first wounded in rural Afghanistan to the return home. Beautifully written by an empathetic and critical reporter who knows the price of war.

     

    https://annjonesonline.com/they-were-soldiers/

    At the trauma hospital at Bagram Air Base she watched the grievously wounded carried from medevac helicopters to the emergency room and witnessed the toll that life-saving surgeries took on the doctors who performed them. She accompanied the wounded on medevac flights from Bagram to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany, then on to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, and finally—for those who made it—back to all-American homes where, often enough, more troubles followed: violence against wives, girlfriends, children, and fellow soldiers; Big Pharma-induced drug addiction; murder, suicide, and the terrible sorrow of caretaker moms and dads who don’t know what happened to their kids. They Were Soldiers is a powerful account of how official American promises—this time to “Support Our Troops”—fall victim to the true costs of war.

     

    Americans love sending their troops off to die in pointless foreign conflicts, but they don't much like facing the long-term consequences.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @VivaLaMigra


    the Afghani [note: an “Afghan” is a type of blanket, not a person]
     
    In English, the language of Kipling, Churchill, Stoddard, and Unz.com, an Afghan is a person as well as a blanket or a dog.


    Note (as in "bank-"): this is an afghani, or, rather, fifty of them:


    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-PD3O1ihv2tM/UMwck2t2izI/AAAAAAAAK50/tL68VgQz-sI/s1600/Afghanistan+currency+50+Afghan+Afghani+note.jpg

  144. @Anon
    @PhysicistDave


    Or just maybe the CCP rather likes the idea of the US wasting its blood and treasure fighting other people’s wars
     
    The US lost rougly 3500 men in Afghanistan over the 20 year period of the war. That's nothing. The mortality rate was slightly higher than civilian life back home in America is today. Get a grip you frickin' Nancy, combat casualties were never an argument against the war.

    Replies: @Vetman, @Drive-by poster, @Almost Missouri, @Wj, @Thea, @PhysicistDave

    The death of one decent American soldier for these worthless wars was too many. All the while Bush pursued this nonsense, our southern border was completely unprotected. These same soldiers could have been employed in much more meaningful ways.

    You don’t mention the living vets missing an arm or leg.

    Don’t forget the trillions of dollars that could have been put to better use taking care of our people and securing our borders.

    • Agree: Mark G.
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Thea


    The death of one decent American soldier for these worthless wars was too many. All the while Bush pursued this nonsense, our southern border was completely unprotected. These same soldiers could have been employed in much more meaningful ways.

    You don’t mention the living vets missing an arm or leg.
     
    Womanbabble.

    The CCP and Russia appreciate your war weariness.

    Don’t forget the trillions of dollars that could have been put to better use taking care of our people and securing our borders
     
    The Afghan war could have funded all of that. All those precious minerals in the mountains and the opium trade was worth something...

    I thought war was a racket? Don't you remember that stupid little meme... ?

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @S. Anonyia

    , @Wilkey
    @Thea


    The death of one decent American soldier for these worthless wars was too many. All the while Bush pursued this nonsense, our southern border was completely unprotected.
     
    I’ve always thought of Bush’s wars as nothing more than a complete diversion from the real solution to the problem of terrorism, which was always saner immigration laws and better border security. When George W. Bush became president our government still had a budget surplus. Almost 22 years later the federal debt has increased by $24 trillion - a average of over $1 trillion per year - and has gone from 55% of GDP to 124% of GDP. People think that deficit spending means lower taxes (for now), but we are just getting taxed in different ways. All of that deficit spending finances a whole lot of Woke bullshit that people wouldn’t tolerate if they actually had to pay for it directly.
  145. @Not Raul

    In 2021 the annual Reagan National Defense Survey, conducted by the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Institute, found that just 45% of Americans had a great deal of trust and confidence in the military, down 25 points since 2018.
     
    Losing a war is bad for morale.

    Afghanistan had been pretty much forgotten by 2018. It wasn’t going well; but few civilians knew that.

    The fall of Kabul was a demoralizing shock to many in the poorly informed majority.

    Replies: @epebble

    The fall of Kabul was a demoralizing shock to many in the poorly informed majority.

    But 70% of Americans had a great deal of trust and confidence in the military after the fall of Baghdad?

    I am curious what were the numbers before/after fall of Saigon.

  146. @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    It is often said that an infantryman's pack has never gotten lighter since Roman legionnaire times.

    I wouldn't be surprised if it's significantly heavier in these days of automatic weapons when the amount of ammunition that can be carried can be decisive. I'm guessing Roman troops likely weighed in the 130 to 140 pound range. And the Roman army was really smart about not overburdening their men. I read Edward Luttwak's book "The Grand Strategy of Rome" and he emphasized how the legions could march for 1000 miles or more and arrive in better shape than when they left. They only marched 4 or 5 hours per day and had lots of techniques for ensuring that they ate and slept well en route.

    Replies: @John Henry, @Almost Missouri, @Joe Stalin, @GeologyAnonMk6, @Kronos

    Average legionaire in Hadraians time carried 60lb of gear while on a March, and slightly less when in battle order. A M249 gunner carries 120lb, and a regular rifleman ~90lb. The NGSW program spent a few billion dollars with the project objective of delivering a lighter but more lethal weapon, original prototypes+ammo were 40% lighter than M249 and 5×100 ammo belts, but somehow SIG won the contract with a gun that is heavier than the M4 it replaces, substantially, with no weight savings in ammunition, a much heavier optic, and smaller magazines and significantly reduced total ammo count carried. Idiotic.

  147. @AceDeuce
    @Steve Sailer


    Oliver Stone volunteered for two tours of combat in Vietnam and was wounded twice and won the Bronze Star once for heroism. I always felt he was more than entitled to offer his opinion of his country’s foreign policy.
     
    Tim McVeigh was awarded a Bronze Star, as well. Does that lend credence to his views?

    Replies: @GeologyAnonMk6

    I’m positive you have never read either his manifesto or reviewed the court records of his trial. He very eloquently skewered the hypocrisy of how he military decorated him for Valor in Iraq with how they vilified him for actually holding true to his oath later. Maybe don’t talk about stuff you have zero idea about.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @GeologyAnonMk6

    Get bent, creepo. I've read extensively about him. My post had nothing to do with the minutiae of his views, or the corn in his stool. I'll write about whatever TF I want to.

    Replies: @GeologyAnonMk6

  148. @Bernie
    @William Badwhite

    Same here. Me and my brothers served but none of our kids will be allowed to enlist in racist, anti-white military.

    Replies: @Houston 1992

    what about lower risk Coast Guard?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Houston 1992


    what about lower risk Coast Guard?
     
    In peacetime, the Coast Guard has the highest risk. At least if the bolts are tightened properly in the other services. Weather isn't governed by a treaty, no matter what the climate change freaks may assert.

    You go out in a small vessel into a North Atlantic storm!

    I wonder if the USCG is less woke than what the other services have lately become. Because they have a job to do. Multiple jobs. You need the ice broken and the buoys in place!

  149. @Redneck farmer
    Worrying about post-service physical problems is actually somewhat legitimate. Infantry carries a lot of gear, and unlike in the past, troops aren't allowed to ditch the items they don't think they're going to need. A relatively large number of ex-grunts are on full or partial disability due to ruined joints.
    Most military jobs don't have that issue, though.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mike Tre, @AceDeuce, @Kronos

    For every vet with a valid disability claim, there are five with faked/exaggerated claims getting paid.

    It’s an open secret. Most of the claimants with no real problems are non-Whites gaming the system, though with the drop-off in honor and integrity over the past few decades, many White vets these days are doing it, too. It’s sickening.

    • Agree: Old Prude
  150. @Drive-by poster
    @Anon


    The US lost rougly 3500 men in Afghanistan over the 20 year period of the war. That’s nothing.
     
    It is only "nothing" if your kid wasn't one of the 3500.

    Also, that figure of 3500 only reflects those killed. You can safely triple that if you include those who were wounded, and came away from the campaign minus an arm or leg, or those who will never feel quite right again between their ears.

    https://pics.me.me/the-war-is-over-my-boy-forget-it-life-magazine-43517979.png

    The mortality rate was slightly higher than civilian life back home in America is today.
     
    Mortality rates are only one cost of warfare. There are many other costs, some of which cannot be seen and counted as easily.

    It is possible for your body to remain in one piece while your mind is long gone.

    If you think going to war is something that soldiers and Marines can simply shrug off once they go home, you haven't been around very many. Wars can continue to be fought, again and again, in the minds of those who were doing the fighting long after the war itself has ended.

