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Media's Demand for Racial Reckoning Not Working Out So Hot in NYC Subways
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From the New York Times:

‘I Am Shaken’: Spate of Violent Subway Attacks Unnerves Riders

Three riders were assaulted in the system over three days, as reports of felony assaults, burglaries and homicides continue to climb.

By Christina Goldbaum
Nov. 20, 2020

It was 2 p.m. on Tuesday, on what would have normally been a busy weekday as the Thanksgiving holiday neared. Alex Weisman, a stage and television actor, stepped off a train at a subway station on the Upper West Side of Manhattan and was punched twice in the face by a man who fled.

The assault broke Mr. Weisman’s skull in two places and tore one of his retinas.

“There was nothing else I could have done to protect myself,” Mr. Weisman, 33, said on Friday. “I am shaken by this.”

The day after Mr. Weisman was attacked, a man was shoved onto the tracks at the Bryant Park subway station after arguing with a man believed to be a panhandler. On Thursday, a 40-year-old woman was shoved off the platform at the Union Square station by an emotionally disturbed man who appeared to be homeless. She lay between the tracks and avoided serious injuries as a train passed over her.

I would imagine that no single type of crime is more damaging to the question of whether people are going to move back to New York City than incidents of being shoved onto the subway tracks. That’s pretty much the worst New York terror.

The trio of violent attacks on the subway is part of a worrying trend: After overall crime on the system dropped significantly during the citywide lockdown this spring, violent crimes, like assaults, started to surge.

My impression is that when a story makes the newspapers about some random assault, such as the crazy man who punched actor Rick Moranis, the assailant has usually been arrested quite a few times before.

For example, remember the Free Hugs Guy, Jermaine Himmelstein, who was arrested in 2016 for punching a woman on video in Times Square? Well, that was only the tip of the iceberg: he’d punched lots of pretty white women before when they didn’t want a Free Hug, including a young lady I know. But charges after the Times Square assault were dropped on grounds he was mentally unfit to stand trial. So then in 2017, Himmelstein was arrested again for harassing a tourist woman.

My point is that it appears that a sizable fraction of unprovoked (and non-larcenous) attacks on pedestrians in New York City are carried out by a small number of repeat offenders. Lock them up and you can put a dent into numbers.

But I also suspect that crazy men tend to be susceptible to the general climate of opinion. When respectable media is declaring a Racial Reckoning against whites, is it all that surprising that lunatics tend to take this message into their own hands?

 
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  1. My point is that it appears that a sizable fraction of unprovoked (and non-larcenous) attacks on pedestrians in New York City are carried out by a small number of repeat offenders.

    Small number? Move to NYC and try it out. A tiny, tiny fraction of assaults ever make the news. Most are B on W of course and hardly any are even reported. Try it out.

    Meanwhile, don’t miss Sabrina Belcher, the latest poster girl for the New America.

    Lame version: https://heavy.com/news/2020/08/sabrina-belcher/

    Rocking version: https://www.takimag.com/article/the-week-that-perished-114/

    Belcher livestreamed her kidnapping because of course she did, and police wondered why she was livestreaming an “unexpected” kidnapping, because of course they did.

    • Replies: @Elmer T. Jones
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    That's funny. When I was in the Army a fat, loudmouthed black guy named Bodie in my platoon went home to his NC town and was AWOL. Went to the police station and claimed he had been kidnapped. The platoon leader asked incredulously "Who would want to kidnap Bodie!?". There was a white Bodie in our company too, and a black guy with my same Italian name. A lot of salt and pepper coincidences like that.

    , @Dissident
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder


    A tiny, tiny fraction of assaults ever make the news. Most are B on W of course and hardly any are even reported.
     
    Apropos, from Nicholas Stix, 2004:
    “Disappearing” Urban Crime [VDARE.com]
    Excerpts:

    Since 1991, I have fought off at least eight racial attacks, including two attempted muggings. All were "disappeared" by police or prosecutors—even when I had bloody wounds; when the police had been called to the scene by a subway motorman or (unbeknownst to me) an anonymous witness who corroborated my depiction of events; or when the attack took place on camera, in front of a black postal police officer.
    ...
    And the fudging of crime statistics is not just a story in the Naked City.
    ...
    Detectives engage in the wholesale "unfounding" of crimes i.e. determine that allegation were "unfounded." And murders are reclassified as non-criminal deaths. But in most cases, crime is "disappeared" by the street officer who engages in "creative writing," turning felonies into misdemeanors or non-crimes. (An additional crime statistic reduction strategy, "de-policing," withdrawing police from embarrassing confrontation with criminals, is beyond the scope of this essay.)
     
    Also, from VDARE:
    [Unknown] On [Unknown] Crime–In DeBlasio’s New York, NYPD Won’t Say [James Fulford, 2015]

    Replies: @David In TN

    , @anonymous
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    "Belcher" is an appropriate surname for this cow.

  2. My point is that it appears that a sizable fraction of unprovoked (and non-larcenous) attacks on pedestrians in New York City are carried out by a small number of repeat offenders. Lock them up and you can put a dent into numbers.

    Exactly the situation that occurred with the Squeegee Men back in the day in NYC. They seemed to be everywhere in NYC and thus unstoppable, but Giuliani had them arrested and got the book thrown at them for jaywalking. And then it turned out there actually weren’t that many of them, it was just the fact that they’d never been arrested before and had set patterns to maximize their profit, making them seem like a far larger horde.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squeegee_man#United_States

    Most serious or bothersome crime is committed by a small percentage of the population, but if you aren’t diligent in rounding them up they can grow to haunt the public’s mind as a much larger and therefore insurmountable problem.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @R.G. Camara

    That's where Charles Bronson comes in.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    , @AnotherDad
    @R.G. Camara

    It must be said:

    The Democrats launched a summer of BLM/Antifa riots and street thuggery based on an open fraud. A direct attack upon the precious rule-of-law.

    And ...
    NY County (Manhattan) -- Biden 84%
    Bronx -- Biden 82%
    Kings (Brooklyn) -- Biden 74%
    Queens -- Biden 69%
    only Richmond (Staten Island) had the good sense to vote for Trump (62%).

    Westchester (63%) and Nassau (54%) counties went for Biden as well.

    People who voted for Biden/Harris deserve being attacked, beaten, killed, particularly by blacks.

    We just had a referendum on rule-of-law and they voted against it.

    ~~

    We simply need separate nations. I value a whole host of traditional American things--Western Civilization, borders, republican government, rule-of-law, marriage, children, family, normal sexual complementarity, roles and relations, personal responsibility, self-reliance--that Democrats reject.

    Sane New Yorkers should move down to Florida. I have some neighbors, that--with a bit of help--i can ship north.

    Responsible sane people need to be to live their lives free of minoritarian looniness.

    Replies: @Joseph Doaks

    , @Cato
    @R.G. Camara

    The "broken window" view of law enforcement -- when minor offenses are taken seriously, major offenses are less likely to occur. We have the technology to seriously suppress crime: high-resolution cameras; facial recognition and license plate reading algorithms; cheap DNA sequencing; massive amounts of data for linking criminals to their associates and favored locales. But we don't use that technology. Partly because of libertarian preferences for "privacy" over "transparency", and partly because of the incompetence of people who rise to positions of authority in our country.

    Replies: @Alden

  3. When respectable media is declaring a Racial Reckoning against whites, is it all that surprising that lunatics tend to take this message into their own hands?

    Mental illnesses are a good reason to be rather calm and cautious as a society.

    (That’s one thing young people often-times don’t understand about conservatives – that there are existential reasons to be rather cautious and restrictive).

  4. “All blacks are schizophrenics”.

    (From a private conversation with a clinical psychiatrist of many many years’ experience).

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous


    “All blacks are schizophrenics”.

    (From a private conversation with a clinical psychiatrist of many many years’ experience).
     
    How does the person define “schizophrenia”?
    , @Charon
    @Anonymous

    The guy was just rounding up. The actual figure is closer to 85%.

    , @Buck Ransom
    @Anonymous

    ...But with a Schlitz in her mitts down at Fitzroy's Bar
    She thinks of the Ritz, oh, it's so schizo.

  5. @R.G. Camara

    My point is that it appears that a sizable fraction of unprovoked (and non-larcenous) attacks on pedestrians in New York City are carried out by a small number of repeat offenders. Lock them up and you can put a dent into numbers.
     
    Exactly the situation that occurred with the Squeegee Men back in the day in NYC. They seemed to be everywhere in NYC and thus unstoppable, but Giuliani had them arrested and got the book thrown at them for jaywalking. And then it turned out there actually weren't that many of them, it was just the fact that they'd never been arrested before and had set patterns to maximize their profit, making them seem like a far larger horde.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squeegee_man#United_States

    Most serious or bothersome crime is committed by a small percentage of the population, but if you aren't diligent in rounding them up they can grow to haunt the public's mind as a much larger and therefore insurmountable problem.

    Replies: @El Dato, @AnotherDad, @Cato

    That’s where Charles Bronson comes in.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @El Dato

    People forget that Bernie Goetz was national hero because of how far NY had fallen and how movies like Death Wish had hit a national nerve before he shot his assailants. Goetz was seen as a real life Paul Kersey.

    Bronson made like 5 of those movies and enjoyed a late-career renaissance from them. And the movies were hits internationally; Bronson was big in Japan as a result.

    Bronson's surprising late-career action star turn pre-figured the Taken films for Liam Neeson, as well as Mel Gibson, Denzel Washington, and Bruce Willis current career choices.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @dvorak

  6. Several months ago the Metropolitan Transportation Authority shut down subway service from 1am to 5am each day.That was a major change for what’s always been a 24/7 operation. It ostensibly is for “deep cleaning” but absolutely everyone knows it’s an attempt to keep skells from living on the trains. That has been accomplished to a degree, unfortunately criminals just do their thing at other times.

  7. New York seems to be heading back to the 1980s. Maybe history will repeat itself with another Bernhard Goetz incident. This time round, the thugs will be all but canonised as saints and streets will be named after them.

    • Agree: Twinkie
  8. I would imagine that no single type of crime is more damaging to the question of whether people are going to move back to New York City than incidents of being shoved onto the subway tracks. That’s pretty much the worst New York terror.

    Perhaps NYC can invest in these:

  9. @El Dato
    @R.G. Camara

    That's where Charles Bronson comes in.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    People forget that Bernie Goetz was national hero because of how far NY had fallen and how movies like Death Wish had hit a national nerve before he shot his assailants. Goetz was seen as a real life Paul Kersey.

    Bronson made like 5 of those movies and enjoyed a late-career renaissance from them. And the movies were hits internationally; Bronson was big in Japan as a result.

    Bronson’s surprising late-career action star turn pre-figured the Taken films for Liam Neeson, as well as Mel Gibson, Denzel Washington, and Bruce Willis current career choices.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @R.G. Camara

    I watched 4* of the Death Wish movies in a row one time, long after they were made. I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson's movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me. That movie was from 1974. Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?

    To Steve, yeah, that being pushed onto the subway tracks thing is probably a big mostly NYC-people nightmare. From what I gather from the maps/posters at the Subway sandwich shop, this one is by far the oldest in the US, at 116 years since opening! The Chicago ones look pretty ancient, but aren't nearly, and the L-train just doesn't have that same aura (I know some is underground.) The rest of the ones in the US look to be more modern than these two.

    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.

    .

    * I didn't know there were 5 till now.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Harry Baldwin, @R.G. Camara, @Anonymouse, @Pericles, @peterike, @Hibernian, @Trinity, @YetAnotherAnon, @restless94110

    , @dvorak
    @R.G. Camara


    People forget that Bernie Goetz was national hero
     
    He was referenced in raps, too.
    "And if ya squad flex/I'm lettin off like Bernard Goetz"
  10. The assaults will continue until race relations improve.

  11. My point is that it appears that a sizable fraction of unprovoked (and non-larcenous) attacks on pedestrians in New York City are carried out by a small number of repeat offenders. Lock them up and you can put a dent into numbers.

    Yes, that’s the rub. DiBlasio inherited a pretty good racket, so you think he’d rather like to keep it going, but he instead is earnest in burning it down.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @The Alarmist

    As WOR radio host Mark Simone points out, COVID cases in NYC schools go up 0.2%, De Blasio wants to shut the schools down. Homicide rate goes up 40%--yawn.

  12. I fear this is a long term trend. 2nd and 3rd tier cities in the US became filthy, dangerous hellholes years ago. The only reason NYC stayed relatively safe and clean was because so many of the Masters of the Universe lived in Manhattan. Now that they have found it’s just as nice in the tony parts of Long Island, CT and NJ, as a result of the COVID Exodus, there’s nothing to stop the collapse of the tax base and then the city.

    I guess the model is San Francisco, since both and NYC are pretty geographically compact cities (as opposed to places like LA or Houston where the Beautiful People can separate themselves by living far from the scum.) Are there still a lot of wealthy people that live in SF proper? How do they isolate themselves from the homeless, crazy and criminals?

    • Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Obviously NYC is taking a colossal hit, but how many suburbs and exurbs have anything to compete with Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, countless world-class museums, Broadway extravaganzas, gallery openings and other A-list parties, and not least: Michelin-starred restaurants?

    And as people come trickling back, the nexus of super-achievers again forms and builds on itself. Talent likes to be around talent.

    New York can (and probably will) fall a fair distance, but unlike most places it has a long way to fall.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Ed, @Technite78, @Anon, @Chris Mallory, @Colin Wright, @Alden, @Morton's toes, @Mycale, @Icy Blast

    , @Anonymouse
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    They don't. A quite prosperous friend of mine living in San Francisco wrote to me recently -

    There are a great many homeless people. If I walk three blocks in this very mixed neighborhood, I usually see at least two guys sleeping in driveways. Lots of those are non-English-speaking. Some non-governmental organizations issue them tents and sleeping bags. Lots of them have substance abuse and/or mental problems. Some of the latter wander down the streets shouting incomprehensibly, but they are obviously angry, Some of them break into garages and steal anything they think they can sell. They shit and piss between parked cars near their encampments. The city has started putting out porta-potties near the big encampments, and has established some areas where people can stay without being harassed—parking lots, mostly. They’ve also set up handwashing stations.

    The city has put a good deal of effort and a lot of money into trying to deal with the problem. They have been trying to get people off the streets by putting them into supportive housing, where all the different services needed by these people can be available—a great improvement on expecting them to be together enough to navigate around town and keep appointments. Many have been housed in hotels that have no guests, owing to the collapse of the tourist trade.

    Every time some people are gotten off the street, more show up. I have to assume that at least one of the causes is the increasing impoverishment of the lowest half of the population. Between the last recession, when a lot of people with very little capital lost what they’d put into buying homes, the job losses, the continuing lack of increases in wages for those who do have jobs, and now this new recession, during which the least well paid have had to choose between risking exposure in service jobs or having no income, there are lots of people (often the whole family) who are in bad shape. As for the ones with mental problems, if I were forced to live on the streets for two weeks, I’d have mental problems, too.

    Obviously, the widespread homeless encampments degrade the environment and make those of us who are lucky enough to be housed feel uncomfortable, unhappy, and sometimes threatened. I don’t know a solution to the problem, but letting it continue is not a solution. Many of the nonprofits that try to help the homeless say that they should have the right to live on the street, and that trying to end this situation is cruel. Me, I think letting people die on the streets is more cruel.

    The short answer is, yes, the situation is very bad, and I don’t know of any solution.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Charon, @Reg Cæsar, @Morton's toes

    , @HallParvey
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    Now that they have found it’s just as nice in the tony parts of Long Island, CT and NJ, as a result of the COVID Exodus, there’s nothing to stop the collapse of the tax base and then the city.
     
    The Covid Crisis may have long term consequences that are in every way an improvement over the way things have been. For example, if you can study at home, why do you need all those schools with all those government approved textbooks. Eliminating the materials and subjects that are less than worthless can only be an improvement. The need for certifications can be achieved by government administered tests. Just as they are today.

    Perhaps home economics can be resurrected. Something useful like cooking for the family might be a subject. Perhaps how to change a faucet washer. You know, something useful, productive.

    There just may be much silver lining behind the dark cloud of Covid Crisis.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    NJ, one of the founders of PayPal and a current San Francisco resident wrote an article, published by SF Gate, on why he is leaving SF. Truth is SF is a shithole that lost tens of millions of dollars in convention business because it is a dirty filthy place. Sf currently spends $600 million on their homelss problem.The whole bay area has a major homeless problem. They also have a uber leftist DA, chessa boudin. the son of convicted terrorist murderers who is very light on criminals, hence skyrocketing crime numbers..

    Replies: @Alden

    , @William Badwhite
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    Are there still a lot of wealthy people that live in SF proper? How do they isolate themselves from the homeless, crazy and criminals?
     
    A lot of San Francisco is composed of stand-alone single family homes. There are quite a few neighborhoods where what goes on around Fisherman's Wharf or the Financial District around the north end of Market might as well be a different world. The Sunset district, the Richmond, Noe Valley, West Portal, Cole Valley, Bernal Heights. These will have few if any crazy homeless people around - its just houses and the occasional retail on a corner.

    Replies: @RAZ

  13. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I fear this is a long term trend. 2nd and 3rd tier cities in the US became filthy, dangerous hellholes years ago. The only reason NYC stayed relatively safe and clean was because so many of the Masters of the Universe lived in Manhattan. Now that they have found it’s just as nice in the tony parts of Long Island, CT and NJ, as a result of the COVID Exodus, there’s nothing to stop the collapse of the tax base and then the city.

    I guess the model is San Francisco, since both and NYC are pretty geographically compact cities (as opposed to places like LA or Houston where the Beautiful People can separate themselves by living far from the scum.) Are there still a lot of wealthy people that live in SF proper? How do they isolate themselves from the homeless, crazy and criminals?

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Anonymouse, @HallParvey, @Buffalo Joe, @William Badwhite

    Obviously NYC is taking a colossal hit, but how many suburbs and exurbs have anything to compete with Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, countless world-class museums, Broadway extravaganzas, gallery openings and other A-list parties, and not least: Michelin-starred restaurants?

    And as people come trickling back, the nexus of super-achievers again forms and builds on itself. Talent likes to be around talent.

    New York can (and probably will) fall a fair distance, but unlike most places it has a long way to fall.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Hey, Baltimore has Johns Hopkins.

    , @Ed
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    The only thing I attended on your list while living in NYC were the museums. There’s some acknowledgement on Wall Street that socializing younger workers at the office is a good thing so there will still be demand for office space. It’s just going to be less of it.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @bomag, @Charon

    , @Technite78
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Just about all the places that 1%-ers in NYC like to spend their time are closed or severely restricted. And they're not opening anytime soon.

    There's an enormous exodus from NYC. I'm one of them. Along with a few hundred thousand others, I've moved my primary residence out of NYC (and additionally, out of NY state).

    Will there be people to fill the vacuum? Certainly. Will they be able to replace the hole in the tax base? Unlikely.

    Replies: @No jack london

    , @Anon
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    New York is an overwhelmingly ugly city. Sure some public insides spaces are upscale, like the Opera or the Saks store on 5th. Expensive restaurants have great decor, but food is often over hyped, with subpar service. Uncollected trash and 10 Warhols on a restaurant’s wall. Only in NY.

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    , @Chris Mallory
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Meh, I will taking being able to target shoot in my backyard over anything on that list or the whole list combined.
    You couldn't pay me to live in that giant cesspit.

    , @Colin Wright
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    'Obviously NYC is taking a colossal hit, but how many suburbs and exurbs have anything to compete with Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, countless world-class museums, Broadway extravaganzas, gallery openings and other A-list parties, and not least: Michelin-starred restaurants?'

    ...except you can no longer go to any of these.

    Replies: @prosa123

    , @Alden
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Suburban and even rural residents can always drive into the city or even spend a weekend to enjoy those things. Lots of big city hotels have weekend packages that include tickets to all those events. Closing all the restaurants for covid hoax is a problem. 6 ft social distancing means theaters and music venues have to operate at maybe 30% capacity which leads to bankruptcy.

    I think covid hoax lockdowns will do more to destroy our great cities than black crime. Most people believe it’s possible to avoid black crime. Uber instead of the subway. But when all the theaters, concert halls restaurants and clubs are closed and everyone works from home and shops online; cities have no reason to exist anymore.

    Maybe it’s really communist subversion. Elect enough Garcetti Lightfoot Deblasio mayors and their lockdowns can do in a year what Soviet subversion and Gramisci slow marches couldn’t do in 70 years.

    , @Morton's toes
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    When Epstein was arrested I looked at his Manhattan address on streetview. It is one block from the Metropolitan Art Museum in Central Park. That sidewalk is solid homeless people tent city on google street view. Or it was the day Epstein got arrested. Not the sidewalk in front of Epstein's old apartment. The sidewalk in front of the museum.

    , @Mycale
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    The vast majority of New Yorkers are not Carrie Bradshaw. They're not going to galas and fancy restaurants every night. They might go to Lincoln Center or a Broadway Show a few times a year. As nice as all that stuff is, and it is nice, and people do miss it when they leave, they're not essential.

    What is essential, though, is feeling safe and secure. People left NYC when it was dangerous and came back when it was safer. It really is that simple. For as long as the City government is deemed not to be in control and for as long as it seems like a place where crazy people have full reign to make everyone miserable, people will stay away.

    This year also had the added problem for the City in that people realized they don't need to be in the office to get their work done. A lot of people simply will not come back and stay gainfully employed in a place with peace and quiet and good schools.

    , @Icy Blast
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    I had never thought of the theater district known as "Broadway" as a manifestation of "culture" but rather as a gathering place for homosexuals. Perhaps the plays "Cats" and "Les Miserables" are magnificent cultural achievements, and I have been cruelly deceived by Republican hillbillies who simply can't appreciate their timeless artistic radiance.

  14. @R.G. Camara
    @El Dato

    People forget that Bernie Goetz was national hero because of how far NY had fallen and how movies like Death Wish had hit a national nerve before he shot his assailants. Goetz was seen as a real life Paul Kersey.

    Bronson made like 5 of those movies and enjoyed a late-career renaissance from them. And the movies were hits internationally; Bronson was big in Japan as a result.

    Bronson's surprising late-career action star turn pre-figured the Taken films for Liam Neeson, as well as Mel Gibson, Denzel Washington, and Bruce Willis current career choices.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @dvorak

    I watched 4* of the Death Wish movies in a row one time, long after they were made. I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson’s movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me. That movie was from 1974. Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?

    To Steve, yeah, that being pushed onto the subway tracks thing is probably a big mostly NYC-people nightmare. From what I gather from the maps/posters at the Subway sandwich shop, this one is by far the oldest in the US, at 116 years since opening! The Chicago ones look pretty ancient, but aren’t nearly, and the L-train just doesn’t have that same aura (I know some is underground.) The rest of the ones in the US look to be more modern than these two.

    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.

    .

    * I didn’t know there were 5 till now.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.
     
    I arrived in NYC during the reign of General Dinkins. They were wild days indeed, and I did watch my back on subway platforms, though at rush hour at 77th Street, the thousands of people (mostly non minority) might be breathing down your neck, but weren’t doing any hostile pushing.

    My second working week, I was riding up front, and this gut on the platform at WTC jumped in front of the train (is that better than the Bridge?) ... that was it; one minute there, next minute not; no gore or mess for me to see, so I called my boss to tell him I would be late to work, and he was all like “Do you need to take the day off? Do you need to see someone? Etc.” He was really shocked when I said I’d seen worse.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Dan Hayes, @Dan Hayes, @bruce county, @Alden

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?

    Having been a New York City resident for several years at the time the first Death Wish movie was released, I can answer your question. Yes, the movie business was already PC enough to make sure that an unrealistically high percentage of the muggers were not black and that that was obvious to New Yorkers who saw it.

    Most big-name reviewers panned the movie, but mostly for what they saw as its "fascism," "simplistic view of crime," and "support for vigilantes" rather than racism, which would be the immediate go-to today.

    Vincent Canby of the NYT wrote, "It's a despicable movie, one that raises complex questions in order to offer bigoted, frivolous, oversimplified answers."

    Roger Ebert wrote, "Death Wish is a quasifascist advertisement for urban vigilantes, done up in a slick and exciting action movie; we like it even while we’re turned off by the message."

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    , @R.G. Camara
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson’s movie wife were white guys from before
     
    Not only where they white, one of them was played by a young Jeff Goldblum.

    From what I gather from the maps/posters at the Subway sandwich shop, this one is by far the oldest in the US, at 116 years since opening
     
    Boston's is technically older, but NYC's is far more extensive and useful. Boston's is basically streetcars on 4 different routes that sometime go underground and usually block traffic.

    Replies: @BostonJoe, @Alfa158

    , @Anonymouse
    @Achmed E. Newman

    >To Steve, yeah, that being pushed onto the subway tracks thing is probably a big mostly NYC-people nightmare.

    I grew up in NYC in the 1949s and 1950s. There were very few blacks in NYC then except for Harlem.
    Subway boarding and exiting platforms are elevated so the full size of the train is not apparent. In the imagination of a child there is always a degree of fear when a subway train comes rushing into a station. My father worked for the Chesapeake & Ohio RR in New Jersey. One day he saw someone walk in front of a moving train. He was visibly quite shaken by the experience and said as much.

    Replies: @prosa123

    , @Pericles
    @Achmed E. Newman



    I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson’s movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me.

     

    In the modern era, I happened upon a movie about terrorism in contemporary London. I literally only saw about five or ten seconds of it, but it turned out that:

    1. The victim to be avenged was chinese/vietnamese;
    2. The officer who assured the avenger (Jackie Chan) that the perps would be etc etc, was a strong black woman;
    3. The terrorists were Irish. (White that is, I suppose I have to add that nowadays.)

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1615160/

    Well kids, that's what terrorism in London looks like.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @restless94110

    , @peterike
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?
     
    Blacks were definitely committing the majority of crimes. Puerto Ricans were doing a lot as well (remember West Side Story: Puerto Ricans flooded NYC long before the Mexican wave made "hispanics" a thing). But there was also a component of white crime. In 1974 there was still such a thing as a tough white neighborhood. And while it wasn't as dangerous as walking through a black neighborhood, it was still pretty scary and you'd get looks that told you in no uncertain terms to keep walking and mind your business.

    Replies: @Corn

    , @Hibernian
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It's happened in Chicago, on the small portion of out system that is underground, possibly also on the "L" (for elevated.)

    , @Trinity
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I just watched a movie that was made in 1967 the other night about a couple of thugs harassing passengers on a subway. The movie was titled, "The Incident" and the two thugs were played by Tony Musante and a young Martin Sheen. I have no idea why the movie was in black & white given it was made in 1967. A young Beau Bridges and a younger Ed McMahon also had roles in this movie. Never even heard of this flick but it was watchable at least, certainly better than the crapola today. They even had the two thugs harassing a negro couple. haha. I was only 6 years old in 1967, but my guess is that the odds of two White thugs harassing a NYC Black couple on the train was about as rare as a cotton patch in Harlem. Bridges plays the hero, he is cast as an Okie farm boy riding the train with an Army buddy from NYC. The thugs harass everyone from a gay guy, a Black couple where the N-bomb is dropped, a history teacher and his wife, a boyfriend and girlfriend, even McMahon and his wife and kid.

