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"Love & Mercy:" Life of Brian
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Screenshot 2015-08-22 19.18.21

The Beach Boys’ Hawthorne and N.W.A.’s Compton are surprisingly close

Here’s my new movie review in Taki’s Magazine:

Love & Mercy is a superb new biopic about head Beach Boy Brian Wilson’s creative summit in 1966, the year of the groundbreaking Pet Sounds album (featuring the sublime “Wouldn’t It Be Nice” and “God Only Knows”) and follow-up “Good Vibrations” mega-single, the greatest Southern California track ever constructed. The film follows Wilson briefly into his rapid collapse into mental illness and obesity, and then skips to his slow but gratifying recovery in the early 1990s.

Read the whole thing there.

And from Walk Hard [NSFW]:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bF3HPqfW5ZU

 
• Tags: Movies, Music 
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  1. Or Wilson’s brain may have been abnormal from the start. It’s seems to be a consistent theme among great artists. His history reminds me a lot of the writer David Foster Wallace (about whom, incidentally, a move is out–probably not nearly as interesting or entertaining as the Wilson pic). Some people just see colors, hear and feel things most of us can’t (thank God). When Wallace found himself unable to create because of all of the anti-psychotic drugs he was forced to take, he stopped the drugs and hanged himself.

  2. Mark Wahlberg’s version is better:

    • Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax
    @Anonymous

    I was hoping you were posting this. A genius at work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYzB_QqxXu4

  3. I much prefer Help Me Rhonda and Shutdown to that hippie stuff on Pet Sounds.

    • Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax
    @Jacobite

    Little Deuce Coupe still sounds great.

    Replies: @Jacobite

  4. Not the drugs but technology. Sinatra benefited from amplified mikes. Devo from cheap synths, ditto Talking Heads.

  5. Steve: Your Taki columns have a habit of suddenly ending without a proper conclusion. Is there a dire punishment for exceeding Taki’s word limit?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @SnakeEyes

    When Steve realizes he has nothing more to say, he stops saying it.

  6. Sam Bottoms would have made an excellent older Brian Wilson. But he’s dead.

  7. Right around the time of Brian Wilson’s creative summit, I made the mistake of mentioning to the older kid next door in Huntington Beach that my favorite band was The Beatles. He threatened to beat me up unless I recanted and converted to the hometown Beach Boys. Fearing a beating, I of course did as I was told. It was my first experience in being told what to think and say. Thus I have long been prepared for the times in which we now live.

  8. @Anonymous
    Mark Wahlberg's version is better:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDQV2iXgZjQ

    Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax

    I was hoping you were posting this. A genius at work.

  9. @Jacobite
    I much prefer Help Me Rhonda and Shutdown to that hippie stuff on Pet Sounds.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_pYU0p6WZhU

    Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax

    Little Deuce Coupe still sounds great.

    • Replies: @Jacobite
    @Malcolm X-Lax

    Indeed it does.

  10. The song God Only Knows was played on The Wonder Years, Boogie Nights, and Big Love.

  11. At age fourteen in the spring of 1965, I bought my only-ever Beach Boys’ record – the single of “I Get Around.”

    Before spring turned to summer the appeal of that number wore thin , but that’s when I played for the first time, and discovered, and fell in love with its b/w track – my favorite Beach Boys’ recording: “Don’t Worry Baby.”

    First time I heard that flipside, it made me feel a way I’d never before felt: sensually religious, like, you know, holy, deeply sacred, impossibly private, yet with…High Voltage that illuminated and warmed every last one of my corpuscles. The chemical stew in my brain got what felt like a complete overhaul as my emotional compass spun like the slicks on a top fuel dragster. “Don’t Worry Baby” melded itself, instantly, permanently, directly into my heart.

    “Don’t Worry Baby” has also got the most plaintive, almost minimalist, instrumental bridge – whose impact is in its sparseness of emotional expression, as if the song’s intense anxiety for whether, or not, “everything’ll work out all-right,” would have all gone saccharine and flat had Carl Wilson instead overwrought a lush, emotionally-indulgent flourish of a bridge. By playing it down-to-the-marrow with breath-bating, deliberately spaced notes, Wilson amplified the bridge’s emotional intensity, and made almost unbearably overwhelming the song’s core emotional ache for a secure, loved, and loving destiny.

    • Replies: @Paul Walker Most beautiful man ever...
    @Auntie Analogue

    Gees Auntie A, I haven't had a smoke in years but I may need one now. (insert winking icon).

    , @I, Libertine
    @Auntie Analogue

    The Beach Boys & The Beatles usually had great flip sides, a sign of their overflowing talent.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Auntie Analogue

    "Don't Worry Baby" is a great song. However, I don't know how many dozens of times I must have listened to it before I noticed that it's (mostly) a car song, not a relationship song, about a guy who bragged too much about his car, now has to race someone, is scared, and is being reassured by his girlfriend. The overall feel of it, though, is kind of spiritual, as you say.

    Replies: @Anon, @Jacobite, @Auntie Analogue

  12. @Auntie Analogue
    At age fourteen in the spring of 1965, I bought my only-ever Beach Boys' record - the single of "I Get Around."

    Before spring turned to summer the appeal of that number wore thin , but that's when I played for the first time, and discovered, and fell in love with its b/w track - my favorite Beach Boys' recording: "Don't Worry Baby."

    First time I heard that flipside, it made me feel a way I'd never before felt: sensually religious, like, you know, holy, deeply sacred, impossibly private, yet with...High Voltage that illuminated and warmed every last one of my corpuscles. The chemical stew in my brain got what felt like a complete overhaul as my emotional compass spun like the slicks on a top fuel dragster. "Don't Worry Baby" melded itself, instantly, permanently, directly into my heart.

    "Don't Worry Baby" has also got the most plaintive, almost minimalist, instrumental bridge - whose impact is in its sparseness of emotional expression, as if the song's intense anxiety for whether, or not, "everything'll work out all-right," would have all gone saccharine and flat had Carl Wilson instead overwrought a lush, emotionally-indulgent flourish of a bridge. By playing it down-to-the-marrow with breath-bating, deliberately spaced notes, Wilson amplified the bridge's emotional intensity, and made almost unbearably overwhelming the song's core emotional ache for a secure, loved, and loving destiny.

    Replies: @Paul Walker Most beautiful man ever..., @I, Libertine, @Harry Baldwin

    Gees Auntie A, I haven’t had a smoke in years but I may need one now. (insert winking icon).

  13. I wonder if The Beach Boys have any Nonwhite fans? I have a Beach Boys t-shirt and whenever I wear it in public the only racial group that ever compliments my shirt are White people. Not even Black people who are old as Morgan Freeman seem to be fans of The Beach Boys. Probably because it reminds them of a time when America was run by the wrong kind of White people in their eyes.

    • Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax
    @Jefferson

    As has been pointed out here before, with the sole exceptions of asian martial arts films and white technology, black people only like black stuff.

    , @Anonymous
    @Jefferson

    An outrageously muscular black guy once complimented me on my t-shirt. It was in a b-ball game in Berkeley around '93. The shirt had a sillouhette of a fat, dancing black woman, with the legend, "9th Annual Empowering Women of Color Conference: Exposing The Margins". I was wearing it ironically - good thing he didn't get it.

    , @Former Darfur
    @Jefferson

    I wonder if The Beach Boys have any Nonwhite fans?

    I've only met one. But they have had black members.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blondie_Chaplin

    , @Chuck
    @Jefferson

    Jackie Chan is a fan.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  14. Wouldn’t Alec Baldwin have made a better Brian Wilson?

  15. How much of what we hear on the recordings is the actual Beach Boys? I’ve always been under the impression that it was mostly Wilson and highly competent session men.

    • Replies: @poolside
    @ChaseBizzy

    That is correct ... the Beach Boys (minus Wilson) would tour while LA's crack team of studio musicians (known today as the Wrecking Crew) recorded all the backing tracks for their albums.

    The band would take a break from the road to come home and cut their vocals.

    This was a very common approach in the '60s. Most pop records of the day do not feature the bands at all, but instead were recorded by the Wrecking Crew.

    Glen Campbell actually filled in for Brian Wilson on Beach Boys dates in '64-'65, and he played on many of their later albums.

    http://www.wreckingcrewfilm.com/

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jacobite

  16. In the second story of Love & Mercy, Cusack plays a much older and more subdued Brian with a wistful awareness that youthful promise doesn’t always work out.

    Yeah… so much promise, and didn’t accomplish much!

    (sorry, couldn’t resist)

  17. I get goose bumps while listening to songs I like but my wife and kids don’t. Am I weird or are they?

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @L7's


    I get goose bumps while listening to songs I like but my wife and kids don’t. Am I weird or are they?
     
    You are.

    And I'm even weirder. I get multiple symptoms of Stendhal's Syndrome when I really really love a piece of music. Some Wagner and Strauss, of course, but also Schubert's "Erlkönig".