    America may have buried its dead from the war, but it will be paying the price of Afghanistan for many decades to come. We will have to wait and see whether the warmongers succeed in talking the Americans into going to war again less than a year after the end of the two-decade long war in Afghanistan.

    Replies: @Anon, @Harry Baldwin

    A very good book on the lasting psychological effect of war is What It Is Like to Go to War by Karl Marlantes. Marlantes is a highly-decorated Marine who fought in Vietnam. He is also a Rhodes scholar.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Harry Baldwin

    On Combat has a lot of interesting facts.

    , @Drive-by poster
    @Harry Baldwin


    A very good book on the lasting psychological effect of war is What It Is Like to Go to War by Karl Marlantes. Marlantes is a highly-decorated Marine who fought in Vietnam. He is also a Rhodes scholar.
     
    Thank you for the book recommendation. I am always seeking books that convincingly describe wartime experiences and their aftermath, as it is the sort of thing more widely experienced than written about.

    I will pick up a copy to see how close this one comes.

    Replies: @AndrewR

  151. @Harry Baldwin
    @Drive-by poster

    A very good book on the lasting psychological effect of war is What It Is Like to Go to War by Karl Marlantes. Marlantes is a highly-decorated Marine who fought in Vietnam. He is also a Rhodes scholar.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Drive-by poster

    On Combat has a lot of interesting facts.

  152. Any American, particularly a white one, would be a fool to serve. You are NOT defending America. You are supporting an overseas empire largely controlled by the all powerful Jewish lobby. The military-industrial complex is a secondary villain here too. Meanwhile at home immigration is turning you into a minority. Truly nuts.

    • Agree: Mike Tre
  153. @pyrrhus
    @Mike_from_SGV

    And then there's the mandatory jab or three....

    Replies: @Mike_from_SGV

    Yeah that didn’t occur to me, but it is an obstacle to a lot of people.

  154. How many wars has the US fought to actually defend the United States? 1812?

    The Spanish-American war was probably a fraud with the Maine being blown up by our own sailors accidently. The Lusitania was carrying war materiel so that the Germans would sink it giving Wilson a reason to join in WW1. Certainly Japan was provoked so that Roosevelt could get is into WW2. Korea and Vietnam? Neither was fought with the intension of winning. Iraq and Afghanistan should see Bush in prison.

    Our military is used and abused so old men can make money.

  155. @GeologyAnonMk6
    @AceDeuce

    I'm positive you have never read either his manifesto or reviewed the court records of his trial. He very eloquently skewered the hypocrisy of how he military decorated him for Valor in Iraq with how they vilified him for actually holding true to his oath later. Maybe don't talk about stuff you have zero idea about.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    Get bent, creepo. I’ve read extensively about him. My post had nothing to do with the minutiae of his views, or the corn in his stool. I’ll write about whatever TF I want to.

    • Replies: @GeologyAnonMk6
    @AceDeuce

    Ah I see, you're not an actual person, but a bit working tirelessly to generate the moat extreme Dunnimg-Kruger effect content possible. Thank goodness, imagine what a sad little human being you would be.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

  156. @Redneck farmer
    Worrying about post-service physical problems is actually somewhat legitimate. Infantry carries a lot of gear, and unlike in the past, troops aren't allowed to ditch the items they don't think they're going to need. A relatively large number of ex-grunts are on full or partial disability due to ruined joints.
    Most military jobs don't have that issue, though.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mike Tre, @AceDeuce, @Kronos

    There are so many stories of patrols hiking for days with 80lbs rucks. It’s no wonder there’s such a high number of foot, knee, and back problems. Had a family friend who worked at the local VA who’d talk about it occasionally.

    BTW, Mystery Ranch backpacks are awesome!

  157. @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    It is often said that an infantryman's pack has never gotten lighter since Roman legionnaire times.

    I wouldn't be surprised if it's significantly heavier in these days of automatic weapons when the amount of ammunition that can be carried can be decisive. I'm guessing Roman troops likely weighed in the 130 to 140 pound range. And the Roman army was really smart about not overburdening their men. I read Edward Luttwak's book "The Grand Strategy of Rome" and he emphasized how the legions could march for 1000 miles or more and arrive in better shape than when they left. They only marched 4 or 5 hours per day and had lots of techniques for ensuring that they ate and slept well en route.

    Replies: @John Henry, @Almost Missouri, @Joe Stalin, @GeologyAnonMk6, @Kronos

    I think that’s why DOD is playing around with robot pack mules and exoskeletons.

    https://www.dogster.com/lifestyle/robot-dog-cujo-military-marines-training-missions-videos-pictures-photos

  158. @Rob Lee
    This is why I chuckle when I read commenters stating: "You can't oppose the US Government with small arms because they'll just send in the military to smoke you! Nah Nah."

    A few more years of this and no, they won't. They won't be able to. There won't be a plane in the air or a greenback who can read a map.

    Many of the actual fighters - white males from the Midwest - are beginning to avoid the service. When intra-US bullets start flying, I'll take five young hunters from PA with bolt actions rifles against a squad of Quan'eshas every. single. time.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Corvinus

    I’m sure with some Midwest ingenuity they could make some narly IEDs.

    • Replies: @FPD72
    @Kronos

    The oil producing regions would be rife with shaped charges used in perforating guns. In rocky areas dynamite and ANFO are still used for pipeline construction and gravel pits. ANFO made with fertilizer could easily be obtained in agricultural areas. So yes, the middle of the nation is populated with men with knowledge and the means of producing and deploying IEDs

  159. @Dumbo
    There's no mystery, Steve. It has NOTHING to do with the Ukraine war. Force soldiers to vaccinate with an unpopular (and useless) vaccine. Promote women, gays and trannies in the military. Turn the whole thing into some type of Woke Academy. Then how can you wonder why numbers would be down?!?

    Sometimes I wonder if the people who analyze things are really that dumb, or they are just pretending to be.

    Replies: @Mr Mox, @S. Anonyia, @Couch scientist, @NOTA

    100%

  160. @Mr. Anon
    @Dmon


    As David Hackworth put it (paraphrasing), any time he saw an officer with a bronze star but no purple heart or CIB, he figured it was bullsh!#.
     
    Most of the politician-soldiers nowadays seemed to have been either JAG officers (I've heard that real soldiers refer to them as JAG-OFFS) or military intelligence (usually naval intelligence). Comfortable billets that don't involve getting shot at - just enough service to put on a resume and get a "thank you for your service" call out.

    There are exceptions of course (Eye-patch Dan, Alan West). But even then I don't care. I don't care if they got shot at or shot up. Their military experience is not a veto they get to impose over my opinions. The concept of America, as it was founded, is that you get a say in how your country is governed including its military and foreign policy, and you get that say whether you have been in the military or not.

    As far as all that thankyou-for-your-service/support-the-troops/they're-fighting-for-our-freedom bulls**t goes.......................I'm over it.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    The concept of America, as it was founded, is that you get a say in how your country is governed including its military and foreign policy, and you get that say whether you have been in the military or not.

    Kind of. I keep having to remind everyone that “America, as it was founded” included, in most states, mandatory service in the local militia along with mandatory owning of an assault weapon, usually a musket, in order to vote. Local rules varied, but the foregoing was often a minimum requirement, as well as not being on the public dole.

    I expect that after the national collapse, this will once again be the way of things (except the “musket” will be more modern). As I also keep saying, elections are proxies for combat, so it is natural that those who make a state will be the ones to decide its disposition.

    • Agree: V. K. Ovelund
    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @Almost Missouri

    "Kind of. I keep having to remind everyone that “America, as it was founded” included, in most states, mandatory service in the local militia along with mandatory owning of an assault weapon, usually a musket, in order to vote. "

    I wouldn't have a problem with these mandates in the current year if service was restricted specifically to defending the continental US, and not to include being shipped to foreign lands to kill people that are no threat to my country and or die trying. Service mandates would also require a homogeneous society.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  161. @JR Ewing
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Next time they force your group into the Diversity Enrichment seminar, you just say NO. Yes, they will aim to fire you instead of AT you, but just as on a battlefield, you need to stick together. It’s a different kind of war.
     
    I quit my last corporate job about 15 years ago. Have since been 100x more successful working for myself than I ever would have been working for someone else.

