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With Donald Trump issuing his executive order calling for future federal buildings to be “beautiful,” I extended my Twitter thread contrasting comparable buildings from before and after WWII, such as upscale municipalities’ city halls, other government buildings, public libraries and the like. The order is pretty rambling, but people seemed to like it.

One reason for the dichotomy is that Beverly Hills in 1932 saw a spectacular city hall as good advertising for attracting newcomers to Beverly Hills to buy up its empty lots. In contrast, modern Malibu doesn’t want more residents. Its civic motto is “Get out of Malibu, Lebowski!”

And win.

Not surprisingly, construction began a month before the stock market crash of October 1929.

That’s just a joke. Mayne is a leftist. He doesn’t hate bureaucrats in particular, he hates everybody.

I suspect General Kesselring could have defended the 1976 Long Beach city hall from Mark Clark’s Sherman tanks for six months.

“You people, you like domes, right? Okay, okay, we’ll build you a dome out in the front of city hall for your tacky weddings and proms. But we’re not going to taint the architectural integrity of the actual San Jose city hall by including a dome in the main building.”

 
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  1. St. Francis de Sales, the 1959 Danish Modern Roman Catholic church

    If you’re going to copy the Danes for anything church-related, why not just hang a ship from the ceiling? Like the stave churches of Norway, these date back to the Catholic era in those countries.

    Why Is There a Ship Hanging in a Church?

    Usually one suffices, but there’s always an exception:

    You can even find them in California.

    SAILING IN UNITY AND SPIRIT

    • Thanks: Dieter Kief
  2. Anonymous[184] • Disclaimer says:

    That style from the 30s and 40s is actually called “PWA Moderne” or “WPA Moderne” for “Public Works Administration” or “Works Progress Administration”. It’s also known by other names such as “Federal Moderne”, “Depression Moderne”, “Classical Moderne”, and internationally as “Stripped Classicism.”

    This style was popular throughout the world at the time in Nazi Germany, Stalinist Russia, Fascist Italy, and FDR’s New Deal America. It was ideal for the Fascists, Stalinists, and New Dealers who liked big government and viewed themselves as progressive and forward looking – the classical, monumental aspects project authority, while the stripped, streamlined look suggests modernity and progressing forward into the future. It’s the style most people identify with Federal government buildings.

    Lots of buildings in LA and Socal were built in that style:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PWA_Moderne#Greater_Los_Angeles

    • Thanks: Pheasant
  3. That 1897 parliamentary library in NZ has kind of a fairy tale vibe. Puts one in a good mood just looking at it.

  4. The Marin County Civic Center – a Frank Lloyd Wright design – built in 1960:

    Still looks pretty good to me. It seems to have inspired George Lucas in how his ancient futuristic buildings would look in the interminable Star Wars sequels (prequels, whatever).

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Anon

    Yes, now that you mention it, I can see Frank Lloyd Wright's influence on Marin-resident George Lucas.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Chrisnonymous

  5. • Replies: @Anon
    @Anonymous

    Possibly the best TED talk ever.

  6. Hell, let’s add some art nouveau while we’re at it. Much more ideal for small government buildings like rural post offices but they are just beautiful.

    • Replies: @Lockean Proviso
    @Kronos

    That would require real skills in metalworking, stone masonry, and precision. Could it even be done anymore? Maybe. Worth it if so.

  7. I’m dreaming of a White Christmas, just like the ones I used to know….

    May your days be merry and bright…. and may all your Christmases be White….

    Merry Christmas!

    • Agree: Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    • Thanks: JimDandy
    • Replies: @CCZ
    @JohnnyWalker123

    "...and may all your Christmases be White…."

    Unless you accidentally happen to turn the television channel to FX and (like modern architecture) see an ugly "progressive" rendition of a revered classic.


    "The BBC's fresh and gritty take on Charles Dickens "A Christmas Carol" [now showing on American cable channel FX] has captivated audiences,...breathing new life into the famous story about Ebenezer Scrooge."

    "The Cratchit's are here again but in this new version, they have been reimagined as a mixed-race family with the role of Mary Cratchit being played by [mixed race: white mother-black father] actor Vinette Robinson."

    "Unfortunately, as it seems to be with almost anything that is slightly progressive these days, there was a lot of negativity to this new portrayal of the family and, yes, it came from Twitter."
     
    https://www.indy100.com/ents/a-christmas-carol-bbc-mixed-race-relationships-vinette-robinson-9259946

    Replies: @Clip Carson

    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Agree with the sentiment, question is, how long is that song going to be permitted in the Current Year? I mean, a WHITE Christmas?

    , @Bill Jones
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Of course to have a Happy New Year:

    May your days be merry and bright…. and may all your Neighbors be White….May your days be merry and bright…. and may all your neighbors be White….

    There, fixed that for you.


  8. Massachusetts College of Art and Design

    🤦‍♂️

    “What the Bleep Happened to Architecture?—E. Michael Jones”

    https://www.patrickcoffin.media/what-the-bleep-happened-to-architecture/

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Apollo 20

    What happened? The same thing that happened to beauty: http://cdn02.cdn.justjared.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/lizzo-radio/lizzo-shines-in-gold-bodysuit-on-stage-at-nyc-concert-07.jpg

    , @Sue D. Nim
    @Apollo 20

    William Morris (24 March 1834 – 3 October 1896) was a British textile designer, poet, novelist, translator, and socialist activist associated with the British Arts and Crafts Movement. He was a major contributor to the revival of traditional British textile arts and methods of production.

    The William Morris School, Walthamstow

    https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@51.5998297,-0.0332061,3a,75y,30.65h,95.56t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s99OH8R05rssHJZQIQDEKZA!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

  9. Someone’s been reading Charles Jencks!

    Frank not Richard Gehry (Goldberg) btw.

    Overall thesis is sound: just consider how the term “prewar” is a marker for “desirable” in upscale New York City apartments.

    Kronos that No.6 Rue du Lac is a knockout. Thanks

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Polistra

    Overall thesis is sound: just consider how the term “prewar” is a marker for “desirable” in upscale New York City apartments.

    The greater desirability of prewar apartments is for the most part attributable not to the buildings' exterior architectural styles, but rather to the fact that they tend to be built better: thicker walls so quieter, high ceilings, quality original moldings, fireplaces, common hallways that look residential rather than institutional, and so on. Although rooms tend to be smaller than in postwar buildings buyers don't seem to mind too much.
    Another point is that prewars are more likely than postwars to be co-operatives rather than condominiums. While co-ops are not without drawbacks, they generally offer better value for the money and some buyers prefer them, especially at the high end of the market.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  10. • Agree: Ron Mexico
    • Replies: @Anon
    @anonymous

    You are correct, when something doesn't exist, there is nothing for the non-delusional to see.

  11. Meanwhile, it’s xmas eve again, and Kevin Spacey still suffers from Borderline Narcissistic Personality Disorder:

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Anonymous

    Kevin, read something. For instance, quite a good book ....

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41MpEqGndRL._SX326_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

  12. @JohnnyWalker123
    I'm dreaming of a White Christmas, just like the ones I used to know....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3ZC45Q82pg

    May your days be merry and bright.... and may all your Christmases be White....

    Merry Christmas!

    Replies: @CCZ, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Bill Jones

    “…and may all your Christmases be White….”

    Unless you accidentally happen to turn the television channel to FX and (like modern architecture) see an ugly “progressive” rendition of a revered classic.

    “The BBC’s fresh and gritty take on Charles Dickens “A Christmas Carol” [now showing on American cable channel FX] has captivated audiences,…breathing new life into the famous story about Ebenezer Scrooge.”

    “The Cratchit’s are here again but in this new version, they have been reimagined as a mixed-race family with the role of Mary Cratchit being played by [mixed race: white mother-black father] actor Vinette Robinson.”

    “Unfortunately, as it seems to be with almost anything that is slightly progressive these days, there was a lot of negativity to this new portrayal of the family and, yes, it came from Twitter.”

    https://www.indy100.com/ents/a-christmas-carol-bbc-mixed-race-relationships-vinette-robinson-9259946

    • Replies: @Clip Carson
    @CCZ

    The reimagined Christmas Carol with black Bob Cratchit ...

    Scrooge: "Cratchit, get back to work!"
    SFX: Bang!

    The remaining 89 minutes of the 90-minute movie is Cratchit on trial for murder, while media twists the story and BLM activists claim Scrooge's death was "reparations."

  13. Thanks, Steve, for including the Tom Wolfe quotes — especially the one about the marble and gold interior surfaces of the San Francisco City Hall’s lobby, “all kept polished as if for the commemoration of the Generalissimo’s birthday.” Only Wolfe could write such a sentence and not be pilloried for it (in 1970, when Francisco Franco — get it? — wasn’t yet fighting to remain dead). I wonder what he might have said about this year that’s about to end; he was far too modest to say, “I told you so!”

    Merry Christmas to you and your family.

  14. My personal favorite “WTF were they thinking” piece of modern architecture is the “Cathedral of Christ the Light” on the shore of Lake Merritt, in Oakland, California. Or, as I call it, the “cunthedral.” Completed in 2008, the holy seat of the Diocese of Oakland splays open towards the sky, as if it were ready to receive something more than just grace and revelation from above. I’d call the overall architectural concept “Marian.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathedral_of_Christ_the_Light_(Oakland,_California)

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Thomas

    Open your hearts this year and open your *explicit word deleted.*

    , @Lockean Proviso
    @Thomas

    It's from the same general theme as the Vatican's Paul VI Audience Hall, aka the Reptilian Overlord Building featuring an Alien Reptile Christ sculpture. Surely it's just a coincidence, but then there is a precedent for seeing Virgin Mary in a cracker or wall stain.

    https://cdn2.collective-evolution.com/assets/uploads/2017/11/pops-audience-hall.jpg

    https://www.collective-evolution.com/2017/11/17/the-dark-secrets-behind-the-popes-audience-hall-its-a-giant-reptilian/

    Merry Christmas, everyone!

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Thomas

    I can't help but like that building.

    It's an instinctive reaction, you know.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    , @Western
    @Thomas

    How do I post a picture that will show?

    Replies: @Thomas

    , @Bill Jones
    @Thomas

    You might like Paddy's Wigwam in Liverpool, or
    The Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King as non-Scousers call it.

    https://wordhistories.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/15421-the-metropolitan-cathedral-of-christ-the-king-in-liverpool-england.png?w=750

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @MBlanc46

  15. https://www.unz.com/isteve/my-single-is-dropping/

    Sudden Death of Stars ‘What Is Winter Good For?’ – ample play records

    The idea is simple: use homemade snow globes from old jars and vintage bottles and fill them with images, logos, words and objects that reflect a 70s inspired psychedelic world all swirling around in water and glitter.

    The track itself, a wonderful piece of ‘understated psych pop’ you could listen to all year long, laments the fact that Brittany has a temperate oceanic climate and that the weather is too mild for snow to fall, and that is why we often wish for the snowman to come.

    Christmas Blossom

    Christmas Blossom · Beat Mark

    [MORE]

    https://www.ampleplay.co.uk/product/winter-warmer-split-7-christmas-single-sudden-death-of-stars-beat-mark/

    https://suddendeathofstars.bandcamp.com/album/winter-warmer-split-single-w-beat-mark

    Split Christmas Single by The Sudden Death of Stars / Beat Mark – ample play records

    Cat No: AMPLA082DD / AMPLA082V

    Christmas comes but once a year which is why we’ve given you two festive tracks in one single. Christmas is such a corporate affair, which is why we’re giving you two down to earth independent crown heights songs:

    A. The Sudden of Stars ‘What is Winter Good For?’ “Brittany has a temperate oceanic climate. The weather in this region makes it too mild for snow to fall, and that is why we often wish for the snowman to come.

    AA. Beat Mark ‘Christmas Blossom’ “A Christmas track that follows in the steps of the great tradition of 60s Christmas songs with sleighbells and naïve melodies with voices together on the chorus, like a choir.”

    Both bands are young examples of how great music still is and can be. Beat Mark and TSDOS came out with critically acclaimed albums earlier this year.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @MEH 0910

    Is that a cocker spaniel, or is it a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel? That kid's Christmas ca. second third of 20th century, sure looks blessed indeed.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/fess-parker-daniel-boone-trailblazer-167118093

    https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/marx-toy-co-1960s-electric-pinball-1823150893

    https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/1960s-japan-sears-canada-rocket-base-1829488403

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/towheadedness-and-neoteny/

    https://f4.bcbits.com/img/a2130852098_10.jpg

    , @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Boone_(1964_TV_series)


    Daniel Boone is an American action-adventure television series starring Fess Parker as Daniel Boone that aired from September 24, 1964, to May 7, 1970, on NBC for 165 episodes, and was produced by 20th Century Fox Television, Arcola Enterprises, and Fespar Corp.[1] Ed Ames co-starred as Mingo, Boone's Cherokee friend, for the first four seasons of the series. Albert Salmi portrayed Boone's companion Yadkin in season one only. Country Western singer-actor Jimmy Dean was a featured actor as Josh Clements during the 1968–1970 seasons. Actor and former NFL football player Rosey Grier made regular appearances as Gabe Cooper in the 1969 to 1970 season.[2] The show was broadcast "in living color" beginning in fall 1965, the second season, and was shot entirely in California and Kanab, Utah.
     
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9b/Daniel_boone-show.jpg
  16. Trump’s executive make-them-beautiful order will have just as much effect as most of the rest of his “orders”, as in nil. For one thing, once the $27,500,000,000,000 debt gets called in, the newest feral buildings and town halls may be made out of old red, blue, and green Cosco shipping containers. How’s that for brutalism?

    On that note, Merry Christmas, iSteve and the great iSteve commenters!

    • Agree: Voltarde
    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Who else ate wayyy too much Christmas Eve food and is currently in a semi-comatose state?

    https://www.lifewithdogs.tv/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/11.24.16-Food-Coma-Pets25.jpg

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Lurker, @Buzz Mohawk

    , @BenKenobi
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Trump’s executive make-them-beautiful order will have just as much effect as most of the rest of his “orders”, as in nil.
     
    All I wanted for Christmas 2017 was a TrumpStaffel in which to enlist. Now we're back to square one.

    We are survivors.
    The ones left behind.
    Defenders of the Legacy.
    The Last of Our Kind.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Hi_kzzSXhY
  17. @Thomas
    My personal favorite "WTF were they thinking" piece of modern architecture is the "Cathedral of Christ the Light" on the shore of Lake Merritt, in Oakland, California. Or, as I call it, the "cunthedral." Completed in 2008, the holy seat of the Diocese of Oakland splays open towards the sky, as if it were ready to receive something more than just grace and revelation from above. I'd call the overall architectural concept "Marian."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathedral_of_Christ_the_Light_(Oakland,_California)

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f4/Oak_Cathdrl_1.jpg/1280px-Oak_Cathdrl_1.jpg

    Replies: @Kronos, @Lockean Proviso, @Buzz Mohawk, @Western, @Bill Jones

    Open your hearts this year and open your *explicit word deleted.*

  18. @Achmed E. Newman
    Trump's executive make-them-beautiful order will have just as much effect as most of the rest of his "orders", as in nil. For one thing, once the $27,500,000,000,000 debt gets called in, the newest feral buildings and town halls may be made out of old red, blue, and green Cosco shipping containers. How's that for brutalism?

    On that note, Merry Christmas, iSteve and the great iSteve commenters!

    Replies: @Kronos, @BenKenobi

    Who else ate wayyy too much Christmas Eve food and is currently in a semi-comatose state?

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Kronos

    "You...and your little dog, too."

    Oh wait, that was the caption for the photo in the next post, from Buzz Mohawk in Connecticut, where the winds are up to 60 mph.

    Did your dog really fall asleep in his or her food dish? If so, great shot.

    Replies: @Kronos

    , @Lurker
    @Kronos

    Awwwww!

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Kronos

    Château Mohawk 2020 Christmas Menu

    From the Lady Chef

    Christmas Eve Dinner:

    Roasted Salmon
    Creamed Spinach
    Boulangere Potatoes


    Christmas Dinner:

    Duck Confit
    Green Bean and Chestnut Casserole
    Tiramisu Dessert


    A Selection of Red and White Wines is Provided.
    Bourbon and Beer are Available.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Kronos

  19. Raining here in Connecticut. Wind gusting to 60 mph. All the snow has washed away.

    MERRY CHRISTMAS
    SEND STEVE MONEY
    .

  20. @Kronos
    Hell, let’s add some art nouveau while we’re at it. Much more ideal for small government buildings like rural post offices but they are just beautiful.

    https://i2.wp.com/designedtotravel.ro/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/DSC_1641-rue-du-lac-6.jpg

    https://www.smalldesignideas.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/1393518609_style-modern-or-art-nouveau.jpg

    https://external-preview.redd.it/g8z1MBKhuqnZ2KIlCua0EsyXSY3T4zo_0DOpCzYuO9A.jpg?auto=webp&s=7581a628bf482b657968621575fcafb0c49dfd62

    Replies: @Lockean Proviso

    That would require real skills in metalworking, stone masonry, and precision. Could it even be done anymore? Maybe. Worth it if so.

    • Agree: Kronos
  21. So you won’t need a dose of pink bismuth*,
    don’t stuff your abdómen this Christmas.
    Eat all on the table,
    but only a taste
    of each dish; you’ll be able
    to maintain your waist
    just as slender as Panama’s isthmus!

    *Pink bismuth = Pepto-Bismol

    • LOL: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers
    @the one they call Desanex

    There's a place in there somewhere near to the isthmus for the Islets of Langerhans, what with overeating and insulin.

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @the one they call Desanex

    Des, too funny.Merry Christmas...stay safe.

  22. @Thomas
    My personal favorite "WTF were they thinking" piece of modern architecture is the "Cathedral of Christ the Light" on the shore of Lake Merritt, in Oakland, California. Or, as I call it, the "cunthedral." Completed in 2008, the holy seat of the Diocese of Oakland splays open towards the sky, as if it were ready to receive something more than just grace and revelation from above. I'd call the overall architectural concept "Marian."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathedral_of_Christ_the_Light_(Oakland,_California)

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f4/Oak_Cathdrl_1.jpg/1280px-Oak_Cathdrl_1.jpg

    Replies: @Kronos, @Lockean Proviso, @Buzz Mohawk, @Western, @Bill Jones

    It’s from the same general theme as the Vatican’s Paul VI Audience Hall, aka the Reptilian Overlord Building featuring an Alien Reptile Christ sculpture. Surely it’s just a coincidence, but then there is a precedent for seeing Virgin Mary in a cracker or wall stain.

    https://www.collective-evolution.com/2017/11/17/the-dark-secrets-behind-the-popes-audience-hall-its-a-giant-reptilian/

    Merry Christmas, everyone!

    • Thanks: Pheasant
    • LOL: Kronos
  23. @Kronos
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Who else ate wayyy too much Christmas Eve food and is currently in a semi-comatose state?

    https://www.lifewithdogs.tv/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/11.24.16-Food-Coma-Pets25.jpg

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Lurker, @Buzz Mohawk

    “You…and your little dog, too.”

    Oh wait, that was the caption for the photo in the next post, from Buzz Mohawk in Connecticut, where the winds are up to 60 mph.

    Did your dog really fall asleep in his or her food dish? If so, great shot.

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Gary in Gramercy

    Not my dog. Just typed in “food coma” and it popped up.

    Replies: @fnn

  24. Hi Steve,

    Speaking of attractive architecture and domes, I just loved going (and going and going and…) to hang out at my friend Jeffrey Epstein’s temple!

    Yeah, it was ‘pleasant’ to hang out on the outside, but even pleasanter (wink wink) to hang out on the inside…

    …and, speaking of people who ‘hang’ out on the ‘inside’, whatever did become of my ol’ pal Jeffrey? Did the DoJ ever find out? (Ha, ha, ha!)

    Wink! Wink!

    Yours

    Bill C

  25. One of the best Christmases I’ve ever had even though separated from my eldest by a thousand kilometres it was more than made up for not having to see my older brother, and not even strictly due to covid lockdown.

    Merry Christmas to you and yours, Steve.

    To all those who are still employed and now with a handy excuse for not having to see fuckwit family members this Christmas

    Dedicated to the triple chinned bush-pig-premier of Queensland.

    (Pro tip: the regular ozzie to and fro response is “no, way, get fucked, fuck off”

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    @Pat Hannagan

    To all my fellow HBD Sailerites, especially those of you brought down by riot police on Christmas Day Sydney

    https://www.news.com.au/world/coronavirus/australia/coronavirus-australia-live-updates-recipe-for-confusion-gladys-christmas-covid-plan-slammed/live-coverage/a279c5020a2e7394382b53f3ba850ff1

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-cejAebJM68

    I said, Tracy, won't you listen, this is Christmas
    Don't you go, don't you go
    She said, David, believe me, I wouldn't miss this for the world
    I've got to blow, I've got to blow
    Tojo never made it
    Tojo never made it to Darwin

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

  26. Hi Steve,

    Your pics of domes with lots of airy empty space underneath, remind me to let your readers know the inside of my skull is available for their wedding photos.

    Yours,

    Joe B

  27. @Kronos
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Who else ate wayyy too much Christmas Eve food and is currently in a semi-comatose state?

    https://www.lifewithdogs.tv/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/11.24.16-Food-Coma-Pets25.jpg

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Lurker, @Buzz Mohawk

    Awwwww!

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    @Lurker

    Dedicated to you, mate. One of the greatest grunge tunes of all time

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OC5Zlvgj8Xs

    All your posts are apposite, you're constantly uplifting, there's zero about you a man would hate.

    Replies: @Lurker

  28. @Lurker
    @Kronos

    Awwwww!

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

    Dedicated to you, mate. One of the greatest grunge tunes of all time

    All your posts are apposite, you’re constantly uplifting, there’s zero about you a man would hate.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @Pat Hannagan

    Thanks mate! And Happy Christmas.

  29. @Kronos
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Who else ate wayyy too much Christmas Eve food and is currently in a semi-comatose state?

    https://www.lifewithdogs.tv/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/11.24.16-Food-Coma-Pets25.jpg

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Lurker, @Buzz Mohawk

    Château Mohawk 2020 Christmas Menu

    From the Lady Chef

    Christmas Eve Dinner:

    Roasted Salmon
    Creamed Spinach
    Boulangere Potatoes

    Christmas Dinner:

    Duck Confit
    Green Bean and Chestnut Casserole
    Tiramisu Dessert

    A Selection of Red and White Wines is Provided.
    Bourbon and Beer are Available.

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Buzz Mohawk

    "Duck Confit"?

    Did he suffer much?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Kronos
    @Buzz Mohawk

    That sounds (and likely tasted) really good!

  30. @Pat Hannagan
    One of the best Christmases I've ever had even though separated from my eldest by a thousand kilometres it was more than made up for not having to see my older brother, and not even strictly due to covid lockdown.

    Merry Christmas to you and yours, Steve.

    To all those who are still employed and now with a handy excuse for not having to see fuckwit family members this Christmas

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xj_QkLrW3qc

    Dedicated to the triple chinned bush-pig-premier of Queensland.

    (Pro tip: the regular ozzie to and fro response is "no, way, get fucked, fuck off"

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

    To all my fellow HBD Sailerites, especially those of you brought down by riot police on Christmas Day Sydney

    https://www.news.com.au/world/coronavirus/australia/coronavirus-australia-live-updates-recipe-for-confusion-gladys-christmas-covid-plan-slammed/live-coverage/a279c5020a2e7394382b53f3ba850ff1

    I said, Tracy, won’t you listen, this is Christmas
    Don’t you go, don’t you go
    She said, David, believe me, I wouldn’t miss this for the world
    I’ve got to blow, I’ve got to blow
    Tojo never made it
    Tojo never made it to Darwin

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    @Pat Hannagan

    For Greg Cochran, The Derb and a thousand blooming HBDers and their motley crew still believing that history rolls out in a never ending stream of logical thought parlayed into rational action.

    But not only to them, but also to all Americans and *all of us* soon to be swept up in the next big international whirlwind merchant war which will be sold to us about something profound, meaningful, that will determine the outcome of everything we believe in and stand for.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGQkp1TLJ38

  31. I hope the new administration passes legislation that shuts hate sites like this down and persecutes hate speech

    I’m hopeful for the new year

    Science will be followed

    Hate will not be tolerated

    Those who need Criticism will get it

    Kids will be taught real history

    Things will be renamed

    Diversity will be tolerated

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Silver gold nose seller

    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/lugAAOSwlpVeTFvI/s-l640.jpg

  32. @Gary in Gramercy
    @Kronos

    "You...and your little dog, too."

    Oh wait, that was the caption for the photo in the next post, from Buzz Mohawk in Connecticut, where the winds are up to 60 mph.

    Did your dog really fall asleep in his or her food dish? If so, great shot.

    Replies: @Kronos

    Not my dog. Just typed in “food coma” and it popped up.

    • Replies: @fnn
    @Kronos

    "Not my dog"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ue0fZfwHfzo

  33. @Pat Hannagan
    @Pat Hannagan

    To all my fellow HBD Sailerites, especially those of you brought down by riot police on Christmas Day Sydney

    https://www.news.com.au/world/coronavirus/australia/coronavirus-australia-live-updates-recipe-for-confusion-gladys-christmas-covid-plan-slammed/live-coverage/a279c5020a2e7394382b53f3ba850ff1

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-cejAebJM68

    I said, Tracy, won't you listen, this is Christmas
    Don't you go, don't you go
    She said, David, believe me, I wouldn't miss this for the world
    I've got to blow, I've got to blow
    Tojo never made it
    Tojo never made it to Darwin

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

    For Greg Cochran, The Derb and a thousand blooming HBDers and their motley crew still believing that history rolls out in a never ending stream of logical thought parlayed into rational action.

    But not only to them, but also to all Americans and *all of us* soon to be swept up in the next big international whirlwind merchant war which will be sold to us about something profound, meaningful, that will determine the outcome of everything we believe in and stand for.

  34. Ever read “The Match” about the money game at Cypress Point between Harvey Wood and Ken Venturi v Byron Nelson and Ben Hogan? It is fantastic. Long description of all 18 holes.

  35. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Kronos

    Château Mohawk 2020 Christmas Menu

    From the Lady Chef

    Christmas Eve Dinner:

    Roasted Salmon
    Creamed Spinach
    Boulangere Potatoes


    Christmas Dinner:

    Duck Confit
    Green Bean and Chestnut Casserole
    Tiramisu Dessert


    A Selection of Red and White Wines is Provided.
    Bourbon and Beer are Available.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Kronos

    “Duck Confit”?

    Did he suffer much?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Gary in Gramercy

    He will be cooked by my wife in his own fat today. Merry Christmas!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duck_confit

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

  36. @Thomas
    My personal favorite "WTF were they thinking" piece of modern architecture is the "Cathedral of Christ the Light" on the shore of Lake Merritt, in Oakland, California. Or, as I call it, the "cunthedral." Completed in 2008, the holy seat of the Diocese of Oakland splays open towards the sky, as if it were ready to receive something more than just grace and revelation from above. I'd call the overall architectural concept "Marian."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathedral_of_Christ_the_Light_(Oakland,_California)

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f4/Oak_Cathdrl_1.jpg/1280px-Oak_Cathdrl_1.jpg

    Replies: @Kronos, @Lockean Proviso, @Buzz Mohawk, @Western, @Bill Jones

    I can’t help but like that building.

    It’s an instinctive reaction, you know.

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Buzz Mohawk

    "If you want to welcome me with open arms, I'm afraid you're also going to have to welcome me with open legs."

    Gene Simmons of KISS, to Terry Gross, "Fresh Air," NPR, February 4, 2002

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

  37. @Gary in Gramercy
    @Buzz Mohawk

    "Duck Confit"?