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3nxyS8wf8E
    , @unpc downunder
    @L7's

    No, but you are in the minority. People who are sensitive or introverted and relatively high on the personality trait of openness to experience, experience higher levels of nervous arousal from listening to music they like or viewing artistically inspiring art. I get it whenever I hear new music with clever cord changes. Most people just don't get kind of thrill out of art.

  18. Art says:

    I cannot adequately say this, but the thing that made the Beach Boys so great, was the total amount of sound that their records produced. Not volume, not loudness, but the total amount of different pleasing sounds that registered in your brain all at the same time. If you intently listen, their music can literally overwhelm you with “good vibrations” (sorry).

    • Replies: @Marty
    @Art

    Same with The Byrds.

  19. Somebody should make a movie out of Dave McGowan’s Laurel Canyon series.

  20. Thanks Steve- I will see this film. As a young kid we went every year to see the Beach Boys at the National Mall on the 4th of July until James Watt said they weren’t wholesome enough for the event. Can you imagine that? Back in 1982 they thought the Beach Boys brought out a bad element. 10 short years later 2 Live Crew played “Smack that Bitch” at Bill Clinton’s inauguration (didn’t happen).

    Also, don’t think for a second that we don’t appreciate you linking to the single page articles in Taki. Because we notice it and we do appreciate it.

    • Replies: @ChaseBizzy
    @Danindc

    Wayne Newton was the replacement act. Californian Reagan was friendly with the Wilson/Love family and gently but publicly reprimanded Watt.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  21. My neighbor is in Brian Wilson’s band and he describes him today as childlike and kinda simple. Is that new or was he always like that before drugs?

  22. You don’t have to like the Beach Boys to hear, in their songs, what our civilization has lost over the last 50 years.

    I’ve never understood the Brian Wilson obsession within our culture. I happen to like the Beach Boys, and like the whole style of innocent teenager music from American Graffiti (and Grease) and so on. But I also happen to like, in a similarly vague way, Donovan, and Franky Vallee, and Buddy Holly, and so on. So thinking of Brian Wilson as somehow special compared to a few dozen other guys has never resonated with me.

    But regardless of whether you like or dislike the Beach Boys/50’s/early 60’s music, you can’t help but hear it, and sense a completely different artistic and cultural ethic that just doesn’t exist anymore. That innocent, corny stuff was actually popular at one time: people listened to it, and paid for it, and it was the public face of popular culture. (and this is true of earlier music as well: ‘the corn was as high as an elephant’s eye’, Sinatra music, big band. Whether you like it or not, you can’t help but think that a culture that made that stuff popular was in some way healthier than the one that makes rap, or metal, or grunge, popular).

    joeyjoejoe

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @joeyjoejoe

    That innocent, corny stuff was actually popular at one time: people listened to it, and paid for it, and it was the public face of popular culture.

    One of the things that impresses me about early 60s music is that it talks honestly about emotions that song writers don't acknowledge anymore, like wanting to be married and guys crying over a failed relationship. Admittedly I don't keep up with these things, but has a hip hop artist ever mentioned wanting to marry or shedding tears over unrequited love? These are experiences that most people share but it's now uncool to admit them.

    Similarly, people love to mock "Leave It to Beaver" as presenting a world that never existed, but the simple problems and family relationships depicted on Beaver were far more true to life than anything on more recent sitcoms, where the father is a clown and the kids all smart alecks. (Granted June Cleaver was more dolled up than any mom in my neighborhood.)

  23. OT:

    http://theconservativetreehouse.com/2015/06/08/the-full-story-of-the-mckinney-texas-pool-mob-inside-the-craig-ranch-subdivision/

    The cluster&!$*k comes into play here when a non-resident, Tatiana Rhodes (further referred to as “Princess Dindu Nuffins”) and her mother decided to organize and promote an event w/DJ and pool party at the park area of Craig Ranch Subdivision, in McKinney, TX. Neither Princess Dindu Nuffins and mother Dindu Nuffins obtained permission, nor paid to rent the facility for their party that was promoted on Twitter which obviously would solicit participation from the free-shit army…Princess Dindu Nuffins claims a promotion business and apparently this event was her baby and it provided her another avenue to promote another event that would sell tickets in advance of said event. What better way to keep overhead on the cheap by taking over a privately controlled neighborhood park without residents nor neighborhood security being aware of until the free shit army arrived in car-loads to take over, climbing fences and generally bullying their way into the scene in total defiance of residents questioning what was happening in their own community.

    • Replies: @I, Libertine
    @Wall the ghetto

    Same story, over and over. MSM first tells us breathlessly what the cops did. Then they reluctantly mention why they did it.

    Replies: @Alfa158

    , @Danindc
    @Wall the ghetto

    Those 13 year olds need to learn how to Make it clap!!

    , @Anonymous
    @Wall the ghetto

    OT:

    The left is trying to destroy the livelihood of one of the white women who was filmed at poolgate. They are accusing her of instigating the whole thing and making racist remarks based off of (a) a video that shows her trying to break up a fight; and (b) the word of one of the black residents...

    On these two scanty pieces of evidence, the Bank Of America has decided to "look into it" because she works for them, apparently.

    The Bank Of America would like you all to know that they're taking this very seriously:
    https://twitter.com/BofA_Careers

    Because she works for a bank, the left is also accusing her of making "racist" bank loans:
    https://twitter.com/hashtag/TraceyCarverAllbritton?src=hash

    That's actually really funny. It's as if they're trying to cram as many narratives into this one event to see how many "stick". Probably too risky to just go with the "police brutality narrative". Better throw in "racist bank loans" for good measure.

    "Housing discrimination" because why not? http://www.ibtimes.com/mckinney-north-texas-city-center-pool-party-video-controversy-was-sued-over-housing-1955995#.VXXH50KS8WA.twitter

    , @Malcolm X-Lax
    @Wall the ghetto

    I'm actually in awe of how the narrative around this story is being pushed. It's as if the left is testing out its theory that it can literally lie to our faces and get away with it. This is an Emperor has no clothes moment. I was watching CNN yesterday and Erin Burnett seemed to be agitating for this police officer to lose his pension, his career, go to prison and have him and his family financially ruined.

  24. I love how Pete Townsend dissed Pet Sounds when it was released and then turned around and made the most Pet Sounds-influenced album I’ve heard, The Who Sell Out.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
    @yaqub the mad scientist

    Are you effing nuts? "Sell Out" owes very little if anything to"Pet Sounds"; the recording that is influenced by "Pet Sounds" is, of course, "Sgt Pepper".

  25. He and his wife have adopted five children. I wonder how well he is able to be a father to them.

    I would also imagine nearly any adoption agency would find serious mental illness in a prospective parent to be a bar to adoption – are there any restrictions at all in a private adoption, done through a lawyer?

  26. @SnakeEyes
    Steve: Your Taki columns have a habit of suddenly ending without a proper conclusion. Is there a dire punishment for exceeding Taki's word limit?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    When Steve realizes he has nothing more to say, he stops saying it.

  27. @Auntie Analogue
    At age fourteen in the spring of 1965, I bought my only-ever Beach Boys' record - the single of "I Get Around."

    Before spring turned to summer the appeal of that number wore thin , but that's when I played for the first time, and discovered, and fell in love with its b/w track - my favorite Beach Boys' recording: "Don't Worry Baby."

    First time I heard that flipside, it made me feel a way I'd never before felt: sensually religious, like, you know, holy, deeply sacred, impossibly private, yet with...High Voltage that illuminated and warmed every last one of my corpuscles. The chemical stew in my brain got what felt like a complete overhaul as my emotional compass spun like the slicks on a top fuel dragster. "Don't Worry Baby" melded itself, instantly, permanently, directly into my heart.

    "Don't Worry Baby" has also got the most plaintive, almost minimalist, instrumental bridge - whose impact is in its sparseness of emotional expression, as if the song's intense anxiety for whether, or not, "everything'll work out all-right," would have all gone saccharine and flat had Carl Wilson instead overwrought a lush, emotionally-indulgent flourish of a bridge. By playing it down-to-the-marrow with breath-bating, deliberately spaced notes, Wilson amplified the bridge's emotional intensity, and made almost unbearably overwhelming the song's core emotional ache for a secure, loved, and loving destiny.

    Replies: @Paul Walker Most beautiful man ever..., @I, Libertine, @Harry Baldwin

    The Beach Boys & The Beatles usually had great flip sides, a sign of their overflowing talent.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @I, Libertine

    Revolution is the flip side for Hey Jude and the Beatles didn't bother putting it on the White Album because they had a rule against ask fans to pay twice for the same songs (since suspended).

    Replies: @manton

  28. @Auntie Analogue
    At age fourteen in the spring of 1965, I bought my only-ever Beach Boys' record - the single of "I Get Around."

    Before spring turned to summer the appeal of that number wore thin , but that's when I played for the first time, and discovered, and fell in love with its b/w track - my favorite Beach Boys' recording: "Don't Worry Baby."