    Nonetheless, before I quit, I dodged mandatory “diversity training” for an entire year. At least 6-8 times by my count. Kept signing up and then coming up with excuses not to go at the last minute. (And truthfully, the excuses were legit - my time was much more valuable and important than sitting in a classroom doing bullshit indoctrination stuff)

    By the time I finally resigned to pursue other opportunities, the training situation had progressed to “possible discipline up to and including termination”. Despite all the money I made them and everything else I accomplished at that company, I still consider avoiding that “training” to be my greatest accomplishment during my time there.

    Replies: @Lurker, @Achmed E. Newman, @Almost Missouri

    When I was last suffering in corporate America under mandatory diversity training, I was amused that a black lady friend at work hated it even more than I did. (The eternal contradictions of liberalism: they make “diversity training” to be nice to blacks but then blacks end up hating it even more than whites.) Anyhow, she flat out told the boss she wouldn’t attend the mandatory training anymore.

    And the boss …

    … did nothing.

    He wasn’t going to lose his one really good black female employee over some BS corporate mandate. Whether his sentiment was shared all the way of the hierarchy or whether he just forged her attendance signature and swept it under the rug, I don’t know. But I still felt a sense of liberation-by-proxy that she could just defy the woke directive, even if I knew the same option wasn’t open to me.

    • LOL: Hibernian
    • Replies: @Sam Malone
    @Almost Missouri

    Uh...she hated diversity training and wouldn't attend it not out of high-minded principle, but because it's aimed at instructing whitey to be more deferential to her, so she doesn't need to be there for that. She just needs the white mothafuckas to show up and be propagandized while she lazes around taking a much-needed break from the emotional labor of being a Black woman in America.

    And you took comfort in the fact that she could openly defy the boss and get away with it only because she has colored skin, even while recognizing that your melanin-deprived skin made you a lesser being?

    Never seen a less-than-stellar take from you before, Almost, but I fear this was it.

  162. @Mike Tre
    @JohnnyWalker123

    My mom went to high school with Caroline Kava.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    No kidding! It must’ve been interesting to see her old classmate become a movie star.

    Thanks for sharing.

  163. @VivaLaMigra
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Ann Jones recounts the horrors of war on the Afghani [note: an "Afghan" is a type of blanket, not a person] population but fails to mention that during a mere two decades of American occupation of that region [it's inaccurate to call that god-forsaken expanse of near bone-dry and mountainous terrain a "nation" or "country" as it's just a bunch of tribes with an artificial boundary arbitrarily drawn around it] the population exploded from just 20 million to 40 million. How did this happen in a region with piss-poor resources and a nearly illiterate population? One could rightly conclude that far from being a catastrophe for the people there, American presence, or more specifically, the billions of US dollars flushed down that toilet was a positive boon to the inhabitants. Afghani women are pooping out babies at a truly sickening rate. There's only one product that shithole can produce with a market demand sufficient to sustain their out-of-control population growth: opium.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Reg Cæsar

    Well, her focus is mostly on the suffering endured by US troops.

    Here’s a good description.

    https://www.perlego.com/book/566499/they-were-soldiers-how-the-wounded-return-from-americas-wars-the-untold-story-pdf

    Ann Jones shines a much-needed light on the dead, mutilated, brain-damaged, drug-addicted, suicidal, homicidal casualties of our distant wars, taking us on a stunning journey from the devastating moment an American soldier is first wounded in rural Afghanistan to the return home. Beautifully written by an empathetic and critical reporter who knows the price of war.

    https://annjonesonline.com/they-were-soldiers/

    At the trauma hospital at Bagram Air Base she watched the grievously wounded carried from medevac helicopters to the emergency room and witnessed the toll that life-saving surgeries took on the doctors who performed them. She accompanied the wounded on medevac flights from Bagram to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany, then on to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, and finally—for those who made it—back to all-American homes where, often enough, more troubles followed: violence against wives, girlfriends, children, and fellow soldiers; Big Pharma-induced drug addiction; murder, suicide, and the terrible sorrow of caretaker moms and dads who don’t know what happened to their kids. They Were Soldiers is a powerful account of how official American promises—this time to “Support Our Troops”—fall victim to the true costs of war.

    Americans love sending their troops off to die in pointless foreign conflicts, but they don’t much like facing the long-term consequences.

  164. @Mr. Anon
    @Luddite in Chief


    The primary problem with serving in the US military (or any military for that matter) is that they own you in a way that a civilian employer never would. If someone in, say, the army tells you, “we are moving your barracks/desk/slit trench downwind from a burn pit,” then you can look forward to inhaling smoke (and God knows what else) for as long as the military feels like having you do it.
     
    The long forward deployments during Operation Forever War will lead to lots of GIs developing lung cancer from exposure to burn-pit smoke. Perhaps that was true in Vietnam too and it was just unrecognized. Maybe it got chalked up to Agent Orange.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/beau-biden-burn-pits-cancer-b2004619.html

    Biden says burn pits killed his son. More than 261,000 vets are sick. So why isn’t the US doing anything?

    Vast open-air pits where trash burned around the clock were simply part of life on deployment for troops in America’s post-9/11 wars. Now, thousands are sick and dying because of the toxic exposure and feel abandoned by the country that they fought for, writes Rachel Sharp.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10752035/Bidens-burn-pit-push-tribute-Beau-Veterans-Affairs-add-nine-rare-respiratory-cancers.html

    Biden has said he believes there could be a connection to the burn pits Beau was stationed near and his illness. Beau Biden died of brain cancer in 2015.

    Biden’s late son Beau was exposed to toxic burn pits during his military service in Iraq.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I'm sure Joe's own brain surgeries are completely unrelated.

    My second cousin died of a brain tumor at 19, before I was born. His mother died of one at 82.

  165. Anon[344] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thea
    @Anon

    The death of one decent American soldier for these worthless wars was too many. All the while Bush pursued this nonsense, our southern border was completely unprotected. These same soldiers could have been employed in much more meaningful ways.

    You don’t mention the living vets missing an arm or leg.


    Don’t forget the trillions of dollars that could have been put to better use taking care of our people and securing our borders.

    Replies: @Anon, @Wilkey

    The death of one decent American soldier for these worthless wars was too many. All the while Bush pursued this nonsense, our southern border was completely unprotected. These same soldiers could have been employed in much more meaningful ways.

    You don’t mention the living vets missing an arm or leg.

    Womanbabble.

    The CCP and Russia appreciate your war weariness.

    Don’t forget the trillions of dollars that could have been put to better use taking care of our people and securing our borders

    The Afghan war could have funded all of that. All those precious minerals in the mountains and the opium trade was worth something…

    I thought war was a racket? Don’t you remember that stupid little meme… ?

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Anon

    War is still a racket, but now it is also a really dumb one.

    All of the Hindu Kush is not worth the bones of a single Louisiana reservist.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @S. Anonyia
    @Anon

    Comically playing up the threat of the CCP/Russia and defending the Afghan money sink on a thread about declining military enlistment while posting as a true anonymous = there’s a chance you may be getting paid to comment as part of the US military’s astroturfing efforts.

    Relevant (although unlike in 2011 it is lawful to “address US audiences” nowadays)

    https://amp.theguardian.com/technology/2011/mar/17/us-spy-operation-social-networks

  166. @Kratoklastes
    @Cool Daddy Jimbo


    John Lee Pettimores
     
    Same's his Daddy and his Daddy before, unless I miss my guess.

    The thing that characterises a lot of the John Lee Pettimore types is that they have absolutely no misconceptions about the military, and post-service they are (ahem) diffident in their approach to "law enforcement".

    Fucking awesome lyrics...

    Volunteered for the army on my birthday
    They draft the white trash first 'round here anyway
    I done two tours of duty in Vietnam
    I came home with a brand new plan
    I take the seed from Colombia and Mexico
    Just plant it up the holler down Copperhead Road

    Now the D.E.A's got a chopper in the air
    I wake up screaming like I'm back over there
    But I learned a thing or two from Charlie don't you know
    You better stay away from Copperhead Road
     

    It should go without saying that I'm referencing Steve Earle, not whatever faggot wrote the utterly-derivative, lyricless recent thing.

    That whole album is terrific - "Nothing But A Child" brings tears to my eyes, and I'm a depopulationist atheist. The only letdown was in the CD cover, where Earle write "If you don't vote, don't bitch", which shows a breathtaking naïveté regarding elections.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xvaEJzoaYZk

    Then again, one of my favourite recording artists of all time is Roger Miller - celebrating white-trash Americana with a wry smile.

    Replies: @Cool Daddy Jimbo, @beavertales

    Here’s an interesting version:

  167. @Jim Don Bob
    @Reg Cæsar

    I have driven the NJT for years and just now I find out Joyce Kilmer was a man!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Hibernian

    I have driven the NJT for years and just now I find out Joyce Kilmer was a man!