    Did he suffer much?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    He will be cooked by my wife in his own fat today. Merry Christmas!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duck_confit

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Buzz Mohawk

    How did you catch him? A bottle of Ripple and a remaindered collection of Leonard Pitts columns?

    (Just kidding. TD lives! Merry Christmas!)

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  38. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Thomas

    I can't help but like that building.

    It's an instinctive reaction, you know.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    “If you want to welcome me with open arms, I’m afraid you’re also going to have to welcome me with open legs.”

    Gene Simmons of KISS, to Terry Gross, “Fresh Air,” NPR, February 4, 2002

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Gary in Gramercy


    “If you want to welcome me with open arms, I’m afraid you’re also going to have to welcome me with open legs.”

    Gene Simmons of KISS, to Terry Gross, “Fresh Air,” NPR, February 4, 2002

     

    Maybe this was his way of indicating to Gross that despite her deficiencies in the looks department, and the (mistaken) assumption by so many that she was a lesbian, there was a man out there for her.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

  39. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Gary in Gramercy

    He will be cooked by my wife in his own fat today. Merry Christmas!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duck_confit

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    How did you catch him? A bottle of Ripple and a remaindered collection of Leonard Pitts columns?

    (Just kidding. TD lives! Merry Christmas!)

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Gary in Gramercy

    Merry Christmas!

    https://www.jendhamuni.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/baby-duck-running.gif

  40. That pic of Buffalo’s City Hall is a reminder of how we were once a truly first class civilization.

  41. The British Columbia Provincial Capital in Victoria, BC is magnificent. Worth a trip there just to see it.

  42. You can compare the old Chicago Public Library, with its Tiffany Dome, with the current Harold Washington Library. The Harold Washington Library is a ham fisted attempt to return to older, more classical style, but it is over the top with out of scale decorations basically tacked on to a modern building.

    • Thanks: JimDandy, Pheasant
    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Mike Zwick

    "The Harold Washington Library is a ham fisted attempt to return to older, more classical style [i.e., Richard J. Daley, Da Mare], but it is over the top with out of scale decorations basically tacked on to a modern building."

    Spoken like a man who actually met Harold Washington face to face.

  43. Steve,

    Merry Christmas to you and your family. Same to all the great commentors here on Unz. Often, this is the best part of my day. Which shows you what my life is like…

  44. @Gary in Gramercy
    @Buzz Mohawk

    How did you catch him? A bottle of Ripple and a remaindered collection of Leonard Pitts columns?

    (Just kidding. TD lives! Merry Christmas!)

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Merry Christmas!

  45. “I suspect General Kesselring could have defended the 1976 Long Beach city hall from Mark Clark’s Sherman tanks for six months.”

    LOLOL

    Merry Christmas!

  46. Been to the Orange County Government building in Goshen, NY because the courthouses for that county are there. Ugly as hell. And despite all that quirky windows on the exterior there is almost no natural light in the place; totally sterile workplaces and courtrooms. And the parking lot is always under construction.

  47. The Malibu town hall is not an employment program like other places. They also don’t want their bureaucrats to think they are important people. The work in a building fit for the proletarians, while better paid and having health benefits the building looks like it could be where a caterer does food prep.

    What the Buffalo city hall says to me is public wealth is going to be redistributed to an army of city bureaucrats. The Buffalo city hall is a monument to that city’s fall from grace. Californians should pay attention to the history of America’s first ‘silicon valley’, the doughnut surrounding New York City. IBM, Xerox, Kodak, Sperry, Bell Labs, and many others.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @George


    The Malibu town hall is not an employment program like other places. They also don’t want their bureaucrats to think they are important people. They work in a building fit for the proletarians
     
    So what you're saying is that the people who work in the Malibu city hall don't live in Malibu.

    Replies: @prosa123

    , @George
    @George

    "So what you’re saying is that the people who work in the Malibu city hall don’t live in Malibu."

    I was trying to comment on the architecture. The fabulous ornate buildings are paid for by bonding which means debts paid for by future taxpayers. The fabulous standalone buildings also communicate to the local bureaucrats how important they you relative to the proles that work at the local strip mall, so don't treat them like cashiers at the dollar store.

    Malibu's city hall architecture on the other hand cost the minimum to achieve function and people that work there get the impression they are employees. Employee does not mean poorly paid, but the power relationship is different.

    The Buffalo city hall in particular implies they intend to hire hoards of people who will vote and all the elected officials will be constantly surrounded by a hive of government workers, in Malibu the mayor and town council can easily avoid contact with the government workers. It also acted as a gigantic paper era memory storage device. The modern government big or small lives in the cloud.

  48. @Achmed E. Newman
    Trump's executive make-them-beautiful order will have just as much effect as most of the rest of his "orders", as in nil. For one thing, once the $27,500,000,000,000 debt gets called in, the newest feral buildings and town halls may be made out of old red, blue, and green Cosco shipping containers. How's that for brutalism?

    On that note, Merry Christmas, iSteve and the great iSteve commenters!

    Replies: @Kronos, @BenKenobi

    Trump’s executive make-them-beautiful order will have just as much effect as most of the rest of his “orders”, as in nil.

    All I wanted for Christmas 2017 was a TrumpStaffel in which to enlist. Now we’re back to square one.

    We are survivors.
    The ones left behind.
    Defenders of the Legacy.
    The Last of Our Kind.

  49. Pre 1945 we pointed to the heavens, after was like, whatever, bro.

    Merry Christmas to all.

  50. Merry Crisis and a Happy New Fear to you too Steve,

  51. Mayne is a leftist. He doesn’t hate bureaucrats in particular, he hates everybody.

    As I may have mentioned before, I met Thom Mayne a few times back when I was working for Richard Meier in LA in the early 90s, and he was actually very pleasant–unlike, for example, Richard Meier. Frank Gehry is funny, but you can tell that deep down he’s probably the kind of jerk you pretty much need to be to get where he is, and Richard is like Frank Gehry but without the sense of humor. Thom Mayne didn’t give off any of that asshole radiation, although admittedly I didn’t know him very well.

    Anyway, Merry Christmas!

    • Replies: @JackOH
    @slumber_j

    " . . . asshole radiation . . . ."

    Asshole radiation. That's a great neologism.

    I was going to watch more of that interview with Undersecretary Munchkin, but his asshole radiation was too repellent.

    Bob was a strong worker, but his asshole radiation alienated his superiors and colleagues.

    Merry Christmas all and best wishes for the New Year.

  52. Buffalo’s huge City Hall reflects the city’s important status at the time. It was a major hub of industry and commerce with a population well in excess of current levels. At about the same time the New York Central railroad built a huge new station, something befitting such an important city, figuring that even though the station was well east of downtown the city would expand to make the location more convenient.
    Today of course Buffalo is much diminished in terms of both population and economic activity, though there are recent signs of growth. The city hall is far in excess of what’s needed and the train station is abandoned except for occasional events.

  53. Apparently the PR department at Hersey’s had too much time on their hands in 2020 and wanted to say something important. But their ad has been the same for 30 years without human actors so this year they inserted a black girl and her father and ruined the whole ad by making it look like every other ad. But that black girl got paid.

    Woke capital never sleeps, it even finds a way to ruin the comforting tradition of an abstract advert that was hugely effective for the company. You will be replaced!

  54. The 1933-1934 Chicago Century of Progress, where Art Deco reigned supreme, as in our super-cool future.

    Hell, the very first Buck Rogers film was presented here.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Joe Stalin

    1939 World's Fair:


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bG0YiDPUJ94

    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-wnBAho6n9_g/VCzLHRK47dI/AAAAAAAADVI/xu4iWTT5Pw8/s1600/Night_Scene.jpg


    https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2019/07/Worlds_Fair._LOC_gsc.5a30821.jpg


    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/4e/ae/9a/4eae9ab170648f696a38a9c017d12b0f.jpg

    https://www.cca.qc.ca/img/jdiXZSY7nJTYKndbR0ffhPJstV4=/1920x0/6296/5700/PH1981_0265.jpg

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @MBlanc46

    , @Dr. Charles Fhandrich
    @Joe Stalin

    Fantastic sir. Great video's you posted and for great reasons. Thank you.

  55. 1. Merry Christmas

    2. I’ve never seen so many ugly buildings, so I guess, we have to thank Steve for this Christmas “gift”…

  56. “tentacle porn brutalism.” I laughed egg nogg out of my nose…

    Seriously though aside from assaulting everyone with their ugliness these are an insult to the people who had to put them together. Working class guys quarried the materials, trucked them to site, installed the windows, etc., etc., and the fruits of their labors were…this. They did their jobs just fine, the buildings don’t fall down due to poor workmanship, but because the elites (‘elites’) didn’t do their jobs they are stuck knowing they spent x% of their lives toiling for these things. Not exactly something to point out to your grandkids.

  57. Buffalo’s city hall is a prime example of art deco (looking at you Art) on the exterior but the lobby is depressingly dark Merry Christmas

  58. Wolfe mentions that the San Francisco City Hall is kept gleamingly polished. All this uptake must be pretty expensive?

    I used to be an attorney in NYC and had cases in the New York Supreme Court building. I always wondered how the City kept that beautiful old building in pretty good shape. One day I was walking through it as the rotunda was cordoned off and a dozen workers were polishing the floors and chandeliers. A security guard told me that a movie production was filming that night and the crew was prepping the building for the shoot.

  59. Merry Christmas!

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
    @PiltdownMan

    Merry Christmas, Piltdown and all of you !

  60. @slumber_j

    Mayne is a leftist. He doesn’t hate bureaucrats in particular, he hates everybody.
     
    As I may have mentioned before, I met Thom Mayne a few times back when I was working for Richard Meier in LA in the early 90s, and he was actually very pleasant--unlike, for example, Richard Meier. Frank Gehry is funny, but you can tell that deep down he's probably the kind of jerk you pretty much need to be to get where he is, and Richard is like Frank Gehry but without the sense of humor. Thom Mayne didn't give off any of that asshole radiation, although admittedly I didn't know him very well.

    Anyway, Merry Christmas!

    Replies: @JackOH

    ” . . . asshole radiation . . . .”

    Asshole radiation. That’s a great neologism.

    I was going to watch more of that interview with Undersecretary Munchkin, but his asshole radiation was too repellent.

    Bob was a strong worker, but his asshole radiation alienated his superiors and colleagues.

    Merry Christmas all and best wishes for the New Year.

    • Thanks: slumber_j
  61. @PiltdownMan
    Merry Christmas!

    Replies: @AKAHorace

    Merry Christmas, Piltdown and all of you !

  62. Why does one get the feeling that Steve tends to take this personally? This is definitely one action of Trump’s, “There shall be no more ugly buildings in public federal works” that he can get behind.

    Merry Christmas, everyone.

  63. Speaking of buildings, someone set off a bomb in downtown Nashville. Jerks never rest.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Anon

    Might have been targeting a big AT&T facility.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @JimDandy

    , @Munkin-4
    @Anon

    Now that Xmas has passed, I can say it: America deserves every bomb that comes its way.

    Your country is doing so much f-ckery in the world these days, and your cud-chewing citizens are for the most part oblivious...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  64. @JohnnyWalker123
    I'm dreaming of a White Christmas, just like the ones I used to know....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3ZC45Q82pg

    May your days be merry and bright.... and may all your Christmases be White....

    Merry Christmas!

    Replies: @CCZ, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Bill Jones

    Agree with the sentiment, question is, how long is that song going to be permitted in the Current Year? I mean, a WHITE Christmas?

  65. > Thom Mayne

    Remember:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thom_Mayne#Controversy

    »Early in his career, Mayne became notorious for having an abusive temper, screaming at clients. “None of my clients would recommend me,” he later admitted.

    In late summer 2002, Mayne was asked by New York magazine to contribute a proposal for the World Trade Center site, where recovery and cleanup had just ended. In discussing his plan, Mayne told an interviewer his thoughts about the September 11th attacks. “I have no empathy; it doesn’t make me weep. I could make a better case for justifying the terror than the other way around.”«

  66. The American future is the strip mall and the taco truck.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @AnotherDad


    The American future is the strip mall and the taco truck.
     
    Have you been outside lately? That is the American present.
  67. @Thomas
    My personal favorite "WTF were they thinking" piece of modern architecture is the "Cathedral of Christ the Light" on the shore of Lake Merritt, in Oakland, California. Or, as I call it, the "cunthedral." Completed in 2008, the holy seat of the Diocese of Oakland splays open towards the sky, as if it were ready to receive something more than just grace and revelation from above. I'd call the overall architectural concept "Marian."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathedral_of_Christ_the_Light_(Oakland,_California)

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f4/Oak_Cathdrl_1.jpg/1280px-Oak_Cathdrl_1.jpg

    Replies: @Kronos, @Lockean Proviso, @Buzz Mohawk, @Western, @Bill Jones

    How do I post a picture that will show?

    • Replies: @Thomas
    @Western

    Paste a link directly to the file, .jpg, .png, or whatever.

    Replies: @Western

  68. An American man said he was “blown away” by the public response to his recreation of an English stately home using gingerbread.

    Eric Becker, 29, from Memphis, Tennessee, shared his “100% edible” design of Blickling Hall, in Norfolk, on a Norwich community Facebook page.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-norfolk-55419351

  69. The dividing year in architecture is 1945. Before, Westerners tried, in many different styles, to make buildings look beautiful. After 1945, they felt like they didn’t deserve beautiful buildings.

    Steve i don’t quite think this is right.

    Euro’s might have been very depressed feeling they didn’t “deserve” nice stuff. But America was a winner! Kings of the world. We’d earned victory and deserved–and were getting–nice stuff in abundance. Yet the architecture still sucked.

    I think the triumph of modernism in public architecture comes from something other than “deserves”:

    — modernist ideology/trendiness
    Modernism triumphing among the great and the good

    — war time “mass efficiency” ideology;
    The prosecution of the War was all about planning, getting your ducks in the row, cranking out the bullets and bombs, guns, tanks and planes. After the war organized efficiency had a lot of pull–cut the frilly stuff, this is business!

    — government expansion
    Where once you had the mayor, some department heads some clerks and secretaries–or once had the judge and a few clerks and baliffs–now with the huge Depression/War expansion you had government bureaucrats coming out the gills. You needed to just pack ’em in like cordwood. You’re spend a fortune to house so many bureaucrats in beautiful buildings of any traditional style.

    — air conditioning
    Beautiful old style buildings were designed–in part–to beat the heat. With AC who needs high vaulted ceilings. Pack ’em in a low ceiling box and you can heat and cool efficiently.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @AnotherDad

    BTW, "air conditioning" is a very under-appreciated contributor to modern American life, demography, politics. It enabled a raft of huge changes to "the way things are".

    Replies: @GeneralRipper, @Jim Don Bob

  70. @AnotherDad

    The dividing year in architecture is 1945. Before, Westerners tried, in many different styles, to make buildings look beautiful. After 1945, they felt like they didn't deserve beautiful buildings.
     
    Steve i don't quite think this is right.

    Euro's might have been very depressed feeling they didn't "deserve" nice stuff. But America was a winner! Kings of the world. We'd earned victory and deserved--and were getting--nice stuff in abundance. Yet the architecture still sucked.

    I think the triumph of modernism in public architecture comes from something other than "deserves":

    -- modernist ideology/trendiness
    Modernism triumphing among the great and the good

    -- war time "mass efficiency" ideology;
    The prosecution of the War was all about planning, getting your ducks in the row, cranking out the bullets and bombs, guns, tanks and planes. After the war organized efficiency had a lot of pull--cut the frilly stuff, this is business!

    -- government expansion
    Where once you had the mayor, some department heads some clerks and secretaries--or once had the judge and a few clerks and baliffs--now with the huge Depression/War expansion you had government bureaucrats coming out the gills. You needed to just pack 'em in like cordwood. You're spend a fortune to house so many bureaucrats in beautiful buildings of any traditional style.

    -- air conditioning
    Beautiful old style buildings were designed--in part--to beat the heat. With AC who needs high vaulted ceilings. Pack 'em in a low ceiling box and you can heat and cool efficiently.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    BTW, “air conditioning” is a very under-appreciated contributor to modern American life, demography, politics. It enabled a raft of huge changes to “the way things are”.

    • Agree: Muggles
    • Replies: @GeneralRipper
    @AnotherDad

    Willis Carrier.

    White man.

    Replies: @GeneralRipper, @Gary in Gramercy

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @AnotherDad


    It enabled a raft of huge changes to “the way things are”.
     
    Like the South.
  71. @the one they call Desanex
    So you won’t need a dose of pink bismuth*,
    don’t stuff your abdómen this Christmas.
    Eat all on the table,
    but only a taste
    of each dish; you’ll be able
    to maintain your waist
    just as slender as Panama’s isthmus!

    *Pink bismuth = Pepto-Bismol

    Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Buffalo Joe

    There’s a place in there somewhere near to the isthmus for the Islets of Langerhans, what with overeating and insulin.

  72. I like the dark, icy Office of the President Elect, where masked harbingers emerge from the shadows to murmur incantations at us.

    • Replies: @Henry's Cat
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Every time I see one of these, I'm wondering if it's a deep fake.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  73. Here is what was on my phone’s news scroll this fine Christmas Day:

    A photo and story about Alec Baldwin’s family. His wife is Hilaria, a Hispanic immigrant with dark hair and olive skin. She has become well known for being pregnant over and over again in recent years; she’s had five kids and numerous miscarriages. She has a large female social media following. I never saw the kids until today and boy oh boy was I surprised.

    The photo shows her pale skinned children with a mixture of pale blonde and medium blonde hair. There’s no way she used her own eggs for any of them. Interestingly enough they all have Spanish names though.

    I have seen numerous articles about her at the Daily Mail with many comments telling her to stop having more kids. They never show the kids like they do in this People article or there’d be comments about how she can’t be their biological mother. I wonder why the Baldwins chose to use eggs from a Northern European mother?

    https://people.com/parents/amy-schumer-hilaria-baldwin-re-do-instagram/?amp=true

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @notsaying

    A photo and story about Alec Baldwin’s family. His wife is Hilaria, a Hispanic immigrant with dark hair and olive skin. ... The photo shows her pale skinned children with a mixture of pale blonde and medium blonde hair. There’s no way she used her own eggs for any of them. Interestingly enough they all have Spanish names though.

    Not necessarily. She has dark hair but otherwise is no darker than any number of completely white people (and of course many many white people are dark-haired). If the children weren't 100% white-looking it would be surprising. Even their light hair means little as small childrens' hair often darkens as they get a bit older. By the time they're pre-teens most of them might have medium brown hair.

    A more interesting factoid about the Baldwin family is that Dad voluntarily quarantines himself in the guest house every time he returns from handling business matters in Manhattan. Virus infection rates in Manhattan are lower than most other places.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    , @duncsbaby
    @notsaying

    Maybe Alec got some of Kim Basinger's frozen ova in the divorce settlement.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    , @Iberian
    @notsaying

    You should travel...
    Try south europe and midle-east.
    From Portugal to Iran and Lebanon (and all in the midle) you will find several millions of blondes with dark haired mothers or fathers. Sometimes both...
    And this is hapenning since many thousands years ago... Before you can change any eggs...

    Replies: @Cortes

    , @MEH 0910
    @notsaying

    https://twitter.com/DailyMailCeleb/status/1343273960058793988

    https://twitter.com/DailyMailCeleb/status/1343517077525704704

  74. @Polistra
    Someone's been reading Charles Jencks!

    Frank not Richard Gehry (Goldberg) btw.

    Overall thesis is sound: just consider how the term "prewar" is a marker for "desirable" in upscale New York City apartments.

    Kronos that No.6 Rue du Lac is a knockout. Thanks

    Replies: @prosa123

    Overall thesis is sound: just consider how the term “prewar” is a marker for “desirable” in upscale New York City apartments.

    The greater desirability of prewar apartments is for the most part attributable not to the buildings’ exterior architectural styles, but rather to the fact that they tend to be built better: thicker walls so quieter, high ceilings, quality original moldings, fireplaces, common hallways that look residential rather than institutional, and so on. Although rooms tend to be smaller than in postwar buildings buyers don’t seem to mind too much.
    Another point is that prewars are more likely than postwars to be co-operatives rather than condominiums. While co-ops are not without drawbacks, they generally offer better value for the money and some buyers prefer them, especially at the high end of the market.

    • Thanks: Dissident
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @prosa123

    Charles Murray in one of his libertarian tracts talks about how, after the war, architecture and city planning were slammed with utopian wishlists outlawing the places many of those same people grew up in, making housing less accessible.

  75. So. Explosion in Nashville, possibly targeting the AT&T building. Has demanding that people give up their families and livelihoods started the fire?

  76. @notsaying
    Here is what was on my phone's news scroll this fine Christmas Day:

    A photo and story about Alec Baldwin's family. His wife is Hilaria, a Hispanic immigrant with dark hair and olive skin. She has become well known for being pregnant over and over again in recent years; she's had five kids and numerous miscarriages. She has a large female social media following. I never saw the kids until today and boy oh boy was I surprised.

    The photo shows her pale skinned children with a mixture of pale blonde and medium blonde hair. There's no way she used her own eggs for any of them. Interestingly enough they all have Spanish names though.

    I have seen numerous articles about her at the Daily Mail with many comments telling her to stop having more kids. They never show the kids like they do in this People article or there'd be comments about how she can't be their biological mother. I wonder why the Baldwins chose to use eggs from a Northern European mother?

    https://people.com/parents/amy-schumer-hilaria-baldwin-re-do-instagram/?amp=true

    Replies: @prosa123, @duncsbaby, @Iberian, @MEH 0910

    A photo and story about Alec Baldwin’s family. His wife is Hilaria, a Hispanic immigrant with dark hair and olive skin. … The photo shows her pale skinned children with a mixture of pale blonde and medium blonde hair. There’s no way she used her own eggs for any of them. Interestingly enough they all have Spanish names though.

    Not necessarily. She has dark hair but otherwise is no darker than any number of completely white people (and of course many many white people are dark-haired). If the children weren’t 100% white-looking it would be surprising. Even their light hair means little as small childrens’ hair often darkens as they get a bit older. By the time they’re pre-teens most of them might have medium brown hair.

    A more interesting factoid about the Baldwin family is that Dad voluntarily quarantines himself in the guest house every time he returns from handling business matters in Manhattan. Virus infection rates in Manhattan are lower than most other places.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @prosa123

    Not at all weird that the Baldwin children are whiter. This phenomenon is known as BLEACHING and in the near future women of color will be allowed to choose to become a war concubine.

    How does it feel, knowing those wombs will be colonized by Men of Palor?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  77. Steve, have you looked at SquadPod as a possible alternative media asset? It’s somewhat like Gab, Parler, MeWe, BitChute, et cetera as a free speech alternative to social media, but potentially much more useful as it sets up “non-discoverable” video conference calls.
    https://squadpod.com/

  78. @the one they call Desanex
    So you won’t need a dose of pink bismuth*,
    don’t stuff your abdómen this Christmas.
    Eat all on the table,
    but only a taste
    of each dish; you’ll be able
    to maintain your waist
    just as slender as Panama’s isthmus!

    *Pink bismuth = Pepto-Bismol

    Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Buffalo Joe

    Des, too funny.Merry Christmas…stay safe.

  79. @Anon
    Speaking of buildings, someone set off a bomb in downtown Nashville. Jerks never rest.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Munkin-4

    Might have been targeting a big AT&T facility.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @prosa123

    In the spirit of this post it's worth noting that those huge windowless ATT monoliths are an architectural blight on downtown districts. So while potential bombing suspects include right-wingers, left-wingers, CIA false flaggers etc ... can Jane Jacobs account for her whereabouts this morning ?

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @prosa123

    , @JimDandy
    @prosa123

    Something-something-something therefore it would be treasonous to pardon Assange.

  80. @prosa123
    @Polistra

    Overall thesis is sound: just consider how the term “prewar” is a marker for “desirable” in upscale New York City apartments.

    The greater desirability of prewar apartments is for the most part attributable not to the buildings' exterior architectural styles, but rather to the fact that they tend to be built better: thicker walls so quieter, high ceilings, quality original moldings, fireplaces, common hallways that look residential rather than institutional, and so on. Although rooms tend to be smaller than in postwar buildings buyers don't seem to mind too much.
    Another point is that prewars are more likely than postwars to be co-operatives rather than condominiums. While co-ops are not without drawbacks, they generally offer better value for the money and some buyers prefer them, especially at the high end of the market.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Charles Murray in one of his libertarian tracts talks about how, after the war, architecture and city planning were slammed with utopian wishlists outlawing the places many of those same people grew up in, making housing less accessible.

  81. @Apollo 20


    https://cdn10.bostonmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2017/10/mass-art-exterior.jpg
    http://www.greatcollegedeals.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Massachusetts-College-of-Art-and-Desgn-1-1024x683.jpg
    Massachusetts College of Art and Design
     
    🤦‍♂️

    “What the Bleep Happened to Architecture?—E. Michael Jones”

    https://www.patrickcoffin.media/what-the-bleep-happened-to-architecture/
     

    Replies: @anonymous, @Sue D. Nim

    What happened? The same thing that happened to beauty:

  82. @Silver gold nose seller
    I hope the new administration passes legislation that shuts hate sites like this down and persecutes hate speech

    I'm hopeful for the new year

    Science will be followed

    Hate will not be tolerated

    Those who need Criticism will get it

    Kids will be taught real history

    Things will be renamed

    Diversity will be tolerated

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  83. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, it’s xmas eve again, and Kevin Spacey still suffers from Borderline Narcissistic Personality Disorder:

    https://youtu.be/w6_N8uxJQ3g

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    Kevin, read something. For instance, quite a good book ….

  84. @prosa123
    @notsaying

    A photo and story about Alec Baldwin’s family. His wife is Hilaria, a Hispanic immigrant with dark hair and olive skin. ... The photo shows her pale skinned children with a mixture of pale blonde and medium blonde hair. There’s no way she used her own eggs for any of them. Interestingly enough they all have Spanish names though.

    Not necessarily. She has dark hair but otherwise is no darker than any number of completely white people (and of course many many white people are dark-haired). If the children weren't 100% white-looking it would be surprising. Even their light hair means little as small childrens' hair often darkens as they get a bit older. By the time they're pre-teens most of them might have medium brown hair.

    A more interesting factoid about the Baldwin family is that Dad voluntarily quarantines himself in the guest house every time he returns from handling business matters in Manhattan. Virus infection rates in Manhattan are lower than most other places.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    Not at all weird that the Baldwin children are whiter. This phenomenon is known as BLEACHING and in the near future women of color will be allowed to choose to become a war concubine.

    How does it feel, knowing those wombs will be colonized by Men of Palor?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @BenKenobi


    Not at all weird that the Baldwin children are whiter. This phenomenon is known as BLEACHING...
     
    Fifty years and a day ago, this is what was on TV:


    https://i2.wp.com/us-east-1.linodeobjects.com/gunaxin/2012/12/Sisters-At-Heart-Racial-Polka-Dots.png

    ‘Bewitched’ Star Erin Murphy Remembers the Episode of the Series That Took on Racism 50 Years Ago

    Story credit goes to a field day group from Thomas Jefferson High School, which is a nice example of Streamline Moderne, designed by a man with the very architectey name of Stiles O. Clements.


    https://jeffersonhighschoolalumnila.org/images/Jefferson_High_Front.jpg


    How long it will keep that name is anybody's guess, but some protection is afforded them by their choice of mascot:


    https://yb.cmcdn.com/yearbooks/9/2/b/4/92b489a2e4d180eaeeb409131707470e/440/0001.jpg


    This is what those black kids wrote into the script-- trigger warning!:



    https://i0.wp.com/altchristmas.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/bewitched.sisters-at-heart-e1579445456151.png

  85. @prosa123
    @Anon

    Might have been targeting a big AT&T facility.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @JimDandy

    In the spirit of this post it’s worth noting that those huge windowless ATT monoliths are an architectural blight on downtown districts. So while potential bombing suspects include right-wingers, left-wingers, CIA false flaggers etc … can Jane Jacobs account for her whereabouts this morning ?

