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For free With Alex Kaschuta.

 
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  1. iSteve comes out of the closet!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @New Dealer

    No, he's IN the closet.

    Dis his family go pod-people woke, and he's hiding from them?

    , @HammerJack
    @New Dealer

    The part about pseudonyms gave me a chuckle of recognition. I'm sure I'm not the only one here who has written for newspapers and magazines, particularly before the internet took over.

    Once my own work began to get a bit too edgy (this was the early 90s) I cast about for ideas: how could I write what I wanted, without using my real name, yet still be able to cash the checks?

    My solution: use my sister's married name, and instantly I perceived (and experienced) tremendous benefits: first of all, as a woman I was immune to a lot of criticism; even better, I decided to present as a black woman and instantly ramped up the immunity to the nth degree.

    So yes, way back when, yours truly was deep into journalistic transgenderism and transracialism. (Yeah yeah, some of you suspected, right?) Needless to add, this didn't work with editors who insisted on phone conversations!

    There was a downside, though: my sister was quite mercenary and I had to let her keep the fees. It was worth it, though, for that brief glimpse of true freedom I enjoyed. A whole lot of irony in there, huh.

    Replies: @TelfoedJohn, @AndrewR

    , @Unintended Consequence
    @New Dealer

    "iSteve comes out of the closet!"

    Are you sure he's not broadcasting from a LA-size studio apartment?

    , @Kronos
    @New Dealer

    One of these days I’ll write a cool R. Kelly’s “Trapped in the Closet” parody featuring Steve Sailer and the iSteve universe.

    https://t2.genius.com/unsafe/600x600/https://images.genius.com/1b68f585cf44e46d8e4d8aea55e1054a.327x327x1.jpg

    https://youtu.be/wRPZHrptoR4

    (Due to copyright issues I guess you can’t find the original R. Kelly video, but here’s a GTA 5 video game reenactment that’s ok.)

  2. Next you need to go on Red Scare! Those girls love you and just asked Ann Coulter about you (in public!!)

    • Agree: Cutter
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @W.S. Strauss

    I wonder how it would go… their vibe and Steve’s are totally different. It could end up being sweetly cordial or train-wreck awkward. Or a bit of both. 🤪

    Maybe Steve could offset his sober, avuncular style by letting Lambo go nuts in the background tearing the shit out of the polo collection.

    Replies: @larry lurker

    , @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang
    @W.S. Strauss

    Absolutely!

    Wild to see fellow RedScare fans on here (oddly, mentioning Steve on the Reddit sub forum got me banned). I think it would be a slam dunk and a great opportunity for Steve to get traction with the younger audience.

    For the longtime Steve fans, he had a pretty fruitful interaction with Roissy/Heartiste in the late oughts/early teens that opened the minds of a bunch of then-hipster millennials. I think a Dasha/Anna episode could do the same for Gen Z.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    , @Kronos
    @W.S. Strauss

    I thought that fairly recent Curtis Yarvin interview with Red Scare went very well.

  3. From Richard Henry Dana to Dana Gioia– who really did have a Beach Boys existence, right in Hawthorne. (His Uncle Giacomo built an indoor sandbox for one of them.)

    When I read this interview with Tyler Cowen last week, I thought, no, Steve is the last:

    GIOIA: Also, [Brian Wilson] did as much as any artist in terms of creating a vision of California. Which is to say, a vision of California as the American dream. This is what the great historian Kevin Starr did in a seven-volume history of California, explaining that. I asked Kevin why he never did the vast volume because he ends in the early ’60s, and he says, “He didn’t have the heart to have the dream fall apart.”

    As a Californian, I guarantee you it has happened alas.

    COWEN: You still live there, right?

    GIOIA: Well, this is where I’m from. I’m the last Jew to leave Nazi Germany, this is my home. This is where I know every tree I know every bird, where I’m part of the history of it and so, it’s still a wonderful place to live, don’t get me wrong, but the detrimental aspects of California economically, culturally educationally have been so extreme in the last 15–20 years. It’s heartbreaking for people here.

    Gioia is half-Mexican, by the way. The Ted Williams of poetry. And the Joe DiMaggio.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @MEH 0910
    @Reg Cæsar

    https://conversationswithtyler.com/episodes/dana-gioia/


    April 7, 2021
    Dana Gioia on Becoming an Information Billionaire (Ep. 119)
    How the internationally acclaimed poet became the only guest who can answer all of Tyler’s questions.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dana_Gioia

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Reg Cæsar

    "Kevin Starr"

    Don't like to speak ill of the dead but -- weak. I'm familiar with Starr, and have one of his very conventional California histories on my shelf. I can still picture Starr, ensconced in his plush SF digs, robed in the apparel of a true popinjay. He didn't have the heart to chronicle the Golden State past the early 60s because hippies, blacks, Manson, and stuff. Yes, paradisical California became less paradisical as the 60s became aflame. What materialistic-minded Starr missed is the seeds of the diminishing were planted in the 1950s, when sinister security state affiliated labs, medical and scientific institutions began popping up in the seductive landscape along with the subdivisions and shopping centers. An infrastructure to support the imposed, synthetic process dreamed up by Aldous Huxley and his fellow 1930s Hollywood exiles -- British, Fabians, Children of the Sun -- that produced the framework for the nascent transhumanist movement.

    California in the 1960s and 1970s was not only a wellspring for great culture and art. The region and soil also produced strange cults and murderous weirdos -- the aforementioned Manson, Jim Jones and his cadre of Jewish associates and compliant black ladies, the Mendocino witch cult that housed Squeaky Fromme and associated with Tim Leary and birthed the lovely and sad Wynona Ryder, the Zodiac killer which was probably a unit of three sprang from the darkest depths of Army Psychological Warfare, the Pasadena Rosicrucian cult that groomed Sirhan to become the patsy for the CIA hit on RFK. And roaming the roads and freeways were organized biker gangs trafficking in young women, drugs, weapons, and moonlighting as assassins. Hollywood itself is practically a temple of Sabbatean black magic.

    Kevin, in his obsession with the accepted and mundane, missed out on the good stuff. RIP Kevin.

    Replies: @Prester John

    , @Hodag
    @Reg Cæsar

    Lana is the last historian of California.

  4. I actually voted for this as the Best Movie of All Time two threads ago, but I was connected on a Maricopa County, AZ VPN at the time, so it got recorded as 7000 votes for David Simon, Male Gigolo.

  5. You have a unique voice Steve. It’s unique enough I pause to attempt to describe it, really it’s a thing of its own, but if I were to liken it to other accents or voices I would say its a mix of Midwestern and Hank Hill.

    What would you say your accent is? 20th Century SoCal, Middle Class, Upper Middle Class, “Pretentious” perhaps in that some would argue that you’re trying to sound of a higher class than you grew up as? Not trying to criticize genuinely curious.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Alyosha

    I'm not good at accents, but I've read that there's pretty much the same accent from Los Angeles to Salt Lake City, so I'd say that I have a run of the mill Western American accent. I'm not particularly articulate orally so my enunciation can be a little muddy.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Hodag

    , @Anonymous
    @Alyosha


    You have a unique voice Steve. It’s unique enough I pause to attempt to describe it, really it’s a thing of its own, but if I were to liken it to other accents or voices I would say its a mix of Midwestern and Hank Hill.
     
    As an East Coaster, to me it sounds like the standard Californian accent. Though I don't know if there is an official thing such as a "Californian" accent.

    I first encountered lots of Californians when I went to college in the Northeast and professionally. Since California is so populous, most of the West Coast transplants you meet on the East Coast are Californian.

    If you're from the East Coast and especially the Northeast, the Californian accent is recognizable because it's notably slower than how most East Coasters talk. It's got a bit of a Midwestern and Okie influence and a slower cadence.
  6. Sailer, you geek. You ready to come out of the closet?

  7. 5:08 — 5:38

    Says it all.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Intelligent Dasein


    5:08 — 5:38

    Says it all.
     
    Steve is temperamentally conservative--not by native inclination a bomb thrower. (I'd say the 30s prior where he mentions loyalty is part of that as well.) But while--maybe--that "says it all" about where Steve is coming from, it really isn't the "gist of Steve".

    To me, Steve hits on that a few minutes later where he talks about how reality should be "continuous". People's "real estate" decisions about "good neighborhood" and "good schools" should line up with the social science.

    Steve is an empiricist. There should not be some sort of break between what people see on the street--see with their own lying eyes--and apply in ordinary life and these academic explanatory and political claims. But we do have such a break because our (minoritarian) elites are lying. They think "stereotypes" are wrong, evil ... and go to great lengths of verbalist bullshitting, spinning elaborate tales to insist that what people see and the straightforward explanations of it, is not reality.

    The crackup in the West is because we have a hostile, minoritarian verbalist elite, which does not want people to believe in "stereotypes", so is continually lying--reality denying. This is extremely destructive. Civilization--maintaining it, reproducing it--requires dealing with the reality on the ground. Steve is the empiricist saying "Hey, this is reality."

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Corvinus

  8. @Alyosha
    You have a unique voice Steve. It's unique enough I pause to attempt to describe it, really it's a thing of its own, but if I were to liken it to other accents or voices I would say its a mix of Midwestern and Hank Hill.

    What would you say your accent is? 20th Century SoCal, Middle Class, Upper Middle Class, "Pretentious" perhaps in that some would argue that you're trying to sound of a higher class than you grew up as? Not trying to criticize genuinely curious.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

    I’m not good at accents, but I’ve read that there’s pretty much the same accent from Los Angeles to Salt Lake City, so I’d say that I have a run of the mill Western American accent. I’m not particularly articulate orally so my enunciation can be a little muddy.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Steve Sailer

    I don't know about any accent but what stands out is your measured pace and soft just slightly granular tone -- it's intelligent enough but reassuringly small townie rather than city slicker or academic.

    I'd cast you as the calm and moderately helpful guy running the bait & tackle shop when Mannix tries to go fishing out in the boonies but runs into nasty tight-lipped locals hiding some terrible secret. You'd be one of the few good folks in town. You could also make a living in Westerns if they still made any.

    Good writers often turn out to be disappointingly dry or inarticulate when interviewed, but you definitely clear that bar. My wife actually did some corporate media training for her company's deer-in-the-headlights execs but I don't think I need to run this by her.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    , @Hodag
    @Steve Sailer

    It is not his voice. Recording in a closet means massive sound dampening which makes people sound damn weird.

    One of my great jobs was working in an industrial laundry in North Lawndale during the 90s crack crisis. It was a formative time and gave me my baseline on what is possible for various peoples.

    There was a room where not in use work uniforms were stored. Think of a 200 x 50 room filled with clothes. So weird I still think about it, perfect sound absorption. My friends who I knew since age 7 sounded like aliens.

    Closets are not sound studios.

  9. Nice. Happy to see you haven’t (yet) been disappeared by the Dioxide Dryad !

    Steve, I disagree that you haven’t widened the Overton window; at 1:13:16 you modestly seem to only be considering the propagation of your empirical observations through polite consideration within established institutional channels (“conference at Stanford”) as a measure of success.

    However, through the magic of the internet you have indeed contributed greatly to the widening of the ‘window’ of discourse: in a Sapir-Whorf sense your observations have helped bolster the Right in general, rather democratically—it’s not just the revelation of facts, but your constant contrasting of facts against institutionally propagated lies (“conventional wisdom” as you call it), that widens the window to possible outcomes beyond a mere complacent consensus that “Knowledge Is Good”. The empirical knowledge of today can bear fruit in the action of tomorrow.

  10. @New Dealer
    iSteve comes out of the closet!

    Replies: @Anonymous, @HammerJack, @Unintended Consequence, @Kronos

    No, he’s IN the closet.

    Dis his family go pod-people woke, and he’s hiding from them?

  11. @Reg Cæsar
    From Richard Henry Dana to Dana Gioia-- who really did have a Beach Boys existence, right in Hawthorne. (His Uncle Giacomo built an indoor sandbox for one of them.)

    When I read this interview with Tyler Cowen last week, I thought, no, Steve is the last:


    GIOIA: Also, [Brian Wilson] did as much as any artist in terms of creating a vision of California. Which is to say, a vision of California as the American dream. This is what the great historian Kevin Starr did in a seven-volume history of California, explaining that. I asked Kevin why he never did the vast volume because he ends in the early ’60s, and he says, “He didn’t have the heart to have the dream fall apart.”

    As a Californian, I guarantee you it has happened alas.

    COWEN: You still live there, right?

    GIOIA: Well, this is where I’m from. I’m the last Jew to leave Nazi Germany, this is my home. This is where I know every tree I know every bird, where I’m part of the history of it and so, it’s still a wonderful place to live, don’t get me wrong, but the detrimental aspects of California economically, culturally educationally have been so extreme in the last 15–20 years. It’s heartbreaking for people here.
     

    Gioia is half-Mexican, by the way. The Ted Williams of poetry. And the Joe DiMaggio.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @MEH 0910, @SunBakedSuburb, @Hodag

    Thanks.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Thanks.
     
    • You're welcome: Reg Cæsar
  12. @New Dealer
    iSteve comes out of the closet!

    Replies: @Anonymous, @HammerJack, @Unintended Consequence, @Kronos

    The part about pseudonyms gave me a chuckle of recognition. I’m sure I’m not the only one here who has written for newspapers and magazines, particularly before the internet took over.

    Once my own work began to get a bit too edgy (this was the early 90s) I cast about for ideas: how could I write what I wanted, without using my real name, yet still be able to cash the checks?

    My solution: use my sister’s married name, and instantly I perceived (and experienced) tremendous benefits: first of all, as a woman I was immune to a lot of criticism; even better, I decided to present as a black woman and instantly ramped up the immunity to the nth degree.

    So yes, way back when, yours truly was deep into journalistic transgenderism and transracialism. (Yeah yeah, some of you suspected, right?) Needless to add, this didn’t work with editors who insisted on phone conversations!

    There was a downside, though: my sister was quite mercenary and I had to let her keep the fees. It was worth it, though, for that brief glimpse of true freedom I enjoyed. A whole lot of irony in there, huh.

    • Replies: @TelfoedJohn
    @HammerJack

    Is it possible to write anonymously and get some $ nowadays? Last time I looked at substack, you had to give them your credit card etc. No crypto option. I would have thought it would be possible with Monero etc.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    , @AndrewR
    @HammerJack

    Wait, so you didn't get any of the money?

    Also I don't think it could be that difficult to pass as a black woman on the phone. Mm-hmm.

    Replies: @HammerJack

  13. anonymous[235] • Disclaimer says:

    What is going on with the military. It now has gay officers who identify as dogs.

    15 years ago, there were ruthless guys like this Marine throwing a puppy off a cliff in Iraq and getting ready to get into firefights with insurgents.

    https://www.dumpert.nl/item/43462_9fb16ab3

    • LOL: BB753
  14. @W.S. Strauss
    Next you need to go on Red Scare! Those girls love you and just asked Ann Coulter about you (in public!!)

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang, @Kronos

    I wonder how it would go… their vibe and Steve’s are totally different. It could end up being sweetly cordial or train-wreck awkward. Or a bit of both. 🤪

    Maybe Steve could offset his sober, avuncular style by letting Lambo go nuts in the background tearing the shit out of the polo collection.

    • Replies: @larry lurker
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    I wonder how it would go… their vibe and Steve’s are totally different. It could end up being sweetly cordial or train-wreck awkward. Or a bit of both.
     
    Maybe, but Ana has been aggressively promoting Steve's writing in almost every episode for the past several months (she even joked about it: "The 'don't-mention-Steve-Sailer-in-every-episode' Challenge"), and Dasha mostly just goes along for the ride.

    They've interviewed many guests who were much more uninterviewable than Steve. I think it would be a great show!

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  15. Interesting interview, one which plays much better to the 2022 conditioned audience @ 1.75X speed. Steve’s natural cadence on turbo is perfecto…

    • Thanks: Inverness
    • LOL: Cutter
  16. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @W.S. Strauss

    I wonder how it would go… their vibe and Steve’s are totally different. It could end up being sweetly cordial or train-wreck awkward. Or a bit of both. 🤪

    Maybe Steve could offset his sober, avuncular style by letting Lambo go nuts in the background tearing the shit out of the polo collection.

    Replies: @larry lurker

    I wonder how it would go… their vibe and Steve’s are totally different. It could end up being sweetly cordial or train-wreck awkward. Or a bit of both.

    Maybe, but Ana has been aggressively promoting Steve’s writing in almost every episode for the past several months (she even joked about it: “The ‘don’t-mention-Steve-Sailer-in-every-episode’ Challenge”), and Dasha mostly just goes along for the ride.

    They’ve interviewed many guests who were much more uninterviewable than Steve. I think it would be a great show!

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @larry lurker


    They’ve interviewed many guests who were much more uninterviewable than Steve.
     
    • Gee, thanks: Steve Sailer
  17. Just as everybody else bails. If you haven’t realized it yet Steve Google hates you and want you dead.
    You are two generations behind Steve.
    If you can’t do Locals or Substack, at least try podbean or similar.