    The only times that I ever encountered any trouble while stationed in NYC was at South Ferry while grabbing a slice of pizza before jumping on the number 1 train, an "incident" near the Brooklyn Navy yards where a group of Blacks gave me and my friends a hassle, and verbal threats again by a group of Blacks in Staten Island waiting on a bus. Damn Black guy at the South Ferry pizza joint wanted me to buy him a slice of pizza. haha. IF he would have asked in the right way, I would have been more than happy to accommodate his order.

    Someone mentioned the first Death Wish movie and the "white thugs" who killed Paul Kersey's wife. Mr. Kersey was also harassed by a couple of white thugs on the train. haha. It showed a Black couple being intimidated to the point of leaving the train before trouble arrived. LMAO at that one. I always think of Bruce Springsteen and Frank Zappa when I see that scene, for some reason the "white thugs" remind me of those two guys. hehe.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @anon

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson’s movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me"

    Has there ever been a gang rape or murder revenge movie where the perps were black? Can't think of one. On the other hand, Hollywood loves them a white gang - look at Straw Dogs, Deliverance (both 'hillbilly' type perps) or the umpteen Manson spinoffs.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Manson#Fiction_inspired_by_Manson

    In the UK a lot of TV crime fiction is set in basically crime-free white places - not just the Miss Marple/Midsomer Murders stuff but crime set in Shetland, Iceland, academic Oxford.

    No one is looking to make a story out of this case, from the press coverage of which I learned that if you really want to scald someone, you put sugar in the water before you boil it, which both raises the boiling temperature of the water and makes it stick better to a victim's skin.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Mary-Ann_Leneghan

    Replies: @Rob McX

    , @restless94110
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I,too, watched 4* of the Death Wish movies in a row one time, long after they were made. I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson’s movie wife were white guys
     
    Just recently I watched 4 of the 5 original Death Watch films (I didn't see the one where he was in Japan) because I had just seen the modern Death Watch. It's a great action film and a real pro-gun message film.

    This one's set in Chicago and has Bruce Willis in the Bronson role and a great supporting cast. But like the first Death Watch, the bad guys are white, and though some of the other baddies Willis takes down some look hispanic (maybe) and another is black (carjacking a car from a black woman victim) the film sidesteps the issue by making the white thugs diabolically smart.

    And somehow that plays better than if they were black.

    The old Death Watches seemed extremely primitive (in blood effects, acting, spoken lines, even cinematography). The modern Death Watch is a lot more well thought out. I've watched it 3 times now. It's one of the few recent films that I can take.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  15. ”My point is that it appears that a sizable fraction of unprovoked …. attacks on pedestrians in New York City are carried out by a small number…..”

    Why yes, it’s a small number. No more than 13% of the population. If only we could make friends with this population. Maybe give each of them jobs in commercials, as models and actors. Let’s try that.

    • LOL: bomag
  16. Very few people who ride the subway are against crazy people attacking subway riders because they have committed the sin of whiteness. Consequently there is no reason for the rest of us to be concerned about subway riders being attacked. It is actually much better for current subway riders to be attacked rather than future ones who had nothing to do with modern wokeness.

    Of course it would be more appropriate for limousine riders to be attacked but one can’t have everything

    • Agree: Abe
    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @TheBoom

    Indeed. Everyone in NYC is a shitlib, until they get thrown on the subway tracks.

  17. @Achmed E. Newman
    @R.G. Camara

    I watched 4* of the Death Wish movies in a row one time, long after they were made. I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson's movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me. That movie was from 1974. Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?

    To Steve, yeah, that being pushed onto the subway tracks thing is probably a big mostly NYC-people nightmare. From what I gather from the maps/posters at the Subway sandwich shop, this one is by far the oldest in the US, at 116 years since opening! The Chicago ones look pretty ancient, but aren't nearly, and the L-train just doesn't have that same aura (I know some is underground.) The rest of the ones in the US look to be more modern than these two.

    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.

    .

    * I didn't know there were 5 till now.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Harry Baldwin, @R.G. Camara, @Anonymouse, @Pericles, @peterike, @Hibernian, @Trinity, @YetAnotherAnon, @restless94110

    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.

    I arrived in NYC during the reign of General Dinkins. They were wild days indeed, and I did watch my back on subway platforms, though at rush hour at 77th Street, the thousands of people (mostly non minority) might be breathing down your neck, but weren’t doing any hostile pushing.

    My second working week, I was riding up front, and this gut on the platform at WTC jumped in front of the train (is that better than the Bridge?) … that was it; one minute there, next minute not; no gore or mess for me to see, so I called my boss to tell him I would be late to work, and he was all like “Do you need to take the day off? Do you need to see someone? Etc.” He was really shocked when I said I’d seen worse.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @The Alarmist

    I've seen a body flying in the air, on the way down after being slammed into by a car, as we came around the corner in a nearby city. We stopped, and my doctor friend tried to help the man, but he died a couple hours later. It was not the driver's fault, as the 84 y/o guy walked out from between parked cars on a one-way street with traffic flow toward his left.*

    It didn't bother either of us really, other than the stupidity at the deposition. The family (yes, black) wanted to collect money from the driver, and the lawyers just irked the crap out of me with their bullshit. Afterwards, they shook hands and the one said, "hey, where you going to lunch?"

    .


    * You gotta really watch it, even young people, or especially young people on those phones. Hong Kong scared the crap out of me with that. Keep that traffic flow in your head!

    Replies: @Haruto Rat

    , @Dan Hayes
    @The Alarmist

    My late father worked in the NYC subway track department. One of his tasks was to remove the dismembered bodies of train suicides. When possible, he tore up the suicide’s note. Why did he do this? He wanted to save the suicide’s family the trauma of learning it was suicide and not platform slippage.

    Replies: @Charon

    , @Dan Hayes
    @The Alarmist

    My late father worked in the NYC subway track department. One of his tasks was to remove the dismembered bodies of train suicides. When possible, he tore up the suicide’s note. Why did he do this? He wanted to save the suicide’s family the trauma of learning it was suicide and not platform slippage!

    Replies: @vinteuil

    , @bruce county
    @The Alarmist

    NYC's first African American mayor, David Dinkins, has died

    https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/world/nycs-first-african-american-mayor-david-dinkins-has-died/ar-BB1biE08?li=AAggNb9

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Alden
    @The Alarmist

    Dinkins just died at age 93. At least he won’t have a MLK George Floyd style grandiose funeral due to covid. I hope.

    Somehow I doubt the crazy blacks who shove people off subway platforms read the NYSlimes articles about racial reckoning.

  18. But I also suspect that crazy men tend to be susceptible to the general climate of opinion.

    Yeah, that’s why I was expecting to carry a rifle for the God-Emperor by now. Whatever happened to that guy? He seemed pretty serious…

  19. A nice little cameo of America today.

    “There was nothing else I could have done to protect myself,”

    What did he do to protect himself?

    To Quote a critic of Lilian Hellman,

    Every word she wrote was a lie, including “and” and “the”.

    There are some people who kie as naturally as breathing.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Bill Jones


    “There was nothing else I could have done to protect myself,” Mr. Weisman, 33, said on Friday. “I am shaken by this.”
     
    Bullshit. He could have voted for Republicans, which I highly doubt he did, instead of for the party that was trying to incite a race war. Not many people more reliably liberal than state actors.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Alden

  20. @Achmed E. Newman
    @R.G. Camara

    I watched 4* of the Death Wish movies in a row one time, long after they were made. I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson's movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me. That movie was from 1974. Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?

    To Steve, yeah, that being pushed onto the subway tracks thing is probably a big mostly NYC-people nightmare. From what I gather from the maps/posters at the Subway sandwich shop, this one is by far the oldest in the US, at 116 years since opening! The Chicago ones look pretty ancient, but aren't nearly, and the L-train just doesn't have that same aura (I know some is underground.) The rest of the ones in the US look to be more modern than these two.

    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.

    .

    * I didn't know there were 5 till now.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Harry Baldwin, @R.G. Camara, @Anonymouse, @Pericles, @peterike, @Hibernian, @Trinity, @YetAnotherAnon, @restless94110

    Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?

    Having been a New York City resident for several years at the time the first Death Wish movie was released, I can answer your question. Yes, the movie business was already PC enough to make sure that an unrealistically high percentage of the muggers were not black and that that was obvious to New Yorkers who saw it.

    Most big-name reviewers panned the movie, but mostly for what they saw as its “fascism,” “simplistic view of crime,” and “support for vigilantes” rather than racism, which would be the immediate go-to today.

    Vincent Canby of the NYT wrote, “It’s a despicable movie, one that raises complex questions in order to offer bigoted, frivolous, oversimplified answers.”

    Roger Ebert wrote, “Death Wish is a quasifascist advertisement for urban vigilantes, done up in a slick and exciting action movie; we like it even while we’re turned off by the message.”

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Harry Baldwin

    So, Crocodile Dundee was less PC than the Death Wish series?

  21. @Achmed E. Newman
    @R.G. Camara

    I watched 4* of the Death Wish movies in a row one time, long after they were made. I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson's movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me. That movie was from 1974. Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?

    To Steve, yeah, that being pushed onto the subway tracks thing is probably a big mostly NYC-people nightmare. From what I gather from the maps/posters at the Subway sandwich shop, this one is by far the oldest in the US, at 116 years since opening! The Chicago ones look pretty ancient, but aren't nearly, and the L-train just doesn't have that same aura (I know some is underground.) The rest of the ones in the US look to be more modern than these two.

    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.

    .

    * I didn't know there were 5 till now.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Harry Baldwin, @R.G. Camara, @Anonymouse, @Pericles, @peterike, @Hibernian, @Trinity, @YetAnotherAnon, @restless94110

    I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson’s movie wife were white guys from before

    Not only where they white, one of them was played by a young Jeff Goldblum.

    From what I gather from the maps/posters at the Subway sandwich shop, this one is by far the oldest in the US, at 116 years since opening

    Boston’s is technically older, but NYC’s is far more extensive and useful. Boston’s is basically streetcars on 4 different routes that sometime go underground and usually block traffic.

    • Replies: @BostonJoe
    @R.G. Camara

    Boston’s is older.

    “Boston’s is basically streetcars...”

    Red Line: Heavy rail. Dedicated right of way, no grade crossings. Underground between Andrew and MGH, then underground again Kendall/MIT to Alewife.

    Orange Line: Heavy rail. Dedicated right of way, no grade crossings. Underground through downtown.

    Blue Line: Heavy rail, dedicated right of way, no grade crossings. Underground from Airport to Government Center, traveling under Boston Harbor as part of that trip.

    Green Line, the oldest portion of the MBTA system:

    4 branches, B, C, D and E (there used to be an A, but was eliminated in the 60s). Light rail aka ‘street cars’.

    Underground and dedicated right of way for lines B, C and D to Kenmore (Fenway Park). E is underground to Symphony, above ground at Northeastern.

    Basically all of central Boston is underground.

    Only branches B, C and E are above ground and share the street with traffic for part of their run, west of town.

    C and E are are semi-dedicated rights of way. They don’t do a lot of traffic blocking. (E does a bit west of Brigham Circle to Arborway).

    D runs west to Newton, dedicated right of way, no grade crossings (Steve: through a golf course—-I have played there a bunch of times).

    B may be your culprit.

    Boston would collapse, absent the MBTA: too many folks in a small area.

    , @Alfa158
    @R.G. Camara

    The actors selected to play the men who attacked the wife and daughter seemed to have been selected to look vaguely White/Puerto Rican.
    In the original novel Bronson’s character was a Jewish CPA named Paul Benjamin. The movie producers changed the ethnicity of the criminals and victims to make the story initially less inflammatory, but didn’t stick to it, as the movie developed Kersey started shooting black muggers.

    Replies: @James O'Meara

  22. @The Alarmist

    My point is that it appears that a sizable fraction of unprovoked (and non-larcenous) attacks on pedestrians in New York City are carried out by a small number of repeat offenders. Lock them up and you can put a dent into numbers.
     
    Yes, that’s the rub. DiBlasio inherited a pretty good racket, so you think he’d rather like to keep it going, but he instead is earnest in burning it down.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    As WOR radio host Mark Simone points out, COVID cases in NYC schools go up 0.2%, De Blasio wants to shut the schools down. Homicide rate goes up 40%–yawn.

  23. In Japan you have people jumping onto tracks of their own accord. For the subways in Tokyo at least they installed barriers with doors or gates that open parallel with the train doors. Now you have to ride a surface train out to the suburbs to kill yourself.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Anon


    Now you have to ride a surface train out to the suburbs to kill yourself.
     
    Those Japanese are really go-getters.
    , @Dieter Kief
    @Anon


    In Tokio you have to ride a surface train out to the suburbs to kill yourself.
     
    Uh. Such is modern life in a functioning society. Full of contradictions.
    , @J.Ross
    @Anon

    Japanese suicides are a cliche but they're way up as a result of the unjustified lockdown.

    , @prosa123
    @Anon

    In Japan you have people jumping onto tracks of their own accord. For the subways in Tokyo at least they installed barriers with doors or gates that open parallel with the train doors.

    Platform doors. They exist in many places, even in New York on the JFK Airtrain. They work only if all the trains that operate on the line have exactly the same door alignments, which isn't the case on the NYC subway.

    Replies: @Yngvar, @Anon

  24. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I fear this is a long term trend. 2nd and 3rd tier cities in the US became filthy, dangerous hellholes years ago. The only reason NYC stayed relatively safe and clean was because so many of the Masters of the Universe lived in Manhattan. Now that they have found it’s just as nice in the tony parts of Long Island, CT and NJ, as a result of the COVID Exodus, there’s nothing to stop the collapse of the tax base and then the city.

    I guess the model is San Francisco, since both and NYC are pretty geographically compact cities (as opposed to places like LA or Houston where the Beautiful People can separate themselves by living far from the scum.) Are there still a lot of wealthy people that live in SF proper? How do they isolate themselves from the homeless, crazy and criminals?

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Anonymouse, @HallParvey, @Buffalo Joe, @William Badwhite

    They don’t. A quite prosperous friend of mine living in San Francisco wrote to me recently –

    There are a great many homeless people. If I walk three blocks in this very mixed neighborhood, I usually see at least two guys sleeping in driveways. Lots of those are non-English-speaking. Some non-governmental organizations issue them tents and sleeping bags. Lots of them have substance abuse and/or mental problems. Some of the latter wander down the streets shouting incomprehensibly, but they are obviously angry, Some of them break into garages and steal anything they think they can sell. They shit and piss between parked cars near their encampments. The city has started putting out porta-potties near the big encampments, and has established some areas where people can stay without being harassed—parking lots, mostly. They’ve also set up handwashing stations.

    The city has put a good deal of effort and a lot of money into trying to deal with the problem. They have been trying to get people off the streets by putting them into supportive housing, where all the different services needed by these people can be available—a great improvement on expecting them to be together enough to navigate around town and keep appointments. Many have been housed in hotels that have no guests, owing to the collapse of the tourist trade.

    Every time some people are gotten off the street, more show up. I have to assume that at least one of the causes is the increasing impoverishment of the lowest half of the population. Between the last recession, when a lot of people with very little capital lost what they’d put into buying homes, the job losses, the continuing lack of increases in wages for those who do have jobs, and now this new recession, during which the least well paid have had to choose between risking exposure in service jobs or having no income, there are lots of people (often the whole family) who are in bad shape. As for the ones with mental problems, if I were forced to live on the streets for two weeks, I’d have mental problems, too.

    Obviously, the widespread homeless encampments degrade the environment and make those of us who are lucky enough to be housed feel uncomfortable, unhappy, and sometimes threatened. I don’t know a solution to the problem, but letting it continue is not a solution. Many of the nonprofits that try to help the homeless say that they should have the right to live on the street, and that trying to end this situation is cruel. Me, I think letting people die on the streets is more cruel.

    The short answer is, yes, the situation is very bad, and I don’t know of any solution.

    • Thanks: Dissident
    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Anonymouse

    They’ve also set up handwashing stations.

    Somehow I suspect skells aren't really into hand washing.

    , @Charon
    @Anonymouse

    One solution would be to stop importing more underclass by the millions. Instead we're going to ramp it up now. Because otherwise white people are racist.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymouse


    They 🚽 and 🍆 between parked cars near their encampments.

     

    https://specials-images.forbesimg.com/imageserve/5e33aab2f133f400076b38b7/960x0.jpg?fit=scale

    https://allthatsinteresting.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/homeless-cleanup-california.jpg


    https://lybio.net/wp-content/uploads/DeAnna-For-Congress-Vs-Nancy-Pelosi-San-Francisco-Needles-And-Human-Feces.png



    ⚠️: 💩-- 🧻, 🛀!


    https://wearethene.ws/assets/images/m0/df/5b/df5b6fac71f7503219c7d1b4eef7eb34b11b701f30d46f240de04b1c2e9ba83c.png
    , @Morton's toes
    @Anonymouse


    I don’t know of any solution.
     
    There is exactly one solution. Do not live in San Francisco. I live near San Francisco and I very rarely see a need to enter the city. The last time I was there I saw a person using a hypodermic needle on the sidewalk in the middle of the day. Hopefully it was insulin not heroin but I really don't need to see that. I didn't see much shit on the street-gutters-sidewalks.

    A long time ago I used to enjoy things like Giants games and concerts and stuff but those pleasures are not worth entering the shit hole that San Francisco has become.
  25. Mayor Wilhelm’s son got mugged in front of their mansion last year, IIRC.

    The best part about “progressivism” is that its proponents are not immune.

  26. @Anon
    In Japan you have people jumping onto tracks of their own accord. For the subways in Tokyo at least they installed barriers with doors or gates that open parallel with the train doors. Now you have to ride a surface train out to the suburbs to kill yourself.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Dieter Kief, @J.Ross, @prosa123

    Now you have to ride a surface train out to the suburbs to kill yourself.

    Those Japanese are really go-getters.

  27. @Harry Baldwin
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?

    Having been a New York City resident for several years at the time the first Death Wish movie was released, I can answer your question. Yes, the movie business was already PC enough to make sure that an unrealistically high percentage of the muggers were not black and that that was obvious to New Yorkers who saw it.

    Most big-name reviewers panned the movie, but mostly for what they saw as its "fascism," "simplistic view of crime," and "support for vigilantes" rather than racism, which would be the immediate go-to today.

    Vincent Canby of the NYT wrote, "It's a despicable movie, one that raises complex questions in order to offer bigoted, frivolous, oversimplified answers."

    Roger Ebert wrote, "Death Wish is a quasifascist advertisement for urban vigilantes, done up in a slick and exciting action movie; we like it even while we’re turned off by the message."

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    So, Crocodile Dundee was less PC than the Death Wish series?

  28. “When respectable media is declaring a Racial Reckoning against whites, is it all that surprising that lunatics tend to take this message into their own hands?”

    Regarding susceptible to media opinions that whites are the bad ones, would the lunatic group also include BLM (and Antifa to a lesser extent)? One would think that BLM attacks on whites, (i.e. July 2016 BLM attacks on white police in Dallas) would certainly fall into this category.

  29. @Achmed E. Newman
    @R.G. Camara

    I watched 4* of the Death Wish movies in a row one time, long after they were made. I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson's movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me. That movie was from 1974. Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?

    To Steve, yeah, that being pushed onto the subway tracks thing is probably a big mostly NYC-people nightmare. From what I gather from the maps/posters at the Subway sandwich shop, this one is by far the oldest in the US, at 116 years since opening! The Chicago ones look pretty ancient, but aren't nearly, and the L-train just doesn't have that same aura (I know some is underground.) The rest of the ones in the US look to be more modern than these two.

    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.

    .

    * I didn't know there were 5 till now.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Harry Baldwin, @R.G. Camara, @Anonymouse, @Pericles, @peterike, @Hibernian, @Trinity, @YetAnotherAnon, @restless94110

    >To Steve, yeah, that being pushed onto the subway tracks thing is probably a big mostly NYC-people nightmare.

    I grew up in NYC in the 1949s and 1950s. There were very few blacks in NYC then except for Harlem.
    Subway boarding and exiting platforms are elevated so the full size of the train is not apparent. In the imagination of a child there is always a degree of fear when a subway train comes rushing into a station. My father worked for the Chesapeake & Ohio RR in New Jersey. One day he saw someone walk in front of a moving train. He was visibly quite shaken by the experience and said as much.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Anonymouse

    Subway boarding and exiting platforms are elevated so the full size of the train is not apparent. In the imagination of a child there is always a degree of fear when a subway train comes rushing into a station.

    In New York at least, the most common reason why people are struck by trains is that they accidentally drop things onto the tracks, cell phones in particular, climb down to retrieve the items, and then find that it's a long, long way back up to the platform.

    Replies: @Anonymouse, @Anon

  30. When I first visited NYC as a wee lad in the late 70’s, my parents warned me about standing too close to the edge of the subway platform, lest some crazy person shove me onto the tracks. I had always assumed it was some sort of urban legend meant to keep kids on their guard, like the one about razor blades in apples on Halloween.

    • Replies: @Bill
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    You're saying people don't put razor blades in Halloween candy? Why do you think this?

  31. @Anon
    In Japan you have people jumping onto tracks of their own accord. For the subways in Tokyo at least they installed barriers with doors or gates that open parallel with the train doors. Now you have to ride a surface train out to the suburbs to kill yourself.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Dieter Kief, @J.Ross, @prosa123

    In Tokio you have to ride a surface train out to the suburbs to kill yourself.

    Uh. Such is modern life in a functioning society. Full of contradictions.

  32. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Obviously NYC is taking a colossal hit, but how many suburbs and exurbs have anything to compete with Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, countless world-class museums, Broadway extravaganzas, gallery openings and other A-list parties, and not least: Michelin-starred restaurants?

    And as people come trickling back, the nexus of super-achievers again forms and builds on itself. Talent likes to be around talent.

    New York can (and probably will) fall a fair distance, but unlike most places it has a long way to fall.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Ed, @Technite78, @Anon, @Chris Mallory, @Colin Wright, @Alden, @Morton's toes, @Mycale, @Icy Blast

    Hey, Baltimore has Johns Hopkins.

  33. @Achmed E. Newman
    @R.G. Camara

    I watched 4* of the Death Wish movies in a row one time, long after they were made. I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson's movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me. That movie was from 1974. Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?

    To Steve, yeah, that being pushed onto the subway tracks thing is probably a big mostly NYC-people nightmare. From what I gather from the maps/posters at the Subway sandwich shop, this one is by far the oldest in the US, at 116 years since opening! The Chicago ones look pretty ancient, but aren't nearly, and the L-train just doesn't have that same aura (I know some is underground.) The rest of the ones in the US look to be more modern than these two.

    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.

    .

    * I didn't know there were 5 till now.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Harry Baldwin, @R.G. Camara, @Anonymouse, @Pericles, @peterike, @Hibernian, @Trinity, @YetAnotherAnon, @restless94110

    I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson’s movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me.

    In the modern era, I happened upon a movie about terrorism in contemporary London. I literally only saw about five or ten seconds of it, but it turned out that:

    1. The victim to be avenged was chinese/vietnamese;
    2. The officer who assured the avenger (Jackie Chan) that the perps would be etc etc, was a strong black woman;
    3. The terrorists were Irish. (White that is, I suppose I have to add that nowadays.)

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1615160/

    Well kids, that’s what terrorism in London looks like.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Pericles

    Suspension of disbelief, Bitchez!

    , @restless94110
    @Pericles

    That would be The Foreigner starring Jackie Chan and Pierce Brosnan. It comes from the book The Chinaman,

    You left out that the whole plot line deals with violent IRA members, which makes the plot line quite old. A rogue element of the IRA has decided to commit terrorist acts in London (against the rest of the IRA's restriction) and Jackie's daughter is blown up in a store they bomb. Chan is revealed in flash back to have escaped the murderous Cambodians or Vietnamese or somewhere back there where they had killed his wife and other child.

    The bombing leaves him totally alone and he goes bezerk in order to get vengeance.

    It is a great action film. And a great dramatic role for Jackie, who produced the film as well.

  34. @The Alarmist
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.
     
    I arrived in NYC during the reign of General Dinkins. They were wild days indeed, and I did watch my back on subway platforms, though at rush hour at 77th Street, the thousands of people (mostly non minority) might be breathing down your neck, but weren’t doing any hostile pushing.

    My second working week, I was riding up front, and this gut on the platform at WTC jumped in front of the train (is that better than the Bridge?) ... that was it; one minute there, next minute not; no gore or mess for me to see, so I called my boss to tell him I would be late to work, and he was all like “Do you need to take the day off? Do you need to see someone? Etc.” He was really shocked when I said I’d seen worse.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Dan Hayes, @Dan Hayes, @bruce county, @Alden

    I’ve seen a body flying in the air, on the way down after being slammed into by a car, as we came around the corner in a nearby city. We stopped, and my doctor friend tried to help the man, but he died a couple hours later. It was not the driver’s fault, as the 84 y/o guy walked out from between parked cars on a one-way street with traffic flow toward his left.*

    It didn’t bother either of us really, other than the stupidity at the deposition. The family (yes, black) wanted to collect money from the driver, and the lawyers just irked the crap out of me with their bullshit. Afterwards, they shook hands and the one said, “hey, where you going to lunch?”

    .

    * You gotta really watch it, even young people, or especially young people on those phones. Hong Kong scared the crap out of me with that. Keep that traffic flow in your head!

    • Replies: @Haruto Rat
    @Achmed E. Newman


    You gotta really watch it
     
    realist [ˈriːəlɪst] n · someone who looks both ways before crossing a one-way street

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  35. Honestly I’m too depressed over the election to care about things like crime in major cities anymore. Maybe in a few weeks or months.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Ed

    Oh no worries, all indications are that, per the new government, it'll be ready when you are, and even harder to ignore. We're going to a civil war or a failed state situation not out of fervent ideological opposition but because it's uncomplicatedly the Democrat plan.

  36. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Obviously NYC is taking a colossal hit, but how many suburbs and exurbs have anything to compete with Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, countless world-class museums, Broadway extravaganzas, gallery openings and other A-list parties, and not least: Michelin-starred restaurants?

    And as people come trickling back, the nexus of super-achievers again forms and builds on itself. Talent likes to be around talent.

    New York can (and probably will) fall a fair distance, but unlike most places it has a long way to fall.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Ed, @Technite78, @Anon, @Chris Mallory, @Colin Wright, @Alden, @Morton's toes, @Mycale, @Icy Blast

    The only thing I attended on your list while living in NYC were the museums. There’s some acknowledgement on Wall Street that socializing younger workers at the office is a good thing so there will still be demand for office space. It’s just going to be less of it.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Ed

    I did everything on his list ... it was all part of business, not only pleasure, but he omitted Scores and Stringfellows.