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Known Fact

    They contain switching machines for the communications fabric of the nation; you WANT them to be impervious to rioters and nearby nuclear detonation in case of nuclear combat "toe-to-toe-with-the-Russkies."

    In the old days the trunk lines went from the switching center to the customers; I would guess that "Remote Switching Modules" exist wherein you could get closer to the customers and reduce the shear amount of cables going to central office building.

    Replies: @Kibernetika

    , @prosa123
    @Known Fact

    In the spirit of this post it’s worth noting that those huge windowless ATT monoliths are an architectural blight on downtown districts. So while potential bombing suspects include right-wingers, left-wingers, CIA false flaggers etc … can Jane Jacobs account for her whereabouts this morning ?

    https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/157686714/jane-jacobs#view-photo=135044222

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Known Fact

  86. @George
    The Malibu town hall is not an employment program like other places. They also don't want their bureaucrats to think they are important people. The work in a building fit for the proletarians, while better paid and having health benefits the building looks like it could be where a caterer does food prep.

    What the Buffalo city hall says to me is public wealth is going to be redistributed to an army of city bureaucrats. The Buffalo city hall is a monument to that city's fall from grace. Californians should pay attention to the history of America's first 'silicon valley', the doughnut surrounding New York City. IBM, Xerox, Kodak, Sperry, Bell Labs, and many others.

    Replies: @Muggles, @George

    The Malibu town hall is not an employment program like other places. They also don’t want their bureaucrats to think they are important people. They work in a building fit for the proletarians

    So what you’re saying is that the people who work in the Malibu city hall don’t live in Malibu.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Muggles

    So what you’re saying is that the people who work in the Malibu city hall don’t live in Malibu.

    Some municipal governments require their employees to live in town and some don't. It often depends on housing prices, the greater the prices the less likely there are residency requirements. For example, I once worked briefly for the local government in a Connecticut city that had some fairly inexpensive housing. They were strict about residency requirements, the only exceptions were teachers (exempt by state law) and cops and firefighters (exempt by union contract). In contrast, the smaller surrounding towns with more costly housing had no such requirements.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  87. @AnotherDad
    The American future is the strip mall and the taco truck.

    Replies: @Muggles

    The American future is the strip mall and the taco truck.

    Have you been outside lately? That is the American present.

  88. @The Anti-Gnostic
    I like the dark, icy Office of the President Elect, where masked harbingers emerge from the shadows to murmur incantations at us.

    https://twitter.com/TheFirstonTV/status/1341808922404007936?s=20

    Replies: @Henry's Cat

    Every time I see one of these, I’m wondering if it’s a deep fake.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Henry's Cat

    Would a deep fake do this?


    President-elect Joe Biden called Fox News correspondent Peter Doocy a "one-horse pony" after he asked a question about reporting over the federal investigation into his son Hunter Biden.
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  89. The schools look like prisons, minus the sharpshooter lookout towers.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Abolish_public_education


    The schools look like prisons, minus the sharpshooter lookout towers.

     

    They could have used them at Columbine, Sandy Hook, etc.
  90. @AnotherDad
    @AnotherDad

    BTW, "air conditioning" is a very under-appreciated contributor to modern American life, demography, politics. It enabled a raft of huge changes to "the way things are".

    Replies: @GeneralRipper, @Jim Don Bob

    Willis Carrier.

    White man.

    • Replies: @GeneralRipper
    @GeneralRipper


    The world without air conditioning was radically different from the one we experience today. For example, before air conditioning, the summer heat transformed Washington, DC into a virtual ghost town as politicians abandoned the nation's capital to escape its oppressive temperatures and humidity. The sizzling temperatures of cities such as Phoenix and Las Vegas inhibited their growth. The dripping heat of summers in the Deep South withered the enthusiasm of industries to locate there. Air conditioning changed all this.
     
    http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/ac.htm
    , @Gary in Gramercy
    @GeneralRipper

    P.O.E.

  91. @Muggles
    @George


    The Malibu town hall is not an employment program like other places. They also don’t want their bureaucrats to think they are important people. They work in a building fit for the proletarians
     
    So what you're saying is that the people who work in the Malibu city hall don't live in Malibu.

    Replies: @prosa123

    So what you’re saying is that the people who work in the Malibu city hall don’t live in Malibu.

    Some municipal governments require their employees to live in town and some don’t. It often depends on housing prices, the greater the prices the less likely there are residency requirements. For example, I once worked briefly for the local government in a Connecticut city that had some fairly inexpensive housing. They were strict about residency requirements, the only exceptions were teachers (exempt by state law) and cops and firefighters (exempt by union contract). In contrast, the smaller surrounding towns with more costly housing had no such requirements.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @prosa123



    So what you’re saying is that the people who work in the Malibu city hall don’t live in Malibu.
     
    Some municipal governments require their employees to live in town and some don’t.
     
    Our Nassau County neighbor was a cop across the town line in NYC. His kids always had the best fireworks. They were legal in the state but not in the city.

    Hmm...

    Replies: @John Up North

  92. @GeneralRipper
    @AnotherDad

    Willis Carrier.

    White man.

    Replies: @GeneralRipper, @Gary in Gramercy

    The world without air conditioning was radically different from the one we experience today. For example, before air conditioning, the summer heat transformed Washington, DC into a virtual ghost town as politicians abandoned the nation’s capital to escape its oppressive temperatures and humidity. The sizzling temperatures of cities such as Phoenix and Las Vegas inhibited their growth. The dripping heat of summers in the Deep South withered the enthusiasm of industries to locate there. Air conditioning changed all this.

    http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/ac.htm

  93. @BenKenobi
    @prosa123

    Not at all weird that the Baldwin children are whiter. This phenomenon is known as BLEACHING and in the near future women of color will be allowed to choose to become a war concubine.

    How does it feel, knowing those wombs will be colonized by Men of Palor?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Not at all weird that the Baldwin children are whiter. This phenomenon is known as BLEACHING…

    Fifty years and a day ago, this is what was on TV:


    ‘Bewitched’ Star Erin Murphy Remembers the Episode of the Series That Took on Racism 50 Years Ago

    Story credit goes to a field day group from Thomas Jefferson High School, which is a nice example of Streamline Moderne, designed by a man with the very architectey name of Stiles O. Clements.

    How long it will keep that name is anybody’s guess, but some protection is afforded them by their choice of mascot:

    This is what those black kids wrote into the script– trigger warning!:

    [MORE]

  94. Ugly buildings are – at their best – little more than counterpoint to a preponderance of attractive buildings. When enough ugly buildings are put up, however, they don’t even have that. It’s like eating all anchovies and no pizza (and most people don’t even like anchovies when diluted by a preponderance of pizza.)

    • Replies: @clyde
    @J1234

    Most are repulsed by anchovies on a pizza pie but I like them. Thanks for the Christmas inspiration, I will make my own tomorrow with a good frozen pizza and a tin of anchovies. Green pepper slices on it too. Tiny bit of cayenne and salt sprinkled all over. Served red hot, I hate lukewarm pizza, feed that to the squirrels. Really, you can take a mundane frozen pizza and improve it 100% in any number of ways.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @J1234, @Jonathan Mason

  95. Here’s a little good news for Christmas Day:

    Santa Claus Converts to Calvinism, Moves Everybody to Naughty List

    Seriously, wishing you all a very merry Christmas!

  96. In contrast, the 1963 Orange Government Center in Goshen, NY by Paul Rudolph: Tentacle Porn Brutalism

    Land o’ Goshen! That looks like Moshe Safdie took it apart to make his Habitat:

    “Orange” here, by the way, refers to the Dutch orange, not that other kind. Look at the timestamp, which is in Guinness Mean Time. Saint Stephen’s Day is here again!

  97. Buffalo City Hall was the inspiration for Moscow’s Lomonosov University skyscraper

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_building_of_Moscow_State_University

    and the other Seven Sisters soviet skyscrapers in stalinist gothic

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Sisters_(Moscow)

    which in turn were the inspiration for Bucharest’s Casa Scânteii and Warsaw’s Pałac Kultury i Nauki imienia Józefa Stalina.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palace_of_Culture_and_Science

  98. @Kronos
    @Gary in Gramercy

    Not my dog. Just typed in “food coma” and it popped up.

    Replies: @fnn

    “Not my dog”

    • Thanks: Gary in Gramercy
    • LOL: Kronos
  99. @MEH 0910
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/my-single-is-dropping/

    Sudden Death of Stars 'What Is Winter Good For?' - ample play records
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ELaDOJxYkQ

    The idea is simple: use homemade snow globes from old jars and vintage bottles and fill them with images, logos, words and objects that reflect a 70s inspired psychedelic world all swirling around in water and glitter.

    The track itself, a wonderful piece of 'understated psych pop' you could listen to all year long, laments the fact that Brittany has a temperate oceanic climate and that the weather is too mild for snow to fall, and that is why we often wish for the snowman to come.
     
    Christmas Blossom
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6XG01Y-C8ko

    Christmas Blossom · Beat Mark
     

    https://www.ampleplay.co.uk/product/winter-warmer-split-7-christmas-single-sudden-death-of-stars-beat-mark/

    https://www.ampleplay.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/p/1/3/6/p_1_3_6_136-Winter-Warmer-Split-7-Vinyl-Christmas-Single-Sudden-Death-of-Stars-Beat-Mark-600x600.jpg

    https://f4.bcbits.com/img/0002648663_10.jpg

    https://suddendeathofstars.bandcamp.com/album/winter-warmer-split-single-w-beat-mark

    https://f4.bcbits.com/img/a3996841510_10.jpg

    Split Christmas Single by The Sudden Death of Stars / Beat Mark - ample play records
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6mz5Sz9jUnw

    Cat No: AMPLA082DD / AMPLA082V

    Christmas comes but once a year which is why we've given you two festive tracks in one single. Christmas is such a corporate affair, which is why we're giving you two down to earth independent crown heights songs:

    A. The Sudden of Stars 'What is Winter Good For?' "Brittany has a temperate oceanic climate. The weather in this region makes it too mild for snow to fall, and that is why we often wish for the snowman to come.

    AA. Beat Mark 'Christmas Blossom' "A Christmas track that follows in the steps of the great tradition of 60s Christmas songs with sleighbells and naïve melodies with voices together on the chorus, like a choir."

    Both bands are young examples of how great music still is and can be. Beat Mark and TSDOS came out with critically acclaimed albums earlier this year.
     

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    Is that a cocker spaniel, or is it a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel? That kid’s Christmas ca. second third of 20th century, sure looks blessed indeed.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Cocker spaniel. They were the most popular breed of the 1950s, but went downhill fast.

  100. @Mr. Anon
    The Marin County Civic Center - a Frank Lloyd Wright design - built in 1960:

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/7C6VY-fjJvY/maxresdefault.jpg

    Still looks pretty good to me. It seems to have inspired George Lucas in how his ancient futuristic buildings would look in the interminable Star Wars sequels (prequels, whatever).

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Yes, now that you mention it, I can see Frank Lloyd Wright’s influence on Marin-resident George Lucas.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Yes, now that you mention it, I can see Frank Lloyd Wright’s influence on Marin-resident George Lucas.

     

    Wright was a nasty boss, no mentor at all, and some of his iconic houses have drainage and other serious problems due to his tendency to ignore engineers' advice. Let's hope Lucas doesn't share these traits, and hired better.


    Fallingwater is now Fallingporch.

    7 things Frank Lloyd Wright, a great American architect, got wrong about design

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @AnotherDad

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    Mr. Anon is probably referring to the similarity with "Jaba's palace". It's design and that of many other iconic Star Wars images originate with film concept artist Ralph McQuarrie, not George Lucas. Here is McQuarrie's painting of Jaba's palace...

    https://mightyjabba.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/mcquarrie_jabbas_palace.jpg

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

  101. @Abolish_public_education
    The schools look like prisons, minus the sharpshooter lookout towers.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The schools look like prisons, minus the sharpshooter lookout towers.

    They could have used them at Columbine, Sandy Hook, etc.

  102. Buffalo has a lot of beautiful buildings.

    What I hadn’t realized is that it also has a replica of Michelangelo’s David in Delaware Park.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @SDMatt

    SDMatt, Buffalo have some streets lined with stately mansions. Delaware Ave.,Nottingham Terrace,Lincoln Parkway,Chapin Parkway and Bidwell Parkway to name a few. The Albright Knox art gallery is world famous and justifibly so. There are three or four Frank Lloyd Wright houses also. The Lady of Victory Basilica in nearby Lackawanna is stunning, some one please post a photos and old Polonia has some magnificent churches. But Buffalo is old and has neighborhoods in decay, as do many NE cities. There are gems to be found if you can find a local to guide you around. PS. The statue of David is in the Frederick Law Olmsted designed Delaware Park.

    Replies: @prosa123, @SDMatt

  103. @J1234
    Ugly buildings are - at their best - little more than counterpoint to a preponderance of attractive buildings. When enough ugly buildings are put up, however, they don't even have that. It's like eating all anchovies and no pizza (and most people don't even like anchovies when diluted by a preponderance of pizza.)

    Replies: @clyde

    Most are repulsed by anchovies on a pizza pie but I like them. Thanks for the Christmas inspiration, I will make my own tomorrow with a good frozen pizza and a tin of anchovies. Green pepper slices on it too. Tiny bit of cayenne and salt sprinkled all over. Served red hot, I hate lukewarm pizza, feed that to the squirrels. Really, you can take a mundane frozen pizza and improve it 100% in any number of ways.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @clyde


    Most are repulsed by anchovies on a pizza pie but I like them. ...I will make my own tomorrow with a good frozen pizza and a tin of anchovies.

     

    Make that three. The Hobbes Special.




    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/ce/bd/82/cebd82c89ff75b00c477015aec450b2a.gif

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @J1234
    @clyde


    Really, you can take a mundane frozen pizza and improve it 100% in any number of ways.
     
    Or...you could buy pizza that's better than the mundane frozen stuff. That way you wouldn't have to put anchovies on it to make it more interesting. BTW, there's an edible fish that actually tastes worse than anchovies: smelt. We had some in Seattle about 25 years ago when we were on our honeymoon. I don't hate all pungent fish, though. I remember liking sardines as a kid.
    , @Jonathan Mason
    @clyde

    Pizza Neapolitana (with anchovies) is the very best kind of pizza karma and no pizza joint that does not serve pizza with anchovies is worthy of consideration.

    The very first piece of pizza I ever had in my life in Milan in 1970 was anchovy flavored and I guess that set the trend for me. I don't mind Hawaiian pizza with a topping of pineapple and ham as occasional sweet alternative, but otherwise give me anchovy pizzas every time.

    Replies: @bruce county, @Buzz Mohawk, @clyde

  104. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @MEH 0910

    Is that a cocker spaniel, or is it a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel? That kid's Christmas ca. second third of 20th century, sure looks blessed indeed.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Cocker spaniel. They were the most popular breed of the 1950s, but went downhill fast.

  105. @Known Fact
    @prosa123

    In the spirit of this post it's worth noting that those huge windowless ATT monoliths are an architectural blight on downtown districts. So while potential bombing suspects include right-wingers, left-wingers, CIA false flaggers etc ... can Jane Jacobs account for her whereabouts this morning ?

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @prosa123

    They contain switching machines for the communications fabric of the nation; you WANT them to be impervious to rioters and nearby nuclear detonation in case of nuclear combat “toe-to-toe-with-the-Russkies.”

    In the old days the trunk lines went from the switching center to the customers; I would guess that “Remote Switching Modules” exist wherein you could get closer to the customers and reduce the shear amount of cables going to central office building.

    • Replies: @Kibernetika
    @Joe Stalin

    Zdraste, dydya Iosef :)

    Sorry for my poor joke... Did you read *How Not to Network a Nation?* by Peters? I'm not saying it's so good, mind you, but it puts a foot in the door. I'm really worried that the West is going to forget a lot about the history of Cybernetics because we are woke.

  106. @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Anon

    Yes, now that you mention it, I can see Frank Lloyd Wright's influence on Marin-resident George Lucas.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Chrisnonymous

    Yes, now that you mention it, I can see Frank Lloyd Wright’s influence on Marin-resident George Lucas.

    Wright was a nasty boss, no mentor at all, and some of his iconic houses have drainage and other serious problems due to his tendency to ignore engineers’ advice. Let’s hope Lucas doesn’t share these traits, and hired better.

    Fallingwater is now Fallingporch.

    7 things Frank Lloyd Wright, a great American architect, got wrong about design

    • Thanks: MEH 0910
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    The rap on Wright's Usonian designs is that they were maintenance nightmares. As you say, flat roofs make for poor drainage. I don't know if his earlier houses, the very germanic looking ones, had the same problem. I've always thought Wright's houses were nice to look at, but I wouldn't want to actually live in one.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar

    , @AnotherDad
    @Reg Cæsar

    Agree.

    People who design stuff that doesn't last or requires excess maintenance or is simply not designed with maintenance in mind at all just pisses me off. It isn't competent design at all it's just artsy-fartsy bullshittery.

    And i see it all the time--in housing going up around me and in consumer products. Ridiculous.

  107. @clyde
    @J1234

    Most are repulsed by anchovies on a pizza pie but I like them. Thanks for the Christmas inspiration, I will make my own tomorrow with a good frozen pizza and a tin of anchovies. Green pepper slices on it too. Tiny bit of cayenne and salt sprinkled all over. Served red hot, I hate lukewarm pizza, feed that to the squirrels. Really, you can take a mundane frozen pizza and improve it 100% in any number of ways.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @J1234, @Jonathan Mason

    Most are repulsed by anchovies on a pizza pie but I like them. …I will make my own tomorrow with a good frozen pizza and a tin of anchovies.

    Make that three. The Hobbes Special.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Reg Cæsar

    Due to schedules and the COVID panickfest, we had no big turkey or duck but we did make our own pizza today. We could have used proper tomato sauce (or paste?), but it was pretty decent. No anchovies, but ham, salami, and pepperoni. Fish on a pizza is bad enough, but vegetables other than olives are a travesty!

    My boy is a lot like Calvin there. Thanks, Reg. I asked him to estimate how much cheaper making the pizza was compared to buying our favorite NY style pizza nearby @$17 for a large one topping. He did pretty well.

  108. First annual WOKIES Awards

    https://www.rt.com/op-ed/510452-2020-top-virtue-signalers-entertainment/

    This Michael McCaffrey guy is trying to steal your thunder, Steve!


  109. Christmas Time, Eastman Johnson, 1864.

    • Thanks: Lockean Proviso
    • Replies: @Anon
    @PiltdownMan

    Thank you!

  110. Merry Christmas to all!

    Confession: I’ve been involved with family today both far (vidyo conferencing, dontcha know) and near for over eight hours, and I am now fully tanked, overindulged. ‘Tis much more than a sufficiency of booze. In vino veritas and all that. Perhaps it’s my drunken conceit, but I wonder if I shouldn’t have tried my hand at psychology.

    That Buffalo City Hall looks a lot like the Soviet architecture of the late ’40s-’50s. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Sisters_(Moscow) The Hotel Ukraine was better before the recent renovations. It was creepy and so Stalinesque; arriving on a floor and being greeted by a bored big broad behind a desk was so surreal. Should you greet her? Passport already surrendered at the main reception desk. Why do those beautiful women at the bar want to make Borat-like “sexy talk” in English, when I speak passable Russian?

    MGU is… well, it’s MGU and hopefully architecturally inviolate for some time.

    Silk for Calde! (Gene Wolfe reference, not other modern perversions.)

  111. @GeneralRipper
    @AnotherDad

    Willis Carrier.

    White man.

    Replies: @GeneralRipper, @Gary in Gramercy

    P.O.E.

  112. Isn’t there a kind of shy Marxism at work here? Building are built for the rich, who own coal mines and exploit the working man. Designing beautiful buildings is implicitly collaborating in that exploitation and glorifying the bourgeoisie. Designing ugly buildings is to heroically participate in the revolution, though in a stealthy way so as not to endanger your cash flow.

  113. @Known Fact
    @prosa123

    In the spirit of this post it's worth noting that those huge windowless ATT monoliths are an architectural blight on downtown districts. So while potential bombing suspects include right-wingers, left-wingers, CIA false flaggers etc ... can Jane Jacobs account for her whereabouts this morning ?

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @prosa123

    In the spirit of this post it’s worth noting that those huge windowless ATT monoliths are an architectural blight on downtown districts. So while potential bombing suspects include right-wingers, left-wingers, CIA false flaggers etc … can Jane Jacobs account for her whereabouts this morning ?

    https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/157686714/jane-jacobs#view-photo=135044222

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @prosa123

    Suggestive, but not dispositive. For all anyone knows, the Lizard King himself is interred with Mr. Jacobs, and the whole Pere Lachaise burial story is a scam to boost the French tourist trade.

    iSteve...where conspiracy theories meet and mingle.

    , @Known Fact
    @prosa123

    Along with Gary in Gramercy I also remain a bit skeptical. I've watched McGarrett and Mannix have enough bodies exhumed to know that there's usually been some sinister switcheroo. Sure Jacobs would be 104 now but still feisty enough to blow up some mammoth monstrosity a la The Fountainhead.

  114. @prosa123
    @Anon

    Might have been targeting a big AT&T facility.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @JimDandy

    Something-something-something therefore it would be treasonous to pardon Assange.

  115. @prosa123
    @Known Fact

    In the spirit of this post it’s worth noting that those huge windowless ATT monoliths are an architectural blight on downtown districts. So while potential bombing suspects include right-wingers, left-wingers, CIA false flaggers etc … can Jane Jacobs account for her whereabouts this morning ?

    https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/157686714/jane-jacobs#view-photo=135044222

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Known Fact

    Suggestive, but not dispositive. For all anyone knows, the Lizard King himself is interred with Mr. Jacobs, and the whole Pere Lachaise burial story is a scam to boost the French tourist trade.

    iSteve…where conspiracy theories meet and mingle.

  116. @Joe Stalin
    @Known Fact

    They contain switching machines for the communications fabric of the nation; you WANT them to be impervious to rioters and nearby nuclear detonation in case of nuclear combat "toe-to-toe-with-the-Russkies."

    In the old days the trunk lines went from the switching center to the customers; I would guess that "Remote Switching Modules" exist wherein you could get closer to the customers and reduce the shear amount of cables going to central office building.

    Replies: @Kibernetika

    Zdraste, dydya Iosef 🙂

    Sorry for my poor joke… Did you read *How Not to Network a Nation?* by Peters? I’m not saying it’s so good, mind you, but it puts a foot in the door. I’m really worried that the West is going to forget a lot about the history of Cybernetics because we are woke.

  117. Less than 24 hours after a bombing in Nashville and already the loonies on Twitter are claiming it’s a plot to enable Trump to declare martial law. Reichstag fire carried out by the Proud Boys, dumber than a sack of hammers.

  118. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Kronos

    Château Mohawk 2020 Christmas Menu

    From the Lady Chef

    Christmas Eve Dinner:

    Roasted Salmon
    Creamed Spinach
    Boulangere Potatoes


    Christmas Dinner:

    Duck Confit
    Green Bean and Chestnut Casserole
    Tiramisu Dessert


    A Selection of Red and White Wines is Provided.
    Bourbon and Beer are Available.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Kronos

    That sounds (and likely tasted) really good!

  119. I love the old stuff too. But I can’t hop on Trump’s bandwagon. Seeing the movie version of Ayn Rand’s The Fountainhead in college stops me. The architect hero of the novel and movie rejects the idea of redoing the same classical architecture over and over.

    I can’t say we should be trapped by what was done centuries ago and unable to do anything new. Why can’t things be contemporary and beautiful at the time? Why has the public rejected the art and architecture produced since 1900? Modern architecture is marble and drywall, a ridiculous combination. I find it impossible to think anything good can come from drywall.

    What is the answer?

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @notsaying

    Whatever A.I. comes up with.

  120. @notsaying
    I love the old stuff too. But I can't hop on Trump's bandwagon. Seeing the movie version of Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead in college stops me. The architect hero of the novel and movie rejects the idea of redoing the same classical architecture over and over.

    I can't say we should be trapped by what was done centuries ago and unable to do anything new. Why can't things be contemporary and beautiful at the time? Why has the public rejected the art and architecture produced since 1900? Modern architecture is marble and drywall, a ridiculous combination. I find it impossible to think anything good can come from drywall.

    What is the answer?

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Whatever A.I. comes up with.

  121. @Reg Cæsar
    @clyde


    Most are repulsed by anchovies on a pizza pie but I like them. ...I will make my own tomorrow with a good frozen pizza and a tin of anchovies.

     

    Make that three. The Hobbes Special.




    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/ce/bd/82/cebd82c89ff75b00c477015aec450b2a.gif

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Due to schedules and the COVID panickfest, we had no big turkey or duck but we did make our own pizza today. We could have used proper tomato sauce (or paste?), but it was pretty decent. No anchovies, but ham, salami, and pepperoni. Fish on a pizza is bad enough, but vegetables other than olives are a travesty!

    My boy is a lot like Calvin there. Thanks, Reg. I asked him to estimate how much cheaper making the pizza was compared to buying our favorite NY style pizza nearby @$17 for a large one topping. He did pretty well.

  122. Steve, you have so many tweets on this post that the page loads like crap. Does anyone else have this problem? I think it would be better if they were images, say screen-shots of those tweets.

    • Agree: Kronos
  123. @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Anon

    Yes, now that you mention it, I can see Frank Lloyd Wright's influence on Marin-resident George Lucas.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Chrisnonymous

    Mr. Anon is probably referring to the similarity with “Jaba’s palace”. It’s design and that of many other iconic Star Wars images originate with film concept artist Ralph McQuarrie, not George Lucas. Here is McQuarrie’s painting of Jaba’s palace…

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Chrisnonymous

    FL Wright's Marin County Center appears designed to echo the ridge behind it.

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Chrisnonymous

    FL Wright's Marin County Center appears designed to echo the ridge behind it.

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Chrisnonymous

    FL Wright's Marin County Center appears designed to echo the ridge behind it.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  124. Merry Christmas and Happy St. Stephens/Boxing Day from a millennial family who had the best day ever despite the worst the year could throw at us.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Anonymous

    Is that your family? Beautiful pic.

    Replies: @Dissident

  125. @clyde
    @J1234

    Most are repulsed by anchovies on a pizza pie but I like them. Thanks for the Christmas inspiration, I will make my own tomorrow with a good frozen pizza and a tin of anchovies. Green pepper slices on it too. Tiny bit of cayenne and salt sprinkled all over. Served red hot, I hate lukewarm pizza, feed that to the squirrels. Really, you can take a mundane frozen pizza and improve it 100% in any number of ways.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @J1234, @Jonathan Mason

    Really, you can take a mundane frozen pizza and improve it 100% in any number of ways.

    Or…you could buy pizza that’s better than the mundane frozen stuff. That way you wouldn’t have to put anchovies on it to make it more interesting. BTW, there’s an edible fish that actually tastes worse than anchovies: smelt. We had some in Seattle about 25 years ago when we were on our honeymoon. I don’t hate all pungent fish, though. I remember liking sardines as a kid.