    He was the Pat Tillman of his day!

    I vaguely remember being in grade school with his granddaughter one year.

  168. @Kronos
    @Rob Lee

    I'm sure with some Midwest ingenuity they could make some narly IEDs.

    Replies: @FPD72

    The oil producing regions would be rife with shaped charges used in perforating guns. In rocky areas dynamite and ANFO are still used for pipeline construction and gravel pits. ANFO made with fertilizer could easily be obtained in agricultural areas. So yes, the middle of the nation is populated with men with knowledge and the means of producing and deploying IEDs

  169. @Anon
    @Thea


    The death of one decent American soldier for these worthless wars was too many. All the while Bush pursued this nonsense, our southern border was completely unprotected. These same soldiers could have been employed in much more meaningful ways.

    You don’t mention the living vets missing an arm or leg.
     
    Womanbabble.

    The CCP and Russia appreciate your war weariness.

    Don’t forget the trillions of dollars that could have been put to better use taking care of our people and securing our borders
     
    The Afghan war could have funded all of that. All those precious minerals in the mountains and the opium trade was worth something...

    I thought war was a racket? Don't you remember that stupid little meme... ?

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @S. Anonyia

    War is still a racket, but now it is also a really dumb one.

    All of the Hindu Kush is not worth the bones of a single Louisiana reservist.

    • Agree: V. K. Ovelund
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Almost Missouri

    Nice crackhead "source". The stuff in those mountains is worth trillions. It's why China is rushing to befriend the Taliban... And why you're going to feel even stupider than you already do in 5 years.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  170. @AceDeuce
    @GeologyAnonMk6

    Get bent, creepo. I've read extensively about him. My post had nothing to do with the minutiae of his views, or the corn in his stool. I'll write about whatever TF I want to.

    Replies: @GeologyAnonMk6

    Ah I see, you’re not an actual person, but a bit working tirelessly to generate the moat extreme Dunnimg-Kruger effect content possible. Thank goodness, imagine what a sad little human being you would be.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @GeologyAnonMk6

    LOL. Get your ears pinned back by a grown up and pathetically try to deflect. Doesn't work.

    So you're a former naval officer who was in the Navy's "combat arms" field? ohhhhh-kayyyyyy.

    LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL--hope you stick around, Rambo. You seem like fun.

  171. @Rob Lee
    This is why I chuckle when I read commenters stating: "You can't oppose the US Government with small arms because they'll just send in the military to smoke you! Nah Nah."

    A few more years of this and no, they won't. They won't be able to. There won't be a plane in the air or a greenback who can read a map.

    Many of the actual fighters - white males from the Midwest - are beginning to avoid the service. When intra-US bullets start flying, I'll take five young hunters from PA with bolt actions rifles against a squad of Quan'eshas every. single. time.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Corvinus

    Will you be joining that group, pretend Cowboy, or will you be sitting in the sidelines?

    That’s why I have to laugh when someone here comes across as a patriot who can’t wait for the impending collapse and the bullets whizzing by “citizen soldiers”.

    (Civil) war is a racket.

  172. @Jim Don Bob
    @Reg Cæsar

    I have driven the NJT for years and just now I find out Joyce Kilmer was a man!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Hibernian

    I think that I shall never see
    A poem as lovely as a tree
    For poems are made by fools like me
    But only God can make a tree

  173. @Harry Baldwin
    @Drive-by poster

    A very good book on the lasting psychological effect of war is What It Is Like to Go to War by Karl Marlantes. Marlantes is a highly-decorated Marine who fought in Vietnam. He is also a Rhodes scholar.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Drive-by poster

    A very good book on the lasting psychological effect of war is What It Is Like to Go to War by Karl Marlantes. Marlantes is a highly-decorated Marine who fought in Vietnam. He is also a Rhodes scholar.

    Thank you for the book recommendation. I am always seeking books that convincingly describe wartime experiences and their aftermath, as it is the sort of thing more widely experienced than written about.

    I will pick up a copy to see how close this one comes.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Drive-by poster

    Check out the book: On Killing

  174. @Achmed E. Newman
    I don't think it's as big as the other factors, the woke BS, the anti-White attitude, and the realization that the US Military does not do defense of the United States, but the forced vaccination business is probably a significant factor too. See, it's not just this one, but once you join up, the military will be free to jab you with something any time some higher up (Mrs. Milly?) decides so.

    The mandatory Kung Flu vaccine has played a small part in the current major pilot shortage. The airlines have conveniently dropped all vaccine requirements for getting employed and staying employed, cause, "this is stupid, and we need people". However, some pilots, mostly the ones closer to retirement age, went ahead and retired earlier due to this threat.

    I also know of one late-50s pilot through a friend who got the vaccine due to his wife's nagging - she wasn't worried about his health, but just that he'd get terminated soon if he didn't - and he can no longer pass the resting EKG so will not fly anymore.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @sayless

    That’s horrible.

  175. @Houston 1992
    @AnotherDad

    Unz-ites should encourage young Whites with few options to join the Coast Guard to stop illegal immigration and drug importation. Little chance of death, but same benefits later.
    (As logistics comes to matter more and more, perhaps Merchant Marine would also be good idea for the same reasons...)

    2) will the neo Cons start promoting White women registering for the draft -- coupled with suitable draft deferments /exemptions for academic program enrollees where their lessors are enrolled?

    Replies: @captflee

    Perhaps not so little as you might think…I lost friends on USCGC Blackthorn. Going to sea in any form is an inherently dangerous undertaking, as the crew of SS El Faro might tell you, were they not all drowned. Eventually we’re going to meet a near peer adversary with aircraft and warships, and will possibly be treated to a replay of WWII, during which the Merchant Marine suffered a fatality rate of 3.9%. Rates for other services were: USMC 2.9%, Army 2.1%, USN 0.9%, USCG 0.2%.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @captflee

    Just finished reading John Keegan's The Second World War. In it, he said that

    1) in the last three weeks of taking Berlin, the Russians lost over 300k killed
    2) The Kriegsmarine had a 75% casualty rate of which 65% were deaths

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  176. @Thea
    @Anon

    The death of one decent American soldier for these worthless wars was too many. All the while Bush pursued this nonsense, our southern border was completely unprotected. These same soldiers could have been employed in much more meaningful ways.

    You don’t mention the living vets missing an arm or leg.


    Don’t forget the trillions of dollars that could have been put to better use taking care of our people and securing our borders.

    Replies: @Anon, @Wilkey

    The death of one decent American soldier for these worthless wars was too many. All the while Bush pursued this nonsense, our southern border was completely unprotected.

    I’ve always thought of Bush’s wars as nothing more than a complete diversion from the real solution to the problem of terrorism, which was always saner immigration laws and better border security. When George W. Bush became president our government still had a budget surplus. Almost 22 years later the federal debt has increased by \$24 trillion – a average of over \$1 trillion per year – and has gone from 55% of GDP to 124% of GDP. People think that deficit spending means lower taxes (for now), but we are just getting taxed in different ways. All of that deficit spending finances a whole lot of Woke bullshit that people wouldn’t tolerate if they actually had to pay for it directly.

  177. @Anon
    George Floyd Riots is the number one reason.

    When our military would not step in and stop that for partisan political reasons, they lost our trust. What in the he'll do you have a military for? BLM and Antifa openly blocking interstates, burning businesses, and physically attacking passers-by hurting real Americans on their own soil but Mark Milley says it's nothing.

    Force-vaxxing with myocarditis/cardiac jabs is #2.

    Woke indoctrination is #3.

    Endless wars for nothing with too many wounded warriors coming back is #4.

    Not stepping in when their was clear electoral fraud in 2020 is #5.

    Why on earth would a white man serve a government that hates him and lies about him comstantly?

    Replies: @sayless

    Who would want to tell their friends, family, or their date that they served on the USS Harvey Milk?

    • Replies: @captflee
    @sayless

    That's USNS (US Naval Ship) Harvey Milk. She's part of the Navy's Military Sealift Command, so civilian crewed, albeit there are some squids aboard for comms, force protection, etc. Say what you will about the gent, he at least served, and in a somewhat risky job (diving officer on a salvage ship), which might weigh in the balance against that whole hebephilic statutory rape thing in later life.
    The fleet oilers are crewed by DOD employees (CIVMARs), who would be well advised to keep shtum regarding any misgivings regarding the less than honorably discharged Lt (j.g.)'s proclivities, assuming they valued their jobs. Although, at least among the unlicensed, such mutterings would probably be in Tagalog.