    The reason The Street will keep offices is that it is essential that the young skulls full of mush be steeped in the appropriate mixture of pressure and partying to condition them for a life of sociopathically screwing people out of money.

    A young person on The Street must decide early on if they are a "Beer and Girls" partier, or a "Hookers and Blow" partier? Your bedroom or livingroom cum office is no environment for that sort of personal development.

    h/t Tucker Max

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    , @bomag
    @Ed


    socializing younger workers at the office is a good thing...
     
    Yeah; I'm wondering if future holograms/virtual reality will displace the urban office model.
    , @Charon
    @Ed

    Did you never once go to a concert or nightclub, or dine out in a fine restaurant? And never a single play or musical? That's kind of mind-blowing. Did you at least have a pretzel on the street in wintertime?

    Replies: @Ed

  37. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    My point is that it appears that a sizable fraction of unprovoked (and non-larcenous) attacks on pedestrians in New York City are carried out by a small number of repeat offenders.
     
    Small number? Move to NYC and try it out. A tiny, tiny fraction of assaults ever make the news. Most are B on W of course and hardly any are even reported. Try it out.

    Meanwhile, don't miss Sabrina Belcher, the latest poster girl for the New America.

    Lame version: https://heavy.com/news/2020/08/sabrina-belcher/

    Rocking version: https://www.takimag.com/article/the-week-that-perished-114/

    Belcher livestreamed her kidnapping because of course she did, and police wondered why she was livestreaming an “unexpected” kidnapping, because of course they did.
     

    Replies: @Elmer T. Jones, @Dissident, @anonymous

    That’s funny. When I was in the Army a fat, loudmouthed black guy named Bodie in my platoon went home to his NC town and was AWOL. Went to the police station and claimed he had been kidnapped. The platoon leader asked incredulously “Who would want to kidnap Bodie!?”. There was a white Bodie in our company too, and a black guy with my same Italian name. A lot of salt and pepper coincidences like that.

  38. What I am seeing here is don’t go underground into the New Morlock’s New version of the New York City Subway system. You are playing Russian roulette but with some schizoid black or mixto homeless who push you onto the tracks. Just for fun and giggles in a padded cell.
    How soon before we get reports of New Jack City cannibalism down there from….after frying someone on the 700 volt third rail? This will lead to more faking it work from home along with more Caribbean derived transit workers doing nothing but getting paid. No woman will get on board these ghost trains. Men will get on board but wearing football helmets and bullet proof vests.

  39. I’m on the 125th st A platform at 0530 every morning…it’s full of aggressive black schizos. I don’t let them get inside arm’s reach.

  40. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Obviously NYC is taking a colossal hit, but how many suburbs and exurbs have anything to compete with Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, countless world-class museums, Broadway extravaganzas, gallery openings and other A-list parties, and not least: Michelin-starred restaurants?

    And as people come trickling back, the nexus of super-achievers again forms and builds on itself. Talent likes to be around talent.

    New York can (and probably will) fall a fair distance, but unlike most places it has a long way to fall.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Ed, @Technite78, @Anon, @Chris Mallory, @Colin Wright, @Alden, @Morton's toes, @Mycale, @Icy Blast

    Just about all the places that 1%-ers in NYC like to spend their time are closed or severely restricted. And they’re not opening anytime soon.

    There’s an enormous exodus from NYC. I’m one of them. Along with a few hundred thousand others, I’ve moved my primary residence out of NYC (and additionally, out of NY state).

    Will there be people to fill the vacuum? Certainly. Will they be able to replace the hole in the tax base? Unlikely.

    • Replies: @No jack london
    @Technite78

    Did you bring your NYC voting habit to Georgia, North Carolina, Palm Beach or Broward Counties in FL?

    Replies: @Technite78

  41. #BlacksRuinThings.

    This happens in Filthaderpia and ChiCongo, as well. ChiCongo had a spate of kneegro females pushing whites off platforms some time back, as well as an incident that got some local ink where a kneegro male pushed a White Man from behind down a flight of stairs at a station, killing him.

    Philly routinely has serious violence on its crappy rail and bus system. Several years ago, a White Starbucks manager was beaten by a gang of kneegrow “teens” in a SEPTA station, triggering his death from an asthma attack during the beatdown by the dusky young scholars.

  42. @Ed
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    The only thing I attended on your list while living in NYC were the museums. There’s some acknowledgement on Wall Street that socializing younger workers at the office is a good thing so there will still be demand for office space. It’s just going to be less of it.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @bomag, @Charon

    I did everything on his list … it was all part of business, not only pleasure, but he omitted Scores and Stringfellows.

    The reason The Street will keep offices is that it is essential that the young skulls full of mush be steeped in the appropriate mixture of pressure and partying to condition them for a life of sociopathically screwing people out of money.

    A young person on The Street must decide early on if they are a “Beer and Girls” partier, or a “Hookers and Blow” partier? Your bedroom or livingroom cum office is no environment for that sort of personal development.

    h/t Tucker Max

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @The Alarmist

    "The reason The Street will keep offices is that it is essential that the young skulls full of mush be steeped in the appropriate mixture of pressure and partying to condition them for a life of sociopathically screwing people out of money."

    See, American Psycho, the opening scene of which encapsulates just that. You don't have to be a doctrinaire commie or SJW to regard our Banking Elite as sociopaths, and well-trained ones at that.

    https://youtu.be/TvNL_u6IaRM

    However, just as the coof has knocked the props out from under restaurants, museums, etc., how long until the Wall St. Experience can be replicated via VR and AI? They goodbye Wall St. training grounds.

  43. @The Alarmist
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.
     
    I arrived in NYC during the reign of General Dinkins. They were wild days indeed, and I did watch my back on subway platforms, though at rush hour at 77th Street, the thousands of people (mostly non minority) might be breathing down your neck, but weren’t doing any hostile pushing.

    My second working week, I was riding up front, and this gut on the platform at WTC jumped in front of the train (is that better than the Bridge?) ... that was it; one minute there, next minute not; no gore or mess for me to see, so I called my boss to tell him I would be late to work, and he was all like “Do you need to take the day off? Do you need to see someone? Etc.” He was really shocked when I said I’d seen worse.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Dan Hayes, @Dan Hayes, @bruce county, @Alden

    My late father worked in the NYC subway track department. One of his tasks was to remove the dismembered bodies of train suicides. When possible, he tore up the suicide’s note. Why did he do this? He wanted to save the suicide’s family the trauma of learning it was suicide and not platform slippage.

    • Thanks: The Alarmist
    • Replies: @Charon
    @Dan Hayes

    Seems like there would be some implications with respect to liability. Even disregarding that, I think he was wrong to interfere with someone's dying wishes.

    Unless of course it's RBG.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

  44. @The Alarmist
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.
     
    I arrived in NYC during the reign of General Dinkins. They were wild days indeed, and I did watch my back on subway platforms, though at rush hour at 77th Street, the thousands of people (mostly non minority) might be breathing down your neck, but weren’t doing any hostile pushing.

    My second working week, I was riding up front, and this gut on the platform at WTC jumped in front of the train (is that better than the Bridge?) ... that was it; one minute there, next minute not; no gore or mess for me to see, so I called my boss to tell him I would be late to work, and he was all like “Do you need to take the day off? Do you need to see someone? Etc.” He was really shocked when I said I’d seen worse.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Dan Hayes, @Dan Hayes, @bruce county, @Alden

    My late father worked in the NYC subway track department. One of his tasks was to remove the dismembered bodies of train suicides. When possible, he tore up the suicide’s note. Why did he do this? He wanted to save the suicide’s family the trauma of learning it was suicide and not platform slippage!

    • Replies: @vinteuil
    @Dan Hayes


    When possible, he tore up the suicide’s note. Why did he do this? He wanted to save the suicide’s family the trauma of learning it was suicide...
     
    He did wrong to insert himself between a man and his family. He had no right.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

  45. Not that I don’t sympathize, but that’s a lot of bodily damage for two punches. I’ve been punched twice and didn’t get my skull broken. Was the attacker wearing brass knuckles, or is Alex Weisman the secret identity of Mr. Glass?

    • Replies: @Bill
    @Michael S

    Perhaps he fell backwards in an uncontrolled way onto concrete?

  46. @Ed
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    The only thing I attended on your list while living in NYC were the museums. There’s some acknowledgement on Wall Street that socializing younger workers at the office is a good thing so there will still be demand for office space. It’s just going to be less of it.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @bomag, @Charon

    socializing younger workers at the office is a good thing…

    Yeah; I’m wondering if future holograms/virtual reality will displace the urban office model.

  47. @Achmed E. Newman
    @R.G. Camara

    I watched 4* of the Death Wish movies in a row one time, long after they were made. I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson's movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me. That movie was from 1974. Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?

    To Steve, yeah, that being pushed onto the subway tracks thing is probably a big mostly NYC-people nightmare. From what I gather from the maps/posters at the Subway sandwich shop, this one is by far the oldest in the US, at 116 years since opening! The Chicago ones look pretty ancient, but aren't nearly, and the L-train just doesn't have that same aura (I know some is underground.) The rest of the ones in the US look to be more modern than these two.

    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.

    .

    * I didn't know there were 5 till now.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Harry Baldwin, @R.G. Camara, @Anonymouse, @Pericles, @peterike, @Hibernian, @Trinity, @YetAnotherAnon, @restless94110

    Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?

    Blacks were definitely committing the majority of crimes. Puerto Ricans were doing a lot as well (remember West Side Story: Puerto Ricans flooded NYC long before the Mexican wave made “hispanics” a thing). But there was also a component of white crime. In 1974 there was still such a thing as a tough white neighborhood. And while it wasn’t as dangerous as walking through a black neighborhood, it was still pretty scary and you’d get looks that told you in no uncertain terms to keep walking and mind your business.

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @Corn
    @peterike


    In 1974 there was still such a thing as a tough white neighborhood. And while it wasn’t as dangerous as walking through a black neighborhood, it was still pretty scary and you’d get looks that told you in no uncertain terms to keep walking and mind your business.
     
    Saturday Night Live had a sketch on in the early 90s called “The Bensonhurst Dating Game”, set in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn.

    Judging by it, as late as the early 90s there were still neighborhoods in NYC where if you weren’t Irish or Italian, God help you.

    Replies: @Known Fact

  48. @Bill Jones
    A nice little cameo of America today.

    “There was nothing else I could have done to protect myself,”
     
    What did he do to protect himself?

    To Quote a critic of Lilian Hellman,

    Every word she wrote was a lie, including "and" and "the".
     
    There are some people who kie as naturally as breathing.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    “There was nothing else I could have done to protect myself,” Mr. Weisman, 33, said on Friday. “I am shaken by this.”

    Bullshit. He could have voted for Republicans, which I highly doubt he did, instead of for the party that was trying to incite a race war. Not many people more reliably liberal than state actors.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Wilkey



    “There was nothing else I could have done to protect myself,” Mr. Weisman, 33, said on Friday. “I am shaken by this.”
     
    Bullshit. He could have voted for Republicans, which I highly doubt he did, instead of for the party that was trying to incite a race war. Not many people more reliably liberal than state actors.
     
    Yeah, maybe in a second GOP term Trump can ramp up the felon release program. And if the GOP keeps the Senate we will see Josh Hawley proposing a Senate hearing into crime like he proposed for Big Tech’s monopoly and war against conservative/dissenting speech in... late 2020.

    I only vote for the GOP because it’s a choice between the stupid and gutless (other than Trump) party and the demonic party.

    Replies: @tyrone

    , @Alden
    @Wilkey

    Black criminal loving Democrats were in charge of NYC long before Weissman was born. It is possible to fracture a skull in certain places, like the temple side of the skull near the front. It’s very thin compared to the back and top of the skull. And being hit hard in the temple would also harm the eye. The bones around the eye are not just very thick. They are like honey comb and flexible. But a hard blow could easily tear the retina. He’s an actor. Hope he has health insurance to repair they eye.

  49. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Obviously NYC is taking a colossal hit, but how many suburbs and exurbs have anything to compete with Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, countless world-class museums, Broadway extravaganzas, gallery openings and other A-list parties, and not least: Michelin-starred restaurants?

    And as people come trickling back, the nexus of super-achievers again forms and builds on itself. Talent likes to be around talent.

    New York can (and probably will) fall a fair distance, but unlike most places it has a long way to fall.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Ed, @Technite78, @Anon, @Chris Mallory, @Colin Wright, @Alden, @Morton's toes, @Mycale, @Icy Blast

    New York is an overwhelmingly ugly city. Sure some public insides spaces are upscale, like the Opera or the Saks store on 5th. Expensive restaurants have great decor, but food is often over hyped, with subpar service. Uncollected trash and 10 Warhols on a restaurant’s wall. Only in NY.

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Anon

    Lived there 30 mis-spent years. NYCers love the filth and ugliness. It's part of their "we can take anything" mentality. In their fucked up heads, the more filth and ugliness, the more it proves how tough they are. That's why nothing ever gets permanently fixed up; after Giuliani/Bloomie comes De Blasio, as winter follows summer.

    The tough/ugly thing must be some miscegenation of Jew/Italian. The Jew in his chutzpah says, "Look at my ugly painting, it's better than Leonardo." The Italian in his bravado says, "You think I'm ugly? Go ahead, punch me, just try it."

    "They say if you can make it in New York you can make it anywhere. But if you can make it anywhere, why would you live in New York?" Ed. Abbey.

    Replies: @Known Fact

  50. Still waiting to see the emails between Dick Durbin and James Hodgkinson.

  51. @Ed
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    The only thing I attended on your list while living in NYC were the museums. There’s some acknowledgement on Wall Street that socializing younger workers at the office is a good thing so there will still be demand for office space. It’s just going to be less of it.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @bomag, @Charon

    Did you never once go to a concert or nightclub, or dine out in a fine restaurant? And never a single play or musical? That’s kind of mind-blowing. Did you at least have a pretzel on the street in wintertime?

    • Replies: @Ed
    @Charon

    I went to a couple plays but just to see actor friends in off-off Broadway (he said Broadway, never went to a show there). Of course I ate at restaurants but not highly rated ones. I was not making that kind of money at the time.

  52. @Dan Hayes
    @The Alarmist

    My late father worked in the NYC subway track department. One of his tasks was to remove the dismembered bodies of train suicides. When possible, he tore up the suicide’s note. Why did he do this? He wanted to save the suicide’s family the trauma of learning it was suicide and not platform slippage.

    Replies: @Charon

    Seems like there would be some implications with respect to liability. Even disregarding that, I think he was wrong to interfere with someone’s dying wishes.

    Unless of course it’s RBG.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @Charon

    Liability would not be an issue as it was before the age of unfettered ambulance chaser lawyers!

  53. How many of these law-defeating thugs-of-opportunity are not blacks with prior records? How many would be able to terrorize the public if New York City recognized the Constitution and ordinary New Yorkers could carry a pistol?

    • Agree: donut, Achmed E. Newman
  54. Anonymous[369] • Disclaimer says:
    @Wilkey
    @Bill Jones


    “There was nothing else I could have done to protect myself,” Mr. Weisman, 33, said on Friday. “I am shaken by this.”
     
    Bullshit. He could have voted for Republicans, which I highly doubt he did, instead of for the party that was trying to incite a race war. Not many people more reliably liberal than state actors.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Alden

    “There was nothing else I could have done to protect myself,” Mr. Weisman, 33, said on Friday. “I am shaken by this.”

    Bullshit. He could have voted for Republicans, which I highly doubt he did, instead of for the party that was trying to incite a race war. Not many people more reliably liberal than state actors.

    Yeah, maybe in a second GOP term Trump can ramp up the felon release program. And if the GOP keeps the Senate we will see Josh Hawley proposing a Senate hearing into crime like he proposed for Big Tech’s monopoly and war against conservative/dissenting speech in… late 2020.

    I only vote for the GOP because it’s a choice between the stupid and gutless (other than Trump) party and the demonic party.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @tyrone
    @Anonymous

    "gutless (other than Trump) party and the demonic party." and now we know it's all a sham…..welcome to Venezuela.

  55. @Ed
    Honestly I’m too depressed over the election to care about things like crime in major cities anymore. Maybe in a few weeks or months.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Oh no worries, all indications are that, per the new government, it’ll be ready when you are, and even harder to ignore. We’re going to a civil war or a failed state situation not out of fervent ideological opposition but because it’s uncomplicatedly the Democrat plan.

  56. @Anon
    In Japan you have people jumping onto tracks of their own accord. For the subways in Tokyo at least they installed barriers with doors or gates that open parallel with the train doors. Now you have to ride a surface train out to the suburbs to kill yourself.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Dieter Kief, @J.Ross, @prosa123

    Japanese suicides are a cliche but they’re way up as a result of the unjustified lockdown.

  57. Years ago, a friend of mine worked for the NYC Medical Examiner (coroner).

    He told me that they could determine whether a subway death had been a suicide or a murder. Something about the position of the victim at the moment of impact with the train.

    He also warned against walking around Central Park, after dark, on a Saturday night. He called it ‘asking to be killed’.

  58. @R.G. Camara
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson’s movie wife were white guys from before
     
    Not only where they white, one of them was played by a young Jeff Goldblum.

    From what I gather from the maps/posters at the Subway sandwich shop, this one is by far the oldest in the US, at 116 years since opening
     
    Boston's is technically older, but NYC's is far more extensive and useful. Boston's is basically streetcars on 4 different routes that sometime go underground and usually block traffic.

    Replies: @BostonJoe, @Alfa158

    Boston’s is older.

    “Boston’s is basically streetcars…”

    Red Line: Heavy rail. Dedicated right of way, no grade crossings. Underground between Andrew and MGH, then underground again Kendall/MIT to Alewife.

    Orange Line: Heavy rail. Dedicated right of way, no grade crossings. Underground through downtown.

    Blue Line: Heavy rail, dedicated right of way, no grade crossings. Underground from Airport to Government Center, traveling under Boston Harbor as part of that trip.

    Green Line, the oldest portion of the MBTA system:

    4 branches, B, C, D and E (there used to be an A, but was eliminated in the 60s). Light rail aka ‘street cars’.

    Underground and dedicated right of way for lines B, C and D to Kenmore (Fenway Park). E is underground to Symphony, above ground at Northeastern.

    Basically all of central Boston is underground.

    Only branches B, C and E are above ground and share the street with traffic for part of their run, west of town.

    C and E are are semi-dedicated rights of way. They don’t do a lot of traffic blocking. (E does a bit west of Brigham Circle to Arborway).

    D runs west to Newton, dedicated right of way, no grade crossings (Steve: through a golf course—-I have played there a bunch of times).

    B may be your culprit.

    Boston would collapse, absent the MBTA: too many folks in a small area.

  59. Anonymous[254] • Disclaimer says:

    I would imagine that no single type of crime is more damaging to the question of whether people are going to move back to New York City

    Do you want people to move back to New York City, Steve? Is the existence of New York City, as the thing that it is, good for the country?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Anonymous

    This has actually been discussed here previously: tldr, cities are inherently useful, hence efforts at ethnic cleansing and reclamation.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  60. @Achmed E. Newman
    @R.G. Camara

    I watched 4* of the Death Wish movies in a row one time, long after they were made. I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson's movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me. That movie was from 1974. Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?

    To Steve, yeah, that being pushed onto the subway tracks thing is probably a big mostly NYC-people nightmare. From what I gather from the maps/posters at the Subway sandwich shop, this one is by far the oldest in the US, at 116 years since opening! The Chicago ones look pretty ancient, but aren't nearly, and the L-train just doesn't have that same aura (I know some is underground.) The rest of the ones in the US look to be more modern than these two.

    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.

    .

    * I didn't know there were 5 till now.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Harry Baldwin, @R.G. Camara, @Anonymouse, @Pericles, @peterike, @Hibernian, @Trinity, @YetAnotherAnon, @restless94110

    It’s happened in Chicago, on the small portion of out system that is underground, possibly also on the “L” (for elevated.)

  61. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Obviously NYC is taking a colossal hit, but how many suburbs and exurbs have anything to compete with Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, countless world-class museums, Broadway extravaganzas, gallery openings and other A-list parties, and not least: Michelin-starred restaurants?

    And as people come trickling back, the nexus of super-achievers again forms and builds on itself. Talent likes to be around talent.

    New York can (and probably will) fall a fair distance, but unlike most places it has a long way to fall.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Ed, @Technite78, @Anon, @Chris Mallory, @Colin Wright, @Alden, @Morton's toes, @Mycale, @Icy Blast

    Meh, I will taking being able to target shoot in my backyard over anything on that list or the whole list combined.
    You couldn’t pay me to live in that giant cesspit.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
  62. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I fear this is a long term trend. 2nd and 3rd tier cities in the US became filthy, dangerous hellholes years ago. The only reason NYC stayed relatively safe and clean was because so many of the Masters of the Universe lived in Manhattan. Now that they have found it’s just as nice in the tony parts of Long Island, CT and NJ, as a result of the COVID Exodus, there’s nothing to stop the collapse of the tax base and then the city.

    I guess the model is San Francisco, since both and NYC are pretty geographically compact cities (as opposed to places like LA or Houston where the Beautiful People can separate themselves by living far from the scum.) Are there still a lot of wealthy people that live in SF proper? How do they isolate themselves from the homeless, crazy and criminals?

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Anonymouse, @HallParvey, @Buffalo Joe, @William Badwhite

    Now that they have found it’s just as nice in the tony parts of Long Island, CT and NJ, as a result of the COVID Exodus, there’s nothing to stop the collapse of the tax base and then the city.

    The Covid Crisis may have long term consequences that are in every way an improvement over the way things have been. For example, if you can study at home, why do you need all those schools with all those government approved textbooks. Eliminating the materials and subjects that are less than worthless can only be an improvement. The need for certifications can be achieved by government administered tests. Just as they are today.

    Perhaps home economics can be resurrected. Something useful like cooking for the family might be a subject. Perhaps how to change a faucet washer. You know, something useful, productive.

    There just may be much silver lining behind the dark cloud of Covid Crisis.

  63. @Achmed E. Newman
    @R.G. Camara

    I watched 4* of the Death Wish movies in a row one time, long after they were made. I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson's movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me. That movie was from 1974. Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?

    To Steve, yeah, that being pushed onto the subway tracks thing is probably a big mostly NYC-people nightmare. From what I gather from the maps/posters at the Subway sandwich shop, this one is by far the oldest in the US, at 116 years since opening! The Chicago ones look pretty ancient, but aren't nearly, and the L-train just doesn't have that same aura (I know some is underground.) The rest of the ones in the US look to be more modern than these two.

    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.

    .

    * I didn't know there were 5 till now.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Harry Baldwin, @R.G. Camara, @Anonymouse, @Pericles, @peterike, @Hibernian, @Trinity, @YetAnotherAnon, @restless94110

    I just watched a movie that was made in 1967 the other night about a couple of thugs harassing passengers on a subway. The movie was titled, “The Incident” and the two thugs were played by Tony Musante and a young Martin Sheen. I have no idea why the movie was in black & white given it was made in 1967. A young Beau Bridges and a younger Ed McMahon also had roles in this movie. Never even heard of this flick but it was watchable at least, certainly better than the crapola today. They even had the two thugs harassing a negro couple. haha. I was only 6 years old in 1967, but my guess is that the odds of two White thugs harassing a NYC Black couple on the train was about as rare as a cotton patch in Harlem. Bridges plays the hero, he is cast as an Okie farm boy riding the train with an Army buddy from NYC. The thugs harass everyone from a gay guy, a Black couple where the N-bomb is dropped, a history teacher and his wife, a boyfriend and girlfriend, even McMahon and his wife and kid.

    The only times that I ever encountered any trouble while stationed in NYC was at South Ferry while grabbing a slice of pizza before jumping on the number 1 train, an “incident” near the Brooklyn Navy yards where a group of Blacks gave me and my friends a hassle, and verbal threats again by a group of Blacks in Staten Island waiting on a bus. Damn Black guy at the South Ferry pizza joint wanted me to buy him a slice of pizza. haha. IF he would have asked in the right way, I would have been more than happy to accommodate his order.

    Someone mentioned the first Death Wish movie and the “white thugs” who killed Paul Kersey’s wife. Mr. Kersey was also harassed by a couple of white thugs on the train. haha. It showed a Black couple being intimidated to the point of leaving the train before trouble arrived. LMAO at that one. I always think of Bruce Springsteen and Frank Zappa when I see that scene, for some reason the “white thugs” remind me of those two guys. hehe.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Trinity

    "The movie was titled, “The Incident” and the two thugs were played by Tony Musante and a young Martin Sheen. I have no idea why the movie was in black & white given it was made in 1967. A young Beau Bridges and a younger Ed McMahon also had roles in this movie. Never even heard of this flick but it was watchable at least, certainly better than the crapola today."

    Sounds wonderful. Always nice to see lots of "faces" in bit or small parts, like all the Irish actors Boorman rounded up for Excalibur (Liam Neeson! Patrick Stewart! etc.). Hard to imagine any film today that would provoke such a reaction in 30 years.

    Did "young Martin Sheen" ever do anything not worth seeing? He's the mark of quality in any unknown film. WTF happened to his kid?

    Replies: @Trinity, @black sea, @Alden

    , @anon
    @Trinity

    I just watched a movie that was made in 1967 the other night about a couple of thugs harassing passengers on a subway. The movie was titled, “The Incident” and the two thugs were played by Tony Musante and a young Martin Sheen.

    Looks like a "slice of life" movie.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Incident_(1967_film)

    I have no idea why the movie was in black & white given it was made in 1967.

    Artistic decision, according to Wikipedia.


    Hirschfeld said in an interview that he filmed in black and white in order to get "the most realistic style of photography possible"; test shots were taken in muted color but they were deemed a distraction from the desired "somber" effect.
     
    Turning to the OP, here's more info from the Newspaper of Record:

    https://nypost.com/2020/11/20/police-union-boss-mta-riders-on-their-own-amid-violence-uptick/


    PBA President Pat Lynch accused lawmakers of preventing cops from doing their jobs and advised straphangers to “keep both eyes wide open” to avoid being victimized.
     

    “The politicians have made it abundantly clear that they don’t want cops enforcing transit system rules, connecting the homeless with services, engaging with seriously mentally ill people or doing any of the things necessary to prevent these terrifying random attacks,” he said.
    ‘ “That is their choice to make, but who is replacing us in those roles? Right now, nobody.”
     
    Perhaps DeMayoro is planning to send social workers down into the MTA to do that job soon. Yeah, real soon, sure.

    Lynch added: “While our elected leaders are closing their eyes and wishing the problem away, we recommend that all New Yorkers keep both eyes wide open while in our transit system.”
     
    Seems obvious enough.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Anonymous

  64. @peterike
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?
     
