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Military Becoming Increasingly Hereditary
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From the New York Times news section:

Who Signs Up to Fight? Makeup of U.S. Recruits Shows Glaring Disparity
More and more, new recruits come from the same small number of counties and are the children of old recruits.

By Dave Philipps and Tim Arango
Jan. 10, 2020

COLORADO SPRINGS — The sergeant in charge of one of the busiest Army recruiting centers in Colorado, Sergeant First Class Dustin Comes, joined the Army, in part, because his father served. Now two of his four children say they want to serve, too. And he will not be surprised if the other two make the same decision once they are a little older. …

“Show me a better deal for the common person,” he said.

Soldiers like him are increasingly making the United States military a family business. The men and women who sign up overwhelmingly come from counties in the South and a scattering of communities at the gates of military bases like Colorado Springs, which sits next to Fort Carson and several Air Force installations, and where the tradition of military service is deeply ingrained.

More and more, new recruits are the children of old recruits. In 2019, 79 percent of Army recruits reported having a family member who served. For nearly 30 percent, it was a parent — a striking point in a nation where less than 1 percent of the population serves in the military.

For years, military leaders have been sounding the alarm over the growing gulf between communities that serve and those that do not, warning that relying on a small number of counties that reliably produce soldiers is unsustainable, particularly now amid escalating tensions with Iran.

… But the military families who have borne nearly all of the burden, and are the most cleareyed about the risks of war, are still the Americans who are most likely to encourage their sons and daughters to join.

… The main predictors are not based on class or race. Army data show service spread mostly evenly through middle-class and “downscale” groups. Youth unemployment turns out not to be the prime factor. And the racial makeup of the force is more or less in line with that of young Americans as a whole,

Whites got killed in Iraq and Afghanistan a lot more per capita because they tend to be more gung-ho about combat jobs. My estimate is whites were 89% more likely per capita than nonwhites to get killed in Iraq and 146% more likely in Afghanistan. (Those figures are not widely known, by the way. Who would be interesting in something as boring and trivial as that? Now back baseball statistics!)

though African-Americans are slightly more likely to serve. Instead, the best predictor is a person’s familiarity with the military.

Black recruits tend to be the children of blacks who served. A 1994 book about recruiting by Moskos made the point that even by then there were a lot of two or three generation black families in the Army (less so in other branches), typically specializing not in combat but in supply paperwork jobs that could then transition to a civilian government job, with an ideal path of collecting two nice pensions. It’s a pretty sensible way to go through life.

… Many schools encourage students to take the military’s aptitude exam, the ASVAB, in the way students nationwide are pushed to take the SAT.

That exposure during school is one of the strongest predictors of enlistment rates, according to a 2018 report by the Institute for Defense Analyses. …

The situation is markedly different in regions where few people traditionally join.

In Los Angeles, a region defined by liberal politics where many families are suspicious of the military, the Army has struggled to even gain access to high schools. By law, schools have to allow recruiters on campus once a semester, but administrators tightly control when and how recruiters can interact with students. Access is “very minimal,” said Lt. Col. Tameka Wilson, the commander of the Los Angeles Recruiting Battalion.

Predictably, enlistment rates are low.

In 2019 the Army made a push to increase recruiting efforts in 22 liberal-leaning cities like Los Angeles. As part of that, Army Secretary Ryan D. McCarthy visited officials from the Los Angeles Unified School District in December to push for greater access.

“He was doing a sort of listening tour,” said Patricia Heideman, who is in charge of high school instruction for the school district and said there was a perception the military preys on disadvantaged students. “I told him from the educator perspective, we sometimes feel they are targeting our black and brown students and students of poverty,” she said. And therefore they are less likely to push enlistment.

In reality, the ASVAB/AFQT enlistment test is a big barrier.

Even within one state there are striking differences in how communities view military service. Colorado Springs produced 29 times as many enlistments in 2019 as nearby Boulder, a liberal university town.

Colorado Springs has about 4+ times as many people as Boulder, so the per capita difference is a little over 6 to 1.

The article ends with a nice human interest story about a young woman from Boulder who went to pricey Middlebury College, famous for ski bums and punching Charles Murray, but really wanted to be a K-9 officer so she’s finally enlisted.

Tom Wolfe implied in his 1979 book The Right Stuff that the military officer corps was becoming more hereditary 60 years ago:

… for a good thirty years, the rising business classes in the cities had been steering their sons away from the military, as if from a bad smell, and the officer corps had never been held in lower esteem. Well, career officers returned the contempt in trumps.

 
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  1. … for a good thirty years, the rising business classes in the cities had been steering their sons away from the military, as if from a bad smell, and the officer corps had never been held in lower esteem. Well, career officers returned the contempt in trumps.

    One fun thing about reading iSteve is finding Easter eggs like this. Our current president didn’t join the military after military school, but he is a pretty good friend of it now — and not so friendly with some members of those rising classes.

    Colorado Springs produced 29 times as many enlistments in 2019 as nearby Boulder, a liberal university town.

    Colorado Springs has about 4+ times as many people as Boulder, so the per capita difference is a little over 6 to 1.

    Of course Boulder produces fewer per capita recruits, but we had some pretty good ROTC guys at the University when I was a student there. Great friends.

    • Agree: Kronos
    • Replies: @gate666
    , @Kronos
    , @Bugg
    , @Coemgen
  2. Mr. Anon says:

    Military Becoming Increasingly Hereditary

    Stands to reason the Military is becoming multi-generational – the wars are becoming multi-generational too.

    The increasingly hereditary nature of occupations was a hallmark of the Late Roman Empire and the beginning of feudalism.

  3. Lee Child recently said (in a fiction book) that the accent of the US military was mainly Southern, with a few other accents thrown in. I’m afraid people in the South are very loyal and very, very tactical. They don’t seem to reflect on the big picture.

    Southerners couldn’t wait to volunteer for war right after being (from their perspective) mistreated by the North. We lined up for the Spanish war.

  4. “Show me a better deal for the common person,”

    yikes.

  5. Is there anything in America that hasn’t become more hereditary in recent years? Chatting about the weather with a physician a couple of months ago, he mentioned how cold the winters are where his son lives, in Cleveland. “What’s he doing in Cleveland”, I asked. He responded, “He’s a gastroenterologist at the Cleveland Clinic.”

  6. farenheit says:

    Back in the early days of the Iraq wars, I worked in a company that had two ex West Pointers as co workers. Often the lunch room discussion revolved about the current happenings there and the relative risks associated with service there. One afternoon the discussion centered around how dangerous modern combat was, or how dangerous was it to be in a combat zone. Any way, one afternoon when I had a little too much time time on my hands, I started to dig around in the statistics for relative risk of things 18 years old do, and what I found was if you were a typical American parent, if your 18 year old son had the option of joining the Army and serving in Iraq, or buying a motorcycle, the risk of death and maiming were about the same.

    So perhaps making the Army the family business is not as risky as a couple of generations ago.

    • Replies: @Realist
    , @Kratoklastes
    , @Lugash
  7. anon[362] • Disclaimer says:

    This is one of those logistical details that leftards do not understand. The majority of combat troops – the trigger pullers, the cannon cockers, the tank heavy metalheads, the flyboys including choppers – are white. This has a number of implications.

  8. John McCain was a third-generation USNA graduate. This phenomenon isn’t new. It’s not increasing; other sources are drying up. The percentage is greater by default.

    as nearby Boulder

    Nearby? It’s a hundred miles away, on the other side of Denver.

    Keep going south and you come to Pueblo, home to all those government brochures hawked on TV in the ’70s. Beyond that is Trinidad, famous for winningest football coach John Gagliardi, and once the sex-change capital of America. Trini was tranny before it was cool.

    North of Boulder is Fort Collins, which sounds like a cut-rate Boulder. (Perhaps they should call it Pebble.) It competes with Cooperstown, N.Y., to be the national capital of Belgian-style beer.

    Denver is kind of the changing point of physical geography going east-and-west, and of mental geography going north-and-south.

  9. “Show me a better deal for the common person,” he said.

    This is a deeply sick quote in a way he doesn’t realise, and very revealing of the age of dimishing expectations in US society. ‘Common’ people are now being herded into the army because the opportunities outside of it are so bleak.

    • Agree: Kolya Krassotkin, Alden
  10. Whitehall says:

    Sounds like my cousins. My aunt married Tom who had served in Korea as an enlisted marine.

    One of their sons, my cousin, went to Annapolis and became a Marine infantry officer, doing three tours in Iraq, starting with the assault on Khafji. He now has two sons attending the Naval Academy, and guess what? They hope to become Marine officers too.

    Before Khafji, he wrote his mom, my aunt, telling her not to worry. He was just out of the academy but told her that he had a company of marines highly motivated to defend him – his was the company payroll officer.

    While my dad had been a Seabee at at front line base in the Solomons in WWII, he hated the military, While I was raised in a rather pleasant Navy town, I knew I would hate the military life too. Seeing the lives of my buddies, the Navy brats, was not a selling point.

  11. black sea says:
    @RichardTaylor

    Same thing could be said for American Indians. No sooner were they corralled on reservations than a significant number volunteered to scout for the Army against other tribes, and sometimes against bands of their own tribe.

    Joining the military — particularly the ground forces — has long been a rite of passage for young men seeking to become “warriors,” with all the status back home that that entails.

    Of course, it hasn’t gotten the American Indians very far in the modern world.

  12. @anon

    This is one of those logistical details that leftards do not understand. The majority of combat troops – the trigger pullers, the cannon cockers, the tank heavy metalheads, the flyboys including choppers – are white. This has a number of implications.

    Woodrow Wilson horrified Southern senators who otherwise supported him when he said blacks were going to be drafted along with whites. But what is worse, drafting both races, or drafting only your own? That depends on how many of these militarily-trained blacks you live near!

    A compromise was reached in which blacks were inducted but limited to safe support positions. Safe for them and for the rest of us.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    , @Neoconned
  13. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:

    Military recruiters are notorious for using all sorts of lies to get people to enlist. They have quotas and are like used car salesmen in their tactics.

    • Replies: @animalogic
    , @Mr. Anon
    , @J.Ross
  14. Black recruits tend to be the children of blacks who served. A 1994 book about recruiting by Moskos made the point that even by then there were a lot of two or three generation black families in the Army (less so in other branches), typically specializing not in combat but in supply paperwork jobs that could then transition to a civilian government job, with an ideal path of collecting two nice pensions. It’s a pretty sensible way to go through life.

    These people are tax eaters. They produce absolutely NOTHING of value, while draining our society of valuable financial resources.

    What does the military do exactly? Who do they defend us from? Goat herders in Afghanistan? Guys with swords in the deserts in Iraq? The long-defunct Soviet Union? The Mongol hordes of Genghis Khan? Canada?

    What does the military (and all these foreign wars) contribute to our society?

    If you’ve ever wondered why America is so deep into debt, the #1 reason is the military and the foreign wars. We spend something like $750 billion on national defense, which is just astronomical. It’s not just soldiers who eat our tax dollars. These various contactors (Haliburton for example) are rapacious beyond belief too.

    You can’t even say anything about this. If you critique the military even lightly, people say you’re “unpatriotic. American seem mind numbingly obsessed with supporting the military.

    If you think left-wing PC is out of control, just look at how much uncritical adulation (sort of a right-wing version of PC) is showered on the U.S. military. Every U.S. politician (Democrat, Republican) thanks “the troops” constantly. If a politician makes even one remark that could even vaguely be anything less than 100% positive of “the troops,” they’ll get taken to the woodshed.

    You drive around anywhere, and see cars with “Support the troops” bumperstickers plastered on back.

    Every NFL game you watch, there are shout outs to the troops overseas by the game announcer. They’ll usually have some military family get a “surprise” reunion with their loved one. They’ll also show a bunch of troops sitting somehwhere in Iraq/Afghanistan/wherever watching the game.

    Then during commercial time, they’ll have some USAA commercial further thanking the troops and showing some troops getting some type of special discount with them. Then there will be some type of “Wounded Warrior” commercial in which some guy lost his limbs, but he’s okay now because he has mechanical prosthetic limbs. So let’s celebrate him and let’s keep supporting the troops.

    You’re not even allowed to ask why these “warriors” were wounded to begin with.

    It really is something else.

  15. @Reg Cæsar

    Sounds like you know the geography, but there are some overlaps.

    Colorado Springs is of course part of the Military Industrial Complex. It is also a center of evangelical and family values groups, but at the same time it has Colorado College, an expensive liberal arts college, in the shadow of the Air Force Academy — and NORAD inside Cheyenne Mountain.

    Boulder is of course a People’s Republic, but did you know Soldier of Fortune magazine was published there? Also, a friend’s family there owned and operated a firearms company. They made guns. That town is a menagerie. The CIA recruited at the University every year. I knew someone who went. Then again, Playboy magazine came to town periodically and recruited pretty girls, while ugly girls held protests as feminists.

    • Replies: @danand
  16. He left no children, but RIP Sultan Qaboos of Oman after 50 civilized years. Let’s hope Oman stays out of the news.

  17. I remember just a few years ago when a British study came out that showed that a large percentage of current British military soldiers could trace their lineage back to the Norman invaders –of 1066 AD–and also had a large number of ancestors who served in the military as well.

    That is, Norman–i.e. French-Viking conquerors—and not Anglo-Saxon. The warring conquerors remained in the warring profession significantly.

    This is besides the fact that most of history countries had an aristocracy that exclusively served as the officers for wars.

    This is all to say that I don’t think a hereditary military system is all that new.

  18. Whitehall says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I did a long weekend in the capital of Oman, Muscat, a few months ago and was amazed at how prosperous and clean it was. Very scenic and retains it’s exotic architecture but is well-served with roads and infrastructure.

    The Sultan did a good job of guiding his country. I think Americans don’t give enough credit to enlightened monarchies supported with adequate petrodollars like Oman and the UAE. Not my first choice of government structures but comparing Muscat to San Francisco puts democracy in a bad light.

  19. @Ghost of Bull Moose

    That’s because for the first several years of his reign, the SAS was finishing up a secret war there.

    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
  20. @Dave Pinsen

    As a society becomes more fragmented and more economically unstable, families retreat to reliable occupational niches.

    The kids often end up growing up in a certain occupational “community” (like military brats for example) that provide a sense of belonging. The kids see the occupation as a reliable way to keep from falling out of the middle-class, and therefore often pursue it themselves. In some cases, the kids end up meeting and marrying somebody from the “community,” like a doctor marrying a fellow doctor.

    So over time, you end up with a caste system. That has all sorts of interesting implications.

    When you have a caste of people who are distinct from society, they aren’t neccessarily focused on the well-being of society. They care more about enriching their profession’s prestige, power, and income. Their interests become delinked from those of the general society.

    In a caste system, the caste’s interest is not in the welfare of the general society. The caste’s interest is in the welfare of the caste. So each caste becomes parasitic and exploits the general society, while also becoming hostile to everyone outside the caste. In some cases, rival castes end up quarreling with one another.

    Maybe someday, we’ll have a full-fledged soldier caste. This caste will (due to possessing munitions, equipment, training, and organization) dominate the society. They’ll choose leaders who advocate for more military spending (more weapons, more equipment, more pay for soldiers), while draining the resources of taxpayers and other economic sectors.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
  21. @R.G. Camara

    Pop singer / tank commander James Blunt’s wikipedia bio says his family has been in the military since the 10th Century.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Anonymous
  22. Anonymous[142] • Disclaimer says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    It is kind of funny because a lot of the (((Alinskyite))) anti-VN war advocacy made military men quit in disgust. Full credit to ZOG media for understanding today that people need encouragement and thanks to die for ZOG.

    But there is also the understanding these day that yes, pay, benefits and risk of dying are favorable and a good risk reward tradeoff, but for the most part you would be killing and dying for Israel. Some of us are still mercenary enough to take that deal but it’s less than when the propaganda was more pervasive and it was not well understood that war is a racket.

  23. Anonymous[142] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I have relatives of the previous two generations who have served in the military. Beyond that almost certainly. The further you go the more of a certainty it becomes, unless your ancestors are rather a lot more “partially inbred” than others.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  24. Hibernian says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    This can be seen as a return to earlier traditions, although in the case of the military, it’s contrary to our citizen soldier tradition.

  25. Hibernian says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    A compromise was reached in which blacks were inducted but limited to safe support positions. Safe for them and for the rest of us.

    Absolutely true in the Navy, but there were Black combat soldiers in the Army, just not many.

    • Replies: @dearieme
  26. dearieme says:
    @R.G. Camara

    “a British study came out that showed that a large percentage of current British military soldiers could trace their lineage back to the Norman invaders –of 1066 AD”

    I don’t believe it. The writer Auberon Waugh offered a large cash prize for anyone who could demonstrate direct male descent from those who “came over with the Conqueror”. It went unclaimed.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @res
    , @Andrew
  27. dearieme says:
    @Hibernian

    When did the US forces become sufficiently “integrated” that a white man might be officered by a black?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @res
  28. @Anonymous

    “In fact, soldiering is in his blood. The Blunts have been a military family for more than 1,000 years, ever since their Danish ancestors arrived in England in the 10th century. James was born in a military hospital in Tidworth. His father, Charles, recently retired as a colonel in the Army Air Corps, and both his grandfathers were soldiers.”

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/3645487/To-be-blunt-James-you-are-a-trooper.html

    The implication is that the Blounts (Blunt is a simplification of the name) were officers, not common enlisted men.

    By the way, when did the officer/men distinction get formalized?

  29. specializing not in combat but in supply paperwork jobs that could then transition to a civilian government job, with an ideal path of collecting two nice pensions. It’s a pretty sensible way to go through life.

    That’s what I saw in the military. A lot of blacks see it as a way to get out of the ghetto for a while and put some money in their pocket. They are more than content to be in the rear with the gear.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Bugg
  30. ATate says:

    It’s certainly generational in my family. My Dad, me, my son and then way back to the Revolutionary War, French Indian War, and the Civil War.

    I’m embarrassed about what it’s done for me. There is no better deal for a commoner like me and I don’t deserve any of it.

    I’ve met some amazing people in my career, most good some not. It fits a part of me and I’m at odds with other parts of it.

    Lots of black dudes in the Marine infantry unit I was in, comparatively speaking. None in the Air Force Comm units I was in. I’m not retired but I work for the DoD overseas. Our base mailroom is mostly young black dudes. Hardly any in the Intel units I support. And on a side note these fucking Intel people are dangerous with WAY to high regard for themselves. Mostly liberal too, which is a great shock to the jockular conservative fake Christian infantry experiences I witnessed.

    Been sucking on your teet for over 20 years. You’ve given me and my family more than I should have ever gotten. Thank you….

    • Replies: @Old Prude
  31. @Steve Sailer

    By the way, when did the officer/men distinction get formalized?

    Not sure when it got formalized, but what I learned as a teenager was that it works, and there’s not a better system available. For instance, why is a seargeant major with 25 years in the service still under the command of a 2nd Lt. just out of college?

    There’s a reason 2nd lt.’s get made fun of by the troops.

  32. dearieme says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    RIP Sultan Qaboos of Oman after 50 civilized years

    I’ve never been to Oman but friends who have hold high opinions of Sultan Qaboos and his success in office.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  33. @Steve Sailer

    By the way, when did the officer/men distinction get formalized?

    In Stephen Pressfield’s novel of Thermopylae, Gates of Fire, the ancient Greeks already had that distinction, with the brushes on the officers’ helmets set sideways, while the enlisted men’s set front-to-back.

    • Replies: @animalogic
    , @Smithsonian_6
  34. LondonBob says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The odd thing is the military was always negligible in America until WWII and the Cold War, pretty much the entire US Army officer corps knew each other in the thirties. America today is more Prussia, an army with a country attached, than the English tradition of ‘no standing armies’.

    The US deficit is one trillion, slashing defence spending to world norms would halve that.

  35. LondonBob says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Qaboos was a very wily ruler, also a homosexual who used to come to London to party with rentboys.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  36. @dearieme

    Is he the Gilbert and Sullivan fan?

  37. Eded says:

    Steve,

    What about academia? The university of Chicago military sociologist Charles Moskos, whom you cite, is the father of sociologist Peter Moskos who studies policing and was briefly a Baltimore cop and wrote about it.

    Charles Moskos , who was also a US army draftee, was aware of the hereditary aspect of the military and was an advocate for the draft. He also came up with the “don’task don’t tell” compromise.

    Incidentally his son Peter is a critic of the anti-police aspects of BLM and is writing a book about the NYPD’s role in the precipitous reduction in crime in NYC. I hope you read and review it.