    It's not quite as woke on the contractor operated MSC ships, crewed in the main by the various maritime unions, but the trend is certainly in that direction. That was made manifest to me about twenty years ago, when I had to gather my crew together and explain to that mass of incredulous souls that, under SECNAV's new anti-human trafficking instructions, they were to no longer consort with prostitutes.

  178. @Anon
    @Thea


    The death of one decent American soldier for these worthless wars was too many. All the while Bush pursued this nonsense, our southern border was completely unprotected. These same soldiers could have been employed in much more meaningful ways.

    You don’t mention the living vets missing an arm or leg.
     
    Womanbabble.

    The CCP and Russia appreciate your war weariness.

    Don’t forget the trillions of dollars that could have been put to better use taking care of our people and securing our borders
     
    The Afghan war could have funded all of that. All those precious minerals in the mountains and the opium trade was worth something...

    I thought war was a racket? Don't you remember that stupid little meme... ?

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @S. Anonyia

    Comically playing up the threat of the CCP/Russia and defending the Afghan money sink on a thread about declining military enlistment while posting as a true anonymous = there’s a chance you may be getting paid to comment as part of the US military’s astroturfing efforts.

    Relevant (although unlike in 2011 it is lawful to “address US audiences” nowadays)

    https://amp.theguardian.com/technology/2011/mar/17/us-spy-operation-social-networks

    • Agree: AndrewR
  179. @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @PhysicistDave

    The United States expanded from the 13 colonies all the way to the Western Pacific under the flag of manifest destiny. This geopolitical strategy has served well for American prosperity, but simply now it is a spent force.

    The proverbial expression is 强弩之末 the arrow from the strongest bow becomes weak after flying its assigned distance.

    https://eng.ichacha.net/强弩之末.html

    PRC's geopolitical strategy is Eurasia integration. If there are no wars in Afghanistan and Ukraine, the heart of Eurasia, the Chinese would sooner build a high-speed rail commerce network connecting West Asia and Europe. The US would become more marginalized, the dollar weaker, and a less appealing destination for the world's best and brightest.

    That's the tradeoff.

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Dave from Oz

    … the Chinese would sooner build a high-speed rail commerce network connecting West Asia and Europe.

    The next war will be to annexe a strip of the eastern section of Khazakstan, to create a rail corridor between Russia and China around the western side of the Altai (Altay) mountains. Not kidding. Watch that space https://goo.gl/maps/8pcY225xnv1P2u2G8 .

  180. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @AndrewR

    Lots of lower middle class white kids in the South and Midwest who see it as a way to get training and get paid. Better than working at the local Autozone.

    Now, do they want to fight? Probably not. The military is just another corporation to them. They also don't want to stay long term.

    Replies: @bro3886

    Partially true. But a lot of young white men purposely volunteer for the combat arms. The poor man’s safari, as it’s been called. Till the future DOJ death squads kick in you won’t get much use out of that 11b training. There are lots of reasons for this volunteering and I think one of them is that white males are continuously emasculated by the Empire, and joining the combat arms part of the military is a way of assuaging the pain of that emasculation, of denying it. They say that Irish and Scottish units were always among the best in the British army, trying to prove their worth in the face of subjugation.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @bro3886

    Wtf? Nothing you say is true. White males aren't emasculated and volunteered for the entirety of this country's history. Military service has always been a source of normal male pride.

    Also, get it right, dipshit, US military recruits tend to come from above average income families. This is a professional military nowadays. It's not the military from whatever decade you weren't bald in. Part of the problem is that so many people on this website are demented geezers who are still living in the 1970s

  181. @Dumbo
    There's no mystery, Steve. It has NOTHING to do with the Ukraine war. Force soldiers to vaccinate with an unpopular (and useless) vaccine. Promote women, gays and trannies in the military. Turn the whole thing into some type of Woke Academy. Then how can you wonder why numbers would be down?!?

    Sometimes I wonder if the people who analyze things are really that dumb, or they are just pretending to be.

    Replies: @Mr Mox, @S. Anonyia, @Couch scientist, @NOTA

    I think the decisionmakers here are all concerned 100% with gaining and keeping power. What happens to US military readiness or whether schoolkids learn to read or whether the power grid stays up are all secondary concerns at best, and with luck failures there can be blamed on someone else.

  182. @Almost Missouri
    @Diversity Heretic


    the solution will be to import African and Asian mercenaries to fill out the ranks–they won’t mind being errand boys for bankers, especially if the enemy is white America.
     
    They've already started doing this, though the Asian and African military imports I've met (mostly a decade or more ago) have been pretty well disposed toward white America. But I know they're working on changing that.

    Replies: @BB753

    How about Mexicans? Why can’t they recruit more Mexicans?

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @BB753

    Maybe they can and do. I've just never met one. But the military already gets plenty of Latino recruits from within the US. The military is disproportionately Latino compared to the US population (approx. 18% military vs. 14% US pop), although apparently underrepresenting compared to the available pool (vs. 22%), per commenter Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco above.

    Incidentally, a statistical trick to determine how each ethnic groups views military service (combat adventure vs. government sinecure) is to look at the enlistment portion for that group's men (allowed in combat arms) vs. women (barred from combat arms). Spoiler: besides whites, every other group has greater female enlistment.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/214869/share-of-active-duty-enlisted-women-and-men-in-the-us-military/

  183. @Mr. Anon
    Smedley Butler was right.

    War is a racket.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @lavoisier

    Smedley Butler was right.

    War is a racket.

    And the young white males are waking up to that fact.

    Not good for the globalists. They might have to fight their own wars.

    • Replies: @Veteran Aryan
    @lavoisier


    ...the young white males are waking up to that fact. Not good for the globalists. They might have to fight their own wars.
     
    The Empire now uses mercenaries and vassal states. And both forces are very heavily white.
  184. @Houston 1992
    @Bernie

    what about lower risk Coast Guard?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    what about lower risk Coast Guard?

    In peacetime, the Coast Guard has the highest risk. At least if the bolts are tightened properly in the other services. Weather isn’t governed by a treaty, no matter what the climate change freaks may assert.

    You go out in a small vessel into a North Atlantic storm!

    I wonder if the USCG is less woke than what the other services have lately become. Because they have a job to do. Multiple jobs. You need the ice broken and the buoys in place!

  185. @PhysicistDave

    “They think they’re going to be physically or emotionally broken after serving,” said one senior U.S. military official familiar with the recruiting issues, who believes a lack of familiarity with military service contributes to that perception.
     
    Yeah., how silly!

    Like how could anyone think that going into battle, being shot at, having an artillery round or a grenade land on top of you, etc. could result in being "physically or emotionally broken"?

    Silly young people!

    Replies: @bomag, @lavoisier

    Like how could anyone think that going into battle, being shot at, having an artillery round or a grenade land on top of you, etc. could result in being “physically or emotionally broken”?

    Or killing someone without any good reason!

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
  186. @Bill Jones
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    At the end of the day, Halford Mackinder was right.
    The American Century is over. The World Island Millennium is here.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    At the end of the day, Halford Mackinder was right.
    The American Century is over. The World Island Millennium is here.

    Mackinder was dead wrong for a century, the most international century since the Crusades if not antiquity, and now all of a sudden he’s right? Kazakhstan is more critical than the Red Sea or the Straits of Malacca?

    By this token, the Austrian, Ottoman, and Russian Empires outshine the British, Dutch, and Portuguese. Yeah, right…

  187. Anon[746] • Disclaimer says:
    @bro3886
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Partially true. But a lot of young white men purposely volunteer for the combat arms. The poor man's safari, as it's been called. Till the future DOJ death squads kick in you won't get much use out of that 11b training. There are lots of reasons for this volunteering and I think one of them is that white males are continuously emasculated by the Empire, and joining the combat arms part of the military is a way of assuaging the pain of that emasculation, of denying it. They say that Irish and Scottish units were always among the best in the British army, trying to prove their worth in the face of subjugation.

    Replies: @Anon

    Wtf? Nothing you say is true. White males aren’t emasculated and volunteered for the entirety of this country’s history. Military service has always been a source of normal male pride.

    Also, get it right, dipshit, US military recruits tend to come from above average income families. This is a professional military nowadays. It’s not the military from whatever decade you weren’t bald in. Part of the problem is that so many people on this website are demented geezers who are still living in the 1970s

  188. @Almost Missouri
    @Anon

    War is still a racket, but now it is also a really dumb one.