    Blacks were definitely committing the majority of crimes. Puerto Ricans were doing a lot as well (remember West Side Story: Puerto Ricans flooded NYC long before the Mexican wave made "hispanics" a thing). But there was also a component of white crime. In 1974 there was still such a thing as a tough white neighborhood. And while it wasn't as dangerous as walking through a black neighborhood, it was still pretty scary and you'd get looks that told you in no uncertain terms to keep walking and mind your business.

    Replies: @Corn

    In 1974 there was still such a thing as a tough white neighborhood. And while it wasn’t as dangerous as walking through a black neighborhood, it was still pretty scary and you’d get looks that told you in no uncertain terms to keep walking and mind your business.

    Saturday Night Live had a sketch on in the early 90s called “The Bensonhurst Dating Game”, set in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn.

    Judging by it, as late as the early 90s there were still neighborhoods in NYC where if you weren’t Irish or Italian, God help you.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Corn

    The notorious Howard Beach incident -- practically NYC's Emmett Till atrocity according to the media -- happened in south Queens in 1986. White yutes there figured three black guys were up to no good and chased them out of the largely Italian nabe until one got flattened running across the highway. Three of the white teens were convicted of manslaughter.

    Howard Beach isn't beachy at all by the way, a quiet working class low-rise backwater way down near Kennedy and Aqueduct.

  65. Though it’s generally explained away as being the actions of mentally ill people the majority of the perps are black or semi-black. So even their sick are hyper-violent. Quality of life anywhere in the US is largely determined by the proximity of a black population, sane or insane.

    • Agree: donut, anonymous1963
    • Replies: @anonymous1963
    @anonymous

    Make that anywhere in the world.

  66. @R.G. Camara
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson’s movie wife were white guys from before
     
    Not only where they white, one of them was played by a young Jeff Goldblum.

    From what I gather from the maps/posters at the Subway sandwich shop, this one is by far the oldest in the US, at 116 years since opening
     
    Boston's is technically older, but NYC's is far more extensive and useful. Boston's is basically streetcars on 4 different routes that sometime go underground and usually block traffic.

    Replies: @BostonJoe, @Alfa158

    The actors selected to play the men who attacked the wife and daughter seemed to have been selected to look vaguely White/Puerto Rican.
    In the original novel Bronson’s character was a Jewish CPA named Paul Benjamin. The movie producers changed the ethnicity of the criminals and victims to make the story initially less inflammatory, but didn’t stick to it, as the movie developed Kersey started shooting black muggers.

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Alfa158

    Rumor has it that Michael (tribes-)Mann changed the names of both "Lektor" and "Dollarhyde" in Manhunter, his version of Red Dragon, because the spelling of Lechter and Dolarhyde looked too Jewish. (You can see Lektor's name in a headline, and the Tooth Fairy's name on his drivers licence record).

    Ironically, he had to change the film's title as well because Dino De Laurentis had produced Mickey Rourke/Michael Cimino's Year of the Dragon which bombed; "no more dragon films!"

    Actually, YotD bombed because of the Heaven's Gate fall out (the movie by Cimino, not the cult) and because it was incredibly based. The script could have been written by Unz's Paul Kersey (or the Bronson one).

  67. Is iSteve familiar with NYC bail reform?

  68. @Achmed E. Newman
    @R.G. Camara

    I watched 4* of the Death Wish movies in a row one time, long after they were made. I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson's movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me. That movie was from 1974. Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?

    To Steve, yeah, that being pushed onto the subway tracks thing is probably a big mostly NYC-people nightmare. From what I gather from the maps/posters at the Subway sandwich shop, this one is by far the oldest in the US, at 116 years since opening! The Chicago ones look pretty ancient, but aren't nearly, and the L-train just doesn't have that same aura (I know some is underground.) The rest of the ones in the US look to be more modern than these two.

    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.

    .

    * I didn't know there were 5 till now.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Harry Baldwin, @R.G. Camara, @Anonymouse, @Pericles, @peterike, @Hibernian, @Trinity, @YetAnotherAnon, @restless94110

    “I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson’s movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me”

    Has there ever been a gang rape or murder revenge movie where the perps were black? Can’t think of one. On the other hand, Hollywood loves them a white gang – look at Straw Dogs, Deliverance (both ‘hillbilly’ type perps) or the umpteen Manson spinoffs.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Manson#Fiction_inspired_by_Manson

    In the UK a lot of TV crime fiction is set in basically crime-free white places – not just the Miss Marple/Midsomer Murders stuff but crime set in Shetland, Iceland, academic Oxford.

    No one is looking to make a story out of this case, from the press coverage of which I learned that if you really want to scald someone, you put sugar in the water before you boil it, which both raises the boiling temperature of the water and makes it stick better to a victim’s skin.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Mary-Ann_Leneghan

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @YetAnotherAnon


    In the UK a lot of TV crime fiction is set in basically crime-free white places – not just the Miss Marple/Midsomer Murders stuff but crime set in Shetland, Iceland, academic Oxford.
     
    Midsomer Murders introduced some non-white characters in 2012, after pressure from the usual suspects. There you had a series with a grisly murder every week in the bucolic environment of Midsomer County. You'd think the woke crowd would have loved this series with an all-white Arcadia that's as dangerous as the South Side of Chicago. But there's no pleasing some people. Needless to say, their non-whites won't be carrying out beheadings or acid attacks. The first to be introduced was an Asian pathologist.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @AnotherDad, @MBlanc46

  69. New York subway is far too cheap, the London Underground is much more expensive so you get a better service and you also keep the undesirables away.

    • Replies: @peterike
    @LondonBob


    New York subway is far too cheap, the London Underground is much more expensive so you get a better service and you also keep the undesirables away.
     
    The flaw in your thinking is assuming the undesirables pay to enter the NY system. They don't. They saunter in without paying, and without the slightest concern that anything will happen to them if they are caught. Cops generally just look the other way now at fare beaters. Arresting them used to be a priority, back when the city wasn't run by an abject imbecile.

    Replies: @LondonBob

  70. That’s pretty much the worst New York terror.

    The rape, or attempted rape, of a female subway rider which was filmed by other subway patrons would also have to be a contender for the worst New York terror. It was right out there on the platform, without even an attempt at concealment.

    I realize that we live in an atomized society, but in a saner world someone who did something like that would have worse things to fear than the cops.

  71. Anyone remember the classic movie, “The Warriors” from 1979? The part of the movie that I always found hilarious was at the beginning where some gang was buying tokens for the train. haha. One guy was putting tokens in for each gang member as they went through the turnstile. LMAO. How bad must that gang have been that they made sure each gang member paid like everyone else before boarding the train to go to the Bronx to listen to “Cyrus” preach. “Can you dig it.” That was some cool music playing at the intro to this movie, though.

    • Replies: @Single malt
    @Trinity

    Love that movie. Hilarious bits of dialogue...”The chicks are packed! The chicks are packed!”

    Replies: @Trinity

  72. In 15 years of mystery shopping NYC I calmly rode every inch of the system except for Staten Island; the bonus money was often way down in south Brooklyn or the far West Side. True it was during Giuliani/Bloomberg — much improved from the 80s — and mostly mornings. But COVID aside I sure wouldn’t do it now, so there probably are plenty of others who would hesitate to come back to the city or just spend the day. The parks also became much safer and now I would no longer press my luck

    The frightening thing about a nut on your platform or God forbid your subway car is that there is no way to get away, especially if it’s crowded. You need situational awareness to spot problems from afar before you commit to a spot.

  73. @TheBoom
    Very few people who ride the subway are against crazy people attacking subway riders because they have committed the sin of whiteness. Consequently there is no reason for the rest of us to be concerned about subway riders being attacked. It is actually much better for current subway riders to be attacked rather than future ones who had nothing to do with modern wokeness.

    Of course it would be more appropriate for limousine riders to be attacked but one can't have everything

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

    Indeed. Everyone in NYC is a shitlib, until they get thrown on the subway tracks.

  74. Circa 1980 I visited family back in NYC with a small-town girlfriend. Sure enough her very first day in the Big Apple a ranting black nutjob picked her out of the midtown crowd on 6th Ave. and got right in her face.

    She was one of these sassy southern types so after a momentary flicker of shock she stood her ground and started yelling right back. He was so short they were going at it face-to-face before I could wedge her away, and it would have been comical if not so risky. If this had been a subway platform they might both have ended up on the tracks.

  75. @The Alarmist
    @Ed

    I did everything on his list ... it was all part of business, not only pleasure, but he omitted Scores and Stringfellows.

    The reason The Street will keep offices is that it is essential that the young skulls full of mush be steeped in the appropriate mixture of pressure and partying to condition them for a life of sociopathically screwing people out of money.

    A young person on The Street must decide early on if they are a "Beer and Girls" partier, or a "Hookers and Blow" partier? Your bedroom or livingroom cum office is no environment for that sort of personal development.

    h/t Tucker Max

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    “The reason The Street will keep offices is that it is essential that the young skulls full of mush be steeped in the appropriate mixture of pressure and partying to condition them for a life of sociopathically screwing people out of money.”

    See, American Psycho, the opening scene of which encapsulates just that. You don’t have to be a doctrinaire commie or SJW to regard our Banking Elite as sociopaths, and well-trained ones at that.

    However, just as the coof has knocked the props out from under restaurants, museums, etc., how long until the Wall St. Experience can be replicated via VR and AI? They goodbye Wall St. training grounds.

  76. @Anon
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    New York is an overwhelmingly ugly city. Sure some public insides spaces are upscale, like the Opera or the Saks store on 5th. Expensive restaurants have great decor, but food is often over hyped, with subpar service. Uncollected trash and 10 Warhols on a restaurant’s wall. Only in NY.

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    Lived there 30 mis-spent years. NYCers love the filth and ugliness. It’s part of their “we can take anything” mentality. In their fucked up heads, the more filth and ugliness, the more it proves how tough they are. That’s why nothing ever gets permanently fixed up; after Giuliani/Bloomie comes De Blasio, as winter follows summer.

    The tough/ugly thing must be some miscegenation of Jew/Italian. The Jew in his chutzpah says, “Look at my ugly painting, it’s better than Leonardo.” The Italian in his bravado says, “You think I’m ugly? Go ahead, punch me, just try it.”

    “They say if you can make it in New York you can make it anywhere. But if you can make it anywhere, why would you live in New York?” Ed. Abbey.

    • Thanks: Abe, anonymous1963
    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @James O'Meara


    The tough/ugly thing must be some miscegenation of Jew/Italian.
     
    I wouldn't give any landscaping prizes to NYC's Asians and Latinxos, either. True there are precious few neighborhoods or commercial streets you would stroll down for an aesthetic treat, but one thing the city does have is quite a few lovely parks and greenways of various sizes, often in surprising locations. I used these a lot, often planned my walking routes around them. But the question, as with the subways, is safety, and no longer would I push my luck there.
  77. @Corn
    @peterike


    In 1974 there was still such a thing as a tough white neighborhood. And while it wasn’t as dangerous as walking through a black neighborhood, it was still pretty scary and you’d get looks that told you in no uncertain terms to keep walking and mind your business.
     
    Saturday Night Live had a sketch on in the early 90s called “The Bensonhurst Dating Game”, set in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn.

    Judging by it, as late as the early 90s there were still neighborhoods in NYC where if you weren’t Irish or Italian, God help you.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    The notorious Howard Beach incident — practically NYC’s Emmett Till atrocity according to the media — happened in south Queens in 1986. White yutes there figured three black guys were up to no good and chased them out of the largely Italian nabe until one got flattened running across the highway. Three of the white teens were convicted of manslaughter.

    Howard Beach isn’t beachy at all by the way, a quiet working class low-rise backwater way down near Kennedy and Aqueduct.

  78. @Anonymouse
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    They don't. A quite prosperous friend of mine living in San Francisco wrote to me recently -

    There are a great many homeless people. If I walk three blocks in this very mixed neighborhood, I usually see at least two guys sleeping in driveways. Lots of those are non-English-speaking. Some non-governmental organizations issue them tents and sleeping bags. Lots of them have substance abuse and/or mental problems. Some of the latter wander down the streets shouting incomprehensibly, but they are obviously angry, Some of them break into garages and steal anything they think they can sell. They shit and piss between parked cars near their encampments. The city has started putting out porta-potties near the big encampments, and has established some areas where people can stay without being harassed—parking lots, mostly. They’ve also set up handwashing stations.

    The city has put a good deal of effort and a lot of money into trying to deal with the problem. They have been trying to get people off the streets by putting them into supportive housing, where all the different services needed by these people can be available—a great improvement on expecting them to be together enough to navigate around town and keep appointments. Many have been housed in hotels that have no guests, owing to the collapse of the tourist trade.

    Every time some people are gotten off the street, more show up. I have to assume that at least one of the causes is the increasing impoverishment of the lowest half of the population. Between the last recession, when a lot of people with very little capital lost what they’d put into buying homes, the job losses, the continuing lack of increases in wages for those who do have jobs, and now this new recession, during which the least well paid have had to choose between risking exposure in service jobs or having no income, there are lots of people (often the whole family) who are in bad shape. As for the ones with mental problems, if I were forced to live on the streets for two weeks, I’d have mental problems, too.

    Obviously, the widespread homeless encampments degrade the environment and make those of us who are lucky enough to be housed feel uncomfortable, unhappy, and sometimes threatened. I don’t know a solution to the problem, but letting it continue is not a solution. Many of the nonprofits that try to help the homeless say that they should have the right to live on the street, and that trying to end this situation is cruel. Me, I think letting people die on the streets is more cruel.

    The short answer is, yes, the situation is very bad, and I don’t know of any solution.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Charon, @Reg Cæsar, @Morton's toes

    They’ve also set up handwashing stations.

    Somehow I suspect skells aren’t really into hand washing.

  79. @Trinity
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I just watched a movie that was made in 1967 the other night about a couple of thugs harassing passengers on a subway. The movie was titled, "The Incident" and the two thugs were played by Tony Musante and a young Martin Sheen. I have no idea why the movie was in black & white given it was made in 1967. A young Beau Bridges and a younger Ed McMahon also had roles in this movie. Never even heard of this flick but it was watchable at least, certainly better than the crapola today. They even had the two thugs harassing a negro couple. haha. I was only 6 years old in 1967, but my guess is that the odds of two White thugs harassing a NYC Black couple on the train was about as rare as a cotton patch in Harlem. Bridges plays the hero, he is cast as an Okie farm boy riding the train with an Army buddy from NYC. The thugs harass everyone from a gay guy, a Black couple where the N-bomb is dropped, a history teacher and his wife, a boyfriend and girlfriend, even McMahon and his wife and kid.

    The only times that I ever encountered any trouble while stationed in NYC was at South Ferry while grabbing a slice of pizza before jumping on the number 1 train, an "incident" near the Brooklyn Navy yards where a group of Blacks gave me and my friends a hassle, and verbal threats again by a group of Blacks in Staten Island waiting on a bus. Damn Black guy at the South Ferry pizza joint wanted me to buy him a slice of pizza. haha. IF he would have asked in the right way, I would have been more than happy to accommodate his order.

    Someone mentioned the first Death Wish movie and the "white thugs" who killed Paul Kersey's wife. Mr. Kersey was also harassed by a couple of white thugs on the train. haha. It showed a Black couple being intimidated to the point of leaving the train before trouble arrived. LMAO at that one. I always think of Bruce Springsteen and Frank Zappa when I see that scene, for some reason the "white thugs" remind me of those two guys. hehe.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @anon

    “The movie was titled, “The Incident” and the two thugs were played by Tony Musante and a young Martin Sheen. I have no idea why the movie was in black & white given it was made in 1967. A young Beau Bridges and a younger Ed McMahon also had roles in this movie. Never even heard of this flick but it was watchable at least, certainly better than the crapola today.”

    Sounds wonderful. Always nice to see lots of “faces” in bit or small parts, like all the Irish actors Boorman rounded up for Excalibur (Liam Neeson! Patrick Stewart! etc.). Hard to imagine any film today that would provoke such a reaction in 30 years.

    Did “young Martin Sheen” ever do anything not worth seeing? He’s the mark of quality in any unknown film. WTF happened to his kid?

    • Replies: @Trinity
    @James O'Meara

    I liked the movie, "Badlands" which starred Martin Sheen, the movie was based loosely on the mass murderer, Charles Starkweather. I believe this one came out in the early 1970s. Movies nowadays are not even watchable IMO.

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    , @black sea
    @James O'Meara

    A great actor who in his younger days had a lot of anxieties about the quality of his performances. Funny how that works. The talented are more likely to doubt themselves, because they can recognize what truly remarkable work looks like. The hacks just keep plowing along, never doubting anything.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Known Fact

    , @Alden
    @James O'Meara

    Not trying to start a fight about Charlie’s acting talent; but I think he’s an excellent actor. Even in that silly thing with his brother. They were garbage men who discovered a dead body and kept it in their apartment for some reason.

  80. @Anon
    In Japan you have people jumping onto tracks of their own accord. For the subways in Tokyo at least they installed barriers with doors or gates that open parallel with the train doors. Now you have to ride a surface train out to the suburbs to kill yourself.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Dieter Kief, @J.Ross, @prosa123

    In Japan you have people jumping onto tracks of their own accord. For the subways in Tokyo at least they installed barriers with doors or gates that open parallel with the train doors.

    Platform doors. They exist in many places, even in New York on the JFK Airtrain. They work only if all the trains that operate on the line have exactly the same door alignments, which isn’t the case on the NYC subway.

    • Replies: @Yngvar
    @prosa123


    Platform doors. They work only if all the trains that operate on the line have exactly the same door alignments, which isn’t the case on the NYC subway.
     
    That 's just an engineering problem. Sliding sliding doors, maybe?
    , @Anon
    @prosa123

    This page from 2013 seems to say that the rolling stock in the New York Subway was set to be standarized in a way that would allow "edge doors" within ten years, i.e., 2023.

    http://secondavenuesagas.com/2013/01/29/a-few-solutions-for-improved-subway-platform-safety/

    It's New York, so I wouldn't be surprised if the money went walkabout and the cars are still nowhere near standardized.

    In Tokyo the project was spread out over a number of years, so if there are lines with standardized car doors it still seems like they could make a start on the projejct.

    Replies: @Known Fact

  81. @Anonymouse
    @Achmed E. Newman

    >To Steve, yeah, that being pushed onto the subway tracks thing is probably a big mostly NYC-people nightmare.

    I grew up in NYC in the 1949s and 1950s. There were very few blacks in NYC then except for Harlem.
    Subway boarding and exiting platforms are elevated so the full size of the train is not apparent. In the imagination of a child there is always a degree of fear when a subway train comes rushing into a station. My father worked for the Chesapeake & Ohio RR in New Jersey. One day he saw someone walk in front of a moving train. He was visibly quite shaken by the experience and said as much.

    Replies: @prosa123

    Subway boarding and exiting platforms are elevated so the full size of the train is not apparent. In the imagination of a child there is always a degree of fear when a subway train comes rushing into a station.

    In New York at least, the most common reason why people are struck by trains is that they accidentally drop things onto the tracks, cell phones in particular, climb down to retrieve the items, and then find that it’s a long, long way back up to the platform.

    • LOL: Alden
    • Replies: @Anonymouse
    @prosa123

    I was waiting at the Broad Channel stop of the A train. The tracks there are open to the sky. My Metro Pass, a laminated card for discount fares, dropped from my hand and fluttered on to the track. No train was visible down the tracks and I thought about whether I should jump down and retrieve the card. Luckily 2 or 3 townie youths were there on the platform and one of them jumped down and retrieved the card. I tipped him a few bucks. I was weighing the trouble between replacing the card in the Metro office in downtown Manhattan and getting squashed like a bug were a train to come out of nowhere. And the more I thought about it, the sooner a train would come. Are there learned studies of dithering? Even animals seem to have second thoughts about their actions.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Hamlet's Ghost

    , @Anon
    @prosa123


    In New York at least, the most common reason why people are struck by trains is that they accidentally drop things onto the tracks, cell phones in particular, climb down to retrieve the items, and then find that it’s a long, long way back up to the platform.
     
    In Tokyo I see staff with poles made to retrieve stuff helping out commuters from time to time. I guess you have to have enough staff on the platform for that.

    One thing that would make it harder to climb back up is that there are hollows under the final two or three feet of the platform track-side specifically to create a space to roll into if a train is coming. This means there is no place to plant your foot to climb out.
  82. @Anonymous
    "All blacks are schizophrenics".

    (From a private conversation with a clinical psychiatrist of many many years' experience).

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Charon, @Buck Ransom

    “All blacks are schizophrenics”.

    (From a private conversation with a clinical psychiatrist of many many years’ experience).

    How does the person define “schizophrenia”?

  83. @LondonBob
    New York subway is far too cheap, the London Underground is much more expensive so you get a better service and you also keep the undesirables away.

    Replies: @peterike

    New York subway is far too cheap, the London Underground is much more expensive so you get a better service and you also keep the undesirables away.

    The flaw in your thinking is assuming the undesirables pay to enter the NY system. They don’t. They saunter in without paying, and without the slightest concern that anything will happen to them if they are caught. Cops generally just look the other way now at fare beaters. Arresting them used to be a priority, back when the city wasn’t run by an abject imbecile.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @peterike

    Fare dodging is pretty much unheard of on the London Underground, although under eighteens travel for free anyway, however lockdown losses might see that policy ended to plug the huge financial shortfall.

  84. Get rid of the Sullivan Act of 1911, implement Constitutional Carry and you should quickly reach “Herd Immunity” on the subway platforms in NYC. And get rid of the surveillance cameras on the subway platforms so that the grifter lawyers can be shut down.

    “Your honor, my BLACK! client was offended by the female’s hair, setting him off to throw her onto the tracks. Clearly, the armed civilian good samaritan should have realized my client’s mental deficiencies and not pumped him full of Pb. NYC is responsible and needs to pay his family $2M in compensation. Thank you.”

    • Replies: @anon
    @Joe Stalin

    Get rid of the Sullivan Act of 1911, implement Constitutional Carry and you should quickly reach “Herd Immunity” on the subway platforms in NYC. </i

    It would be simpler and easier to just provide every person with a tame unicorn to ride.
    Then there's no need to use the subway at all.

  85. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Obviously NYC is taking a colossal hit, but how many suburbs and exurbs have anything to compete with Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, countless world-class museums, Broadway extravaganzas, gallery openings and other A-list parties, and not least: Michelin-starred restaurants?

    And as people come trickling back, the nexus of super-achievers again forms and builds on itself. Talent likes to be around talent.

    New York can (and probably will) fall a fair distance, but unlike most places it has a long way to fall.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Ed, @Technite78, @Anon, @Chris Mallory, @Colin Wright, @Alden, @Morton's toes, @Mycale, @Icy Blast

    ‘Obviously NYC is taking a colossal hit, but how many suburbs and exurbs have anything to compete with Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, countless world-class museums, Broadway extravaganzas, gallery openings and other A-list parties, and not least: Michelin-starred restaurants?’

    …except you can no longer go to any of these.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Colin Wright

    The museums are open, as are the restaurants though at limited capacity. Broadway and other forms of live entertainment are still closed, however.

  86. @Anonymous
    @Wilkey



    “There was nothing else I could have done to protect myself,” Mr. Weisman, 33, said on Friday. “I am shaken by this.”
     
    Bullshit. He could have voted for Republicans, which I highly doubt he did, instead of for the party that was trying to incite a race war. Not many people more reliably liberal than state actors.
     
    Yeah, maybe in a second GOP term Trump can ramp up the felon release program. And if the GOP keeps the Senate we will see Josh Hawley proposing a Senate hearing into crime like he proposed for Big Tech’s monopoly and war against conservative/dissenting speech in... late 2020.

    I only vote for the GOP because it’s a choice between the stupid and gutless (other than Trump) party and the demonic party.

    Replies: @tyrone

    “gutless (other than Trump) party and the demonic party.” and now we know it’s all a sham…..welcome to Venezuela.

  87. @R.G. Camara

    My point is that it appears that a sizable fraction of unprovoked (and non-larcenous) attacks on pedestrians in New York City are carried out by a small number of repeat offenders. Lock them up and you can put a dent into numbers.
     
    Exactly the situation that occurred with the Squeegee Men back in the day in NYC. They seemed to be everywhere in NYC and thus unstoppable, but Giuliani had them arrested and got the book thrown at them for jaywalking. And then it turned out there actually weren't that many of them, it was just the fact that they'd never been arrested before and had set patterns to maximize their profit, making them seem like a far larger horde.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squeegee_man#United_States

    Most serious or bothersome crime is committed by a small percentage of the population, but if you aren't diligent in rounding them up they can grow to haunt the public's mind as a much larger and therefore insurmountable problem.

    Replies: @El Dato, @AnotherDad, @Cato

    It must be said:

    The Democrats launched a summer of BLM/Antifa riots and street thuggery based on an open fraud. A direct attack upon the precious rule-of-law.

    And …
    NY County (Manhattan) — Biden 84%
    Bronx — Biden 82%
    Kings (Brooklyn) — Biden 74%
    Queens — Biden 69%
    only Richmond (Staten Island) had the good sense to vote for Trump (62%).

    Westchester (63%) and Nassau (54%) counties went for Biden as well.

    People who voted for Biden/Harris deserve being attacked, beaten, killed, particularly by blacks.

    We just had a referendum on rule-of-law and they voted against it.

    ~~

    We simply need separate nations. I value a whole host of traditional American things–Western Civilization, borders, republican government, rule-of-law, marriage, children, family, normal sexual complementarity, roles and relations, personal responsibility, self-reliance–that Democrats reject.

    Sane New Yorkers should move down to Florida. I have some neighbors, that–with a bit of help–i can ship north.

    Responsible sane people need to be to live their lives free of minoritarian looniness.

    • Agree: Ed, Technite78, MBlanc46
    • Replies: @Joseph Doaks
    @AnotherDad

    "Responsible sane people need to be to live their lives free of minoritarian looniness."

    That sounds like segregation --- could it be that George Wallace was right?

  88. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Obviously NYC is taking a colossal hit, but how many suburbs and exurbs have anything to compete with Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, countless world-class museums, Broadway extravaganzas, gallery openings and other A-list parties, and not least: Michelin-starred restaurants?

    And as people come trickling back, the nexus of super-achievers again forms and builds on itself. Talent likes to be around talent.

    New York can (and probably will) fall a fair distance, but unlike most places it has a long way to fall.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Ed, @Technite78, @Anon, @Chris Mallory, @Colin Wright, @Alden, @Morton's toes, @Mycale, @Icy Blast

    Suburban and even rural residents can always drive into the city or even spend a weekend to enjoy those things. Lots of big city hotels have weekend packages that include tickets to all those events. Closing all the restaurants for covid hoax is a problem. 6 ft social distancing means theaters and music venues have to operate at maybe 30% capacity which leads to bankruptcy.