    First time I heard that flipside, it made me feel a way I'd never before felt: sensually religious, like, you know, holy, deeply sacred, impossibly private, yet with...High Voltage that illuminated and warmed every last one of my corpuscles. The chemical stew in my brain got what felt like a complete overhaul as my emotional compass spun like the slicks on a top fuel dragster. "Don't Worry Baby" melded itself, instantly, permanently, directly into my heart.

    "Don't Worry Baby" has also got the most plaintive, almost minimalist, instrumental bridge - whose impact is in its sparseness of emotional expression, as if the song's intense anxiety for whether, or not, "everything'll work out all-right," would have all gone saccharine and flat had Carl Wilson instead overwrought a lush, emotionally-indulgent flourish of a bridge. By playing it down-to-the-marrow with breath-bating, deliberately spaced notes, Wilson amplified the bridge's emotional intensity, and made almost unbearably overwhelming the song's core emotional ache for a secure, loved, and loving destiny.

    Replies: @Paul Walker Most beautiful man ever..., @I, Libertine, @Harry Baldwin

    “Don’t Worry Baby” is a great song. However, I don’t know how many dozens of times I must have listened to it before I noticed that it’s (mostly) a car song, not a relationship song, about a guy who bragged too much about his car, now has to race someone, is scared, and is being reassured by his girlfriend. The overall feel of it, though, is kind of spiritual, as you say.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Harry Baldwin

    "I don’t know how many dozens of times I must have listened to it before I noticed that it’s (mostly) a car song"

    Someone should write an article, 'Car as a metaphor'.

    I wonder if the band Cars took cue from BB.

    Drive is sort of like Don't Worry Baby.

    Replies: @Former Darfur

    , @Jacobite
    @Harry Baldwin

    Well, now we know the origins of the script to American Graffiti.

    , @Auntie Analogue
    @Harry Baldwin

    My dear Harry Baldwin, let's just say that the car in the song is a placeholder for male sexual performance anxiety, to which the girlfriend says, "Don't Worry Baby."

    The singer, like most men, cannot get over his monomania that he will be judged for his performance, while for his girlfriend, like most women, using sex to get love, the performance of her boyfriend in solely the sexual facet of the relationship is not paramount - for her it's much more, it's sharing feelings, bonding, soul-mateship, loyalty, security.

    The singer wants bonding, loyalty and security too, but like most men he misplaces the locus or overemphasis of this in his performance ("If I can't be a maximum stud-muffin every time then I'm worthless in my own eyes and, worse, in my girlfriend's eyes."). See, the girlfriend is taking in the entirety of the relationship with "everything will turn out alright," so she says "Don't Worry Baby" because she sees and feels that the monodimensional concern over sexual performance is but one component of the relationship.

  29. A CD of the Beach Boys is the only American pop music I’ve ever owned (unless maybe I’d bought a Bob Dylan LP – my poor memory does not reveal whether I did or not). I still like it; what rotten luck to be so overshadowed by The Beatles. Or was in The Beatles who showed them what could be done and spurred them on to better things?

    What interest me is why, since the eras of ragtime, early jazz, and Berlin/Gershwin/Porter/Rodgers & Hart, there have been only two periods when pop music has included plenty of stuff worth listening to, namely The Swing Era, and the 60s. I remember 50s pop on the radio – utterly dire. Or post Beatles: god-awful. Why?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @dearieme


    …there have been only two periods when pop music has included plenty of stuff worth listening to, namely The Swing Era, and the 60s.
     
    The '50s and early '60s were pretty good on Broadway, and sometimes in its suburb, Hollywood. But that's not "pop" music.
    , @onetwothree
    @dearieme

    Because you have no taste. Show tune schmaltz vs Pink Floyd/Led Zeppelin/Rolling Stones/hundreds of other decent bands? Come on.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  30. @joeyjoejoe
    You don't have to like the Beach Boys to hear, in their songs, what our civilization has lost over the last 50 years.

    I've never understood the Brian Wilson obsession within our culture. I happen to like the Beach Boys, and like the whole style of innocent teenager music from American Graffiti (and Grease) and so on. But I also happen to like, in a similarly vague way, Donovan, and Franky Vallee, and Buddy Holly, and so on. So thinking of Brian Wilson as somehow special compared to a few dozen other guys has never resonated with me.

    But regardless of whether you like or dislike the Beach Boys/50's/early 60's music, you can't help but hear it, and sense a completely different artistic and cultural ethic that just doesn't exist anymore. That innocent, corny stuff was actually popular at one time: people listened to it, and paid for it, and it was the public face of popular culture. (and this is true of earlier music as well: 'the corn was as high as an elephant's eye', Sinatra music, big band. Whether you like it or not, you can't help but think that a culture that made that stuff popular was in some way healthier than the one that makes rap, or metal, or grunge, popular).

    joeyjoejoe

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    That innocent, corny stuff was actually popular at one time: people listened to it, and paid for it, and it was the public face of popular culture.

    One of the things that impresses me about early 60s music is that it talks honestly about emotions that song writers don’t acknowledge anymore, like wanting to be married and guys crying over a failed relationship. Admittedly I don’t keep up with these things, but has a hip hop artist ever mentioned wanting to marry or shedding tears over unrequited love? These are experiences that most people share but it’s now uncool to admit them.

    Similarly, people love to mock “Leave It to Beaver” as presenting a world that never existed, but the simple problems and family relationships depicted on Beaver were far more true to life than anything on more recent sitcoms, where the father is a clown and the kids all smart alecks. (Granted June Cleaver was more dolled up than any mom in my neighborhood.)

  31. @Wall the ghetto
    OT:

    http://theconservativetreehouse.com/2015/06/08/the-full-story-of-the-mckinney-texas-pool-mob-inside-the-craig-ranch-subdivision/

    The cluster&!$*k comes into play here when a non-resident, Tatiana Rhodes (further referred to as “Princess Dindu Nuffins”) and her mother decided to organize and promote an event w/DJ and pool party at the park area of Craig Ranch Subdivision, in McKinney, TX. Neither Princess Dindu Nuffins and mother Dindu Nuffins obtained permission, nor paid to rent the facility for their party that was promoted on Twitter which obviously would solicit participation from the free-shit army…Princess Dindu Nuffins claims a promotion business and apparently this event was her baby and it provided her another avenue to promote another event that would sell tickets in advance of said event. What better way to keep overhead on the cheap by taking over a privately controlled neighborhood park without residents nor neighborhood security being aware of until the free shit army arrived in car-loads to take over, climbing fences and generally bullying their way into the scene in total defiance of residents questioning what was happening in their own community.

    Replies: @I, Libertine, @Danindc, @Anonymous, @Malcolm X-Lax

    Same story, over and over. MSM first tells us breathlessly what the cops did. Then they reluctantly mention why they did it.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @I, Libertine

    They mention it at all even if reluctantly, only because with all the alternative media out there they can no longer just put out their message and entirely control the narrative. In their version of the good old days all you had was CBS and Uncle Walter showing you what they wanted you to see.
    They are still however, pretty much getting what they want. They put out the official message showing only selected images and talking only to activists they want to, and by the time the truth emerges they can quietly let the story fade away after having turned the ratcheted wheel one more click. The idiots have already swallowed the lead. These are people who understand that a
    lie will go halfway around the world while the truth is still putting on its pants, and they exploit that to the hilt.

  32. There’s a paper out claiming the genetics for high creativity are shared with those of schizophrenia. It’s being disputed, but would anyone be surprised if there is a close genetic link between creativity and craziness? Since the Greeks it has been noted that there is a fine line between creative genius and insanity.

    I wonder if the drugs are self-medication or maybe the needed push to get some people over the hump creatively. Maybe it is both. The latter seems to square with observation, because once these creative geniuses get clean they stop being geniuses. But, there are examples where the genius runs out of material and then takes up drugs as a response, so who knows.

    For anyone interested in the evolution of popular music, I’d recommend a book called The Wrecking Crew. It is a fun read and does a good job explaining how pop evolved in the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s. It also helps explain why pop is in such bad shape now.

  33. …the simple problems and family relationships depicted on Beaver were far more true to life than anything on more recent sitcoms… (Granted June Cleaver was more dolled up than any mom in my neighborhood.)

    My parents were of that generation, and Mom was hot in a Marilyn Monroe kind of way. What can I say? Dad knew how to get the babes of his day.

    Alas, looks did not translate into happiness, and their relationship was more like Marilyn’s real life than the Cleaver household. Take it from me, there were some really fu*ked up things going on in those days that never made it to television.

    The real world was a scary place (for some of us) long before the music turned sour.

    • Replies: @J1234
    @Buzz Mohawk


    ....their relationship was more like Marilyn’s real life than the Cleaver household. Take it from me, there were some really fu*ked up things going on in those days that never made it to television.
     
    My question is...why should it have made it to television?

    Replies: @carol

  34. Ah, The Beach Boys! Surf music! An excellent way to clear the palate after women’s soccer.

  35. It must have hurt Brian that Pet Sounds didn’t sell well but the Beach Boys achieved their fame and sales success in the era of the 45 record. Their fans were suspicious of LP’s because they were usually rip offs with just a couple of good tunes and the rest junk. In fact, I remember trying to buy ‘Shut Down’ at my local record store but it wasn’t on a 45 there. It was on an LP along with a bunch of other hot rod songs by Southern California garage bands that cost four or five dollars. It was also the case that a lot of adolescent Beach Boy fans only had those little 45 record players or if they had a ‘Hi Fi that played LPs it was in the living room and thus not entirely under the control of the kids!