  18. @Steve Sailer
    @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks.

    • You’re welcome: Reg Cæsar

  19. I noticed you notice this sort of thing.

    Transgender Activists Attack Feminists Protesting Men In Women’s Prisons

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/transgender-activists-attack-feminists-protesting-men-womens-prisons

    But did you notice that the trannies fight like girls?

    throwing an egg into the group of women and also seen striking one with an umbrella

    At least they try for verisimilitude.

  20. @HammerJack
    @New Dealer

    The part about pseudonyms gave me a chuckle of recognition. I'm sure I'm not the only one here who has written for newspapers and magazines, particularly before the internet took over.

    Once my own work began to get a bit too edgy (this was the early 90s) I cast about for ideas: how could I write what I wanted, without using my real name, yet still be able to cash the checks?

    My solution: use my sister's married name, and instantly I perceived (and experienced) tremendous benefits: first of all, as a woman I was immune to a lot of criticism; even better, I decided to present as a black woman and instantly ramped up the immunity to the nth degree.

    So yes, way back when, yours truly was deep into journalistic transgenderism and transracialism. (Yeah yeah, some of you suspected, right?) Needless to add, this didn't work with editors who insisted on phone conversations!

    There was a downside, though: my sister was quite mercenary and I had to let her keep the fees. It was worth it, though, for that brief glimpse of true freedom I enjoyed. A whole lot of irony in there, huh.

    Replies: @TelfoedJohn, @AndrewR

    Is it possible to write anonymously and get some $ nowadays? Last time I looked at substack, you had to give them your credit card etc. No crypto option. I would have thought it would be possible with Monero etc.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @TelfoedJohn

    I'm still trying to figure out how to give anonymously. It's remarkably difficult. I suppose we should enjoy the concept of cash, while we still have it.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  21. Anon[603] • Disclaimer says:

    Literally a closet! I thought you meant that you had emptied out and converted a closet to a work area, but there are sports coat sleeves brushing against your head!

    I joined Alex’s Substack for this when it came out and listened to it. I didn’t realize there was video. I’ll watch the video version now.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Anon

    Perhaps the sleeves are set dressing, rather than Steve dressing?

  22. I have a big closet and thought about putting a desk in there, but I need to look into the distance every now and then to rest my eyes when I’m working on a screen, so I dismissed the idea.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Bill P

    Now I believe Steve when he says California is too expensive, when he has to work in his closet. Probably can't spare a room for a workspace.

    , @HammerJack
    @Bill P

    That's a very good habit you have. It could even save your eyesight. Periodically focus on something far away, and ideally upon organic forms for the sake of contrast.

  23. It’s been enjoyable watching and listening so far (23 min in) – this lady is a good interviewer, letting you expound with your answers as far as you’d like.

    At ~19 in , with the AA stuff and Ivy League colleges, I came to the problem I have with your view on it. You would like everyone to just be honest about things, and you see this (forced?) dishonesty as causing lots of the extreme anti-White vitriol as explanation instead of the truth.

    Of course, honesty is a great thing. The lies right now are so overwhelming. However, your prescription for just (the president of Harvard, for example) gaming the system to make it work involves unfairness. Is that still OK? We’ll be unfair to make the most people happy and keep the bitching to a dull roar.

    You would like people to be honest but not necessarily the Institutions to be fair. A society with purposeful unfairness is not an honest one.

    (BTW, I don’t care who gets into Harvard, Feral Gov’t money or not. This AA stuff is everywhere though – it’s almost ingrained after 55 years, so people are just accepting. That doesn’t make it right.)

    OK, I’ll view on…

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Aaah, I forgot to write this earlier - had to get things moving this morning: That joke about the changes over the years in the list of low-to-high IQ groups is one of your best! (I'd only read it from you once.)

    , @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Most of the earth's population doesn't care that much about the truth. Not enough to privilege it over political concerns.

    How honest was everyone about Covid - it's origin and the resulting lockdown? What about claims that US intelligence didn't know nuffin' about the killing of Dugan's daughter or the destruction of that pipeline. Or the selling of Zelensky as a hero when he's actually a corrupt little dictator.

    My vague impression is that a lot of pundits are okay with their own set of Noble Lies.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Unintended Consequence
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "... this lady is a good interviewer, letting you expound with your answers as far as you’d like."

    She did a good job of drawing Steve out but asked too much about Obama and Iglesias and not enough about HBD or crime.

    "(BTW, I don’t care who gets into Harvard, Feral Gov’t money or not. This AA stuff is everywhere though – it’s almost ingrained after 55 years, so people are just accepting. That doesn’t make it right.)"

    I don't know how we made the leap from most people finding a job right after highschool to certain average folk requiring access to even elite universities. The need has been manufactured. Most people just need solid communication skills and some well roundedness along with specialized job training. The sorting according to ability is another matter. Doesn't the military do a fair amount of this without complaints from the enlisted?

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  24. It’s pretty cool to see a Romanian lady interviewing Steve. She is in the same part of the country my wife is from. In another interview she describes it as, “a small city in the Austro-Hungarian part near the Hungarian border.”

    Good job Steve, and kudos for keeping your trademark closet space as part of your international image. Your “aww shucks” manner and accent are about as Western American as things get too, which is nice.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Buzz Mohawk


    It’s pretty cool to see a Romanian lady interviewing Steve. She is in the same part of the country my wife is from. In another interview she describes it as, “a small city in the Austro-Hungarian part near the Hungarian border.”
     
    I really felt for her when she described emerging from behind the Iron Curtain to reach at long last the Promised Land of the Golden West, ... only to find it was decadent, decrepit, dishonest, and diseased. I've heard similar stories from other East Bloc émigrés, some of whom eventually turned around and went back, as Ms. Kaschuta seems to have done.

    As a kid I got the same feeling from reading a sci-fi* about an nth-generation interplanetary settler who returns to Earth for help when his colonial homeworld faces an existential threat, only find that in the generations since they left, the Earth that had spawned far-flung conquests had become a degenerate hive of useless self-absorbed pleasure-seekers. The Frontier Hypothesis in sci-fi form, basically.

    The 20th century East Bloc-ers just didn't realize they were the frontiermen of Western Civilization. I think they do now, though.


    ---------

    *The book's not really that great, it was more of an over-developed short story, and the references of what the author thought demonstrated deterioration were very mid-century modern. He imagined the 1970s, basically. Today's reality is much worse than this science fiction projection of what a decaying society would be like.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @JackOH

    , @TelfoedJohn
    @Buzz Mohawk

    She’s actually from the German (‘Transylvanian Saxon’) minority in Romania. I think her husband is Saxon-Romanian too. The current president of Romania is one too:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klaus_Iohannis

    There’s only a few thousand of them, but they’re admired for their honesty and work ethic.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klaus_Iohannis

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  25. @Achmed E. Newman
    It's been enjoyable watching and listening so far (23 min in) - this lady is a good interviewer, letting you expound with your answers as far as you'd like.

    At ~19 in , with the AA stuff and Ivy League colleges, I came to the problem I have with your view on it. You would like everyone to just be honest about things, and you see this (forced?) dishonesty as causing lots of the extreme anti-White vitriol as explanation instead of the truth.

    Of course, honesty is a great thing. The lies right now are so overwhelming. However, your prescription for just (the president of Harvard, for example) gaming the system to make it work involves unfairness. Is that still OK? We'll be unfair to make the most people happy and keep the bitching to a dull roar.

    You would like people to be honest but not necessarily the Institutions to be fair. A society with purposeful unfairness is not an honest one.

    (BTW, I don't care who gets into Harvard, Feral Gov't money or not. This AA stuff is everywhere though - it's almost ingrained after 55 years, so people are just accepting. That doesn't make it right.)

    OK, I'll view on...

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship, @Unintended Consequence

    Aaah, I forgot to write this earlier – had to get things moving this morning: That joke about the changes over the years in the list of low-to-high IQ groups is one of your best! (I’d only read it from you once.)

  26. @Reg Cæsar
    From Richard Henry Dana to Dana Gioia-- who really did have a Beach Boys existence, right in Hawthorne. (His Uncle Giacomo built an indoor sandbox for one of them.)

    When I read this interview with Tyler Cowen last week, I thought, no, Steve is the last:


    GIOIA: Also, [Brian Wilson] did as much as any artist in terms of creating a vision of California. Which is to say, a vision of California as the American dream. This is what the great historian Kevin Starr did in a seven-volume history of California, explaining that. I asked Kevin why he never did the vast volume because he ends in the early ’60s, and he says, “He didn’t have the heart to have the dream fall apart.”

    As a Californian, I guarantee you it has happened alas.

    COWEN: You still live there, right?

    GIOIA: Well, this is where I’m from. I’m the last Jew to leave Nazi Germany, this is my home. This is where I know every tree I know every bird, where I’m part of the history of it and so, it’s still a wonderful place to live, don’t get me wrong, but the detrimental aspects of California economically, culturally educationally have been so extreme in the last 15–20 years. It’s heartbreaking for people here.
     

    Gioia is half-Mexican, by the way. The Ted Williams of poetry. And the Joe DiMaggio.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @MEH 0910, @SunBakedSuburb, @Hodag

    https://conversationswithtyler.com/episodes/dana-gioia/

    April 7, 2021
    Dana Gioia on Becoming an Information Billionaire (Ep. 119)
    How the internationally acclaimed poet became the only guest who can answer all of Tyler’s questions.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dana_Gioia

    • Thanks: Emil Nikola Richard
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @MEH 0910

    Thanks! Carelessly forgot the link.

  27. @Achmed E. Newman
    It's been enjoyable watching and listening so far (23 min in) - this lady is a good interviewer, letting you expound with your answers as far as you'd like.

    At ~19 in , with the AA stuff and Ivy League colleges, I came to the problem I have with your view on it. You would like everyone to just be honest about things, and you see this (forced?) dishonesty as causing lots of the extreme anti-White vitriol as explanation instead of the truth.

    Of course, honesty is a great thing. The lies right now are so overwhelming. However, your prescription for just (the president of Harvard, for example) gaming the system to make it work involves unfairness. Is that still OK? We'll be unfair to make the most people happy and keep the bitching to a dull roar.

    You would like people to be honest but not necessarily the Institutions to be fair. A society with purposeful unfairness is not an honest one.

    (BTW, I don't care who gets into Harvard, Feral Gov't money or not. This AA stuff is everywhere though - it's almost ingrained after 55 years, so people are just accepting. That doesn't make it right.)

    OK, I'll view on...

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship, @Unintended Consequence

    Most of the earth’s population doesn’t care that much about the truth. Not enough to privilege it over political concerns.

    How honest was everyone about Covid – it’s origin and the resulting lockdown? What about claims that US intelligence didn’t know nuffin’ about the killing of Dugan’s daughter or the destruction of that pipeline. Or the selling of Zelensky as a hero when he’s actually a corrupt little dictator.

    My vague impression is that a lot of pundits are okay with their own set of Noble Lies.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship


    Most of the earth’s population doesn’t governments don't care that much about the truth. Not enough to privilege it over political concerns.
     
    FIFY.

    My vague impression is that a lot of pundits are okay with their own set of Noble Lies.
     
    Not this guy.

    Seek the Truth was the handle of a commenter on Zerohedge way back. I like that. For now, though, you can call me Mark Twain.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

  28. @Bill P
    I have a big closet and thought about putting a desk in there, but I need to look into the distance every now and then to rest my eyes when I'm working on a screen, so I dismissed the idea.

    Replies: @BB753, @HammerJack

    Now I believe Steve when he says California is too expensive, when he has to work in his closet. Probably can’t spare a room for a workspace.

  29. @HammerJack
    @New Dealer

    The part about pseudonyms gave me a chuckle of recognition. I'm sure I'm not the only one here who has written for newspapers and magazines, particularly before the internet took over.

    Once my own work began to get a bit too edgy (this was the early 90s) I cast about for ideas: how could I write what I wanted, without using my real name, yet still be able to cash the checks?

    My solution: use my sister's married name, and instantly I perceived (and experienced) tremendous benefits: first of all, as a woman I was immune to a lot of criticism; even better, I decided to present as a black woman and instantly ramped up the immunity to the nth degree.

    So yes, way back when, yours truly was deep into journalistic transgenderism and transracialism. (Yeah yeah, some of you suspected, right?) Needless to add, this didn't work with editors who insisted on phone conversations!

    There was a downside, though: my sister was quite mercenary and I had to let her keep the fees. It was worth it, though, for that brief glimpse of true freedom I enjoyed. A whole lot of irony in there, huh.

    Replies: @TelfoedJohn, @AndrewR

    Wait, so you didn’t get any of the money?

    Also I don’t think it could be that difficult to pass as a black woman on the phone. Mm-hmm.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @AndrewR

    Funny thing, I've always been good with voices but I figured I was far enough out on a limb that I wasn't tempted to risk anything further.

    The money at the time wasn't really all that much, and honestly I was happy to help my sister.

  30. @MEH 0910
    @Reg Cæsar

    https://conversationswithtyler.com/episodes/dana-gioia/


    April 7, 2021
    Dana Gioia on Becoming an Information Billionaire (Ep. 119)
    How the internationally acclaimed poet became the only guest who can answer all of Tyler’s questions.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dana_Gioia

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks! Carelessly forgot the link.

  31. @Steve Sailer
    @Alyosha

    I'm not good at accents, but I've read that there's pretty much the same accent from Los Angeles to Salt Lake City, so I'd say that I have a run of the mill Western American accent. I'm not particularly articulate orally so my enunciation can be a little muddy.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Hodag

    I don’t know about any accent but what stands out is your measured pace and soft just slightly granular tone — it’s intelligent enough but reassuringly small townie rather than city slicker or academic.

    I’d cast you as the calm and moderately helpful guy running the bait & tackle shop when Mannix tries to go fishing out in the boonies but runs into nasty tight-lipped locals hiding some terrible secret. You’d be one of the few good folks in town. You could also make a living in Westerns if they still made any.

    Good writers often turn out to be disappointingly dry or inarticulate when interviewed, but you definitely clear that bar. My wife actually did some corporate media training for her company’s deer-in-the-headlights execs but I don’t think I need to run this by her.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Known Fact

    I would like to suggest you face the camera more -- your head is pretty much faced forward but your eyes are off to your left quite a bit, and sometimes upward or off to the right. This looks "thoughtful" up to a point but then can start to seem insincere or evasive

  32. @Known Fact
    @Steve Sailer

    I don't know about any accent but what stands out is your measured pace and soft just slightly granular tone -- it's intelligent enough but reassuringly small townie rather than city slicker or academic.

    I'd cast you as the calm and moderately helpful guy running the bait & tackle shop when Mannix tries to go fishing out in the boonies but runs into nasty tight-lipped locals hiding some terrible secret. You'd be one of the few good folks in town. You could also make a living in Westerns if they still made any.

    Good writers often turn out to be disappointingly dry or inarticulate when interviewed, but you definitely clear that bar. My wife actually did some corporate media training for her company's deer-in-the-headlights execs but I don't think I need to run this by her.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    I would like to suggest you face the camera more — your head is pretty much faced forward but your eyes are off to your left quite a bit, and sometimes upward or off to the right. This looks “thoughtful” up to a point but then can start to seem insincere or evasive

  33. @Intelligent Dasein
    5:08 --- 5:38

    Says it all.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    5:08 — 5:38

    Says it all.

    Steve is temperamentally conservative–not by native inclination a bomb thrower. (I’d say the 30s prior where he mentions loyalty is part of that as well.) But while–maybe–that “says it all” about where Steve is coming from, it really isn’t the “gist of Steve”.

    To me, Steve hits on that a few minutes later where he talks about how reality should be “continuous”. People’s “real estate” decisions about “good neighborhood” and “good schools” should line up with the social science.

    Steve is an empiricist. There should not be some sort of break between what people see on the street–see with their own lying eyes–and apply in ordinary life and these academic explanatory and political claims. But we do have such a break because our (minoritarian) elites are lying. They think “stereotypes” are wrong, evil … and go to great lengths of verbalist bullshitting, spinning elaborate tales to insist that what people see and the straightforward explanations of it, is not reality.

    The crackup in the West is because we have a hostile, minoritarian verbalist elite, which does not want people to believe in “stereotypes”, so is continually lying–reality denying. This is extremely destructive. Civilization–maintaining it, reproducing it–requires dealing with the reality on the ground. Steve is the empiricist saying “Hey, this is reality.”

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @AnotherDad

    Thanks for explaining Steve. Did that dog wander in whilst Steve was speaking? This is why I cannot watch the interview. Having seen the Shimmery once, and having endured the subsequent nightmares, I will not subject myself to a second round. Not even the delight of seeing Steve in his Batcave, wearing his tattered Ben Cooper costume, will get me to risk a glimpse of the Shimmery.

    , @Corvinus
    @AnotherDad

    “Steve is an empiricist. There should not be some sort of break between what people see on the street–see with their own lying eyes–and apply in ordinary life and these academic explanatory and political claims“

    It’s manufactured reality on his part. He doesn’t address the impact of attributional theory, confirmation bias, and recency bias.