    I think covid hoax lockdowns will do more to destroy our great cities than black crime. Most people believe it’s possible to avoid black crime. Uber instead of the subway. But when all the theaters, concert halls restaurants and clubs are closed and everyone works from home and shops online; cities have no reason to exist anymore.

    Maybe it’s really communist subversion. Elect enough Garcetti Lightfoot Deblasio mayors and their lockdowns can do in a year what Soviet subversion and Gramisci slow marches couldn’t do in 70 years.

  89. anon[336] • Disclaimer says:
    @Trinity
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I just watched a movie that was made in 1967 the other night about a couple of thugs harassing passengers on a subway. The movie was titled, "The Incident" and the two thugs were played by Tony Musante and a young Martin Sheen. I have no idea why the movie was in black & white given it was made in 1967. A young Beau Bridges and a younger Ed McMahon also had roles in this movie. Never even heard of this flick but it was watchable at least, certainly better than the crapola today. They even had the two thugs harassing a negro couple. haha. I was only 6 years old in 1967, but my guess is that the odds of two White thugs harassing a NYC Black couple on the train was about as rare as a cotton patch in Harlem. Bridges plays the hero, he is cast as an Okie farm boy riding the train with an Army buddy from NYC. The thugs harass everyone from a gay guy, a Black couple where the N-bomb is dropped, a history teacher and his wife, a boyfriend and girlfriend, even McMahon and his wife and kid.

    The only times that I ever encountered any trouble while stationed in NYC was at South Ferry while grabbing a slice of pizza before jumping on the number 1 train, an "incident" near the Brooklyn Navy yards where a group of Blacks gave me and my friends a hassle, and verbal threats again by a group of Blacks in Staten Island waiting on a bus. Damn Black guy at the South Ferry pizza joint wanted me to buy him a slice of pizza. haha. IF he would have asked in the right way, I would have been more than happy to accommodate his order.

    Someone mentioned the first Death Wish movie and the "white thugs" who killed Paul Kersey's wife. Mr. Kersey was also harassed by a couple of white thugs on the train. haha. It showed a Black couple being intimidated to the point of leaving the train before trouble arrived. LMAO at that one. I always think of Bruce Springsteen and Frank Zappa when I see that scene, for some reason the "white thugs" remind me of those two guys. hehe.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @anon

    I just watched a movie that was made in 1967 the other night about a couple of thugs harassing passengers on a subway. The movie was titled, “The Incident” and the two thugs were played by Tony Musante and a young Martin Sheen.

    Looks like a “slice of life” movie.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Incident_(1967_film)

    I have no idea why the movie was in black & white given it was made in 1967.

    Artistic decision, according to Wikipedia.

    Hirschfeld said in an interview that he filmed in black and white in order to get “the most realistic style of photography possible”; test shots were taken in muted color but they were deemed a distraction from the desired “somber” effect.

    Turning to the OP, here’s more info from the Newspaper of Record:

    https://nypost.com/2020/11/20/police-union-boss-mta-riders-on-their-own-amid-violence-uptick/

    PBA President Pat Lynch accused lawmakers of preventing cops from doing their jobs and advised straphangers to “keep both eyes wide open” to avoid being victimized.

    “The politicians have made it abundantly clear that they don’t want cops enforcing transit system rules, connecting the homeless with services, engaging with seriously mentally ill people or doing any of the things necessary to prevent these terrifying random attacks,” he said.
    ‘ “That is their choice to make, but who is replacing us in those roles? Right now, nobody.”

    Perhaps DeMayoro is planning to send social workers down into the MTA to do that job soon. Yeah, real soon, sure.

    Lynch added: “While our elected leaders are closing their eyes and wishing the problem away, we recommend that all New Yorkers keep both eyes wide open while in our transit system.”

    Seems obvious enough.

    • Thanks: Trinity
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @anon

    It's on YouTube.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aH24v-Q9r8Q

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    , @Anonymous
    @anon

    The material to shoot, develop, and duplicate color prints got mass-economical in the early '60s which coincided with the new artisanal market of "gritty" B&W films, e.g. "In Cold Blood" (1967)/"The Last Picture Show" (1971).

    In the middle of the decade there was still enough relative expense vs. consumer adoption that TV series might not get renewed because the network had decided to push color production. The early seasons of "Gilligan's Island," "Bewitched," and "I Dream of Jeannie" were all monochrome, if childhood memory of Nick At Night serves. In the '80s when Ted Turner colorized "Casablanca" for his channel I recall this being a medium-sized scandal among the adults in my life.

  90. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    My point is that it appears that a sizable fraction of unprovoked (and non-larcenous) attacks on pedestrians in New York City are carried out by a small number of repeat offenders.
     
    Small number? Move to NYC and try it out. A tiny, tiny fraction of assaults ever make the news. Most are B on W of course and hardly any are even reported. Try it out.

    Meanwhile, don't miss Sabrina Belcher, the latest poster girl for the New America.

    Lame version: https://heavy.com/news/2020/08/sabrina-belcher/

    Rocking version: https://www.takimag.com/article/the-week-that-perished-114/

    Belcher livestreamed her kidnapping because of course she did, and police wondered why she was livestreaming an “unexpected” kidnapping, because of course they did.
     

    Replies: @Elmer T. Jones, @Dissident, @anonymous

    A tiny, tiny fraction of assaults ever make the news. Most are B on W of course and hardly any are even reported.

    Apropos, from Nicholas Stix, 2004:
    “Disappearing” Urban Crime [VDARE.com]
    Excerpts:

    Since 1991, I have fought off at least eight racial attacks, including two attempted muggings. All were “disappeared” by police or prosecutors—even when I had bloody wounds; when the police had been called to the scene by a subway motorman or (unbeknownst to me) an anonymous witness who corroborated my depiction of events; or when the attack took place on camera, in front of a black postal police officer.

    And the fudging of crime statistics is not just a story in the Naked City.

    Detectives engage in the wholesale “unfounding” of crimes i.e. determine that allegation were “unfounded.” And murders are reclassified as non-criminal deaths. But in most cases, crime is “disappeared” by the street officer who engages in “creative writing,” turning felonies into misdemeanors or non-crimes. (An additional crime statistic reduction strategy, “de-policing,” withdrawing police from embarrassing confrontation with criminals, is beyond the scope of this essay.)

    Also, from VDARE:
    [Unknown] On [Unknown] Crime–In DeBlasio’s New York, NYPD Won’t Say [James Fulford, 2015]

    • Replies: @David In TN
    @Dissident

    My friend Nicholas Stix has said shoving people onto the subway tracks by black criminals has gone on for decades.

    Every 10 years or so a MSM source will have a handwringing piece on the subject along the lines of, "We can't understand why this happens."

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @lavoisier

  91. @Alfa158
    @R.G. Camara

    The actors selected to play the men who attacked the wife and daughter seemed to have been selected to look vaguely White/Puerto Rican.
    In the original novel Bronson’s character was a Jewish CPA named Paul Benjamin. The movie producers changed the ethnicity of the criminals and victims to make the story initially less inflammatory, but didn’t stick to it, as the movie developed Kersey started shooting black muggers.

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    Rumor has it that Michael (tribes-)Mann changed the names of both “Lektor” and “Dollarhyde” in Manhunter, his version of Red Dragon, because the spelling of Lechter and Dolarhyde looked too Jewish. (You can see Lektor’s name in a headline, and the Tooth Fairy’s name on his drivers licence record).

    Ironically, he had to change the film’s title as well because Dino De Laurentis had produced Mickey Rourke/Michael Cimino’s Year of the Dragon which bombed; “no more dragon films!”

    Actually, YotD bombed because of the Heaven’s Gate fall out (the movie by Cimino, not the cult) and because it was incredibly based. The script could have been written by Unz’s Paul Kersey (or the Bronson one).

  92. @Dan Hayes
    @The Alarmist

    My late father worked in the NYC subway track department. One of his tasks was to remove the dismembered bodies of train suicides. When possible, he tore up the suicide’s note. Why did he do this? He wanted to save the suicide’s family the trauma of learning it was suicide and not platform slippage!

    Replies: @vinteuil

    When possible, he tore up the suicide’s note. Why did he do this? He wanted to save the suicide’s family the trauma of learning it was suicide…

    He did wrong to insert himself between a man and his family. He had no right.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @vinteuil

    I disagree. It was a corporal work of mercy!

    Replies: @JimmyG., @Hibernian

  93. @prosa123
    @Anonymouse

    Subway boarding and exiting platforms are elevated so the full size of the train is not apparent. In the imagination of a child there is always a degree of fear when a subway train comes rushing into a station.

    In New York at least, the most common reason why people are struck by trains is that they accidentally drop things onto the tracks, cell phones in particular, climb down to retrieve the items, and then find that it's a long, long way back up to the platform.

    Replies: @Anonymouse, @Anon

    I was waiting at the Broad Channel stop of the A train. The tracks there are open to the sky. My Metro Pass, a laminated card for discount fares, dropped from my hand and fluttered on to the track. No train was visible down the tracks and I thought about whether I should jump down and retrieve the card. Luckily 2 or 3 townie youths were there on the platform and one of them jumped down and retrieved the card. I tipped him a few bucks. I was weighing the trouble between replacing the card in the Metro office in downtown Manhattan and getting squashed like a bug were a train to come out of nowhere. And the more I thought about it, the sooner a train would come. Are there learned studies of dithering? Even animals seem to have second thoughts about their actions.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Anonymouse

    Some years back I dropped my iPod onto the tracks at a Long Island Rail Road station while boarding a train. I got off, waited for the train to leave, and climbed down onto the tracks (same platform height as on the subway) to retrieve it. Doing so probably wasn't legal but as it was a very lightly traveled station there was no one around to see. It was safe to do so because it was a single track line so there couldn't be another train for a while, it was a diesel line so no third rail, there was ample clear space on the other side of the platform, and in any event it was a short elevated platform so I could simply walk around the end of it in a few seconds.
    While I was able to climb back onto the platform it wasn't easy, and I could very well see how a less physically fit person - or any person who had been injured by a fall to the tracks - would be unable to do so.
    Why didn't I just walk around to the end of the platform? I wanted to see how hard it would be to climb back up.

    Replies: @Simon

    , @Hamlet's Ghost
    @Anonymouse

    It was covered in Buridan's ass. Long ago.

  94. @Technite78
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Just about all the places that 1%-ers in NYC like to spend their time are closed or severely restricted. And they're not opening anytime soon.

    There's an enormous exodus from NYC. I'm one of them. Along with a few hundred thousand others, I've moved my primary residence out of NYC (and additionally, out of NY state).

    Will there be people to fill the vacuum? Certainly. Will they be able to replace the hole in the tax base? Unlikely.

    Replies: @No jack london

    Did you bring your NYC voting habit to Georgia, North Carolina, Palm Beach or Broward Counties in FL?

    • Replies: @Technite78
    @No jack london

    No... I didn't move to any of those places.

    But I did bring my voting habit to the place I did move to... and my voting habit is to not vote for liberals, communists, progressives, or leftists of any kind.

  95. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson’s movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me"

    Has there ever been a gang rape or murder revenge movie where the perps were black? Can't think of one. On the other hand, Hollywood loves them a white gang - look at Straw Dogs, Deliverance (both 'hillbilly' type perps) or the umpteen Manson spinoffs.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Manson#Fiction_inspired_by_Manson

    In the UK a lot of TV crime fiction is set in basically crime-free white places - not just the Miss Marple/Midsomer Murders stuff but crime set in Shetland, Iceland, academic Oxford.

    No one is looking to make a story out of this case, from the press coverage of which I learned that if you really want to scald someone, you put sugar in the water before you boil it, which both raises the boiling temperature of the water and makes it stick better to a victim's skin.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Mary-Ann_Leneghan

    Replies: @Rob McX

    In the UK a lot of TV crime fiction is set in basically crime-free white places – not just the Miss Marple/Midsomer Murders stuff but crime set in Shetland, Iceland, academic Oxford.

    Midsomer Murders introduced some non-white characters in 2012, after pressure from the usual suspects. There you had a series with a grisly murder every week in the bucolic environment of Midsomer County. You’d think the woke crowd would have loved this series with an all-white Arcadia that’s as dangerous as the South Side of Chicago. But there’s no pleasing some people. Needless to say, their non-whites won’t be carrying out beheadings or acid attacks. The first to be introduced was an Asian pathologist.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Rob McX


    Midsomer Murders introduced some non-white characters in 2012, after pressure from the usual suspects.
     
    That's after the producer was sacked for being too honest about the show's appeal.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midsomer_Murders#Controversy

    In March 2011, the series' producer, Brian True-May, was suspended by All3Media after telling the TV listings magazine Radio Times that the programme did not have any non-white characters because the series was a "bastion of Englishness". When challenged about the term "Englishness" and whether that would exclude ethnic minorities, True-May responded: "Well, it should do, and maybe I'm not politically correct." He later went on to say that he wanted to make a programme "that appeals to a certain audience, which seems to succeed." True-May's comments were investigated by the production company.
     

    Replies: @Rob McX

    , @AnotherDad
    @Rob McX


    Midsomer Murders introduced some non-white characters in 2012, after pressure from the usual suspects. There you had a series with a grisly murder every week in the bucolic environment of Midsomer County.
     
    "A" grisly murder? As in one? Good luck with that. The whites in Midsomer county are as murderous as Somalis.

    You were lucky to get through an episode with only three killings. Having that Barnaby guy on the case was more or less pointless. While he'd always eventually figure it out, it was because eventually all the suspects but one was dead. Ok, he's the guy!

    Total nonsense. But the appeal--for a long time--was that it was pleasantly English. You could just watch this show about some fictional place in rural England and it was ... full of English people! Wasn't like everything else you see now where TPTB insist on jamming "diversity" in your face, even--or even especially--where it was completely historically inaccurate.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Reg Cæsar

    , @MBlanc46
    @Rob McX

    I’ve indicated to Mme B, Household Tsarina of All Things Televisual, that I am no longer interested. Plus the new Barnaby is much inferior to John Nettles.

  96. @Rob McX
    @YetAnotherAnon


    In the UK a lot of TV crime fiction is set in basically crime-free white places – not just the Miss Marple/Midsomer Murders stuff but crime set in Shetland, Iceland, academic Oxford.
     
    Midsomer Murders introduced some non-white characters in 2012, after pressure from the usual suspects. There you had a series with a grisly murder every week in the bucolic environment of Midsomer County. You'd think the woke crowd would have loved this series with an all-white Arcadia that's as dangerous as the South Side of Chicago. But there's no pleasing some people. Needless to say, their non-whites won't be carrying out beheadings or acid attacks. The first to be introduced was an Asian pathologist.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @AnotherDad, @MBlanc46

    Midsomer Murders introduced some non-white characters in 2012, after pressure from the usual suspects.

    That’s after the producer was sacked for being too honest about the show’s appeal.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midsomer_Murders#Controversy

    In March 2011, the series’ producer, Brian True-May, was suspended by All3Media after telling the TV listings magazine Radio Times that the programme did not have any non-white characters because the series was a “bastion of Englishness”. When challenged about the term “Englishness” and whether that would exclude ethnic minorities, True-May responded: “Well, it should do, and maybe I’m not politically correct.” He later went on to say that he wanted to make a programme “that appeals to a certain audience, which seems to succeed.” True-May’s comments were investigated by the production company.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @YetAnotherAnon

    I know. "Diversity" in broadcasting, as in everything else, means enforced uniformity. Non-whites everywhere, including dramas about mediaeval England.

  97. @Charon
    @Ed

    Did you never once go to a concert or nightclub, or dine out in a fine restaurant? And never a single play or musical? That's kind of mind-blowing. Did you at least have a pretzel on the street in wintertime?

    Replies: @Ed

    I went to a couple plays but just to see actor friends in off-off Broadway (he said Broadway, never went to a show there). Of course I ate at restaurants but not highly rated ones. I was not making that kind of money at the time.

  98. @James O'Meara
    @Trinity

    "The movie was titled, “The Incident” and the two thugs were played by Tony Musante and a young Martin Sheen. I have no idea why the movie was in black & white given it was made in 1967. A young Beau Bridges and a younger Ed McMahon also had roles in this movie. Never even heard of this flick but it was watchable at least, certainly better than the crapola today."

    Sounds wonderful. Always nice to see lots of "faces" in bit or small parts, like all the Irish actors Boorman rounded up for Excalibur (Liam Neeson! Patrick Stewart! etc.). Hard to imagine any film today that would provoke such a reaction in 30 years.

    Did "young Martin Sheen" ever do anything not worth seeing? He's the mark of quality in any unknown film. WTF happened to his kid?

    Replies: @Trinity, @black sea, @Alden

    I liked the movie, “Badlands” which starred Martin Sheen, the movie was based loosely on the mass murderer, Charles Starkweather. I believe this one came out in the early 1970s. Movies nowadays are not even watchable IMO.

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Trinity

    Badlands, Terence Mallick's first film, so it gets lots of attention, like a Criterion release. Great film. Boss Carl Orff score.

    More great but obscure Martin Sheen: Catholics from Brian Moore's novel, perhaps a TV movie? Sheen as a Doc Martin wearing paratrooper type hip future priest, sent to investigate a remote monastery where they still believe in God and other heresies. Sorta like The Wicker Man but with Catholics and the cop wins.

    Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane (1976): Sheen AND Jodie Foster! Quebec/French production.

    Replies: @Trinity, @Neoconned

  99. @Anonymouse
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    They don't. A quite prosperous friend of mine living in San Francisco wrote to me recently -

    There are a great many homeless people. If I walk three blocks in this very mixed neighborhood, I usually see at least two guys sleeping in driveways. Lots of those are non-English-speaking. Some non-governmental organizations issue them tents and sleeping bags. Lots of them have substance abuse and/or mental problems. Some of the latter wander down the streets shouting incomprehensibly, but they are obviously angry, Some of them break into garages and steal anything they think they can sell. They shit and piss between parked cars near their encampments. The city has started putting out porta-potties near the big encampments, and has established some areas where people can stay without being harassed—parking lots, mostly. They’ve also set up handwashing stations.

    The city has put a good deal of effort and a lot of money into trying to deal with the problem. They have been trying to get people off the streets by putting them into supportive housing, where all the different services needed by these people can be available—a great improvement on expecting them to be together enough to navigate around town and keep appointments. Many have been housed in hotels that have no guests, owing to the collapse of the tourist trade.

    Every time some people are gotten off the street, more show up. I have to assume that at least one of the causes is the increasing impoverishment of the lowest half of the population. Between the last recession, when a lot of people with very little capital lost what they’d put into buying homes, the job losses, the continuing lack of increases in wages for those who do have jobs, and now this new recession, during which the least well paid have had to choose between risking exposure in service jobs or having no income, there are lots of people (often the whole family) who are in bad shape. As for the ones with mental problems, if I were forced to live on the streets for two weeks, I’d have mental problems, too.

    Obviously, the widespread homeless encampments degrade the environment and make those of us who are lucky enough to be housed feel uncomfortable, unhappy, and sometimes threatened. I don’t know a solution to the problem, but letting it continue is not a solution. Many of the nonprofits that try to help the homeless say that they should have the right to live on the street, and that trying to end this situation is cruel. Me, I think letting people die on the streets is more cruel.

    The short answer is, yes, the situation is very bad, and I don’t know of any solution.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Charon, @Reg Cæsar, @Morton's toes

    One solution would be to stop importing more underclass by the millions. Instead we’re going to ramp it up now. Because otherwise white people are racist.

  100. @Anonymous
    "All blacks are schizophrenics".

    (From a private conversation with a clinical psychiatrist of many many years' experience).

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Charon, @Buck Ransom

    The guy was just rounding up. The actual figure is closer to 85%.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  101. @James O'Meara
    @Anon

    Lived there 30 mis-spent years. NYCers love the filth and ugliness. It's part of their "we can take anything" mentality. In their fucked up heads, the more filth and ugliness, the more it proves how tough they are. That's why nothing ever gets permanently fixed up; after Giuliani/Bloomie comes De Blasio, as winter follows summer.

    The tough/ugly thing must be some miscegenation of Jew/Italian. The Jew in his chutzpah says, "Look at my ugly painting, it's better than Leonardo." The Italian in his bravado says, "You think I'm ugly? Go ahead, punch me, just try it."

    "They say if you can make it in New York you can make it anywhere. But if you can make it anywhere, why would you live in New York?" Ed. Abbey.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    The tough/ugly thing must be some miscegenation of Jew/Italian.

    I wouldn’t give any landscaping prizes to NYC’s Asians and Latinxos, either. True there are precious few neighborhoods or commercial streets you would stroll down for an aesthetic treat, but one thing the city does have is quite a few lovely parks and greenways of various sizes, often in surprising locations. I used these a lot, often planned my walking routes around them. But the question, as with the subways, is safety, and no longer would I push my luck there.

  102. @No jack london
    @Technite78

    Did you bring your NYC voting habit to Georgia, North Carolina, Palm Beach or Broward Counties in FL?

    Replies: @Technite78

    No… I didn’t move to any of those places.

    But I did bring my voting habit to the place I did move to… and my voting habit is to not vote for liberals, communists, progressives, or leftists of any kind.

  103. @Dissident
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder


    A tiny, tiny fraction of assaults ever make the news. Most are B on W of course and hardly any are even reported.
     
    Apropos, from Nicholas Stix, 2004:
    “Disappearing” Urban Crime [VDARE.com]
    Excerpts:

    Since 1991, I have fought off at least eight racial attacks, including two attempted muggings. All were "disappeared" by police or prosecutors—even when I had bloody wounds; when the police had been called to the scene by a subway motorman or (unbeknownst to me) an anonymous witness who corroborated my depiction of events; or when the attack took place on camera, in front of a black postal police officer.
    ...
    And the fudging of crime statistics is not just a story in the Naked City.
    ...
    Detectives engage in the wholesale "unfounding" of crimes i.e. determine that allegation were "unfounded." And murders are reclassified as non-criminal deaths. But in most cases, crime is "disappeared" by the street officer who engages in "creative writing," turning felonies into misdemeanors or non-crimes. (An additional crime statistic reduction strategy, "de-policing," withdrawing police from embarrassing confrontation with criminals, is beyond the scope of this essay.)
     
    Also, from VDARE:
    [Unknown] On [Unknown] Crime–In DeBlasio’s New York, NYPD Won’t Say [James Fulford, 2015]

    Replies: @David In TN

    My friend Nicholas Stix has said shoving people onto the subway tracks by black criminals has gone on for decades.

    Every 10 years or so a MSM source will have a handwringing piece on the subject along the lines of, “We can’t understand why this happens.”

    • Agree: Nicholas Stix
    • Thanks: Dissident
    • Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @David In TN

    Mr. Stix is right, and they were highly publicized. The ones I'm thinking of right now occurred about 10-15-20 years ago, although surely some before that. There was one that made me always stand at the back of the platform till the train gets there. I read that article from NYT to my sister in Georgia the other day. Union Square is near me, and also got the beginnings or tail ends of some recent protests on either side. Mainly, I was marvelling at the woman who got under the tracks and survived. I think I could pull myself up the platform, it's not too high--and if I dropped something really important onto the tracks, I wouldn't hesitate to jump down, even though you're never supposed to.

    I haven't taken the subways since pandemic started, but they were already getting horrible well before that. Threats of beheading me once, single mothers taking up 5 seats for 3 people getting furious at somebody who wanted to sit in a crowded car, and throwing their junk food at them. Those were black, but I ran into a young super-butch lesbian a year or so ago, who started a fight with me, and we screamed at each other till I had to get off--she was Asian, surprisingly.

    I don't believe the Upper East Siders who left for their beach and country homes won't be back. That's just part of the way it works--the city part is the most important, with all the galas, openings, etc., although that social level does 'require' enough money to have something in the Hamptons at least.

    Once the vaccines start really working, I think the city will totally come back. There's just much more of all things cultural here. All right, I know about the NY vs. LA thing, going back to shit talk by Woody Allen and the rest, but I have made 13 trips to LA since 2001, and explored everything: The quality is as good at the Music Center, Disney Hall, and many great museums (not just both Gettys), and I'd stay a week usually just before Xmas. It was like a horizontal and wonderfully relaxing version of New York in some ways, and fabulous restaurants, to be sure, and all those much more beautiful beaches than we have. But the quantity is still not as great as it is in NYC by a long shot. There's a good, but small and young ballet company which I've seen once, and the LA Opera was very good--saw Robert Wilson's Parsifal there--it was fabulous, as good as the Met, and TeKanawa's last opera role Vanessa, plus some orchestra concerts under David Zinman, and The School for Scandal at Mark Taper Forum. All first-rate quality. LA gets Broadway shows, but doesn't have a big theater tradition like Broadway. Of course we don't have Hollywood, but that's pretty over-woke by now. LA Ballet is very minor compared to NYCB and ABT.

    Still, what LA does have is of such top quality, I could easily imagine living there, and have almost moved several times. I'm crazy about it, but one of the most quintessential things about LA life I never did was drive the freeways. I remained a New Yorker that way, and I could have easily rented a car if I'd wanted to. What I mean by that is that I really saw the LAMTA first-hand and it is perfectly gruesome, much meaner blacks, once I was in a Blue Line car coming back from Catalina/Long Beach, and it was full of Bloods or Crips.

    Buses are not nearly as horrible in NYC as LA, because everybody on the LA buses is poor, everybody else has a car. But the LA subway was adding more and more, and you could even get to Pasadena on the Purple Line, or whichever one it was. I took them all the time, they seemed a little more sinister than the NYC ones, and there is certainly no dearth of homeless in LAl, I was always seeing them, and once made a wrong turn and found myself lost in the DT Skid Row, and that was no fun.

    Some commenters said "New Yorkers love the filth", that's total bullshit. The richest area, the Upper East Side, is beautiful and tranquil. Those are City People, they won't want to stay out on Long Island when they feel 'courageous' enough to move back, and things are functioning. I live in a Whitopia that is the trendiest area right now with the celebs who can't get past the Park Avenue Brahmins, and this is all nice. Derelict parks like Jackson Square, Washington Square, and Union Square have all been renovated. I think Griffith Park is better than anything we have in terms of parks, though. Better than Central Park, but that's always getting dressed up too.

    The other boroughs are less clean, except for Brooklyn Heights, and Queens is middle-class. We'll just have to see. I don't see how there can be Broadway and Lincoln Center for a long time, though.

    As for the 'electric energy of New York', I think that began to dissipate by the mid-80s, and I have not thought there was any of the legendary excitement since about 1984. Insofar as people think it's still prestigious to live here, they'll keep coming, and I notice among millennials and Gen Z that they still think there's all this 'magic' about New York. I am comfortable here, but just because it's so convenient once you've worked your way all the way in. Broadway's been a bore for decades, but Lincoln Center has the best things.

    , @lavoisier
    @David In TN


    Every 10 years or so a MSM source will have a handwringing piece on the subject along the lines of, “We can’t understand why this happens.”
     