  126. @Mike Zwick
    You can compare the old Chicago Public Library, with its Tiffany Dome, with the current Harold Washington Library. The Harold Washington Library is a ham fisted attempt to return to older, more classical style, but it is over the top with out of scale decorations basically tacked on to a modern building.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    “The Harold Washington Library is a ham fisted attempt to return to older, more classical style [i.e., Richard J. Daley, Da Mare], but it is over the top with out of scale decorations basically tacked on to a modern building.”

    Spoken like a man who actually met Harold Washington face to face.

  127. @notsaying
    Here is what was on my phone's news scroll this fine Christmas Day:

    A photo and story about Alec Baldwin's family. His wife is Hilaria, a Hispanic immigrant with dark hair and olive skin. She has become well known for being pregnant over and over again in recent years; she's had five kids and numerous miscarriages. She has a large female social media following. I never saw the kids until today and boy oh boy was I surprised.

    The photo shows her pale skinned children with a mixture of pale blonde and medium blonde hair. There's no way she used her own eggs for any of them. Interestingly enough they all have Spanish names though.

    I have seen numerous articles about her at the Daily Mail with many comments telling her to stop having more kids. They never show the kids like they do in this People article or there'd be comments about how she can't be their biological mother. I wonder why the Baldwins chose to use eggs from a Northern European mother?

    https://people.com/parents/amy-schumer-hilaria-baldwin-re-do-instagram/?amp=true

    Replies: @prosa123, @duncsbaby, @Iberian, @MEH 0910

    Maybe Alec got some of Kim Basinger’s frozen ova in the divorce settlement.

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @duncsbaby

    "9 1/2 Weeks" x 4 eggs = 38 weeks.

    Close enough for gestation.

    So if Hilaria has been pregnant x times, how many of Kim's eggs did Alec bargain for in the divorce settlement?

    Sounds like a question on the LSAT.

  128. @MEH 0910
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/my-single-is-dropping/

    Sudden Death of Stars 'What Is Winter Good For?' - ample play records
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ELaDOJxYkQ

    The idea is simple: use homemade snow globes from old jars and vintage bottles and fill them with images, logos, words and objects that reflect a 70s inspired psychedelic world all swirling around in water and glitter.

    The track itself, a wonderful piece of 'understated psych pop' you could listen to all year long, laments the fact that Brittany has a temperate oceanic climate and that the weather is too mild for snow to fall, and that is why we often wish for the snowman to come.
     
    Christmas Blossom
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6XG01Y-C8ko

    Christmas Blossom · Beat Mark
     

    https://www.ampleplay.co.uk/product/winter-warmer-split-7-christmas-single-sudden-death-of-stars-beat-mark/

    https://www.ampleplay.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/p/1/3/6/p_1_3_6_136-Winter-Warmer-Split-7-Vinyl-Christmas-Single-Sudden-Death-of-Stars-Beat-Mark-600x600.jpg

    https://f4.bcbits.com/img/0002648663_10.jpg

    https://suddendeathofstars.bandcamp.com/album/winter-warmer-split-single-w-beat-mark

    https://f4.bcbits.com/img/a3996841510_10.jpg

    Split Christmas Single by The Sudden Death of Stars / Beat Mark - ample play records
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6mz5Sz9jUnw

    Cat No: AMPLA082DD / AMPLA082V

    Christmas comes but once a year which is why we've given you two festive tracks in one single. Christmas is such a corporate affair, which is why we're giving you two down to earth independent crown heights songs:

    A. The Sudden of Stars 'What is Winter Good For?' "Brittany has a temperate oceanic climate. The weather in this region makes it too mild for snow to fall, and that is why we often wish for the snowman to come.

    AA. Beat Mark 'Christmas Blossom' "A Christmas track that follows in the steps of the great tradition of 60s Christmas songs with sleighbells and naïve melodies with voices together on the chorus, like a choir."

    Both bands are young examples of how great music still is and can be. Beat Mark and TSDOS came out with critically acclaimed albums earlier this year.
     

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

  129. • Replies: @Polistra
    @GeneralRipper

    What's that, old Baltimore? Can't hold a candle to this!

    http://www.live-travel-blog.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/IMG_0504.jpg

    Behold, Americans, Brits! Europeans! Aussies! Your future awaits!

  130. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Yes, now that you mention it, I can see Frank Lloyd Wright’s influence on Marin-resident George Lucas.

     

    Wright was a nasty boss, no mentor at all, and some of his iconic houses have drainage and other serious problems due to his tendency to ignore engineers' advice. Let's hope Lucas doesn't share these traits, and hired better.


    Fallingwater is now Fallingporch.

    7 things Frank Lloyd Wright, a great American architect, got wrong about design

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @AnotherDad

    The rap on Wright’s Usonian designs is that they were maintenance nightmares. As you say, flat roofs make for poor drainage. I don’t know if his earlier houses, the very germanic looking ones, had the same problem. I’ve always thought Wright’s houses were nice to look at, but I wouldn’t want to actually live in one.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Anon

    My dad lived next to Frank Lloyd Wright's Moore House in Oak Park. IL from 1917-1929. It burned down on Christmas Day 1922, so FLW, on his return from Japan, rebuilt this Tudor cottage as a giant Japanese-looking Tudor cottage. My dad's old non-descript house next door looks easier to live in.

    http://www.oprf.com/flw/Moore.html

    Replies: @JimDandy

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Mr. Anon


    As you say, flat roofs make for poor drainage.
     
    Something a child could figure out. I had great fun chasing frogs during a Honolulu cloudburst in our apartment complex's fairly safe gardens. We learned the next day that across town, a supermarket's level roof had fallen in. Boy Barack hadn't left for Jakarta yet. It was on his side of the city.
  131. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Yes, now that you mention it, I can see Frank Lloyd Wright’s influence on Marin-resident George Lucas.

     

    Wright was a nasty boss, no mentor at all, and some of his iconic houses have drainage and other serious problems due to his tendency to ignore engineers' advice. Let's hope Lucas doesn't share these traits, and hired better.


    Fallingwater is now Fallingporch.

    7 things Frank Lloyd Wright, a great American architect, got wrong about design

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @AnotherDad

    Agree.

    People who design stuff that doesn’t last or requires excess maintenance or is simply not designed with maintenance in mind at all just pisses me off. It isn’t competent design at all it’s just artsy-fartsy bullshittery.

    And i see it all the time–in housing going up around me and in consumer products. Ridiculous.

  132. @Anon
    Speaking of buildings, someone set off a bomb in downtown Nashville. Jerks never rest.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Munkin-4

    Now that Xmas has passed, I can say it: America deserves every bomb that comes its way.

    Your country is doing so much f-ckery in the world these days, and your cud-chewing citizens are for the most part oblivious…

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Munkin-4

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51pF4s4zqoL._AC_.jpg


    You folks nagged us in 1914 and 1939 for staying out. You're hard to please.

  133. @duncsbaby
    @notsaying

    Maybe Alec got some of Kim Basinger's frozen ova in the divorce settlement.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    “9 1/2 Weeks” x 4 eggs = 38 weeks.

    Close enough for gestation.

    So if Hilaria has been pregnant x times, how many of Kim’s eggs did Alec bargain for in the divorce settlement?

    Sounds like a question on the LSAT.

  134. @Western
    @Thomas

    How do I post a picture that will show?

    Replies: @Thomas

    Paste a link directly to the file, .jpg, .png, or whatever.

    • Replies: @Western
    @Thomas

    thanks

  135. One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn’t he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American’s big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy? I know conservatives hate liberals and don’t care about the demise of those big blue urban centers. But pointing that out would serve as vindication of the disastrous consequences of liberal policies extended to the whole of Society. Upper middle-class liberal professionals can eschew rules and order because they tend to be intelligent and responsible, so they can live like that without their lives descending into chaos. But applying the “throw rules and authority out of the window: it it feels good, do it.” to the whole of Society is DISASTROUS. And this is what makes urban upper middle-class liberals so stupid: they don’t realize that average unintelligent people with more impulses than brains cannot live liberal/libertarian lives without causing enormous amount of harm to Society and, especially, to themselves.

    Liberals have an enormous problem with the concept of order, hierarchy and authority. In a way, it makes sense: studies show that, the more cognitively capable and well-educated a person is, the more they find authority and order suffocating, irrational and oppressive. But proles NEED it. They remain toddlers for life and cannot live responsible adult lives. Once upon a time, it was accepted that elites were the “grown ups” of Society, and that the little people were their “children” that the elites had an obligation to care of, but had, in exchange for that protection, behave properly and not demand things that they cannot understand or use responsibly. Like Augustus Caesar told his good friend, Agrippa, before taking his first Consulship:

    “Giving power to the people is like giving a butcher’s knife to a child or a madman. To yield power is not a blessing, but a burden.”

    Elites fail to discipline Society for the same reason parents nowadays refuse to discipline their children: the mistaken belief that we are all the same, that a child or a moron have the same degree of sentience and abiltiy to self-determine that that of a 25 year-old man with a 150 IQ, They don’t.

    Hence, pupils spitting on their teachers, teenagers deciding they are actually of the othe gender and getting irreversible surgery that they will regret latter, obese people eating themselves into death by stroke at 45 because fat-shaming is wrong, girls getting anal tattoos, or fucking 20 different men and then getting pregnant with no concern because she can just kill the kid or give it to social services to be raised with other people’s tax money since she thinks her sexual gratification cannot be denied, youths being extremely weak and pathetic and unprepared for the World because they believe no one has the right to violate their “safe spaces”

    You want a short and sweet answer to what is the cause of ALL the social misery we are going through now? Four words: lack of parental authority. I repeat: LACK. OF. PARENTAL. AUTHORITY. Both at home and especially at the level 0f Society with elites being too shy and too full of self-guit to put the children in their place.

    One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn’t he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American’s big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy? I know conservatives hate liberals and don’t care about the demise of those big blue urban centers. But pointing that out would serve as vindication of the disastrous consequences of liberal policies extended to the whole of Society. Upper middle-class liberal professionals can eschew rules and order because they tend to be intelligent and responsible, so they can live like that without their lives descending into chaos. But applying the “throw rules and authority out of the window: it it feels good, do it.” to the whole of Society is DISASTROUS. And this is what makes urban upper middle-class liberals so stupid: they don’t realize that average unintelligent people with more impulses than brains cannot live liberal/libertariasn lives without causing enormous amount of harm to Society and, especially, to themselves.

    Liberals have an enormous problem with the concept of order, hierarchy and authority. In a way, it makes sense: studies show that, the more cognitively capable and well-educated a person is, the more they find authority and order suffocating, irrational and oppressive. But proles NEED it. They remain toddlers for life and cannot live responsible adult lives. Once upon a time, it was accepted that elites were the “grown ups” of Society, and that the little people were their “children” that the elites had an obligation to care of, but had, in exchange for that protection, behave properly and not demand things that they cannot understand or use responsibly. Like Augustus Caesar told his good friend, Agrippa, before taking his first Consulship:

    “Giving power to the people is like giving a butcher’s knife to a child or a madman. To yield power is not a blessing, but a burden.”

    Elites fail to discipline Society for the same reason parents nowadays refuse to discipline their children: the mistaken belief that we are all the same, that a child or a moron have the same degree of sentience and abiltiy to self-determine that that of a 25 year-old man with a 150 IQ, They don’t.

    Hence, pupils spitting on their teachers, teenagers deciding they are actually of the othe gender and getting irreversible surgery that they will regret latter, obese people eating themselves into death by stroke at 45 because fat-shaming is wrong, girls getting anal tattoos, or fucking 20 different men and then getting pregnant with no concern because she can just kill the kid or give it to social services to be raised with other people’s tax money since she thinks her sexual gratification cannot be denied, youths being extremely weak and pathetic and unprepared for the World because they believe no one has the right to violate their “safe spaces”

    You want a short and sweet answer to what is the cause of ALL the social misery we are going through now? Four words: lack of parental authority. I repeat: LACK. OF. PARENTAL. AUTHORITY. Both at home and especially at the level 0f Society with elites being too shy and too full of self-guit to put the children in their place.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Rockford Tyson


    One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn’t he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American’s big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy?
     
    In truth it’s been a common theme. (Please check the archives.)

    https://www.takimag.com/article/the-soiled-streets-of-san-francisco/

    If your new the Covid-19 Pandemic has sucked the most oxygen out of such typical subjects this year. But I’m sure it’s been brought up a few times in 2020. It just doesn’t look that bad when the major cities are in some form of lockdown or another.


    And this is what makes urban upper middle-class liberals so stupid: they don’t realize that average unintelligent people with more impulses than brains cannot live liberal/libertarian lives without causing enormous amount of harm to Society and, especially, to themselves.
     
    Oh they learned that the hard way. The “Free Love” thing was the last thing the African American community needed and the cities have been paying for it ever since. The real problem is how do you put Humpty Dumpty back together again after the 1960s? Nobody can edit the source code of the 1960s for another 10-20 years.

    https://youtu.be/BLPM-P7mNQw

    Also, the current crop of elites lost a lot of standing

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Joe Stalin

    , @Anon
    @Rockford Tyson


    One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn’t he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American’s big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy? I know conservatives hate liberals and don’t care about the demise of those big blue urban centers. But pointing that out would serve as vindication of the disastrous consequences of liberal policies extended to the whole of Society. Upper middle-class liberal professionals can eschew rules and order because they tend to be intelligent and responsible, so they can live like that without their lives descending into chaos.
     
    The upper middle class professionals weren’t behind the demise of American cities. They are simply another set of marionettes of the TPTB in the Kulturkampf. Read The Slaughter of Cities by E. Michael Jones to understand the ‘who, what, where, why, and how’ behind the destruction of American cities.

    Replies: @Lockean Proviso

    , @Too Long Didn't Read
    @Rockford Tyson

    One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn’t he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American’s big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy?

    One of the things I find boring about unz.com is how many midwits do not bother to actually read any of the essays before commenting.

    Replies: @Rockford Tyson

  136. @Mr. Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    The rap on Wright's Usonian designs is that they were maintenance nightmares. As you say, flat roofs make for poor drainage. I don't know if his earlier houses, the very germanic looking ones, had the same problem. I've always thought Wright's houses were nice to look at, but I wouldn't want to actually live in one.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar

    My dad lived next to Frank Lloyd Wright’s Moore House in Oak Park. IL from 1917-1929. It burned down on Christmas Day 1922, so FLW, on his return from Japan, rebuilt this Tudor cottage as a giant Japanese-looking Tudor cottage. My dad’s old non-descript house next door looks easier to live in.

    http://www.oprf.com/flw/Moore.html

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Steve Sailer

    There was a Frank Lloyd Wright house in Oak Park that was used as a bed and breakfast. I spent a couple hours inside one once. It was an extremely stiff and uncomfortable experience.

  137. @Anonymous
    Merry Christmas and Happy St. Stephens/Boxing Day from a millennial family who had the best day ever despite the worst the year could throw at us.

    https://i.imgur.com/G8KakCH.jpg

    Replies: @Anon

    Is that your family? Beautiful pic.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    @Anon


    Is that your family?
     
    An Anonymous posting a photo of his own family? Wouldn't the intelligence level indicated by such an action be well below the minimum one would expect of an iSteve reader?

    On the other hand, given the season, perhaps temporarily impaired reasoning was in evidence? If so, the individual would presumably be well-advised to contact the admin to request removal.

  138. @JohnnyWalker123
    I'm dreaming of a White Christmas, just like the ones I used to know....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3ZC45Q82pg

    May your days be merry and bright.... and may all your Christmases be White....

    Merry Christmas!

    Replies: @CCZ, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Bill Jones

    Of course to have a Happy New Year:

    May your days be merry and bright…. and may all your Neighbors be White….May your days be merry and bright…. and may all your neighbors be White….

    There, fixed that for you.

  139. @Thomas
    My personal favorite "WTF were they thinking" piece of modern architecture is the "Cathedral of Christ the Light" on the shore of Lake Merritt, in Oakland, California. Or, as I call it, the "cunthedral." Completed in 2008, the holy seat of the Diocese of Oakland splays open towards the sky, as if it were ready to receive something more than just grace and revelation from above. I'd call the overall architectural concept "Marian."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathedral_of_Christ_the_Light_(Oakland,_California)

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f4/Oak_Cathdrl_1.jpg/1280px-Oak_Cathdrl_1.jpg

    Replies: @Kronos, @Lockean Proviso, @Buzz Mohawk, @Western, @Bill Jones

    You might like Paddy’s Wigwam in Liverpool, or
    The Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King as non-Scousers call it.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Bill Jones

    Actually I have been inside and it is rather nice.

    , @MBlanc46
    @Bill Jones

    And quite a contrast with the Anglican Cathedral nearby.

  140. @Rockford Tyson
    One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn't he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American's big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy? I know conservatives hate liberals and don't care about the demise of those big blue urban centers. But pointing that out would serve as vindication of the disastrous consequences of liberal policies extended to the whole of Society. Upper middle-class liberal professionals can eschew rules and order because they tend to be intelligent and responsible, so they can live like that without their lives descending into chaos. But applying the "throw rules and authority out of the window: it it feels good, do it." to the whole of Society is DISASTROUS. And this is what makes urban upper middle-class liberals so stupid: they don't realize that average unintelligent people with more impulses than brains cannot live liberal/libertarian lives without causing enormous amount of harm to Society and, especially, to themselves.

    Liberals have an enormous problem with the concept of order, hierarchy and authority. In a way, it makes sense: studies show that, the more cognitively capable and well-educated a person is, the more they find authority and order suffocating, irrational and oppressive. But proles NEED it. They remain toddlers for life and cannot live responsible adult lives. Once upon a time, it was accepted that elites were the "grown ups" of Society, and that the little people were their "children" that the elites had an obligation to care of, but had, in exchange for that protection, behave properly and not demand things that they cannot understand or use responsibly. Like Augustus Caesar told his good friend, Agrippa, before taking his first Consulship:

    "Giving power to the people is like giving a butcher's knife to a child or a madman. To yield power is not a blessing, but a burden."

    Elites fail to discipline Society for the same reason parents nowadays refuse to discipline their children: the mistaken belief that we are all the same, that a child or a moron have the same degree of sentience and abiltiy to self-determine that that of a 25 year-old man with a 150 IQ, They don't.

    Hence, pupils spitting on their teachers, teenagers deciding they are actually of the othe gender and getting irreversible surgery that they will regret latter, obese people eating themselves into death by stroke at 45 because fat-shaming is wrong, girls getting anal tattoos, or fucking 20 different men and then getting pregnant with no concern because she can just kill the kid or give it to social services to be raised with other people's tax money since she thinks her sexual gratification cannot be denied, youths being extremely weak and pathetic and unprepared for the World because they believe no one has the right to violate their "safe spaces"

    You want a short and sweet answer to what is the cause of ALL the social misery we are going through now? Four words: lack of parental authority. I repeat: LACK. OF. PARENTAL. AUTHORITY. Both at home and especially at the level 0f Society with elites being too shy and too full of self-guit to put the children in their place.

    One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn't he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American's big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy? I know conservatives hate liberals and don't care about the demise of those big blue urban centers. But pointing that out would serve as vindication of the disastrous consequences of liberal policies extended to the whole of Society. Upper middle-class liberal professionals can eschew rules and order because they tend to be intelligent and responsible, so they can live like that without their lives descending into chaos. But applying the "throw rules and authority out of the window: it it feels good, do it." to the whole of Society is DISASTROUS. And this is what makes urban upper middle-class liberals so stupid: they don't realize that average unintelligent people with more impulses than brains cannot live liberal/libertariasn lives without causing enormous amount of harm to Society and, especially, to themselves.

    Liberals have an enormous problem with the concept of order, hierarchy and authority. In a way, it makes sense: studies show that, the more cognitively capable and well-educated a person is, the more they find authority and order suffocating, irrational and oppressive. But proles NEED it. They remain toddlers for life and cannot live responsible adult lives. Once upon a time, it was accepted that elites were the "grown ups" of Society, and that the little people were their "children" that the elites had an obligation to care of, but had, in exchange for that protection, behave properly and not demand things that they cannot understand or use responsibly. Like Augustus Caesar told his good friend, Agrippa, before taking his first Consulship:

    "Giving power to the people is like giving a butcher's knife to a child or a madman. To yield power is not a blessing, but a burden."

    Elites fail to discipline Society for the same reason parents nowadays refuse to discipline their children: the mistaken belief that we are all the same, that a child or a moron have the same degree of sentience and abiltiy to self-determine that that of a 25 year-old man with a 150 IQ, They don't.

    Hence, pupils spitting on their teachers, teenagers deciding they are actually of the othe gender and getting irreversible surgery that they will regret latter, obese people eating themselves into death by stroke at 45 because fat-shaming is wrong, girls getting anal tattoos, or fucking 20 different men and then getting pregnant with no concern because she can just kill the kid or give it to social services to be raised with other people's tax money since she thinks her sexual gratification cannot be denied, youths being extremely weak and pathetic and unprepared for the World because they believe no one has the right to violate their "safe spaces"

    You want a short and sweet answer to what is the cause of ALL the social misery we are going through now? Four words: lack of parental authority. I repeat: LACK. OF. PARENTAL. AUTHORITY. Both at home and especially at the level 0f Society with elites being too shy and too full of self-guit to put the children in their place.

    https://youtu.be/HKCfu4UJQiQ

    Replies: @Kronos, @Anon, @Too Long Didn't Read

    One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn’t he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American’s big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy?

    In truth it’s been a common theme. (Please check the archives.)

    https://www.takimag.com/article/the-soiled-streets-of-san-francisco/

    If your new the Covid-19 Pandemic has sucked the most oxygen out of such typical subjects this year. But I’m sure it’s been brought up a few times in 2020. It just doesn’t look that bad when the major cities are in some form of lockdown or another.

    And this is what makes urban upper middle-class liberals so stupid: they don’t realize that average unintelligent people with more impulses than brains cannot live liberal/libertarian lives without causing enormous amount of harm to Society and, especially, to themselves.

    Oh they learned that the hard way. The “Free Love” thing was the last thing the African American community needed and the cities have been paying for it ever since. The real problem is how do you put Humpty Dumpty back together again after the 1960s? Nobody can edit the source code of the 1960s for another 10-20 years.

    Also, the current crop of elites lost a lot of standing

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Kronos

    You're correct that Steve has frequently remarked on the decline of the big cities in blue or purple states (or even red states: e.g., New Orleans in otherwise red Louisiana).

    You're also right that the deterioration of such cities doesn't get as much attention in a turbulent year like this one, in which virtually all cities are under lockdown orders of one kind or another.

    (I didn't check Rockford Tyson's commenting history, but I suspect your hunch is on the mark: he may be new around here.)

    By the way, did you ever finish Icky Homo (Himself's first volume of Presidential memoirs)? If so, I admire your persistence, but expect you're exhausted from the sheer effort required.

    Finally, it looks as if the very end of your comment may have been cut off. It ends somewhat abruptly: "Also, the current crop of elites lost a lot of standing..." I've had that happen once or twice: you're typing furiously, trying to get to the end of your comment, and you accidentally hit the "Publish Comment" button.

    Anyway, Happy Boxing Day.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Kronos

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Kronos


    The “Free Love” thing was the last thing the African American community needed and the cities have been paying for it ever since.
     
    The 1960s had one salient characteristic: baby mamas bitched and moaned and their useless baby daddies NOT paying child support.

    Black women and men wised up and figured out that getting the state to GIVE them money to live off was the cat's meow of taking advantage of their situation. Black women are the backbone of the Democratic Party, their most loyal voters.

    Start reducing state support and start going after the baby daddies for support. I once heard a Black woman on public transit moaning about the Republican Governor was 'messing stuff up' for her living off the government, so I know that reducing state support is the key to putting pressure on this stuff.

    After all, how do all those Black men on the Maury Show have eight children while working at Burger King (True story)?

    Replies: @Kronos

  141. Merry Christmas, a little late 🙂

    Chinese have an inactivated vaccine:

    https://www.reuters.com/article/health-coronavirus-turkey-china-int/turkey-says-chinas-sinovac-covid-vaccine-91-25-effective-in-late-trials-idUSKBN28Y1R3

    Maybe helps if you invented the virus as well.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Gordo


    Millions of doses of Pfizer Inc (NYSE: PFE) and BioNTech SE’s (NASDAQ: BNTX) COVID-19 vaccine will be administered in China alongside home-made options, Bloomberg reported Tuesday.

    What Happened: Local pharmaceutical firm Shanghai Fosun Pharmaceutical (Group) Co, Ltd (OTC: SFOSF) — which signed an agreement with BioNTech in March — will pay the German company $300 million (EUR 250 million) for an initial 50 million doses, according to Bloomberg.

    Pfizer’s German partner will supply no less than 100 million doses to China by 2021, Fosun informed the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, as per Bloomberg.

    Meanwhile, COVID-19 vaccines made by China National Biotec Group Co and Sinovac Biotech Ltd are reportedly close to approval by drug regulators in China and 1.6 billion doses are expected to be manufactured in 2021.

    Why It Matters: Since the Chinese vaccines require two doses and President Xi Jinping has also stated the country’s commitment to making available successful vaccines to the developing world, there is a need for additional vaccines, noted Bloomberg.

    AstraZeneca plc (NYSE: AZN) and its local partner will also reportedly supply the former’s vaccine to the East Asian country.

    https://www.yahoo.com/now/china-secures-100m-doses-pfizer-074155989.html
     
  142. Anon[190] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rockford Tyson
    One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn't he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American's big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy? I know conservatives hate liberals and don't care about the demise of those big blue urban centers. But pointing that out would serve as vindication of the disastrous consequences of liberal policies extended to the whole of Society. Upper middle-class liberal professionals can eschew rules and order because they tend to be intelligent and responsible, so they can live like that without their lives descending into chaos. But applying the "throw rules and authority out of the window: it it feels good, do it." to the whole of Society is DISASTROUS. And this is what makes urban upper middle-class liberals so stupid: they don't realize that average unintelligent people with more impulses than brains cannot live liberal/libertarian lives without causing enormous amount of harm to Society and, especially, to themselves.

    Liberals have an enormous problem with the concept of order, hierarchy and authority. In a way, it makes sense: studies show that, the more cognitively capable and well-educated a person is, the more they find authority and order suffocating, irrational and oppressive. But proles NEED it. They remain toddlers for life and cannot live responsible adult lives. Once upon a time, it was accepted that elites were the "grown ups" of Society, and that the little people were their "children" that the elites had an obligation to care of, but had, in exchange for that protection, behave properly and not demand things that they cannot understand or use responsibly. Like Augustus Caesar told his good friend, Agrippa, before taking his first Consulship:

    "Giving power to the people is like giving a butcher's knife to a child or a madman. To yield power is not a blessing, but a burden."

    Elites fail to discipline Society for the same reason parents nowadays refuse to discipline their children: the mistaken belief that we are all the same, that a child or a moron have the same degree of sentience and abiltiy to self-determine that that of a 25 year-old man with a 150 IQ, They don't.

    Hence, pupils spitting on their teachers, teenagers deciding they are actually of the othe gender and getting irreversible surgery that they will regret latter, obese people eating themselves into death by stroke at 45 because fat-shaming is wrong, girls getting anal tattoos, or fucking 20 different men and then getting pregnant with no concern because she can just kill the kid or give it to social services to be raised with other people's tax money since she thinks her sexual gratification cannot be denied, youths being extremely weak and pathetic and unprepared for the World because they believe no one has the right to violate their "safe spaces"

    You want a short and sweet answer to what is the cause of ALL the social misery we are going through now? Four words: lack of parental authority. I repeat: LACK. OF. PARENTAL. AUTHORITY. Both at home and especially at the level 0f Society with elites being too shy and too full of self-guit to put the children in their place.