    Of course, if we want to be “real”, then Madison Grant’s racial categorization of Europeans has yet to be refuted. We ought to recognize that certain groups of Europeans are biologically and behaviorally inferior. It’s just the way it was back then and it’s just the way it is now. Don’t blame me for pointing out this hate fact, blame HbD.

  34. I reported it for harmful content.

    • LOL: Polistra
  35. @Reg Cæsar
    From Richard Henry Dana to Dana Gioia-- who really did have a Beach Boys existence, right in Hawthorne. (His Uncle Giacomo built an indoor sandbox for one of them.)

    When I read this interview with Tyler Cowen last week, I thought, no, Steve is the last:


    GIOIA: Also, [Brian Wilson] did as much as any artist in terms of creating a vision of California. Which is to say, a vision of California as the American dream. This is what the great historian Kevin Starr did in a seven-volume history of California, explaining that. I asked Kevin why he never did the vast volume because he ends in the early ’60s, and he says, “He didn’t have the heart to have the dream fall apart.”

    As a Californian, I guarantee you it has happened alas.

    COWEN: You still live there, right?

    GIOIA: Well, this is where I’m from. I’m the last Jew to leave Nazi Germany, this is my home. This is where I know every tree I know every bird, where I’m part of the history of it and so, it’s still a wonderful place to live, don’t get me wrong, but the detrimental aspects of California economically, culturally educationally have been so extreme in the last 15–20 years. It’s heartbreaking for people here.
     

    Gioia is half-Mexican, by the way. The Ted Williams of poetry. And the Joe DiMaggio.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @MEH 0910, @SunBakedSuburb, @Hodag

    “Kevin Starr”

    Don’t like to speak ill of the dead but — weak. I’m familiar with Starr, and have one of his very conventional California histories on my shelf. I can still picture Starr, ensconced in his plush SF digs, robed in the apparel of a true popinjay. He didn’t have the heart to chronicle the Golden State past the early 60s because hippies, blacks, Manson, and stuff. Yes, paradisical California became less paradisical as the 60s became aflame. What materialistic-minded Starr missed is the seeds of the diminishing were planted in the 1950s, when sinister security state affiliated labs, medical and scientific institutions began popping up in the seductive landscape along with the subdivisions and shopping centers. An infrastructure to support the imposed, synthetic process dreamed up by Aldous Huxley and his fellow 1930s Hollywood exiles — British, Fabians, Children of the Sun — that produced the framework for the nascent transhumanist movement.

    California in the 1960s and 1970s was not only a wellspring for great culture and art. The region and soil also produced strange cults and murderous weirdos — the aforementioned Manson, Jim Jones and his cadre of Jewish associates and compliant black ladies, the Mendocino witch cult that housed Squeaky Fromme and associated with Tim Leary and birthed the lovely and sad Wynona Ryder, the Zodiac killer which was probably a unit of three sprang from the darkest depths of Army Psychological Warfare, the Pasadena Rosicrucian cult that groomed Sirhan to become the patsy for the CIA hit on RFK. And roaming the roads and freeways were organized biker gangs trafficking in young women, drugs, weapons, and moonlighting as assassins. Hollywood itself is practically a temple of Sabbatean black magic.

    Kevin, in his obsession with the accepted and mundane, missed out on the good stuff. RIP Kevin.

    • Agree: Prester John
    • Replies: @Prester John
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Good job. Excellent summary of post-1960 CA. This only reinforces the notion that CA is usually at least ten years ahead of the rest of the country.

    Look at it now--and get those seatbelts on, folks!

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

  36. @AnotherDad
    @Intelligent Dasein


    5:08 — 5:38

    Says it all.
     
    Steve is temperamentally conservative--not by native inclination a bomb thrower. (I'd say the 30s prior where he mentions loyalty is part of that as well.) But while--maybe--that "says it all" about where Steve is coming from, it really isn't the "gist of Steve".

    To me, Steve hits on that a few minutes later where he talks about how reality should be "continuous". People's "real estate" decisions about "good neighborhood" and "good schools" should line up with the social science.

    Steve is an empiricist. There should not be some sort of break between what people see on the street--see with their own lying eyes--and apply in ordinary life and these academic explanatory and political claims. But we do have such a break because our (minoritarian) elites are lying. They think "stereotypes" are wrong, evil ... and go to great lengths of verbalist bullshitting, spinning elaborate tales to insist that what people see and the straightforward explanations of it, is not reality.

    The crackup in the West is because we have a hostile, minoritarian verbalist elite, which does not want people to believe in "stereotypes", so is continually lying--reality denying. This is extremely destructive. Civilization--maintaining it, reproducing it--requires dealing with the reality on the ground. Steve is the empiricist saying "Hey, this is reality."

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Corvinus

    Thanks for explaining Steve. Did that dog wander in whilst Steve was speaking? This is why I cannot watch the interview. Having seen the Shimmery once, and having endured the subsequent nightmares, I will not subject myself to a second round. Not even the delight of seeing Steve in his Batcave, wearing his tattered Ben Cooper costume, will get me to risk a glimpse of the Shimmery.

  37. Steve,

    I haven’t watched it yet but I’m sure you did a great job! Is it…is it possible you could’ve just moved the clothes over like 4 feet??

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Danindc

    Four feet?! He lives in California. Four more feet of closet would add another million dollars to the cost of the house. He mentions in the interview that things have gotten expensive out there.

    He seems to be expanding his wardrobe, however. He's added a few more Costco shirts and beige jackets since the last time he gave an interview.

    Don't hate the closet. It's a great trademark.

    Replies: @Danindc, @XBardon Kaldlan

  38. @Danindc
    Steve,

    I haven’t watched it yet but I’m sure you did a great job! Is it…is it possible you could’ve just moved the clothes over like 4 feet??

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Four feet?! He lives in California. Four more feet of closet would add another million dollars to the cost of the house. He mentions in the interview that things have gotten expensive out there.

    He seems to be expanding his wardrobe, however. He’s added a few more Costco shirts and beige jackets since the last time he gave an interview.

    Don’t hate the closet. It’s a great trademark.

    • Replies: @Danindc
    @Buzz Mohawk

    All good points. Seemed like there was some space- just saying. I want my next donation to go towards Closet Stretchers

    , @XBardon Kaldlan
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The pink shirt. A nod to the trannies?

    Replies: @Curle

  39. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Most of the earth's population doesn't care that much about the truth. Not enough to privilege it over political concerns.

    How honest was everyone about Covid - it's origin and the resulting lockdown? What about claims that US intelligence didn't know nuffin' about the killing of Dugan's daughter or the destruction of that pipeline. Or the selling of Zelensky as a hero when he's actually a corrupt little dictator.

    My vague impression is that a lot of pundits are okay with their own set of Noble Lies.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Most of the earth’s population doesn’t governments don’t care that much about the truth. Not enough to privilege it over political concerns.

    FIFY.

    My vague impression is that a lot of pundits are okay with their own set of Noble Lies.

    Not this guy.

    Seek the Truth was the handle of a commenter on Zerohedge way back. I like that. For now, though, you can call me Mark Twain.

    • Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I've heard it said that Germans have an obsessive concern with the truth. Like, it's important to them personally that you get the truth of whatever matter they're talking about. That seems to be one extreme.

    I never hear that about Africans, Asians or Indians. And that's over half the world population. They may want you to believe something (or say it), but declaring objective truth doesn't seem as high on their list of values.

    It would be interesting to know more about this because I truly think huge parts of the human population aren't as concerned with the truth as a few of us are.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  40. That last thing I wrote reminded me of your few minute conversation about anonymity. Very interesting. I’m surprised you haven’t written a post or two on that.

    I’m not sure if you keep up with every single post on VDare, but you may recall that Jason Kessler has an occasional Doxxing the Doxxers post*. Holy crap, those guys are some angry vicious bastards. I’m not exactly sure how I’d handle it, if one of those guys got on my case.

    .

    * For those interested, read here, here, and here, and, by Rosa Luxemburg, here.

  41. @AnotherDad
    @Intelligent Dasein


    5:08 — 5:38

    Says it all.
     
    Steve is temperamentally conservative--not by native inclination a bomb thrower. (I'd say the 30s prior where he mentions loyalty is part of that as well.) But while--maybe--that "says it all" about where Steve is coming from, it really isn't the "gist of Steve".

    To me, Steve hits on that a few minutes later where he talks about how reality should be "continuous". People's "real estate" decisions about "good neighborhood" and "good schools" should line up with the social science.

    Steve is an empiricist. There should not be some sort of break between what people see on the street--see with their own lying eyes--and apply in ordinary life and these academic explanatory and political claims. But we do have such a break because our (minoritarian) elites are lying. They think "stereotypes" are wrong, evil ... and go to great lengths of verbalist bullshitting, spinning elaborate tales to insist that what people see and the straightforward explanations of it, is not reality.

    The crackup in the West is because we have a hostile, minoritarian verbalist elite, which does not want people to believe in "stereotypes", so is continually lying--reality denying. This is extremely destructive. Civilization--maintaining it, reproducing it--requires dealing with the reality on the ground. Steve is the empiricist saying "Hey, this is reality."

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Corvinus

    “Steve is an empiricist. There should not be some sort of break between what people see on the street–see with their own lying eyes–and apply in ordinary life and these academic explanatory and political claims“

    It’s manufactured reality on his part. He doesn’t address the impact of attributional theory, confirmation bias, and recency bias.

    Of course, if we want to be “real”, then Madison Grant’s racial categorization of Europeans has yet to be refuted. We ought to recognize that certain groups of Europeans are biologically and behaviorally inferior. It’s just the way it was back then and it’s just the way it is now. Don’t blame me for pointing out this hate fact, blame HbD.

    • Troll: HammerJack
  42. I enjoyed it. Steve has a good presence and is engaging. It’s annoying that Alex–who lives in Romania–didn’t ask him about her child being cold this winter. Steve, you feel no guilt over supporting the pointless deaths of thousands of Ukrainians and the pointless destruction of economic value across Europe? Pointless and immoral as the rationale is that Russia is defying the Pax Americana order, but the war is being dishonestly promoted as one of Ukrainian national sovereignty, and the warriors being used by the US are essentially Ukrainians slaves (conscripts).

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Chrisnonymous


    Steve, you feel no guilt over supporting the pointless deaths of thousands of Ukrainians and the pointless destruction of economic value across Europe?
     
    The good citizens of classical Greece drew strength from the determination of two of their countrymen, Sperthias and Bulis, to resist the lure of total power. On their way to Suza, the Spartan envoys were met by Hydarnes, a high Persian official, who offered to make them mighty in their homeland, if only they would attach themselves to the Great King, his despotic master. To the benefit of Greece-and to the benefit of all free men-Herodotus has preserved their answer. “Hydarnes,” they said, “thou art a one-sided counselor. Thou hast experience of half the matter; but the other half is beyond thy knowledge. A slave’s life thou understandest; but, never having tasted liberty, thou canst not tell whether it be sweet or no. Ah! hadst thou known what freedom is, thou wouldst have bidden us fight for it, not with the spear only, but with the battle-axe.”

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    , @Veteran Aryan
    @Chrisnonymous


    Russia is defying the Pax Americana order
     
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CxHIyv0UsAAsL8J.jpg:large
  43. As much as I want to, I decided not to watch.

    If I watch, every time I read something you have written I’ll hear your voice in my head rather than my own voice.

    What if you have an annoying voice?

    This happened to me with Camille Paglia. I read something she had written and admired it, so wanted to hear a bit more. After watching her: I couldn’t read anything by her since her voice and mannerisms were so irritating.

  44. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Reg Cæsar

    "Kevin Starr"

    Don't like to speak ill of the dead but -- weak. I'm familiar with Starr, and have one of his very conventional California histories on my shelf. I can still picture Starr, ensconced in his plush SF digs, robed in the apparel of a true popinjay. He didn't have the heart to chronicle the Golden State past the early 60s because hippies, blacks, Manson, and stuff. Yes, paradisical California became less paradisical as the 60s became aflame. What materialistic-minded Starr missed is the seeds of the diminishing were planted in the 1950s, when sinister security state affiliated labs, medical and scientific institutions began popping up in the seductive landscape along with the subdivisions and shopping centers. An infrastructure to support the imposed, synthetic process dreamed up by Aldous Huxley and his fellow 1930s Hollywood exiles -- British, Fabians, Children of the Sun -- that produced the framework for the nascent transhumanist movement.

    California in the 1960s and 1970s was not only a wellspring for great culture and art. The region and soil also produced strange cults and murderous weirdos -- the aforementioned Manson, Jim Jones and his cadre of Jewish associates and compliant black ladies, the Mendocino witch cult that housed Squeaky Fromme and associated with Tim Leary and birthed the lovely and sad Wynona Ryder, the Zodiac killer which was probably a unit of three sprang from the darkest depths of Army Psychological Warfare, the Pasadena Rosicrucian cult that groomed Sirhan to become the patsy for the CIA hit on RFK. And roaming the roads and freeways were organized biker gangs trafficking in young women, drugs, weapons, and moonlighting as assassins. Hollywood itself is practically a temple of Sabbatean black magic.

    Kevin, in his obsession with the accepted and mundane, missed out on the good stuff. RIP Kevin.

    Replies: @Prester John

    Good job. Excellent summary of post-1960 CA. This only reinforces the notion that CA is usually at least ten years ahead of the rest of the country.

    Look at it now–and get those seatbelts on, folks!

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Prester John

    "CA is usually ten years ahead of the rest of the country"

    America, look at California for a glimpse of your totalitarian future. The governments of Washington and Oregon are similarly infected by the totalitarian mind-virus. I wish the West Coast wasn't so beautiful and great.

  45. @Chrisnonymous
    I enjoyed it. Steve has a good presence and is engaging. It's annoying that Alex--who lives in Romania--didn't ask him about her child being cold this winter. Steve, you feel no guilt over supporting the pointless deaths of thousands of Ukrainians and the pointless destruction of economic value across Europe? Pointless and immoral as the rationale is that Russia is defying the Pax Americana order, but the war is being dishonestly promoted as one of Ukrainian national sovereignty, and the warriors being used by the US are essentially Ukrainians slaves (conscripts).

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Veteran Aryan

    Steve, you feel no guilt over supporting the pointless deaths of thousands of Ukrainians and the pointless destruction of economic value across Europe?

    The good citizens of classical Greece drew strength from the determination of two of their countrymen, Sperthias and Bulis, to resist the lure of total power. On their way to Suza, the Spartan envoys were met by Hydarnes, a high Persian official, who offered to make them mighty in their homeland, if only they would attach themselves to the Great King, his despotic master. To the benefit of Greece-and to the benefit of all free men-Herodotus has preserved their answer. “Hydarnes,” they said, “thou art a one-sided counselor. Thou hast experience of half the matter; but the other half is beyond thy knowledge. A slave’s life thou understandest; but, never having tasted liberty, thou canst not tell whether it be sweet or no. Ah! hadst thou known what freedom is, thou wouldst have bidden us fight for it, not with the spear only, but with the battle-axe.”

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Bardon Kaldian

    This is a Red Herring because Steve's professed reason for supporting the continuation of conflict is not freedom for Ukrainians but "punishing" Russia. I put "punishing" in quotation marks not because they are scare quotes because that is literally the word he has used. And what does he want to "punish" them for? For violating the post-1945 lack of invasion by countries other than the US. It is about US hegemony and is therefore immoral and has nothing to do with Ukrainian freedom. For the extreme form of this argument, see Richard Hanania's recent post advocating that we sacrifice all Ukrainians (it's just utilitarianism, doncha know?) to avoid a counterfactual situation that is entirely hypothetical and implausible.

    The real parallel with the Spartans would be if the Ukrainians were voluntarily sacrificing themselves to stop an in-progress invasion of all of Europe by a power intent on literally enslaving them as well as literally capable of enslaving them. That is so far from the reality of the Russia-Ukraine conflict that if you believe in your post, you're objectively an utter ignoramus and fool.

  46. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Danindc

    Four feet?! He lives in California. Four more feet of closet would add another million dollars to the cost of the house. He mentions in the interview that things have gotten expensive out there.

    He seems to be expanding his wardrobe, however. He's added a few more Costco shirts and beige jackets since the last time he gave an interview.

    Don't hate the closet. It's a great trademark.

    Replies: @Danindc, @XBardon Kaldlan

    All good points. Seemed like there was some space- just saying. I want my next donation to go towards Closet Stretchers

  47. @Reg Cæsar
    From Richard Henry Dana to Dana Gioia-- who really did have a Beach Boys existence, right in Hawthorne. (His Uncle Giacomo built an indoor sandbox for one of them.)

    When I read this interview with Tyler Cowen last week, I thought, no, Steve is the last:


    GIOIA: Also, [Brian Wilson] did as much as any artist in terms of creating a vision of California. Which is to say, a vision of California as the American dream. This is what the great historian Kevin Starr did in a seven-volume history of California, explaining that. I asked Kevin why he never did the vast volume because he ends in the early ’60s, and he says, “He didn’t have the heart to have the dream fall apart.”