    Subway passenger shoved off platform by black criminal and dismembered by oncoming train is just a case of a passenger failing to board the train properly--"commute gone bad."
  104. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I fear this is a long term trend. 2nd and 3rd tier cities in the US became filthy, dangerous hellholes years ago. The only reason NYC stayed relatively safe and clean was because so many of the Masters of the Universe lived in Manhattan. Now that they have found it’s just as nice in the tony parts of Long Island, CT and NJ, as a result of the COVID Exodus, there’s nothing to stop the collapse of the tax base and then the city.

    I guess the model is San Francisco, since both and NYC are pretty geographically compact cities (as opposed to places like LA or Houston where the Beautiful People can separate themselves by living far from the scum.) Are there still a lot of wealthy people that live in SF proper? How do they isolate themselves from the homeless, crazy and criminals?

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Anonymouse, @HallParvey, @Buffalo Joe, @William Badwhite

    NJ, one of the founders of PayPal and a current San Francisco resident wrote an article, published by SF Gate, on why he is leaving SF. Truth is SF is a shithole that lost tens of millions of dollars in convention business because it is a dirty filthy place. Sf currently spends $600 million on their homelss problem.The whole bay area has a major homeless problem. They also have a uber leftist DA, chessa boudin. the son of convicted terrorist murderers who is very light on criminals, hence skyrocketing crime numbers..

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Buffalo Joe

    Boudin’s now lobbying for his weatherman father, David Gilbert to be either pardoned or paroled from his life sentence.

  105. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Rob McX


    Midsomer Murders introduced some non-white characters in 2012, after pressure from the usual suspects.
     
    That's after the producer was sacked for being too honest about the show's appeal.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midsomer_Murders#Controversy

    In March 2011, the series' producer, Brian True-May, was suspended by All3Media after telling the TV listings magazine Radio Times that the programme did not have any non-white characters because the series was a "bastion of Englishness". When challenged about the term "Englishness" and whether that would exclude ethnic minorities, True-May responded: "Well, it should do, and maybe I'm not politically correct." He later went on to say that he wanted to make a programme "that appeals to a certain audience, which seems to succeed." True-May's comments were investigated by the production company.
     

    Replies: @Rob McX

    I know. “Diversity” in broadcasting, as in everything else, means enforced uniformity. Non-whites everywhere, including dramas about mediaeval England.

  106. @James O'Meara
    @Trinity

    "The movie was titled, “The Incident” and the two thugs were played by Tony Musante and a young Martin Sheen. I have no idea why the movie was in black & white given it was made in 1967. A young Beau Bridges and a younger Ed McMahon also had roles in this movie. Never even heard of this flick but it was watchable at least, certainly better than the crapola today."

    Sounds wonderful. Always nice to see lots of "faces" in bit or small parts, like all the Irish actors Boorman rounded up for Excalibur (Liam Neeson! Patrick Stewart! etc.). Hard to imagine any film today that would provoke such a reaction in 30 years.

    Did "young Martin Sheen" ever do anything not worth seeing? He's the mark of quality in any unknown film. WTF happened to his kid?

    Replies: @Trinity, @black sea, @Alden

    A great actor who in his younger days had a lot of anxieties about the quality of his performances. Funny how that works. The talented are more likely to doubt themselves, because they can recognize what truly remarkable work looks like. The hacks just keep plowing along, never doubting anything.

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @black sea

    "Hi, You man think I'm Martin Sheen, but I'm his equally talented but strangely neglected brother Joe Estavez." (MST3k, Soultaker)

    Joe Estavez is Martin Sheen's brother, who kept the name (his son is Emilio Estavez, like Martin has Charlie), and apart from doing his brother's voiceover in Apocalypse Now, has had a fine career in straight to video horror movies (Soultaker, Werewolf, etc.). The special features on the MST3k DVD version show Joe to be a down to Earth guy who knows his limits (as John Wayne might say) and relishes making people happy with his work ("People say, 'Hey, Soultaker! Don't take my soooooul!'"). In turn, he seems to be a happy man.

    , @Known Fact
    @black sea

    If you're a big Martin Sheen fan, track these down...

    -- At age 23 Sheen powerfully played a mama's-boy space trooper the aliens capture and break in Nightmare, a standout Outer Limits episode that fans of the series argue about incessantly due to its bizarre style and controversial plot.

    -- With my Mannix retrospective just about done, To Kill a Memory is a clear top-10 entry, with Sheen as an amnesiac Viet vet helping pull off a complex jewel heist despite his addled state.

  107. My point is that it appears that a sizable fraction of unprovoked (and non-larcenous) attacks on pedestrians in New York City are carried out by a small number of repeat offenders. Lock them up and you can put a dent into numbers.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/nyc-the-1970s-are-back-without-the-good-movies/#comment-4084835

  108. @AnotherDad
    @R.G. Camara

    It must be said:

    The Democrats launched a summer of BLM/Antifa riots and street thuggery based on an open fraud. A direct attack upon the precious rule-of-law.

    And ...
    NY County (Manhattan) -- Biden 84%
    Bronx -- Biden 82%
    Kings (Brooklyn) -- Biden 74%
    Queens -- Biden 69%
    only Richmond (Staten Island) had the good sense to vote for Trump (62%).

    Westchester (63%) and Nassau (54%) counties went for Biden as well.

    People who voted for Biden/Harris deserve being attacked, beaten, killed, particularly by blacks.

    We just had a referendum on rule-of-law and they voted against it.

    ~~

    We simply need separate nations. I value a whole host of traditional American things--Western Civilization, borders, republican government, rule-of-law, marriage, children, family, normal sexual complementarity, roles and relations, personal responsibility, self-reliance--that Democrats reject.

    Sane New Yorkers should move down to Florida. I have some neighbors, that--with a bit of help--i can ship north.

    Responsible sane people need to be to live their lives free of minoritarian looniness.

    Replies: @Joseph Doaks

    “Responsible sane people need to be to live their lives free of minoritarian looniness.”

    That sounds like segregation — could it be that George Wallace was right?

  109. @Anonymouse
    @prosa123

    I was waiting at the Broad Channel stop of the A train. The tracks there are open to the sky. My Metro Pass, a laminated card for discount fares, dropped from my hand and fluttered on to the track. No train was visible down the tracks and I thought about whether I should jump down and retrieve the card. Luckily 2 or 3 townie youths were there on the platform and one of them jumped down and retrieved the card. I tipped him a few bucks. I was weighing the trouble between replacing the card in the Metro office in downtown Manhattan and getting squashed like a bug were a train to come out of nowhere. And the more I thought about it, the sooner a train would come. Are there learned studies of dithering? Even animals seem to have second thoughts about their actions.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Hamlet's Ghost

    Some years back I dropped my iPod onto the tracks at a Long Island Rail Road station while boarding a train. I got off, waited for the train to leave, and climbed down onto the tracks (same platform height as on the subway) to retrieve it. Doing so probably wasn’t legal but as it was a very lightly traveled station there was no one around to see. It was safe to do so because it was a single track line so there couldn’t be another train for a while, it was a diesel line so no third rail, there was ample clear space on the other side of the platform, and in any event it was a short elevated platform so I could simply walk around the end of it in a few seconds.
    While I was able to climb back onto the platform it wasn’t easy, and I could very well see how a less physically fit person – or any person who had been injured by a fall to the tracks – would be unable to do so.
    Why didn’t I just walk around to the end of the platform? I wanted to see how hard it would be to climb back up.

    • Replies: @Simon
    @prosa123

    I once saw a portly, decrepit-looking white or hispanic derelict crushed by a New York subway train at the West 96th Street express stop. I don't know what he was doing down on the tracks -- he looked, from a distance, maybe a bit drunk and dazed, so perhaps he'd fallen -- but he struggled awkwardly to hoist himself back onto the platform. As you noted, it's not an easy climb, and he was in no shape to attempt it. I don't recall, after all these years, whether anyone on the platform tried to help him; at any rate, he was still down there on the tracks when the train arrived. There was much horrified screaming from the crowd of onlookers. I was actually rather shocked by how little I felt; I think years of living in Manhattan have eroded any compassion I might once have had for derelicts.

  110. @Colin Wright
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    'Obviously NYC is taking a colossal hit, but how many suburbs and exurbs have anything to compete with Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, countless world-class museums, Broadway extravaganzas, gallery openings and other A-list parties, and not least: Michelin-starred restaurants?'

    ...except you can no longer go to any of these.

    Replies: @prosa123

    The museums are open, as are the restaurants though at limited capacity. Broadway and other forms of live entertainment are still closed, however.

  111. anon[140] • Disclaimer says:
    @Joe Stalin
    Get rid of the Sullivan Act of 1911, implement Constitutional Carry and you should quickly reach "Herd Immunity" on the subway platforms in NYC. And get rid of the surveillance cameras on the subway platforms so that the grifter lawyers can be shut down.

    "Your honor, my BLACK! client was offended by the female's hair, setting him off to throw her onto the tracks. Clearly, the armed civilian good samaritan should have realized my client's mental deficiencies and not pumped him full of Pb. NYC is responsible and needs to pay his family $2M in compensation. Thank you."

    Replies: @anon

    Get rid of the Sullivan Act of 1911, implement Constitutional Carry and you should quickly reach “Herd Immunity” on the subway platforms in NYC. </i

    It would be simpler and easier to just provide every person with a tame unicorn to ride.
    Then there's no need to use the subway at all.

  112. I predicted this in the tough on crime 90s. I noticed most everyone who spoke bad about criminals and wanted them locked up were older than me. Younger people would say there are too many people in prison. I also knew younger women who had boyfriends in prison, attractive appealing women who probably thought their jailbirds were “real men”. I remember telling people that in the future we would be soft on crime. One of my predictions was outlawing the death penalty which has happened in many states and rarely used in the others. Everything I said at the time sounded tin foil but it’s all happening right now.

    My long term prediction, which I still hold, is that the day will come when prisons are called cruel and unusual punishment, are all emptied out and closed permanently.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    @Jay Fink

    Clarence Darrow wanted prisons emptied and closed 100 years ago. Darrow didn't believe anybody was responsible for whatever evil acts they did.

    Replies: @Jay Fink, @James O'Meara

  113. I used to work downtown in a big city and I knew of two of these characters. They did it for years. One never approached me. One, who was a couple of inches shorter than me, jumped in front of me about six feet away with no weapons and demanded that I give him a dollar for food. I gave him a dirty look and walked around him and he never approached me again in the hundreds of times that I saw him after that. I saw these guys harass dozens of people over the years.

    GIVE ME A DOLLAR FOR FOOD!

    (Both of these men were/are negroes.)

    I wonder where they are now? It would actually be kind of funny if they were still doing it. For sure they were still doing it the day I moved away.

  114. While reading this I listened to my all time favorite anti-NY anthem. It’s early Fleetwood Mac when the late Bob Welch fronted the band. He expresses an utter disgust with the place.

  115. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Obviously NYC is taking a colossal hit, but how many suburbs and exurbs have anything to compete with Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, countless world-class museums, Broadway extravaganzas, gallery openings and other A-list parties, and not least: Michelin-starred restaurants?

    And as people come trickling back, the nexus of super-achievers again forms and builds on itself. Talent likes to be around talent.

    New York can (and probably will) fall a fair distance, but unlike most places it has a long way to fall.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Ed, @Technite78, @Anon, @Chris Mallory, @Colin Wright, @Alden, @Morton's toes, @Mycale, @Icy Blast

    When Epstein was arrested I looked at his Manhattan address on streetview. It is one block from the Metropolitan Art Museum in Central Park. That sidewalk is solid homeless people tent city on google street view. Or it was the day Epstein got arrested. Not the sidewalk in front of Epstein’s old apartment. The sidewalk in front of the museum.

  116. @David In TN
    @Dissident

    My friend Nicholas Stix has said shoving people onto the subway tracks by black criminals has gone on for decades.

    Every 10 years or so a MSM source will have a handwringing piece on the subject along the lines of, "We can't understand why this happens."

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @lavoisier

    Mr. Stix is right, and they were highly publicized. The ones I’m thinking of right now occurred about 10-15-20 years ago, although surely some before that. There was one that made me always stand at the back of the platform till the train gets there. I read that article from NYT to my sister in Georgia the other day. Union Square is near me, and also got the beginnings or tail ends of some recent protests on either side. Mainly, I was marvelling at the woman who got under the tracks and survived. I think I could pull myself up the platform, it’s not too high–and if I dropped something really important onto the tracks, I wouldn’t hesitate to jump down, even though you’re never supposed to.

    I haven’t taken the subways since pandemic started, but they were already getting horrible well before that. Threats of beheading me once, single mothers taking up 5 seats for 3 people getting furious at somebody who wanted to sit in a crowded car, and throwing their junk food at them. Those were black, but I ran into a young super-butch lesbian a year or so ago, who started a fight with me, and we screamed at each other till I had to get off–she was Asian, surprisingly.

    I don’t believe the Upper East Siders who left for their beach and country homes won’t be back. That’s just part of the way it works–the city part is the most important, with all the galas, openings, etc., although that social level does ‘require’ enough money to have something in the Hamptons at least.

    Once the vaccines start really working, I think the city will totally come back. There’s just much more of all things cultural here. All right, I know about the NY vs. LA thing, going back to shit talk by Woody Allen and the rest, but I have made 13 trips to LA since 2001, and explored everything: The quality is as good at the Music Center, Disney Hall, and many great museums (not just both Gettys), and I’d stay a week usually just before Xmas. It was like a horizontal and wonderfully relaxing version of New York in some ways, and fabulous restaurants, to be sure, and all those much more beautiful beaches than we have. But the quantity is still not as great as it is in NYC by a long shot. There’s a good, but small and young ballet company which I’ve seen once, and the LA Opera was very good–saw Robert Wilson’s Parsifal there–it was fabulous, as good as the Met, and TeKanawa’s last opera role Vanessa, plus some orchestra concerts under David Zinman, and The School for Scandal at Mark Taper Forum. All first-rate quality. LA gets Broadway shows, but doesn’t have a big theater tradition like Broadway. Of course we don’t have Hollywood, but that’s pretty over-woke by now. LA Ballet is very minor compared to NYCB and ABT.

    [MORE]

    Still, what LA does have is of such top quality, I could easily imagine living there, and have almost moved several times. I’m crazy about it, but one of the most quintessential things about LA life I never did was drive the freeways. I remained a New Yorker that way, and I could have easily rented a car if I’d wanted to. What I mean by that is that I really saw the LAMTA first-hand and it is perfectly gruesome, much meaner blacks, once I was in a Blue Line car coming back from Catalina/Long Beach, and it was full of Bloods or Crips.

    Buses are not nearly as horrible in NYC as LA, because everybody on the LA buses is poor, everybody else has a car. But the LA subway was adding more and more, and you could even get to Pasadena on the Purple Line, or whichever one it was. I took them all the time, they seemed a little more sinister than the NYC ones, and there is certainly no dearth of homeless in LAl, I was always seeing them, and once made a wrong turn and found myself lost in the DT Skid Row, and that was no fun.

    Some commenters said “New Yorkers love the filth”, that’s total bullshit. The richest area, the Upper East Side, is beautiful and tranquil. Those are City People, they won’t want to stay out on Long Island when they feel ‘courageous’ enough to move back, and things are functioning. I live in a Whitopia that is the trendiest area right now with the celebs who can’t get past the Park Avenue Brahmins, and this is all nice. Derelict parks like Jackson Square, Washington Square, and Union Square have all been renovated. I think Griffith Park is better than anything we have in terms of parks, though. Better than Central Park, but that’s always getting dressed up too.

    The other boroughs are less clean, except for Brooklyn Heights, and Queens is middle-class. We’ll just have to see. I don’t see how there can be Broadway and Lincoln Center for a long time, though.

    As for the ‘electric energy of New York’, I think that began to dissipate by the mid-80s, and I have not thought there was any of the legendary excitement since about 1984. Insofar as people think it’s still prestigious to live here, they’ll keep coming, and I notice among millennials and Gen Z that they still think there’s all this ‘magic’ about New York. I am comfortable here, but just because it’s so convenient once you’ve worked your way all the way in. Broadway’s been a bore for decades, but Lincoln Center has the best things.

  117. @Anonymouse
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    They don't. A quite prosperous friend of mine living in San Francisco wrote to me recently -

    There are a great many homeless people. If I walk three blocks in this very mixed neighborhood, I usually see at least two guys sleeping in driveways. Lots of those are non-English-speaking. Some non-governmental organizations issue them tents and sleeping bags. Lots of them have substance abuse and/or mental problems. Some of the latter wander down the streets shouting incomprehensibly, but they are obviously angry, Some of them break into garages and steal anything they think they can sell. They shit and piss between parked cars near their encampments. The city has started putting out porta-potties near the big encampments, and has established some areas where people can stay without being harassed—parking lots, mostly. They’ve also set up handwashing stations.

    The city has put a good deal of effort and a lot of money into trying to deal with the problem. They have been trying to get people off the streets by putting them into supportive housing, where all the different services needed by these people can be available—a great improvement on expecting them to be together enough to navigate around town and keep appointments. Many have been housed in hotels that have no guests, owing to the collapse of the tourist trade.

    Every time some people are gotten off the street, more show up. I have to assume that at least one of the causes is the increasing impoverishment of the lowest half of the population. Between the last recession, when a lot of people with very little capital lost what they’d put into buying homes, the job losses, the continuing lack of increases in wages for those who do have jobs, and now this new recession, during which the least well paid have had to choose between risking exposure in service jobs or having no income, there are lots of people (often the whole family) who are in bad shape. As for the ones with mental problems, if I were forced to live on the streets for two weeks, I’d have mental problems, too.

    Obviously, the widespread homeless encampments degrade the environment and make those of us who are lucky enough to be housed feel uncomfortable, unhappy, and sometimes threatened. I don’t know a solution to the problem, but letting it continue is not a solution. Many of the nonprofits that try to help the homeless say that they should have the right to live on the street, and that trying to end this situation is cruel. Me, I think letting people die on the streets is more cruel.

    The short answer is, yes, the situation is very bad, and I don’t know of any solution.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Charon, @Reg Cæsar, @Morton's toes

    They 🚽 and 🍆 between parked cars near their encampments.

    ⚠️: 💩– 🧻, 🛀!

    [MORE]

    • Thanks: Trinity
  118. @Anonymouse
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    They don't. A quite prosperous friend of mine living in San Francisco wrote to me recently -

    There are a great many homeless people. If I walk three blocks in this very mixed neighborhood, I usually see at least two guys sleeping in driveways. Lots of those are non-English-speaking. Some non-governmental organizations issue them tents and sleeping bags. Lots of them have substance abuse and/or mental problems. Some of the latter wander down the streets shouting incomprehensibly, but they are obviously angry, Some of them break into garages and steal anything they think they can sell. They shit and piss between parked cars near their encampments. The city has started putting out porta-potties near the big encampments, and has established some areas where people can stay without being harassed—parking lots, mostly. They’ve also set up handwashing stations.

    The city has put a good deal of effort and a lot of money into trying to deal with the problem. They have been trying to get people off the streets by putting them into supportive housing, where all the different services needed by these people can be available—a great improvement on expecting them to be together enough to navigate around town and keep appointments. Many have been housed in hotels that have no guests, owing to the collapse of the tourist trade.

    Every time some people are gotten off the street, more show up. I have to assume that at least one of the causes is the increasing impoverishment of the lowest half of the population. Between the last recession, when a lot of people with very little capital lost what they’d put into buying homes, the job losses, the continuing lack of increases in wages for those who do have jobs, and now this new recession, during which the least well paid have had to choose between risking exposure in service jobs or having no income, there are lots of people (often the whole family) who are in bad shape. As for the ones with mental problems, if I were forced to live on the streets for two weeks, I’d have mental problems, too.

    Obviously, the widespread homeless encampments degrade the environment and make those of us who are lucky enough to be housed feel uncomfortable, unhappy, and sometimes threatened. I don’t know a solution to the problem, but letting it continue is not a solution. Many of the nonprofits that try to help the homeless say that they should have the right to live on the street, and that trying to end this situation is cruel. Me, I think letting people die on the streets is more cruel.

    The short answer is, yes, the situation is very bad, and I don’t know of any solution.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Charon, @Reg Cæsar, @Morton's toes

    I don’t know of any solution.

    There is exactly one solution. Do not live in San Francisco. I live near San Francisco and I very rarely see a need to enter the city. The last time I was there I saw a person using a hypodermic needle on the sidewalk in the middle of the day. Hopefully it was insulin not heroin but I really don’t need to see that. I didn’t see much shit on the street-gutters-sidewalks.

    A long time ago I used to enjoy things like Giants games and concerts and stuff but those pleasures are not worth entering the shit hole that San Francisco has become.

  119. @Trinity
    Anyone remember the classic movie, "The Warriors" from 1979? The part of the movie that I always found hilarious was at the beginning where some gang was buying tokens for the train. haha. One guy was putting tokens in for each gang member as they went through the turnstile. LMAO. How bad must that gang have been that they made sure each gang member paid like everyone else before boarding the train to go to the Bronx to listen to "Cyrus" preach. "Can you dig it." That was some cool music playing at the intro to this movie, though.

    Replies: @Single malt

    Love that movie. Hilarious bits of dialogue…”The chicks are packed! The chicks are packed!”

    • Replies: @Trinity
    @Single malt

    Oh yes, The Lizzies. haha. That one "Warrior" must have been gay. The one that told Snow he "didn't feel like getting racked." haha. He was the one that was responsible for painting gang signs with spray paint. haha. If I remember right, the gay, spray paint gay wasn't diggin' The Lizzies. haha. Can't remember the spray paint guy's name? Was it Rembrandt? lolol.

  120. @vinteuil
    @Dan Hayes


    When possible, he tore up the suicide’s note. Why did he do this? He wanted to save the suicide’s family the trauma of learning it was suicide...
     
    He did wrong to insert himself between a man and his family. He had no right.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    I disagree. It was a corporal work of mercy!

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @JimmyG.
    @Dan Hayes

    I think your relative tearing up the suicide victims' suicide notes acted pretty outrageously.

    What right had he to interfere like that? The writers of those notes might have included special farewells for loved ones, or explanations about family mysteries, or who-knows-what.

    People's behaviour sometimes makes me SMH...

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    , @Hibernian
    @Dan Hayes

    Maybe even a spiritual one too.

  121. Anonymous[253] • Disclaimer says:

    Honestly Sailer, you can’t be this stupid. The black on white hostility, murder and mayhem is off the charts in both quantity and quality. Listen to One podcast by Colin Flaherty for God’s sake. Make One visit to Newnation.com. Make One attempt at facing reality.

    Honest question for the negrophiliacs-do you care at all about the victims of all of this unprovoked savagery? Elderly women being savaged in their own homes, children being executed in the streets…And they laugh and screech with joy while they do these things…

  122. @anon
    @Trinity

    I just watched a movie that was made in 1967 the other night about a couple of thugs harassing passengers on a subway. The movie was titled, “The Incident” and the two thugs were played by Tony Musante and a young Martin Sheen.

    Looks like a "slice of life" movie.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Incident_(1967_film)

    I have no idea why the movie was in black & white given it was made in 1967.

    Artistic decision, according to Wikipedia.


    Hirschfeld said in an interview that he filmed in black and white in order to get "the most realistic style of photography possible"; test shots were taken in muted color but they were deemed a distraction from the desired "somber" effect.
     
    Turning to the OP, here's more info from the Newspaper of Record:

    https://nypost.com/2020/11/20/police-union-boss-mta-riders-on-their-own-amid-violence-uptick/


    PBA President Pat Lynch accused lawmakers of preventing cops from doing their jobs and advised straphangers to “keep both eyes wide open” to avoid being victimized.
     

    “The politicians have made it abundantly clear that they don’t want cops enforcing transit system rules, connecting the homeless with services, engaging with seriously mentally ill people or doing any of the things necessary to prevent these terrifying random attacks,” he said.
    ‘ “That is their choice to make, but who is replacing us in those roles? Right now, nobody.”
     
    Perhaps DeMayoro is planning to send social workers down into the MTA to do that job soon. Yeah, real soon, sure.

    Lynch added: “While our elected leaders are closing their eyes and wishing the problem away, we recommend that all New Yorkers keep both eyes wide open while in our transit system.”
     
    Seems obvious enough.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Anonymous

    It’s on YouTube.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    @J.Ross

    The Incident has an excellent cast, but the problem is with the casting of two white guys as the perps. That robs the story of all credibility.

    For a similar case, but based on a real crime, my friend and partner-in-crime David in TN once came across a TV movie based on the Kitty Genovese murder-rape, where the director replaced the black perp, Winston Moseley, with a white guy.

  123. @Anonymous

    I would imagine that no single type of crime is more damaging to the question of whether people are going to move back to New York City
     
    Do you want people to move back to New York City, Steve? Is the existence of New York City, as the thing that it is, good for the country?

    Replies: @J.Ross

    This has actually been discussed here previously: tldr, cities are inherently useful, hence efforts at ethnic cleansing and reclamation.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @J.Ross


    cities are inherently useful,
     
    Not since about 1960. Containerization, rubber tired transport, the Interstate, computers replacing clerks, telephony and then the Internet, have eliminated the old natural monopolies of economic functions that made cities inherently useful. Contemporary cities in the West have only political functions. They became mega-cities, supported by taxation and government activity, thanks to migration of the economically functionless during the post WW II interval of population increase.

    Now the cities have become too much a burden for nations whose industrial capacity has been destroyed by diversion of funds from capital development and repair, and they are falling throughout the West. This fall will last (as it did after the cities of Classic civilization dies) until cities recover some natural economic monopoly. That event that is not within anybody's planning horizon.

    The late 1960s revolution, and for that matter the entire Liberal ideology in the US, are merely pretexts for political funding of urban areas -- inadequately, as it has turned out. It was their only achievement.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

  124. @Rob McX
    @YetAnotherAnon


    In the UK a lot of TV crime fiction is set in basically crime-free white places – not just the Miss Marple/Midsomer Murders stuff but crime set in Shetland, Iceland, academic Oxford.
     
    Midsomer Murders introduced some non-white characters in 2012, after pressure from the usual suspects. There you had a series with a grisly murder every week in the bucolic environment of Midsomer County. You'd think the woke crowd would have loved this series with an all-white Arcadia that's as dangerous as the South Side of Chicago. But there's no pleasing some people. Needless to say, their non-whites won't be carrying out beheadings or acid attacks. The first to be introduced was an Asian pathologist.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @AnotherDad, @MBlanc46

    Midsomer Murders introduced some non-white characters in 2012, after pressure from the usual suspects. There you had a series with a grisly murder every week in the bucolic environment of Midsomer County.

    “A” grisly murder? As in one? Good luck with that. The whites in Midsomer county are as murderous as Somalis.

    You were lucky to get through an episode with only three killings. Having that Barnaby guy on the case was more or less pointless. While he’d always eventually figure it out, it was because eventually all the suspects but one was dead. Ok, he’s the guy!