    All of the Hindu Kush is not worth the bones of a single Louisiana reservist.

    Replies: @Anon

    Nice crackhead “source”. The stuff in those mountains is worth trillions. It’s why China is rushing to befriend the Taliban… And why you’re going to feel even stupider than you already do in 5 years.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Anon

    Please list the "stuff" and the values totaling "trillions" in the Hindu Kush. Thanks.

    Replies: @Anon

  189. @lavoisier
    @Mr. Anon


    Smedley Butler was right.

    War is a racket.
     
    And the young white males are waking up to that fact.

    Not good for the globalists. They might have to fight their own wars.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

    …the young white males are waking up to that fact. Not good for the globalists. They might have to fight their own wars.

    The Empire now uses mercenaries and vassal states. And both forces are very heavily white.

  190. @BB753
    @Almost Missouri

    How about Mexicans? Why can't they recruit more Mexicans?

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Maybe they can and do. I’ve just never met one. But the military already gets plenty of Latino recruits from within the US. The military is disproportionately Latino compared to the US population (approx. 18% military vs. 14% US pop), although apparently underrepresenting compared to the available pool (vs. 22%), per commenter Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco above.

    Incidentally, a statistical trick to determine how each ethnic groups views military service (combat adventure vs. government sinecure) is to look at the enlistment portion for that group’s men (allowed in combat arms) vs. women (barred from combat arms). Spoiler: besides whites, every other group has greater female enlistment.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/214869/share-of-active-duty-enlisted-women-and-men-in-the-us-military/

    • Thanks: Rob, BB753
  191. @sayless
    @Anon

    Who would want to tell their friends, family, or their date that they served on the USS Harvey Milk?

    Replies: @captflee

    That’s USNS (US Naval Ship) Harvey Milk. She’s part of the Navy’s Military Sealift Command, so civilian crewed, albeit there are some squids aboard for comms, force protection, etc. Say what you will about the gent, he at least served, and in a somewhat risky job (diving officer on a salvage ship), which might weigh in the balance against that whole hebephilic statutory rape thing in later life.
    The fleet oilers are crewed by DOD employees (CIVMARs), who would be well advised to keep shtum regarding any misgivings regarding the less than honorably discharged Lt (j.g.)’s proclivities, assuming they valued their jobs. Although, at least among the unlicensed, such mutterings would probably be in Tagalog.

    It’s not quite as woke on the contractor operated MSC ships, crewed in the main by the various maritime unions, but the trend is certainly in that direction. That was made manifest to me about twenty years ago, when I had to gather my crew together and explain to that mass of incredulous souls that, under SECNAV’s new anti-human trafficking instructions, they were to no longer consort with prostitutes.

    • Thanks: sayless
  192. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Mr. Anon

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/beau-biden-burn-pits-cancer-b2004619.html


    Biden says burn pits killed his son. More than 261,000 vets are sick. So why isn’t the US doing anything?

    Vast open-air pits where trash burned around the clock were simply part of life on deployment for troops in America’s post-9/11 wars. Now, thousands are sick and dying because of the toxic exposure and feel abandoned by the country that they fought for, writes Rachel Sharp.
     
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10752035/Bidens-burn-pit-push-tribute-Beau-Veterans-Affairs-add-nine-rare-respiratory-cancers.html

    Biden has said he believes there could be a connection to the burn pits Beau was stationed near and his illness. Beau Biden died of brain cancer in 2015.

     


    Biden's late son Beau was exposed to toxic burn pits during his military service in Iraq.
     

    Replies: @Ralph L

    I’m sure Joe’s own brain surgeries are completely unrelated.

    My second cousin died of a brain tumor at 19, before I was born. His mother died of one at 82.

  193. My guess is that the driver here is just economics. It’s a tight job market so lots of 18 year old kids can find work that pays well and seems like it has some kind of future, without joining the military. If the economy goes way downhill and jobs become scarce, recruitment will go back up.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @NOTA

    Disagree with your first sentence, agree with the rest. It's the economy plus the other factors that have been mentioned.

  194. @Drive-by poster
    @Harry Baldwin


    A very good book on the lasting psychological effect of war is What It Is Like to Go to War by Karl Marlantes. Marlantes is a highly-decorated Marine who fought in Vietnam. He is also a Rhodes scholar.
     
    Thank you for the book recommendation. I am always seeking books that convincingly describe wartime experiences and their aftermath, as it is the sort of thing more widely experienced than written about.

    I will pick up a copy to see how close this one comes.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Check out the book: On Killing

  195. @Anon
    @PhysicistDave


    Or just maybe the CCP rather likes the idea of the US wasting its blood and treasure fighting other people’s wars
     
    The US lost rougly 3500 men in Afghanistan over the 20 year period of the war. That's nothing. The mortality rate was slightly higher than civilian life back home in America is today. Get a grip you frickin' Nancy, combat casualties were never an argument against the war.

    Replies: @Vetman, @Drive-by poster, @Almost Missouri, @Wj, @Thea, @PhysicistDave

    Anon[887] wrote to me:

    The US lost rougly 3500 men in Afghanistan over the 20 year period of the war. That’s nothing. The mortality rate was slightly higher than civilian life back home in America is today. Get a grip you frickin’ Nancy, combat casualties were never an argument against the war.

    If the 3500 American dead in Afghanistan do not matter, then I suppose the slightly less than 3000 dead on 9/11 did not matter either?

    A thousand here, a thousand there, who cares, right??

    One of the 9/11 victims was an old college friend of mine — Bryan Jack. I’m pretty sure that to Bryan’s family his death did matter.

    And the same for each of the combat deaths in Afghanistan.

    Of course, if that war had served any legitimate purpose for the well-being of the American people, you might have a point.

    But it didn’t.

    You frickin’ Nancy.

    Frickin’ anonymous Nancy, who lacks the guts to even give your own name.

    Dave Miller in Sacramento

  196. @Almost Missouri
    @Mr. Anon


    The concept of America, as it was founded, is that you get a say in how your country is governed including its military and foreign policy, and you get that say whether you have been in the military or not.
     
    Kind of. I keep having to remind everyone that "America, as it was founded" included, in most states, mandatory service in the local militia along with mandatory owning of an assault weapon, usually a musket, in order to vote. Local rules varied, but the foregoing was often a minimum requirement, as well as not being on the public dole.

    I expect that after the national collapse, this will once again be the way of things (except the "musket" will be more modern). As I also keep saying, elections are proxies for combat, so it is natural that those who make a state will be the ones to decide its disposition.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    “Kind of. I keep having to remind everyone that “America, as it was founded” included, in most states, mandatory service in the local militia along with mandatory owning of an assault weapon, usually a musket, in order to vote. ”

    I wouldn’t have a problem with these mandates in the current year if service was restricted specifically to defending the continental US, and not to include being shipped to foreign lands to kill people that are no threat to my country and or die trying. Service mandates would also require a homogeneous society.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Mike Tre


    I wouldn’t have a problem with these mandates in the current year if service was restricted specifically to defending the continental US, and not to include being shipped to foreign lands to kill people that are no threat to my country and or die trying.
     
    Once again, “America, as it was founded” had these restrictions. Some states are working on legislation to re-impose them, which would be great, though these efforts may run up against novel and non-Constitutional concepts such as "dual sovereignty". Then I suppose it will be yet another question to be decided by a few guys in black robes—another thing that "America, as it was founded" was not supposed to have so much of.

    Service mandates would also require a homogeneous society.
     
    Well, we all know how that's gone. OTOH, mandatory militia service might go some way toward re-homogenizing society, to the extent that nurture can overcome nature. And to the extent that it can't, restricting the voting franchise makes lack of homogeneity matter less.
  197. @Blodgie
    This is excellent news.

    Why anyone, ever, would want to join a murder racket boggles the mind.

    Something deep inside us loves murder and war: as Patton said “God help me, I do love it so.”

    Replies: @lavoisier

    Something deep inside us loves murder and war: as Patton said “God help me, I do love it so.”

    Nietzsche described it as “The love of the knife.”

    I think it gets to the primal, to the evil inside all of us and all of live itself.

  198. @NOTA
    My guess is that the driver here is just economics. It's a tight job market so lots of 18 year old kids can find work that pays well and seems like it has some kind of future, without joining the military. If the economy goes way downhill and jobs become scarce, recruitment will go back up.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Disagree with your first sentence, agree with the rest. It’s the economy plus the other factors that have been mentioned.