  38. @South Texas Guy

    Jerry Pournelle told the story of the private in the British Army who asks his veteran sergeant-major: “What are the lieutenants for? You teach us everything, sergeant, the lieutenants are boys just out of Sandhurst, they don’t know anything. What do they teach us?”

    “They teach us how to die.”

    • Replies: @Squid
  39. Anonymous[277] • Disclaimer says:

    Sounds like blacks are the smarter ones here. Why take on some dangerous job? For the “honor” of getting blown up by an IED? For the sake of some neocon boomer’s human-rights fantasy? Better to keep your head and learn a skill that might translate to the civilian world. Of course this is contrary to the Hollywood depiction of some alpha black Special Forces guy who looks like Jimi Hendrix and beats all the white boys at everything, but who are they really kidding besides their fellow bourgeoisie?

    Talk of the military reminds me of those “such-and-such-field has a whiteness problem” articles from the NYT that Steve always posts. What area of American life *doesn’t* have a whiteness problem, then? Enlisting in the military is an obvious one I think. Shopping at Wal-Mart would be another. Eating at McDonald’s. Watching professional wrestling. The areas where Americans of different races mingle on equal terms seem to be mostly proletarian pursuits. What percentage of black or Hispanic Americans read the New Yorker?

  40. @South Texas Guy

    Raising your kids to be Army brats rather than hood rats is commendable.

    • Agree: iffen, XYZ (no Mr.)
  41. Anonymous[124] • Disclaimer says:

    The hereditary nature of service is clear in my family: My father was a naval aviator; my grandfather was a naval aviator; my great-grandfather was a naval aviator; my great-great grandfather was a Army mounted scout. I was an FMF corpsman; my mother was an Army nurse and my grandmother was a Navy nurse. My husband is a naval aviator, as is my brother.
    As to the whiteness of combat specialties, there can be no doubt of that, and they take the casualties, not the fobbits. Naval aviation is overwhelmingly white and I would assume the Air Force is, too.
    Three-fourths of individuals between the ages of 18 and 24 are unqualified to join the armed forces because they are physically unfit, have a criminal record, use drugs, or have too poor an academic record: You must have a high school diploma and a de facto B average; otherwise forget it.
    Whenever standards are lowered, usually due to political pressure to increase diversity, the result is an increase in initial enlistments by the diverse, followed shortly by an increase in administrative separations of the diverse. So nothing really changes.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Kronos
  42. @dearieme

    Colin Powell graduated from CCNY in ROTC and became a platoon leader in c. 1959, so I’d say probably in the 2nd half of the 1950s.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colin_Powell

    Harry Truman desegregated the military. He called in the Southern Senators and told them he didn’t want any Jim Crow nonsense at military bases in the South and he expected them to relay the word to their home state newspaper editors and other influential figures to not endanger national security by making military desegregation an issue. They obeyed.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  43. @dearieme

    Auberon Waugh’s dad Evelyn argued that most 20th Century aristocrats who claimed descent from the Normans were actually descended from 15th or 16th Century arrivistes. Evelyn asserted that they bribed genealogists to find 11th Century predecessors with similar names from whom they could claim descent.

  44. @South Texas Guy

    It’s the same in the Navy. My father began as an ensign on a destroyer. He told me that ensigns don’t know anything, and that everybody on a ship knows that.

    I would say things are not that different in some industries or workplaces. In life there are always people above you and people below you, no matter what age you are or how much experience you have. The labor/management delineation always struck me as rather military.

  45. danand says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    “NORAD inside Cheyenne Mountain”

    “It is also a center of evangelical and family values groups”
    “The CIA recruited at the University every year. I knew someone who went.”

    “Then again, Playboy magazine came to town periodically and recruited pretty girls, while ugly girls held protests as feminists.”

    Buzz, did the person you knew who was recruited to the CIA happen to be LDS (family value group). Decades back both the FBI & CIA recruited a fair number of Mormons to their ranks; could only speculate as to why.

    I was fortunate to have a chance to stay at the Cheyenne Mountain resort for a couple weeks a few years back. Very beautiful place (Colorado Springs) to visit, hadn’t been back there since a trip in my youth. Two things that struck me were the number of people in military fatigues out in public, and the rapid day to day changes in weather/temperature: 75 and sunny to snowing within hours.

    Caught my eye when you mentioned protesters, as there were a number outside the resort, across the street, during part of my stay. At the time I thought they were just Democrats who didn’t like Tom Tancredo, who was going to stay/speak there. But it was a little more than that:

    “White nationalist group books conference at Cheyenne Mountain Resort

    Tancredo, who’s an announced speaker at a white nationalist conference set for April in Colorado Springs, with Rep. Doug Lamborn, who endorsed him for governor of Colorado in 2010.

    VDare, a group based in Litchfield, Conn., whose name stems from Virginia Dare, the first English child born in the New World in 1587, is charging $225 to register in advance for the conference, planned for April 19-22 at the Cheyenne Mountain Resort.

    Update – KRDO TV is reporting the Cheyenne Mountain Resort won’t be the host for the VDare white identity group.”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Buzz Mohawk
  46. @danand

    The Broadmoor resort in Colorado Springs is wonderful. My wife and I spent a lovely evening walking around there in the spring of 2017. The resort owns one of America’s best collections of Western art, such as Remington, Borglum, and Bierstadt, displayed in the hallways. However, some of the paintings are ink jet reproductions of paintings that owner Philip Anschutz has in his vaults. Nobody can tell which is original and which is authentic so there’s no point in hoisting them off the walls. So you can inspect the fine paintings more closely than in a museum with security guards hovering.

    I signed up to be a speaker at this April 2018 shoulder season VDARE conference next door at the Cheyenne Mountain Resort but, like almost all VDARE conferences since 2013, it got canceled because it would be horrible for Steve Sailer to be allowed to speak in public.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    , @Philip Owen
  47. @Steve Sailer

    If I had to give advice to a young person without much drive or desire to compete, I’d tell them to go work for the govt.

    You get generous benefits, a fat pension, and can retire young. Despite what you may have heard, salaries are surprisingly good too, especially these days.

    Most govt jobs have limited hours, so you don’t have to “work remotely” (which is depressingly common in the private sector due to smartphones and laptops). Even when you’re at work, it’s often hard to get fired, even if you’re incompetent. There’s a strong union. There’s not much competition, as your office is full of lazy people. There are lots of seminars and workshops that you attend, which are basically easy days.

    The private sector places a lot of pressure on people to perform and produce. If workers create more value, that translates into higher profits. Higher profits translate into higher executive compensation and shareholder dividends. So workers get ridden hard to get it done. Time is money!

    In the govt, there are no profits to be distributed to shareholders or executives. The value created is some service to the public. However, the public is generally apathetic, inattentive, and can’t effectively monitor govt performance. So govt workers can slack off an produce minimal value, without the public being much wiser or capable of doing anything about it.

    Once in a while, bad stuff happens to govt workers. Like when Reagan fired the air traffic controllers. However, more often than not, govt workers just eat tax money for 20-25 years. Then retire. Often they “double dip” by then getting rehired at another govt agency, so they collect a salary and their pension check (from the first job).

    Why do you think so many Blacks work for the govt? Easy life. Blacks don’t want to push themselves. They want to take it easy, while living the good life.

  48. @Anonymous

    What have naval aviators ever done for America? I mean, not including the six minutes between 10:24 AM and 10:30 AM on June 4, 1942?

    https://www.takimag.com/article/midway-effective-bang-bang-boom-boom/

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  49. @Dave Pinsen

    Chatting about the weather huh?

    What racists.

    • LOL: kaganovitch
  50. Realist says:

    Military Becoming Increasingly Hereditary

    Yes, and that inheritance is the inheritance of stupidity. Only an idiot would join a military of hegemony.

    • Replies: @guest
  51. @Anonymous

    The couple of WWE wrestling matches I’ve been to have had highly diverse audiences that got along very well.

  52. @LondonBob

    What? You mean Gilbert and Sullivan fans aren’t as heterosexual as Rush fans?

  53. Bert says:

    Almost all of the comments miss the strategic point, which is that the Deep State does not have a military on which to call. It has perhaps 30 thousand FBI, Marshals Service, IRS, BLM, DEA etc. foot soldiers and that’s it. On the other side, and not just potentially any longer per Virginia, are about 3,000 county sheriffs, most of whom could deputize hundreds of well-equipped citizens.

    With the U.S. land forces being made up of Southerners, many of whom are Ulster-descended with all the cultural and psychological tendencies that descent entails, the U.S. land forces would not be at the disposal of the Deep State in any open contest. At worst, the U.S. land forces would remain neutral. That is why I applaud the idiocy of the totalitarian Left in California and Virginia; it’s bringing the denoument closer and closer.

    So in the current political and social environment, the military budgets some complain about are as much protectors of our rights from threats within the Homeland as is the Second Amendment.

  54. @JohnnyWalker123

    I suppose this is a result of the over-correction of the antagonism toward Vietnam-era soldiers, many of whom were drafted. Rambo might be the main influence here.

    Yankee Stadium usually has WW2 vets limp out, supported by family. I do find it nice to observe that everyone at the stadium, regardless of race, seems genuine in applauding.

  55. Realist says:
    @farenheit

    So perhaps making the Army the family business is not as risky as a couple of generations ago.

    Wow your leap of logic is astounding. The military is dead end for 99%.

  56. @danand

    CIA hired Mormons for the same reason Howard Hughes did: they lived clean lives and you could trust them. Even though their whole religion is founded on a hoax, they have become sort of America’s own version of… of… well, something like Amish or any kind of throwback group that preserves a way of life, in this case, White American. At least thats one of my takes on them, and I knew many.

    My friend was not one, just a conservative history/political science major. I was liberal back then, but made friends easily. That used to be possible when more Americans were like Mormons.

    • Replies: @BB753
    , @Desiderius
  57. @Steve Sailer

    That is still the case. Usually, blacks (Blacks?) are overrepresented in the audience. I bring my kids, and find crowd-watching fascinating. In Philly, there are always groups of young black men that, in other circumstances, would generate fear, but they are smiling and hooting while wearing New Day or even Austin 3:16 gear. It is a reminder that blacks are often as nerdy as whites, when left alone.

  58. Realist says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Your points are excellent and accurate.

    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
  59. @Bert

    San Diego, with its superb Pacific port and huge naval base, would seem like the key asset in any struggle to divide up the USA.

  60. BB753 says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Funny that the CIA itself should be anything but clean-cut and clean.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  61. iffen says:
    @Steve Sailer

    In the Deep South, the youth sports venue is remarkable for its diversity and harmonious personal interactions among the races.

  62. @Mr. Anon

    Like so many socio-cultural norms of old, feudalism would be good, if you get all the rest, like keeping your castle walls closed (even in your tiny manor), restricting women’s outlandish drama, and punishing the wicked, openly, and with impunity.

  63. Bert says:
    @Steve Sailer

    What I have in mind is a return to sanity, i.e., running society based on how human beings are known to behave rather than on Leftist fantasies. Not a dividing up of the country. But in the event of a dividing up process California would be the largest single prize. Leftists there would do well to contemplate what a reconquest might involve.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  64. BB753 says:
    @Bert

    Judging by the last 73 years, the US military has always obeyed faithfully the orders of the CIA.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  65. Old Prude says:
    @ATate

    You are welcome. I appreciate your honesty and self awareness. Just make sure when someone says “Thank you for your service”, you reply appropriately with either “It was my priveledge to serve” or “No: Thank you for funding my comfortable lifestyle (chump).”

    Many of my careerist classmates are smug, self-serving dicks. I still feel guilty about all the benefits I got from my four years at USMA and five active service: Free college, flight training, four years of skiing, flying and getting laid, then an airline job at Delta.

    To Steve’s point, the number of my classmates with children at USMA is remarkable, and highlights the hereditary nature of this racket.

    I couldn’t stomach the chicken-shit in the Army, but those who could, set themselves up for a very nice upper middle class early retirement with a generous pension and Tri-care. Let’s cut it with the “thank you for your service” bull-shit though. They should be thanking us. They haven’t done anything useful for the country in their careers, but were allow to pretend they were. Actually, after the Wall came down and they started all the diversity and inclusion BS, endless wars and wasted money, along with standing idle during a third-world invasion of the homeland, their careers have been worse than useless to anyone but themselves.

    • Agree: South Texas Guy, Hail, BB753
    • Replies: @ATate
    , @Carlton Meyer
  66. @BB753

    Most CIA people process and analyze information. Living a clean, moral life makes one less susceptible to temptation and blackmail, less likely to end up sharing that information with others who might want it. Most agency people are not secret agents doing dramatic things, but you knew that already.

    Plus, Mormons are just good employees.

    (BTW, I hope I didn’t insult any LDS people when I wrote that their religion was based on a hoax. I respect people’s choice of faith, and I am an equal-opportunity skeptic: I think most all religions began as hoaxes. I am a modern Deist who believes God exists and can intervene in current affairs — and that most men’s claims of their own revelations about him are false; the books and stories are false or distorted, not divinely inspired or handed down — and Joseph Smith’s gold tablets did not exist at all.)

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    , @danand
    , @BB753
  67. Hunsdon says:
    @Steve Sailer

    . . . and Sevastopol is how you say San Diego in Russian.

  68. Anonymous[142] • Disclaimer says:
    @South Texas Guy

    For instance, why is a seargeant major with 25 years in the service still under the command of a 2nd Lt. just out of college?

    That higher IQ 2nd Lt should on average learn faster than the 25 year sgt major and within a shorter time frame be making better decisions. When he has 25 years of experience if he has shown ability he will make better decisions than a lower IQ NCO of 25 years to guide the much greater numbers of men under him, and achieve victory.

    It’s not that much different from the management and labor distinction. It exists for a reason. You have the IQ and ability where it is needed as a force multiplier.

  69. @JohnnyWalker123

    Cultural factors are out of court here, buddy. This is iSteve. It’s all genetic, capisce?

  70. Bill P says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Well, if you know the orthography it isn’t too hard to distinguish real Norman names — especially those of non-French origin like Joyce and Fitzhugh.

    One has to keep in mind that the Normans were not really an ethnic group in 1066. They were more like a political party that united people based on common goals and grievances.

    It’s kind of curious how that became the basis of a hereditary English aristocracy, since one of the main goals of the Norman coalition was to wipe out what they saw as an illegitimate Saxon ruling class and set up a more “British” administration.

    It’s a good thing they won, too. Otherwise the hapless Saxons probably would have fallen to some primitive Norse kingdom and the island would have been an obscure, culturally deprived backwater for centuries.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @duncsbaby
  71. Hail says: • Website

    More and more, new recruits are the children of old recruits. In 2019, 79 percent of Army recruits reported having a family member who served. For nearly 30 percent, it was a parent — a striking point in a nation where less than 1 percent of the population serves in the military.

    By Dave Philipps and Tim Arango
    Jan. 10, 2020

    I think Dave Philipps (two p’s, I see; unusual) and/or Tim Arango are confusing something important:

    “Serves” vs. “Has served.” (Secondary problems: “of the population” vs. men; also, “population” vs. US-born citizens and not Ilhan-Omar-Americans.)

    I think easily more than 1% of US-born males in the relevant age cohorts have served, at some point, in some branch, of the US military.

    The great majority of those signing up in 2019 were born mid-1990s to 2001, making their fathers primarily b.1960s and b.1970s.

    Find the lifetime male military-service rate for US males b.1960s and b.1970s and find the total number of US-born males in those cohorts. Probably doable, but requires some work and skill in searching census records. Instead, Dave Philipps and Tim Arango just lazily went with current personnel / total population.

    Their general point is not wrong but this ex. of sloppy research should be pointed out.

    • Replies: @dearieme
  72. @RichardTaylor

    If memory serves, southerners made up a majority of the union officer Corp prior to the outbreak of the War of Succession.

    • Agree: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @Rich
    , @Father O'Hara
  73. @Steve Sailer

    I am reminded above that VDare is in Litchfield. You should come and speak with Mr. Brimelow in his town. It’s a nice little place near us where our farmer friend has his animals butchered. Nobody would notice, but we could go — and you would enjoy a great steak.

    • Replies: @danand
  74. @Anonymous

    Nothing new there. In the old days/old country it was called “taking the king’s shilling”. Quite literally. Popular practice for recruiters was to hang out at village fairs. Get some peasant pissed, then give him some money to pay the drinks bill. That’s all it took; “you’re mine sonny boy! ” says the recruiting Sargent.

  75. Military Becoming Increasingly Hereditary

    If the military is viewed as a trade in general, then it’s not much different than all the trades that were typically passed down from generation to generation. Ask anybody named Smith, Black, Stone, Mason, Carter, Miller, Farmer, etc, etc.

    Who Signs Up to Fight?

    Misleading. Not everyone who enlists in the military “signs up to fight.” As Steve points out, the guys who “sign up to fight” are the young white men (if I were a conspiracy theorist I might almost believe this is a secondary feature of the USA’s endless wars.) The ones who sign up for gibs, are where you find most of the blacks and women, and the remaining hodgepodge of POC. Those are the groups you will find equally or overly represented in admin, motor transport, supply, logistics, or as cooks.

    Contrary to popular notions, all who “serve” do not serve equally. The admin clerk who has never been stationed anywhere but Fort Benning is not worthy of the same assessment as the infantrymen who has spent over half of his enlistment in a combat zone.

    Soldiers like him are increasingly making the United States military a family business.

    The article does not go on to substantiate this claim. It provides statistics on 2019 recruits answering whether they have family in the military, but no basis for comparison.

    In Los Angeles, a region defined by liberal politics where many families are suspicious of the military,

    Based on what measure? Or is this code for “many mestizos are suspicious of the government in general”?

    Access is “very minimal,” said Lt. Col. Tameka Wilson, the commander of the Los Angeles Recruiting Battalion.

    Recruiters are often the first impression potential recruits have of the military. I’m not sure if Tameka is the face that inspires very many to go charging up a hill.

    • Replies: @South Texas Guy
    , @Jack D
  76. Dr. X says:

    Cops are hereditary/nepotistic, too. And a lot of them have military service as well…

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  77. Tarrou says:
    @Thulean Friend

    The military is in no way a bad deal, looked at as a career from the point of the lower to lower-middle class. It’s hard to get fired, you have a guaranteed pension in twenty years, there’s no layoffs, promotion is heavily time-based. And, if you avoid the pointier end of the stick, the risks are relatively small. It is a heavy strain on one’s family life, and it separates the recruit from his home culture, but that can be a very, very good thing considering where some of these kids come from. It’s one of the few things that a kid can do on his own, with nothing to his name, to permanently move from a lower class to a middle one. The “lock-in” feature of enlistment prevents backsliding, and getting moved around the world for twenty years gives one a broad perspective.

    As to the question of the grunts who take most of the casualties, mostly poor whites and hispanics. Mostly southern, but with a good minority of rural northerners. A surprising number of foreign nationals getting their citizenship, from cultures where service is more honored with more risk. Samoans and Sikhs famously are tiny minorities, but serve in combat arms at incredibly elevated rates, because their cultures devote special honor to those who actually do the fighting and dying. Same with a certain group of whites, who hear the shit-talk about REMFs and POGs. Within the military, the status heirarchy of jobs is based on how much your job sucks, and the more it sucks, the higher you rate. Infantry shits on everyone, because they have it the worst.

    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
  78. Tarrou says:

    FWIW, I never thought of my family as a military one, because my father never served, and was a religious pacifist. But it did strike me later on, after my own enlistments, that both grandfathers, 3/4 uncles, a dozen cousins and both of my qualified brothers also joined. Most were not career men, they did an enlistment or two and went on to other things, but by far the majority of my male relatives did some sort of military service.

  79. @Dave Pinsen

    “the ancient Greeks already had that distinction, with the brushes on the officers’ helmets set sideways, while the enlisted men’s set front-to-back.”
    Didn’t know that about the Greeks. Perhaps that’s where the Roman’s picked it up from, because the sideways plume was always the Centurions’ helmet.

  80. gate666 says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    why didnt trump join the military.

  81. Arclight says:

    It seems to me that the military is still a useful institution for providing a kind of unity that transcends race/region in a lot of cases, instills loyalty to the nation, and offers a good way for non-college youth to spend their earliest years as an adult learning discipline and hopefully a skill before getting out, or a predictable career path. Getting away from their home neighborhood/friends when they are in their late teen-early 20s and most likely to get into trouble is not to be underestimated.

    I have friends and relatives that served and they seem united in feeling glad for the experiences they got out of it, although none of them made a career out of the military. Those that are minorities are very attached to the military and highly patriotic.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  82. @Tarrou

    That 20-year pension is by no means a sure thing. You have to make a certain rank in order to get it (Staff Sergeant for enlisted, Major for commissioned), otherwise you are forced out after two times failing to get promoted. And often, a lot just quit before their 20 because they just can’t deal with it any more.