    Total nonsense. But the appeal–for a long time–was that it was pleasantly English. You could just watch this show about some fictional place in rural England and it was … full of English people! Wasn’t like everything else you see now where TPTB insist on jamming “diversity” in your face, even–or even especially–where it was completely historically inaccurate.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @AnotherDad


    “A” grisly murder? As in one? Good luck with that. The whites in Midsomer county are as murderous as Somalis.

    You were lucky to get through an episode with only three killings. Having that Barnaby guy on the case was more or less pointless. While he’d always eventually figure it out, it was because eventually all the suspects but one was dead. Ok, he’s the guy!
     
    I don't think I ever actually watched it, so I didn't know the denizens of Midsomer were such a bloodthirsty bunch. But, as you say, the problem was that it was all white. As far as the wokeocracy is concerned, people who enjoy this kind of thing need to get diversity, and get it good and hard.
    , @Reg Cæsar
  125. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    My point is that it appears that a sizable fraction of unprovoked (and non-larcenous) attacks on pedestrians in New York City are carried out by a small number of repeat offenders.
     
    Small number? Move to NYC and try it out. A tiny, tiny fraction of assaults ever make the news. Most are B on W of course and hardly any are even reported. Try it out.

    Meanwhile, don't miss Sabrina Belcher, the latest poster girl for the New America.

    Lame version: https://heavy.com/news/2020/08/sabrina-belcher/

    Rocking version: https://www.takimag.com/article/the-week-that-perished-114/

    Belcher livestreamed her kidnapping because of course she did, and police wondered why she was livestreaming an “unexpected” kidnapping, because of course they did.
     

    Replies: @Elmer T. Jones, @Dissident, @anonymous

    “Belcher” is an appropriate surname for this cow.

  126. Serious question: how does a black dude get the last name “Himmelstein”?

    That’s like the name either of a German Jewish surgeon or some SS psycho out of a Tarantino WW2 film….

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Neoconned

    Maybe he's related to Whoopi Goldberg.

    , @duncsbaby
    @Neoconned

    Probably adopted by Jewish parents, or had a Jewish mom & black dad.

  127. @Charon
    @Dan Hayes

    Seems like there would be some implications with respect to liability. Even disregarding that, I think he was wrong to interfere with someone's dying wishes.

    Unless of course it's RBG.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    Liability would not be an issue as it was before the age of unfettered ambulance chaser lawyers!

  128. @Jay Fink
    I predicted this in the tough on crime 90s. I noticed most everyone who spoke bad about criminals and wanted them locked up were older than me. Younger people would say there are too many people in prison. I also knew younger women who had boyfriends in prison, attractive appealing women who probably thought their jailbirds were "real men". I remember telling people that in the future we would be soft on crime. One of my predictions was outlawing the death penalty which has happened in many states and rarely used in the others. Everything I said at the time sounded tin foil but it's all happening right now.

    My long term prediction, which I still hold, is that the day will come when prisons are called cruel and unusual punishment, are all emptied out and closed permanently.

    Replies: @David In TN

    Clarence Darrow wanted prisons emptied and closed 100 years ago. Darrow didn’t believe anybody was responsible for whatever evil acts they did.

    • Replies: @Jay Fink
    @David In TN

    The problem is, even if you think they aren't responsible, they are going to commit crimes again and again. You can't have civilization without prisons.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

    , @James O'Meara
    @David In TN

    "Darrow didn’t believe anybody was responsible for whatever evil acts they did."

    Well, unless they were a "robber baron" and the off with their heads, right Comrade Darrow?

  129. @Single malt
    @Trinity

    Love that movie. Hilarious bits of dialogue...”The chicks are packed! The chicks are packed!”

    Replies: @Trinity

    Oh yes, The Lizzies. haha. That one “Warrior” must have been gay. The one that told Snow he “didn’t feel like getting racked.” haha. He was the one that was responsible for painting gang signs with spray paint. haha. If I remember right, the gay, spray paint gay wasn’t diggin’ The Lizzies. haha. Can’t remember the spray paint guy’s name? Was it Rembrandt? lolol.

  130. Anonymous[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross
    @Anonymous

    This has actually been discussed here previously: tldr, cities are inherently useful, hence efforts at ethnic cleansing and reclamation.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    cities are inherently useful,

    Not since about 1960. Containerization, rubber tired transport, the Interstate, computers replacing clerks, telephony and then the Internet, have eliminated the old natural monopolies of economic functions that made cities inherently useful. Contemporary cities in the West have only political functions. They became mega-cities, supported by taxation and government activity, thanks to migration of the economically functionless during the post WW II interval of population increase.

    Now the cities have become too much a burden for nations whose industrial capacity has been destroyed by diversion of funds from capital development and repair, and they are falling throughout the West. This fall will last (as it did after the cities of Classic civilization dies) until cities recover some natural economic monopoly. That event that is not within anybody’s planning horizon.

    The late 1960s revolution, and for that matter the entire Liberal ideology in the US, are merely pretexts for political funding of urban areas — inadequately, as it has turned out. It was their only achievement.

    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @Anonymous

    "The late 1960s revolution, and for that matter the entire Liberal ideology in the US, are merely pretexts for political funding of urban areas — inadequately, as it has turned out. It was their only achievement."

    This is simple brilliant. The cities have outlive their usefulness, and survive only because they have acquired the political power to coerce money from the state.

    Perhaps that is why their political power derives from being sinkholes filled with obsolete farm equipment (aka bleks)?

    McLuhan, though a professor himself, said that universities arose in the Middle Ages due to the need to travel to where manuscripts were, and were rendered obsolete by Gutenberg, although they contrived ways to survive. Hence, our current student-loan boondoggle.

    Covid could bring down both universities and cities (work from home in the burbs)

    Replies: @anon

  131. Anonymous[504] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon
    @Trinity

    I just watched a movie that was made in 1967 the other night about a couple of thugs harassing passengers on a subway. The movie was titled, “The Incident” and the two thugs were played by Tony Musante and a young Martin Sheen.

    Looks like a "slice of life" movie.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Incident_(1967_film)

    I have no idea why the movie was in black & white given it was made in 1967.

    Artistic decision, according to Wikipedia.


    Hirschfeld said in an interview that he filmed in black and white in order to get "the most realistic style of photography possible"; test shots were taken in muted color but they were deemed a distraction from the desired "somber" effect.
     
    Turning to the OP, here's more info from the Newspaper of Record:

    https://nypost.com/2020/11/20/police-union-boss-mta-riders-on-their-own-amid-violence-uptick/


    PBA President Pat Lynch accused lawmakers of preventing cops from doing their jobs and advised straphangers to “keep both eyes wide open” to avoid being victimized.
     

    “The politicians have made it abundantly clear that they don’t want cops enforcing transit system rules, connecting the homeless with services, engaging with seriously mentally ill people or doing any of the things necessary to prevent these terrifying random attacks,” he said.
    ‘ “That is their choice to make, but who is replacing us in those roles? Right now, nobody.”
     
    Perhaps DeMayoro is planning to send social workers down into the MTA to do that job soon. Yeah, real soon, sure.

    Lynch added: “While our elected leaders are closing their eyes and wishing the problem away, we recommend that all New Yorkers keep both eyes wide open while in our transit system.”
     
    Seems obvious enough.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Anonymous

    The material to shoot, develop, and duplicate color prints got mass-economical in the early ’60s which coincided with the new artisanal market of “gritty” B&W films, e.g. “In Cold Blood” (1967)/”The Last Picture Show” (1971).

    In the middle of the decade there was still enough relative expense vs. consumer adoption that TV series might not get renewed because the network had decided to push color production. The early seasons of “Gilligan’s Island,” “Bewitched,” and “I Dream of Jeannie” were all monochrome, if childhood memory of Nick At Night serves. In the ’80s when Ted Turner colorized “Casablanca” for his channel I recall this being a medium-sized scandal among the adults in my life.

  132. @David In TN
    @Dissident

    My friend Nicholas Stix has said shoving people onto the subway tracks by black criminals has gone on for decades.

    Every 10 years or so a MSM source will have a handwringing piece on the subject along the lines of, "We can't understand why this happens."

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @lavoisier

    Every 10 years or so a MSM source will have a handwringing piece on the subject along the lines of, “We can’t understand why this happens.”

    Subway passenger shoved off platform by black criminal and dismembered by oncoming train is just a case of a passenger failing to board the train properly–“commute gone bad.”

  133. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Obviously NYC is taking a colossal hit, but how many suburbs and exurbs have anything to compete with Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, countless world-class museums, Broadway extravaganzas, gallery openings and other A-list parties, and not least: Michelin-starred restaurants?

    And as people come trickling back, the nexus of super-achievers again forms and builds on itself. Talent likes to be around talent.

    New York can (and probably will) fall a fair distance, but unlike most places it has a long way to fall.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Ed, @Technite78, @Anon, @Chris Mallory, @Colin Wright, @Alden, @Morton's toes, @Mycale, @Icy Blast

    The vast majority of New Yorkers are not Carrie Bradshaw. They’re not going to galas and fancy restaurants every night. They might go to Lincoln Center or a Broadway Show a few times a year. As nice as all that stuff is, and it is nice, and people do miss it when they leave, they’re not essential.

    What is essential, though, is feeling safe and secure. People left NYC when it was dangerous and came back when it was safer. It really is that simple. For as long as the City government is deemed not to be in control and for as long as it seems like a place where crazy people have full reign to make everyone miserable, people will stay away.

    This year also had the added problem for the City in that people realized they don’t need to be in the office to get their work done. A lot of people simply will not come back and stay gainfully employed in a place with peace and quiet and good schools.

  134. @David In TN
    @Jay Fink

    Clarence Darrow wanted prisons emptied and closed 100 years ago. Darrow didn't believe anybody was responsible for whatever evil acts they did.

    Replies: @Jay Fink, @James O'Meara

    The problem is, even if you think they aren’t responsible, they are going to commit crimes again and again. You can’t have civilization without prisons.

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @Jay Fink

    Exactly. Even if they "morden musst" (have to kill -- as the criminal leader characterizes Peter Lorre's speech in M) then something must be done to stop then -- presumably either kill them or lobotomize them. Prisons are a relatively kind-hearted solution: in the old days we hanged everyone (cue HBDers on how we killed off all the violent genes) and in the future we will alter their brains. For now, prison.

  135. @AnotherDad
    @Rob McX


    Midsomer Murders introduced some non-white characters in 2012, after pressure from the usual suspects. There you had a series with a grisly murder every week in the bucolic environment of Midsomer County.
     
    "A" grisly murder? As in one? Good luck with that. The whites in Midsomer county are as murderous as Somalis.

    You were lucky to get through an episode with only three killings. Having that Barnaby guy on the case was more or less pointless. While he'd always eventually figure it out, it was because eventually all the suspects but one was dead. Ok, he's the guy!

    Total nonsense. But the appeal--for a long time--was that it was pleasantly English. You could just watch this show about some fictional place in rural England and it was ... full of English people! Wasn't like everything else you see now where TPTB insist on jamming "diversity" in your face, even--or even especially--where it was completely historically inaccurate.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Reg Cæsar

    “A” grisly murder? As in one? Good luck with that. The whites in Midsomer county are as murderous as Somalis.

    You were lucky to get through an episode with only three killings. Having that Barnaby guy on the case was more or less pointless. While he’d always eventually figure it out, it was because eventually all the suspects but one was dead. Ok, he’s the guy!

    I don’t think I ever actually watched it, so I didn’t know the denizens of Midsomer were such a bloodthirsty bunch. But, as you say, the problem was that it was all white. As far as the wokeocracy is concerned, people who enjoy this kind of thing need to get diversity, and get it good and hard.

  136. @Rob McX
    @YetAnotherAnon


    In the UK a lot of TV crime fiction is set in basically crime-free white places – not just the Miss Marple/Midsomer Murders stuff but crime set in Shetland, Iceland, academic Oxford.
     
    Midsomer Murders introduced some non-white characters in 2012, after pressure from the usual suspects. There you had a series with a grisly murder every week in the bucolic environment of Midsomer County. You'd think the woke crowd would have loved this series with an all-white Arcadia that's as dangerous as the South Side of Chicago. But there's no pleasing some people. Needless to say, their non-whites won't be carrying out beheadings or acid attacks. The first to be introduced was an Asian pathologist.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @AnotherDad, @MBlanc46

    I’ve indicated to Mme B, Household Tsarina of All Things Televisual, that I am no longer interested. Plus the new Barnaby is much inferior to John Nettles.

  137. @Neoconned
    Serious question: how does a black dude get the last name "Himmelstein"?

    That's like the name either of a German Jewish surgeon or some SS psycho out of a Tarantino WW2 film....

    Replies: @Rob McX, @duncsbaby

    Maybe he’s related to Whoopi Goldberg.

  138. @Trinity
    @James O'Meara

    I liked the movie, "Badlands" which starred Martin Sheen, the movie was based loosely on the mass murderer, Charles Starkweather. I believe this one came out in the early 1970s. Movies nowadays are not even watchable IMO.

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    Badlands, Terence Mallick’s first film, so it gets lots of attention, like a Criterion release. Great film. Boss Carl Orff score.

    More great but obscure Martin Sheen: Catholics from Brian Moore’s novel, perhaps a TV movie? Sheen as a Doc Martin wearing paratrooper type hip future priest, sent to investigate a remote monastery where they still believe in God and other heresies. Sorta like The Wicker Man but with Catholics and the cop wins.

    Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane (1976): Sheen AND Jodie Foster! Quebec/French production.

    • Thanks: Trinity
    • Replies: @Trinity
    @James O'Meara

    I remember Martin Sheen in a decent television movie back in the day, it was titled, "Execution Of Private Slovik," that was based on the true story of the last American soldier executed for desertion. He was a talented actor no doubt. Nowadays we are treated to comic book movies, remakes of remakes, and a gazillion sequels of movies that hardly deserve sequels. I think sequels even ruin good movies. No movie should have a sequel.

    , @Neoconned
    @James O'Meara

    I was going to mention the film with Jodie Foster....disturbing and ahead of its time.....oh yeah.....and Spawn.....he looks like a fat Charlie in that film....

  139. @black sea
    @James O'Meara

    A great actor who in his younger days had a lot of anxieties about the quality of his performances. Funny how that works. The talented are more likely to doubt themselves, because they can recognize what truly remarkable work looks like. The hacks just keep plowing along, never doubting anything.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Known Fact

    “Hi, You man think I’m Martin Sheen, but I’m his equally talented but strangely neglected brother Joe Estavez.” (MST3k, Soultaker)

    Joe Estavez is Martin Sheen’s brother, who kept the name (his son is Emilio Estavez, like Martin has Charlie), and apart from doing his brother’s voiceover in Apocalypse Now, has had a fine career in straight to video horror movies (Soultaker, Werewolf, etc.). The special features on the MST3k DVD version show Joe to be a down to Earth guy who knows his limits (as John Wayne might say) and relishes making people happy with his work (“People say, ‘Hey, Soultaker! Don’t take my soooooul!’”). In turn, he seems to be a happy man.

  140. @Jay Fink
    @David In TN

    The problem is, even if you think they aren't responsible, they are going to commit crimes again and again. You can't have civilization without prisons.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

    Exactly. Even if they “morden musst” (have to kill — as the criminal leader characterizes Peter Lorre’s speech in M) then something must be done to stop then — presumably either kill them or lobotomize them. Prisons are a relatively kind-hearted solution: in the old days we hanged everyone (cue HBDers on how we killed off all the violent genes) and in the future we will alter their brains. For now, prison.

  141. @David In TN
    @Jay Fink

    Clarence Darrow wanted prisons emptied and closed 100 years ago. Darrow didn't believe anybody was responsible for whatever evil acts they did.

    Replies: @Jay Fink, @James O'Meara

    “Darrow didn’t believe anybody was responsible for whatever evil acts they did.”

    Well, unless they were a “robber baron” and the off with their heads, right Comrade Darrow?

    • LOL: Hibernian
  142. @Anonymous
    @J.Ross


    cities are inherently useful,
     
    Not since about 1960. Containerization, rubber tired transport, the Interstate, computers replacing clerks, telephony and then the Internet, have eliminated the old natural monopolies of economic functions that made cities inherently useful. Contemporary cities in the West have only political functions. They became mega-cities, supported by taxation and government activity, thanks to migration of the economically functionless during the post WW II interval of population increase.

    Now the cities have become too much a burden for nations whose industrial capacity has been destroyed by diversion of funds from capital development and repair, and they are falling throughout the West. This fall will last (as it did after the cities of Classic civilization dies) until cities recover some natural economic monopoly. That event that is not within anybody's planning horizon.

    The late 1960s revolution, and for that matter the entire Liberal ideology in the US, are merely pretexts for political funding of urban areas -- inadequately, as it has turned out. It was their only achievement.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

    “The late 1960s revolution, and for that matter the entire Liberal ideology in the US, are merely pretexts for political funding of urban areas — inadequately, as it has turned out. It was their only achievement.”

    This is simple brilliant. The cities have outlive their usefulness, and survive only because they have acquired the political power to coerce money from the state.

    Perhaps that is why their political power derives from being sinkholes filled with obsolete farm equipment (aka bleks)?

    McLuhan, though a professor himself, said that universities arose in the Middle Ages due to the need to travel to where manuscripts were, and were rendered obsolete by Gutenberg, although they contrived ways to survive. Hence, our current student-loan boondoggle.

    Covid could bring down both universities and cities (work from home in the burbs)

    • Replies: @anon
    @Peter D. Bredon

    Covid could bring down both universities and cities (work from home in the burbs)

    Universities in the US are in a bubble, a lot like the housing bubble of 15 years ago. The Duke Power case in the 1970's essentially banning intelligence testing pushed that task into the uni's, where a 4 year degree in anything became a certification.

    There are too many colleges in the US and almost all depend on Federal backed student loans, but in order to get the tuition they have to deliver something to the students. SARS-2 / COVID-19 has killed the party world that many colleges float in, and online courses are simply not worth the same tuition cost as face to face.

    A lot of the little liberal arts schools with 4,00o or so students were endangered by the demographic shift already, the lockups of this year have put them in a financially tenuous position. The higher ed bubble is popping, and the only issue that is keeping many alive is accreditation. Even now a degree in Poly Sci from an accredited College of Flyover is still worth more than something from the University of Phoenix -- but that can change.

    In general the really bright students can learn online about as well as in person. The not bright students won't get it either way. The vast middle, who often have more of a problem with motivation than intelligence, maybe should do something else for a year or two until they get themselves organized enough to have a plan.

    Example: online Kahn academy math runs up to about the 2nd to 3rd year of college, one can get through differential equations. The only issue is certification. Leetcode has become a de facto standard in the IT sector, by the way.

    NYC was a manufacturing hub 100 years ago. Now all it manufactures is entertainments and financial instruments - but Internet makes financialization quite portable. It's not as glam to issue bonds from Boise as from Wall Street, but it is just as easy to do, and Jane Average the bond analyst doesn't need to worry about being pushed in front of an A train on the way home.

    NYC is not indispensable.

  143. @Anonymous
    "All blacks are schizophrenics".

    (From a private conversation with a clinical psychiatrist of many many years' experience).

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Charon, @Buck Ransom

    …But with a Schlitz in her mitts down at Fitzroy’s Bar
    She thinks of the Ritz, oh, it’s so schizo.

  144. @R.G. Camara
    @El Dato

    People forget that Bernie Goetz was national hero because of how far NY had fallen and how movies like Death Wish had hit a national nerve before he shot his assailants. Goetz was seen as a real life Paul Kersey.

    Bronson made like 5 of those movies and enjoyed a late-career renaissance from them. And the movies were hits internationally; Bronson was big in Japan as a result.

    Bronson's surprising late-career action star turn pre-figured the Taken films for Liam Neeson, as well as Mel Gibson, Denzel Washington, and Bruce Willis current career choices.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @dvorak

    People forget that Bernie Goetz was national hero

    He was referenced in raps, too.
    “And if ya squad flex/I’m lettin off like Bernard Goetz”

  145. @prosa123
    @Anonymouse

    Some years back I dropped my iPod onto the tracks at a Long Island Rail Road station while boarding a train. I got off, waited for the train to leave, and climbed down onto the tracks (same platform height as on the subway) to retrieve it. Doing so probably wasn't legal but as it was a very lightly traveled station there was no one around to see. It was safe to do so because it was a single track line so there couldn't be another train for a while, it was a diesel line so no third rail, there was ample clear space on the other side of the platform, and in any event it was a short elevated platform so I could simply walk around the end of it in a few seconds.
    While I was able to climb back onto the platform it wasn't easy, and I could very well see how a less physically fit person - or any person who had been injured by a fall to the tracks - would be unable to do so.
    Why didn't I just walk around to the end of the platform? I wanted to see how hard it would be to climb back up.

    Replies: @Simon

    I once saw a portly, decrepit-looking white or hispanic derelict crushed by a New York subway train at the West 96th Street express stop. I don’t know what he was doing down on the tracks — he looked, from a distance, maybe a bit drunk and dazed, so perhaps he’d fallen — but he struggled awkwardly to hoist himself back onto the platform. As you noted, it’s not an easy climb, and he was in no shape to attempt it. I don’t recall, after all these years, whether anyone on the platform tried to help him; at any rate, he was still down there on the tracks when the train arrived. There was much horrified screaming from the crowd of onlookers. I was actually rather shocked by how little I felt; I think years of living in Manhattan have eroded any compassion I might once have had for derelicts.

  146. @Dan Hayes
    @vinteuil

    I disagree. It was a corporal work of mercy!

    Replies: @JimmyG., @Hibernian

    I think your relative tearing up the suicide victims’ suicide notes acted pretty outrageously.

    What right had he to interfere like that? The writers of those notes might have included special farewells for loved ones, or explanations about family mysteries, or who-knows-what.

    People’s behaviour sometimes makes me SMH…

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @JimmyG.

    My previous response (#121) also holds!

  147. @prosa123
    @Anon

    In Japan you have people jumping onto tracks of their own accord. For the subways in Tokyo at least they installed barriers with doors or gates that open parallel with the train doors.

    Platform doors. They exist in many places, even in New York on the JFK Airtrain. They work only if all the trains that operate on the line have exactly the same door alignments, which isn't the case on the NYC subway.

    Replies: @Yngvar, @Anon

    Platform doors. They work only if all the trains that operate on the line have exactly the same door alignments, which isn’t the case on the NYC subway.

    That ‘s just an engineering problem. Sliding sliding doors, maybe?

  148. @peterike
    @LondonBob


    New York subway is far too cheap, the London Underground is much more expensive so you get a better service and you also keep the undesirables away.
     
    The flaw in your thinking is assuming the undesirables pay to enter the NY system. They don't. They saunter in without paying, and without the slightest concern that anything will happen to them if they are caught. Cops generally just look the other way now at fare beaters. Arresting them used to be a priority, back when the city wasn't run by an abject imbecile.

    Replies: @LondonBob

    Fare dodging is pretty much unheard of on the London Underground, although under eighteens travel for free anyway, however lockdown losses might see that policy ended to plug the huge financial shortfall.

  149. Fare dodging is pretty much unheard of on the London Underground, although under eighteens travel for free anyway…

    So, any “asylum seeker” under 45 needs no ticket.

  150. @James O'Meara
    @Trinity

    Badlands, Terence Mallick's first film, so it gets lots of attention, like a Criterion release. Great film. Boss Carl Orff score.

    More great but obscure Martin Sheen: Catholics from Brian Moore's novel, perhaps a TV movie? Sheen as a Doc Martin wearing paratrooper type hip future priest, sent to investigate a remote monastery where they still believe in God and other heresies. Sorta like The Wicker Man but with Catholics and the cop wins.

    Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane (1976): Sheen AND Jodie Foster! Quebec/French production.

    Replies: @Trinity, @Neoconned

    I remember Martin Sheen in a decent television movie back in the day, it was titled, “Execution Of Private Slovik,” that was based on the true story of the last American soldier executed for desertion. He was a talented actor no doubt. Nowadays we are treated to comic book movies, remakes of remakes, and a gazillion sequels of movies that hardly deserve sequels. I think sequels even ruin good movies. No movie should have a sequel.

  151. @JimmyG.
    @Dan Hayes

    I think your relative tearing up the suicide victims' suicide notes acted pretty outrageously.

    What right had he to interfere like that? The writers of those notes might have included special farewells for loved ones, or explanations about family mysteries, or who-knows-what.

    People's behaviour sometimes makes me SMH...

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    My previous response (#121) also holds!

  152. @The Alarmist
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.
     
    I arrived in NYC during the reign of General Dinkins. They were wild days indeed, and I did watch my back on subway platforms, though at rush hour at 77th Street, the thousands of people (mostly non minority) might be breathing down your neck, but weren’t doing any hostile pushing.

    My second working week, I was riding up front, and this gut on the platform at WTC jumped in front of the train (is that better than the Bridge?) ... that was it; one minute there, next minute not; no gore or mess for me to see, so I called my boss to tell him I would be late to work, and he was all like “Do you need to take the day off? Do you need to see someone? Etc.” He was really shocked when I said I’d seen worse.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Dan Hayes, @Dan Hayes, @bruce county, @Alden

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @bruce county


    NYC’s first African American mayor, David Dinkins, has died

     
    NYC’s [last] African-American mayor, David Dinkins, has died
  153. @Achmed E. Newman
    @R.G. Camara

    I watched 4* of the Death Wish movies in a row one time, long after they were made. I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson's movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me. That movie was from 1974. Was the country, or at least the movie business, that PC already, or was it that Americans were under the impression that the growing out-of-control criminality in NYC was not considered a racial thing back then?

    To Steve, yeah, that being pushed onto the subway tracks thing is probably a big mostly NYC-people nightmare. From what I gather from the maps/posters at the Subway sandwich shop, this one is by far the oldest in the US, at 116 years since opening! The Chicago ones look pretty ancient, but aren't nearly, and the L-train just doesn't have that same aura (I know some is underground.) The rest of the ones in the US look to be more modern than these two.

    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.

    .

    * I didn't know there were 5 till now.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Harry Baldwin, @R.G. Camara, @Anonymouse, @Pericles, @peterike, @Hibernian, @Trinity, @YetAnotherAnon, @restless94110

    I,too, watched 4* of the Death Wish movies in a row one time, long after they were made. I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson’s movie wife were white guys

    Just recently I watched 4 of the 5 original Death Watch films (I didn’t see the one where he was in Japan) because I had just seen the modern Death Watch. It’s a great action film and a real pro-gun message film.

    This one’s set in Chicago and has Bruce Willis in the Bronson role and a great supporting cast. But like the first Death Watch, the bad guys are white, and though some of the other baddies Willis takes down some look hispanic (maybe) and another is black (carjacking a car from a black woman victim) the film sidesteps the issue by making the white thugs diabolically smart.