  199. @GeologyAnonMk6
    @AceDeuce

    Ah I see, you're not an actual person, but a bit working tirelessly to generate the moat extreme Dunnimg-Kruger effect content possible. Thank goodness, imagine what a sad little human being you would be.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    LOL. Get your ears pinned back by a grown up and pathetically try to deflect. Doesn’t work.

    So you’re a former naval officer who was in the Navy’s “combat arms” field? ohhhhh-kayyyyyy.

    LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL–hope you stick around, Rambo. You seem like fun.

  200. Obviously the solution is to extend selective service to womyn.

  201. @VivaLaMigra
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Ann Jones recounts the horrors of war on the Afghani [note: an "Afghan" is a type of blanket, not a person] population but fails to mention that during a mere two decades of American occupation of that region [it's inaccurate to call that god-forsaken expanse of near bone-dry and mountainous terrain a "nation" or "country" as it's just a bunch of tribes with an artificial boundary arbitrarily drawn around it] the population exploded from just 20 million to 40 million. How did this happen in a region with piss-poor resources and a nearly illiterate population? One could rightly conclude that far from being a catastrophe for the people there, American presence, or more specifically, the billions of US dollars flushed down that toilet was a positive boon to the inhabitants. Afghani women are pooping out babies at a truly sickening rate. There's only one product that shithole can produce with a market demand sufficient to sustain their out-of-control population growth: opium.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Reg Cæsar

    the Afghani [note: an “Afghan” is a type of blanket, not a person]

    In English, the language of Kipling, Churchill, Stoddard, and Unz.com, an Afghan is a person as well as a blanket or a dog.

    Note (as in “bank-“): this is an afghani, or, rather, fifty of them:

  202. @Mike Tre
    @Almost Missouri

    "Kind of. I keep having to remind everyone that “America, as it was founded” included, in most states, mandatory service in the local militia along with mandatory owning of an assault weapon, usually a musket, in order to vote. "

    I wouldn't have a problem with these mandates in the current year if service was restricted specifically to defending the continental US, and not to include being shipped to foreign lands to kill people that are no threat to my country and or die trying. Service mandates would also require a homogeneous society.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    I wouldn’t have a problem with these mandates in the current year if service was restricted specifically to defending the continental US, and not to include being shipped to foreign lands to kill people that are no threat to my country and or die trying.

    Once again, “America, as it was founded” had these restrictions. Some states are working on legislation to re-impose them, which would be great, though these efforts may run up against novel and non-Constitutional concepts such as “dual sovereignty”. Then I suppose it will be yet another question to be decided by a few guys in black robes—another thing that “America, as it was founded” was not supposed to have so much of.

    Service mandates would also require a homogeneous society.

    Well, we all know how that’s gone. OTOH, mandatory militia service might go some way toward re-homogenizing society, to the extent that nurture can overcome nature. And to the extent that it can’t, restricting the voting franchise makes lack of homogeneity matter less.

    • Thanks: Mike Tre
  203. @Altai
    It's a combination of greater and greater proportions of the population going to college as a life script and maybe, just maybe, has something to do with all the crazy neocon wars and a decline in the proportion of young men who feel like they own the country they were born in.

    Replies: @Arclight, @Bill Jones, @McFly, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    Actually white men are more likely to enlist in the military today compared to 2010. Back in 2010 there were 1.1 million whites in the military. Today there are 1 million whites in the military. Yet we have 9 million less whites of military age today , so a much higher share of eligible whites are in the military in 2022 compared to 2010.

    Back in 2010 70% of the active duty military was white. Today 68% of the active military is white. Back in 2010 the pool of potential recruits was 60% white compared to just 55% white today. More significant to recruitment goals is the fact that the pool has shrunk from 27 million whites down to 23 million whites over the past decade. We are running out of whites , as the white population continues to decline each year.

    When we consider the decline in the number of whites the share of whites enlisting in the military is actually higher today than in 2010. The military is having trouble enlisting men because we have less White men today compared to a decade ago. The White population is in rapid decline and it can be observed by looking at the significant decline in the number of whites under the age of 40.

    • Replies: @Cool Daddy Jimbo
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco


    Actually white men are more likely to enlist in the military today compared to 2010. Back in 2010 there were 1.1 million whites in the military. Today there are 1 million whites in the military. Yet we have 9 million less whites of military age today , so a much higher share of eligible whites are in the military in 2022 compared to 2010.
     
    You made some good points in that post. I feel like there is a piece or two of the puzzle missing, but I'll be damned if I can spot 'em.

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

  204. @captflee
    @Houston 1992

    Perhaps not so little as you might think...I lost friends on USCGC Blackthorn. Going to sea in any form is an inherently dangerous undertaking, as the crew of SS El Faro might tell you, were they not all drowned. Eventually we're going to meet a near peer adversary with aircraft and warships, and will possibly be treated to a replay of WWII, during which the Merchant Marine suffered a fatality rate of 3.9%. Rates for other services were: USMC 2.9%, Army 2.1%, USN 0.9%, USCG 0.2%.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Just finished reading John Keegan’s The Second World War. In it, he said that

    1) in the last three weeks of taking Berlin, the Russians lost over 300k killed
    2) The Kriegsmarine had a 75% casualty rate of which 65% were deaths

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Jim Don Bob

    The Kriegsmarine crews were primarily of U-boats. The thing about a U-boat is that when it is sunk, it is usually already underwater, so the result for the crew is usually 100% KIA.

    Because space was at a premium on U-boats, and cruises were long, all U-boat crew were selected from the top percentiles of healthy available. (You couldn't even have one dental cavity as there is no dentist on board.) So the deaths of all those U-boat crews was an immense destruction of Germany's best biological capital.

  205. @For what it's worth
    @Reg Cæsar

    Wtf is the point of posting photos of the children of the author?

    Replies: @Anon, @Reg Cæsar, @Wency

    Don’t care. Childbearing needs to be high-status again. Making this happen will involve a lot of things that look stupid, but I’m not going to knock it.

  206. @Bill Jones
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    At the end of the day, Halford Mackinder was right.
    The American Century is over. The World Island Millennium is here.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    I would say Six Millennia of Eurasia beginning in Mesopotamia, succeed by Five Centuries of Thalassocracy beginning in 15 CE with European Age of Discovery:

  207. @Kratoklastes
    @Cool Daddy Jimbo


    John Lee Pettimores
     
    Same's his Daddy and his Daddy before, unless I miss my guess.

    The thing that characterises a lot of the John Lee Pettimore types is that they have absolutely no misconceptions about the military, and post-service they are (ahem) diffident in their approach to "law enforcement".

    Fucking awesome lyrics...

    Volunteered for the army on my birthday
    They draft the white trash first 'round here anyway
    I done two tours of duty in Vietnam
    I came home with a brand new plan
    I take the seed from Colombia and Mexico
    Just plant it up the holler down Copperhead Road

    Now the D.E.A's got a chopper in the air
    I wake up screaming like I'm back over there
    But I learned a thing or two from Charlie don't you know
    You better stay away from Copperhead Road
     

    It should go without saying that I'm referencing Steve Earle, not whatever faggot wrote the utterly-derivative, lyricless recent thing.

    That whole album is terrific - "Nothing But A Child" brings tears to my eyes, and I'm a depopulationist atheist. The only letdown was in the CD cover, where Earle write "If you don't vote, don't bitch", which shows a breathtaking naïveté regarding elections.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xvaEJzoaYZk

    Then again, one of my favourite recording artists of all time is Roger Miller - celebrating white-trash Americana with a wry smile.

    Replies: @Cool Daddy Jimbo, @beavertales

    The young Steve Earle dismissed Shania Twain as just a singing lap-dancer.

    The older Steve Earle came out for woke-banning the confederate flag.

    So many artists of that era, like Bruce Springsteen (Born in the USA) , aged into meek, progressive conformity. They haven’t gotten wiser, they just never had a good grasp of why their anthems of rebellion were immortal. Their music is aging better than them.

    The new revolutionaries opposing the man are conservatives, and this doesn’t fit the boomer leftist script.

    I look forward to modern leftists composing folk songs about the righteousness of joining the army to spread democracy and gay rights abroad. I dare them to try.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @beavertales


    The young Steve Earle dismissed Shania Twain as just a singing lap-dancer.
     
    I would pay the young Shania Twain to give me a lap dance.

    2) Steve Earle has always been somewhat of a dick, like Bruce S. Once a rebel, now just a conformist drone.
  208. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Altai

    Actually white men are more likely to enlist in the military today compared to 2010. Back in 2010 there were 1.1 million whites in the military. Today there are 1 million whites in the military. Yet we have 9 million less whites of military age today , so a much higher share of eligible whites are in the military in 2022 compared to 2010.