    As a Californian, I guarantee you it has happened alas.

    COWEN: You still live there, right?

    GIOIA: Well, this is where I’m from. I’m the last Jew to leave Nazi Germany, this is my home. This is where I know every tree I know every bird, where I’m part of the history of it and so, it’s still a wonderful place to live, don’t get me wrong, but the detrimental aspects of California economically, culturally educationally have been so extreme in the last 15–20 years. It’s heartbreaking for people here.
     

    Gioia is half-Mexican, by the way. The Ted Williams of poetry. And the Joe DiMaggio.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @MEH 0910, @SunBakedSuburb, @Hodag

    Lana is the last historian of California.

  48. @Steve Sailer
    @Alyosha

    I'm not good at accents, but I've read that there's pretty much the same accent from Los Angeles to Salt Lake City, so I'd say that I have a run of the mill Western American accent. I'm not particularly articulate orally so my enunciation can be a little muddy.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Hodag

    It is not his voice. Recording in a closet means massive sound dampening which makes people sound damn weird.

    One of my great jobs was working in an industrial laundry in North Lawndale during the 90s crack crisis. It was a formative time and gave me my baseline on what is possible for various peoples.

    There was a room where not in use work uniforms were stored. Think of a 200 x 50 room filled with clothes. So weird I still think about it, perfect sound absorption. My friends who I knew since age 7 sounded like aliens.

    Closets are not sound studios.

  49. Anonymous[370] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alyosha
    You have a unique voice Steve. It's unique enough I pause to attempt to describe it, really it's a thing of its own, but if I were to liken it to other accents or voices I would say its a mix of Midwestern and Hank Hill.

    What would you say your accent is? 20th Century SoCal, Middle Class, Upper Middle Class, "Pretentious" perhaps in that some would argue that you're trying to sound of a higher class than you grew up as? Not trying to criticize genuinely curious.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

    You have a unique voice Steve. It’s unique enough I pause to attempt to describe it, really it’s a thing of its own, but if I were to liken it to other accents or voices I would say its a mix of Midwestern and Hank Hill.

    As an East Coaster, to me it sounds like the standard Californian accent. Though I don’t know if there is an official thing such as a “Californian” accent.

    I first encountered lots of Californians when I went to college in the Northeast and professionally. Since California is so populous, most of the West Coast transplants you meet on the East Coast are Californian.

    If you’re from the East Coast and especially the Northeast, the Californian accent is recognizable because it’s notably slower than how most East Coasters talk. It’s got a bit of a Midwestern and Okie influence and a slower cadence.

  50. “…it’s just become standard to denounce whites for any non-white shortcomings.” (21:40)

    With a few exceptions. White supremacism on open display in Qatar:


    Of course, nobody on either side calls out the racial aspect of this movement. Some things just don’t fit the narrative. In either direction.

  51. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship


    Most of the earth’s population doesn’t governments don't care that much about the truth. Not enough to privilege it over political concerns.
     
    FIFY.

    My vague impression is that a lot of pundits are okay with their own set of Noble Lies.
     
    Not this guy.

    Seek the Truth was the handle of a commenter on Zerohedge way back. I like that. For now, though, you can call me Mark Twain.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    I’ve heard it said that Germans have an obsessive concern with the truth. Like, it’s important to them personally that you get the truth of whatever matter they’re talking about. That seems to be one extreme.

    I never hear that about Africans, Asians or Indians. And that’s over half the world population. They may want you to believe something (or say it), but declaring objective truth doesn’t seem as high on their list of values.

    It would be interesting to know more about this because I truly think huge parts of the human population aren’t as concerned with the truth as a few of us are.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    “I never hear that about Africans, Asians or Indians. And that’s over half the world population. They may want you to believe something (or say it), but declaring objective truth doesn’t seem as high on their list of values.”

    You can count yourself in that list as an Eastern European. Don’t blame me, blame HbD.

    “My vague impression is that a lot of pundits are okay with their own set of Noble Lies.“

    Does that include our intrepid host?

  52. @New Dealer
    iSteve comes out of the closet!

    Replies: @Anonymous, @HammerJack, @Unintended Consequence, @Kronos

    “iSteve comes out of the closet!”

    Are you sure he’s not broadcasting from a LA-size studio apartment?

  53. @Prester John
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Good job. Excellent summary of post-1960 CA. This only reinforces the notion that CA is usually at least ten years ahead of the rest of the country.

    Look at it now--and get those seatbelts on, folks!

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “CA is usually ten years ahead of the rest of the country”

    America, look at California for a glimpse of your totalitarian future. The governments of Washington and Oregon are similarly infected by the totalitarian mind-virus. I wish the West Coast wasn’t so beautiful and great.

    • Agree: HammerJack
  54. Anonymous[278] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve Sailer freaked out about the phony virus and early on came out in support of Zelensky and the Kiev government. I understand that Sailer has to cater to his donors and their neurosis and obsessive anti-Christian grievances, but he didn’t need to run with it.

    I have nothing to learn from this 🤡

  55. Opening an interview about contemporary politics with Richard Henry Dana? Mr. Sailer, this is exactly why we love you, and you’re an irreplaceable national treasure.

  56. @TelfoedJohn
    @HammerJack

    Is it possible to write anonymously and get some $ nowadays? Last time I looked at substack, you had to give them your credit card etc. No crypto option. I would have thought it would be possible with Monero etc.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    I’m still trying to figure out how to give anonymously. It’s remarkably difficult. I suppose we should enjoy the concept of cash, while we still have it.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @HammerJack

    Go buy some Amazon gift cards and mail them to Steve.

  57. @Bill P
    I have a big closet and thought about putting a desk in there, but I need to look into the distance every now and then to rest my eyes when I'm working on a screen, so I dismissed the idea.

    Replies: @BB753, @HammerJack

    That’s a very good habit you have. It could even save your eyesight. Periodically focus on something far away, and ideally upon organic forms for the sake of contrast.

  58. @AndrewR
    @HammerJack

    Wait, so you didn't get any of the money?

    Also I don't think it could be that difficult to pass as a black woman on the phone. Mm-hmm.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    Funny thing, I’ve always been good with voices but I figured I was far enough out on a limb that I wasn’t tempted to risk anything further.

    The money at the time wasn’t really all that much, and honestly I was happy to help my sister.

  59. @larry lurker
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    I wonder how it would go… their vibe and Steve’s are totally different. It could end up being sweetly cordial or train-wreck awkward. Or a bit of both.
     
    Maybe, but Ana has been aggressively promoting Steve's writing in almost every episode for the past several months (she even joked about it: "The 'don't-mention-Steve-Sailer-in-every-episode' Challenge"), and Dasha mostly just goes along for the ride.

    They've interviewed many guests who were much more uninterviewable than Steve. I think it would be a great show!

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    They’ve interviewed many guests who were much more uninterviewable than Steve.

    • Gee, thanks: Steve Sailer

  60. @Achmed E. Newman
    It's been enjoyable watching and listening so far (23 min in) - this lady is a good interviewer, letting you expound with your answers as far as you'd like.

    At ~19 in , with the AA stuff and Ivy League colleges, I came to the problem I have with your view on it. You would like everyone to just be honest about things, and you see this (forced?) dishonesty as causing lots of the extreme anti-White vitriol as explanation instead of the truth.

    Of course, honesty is a great thing. The lies right now are so overwhelming. However, your prescription for just (the president of Harvard, for example) gaming the system to make it work involves unfairness. Is that still OK? We'll be unfair to make the most people happy and keep the bitching to a dull roar.

    You would like people to be honest but not necessarily the Institutions to be fair. A society with purposeful unfairness is not an honest one.

    (BTW, I don't care who gets into Harvard, Feral Gov't money or not. This AA stuff is everywhere though - it's almost ingrained after 55 years, so people are just accepting. That doesn't make it right.)

    OK, I'll view on...

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship, @Unintended Consequence

    “… this lady is a good interviewer, letting you expound with your answers as far as you’d like.”

    She did a good job of drawing Steve out but asked too much about Obama and Iglesias and not enough about HBD or crime.

    “(BTW, I don’t care who gets into Harvard, Feral Gov’t money or not. This AA stuff is everywhere though – it’s almost ingrained after 55 years, so people are just accepting. That doesn’t make it right.)”

    I don’t know how we made the leap from most people finding a job right after highschool to certain average folk requiring access to even elite universities. The need has been manufactured. Most people just need solid communication skills and some well roundedness along with specialized job training. The sorting according to ability is another matter. Doesn’t the military do a fair amount of this without complaints from the enlisted?

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Unintended Consequence


    I don’t know how we made the leap from most people finding a job right after highschool to certain average folk requiring access to even elite universities.
     
    Griggs v. Duke Power, mostly. Perhaps the most catastrophic decision in judicial history. Trillions of dollars and millions of lives wasted. It may end civilization.

    FWIW, it was a unanimous decision.
  61. @Buzz Mohawk
    It's pretty cool to see a Romanian lady interviewing Steve. She is in the same part of the country my wife is from. In another interview she describes it as, "a small city in the Austro-Hungarian part near the Hungarian border."

    Good job Steve, and kudos for keeping your trademark closet space as part of your international image. Your "aww shucks" manner and accent are about as Western American as things get too, which is nice.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @TelfoedJohn

    It’s pretty cool to see a Romanian lady interviewing Steve. She is in the same part of the country my wife is from. In another interview she describes it as, “a small city in the Austro-Hungarian part near the Hungarian border.”

    I really felt for her when she described emerging from behind the Iron Curtain to reach at long last the Promised Land of the Golden West, … only to find it was decadent, decrepit, dishonest, and diseased. I’ve heard similar stories from other East Bloc émigrés, some of whom eventually turned around and went back, as Ms. Kaschuta seems to have done.

    As a kid I got the same feeling from reading a sci-fi* about an nth-generation interplanetary settler who returns to Earth for help when his colonial homeworld faces an existential threat, only find that in the generations since they left, the Earth that had spawned far-flung conquests had become a degenerate hive of useless self-absorbed pleasure-seekers. The Frontier Hypothesis in sci-fi form, basically.

    The 20th century East Bloc-ers just didn’t realize they were the frontiermen of Western Civilization. I think they do now, though.

    ———

    *The book’s not really that great, it was more of an over-developed short story, and the references of what the author thought demonstrated deterioration were very mid-century modern. He imagined the 1970s, basically. Today’s reality is much worse than this science fiction projection of what a decaying society would be like.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Almost Missouri

    My wife makes me even more red-pilled than I would be. And to think that I could have married a trust fund girl in Boulder...

    As Alex and Steve discuss, though, the younger generations there is absorbing the same shit we have here now, in the English language. I notice the difference. Part of it is good: My twelve-year-old godson speaks and understands English perfectly. He learned it via the internet with friends, but the "Western" influence is strong.

    Let's see where this leads...

    , @JackOH
    @Almost Missouri


    I really felt for her when she described emerging from behind the Iron Curtain to reach at long last the Promised Land of the Golden West, … only to find it was decadent, decrepit, dishonest, and diseased. I’ve heard similar stories from other East Bloc émigrés . . .
     
    I've heard likewise from immigrants, Almost Missouri. Those 4 d's you mention pretty much cover what I've heard, too. It's shocking. The immigrants are energetic, enterprising, often educated---and their run-ins with the real America can leave them shaken. I'd add a "c" for corrupt, too.

    I only listened lazily for 10 minutes. I'll have to listen to the whole thing. I thought I heard Alex say something to the effect that she couldn't find England in London, and that they [the English] just take it. I'm hoping for some elaboration.
  62. @Unintended Consequence
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "... this lady is a good interviewer, letting you expound with your answers as far as you’d like."

    She did a good job of drawing Steve out but asked too much about Obama and Iglesias and not enough about HBD or crime.

    "(BTW, I don’t care who gets into Harvard, Feral Gov’t money or not. This AA stuff is everywhere though – it’s almost ingrained after 55 years, so people are just accepting. That doesn’t make it right.)"

    I don't know how we made the leap from most people finding a job right after highschool to certain average folk requiring access to even elite universities. The need has been manufactured. Most people just need solid communication skills and some well roundedness along with specialized job training. The sorting according to ability is another matter. Doesn't the military do a fair amount of this without complaints from the enlisted?

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    I don’t know how we made the leap from most people finding a job right after highschool to certain average folk requiring access to even elite universities.

    Griggs v. Duke Power, mostly. Perhaps the most catastrophic decision in judicial history. Trillions of dollars and millions of lives wasted. It may end civilization.

    FWIW, it was a unanimous decision.

  63. @Anon
    Literally a closet! I thought you meant that you had emptied out and converted a closet to a work area, but there are sports coat sleeves brushing against your head!

    I joined Alex’s Substack for this when it came out and listened to it. I didn’t realize there was video. I’ll watch the video version now.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    Perhaps the sleeves are set dressing, rather than Steve dressing?

  64. @W.S. Strauss
    Next you need to go on Red Scare! Those girls love you and just asked Ann Coulter about you (in public!!)

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang, @Kronos

    Absolutely!

    Wild to see fellow RedScare fans on here (oddly, mentioning Steve on the Reddit sub forum got me banned). I think it would be a slam dunk and a great opportunity for Steve to get traction with the younger audience.

    For the longtime Steve fans, he had a pretty fruitful interaction with Roissy/Heartiste in the late oughts/early teens that opened the minds of a bunch of then-hipster millennials. I think a Dasha/Anna episode could do the same for Gen Z.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

    “For the longtime Steve fans, he had a pretty fruitful interaction with Roissy/Heartiste“

    Yeah, he was a builder of civilizations. Pump and dump. Trick virgins into having sex. Act assholish to bed broads.

    So where is the great Roissy now? In his McMansion with a trophy wife and four based sons in his brood?

    Replies: @BB753

  65. @Chrisnonymous
    I enjoyed it. Steve has a good presence and is engaging. It's annoying that Alex--who lives in Romania--didn't ask him about her child being cold this winter. Steve, you feel no guilt over supporting the pointless deaths of thousands of Ukrainians and the pointless destruction of economic value across Europe? Pointless and immoral as the rationale is that Russia is defying the Pax Americana order, but the war is being dishonestly promoted as one of Ukrainian national sovereignty, and the warriors being used by the US are essentially Ukrainians slaves (conscripts).

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Veteran Aryan

    Russia is defying the Pax Americana order

  66. @HammerJack
    @TelfoedJohn

    I'm still trying to figure out how to give anonymously. It's remarkably difficult. I suppose we should enjoy the concept of cash, while we still have it.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Go buy some Amazon gift cards and mail them to Steve.

  67. @Almost Missouri
    @Buzz Mohawk


    It’s pretty cool to see a Romanian lady interviewing Steve. She is in the same part of the country my wife is from. In another interview she describes it as, “a small city in the Austro-Hungarian part near the Hungarian border.”
     
    I really felt for her when she described emerging from behind the Iron Curtain to reach at long last the Promised Land of the Golden West, ... only to find it was decadent, decrepit, dishonest, and diseased. I've heard similar stories from other East Bloc émigrés, some of whom eventually turned around and went back, as Ms. Kaschuta seems to have done.

    As a kid I got the same feeling from reading a sci-fi* about an nth-generation interplanetary settler who returns to Earth for help when his colonial homeworld faces an existential threat, only find that in the generations since they left, the Earth that had spawned far-flung conquests had become a degenerate hive of useless self-absorbed pleasure-seekers. The Frontier Hypothesis in sci-fi form, basically.

    The 20th century East Bloc-ers just didn't realize they were the frontiermen of Western Civilization. I think they do now, though.


    ---------

    *The book's not really that great, it was more of an over-developed short story, and the references of what the author thought demonstrated deterioration were very mid-century modern. He imagined the 1970s, basically. Today's reality is much worse than this science fiction projection of what a decaying society would be like.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @JackOH

    My wife makes me even more red-pilled than I would be. And to think that I could have married a trust fund girl in Boulder…

    As Alex and Steve discuss, though, the younger generations there is absorbing the same shit we have here now, in the English language. I notice the difference. Part of it is good: My twelve-year-old godson speaks and understands English perfectly. He learned it via the internet with friends, but the “Western” influence is strong.

    Let’s see where this leads…

  68. @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang
    @W.S. Strauss

    Absolutely!

    Wild to see fellow RedScare fans on here (oddly, mentioning Steve on the Reddit sub forum got me banned). I think it would be a slam dunk and a great opportunity for Steve to get traction with the younger audience.

    For the longtime Steve fans, he had a pretty fruitful interaction with Roissy/Heartiste in the late oughts/early teens that opened the minds of a bunch of then-hipster millennials. I think a Dasha/Anna episode could do the same for Gen Z.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “For the longtime Steve fans, he had a pretty fruitful interaction with Roissy/Heartiste“

    Yeah, he was a builder of civilizations. Pump and dump. Trick virgins into having sex. Act assholish to bed broads.

    So where is the great Roissy now? In his McMansion with a trophy wife and four based sons in his brood?