    And somehow that plays better than if they were black.

    The old Death Watches seemed extremely primitive (in blood effects, acting, spoken lines, even cinematography). The modern Death Watch is a lot more well thought out. I’ve watched it 3 times now. It’s one of the few recent films that I can take.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @restless94110

    Thanks for the review, Restless.

  154. anon[192] • Disclaimer says:
    @Peter D. Bredon
    @Anonymous

    "The late 1960s revolution, and for that matter the entire Liberal ideology in the US, are merely pretexts for political funding of urban areas — inadequately, as it has turned out. It was their only achievement."

    This is simple brilliant. The cities have outlive their usefulness, and survive only because they have acquired the political power to coerce money from the state.

    Perhaps that is why their political power derives from being sinkholes filled with obsolete farm equipment (aka bleks)?

    McLuhan, though a professor himself, said that universities arose in the Middle Ages due to the need to travel to where manuscripts were, and were rendered obsolete by Gutenberg, although they contrived ways to survive. Hence, our current student-loan boondoggle.

    Covid could bring down both universities and cities (work from home in the burbs)

    Replies: @anon

    Covid could bring down both universities and cities (work from home in the burbs)

    Universities in the US are in a bubble, a lot like the housing bubble of 15 years ago. The Duke Power case in the 1970’s essentially banning intelligence testing pushed that task into the uni’s, where a 4 year degree in anything became a certification.

    There are too many colleges in the US and almost all depend on Federal backed student loans, but in order to get the tuition they have to deliver something to the students. SARS-2 / COVID-19 has killed the party world that many colleges float in, and online courses are simply not worth the same tuition cost as face to face.

    A lot of the little liberal arts schools with 4,00o or so students were endangered by the demographic shift already, the lockups of this year have put them in a financially tenuous position. The higher ed bubble is popping, and the only issue that is keeping many alive is accreditation. Even now a degree in Poly Sci from an accredited College of Flyover is still worth more than something from the University of Phoenix — but that can change.

    In general the really bright students can learn online about as well as in person. The not bright students won’t get it either way. The vast middle, who often have more of a problem with motivation than intelligence, maybe should do something else for a year or two until they get themselves organized enough to have a plan.

    Example: online Kahn academy math runs up to about the 2nd to 3rd year of college, one can get through differential equations. The only issue is certification. Leetcode has become a de facto standard in the IT sector, by the way.

    NYC was a manufacturing hub 100 years ago. Now all it manufactures is entertainments and financial instruments – but Internet makes financialization quite portable. It’s not as glam to issue bonds from Boise as from Wall Street, but it is just as easy to do, and Jane Average the bond analyst doesn’t need to worry about being pushed in front of an A train on the way home.

    NYC is not indispensable.

  155. @Hapalong Cassidy
    When I first visited NYC as a wee lad in the late 70’s, my parents warned me about standing too close to the edge of the subway platform, lest some crazy person shove me onto the tracks. I had always assumed it was some sort of urban legend meant to keep kids on their guard, like the one about razor blades in apples on Halloween.

    Replies: @Bill

    You’re saying people don’t put razor blades in Halloween candy? Why do you think this?

  156. @Michael S
    Not that I don't sympathize, but that's a lot of bodily damage for two punches. I've been punched twice and didn't get my skull broken. Was the attacker wearing brass knuckles, or is Alex Weisman the secret identity of Mr. Glass?

    Replies: @Bill

    Perhaps he fell backwards in an uncontrolled way onto concrete?

  157. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I fear this is a long term trend. 2nd and 3rd tier cities in the US became filthy, dangerous hellholes years ago. The only reason NYC stayed relatively safe and clean was because so many of the Masters of the Universe lived in Manhattan. Now that they have found it’s just as nice in the tony parts of Long Island, CT and NJ, as a result of the COVID Exodus, there’s nothing to stop the collapse of the tax base and then the city.

    I guess the model is San Francisco, since both and NYC are pretty geographically compact cities (as opposed to places like LA or Houston where the Beautiful People can separate themselves by living far from the scum.) Are there still a lot of wealthy people that live in SF proper? How do they isolate themselves from the homeless, crazy and criminals?

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Anonymouse, @HallParvey, @Buffalo Joe, @William Badwhite

    Are there still a lot of wealthy people that live in SF proper? How do they isolate themselves from the homeless, crazy and criminals?

    A lot of San Francisco is composed of stand-alone single family homes. There are quite a few neighborhoods where what goes on around Fisherman’s Wharf or the Financial District around the north end of Market might as well be a different world. The Sunset district, the Richmond, Noe Valley, West Portal, Cole Valley, Bernal Heights. These will have few if any crazy homeless people around – its just houses and the occasional retail on a corner.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @RAZ
    @William Badwhite

    Before it became the Gay Mecca and before Big Tech it was a city not too different from others. Prettier and better climate than most, but at one time it was a normal working class city. A lot of Irish (Pat/Jerry Brown/Newsom) and Italian working class (DiMaggios).

    I have relatives who moved west to work in the port during WWII.

  158. @Achmed E. Newman
    @The Alarmist

    I've seen a body flying in the air, on the way down after being slammed into by a car, as we came around the corner in a nearby city. We stopped, and my doctor friend tried to help the man, but he died a couple hours later. It was not the driver's fault, as the 84 y/o guy walked out from between parked cars on a one-way street with traffic flow toward his left.*

    It didn't bother either of us really, other than the stupidity at the deposition. The family (yes, black) wanted to collect money from the driver, and the lawyers just irked the crap out of me with their bullshit. Afterwards, they shook hands and the one said, "hey, where you going to lunch?"

    .


    * You gotta really watch it, even young people, or especially young people on those phones. Hong Kong scared the crap out of me with that. Keep that traffic flow in your head!

    Replies: @Haruto Rat

    You gotta really watch it

    realist [ˈriːəlɪst] n · someone who looks both ways before crossing a one-way street

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Haruto Rat

    It's almost automatic for us to look left first, and then get started. That was the problem with the old guy, and with parked cars, the sight line and driver reaction time add up to "body flying in the air".

    However, I really like your definition, Mr. Rat. I have gone the wrong way for a block myself before. It took me half the block before I realized "hey, what happened to all the stop lights .. ohhhh ...."

  159. @Dan Hayes
    @vinteuil

    I disagree. It was a corporal work of mercy!

    Replies: @JimmyG., @Hibernian

    Maybe even a spiritual one too.

    • Thanks: Dan Hayes
  160. @Haruto Rat
    @Achmed E. Newman


    You gotta really watch it
     
    realist [ˈriːəlɪst] n · someone who looks both ways before crossing a one-way street

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    It’s almost automatic for us to look left first, and then get started. That was the problem with the old guy, and with parked cars, the sight line and driver reaction time add up to “body flying in the air”.

    However, I really like your definition, Mr. Rat. I have gone the wrong way for a block myself before. It took me half the block before I realized “hey, what happened to all the stop lights .. ohhhh ….”

  161. @restless94110
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I,too, watched 4* of the Death Wish movies in a row one time, long after they were made. I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson’s movie wife were white guys
     
    Just recently I watched 4 of the 5 original Death Watch films (I didn't see the one where he was in Japan) because I had just seen the modern Death Watch. It's a great action film and a real pro-gun message film.

    This one's set in Chicago and has Bruce Willis in the Bronson role and a great supporting cast. But like the first Death Watch, the bad guys are white, and though some of the other baddies Willis takes down some look hispanic (maybe) and another is black (carjacking a car from a black woman victim) the film sidesteps the issue by making the white thugs diabolically smart.

    And somehow that plays better than if they were black.

    The old Death Watches seemed extremely primitive (in blood effects, acting, spoken lines, even cinematography). The modern Death Watch is a lot more well thought out. I've watched it 3 times now. It's one of the few recent films that I can take.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Thanks for the review, Restless.

  162. @Pericles
    @Achmed E. Newman



    I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson’s movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me.

     

    In the modern era, I happened upon a movie about terrorism in contemporary London. I literally only saw about five or ten seconds of it, but it turned out that:

    1. The victim to be avenged was chinese/vietnamese;
    2. The officer who assured the avenger (Jackie Chan) that the perps would be etc etc, was a strong black woman;
    3. The terrorists were Irish. (White that is, I suppose I have to add that nowadays.)

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1615160/

    Well kids, that's what terrorism in London looks like.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @restless94110

    Suspension of disbelief, Bitchez!

  163. Check it out. You’ll like it

    Elizabeth Shue, Vincent D’Onofrio, the guy who played the brother-in-law DEA agent in Breaking Bad. It’s a great framing of the story.

  164. @The Alarmist
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I guess thinking about getting pushed onto the subway tracks is a big part of NYC culture after 116 years, along with that thing about jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge.
     
    I arrived in NYC during the reign of General Dinkins. They were wild days indeed, and I did watch my back on subway platforms, though at rush hour at 77th Street, the thousands of people (mostly non minority) might be breathing down your neck, but weren’t doing any hostile pushing.

    My second working week, I was riding up front, and this gut on the platform at WTC jumped in front of the train (is that better than the Bridge?) ... that was it; one minute there, next minute not; no gore or mess for me to see, so I called my boss to tell him I would be late to work, and he was all like “Do you need to take the day off? Do you need to see someone? Etc.” He was really shocked when I said I’d seen worse.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Dan Hayes, @Dan Hayes, @bruce county, @Alden

    Dinkins just died at age 93. At least he won’t have a MLK George Floyd style grandiose funeral due to covid. I hope.

    Somehow I doubt the crazy blacks who shove people off subway platforms read the NYSlimes articles about racial reckoning.

  165. @Wilkey
    @Bill Jones


    “There was nothing else I could have done to protect myself,” Mr. Weisman, 33, said on Friday. “I am shaken by this.”
     
    Bullshit. He could have voted for Republicans, which I highly doubt he did, instead of for the party that was trying to incite a race war. Not many people more reliably liberal than state actors.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Alden

    Black criminal loving Democrats were in charge of NYC long before Weissman was born. It is possible to fracture a skull in certain places, like the temple side of the skull near the front. It’s very thin compared to the back and top of the skull. And being hit hard in the temple would also harm the eye. The bones around the eye are not just very thick. They are like honey comb and flexible. But a hard blow could easily tear the retina. He’s an actor. Hope he has health insurance to repair they eye.

  166. @anonymous
    Though it's generally explained away as being the actions of mentally ill people the majority of the perps are black or semi-black. So even their sick are hyper-violent. Quality of life anywhere in the US is largely determined by the proximity of a black population, sane or insane.

    Replies: @anonymous1963

    Make that anywhere in the world.

  167. @James O'Meara
    @Trinity

    "The movie was titled, “The Incident” and the two thugs were played by Tony Musante and a young Martin Sheen. I have no idea why the movie was in black & white given it was made in 1967. A young Beau Bridges and a younger Ed McMahon also had roles in this movie. Never even heard of this flick but it was watchable at least, certainly better than the crapola today."

    Sounds wonderful. Always nice to see lots of "faces" in bit or small parts, like all the Irish actors Boorman rounded up for Excalibur (Liam Neeson! Patrick Stewart! etc.). Hard to imagine any film today that would provoke such a reaction in 30 years.

    Did "young Martin Sheen" ever do anything not worth seeing? He's the mark of quality in any unknown film. WTF happened to his kid?

    Replies: @Trinity, @black sea, @Alden

    Not trying to start a fight about Charlie’s acting talent; but I think he’s an excellent actor. Even in that silly thing with his brother. They were garbage men who discovered a dead body and kept it in their apartment for some reason.

  168. My point is that it appears that a sizable fraction of unprovoked (and non-larcenous) attacks on pedestrians in New York City are carried out by a small number of repeat offenders. Lock them up and you can put a dent into numbers.

    … unless there is disparate impact.

    But I also suspect that crazy men tend to be susceptible to the general climate of opinion. When respectable media is declaring a Racial Reckoning against whites, is it all that surprising that lunatics tend to take this message into their own hands?

    I suspect that people who are basically more primitive with less consideration given tor consequences etc are more likely to be able to roam about and deal with perceived slights in a more lenient (defund police – ignore crime) environment.,

  169. @AnotherDad
    @Rob McX


    Midsomer Murders introduced some non-white characters in 2012, after pressure from the usual suspects. There you had a series with a grisly murder every week in the bucolic environment of Midsomer County.
     
    "A" grisly murder? As in one? Good luck with that. The whites in Midsomer county are as murderous as Somalis.

    You were lucky to get through an episode with only three killings. Having that Barnaby guy on the case was more or less pointless. While he'd always eventually figure it out, it was because eventually all the suspects but one was dead. Ok, he's the guy!

    Total nonsense. But the appeal--for a long time--was that it was pleasantly English. You could just watch this show about some fictional place in rural England and it was ... full of English people! Wasn't like everything else you see now where TPTB insist on jamming "diversity" in your face, even--or even especially--where it was completely historically inaccurate.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Reg Cæsar

  170. @bruce county
    @The Alarmist

    NYC's first African American mayor, David Dinkins, has died

    https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/world/nycs-first-african-american-mayor-david-dinkins-has-died/ar-BB1biE08?li=AAggNb9

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    NYC’s first African American mayor, David Dinkins, has died

    NYC’s [last] African-American mayor, David Dinkins, has died

  171. @R.G. Camara

    My point is that it appears that a sizable fraction of unprovoked (and non-larcenous) attacks on pedestrians in New York City are carried out by a small number of repeat offenders. Lock them up and you can put a dent into numbers.
     
    Exactly the situation that occurred with the Squeegee Men back in the day in NYC. They seemed to be everywhere in NYC and thus unstoppable, but Giuliani had them arrested and got the book thrown at them for jaywalking. And then it turned out there actually weren't that many of them, it was just the fact that they'd never been arrested before and had set patterns to maximize their profit, making them seem like a far larger horde.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squeegee_man#United_States

    Most serious or bothersome crime is committed by a small percentage of the population, but if you aren't diligent in rounding them up they can grow to haunt the public's mind as a much larger and therefore insurmountable problem.

    Replies: @El Dato, @AnotherDad, @Cato

    The “broken window” view of law enforcement — when minor offenses are taken seriously, major offenses are less likely to occur. We have the technology to seriously suppress crime: high-resolution cameras; facial recognition and license plate reading algorithms; cheap DNA sequencing; massive amounts of data for linking criminals to their associates and favored locales. But we don’t use that technology. Partly because of libertarian preferences for “privacy” over “transparency”, and partly because of the incompetence of people who rise to positions of authority in our country.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Cato

    The reason broken windows works so well is that the people stopped for small things often have illegal drugs, illegal and often stolen guns, and most important, outstanding warrants and parole violations. So they are arrested and imprisoned. Where they can’t prey on the public.

    That’s why so many traffic stops for blacks end up in Rodney King George Floyd riots. King was so high on PCP he was going over 100 MPH. Floyd had fentanyl in his possession. Both were so arrogant they had to fight the police and in Floyd’s case, cause the store clerk to call the police about the counterfeit bill.

    In addition to the speeding, King was a recently released parolee. The PCP should have sent him back to prison on a parole violation. I believe Floyd was on parole too.

    It’s really not just unusual aggressiveness, and arrogance. It’s the fact that so many have warrants and parole violations and know they’ll be going back to prison.

    The easiest most efficient way to clear up warrants is to stop black men for whatever reason. This used to get them back to prison. The rest of us were safe and they couldn’t have any baby criminals while in prison.

  172. Anon[353] • Disclaimer says:
    @prosa123
    @Anonymouse

    Subway boarding and exiting platforms are elevated so the full size of the train is not apparent. In the imagination of a child there is always a degree of fear when a subway train comes rushing into a station.

    In New York at least, the most common reason why people are struck by trains is that they accidentally drop things onto the tracks, cell phones in particular, climb down to retrieve the items, and then find that it's a long, long way back up to the platform.

    Replies: @Anonymouse, @Anon

    In New York at least, the most common reason why people are struck by trains is that they accidentally drop things onto the tracks, cell phones in particular, climb down to retrieve the items, and then find that it’s a long, long way back up to the platform.

    In Tokyo I see staff with poles made to retrieve stuff helping out commuters from time to time. I guess you have to have enough staff on the platform for that.

    One thing that would make it harder to climb back up is that there are hollows under the final two or three feet of the platform track-side specifically to create a space to roll into if a train is coming. This means there is no place to plant your foot to climb out.

  173. Anon[196] • Disclaimer says:
    @prosa123
    @Anon

    In Japan you have people jumping onto tracks of their own accord. For the subways in Tokyo at least they installed barriers with doors or gates that open parallel with the train doors.

    Platform doors. They exist in many places, even in New York on the JFK Airtrain. They work only if all the trains that operate on the line have exactly the same door alignments, which isn't the case on the NYC subway.

    Replies: @Yngvar, @Anon

    This page from 2013 seems to say that the rolling stock in the New York Subway was set to be standarized in a way that would allow “edge doors” within ten years, i.e., 2023.

    http://secondavenuesagas.com/2013/01/29/a-few-solutions-for-improved-subway-platform-safety/

    It’s New York, so I wouldn’t be surprised if the money went walkabout and the cars are still nowhere near standardized.

    In Tokyo the project was spread out over a number of years, so if there are lines with standardized car doors it still seems like they could make a start on the projejct.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Anon

    One roadblock to subway safety improvements in NYC -- while the city itself is responsible for the subway stations, the transit authority, largely state-controlled, is responsible for the subway cars, tracks and signals. So you have yet one more issue for Cuomo and DeBlasio to wrestle over like two of my favorite Star Trek characters, the half-white/half-black dudes with the thousand-year grudge

  174. @Buffalo Joe
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    NJ, one of the founders of PayPal and a current San Francisco resident wrote an article, published by SF Gate, on why he is leaving SF. Truth is SF is a shithole that lost tens of millions of dollars in convention business because it is a dirty filthy place. Sf currently spends $600 million on their homelss problem.The whole bay area has a major homeless problem. They also have a uber leftist DA, chessa boudin. the son of convicted terrorist murderers who is very light on criminals, hence skyrocketing crime numbers..

    Replies: @Alden

    Boudin’s now lobbying for his weatherman father, David Gilbert to be either pardoned or paroled from his life sentence.

  175. @Anonymouse
    @prosa123

    I was waiting at the Broad Channel stop of the A train. The tracks there are open to the sky. My Metro Pass, a laminated card for discount fares, dropped from my hand and fluttered on to the track. No train was visible down the tracks and I thought about whether I should jump down and retrieve the card. Luckily 2 or 3 townie youths were there on the platform and one of them jumped down and retrieved the card. I tipped him a few bucks. I was weighing the trouble between replacing the card in the Metro office in downtown Manhattan and getting squashed like a bug were a train to come out of nowhere. And the more I thought about it, the sooner a train would come. Are there learned studies of dithering? Even animals seem to have second thoughts about their actions.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Hamlet's Ghost

    It was covered in Buridan’s ass. Long ago.

  176. @Anon
    @prosa123

    This page from 2013 seems to say that the rolling stock in the New York Subway was set to be standarized in a way that would allow "edge doors" within ten years, i.e., 2023.

    http://secondavenuesagas.com/2013/01/29/a-few-solutions-for-improved-subway-platform-safety/

    It's New York, so I wouldn't be surprised if the money went walkabout and the cars are still nowhere near standardized.

    In Tokyo the project was spread out over a number of years, so if there are lines with standardized car doors it still seems like they could make a start on the projejct.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    One roadblock to subway safety improvements in NYC — while the city itself is responsible for the subway stations, the transit authority, largely state-controlled, is responsible for the subway cars, tracks and signals. So you have yet one more issue for Cuomo and DeBlasio to wrestle over like two of my favorite Star Trek characters, the half-white/half-black dudes with the thousand-year grudge

  177. @black sea
    @James O'Meara

    A great actor who in his younger days had a lot of anxieties about the quality of his performances. Funny how that works. The talented are more likely to doubt themselves, because they can recognize what truly remarkable work looks like. The hacks just keep plowing along, never doubting anything.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Known Fact

    If you’re a big Martin Sheen fan, track these down…

    — At age 23 Sheen powerfully played a mama’s-boy space trooper the aliens capture and break in Nightmare, a standout Outer Limits episode that fans of the series argue about incessantly due to its bizarre style and controversial plot.

    — With my Mannix retrospective just about done, To Kill a Memory is a clear top-10 entry, with Sheen as an amnesiac Viet vet helping pull off a complex jewel heist despite his addled state.

  178. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Obviously NYC is taking a colossal hit, but how many suburbs and exurbs have anything to compete with Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, countless world-class museums, Broadway extravaganzas, gallery openings and other A-list parties, and not least: Michelin-starred restaurants?

    And as people come trickling back, the nexus of super-achievers again forms and builds on itself. Talent likes to be around talent.

    New York can (and probably will) fall a fair distance, but unlike most places it has a long way to fall.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Ed, @Technite78, @Anon, @Chris Mallory, @Colin Wright, @Alden, @Morton's toes, @Mycale, @Icy Blast

    I had never thought of the theater district known as “Broadway” as a manifestation of “culture” but rather as a gathering place for homosexuals. Perhaps the plays “Cats” and “Les Miserables” are magnificent cultural achievements, and I have been cruelly deceived by Republican hillbillies who simply can’t appreciate their timeless artistic radiance.

  179. Media’s Demand for Racial Reckoning Not Working Out So Hot in NYC Subways

    Seems to be working out just fine. Just a little bit of punching up, that’s all.

  180. In the late 1990’s, I remember looking out the second floor window of a house, at two people walking past on the sidewalk, across the street. I noticed them because one of them was jabbering loudly to his mate, and at one point said: I’m so angry, I could kill a white person! The two people were black, middle-aged men. They looked more humorous than dangerous, but I suspect their danger might be situational. I wasn’t sure that he was mad at something a white person did: it was more a measure of how pissed off he was.

    Those are the kinds of people that can easily be pushed over the edge, with a well-publicized media narrative. I think all large human groups have such people, to a greater or lesser extent, so they should be treated responsibly. I blame the promoters of any such “agitating” narratives.

  181. @Cato
    @R.G. Camara

    The "broken window" view of law enforcement -- when minor offenses are taken seriously, major offenses are less likely to occur. We have the technology to seriously suppress crime: high-resolution cameras; facial recognition and license plate reading algorithms; cheap DNA sequencing; massive amounts of data for linking criminals to their associates and favored locales. But we don't use that technology. Partly because of libertarian preferences for "privacy" over "transparency", and partly because of the incompetence of people who rise to positions of authority in our country.

    Replies: @Alden

    The reason broken windows works so well is that the people stopped for small things often have illegal drugs, illegal and often stolen guns, and most important, outstanding warrants and parole violations. So they are arrested and imprisoned. Where they can’t prey on the public.

    That’s why so many traffic stops for blacks end up in Rodney King George Floyd riots. King was so high on PCP he was going over 100 MPH. Floyd had fentanyl in his possession. Both were so arrogant they had to fight the police and in Floyd’s case, cause the store clerk to call the police about the counterfeit bill.

    In addition to the speeding, King was a recently released parolee. The PCP should have sent him back to prison on a parole violation. I believe Floyd was on parole too.

    It’s really not just unusual aggressiveness, and arrogance. It’s the fact that so many have warrants and parole violations and know they’ll be going back to prison.

    The easiest most efficient way to clear up warrants is to stop black men for whatever reason. This used to get them back to prison. The rest of us were safe and they couldn’t have any baby criminals while in prison.

  182. @William Badwhite
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    Are there still a lot of wealthy people that live in SF proper? How do they isolate themselves from the homeless, crazy and criminals?
     
    A lot of San Francisco is composed of stand-alone single family homes. There are quite a few neighborhoods where what goes on around Fisherman's Wharf or the Financial District around the north end of Market might as well be a different world. The Sunset district, the Richmond, Noe Valley, West Portal, Cole Valley, Bernal Heights. These will have few if any crazy homeless people around - its just houses and the occasional retail on a corner.

    Replies: @RAZ

    Before it became the Gay Mecca and before Big Tech it was a city not too different from others. Prettier and better climate than most, but at one time it was a normal working class city. A lot of Irish (Pat/Jerry Brown/Newsom) and Italian working class (DiMaggios).

    I have relatives who moved west to work in the port during WWII.

    • Agree: Charon
  183. @James O'Meara
    @Trinity

    Badlands, Terence Mallick's first film, so it gets lots of attention, like a Criterion release. Great film. Boss Carl Orff score.

    More great but obscure Martin Sheen: Catholics from Brian Moore's novel, perhaps a TV movie? Sheen as a Doc Martin wearing paratrooper type hip future priest, sent to investigate a remote monastery where they still believe in God and other heresies. Sorta like The Wicker Man but with Catholics and the cop wins.

    Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane (1976): Sheen AND Jodie Foster! Quebec/French production.

    Replies: @Trinity, @Neoconned

    I was going to mention the film with Jodie Foster….disturbing and ahead of its time…..oh yeah…..and Spawn…..he looks like a fat Charlie in that film….

  184. @J.Ross
    @anon

    It's on YouTube.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aH24v-Q9r8Q

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    The Incident has an excellent cast, but the problem is with the casting of two white guys as the perps. That robs the story of all credibility.

    For a similar case, but based on a real crime, my friend and partner-in-crime David in TN once came across a TV movie based on the Kitty Genovese murder-rape, where the director replaced the black perp, Winston Moseley, with a white guy.

  185. @Neoconned
    Serious question: how does a black dude get the last name "Himmelstein"?

    That's like the name either of a German Jewish surgeon or some SS psycho out of a Tarantino WW2 film....

    Replies: @Rob McX, @duncsbaby

    Probably adopted by Jewish parents, or had a Jewish mom & black dad.

  186. @Pericles
    @Achmed E. Newman



    I think I may have barely remembered from long ago that the murderers of Bronson’s movie wife were white guys from before, but it really struck me.

     

    In the modern era, I happened upon a movie about terrorism in contemporary London. I literally only saw about five or ten seconds of it, but it turned out that:

    1. The victim to be avenged was chinese/vietnamese;
    2. The officer who assured the avenger (Jackie Chan) that the perps would be etc etc, was a strong black woman;
    3. The terrorists were Irish. (White that is, I suppose I have to add that nowadays.)

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1615160/

    Well kids, that's what terrorism in London looks like.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @restless94110

    That would be The Foreigner starring Jackie Chan and Pierce Brosnan. It comes from the book The Chinaman,

    You left out that the whole plot line deals with violent IRA members, which makes the plot line quite old. A rogue element of the IRA has decided to commit terrorist acts in London (against the rest of the IRA’s restriction) and Jackie’s daughter is blown up in a store they bomb. Chan is revealed in flash back to have escaped the murderous Cambodians or Vietnamese or somewhere back there where they had killed his wife and other child.

    The bombing leaves him totally alone and he goes bezerk in order to get vengeance.

    It is a great action film. And a great dramatic role for Jackie, who produced the film as well.

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