  36. @ChaseBizzy
    How much of what we hear on the recordings is the actual Beach Boys? I've always been under the impression that it was mostly Wilson and highly competent session men.

    Replies: @poolside

    That is correct … the Beach Boys (minus Wilson) would tour while LA’s crack team of studio musicians (known today as the Wrecking Crew) recorded all the backing tracks for their albums.

    The band would take a break from the road to come home and cut their vocals.

    This was a very common approach in the ’60s. Most pop records of the day do not feature the bands at all, but instead were recorded by the Wrecking Crew.

    Glen Campbell actually filled in for Brian Wilson on Beach Boys dates in ’64-’65, and he played on many of their later albums.

    http://www.wreckingcrewfilm.com/

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @poolside

    Mike Love had logical reasons for objecting to the directions Brian Wilson was heading musically, like how are we supposed to play this on stage?

    , @Jacobite
    @poolside


    studio musicians (known today as the Wrecking Crew) recorded all the backing tracks for their albums.
     
    Not true for the first two or three albums when they could not afford studio musicians. Dave Marks, Al Jardine, and Carl Wilson all played instruments on those albums and Carl's Rickenbacker can even be heard on some Pet Sounds era tracks.
  37. @Wall the ghetto
    OT:

    http://theconservativetreehouse.com/2015/06/08/the-full-story-of-the-mckinney-texas-pool-mob-inside-the-craig-ranch-subdivision/

    The cluster&!$*k comes into play here when a non-resident, Tatiana Rhodes (further referred to as “Princess Dindu Nuffins”) and her mother decided to organize and promote an event w/DJ and pool party at the park area of Craig Ranch Subdivision, in McKinney, TX. Neither Princess Dindu Nuffins and mother Dindu Nuffins obtained permission, nor paid to rent the facility for their party that was promoted on Twitter which obviously would solicit participation from the free-shit army…Princess Dindu Nuffins claims a promotion business and apparently this event was her baby and it provided her another avenue to promote another event that would sell tickets in advance of said event. What better way to keep overhead on the cheap by taking over a privately controlled neighborhood park without residents nor neighborhood security being aware of until the free shit army arrived in car-loads to take over, climbing fences and generally bullying their way into the scene in total defiance of residents questioning what was happening in their own community.

    Replies: @I, Libertine, @Danindc, @Anonymous, @Malcolm X-Lax

    Those 13 year olds need to learn how to Make it clap!!

  38. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Wall the ghetto
    OT:

    http://theconservativetreehouse.com/2015/06/08/the-full-story-of-the-mckinney-texas-pool-mob-inside-the-craig-ranch-subdivision/

    The cluster&!$*k comes into play here when a non-resident, Tatiana Rhodes (further referred to as “Princess Dindu Nuffins”) and her mother decided to organize and promote an event w/DJ and pool party at the park area of Craig Ranch Subdivision, in McKinney, TX. Neither Princess Dindu Nuffins and mother Dindu Nuffins obtained permission, nor paid to rent the facility for their party that was promoted on Twitter which obviously would solicit participation from the free-shit army…Princess Dindu Nuffins claims a promotion business and apparently this event was her baby and it provided her another avenue to promote another event that would sell tickets in advance of said event. What better way to keep overhead on the cheap by taking over a privately controlled neighborhood park without residents nor neighborhood security being aware of until the free shit army arrived in car-loads to take over, climbing fences and generally bullying their way into the scene in total defiance of residents questioning what was happening in their own community.

    Replies: @I, Libertine, @Danindc, @Anonymous, @Malcolm X-Lax

    OT:

    The left is trying to destroy the livelihood of one of the white women who was filmed at poolgate. They are accusing her of instigating the whole thing and making racist remarks based off of (a) a video that shows her trying to break up a fight; and (b) the word of one of the black residents…

    On these two scanty pieces of evidence, the Bank Of America has decided to “look into it” because she works for them, apparently.

    The Bank Of America would like you all to know that they’re taking this very seriously:

    Because she works for a bank, the left is also accusing her of making “racist” bank loans:
    https://twitter.com/hashtag/TraceyCarverAllbritton?src=hash

    That’s actually really funny. It’s as if they’re trying to cram as many narratives into this one event to see how many “stick”. Probably too risky to just go with the “police brutality narrative”. Better throw in “racist bank loans” for good measure.

    “Housing discrimination” because why not? http://www.ibtimes.com/mckinney-north-texas-city-center-pool-party-video-controversy-was-sued-over-housing-1955995#.VXXH50KS8WA.twitter

  39. Their best stuff really was as good as the Beatles…in a few cases, better. The problem with the Beach Boys was that their earlier recorded songs were very reminiscent of the 1950’s (at least culturally, if not musically), and that was horribly out of vogue in the mid to late 1960’s. As a result, they came across as dweebs when compared to the Beatles, whose early records were very “mod.” That reputation stayed with them and their music. Some rock critics could never get past it.

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    @J1234

    "Their best stuff really was as good as the Beatles…in a few cases, better. The problem with the Beach Boys was that their earlier recorded songs were very reminiscent of the 1950′s (at least culturally, if not musically), and that was horribly out of vogue in the mid to late 1960′s. As a result, they came across as dweebs when compared to the Beatles, whose early records were very “mod.” That reputation stayed with them and their music. Some rock critics could never get past it."

    At my high school (very late seventies) the contempt and disgust for Beach Boys music was palpable. Whereas the Beatles were considered cool.

    Replies: @dearieme

  40. Debating sexism in science. Further question: will gays become more publicly chauvinistic as social acceptance for them increases?

  41. @Jefferson
    I wonder if The Beach Boys have any Nonwhite fans? I have a Beach Boys t-shirt and whenever I wear it in public the only racial group that ever compliments my shirt are White people. Not even Black people who are old as Morgan Freeman seem to be fans of The Beach Boys. Probably because it reminds them of a time when America was run by the wrong kind of White people in their eyes.

    Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax, @Anonymous, @Former Darfur, @Chuck

    As has been pointed out here before, with the sole exceptions of asian martial arts films and white technology, black people only like black stuff.

  42. @Buzz Mohawk

    ...the simple problems and family relationships depicted on Beaver were far more true to life than anything on more recent sitcoms... (Granted June Cleaver was more dolled up than any mom in my neighborhood.)
     
    My parents were of that generation, and Mom was hot in a Marilyn Monroe kind of way. What can I say? Dad knew how to get the babes of his day.

    Alas, looks did not translate into happiness, and their relationship was more like Marilyn's real life than the Cleaver household. Take it from me, there were some really fu*ked up things going on in those days that never made it to television.

    The real world was a scary place (for some of us) long before the music turned sour.

    Replies: @J1234

    ….their relationship was more like Marilyn’s real life than the Cleaver household. Take it from me, there were some really fu*ked up things going on in those days that never made it to television.

    My question is…why should it have made it to television?

    • Replies: @carol
    @J1234

    No reason, but the contradictions were noted later on.

  43. @Wall the ghetto
    OT:

    http://theconservativetreehouse.com/2015/06/08/the-full-story-of-the-mckinney-texas-pool-mob-inside-the-craig-ranch-subdivision/

    The cluster&!$*k comes into play here when a non-resident, Tatiana Rhodes (further referred to as “Princess Dindu Nuffins”) and her mother decided to organize and promote an event w/DJ and pool party at the park area of Craig Ranch Subdivision, in McKinney, TX. Neither Princess Dindu Nuffins and mother Dindu Nuffins obtained permission, nor paid to rent the facility for their party that was promoted on Twitter which obviously would solicit participation from the free-shit army…Princess Dindu Nuffins claims a promotion business and apparently this event was her baby and it provided her another avenue to promote another event that would sell tickets in advance of said event. What better way to keep overhead on the cheap by taking over a privately controlled neighborhood park without residents nor neighborhood security being aware of until the free shit army arrived in car-loads to take over, climbing fences and generally bullying their way into the scene in total defiance of residents questioning what was happening in their own community.

    Replies: @I, Libertine, @Danindc, @Anonymous, @Malcolm X-Lax

    I’m actually in awe of how the narrative around this story is being pushed. It’s as if the left is testing out its theory that it can literally lie to our faces and get away with it. This is an Emperor has no clothes moment. I was watching CNN yesterday and Erin Burnett seemed to be agitating for this police officer to lose his pension, his career, go to prison and have him and his family financially ruined.

  44. Anonymous [AKA "11 GIR"] says:
    @Jefferson
    I wonder if The Beach Boys have any Nonwhite fans? I have a Beach Boys t-shirt and whenever I wear it in public the only racial group that ever compliments my shirt are White people. Not even Black people who are old as Morgan Freeman seem to be fans of The Beach Boys. Probably because it reminds them of a time when America was run by the wrong kind of White people in their eyes.

    Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax, @Anonymous, @Former Darfur, @Chuck

    An outrageously muscular black guy once complimented me on my t-shirt. It was in a b-ball game in Berkeley around ’93. The shirt had a sillouhette of a fat, dancing black woman, with the legend, “9th Annual Empowering Women of Color Conference: Exposing The Margins”. I was wearing it ironically – good thing he didn’t get it.

  45. @L7's
    I get goose bumps while listening to songs I like but my wife and kids don't. Am I weird or are they?

    Replies: @Kylie, @unpc downunder

    I get goose bumps while listening to songs I like but my wife and kids don’t. Am I weird or are they?

    You are.

    And I’m even weirder. I get multiple symptoms of Stendhal’s Syndrome when I really really love a piece of music. Some Wagner and Strauss, of course, but also Schubert’s “Erlkönig”.

  46. @poolside
    @ChaseBizzy

    That is correct ... the Beach Boys (minus Wilson) would tour while LA's crack team of studio musicians (known today as the Wrecking Crew) recorded all the backing tracks for their albums.

    The band would take a break from the road to come home and cut their vocals.

    This was a very common approach in the '60s. Most pop records of the day do not feature the bands at all, but instead were recorded by the Wrecking Crew.

    Glen Campbell actually filled in for Brian Wilson on Beach Boys dates in '64-'65, and he played on many of their later albums.

    http://www.wreckingcrewfilm.com/

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jacobite

    Mike Love had logical reasons for objecting to the directions Brian Wilson was heading musically, like how are we supposed to play this on stage?

  47. “Back in 1982 they thought the Beach Boys brought out a bad element.”

    I find it hard to believe that The Beach Boys were considered too rated R in 1982. Especially since in 1975 Donna Summers recorded a disco song where she basically has an orgasm. Love To Love You Baby is more sexually explicit than anything The Beach Boys have ever recorded and it came out 7 years before 1982.

    Also MTV was already on the airwaves in 1982 and they were showing Michael Jackson grabbing his crotch. I know 1982 was a long time ago, but this was 1982 not 1962. The wholesome Leave It To Beaver image in pop culture was long gone by than. Also in 1982 you had Grandmaster Flash And The Furious Five rapping about junkie base heads in the housing projects of New York City.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Jefferson

    Interior secretary James Watt thought they'd draw "a bad element" as fans.

    Replies: @Jefferson

  48. @Art
    I cannot adequately say this, but the thing that made the Beach Boys so great, was the total amount of sound that their records produced. Not volume, not loudness, but the total amount of different pleasing sounds that registered in your brain all at the same time. If you intently listen, their music can literally overwhelm you with “good vibrations” (sorry).

    Replies: @Marty

    Same with The Byrds.

  49. LSD isn’t for everybody, but for some people, the drug really seems to agree with them creatively.

    McCartney and especially Lennon, who took acid about every day during the Beatles most creative period, as well as Wilson, John Sebastian, John Phillips, the Doors, Hendrix, Joplin and others benefited tremendously. LSD seemed to supercharge them creatively. When they stopped taking it, they had to rely on their technical chops fueled by a little inspiration, rather than the other way around, thanks to LSD.

    Heroin, in the right brain, also seems to be very helpful. James Taylor was at his most prolific creatively while he was shooting smack. Kurt Cobain also. And yes, Jimi and Janis were there too. It seems to have a law of diminishing returns, however. Seems harder to somewhat recover from than dropping acid.

    The unpopular fact remains that hallucinogenics was the driving force for our pop/rock surge of inspired creativity. That’s why it couldn’t last. Eventually, it fries the brain. McCartney couldn’t write another “Hey Jude” if you put a gun to his head. Get him to agree to drop acid in a recording studio for a month with some friends he trusted, and I wouldn’t bet against him.

    Brian Wilson, however, indulged too much. I don’t think a hallucinogen would benefit him now. It would just make him crazier.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @V Vega

    Robert Crumb is another artist whose creativity was unleashed by LSD. As you say, though, there seem to be diminishing returns, as after his peak period his work no longer had its earlier inspired craziness.

    , @Whiskey
    @V Vega

    Disagree. Some of McCartney's best songs came in the 1970s: Live and Let Die, Band on the Run, Simply Having a Wonderful Christmas Time. Heresy I know, but McCartney was better in Wings than with the Beatles.

    Meanwhile some the most groundbreaking music was nothing more than technical chops and inspiration: Scott Joplin, George Gershwin, Louis Armstrong, Mahalia Jackson, Sidney Bechet, Miles Davis, Frank Sinatra, and Benny Goodman would all disagree with you. As would Mark Mothersbaugh, Bono, and Sting.

    I think instead there is a strong correlation between talented, but stage averse people taking drugs to calm down and perform in front of people (like Billy Holiday) and the obvious talent being confused for the drugs to self-medicate nervousness in front of a huge audience. Some performers just take it as a challenge, others are more comfortable in a recording studio.

    A lot of what we take for sudden creative impulses are just technology advances: Wilson without the mixing technology of the day could not create the wall of sound. Wall of Voodoo just took the advancement of synthesizers and used that to create the wall of sound onstage against the lead singer's sarcasm.

    While demographic decline of "enough" young White kids to support their own live playing scene plays a part in the stagnation of music (as Blacks just descend into endless bragging music aka RAP) the lack of any real new technology is also a part. Interestingly enough "DJS" who basically remix sounds on stage like DeadM4us etc. are the only "creative" new people on the scene and these guys are pretty boring on stage behind a keyboard.

    Replies: @Jacobite, @Harry Baldwin

    , @Neil Templeton
    @V Vega

    Certainly the mixing of cultures and import of drugs, e.g. tobacco, coffee; has affected the character and quantity of artistic and intellectual output in the West.

    , @Anonym
    @V Vega

    This is an interesting comment.

    The Beach Boys' Smile Sessions and Pink Floyd's The Piper at the Gates of Dawn have several similar qualities, and both are basically the final creative spurt before the creative geniuses grew too mad to pull their shit together again. I think most people would recognize the musical genius of the best compositions on those albums. But after repeated listens, the random craziness starts to make my brain hurt. Still, it's good to listen to every so often.

  50. @I, Libertine
    @Auntie Analogue

    The Beach Boys & The Beatles usually had great flip sides, a sign of their overflowing talent.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Revolution is the flip side for Hey Jude and the Beatles didn’t bother putting it on the White Album because they had a rule against ask fans to pay twice for the same songs (since suspended).

    • Replies: @manton
    @Steve Sailer

    Not sure what you mean here, there is a version of "Revolution" on the White Album, but a slow acoustic version, not the rock-electric version they released as a single (and later released on the US album Hey Jude).

    Replies: @James Kabala

  51. @J1234
    @Buzz Mohawk


    ....their relationship was more like Marilyn’s real life than the Cleaver household. Take it from me, there were some really fu*ked up things going on in those days that never made it to television.
     
    My question is...why should it have made it to television?

    Replies: @carol

    No reason, but the contradictions were noted later on.

  52. @I, Libertine
    @Wall the ghetto

    Same story, over and over. MSM first tells us breathlessly what the cops did. Then they reluctantly mention why they did it.

    Replies: @Alfa158

    They mention it at all even if reluctantly, only because with all the alternative media out there they can no longer just put out their message and entirely control the narrative. In their version of the good old days all you had was CBS and Uncle Walter showing you what they wanted you to see.
    They are still however, pretty much getting what they want. They put out the official message showing only selected images and talking only to activists they want to, and by the time the truth emerges they can quietly let the story fade away after having turned the ratcheted wheel one more click. The idiots have already swallowed the lead. These are people who understand that a
    lie will go halfway around the world while the truth is still putting on its pants, and they exploit that to the hilt.

  53. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    @Auntie Analogue

    "Don't Worry Baby" is a great song. However, I don't know how many dozens of times I must have listened to it before I noticed that it's (mostly) a car song, not a relationship song, about a guy who bragged too much about his car, now has to race someone, is scared, and is being reassured by his girlfriend. The overall feel of it, though, is kind of spiritual, as you say.

    Replies: @Anon, @Jacobite, @Auntie Analogue

    “I don’t know how many dozens of times I must have listened to it before I noticed that it’s (mostly) a car song”

    Someone should write an article, ‘Car as a metaphor’.

    I wonder if the band Cars took cue from BB.

    Drive is sort of like Don’t Worry Baby.

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    @Anon

    I wonder if the band Cars took cue from BB.

    Yes they did.

    As did most of the other New Wave outfits. The late (Pretenders guitarist) James Honeyman Scott was a huge fan, although Pretenders' records sound pretty antithetic to the BB until after his demise. Blondie, Cheap Trick and the Knack all bear obvious BB riffs.