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Corvinus

    I can't remember any interaction between Steve Sailer and Heartiste/ Roissy.

  69. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I've heard it said that Germans have an obsessive concern with the truth. Like, it's important to them personally that you get the truth of whatever matter they're talking about. That seems to be one extreme.

    I never hear that about Africans, Asians or Indians. And that's over half the world population. They may want you to believe something (or say it), but declaring objective truth doesn't seem as high on their list of values.

    It would be interesting to know more about this because I truly think huge parts of the human population aren't as concerned with the truth as a few of us are.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “I never hear that about Africans, Asians or Indians. And that’s over half the world population. They may want you to believe something (or say it), but declaring objective truth doesn’t seem as high on their list of values.”

    You can count yourself in that list as an Eastern European. Don’t blame me, blame HbD.

    “My vague impression is that a lot of pundits are okay with their own set of Noble Lies.“

    Does that include our intrepid host?

  70. @Buzz Mohawk
    It's pretty cool to see a Romanian lady interviewing Steve. She is in the same part of the country my wife is from. In another interview she describes it as, "a small city in the Austro-Hungarian part near the Hungarian border."

    Good job Steve, and kudos for keeping your trademark closet space as part of your international image. Your "aww shucks" manner and accent are about as Western American as things get too, which is nice.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @TelfoedJohn

    She’s actually from the German (‘Transylvanian Saxon’) minority in Romania. I think her husband is Saxon-Romanian too. The current president of Romania is one too:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klaus_Iohannis

    There’s only a few thousand of them, but they’re admired for their honesty and work ethic.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klaus_Iohannis

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @TelfoedJohn

    Right. My wife is from the Hungarian population there.

  71. @New Dealer
    iSteve comes out of the closet!

    Replies: @Anonymous, @HammerJack, @Unintended Consequence, @Kronos

    One of these days I’ll write a cool R. Kelly’s “Trapped in the Closet” parody featuring Steve Sailer and the iSteve universe.

    (Due to copyright issues I guess you can’t find the original R. Kelly video, but here’s a GTA 5 video game reenactment that’s ok.)

  72. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Danindc

    Four feet?! He lives in California. Four more feet of closet would add another million dollars to the cost of the house. He mentions in the interview that things have gotten expensive out there.

    He seems to be expanding his wardrobe, however. He's added a few more Costco shirts and beige jackets since the last time he gave an interview.

    Don't hate the closet. It's a great trademark.

    Replies: @Danindc, @XBardon Kaldlan

    The pink shirt. A nod to the trannies?

    • Replies: @Curle
    @XBardon Kaldlan

    California around 1982. Everyone in LA had one.

  73. @W.S. Strauss
    Next you need to go on Red Scare! Those girls love you and just asked Ann Coulter about you (in public!!)

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang, @Kronos

    I thought that fairly recent Curtis Yarvin interview with Red Scare went very well.

  74. @TelfoedJohn
    @Buzz Mohawk

    She’s actually from the German (‘Transylvanian Saxon’) minority in Romania. I think her husband is Saxon-Romanian too. The current president of Romania is one too:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klaus_Iohannis

    There’s only a few thousand of them, but they’re admired for their honesty and work ethic.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klaus_Iohannis

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Right. My wife is from the Hungarian population there.

  75. @XBardon Kaldlan
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The pink shirt. A nod to the trannies?

    Replies: @Curle

    California around 1982. Everyone in LA had one.

  76. @Corvinus
    @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

    “For the longtime Steve fans, he had a pretty fruitful interaction with Roissy/Heartiste“

    Yeah, he was a builder of civilizations. Pump and dump. Trick virgins into having sex. Act assholish to bed broads.

    So where is the great Roissy now? In his McMansion with a trophy wife and four based sons in his brood?

    Replies: @BB753

    I can’t remember any interaction between Steve Sailer and Heartiste/ Roissy.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  77. @Almost Missouri
    @Buzz Mohawk


    It’s pretty cool to see a Romanian lady interviewing Steve. She is in the same part of the country my wife is from. In another interview she describes it as, “a small city in the Austro-Hungarian part near the Hungarian border.”
     
    I really felt for her when she described emerging from behind the Iron Curtain to reach at long last the Promised Land of the Golden West, ... only to find it was decadent, decrepit, dishonest, and diseased. I've heard similar stories from other East Bloc émigrés, some of whom eventually turned around and went back, as Ms. Kaschuta seems to have done.

    As a kid I got the same feeling from reading a sci-fi* about an nth-generation interplanetary settler who returns to Earth for help when his colonial homeworld faces an existential threat, only find that in the generations since they left, the Earth that had spawned far-flung conquests had become a degenerate hive of useless self-absorbed pleasure-seekers. The Frontier Hypothesis in sci-fi form, basically.

    The 20th century East Bloc-ers just didn't realize they were the frontiermen of Western Civilization. I think they do now, though.


    ---------

    *The book's not really that great, it was more of an over-developed short story, and the references of what the author thought demonstrated deterioration were very mid-century modern. He imagined the 1970s, basically. Today's reality is much worse than this science fiction projection of what a decaying society would be like.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @JackOH

    I really felt for her when she described emerging from behind the Iron Curtain to reach at long last the Promised Land of the Golden West, … only to find it was decadent, decrepit, dishonest, and diseased. I’ve heard similar stories from other East Bloc émigrés . . .

    I’ve heard likewise from immigrants, Almost Missouri. Those 4 d’s you mention pretty much cover what I’ve heard, too. It’s shocking. The immigrants are energetic, enterprising, often educated—and their run-ins with the real America can leave them shaken. I’d add a “c” for corrupt, too.

    I only listened lazily for 10 minutes. I’ll have to listen to the whole thing. I thought I heard Alex say something to the effect that she couldn’t find England in London, and that they [the English] just take it. I’m hoping for some elaboration.

  78. I finished Alex’s interview with Steve. What really stuck out for me at my first hearing was Steve’s pessimism regarding the possibility of fact-based (or reality-based) debate on anything our governing bodies don’t wish to hear.

    Also, Steve had a sort of comment about it being a good thing that not everyone is within the Anglophone world. That got me thinking about the regimented and regimenting power of the American Imperium, both within our borders and without.

    Thanks to Alex, also.

  79. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Chrisnonymous


    Steve, you feel no guilt over supporting the pointless deaths of thousands of Ukrainians and the pointless destruction of economic value across Europe?
     
    The good citizens of classical Greece drew strength from the determination of two of their countrymen, Sperthias and Bulis, to resist the lure of total power. On their way to Suza, the Spartan envoys were met by Hydarnes, a high Persian official, who offered to make them mighty in their homeland, if only they would attach themselves to the Great King, his despotic master. To the benefit of Greece-and to the benefit of all free men-Herodotus has preserved their answer. “Hydarnes,” they said, “thou art a one-sided counselor. Thou hast experience of half the matter; but the other half is beyond thy knowledge. A slave’s life thou understandest; but, never having tasted liberty, thou canst not tell whether it be sweet or no. Ah! hadst thou known what freedom is, thou wouldst have bidden us fight for it, not with the spear only, but with the battle-axe.”

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    This is a Red Herring because Steve’s professed reason for supporting the continuation of conflict is not freedom for Ukrainians but “punishing” Russia. I put “punishing” in quotation marks not because they are scare quotes because that is literally the word he has used. And what does he want to “punish” them for? For violating the post-1945 lack of invasion by countries other than the US. It is about US hegemony and is therefore immoral and has nothing to do with Ukrainian freedom. For the extreme form of this argument, see Richard Hanania’s recent post advocating that we sacrifice all Ukrainians (it’s just utilitarianism, doncha know?) to avoid a counterfactual situation that is entirely hypothetical and implausible.

    The real parallel with the Spartans would be if the Ukrainians were voluntarily sacrificing themselves to stop an in-progress invasion of all of Europe by a power intent on literally enslaving them as well as literally capable of enslaving them. That is so far from the reality of the Russia-Ukraine conflict that if you believe in your post, you’re objectively an utter ignoramus and fool.

  80. Transcript, by https://openai.com/blog/whisper/

    00:00 My name is Alex Koshuta, and this is the Subversive Podcast.
    00:06 It’s an excuse for me to talk to some of the most interesting people on the heterodox
    00:11 to heretic spectrum.
    00:13 Everyone from iconoclast philosophers to rogue scientists to real post buzzfeed journalists,
    00:20 and our true intellectual elite, Twitter Anonymous Accounts.
    00:24 In short, they’re quite subversive.
    00:28 Enjoy.
    00:34 Today, I am joined by none other than Steve Saylor.
    00:44 I know Steve doesn’t need an introduction for most of my audience.
    00:48 People know who Steve is, but for the few stragglers who might not know about Steve,
    00:53 he is a journalist, an Ur blogger, one of the oldest bloggers, not in age, but in terms
    01:00 of activity.
    01:01 Both.
    01:02 One of the last bloggers standing, perhaps.
    01:07 Yeah, and an international man of mystery and probably a gray intellectual, not by the
    01:13 color of his hair, but just by the fact that he is extremely red, but often not sighted.
    01:19 So welcome, Steve.
    01:21 Howdy, thanks for having me here.
    01:25 Thank you so much for coming on.
    01:27 It’s needless to say that you are one of the most requested people to come on the show,
    01:32 which is dedicated to exactly that type of intellectual that you so well represent, the
    01:37 gray zone of intellectuals, the people that are often red, but not really sighted.
    01:45 So I wanted to start off our discussion with something a bit gentle before we slam head
    01:51 on into the Excel sheet of uncomfortable facts.
    01:55 It’s about your growing up in California, because California is an area of the world
    02:02 that is really small, but it casts a shadow as big as the entire planet.
    02:08 We’re speaking now from Romania.
    02:09 I mean, I’m obviously in many ways, very influenced from California.
    02:14 It’s a place that I’ve never been to, I’ve only seen about it in movies and all of the
    02:20 culture from there has been passed down on to me through all of the media that’s coming
    02:23 out of there.
    02:24 But you grew up there and how has California changed and how has California changed you
    02:31 personally?
    02:32 Well, let’s see, I mean, mostly it’s gotten more expensive.
    02:37 I mean, it was a really good deal.
    02:43 Back in the 1830s, a Harvard student took a sabbatical, his name was Richard Henry Dana
    02:49 and he went around Cape Horn as a sailor on a Boston trading ship going up and down the
    02:57 coast of California.
    02:58 And he came back, he wrote a bestseller called Two Years Before the Mast.
    03:04 And one of the things he told the American audience was California, wow, it’s like the
    03:12 best place and practically nobody lives there.
    03:16 He especially emphasized the San Francisco Bay area as barely of interest to the Mexican
    03:25 government.
    03:26 Nobody’s there and it’s incredible.
    03:29 So over the centuries, the population’s grown dramatically and not surprisingly, it’s gotten
    03:37 really expensive.
    03:38 So in a lot of ways, it’s a higher class place than when I was growing up in kind of a beach
    03:46 boy’s childhood.
    03:49 It’s also gotten fewer eccentrics probably today than, today it’s kind of Florida man
    03:56 rather than California man represents kind of the cutting edge of weirdness in the United
    04:05 States.
    04:06 But you know, those are two obvious changes.
    04:11 It was certainly a great place to grow up despite the smog and some other problems.
    04:20 But the effects of population growth, of demand, of increased wealth, it makes life more challenging
    04:33 in a lot of ways when I was young and it was kind of a golden age of easy goingness.
    04:44 I wonder because California has seen us as this extremely left wing place.
    04:49 Have you ever been a left wing or have you ever considered yourself a man of the left?
    04:56 Thinking maybe for a couple of weeks when I was about 12.
    05:00 In general, I’ve always been some kind of conservative by temperament.
    05:09 My father was an aircraft engineer for Lockheed, so it was natural to my environment to grow
    05:18 up on the conservative Republican leaning side in the U.S.
    05:26 And I think by temperament I’ve always been kind of a loyalist and kind of leaning toward
    05:39 the conservative side.
    05:43 But on the other hand, I’ve never been particularly strongly to the right.
    05:52 I come from a background.
    05:57 I was a Ronald Reagan supporter in and that kind of represents a lot about my background
    06:07 and orientation.
    06:12 I think that flavor of politics, at least now on the right or on the so called new right,
    06:19 is losing a bit of its shine.
    06:24 Somebody was mentioning basically I’m not part of the younger generation that’s interested
    06:34 in European political philosophers.
    06:38 I grew up as kind of an Anglophile reading Adam Smith and Boswell on Johnson and so forth
    06:46 as a teenager.
    06:49 And whereas the kind of continental names like Carl Schmitt and so forth, nah, before
    07:02 my time and so I’m not that up on recent ideologies and I’m not even that ideological, I’m more
    07:16 empirical and as I’ve gotten older and gotten more time to create my Excel spreadsheets
    07:24 of data, that takes up most of my interest rather than highly ideological questions.

    [MORE]