  83. Recently Congress opened bases military shopping and MWR (golf courses, marinas, vacation motels) to veterans with any disability rating from the VA, even 0% for hearing loss.

    I was trying to figure out why, but this makes sense. Tightening the bonds to veteran’s families to get their kids and grand kids to think about serving.

    Blacks and Hispanics can’t really fill the gap. When I was in there were Black majority units like transport and fuels, but the average Black IQ is 85 and with modern equipment all the combat/combat support jobs need higher ability. People call infantry ‘grunts’, but it is both a physically and mentally hard job.

    Now contractors and civvie employees do a lot of the traditional dummy military work–cutting grass, base supply, food service, painting equipment, fuel shipment. They need middle and working class America in uniform, and this sounds like the way to get them.

  84. @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Ranulph Fiennes book “Where Soldiers Fear To Tread” is about his service in Oman during the period when Qaboos took over (with I assume a fair bit of MI6 involvement) and covers the coup, organised essentially because of fears that PFLOAG (Popular Front for the Liberation of Oman And the Gulf) were winning the guerrilla war, and that a Sandhurst-trained son was more likely to stop this than his old-school dad.

    Very interesting on leftist revolutionary politics which in those days was extremely anti-Islam (‘opium of the people’ etc) as propagated by the Chinese and Russian-trained guerrillas of the region.

    He has a sardonic, dry wit – one of his first sights as he arrives in Oman is seeing the only officer he knows (and the one who suggested he come out there) being carried badly-wounded to the plane he’s just left.

    • Thanks: Ghost of Bull Moose
  85. Kronos says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    It’ll be interesting to see how many “military dynasties” were disrupted by the Vietnam War. Many Northern WASP families had strong military histories but things “went south” after Vietnam. Many educational institutions do try to freeze out the military from the high IQ (and low) student body pool.

    From Wikipedia:

    Avoidance and resistance at home

    Significant draft avoidance was taking place even before the U.S. became heavily involved in the Vietnam War. The large cohort of Baby Boomers allowed for a steep increase in the number of exemptions and deferments, especially for college and graduate students.[87] According to peace studies scholar David Cortright, more than half of the 27 million men eligible for the draft during the Vietnam War were deferred, exempted, or disqualified.[87]

    The number of draft resisters was also significant. According to Cortright, “Distinct from the millions who [avoided] the draft were the many thousands who resisted the conscription system and actively opposed the war”.[88] The head of U.S. President Richard Nixon’s task force on the all-volunteer military reported in 1970 that the number of resisters was “expanding at an alarming rate” and that the government was “almost powerless to apprehend and prosecute them”.[89] It is now known that, during the Vietnam era, approximately 570,000 young men were classified as draft offenders,[87] and approximately 210,000 were formally accused of draft violations;[90][87] however, only 8,750 were convicted and only 3,250 were jailed.[87] Some draft eligible men publicly burned their draft cards, but the Justice Department brought charges against only 50, of whom 40 were convicted.[91]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draft_evasion#Vietnam_War

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  86. @Buzz Mohawk

    Note past tense.

    California is eating Utah.

  87. Patricia Heideman, who is in charge of high school instruction for the school district and said there was a perception the military preys on disadvantaged students. “I told him from the educator perspective, we sometimes feel they are targeting our black and brown students and students of poverty,” she said.

    “That’s our job,” Heideman added.

    • Agree: kaganovitch
  88. @Steve Sailer

    Flipped ca. 2018.

    There will be no divorce.

  89. Kronos says:
    @Anonymous

    The obesity issue is a “big” one. The Southern diet with all that sugar in “sweet tea” and stuff in alarming.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  90. Rich says:
    @animalogic

    977 West Point graduates from the classes of 1831 through 1861 were alive when the Civil War began. Of these men 259(26%) joined the Confederacy and 638(65%) fought for the Union. 39 of these graduates from Southern states fought for the Union and 32 from Northern states fought for the Rebels. 8 graduates did not fight for either side. (From the Cleveland Civil War Round-table.)

    The officer corps had a higher percentage of Northerners, based on percent of population, prior to the War.

    • Replies: @animalogic
    , @LondonBob
  91. Kronos says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Any idea if it was through “bribery” through military spending?

  92. Bugg says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    One thing you may notice if you have cable TV about Colorado Springs if you have ID TV; the Homicide Hunter, Lt. Joe Kenda, could be that city’s most well-known citizen. Despite being an overwhelmingly white college town, you would think it’s the East St. Louis of the Rockies. each show features another murder in the area. Not sure how and why Kenda has so many murder cases to so investigate in what looks objectively by every metric like a relatively quiet place. 2nd most prominent Colorado Springs resident may be Kenda’s hairpiece.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    , @Wilkey
  93. Barnard says:
    @prime noticer

    Wouldn’t learning most skilled trades be a much better deal for the common man? Low cost of education, high demand for jobs with decent wages and no worries about getting sent to risk your life trying to democratize some third world dump. Has the term “common man” been dumbed down to the point where it only applies to those who don’t have the aptitude or personal discipline to learn a trade?

    • Replies: @JMcG
  94. Here in Canada, we’ve been copying that the USA’s ra-ra military culture since around 2001 when we decided to enter the Afghanistan foray. Before that, the Canadian forces barely had a presence in the public square at all. Nowadays, you’re obliged to stand up and cheer when they bring in some overweight white woman from the Canadian army’s human resources department to be feted during a break at the Maple Leafs or Blue Jays game.

    Here in Canada, the armed services are increasing becoming a racket for women and minorities as well. In the meantime, virtually all the Canadian soldiers who died in Afghanistan were young white men. It also seems to me that the women serving in the Canadian army are universally ugly, fat and have a nasty attitude. All the bases are also located in the middle of nowhere.

    If you’re in Canada, DON’T serve in the military.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  95. Bugg says:
    @South Texas Guy

    As is said of support positions in NYPD and FDNY, more black loafers than a Florsheim shoe factory.

    • LOL: Lurker
  96. AP says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I guess genetic tests can sort this out now. So the Eastern Slavic Rurikid princes turned out to indeed have 9th century Swedish origins (except oops – the princes of Chernihiv; someone wasn’t faithful in that branch).

  97. @LondonBob

    Which is the preferable solution. But all those defense dollars not only keep much American heavy manufacturing afloat, but also many communities adjacent to military bases off life support. Slashing defense spending without other actions would be ruinous for millions of Americans — most not in uniform — and most of those Americans would be white. But not surprisingly, there are more than a few commenters here where that would be a desired feature, not a bug.

    Slashing defense spending will be made far more politically feasible with the return of offshored manufacturing to American communities, and resultant elimination of the continuous, and very large, trade deficits that have been occurring for decades. I am glad President Trump is working on that. What do you think the overlap is between Americans that desire massive defense cuts, and Americans that desire high tariffs for imports until the American economy is reshaped into an economy reflecting an isolationist foreign policy? Because I’m in that overlap.

  98. @JohnnyWalker123

    I realize that this is a widely held public perception about government jobs and was not without justification at certain times, but to extent that it was ever true, it really isn’t much any longer.

    Clerking for the empire is still better than working at Starbucks, but it’s a stressful occupation these days, the pay scales in the lower tiers have been eviscerated, and the accumulated decades of mismanagement have resulted in severely dysfunctional workplaces where it is difficult just to keep the enterprise functioning, let alone fulfill its ostensible purpose.

    And contrary to what many believe, modern life does actually require a large bureaucracy to go on functioning. Basic things like having a national postal service or standardized weights and measures are, where the rubber meets the road, extremely difficult things to organize, and without them the machinery of society would not work. Then just try to imagine things like international trade, banking and financial regulation, communications…it gets complicated very quickly.

    These things ought to be sacrosanct because they are the basis of public trust and confidence. The positions ought to be generously compensated so that the public officials who hold them would have a standard of living commensurate with the dignity of their public duties. But along with that goes personal responsibility and a high standard of excellence. Turning these jobs over to nepotism and quota hires is the worst thing you could do, but it is fundamentally no different than the decay of an old aristocracy. Sad, but inevitable.

  99. J.Ross says:


    Rolling block
    Cover the target with your front sight
    Rolling block
    Comes from deep within the stock
    Rolling block
    Let your block talk out loud tonight

    School shooting in Mexico, violent crime in Europe, rumblings in Iran, chaos in China: nevertheless NPR just found time to talk to its listeners about the big igloo (and the locally elusive Virginia story). If it wasn’t for the evil, child-eating white man, clinging bitterly to his “rights,” NPR would have nothing to talk about. NPR had some mention earlier of the Virginia legislature, but without any facts, and no mention of the bizarre scene on the first day of its new session. However they do have time for this.
    But wait, it gets stupider. The overall thrust of the article is that this is racist because, you see, the word “boogaloo” is actually a great nonwhite institution of racial harmony and musical genius. Why, as can be see in the illustration below, there’s even Greater East Asian influence!

    https://www.npr.org/2020/01/10/795366630/boogaloo-is-the-new-far-right-slang-for-civil-war

    Journalism today consists of receiving a script from the ADL/SPLC and a bit of scanning 4chan and YouTube, but at least this way they were able to locate a certain infamously hard to find, far-ranging white nationalist:

    OREN SEGAL: And that’s what makes it, I think, particularly insidious, is the use and co-opting of, you know, pop culture in order to make extremist points.

    HANNAH ALLAM: That’s Oren Segal of the Anti-Defamation League. The ADL just released a report about the spread of boogaloo. With far-right violence on the rise, Siegel says, it’s time to look closer at how extremists use pop culture to communicate.

    SEGAL: It helps the message spread. It helps people maybe who are sort of on the margins want to explore. And so it’s really weaponizing language as a way to try to reach and recruit people into the movement.

    NPR BALANCE OMBUDSMAN: What about the arrogance of power demonstrated by the Democrats, where they say they are going to ram through these radical changes even though everyone outside the capital has said they do not want this? Does that make people “want to explore”? Or no, I guess: it’s the goofy pop culture slang amd not, like, y’know, 243 years of non-controversial Constitutional law.

    Just kidding about that last part, of course. NPR retains no such office.

    ALLAM: Decades later, boogaloo is no longer about music, but about menace – a word coined by black and brown people now used by some who envision a country without them.

    Remember kids, if you think you have God-given rights enumerated in some dumb piece of paper, it’s only because you’re a genocidal racist on your way to the dustbin of history.

  100. @Dave Pinsen

    My sister got into a top five medical school because not only did she have good test scores BUT MORE IMPORTANTLY my parents aren’t doctors but rather work in agriculture and that was a novelty for the admissions committee.

  101. @RichardTaylor

    My explanation is this, as a southerner: it’s not just the more outdoorsy and conservative lifestyle.

    There are a lot of people in the South who are relatively personable, capable of performing complex tasks when following a plan or orders, but they also aren’t very ambitious or studious or good with money. Basically, they are charming and social but not all that bright, like the male versions of women who get Mrs. Degrees.

    These people would have been fine running a business 100 years ago but the modern economy is increasingly competitive and automated.

    The military officer corps is a good career choice for a middle class guy who doesn’t want to do blue collar work, but also doesn’t want to take a lot of math and science courses in college.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    , @JMcG
  102. @Anonymous

    Sounds like blacks are the smarter ones here. Why take on some dangerous job? For the “honor” of getting blown up by an IED?

    I interviewed a black WWII vet a few years ago (about what I don’t remember, he was also a preacher), and he told me straight up that if blacks had been in combat roles back then (Pacific Theater) he probably wouldn’t have made it back. As it was, he and his fellow colored servicement in that area were on clean up (stacking corpses among other things) after the fighting was done.

  103. @Buzz Mohawk

    Mormons are good employees because they’ve been selectively bred for suggestibility, without necessarily losing intelligence, for the past 150 years.

    You’re definitely going to “buy in” to the company mission if you can buy in to the Angel Moroni, golden tablets, lost Indian tribes of Israelis, and the Aaronic Priesthood.

    Highly recommend everyone who gets the chance visit the big LDS temple complex in Salt Lake City. It’s like a Victorian sci-fi fever dream.

  104. ATate says:
    @Old Prude

    Yep I do. I always thank people and let them know I appreciate the undeserved comment but thank them as well.

    My service was common, unexemplary, and not worthy of discussion.

    For the most part it never comes up. I don’t have stickers, shirts or hats advertising service branches. I don’t post sappy veteran memes or military related shit on social media and there’s nothing in my house about any show of my military career. What few trinkets I do have from my military service are shoved in the same box as my college degrees. And the box is in storage.

    Still there’s a few knobs out there I’m sure I couldn’t genuflect enough for, but they can eat a dick.

    • LOL: JMcG
  105. @Mr. Anon

    Unlike political office. Why Bush, Clinton and even Dingell aren’t hereditary politicians, just aberrations. I’m sure no non-white politicians would never expect their children to do just like they did.

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
  106. Jack D says:
    @Kronos

    Whatever is making Southerners fat, it’s not sweet tea – 16oz. of sweet tea has 90 calories from around 6 tsp. of sugar. You’d have to drink an awful lot of sweet tea to be fat.

    A Big Mac Meal (burger, medium fries and medium soft drink) has 1,100 calories or more than 1/2 of your daily need. I guess if you had 2 Big Mac Meals a day and ate nothing else (no breakfast, no snacks, no soda or sweet tea between meals, no dessert) then you would be OK but otherwise you’re going to put on weight unless you are very active.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Kronos
  107. Commodore Perry who preserved the Old North West from Canada by fighting the British and Tecumseh in the War of 1812, mostly through naval engagements on Lakes Superior and Michigan was the father of Commodore Perry in Japan. I believe there has been at least one Perry with the rank of Commodore in my lifetime. Hereditary military service is not new, even in the US.

    In the UK, lieutenant Bromhead, great grandson of the lieutenant Bromhead who held off the Zulus at Rorke’s Drift was sent to train the South African army after the end of apartheid. The earlier Bromhead was the son of a general.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  108. @MikeatMikedotMike

    Recruiters are often the first impression potential recruits have of the military. I’m not sure if Tameka is the face that inspires very many to go charging up a hill.

    Had to laugh at this. True story, I was at Redstone Arsenal for AIT and our senior drill sergeant was a black woman. An E-7 who couldn’t count cadence. I shit you not. One time a staff sergeant had to politely tell her that he’d take over.

    Any large organization carry some dead weight (which is why Affirmative action still exists), but at some point it becomes a real detriment.

  109. anon[372] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bert

    The problem with your reasoning about the military is that soldiers obey orders, and the Deep State gives the orders.

  110. Jack D says:
    @Arclight

    The military is an ideal setting for slightly above (minority) average blacks – it’s a structured setting, it takes them out of the ghetto, they are (more or less) capable of doing the tasks that are assigned to them (which are designed to be doable by someone with their IQ). They get a feeling of fulfillment instead of resentment because they are not in over their heads like blacks in Ivy League schools. It’s literally been a lifesaver for many blacks, taking them out of the underclass and putting them on the road to at least the lower middle class.

    Of course the dirty little secret of why blacks do OK in the military is that in the volunteer era (and during periods when they are not short on bodies) the military is very selective in which blacks they take and exclude ones with low IQ (at least half of them).

    And they don’t tend to end up in front line positions. Does anyone have the stats on what % of Iraq and Afghanistan casualties were minority? I would bet that it is lower than their overall representation in the military.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    , @Paul Mendez
  111. @Thulean Friend

    “very revealing in the age of diminishing expectations in US society.”

    True. But military service can be an opportunity for a lot of young people. I dropped out of college and enlisted in the USCG because of boredom and to escape the life of a poverty-stricken student.

  112. anon[225] • Disclaimer says:

    We have to be careful with the word “hoax” as it applies to faith. All faiths require belief in some sort of “hoax” or else it would become science. The religions with most members believe in immaculate conception and resurrection; and in partaking bread and wine that have magically become flesh and blood. Compared to that, gold plates with hieroglyphics is easier to believe in!

  113. @Steve Sailer

    “Broadmoor”. An unfortunate name. In the UK it is the highest security prison in the country into which are sent the criminally insane, never to return.

  114. Jack D says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    Based on what measure? Or is this code for “many mestizos are suspicious of the government in general”?

    No, it’s code for white liberal school administrators who don’t want the military to pick off their precious charges and won’t let the recruiters into the schools. Read the article – it’s clear that’s who they are referring to.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
  115. @JohnnyWalker123

    Keep fighting our wars, working class whites. Maybe you’ll be rewarded with a Wounded Warrior commercial. The parasitic elites have devised an effective system. It works quite well for them.

    • Agree: Kolya Krassotkin
  116. @Reg Cæsar

    I spent a lot of time at HP in Greely and later I was on the board of a start up in Boulder on behalf of a large UK chemical firm, now gone. Jose Muldoon’s was a place then. I saw Denver as a little bit of Texas but certainly a crossroads. Greely was a replica of Boise, another place I stayed a lot.

    Your observation of a crossroads stands up. Bison, oil, ski resorts, TB hospitals (Estes Park the Boulder that didn’t make it), prairie and mountains. (I walked the Arapahoe grasslands and the Arapahoe pass often).

    With all those pickup trucks with rifles in the back, Colorado seemed a place that would be predisposed to the military. But then Columbine.

  117. @JohnnyWalker123

    What does the military do exactly? Who do they defend us from? Goat herders in Afghanistan? Guys with swords in the deserts in Iraq? The long-defunct Soviet Union? The Mongol hordes of Genghis Khan? Canada?

    What does the military (and all these foreign wars) contribute to our society?

    If you’ve ever wondered why America is so deep into debt, the #1 reason is the military and the foreign wars. We spend something like $750 billion on national defense, which is just astronomical. It’s not just soldiers who eat our tax dollars. These various contactors (Haliburton for example) are rapacious beyond belief too.

    Our economy is driven by military spending. If you look at the other economies around the globe it would be very hard to argue that the American way is inferior. The alternative does not appear to be fiscal integrity. The alternative appears to be getting swamped in debt buying other stuff. This is kind of ridiculous but if you had to choose between:

    1. being buried by debt and having the United States military on the horizon in somebody else’s control; and
    2. being buried by debt and being behind the battlements with the guns pointed at the other debtors.

    Number one is by no means the better of those options.

    There are dinky countries like Iceland who have avoided being embedded into the quicksand swamp so far but I can’t name a second one of them offhand. Mankind’s best option at this point might be Russia and some kind of Putinism/Duginism but I am dubious they really have their shit held together all that great.

  118. Of course it’s hereditary, it has always been. Just look at Douglas MacArthur and Chester W. Nimitz.

    • Replies: @Bubba
  119. @Bert

    Virginia appears to be a laboratory where the authoritarian left is testing their schemes. The Dixiecrat governor, after being caught in black face, is now owned by the progressive totalitarians. Meanwhile, in the Golden State, our governor has signed into law protections for black lady hair and black kid chaos in the public school system. The California governor is politically ambitious and knows he has to appease the African element within his party. He is also a vampire.

  120. res says:
    @dearieme

    Reasonable to be skeptical, but don’t forget that the Conquest was about 40 generations ago. So even if there is only 1 direct male line of descent there are 2^40 (a trillion) possible ancestors that far back. In reality there are fewer actual ancestors because of pedigree collapse. But still, that is a great deal of possible chances to have an ancestor from then.

    Blunt seems to be basing his claim partly on his last name (?) so both your comment and Steve’s response are on point.

  121. @Jack D

    Lol.

    They don’t make those fat straws for 16 oz.

  122. res says:
    @dearieme

    Good question. This page has some history:
    https://history.army.mil/html/faq/diversity.html
    and states: “Army to begin integrating its units in mid-1951.”

    They don’t explicitly answer your question, but Steve’s statement seems reasonable: “probably in the 2nd half of the 1950s.”

  123. @Steve Sailer

    I don’t buy it. Sounds like so much mid-century cynicism, like the kind that claimed Carthaginian child sacrifices were all tosh, Aztecs never sacrificed humans, and the Trojan War was a phantom. Turns out old stories, though mere oral traditions, are rooted in truth.

    First of all, the requirement of DIRECT MALE descent is designed to prune claims, and to do so quite unfairly. Is a daughter not a carrier of blood and genetics? If you flip a coin long enough, it turns up heads. That doesn’t make claims of descent a lie. And sometimes the head of a family can’t, for various reasons, make a son or a daughter. Perhaps they like theatre a bit too much. Over enough centuries, you’re going to hit a stumbling block. But it’s still a real line of descent which is being traced.