    Of course, the Beach Boys' main guitar influence was Chuck Berry. That's also true of Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones, but Mike Love's demented rant aside, there really is almost a Good Kirk Bad Kirk Transporter Accident Split between what the Beach Boys and the Rolling Stones did with it. Hail Hail Rock And Roll, the Taylor Hackford concert documentary about Berry instigated and co-produced by Keef, is all Bad Kirk and no Good Kirk, moderated only by Berry's refusal to "go for it" when prodded behind the desk. That doesn't change that it's one of the best rock and roll films ever made.

  54. @Jefferson
    I wonder if The Beach Boys have any Nonwhite fans? I have a Beach Boys t-shirt and whenever I wear it in public the only racial group that ever compliments my shirt are White people. Not even Black people who are old as Morgan Freeman seem to be fans of The Beach Boys. Probably because it reminds them of a time when America was run by the wrong kind of White people in their eyes.

    Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax, @Anonymous, @Former Darfur, @Chuck

    I wonder if The Beach Boys have any Nonwhite fans?

    I’ve only met one. But they have had black members.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blondie_Chaplin

  55. There are Youtube videos of The Beach Boys playing in Singapore, Hong Kong, and Japan. So there are some Nonwhite people out there who are fans of The Beach Boys, but they are still Nonwhites of the Non Negro kind. So technically I am still correct from my original post that Vibrant Diversity are not fans of The Beach Boys because Orientals are seen as the least Vibrantly Diverse out of all the Nonwhite groups in the world.

  56. Landy’s exploitation of Wilson almost exactly mirrors Ralph Greenson’s exploitation of Marilyn Monroe, in fact, with the exception that Wilson survived and escaped and Monroe did not.

    Greenson, who was famous before Marilyn went to him ( he was the acknowledged model for the Gregory Peck film, “Captain Newman, M.D.” ) probably greatly exacerbated her neuroses and put her on the contemporary pharmacopeia. I’m reasonably certain that MM died from a barbiturate enema or suppository administered or prepared at his instruction by the medically untrained Eunice Murray which was wildly excessive in dosage. I think it is very unlikely that it was deliberate: she was worth a lot more alive than dead to him and her death, along with that of another less well known actress-patient of the time was devastating to his career and reputation.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Former Darfur


    I’m reasonably certain that MM died from a barbiturate enema or suppository administered or prepared at his instruction by the medically untrained Eunice Murray
     
    Any relation to Conrad?
  57. @Anon
    @Harry Baldwin

    "I don’t know how many dozens of times I must have listened to it before I noticed that it’s (mostly) a car song"

    Someone should write an article, 'Car as a metaphor'.

    I wonder if the band Cars took cue from BB.

    Drive is sort of like Don't Worry Baby.

    Replies: @Former Darfur

    I wonder if the band Cars took cue from BB.

    Yes they did.

    As did most of the other New Wave outfits. The late (Pretenders guitarist) James Honeyman Scott was a huge fan, although Pretenders’ records sound pretty antithetic to the BB until after his demise. Blondie, Cheap Trick and the Knack all bear obvious BB riffs.

    Of course, the Beach Boys’ main guitar influence was Chuck Berry. That’s also true of Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones, but Mike Love’s demented rant aside, there really is almost a Good Kirk Bad Kirk Transporter Accident Split between what the Beach Boys and the Rolling Stones did with it. Hail Hail Rock And Roll, the Taylor Hackford concert documentary about Berry instigated and co-produced by Keef, is all Bad Kirk and no Good Kirk, moderated only by Berry’s refusal to “go for it” when prodded behind the desk. That doesn’t change that it’s one of the best rock and roll films ever made.

  58. @dearieme
    A CD of the Beach Boys is the only American pop music I've ever owned (unless maybe I'd bought a Bob Dylan LP - my poor memory does not reveal whether I did or not). I still like it; what rotten luck to be so overshadowed by The Beatles. Or was in The Beatles who showed them what could be done and spurred them on to better things?

    What interest me is why, since the eras of ragtime, early jazz, and Berlin/Gershwin/Porter/Rodgers & Hart, there have been only two periods when pop music has included plenty of stuff worth listening to, namely The Swing Era, and the 60s. I remember 50s pop on the radio - utterly dire. Or post Beatles: god-awful. Why?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @onetwothree

    …there have been only two periods when pop music has included plenty of stuff worth listening to, namely The Swing Era, and the 60s.

    The ’50s and early ’60s were pretty good on Broadway, and sometimes in its suburb, Hollywood. But that’s not “pop” music.

  59. @J1234
    Their best stuff really was as good as the Beatles...in a few cases, better. The problem with the Beach Boys was that their earlier recorded songs were very reminiscent of the 1950's (at least culturally, if not musically), and that was horribly out of vogue in the mid to late 1960's. As a result, they came across as dweebs when compared to the Beatles, whose early records were very "mod." That reputation stayed with them and their music. Some rock critics could never get past it.

    Replies: @Former Darfur

    “Their best stuff really was as good as the Beatles…in a few cases, better. The problem with the Beach Boys was that their earlier recorded songs were very reminiscent of the 1950′s (at least culturally, if not musically), and that was horribly out of vogue in the mid to late 1960′s. As a result, they came across as dweebs when compared to the Beatles, whose early records were very “mod.” That reputation stayed with them and their music. Some rock critics could never get past it.”

    At my high school (very late seventies) the contempt and disgust for Beach Boys music was palpable. Whereas the Beatles were considered cool.

    • Replies: @dearieme
    @Former Darfur

    "At my high school (very late seventies) the contempt and disgust for Beach Boys music was palpable." How sad. "Good Vibrations", for example, was super. It can still get me capering around the room. I don't mean it was Mozart-Beethoven super, but for a pop song it was very fine. And I say that as a Beatles fan. Again, not Mozart-Beethoven, or even Armstrong-Beiderbecke, but, oh, after the 50s, what rhythms, what melodies, what harmonies, what panache. I got my father - a Gershwin/Porter/etc fan - to give the Beatles a try. Even he admitted their merits.

    Simple test: who produced the more pleasurable music - Beach Boys, Elvis, Sinatra? For me, the Beach Boys by a country mile. But what can you say about taste? There were lummoxes who reckoned The Rolling Stones on a par with The Beatles. But then there are people who like Coke.

  60. @V Vega
    LSD isn't for everybody, but for some people, the drug really seems to agree with them creatively.

    McCartney and especially Lennon, who took acid about every day during the Beatles most creative period, as well as Wilson, John Sebastian, John Phillips, the Doors, Hendrix, Joplin and others benefited tremendously. LSD seemed to supercharge them creatively. When they stopped taking it, they had to rely on their technical chops fueled by a little inspiration, rather than the other way around, thanks to LSD.

    Heroin, in the right brain, also seems to be very helpful. James Taylor was at his most prolific creatively while he was shooting smack. Kurt Cobain also. And yes, Jimi and Janis were there too. It seems to have a law of diminishing returns, however. Seems harder to somewhat recover from than dropping acid.

    The unpopular fact remains that hallucinogenics was the driving force for our pop/rock surge of inspired creativity. That's why it couldn't last. Eventually, it fries the brain. McCartney couldn't write another "Hey Jude" if you put a gun to his head. Get him to agree to drop acid in a recording studio for a month with some friends he trusted, and I wouldn't bet against him.

    Brian Wilson, however, indulged too much. I don't think a hallucinogen would benefit him now. It would just make him crazier.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Whiskey, @Neil Templeton, @Anonym

    Robert Crumb is another artist whose creativity was unleashed by LSD. As you say, though, there seem to be diminishing returns, as after his peak period his work no longer had its earlier inspired craziness.

  61. @dearieme
    A CD of the Beach Boys is the only American pop music I've ever owned (unless maybe I'd bought a Bob Dylan LP - my poor memory does not reveal whether I did or not). I still like it; what rotten luck to be so overshadowed by The Beatles. Or was in The Beatles who showed them what could be done and spurred them on to better things?

    What interest me is why, since the eras of ragtime, early jazz, and Berlin/Gershwin/Porter/Rodgers & Hart, there have been only two periods when pop music has included plenty of stuff worth listening to, namely The Swing Era, and the 60s. I remember 50s pop on the radio - utterly dire. Or post Beatles: god-awful. Why?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @onetwothree

    Because you have no taste. Show tune schmaltz vs Pink Floyd/Led Zeppelin/Rolling Stones/hundreds of other decent bands? Come on.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @onetwothree


    …Pink Floyd/Led Zeppelin/Rolling Stones/hundreds of other decent bands?
     
    Pink Floyd/Led Zeppelin/Rolling Stones/hundreds of other pasty middle-class British Mississippi-Negro wannabes

    That's okay for slumming, but I'll take the "show tune schmaltz". It's far better crafted.

    Replies: @Jacobite

  62. @Steve Sailer
    @I, Libertine

    Revolution is the flip side for Hey Jude and the Beatles didn't bother putting it on the White Album because they had a rule against ask fans to pay twice for the same songs (since suspended).

    Replies: @manton

    Not sure what you mean here, there is a version of “Revolution” on the White Album, but a slow acoustic version, not the rock-electric version they released as a single (and later released on the US album Hey Jude).