    07:32 I think it is really interesting that even though you are focused on the empirical and
    07:39 you essentially are very connected to reality through whatever data sources you might find
    07:44 because they’re getting rarer and rarer, but you come to a lot of the conclusions that
    07:49 people who are a bit more into this esoteric ideology and things like that come, but you
    07:55 do that through, I don’t know, analyzing the real world.
    08:00 You just notice your way to maybe some more eccentric conclusions.
    08:05 So I think that’s why I don’t think people mind that you’re not into Carl Schmitt or
    08:10 whatever esoteric politics because I feel like you’re obviously one of us in some way,
    08:18 even for the theory people, because you come to similar conclusions just by interpreting.
    08:24 Yeah.
    08:26 My approach is sort of to think that there’s a general continuum rather than a sharp dichotomy
    08:37 at different intellectual levels that if you’re doing something that makes sense at the social
    08:50 science level, it’s also going to make sense in terms of your real estate decision making.
    08:57 That if you say, oh, okay, yeah, that’s a good neighborhood, good schools, things like
    09:06 that, yeah, it’s going to show up exactly in the social science data.
    09:11 And if you’re going to take it to higher intellectual levels than that, they all ought to fit together
    09:16 and not contradict each other.
    09:18 I mean, a lot of people in the kind of conventional wisdom these days assume that there’s some
    09:26 extreme contradiction and dichotomy between following the science and stereotypes, what
    09:37 people notice with their lying eyes.
    09:40 But I don’t think so.
    09:44 I mean, for example, I’ve been a social science aficionado since maybe I was 13 in 1972.
    09:52 And I just like reading academic papers that churn through a lot of data.
    10:04 Most people assume that they have to come to highly leftist conclusions, but it sure
    10:11 doesn’t look like that to me when I read them carefully and critically.
    10:15 It sure looks like, oh, yeah, that’s connected to what people say about local crime rates
    10:23 or schools or whatever, that there isn’t this sharp contradiction.
    10:31 So I think that’s something I try to bring, is tie together the anecdotal, the social
    10:44 scientific and the more ideological, it should all fit together and shouldn’t contradict
    10:53 each other.
    10:54 If it does, you’ve probably got a real problem.
    10:57 And there’s a lot of labor and it kind of takes a knack for analyzing this data and
    11:04 also just liking the time you spend doing it.
    11:08 And I don’t think that many people are into it as much as you are.
    11:13 It takes a lot of time.
    11:18 Here in the U.S., over the last half century, there’s been a big movement of guys like me
    11:27 to analyze baseball statistics in ever more sophisticated fashion.
    11:34 And I’m fascinated by it, but I’m not at their level.
    11:40 But I kind of follow the Bill Jameses, the baseball statistical world, just working with
    11:48 social data from the world around us.
    11:53 So yeah, that’s kind of who I am in a lot of ways.
    11:57 Yeah.
    11:58 I also think that there’s kind of a level of status in going deep into ideology and
    12:07 reading the classics and coming to the same relatively more unsavory conclusions that
    12:14 someone whose lower status might get.
    12:16 Like your uncle has the same beliefs as Carl Schmitt, but you need to slog through the
    12:22 pages of esoteric literature before you can admit that or you can kind of associate
    12:28 yourself with those things that are just derived from noticing.
    12:33 Just go down the street.
    12:34 You notice stuff.
    12:35 Yeah, so yeah, I mean, I’m basically not caught up with or, you know, the higher level European
    12:48 ideological thinking.
    12:50 But yeah, it’s sort of like, oh, yeah, your uncle and Charles Murray kind of came to the
    12:56 same conclusions from vastly different starting points.
    13:02 And yeah, that suggests that the two of them are on to something, that there shouldn’t
    13:14 be a contradiction.
    13:16 If you assume for status reasons that the science should disagree with your lying eyes,
    13:27 you’re probably kidding yourself.
    13:29 Yeah.
    13:30 Yeah, I think that was a very useful tool for me to bring to my life in the Western
    13:37 world.
    13:38 I lived in Western Europe for a long time, studied there, just being from Eastern Europe,
    13:42 where things are much more, they work a bit more in a straight line, especially after
    13:47 communism when, you know, the liberalization of noticing really went hard.
    13:52 People were allowed to notice and we noticed everything.
    13:55 And we also looked up to the West quite a lot.
    13:58 So when I moved to the UK, to London, I was expecting the West.
    14:04 And what I saw was quite different.
    14:07 It was kind of, you know, a speedy ticket to the Third World.
    14:13 And it was really shocking to see how there was no immune system against it.
    14:18 People were just laying down and taking it.
    14:21 It was incredible.
    14:22 Yeah.
    14:23 I mean, we’ve especially seen that in the U.S. in this decade.
    14:29 You know, the George Floyd mania was so obviously a disaster while it was happening.
    14:37 But you know, the prestige class couldn’t resist themselves.
    14:44 Their logic led them to ridiculous conclusions, which have not been good for the country.
    14:53 And, you know, if you’re not going to tell the truth, eventually it’s going to turn around
    15:02 and bite you.
    15:05 But the issue is that if you don’t, what goes unsayable kind of becomes unthinkable and
    15:14 even inconceivable.
    15:17 And so we’ve seen that, you know, with the big increase in crime and so forth since,
    15:23 you know, the racial reckoning was declared 28 months ago or so and, you know, the people,
    15:34 the establishment just couldn’t see it coming, even though it had happened before.
    15:39 It happened in the 60s with the huge increase in crime and really wrecked a lot of the great
    15:47 American cities in the 60s.
    15:50 And we saw it on more intermittent scale with the Ferguson effect in the first Black Lives
    15:58 Matter era, mid 2010s.
    16:02 And then it just came back huge and, you know, people getting their cars stolen all over
    16:08 the place.
    16:09 A lot of bad things are happening and, you know, it shouldn’t have.
    16:14 It made some progress, you know, for a long time at making urban life in the U.S. better.
    16:25 But the people, you know, what urban elites then decided to blow up a lot of that progress.
    16:34 It’s crazy.
    16:35 Yeah.
    16:36 Do you think it’s just kind of fear based as well?
    16:40 Like they fear what would happen if the, you know, the truths that you feel in about differences
    16:46 in cognitive capacity, differences in crime, you know, rates, where common knowledge.
    16:53 I mean, what would America look like?
    16:55 What would the world look like if that was, you know, just common knowledge?
    16:58 People would act according to…
    16:59 My friend, physicist Gregory Cochran asks, asks, well, how would the world look different
    17:08 if I was right?
    17:12 And his view is, no, it’s basically the world couldn’t look any different because I’m trying
    17:18 to make up my ideas based on what currently actually exists.
    17:25 Now the question then becomes, would the world suddenly be a horrible place if everybody
    17:33 went, oh, yeah, actually, you know, the bell
    17:38 curve is a sensible look at how the world works, as it was 28 years ago, and things
    17:45 haven’t changed a whole lot since then.
    17:50 I mean, it’s, I mean, I joke that, all right, about 15 years ago, there was a kids movie
    17:57 series called National Treasure with Nicolas Cage running around, kind of doing Dan Brown
    18:03 type stuff involving the American Founding Fathers.
    18:06 And the second one, the Book of Secrets, he discovers that when you get elected president,
    18:13 you get the key to open up the president’s Book of Secrets that has, you know, the secret
    18:20 of the Kennedy assassination, Area 51, and all the conspiracy theories are revealed in
    18:27 the book, in the president’s Book of Secrets.
    18:30 So I’m kind of wondering if, like, when you become the president of Harvard University,
    18:37 does the previous president give you the Harvard president’s Book of Secrets, which turns out
    18:43 to be a dog eared copy signed by Richard J.
    18:47 Herrnstein of the bell curve, and in it is, okay, this is why we have to have affirmative
    18:54 action quotas at Harvard.
    18:57 You know, we’re not going to get to a lot of black or, to a lesser extent, Hispanic
    19:04 representation that we think we really need to be at any other way.
    19:09 And you just can’t get there without putting a thumb on the scale on admissions.
    19:14 I kind of think that something like that is true about Harvard presidents and elite college
    19:22 presidents in general.
    19:26 In the U.S., you hear a lot of in the U.S., most people when they answer opinion polls
    19:33 are against affirmative action and college admissions.
    19:39 And there isn’t any acceptable way to explain to the general public that, yeah, at the Ivy
    19:52 League, it would be about 1% black if we had a totally meritocratic system.
    20:00 And recently, it would be dramatically Asian, you know, probably heading toward 50% or higher.
    20:09 Almost nobody knows about the Asian test scores in the U.S. in the 21st century have exploded.
    20:19 And Ivy League presidents have to kind of talk amongst themselves and go, well, let’s
    20:25 be honest here that nothing’s changing.
    20:28 We’ve been doing the same thing since 1969.
    20:32 And all that happens is that the Asian percentage of high scores and high GPAs just keeps going
    20:44 up by leaps and bounds and nothing else evens out.
    20:48 So we’re going to have to keep doing the affirmative action.
    20:52 And the Supreme Court in said, well, only for another 25 years, then there won’t
    20:59 be any more need for it.
    21:02 But here we are in 2022, and that 25 years is almost up and nothing has changed.
    21:17 So the question is, if you were allowed to discuss, you know, these giant differences,
    21:32 you know, in respectable forms in the public, what different policies would you come to?
    21:40 And I think the main thing you’d do is you’d stop making up kind of anti white, anti male,
    21:52 you know, anti whiteness, defamation theories that have become ever worse over the last
    22:00 few decades.
    22:02 And then, you know, in the last nine or 10 years, they’re, you know, what we call the
    22:08 great awakening, it’s just become standard to denounce whites for any non white shortcomings
    22:18 and in rather nasty hate filled terms.
    22:25 And it’s causing a lot of the divisiveness within the country.
    22:32 That I think would seem to be the number one result that we wouldn’t waste as much time
    22:41 or promote as, you know, hate filled vile ideologies, if we just went, yeah, it’s kind
    22:54 of the way it is.
    22:55 And it’s, it could be all cultural, but it’s probably not.
    23:00 And whatever it is, these gaps have been here for a long time, and they’re probably going
    23:05 to be here for a whole lot more time.
    23:07 And one of my standard jokes is that when I first got interested in social science statistics
    23:16 in 1972, when I was 13, that, you know, everything was different back then.
    23:24 You know, the rankings of academic performance were number one, Oriental, number two, Caucasian,
    23:31 number three, Chicano, and number four, black.
    23:38 And today they’re Asian, white, Latino or Latins, and African American, or maybe still
    23:51 black, but now it’s capitalized.
    23:54 It’s about all that’s changed.
    23:56 I think we can live with that.
    23:58 I mean, we live with it.
    23:59 We live with the reality of these facts every day.
    24:03 But on the other hand, a lot of people seem to think that if these secrets were revealed,
    24:11 if everybody got access to the Harvard president’s book of secrets, you know, that horrible,
    24:18 disastrous things would happen.
    24:21 So I don’t know.
    24:22 Perhaps they would.
    24:23 And it might say more about how, you know, the liberal establishment thinks about the
    24:29 value of IQ and things like that, that it’s like, well, of course, if this were true,
    24:37 we’d have to do horrible, genocidal things.
    24:42 I don’t know.
    24:43 I mean, people ask me, what do you really think, Steve?
    24:50 And I’m like, I’ve published a million words or so.
    24:55 I don’t really have time to think about anything that I’m not publishing.
    24:59 Okay.
    25:00 I’ve rambled on.
    25:01 Oh, no, it’s all illuminating.
    25:05 But I also wanted to ask you about the, I mean, the consequence here is that we have
    25:12 so called liberal democracy as the framework for the regime.
    25:17 One of the core ideas at the base of this, kind of one of the promises of liberal democracy
    25:21 is that through meritocracy, you can make it up to the top.
    25:26 And meritocracy essentially, you know, if you ask me, is pretty much IQ.
    25:31 And the top is pretty much some sort of IQ related status or some proof that you’re intelligent
    25:38 and you can make it up to the elite or some money that usually you get by being smart
    25:42 about how you invest, what you do with your life.
    25:46 So the kind of the places, the higher echelons that are promised by just the core idea of
    25:52 the regime are all tied to IQ.
    25:55 So obfuscating how one gets there and how one deserves to get there is very important
    26:01 to the people who like the liberal order.
    26:03 So I wonder what’s downstream of this politically, because this is what I feel that just a completely
    26:12 materialist outlook on the world will get you.
    26:15 It’s okay.
    26:16 How much, how productive are you as an individual?
    26:18 How much pleasure can you derive?
    26:20 How much utility can you give?
    26:22 How much money can you make?
    26:24 I really don’t think that for most people nowadays, there is a lot of value outside
    26:29 of being smart.
    26:30 I think in a way, you know, the liberal establishment really does reflect what maybe a lot of people
    26:36 won’t want to say, you know, this is the same conversation that’s not being had behind
    26:41 the eugenics discussion.
    26:42 You know, they don’t want to say that this is, you know, this is how they think, but
    26:45 they really do think if you look at, you know, selective abortions, you know, genetic screening,
    26:50 all this type of stuff.
    26:53 And I think it’s natural.
    26:54 I mean, if you have a completely materialist outlook, this is the consequence.
    26:58 You want to, you want Gattaca, you want to optimize genetic output, you want people to
    27:01 be smarter, you know, designer babies, all this type of stuff.
    27:04 So I don’t know, what’s, what’s your feeling about this?
    27:07 Yes, and my take is that to the extent that the US has a high immigration rate, it’s going
    27:22 to make the US kind of ever more of a kind of meritocratic free for all.
    27:30 And that’s going to be driven by IQ, by work ethic, and a few other things.
    27:44 And it’s, it’s not going to be good for people who didn’t get kind of lucky in kind of the
    27:53 genetic or the nature or the nurture lotteries.
    28:00 I mean, for example, Americans think, okay, you know, affirmative action, should we really
    28:08 be discriminating against some kids and in favor in favor of other kids based on their
    28:17 race?
    28:18 All right.
    28:19 Um, in the answer, aren’t we past that?
    28:24 And those are perfectly reasonable things to think.
    28:26 But one of the problems is that because we’ve had a lot of immigration, especially from
    28:30 Asia, the competition for blacks has gotten dramatically harder to get to the top that,
    28:42 you know, it was big 50 years ago, but it’s a lot harder today.
    28:49 And but we’ve also kind of put immigration off as a, as another sacred thing we can’t
    28:56 talk about.
    28:58 So we keep, we keep going on.
    29:01 And well, we’ve made things harder for our African American fellow citizens.
    29:09 And what can, what can the liberal establishment do?
    29:11 All they can do is, is blame white people for it.
    29:16 That’s, that’s their only go to solution.
    29:19 But yeah, I mean, the world has probably gotten even more dominated by IQ than in the past.
    29:26 I mean, for example, Silicon Valley goes, goes back really to the, in a lot of ways
    29:34 to the Terman family, Louis Terman was the first American IQ scientist who made up the
    29:42 Stanford Binet IQ test in like 1916.
    29:46 His son, Fred Terman, became the dean of engineering at Stanford.
    29:52 He was Hewlett Packard’s PhD mentor, and he pretty much launched the Silicon Valley system
    30:01 of tying together Stanford and startups, and probably more than his friend William Shockley
    30:10 deserves the title of father of Silicon Valley.
    30:13 All right.
    30:14 Silicon Valley is kind of increasingly conquering the world.
    30:20 And not surprisingly, it’s making it more IQ centric.
    30:28 You know, the only thing I can think of to avoid that is let’s kind of, let’s go a little
    30:35 easier on the immigration.
    30:36 Let’s, let’s try a few things to slow down turning America into, you know, a total being
    30:48 totally competitive all the time.
    30:51 But we don’t have a framework really for our elites to publicly discuss that.
    30:58 And I’m not a big, I’m not a big admirer of what they can come up with, you know, behind
    31:05 closed doors, maybe in the past, but, you know, I think, I think we’re really suffering
    31:13 from not having open discussion.
    31:16 Yeah.
    31:17 And the, I think the issue was on the right wing, it was all, I mean, the goals were pretty
    31:23 much the same, you know, neocons and neoliberals have the same goal, GDP line go up.
    31:29 And that is essentially pumped up by a lot of immigration.
    31:33 And it does work.
    31:35 I think what’s relatively new now with the so called new right and some, some politicians
    31:40 on the right is that, you know, the economy is only important insofar as it benefits the
    31:47 so called indigenous people of the United States.
    31:50 You know, the people who are the Americans, not necessarily white Americans, but also,
    31:56 you know, people who are currently in America and not came in off the boat five minutes
    32:01 ago.
    32:02 I mean, my, my take on it is that citizenship should be kind of like stock ownership.
    32:14 And 40 years ago, I was getting an MBA and the crusty old finance professor like he liked
    32:22 me because I’d always blurred out what all the other students were thinking, but we’re
    32:26 maybe a little shyer or less confident about it.
    32:30 So the question was, if you’re a corporate officer of a publicly traded company, do you
    32:39 have the right to make up more, to issue new stock and sell it to and sell it for less
    32:49 than you really think it’s worth.
    32:52 And so I said, I stuck out my hand and said, yeah, sure, professor, cause all right.
    32:57 So the old stockholders, maybe they’re getting ripped off, but your new stockholders are
    33:03 getting a deal.
    33:04 So it all balances out and comes out in the wash.
    33:08 And then he just thundered and went wrong.
    33:11 Your fiduciary duty is to the old stockholders, the current stockholders, not to the new stockholders.
    33:19 So that’s always struck me like, oh yeah, actually being an American citizen should
    33:26 have come with some privileges and we shouldn’t give it, give away the right to live in America
    33:33 too cheap.
    33:36 But everybody’s doing that because they’re not supposed to have this kind of discussion
    33:40 about it.
    33:43 And when I say it, people go, oh yeah, that’s kind of right.
    33:48 The libertarian economist, Brian Kaplan just went berserk with rage over it and started