    [MORE]

    And secondly, it’s very, very hard to prove descent. How many people have to keep various documents throughout their life, such a passport? How many people ever lose their passport, or some old receipts, or any other bits of paper? How about during their whole life? Now extend that task to dozens of human lifetimes. And many of these tasks aren’t peaceful, paper-shuffling lifetimes. They’re lives where your enemies have had you expropriated, or the country is in civil war, or you are migrating across a country or even a continent to greener pastures. Take, for instance, Dr. Golitsyn. He has to flee across Russia, eating cans of beans, in a boxcar. His only means of sustenance is his medical education, treating the wounded until he is able to arrive, safely, in an American refugee camp near China. Are future commentators in distant centuries going to snark at the unlikelihood of a Russian princely family ending up in far away sunny California? A more extreme example would the Sephardic grandees. These families were stripped of their noble lands and titles in Spain, and had to flee to the colonies or to Holland. From there, it is another migration to America and what was then New Amsterdam. But you can trace these journeys through artifacts and through the wayward Jewish genes found in many Mestizos. It is not all bunkum. To hear people tell it, elites turn over every fifty years and generations alternate between rags and riches. How convenient that his big wave of arrivistes shows up when the previous elite has all died off in the Wars of the Roses. Even more convenient that they have the same names and claim descent! It certainly couldn’t be the case that families were dislocated to new pastures by civil war.

    Finally, even in cases of pure fabrication, it doesn’t even change that much in the long run. Let’s take the lineage of the Astors, which is very likely false. Was John Jacob Astor a Spanish d’Astore? Probably not. But when a small number of new entrants pass into an existing population, they are assimilated, they don’t replace the originals. This is why Turks look, talk, and act like Greeks, not Altaics. If an Astor marries into the Norman yoke, and his kid marries into the Norman yoke, and their kid marries into the Norman yoke, what you have is a Norman, not a German butcher. Especially since the upwardly mobile will be upwardly mobile precisely because they have traits selected for in the elite – they already have phenotype similarity.

    That’s why I caution so much against marrying rich celebrities and media types. It is a far more honorable thing to marry a nobody NASA employee than an inherited acting fortune – what matters is the genes, not the money. Actors aren’t selected for any of the same traits, they’re just pretty people. Any intermarriage must necessarily dilute the blood. One would be better off marrying a random person off 4chan or r/WallStreetBets – thus, would a family’s precious autism genes be conserved, even if there would be some decay. There’s more phenotype resemblance, and probably more genotype resemblance. When goes the autism, goes the family fortune.

  124. dearieme says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I’m sure that most genealogies in history are fake. Though few can be as unpersuasive as Jesus’s whereby he was purportedly descended from King David through his non-father Joseph.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
  125. Jake says:

    ” My estimate is whites were 89% more likely per capita than nonwhites to get killed in Iraq and 146% more likely in Afghanistan. (Those figures are not widely known, by the way. Who would be interesting in something as boring and trivial as that? Now back baseball statistics!)”

    Every Liberal knows that per capita more blacks were killed in Vietnam than whites.

    Of course, what they know is not true. More blacks were killed in Vietnam than the total of blacks per the US population, but that was because more blacks per capita were in the military in the early and mid-1960s than blacks were per capita the US population.

    Whites die for an America whose Elites HATE non-elite whites.

    Anglo-Zionist Empire.

  126. Mukarjee says:

    The “1% serving” figure is crazy. I presume they mean AT ANY ONE TIME. I.e., maybe there are 150 million employed in the country, and 1.5 in the military at any one time. But over a lifetime,
    the figure has to be far higher. Polling on what percentage of Americans are veterans, even among the younger age groups, is far higher.

  127. dearieme says:
    @Steve Sailer

    San Diego, with its superb Pacific port and huge naval base, would seem like the key asset in any struggle to divide up the USA.

    Would The Seceded States of America retake the Panama canal?

    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
  128. @Bert

    The other thing the Deep State doesn’t seem to understand about Virginia is that there are hundreds, maybe thousands of well-practiced Virginians that are accurate with a rifle to say 300 yards or so.

    Some subset of those folks are probably good to 500 yards, and I’d bet there are a few dozen good out to 1000.

  129. “I told him from the educator perspective, we sometimes feel they are targeting our black and brown students and students of poverty,” she said.

    “[whatevers] of poverty.” That’s a new one to me. Are we witnessing some gradual shift away from using adjectives?

  130. dearieme says:
    @Hail

    two p’s, I see; unusual

    Maybe they are a family of pedants, influenced by the spelling of hippopotamus.

  131. @Jack D

    And they don’t tend to end up in front line positions. Does anyone have the stats on what % of Iraq and Afghanistan casualties were minority? I would bet that it is lower than their overall representation in the military.

    That would be correct. Blacks were 9.5% of Iraq casualties but 17% of overall headcount:

    https://usiraq.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000671#miltfatstat
    https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/04/13/6-facts-about-the-u-s-military-and-its-changing-demographics/

  132. There seems to be a growing divide between the elite and the military that the elite uses to enforce its values globally. Doesn’t feel very sustainable.

    • Replies: @Andrew
  133. Jake says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Evelyn was correct, certainly if he also added 17th and 18th centuries to his list of arrivistes.

    First, the Wars of the Roses ruined some Norman families and weakened many more. The Tudor reign did much more damage, literally ending several Norman families as ‘noble.’ Physical survivors became ‘common.’

    The Hardy novel Tess of the D’Urbervilles takes off from that process, with poor farm girl Tess Durbeyfield a descendant of the Norman D’Urbervilles, and Alec D’Urberville the scion of a new rich WASP family that bought the Norman name and its crest, etc.

    Certainly by the time Disraeli became Prime Minister, that process across the British Isles of replacement of old Norman families and titles with nouveau riche people was primarily one befitting Jews. But those rarely claimed to be Norman. They were happy to to be Jews who replaced what once had been non-WASP, had been Christendom, Lord and gentry.

  134. Anon7 says:

    The military is just another government jobs program. Isn’t nepotism on the rise in ALL state and local government jobs? Grab a job in city, county or state government with the help of uncles, cousins, family friends. Take your first pension in your forties, then go for another. The jobs have low requirements, guaranteed paychecks and pensions; it’s a sweet deal if you’re a regular person.

    Just type “[city name] nepotism” into your favorite search engine. You’ll see.

    Oh, and just wait for the nepotism “bump” that will occur when the mass immigration from cultures that are based on favoritism toward extended family really takes hold.

  135. @dearieme

    He was also descended from King David through the Blessed Virgin Mary.

  136. Anon[150] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    There’s plenty of Norman blood in the British aristocracy even today. Most of it was inherited through the female lines, though. Keep in mind that the original Norman barons were actually a caste that evolved from the Norse freebooters led to Normandy by Rollo after they were kicked out by an infuriated King Harold Fairhair for being a pain in the butt.

  137. @Dr. X

    In Virginia recently, the left threatened to use the national guard to enforce gun restrictions if local cops wouldn’t. They apparently don’t realize how many local cops are also national guardsmen.

  138. @animalogic

    The War of Succession is what Prince Charles and William are very quietly fighting.
    I think you meant Secession. You no like a the name a Civil War?

    • Replies: @animalogic
  139. Dtbb says:
    @prime noticer

    The military paid for both my nephews education. One is currently a doctor and the other is an intelligence officer with 4 young children.

  140. Dtbb says:
    @anon

    On the news the other night they showed scenes of soldiers getting on planes with all their gear. I didn’t see one obviously black guy.

  141. @R.G. Camara

    Somebody needs to do a Genghis-Khan-gene-proliferation-type study for Eric Bloodaxe.

  142. Mr. Anon says:
    @Anonymous

    Military recruiters are notorious for using all sorts of lies to get people to enlist. They have quotas and are like used car salesmen in their tactics.

    What’s it going to take for me to put you into a prosthetic leg today?

    • LOL: JMcG
  143. Squid says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Evelyn Waugh: ‘The relation between a Halberdier officer and his sergeant was precisely that between child and nanny. The sergeant was expected to run the platoon and keep his officer out of trouble. The officer was expected to sign things, take the blame, and, quite simply, walk in front and get shot first.’

  144. @Steve Sailer

    And yet the ancestors of the citizens of Cheshire pre-date the Celts in that area.

  145. danand says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz, you probably are aware of this already:

    “Peter Brimelow, an anti-immigration activist who hosts a website that has published the writings of white supremacists, is suing The New York Times for $5 million for labeling him an “open white nationalist” in an article last year.”

    Should be interesting if it makes it to open court.

    https://www.politico.com/news/2020/01/09/brimelow-new-york-times-lawsuit-097095

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Buzz Mohawk
  146. @Steve Sailer

    And then there are all the bastards. As with the current succès de scandale hisself.

  147. @Dave Pinsen

    In Stephen Pressfield’s novel of Thermopylae, Gates of Fire, the ancient Greeks already had that distinction, with the brushes on the officers’ helmets set sideways, while the enlisted men’s set front-to-back.

    If the officer in question was new, he might just have put his helmet on sideways by mistake.

  148. Kronos says:
    @Jack D

    I believe in the Gary Taubes idea that sugar and carbohydrates are the main cause of the obesity/diabetes epidemic. That calories are a relatively pointless measurement.
    Sugar possesses unique metabolic properties that activate insulin to expand fat cells. You’ll get fatter by eating 300 calories of cotton candy compared to eating 300 calories of steak and spinach. (Fats and low-starch vegetables don’t trigger higher insulin levels.)

    Essentially, government institutions got the science wrong after WW2 (like environmental nurture dictates IQ) and have supported disastrous policies ever since.

    https://lukeford.net/blog/?p=128449 -Hell, even Steve personally supports the idea.

    Soft drinks/sweet teas are the worst because you can store lots of sugar in a liquid mix. You can drink in one glass the same amount of sugar that’s typically stored in 100 apples easy. You really can eat as much as you want (hunger is the body’s demand for protein) as long as you stay away from fructose corn syrup and such.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  149. @animalogic

    This is dramatized by the Crimean War ballad ‘The Kerry Recruit’, albeit you have to be able to understand a lot of Irish brogue to properly enjoy it

  150. Anonymous[974] • Disclaimer says:
    @Intelligent Dasein

    And contrary to what many believe, modern life does actually require a large bureaucracy to go on functioning. Basic things like having a national postal service or standardized weights and measures are, where the rubber meets the road, extremely difficult things to organize, and without them the machinery of society would not work. Then just try to imagine things like international trade, banking and financial regulation, communications…it gets complicated very quickly.

    Not anymore now that we have Bitcoin and the Blockchain. We no longer need these large, inefficient, corrupt bureaucracies. The Blockchain has made them totally obsolete. We can privatize them through the Blockchain and have better and more efficient institutions. Bitcoin can do the same for money, banking, and finance.

    • Replies: @HA
  151. @Morton's toes

    Wow, if your bleak outlook is right, then maybe Theodore J. Kaczynski was correct after all

    “The industrial revolution and its consequences have been a disaster for mankind.”

    • Replies: @Morton's toes
  152. @LondonBob

    True but, in all due respect, didn’t the English throw out this no-standing-army tradition by the 18th century in order to have an empire?

    I certainly would prefer if the Anglo-American world returned to something more like its roots in pre-industrial Little England, at least as I understand it from Chesterton and Tolkien, rather than this godawful Anglo-American empire.

  153. 68W58 says:
    @prime noticer

    It’s true though-factor in pension and benefits and it’s hard to beat. I worked a construction trade for a while and while there was the opportunity to (eventually) make a lot of money, it would have meant even more time away from home than when I was in the Army. There are all sorts of reasons that the military lifestyle is preferable to civilian occupations.

  154. @Kronos

    My dad said only time he saw his dad cry was standing on the runway as his son boarded the plane for Nam. I was six months old in Grandad’s arms.

    Not tears of pride.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    , @Kronos
  155. 68W58 says:
    @South Texas Guy

    That might be true, but if the CSM suggests that the LT do something differently he had better listen.

    • Replies: @South Texas Guy
  156. @Desiderius

    Corleones have a discussion about military service.

    They’re saps because they risk their lives for strangers.

    The country aint your blood, you remember that.

  157. J.Ross says:
    @Anonymous

    While there are some real horror stories, recruiters today really are dependent on their subjects being dumb proud kids who are unaware or unwilling to use legal protections: they do not have you at all until you are at the recruit depot, you can literally just walk away. Almost nobody does that because they don’t want to look like a coward. I knew a guy who threatened a potential recruit suffering last minute cold feet with an Oscar-worthy declamation of military-legal threats, none of which had any specificity or validity, and a few improperly used terms the teenagers didn’t know how to parse.

  158. @Kronos

    The key to good health is to keep your blood sugar as low as possible.

    High blood sugar drives so many health issues – cancer, heart disease, blood pressure, diabetes, stroke, obesity. If you keep your blood sugar low, you’ll be in much better health.

    So the main benefit of a low carb/sugar diet is that it keeps blood sugar at low levels. That’s why you should be on it.

    There are other ways to keep blood sugar low.

    -Metformin (perscribed by a physician)
    -Berberine (non-perscription supplement)
    -Exercise (high-intensity cardio and strength training)
    -Intermittent fasting

    One more piece of advice.

    If you donate blood, you’ll lower your level of iron (ferritin) in your body. Excess iron leads to lots of health problems, particularly atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), blood pressure, and cancer. We tend to accumulate iron as we age, with that iron oxidizing and causing health issues. So by giving blood, you basically deplete your body of excess iron reserves.

    • Thanks: Kronos
    • Replies: @Coemgen
  159. Rob says:

    Is this really surprising? Without conscription, people in the military are people who want to be i the military and meet the qualifications, all of which, I am sure, are more or less heritable. I am willing to bet that people in the military who like it and do well have more kids and are more likely to encourage their kids to enlist than people who only marginally meet the requirements.

    That said, it is probably not healthy for a democracy to have a military caste. It is probably not healthy for democracies to have capitalist castes, or an intelligentsia class. That last one probably doesn’t exist because it doesn’t reproduce itself. But castes are an almost unavoidable consequence of meritocracy, assertive mating, and heritability.

  160. J.Ross says:
    @Bert

    It’s pretty useless to talk about division when Southern California has already been recolonized: San Diego is neither ours to give nor retain, unless we reconquer the surrounding areas. LA has a good port, maybe they’d let us trade. On the one hand, one of the best arguments against civil war is the merkelboner, because once the balloon goes up, the most denial-enshrouded open borders nut will be forced to recognize terrifyingly huge swaths of America that are already not America, and which in that case would be very happy to stay out of America’s internal dispute (apart from harvesting scraps dropped by combatants). On the other hand, if the rulers are pigheaded enough, I really don’t see a good end.

  161. @S. Anonyia

    The military officer corps is a good career choice for a middle class guy who doesn’t want to do blue collar work, but also doesn’t want to take a lot of math and science courses in college.

    Here’s a better choice.

    1. Stop the H-1B visas and give the jobs to the good ole boys of the Southern hollers.
    2. Cut back spending trillions on unneccessary military size and foreign wars.

    It’d seem like a common sense way to prevent national bankruptcy, while keeping people employed.

  162. It runs in the genes.

    Of my direct line great-grandfathers one was a Royal Navy captain in the 1830’s, his son (my great great grandfather) was an intelligence office who was kidnapped and murdered in the Indian Mutiny, my great grandfather played a large role in the subjugation of Northern Nigeria with a Gatling gun in around 1903, my grandfather was killed in the service of empire in Iraq, and my father served in the navy in World War II.

    Getting killed in action seems to occur approximately every other generation.

    The common factor in all cases was that they needed the money, having not inherited any due to an even earlier ancestor who was a pioneer in aviation having gone massively bankrupt in a case that dragged on for many years and was fictionalized by Charles Dickens.

    Same deal today, because not having wealth, it is a way to earn money, get an education without getting into massive debt, and get a start in life. You may also get killed on the job, but nothing comes without a price.

    Rick Scott, current senator for Florida, a former governor of that state, was adopted by a poor family and joined the navy from high school and stayed in just long enough to qualify for college under the GI Bill or its successor, bought a failing donut shop, made money, then graduated from law school and become immensely rich as owner of Columbia HCA, though ultimately he became involved in Medicare fraud scandals.

    On the other hand, the scions of wealthy family trees tend to avoid military service like the plague, or do token military service if they want to get into politics later. Some ambitious future politicians from poorer backgrounds, like Pete Buttigieg, also join the forces to build a credible political resume.

    Politicians who have a military background tend to be less gung-ho about starting foreign wars than their civilian counterparts.

  163. @RichardTaylor

    There’s also this quote from the Jack Reacher movie, nor sure if it’s in the book:

    There are four types of people who join the military. For some, it’s a family trade. Others are patriots, eager to serve. Next, you have those who just need a job. Then there’s the kind who want a legal means of killing other people.

  164. JMcG says:

    I think everything is becoming more hereditary. I know guys who are fifth generation in my trade. I don’t want my son to follow me, but it might not be such a terrible thing.

  165. @Jack D

    I read the article, thanks.

    Speaking of recruiting, have you enlisted yet? We need able minds and sound bodies for our upcoming war with Iran. Go get ’em, tiger!

    • Replies: @Jack D
  166. When only the military is permitted affordable family formation, genuine conservatives will necessarily become warmongers so as to prevent their de facto genocide by something far more deadly to their genes than even IED-brain damaged heroes or the emotional trauma of doing the dirty work of neocon cowards like Bill Kristol:

    The economy outbidding the family for the fertile years of the most desirable young women.

    • Replies: @Whiskey
  167. @Morton's toes

    Perhaps our economy should be driven through investments in infrastructure, technology, and labor-intensive industries? Sort of like China (and the other East Asian “Tigers”) are doing.

    Then instead of being perpetually in debt, we could achieve financial solvency and even start to export goods&services overseas.

    As for military spending, keep it a reasonable level, with more of a focus on national defense (as opposed to playing offens). If the U.S. is really scared of a foreign confrontation, build walls&barriers, anti-missile systems, and troop garrisons on our nation’s perimeter. Be fortress America. This could all be done at a highly reasonable cost.

    If you look at the other economies around the globe it would be very hard to argue that the American way is inferior. The alternative does not appear to be fiscal integrity. The alternative appears to be getting swamped in debt buying other stuff.

    One alternative is what they’re doing in China, which (last time I checked) is becoming a very prosperous country. Moderate military spending + investments in infrastructure, technology, and labor-intensive, export-driven industry.

    Another alternative (in Europe) is often generous public benefits for the general population. Perhaps a waste of money, but at least they get to retire earlier, sleep easier, and not have to worry about losing healthcare.

    The American system seems to be uniquely atrocious in that it’s super expensive and doesn’t benefit the general population much. If you’re going to go bankrupt, at least do so while enjoying life. Not fighting in the trenches of the forsaken deserts of the Middle East and the remote mountains of the Khyber pass.

    Why do we maintain this type of system? Many reasons. One of the major reasons is that the military is the target of a very extreme level of PC worship, so you can’t actually critique the soldiers or the wars overseas. We have to pretend like the military “keeps us safe” and “defends freedom.” So if you don’t support constant war overseas and multitrillion-dollar budgets, you’re “unpatriotic.”

    Since the Vietnam era (and more especially since the “War on Terror” began), Republicans (and some “moderate” Democrats) have been screaming at and denouncing any military-skeptics as “unpatriotic.” That has created an atmosphere in which military grifters can financially bleed the country dry.

    • Agree: Rob
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  168. JMcG says:
    @Barnard

    Competition from illegal immigrants mostly. The unionized trades are not easy to get into. A little easier now, with demand so high, but sooner or later the baleful eye of sauron will light on us too.
    Painting, roofing, siding, landscaping – all gone to illegals.
    We really need stronger unions in this country.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  169. JMcG says:
    @S. Anonyia

    I don’t think you meant it, but that was kind of condescending. USAF won’t pay for ROTC scholarships unless in a stem field.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
  170. We have to pretend like the military “keeps us safe” and “defends freedom.” So if you don’t support constant war overseas and multitrillion-dollar budgets, you’re “unpatriotic.”

    I always say that the best way we can protect our sons and daughters in the military is to keep them out of foreign wars and preserve the military as a Peace Corps type program that provides employment, education,sports, and healthcare for many of our finest young people.

    For anyone looking for adventure, it certainly beats working in the local Dollar Tree.

  171. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    It’s been heavily Scots for 300 years. Who can you convince to get in rickety wooden boats to go kill and be killed by poc. Men who enjoy war and are used to harsh lives.