    • Replies: @James Kabala
    @manton

    The Beatles had little to do with some of their rearranged American releases and especially little to do with this one in particular: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hey_Jude_%28album%29

    The self-imposed ban on including singles on British albums was violated a few times but generally observed. Most of their better-known albums had a single that was released at about the same time but was not included on the album. Besides "Hey Jude"/"Revolution," the best-known example is "Penny Lane"/"Strawberry Fields Forever," which was released shortly before Sgt. Pepper.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  63. @Malcolm X-Lax
    @Jacobite

    Little Deuce Coupe still sounds great.

    Replies: @Jacobite

    Indeed it does.

  64. @Harry Baldwin
    @Auntie Analogue

    "Don't Worry Baby" is a great song. However, I don't know how many dozens of times I must have listened to it before I noticed that it's (mostly) a car song, not a relationship song, about a guy who bragged too much about his car, now has to race someone, is scared, and is being reassured by his girlfriend. The overall feel of it, though, is kind of spiritual, as you say.

    Replies: @Anon, @Jacobite, @Auntie Analogue

    Well, now we know the origins of the script to American Graffiti.

  65. @poolside
    @ChaseBizzy

    That is correct ... the Beach Boys (minus Wilson) would tour while LA's crack team of studio musicians (known today as the Wrecking Crew) recorded all the backing tracks for their albums.

    The band would take a break from the road to come home and cut their vocals.

    This was a very common approach in the '60s. Most pop records of the day do not feature the bands at all, but instead were recorded by the Wrecking Crew.

    Glen Campbell actually filled in for Brian Wilson on Beach Boys dates in '64-'65, and he played on many of their later albums.

    http://www.wreckingcrewfilm.com/

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jacobite

    studio musicians (known today as the Wrecking Crew) recorded all the backing tracks for their albums.

    Not true for the first two or three albums when they could not afford studio musicians. Dave Marks, Al Jardine, and Carl Wilson all played instruments on those albums and Carl’s Rickenbacker can even be heard on some Pet Sounds era tracks.

  66. @Former Darfur
    @J1234

    "Their best stuff really was as good as the Beatles…in a few cases, better. The problem with the Beach Boys was that their earlier recorded songs were very reminiscent of the 1950′s (at least culturally, if not musically), and that was horribly out of vogue in the mid to late 1960′s. As a result, they came across as dweebs when compared to the Beatles, whose early records were very “mod.” That reputation stayed with them and their music. Some rock critics could never get past it."

    At my high school (very late seventies) the contempt and disgust for Beach Boys music was palpable. Whereas the Beatles were considered cool.

    Replies: @dearieme

    “At my high school (very late seventies) the contempt and disgust for Beach Boys music was palpable.” How sad. “Good Vibrations”, for example, was super. It can still get me capering around the room. I don’t mean it was Mozart-Beethoven super, but for a pop song it was very fine. And I say that as a Beatles fan. Again, not Mozart-Beethoven, or even Armstrong-Beiderbecke, but, oh, after the 50s, what rhythms, what melodies, what harmonies, what panache. I got my father – a Gershwin/Porter/etc fan – to give the Beatles a try. Even he admitted their merits.

    Simple test: who produced the more pleasurable music – Beach Boys, Elvis, Sinatra? For me, the Beach Boys by a country mile. But what can you say about taste? There were lummoxes who reckoned The Rolling Stones on a par with The Beatles. But then there are people who like Coke.

  67. WhatEvvs [AKA "Prada Yada Yada"] says:

    Since you mentioned obesity, I think it on topic to state that if you check Google Trends, the phrase “fat-shaming” took off in 2012.

    Along with WWG, WWG, there is WWFT – the war on fat shaming. Shaming the morbidly obese is wrong.

    • Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax
    @WhatEvvs

    You can't fat shame down (e.g., Lena Dunham) but you can fat shame up (e.g. Chris Christie).

  68. @Harry Baldwin
    @Auntie Analogue

    "Don't Worry Baby" is a great song. However, I don't know how many dozens of times I must have listened to it before I noticed that it's (mostly) a car song, not a relationship song, about a guy who bragged too much about his car, now has to race someone, is scared, and is being reassured by his girlfriend. The overall feel of it, though, is kind of spiritual, as you say.

    Replies: @Anon, @Jacobite, @Auntie Analogue

    My dear Harry Baldwin, let’s just say that the car in the song is a placeholder for male sexual performance anxiety, to which the girlfriend says, “Don’t Worry Baby.”

    The singer, like most men, cannot get over his monomania that he will be judged for his performance, while for his girlfriend, like most women, using sex to get love, the performance of her boyfriend in solely the sexual facet of the relationship is not paramount – for her it’s much more, it’s sharing feelings, bonding, soul-mateship, loyalty, security.

    The singer wants bonding, loyalty and security too, but like most men he misplaces the locus or overemphasis of this in his performance (“If I can’t be a maximum stud-muffin every time then I’m worthless in my own eyes and, worse, in my girlfriend’s eyes.”). See, the girlfriend is taking in the entirety of the relationship with “everything will turn out alright,” so she says “Don’t Worry Baby” because she sees and feels that the monodimensional concern over sexual performance is but one component of the relationship.

  69. @Danindc
    Thanks Steve- I will see this film. As a young kid we went every year to see the Beach Boys at the National Mall on the 4th of July until James Watt said they weren't wholesome enough for the event. Can you imagine that? Back in 1982 they thought the Beach Boys brought out a bad element. 10 short years later 2 Live Crew played "Smack that Bitch" at Bill Clinton's inauguration (didn't happen).

    Also, don't think for a second that we don't appreciate you linking to the single page articles in Taki. Because we notice it and we do appreciate it.

    Replies: @ChaseBizzy

    Wayne Newton was the replacement act. Californian Reagan was friendly with the Wilson/Love family and gently but publicly reprimanded Watt.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @ChaseBizzy


    Californian Reagan was friendly with the Wilson/Love family and gently but publicly reprimanded Watt.
     
    Reagan and John Lennon were inadvertently invited to the Monday Night Football booth for the same game. The staff frantically tried to keep the two apart.

    They failed. Reagan put his arm around Lennon and explained the rules of gridiron football to a rapt audience.

    Hey, sons of Irish scoundrels gotta stick together.

    In Watt's defense, though, I think it was drug use by one or more of the Boys that bothered him, not their public image.
  70. @V Vega
    LSD isn't for everybody, but for some people, the drug really seems to agree with them creatively.

    McCartney and especially Lennon, who took acid about every day during the Beatles most creative period, as well as Wilson, John Sebastian, John Phillips, the Doors, Hendrix, Joplin and others benefited tremendously. LSD seemed to supercharge them creatively. When they stopped taking it, they had to rely on their technical chops fueled by a little inspiration, rather than the other way around, thanks to LSD.

    Heroin, in the right brain, also seems to be very helpful. James Taylor was at his most prolific creatively while he was shooting smack. Kurt Cobain also. And yes, Jimi and Janis were there too. It seems to have a law of diminishing returns, however. Seems harder to somewhat recover from than dropping acid.

    The unpopular fact remains that hallucinogenics was the driving force for our pop/rock surge of inspired creativity. That's why it couldn't last. Eventually, it fries the brain. McCartney couldn't write another "Hey Jude" if you put a gun to his head. Get him to agree to drop acid in a recording studio for a month with some friends he trusted, and I wouldn't bet against him.

    Brian Wilson, however, indulged too much. I don't think a hallucinogen would benefit him now. It would just make him crazier.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Whiskey, @Neil Templeton, @Anonym

    Disagree. Some of McCartney’s best songs came in the 1970s: Live and Let Die, Band on the Run, Simply Having a Wonderful Christmas Time. Heresy I know, but McCartney was better in Wings than with the Beatles.

    Meanwhile some the most groundbreaking music was nothing more than technical chops and inspiration: Scott Joplin, George Gershwin, Louis Armstrong, Mahalia Jackson, Sidney Bechet, Miles Davis, Frank Sinatra, and Benny Goodman would all disagree with you. As would Mark Mothersbaugh, Bono, and Sting.

    I think instead there is a strong correlation between talented, but stage averse people taking drugs to calm down and perform in front of people (like Billy Holiday) and the obvious talent being confused for the drugs to self-medicate nervousness in front of a huge audience. Some performers just take it as a challenge, others are more comfortable in a recording studio.

    A lot of what we take for sudden creative impulses are just technology advances: Wilson without the mixing technology of the day could not create the wall of sound. Wall of Voodoo just took the advancement of synthesizers and used that to create the wall of sound onstage against the lead singer’s sarcasm.

    While demographic decline of “enough” young White kids to support their own live playing scene plays a part in the stagnation of music (as Blacks just descend into endless bragging music aka RAP) the lack of any real new technology is also a part. Interestingly enough “DJS” who basically remix sounds on stage like DeadM4us etc. are the only “creative” new people on the scene and these guys are pretty boring on stage behind a keyboard.

    • Replies: @Jacobite
    @Whiskey


    Some of McCartney’s best songs came in the 1970s: Live and Let Die, Band on the Run, Simply Having a Wonderful Christmas Time.
     