    33:54 saying that by that logic, we should invade Canada and enslave all the Canadians.
    34:00 I’m like, no, actually it’s not a good, good idea.
    34:04 Let’s not do that.
    34:06 But what’s here in America, be kind of cautious about giving away the rather nice privilege
    34:13 of being an American.
    34:15 Yeah.
    34:16 I know that Brian Kaplan has to, I think the famous pro immigration stance, but what’s,
    34:23 what’s your general position towards libertarianism now that you know so much about how the actual,
    34:30 the dark underbelly of the world works?
    34:32 Yeah.
    34:33 I was always kind, you know, kind of a libertarian fellow traveler, but I could, I could usually
    34:39 come up with arguments that would be like, well, yeah, actually the government should
    34:44 help out in this situation or that situation.
    34:49 I think, I mean, in defense of the libertarians, they’re quite, they’re quite a bit better
    34:57 than just about everybody else on freedom of speech, on, on realistic debates.
    35:07 You know, they’re not, they’re not out to shut people down and bring up empirical facts
    35:13 that are politically incorrect.
    35:15 You know, there’s a lot to be said for it.
    35:20 It’s also, you know, kind of a liberty oriented culture, political tradition is, is very American.
    35:29 I’m not saying it’s for everybody, but it’s, it’s for Americans.
    35:36 And it’s, it’s, it’s part of what’s good about being an American.
    35:43 It’s one of our traditions going back to 1776.
    35:50 So you know, I’m not, I’m not anywhere near being a libertarian fellow traveler anymore,
    35:58 but I do have quite a bit of respect for libertarians.
    36:03 So I’m not, not going to say real bad stuff about them.
    36:08 Yeah, do you think there’s something to be said about a lot of our problems being downstream
    36:15 of us or kind of the Anglo world, a world trying to take a system that is almost customized
    36:23 for a certain ethnos, a certain Anglo type of mindset, Anglo type of, you know, Puritan,
    36:30 Moors and things like that, and trying to apply it across the world because it’s a,
    36:35 it’s the best system, you know, the, the spreading democracy type of thing.
    36:38 Like it’s a, like it’s a virus and everyone should partake.
    36:41 Yeah.
    36:42 I mean, that was one of the things about 20 years ago that it got interested in during
    36:49 the run up to the Iraq war.
    36:52 And that was an important dividing line among conservatives was, is this a good idea or
    37:02 not?
    37:03 Because the, the pro Iraq war largely won.
    37:08 And that was a big part of kind of running the, the more independent minded people and
    37:14 the American right out of the mainstream.
    37:19 But yeah, looking, looking at Iraq and saying, okay, are they really ready for democracy?
    37:26 Are they going to be, you know, Germany after or Japan?
    37:36 And one of the things I saw was, wow, I mean, in Iraq, it’s very prestigious and pretty
    37:42 common to marry your cousin.
    37:47 And in fact, it went up over the 20th century as, as more people had surviving cousins.
    37:53 You have this huge fraction of the population that’s married either to their first cousin
    37:58 or their second cousin, which has in the anthropological literature, all sorts of interesting effects,
    38:05 mostly in terms of making a society much more clannish because like you and your brother
    38:14 have a, have a goat herd.
    38:16 How do you split it up between you?
    38:17 Oh, you have your son, marry your brother’s daughter, and then your, your grandson of
    38:24 both of you inherits the herd.
    38:27 Okay.
    38:28 And that actually makes these extended families get along better.
    38:34 But it also means that each extended family isn’t as related to the rest of the society
    38:39 whereas, you know, the Anglo world was especially oriented toward individualism, like away from
    38:50 cousin marriage, away from clannishness for probably, I don’t know, the last thousand
    38:55 years possibly.
    38:58 And so a lot of things in the Anglo world work, work that in other cultures wouldn’t
    39:09 work very easily, but our language has become so dominant around the world that we don’t
    39:18 really know that much about the rest of the world anymore, that it’s real easy for even
    39:25 somebody who considers themselves an intellectual to just kind of be out of touch from, from
    39:29 how other people who don’t speak English think.
    39:35 And then we do hear from people in other countries, and we just listen to the ones who speak English
    39:43 and talk and listen and watch our media all the time and think like we do.
    39:48 So you know, we’ve had, it’s a big problem, you know, because America and Britain before
    39:57 them was so dominant that, you know, we give advice to the rest of the world all the time
    40:04 with basically no clue.
    40:07 Yeah, and that’s, this is a huge split, you know, even in countries like Romania or the
    40:14 rest of Eastern Europe, Europe in general, between kind of people who are downstream
    40:18 from America speak English, especially younger people, and everyone else who maybe speaks
    40:24 a little bit of English, likes a little bit of American media, but aren’t absorbed into
    40:28 the, into the empire.
    40:30 And it’s, it’s leading to huge political differences, like the differences between generation are
    40:36 almost like aliens coming to commune with, with the humans and it’s, it’s very, very
    40:42 strange and it’s, it’s in progress right now.
    40:45 I don’t think the consequences are pretty, are clear yet, what, what this is going to
    40:50 mean in 10, 20, 30 years when these kids are grown up.
    40:54 Right, people growing up listening to kind of clueless Americans about, and just absorbing
    41:08 the American perspective, you know, I mean, I’m really glad that the Japanese aren’t very
    41:17 good at learning English.
    41:18 I mean, about 50 years ago, the physicist Freeman Dyson suggested that having a global
    41:29 language was a really bad thing.
    41:31 It was kind of like planting exactly one genotype of the highest producing soybean and then
    41:39 something comes along and wipes out all the soybeans in the world.
    41:47 I’m glad that there are parts of the world where you have highly literate people who
    41:51 just don’t deal with English well, because it could, it could, you know, save us a lot
    41:58 of trouble someday that if, if the English speaking world goes off on a really bad jag,
    42:05 which we seem to have a tendency to do.
    42:09 Yeah, it’s, it’s interesting because as people have noted in America as well, Hungary, even
    42:15 in Eastern Europe is a bit of an exception.
    42:18 And I feel that there’s, there’s almost a language based force field around Hungary
    42:24 because they have a very strange language.
    42:28 It’s quite exotic.
    42:29 They’re also highly ethnocentric compared even to the places around them.
    42:35 And they, they don’t dub American media.
    42:38 They have maybe subtitles and, or, or no, they, they dub American media.
    42:42 They don’t have subtitles.
    42:43 And that’s why I speak the way I speak and, and they, they don’t, they, even young people,
    42:48 if you go to Hungary, you know, some in Budapest will speak English, of course, but, you know,
    42:54 especially in smaller cities or in the countryside, no way they’re very resistant to it.
    42:59 Well, I’ve been reading, you know, New York times coverage of Hungary for the last 10
    43:06 years.
    43:07 And just, it basically seems like every, everybody who’s quoted is somebody who speaks English
    43:13 and some Hungarian who speaks superb English.
    43:18 And I’m only, I’m only getting one side of the story, but, you know, it’s, it’s hard
    43:27 to, it’s hard to learn Hungarian, I mean, so yeah, I think, I think there’s some protection
    43:36 and staying out of, out of the English speaking world, much, much as I benefited from it,
    43:42 from having a bigger audience without, you know, being able to speak any other language.
    43:50 So, yeah, it’s, it’s, it’s extremely useful in so many ways.
    43:55 I mean, I, you know, I can’t poo poo it too much, I have to say, I’ve benefited from
    44:00 it greatly.
    44:01 I mean, my husband’s from New Zealand, so, I mean, wouldn’t, wouldn’t be possible otherwise.
    44:05 He doesn’t speak any Romanian, as you can imagine.
    44:08 So yeah, it’s, it’s all, it’s all downstream from that.
    44:14 I also wanted to ask you about the legacy of Barack Obama.
    44:19 You’ve written a book on this, and I wonder what you, what you think about the book and
    44:24 about Barack Obama’s legacy, given the fact that, you know, Joe Biden is now in office.
    44:29 He still seems to be kind of the, the, the gray eminence behind a lot of American politics.
    44:35 I mean, what, what is the importance of Barack Obama?
    44:38 I mean, I’m mildly positive about Obama.
    44:44 My argument when I wrote a book about him in was that if you, if you read his memoirs
    45:00 carefully, I think he’s, he was, he was very cautious.
    45:06 I argued that his first term as president would be quite cautious on racial issues.
    45:14 And I think in retrospect, it was that then after reelection, things would get dicier.
    45:29 And that does seem to have happened, you know, the first Black Lives Matter era and so forth.
    45:38 To this day, I’m not that sure whether Obama was pushing the, so much the great awakening
    45:47 in his second term, or whether it was the people working for him.
    45:52 And that during the first term, he, he sort of, he held them back in order to get reelected.
    45:58 And then he said, okay, go for it in the second term.
    46:01 I don’t know.
    46:02 We don’t have real good coverage inside, like democratic administrations, how they work to
    46:08 get together with the prestige press and so forth.
    46:11 It’s, you know, I mean, obviously, obviously there’s, there’s a lot going on.
    46:16 But if you mention it, it sounds like a conspiracy theory.
    46:21 You know, for example, in May 2013, I’m reading the New York Times, and I’ve noticed that
    46:32 the last year or so, there’s all these articles about transsexuals, or is now called transgender.
    46:40 And I’m reading this article about some guy who be, who’s a mixed martial artist fighter,
    46:51 and he decided he’s now a woman, but he’s being discriminated against because he can’t
    46:56 get paid to beat up women on TV.
    47:01 And like this, and I’m like, this is the craziest thing I’ve ever read, but I’ve read a whole
    47:06 bunch of them.
    47:07 Oh my God, this is going to be the next big thing that the gay marriage is kind of locked
    47:12 in now for sure.
    47:14 And this trans stuff is going to be huge.
    47:17 And they’re working on this, it’s, you know, it’s a coordinated effort.
    47:23 But you know, how much was it the Obama administration?
    47:27 How much was it the New York Times, other media, academia?
    47:33 I don’t know.
    47:34 We saw the same thing with, you know, rape on campus, which led to a temporary setback
    47:44 when Rolling Stone ran with a totally full hoax based story on it and became embarrassing.
    47:52 But that was another thing, that was the government, the administration working with the media
    47:57 to promote.
    47:59 All right.
    48:00 So how much of it was Obama and was it he just got tired of holding his people back
    48:08 and said, okay, you guys go do what you want, I’m, you know, I got my second term, I’m going
    48:13 to watch ESPN Sports Center.
    48:18 I can’t say for sure.
    48:20 You know, I also don’t know, is Obama calling the shots within the Democrats still or is
    48:29 he not really that energetic?
    48:32 In some ways, you know, I could I could see an argument for the latter.
    48:38 But we don’t we don’t get good coverage of kind of behind the scenes on how these different
    48:47 pushes come about.
    48:50 So I can say I think I was pretty much right about the first term versus the second term.
    49:01 The other thing I’ve noticed since I wrote that book was how much Obama kind of represents
    49:12 the kind of global American empire in person, because I noticed like going back and reading
    49:22 about Hawaii and why it was brought in to be a state in 1959.
    49:32 What was going on was that the U.S. was looking for a way to increase its its soft power around
    49:40 the world in the battle with the Soviet Union.
    49:44 And it was embarrassing that, you know, the U.S. government, all the senators and so forth
    49:51 were all white.
    49:53 And then it was realized, oh, if we make Hawaii a state, they’ll probably elect a Japanese
    49:58 senator, maybe a Chinese senator, too.
    50:03 And that would be good for the U.S. image.
    50:07 And that was promoted especially by two of the great middle brow figures of the time,
    50:14 Oscar Hammerstein, the lyricist of Rodgers and Hammerstein and James Michener, the novelist.
    50:24 And they teamed up for the musical South Pacific in the early 50s based on Michener’s book
    50:30 and Hammerstein, it was half Jewish, half Gentile, was like, oh, look, these two these two short
    50:37 stories of yours about mixed marriages, that’s really interesting.
    50:41 That’s what we should do it about.
    50:42 And Michener was like, oh, yeah, I guess.
    50:45 Why?
    50:46 He goes, well, look, I mean, it’s very important for the U.S. in the battle with the Soviet
    50:53 Union that we don’t get dragged down by just being all white power.
    50:57 We need to have more representation and of that you can make it in the U.S. otherwise.
    51:07 And so Michener picked up on that and like his huge bestseller in 1960, Hawaii, the number
    51:16 one bestseller at the time, which probably was read by Obama’s mother and her parents
    51:22 and played a role in their deciding to move to Hawaii, kind of ends with this image of
    51:29 a mixed race golden man who’s going to emerge out of Hawaii and lead America to ever greater
    51:38 global influence.
    51:41 And what Michener was thinking of was going to be somebody who was was part white, part
    51:47 East Asian, but it turned out to be Obama.
    51:53 And I was like, wow, that’s actually kind of kind of weirdly promontory.
    52:04 So that’s something I think that kind of Obama was foreseen as going to be good for the American
    52:15 kind of global power.
    52:18 And that that kind of laid the path for for his rise to power.
    52:27 Probably he understood it to some extent, but I’m not sure that many other people do.
    52:33 I mean, Obama being from Hawaii, practically nobody pays attention to, but I think it’s
    52:38 a big part of the story.
    52:40 Yeah, he was definitely the the man of the hour and also obviously a product of his time
    52:46 and of the kind of sixties generation, almost like like you said, an embodiment of the sixties
    52:51 generation in so many ways.
    52:54 But there’s also I don’t know how familiar you are with this Curtis Yarvin’s theories
    53:00 about the cathedral.
    53:01 Yeah, I mean, I know Curtis, he’s a great guy and I really like him.
    53:09 I can’t say I’m an expert on but it’s just the general idea that, you know, there’s there’s
    53:15 kind of this decentralized thing that is downstream from some fairly basic ideas.
    53:24 But the incentive system behind it is what powers it.
    53:27 So there’s status to be gained.
    53:29 There’s power to be gained in affirming certain ideas that are at the core of the liberal
    53:34 mindset.
    53:35 For example, you know, you’ve got this access to the meritocracy.
    53:40 You’ve got the fact that traditional structures are oppressive, we need to dismantle them
    53:46 and that there’s always power to be mined by affirming these ideas, affirming them even
    53:52 more stridently.
    53:53 And there’s no one going to be standing in your way because, you know, these are very
    53:56 much downstream from from the regime and what, you know, what this core, you know, decentralized
    54:02 being the cathedral believes.
    54:04 So people who have a sense for power are always mining it in that direction.
    54:08 And they know there’s no one’s really going to come and, you know, contradict you.
    54:12 Maybe Steve Saylor, but no one no one in the in the mainstream.
    54:15 I mean, the US, you know, crucial element in the American tradition goes back to goes
    54:25 back to the left in 17th century England, the English Civil War and so forth.
    54:35 And, you know, another element goes back to the to the moderate right, you know, kind
    54:43 of the Virginia tradition.
    54:47 But it, you know, it couldn’t be full blown aristocracy.
    54:52 So America has always been kind of a progressive country and there’s a lot of good things about
    54:56 it.
    54:57 But, yeah, I mean, I mean, Obama, his, you know, his his American family side, you know,
    55:09 his his great uncle’s name was named Ralph Waldo Emerson and so Obama is kind of closely
    55:23 tied to the kind of the northern United States tradition that grew out of the Puritans of
    55:30 New England and so forth.
    55:34 And, you know, I’ve read interviews with his his like parents, relatives, and they’re,
    55:41 you know, very intelligent, well spoken people and, you know, they’re fine representatives
    55:48 of the northern American progressive tradition.
    55:53 Yeah, yeah, he’s he’s definitely an interesting mixture of both.
    56:01 And what do you think about the the theory that the fact that he is mixed race is also
    56:06 something that that powered his interest in politics seems to be a template for a lot
    56:14 of people who are very politically active in organizing so called organizing.
    56:18 Yeah, a friend of mine who watches a lot of MSNBC started noticing time frame as
    56:30 you’re starting to have wokeness becomes ever more powerful that, oh, if you’re looking
    56:37 if you’re looking at campus, you know, activists, boy, you’re sure getting a lot of kind of
    56:45 Obama types who look like they’ve got one white parent and one black parent and so forth.
    56:50 And then that, you know, kind of Obama is a role model.
    56:55 I mean, I think I think Obama is a lot better than the woke people.
    57:02 He’s kind of cautious by nature.
    57:04 He’s also I mean, he’s good at kind of understanding other people’s point of view.
    57:11 But he’s kind of kind of set off whether by planning it or just by not running out of
    57:23 energy to stand in the way of the woke, he kind of led to kind of this this woke revolution
    57:32 that’s that’s I first noticed about has made itself pretty obnoxious since then.
    57:43 Yeah, he’s definitely been a good icon for for the movement.
    57:49 You’ve made some some comments at one point.
    57:51 I think it was in a clubhouse chat.
    57:53 I think you’ve been on clubhouse many times, but I was there when you were just once.
    57:57 Yeah.
    57:58 Well, then that’s great because that was the one the one time I was there as well.
    58:03 You said something about anonymity and that you you would kind of advise people nowadays
    58:10 if they want to be spicy about certain subjects to maybe try to do it in an anonymous way
    58:17 before they become a figure associated with that.
    58:20 Do you think you still believe that?
    58:22 Yeah, I think I mean, I think there’s a lot to be said for kind of a Mark Twain type pseudonym
    58:29 that people don’t necessarily notice is is a pseudonym.
    58:36 I mean, somebody can figure out who you are and track you down if you if you make enough
    58:43 enemies and publish your real name.
    58:47 On the other hand, most people don’t care enough.
    58:53 So there’s a lot to be said, or you just don’t want the world out there like hating you.
    58:59 Now, I haven’t run into into problem too many problems.
    59:04 I mean, it’s partly I’ve lived in Southern California, a native of Los Angeles.
    59:10 And if you tell somebody on a few occasions, I tell people I’m a writer, they go, Oh, what
    59:17 are you write movies or TV like stuff that doesn’t pay as well?
    59:22 And they go, Oh, that’s interesting.
    59:23 And you can see they’ve lost interest.