    One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn't he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American's big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy? I know conservatives hate liberals and don't care about the demise of those big blue urban centers. But pointing that out would serve as vindication of the disastrous consequences of liberal policies extended to the whole of Society. Upper middle-class liberal professionals can eschew rules and order because they tend to be intelligent and responsible, so they can live like that without their lives descending into chaos. But applying the "throw rules and authority out of the window: it it feels good, do it." to the whole of Society is DISASTROUS. And this is what makes urban upper middle-class liberals so stupid: they don't realize that average unintelligent people with more impulses than brains cannot live liberal/libertariasn lives without causing enormous amount of harm to Society and, especially, to themselves.

    Liberals have an enormous problem with the concept of order, hierarchy and authority. In a way, it makes sense: studies show that, the more cognitively capable and well-educated a person is, the more they find authority and order suffocating, irrational and oppressive. But proles NEED it. They remain toddlers for life and cannot live responsible adult lives. Once upon a time, it was accepted that elites were the "grown ups" of Society, and that the little people were their "children" that the elites had an obligation to care of, but had, in exchange for that protection, behave properly and not demand things that they cannot understand or use responsibly. Like Augustus Caesar told his good friend, Agrippa, before taking his first Consulship:

    "Giving power to the people is like giving a butcher's knife to a child or a madman. To yield power is not a blessing, but a burden."

    Elites fail to discipline Society for the same reason parents nowadays refuse to discipline their children: the mistaken belief that we are all the same, that a child or a moron have the same degree of sentience and abiltiy to self-determine that that of a 25 year-old man with a 150 IQ, They don't.

    Hence, pupils spitting on their teachers, teenagers deciding they are actually of the othe gender and getting irreversible surgery that they will regret latter, obese people eating themselves into death by stroke at 45 because fat-shaming is wrong, girls getting anal tattoos, or fucking 20 different men and then getting pregnant with no concern because she can just kill the kid or give it to social services to be raised with other people's tax money since she thinks her sexual gratification cannot be denied, youths being extremely weak and pathetic and unprepared for the World because they believe no one has the right to violate their "safe spaces"

    You want a short and sweet answer to what is the cause of ALL the social misery we are going through now? Four words: lack of parental authority. I repeat: LACK. OF. PARENTAL. AUTHORITY. Both at home and especially at the level 0f Society with elites being too shy and too full of self-guit to put the children in their place.

    https://youtu.be/HKCfu4UJQiQ

    Replies: @Kronos, @Anon, @Too Long Didn't Read

    One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn’t he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American’s big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy? I know conservatives hate liberals and don’t care about the demise of those big blue urban centers. But pointing that out would serve as vindication of the disastrous consequences of liberal policies extended to the whole of Society. Upper middle-class liberal professionals can eschew rules and order because they tend to be intelligent and responsible, so they can live like that without their lives descending into chaos.

    The upper middle class professionals weren’t behind the demise of American cities. They are simply another set of marionettes of the TPTB in the Kulturkampf. Read The Slaughter of Cities by E. Michael Jones to understand the ‘who, what, where, why, and how’ behind the destruction of American cities.

    • Replies: @Lockean Proviso
    @Anon


    Focusing on Boston, Philadelphia, Detroit, and Chicago, Dr. E. Michael Jones shows that Government sponsored "renewal" of American cities was not a program that failed by going sadly awry, but instead was a planned destruction of the ethnic neighborhoods that made up the human, residential heart of the cities.
     
    That's DR. E. Michael Jones.

    Looks like an interesting forensic history. Hadn't heard of the WW1 homefront propaganda connection to urban integration policies.
  143. @AnotherDad
    @AnotherDad

    BTW, "air conditioning" is a very under-appreciated contributor to modern American life, demography, politics. It enabled a raft of huge changes to "the way things are".

    Replies: @GeneralRipper, @Jim Don Bob

    It enabled a raft of huge changes to “the way things are”.

    Like the South.

  144. It makes sense that the appearance and aesthetics of a new building should be taken into consideration.

    It would also make sense to mandate the building of parks and landscaping, statuary and fountains, shady places to sit and eat lunch outside of buildings, and I don’t mean just Home Depot style utilitarian cheap-to-maintain bushes like a Walmart parking lot.

    However the same rules should also apply to all buildings built by private businesses and hospitals and churches over a certain size, not to mention schools and colleges, transit terminals, and airports.

    Unfortunately the United States is probably more motorized than any other country in the world, and the need for parking lots seems to take over all other kinds of esthetic consideration in many settings.

    Parking lots should be put behind buildings, or underneath them if the local geology supports this and various forms of shuttle should be used to treat people from remote parking lots to the buildings where they need to be.

    Many countries are coming up with ingenious solutions to getting ready for the post ICE society and while the United States cannot copy everything from overseas, architects, planners, and designers should certainly be looking at what other countries are doing for creative ideas.

    • Agree: SimpleSong
    • Disagree: Abolish_public_education
    • Replies: @SimpleSong
    @Jonathan Mason

    The second industrial revolution had some really unfortunate effects on the aesthetics of the built environment. Telephone poles and power lines are ugly, and almost any building will look bad if plonked in the middle of a sea of asphalt. Add in the toxic notion that America is not a people but rather a big steaming vat of capitalism and now we have people sticking garish plastic signs everywhere making the place look even worse.

    Conservatives can't keep you from being ethnically cleansed out of your old neighborhood or the medical establishment from cutting off your son's gonads, but if someone suggests we should have some rules about putting giant plastic signs on a stick suddenly it's all muh freedom muh property rights and they actually manage to win some legislative battles.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  145. @clyde
    @J1234

    Most are repulsed by anchovies on a pizza pie but I like them. Thanks for the Christmas inspiration, I will make my own tomorrow with a good frozen pizza and a tin of anchovies. Green pepper slices on it too. Tiny bit of cayenne and salt sprinkled all over. Served red hot, I hate lukewarm pizza, feed that to the squirrels. Really, you can take a mundane frozen pizza and improve it 100% in any number of ways.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @J1234, @Jonathan Mason

    Pizza Neapolitana (with anchovies) is the very best kind of pizza karma and no pizza joint that does not serve pizza with anchovies is worthy of consideration.

    The very first piece of pizza I ever had in my life in Milan in 1970 was anchovy flavored and I guess that set the trend for me. I don’t mind Hawaiian pizza with a topping of pineapple and ham as occasional sweet alternative, but otherwise give me anchovy pizzas every time.

    • Replies: @bruce county
    @Jonathan Mason

    https://imagesvc.meredithcorp.io/v3/mm/image?url=https%3A%2F%2Fstatic.onecms.io%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2Fsites%2F13%2F2016%2F08%2F16%2Ftumblr_inline_oc0mi9SV9i1te9s4t_540.png_.cf_.jpg

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jonathan Mason

    Those early experiences make a difference.

    My first pizza was the simple, cheap, thin kind that I bought for 25 cents per slice in New Jersey. I would ride my bike 3 miles to downtown. My favorite place was a weird department store that had a pizza counter in the front. There was another place called "Dominick's" across the street. I still remember when the price for a slice, at both places simultaneously, went from 25 cents to 35.

    That was my first experience with inflation.

    Forever after, pizza to me has been a thin slice with nothing but tomato sauce and mozzarella -- best purchased with pocket change, from a bicycle in New Jersey.

    , @clyde
    @Jonathan Mason

    You are a man of wealth and taste if you like pizza with anchovies. You had the real deal in Milan. Italy has long had a love affair with anchovies. The Romans made a fermented anchovy paste as a condiment.---- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garum ---Similar to how the Vietnamese make fish sauce from fermenting anchovies.

    Matter of fact I saw on YouTube the other day, making the same fish sauce in Thailand. (21 minutes in)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOzQYxGTnKE (21 minutes in)

    Replies: @J1234

  146. @GeneralRipper
    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-fLGYLNnZBAE/Wbc-1QTq4RI/AAAAAAABO8s/spWvJrArT9YoNTvMXMsn4R0nCqRKEaN_gCLcBGAs/s1600/1b%2BBaltimore%2BBasilica%2B%25281%2529.jpg


    https://c8.alamy.com/comp/E9MK0Y/united-states-maryland-baltimore-basilica-americas-first-cathedral-E9MK0Y.jpg

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e7/Ext-Night.jpg

    Replies: @Polistra

    What’s that, old Baltimore? Can’t hold a candle to this!

    Behold, Americans, Brits! Europeans! Aussies! Your future awaits!

  147. Has anybody done any studies on racial statistics pertaining to financial crimes only, like accounting fraud, tax evasion, and various types of securities fraud, or general financial scams?

    • Replies: @res
    @128

    Good old Table 43 from the FBI UCR has data for Forgery and counterfeiting, Fraud, and Embezzlement. Close enough?

    https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2018/crime-in-the-u.s.-2018/tables/table-43

    Replies: @Polistra, @Bill Jones

  148. @Kronos
    @Rockford Tyson


    One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn’t he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American’s big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy?
     
    In truth it’s been a common theme. (Please check the archives.)

    https://www.takimag.com/article/the-soiled-streets-of-san-francisco/

    If your new the Covid-19 Pandemic has sucked the most oxygen out of such typical subjects this year. But I’m sure it’s been brought up a few times in 2020. It just doesn’t look that bad when the major cities are in some form of lockdown or another.


    And this is what makes urban upper middle-class liberals so stupid: they don’t realize that average unintelligent people with more impulses than brains cannot live liberal/libertarian lives without causing enormous amount of harm to Society and, especially, to themselves.
     
    Oh they learned that the hard way. The “Free Love” thing was the last thing the African American community needed and the cities have been paying for it ever since. The real problem is how do you put Humpty Dumpty back together again after the 1960s? Nobody can edit the source code of the 1960s for another 10-20 years.

    https://youtu.be/BLPM-P7mNQw

    Also, the current crop of elites lost a lot of standing

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Joe Stalin

    You’re correct that Steve has frequently remarked on the decline of the big cities in blue or purple states (or even red states: e.g., New Orleans in otherwise red Louisiana).

    You’re also right that the deterioration of such cities doesn’t get as much attention in a turbulent year like this one, in which virtually all cities are under lockdown orders of one kind or another.

    (I didn’t check Rockford Tyson’s commenting history, but I suspect your hunch is on the mark: he may be new around here.)

    By the way, did you ever finish Icky Homo (Himself’s first volume of Presidential memoirs)? If so, I admire your persistence, but expect you’re exhausted from the sheer effort required.

    Finally, it looks as if the very end of your comment may have been cut off. It ends somewhat abruptly: “Also, the current crop of elites lost a lot of standing…” I’ve had that happen once or twice: you’re typing furiously, trying to get to the end of your comment, and you accidentally hit the “Publish Comment” button.

    Anyway, Happy Boxing Day.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Gary in Gramercy


    By the way, did you ever finish Icky Homo (Himself’s first volume of Presidential memoirs)? If so, I admire your persistence, but expect you’re exhausted from the sheer effort required.
     
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/1524763160/ref=dbs_a_w_dp_1524763160

    I did, it was interesting and actually quite fun to read (akin to a plaintiff’s lawyer looking for mistakes the defense may have made.)

    About 1/5 of the book is essentially a big thank you card thanking all the various members of Obama’s Administration (even Hillary) and portraying the likes of Larry Summers and Rahm Emanuel in a positive light. Essentially it starts with his early life and ends with the assassination of Osama Bin Laden. Compared to Obama’s first book that Steve diligently dissected, this book has much less “encryption” despite being 4x as long. That Obama opaque literary style doesn’t kick in until Chapter 13 when he presents this weird French “New Wave” cinematic analogy of him trying to master a real military salute that symbolizes him taking the reigns of the National Security State. Before chapter 13, there’s only this snippet from his 2008 campaign.


    Even before I formally announced, Gibbs and our communications team had beaten back various rumors that bubbled up on conservative talk radio or fly-by-night websites before migrating to the Drudge Report and Fox News. There were reports that I had been schooled in an Indonesian madrassa, which gained enough traction that a CNN correspondent actually traveled to my old elementary school in Jakarta, where he found a bunch of kids wearing Western-style uniforms and listening to New Kids on the Block on their iPods.
     

    There were claims that I wasn’t an American citizen (helpfully illustrated by a picture of me wearing an African outfit at my Kenyan half brother’s wedding). As the campaign progressed, more lurid falsehoods were circulated. These had nothing to do with my nationality but everything to do with a “foreignness” of a more familiar, homegrown, dark-hued variety: that I had dealt drugs, that I had worked as a gay prostitute, that I had Marxist ties and had fathered multiple children out of wedlock.
     
    The book was a “sweet & sour but mostly sour” walk down memory lane. If you went through kindergarten-college under the Bush II and Obama Administrations I think you developed a general sense of political despair. The sections on Obamacare deserve special discussion. Obama was on fire in 2009 but that legislation tarred him like how the second invasion of Iraq destroyed Bush II. In 2010 you had Democrats getting slaughtered mainly due to political backlash against that legislation. (The basis of the system planned on heavily pimping Millennials to sustain the old and sick.)

    https://www.amazon.com/Decision-Points-George-W-Bush/dp/0307590615/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=decision+points&qid=1609015773&sr=8-1

    , @Kronos
    @Gary in Gramercy


    Finally, it looks as if the very end of your comment may have been cut off. It ends somewhat abruptly: “Also, the current crop of elites lost a lot of standing…” I’ve had that happen once or twice: you’re typing furiously, trying to get to the end of your comment, and you accidentally hit the “Publish Comment” button.

    Anyway, Happy Boxing Day.
     

    Yeah, I made a guber. I was going to write some more but I felt tired and thought “fuck it” (not to you Rockford Tyson) and went to bed without deleting that new starting sentence.

    But I wish you a Happy Boxing Day too.

  149. @PiltdownMan
    https://i.imgur.com/MpTZiBi.jpg

    Christmas Time, Eastman Johnson, 1864.

    Replies: @Anon

    Thank you!

  150. @Jonathan Mason
    @clyde

    Pizza Neapolitana (with anchovies) is the very best kind of pizza karma and no pizza joint that does not serve pizza with anchovies is worthy of consideration.

    The very first piece of pizza I ever had in my life in Milan in 1970 was anchovy flavored and I guess that set the trend for me. I don't mind Hawaiian pizza with a topping of pineapple and ham as occasional sweet alternative, but otherwise give me anchovy pizzas every time.

    Replies: @bruce county, @Buzz Mohawk, @clyde

    • LOL: MEH 0910
  151. It isn’t just architecture. All culture seemed to devolve during the last century. Music descended from great classics to rap. Even the classical genre became more noise than music. Noted well by Hanslick on Tchaikovsky: “It gives us, for the first time, the hideous notion that there can be music which stinks to the ear.”

  152. OT Women’s brains scan like the brains of pathological liars, for some reason. Norse anon said:

    Some people are born liars. But lying constantly can rewire and rebuild your brain to make you naturally even more prone to lying …
    So what do you think happens to people who virtue signal all day long, put make up on everyday, use filters, lie to their orbiters, manipulate simps, flake out on guys, lie to their friends (you look beautiful XD xoxox best friend forever) etc? Every small lie, omission and manipulation only strengthens the liar in them.

    Study 1, 2 and 3 in order:
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16199789/

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2376803/

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/8000210_The_neuroanatomy_of_general_intelligence_Sex_matters

    https://postimg.cc/qg2JKY22

  153. The church where I got married in Transylvania:

    Nothing exceptional. Just common architecture in Europe, after all the iniquities they have suffered.

    • Thanks: Pheasant
  154. The point about cleaning soot from old buildings is under appreciated. Check out pictures of the Cathedral of Learning at Pitt before and after cleaning.

    The Cathedral of Learning before and after it was power washed at the University of Pittsburgh (my alma mater!) [600 x 399] from powerwashingporn

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Magic Dirt Resident

    It's hard to remember now, but the buildings of the cities of Europe were all almost uniformly black and sooty until the 1960s. Then, various clean air laws were enacted, coal fire gave way to oil-fired heating, and town councils decided to scrub off centuries of soot.

    I remember reading an article in the '60s, in LIFE magazine, about London—before and after. The pictures depicted old cityscapes of blackened buildings contrasted to light, mostly limestone, facades after.

    I can't find that article online, but this link on Manchester, documents a similar process of scrubbing buildings clean.


    https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/incoming/gallery/blackened-buildings-manchester-before-clean-8727918
     
    https://i.imgur.com/c0afXRt.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/z99xdtO.jpg

    Replies: @Lurker, @The Only Catholic Unionist

  155. @Jonathan Mason
    @clyde

    Pizza Neapolitana (with anchovies) is the very best kind of pizza karma and no pizza joint that does not serve pizza with anchovies is worthy of consideration.

    The very first piece of pizza I ever had in my life in Milan in 1970 was anchovy flavored and I guess that set the trend for me. I don't mind Hawaiian pizza with a topping of pineapple and ham as occasional sweet alternative, but otherwise give me anchovy pizzas every time.

    Replies: @bruce county, @Buzz Mohawk, @clyde

    Those early experiences make a difference.

    My first pizza was the simple, cheap, thin kind that I bought for 25 cents per slice in New Jersey. I would ride my bike 3 miles to downtown. My favorite place was a weird department store that had a pizza counter in the front. There was another place called “Dominick’s” across the street. I still remember when the price for a slice, at both places simultaneously, went from 25 cents to 35.

    That was my first experience with inflation.

    Forever after, pizza to me has been a thin slice with nothing but tomato sauce and mozzarella — best purchased with pocket change, from a bicycle in New Jersey.

  156. OT: Electoral Fraud

    https://www.revolver.news/2020/12/statistical-model-indicates-trump-won-landslide/

    This article examines the statistics of the Presidential election at the county level. Looks at the differences from previous elections, modeling each county on ethnicity and (for whites) education. The national swing for each group accounts for the results in nearly all states. Differences between the model and the actual results should be random, sometimes favoring Biden and sometimes Trump. Instead the discrepancies all favor Biden, and occur in a few of the battleground states. It is hard to account for these discrepancies except by fraud.

    The national swing for each ethnic/educational group should have given Trump Arizona, Georgia, Nevada, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin; but not Michigan.

    The article includes links to the electoral and census data that it uses, so you can examine the claims for yourself.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @James N. Kennett

    Give it up, this kind of thing is turning conservatism into a clown show.
    Should we also examine whether the earth is flat?

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Reg Cæsar

  157. @Thomas
    @Western

    Paste a link directly to the file, .jpg, .png, or whatever.

    Replies: @Western

    thanks

  158. @Kronos
    @Rockford Tyson


    One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn’t he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American’s big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy?
     
    In truth it’s been a common theme. (Please check the archives.)

    https://www.takimag.com/article/the-soiled-streets-of-san-francisco/

    If your new the Covid-19 Pandemic has sucked the most oxygen out of such typical subjects this year. But I’m sure it’s been brought up a few times in 2020. It just doesn’t look that bad when the major cities are in some form of lockdown or another.


    And this is what makes urban upper middle-class liberals so stupid: they don’t realize that average unintelligent people with more impulses than brains cannot live liberal/libertarian lives without causing enormous amount of harm to Society and, especially, to themselves.
     
    Oh they learned that the hard way. The “Free Love” thing was the last thing the African American community needed and the cities have been paying for it ever since. The real problem is how do you put Humpty Dumpty back together again after the 1960s? Nobody can edit the source code of the 1960s for another 10-20 years.

    https://youtu.be/BLPM-P7mNQw

    Also, the current crop of elites lost a lot of standing

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Joe Stalin

    The “Free Love” thing was the last thing the African American community needed and the cities have been paying for it ever since.

    The 1960s had one salient characteristic: baby mamas bitched and moaned and their useless baby daddies NOT paying child support.

    Black women and men wised up and figured out that getting the state to GIVE them money to live off was the cat’s meow of taking advantage of their situation. Black women are the backbone of the Democratic Party, their most loyal voters.

    Start reducing state support and start going after the baby daddies for support. I once heard a Black woman on public transit moaning about the Republican Governor was ‘messing stuff up’ for her living off the government, so I know that reducing state support is the key to putting pressure on this stuff.

    After all, how do all those Black men on the Maury Show have eight children while working at Burger King (True story)?

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Joe Stalin


    The 1960s had one salient characteristic: baby mamas bitched and moaned and their useless baby daddies NOT paying child support.
     
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08GJZFBYV/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i0

    One of the more interesting realizations I made after reading Obama’s new autobiography is that African Americans are essentially the biggest unsung heroes for defending laissez-faire capitalism and stunting socialism in the US. In Chapter 12, Obama discusses social contracts and how Americans were using government to help one another quite successfully in the early 20th century. But for “reasons” white people took a U-turn when they didn’t want blacks and Latinos involved in the same drinking hole of socialism.


    Maintaining this social compact, though, required trust. It required that we see ourselves as bound together, if not as a family then at least as a community, each member worthy of concern and able to make claims on the whole. It required us to believe that whatever actions the government might take to help those in need were available to you and people like you; that nobody was gaming the system and that the misfortunes or stumbles or circumstances that caused others to suffer were ones to which you at some point in your life might fall prey.
     

    Over the years, that trust proved difficult to sustain. In particular, the fault line of race strained it mightily. Accepting that African Americans and other minority groups might need extra help from the government—that their specific hardships could be traced to a brutal history of discrimination rather than immutable characteristics or individual choices—required a level of empathy, of fellow feeling, that many white voters found difficult to muster. Historically, programs designed to help racial minorities, from “forty acres and a mule” to affirmative action, were met with open hostility. Even universal programs that enjoyed broad support—like public education or public sector employment— had a funny way of becoming controversial once Black and brown people were included as beneficiaries.
     
    Due to Supreme Court decisions and Civil Rights legislation, you could never enact “ He who does not work, neither shall he eat” measures to counteract those who’d extract more than they put into any government program. It’s something blacks are notorious for engaging in. Their small national demographic size and yet massive consumption of government resources is truly staggering. So it’s easier and cheaper to remain in private systems where Civil Rights rules are most minimal.

    http://religiondispatches.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/gallery_hero_zoom_il_fullxfull.721814688_ocyy.jpg

    So blacks are natural repellent for socialist single-payer healthcare systems and other subsequent programs.

  159. @Pat Hannagan
    @Lurker

    Dedicated to you, mate. One of the greatest grunge tunes of all time

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OC5Zlvgj8Xs

    All your posts are apposite, you're constantly uplifting, there's zero about you a man would hate.

    Replies: @Lurker

    Thanks mate! And Happy Christmas.

  160. @Gary in Gramercy
    @Buzz Mohawk

    "If you want to welcome me with open arms, I'm afraid you're also going to have to welcome me with open legs."

    Gene Simmons of KISS, to Terry Gross, "Fresh Air," NPR, February 4, 2002

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    “If you want to welcome me with open arms, I’m afraid you’re also going to have to welcome me with open legs.”

    Gene Simmons of KISS, to Terry Gross, “Fresh Air,” NPR, February 4, 2002

    Maybe this was his way of indicating to Gross that despite her deficiencies in the looks department, and the (mistaken) assumption by so many that she was a lesbian, there was a man out there for her.

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Johann Ricke

    If you listen to the entire interview on YouTube -- I think it's divided into three parts -- it's pretty clear that Simmons did not intend, by that particular remark, to compliment Terry Gross on her femininity (although he softens just a bit at the very end of the interview).

    The context of the "welcome me with open legs" bit, which I didn't explain (because, really, he did it to get a rise out of her, and boy, did he succeed), was TG's rundown of Simmons's onstage costumes with KISS. First, she asks him about his makeup, and how he removes it (answer: Pond's cold cream, "you know, the same stuff women do"). Then she goes on to the spiked platform heels, and then, "the studded codpiece," at which point Simmons gets solemn. Gross asks, "Do you have a sense of humor about that?" Simmons replies, as if in a sworn deposition, "No. It holds in my manhood."

    Hearing this -- and surely thinking of the scene in This Is Spinal Tap where one of the Tapsters says, "Well, frankly, the birds [girls] are terrified; we've all got armadillos in our trousers" -- Gross starts laughing, but Simmons is undeterred: "Otherwise it would be too much for you to take. You'd have to put the book down and confront life." Then he utters the immortal line about if you want to welcome me with open arms, etc., etc. If you listen to it, you'll get the humor of the exchange: Simmons knew perfectly well what he was doing, and he was aware that his fan base wouldn't know NPR from NWA.

  161. @Anonymous
    https://youtu.be/Q1ZeXnmDZMQ

    Replies: @Anon

    Possibly the best TED talk ever.

  162. Talk about a moron-tier anti-YT TWITTER thread:

    158 years ago today, the largest mass execution in U.S. history took place under the orders of Abraham Lincoln. On Dec 26, 1862, the day after Christmas, 38 Dakota warriors were hanged in Mankato, MN.

    Completely fails to note that over 300 Dakota were originally sentenced to death. Lincoln, after reviewing the evidence, commuted all but 38, and those 38 were hanged for committing atrocities. The Dakota did a lot of unpleasant stuff:

    Mr. Massipost had two daughters, young ladies, intelligent and accomplished. These the savages murdered most brutally. The head of one of them was afterward found, severed from the body, attached to a fish-hook, and hung upon a nail. His son, a young man of twenty-four years, was also killed. Mr. Massipost and a son of eight years escaped to New Ulm.[48]:141

    The daughter of Mr. Schwandt, enceinte [pregnant], was cut open, as was learned afterward, the child taken alive from the mother, and nailed to a tree. The son of Mr. Schwandt, aged thirteen years, who had been beaten by the Indians, until dead, as was supposed, was present, and saw the entire tragedy. He saw the child taken alive from the body of his sister, Mrs. Waltz, and nailed to a tree in the yard.

  163. @Rockford Tyson
    One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn't he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American's big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy? I know conservatives hate liberals and don't care about the demise of those big blue urban centers. But pointing that out would serve as vindication of the disastrous consequences of liberal policies extended to the whole of Society. Upper middle-class liberal professionals can eschew rules and order because they tend to be intelligent and responsible, so they can live like that without their lives descending into chaos. But applying the "throw rules and authority out of the window: it it feels good, do it." to the whole of Society is DISASTROUS. And this is what makes urban upper middle-class liberals so stupid: they don't realize that average unintelligent people with more impulses than brains cannot live liberal/libertarian lives without causing enormous amount of harm to Society and, especially, to themselves.

    Liberals have an enormous problem with the concept of order, hierarchy and authority. In a way, it makes sense: studies show that, the more cognitively capable and well-educated a person is, the more they find authority and order suffocating, irrational and oppressive. But proles NEED it. They remain toddlers for life and cannot live responsible adult lives. Once upon a time, it was accepted that elites were the "grown ups" of Society, and that the little people were their "children" that the elites had an obligation to care of, but had, in exchange for that protection, behave properly and not demand things that they cannot understand or use responsibly. Like Augustus Caesar told his good friend, Agrippa, before taking his first Consulship:

    "Giving power to the people is like giving a butcher's knife to a child or a madman. To yield power is not a blessing, but a burden."

    Elites fail to discipline Society for the same reason parents nowadays refuse to discipline their children: the mistaken belief that we are all the same, that a child or a moron have the same degree of sentience and abiltiy to self-determine that that of a 25 year-old man with a 150 IQ, They don't.