  172. @JohnnyWalker123

    Sonny is right. If America isn’t going to be a country of any religious or cultural ties, and if it isn’t going to be in my interest, then I won’t be a sap.

  173. Tony says:

    Most of the special forces are from areas other than the south.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  174. @Jonathan Mason

    You and JohnnyWalker123 are making some great comments here.

  175. @Philip Owen

    No. The Perry of the Great Lakes was the elder brother of the Japanese Perry not the father. (I read this a long time ago) The strategic victory was on Superior and Michigan, as above but the only real naval battle was on Lake Erie.

  176. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @South Texas Guy

    There is a lot to be said for an officer corps of former enlisted men, “mustangs”, but that is always unpopular with academy types.

    • Replies: @South Texas Guy
  177. @The Wild Geese Howard

    Brings to mind John Ross’ novel ‘Unintended Consequences’

  178. Lurker says:

    My theory is that large scale volunteering and conscription thru WW1 and 2 plus Korea & Vietnam has masked this process which has otherwise been bubbling away under the surface. Pretty sure a similar process is at work in the British military.

  179. Anonymous[142] • Disclaimer says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    It is funny that back when there was a cold war, the goal of the VN war was China containment.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentagon_Papers

    Since the end of the USSR, until recently the USA has done a feeble job of China containment. A cynic would say that a strong China means a strong US military budget.

  180. This article mentions that military families are more “clear-eyed” about the risk of war and I guess presumably more discriminating and careful about supporting more invasions on a whim. This follows the common theme I have heard for several years about how Trump supporters are tired of war, and that Trump ran on a fairly anti-war platform. That would be worth something if it were true, but it does not match my experience on the ground to any degree whatsoever. I live in a mid-sized southern city, and I have yet to encounter one single Trump voter who is even vaguely anti-war. Not in person nor anywhere online for that matter. On a guess, I would say that 90% or more of Trump voters I personally know are college grads, but not all that bright (think public U., business degree, nursing, accounting etc. ), comfortable income, no reading outside neocon drivel by Shapiro or whoever, megachurch evangelicals, some pentecostals, methodists, etc. TRUST me, even incredibly slight criticism of the military or american foreign policy is an absolute no-go zone with these otherwise friendly people. The ones who have spent time in the military and been deployed are just as fanatically pro-war as those who haven’t. All seem to believe sincerely that if children and civilians die as a result of US bombs or sanctions, they must have deserved it and it is what Jesus wants. They also seem to believe that the middle east is one homogenous blob of goat screwers who can talk or think of nothing else but how angry america’s christianity and freedom makes them. This is not exaggeration or hyperbole in any way. I encounter many of these same types, mostly transplants, in the San Diego area.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  181. @anon

    The racial breakdown is even more glaring when you take a look at the various
    Special Operations units. This article contains the most recent data I can find:

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2015/08/05/diversity-seals-green-berets/31122851/

    The author also cites the “family legacy” angle as one of the many explanations for the “underrepresentation” of the POCs (who are OVER-represented in professional sports) in the most highly-athletic/physical units in the military.

  182. danand says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    “Joseph Smith’s gold tablets did not exist at all.”

    Buzz, maybe they didn’t exit then, but it seems they do now!

    Mormon Church Reportedly Amassed $100 Billion Fund For ‘Second Coming Of Christ’

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/lisettevoytko/2019/12/17/mormon-church-reportedly-amassed-100-billion-fund-for-second-coming-of-christ/#1e3ad6566a7b

    Even if one hardly believes a lick of the doctrine, it can be beneficial to align oneself with a successful tribe, especially one that provides significant guidance & support during life’s rough patches. Over a lifetime I’d bet the 10% tithe is, on average, well worth paying considering the associative benefits.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  183. Coemgen says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The mention of Trump’s military high school experience reminded me that there’s a documentary about his mother available for streaming from an Irish television station. If you want to watch, don’t delay because it’s only available for four more days:

    Máthair TRUMP

    • Thanks: danand, Desiderius
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
  184. @JohnnyWalker123

    Your description of gummint work doesn’t hold true at the top of the food chain. Being a director-level federal worker is stressful and requires long hours and much political maneuvering. Competition is intense for the top positions, since the high pay they bring translates into a higher pension for the rest of your life.

    People with federal titles like Assistant Director, Deputy Secretary, Chief, and so on usually work extremely long hours, weekends and holidays too. Unfortunately, too much of this effort goes into projects that ought not be done in the first place.

    • LOL: Coemgen
  185. @JohnnyWalker123

    Strings?

    Didn’t have any didn’t want any. Your kind don’t understand a man like that.

    My dad’s number came up and he went. That’s how a draft works.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  186. @Louis Renault

    You’re utterly wrong about politics not being a family business. Quite the contrary.

    Pelosi. The Sarbanes in Maryland. Romney. The Kennedy clan. I could come up with a hundred more examples, but I don’t feel the need to.

  187. @Whitehall

    My Dad (a longtime State Department ME hand and son of one of the old Arabists who used to be prevalent there) used to tell me about the Sultan of Oman as an example of a benevolent Arab dictator whose country benefitted from his rule. You know Oman was well-run because we never had to invade it or or prop up its leadership.

  188. @Redneck farmer

    Yes, but the last 40 years went pretty smoothly.

  189. @Jack D

    I recently realized that every single black friend I’ve ever had in my adult life had one thing in common. He served in the military.

  190. Coemgen says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    A shot of insulin will send your blood sugar levels to even lower levels.

    All joking aside, if you do work that requires intensive intellectual effort with immediate feedback, i.e., programming, you’ll know that there’s a trade-off: you need that high blood glucose to think but you know that it’s doing some damage at the same time.

  191. @Paul Mendez

    >People with federal titles like Assistant Director, Deputy Secretary, Chief, and so on usually work extremely long hours, weekends and holidays too.

    They do that by choice because they have no conception of themselves beyond their career. They are perfect bug men (or bug women).

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
  192. @Reg Cæsar

    John McCain was a third-generation USNA graduate. This phenomenon isn’t new. It’s not increasing; other sources are drying up. The percentage is greater by default.

    At least the officer class has long had an hereditary component. Douglas MacArthur and his father Arthur MacArthur, Jr., were both general officers, and the first father-son pair to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor. Theodore Roosevelt, a colonel of volunteers during the Spanish-American War, had four sons commissioned as officers during World War I; one, Quentin, was killed in action during that war, and another, Theodore Roosevelt III, who died while serving in World War II, received a posthumous Medal of Honor.

    Robert E. Lee had a long career in the U.S. Army, including the superintendency of West Point, before resigning to serve the Confederacy; his brother, Sydney Smith Lee, served in the U.S. Navy, including a term as commandant of the U.S. Naval Academy, before resigning to serve in the Confederate Navy. His son, and R.E. Lee’s nephew, Fitzhugh Lee, graduated from West Point in 1856, later serving as a general in the Confederate Army, and ultimately as a general in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War. Four of his brothers also served as Confederate officers. All were descendants of Henry “Light Horse Harry” Lee, who served in the American Revolution under George Washington. Fitzhugh Lee III, the grandson of Fitzhugh Lee, served in the U.S. Navy as a vice admiral during World War II. J.E.B. Stuart, great-grandson of a Revolutionary officer and son of a veteran of the War of 1812, graduated from West Point in 1854, served in the U.S. Army until 1861, resigning in 1861 to serve in the Confederate Army, in which he rose to general rank and died in action. I have met his descendant Col. J.E.B. Stuart IV, who was a career U.S. Army officer.

    If the armed services are becoming increasingly hereditary and disproportionately Southern, this appears to me to be a reversion to historic norms rather than anything novel.

  193. Neoconned says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Reg….dunno if it was you but I’ve seen it brought up on here where southern white political leaders around the 2 world wars were horrified at the thought of blacks getting drafted and thus getting combat training….the fear being if they get uppity they could launch a semi armed revolt of sorts….

    Do you know of any books or articles that expand on this?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  194. Neoconned says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    This is 1 of the best posts I’ve ever read on Steve’s articles…..seriously.

    All you did was dare to ASK uncomfortable questions others refuse to ask….who exactly are they defending us from?

    I don’t feel like drudging up the links from my e-mail where I store them but yrs ago I collected links to news about how Obama had INCREASED the military budget while slashing various types of welfare including heating oil subsidies and food stamps. The military budget went UP UNDER OBAMA EVERY YEAR save 1….and that was because of sequestration….

    You’re right…we spend about 700 billion on defense not including the other “ABC security agency” budgets….

    Meanwhile the Pentagon actually CUT THE NUMBER of airmen, seamen, soldiers etc under Obama while the military budget went up….so obviously that money went SOMEWHERE….to the defense contractors of course….

    Meanwhile Obama wanted to spend a lousy 60 billion a year on free community college….a TENTH of the defense budget….

    And yet we cant finance that?

    If everybody went to college no body would work sh*t fast food type service McJobs and the low rent service economy would collapse.

    As Orrin Hatch said when they cut off unemployment in 2009….some people who used to have good jobs are just going to have to take lower paying work….somebody has to flip those hamburgers and clean those toilets dont they?

    A big military budget enrichens the wealthy while keeping college unaffordable keeps competent low wage workers in their place so they cant move up and challenge our petty middle class white overlords who want to serf us in a neo feudalism.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @JohnnyWalker123
  195. The hereditary nature of occupations is a feature of the caste-based society that is India. When the British took over the place three centuries ago, they found a natural fit to their own feudal thinking, and organized their natives staffed British Indian Army around caste and ethnic lines. The Indian Army to this day is formally organized around ethnic and caste regiments, and family and caste play a big part in recruitment of enlisted men.

    Service in the military has always been a point of pride for young men from poor, white, Southern backgrounds, and a well-understood means of upward mobility into financial stability and a pension.

    But perhaps it is even more so, now, with other groups shunning military service?

    A pattern that Mr. Sailer has noticed and written about often, is, of course, the increasing resemblance of American “woke” and “diverse” economic and political interest groups’ demands to the caste politics of India. Perhaps what white kids in the South are doing is also reaction and a drawing up of barriers around what they see as their natural preserve-they’re becoming a caste in reaction to all the “diverse” caste groups arising all over.

  196. @Paul Mendez

    Maybe at payband one, but you are conflicting political appointees with career SES. At payband 4 and 5 the career SESes work 30 hour weeks, and 10 of those are calling around to make sure their relatives are being promoted and included in the bonus pools, and then taking care of the relatives of other SESes under their chain.

    Once they have the formal dinner to become a made man at career SES 5 (the start of SES), they never sweat again. Mostly because their spouse or other close family is hired at the regional IG as part of the SES ceremony–to insure they can never be busted.

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
  197. @Steve Sailer

    There is a lot of evidence for the Norman descent of the English upper classes. Practically all of them can show descent from Edward III. Descent from the sureties of Magna Carta is also widespread, and it is easily shown that the sureties were almost all descended from the documented companions of William the Conqueror.

    It is true that in the male line, many of the current English nobility and gentry are descendants of “arrivistes,” but those arrivistes married into older and more established families. The phenomenon of the “double-barreled name” in Britain typically reflects the marriage of an armigerous man with an heraldic heiress, with the intent of preserving her family’s name as part of the surname of their offspring, and quartering her arms with those of her husband in the bearings that descend to those offspring.

  198. @Buzz Mohawk

    Sergeants run the US military.

    WRT officers. If you keep your nose clean, you can retire after 20 years as a Lt. Colonel.

    “If you remain in service for 20 years, your pension will amount to 50% of your highest 36 months of base pay.”

    “Starting pay for a Lieutenant Colonel is $5,334.30 per month, with raises for experience resulting in a maximum base pay of $9,062.70 per month.”

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    , @Buzz Mohawk
  199. Hail says: • Website
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Gold-box comment.

    _______

    It now seems that companies are legally required to include the following disclaimer:

    [We give hiring preference to] women, minorities, protected veterans

    Making veterans a legally privileged group is disturbing. All three of those preferences are wrong, of course, and some would argue that the veterans preference is least destructive; maybe so, but it is somehow uniquely disturbing.

    What I mean is, since the US military as we know it today is as JohnnyWalker123 (and others in this thread) have described it, i.e., an expensive (now well past $4,000/year for every working-age adult citizen), elaborate jobs program of perhaps negative net value to the organic American nation; a mercenary corps for a network of supranational interests (“the empire”) primarily rotating around Israel (and largely hurting core Western ethnonational interests); the maintenance of this now-mandatory, elaborate pretense that veterans are a hopeless, mistreated group desperately in need of a helping hand against a hostile society (“just like Blacks and women”) (note that the obligatory tributes to troops overseas in football games is a softer variant of the same) — seems like a disturbing example of social control.

    That this is so much stronger in the 2000s, 2010s, and 2020s (so far) than when the imagery of the downtrodden citizen-soldier bore a lot more resemblance to reality (the draft era), that is disturbing.

    • Agree: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @JohnnyWalker123
  200. @farenheit

    if your 18 year old son had the option of joining the Army and serving in Iraq, or buying a motorcycle, the risk of death and maiming were about the same

    That’s intuitively plausible: if the kid is smart enough to avoid a combat MOS the risk of death or maiming (in combat) is almost zero, and most enlistees are not to combat arms. Even the risk of being killed, raped or sexually assaulted by your ‘comrades’ is higher in combat arms: see The Military’s Secret Shame.

    Only 10% of the military is combat arms, after all, so just Pr(Combat MOS|Join Army) already tilts the odds in favour of not-being-mained.

    Pr(Deployed|Combat MOS) is reasonably high; for some (e.g., 18) it’s basically 100% given that the US Death Machine never sleeps: even during periods of ‘peace’ there is always someone who the US government wants dead. 18 is entirely self-selected and 18X is not a realistic option for most enlistees.

    Pr(Combat|Deployed) is a lot higher since Blowback Day than it has been at any time since Viet Nam.

    Pr(Wounded|Combat) is fairly high (roughly 6%pyd from memory), and Pr(Killed|Combat) is ~2%pyd (including both KIA and death from wounds). Those are annualised (per year deployed) risks, not ‘raw’ risks.

    Lastly: Pr(PTSD|Combat) and Pr(Suicide|PTSD) are both reasonably high, but their combination is low enough that even for Marines, the suicide rate is ~14 per 100,000 (active duty) and more than double that for veterans. Having time to reflect on what you participated in is a bitch.

    • Replies: @Rich
  201. @The Wild Geese Howard

    It’s always fun to look at the number of hunting licenses granted annually in each state, and then to reflect on the demographics and religio-political orientations of those hunters.

  202. Kronos says:
    @Desiderius

    It would appear military/officer service became undesirable during and after the Vietnam War. This was/is especially true for the upper classes. Oregon is full of former Vietnam War protesters and quite a few of the un-peaceful kind.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Weatherman_actions

    Many of the 1960s anti-war craziness you might expect during WW1 and WW2 (far more destructive and disruptive wars) actually came about in a much smaller conflict. The whole “I’m gonna levitate the Pentagon” sounds stupid as hell. You’d think they’d line up in droves to climb up the military ranks and receive some juicy prestige, pensions, and general power/influence. Many WW2 veterans heavily cashed in on their military service. Something that appeared severely undervalued and a liability for Vietnam veterans.

  203. @R.G. Camara

    Historically it was partly due to the absence of career prospects for seconds (and subsequent) sons of the nobility – primogeniture vested the patrimoine in the eldest son; other sons went into the military (or the clergy if they were too-obviously homosexual).

    The rise of ‘self-made’ families after the Industrial Revolution undermined this (slightly); it became more common for the property of aristocrats to be divided among the sons, which diluted property distribution meaningfully.

    In the late 18th and 19th century the expanding range of ‘divertissements‘ available to the (largely uneducated/ill-educated) scions of the aristocracy led – directly – to a very large number of estates being dissipated.

    That’s why Winston Churchill’s mother was a Yank (his father’s family arranged the marriage to infuse capital, which the drunken catamite Churchill disspated anyway, making him vulnerable to exploitation through bribery).

    It’s basically what the National Trust is for: the penniless scions of major estates now get to live in them at taxpayers’ expense, in exchange for letting peasants into a few rooms during a few weeks each summer.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  204. Kronos says:
    @Neoconned

    This is from Micheal Hudson’s economic book “Super Imperialism.”

    Essentially, the Pentagon/Department of Defense was strongly incorporated into the world financial system after WW2. It seemed like a good idea and the time but became problematic later on.

    The problem from the government’s point of view was that the U.S. balance of payments had reached a surplus level unattained by any other nation in history. It had an embarrassment of riches, and now required a payments deficit to promote foreign export markets and world currency stability. Foreigners could not buy American exports without a means of payment, and private creditors were not eager to extend further loans to countries that were not creditworthy. The Korean War seemed to resolve this set of problems by shifting the U.S. balance of payments into deficit. Confrontation with Communism became a catalyst for U.S. military and aid programs abroad. Congress was much more willing to provide countries with dollars via anti-Communist or national defense programs than by outright gifts or loans, and after the Korean War U.S. military spending in the NATO and SEATO countries seemed to be a relatively bloodless form of international monetary support.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  205. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    I had the preliminary disclaimer that it was ridiculous. A very useful disclaimer! : )

    The stock market is up. The yield curve is bullish for the next twelve months. The misery index is low. Really you got to be kind of a Chicken Little to think things are horrible. My average outlook is to ignore the news and read the internet for recreation. I cannot recall the last time I got one of those stupid notifications from the New York Times that my free paywall bypasses were all used up.

    Kazcynski has some very good observations for a Mad Bomber. I read that the thing that set him off was he bought a cabin in the woods and then yuppies started buying property around him and gentrifying the neighborhood. He should have read some of those textbooks and HOWTO’s on hedging. If you are going to read 8 000 books surely you can squeeze in 2 or 3 of those.

  206. Kronos says:
    @Hail

    The Boomers are more than willing to “support the troops” if the US world reserve currency status is on the line. Why else would these endless Middle East wars keep occurring under Bush I, Bush II, Obama, (Trump?) Israel and Saudi Arabia are big players but the sit on something FAR bigger than either of them: The Petrodollar Recycling System. If that blows, think 97% stock value reduction and goodbye social security.

    • Replies: @BB753
    , @Reg Cæsar
  207. @dearieme

    Drang nach Westen. We will need lebensraum und a corridor to the sea. The Anglos of San Diego will welcome us with open arms.

  208. @68W58

    That might be true, but if the CSM suggests that the LT do something differently he had better listen.

    Absolutely correct. A sub five-year officer (O-1 to O-3) may or may not know his ass from a hole in the ground. He only represents potential, not proven capabilty like the CSM.

    I was always lucky in the my officers were not assholes for the most part, but many others were. I was talking some major shit about the adjuant battallion commander (a major) that would have got me thrown into the stockade with only an Article 15 if I got off lucky. My platoon leader was a good guy who realized I was just blowing off steam and let the whole thing pass.

    I’m pretty sure there’s a course in officer training about taking advice from senior NCO’s and not being a dick to them, but also about asserting yourself, which is where I’m guessing a most of the ‘you didn’t salute’ shit comes from. I’ve never seen a lt. Col. or above who gave a shit about that. They know they’re above you and that salutes are just window dressing.

    • Replies: @Busby
  209. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @XYZ (no Mr.)

    Defense contract holders become “spoiled contractors” and quit wanting to compete for manufacturing business that is not defense related. I’ve seen this extensively in electronic manufacturing and in light aircraft manufacturing. Military money is like heroin to these guys.

    Offshoring consumer appliance and electronic manufacturing should be made unprofitable for American companies. That doesn’t mean there will be no more cheap off shore made products, just that it will be made with foreign capital, foreign engineering, foreign branding. You’ll still be able to buy a cheap radio or MP3 player, just that it won’t misleadingly say GE or some other old line American name.

  210. @Anonymous

    There is a lot to be said for an officer corps of former enlisted men, “mustangs”, but that is always unpopular with academy types.

    I used to think so as well, but I eventually came around to the conclusion that assholes are just assholes, and there’s no getting around it. I’ve been around mustang officers who were POS’s, and I have fond memories of others, like Lt. Col. Barnes (always an officer, and was held back because he wasn’t out of West Point) who taught me how to tie a half windsor knot on an army tie.