    Back in 2010 70% of the active duty military was white. Today 68% of the active military is white. Back in 2010 the pool of potential recruits was 60% white compared to just 55% white today. More significant to recruitment goals is the fact that the pool has shrunk from 27 million whites down to 23 million whites over the past decade. We are running out of whites , as the white population continues to decline each year.

    When we consider the decline in the number of whites the share of whites enlisting in the military is actually higher today than in 2010. The military is having trouble enlisting men because we have less White men today compared to a decade ago. The White population is in rapid decline and it can be observed by looking at the significant decline in the number of whites under the age of 40.

    Replies: @Cool Daddy Jimbo

    Actually white men are more likely to enlist in the military today compared to 2010. Back in 2010 there were 1.1 million whites in the military. Today there are 1 million whites in the military. Yet we have 9 million less whites of military age today , so a much higher share of eligible whites are in the military in 2022 compared to 2010.

    You made some good points in that post. I feel like there is a piece or two of the puzzle missing, but I’ll be damned if I can spot ’em.

    • Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Cool Daddy Jimbo

    It is the flip side to the declining number of whites attending the top colleges....while 51% of recent High School graduates are white, enrollment at the top universities has fallen to just 40% white

    Back in 2010 60% of High School graduates were white, and 59% of the students at the top colleges were white and 70% of our military was White.

    Yet the military is still close to 70% white, almost the same as it was in 2010, despite the decline in the number of recent white high school graduates. How is the military able to maintain a white majority when our top universities have been unable to maintain a white majority student body? How long can our military be majority white when whites are now a minority of US high school students ? How can the US maintain a military of 1.3 million active duty personal when the white population of High School graduates keeps declining? This year we had 2.1 million whites graduate from High School, in 15 years we will have just 1.6 million whites graduating from High School.

    Replies: @epebble

  209. @Jim Don Bob
    @captflee

    Just finished reading John Keegan's The Second World War. In it, he said that

    1) in the last three weeks of taking Berlin, the Russians lost over 300k killed
    2) The Kriegsmarine had a 75% casualty rate of which 65% were deaths

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    The Kriegsmarine crews were primarily of U-boats. The thing about a U-boat is that when it is sunk, it is usually already underwater, so the result for the crew is usually 100% KIA.

    Because space was at a premium on U-boats, and cruises were long, all U-boat crew were selected from the top percentiles of healthy available. (You couldn’t even have one dental cavity as there is no dentist on board.) So the deaths of all those U-boat crews was an immense destruction of Germany’s best biological capital.

  210. @Anon
    @Almost Missouri

    Nice crackhead "source". The stuff in those mountains is worth trillions. It's why China is rushing to befriend the Taliban... And why you're going to feel even stupider than you already do in 5 years.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Please list the “stuff” and the values totaling “trillions” in the Hindu Kush. Thanks.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Almost Missouri

    https://gemandmineralmuseum.arizona.edu/content/dangerous-beauty-minerals-hindu-kush


    In 2010, American geologists working in Afghanistan discovered untapped mineral deposits of iron, copper, cobalt, gold, lithium, and rare earth minerals, worth an estimated $1 trillion
     
    Note: this was just one find, on one mountain, out of hundreds.
  211. @Cool Daddy Jimbo
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco


    Actually white men are more likely to enlist in the military today compared to 2010. Back in 2010 there were 1.1 million whites in the military. Today there are 1 million whites in the military. Yet we have 9 million less whites of military age today , so a much higher share of eligible whites are in the military in 2022 compared to 2010.
     
    You made some good points in that post. I feel like there is a piece or two of the puzzle missing, but I'll be damned if I can spot 'em.

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    It is the flip side to the declining number of whites attending the top colleges….while 51% of recent High School graduates are white, enrollment at the top universities has fallen to just 40% white

    Back in 2010 60% of High School graduates were white, and 59% of the students at the top colleges were white and 70% of our military was White.

    Yet the military is still close to 70% white, almost the same as it was in 2010, despite the decline in the number of recent white high school graduates. How is the military able to maintain a white majority when our top universities have been unable to maintain a white majority student body? How long can our military be majority white when whites are now a minority of US high school students ? How can the US maintain a military of 1.3 million active duty personal when the white population of High School graduates keeps declining? This year we had 2.1 million whites graduate from High School, in 15 years we will have just 1.6 million whites graduating from High School.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    How is the military able to maintain a white majority when our top universities have been unable to maintain a white majority student body?

    Hint: The answer may be in the question!

    Those who can't/won't go to good college, may join military. Good career if it works out, if not, good benefits, including college, later. I think anyone who is smart but not wealthy should try this route for all the benefits rest of the life.

  212. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Cool Daddy Jimbo

    It is the flip side to the declining number of whites attending the top colleges....while 51% of recent High School graduates are white, enrollment at the top universities has fallen to just 40% white

    Back in 2010 60% of High School graduates were white, and 59% of the students at the top colleges were white and 70% of our military was White.

    Yet the military is still close to 70% white, almost the same as it was in 2010, despite the decline in the number of recent white high school graduates. How is the military able to maintain a white majority when our top universities have been unable to maintain a white majority student body? How long can our military be majority white when whites are now a minority of US high school students ? How can the US maintain a military of 1.3 million active duty personal when the white population of High School graduates keeps declining? This year we had 2.1 million whites graduate from High School, in 15 years we will have just 1.6 million whites graduating from High School.

    Replies: @epebble

    How is the military able to maintain a white majority when our top universities have been unable to maintain a white majority student body?

    Hint: The answer may be in the question!

    Those who can’t/won’t go to good college, may join military. Good career if it works out, if not, good benefits, including college, later. I think anyone who is smart but not wealthy should try this route for all the benefits rest of the life.

  213. @beavertales
    @Kratoklastes

    The young Steve Earle dismissed Shania Twain as just a singing lap-dancer.

    The older Steve Earle came out for woke-banning the confederate flag.

    So many artists of that era, like Bruce Springsteen (Born in the USA) , aged into meek, progressive conformity. They haven't gotten wiser, they just never had a good grasp of why their anthems of rebellion were immortal. Their music is aging better than them.

    The new revolutionaries opposing the man are conservatives, and this doesn't fit the boomer leftist script.

    I look forward to modern leftists composing folk songs about the righteousness of joining the army to spread democracy and gay rights abroad. I dare them to try.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    The young Steve Earle dismissed Shania Twain as just a singing lap-dancer.

    I would pay the young Shania Twain to give me a lap dance.

    2) Steve Earle has always been somewhat of a dick, like Bruce S. Once a rebel, now just a conformist drone.

    • Agree: Ron Mexico
  214. @Almost Missouri
    @Anon

    Please list the "stuff" and the values totaling "trillions" in the Hindu Kush. Thanks.

    Replies: @Anon

    https://gemandmineralmuseum.arizona.edu/content/dangerous-beauty-minerals-hindu-kush

    In 2010, American geologists working in Afghanistan discovered untapped mineral deposits of iron, copper, cobalt, gold, lithium, and rare earth minerals, worth an estimated \$1 trillion

    Note: this was just one find, on one mountain, out of hundreds.

  215. @Almost Missouri
    @JR Ewing

    When I was last suffering in corporate America under mandatory diversity training, I was amused that a black lady friend at work hated it even more than I did. (The eternal contradictions of liberalism: they make "diversity training" to be nice to blacks but then blacks end up hating it even more than whites.) Anyhow, she flat out told the boss she wouldn't attend the mandatory training anymore.

    And the boss ...

    ... did nothing.

    He wasn't going to lose his one really good black female employee over some BS corporate mandate. Whether his sentiment was shared all the way of the hierarchy or whether he just forged her attendance signature and swept it under the rug, I don't know. But I still felt a sense of liberation-by-proxy that she could just defy the woke directive, even if I knew the same option wasn't open to me.

    Replies: @Sam Malone

    Uh…she hated diversity training and wouldn’t attend it not out of high-minded principle, but because it’s aimed at instructing whitey to be more deferential to her, so she doesn’t need to be there for that. She just needs the white mothafuckas to show up and be propagandized while she lazes around taking a much-needed break from the emotional labor of being a Black woman in America.

    And you took comfort in the fact that she could openly defy the boss and get away with it only because she has colored skin, even while recognizing that your melanin-deprived skin made you a lesser being?

    Never seen a less-than-stellar take from you before, Almost, but I fear this was it.

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The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
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