    Hence, pupils spitting on their teachers, teenagers deciding they are actually of the othe gender and getting irreversible surgery that they will regret latter, obese people eating themselves into death by stroke at 45 because fat-shaming is wrong, girls getting anal tattoos, or fucking 20 different men and then getting pregnant with no concern because she can just kill the kid or give it to social services to be raised with other people's tax money since she thinks her sexual gratification cannot be denied, youths being extremely weak and pathetic and unprepared for the World because they believe no one has the right to violate their "safe spaces"

    You want a short and sweet answer to what is the cause of ALL the social misery we are going through now? Four words: lack of parental authority. I repeat: LACK. OF. PARENTAL. AUTHORITY. Both at home and especially at the level 0f Society with elites being too shy and too full of self-guit to put the children in their place.

    One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn't he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American's big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy? I know conservatives hate liberals and don't care about the demise of those big blue urban centers. But pointing that out would serve as vindication of the disastrous consequences of liberal policies extended to the whole of Society. Upper middle-class liberal professionals can eschew rules and order because they tend to be intelligent and responsible, so they can live like that without their lives descending into chaos. But applying the "throw rules and authority out of the window: it it feels good, do it." to the whole of Society is DISASTROUS. And this is what makes urban upper middle-class liberals so stupid: they don't realize that average unintelligent people with more impulses than brains cannot live liberal/libertariasn lives without causing enormous amount of harm to Society and, especially, to themselves.

    Liberals have an enormous problem with the concept of order, hierarchy and authority. In a way, it makes sense: studies show that, the more cognitively capable and well-educated a person is, the more they find authority and order suffocating, irrational and oppressive. But proles NEED it. They remain toddlers for life and cannot live responsible adult lives. Once upon a time, it was accepted that elites were the "grown ups" of Society, and that the little people were their "children" that the elites had an obligation to care of, but had, in exchange for that protection, behave properly and not demand things that they cannot understand or use responsibly. Like Augustus Caesar told his good friend, Agrippa, before taking his first Consulship:

    "Giving power to the people is like giving a butcher's knife to a child or a madman. To yield power is not a blessing, but a burden."

    Elites fail to discipline Society for the same reason parents nowadays refuse to discipline their children: the mistaken belief that we are all the same, that a child or a moron have the same degree of sentience and abiltiy to self-determine that that of a 25 year-old man with a 150 IQ, They don't.

    Hence, pupils spitting on their teachers, teenagers deciding they are actually of the othe gender and getting irreversible surgery that they will regret latter, obese people eating themselves into death by stroke at 45 because fat-shaming is wrong, girls getting anal tattoos, or fucking 20 different men and then getting pregnant with no concern because she can just kill the kid or give it to social services to be raised with other people's tax money since she thinks her sexual gratification cannot be denied, youths being extremely weak and pathetic and unprepared for the World because they believe no one has the right to violate their "safe spaces"

    You want a short and sweet answer to what is the cause of ALL the social misery we are going through now? Four words: lack of parental authority. I repeat: LACK. OF. PARENTAL. AUTHORITY. Both at home and especially at the level 0f Society with elites being too shy and too full of self-guit to put the children in their place.

    https://youtu.be/HKCfu4UJQiQ

    Replies: @Kronos, @Anon, @Too Long Didn't Read

    One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn’t he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American’s big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy?

    One of the things I find boring about unz.com is how many midwits do not bother to actually read any of the essays before commenting.

    • Replies: @Rockford Tyson
    @Too Long Didn't Read

    Are you talking about yourself? Seems like it. More like you are a low wit or, better yet, an under-wit, as your wit is below zero. I did read all those articles, dummy. That is why I boldened the word "absolute". Point is, Sailer makes it seem better than it actually is. I love when some guy calls me a mid wit when he can't even read properly!

  164. OT excellent VDH piece:

    https://dailycaller.com/2020/12/24/victor-davis-hanson-our-upside-down-post-election-world/

    Impeaching a first-term president after his first midterm election — on a strictly partisan vote, for political reasons other than the Constitution’s “treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors” — is now a terrible idea.

    Worse would be to appoint a special counsel to harass a president on unfounded charges of collusion with China. An even scarier notion would be a conservative dream team of partisan lawyers hounding President Joe Biden — using a 22-month, $40 million blank check.

  165. @SDMatt
    Buffalo has a lot of beautiful buildings.

    What I hadn't realized is that it also has a replica of Michelangelo's David in Delaware Park.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/db/Statue_of_David_in_Delaware_Park%2C_Buffalo.jpg

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    SDMatt, Buffalo have some streets lined with stately mansions. Delaware Ave.,Nottingham Terrace,Lincoln Parkway,Chapin Parkway and Bidwell Parkway to name a few. The Albright Knox art gallery is world famous and justifibly so. There are three or four Frank Lloyd Wright houses also. The Lady of Victory Basilica in nearby Lackawanna is stunning, some one please post a photos and old Polonia has some magnificent churches. But Buffalo is old and has neighborhoods in decay, as do many NE cities. There are gems to be found if you can find a local to guide you around. PS. The statue of David is in the Frederick Law Olmsted designed Delaware Park.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Buffalo Joe

    Even though it soon became obsolete as a railroad station and is in a poor location, Buffalo Central Terminal is a grand structure that hopefully will be fully restored before long.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @SDMatt
    @Buffalo Joe

    Thanks Joe. I'm your neighbour in Toronto, so when the border re-opens I'll check out your recommendations.

  166. @Joe Stalin
    The 1933-1934 Chicago Century of Progress, where Art Deco reigned supreme, as in our super-cool future.

    https://youtu.be/QGfRgU4cPrY

    Hell, the very first Buck Rogers film was presented here.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qm4I8B3bFUA

    Replies: @syonredux, @Dr. Charles Fhandrich

    1939 World’s Fair:

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @syonredux

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6pDHm5zUK7U

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b2QPWTZ7bwQ

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcGlUaD9Kjg

    Replies: @syonredux

    , @MBlanc46
    @syonredux

    Thanks for those.

  167. @Apollo 20


    https://cdn10.bostonmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2017/10/mass-art-exterior.jpg
    http://www.greatcollegedeals.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Massachusetts-College-of-Art-and-Desgn-1-1024x683.jpg
    Massachusetts College of Art and Design
     
    🤦‍♂️

    “What the Bleep Happened to Architecture?—E. Michael Jones”

    https://www.patrickcoffin.media/what-the-bleep-happened-to-architecture/
     

    Replies: @anonymous, @Sue D. Nim

    William Morris (24 March 1834 – 3 October 1896) was a British textile designer, poet, novelist, translator, and socialist activist associated with the British Arts and Crafts Movement. He was a major contributor to the revival of traditional British textile arts and methods of production.

    The William Morris School, Walthamstow

    https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@51.5998297,-0.0332061,3a,75y,30.65h,95.56t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s99OH8R05rssHJZQIQDEKZA!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

  168. Library of Congress, Jefferson Building:


  169. There are several reasons for the ugliness of modern (that doesn’t mean modernist, you pedants) architecture.

    1. Remind everybody who’s in charge. “We can make your world as ugly as we want and you can’t do shit about it”.

    2. Deracination. The modern citizen shouldn’t accidentally be reminded of how great his ancestors were while walking around, or even what country he’s in.

    3. As an accessory for maintaining a caste system. If you want to be part of the system with potentially a way upwards, you’ll have to loudly declare how beautiful all the self-evident ugliness is. If you can’t do that, you can’t be trusted and therefore an outsider.

    4. Demoralization. Having to deal with ugliness wears you out.

    5. Laziness. Imagining what it would be like for people to actually live in your monstrosity costs energy.

    • Agree: Lot
  170. @Buffalo Joe
    @SDMatt

    SDMatt, Buffalo have some streets lined with stately mansions. Delaware Ave.,Nottingham Terrace,Lincoln Parkway,Chapin Parkway and Bidwell Parkway to name a few. The Albright Knox art gallery is world famous and justifibly so. There are three or four Frank Lloyd Wright houses also. The Lady of Victory Basilica in nearby Lackawanna is stunning, some one please post a photos and old Polonia has some magnificent churches. But Buffalo is old and has neighborhoods in decay, as do many NE cities. There are gems to be found if you can find a local to guide you around. PS. The statue of David is in the Frederick Law Olmsted designed Delaware Park.

    Replies: @prosa123, @SDMatt

    Even though it soon became obsolete as a railroad station and is in a poor location, Buffalo Central Terminal is a grand structure that hopefully will be fully restored before long.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @prosa123


    Even though it soon became obsolete as a railroad station and is in a poor location, Buffalo Central Terminal is a grand structure that hopefully will be fully restored before long.
     
    Saint Paul did a good job of this with Union Station. Minneapolitans turned theirs into a skating rink and farmers' market depending on the season. The "temporary" station both cities used for decades was midway between the downtowns, in a desolate industrial zone called, of course, the Midway. (The city's 10mph speed limit made the last hour of the trip from Chicago quite frustrating.)

    Buffalo's "modern" depot when I was there was a double-wide trailer among distant malls accessible by a long, slow bus ride from downtown.

    Buffalo educated St Paul's notable native F Scott Fitzgerald for some years. It's time Pig's Eye returned the favor and show how to revive a classic terminal. Then combine to tackle Detroit's!


    https://www.history.com/.image/ar_16:9%2Cc_fill%2Ccs_srgb%2Cfl_progressive%2Cg_faces:center%2Cq_auto:good%2Cw_768/MTU3OTIzNjYwOTQxOTYxMTY2/this-train-station-is-poised-to-help-detroit-get-back-on-tracks-featured-photo.jpg


    Oh, wait...

    Detroit train station renovation still moving ahead in pandemic: Where it stands
  171. @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Anon

    My dad lived next to Frank Lloyd Wright's Moore House in Oak Park. IL from 1917-1929. It burned down on Christmas Day 1922, so FLW, on his return from Japan, rebuilt this Tudor cottage as a giant Japanese-looking Tudor cottage. My dad's old non-descript house next door looks easier to live in.

    http://www.oprf.com/flw/Moore.html

    Replies: @JimDandy

    There was a Frank Lloyd Wright house in Oak Park that was used as a bed and breakfast. I spent a couple hours inside one once. It was an extremely stiff and uncomfortable experience.

  172. Being stuck at home all the time is turning women into drunks:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/25/nyregion/pandemic-drinking-alcoholism.html

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @prosa123

    https://i1.wp.com/www.powerlineblog.com/ed-assets/2020/12/Screen-Shot-2020-12-20-at-11.49.48-AM.png

    , @Gary in Gramercy
    @prosa123

    Thanks for pointing out this piece -- yet another in a series of "would you like cheese with that whine?"

    The author conveniently fails to mention that men in New York have also been working from home for several months. Are they, too, turning into raging alcoholics?

    Readers looking for a hint at the real problem would do well to focus on the stated occupations of the three women who were identified as seeking help to cut down on their at-home imbibing: (1) "marketing manager in media"; (2) "publicist"; and (3) [my favorite] "annual fund manager at a synagogue."

    Look, unless it's either Temple Emanu-el, the Park Avenue Synagogue, Central Synagogue, Sutton Place, Lincoln Square, B'nai Jeshurun, Anshe Chesed and maybe a few others, we're not talking large-cap funds, if you catch my drift. And those congregations probably all have members who manage money (i.e., billions) for a living, and know who the heavy hitters are: they're not going to entrust their annual funds, building funds or any other shul-related money to a self-confessed morning drinker.

    My point is that in all three cases, the women's jobs are somewhat less than essential. The ladies were able to avoid this downer of a realization in normal times, but now that they're stuck at home, it's become painfully apparent how insignificant their positions really are. That's why they're drinking like there's no tomorrow.

    Best quote: "The pandemic prevented us from connecting with others." This, from a retired professor of psychiatry and behavioral science at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine. Then what is every woman in a big city doing with her cell phone? Playing Candy Crush? Whenever I'm on a city bus, every woman is on her phone, yakking away to her friends about something or other. They're connecting just fine.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  173. @syonredux
    @Joe Stalin

    1939 World's Fair:


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bG0YiDPUJ94

    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-wnBAho6n9_g/VCzLHRK47dI/AAAAAAAADVI/xu4iWTT5Pw8/s1600/Night_Scene.jpg


    https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2019/07/Worlds_Fair._LOC_gsc.5a30821.jpg


    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/4e/ae/9a/4eae9ab170648f696a38a9c017d12b0f.jpg

    https://www.cca.qc.ca/img/jdiXZSY7nJTYKndbR0ffhPJstV4=/1920x0/6296/5700/PH1981_0265.jpg

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @MBlanc46

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Joe Stalin

    And let's not forget the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago:

    https://monovisions.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Worlds-Columbian-Exposition-Chicago-1893-01.jpg

    https://sep.yimg.com/ay/pomegranate/the-white-city-chicago-s-world-s-columbian-exposition-of-1893-book-of-postcards-74.jpg

    https://images.fineartamerica.com/images-medium-large-5/worlds-columbian-exposition-administration-building-chicago-1893-historic-photos.jpg

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJROOVf85Fc


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpOQE5KJJds

  174. @Jonathan Mason
    It makes sense that the appearance and aesthetics of a new building should be taken into consideration.

    It would also make sense to mandate the building of parks and landscaping, statuary and fountains, shady places to sit and eat lunch outside of buildings, and I don't mean just Home Depot style utilitarian cheap-to-maintain bushes like a Walmart parking lot.

    However the same rules should also apply to all buildings built by private businesses and hospitals and churches over a certain size, not to mention schools and colleges, transit terminals, and airports.

    Unfortunately the United States is probably more motorized than any other country in the world, and the need for parking lots seems to take over all other kinds of esthetic consideration in many settings.

    Parking lots should be put behind buildings, or underneath them if the local geology supports this and various forms of shuttle should be used to treat people from remote parking lots to the buildings where they need to be.

    Many countries are coming up with ingenious solutions to getting ready for the post ICE society and while the United States cannot copy everything from overseas, architects, planners, and designers should certainly be looking at what other countries are doing for creative ideas.

    Replies: @SimpleSong

    The second industrial revolution had some really unfortunate effects on the aesthetics of the built environment. Telephone poles and power lines are ugly, and almost any building will look bad if plonked in the middle of a sea of asphalt. Add in the toxic notion that America is not a people but rather a big steaming vat of capitalism and now we have people sticking garish plastic signs everywhere making the place look even worse.

    Conservatives can’t keep you from being ethnically cleansed out of your old neighborhood or the medical establishment from cutting off your son’s gonads, but if someone suggests we should have some rules about putting giant plastic signs on a stick suddenly it’s all muh freedom muh property rights and they actually manage to win some legislative battles.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @SimpleSong

    An architectural critic in Nashville, TN appears to have taken matters into his own hands by setting off the bomb that warned residents to get out, and then inflicting damage on more than 20 buildings in an attempt to rearrange the Nashville skyline.

    It all reminds me of the Sir John Betjamin poem about Slough, (home of the UK version of the TV show The Office.)

    Come, friendly bombs, and fall on Slough
    It isn't fit for humans now,
    There isn't grass to graze a cow
    Swarm over, Death!

    Come, bombs, and blow to smithereens
    Those air-conditioned, bright canteens,
    Tinned fruit, tinned meat, tinned milk, tinned beans
    Tinned minds, tinned breath.

    Mess up the mess they call a town -
    A house for ninety-seven down
    And once a week for half-a-crown
    For twenty years,

    Latest news is that it may have been a white man called Warner. Don't say he didn't warn yer!

    Replies: @syonredux, @SimpleSong

  175. @prosa123
    Being stuck at home all the time is turning women into drunks:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/25/nyregion/pandemic-drinking-alcoholism.html

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Gary in Gramercy

  176. @notsaying
    Here is what was on my phone's news scroll this fine Christmas Day:

    A photo and story about Alec Baldwin's family. His wife is Hilaria, a Hispanic immigrant with dark hair and olive skin. She has become well known for being pregnant over and over again in recent years; she's had five kids and numerous miscarriages. She has a large female social media following. I never saw the kids until today and boy oh boy was I surprised.

    The photo shows her pale skinned children with a mixture of pale blonde and medium blonde hair. There's no way she used her own eggs for any of them. Interestingly enough they all have Spanish names though.

    I have seen numerous articles about her at the Daily Mail with many comments telling her to stop having more kids. They never show the kids like they do in this People article or there'd be comments about how she can't be their biological mother. I wonder why the Baldwins chose to use eggs from a Northern European mother?

    https://people.com/parents/amy-schumer-hilaria-baldwin-re-do-instagram/?amp=true

    Replies: @prosa123, @duncsbaby, @Iberian, @MEH 0910

    You should travel…
    Try south europe and midle-east.
    From Portugal to Iran and Lebanon (and all in the midle) you will find several millions of blondes with dark haired mothers or fathers. Sometimes both…
    And this is hapenning since many thousands years ago… Before you can change any eggs…

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Iberian

    The term of art is “Spanish Gold”.

  177. @Bill Jones
    @Thomas

    You might like Paddy's Wigwam in Liverpool, or
    The Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King as non-Scousers call it.

    https://wordhistories.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/15421-the-metropolitan-cathedral-of-christ-the-king-in-liverpool-england.png?w=750

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @MBlanc46

    Actually I have been inside and it is rather nice.

  178. @SimpleSong
    @Jonathan Mason

    The second industrial revolution had some really unfortunate effects on the aesthetics of the built environment. Telephone poles and power lines are ugly, and almost any building will look bad if plonked in the middle of a sea of asphalt. Add in the toxic notion that America is not a people but rather a big steaming vat of capitalism and now we have people sticking garish plastic signs everywhere making the place look even worse.

    Conservatives can't keep you from being ethnically cleansed out of your old neighborhood or the medical establishment from cutting off your son's gonads, but if someone suggests we should have some rules about putting giant plastic signs on a stick suddenly it's all muh freedom muh property rights and they actually manage to win some legislative battles.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    An architectural critic in Nashville, TN appears to have taken matters into his own hands by setting off the bomb that warned residents to get out, and then inflicting damage on more than 20 buildings in an attempt to rearrange the Nashville skyline.

    It all reminds me of the Sir John Betjamin poem about Slough, (home of the UK version of the TV show The Office.)

    Come, friendly bombs, and fall on Slough
    It isn’t fit for humans now,
    There isn’t grass to graze a cow
    Swarm over, Death!

    Come, bombs, and blow to smithereens
    Those air-conditioned, bright canteens,
    Tinned fruit, tinned meat, tinned milk, tinned beans
    Tinned minds, tinned breath.

    Mess up the mess they call a town –
    A house for ninety-seven down
    And once a week for half-a-crown
    For twenty years,

    Latest news is that it may have been a white man called Warner. Don’t say he didn’t warn yer!

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Jonathan Mason

    When I was a kid, I read some batman comics where the plot revolved around an aesthete who was destroying all the modernist architecture in Gotham while leaving intact the "Dark Deco" masterpieces that had formerly defined the city:

    https://comicsalliance.com/files/2014/06/lotdk-001.jpg

    https://i2.wp.com/lifewithoutbuildings.net/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/destroyer-covers.jpg

    Batman, Gotham City, and an Overzealous Architecture Historian With a Working Knowledge of Explosives


    http://lifewithoutbuildings.net/2009/06/on-influence-batman-gotham-city-and-an-overzealous-architecture-historian-with-a-working-knowledge-of-explosives.html

    Replies: @J.Ross

    , @SimpleSong
    @Jonathan Mason

    I wonder what the guy's motivation was. When I first heard about that I immediately thought I.R.A. tactics. Minimize casualties but inflict maximum economic damage, in this case by targeting a bunch of expensive telecom equipment. Also made me wonder if those google outages earlier this month were due to incompetence as google claimed or something like this that was hushed up to avoid copycats.

    Replies: @Philip Neal

  179. @Jonathan Mason
    @SimpleSong

    An architectural critic in Nashville, TN appears to have taken matters into his own hands by setting off the bomb that warned residents to get out, and then inflicting damage on more than 20 buildings in an attempt to rearrange the Nashville skyline.

    It all reminds me of the Sir John Betjamin poem about Slough, (home of the UK version of the TV show The Office.)

    Come, friendly bombs, and fall on Slough
    It isn't fit for humans now,
    There isn't grass to graze a cow
    Swarm over, Death!

    Come, bombs, and blow to smithereens
    Those air-conditioned, bright canteens,
    Tinned fruit, tinned meat, tinned milk, tinned beans
    Tinned minds, tinned breath.

    Mess up the mess they call a town -
    A house for ninety-seven down
    And once a week for half-a-crown
    For twenty years,

    Latest news is that it may have been a white man called Warner. Don't say he didn't warn yer!

    Replies: @syonredux, @SimpleSong

    When I was a kid, I read some batman comics where the plot revolved around an aesthete who was destroying all the modernist architecture in Gotham while leaving intact the “Dark Deco” masterpieces that had formerly defined the city:

    Batman, Gotham City, and an Overzealous Architecture Historian With a Working Knowledge of Explosives

    http://lifewithoutbuildings.net/2009/06/on-influence-batman-gotham-city-and-an-overzealous-architecture-historian-with-a-working-knowledge-of-explosives.html

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @syonredux

    >the hero we need but don't deserve.

  180. @Joe Stalin
    @syonredux

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6pDHm5zUK7U

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b2QPWTZ7bwQ

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcGlUaD9Kjg

    Replies: @syonredux

    And let’s not forget the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago:

  181. @Gordo
    Merry Christmas, a little late :-)

    Chinese have an inactivated vaccine:

    https://www.reuters.com/article/health-coronavirus-turkey-china-int/turkey-says-chinas-sinovac-covid-vaccine-91-25-effective-in-late-trials-idUSKBN28Y1R3

    Maybe helps if you invented the virus as well.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    Millions of doses of Pfizer Inc (NYSE: PFE) and BioNTech SE’s (NASDAQ: BNTX) COVID-19 vaccine will be administered in China alongside home-made options, Bloomberg reported Tuesday.

    What Happened: Local pharmaceutical firm Shanghai Fosun Pharmaceutical (Group) Co, Ltd (OTC: SFOSF) — which signed an agreement with BioNTech in March — will pay the German company $300 million (EUR 250 million) for an initial 50 million doses, according to Bloomberg.

    Pfizer’s German partner will supply no less than 100 million doses to China by 2021, Fosun informed the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, as per Bloomberg.

    Meanwhile, COVID-19 vaccines made by China National Biotec Group Co and Sinovac Biotech Ltd are reportedly close to approval by drug regulators in China and 1.6 billion doses are expected to be manufactured in 2021.

    Why It Matters: Since the Chinese vaccines require two doses and President Xi Jinping has also stated the country’s commitment to making available successful vaccines to the developing world, there is a need for additional vaccines, noted Bloomberg.

    AstraZeneca plc (NYSE: AZN) and its local partner will also reportedly supply the former’s vaccine to the East Asian country.

    https://www.yahoo.com/now/china-secures-100m-doses-pfizer-074155989.html

  182. @prosa123
    Being stuck at home all the time is turning women into drunks:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/25/nyregion/pandemic-drinking-alcoholism.html

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Gary in Gramercy

    Thanks for pointing out this piece — yet another in a series of “would you like cheese with that whine?”

    The author conveniently fails to mention that men in New York have also been working from home for several months. Are they, too, turning into raging alcoholics?

    Readers looking for a hint at the real problem would do well to focus on the stated occupations of the three women who were identified as seeking help to cut down on their at-home imbibing: (1) “marketing manager in media”; (2) “publicist”; and (3) [my favorite] “annual fund manager at a synagogue.”

    Look, unless it’s either Temple Emanu-el, the Park Avenue Synagogue, Central Synagogue, Sutton Place, Lincoln Square, B’nai Jeshurun, Anshe Chesed and maybe a few others, we’re not talking large-cap funds, if you catch my drift. And those congregations probably all have members who manage money (i.e., billions) for a living, and know who the heavy hitters are: they’re not going to entrust their annual funds, building funds or any other shul-related money to a self-confessed morning drinker.

    My point is that in all three cases, the women’s jobs are somewhat less than essential. The ladies were able to avoid this downer of a realization in normal times, but now that they’re stuck at home, it’s become painfully apparent how insignificant their positions really are. That’s why they’re drinking like there’s no tomorrow.

    Best quote: “The pandemic prevented us from connecting with others.” This, from a retired professor of psychiatry and behavioral science at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine. Then what is every woman in a big city doing with her cell phone? Playing Candy Crush? Whenever I’m on a city bus, every woman is on her phone, yakking away to her friends about something or other. They’re connecting just fine.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Gary in Gramercy

    This is a logical way of introducing a situation when you have been indoctrinated to think that men cannot be victims. The author of Murder City responded to the maker of the Juatez documentary by saying, yes, women are being victimized in Juarez, but so are the men and the children.

  183. A woman just jumped to her death from one of the most depressing post-modern monstrosities ever dumped on the city of New York. These chaotic misshapen monsters help people to give up and die.

    https://nypost.com/2020/12/26/womans-instagram-suicide-note-posts-days-after-she-jumped-to-her-death/

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Anonymous

    This is the building:
    https://www.hudsonyardsnewyork.com/sites/default/files/styles/experience_details/public/2019-03/Schenck%20Related%20HY%202019_03_15%20DSC_1932.jpg

    It's "interesting" in that gaudy tourist-trap kind of way.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2GBWVXBZn2I

    My grandmother took me on a quick trip to New York over the Fourth of July holiday in 2001. (I was a teenager at the time.) We arrived on the third and left on the fifth.

    On the Fourth, we saw the Statue of Liberty and arrived back in Lower Manhattan in the late afternoon. I wanted to visit the observation deck of the World Trade Center. (We'd already seen the view from atop the Empire State Building.)

    "I'm exhausted," she said. "I need you to take me back to the hotel. I promise you that we'll see it next year."

    Well...

    When she saw me on 9/11, the first thing she said to me was, "I'm so sorry. We should have gone when we had the chance."

    I did get to see Ground Zero.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Reg Cæsar, @Lockean Proviso

  184. @Gary in Gramercy
    @Kronos

    You're correct that Steve has frequently remarked on the decline of the big cities in blue or purple states (or even red states: e.g., New Orleans in otherwise red Louisiana).

    You're also right that the deterioration of such cities doesn't get as much attention in a turbulent year like this one, in which virtually all cities are under lockdown orders of one kind or another.

    (I didn't check Rockford Tyson's commenting history, but I suspect your hunch is on the mark: he may be new around here.)

    By the way, did you ever finish Icky Homo (Himself's first volume of Presidential memoirs)? If so, I admire your persistence, but expect you're exhausted from the sheer effort required.

    Finally, it looks as if the very end of your comment may have been cut off. It ends somewhat abruptly: "Also, the current crop of elites lost a lot of standing..." I've had that happen once or twice: you're typing furiously, trying to get to the end of your comment, and you accidentally hit the "Publish Comment" button.

    Anyway, Happy Boxing Day.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Kronos

    By the way, did you ever finish Icky Homo (Himself’s first volume of Presidential memoirs)? If so, I admire your persistence, but expect you’re exhausted from the sheer effort required.

    I did, it was interesting and actually quite fun to read (akin to a plaintiff’s lawyer looking for mistakes the defense may have made.)

    About 1/5 of the book is essentially a big thank you card thanking all the various members of Obama’s Administration (even Hillary) and portraying the likes of Larry Summers and Rahm Emanuel in a positive light. Essentially it starts with his early life and ends with the assassination of Osama Bin Laden. Compared to Obama’s first book that Steve diligently dissected, this book has much less “encryption” despite being 4x as long. That Obama opaque literary style doesn’t kick in until Chapter 13 when he presents this weird French “New Wave” cinematic analogy of him trying to master a real military salute that symbolizes him taking the reigns of the National Security State. Before chapter 13, there’s only this snippet from his 2008 campaign.