  211. I saw this Vietnam veteran in the store today. He was wearing a shirt with a picture of an old fashioned WW2/Nam era helmet resting on a rifle sticking into the ground. “Freedom Requires Sacrifice” is printed above the picture. I, a Nam era draft resistor. am thinking “Yes, freedom does require sacrifice and you – the vet – did sacrifice. But you did not get freedom for your sacrifice and I did not get freedom for your sacrifice either. Instead we got a government run for the benefit of a foreign power and international finance” But I did not say it. I did not think he would understand me and I don’t know how to talk to guys like that in a way that they would have a chance to understand me. I have spent my life talking to educrats But now we are back on the road to war, or at least big war. again and guys like him are going to support it once it starts because “patriotism” is supporting the troops once the oligarchs get them committed. It drives me nuts. It is no wonder a certain ethnic group thinks we are stupid. We ARE stupid. That vet guy for thinking like he does and me for not knowing how to talk to him about it.

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
  212. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kronos

    You’ll get fatter by eating 300 calories of cotton candy compared to eating 300 calories of steak and spinach. (Fats and low-starch vegetables don’t trigger higher insulin levels.)

    I don’t think this is actually true. I think the main reason is that it’s a lot easier to consume excessive calories by eating carbs, especially refined carbs, than it is by eating fats and proteins. Veggies like spinach have so few calories that you’d have to spend all day eating like a cow to get the equivalent calories. They’re basically irrelevant calorie wise.

    A large party size bag of potato chips has about 2,000 calories. It’s quite easy for a normal adult man to go through half a bag or even the whole thing in a sitting. You never get quite full, and they’re delicious. A stick of butter has 800 calories. Most men could not eat a stick of butter in a sitting without getting sick.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  213. Whiskey says: • Website
    @James Bowery

    The fertile years of the most desirable women belong to Alphas. There is nothing more Alpha than killing people. See Amanda Palmer and Dhokar Tsarnaev. Not even Neil Gaiman a very big deal was enough for her.

    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
  214. Rich says:
    @Kratoklastes

    According to the National Institute of Mental Health the average rate of suicide for White males is 28.2 per 100,000. So, it would appear, if your numbers are correct, the suicide rate for vets is the same as that for all White males. Guess it has nothing to do with “reflection”, eh? Just the way it is. Certain people see suicide as an option, others don’t.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
  215. @Not My Economy

    They do that by choice because they have no conception of themselves beyond their career.

    They do that by choice because they have no conception of themselves beyond their pension.

    There. Fixed it for you.

  216. @Lawyer Guy

    At payband 4 and 5 the career SESes work 30 hour weeks,

    You’re so wrong I won’t even begin to guess who you are or where you really live!

  217. nebulafox says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    Noncoms keep every military going. One of those elemental things that never goes away.

  218. @Achilles Wannabe

    Why are you so afraid of war? It’s what we Homo Sapiens do. You might as well be a dog that is afraid of smelling other dogs’ butts.

    • Replies: @Achilles Wannabe
  219. @Hail

    It actually makes sense when you think about it.

    The more hiring preferences are given to Vets, the more Vets that you’ll see in positions of power and influence. Since Vets tend to spend much of their lives marinated in imperialist propaganda, they can act as the Empire’s sphere of influence within major corporations and other organizations. Whether or not they know it, Vets are basically members of the outer party.

    By the way, you’re correct that Vets haven’t faced any significant labor market discrimination since maybe the Vietnam era.

  220. anon[390] • Disclaimer says:
    @danand

    Should be interesting if it makes it to open court.

    Discovery phase would likely be enough. CNN is settling with the Covington HS “smirker” for an undisclosed sum of money.

  221. @Old Prude

    A US Army captain with ten years in service makes over $100,000 a year, and so does a senior enlisted man with 24 years in service. After just four years of service an enlisted man makes more than the average American college graduate in the USA. A Colonel makes twice as much as the average American with a masters degree. Plus free family health care and one of the most generous pension plans in the USA. I wrote an article about all this. One can debate if GIs deserve this, but don’t think they are lowly paid people. Keep mind that less than 5% of GIs have served in combat.

    https://www.g2mil.com/pay.htm

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @South Texas Guy
  222. @Neoconned

    This is 1 of the best posts I’ve ever read on Steve’s articles…..seriously.

    LOL. Thanks.

    All you did was dare to ASK uncomfortable questions others refuse to ask….who exactly are they defending us from?

    That’s really the key question. Isn’t it?

    Here are the top 10 countries by military spending.

    United States of America $649

    People’s Republic of China $250

    Saudi Arabia $67.6

    India $66.5

    France $63.8

    Russia $61.4

    United Kingdom $50.0

    Germany $49.5

    Japan $46.6

    South Korea $43.1

    Other than China, those countries have around a tenth or less of America’s spending. Surprisingly, the U.S. spends more than 10x as much as Russia.

    So maybe other China, the U.S. has no competitors. Even in China’s case, the military challenge is more technological, not physical. Which suggests we should invest more in R&D, especially when it pertains to national defense.

    China is 5,000 miles away – across the sea. When China has fought wars with enemies, they always were neighboring countries. China hasn’t fought a war with anybody for 40 years. The odds of a physical war (or even the logistics of them coming thousands of miles away from across the ocean) are nearly zero.

    to the defense contractors of course

    Vice President Cheney (who was former CEO of Haliburton) allowed no-bid contracts to his former company, who went on to overbill the U.S. for many billions of dollars. The long-term cost of the Iraq War alone is $5 trillion (not including the other wars), with at least $60 billion lost to fraud and waste (probably MUCH more since it’s hard to measure).

    Why hasn’t anyone gone to jail for this?

    Here’s a good documentary on the massive fraud that went on during the Iraq War. It’s long, but informative.

    Since it’s “unpatriotic” to criticize our military (or “Commander-in-Chief” President George W. Bush), you probably shouldn’t ever mention this documentary to any of your friends and family.

    A big military budget enrichens the wealthy while keeping college unaffordable keeps competent low wage workers in their place so they cant move up and challenge our petty middle class white overlords who want to serf us in a neo feudalism.

    Watch this ending of Michael Moore’s documentary Farhenheit 911. It’s only 2 minutes, but very similar to what you’re saying.

    The system is perhaps deliberately designed to keep a lot of people on the edge economically, so they’re forced by circumstances to join the military. If we had a broadly prosperous and egalitarian society (like Scandanavia), who would be cannon fodder for all these multitrillion dollar adventures overseas?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @danand
  223. @Neoconned

    Do you know of any books or articles that expand on this?

    The books and articles I’ve been reading on the history of U.S. conscription only mention it in passing, if at all. You might have to check biographies of the politicians involved, or the Congressional Record, or old newspapers to get more detail.

    We’ve always been taught that the New York draft riots during the Civil War arose out of resentment that the well-off could purchase their way out.

    Rarely mentioned is the important fact that blacks weren’t subject to the Union draft at all. I doubt Paddy and Mike were too pleased with that.

  224. @Father O'Hara

    Thank you for correcting my bad & misleading spelling.
    As for the “civil war” — it is inaccurate. A civil war implies a conflict between whatever factions of a country (regional, ideological, political, racial, economic factions) for control etc of the whole country.
    In the US case, the South had no desire to control the whole US. It wanted to withdraw from the “Union”.
    The “war between the states” is better than “civil war” but is still perhaps misleading. The North never saw itself as mere states but as the only valid union of those states.

  225. @Steve Sailer

    Auberon Waugh’s dad Evelyn argued that most 20th Century aristocrats who claimed descent from the Normans were actually descended from 15th or 16th Century arrivistes.

    Unless he meant specifically through the male line, there is no need to quibble. Practically everybody on the island a century ago descended multiple times from both, and from peasant stock as well.

    The number of your ancestors goes up approximately an order of magnitude each century you go back. Ancestral slots, I should say.

  226. @JohnnyWalker123

    If we had a broadly prosperous and egalitarian society (like Scandanavia), who would be cannon fodder for all these multitrillion dollar adventures overseas?

    There is an active draft today in every Scandinavian country but Iceland. Equality can be a bitch at times.

  227. @Rich

    Thank you for this information. I had always understood (incorrectly it seems) that the South had a greater proportional enlistment in the Army than northerners. (for various reasons — less economic opportunities in the Sth & a cultural inclination or attraction to military life etc.)

  228. @Intelligent Dasein

    Well, my thinking is this.

    Govt offers good pay, benefits, lifestyle, etc. It’s really not a bad way to go. Especially if you have limited drive and don’t want to compete or push yourself too hard, govt is a very good option.

    I think if Americans were a bit more savy about achieving a good work-life balance (as continental Euros most certainly are), we’d see a far larger number of competent people (even from top schools) competing over govt jobs. So you’d have a higher-quality workforce and more occupational prestige.

    One thing to remember is this. As I mentioned above, private sector employee performance is important to the boss (shareholders and executives), as they benefit financially from more profits. Public sector performance is much harder to measure by the boss (the taxpayer). So there’s more leeway to breathe easy in the public sector.

    The taxpayer ultimately will always be the “nicest” boss you can have.

    You are correct that lots of govt functions are important and there’s a need for at least a somewhat large sized bureaucracy. That’s why despite the rhetoric, Republicans can only trim govt so much.

    In an affluent and large country (like America), govt work is not a bad deal at all.

    Turning these jobs over to nepotism and quota hires is the worst thing you could do

    You’re right. This seems to do a lot to diminish occupational prestige for govt workers, often creating the perception that the govt is a “dumping ground” for the inept and lazy.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  229. @prime noticer

    “Show me a better deal for the common person,”

    yikes.

    It’s true though, the common person won’t get any other deal near as good as the military. They’re more likely to get shot or stabbed, blown up etc on the home front so you can’t make that argument.

  230. @Kronos

    Interesting excerpt.

    There’s actually a very strong link between the military-industrial complex and Wall Street. Much stronger than most people would ever begin to think.

    After General Petraeus resigned back in 2012 (due to an “extramarital affair”), within a few months he ended up taking a job in Wall Street. The super huge private-equity firm KKR (Kohlberg Kravis Roberts) hired him to be a Chairman of their investment committee. Which is an amazingly senior position for someone with ZERO financial experience.

    Imagine if I (despite having no surgical background) got hired to be Chief Surgeon at the Mayo Clinic. That’d be interesting. Wouldn’t it?

    By the way, here’s the biography for Petraeus on the KKR site.

    https://www.kkr.com/our-firm/leadership/david-h-petraeus

    • Replies: @Kronos
  231. danand says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    “U.S. spends more than 10x as much as Russia.”

    Johnny W, then we should step up our game? Are we really underspending by that much, ~$150B?

    United States – $649B/2019 GDP of $21.44T ~3.o3%
    Russia – $61.4B/2019 GDP of $1.64T ~3.74%

    Just goofing with you, 3% seems to be plenty enough allocation towards the world police budget; at least for the moment.

  232. Yngvar says:

    Norway have conscription so each year the branches get to pick from the litter. My father got selected by, and served in, the semi-elite King’s Guard. I’m not sure if he met any of the requirements, maybe vision, but he was a legacy; his grandfather had been an officer in the battalion. We take care of our own.

  233. @Bugg

    “Despite being an overwhelmingly white college town, you would think it’s the East St. Louis of the Rockies. each show features another murder in the area. Not sure how and why Kenda has so many murder cases to so investigate in what looks objectively by every metric like a relatively quiet place. “

    Same in the UK, where shows like Inspector Morse and Midsomer Murders feature middle-class English murderers and attractive middle-class English women.

    The reality of English murders these days are either non-English stabbing each other or “domestics”.

    Very few Oxford dons poisoning each other to get the retiring Master’s job.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
  234. @Steve Sailer

    Despite what you may have heard, salaries are surprisingly good too, especially these days.

    This myth still subsists. Most gov’t jobs pay pretty well, and have excellent benefits.

  235. @Kratoklastes

    Nice use of the word catamite. 😉

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  236. Jack D says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    We need able minds and sound bodies for our upcoming war with Iran.

    So they won’t be taking you?

    That was last week’s panic/Dem talking point. There’s not going to be a war. This week we need to panic about climate change or something. Read your NY Times for the correct Party Line/panic of the week, please.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  237. anon[285] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill P

    “Otherwise the hapless Saxons probably would have fallen to some primitive Norse kingdom and the island would have been an obscure, culturally deprived backwater for centuries.”

    Isnt that what happened? The Norman leadership presided over the end of hope for English victory after the fall of Calais, and England only began to regain some military standing under the Tudors, a Native British dynasty.

    • Replies: @Crawfurdmuir
  238. anonymous[185] • Disclaimer says:

    Group that dies the most in combat are Samoans.

    What about Koreans? They are over represented at West Point.

  239. Kronos says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The book “Super Imperialism” go’s further into that. It’s common for DoD leaders to take control of IMF, World Bank and other economic institutions after becoming Secretary of Defense.

    “In his maiden speech as president he stated that a new function of its operations would be to transfer funds from payment-surplus to payments-deficit countries, i.e., from Europe to the United States. McNamara’s appointment may be viewed as an extension of his authority as strategist of Pax Americana from national to global scope. Having enlarged the Pentagon’s role in American society to one of dominance, he was elevated to the position as head of the world’s major development-lending institution, able to lay down explicit social policy conditions to be adopted by applicants for World Bank loans. To assert that he personally transformed the Bank’s operating philosophy into a vehicle for U.S. Cold War aims is not to put forth an argument ad hominem. In view of the linking of World Bank operations to Pax Americana strategy after he took office, and in light of the convergence of views of the reports of the Peterson and Pearson Commissions and McNamara’s maiden speech, the question must be raised as to whether his appointment epitomized the final subversion of World Bank operations to U.S. Cold War policies for the 1970s. For in the same way that U.S. foreign aid became increasingly military and paramilitary in character under his regime as Secretary of Defense, more and more employed to prop up politically friendly and anti-democratic governments, so the resources of the World Bank were mobilized as a vehicle for militant U.S. policy abroad.

    — Super Imperialism: The Origin and Fundamentals of U.S. World Dominance by Michael Hudson
    http://a.co/aNExUKT

    Hudson’s a VERY interesting guy. He was the godson of Trotsky and later fired Alan Greenspan at Chase Manhattan Bank for fraudulent statistics.

  240. BB753 says:
    @Kronos

    Yep, you’ve got to spend a trillion dollars in the armed forces just to keep the dollar afloat as a reserve currency and to be able to print money at will, that is, to perpetuate the Federal Reserve scam until it blows in our faces.
    They might as well say “Support the Fed” instead of support our pampered troops.

  241. @JohnnyWalker123

    Other than people in the military, almost nobody retires from one federal agency, gets a pension, and then works for another federal agency.

    Also, there are people in select parts of the federal government who work hard and deliver value to the taxpayers, particularly in the federal court system and the patent and trademark office. But those are tiny compared to the massive bureaucracies of the US Departments of the Interior, Education, Labor, Housing and Urban Development, etc., and your description applies quite well to those lazy ungrateful schlubs in my experience.

    Very Disproportionately African, very disproportionately homosexual, out of the office from seven to eight weeks per year on vacation or medical leave, and consistently dedicated to complaining about their pay, their benefits, and normal people, was how I’d describe the bulk of federal workforce I saw in DC and other places over the years.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  242. Kronos says:
    @Anonymous

    For weight loss, it’s not so what you eat so much as what not to eat. I lost forty pounds and kept it off since reading “good calorie/bad calorie” back in 2013.

    But in the book, it’s really interesting just how and why US nutritional policy became so messed up in the first place. You had certain scientists advocating their beautiful theories despite scientific reality (through limited testing) simply refuting them. Many US scientists are great showman but often suck at the scientific part either by lack of skill and/or honesty.

    It actually very much reminds me of the Opiate Crisis. You also had plenty of Scientists claiming in the 1990s that these new blockbuster pills like OxyContin never posed any real risk of addiction. The science on that research was even skimpier than the 1950s calorie in/calorie out nutritional model.

  243. BB753 says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I meant the actual CIA operations: drug-running, blackmail, assassinations, torture, overthrowing foreign governments, supporting corrupt ones, infiltrating American institutions for self-serving purposes.
    And there’s the clean, moral project called MK Ultra, among others.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_MKUltra

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  244. @JohnnyWalker123

    Notwithstanding the size and complexity of our country and economy, much of the federal bureaucracy is NOT necessary even if one wants the fed gov to redistribute a lot of income and level the playing field.

    The fed gov could lay off most agency employees and replace their offices and subsidies with a single Universal Basic Income. That is, UBI checks go out in sufficient amounts to completely replace most other fed and fed/state gov programs including food stamps, home heating assistance, cash assistance, usually futile “job training”, college grants or federally subsidized loans, etc.

    No paperwork, no means testing, no regulations, no reporting or job-search requirements, hence no need for 80% or our present federal bureaucracy.

    I’d pay laid-off career federal employees a very generous severance package, such as continuing to pay them full pay and benefits for a year, then five years of nearly-full pay and benefits, as we would be taking away what they planned as their entire career. This might be the only way to make such a downsizing proposal politically palatable in enough States and congressional districts. And still well worth it for the fed taxpayers.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  245. Busby says:
    @South Texas Guy

    Unlikely you ever see a SGM under the command of 2LT. By the regulations, customs and courtesies of the service, officers are entitled to a certain level of deference and respect. But a SGM works for a field grade officer and carries that officer’s authority implicitly. Essentially, “I may have to salute you and call you sir. But you can’t make me do anything I’m not already disposed to do.”

    Or as I was once told by my troop first sergeant (that’s the guy with the diamond in the middle of his six stripes), “LT, this is the time where I remind you that I work for the Troop Commander.”

    • Replies: @South Texas Guy
  246. Svevlad says:

    Prepare to be caste society’d. Probably not as severely as India – that’s an aberration.

    Long term, this also ruins a country’s bell curve – you’ll get abysmal averages, but in reality nobody is the average, everyone is either an idiot or very smart.

    It’s like that in the Balkans, it’s like that in the Middle East, it’s like that in India. Shitholeness varies by the amounts of people and their ratios.

    Dunno how the Asians did it. They’re all nearly always perfectly on the average. That’s why they appear so smart, but really they’re just average hence why they lagged behind Europe.

  247. @Kronos

    At what pump price would you start taking the bus?

    • Replies: @Kronos
  248. @Jim Don Bob

    Nice use of the word catamite.

    Go UVM!

  249. Bert says:
    @SteveRogers42

    Quoting Bob Johnson: “A significant majority–between 55 and 70%–of the military would defect to the side of the citizens.”

    As you undoubtedly understand, the reason that such a defection rate is conceivable is that so many at the point of the spear are Southerners. And their influence would motivate some from other regions.

  250. JMcG says:
    @Hangthelobbyists

    Well, as a counter example, I work with a few dozen guys, just about all Trump supporters. Not really politically engaged, but full of loathing for the media and the ruling class. I mean loathing with a capital L.
    Without exception, they want out of the Middle East and Afghanistan. And Germany and Korea for that matter.
    Now, they have no problem blowing up bad guys in specific instances, but are definitely ready to bring the boys home.

  251. Military?

    We need to get the New Haven Mental Hospital back in their lane stat.

  252. Kronos says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Doesn’t really effect me. I often ride a motorcycle with a hot chick on the back. I often ride her as well.

  253. @danand

    Yes. Some, myself included, feel he is entitled to add a zero to the number, and should win it. Maybe Anglo-Saxon fairness prevented him from doing that.

  254. Busby says:
    @South Texas Guy

    Best summarized as, “You lead the platoon. Your platoon sergeant runs the platoon.”
    A good platoon sergeant takes pride in successfully mentoring his platoon leader. That includes allowing the platoon leader to make mistakes. And ensuring those mistakes aren’t career ending types.

    A few other observations, gained from experience 30 years ago…

    The divide between officers and NCOs in European armies was greater than in the American Army. It wasn’t unusual to find American junior officers in the motor pool turning wrenches and setting packs. Working side by side with your troops was an ethic. To the Brits, there was a clear divide between garrison work as the province of the NCOs and administration, the responsibility of the officers.

    In my time, the presence of black senior NCOs in combat units was noticeable. Almost all these men were veterans of combat in Vietnam and had, to borrow a phrase, “found a home in the Army”. As part of the Big Green Machine, those men had the credibility white officers and NCOs lacked. They did not tolerate young kids who acted as if they were “back on the block”.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  255. @JMcG

    Painting, roofing, siding, landscaping – all gone to illegals.
    We really need stronger unions in this country.

    No, what we need is to get rid of this illegal economy and the resultant tight labor market will take care of itself. Stronger unions are a recipe for abuse with with “work rules” ,”featherbedding” and the like.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  256. Lugash says:
    @farenheit

    2004-2008 was a meat grinder in Iraq, death/maiming isn’t that bad. The wear and tear on combat soldiers due to all the gear they carry seems to be pretty bad, but I talk to a lot of ‘90% disabled’ vets who seem to be fine physically.