    59:26 I mean, the nice thing about L.A. is that nobody, you know, nobody cares.
    59:34 You know, you’re not you’re not you’re not we got we have real celebrities here and absolutely
    59:39 nobody cares about micro internet names.
    59:45 So there’s a lot of advantages there.
    59:47 But you know, there can be ramifications.
    59:50 And for personal reasons, I don’t want to get into them.
    59:52 But I would advise people, you know, create a Mark Twain type brand name for yourself
    1:00:00 and to and use that, you know, and keep keep your your personal name to yourself.
    1:00:10 You know, people did that for hundreds of years, and then it faded out of standard operation.
    1:00:17 Not that, you know, maybe in the 19th century for writers, you know, it was common in the
    1:00:23 18th century.
    1:00:26 So you know, be don’t figure that it’s like, well, I’m brave and this won’t cause any problems
    1:00:34 for people around me, but so that’s my advice.
    1:00:41 I didn’t follow it myself.
    1:00:42 I was like, oh, maybe I should make up a name.
    1:00:44 I go like, oh, how do I get if somebody if a newspaper sends me a check for an opinion
    1:00:49 call, how do I cash it?
    1:00:51 Hmm.
    1:00:52 Well, it’s got to be a way, but it’s too much work.
    1:00:54 I’ll just use it.
    1:00:55 Put my real name in.
    1:00:56 So here I am.
    1:00:57 Yeah.
    1:00:58 Yeah.
    1:00:59 So if you if you went back, I don’t know, 30, 40 years, would you have still used your
    1:01:05 or?
    1:01:06 Yeah.
    1:01:07 Still gone.
    1:01:08 No, I’d have made up a name and, you know, made it my brand and gone with that.
    1:01:14 I would have I would have got called up the bank and asked them about it and found somebody
    1:01:18 to tell me it wasn’t really that hard.
    1:01:22 Yeah.
    1:01:23 Yeah.
    1:01:24 Now there are many ways I think there’s much more of an easy route to get paid if you’re
    1:01:28 anonymous, you know, crypto and all this type of stuff.
    1:01:31 But yeah, I mean, I’ve had that that thought myself had a pseudonym for about a week.
    1:01:38 And then I had similar thoughts and I just moved on to my my real name just out of comfort.
    1:01:43 But yeah, I think for me, it was a little bit easier just because I’m not in the heart
    1:01:49 of the American empire like you are.
    1:01:51 And I’m just kind of reporting on it from far away.
    1:01:54 I don’t think I’m that interesting to the powers.
    1:01:57 Yeah.
    1:01:58 So it’s a bit easier.
    1:01:59 I haven’t had any negative effects up to this point, but you’ve you’ve coined kind of an
    1:02:06 important term, I think the human biodiversity, which is is that true?
    1:02:14 In 19.
    1:02:15 Yeah, I was I didn’t coin it in 1999.
    1:02:20 I said, Oh, well, you know, I’m interested as a sports fan in differences and how people
    1:02:34 what sports they’re good at that has some correlation to who their ancestors were, which
    1:02:39 is, of course, related to race.
    1:02:42 And that’s that’s an interesting subject.
    1:02:45 And at the time, Edward Wilson, the evolutionary theorist, naturalist, was was pushing the
    1:02:53 word biodiversity, you know, like save the rains forests so we don’t lose all these species.
    1:03:00 So I said, Oh, well, I mean, I’m really interested in is kind of this human biodiversity.
    1:03:05 I mean, I’m I’m kind of the nature side of nature and nurture.
    /Users/calissendorff/Library/Mobile\ Documents/com\~apple\~CloudDocs/1:03:10 I’m also really interested in the nurture side, but it seems like there’s kind of a
    1:03:15 niche here.
    1:03:16 So then I immediately typed the term human biodiversity into a search engine and found
    1:03:22 that there had been one book published with that title by anthropologist Jonathan Marx.
    1:03:28 So I didn’t coin the term, but it does it is sort of associated with me.
    1:03:35 Yeah, it’s a it’s an interesting and important term just because it’s it kind of gives.
    1:03:43 I don’t know, not necessarily respectability, but it’s self explanatory.
    1:03:48 And even just just looking at it, you know, that there is, you know, there’s there’s a
    1:03:51 whole field of science opening up underneath it that’s, you know, undeniably interesting
    1:03:56 and true.
    1:03:58 And yeah, I don’t know.
    1:03:59 There’s there’s something something I mean, I’ve been a you know, I’ve been a sports fan
    1:04:04 all my life and and I went to a USC football game.
    1:04:11 It was like the big game of the year.
    1:04:14 And the USC running back, there are two all Americans playing a white guy from Oregon
    1:04:21 State and Bill Ennard was real strong, not real fast.
    1:04:28 And a black guy for USC named O.J. Simpson, who was real strong, but really, really fast.
    1:04:37 And you know, they played a great game and everything, but it kind of opened my eyes
    1:04:42 to a pattern.
    1:04:43 Oh yeah, the black football players tend to be a bit faster than the white football players.
    1:04:50 And I’ve thought about it for a long time, but I can’t really see like a nurture reason
    1:04:56 or the reason why racism makes O.J. run faster than the white guy.
    1:05:05 So it seemed pretty obvious.
    1:05:07 And there are there are these patterns and you can watch the Olympics and they show up
    1:05:11 all the time.
    1:05:13 And if there’s patterns in sports, which is super competitive, there’s probably biology
    1:05:19 related patterns in other areas.
    1:05:23 Now that doesn’t prove there are, or it doesn’t prove the ones you come up with are right,
    1:05:28 but it sure makes it seem like basically plausible and interesting to think about.
    1:05:36 So thinking about nature and nurture is kind of the big time of intellectual life in a
    1:05:42 lot of ways.
    1:05:43 It’s been that way for a long time.
    1:05:46 And I think one of the more interesting debates you were engaged in is the kind of abortions
    1:05:52 effect on crime debate with the Freakonomics professors.
    1:05:56 Yeah, that was yeah, that was goes back to to 1999.
    1:06:03 And it’s very interesting and not sure who ultimately is right.
    1:06:12 But University of Chicago economist Stephen Levitt, who published a bestseller in 2005
    1:06:20 called Freakonomics, went around arguing that legalizing abortion in the U.S. from 1970
    1:06:28 to is why the crime rate was lower in than in and got a lot of good publicity
    1:06:41 for this.
    1:06:42 And everybody went, wow, that that makes sense.
    1:06:44 You know, you know, we don’t have as many of the unwanted.
    1:06:50 So I pointed out that, well, yeah, the crime rate was lower in 1997, 1985, but was higher
    1:06:58 in than 1985.
    1:07:04 And in fact, it was probably it was highest.
    1:07:08 The homicide rate for teens went through the roof.
    1:07:12 Teens were born in the few years after Roe v. Wade in was extremely high and especially
    1:07:21 for black teens.
    1:07:23 Now the reason was, of course, that that was the crack era from like the wire and so forth.
    1:07:29 And just in a crazy amount of shootings, especially by black youth.
    1:07:40 So I pointed out a bunch of reasons why, you know, the evidence that Levitt brought forward
    1:07:48 doesn’t prove his theory.
    1:07:51 And then eventually it turned out in 2005, some less known economists went back and tried
    1:07:57 to replicate his results and went, oh, wait a minute, he made an error in his computer
    1:08:01 code right here.
    1:08:02 And that’s that’s why the numbers don’t come out.
    1:08:05 All right.
    1:08:06 On the other hand, I can’t prove that that there isn’t a Freakonomics effect.
    1:08:15 It’s just it’s just pretty it’s just pretty modest.
    1:08:19 The crack wars were gigantic in their effects on crime, especially the best measured crime
    1:08:26 of murder.
    1:08:29 Maybe maybe there’s some effect today.
    1:08:33 I don’t know.
    1:08:34 I haven’t I haven’t gone back to look.
    1:08:38 We had this big natural experiment or not exactly natural experiment of legalizing abortion.
    1:08:45 And it’s it’s pretty hard to tell.
    1:08:49 But it could well be.
    1:08:52 It could well be that that era, 50 years ago, that legalizing abortion kind of had mostly
    1:09:05 cut down on the number of working class kids being born and didn’t have any effect on under
    1:09:12 class children being born.
    1:09:16 That’s one possibility.
    1:09:17 I don’t know.
    1:09:19 But it was it was an interesting debate.
    1:09:23 We debated in Slate.com in 1999, although since then, they’ve taken our names off it.
    1:09:30 You can still see our debate online, but it’s just attributed to by authors.
    1:09:39 That’s interesting.
    1:09:40 I think that seems to happen as that happened multiple times, I guess, in association with
    1:09:47 you.
    1:09:48 Yeah.
    1:09:49 I mean, the notion that, you know, that I’m some horrible crime thinker is kind of a strange
    1:09:59 one in that I’m highly reasonable minded about things.
    1:10:09 You know, I’m pretty good at reductionist thinking.
    1:10:13 And what I don’t have is I don’t I don’t have the patience to write out a whole lot of soft
    1:10:22 soap ahead of getting to the point because I’ve got enough of other points to get to.
    1:10:31 You know, there’s there’s people who are more presentable than me, who are real good at
    1:10:40 that, at giving all the whatevers and notwithstandings that people who would get mad at them kind
    1:10:52 of get bored before they finally get to the point.
    1:10:57 But yeah, I like getting to the point and but it’s probably not been good for my career.
    1:11:05 But, you know, you sort of have to be who you are, and that’s and that’s what I’ve got
    1:11:11 the energy to do.
    1:11:13 Yeah, and a lot of people appreciate it, even the ones who who don’t, who’re not saying
    1:11:20 it publicly.
    1:11:21 I know there’s a lot of people have have asked me to ask you about your kind of strange buddy
    1:11:28 comedy relationship with Matt Iglesias.
    1:11:33 Yeah, I mean, I’ve never met him, but I’ve read him for a long, long time and, you know,
    1:11:39 I admire his his insightfulness.
    1:11:44 I mean, it’s a real good combination of creative thinking pundit with also being very reasonable
    1:11:52 oriented one that, you know, he generally doesn’t get carried away with his ideas, other
    1:11:59 than the one about a billion Americans, which is not a good idea.
    1:12:03 But you know, but yeah, I, you know, he’s had influence on me, I probably had some influence
    1:12:15 on him.
    1:12:16 I mean, you know, he’s, he’s an urban family man who does not like crime and, you know,
    1:12:24 it’s his family to be safe living in a big American city that seems totally reasonable.
    1:12:32 And you know, so he tries to come up with, you know, reasonable ideas to promote, you
    1:12:41 know, basic, you know, urban walkability, which is, I think is great.
    1:12:48 It just, you know, it requires a lot of law and order.
    1:12:52 And, you know, the glacius is in favor of law and order too, but, you know, he doesn’t
    1:12:56 want to come out and get himself canceled either.
    1:12:58 Yeah.
    1:12:59 So it does seem to me like he knows that much relationship, but I appreciate his, his turn
    1:13:08 of mind.
    1:13:09 And, you know, I think he’s, he’s probably benefited from me wisecracking in his comments
    1:13:18 for a long time.
    1:13:19 We’ve all benefited from you wisecracking in his comments at all times.
    1:13:26 It’s a strange thing because I know that he knows, and I also feel like he, you know,
    1:13:34 sometimes the way he asks his questions is almost an invitation for you to refute him.
    1:13:40 And that may be simply a way of him trying to deny, you know, with possible deniability,
    1:13:49 bring in some facts.
    1:13:50 I mean, the Overton window of what you’re supposed, what you’re allowed to say has probably
    1:13:55 gotten narrower over the years and, you know, my, my concern is, I always hope that I would
    1:14:06 enlarge the Overton window, that I would, that I would put ideas out there, findings,
    1:14:15 statistical patterns and so forth, and lead to academics and so forth, picking up on them
    1:14:21 and like going, oh, we should do this in a more sophisticated fashion and look into this
    1:14:26 interesting relationship.
    1:14:29 I sort of fear my influence has been kind of closing the, the Overton window.
    1:14:38 It’s partly because, because there’s a handful of people out there online who, if, if an
    1:14:45 academic published a paper from an idea they got from me and didn’t mention me, you know,
    1:14:54 people at econ market job rumors would jump all over them for not mentioning that me.
    1:15:01 And if they did mention me, you know, the SPLC would try to have them canceled or something
    1:15:06 like that.
    1:15:07 It’s it’s, it’s an unfortunate situation that the world has moved in that direction.
    1:15:15 Yes.
    1:15:16 I, what I do see is kind of a fracturing of the, of the Overton window because there’s,
    1:15:22 you know, there’s a general mainstream Overton window.
    1:15:25 And then there are subcultures which are gaining some form of traction within some subcultures
    1:15:33 in the elites as well.
    1:15:34 So what this is going to look like, what this is going to evolve.
    1:15:39 And I know relatively important people are listening to the general space, not saying
    1:15:44 they’re listening to this podcast, but they’re listening to, to what’s going on in the new
    1:15:48 right and the people adjacent to it, and they’re taking steps in this direction.
    1:15:53 There’s also politicians that kind of reflect this type of thinking now, you know, there’s,
    1:15:58 there are movements and the Overton window is pretty, you know, gaping where I’m standing
    1:16:04 and a lot of things are being discussed, which no one thought would be discussed even, I
    1:16:09 don’t know, five years ago.
    1:16:10 So I don’t know what this means, but yeah.
    1:16:14 It’s, it’s, it, there’s a lot to be said.
    1:16:22 I mean, there’s a lot to be said for enlarging the Overton window of what’s respectable.
    1:16:34 I mean, that having, being able to have a conference and meet people who think kind
    1:16:42 of like you, but have different, slightly different perspectives, so you can exchange
    1:16:46 views in person, you know, Peter Teal, where is it Teal, no, I don’t know, I shouldn’t
    1:16:55 say that.
    1:16:56 It was, I mean, there was just a conference at Stanford, proponents of academic freedom
    1:17:01 got together, you know, big names like Steven Pinker and, you know, obscure academics who
    1:17:09 got canceled for some ridiculous reason and exchanged their ideas.
    1:17:17 Getting together in person is important, and that’s, that’s one of the things that over
    1:17:23 the last 10 years has become more difficult as, you know, leftist violence against groups
    1:17:31 and so forth.
    1:17:32 We need more and more security, and it’s, it’s unfortunate, but.
    1:17:41 Yeah, but it’s starting to change, I feel.
    1:17:44 I mean, I’ve, I don’t know, I’m happy to have been invited recently.
    1:17:48 I think a few months ago there was NatCon in Miami, and there were quite a lot of people
    1:17:52 there who, you know, were wrong thinkers, some on the SPLC list, some people who had
    1:17:58 been excluded from the right wing, from, you know, like people like Paul Gottfried, who
    1:18:02 was kicked out by the fusionists who brought back into the fray now, so there’s a lot of
    1:18:08 things happening.
    1:18:09 So, I don’t know, hopeful.
    1:18:12 Yeah, I hope so, and some of it is you really need, you need an infrastructure, you need,
    1:18:21 you need people to meet.
    1:18:25 And I hope so, I mean, I’m just, I just haven’t seen, I haven’t seen a good trend in sort
    1:18:36 of the 25 years or so that I’ve been doing this kind of thing, but, you know, hope always
    1:18:46 dawns.
    1:18:47 So.
    1:18:48 Yes, I hope so, and I hope there will be many conferences that you will be invited to because
    1:18:56 it’s high time, and I feel like the tides are changing.
    1:19:03 Thank you so much, Steve.
    1:19:04 I want to ask you the last question, the last question is the question of the show, which
    1:19:08 I forgot to tell you about before the show, but you take your time to think about it because
    1:19:13 it’s just, if you have a recommendation of a subversive thinker, someone who’s been maybe
    1:19:18 influential on your thought, you know, I know you read a lot, but, you know, it could be
    1:19:23 a writer, could be even like an actor, a movie producer, I’ve had, you know, video game developers
    1:19:28 and musicians being recommended on the show, just someone who might be underrated and people
    1:19:34 just maybe haven’t heard about and you think would be worth checking out.
    1:19:39 The journalist who kind of most influenced me on, well, this isn’t going to be a very
    1:19:53 exciting recommendation and I should.
    1:19:59 But yeah, back in the 20th century, I became really interested and became a little friendly
    1:20:09 with a business magazine journalist at Fortune magazine named Dan Seligman.
    1:20:17 And basically my kind of blogging was kind of pioneered by him.
    1:20:23 He became interested in, you know, realistic quantitative social science that actually,
    1:20:34 if you don’t, if you aren’t afraid of what you’ll find, you’ll come up with interesting
    1:20:39 stuff for the general reading audience.
    1:20:42 Now, Dan died, you know, at least a decade ago or so, but I did want to give a plug if
    1:20:48 anybody’s, if anybody like wants to read a good introduction to IQ, his quite short and
    1:21:00 easy to read book, A Question of Intelligence by Daniel Seligman, you know, is available
    1:21:09 from used bookstores and things like that.
    1:21:12 And you know, it sort of got canceled too in its own time.
    1:21:20 But it’s, you know, I would think even though it’s 30 years ago, the science is still valuable.
    1:21:32 I haven’t discovered a whole lot since then.
    1:21:36 And it’s probably the most straightforward introduction to the subject.
    1:21:45 If you feel like thepages of The Bell Curve from two years later sounds like take
    1:21:52 more time than you’ve got, give Seligman’s A Question of Intelligence a try.
    1:22:02 Now the interesting thing was he was like a completely mainstream, you know, conservative
    1:22:07 business journalist in his day.
    1:22:10 I try to carry on and I’m kind of this weirdly unmentionable person 30 years later.
    1:22:18 But the trends were already heading toward cancellation in his day.
    1:22:24 But yeah, it’s just reading his introduction to IQ would give you a good picture of where
    1:22:33 I’m coming from and kind of, you know, the kind of personalities I’ve always found pleasant
    1:22:39 and intriguing and worth imitating.
    1:22:43 All right, so that’ll be my plug for an old hero from a long time ago.
    1:22:49 Excellent.
    1:22:50 Thank you so much, Dave.
    1:22:51 I want to point people toward your blog, the UND review, and to your Twitter, which is
    1:23:01 extremely…
    1:23:02 Yeah, I’m on Twitter.
    1:23:03 I’m…I write a column on Wednesdays for Takis Magazine, T A K I M A G dot com, and I show
    1:23:13 up in people’s comment sections, kind of whether they want me to or not.
    1:23:18 But…
    1:23:19 Yes, and we all appreciate it.
    1:23:21 The bat signal is an important feature of Twitter.
    1:23:25 Perfect.
    1:23:26 Thank you so much, Steve.
    1:23:28 This was excellent.
    1:23:29 And I hope we can do this again, because I have a backlog of a thousand more questions
    1:23:34 that, you know, I and other people want to ask you.
    1:23:37 So thanks so much for coming on.
    1:23:39 Okay.
    1:23:40 Thank you.
    1:23:41 If you like what you’re hearing, want to see where I take it, and maybe want early access
    1:23:47 episodes, bonus episodes, access to the AMA, or you just want to support the cause of dissident
    1:23:54 speech or my work in general, head to my Patreon at patreon.com slash AK subversive.
    1:24:01 Your donations are what keeps the lights on and makes the show possible.

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