    Even before I formally announced, Gibbs and our communications team had beaten back various rumors that bubbled up on conservative talk radio or fly-by-night websites before migrating to the Drudge Report and Fox News. There were reports that I had been schooled in an Indonesian madrassa, which gained enough traction that a CNN correspondent actually traveled to my old elementary school in Jakarta, where he found a bunch of kids wearing Western-style uniforms and listening to New Kids on the Block on their iPods.

    There were claims that I wasn’t an American citizen (helpfully illustrated by a picture of me wearing an African outfit at my Kenyan half brother’s wedding). As the campaign progressed, more lurid falsehoods were circulated. These had nothing to do with my nationality but everything to do with a “foreignness” of a more familiar, homegrown, dark-hued variety: that I had dealt drugs, that I had worked as a gay prostitute, that I had Marxist ties and had fathered multiple children out of wedlock.

    The book was a “sweet & sour but mostly sour” walk down memory lane. If you went through kindergarten-college under the Bush II and Obama Administrations I think you developed a general sense of political despair. The sections on Obamacare deserve special discussion. Obama was on fire in 2009 but that legislation tarred him like how the second invasion of Iraq destroyed Bush II. In 2010 you had Democrats getting slaughtered mainly due to political backlash against that legislation. (The basis of the system planned on heavily pimping Millennials to sustain the old and sick.)

  185. @Too Long Didn't Read
    @Rockford Tyson

    One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn’t he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American’s big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy?

    One of the things I find boring about unz.com is how many midwits do not bother to actually read any of the essays before commenting.

    Replies: @Rockford Tyson

    Are you talking about yourself? Seems like it. More like you are a low wit or, better yet, an under-wit, as your wit is below zero. I did read all those articles, dummy. That is why I boldened the word “absolute”. Point is, Sailer makes it seem better than it actually is. I love when some guy calls me a mid wit when he can’t even read properly!

  186. @Henry's Cat
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Every time I see one of these, I'm wondering if it's a deep fake.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Would a deep fake do this?

    President-elect Joe Biden called Fox News correspondent Peter Doocy a “one-horse pony” after he asked a question about reporting over the federal investigation into his son Hunter Biden.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Harry Baldwin


    President-elect Joe Biden called Fox News correspondent Peter Doocy a “one-horse pony”...
     
    He could have done a lot more with "Doocy". Remember what Chris Thompson did with Springsteen's "deuce" on the 1975 hit "Blinded By the Light".


    OT, but how much deplatforming starts here?:

    https://www.change.org/p/youtube-remove-all-tommy-sotomayor-videos-from-youtube-now

    Replies: @Lot

  187. @syonredux
    @Jonathan Mason

    When I was a kid, I read some batman comics where the plot revolved around an aesthete who was destroying all the modernist architecture in Gotham while leaving intact the "Dark Deco" masterpieces that had formerly defined the city:

    https://comicsalliance.com/files/2014/06/lotdk-001.jpg

    https://i2.wp.com/lifewithoutbuildings.net/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/destroyer-covers.jpg

    Batman, Gotham City, and an Overzealous Architecture Historian With a Working Knowledge of Explosives


    http://lifewithoutbuildings.net/2009/06/on-influence-batman-gotham-city-and-an-overzealous-architecture-historian-with-a-working-knowledge-of-explosives.html

    Replies: @J.Ross

    >the hero we need but don’t deserve.

  188. @Gary in Gramercy
    @prosa123

    Thanks for pointing out this piece -- yet another in a series of "would you like cheese with that whine?"

    The author conveniently fails to mention that men in New York have also been working from home for several months. Are they, too, turning into raging alcoholics?

    Readers looking for a hint at the real problem would do well to focus on the stated occupations of the three women who were identified as seeking help to cut down on their at-home imbibing: (1) "marketing manager in media"; (2) "publicist"; and (3) [my favorite] "annual fund manager at a synagogue."

    Look, unless it's either Temple Emanu-el, the Park Avenue Synagogue, Central Synagogue, Sutton Place, Lincoln Square, B'nai Jeshurun, Anshe Chesed and maybe a few others, we're not talking large-cap funds, if you catch my drift. And those congregations probably all have members who manage money (i.e., billions) for a living, and know who the heavy hitters are: they're not going to entrust their annual funds, building funds or any other shul-related money to a self-confessed morning drinker.

    My point is that in all three cases, the women's jobs are somewhat less than essential. The ladies were able to avoid this downer of a realization in normal times, but now that they're stuck at home, it's become painfully apparent how insignificant their positions really are. That's why they're drinking like there's no tomorrow.

    Best quote: "The pandemic prevented us from connecting with others." This, from a retired professor of psychiatry and behavioral science at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine. Then what is every woman in a big city doing with her cell phone? Playing Candy Crush? Whenever I'm on a city bus, every woman is on her phone, yakking away to her friends about something or other. They're connecting just fine.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    This is a logical way of introducing a situation when you have been indoctrinated to think that men cannot be victims. The author of Murder City responded to the maker of the Juatez documentary by saying, yes, women are being victimized in Juarez, but so are the men and the children.

  189. @Anon
    @Rockford Tyson


    One of the things I find fascinating about Steve Sailer is why isn’t he pointing out that *absolute* collapse of American’s big Blue Cities into Third World squalor and utter anarchy? I know conservatives hate liberals and don’t care about the demise of those big blue urban centers. But pointing that out would serve as vindication of the disastrous consequences of liberal policies extended to the whole of Society. Upper middle-class liberal professionals can eschew rules and order because they tend to be intelligent and responsible, so they can live like that without their lives descending into chaos.
     
    The upper middle class professionals weren’t behind the demise of American cities. They are simply another set of marionettes of the TPTB in the Kulturkampf. Read The Slaughter of Cities by E. Michael Jones to understand the ‘who, what, where, why, and how’ behind the destruction of American cities.

    Replies: @Lockean Proviso

    Focusing on Boston, Philadelphia, Detroit, and Chicago, Dr. E. Michael Jones shows that Government sponsored “renewal” of American cities was not a program that failed by going sadly awry, but instead was a planned destruction of the ethnic neighborhoods that made up the human, residential heart of the cities.

    That’s DR. E. Michael Jones.

    Looks like an interesting forensic history. Hadn’t heard of the WW1 homefront propaganda connection to urban integration policies.

  190. @Jonathan Mason
    @clyde

    Pizza Neapolitana (with anchovies) is the very best kind of pizza karma and no pizza joint that does not serve pizza with anchovies is worthy of consideration.

    The very first piece of pizza I ever had in my life in Milan in 1970 was anchovy flavored and I guess that set the trend for me. I don't mind Hawaiian pizza with a topping of pineapple and ham as occasional sweet alternative, but otherwise give me anchovy pizzas every time.

    Replies: @bruce county, @Buzz Mohawk, @clyde

    You are a man of wealth and taste if you like pizza with anchovies. You had the real deal in Milan. Italy has long had a love affair with anchovies. The Romans made a fermented anchovy paste as a condiment.—- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garum —Similar to how the Vietnamese make fish sauce from fermenting anchovies.

    Matter of fact I saw on YouTube the other day, making the same fish sauce in Thailand. (21 minutes in)

    (21 minutes in)

    • Replies: @J1234
    @clyde

    I'll be honest with you: The pizza I had at a small restaurant in Rome kind of sucked. I don't know if that typified pizza in Italy or not. It was a crispy kind of lavosh thing. NOT lavosh, but reminscent of it. Minimal toppings, too. The restaurant's other dishes were good. American pizza may be something that's corrupt, but if so, I kind of prefer the corrupt version.

  191. @Johann Ricke
    @Gary in Gramercy


    “If you want to welcome me with open arms, I’m afraid you’re also going to have to welcome me with open legs.”

    Gene Simmons of KISS, to Terry Gross, “Fresh Air,” NPR, February 4, 2002

     

    Maybe this was his way of indicating to Gross that despite her deficiencies in the looks department, and the (mistaken) assumption by so many that she was a lesbian, there was a man out there for her.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    If you listen to the entire interview on YouTube — I think it’s divided into three parts — it’s pretty clear that Simmons did not intend, by that particular remark, to compliment Terry Gross on her femininity (although he softens just a bit at the very end of the interview).

    The context of the “welcome me with open legs” bit, which I didn’t explain (because, really, he did it to get a rise out of her, and boy, did he succeed), was TG’s rundown of Simmons’s onstage costumes with KISS. First, she asks him about his makeup, and how he removes it (answer: Pond’s cold cream, “you know, the same stuff women do”). Then she goes on to the spiked platform heels, and then, “the studded codpiece,” at which point Simmons gets solemn. Gross asks, “Do you have a sense of humor about that?” Simmons replies, as if in a sworn deposition, “No. It holds in my manhood.”

    Hearing this — and surely thinking of the scene in This Is Spinal Tap where one of the Tapsters says, “Well, frankly, the birds [girls] are terrified; we’ve all got armadillos in our trousers” — Gross starts laughing, but Simmons is undeterred: “Otherwise it would be too much for you to take. You’d have to put the book down and confront life.” Then he utters the immortal line about if you want to welcome me with open arms, etc., etc. If you listen to it, you’ll get the humor of the exchange: Simmons knew perfectly well what he was doing, and he was aware that his fan base wouldn’t know NPR from NWA.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
  192. @Mr. Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    The rap on Wright's Usonian designs is that they were maintenance nightmares. As you say, flat roofs make for poor drainage. I don't know if his earlier houses, the very germanic looking ones, had the same problem. I've always thought Wright's houses were nice to look at, but I wouldn't want to actually live in one.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar

    As you say, flat roofs make for poor drainage.

    Something a child could figure out. I had great fun chasing frogs during a Honolulu cloudburst in our apartment complex’s fairly safe gardens. We learned the next day that across town, a supermarket’s level roof had fallen in. Boy Barack hadn’t left for Jakarta yet. It was on his side of the city.

  193. @Harry Baldwin
    @Henry's Cat

    Would a deep fake do this?


    President-elect Joe Biden called Fox News correspondent Peter Doocy a "one-horse pony" after he asked a question about reporting over the federal investigation into his son Hunter Biden.
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    President-elect Joe Biden called Fox News correspondent Peter Doocy a “one-horse pony”…

    He could have done a lot more with “Doocy”. Remember what Chris Thompson did with Springsteen’s “deuce” on the 1975 hit “Blinded By the Light”.

    OT, but how much deplatforming starts here?:

    https://www.change.org/p/youtube-remove-all-tommy-sotomayor-videos-from-youtube-now

    • Replies: @Lot
    @Reg Cæsar

    “ OT, but how much deplatforming starts here?”

    I think Twitter mobbing is the main way people are deplatformed.

    Where Change.org petitions seem to work are for non-tenured academic positions. Even then, the organizing seems to be on Twitter.

  194. @Jonathan Mason
    @SimpleSong

    An architectural critic in Nashville, TN appears to have taken matters into his own hands by setting off the bomb that warned residents to get out, and then inflicting damage on more than 20 buildings in an attempt to rearrange the Nashville skyline.

    It all reminds me of the Sir John Betjamin poem about Slough, (home of the UK version of the TV show The Office.)

    Come, friendly bombs, and fall on Slough
    It isn't fit for humans now,
    There isn't grass to graze a cow
    Swarm over, Death!

    Come, bombs, and blow to smithereens
    Those air-conditioned, bright canteens,
    Tinned fruit, tinned meat, tinned milk, tinned beans
    Tinned minds, tinned breath.

    Mess up the mess they call a town -
    A house for ninety-seven down
    And once a week for half-a-crown
    For twenty years,

    Latest news is that it may have been a white man called Warner. Don't say he didn't warn yer!

    Replies: @syonredux, @SimpleSong

    I wonder what the guy’s motivation was. When I first heard about that I immediately thought I.R.A. tactics. Minimize casualties but inflict maximum economic damage, in this case by targeting a bunch of expensive telecom equipment. Also made me wonder if those google outages earlier this month were due to incompetence as google claimed or something like this that was hushed up to avoid copycats.

    • Replies: @Philip Neal
    @SimpleSong

    According to the Beeb

    Police emergency systems were knocked out across the surrounding state of Tennessee.

    Telephone, internet and fibre optic TV services were also disrupted in Tennessee, Mississippi, Kentucky, Alabama and Georgia, according to telecoms firm AT&T.

     

    Conspiracy theory: Antifa. The Portland Autonomous Zone was just practice. Now, with Trump on his way out, expect autonomous zones in the red states. National guard? What national guard? Police defunding? What police defunding?

    Replies: @J.Ross

  195. @Gary in Gramercy
    @Kronos

    You're correct that Steve has frequently remarked on the decline of the big cities in blue or purple states (or even red states: e.g., New Orleans in otherwise red Louisiana).

    You're also right that the deterioration of such cities doesn't get as much attention in a turbulent year like this one, in which virtually all cities are under lockdown orders of one kind or another.

    (I didn't check Rockford Tyson's commenting history, but I suspect your hunch is on the mark: he may be new around here.)

    By the way, did you ever finish Icky Homo (Himself's first volume of Presidential memoirs)? If so, I admire your persistence, but expect you're exhausted from the sheer effort required.

    Finally, it looks as if the very end of your comment may have been cut off. It ends somewhat abruptly: "Also, the current crop of elites lost a lot of standing..." I've had that happen once or twice: you're typing furiously, trying to get to the end of your comment, and you accidentally hit the "Publish Comment" button.

    Anyway, Happy Boxing Day.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Kronos

    Finally, it looks as if the very end of your comment may have been cut off. It ends somewhat abruptly: “Also, the current crop of elites lost a lot of standing…” I’ve had that happen once or twice: you’re typing furiously, trying to get to the end of your comment, and you accidentally hit the “Publish Comment” button.

    Anyway, Happy Boxing Day.

    Yeah, I made a guber. I was going to write some more but I felt tired and thought “fuck it” (not to you Rockford Tyson) and went to bed without deleting that new starting sentence.

    But I wish you a Happy Boxing Day too.

  196. @anonymous
    Steve: Nothing to see.

    https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1342212651447967744

    Replies: @Anon

    You are correct, when something doesn’t exist, there is nothing for the non-delusional to see.

    • Agree: Dissident
  197. Ho Ho Ho in Chicago (from Heyjackass.com)

    https://heyjackass.com/shootings/

  198. @Joe Stalin
    @Kronos


    The “Free Love” thing was the last thing the African American community needed and the cities have been paying for it ever since.
     
    The 1960s had one salient characteristic: baby mamas bitched and moaned and their useless baby daddies NOT paying child support.

    Black women and men wised up and figured out that getting the state to GIVE them money to live off was the cat's meow of taking advantage of their situation. Black women are the backbone of the Democratic Party, their most loyal voters.

    Start reducing state support and start going after the baby daddies for support. I once heard a Black woman on public transit moaning about the Republican Governor was 'messing stuff up' for her living off the government, so I know that reducing state support is the key to putting pressure on this stuff.

    After all, how do all those Black men on the Maury Show have eight children while working at Burger King (True story)?

    Replies: @Kronos

    The 1960s had one salient characteristic: baby mamas bitched and moaned and their useless baby daddies NOT paying child support.

    One of the more interesting realizations I made after reading Obama’s new autobiography is that African Americans are essentially the biggest unsung heroes for defending laissez-faire capitalism and stunting socialism in the US. In Chapter 12, Obama discusses social contracts and how Americans were using government to help one another quite successfully in the early 20th century. But for “reasons” white people took a U-turn when they didn’t want blacks and Latinos involved in the same drinking hole of socialism.

    Maintaining this social compact, though, required trust. It required that we see ourselves as bound together, if not as a family then at least as a community, each member worthy of concern and able to make claims on the whole. It required us to believe that whatever actions the government might take to help those in need were available to you and people like you; that nobody was gaming the system and that the misfortunes or stumbles or circumstances that caused others to suffer were ones to which you at some point in your life might fall prey.

    Over the years, that trust proved difficult to sustain. In particular, the fault line of race strained it mightily. Accepting that African Americans and other minority groups might need extra help from the government—that their specific hardships could be traced to a brutal history of discrimination rather than immutable characteristics or individual choices—required a level of empathy, of fellow feeling, that many white voters found difficult to muster. Historically, programs designed to help racial minorities, from “forty acres and a mule” to affirmative action, were met with open hostility. Even universal programs that enjoyed broad support—like public education or public sector employment— had a funny way of becoming controversial once Black and brown people were included as beneficiaries.

    Due to Supreme Court decisions and Civil Rights legislation, you could never enact “ He who does not work, neither shall he eat” measures to counteract those who’d extract more than they put into any government program. It’s something blacks are notorious for engaging in. Their small national demographic size and yet massive consumption of government resources is truly staggering. So it’s easier and cheaper to remain in private systems where Civil Rights rules are most minimal.

    So blacks are natural repellent for socialist single-payer healthcare systems and other subsequent programs.

  199. @Iberian
    @notsaying

    You should travel...
    Try south europe and midle-east.
    From Portugal to Iran and Lebanon (and all in the midle) you will find several millions of blondes with dark haired mothers or fathers. Sometimes both...
    And this is hapenning since many thousands years ago... Before you can change any eggs...

    Replies: @Cortes

    The term of art is “Spanish Gold”.

  200. @Chrisnonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    Mr. Anon is probably referring to the similarity with "Jaba's palace". It's design and that of many other iconic Star Wars images originate with film concept artist Ralph McQuarrie, not George Lucas. Here is McQuarrie's painting of Jaba's palace...

    https://mightyjabba.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/mcquarrie_jabbas_palace.jpg

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    FL Wright’s Marin County Center appears designed to echo the ridge behind it.

  201. @Chrisnonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    Mr. Anon is probably referring to the similarity with "Jaba's palace". It's design and that of many other iconic Star Wars images originate with film concept artist Ralph McQuarrie, not George Lucas. Here is McQuarrie's painting of Jaba's palace...

    https://mightyjabba.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/mcquarrie_jabbas_palace.jpg

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    FL Wright’s Marin County Center appears designed to echo the ridge behind it.

  202. @Chrisnonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    Mr. Anon is probably referring to the similarity with "Jaba's palace". It's design and that of many other iconic Star Wars images originate with film concept artist Ralph McQuarrie, not George Lucas. Here is McQuarrie's painting of Jaba's palace...

    https://mightyjabba.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/mcquarrie_jabbas_palace.jpg

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    FL Wright’s Marin County Center appears designed to echo the ridge behind it.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    Yes, you're right.

    Also, I didn't read Mr. Anon's comment closely. He was referring to Lucas's prequels, not the original films. I don't think Ralph McQuarrie had the same influence on the later films.

    The outcome of the design and sound of the original Star Wars films seems to have been a kind of collaboration between Lucas, who had inchoate ideas, story board artists, who made initial designs that Lucas did or didn't approve, and the final prop and special effects artists.

    For John Williams score, Lucas gave him notes on what music he was listening to while writing, which is why you can hear pieces like Mars from The Planets in the Star Wars soundtrack.

    For the prequels, I have the impression that, due to the immediacy of and ease of changes in digitized design, Lucas was able to micromanage design to a greater degree. According to the following article, he did indeed use the FLW civic center as a model, just he had imagined specific pieces of music as the basis of the earlier scores.
    https://weburbanist.com/2017/01/26/clone-wars-how-star-architect-frank-lloyd-wright-inspired-the-design-of-naboo/

    I suppose the reason that the original films looked like real places and things and the prequels look like imaginary Rennaisance fantasia is the difference between the invisible hand of design collaboration and micromanaging by someone who didn't have as much talent as Wright.

  203. @James N. Kennett
    OT: Electoral Fraud

    https://www.revolver.news/2020/12/statistical-model-indicates-trump-won-landslide/

    This article examines the statistics of the Presidential election at the county level. Looks at the differences from previous elections, modeling each county on ethnicity and (for whites) education. The national swing for each group accounts for the results in nearly all states. Differences between the model and the actual results should be random, sometimes favoring Biden and sometimes Trump. Instead the discrepancies all favor Biden, and occur in a few of the battleground states. It is hard to account for these discrepancies except by fraud.

    The national swing for each ethnic/educational group should have given Trump Arizona, Georgia, Nevada, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin; but not Michigan.

    The article includes links to the electoral and census data that it uses, so you can examine the claims for yourself.

    Replies: @Anon

    Give it up, this kind of thing is turning conservatism into a clown show.
    Should we also examine whether the earth is flat?

    • Troll: Lurker
    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Anon

    The True Conservative(TM) Voice of Reason - the Very Smart Boy - has arrived!

    Remember, boys and girls, our job is to lose gracefully.


    Give it up, this kind of thing is turning conservatism into a clown show.
     
    Conservatism may be a clown show, but liberalism is a freak show.

    What have Russiagate, Ukrainegate, and the Summer of St. Floyd done to the credibility of leftists?
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Anon

    They are working hard to hide something, and you know it.


    https://www.identity-links.com/img/ucart/images/pimage/121076/DUK333.jpg

  204. @Reg Cæsar
    @Harry Baldwin


    President-elect Joe Biden called Fox News correspondent Peter Doocy a “one-horse pony”...
     
    He could have done a lot more with "Doocy". Remember what Chris Thompson did with Springsteen's "deuce" on the 1975 hit "Blinded By the Light".


    OT, but how much deplatforming starts here?:

    https://www.change.org/p/youtube-remove-all-tommy-sotomayor-videos-from-youtube-now

    Replies: @Lot

    “ OT, but how much deplatforming starts here?”

    I think Twitter mobbing is the main way people are deplatformed.

    Where Change.org petitions seem to work are for non-tenured academic positions. Even then, the organizing seems to be on Twitter.

  205. @SimpleSong
    @Jonathan Mason

    I wonder what the guy's motivation was. When I first heard about that I immediately thought I.R.A. tactics. Minimize casualties but inflict maximum economic damage, in this case by targeting a bunch of expensive telecom equipment. Also made me wonder if those google outages earlier this month were due to incompetence as google claimed or something like this that was hushed up to avoid copycats.

    Replies: @Philip Neal

    According to the Beeb

    Police emergency systems were knocked out across the surrounding state of Tennessee.

    Telephone, internet and fibre optic TV services were also disrupted in Tennessee, Mississippi, Kentucky, Alabama and Georgia, according to telecoms firm AT&T.

    Conspiracy theory: Antifa. The Portland Autonomous Zone was just practice. Now, with Trump on his way out, expect autonomous zones in the red states. National guard? What national guard? Police defunding? What police defunding?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Philip Neal

    hey hey you guys you guys remember when the russians were taking over and we had to steel ourselves against the awful russians and indeed so terrible a menace did the russians present that we had all our comms go through a single trunk point that could be taken out by one homemade bomb you guys remember that you guys

  206. I take everything the BBC and the NYT say with a cup of salt. Narrative first, facts second, maybe.

  207. @Anonymous
    A woman just jumped to her death from one of the most depressing post-modern monstrosities ever dumped on the city of New York. These chaotic misshapen monsters help people to give up and die.

    https://nypost.com/2020/12/26/womans-instagram-suicide-note-posts-days-after-she-jumped-to-her-death/

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    This is the building:

    It’s “interesting” in that gaudy tourist-trap kind of way.

    My grandmother took me on a quick trip to New York over the Fourth of July holiday in 2001. (I was a teenager at the time.) We arrived on the third and left on the fifth.

    On the Fourth, we saw the Statue of Liberty and arrived back in Lower Manhattan in the late afternoon. I wanted to visit the observation deck of the World Trade Center. (We’d already seen the view from atop the Empire State Building.)

    “I’m exhausted,” she said. “I need you to take me back to the hotel. I promise you that we’ll see it next year.”

    Well…

    When she saw me on 9/11, the first thing she said to me was, “I’m so sorry. We should have gone when we had the chance.”

    I did get to see Ground Zero.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Stan Adams


    When she saw me on 9/11, the first thing she said to me was, “I’m so sorry. We should have gone when we had the chance.”
     
    Hey, it could’ve been worse.

    https://ychef.files.bbci.co.uk/976x549/p04t2lbb.jpg
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Stan Adams


    I wanted to visit the observation deck of the World Trade Center. (We’d already seen the view from atop the Empire State Building.)

    When she saw me on 9/11, the first thing she said to me was, “I’m so sorry. We should have gone when we had the chance.”
     
    You missed nothing. The view from the WTC offered less than the one from the ESB. I spent more time on the 110th floor reading the fascinating history of money displayed on the inside walls. On the other hand, I lived on Governors Island and worked in the harbor, so maybe I was jaded. Others might have been more impressed.

    From the ESB, you could look down on penthouses.

    Replies: @syonredux

    , @Lockean Proviso
    @Stan Adams

    The Vessal looks like a Lexus grill or other upper-mid tier consumer product design. Maybe Illuminati use it after hours as a hive to molest children in the middle of that light ring in the center with the color changed to red and onlooking members dressed as owls standing on every balcony watching and chanting incantations.

  208. @Buffalo Joe
    @SDMatt

    SDMatt, Buffalo have some streets lined with stately mansions. Delaware Ave.,Nottingham Terrace,Lincoln Parkway,Chapin Parkway and Bidwell Parkway to name a few. The Albright Knox art gallery is world famous and justifibly so. There are three or four Frank Lloyd Wright houses also. The Lady of Victory Basilica in nearby Lackawanna is stunning, some one please post a photos and old Polonia has some magnificent churches. But Buffalo is old and has neighborhoods in decay, as do many NE cities. There are gems to be found if you can find a local to guide you around. PS. The statue of David is in the Frederick Law Olmsted designed Delaware Park.

    Replies: @prosa123, @SDMatt

    Thanks Joe. I’m your neighbour in Toronto, so when the border re-opens I’ll check out your recommendations.

  209. @prosa123
    @Muggles

    So what you’re saying is that the people who work in the Malibu city hall don’t live in Malibu.

    Some municipal governments require their employees to live in town and some don't. It often depends on housing prices, the greater the prices the less likely there are residency requirements. For example, I once worked briefly for the local government in a Connecticut city that had some fairly inexpensive housing. They were strict about residency requirements, the only exceptions were teachers (exempt by state law) and cops and firefighters (exempt by union contract). In contrast, the smaller surrounding towns with more costly housing had no such requirements.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    So what you’re saying is that the people who work in the Malibu city hall don’t live in Malibu.

    Some municipal governments require their employees to live in town and some don’t.

    Our Nassau County neighbor was a cop across the town line in NYC. His kids always had the best fireworks. They were legal in the state but not in the city.

    Hmm…

    • Replies: @John Up North
    @Reg Cæsar

    Back in the day Chicago cops were well known for confiscating beer from teen agers and taking the brew home for themselves. Same for fireworks.

  210. @Bill Jones
    @Thomas

    You might like Paddy's Wigwam in Liverpool, or
    The Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King as non-Scousers call it.

    https://wordhistories.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/15421-the-metropolitan-cathedral-of-christ-the-king-in-liverpool-england.png?w=750

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @MBlanc46

    And quite a contrast with the Anglican Cathedral nearby.

  211. @syonredux
    @Joe Stalin

    1939 World's Fair:


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bG0YiDPUJ94

    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-wnBAho6n9_g/VCzLHRK47dI/AAAAAAAADVI/xu4iWTT5Pw8/s1600/Night_Scene.jpg


    https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2019/07/Worlds_Fair._LOC_gsc.5a30821.jpg


    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/4e/ae/9a/4eae9ab170648f696a38a9c017d12b0f.jpg

    https://www.cca.qc.ca/img/jdiXZSY7nJTYKndbR0ffhPJstV4=/1920x0/6296/5700/PH1981_0265.jpg

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @MBlanc46

    Thanks for those.