    Personally I’ve seen a non-hereditary spike in signing up. Mostly kids who graduate college, work a bit in corporate America and are bored senseless or not advancing at their careers.

    OT:

    Thank you Adroyim v. Rusk:

    https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2020-01-10/california-residents-vote-taiwanese-presidential-election

  257. @JMcG

    There are more branches to the military than the USAF. The Navy, Army, Coast Guard, and Marine Officer Corps certainly don’t require STEM degrees.

    I’m speaking from anecdotal experience; these are my close friends and relatives I’m talking about here. I’m just being honest about my observations.

    And it’s not condescending to say that a lot of middle-class depend on the military for a decent standard of living because the economy has become so competitive, corporatized, and automated. I think it sucks that our economy is like that, by the way. But a lot of these guys would be doing drudge work otherwise, and the trades haven’t caught on totally yet. Even the ones that don’t do the military for a career use it as a stepping stone into various comfortable government jobs. Hence, like the article says, hereditary military….

    • Replies: @JMcG
  258. @YetAnotherAnon

    Oxford dons poisoning each other for a post would make a good miniseries, though.

  259. @Canadian Observer

    Nowadays, you’re obliged to stand up and cheer when they bring in some overweight white woman from the Canadian army’s human resources department to be feted during a break at the Maple Leafs or Blue Jays game.

    The whole point of women in the military is to denigrate it as an actual fighting/nation-defending institution and to blunt the natural martial instincts of young men to defend their tribe/turf/nation.

    Basically you turn national defence into a joke, and ergo turn the nation into a joke.

    • Agree: 68W58, BB753, Coemgen
  260. 68W58 says:

    With the theme of this iSteve piece in mind, I’ve just been to see 1917 and while I enjoyed it, I just kept wanting to quote the old lady from the “that’s not how this works! That’s not how any of this works” commercial. The movie was enjoyable, but it was hard to get past the initial premise of “we just can’t communicate with this unit any other way”. I felt the same way about “Saving Private Ryan” which I think is vastly overrated and “Platoon” which I thought did not reflect the experiences of Vietnam vets, or at least not to the extent that the media told us it did (I am too young for that conflict, but I have two uncles and a stepdad who are Vietnam veterans). I’m often amazed at how my perspective differs from non-veterans and when I point out significant plot holes in military movies they are often taken quite aback. It used to be said that war movies from the 40s and 50s were “not realistic” but there were honest to God real life war vets in many of those films and there were realistic touches that might be lost on those who would not have had similar experiences. Anyway, maybe Steve will review “1917” and others can give their perspective.

    • Replies: @Bugg
    , @Jim Don Bob
  261. J.Ross says:
    @kaganovitch

    This, we need a purge of propertied elements in the party, we need to mercilessly punish the Koch/Adelson crowd, to not only go after the employers of illegals but to have a parallel media campaign making it clear that the illegal is merely getting deported but the rich white American who thought it was okay to traffic them is getting punished like the criminal scum he is; we need mandatory e-Verify. We need to David Brat the party, to make them realize that all the Koch/Adelson dollars cannot outvote an angry people. The task is probably so big that it might not be possible in only a few years.

  262. @danand

    Maybe the Mormon Church can join forces with Harvard for the Second Coming when the Third Temple is built.

    I agree with what you wrote here:

    … it can be beneficial to align oneself with a successful tribe, especially one that provides significant guidance & support during life’s rough patches.

    That alone may be the biggest reason members of such tribes do as well as they do. Examples, Mormons and Jews, are both reared to high standards. Countless other people have improved their lives after joining one or another religious organization and sticking with it. Hell, Alhoholics Anonymous is based on a “higher power” and the recognition that one needs its help. How is this different from believing that we are all sinners and need God or a savior?

    God exists, is bigger than you, and Reason can lead you to him, but if you need a group or a club with rules to get you there, God bless you and have at it.

  263. HA says:
    @Anonymous

    “We no longer need these large, inefficient, corrupt bureaucracies. The Blockchain has made them totally obsolete.”

    And yet, as soon as someone whacks a holder of some Brave New Currency for the bitcoin located on the USB in his pocket or safe or server, odds are he’s going to expect the police and courts and, if necessary, the spooks and spymasters, to implement some old school justice on whichever individual or government engineered the theft (unless of course there’s also child porn or assassination contracts on that drive — in that case, he may just have to let it slide). The same goes if his wife divorces him and demands half of whatever is on that drive. The taxman will also want a cut.

    Once people are removed from the scene entirely, and only robots are swapping bitcoin back and forth, maybe then will those old institutions — with all their rough men ready to violence — be totally obsolete.

    But guess who else will be totally obsolete at that point?

  264. @Jim Don Bob

    I grew up next door to a man my father called a “double dipper,” someone who got his 20-year retirement as a non-commissioned-whatever from the Army/Air Force and then got another 20-year retirement from “civil service” work at the base near Denver. His wife got her 20-year retirement as a secretary there too.

    He built a house on two acres next to us. My father served in the Navy in two wars and made full lieutenant during the Korean one, but he made his money as a corporate executive/engineer and felt he’d earned it. Our neighbor drove a Mercedes 450 SEL and had his own beer tap in his house. He was always inviting me in for beer, but I didn’t drink until after college. He retired (for real) before my father did, even though they were close in age. I thought he was a good guy, but Dad never respected him.

  265. Kronos says:
    @Busby

    To the Brits, there was a clear divide between garrison work as the province of the NCOs and administration, the responsibility of the officers.

    I always recall Micheal Caine playing the posh British Officer from “Zulu” when the British Officer class is mentioned.

  266. guest says:

    “Glaring Disparity”

    What a weird way to put it.

  267. @RadicalCenter

    much of the federal bureaucracy is NOT necessary

    Even if you had a govt that was adamantly focused on eliminating govt waste (of which there is a substantial amount), there’d still be a large number of govt jobs left. In a society with the size and economic affluence of the U.S., there’s a need for at least a moderate-sized govt.

    My main point (which I made in my above posts) is that the govt is where the best work-life balance lies, with significantly less stress, competitiveness, and pressure to perform than the private sector. In most first world societies (and quite a few in the third world), govt is a REALLY good deal. Not federal govt, be even state and local.

    The fed gov could lay off most agency employees and replace their offices and subsidies with a single Universal Basic Income.

    Given that automation will likely eliminate an enormous fraction of jobs in the next few decades, I think UBI is an idea that will be implemented sometime within our lifetime. Unfortunately for Andrew Yang, perhaps he’ll have to wait at least one more election cycle.

  268. guest says:
    @RichardTaylor

    “From their perspective”

    And History ‘s/God’s.

    – a descendant of Midwest Yankees

  269. guest says:
    @Realist

    Wellnow, that depends. Hegemony over the continental U.S., okay. Hegemony over the whole world, no siree.

  270. Dan Hayes says:
    @Coemgen

    Only on the UR would one would one find reference to Mrs Trump’s video biography – and in Gaelic no less. Thanks!

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Replies: @Coemgen
    , @Coemgen
  271. @Bert

    With the U.S. land forces being made up of Southerners, many of whom are Ulster-descended with all the cultural and psychological tendencies that descent entails

    So in the current political and social environment, the military budgets some complain about are as much protectors of our rights from threats within the Homeland as is the Second Amendment.

    Which rights are all those “freedom loving” White Southerners protecting exactly?

    They didn’t protect us from unconstitutional laws like the PATRIOT Act.
    They don’t protect us from illegal spying by the NSA and Alphabet Soup of intelligence agencies.
    They’re not halting the assault on common people by corporate power.
    They did nothing to stop a series of bloody multitrillion-dollar wars in the Mid East.

    The reality is this. The U.S. govt’s agenda is oligarchy at home, militarism abroad. Rather than blocking anything, the military defends (and often executes) that agenda.

    I’ve often found it interesting that Republicans are wildly distrusting of the various branches of the govt and view most govt employees through a conspiratorial lense, but then somehow are naively trusting of the USM. The same USM that travels overseas and engages in bloody wars that destroy countries and kill millions.

    Republicans complains about “big govt” that threatens our freedoms, but then somehow exempt the USM. It’s a right-wing version of PC.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
  272. @Buzz Mohawk

    He told me that ensigns don’t know anything, and that everybody on a ship knows that.

    The Ensigns also know they don’t know anything. O-1’s and some O-2’s can be thought of as management trainees, training for O-3 and higher when they’ll be expected to be competent leaders and managers.

  273. @JohnnyWalker123

    I’ve often found it interesting that Republicans are wildly distrusting of the various branches of the govt and view most govt employees through a conspiratorial lense, but then somehow are naively trusting of the USM.

    I think there is more to it than meets the eye. People who say they are opposed to “big government” but like the military are often opposed to social programs that they perceive as benefiting other societal groups. They may also perceive a majority of government employees in the same light.

    Of course one of the biggest parts of big government is Medicare, and hardly anyone wants to get rid of it, but by letting older people die earlier, we could make more lebensraum, inherit their wealth earlier, reduce traffic congestion and pollution, reduce social security expenditure, and reduce overall levels of taxation. Let’s go for it!

    • LOL: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  274. Bugg says:
    @68W58

    In “Saving….”, D-Day plus 2 there was no need for radio silence. The Germans had an idea that the Allies where there. There was nothing stopping the rear contacting a forward unit via the radio. Sending a platoon across a war zone to do so was a ridiculous premise.

    • Agree: 68W58
  275. @Steve Sailer

    You also will see quite a few black people at NASCAR races. I’d guess they’re 5-10% of attendees at the races I’ve been to.

  276. @Desiderius

    Your kind

    Guilty as charged.

    My dad’s number came up and he went. That’s how a draft works.

    Not always. Just ask PRESIDENT Bush.

    Or PRESIDENT Trump.

    Or PRESIDENT Bill Clinton.

    Not everybody went.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Desiderius
  277. @RadicalCenter

    Other than people in the military, almost nobody retires from one federal agency, gets a pension, and then works for another federal agency

    Common in State and Municipal/County employment though.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  278. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    Universal service with those not able to comply being disenfranchised, and <90 IQ people not able to comply, nor felons, firebugs, serious delinquents, etc, kills a lot of birds with one stone.

    When everyone has kids in the military, and sons on the pointy end of the spear, a large disincentive for military adventurism is created. The military looks like the population at large, minus elements we don't really find conducive anyway. A disincentive to come here for those disinclined to fight is created.

    The military, of course, prefers the present system. But is the military for the nation or the nation for the military?

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Hibernian
  279. @Paul Mendez

    All you are saying is give war a chance? So who do you represent? The foreign power? International finance? Not that there is much difference between them

  280. @JohnnyWalker123

    How much was the student deferment inspired by eugenics? Sequester the smart guys. It dates from the early 1950s.

    It’s still the law, by the way, but much more limited. Should an active call-up resume, one can only defer till the end of the semester, or the school year if it’s your final one.

    Add Ted Nugent to your list. The story of his going full-homeless to flunk his physical was just that, a story.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  281. @Intelligent Dasein

    “Payscale eviscerated…abloo abloo”.

    Yeah which is why for people in the know getting a GS7/9 clerical position is basically being set for life as long you stay away from NoVa and a few other geo locations. If you insist on living there either you eat rice and beans until you can transfer or promote .

    Fedgov gave out a 3%+ raise iirc, TSP is 401k with steroids, and access to health insurance alone is worth it. Weep not for the poor federal bureaucrat, they’ve got it made in the shade.

  282. JMcG says:
    @S. Anonyia

    Thanks for the reply. I didn’t mean to sound accusatory, I apologize for that. I have a better idea of where you are coming from now.
    Cheers

  283. @BB753

    Judging by the last 73 years, the US military has always obeyed faithfully the orders of the CIA.

    All that pot my shipmates ingested in the empty warehouses next to our pier came from Langley?

    Who’da thunk it?

  284. @Rich

    Guess it has nothing to do with “reflection”

    It depends – pretty critically – on the numeracy of the beholder.

    One of the biggest things about comparing stats is that the GenPop contains a lot of kids (where the military contains none), and very few kids off themselves.

    If you compare apples with apples AND back out military suicides from total suicides, the numbers become clearer.

    Let’s do that as an exercise (saves you from having to work out how to do it yourself).

    .

    According to WISCQ (CDC’s data interface), the self-offing rates for the male population are as follows:

    • all males over 18: 28.1 per 100k;
    white males over 18: 31.6 per 100k.

    Seems high, but people living shit lives off themselves, and the US system is merciless to white men in the lower orders.

    Now let’s do some apples-to-apples comparisons, male-only.

    01. All Males

    For vets, all-males it’s a tad under 42 (as of 2014) as opposed to WISCQ’s 28.1 for all males over 18.

    Note that the GenPop number includes a contribution from the vet all-males number: there are 16 million male veterans in the US, so the contribution of the vet number on the “all males 18+” number is not trivial. But regardless of that: the ‘all males’ vet suicide number is already almost 50% higher than the GenPop.

    02. White Males

    The vet suicide rate for white males is above 46 per 100,000, but let’s use that to be conservative.

    The VHA’s PowerPoint presentation unhelpfully doesn’t include data tables: slide 27 is the relevant one; definitely above 45, definitely below 50… probably below 47… so 46 is a lowball (especially since vets who go to the VA are a subset of all vets, and the VA numbers are vet suicides for ‘recent VA attendees’).

    So 46/31.6 … in raw terms, white male veterans off themselves at a 46% higher rate than the GenPop.

    The males tracked by the VA are ~66% non-Hispanic white, and they represent ~82% of suicides among recent VA users.

    Now let’s get to the contribution of vet white males to the GenPop number.

    If 66% of male vets are white males, that means there are ~11 million of them, in a total US white male 18+ cohort of about 102 million (hard to get hard number on this in a non-census year, but WaPo think that “white men” are ~31% of the population).

    So the total suicide rate for non-veteran adult white males in the US is the v in

    (11 * 46) + (102-11)*X = 31.6 * 102

    Solving for X gives X = 29.9 (per 100k) – that is the rate at which non-veteran white males 18+ off themselves.

    So vet suicides add 1.7/100,000 to the overall (vet + non-vet) white adult male rate.

    Therefore the excess suicides among white male vets is more like 54%. I am surprised that anyone who purports to care about veterans would dpwnplay that number.

    We can quibble about which side of 50% it’s on (by getting harder numbers for each quantity), but the numbers would all have to be out in the same direction to meaningfully influence the result.

    Reflection matters.

    • Replies: @Rich
  285. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @gcochran

    From part of a rough draft I was sent, and passed on with permission:

    In Regard to an American Civil War:

    Recently I was sent the following video:

    There are some good and salient points here but I think that it misses the real issues and the likely scenarios derivable therefrom.

    The lesson of the War of Northern Aggression (q.v., 1861-1865) (or rather, a significant and perhps the major lesson) is that a binary split of the United States is a worst case scenario. This is consonant with the Twin Engine Airplane Rule, the theory that two is a pessimal number of engines on an airplane because the most number of compromises have to be made to ensure that the airplane is flyable with one of its two engines failed. Without getting into a long digression, a twin engine airplane has twice the chance of one engine failing as a single engine one does of its one engine quitting, but loses fully half of its power. As the number of engines increases, the chances of any one engine quitting in flight increase but the gravity of the situation decreases, since on a three engine airplane you still have 2/3rds power, 3/4ths on a four engine airplane, und so weiter.

    I advocate here no course of action, legal or otherwise; I merely predict what I think is likely to happen. The reader may reach his, her, or its own conclusions and act accordingly. You are soley responsible for your own actions. All BATFE rules apply.

    I believe that the United States of America (q.v.) is a polity which, like Rome, began as a noble Republic, degenerated into an Empire, and is at the mid-terminal stage of the ballistic arc which all empires in known human history have followed. History records no known recovery from this stage, but the arc can be stretched or shortened somewhat.

    For many reasons, I predict that the United States as we know it now will split into a number of geographical areas, a minimum of four and perhaps as many as eight or nine, most likely four to six not including Alaska, Hawaii, and various commonwealths, dependencies and outlying minor islands, and with some regions becoming unified with former parts of Canada and Mexico. These nations will be organized along racial, religious, ideological and economic commonality as well as geography. In most cases, existing state lines, major geographical divides, or in some cases Interstate highway or other manmade fault lines will be the border lines.

    Alaska and Hawaii are separate issues entirely, along with the aforementioned island dependencies. Hawaii will probably choose independence and can be logically expected (as a glance at its state flag would suggest) to join the British Commonwealth. Alaska will possibly split with a strip of temperate coastal area joining contiguous British Columbia and southward to the Pacific Northwest, about which we will discuss later, and the northern and eastern areas becoming independent, with or without the Yukon Territioies, and possibly forming an alliance with the Commonwealth of Independent States.

    In terms of the continental United states as it is, I would expect that there will be a large area of the South that will coalesce along religious lines, being explicitly evangelical Protestant Christian, but that South Florida would certainly be separate, and possibly there being a black ethnostate as well. The largest part of the region would be de facto white, but it is doubtful that any hardcore racial exclusionism would be practiced. Nonwhites who can follow the rules and accept a distinct lack of group political power will probably be accepted. Religious tolerance would be another question, however. Religion can make for strange bedfellows in practice, while minor differences in similar theological or organizational doctrines can provoke serious schisms.

    The Northeast will probably be motivated primarily by economic concerns and will likely constitute the rump United States. It contains both the de jure seat of government and the de facto national (and, to a large extent, global) economic hub, Washington, DC and New York City (and specifically the Borough of Manhattan). It is also the home of the largest percentage of the (somewhat overwhelmingly) single most powerful and influential mercantile and media, entertainment, and academic minority ethny in the United States (and globally). The only question is how much of the industrial and agricultural heartland its borders will also encompass, and how much of the conventional and (most critically) nuclear assets of the American military it will retain control over. However, it has serious liabilities as well as assets and is vulnerable in many ways, and these can and almost certainly will be well exploited.

    The current State of California is already farther along to separation than any other area of the United states. It is the most populous state in the Union, with a large majority of its population in a strip of Mediterranean climate extending along its coastline from roughly somewhat north of San Francisco to San Diego and extending a fourth or so of the way across the state eastward. Much of the rest of thestate is sparsely populated. Many efforts to break California into several states, to leave the union, or to otherwise reorganize the state in fundamental ways have long held popular traction, meaning that separation is not unthinkable to a large proportion of the California population, in and of itself a critical condition for separation. The earliest such effort was the proposal to separate the northernmost fourth or so of th state, together with a couple of counties in Oregon, into a new Jefferson State;it ha enough tration to have had Congressional hearings scheduled to review the matter, which were interrupted by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. More recently, open discussion of “Calexit”-secession from the United States alone and independent of any other efforts-has attracted relatively mainstream discussion. To quote from one website,

    “Statehood is no longer serving California’s best interests. On issues ranging from peace and security to natural resources, California would be better off as an independent country. Take a look below at what independence will mean for California.”

    California is also, on average, politically far to the left of most of the rest of the United States, and it contains a large number of non-European immigrants of every conceivable ethnicity occupying all niches of the economic strata. In no other area of the United States is the attachment to the concept of “America, indivisible…” as tenuous. Yet the state’s primary sources of income are highly linked to the present social order; eliminate the Hollywood entertainment industry, Silicon Valley, and the defense/aerospace industry and the state is in a grat deal of economic trouble.

    Texas, like California, has been host to numerous efforts both to split the state within the Union and to leave it. Texas has one peculiarity in that under the terms of its joining the Union, it can split into five different states, at its internal option, giving it a total of ten Senators: however, no one in any part of Texas is under any illusion that all five, or even any two, could effectively cooperate to provide a substantial advantage to any single area or interest involved. It is also home to a large number of Mesoamerican and mestizo elements some (but, critically, not all) of whom harbor substantial irredentist and revanchist sentiments. Many border areas openly flaunt their loyalties to the nation south of the border and contempt for gringo law even as they seek the gringo dollar and the general benefits of living in a white polity such as welfare payments and police departments not controlled by narcotics cartels. It also has a German population which generally considers itself as founding-stock American as any Massachusetts Yankee tracing an ancestor to the Mayflower, but also a few who, as they say, “know the old songs”, “old” tracing back to 1933, and who occasionally quietly will tell you the great circle distance and heading to a small town known as Brannau-am-Inn.

    If anyplace in the present United States were to become an explicit and exclusive white ethnostate, almost certainly it would be the Pacific Northwest. Although the fundamental elements are not as widespread as separatist elements in California and Texas, they have been probably better thought out there than anywhere else, and there is a smaller but hardcore element already in place-at present far too small to do much, but the logistics have been thought out. The current minority population is relatively small, outside the Seattle-Tacoma and Portland areas, and the area is otherwise nearly ideally suited to a serious guerrilla action if it ever came down to that. It has coastline, hydroelectric power, substantial natural resources and a fair amount of arable land.

    Utah was founded by and is still overwhelmingly dominated by the Mormon church. It was actually the goal of the Church’s real founder, Brigham Young, to establish his own sovereign nation, and had circumstances been different he well might have. The parallels between Young and Iraq’s Saddam Hussein are substantial, in fact. Utah’s biggest impediment to sovereignty is its landlocked, central location within the Western United States. Nevertheless, the LDS Church is sufficiently prominent and sufficiently dominating in the lives of its adherents that it well might seek out some sort of arrangement for local governance under the right circumstances.

    This echoes statements by “Maguire” on the old Robert Frenz FAEM.com website (First Amendment Exercise machine) , maintained ironically by the guys in England who got busted in LA for trying to do the right thing, the Heretical Two.

  286. Coemgen says:
    @Dan Hayes

    My pleasure and, yes, it’s amazing how Mary MacLeod Trump’s biography is uninteresting to U.S. media. Thank you to Ron Unz and Steve Sailer for providing us a venue for a voice that the “fake news” works to suppress.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    , @Desiderius
  287. @Reg Cæsar

    How much was the student deferment inspired by eugenics? Sequester the smart guys. It dates from the early 1950s.

    Most of it was rich parents not wanting their kids to go overseas and die. Since the rich sort of run the govt, they gamed the draft system by creating deferments.

    So “Dubya” Bush evaded the draft by his powerful father using his connections to get him into the Texas Air National Guard. Interestingly, after getting in, Bush sort of just showing up to duty. According to most accounts, Bush spent the 60s and 70s lost in a haze of cocaine and alcohol. So instead of “serving his country,” he snorted coke for a couple decades. Many years later, he (and his Vice-President who also dodged the draft) started a large war overseas, spending a lot of time accusing anti-war individuals as “unpatriotic.”

    Trump’s wealthy real estate developer father (Fred Trum) bribed a Podiatrist to diagnose his son with “bone spurs.” So Trump evaded Vietnam.

    Clinton spent the late 60s studying in England, so he got a student deferment. Clinton ended up joining the anti-war movement there, but also worked as a CIA informant behind the scenes.

    Meanwhile, 60,000 American kids (whose parents weren’t so connected) died in Vietnam. A much larger number were injured, often very badly.

    There’s an interesting film called “Born on the 4th of July.”

    It broadcasts a real-life look at what happened to a lot of the soldiers who served back during Vietnam.

  288. Wilkey says:
    @Bugg

    One thing you may notice if you have cable TV about Colorado Springs if you have ID TV; the Homicide Hunter, Lt. Joe Kenda, could be that city’s most well-known citizen. Despite being an overwhelmingly white college town, you would think it’s the East St. Louis of the Rockies.

    Two words: Fort Carson.

    My brother’s guard unit was sent there for training just before it was deployed to Iraq. Apparently a lot of the crime in the mostly white, conservative Colorado Springs can be traced to soldiers, usually black, who are stationed there.

    Military careers can be great for a certain type of person. If you’re smart enough to graduate from college but aren’t genius level it’s a good career with a nice, early pension waiting for you at the finish line, not long after you turn 40. Doctors, lawyers, accountants, and a fair percentage of engineers, however, can easily make more than a full, four star general or admiral. And you can make that income without spending your entire career navigating the political minefield that is the US military.

    The current pay for colonels, iirc, is around $100k. And it takes about 20 years to make colonel, if you ever do. There are other perks besides salary, of course, including that early pension, but I know plenty of people making more than full generals, who are much younger.

  289. @JohnnyWalker123

    You go on ahead and run with that crowd. You’ve seen what that (and evidently, proudly your) kind has brought our country.

    Nemesis ain’t playin’ that shit.

  290. Dan Hayes says:
    @Coemgen

    Many years ago Mrs Trump sponsored the performance of the late Irish tenor Frank Patterson at the local Salvation Army Hospital. It was only years later that I belatedly realized the Celtic Connection!

  291. @JohnnyWalker123

    Meanwhile, 60,000 American kids (whose parents weren’t so connected) died in Vietnam.

    Ca. 17,000 of those were conscripts. The other 31,000 were enlisted or commissioned. There is some overlap, but I believe those figures go by one’s original entry.

    spending a lot of time accusing anti-war individuals as “unpatriotic.”

    Taking after Truman, FDR, Wilson, and Lincoln. Nothing new to see here.

    (Well, okay, Truman was a grunt in Wilson’s war.)

  292. @JohnnyWalker123

    I am from a military family, but I now will be damned first before I let anyone I love now throw away his life in military service to advance a corrupt greedy empire without protestation from me.

  293. @JohnnyWalker123

    First movie I walked out of. Sour, shallow, and defamatory.

    My dad dodged several bullets while he was there, but Nam was still a bullet to our life chances, both in taking my father away for two years of my early life and destroying our family shortly thereafter. No rhyme or reason or any sign of trouble before the war according to family members who were there and I trust.

    We all made it and he now, belatedly, has his five grandsons and I the happiness that is only available to those who have withstood the relentless charge of the cavalry of woe. Such is life.

    I find it odd that you would counsel dishonour and willfully number yourself among those who left it to my father and his colleagues to bear your burden in addition to their own.

  294. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    So “Dubya” Bush evaded the draft by his powerful father using his connections to get him into the Texas Air National Guard. Interestingly, after getting in, Bush sort of just showing up to duty. According to most accounts, Bush spent the 60s and 70s lost in a haze of cocaine and alcohol. So instead of “serving his country,” he snorted coke for a couple decades. Many years later, he (and his Vice-President who also dodged the draft) started a large war overseas, spending a lot of time accusing anti-war individuals as “unpatriotic.”

    GWB got an unusual and special deal where he was able to join the Texas ANG and go through USAF UPT, but not be part of the usual assignment process by which the select parts of the class got the desirable (e.g., generally but not always fighters) assignments and those who passed but not considered “qualified for fighters” would be sent to bomber/tanker/transport or helo assignments.

    This was not completely unique to ANG units: foreign military pupils and occasionally astronaut candidates would go through the system on this basis as well. It did constitute a loophole by which one otherwise not eligible for fighter assignments might be sent to them and also meant one was guaranteed to stay with the ANG and not be sent to Vietnam, which for a fighter pilot was where you wanted to be despite the frustrating and unnecessarily dangerous way the war was being prosecuted. In Bush’s case, he would be flying the docile and pleasant, if slow, F-102 and never outside of Texas. Since he was the son of a Congressman, and since even then there was no great shortage of returning from one tour active duty guys looking for ANG or Reserve assignments, it can be reasonably concluded that he got a politically motivated special deal.

    (Even at that time, the operationally subsonic F-102 was obsolete as an interceptor, and served little real purpose besides to thwart any attempted air attack by the Mexican Air Force. Against actual likely invaders it was quite useless. Nevertheless it was a delightful airplane to tool around in, especially if someone else is paying for the kerosene.)

    G.W.Bush is not stupid, but he is lazy and possesses no evidence of any particular virtue. He is someone who without ‘sponsorship’ and connections could reasonably have been expected to have a modest career in middle management, although his fine knowledge and devotion to baseball have led some to suggest he would have made a good Baseball Commissioner. The fact that he never flew after the ANG leads one to think that reports of his being a mediocre pupil in UPT are accurate.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    , @Desiderius
  295. black sea says:

    G.W.Bush is not stupid, but he is lazy and possesses no evidence of any particular virtue.

    As compared to the general population, GWB is indeed not stupid. As compared to his predecessor and successor in the White House, he certainly came across as convincingly stupid. As compared to the requirements of the position, he proved himself “not up to the task” in a number of ways.

    I agree that his laziness, lack of curiosity, childish worldview, and desire to be well thought of for no particular reason all made him an easy mark for party apparatchiks more clever than he.

  296. anon[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Universal service with those not able to comply being disenfranchised, and <90 IQ people not able to comply, nor felons, firebugs, serious delinquents, etc, kills a lot of birds with one stone.

    Like ancient Greece or Rome? Might work, in a culturally and genetically homogeneous nation. Like Norway and the Helvitican Confederation used to be.

    What’s that got to do with anything today?

  297. Anonymous[124] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    From your review:

    When I was a kid watching black-and-white movies on television, the single most repeated scene in Hollywood history had to be a shot of swing jazz emanating from a floor radio on a peaceful Sunday in December 1941, then an announcer saying, “We interrupt this broadcast…”

    This 90-second scene from one of my favorite movies is pretty close to that:

  298. @Busby

    I can’t find the link, but there was a remembrance of Stan Lee by an air force officer. He told the story about how back when he was a 2nd lt. he was on watch when the Panama situation happened. Long story short, in spite of senior NCOs and warrant officers being present, he was the dude in charge.

    *BTW, the theme of the piece was basically ‘what would Captain America do?’

  299. @Carlton Meyer

    One can debate if GIs deserve this, but don’t think they are lowly paid people.

    Yep. My pay was about 900 bucks before taxes way back when as a private. Now a buck sergeant practically makes enough to pay a mortgage. A few years back, I was talking with a retired E-7 with a little over 20 years in, and I was amazed at how much he was making, both in retirement and beforehand.

  300. duncsbaby says:
    @Steve Sailer

    “Danish ancestors,” makes it sound like they were bucolic settlers. Truth is quite a few English have “Danish ancestors,” from the 10th century.

    We come from the land of the ice and snow
    From the midnight sun where the hot springs flow

    The hammer of the gods will drive our ships to new land
    To fight the horde and sing, and cry
    Valhalla, I am coming

    On we sweep with, with threshing oar
    Our only goal will be the western shore

    We come from the land of the ice and snow
    From the midnight sun where the hot springs flow

    How soft your fields so green. Can whisper tales of gore
    Of how we calmed the tides of war. We are your overlords

  301. duncsbaby says:
    @Bill P

    Otherwise the hapless Saxons probably would have fallen to some primitive Norse kingdom and the island would have been an obscure, culturally deprived backwater for centuries.

    The “hapless Saxons” had just defeated an invading Norwegian army before they in turn were defeated by the Normans.

    “The Battle of Stamford Bridge took place at the village of Stamford Bridge, East Riding of Yorkshire, in England on 25 September 1066, between an English army under King Harold Godwinson and an invading Norwegian force led by King Harald Hardrada and the English king’s brother Tostig Godwinson. After a bloody battle, both Hardrada and Tostig along with most of the Norwegians were killed. Although Harold Godwinson repelled the Norwegian invaders, his army was defeated by the Normans at Hastings less than three weeks later. The battle has traditionally been presented as symbolising the end of the Viking Age,”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Stamford_Bridge

  302. Anonymous[378] • Disclaimer says:

    G.W.Bush is not stupid, but he is lazy and possesses no evidence of any particular virtue. He is someone who without ‘sponsorship’ and connections could reasonably have been expected to have a modest career in middle management

    So, just like Obama then. Both men had far more in common than their respective supporters ever liked to admit.

  303. JMcG says:
    @Anonymous

    You are clearly more knowledgeable than I on the subject, so let me ask a question. I have a friend who enlisted in the Air National Guard. He graduated university with an engineering degree, and was nominated for UPT by his base commander. He was accepted and successfully completed the course. During his time at flight school, his base changed in their fighters for tankers; much to his dismay. So my understanding was that you were trained to fly whatever your unit was equipped with. Is that incorrect?
    Thanks

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  304. LondonBob says:
    @Rich

    Yes but a lot of Southerners would have gone to the VMI or the Citadel I would assume. No idea on the numbers but I would guess it would be a disproportionate number of officers would be southerners if you factored those in. Sherman was teaching as some sort of military academy in Louisiana when the war broke out so probably the South had more than a few other military institutions.

    • Replies: @Rich
  305. LondonBob says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    A study done of the Vietnam War and of the US military more recently show it is disproportionately Southern and Mountain West.

  306. Twinkie says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Pueblo

    Pueblo is the rape capital of Colorado. I give you one guess why.

    And 1/4 of Colorado Springs is Pueblo (the rest is expensive homes on the mountains/hills and Fort Carson+Air Force Academy-related stuff).

    Monument, a Colorado Springs suburb/exurb of sorts, is my favorite town in Colorado.

  307. Coemgen says:
    @Dan Hayes

    TG4 (tee gee four/ceathair) also has a documentary about Robert Shaw, who was Captain Quint in Jaws, that’s well worth watching.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  308. @Anonymous

    I preached a sermon just after the second inaugural suggesting that W and Carter* both missed their true calling, the main point being that smaller family sizes were draining talent from the ministry. That address was a sermon in itself.

    The next Sunday there was an observer from the Presbytery to make sure I didn’t try anything like that again.

    * – Americus (HfHI HQ) isn’t far from Plains so I got to catch his Sunday School class frequently to see him in action. Both he and W practice a far more orthodox Christianity than is now customary.

  309. @anon

    The Norman leadership presided over the end of hope for English victory after the fall of Calais, and England only began to regain some military standing under the Tudors, a Native British dynasty.

    Calais was lost to England in 1558, during the reign of Queen Mary, a Tudor. Henry VIII, it will be recalled, in 1536 brought the town headsman from his then-possession Calais, to decapitate Ann Boleyn, because he used a sword after the French fashion (which Henry thought more befitting a queen), rather than an axe.

    As for the Tudors being a “Native British Dynasty,” Henry VII (the first Tudor King and the father of Henry VIII) was descended through Edward I in one line and from Edward III through John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, in another, both on the side of his mother Margaret Beaufort.

    Henry VII succeeded to the throne because by 1483 he was the senior surviving claimant on the Lancastrian side. He then married his third cousin, Elizabeth of York, uniting the Houses of Lancaster and York in his offspring.

    A dynasty takes the name of its male line, but all that a dynastic change amounts to is the succession of the dynasty’s founder through a female ancestor. A look at the ancestral chart of Henry Tudor shows him to have been substantially Norman and French in ancestry.

  310. @68W58

    I saw 1917 this afternoon and thought it was ok, but not as good as the hype. Saving Private Ryan occurred to me too. The movie could easily have been thirty minutes shorter, and had some big plot holes.

    The interesting thing is that it looked like it was shot with a single camera with no cuts. The camera followed the lead characters throughout the movie and never cut away. I don’t know how they did it but I liked it better than the too frequent cutting you see especially on TV shows. The credits listed hundreds of special effects people, so maybe they did frame by frame matching.

    2) Steve, you should go see Parasite. It’s hilarious.

    • Replies: @Hail
  311. @Jonathan Mason

    There are five parts to Federal spending: defense, Social Security, Medicare, debt service, and everything else. We only collect enough taxes to pay for three of these.

    Everything else is the smallest part. Much as I would like to see the Department of Education HQ dynamited and its former employees reduced to begging on street corners, we could fire every Fed tomorrow and we would still have a trillion dollar deficit.

    One of the reasons the Federal Reserve is keeping interest rates so low is that, if interest rates go to 5%, then interest on the national debt of 22 trillion dollars would be over a trillion dollars all by itself.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
  312. @Whiskey

    Bitch also had three abortions, so a killer was attracted to a killer.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  313. Rich says:
    @Kratoklastes

    Nice try, but you’re making an awful lot of assumptions about the race of veterans who’ve committed suicide. You’re also wrong about the socioeconomic level of White males who commit suicide. It’s more often people with terminal illnesses who don’t want to unduly burden their families or suffer needlessly.

  314. Hail says: • Website
    @Jim Don Bob

    Steve, you should go see Parasite. It’s hilarious.

    He saw it on or shortly before Oct. 25 during its US theater release.

    Parasite, iSteve blog post (500 words), Oct. 25, 2019.

    The 152 comments were largely reacting to a line in Sailer’s mini-review about class accents, and being unable to distinguish them in the movie (an underlying presumption being that they exist in Korean, which they don’t, not in the British sense).

    [MORE]

    I presume they adopt different accents when talking to the rich folk than they use in their squalid home, but I can’t tell that from watching the movie.

    But how did they learn those prestigious accents? Moreover, if they can speak in educated accents, why can’t they use them to get better jobs than folding pizza boxes, such as in sales? I imagine Koreans can fill in a more of the gaps, but for a clueless roundeye like me, it was a pretty thin experience. For all I know, Parasite might be the most sophisticated movie ever made about class in South Korea, but I didn’t learn anything from it about class in Korea other than that Koreans thinks American stuff is cool.

  315. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @JMcG

    Basically, but when units went from fighters to transports or tankers, pilots started looking for another unit to transfer to or if their obligation was satisfied many just left the Guard. When it was the other way around you had a unit heavy with guys that could operate the aircraft but were never going to be effective in combat with it, some were happy about getting a chance to fly fast movers they’d otherwise never would have had, and especially in the days of single engine fighters when engines weren’t as reliable as now (nor ejection seats) some of the heavy guys would avoid conversion by, again, transferring (there were always pilots in ANG tanker or transport squadrons who would commute or move for a fighter slot) or if they still had a service obligation, would get themselves taken off flight status and continuing on in a ground role. In those days if you had a reasonable amount of heavy time there were always civilian jobs in multiengine airplanes so you weren’t giving up flying.

    Richard Bach usefully writes of this in several of his books, of which the best is Stranger to the Ground. Bach went off the deep end into mysticism and a hippy-dippy scented fantasy genre, but his earlier writing was some of the best hard aviation writing of its day.

    • Thanks: JMcG
  316. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @SteveRogers42

    Bitch also had three abortions, so a killer was attracted to a killer.

    Society is much worse off that Palmer’s gene line dies out? Err….

  317. @Coemgen

    U.S. media

    Would that they were.

    My thanks as well, you can see him in his mother.

    Every picture tells a story, don’t it.

  318. Shem says:

    Okay, I have to say: how did you dig up that Tom Wolfe quote? Did you remember it, happen to have the book around, and spent the time digging up the exact line? Or is it from your own cuttings collection?

    I’m just curious because if that’s not a book you’ve read recently, that’s quite a memory!

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  319. @Shem

    I can recall reading that line in 1979 in The Right Stuff: not word for word, but I immediately seized upon the implication, which isn’t quite stated by Wolfe, that the military would be getting more hereditary.

    Back before the Internet, I had to kind of burn things into my memory. In contrast, lately, I’m amazed by all the facts that in recent years I’ve, briefly, learned and then forgotten.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  320. LondonBob says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    https://www.zerohedge.com/economics/us-budget-deficit-blows-out-nine-year-high-first-quarter-fiscal-2020

    Impressive the fiscal consolidation from 2011 to 2016, I understand a lot was squeezing military spending by Obama from 750bn to around 600bn, alongside a strengthening economy. Perhaps even more impressive is how Trump has massively widened the deficit despite an even stronger economy. No surprise gold is rising sharply in price.

  321. Andrew says:
    @dearieme

    I don’t believe it. The writer Auberon Waugh offered a large cash prize for anyone who could demonstrate direct male descent from those who “came over with the Conqueror”. It went unclaimed.

    My maternal grandfather was a direct male line descendant of Urse D’Abitot, a chum of William and Tancred of Normandy, a chum of Rollo.

    But do go on. I’m sure you know so much about this subject.

  322. Andrew says:
    @Clement Pulaski

    There seems to be a growing divide between the elite and the military that the elite uses to enforce its values globally. Doesn’t feel very sustainable.

    Eventually the military will replace the elite.

    “But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.”

  323. @Steve Sailer

    Don’t feel bad.

    The Internet, especially on mobile devices, is reshaping mankind so that we have the collective attention span of a goldfish, possibly a gnat.

    • Agree: Dissident
  324. Rich says:
    @LondonBob

    There were 1,108 commissioned officers in the US Army prior to the War Between the States, of these, 20% were from the South. You’re right that the South was top heavy with military schools, but they were vastly lower in population than the North which provided the standing Army with most of its soldiers. The military tradition of the South was just as common in the North. These were the same breed of people, with the same history, the same bloodlines. I realize that some try to make big differences of a Lowlander and a Highlander, a Londoner and a Cornishman, but genetically, they’re basically the same breed. Euro-man is (or was) bred to be a warrior. North or South.

  325. Hibernian says:
    @Jack D

    If the Iranians close the straits of Hormuz there will be pressure to seize some ground on the Iranian side of this Strait. A limited objective. And there will be no wider war. Sure.

  326. Hibernian says:
    @kaganovitch

    Usually it’s cops who do this. Retire from the Police Department and become an investigator for the State’s Attorney’s office or the Public Defender.

  327. Hibernian says:
    @Anonymous

    The modern military cannot use all able bodied males, let alone able bodied men and women.

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