  212. @Stan Adams
    @Anonymous

    This is the building:
    https://www.hudsonyardsnewyork.com/sites/default/files/styles/experience_details/public/2019-03/Schenck%20Related%20HY%202019_03_15%20DSC_1932.jpg

    It's "interesting" in that gaudy tourist-trap kind of way.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2GBWVXBZn2I

    My grandmother took me on a quick trip to New York over the Fourth of July holiday in 2001. (I was a teenager at the time.) We arrived on the third and left on the fifth.

    On the Fourth, we saw the Statue of Liberty and arrived back in Lower Manhattan in the late afternoon. I wanted to visit the observation deck of the World Trade Center. (We'd already seen the view from atop the Empire State Building.)

    "I'm exhausted," she said. "I need you to take me back to the hotel. I promise you that we'll see it next year."

    Well...

    When she saw me on 9/11, the first thing she said to me was, "I'm so sorry. We should have gone when we had the chance."

    I did get to see Ground Zero.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Reg Cæsar, @Lockean Proviso

    When she saw me on 9/11, the first thing she said to me was, “I’m so sorry. We should have gone when we had the chance.”

    Hey, it could’ve been worse.

    • LOL: Cortes
  213. @Reg Cæsar
    @prosa123



    So what you’re saying is that the people who work in the Malibu city hall don’t live in Malibu.
     
    Some municipal governments require their employees to live in town and some don’t.
     
    Our Nassau County neighbor was a cop across the town line in NYC. His kids always had the best fireworks. They were legal in the state but not in the city.

    Hmm...

    Replies: @John Up North

    Back in the day Chicago cops were well known for confiscating beer from teen agers and taking the brew home for themselves. Same for fireworks.

  214. @Stan Adams
    @Anonymous

    This is the building:
    https://www.hudsonyardsnewyork.com/sites/default/files/styles/experience_details/public/2019-03/Schenck%20Related%20HY%202019_03_15%20DSC_1932.jpg

    It's "interesting" in that gaudy tourist-trap kind of way.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2GBWVXBZn2I

    My grandmother took me on a quick trip to New York over the Fourth of July holiday in 2001. (I was a teenager at the time.) We arrived on the third and left on the fifth.

    On the Fourth, we saw the Statue of Liberty and arrived back in Lower Manhattan in the late afternoon. I wanted to visit the observation deck of the World Trade Center. (We'd already seen the view from atop the Empire State Building.)

    "I'm exhausted," she said. "I need you to take me back to the hotel. I promise you that we'll see it next year."

    Well...

    When she saw me on 9/11, the first thing she said to me was, "I'm so sorry. We should have gone when we had the chance."

    I did get to see Ground Zero.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Reg Cæsar, @Lockean Proviso

    I wanted to visit the observation deck of the World Trade Center. (We’d already seen the view from atop the Empire State Building.)

    When she saw me on 9/11, the first thing she said to me was, “I’m so sorry. We should have gone when we had the chance.”

    You missed nothing. The view from the WTC offered less than the one from the ESB. I spent more time on the 110th floor reading the fascinating history of money displayed on the inside walls. On the other hand, I lived on Governors Island and worked in the harbor, so maybe I was jaded. Others might have been more impressed.

    From the ESB, you could look down on penthouses.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Reg Cæsar

    My favorite is the Top of the Rock at Rockefeller Center:

    https://www.newyorksightseeing.com/media/catalog/product/cache/29/thumbnail/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/t/o/top_of_rock_2.jpg

  215. @MEH 0910
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/my-single-is-dropping/

    Sudden Death of Stars 'What Is Winter Good For?' - ample play records
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ELaDOJxYkQ

    The idea is simple: use homemade snow globes from old jars and vintage bottles and fill them with images, logos, words and objects that reflect a 70s inspired psychedelic world all swirling around in water and glitter.

    The track itself, a wonderful piece of 'understated psych pop' you could listen to all year long, laments the fact that Brittany has a temperate oceanic climate and that the weather is too mild for snow to fall, and that is why we often wish for the snowman to come.
     
    Christmas Blossom
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6XG01Y-C8ko

    Christmas Blossom · Beat Mark
     

    https://www.ampleplay.co.uk/product/winter-warmer-split-7-christmas-single-sudden-death-of-stars-beat-mark/

    https://www.ampleplay.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/p/1/3/6/p_1_3_6_136-Winter-Warmer-Split-7-Vinyl-Christmas-Single-Sudden-Death-of-Stars-Beat-Mark-600x600.jpg

    https://f4.bcbits.com/img/0002648663_10.jpg

    https://suddendeathofstars.bandcamp.com/album/winter-warmer-split-single-w-beat-mark

    https://f4.bcbits.com/img/a3996841510_10.jpg

    Split Christmas Single by The Sudden Death of Stars / Beat Mark - ample play records
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6mz5Sz9jUnw

    Cat No: AMPLA082DD / AMPLA082V

    Christmas comes but once a year which is why we've given you two festive tracks in one single. Christmas is such a corporate affair, which is why we're giving you two down to earth independent crown heights songs:

    A. The Sudden of Stars 'What is Winter Good For?' "Brittany has a temperate oceanic climate. The weather in this region makes it too mild for snow to fall, and that is why we often wish for the snowman to come.

    AA. Beat Mark 'Christmas Blossom' "A Christmas track that follows in the steps of the great tradition of 60s Christmas songs with sleighbells and naïve melodies with voices together on the chorus, like a choir."

    Both bands are young examples of how great music still is and can be. Beat Mark and TSDOS came out with critically acclaimed albums earlier this year.
     

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Boone_(1964_TV_series)

    Daniel Boone is an American action-adventure television series starring Fess Parker as Daniel Boone that aired from September 24, 1964, to May 7, 1970, on NBC for 165 episodes, and was produced by 20th Century Fox Television, Arcola Enterprises, and Fespar Corp.[1] Ed Ames co-starred as Mingo, Boone’s Cherokee friend, for the first four seasons of the series. Albert Salmi portrayed Boone’s companion Yadkin in season one only. Country Western singer-actor Jimmy Dean was a featured actor as Josh Clements during the 1968–1970 seasons. Actor and former NFL football player Rosey Grier made regular appearances as Gabe Cooper in the 1969 to 1970 season.[2] The show was broadcast “in living color” beginning in fall 1965, the second season, and was shot entirely in California and Kanab, Utah.

  216. @Philip Neal
    @SimpleSong

    According to the Beeb

    Police emergency systems were knocked out across the surrounding state of Tennessee.

    Telephone, internet and fibre optic TV services were also disrupted in Tennessee, Mississippi, Kentucky, Alabama and Georgia, according to telecoms firm AT&T.

     

    Conspiracy theory: Antifa. The Portland Autonomous Zone was just practice. Now, with Trump on his way out, expect autonomous zones in the red states. National guard? What national guard? Police defunding? What police defunding?

    Replies: @J.Ross

    hey hey you guys you guys remember when the russians were taking over and we had to steel ourselves against the awful russians and indeed so terrible a menace did the russians present that we had all our comms go through a single trunk point that could be taken out by one homemade bomb you guys remember that you guys

  217. @128
    Has anybody done any studies on racial statistics pertaining to financial crimes only, like accounting fraud, tax evasion, and various types of securities fraud, or general financial scams?

    Replies: @res

    Good old Table 43 from the FBI UCR has data for Forgery and counterfeiting, Fraud, and Embezzlement. Close enough?

    https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2018/crime-in-the-u.s.-2018/tables/table-43

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @res

    Two notes: 1) Too bad there's no "FWP" category for financial crimes (and there never will be) and 2) Next year (and thereafter) the FBI will no longer be reporting racial or ethnic categories and moreover all the old data will be scrubbed.

    Replies: @res

    , @Bill Jones
    @res

    The FBI table you linked to btw has this as a header
    "12,212 agencies; 2018 estimated population 247,752,415"

    Looks to be about 80 million people light.

  218. @Magic Dirt Resident
    The point about cleaning soot from old buildings is under appreciated. Check out pictures of the Cathedral of Learning at Pitt before and after cleaning.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/powerwashingporn/comments/6ocfe2/the_cathedral_of_learning_before_and_after_it_was/

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

    It’s hard to remember now, but the buildings of the cities of Europe were all almost uniformly black and sooty until the 1960s. Then, various clean air laws were enacted, coal fire gave way to oil-fired heating, and town councils decided to scrub off centuries of soot.

    I remember reading an article in the ’60s, in LIFE magazine, about London—before and after. The pictures depicted old cityscapes of blackened buildings contrasted to light, mostly limestone, facades after.

    I can’t find that article online, but this link on Manchester, documents a similar process of scrubbing buildings clean.

    https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/incoming/gallery/blackened-buildings-manchester-before-clean-8727918

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @PiltdownMan

    Another notable one is the Houses of Parliament. Black, streaked and forbidding up until (I think) the early 1980s when it was properly cleaned all over.* I was somewhat shocked the first time to see it after that began that it was now a more pleasant light brown. As a kid I thought it was built of some sort of black stone.

    *As with many such buildings there is always some ongoing restoration work.

    , @The Only Catholic Unionist
    @PiltdownMan

    Let's not neglect the interior sooting from candles. See also Chapel, Sistine

  219. @PiltdownMan
    @Magic Dirt Resident

    It's hard to remember now, but the buildings of the cities of Europe were all almost uniformly black and sooty until the 1960s. Then, various clean air laws were enacted, coal fire gave way to oil-fired heating, and town councils decided to scrub off centuries of soot.

    I remember reading an article in the '60s, in LIFE magazine, about London—before and after. The pictures depicted old cityscapes of blackened buildings contrasted to light, mostly limestone, facades after.

    I can't find that article online, but this link on Manchester, documents a similar process of scrubbing buildings clean.


    https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/incoming/gallery/blackened-buildings-manchester-before-clean-8727918
     
    https://i.imgur.com/c0afXRt.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/z99xdtO.jpg

    Replies: @Lurker, @The Only Catholic Unionist

    Another notable one is the Houses of Parliament. Black, streaked and forbidding up until (I think) the early 1980s when it was properly cleaned all over.* I was somewhat shocked the first time to see it after that began that it was now a more pleasant light brown. As a kid I thought it was built of some sort of black stone.

    *As with many such buildings there is always some ongoing restoration work.

  220. @Reg Cæsar
    @Stan Adams


    I wanted to visit the observation deck of the World Trade Center. (We’d already seen the view from atop the Empire State Building.)

    When she saw me on 9/11, the first thing she said to me was, “I’m so sorry. We should have gone when we had the chance.”
     
    You missed nothing. The view from the WTC offered less than the one from the ESB. I spent more time on the 110th floor reading the fascinating history of money displayed on the inside walls. On the other hand, I lived on Governors Island and worked in the harbor, so maybe I was jaded. Others might have been more impressed.

    From the ESB, you could look down on penthouses.

    Replies: @syonredux

    My favorite is the Top of the Rock at Rockefeller Center:

  221. You forgot the “ray-gun” bldg in LA, Maestro Sailer *tsk tsk*. Pics or it doesn’t exist, please, sir… (reply with yr pic of it, if you would be so kind, hint hint)

  222. @PiltdownMan
    @Magic Dirt Resident

    It's hard to remember now, but the buildings of the cities of Europe were all almost uniformly black and sooty until the 1960s. Then, various clean air laws were enacted, coal fire gave way to oil-fired heating, and town councils decided to scrub off centuries of soot.

    I remember reading an article in the '60s, in LIFE magazine, about London—before and after. The pictures depicted old cityscapes of blackened buildings contrasted to light, mostly limestone, facades after.

    I can't find that article online, but this link on Manchester, documents a similar process of scrubbing buildings clean.


    https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/incoming/gallery/blackened-buildings-manchester-before-clean-8727918
     
    https://i.imgur.com/c0afXRt.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/z99xdtO.jpg

    Replies: @Lurker, @The Only Catholic Unionist

    Let’s not neglect the interior sooting from candles. See also Chapel, Sistine

  223. @George
    The Malibu town hall is not an employment program like other places. They also don't want their bureaucrats to think they are important people. The work in a building fit for the proletarians, while better paid and having health benefits the building looks like it could be where a caterer does food prep.

    What the Buffalo city hall says to me is public wealth is going to be redistributed to an army of city bureaucrats. The Buffalo city hall is a monument to that city's fall from grace. Californians should pay attention to the history of America's first 'silicon valley', the doughnut surrounding New York City. IBM, Xerox, Kodak, Sperry, Bell Labs, and many others.

    Replies: @Muggles, @George

    “So what you’re saying is that the people who work in the Malibu city hall don’t live in Malibu.”

    I was trying to comment on the architecture. The fabulous ornate buildings are paid for by bonding which means debts paid for by future taxpayers. The fabulous standalone buildings also communicate to the local bureaucrats how important they you relative to the proles that work at the local strip mall, so don’t treat them like cashiers at the dollar store.

    Malibu’s city hall architecture on the other hand cost the minimum to achieve function and people that work there get the impression they are employees. Employee does not mean poorly paid, but the power relationship is different.

    The Buffalo city hall in particular implies they intend to hire hoards of people who will vote and all the elected officials will be constantly surrounded by a hive of government workers, in Malibu the mayor and town council can easily avoid contact with the government workers. It also acted as a gigantic paper era memory storage device. The modern government big or small lives in the cloud.

  224. @prosa123
    @Known Fact

    In the spirit of this post it’s worth noting that those huge windowless ATT monoliths are an architectural blight on downtown districts. So while potential bombing suspects include right-wingers, left-wingers, CIA false flaggers etc … can Jane Jacobs account for her whereabouts this morning ?

    https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/157686714/jane-jacobs#view-photo=135044222

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Known Fact

    Along with Gary in Gramercy I also remain a bit skeptical. I’ve watched McGarrett and Mannix have enough bodies exhumed to know that there’s usually been some sinister switcheroo. Sure Jacobs would be 104 now but still feisty enough to blow up some mammoth monstrosity a la The Fountainhead.

  225. @Anon
    @James N. Kennett

    Give it up, this kind of thing is turning conservatism into a clown show.
    Should we also examine whether the earth is flat?

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Reg Cæsar

    The True Conservative(TM) Voice of Reason – the Very Smart Boy – has arrived!

    Remember, boys and girls, our job is to lose gracefully.

    Give it up, this kind of thing is turning conservatism into a clown show.

    Conservatism may be a clown show, but liberalism is a freak show.

    What have Russiagate, Ukrainegate, and the Summer of St. Floyd done to the credibility of leftists?

  226. @CCZ
    @JohnnyWalker123

    "...and may all your Christmases be White…."

    Unless you accidentally happen to turn the television channel to FX and (like modern architecture) see an ugly "progressive" rendition of a revered classic.


    "The BBC's fresh and gritty take on Charles Dickens "A Christmas Carol" [now showing on American cable channel FX] has captivated audiences,...breathing new life into the famous story about Ebenezer Scrooge."

    "The Cratchit's are here again but in this new version, they have been reimagined as a mixed-race family with the role of Mary Cratchit being played by [mixed race: white mother-black father] actor Vinette Robinson."

    "Unfortunately, as it seems to be with almost anything that is slightly progressive these days, there was a lot of negativity to this new portrayal of the family and, yes, it came from Twitter."
     
    https://www.indy100.com/ents/a-christmas-carol-bbc-mixed-race-relationships-vinette-robinson-9259946

    Replies: @Clip Carson

    The reimagined Christmas Carol with black Bob Cratchit …

    Scrooge: “Cratchit, get back to work!”
    SFX: Bang!

    The remaining 89 minutes of the 90-minute movie is Cratchit on trial for murder, while media twists the story and BLM activists claim Scrooge’s death was “reparations.”

  227. @prosa123
    @Buffalo Joe

    Even though it soon became obsolete as a railroad station and is in a poor location, Buffalo Central Terminal is a grand structure that hopefully will be fully restored before long.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Even though it soon became obsolete as a railroad station and is in a poor location, Buffalo Central Terminal is a grand structure that hopefully will be fully restored before long.

    Saint Paul did a good job of this with Union Station. Minneapolitans turned theirs into a skating rink and farmers’ market depending on the season. The “temporary” station both cities used for decades was midway between the downtowns, in a desolate industrial zone called, of course, the Midway. (The city’s 10mph speed limit made the last hour of the trip from Chicago quite frustrating.)

    Buffalo’s “modern” depot when I was there was a double-wide trailer among distant malls accessible by a long, slow bus ride from downtown.

    Buffalo educated St Paul’s notable native F Scott Fitzgerald for some years. It’s time Pig’s Eye returned the favor and show how to revive a classic terminal. Then combine to tackle Detroit’s!

    Oh, wait…

    Detroit train station renovation still moving ahead in pandemic: Where it stands

  228. @Anon
    @James N. Kennett

    Give it up, this kind of thing is turning conservatism into a clown show.
    Should we also examine whether the earth is flat?

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Reg Cæsar

    They are working hard to hide something, and you know it.

  229. @Munkin-4
    @Anon

    Now that Xmas has passed, I can say it: America deserves every bomb that comes its way.

    Your country is doing so much f-ckery in the world these days, and your cud-chewing citizens are for the most part oblivious...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    You folks nagged us in 1914 and 1939 for staying out. You’re hard to please.

  230. @Stan Adams
    @Anonymous

    This is the building:
    https://www.hudsonyardsnewyork.com/sites/default/files/styles/experience_details/public/2019-03/Schenck%20Related%20HY%202019_03_15%20DSC_1932.jpg

    It's "interesting" in that gaudy tourist-trap kind of way.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2GBWVXBZn2I

    My grandmother took me on a quick trip to New York over the Fourth of July holiday in 2001. (I was a teenager at the time.) We arrived on the third and left on the fifth.

    On the Fourth, we saw the Statue of Liberty and arrived back in Lower Manhattan in the late afternoon. I wanted to visit the observation deck of the World Trade Center. (We'd already seen the view from atop the Empire State Building.)

    "I'm exhausted," she said. "I need you to take me back to the hotel. I promise you that we'll see it next year."

    Well...

    When she saw me on 9/11, the first thing she said to me was, "I'm so sorry. We should have gone when we had the chance."

    I did get to see Ground Zero.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Reg Cæsar, @Lockean Proviso

    The Vessal looks like a Lexus grill or other upper-mid tier consumer product design. Maybe Illuminati use it after hours as a hive to molest children in the middle of that light ring in the center with the color changed to red and onlooking members dressed as owls standing on every balcony watching and chanting incantations.

  231. @notsaying
    Here is what was on my phone's news scroll this fine Christmas Day:

    A photo and story about Alec Baldwin's family. His wife is Hilaria, a Hispanic immigrant with dark hair and olive skin. She has become well known for being pregnant over and over again in recent years; she's had five kids and numerous miscarriages. She has a large female social media following. I never saw the kids until today and boy oh boy was I surprised.

    The photo shows her pale skinned children with a mixture of pale blonde and medium blonde hair. There's no way she used her own eggs for any of them. Interestingly enough they all have Spanish names though.

    I have seen numerous articles about her at the Daily Mail with many comments telling her to stop having more kids. They never show the kids like they do in this People article or there'd be comments about how she can't be their biological mother. I wonder why the Baldwins chose to use eggs from a Northern European mother?

    https://people.com/parents/amy-schumer-hilaria-baldwin-re-do-instagram/?amp=true

    Replies: @prosa123, @duncsbaby, @Iberian, @MEH 0910

  232. @Anon
    @Anonymous

    Is that your family? Beautiful pic.

    Replies: @Dissident

    Is that your family?

    An Anonymous posting a photo of his own family? Wouldn’t the intelligence level indicated by such an action be well below the minimum one would expect of an iSteve reader?

    On the other hand, given the season, perhaps temporarily impaired reasoning was in evidence? If so, the individual would presumably be well-advised to contact the admin to request removal.

  233. @Steve Sailer
    @Chrisnonymous

    FL Wright's Marin County Center appears designed to echo the ridge behind it.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    Yes, you’re right.

    Also, I didn’t read Mr. Anon’s comment closely. He was referring to Lucas’s prequels, not the original films. I don’t think Ralph McQuarrie had the same influence on the later films.

    The outcome of the design and sound of the original Star Wars films seems to have been a kind of collaboration between Lucas, who had inchoate ideas, story board artists, who made initial designs that Lucas did or didn’t approve, and the final prop and special effects artists.

    For John Williams score, Lucas gave him notes on what music he was listening to while writing, which is why you can hear pieces like Mars from The Planets in the Star Wars soundtrack.

    For the prequels, I have the impression that, due to the immediacy of and ease of changes in digitized design, Lucas was able to micromanage design to a greater degree. According to the following article, he did indeed use the FLW civic center as a model, just he had imagined specific pieces of music as the basis of the earlier scores.
    https://weburbanist.com/2017/01/26/clone-wars-how-star-architect-frank-lloyd-wright-inspired-the-design-of-naboo/

    I suppose the reason that the original films looked like real places and things and the prequels look like imaginary Rennaisance fantasia is the difference between the invisible hand of design collaboration and micromanaging by someone who didn’t have as much talent as Wright.

  234. @res
    @128

    Good old Table 43 from the FBI UCR has data for Forgery and counterfeiting, Fraud, and Embezzlement. Close enough?

    https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2018/crime-in-the-u.s.-2018/tables/table-43

    Replies: @Polistra, @Bill Jones

    Two notes: 1) Too bad there’s no “FWP” category for financial crimes (and there never will be) and 2) Next year (and thereafter) the FBI will no longer be reporting racial or ethnic categories and moreover all the old data will be scrubbed.

    • Replies: @res
    @Polistra

    Thanks.


    1) Too bad there’s no “FWP” category for financial crimes (and there never will be)
     
    How would you have that differ from Forgery and counterfeiting, Fraud, and Embezzlement?

    2) Next year (and thereafter) the FBI will no longer be reporting racial or ethnic categories and moreover all the old data will be scrubbed.
     
    Can you point to any discussion of those? Especially the scrubbing. Have to make sure I have an archive of the old Table 43s. BTW, anyone interested in historical statistics for interracial crime might want to have a look at this comment (especially after the more) and archive those links as well just in case.
    https://www.unz.com/runz/white-racialism-in-america-then-and-now/?showcomments#comment-4206835

    P.S. Probably also good to make sure the Internet Archive and other comparable sites are well seeded with references to the data.

    Replies: @anon, @Bill Jones

  235. @Polistra
    @res

    Two notes: 1) Too bad there's no "FWP" category for financial crimes (and there never will be) and 2) Next year (and thereafter) the FBI will no longer be reporting racial or ethnic categories and moreover all the old data will be scrubbed.

    Replies: @res

    Thanks.

    1) Too bad there’s no “FWP” category for financial crimes (and there never will be)

    How would you have that differ from Forgery and counterfeiting, Fraud, and Embezzlement?

    2) Next year (and thereafter) the FBI will no longer be reporting racial or ethnic categories and moreover all the old data will be scrubbed.

    Can you point to any discussion of those? Especially the scrubbing. Have to make sure I have an archive of the old Table 43s. BTW, anyone interested in historical statistics for interracial crime might want to have a look at this comment (especially after the more) and archive those links as well just in case.
    https://www.unz.com/runz/white-racialism-in-america-then-and-now/?showcomments#comment-4206835

    P.S. Probably also good to make sure the Internet Archive and other comparable sites are well seeded with references to the data.

    • Replies: @anon
    @res

    P.S. Probably also good to make sure the Internet Archive and other comparable sites are well seeded with references to the data.

    Probably, although it's also possible those refs will just be wiped away. The retconning has been real this year and I don't see any reason for it to slow down.

    Anyone who wants reliable access to Actual hatefacts, such as old Table 43's from FBI UCR's would be well advised to save them on a couple of back up devices, preferably not connected to any network.

    , @Bill Jones
    @res

    James Corbett has been commenting on this, most recently in this piece:
    https://www.corbettreport.com/episode-391-solutions-physical-media/

    I like the analogy he uses : "The Library of Alexandria is burning".

  236. anon[326] • Disclaimer says:
    @res
    @Polistra

    Thanks.


    1) Too bad there’s no “FWP” category for financial crimes (and there never will be)
     
    How would you have that differ from Forgery and counterfeiting, Fraud, and Embezzlement?

    2) Next year (and thereafter) the FBI will no longer be reporting racial or ethnic categories and moreover all the old data will be scrubbed.
     
    Can you point to any discussion of those? Especially the scrubbing. Have to make sure I have an archive of the old Table 43s. BTW, anyone interested in historical statistics for interracial crime might want to have a look at this comment (especially after the more) and archive those links as well just in case.
    https://www.unz.com/runz/white-racialism-in-america-then-and-now/?showcomments#comment-4206835

    P.S. Probably also good to make sure the Internet Archive and other comparable sites are well seeded with references to the data.

    Replies: @anon, @Bill Jones

    P.S. Probably also good to make sure the Internet Archive and other comparable sites are well seeded with references to the data.

    Probably, although it’s also possible those refs will just be wiped away. The retconning has been real this year and I don’t see any reason for it to slow down.

    Anyone who wants reliable access to Actual hatefacts, such as old Table 43’s from FBI UCR’s would be well advised to save them on a couple of back up devices, preferably not connected to any network.

    • Agree: res
  237. @res
    @Polistra

    Thanks.


    1) Too bad there’s no “FWP” category for financial crimes (and there never will be)
     
    How would you have that differ from Forgery and counterfeiting, Fraud, and Embezzlement?

    2) Next year (and thereafter) the FBI will no longer be reporting racial or ethnic categories and moreover all the old data will be scrubbed.
     
    Can you point to any discussion of those? Especially the scrubbing. Have to make sure I have an archive of the old Table 43s. BTW, anyone interested in historical statistics for interracial crime might want to have a look at this comment (especially after the more) and archive those links as well just in case.
    https://www.unz.com/runz/white-racialism-in-america-then-and-now/?showcomments#comment-4206835

    P.S. Probably also good to make sure the Internet Archive and other comparable sites are well seeded with references to the data.

    Replies: @anon, @Bill Jones

    James Corbett has been commenting on this, most recently in this piece:
    https://www.corbettreport.com/episode-391-solutions-physical-media/

    I like the analogy he uses : “The Library of Alexandria is burning”.

    • Thanks: res
  238. @res
    @128

    Good old Table 43 from the FBI UCR has data for Forgery and counterfeiting, Fraud, and Embezzlement. Close enough?

    https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2018/crime-in-the-u.s.-2018/tables/table-43

    Replies: @Polistra, @Bill Jones

    The FBI table you linked to btw has this as a header
    “12,212 agencies; 2018 estimated population 247,752,415”

    Looks to be about 80 million people light.

  239. @clyde
    @Jonathan Mason

    You are a man of wealth and taste if you like pizza with anchovies. You had the real deal in Milan. Italy has long had a love affair with anchovies. The Romans made a fermented anchovy paste as a condiment.---- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garum ---Similar to how the Vietnamese make fish sauce from fermenting anchovies.

    Matter of fact I saw on YouTube the other day, making the same fish sauce in Thailand. (21 minutes in)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOzQYxGTnKE (21 minutes in)

    Replies: @J1234

    I’ll be honest with you: The pizza I had at a small restaurant in Rome kind of sucked. I don’t know if that typified pizza in Italy or not. It was a crispy kind of lavosh thing. NOT lavosh, but reminscent of it. Minimal toppings, too. The restaurant’s other dishes were good. American pizza may be something that’s corrupt, but if so, I kind of prefer the corrupt version.

  240. @Joe Stalin
    The 1933-1934 Chicago Century of Progress, where Art Deco reigned supreme, as in our super-cool future.

    https://youtu.be/QGfRgU4cPrY

    Hell, the very first Buck Rogers film was presented here.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qm4I8B3bFUA

    Replies: @syonredux, @Dr. Charles Fhandrich

    Fantastic sir. Great video’s you posted and for great reasons. Thank you.

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