    Those songs truly and deeply suck big time. They are nothing but puerile jingles even worse than many of McCartney's songs with the Beatles.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Whiskey

    Disagree. Some of McCartney’s best songs came in the 1970s: Live and Let Die, Band on the Run, Simply Having a Wonderful Christmas Time.

    Awful stuff. Total crap. I recall hearing John Lennon on the nighttime Alison Steele Show in NYC in the early 1970s saying that the only thing McCartney did post-Beatles that didn't suck was "Maybe I'm Amazed." I would have to agree. (Of course most of Lennon's post-Beatles work sucks too.)

    Replies: @Auntie Analogue, @Anonymous

  71. There was a made-for-tv Beach Boys/Brian Wilson flick made back around 1990. Anyone remember it? My only recollection is that it wasn’t that great.

    • Replies: @James Kabala
    @Malcolm X-Lax

    There was another one in 2000 that Wilson denounced as inaccurate, although in the 1966-67 area where that and the new movie overlap (the older one covered c. 1961-1976), they tell pretty much the same story and even have several similar scenes.

  72. @WhatEvvs
    Since you mentioned obesity, I think it on topic to state that if you check Google Trends, the phrase "fat-shaming" took off in 2012.

    Along with WWG, WWG, there is WWFT - the war on fat shaming. Shaming the morbidly obese is wrong.

    Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax

    You can’t fat shame down (e.g., Lena Dunham) but you can fat shame up (e.g. Chris Christie).

  73. @Jefferson
    "Back in 1982 they thought the Beach Boys brought out a bad element."

    I find it hard to believe that The Beach Boys were considered too rated R in 1982. Especially since in 1975 Donna Summers recorded a disco song where she basically has an orgasm. Love To Love You Baby is more sexually explicit than anything The Beach Boys have ever recorded and it came out 7 years before 1982.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4C4j6q6PQc0

    Also MTV was already on the airwaves in 1982 and they were showing Michael Jackson grabbing his crotch. I know 1982 was a long time ago, but this was 1982 not 1962. The wholesome Leave It To Beaver image in pop culture was long gone by than. Also in 1982 you had Grandmaster Flash And The Furious Five rapping about junkie base heads in the housing projects of New York City.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4o8TeqKhgY

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Interior secretary James Watt thought they’d draw “a bad element” as fans.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Hibernian

    "Interior secretary James Watt thought they’d draw “a bad element” as fans."

    I didn't know gangsta thugs in 1982 were blasting Beach Boys music out of their cars.

  74. I would recommend Karina Longworth’s classic movies podcast “You Must Remember This.” Its great in general, but they are doing a multi-part series on Manson in Hollywood. The most recent one is Dennis Wilson and the Manson Family. For instance, I didn’t know that the Beach Boys recorded a song with Manson written lyrics (uncredited).

    http://www.infiniteguest.org/remember-this/

  75. @Whiskey
    @V Vega

    Disagree. Some of McCartney's best songs came in the 1970s: Live and Let Die, Band on the Run, Simply Having a Wonderful Christmas Time. Heresy I know, but McCartney was better in Wings than with the Beatles.

    Meanwhile some the most groundbreaking music was nothing more than technical chops and inspiration: Scott Joplin, George Gershwin, Louis Armstrong, Mahalia Jackson, Sidney Bechet, Miles Davis, Frank Sinatra, and Benny Goodman would all disagree with you. As would Mark Mothersbaugh, Bono, and Sting.

    I think instead there is a strong correlation between talented, but stage averse people taking drugs to calm down and perform in front of people (like Billy Holiday) and the obvious talent being confused for the drugs to self-medicate nervousness in front of a huge audience. Some performers just take it as a challenge, others are more comfortable in a recording studio.

    A lot of what we take for sudden creative impulses are just technology advances: Wilson without the mixing technology of the day could not create the wall of sound. Wall of Voodoo just took the advancement of synthesizers and used that to create the wall of sound onstage against the lead singer's sarcasm.

    While demographic decline of "enough" young White kids to support their own live playing scene plays a part in the stagnation of music (as Blacks just descend into endless bragging music aka RAP) the lack of any real new technology is also a part. Interestingly enough "DJS" who basically remix sounds on stage like DeadM4us etc. are the only "creative" new people on the scene and these guys are pretty boring on stage behind a keyboard.

    Replies: @Jacobite, @Harry Baldwin

    Some of McCartney’s best songs came in the 1970s: Live and Let Die, Band on the Run, Simply Having a Wonderful Christmas Time.

    Those songs truly and deeply suck big time. They are nothing but puerile jingles even worse than many of McCartney’s songs with the Beatles.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Jacobite

    "Some of McCartney’s best songs came in the 1970s: Live and Let Die, Band on the Run, Simply Having a Wonderful Christmas Time."

    "Those songs truly and deeply suck big time. They are nothing but puerile jingles even worse than many of McCartney’s songs with the Beatles."

    It's called Pop. What do you expect from pop? Meaning?

    99% of pop songs are silly love songs, and McCartney composed some catchy ones in the 70s and early 80s.

    Sure, they are light but they good light. They are throwaway songs with the fizz.

    "With a little luck", "Take It Away", and "No More Lonely Nights"(which I especially love).

    Okay, McCartney was no longer the groundbreaking composer after his stint as a Beatle. None of his later songs made a difference like "All My Loving", "Yesterday", "Penny Lane", and "Hey Jude" did in their time.

    He's turned into a slick pro, but there's nothing wrong with cranking out good pop songs. Neil Diamond did it all his life, and I got nothing against "Little Bit You, Little Bit Me" and "Girl, You'll Be a Woman Soon."

    Replies: @Jacobite

  76. Why does John Cusack look like he’s trying to impersonate Werner Herzog?

  77. @Hibernian
    @Jefferson

    Interior secretary James Watt thought they'd draw "a bad element" as fans.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “Interior secretary James Watt thought they’d draw “a bad element” as fans.”

    I didn’t know gangsta thugs in 1982 were blasting Beach Boys music out of their cars.

  78. @Malcolm X-Lax
    There was a made-for-tv Beach Boys/Brian Wilson flick made back around 1990. Anyone remember it? My only recollection is that it wasn't that great.

    Replies: @James Kabala

    There was another one in 2000 that Wilson denounced as inaccurate, although in the 1966-67 area where that and the new movie overlap (the older one covered c. 1961-1976), they tell pretty much the same story and even have several similar scenes.

  79. @manton
    @Steve Sailer

    Not sure what you mean here, there is a version of "Revolution" on the White Album, but a slow acoustic version, not the rock-electric version they released as a single (and later released on the US album Hey Jude).

    Replies: @James Kabala

    The Beatles had little to do with some of their rearranged American releases and especially little to do with this one in particular: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hey_Jude_%28album%29

    The self-imposed ban on including singles on British albums was violated a few times but generally observed. Most of their better-known albums had a single that was released at about the same time but was not included on the album. Besides “Hey Jude”/”Revolution,” the best-known example is “Penny Lane”/”Strawberry Fields Forever,” which was released shortly before Sgt. Pepper.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @James Kabala

    George Martin says leaving “Penny Lane”/"Strawberry Fields Forever” off the Sgt. Pepper album was his biggest mistake.

    And there's Day Tripper / We Can Work It Out from the Rubber Soul sessions, but not from the Rubber Soul album.

  80. @James Kabala
    @manton

    The Beatles had little to do with some of their rearranged American releases and especially little to do with this one in particular: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hey_Jude_%28album%29

    The self-imposed ban on including singles on British albums was violated a few times but generally observed. Most of their better-known albums had a single that was released at about the same time but was not included on the album. Besides "Hey Jude"/"Revolution," the best-known example is "Penny Lane"/"Strawberry Fields Forever," which was released shortly before Sgt. Pepper.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    George Martin says leaving “Penny Lane”/”Strawberry Fields Forever” off the Sgt. Pepper album was his biggest mistake.

    And there’s Day Tripper / We Can Work It Out from the Rubber Soul sessions, but not from the Rubber Soul album.

  81. @Whiskey
    @V Vega

    Disagree. Some of McCartney's best songs came in the 1970s: Live and Let Die, Band on the Run, Simply Having a Wonderful Christmas Time. Heresy I know, but McCartney was better in Wings than with the Beatles.

    Meanwhile some the most groundbreaking music was nothing more than technical chops and inspiration: Scott Joplin, George Gershwin, Louis Armstrong, Mahalia Jackson, Sidney Bechet, Miles Davis, Frank Sinatra, and Benny Goodman would all disagree with you. As would Mark Mothersbaugh, Bono, and Sting.

    I think instead there is a strong correlation between talented, but stage averse people taking drugs to calm down and perform in front of people (like Billy Holiday) and the obvious talent being confused for the drugs to self-medicate nervousness in front of a huge audience. Some performers just take it as a challenge, others are more comfortable in a recording studio.

    A lot of what we take for sudden creative impulses are just technology advances: Wilson without the mixing technology of the day could not create the wall of sound. Wall of Voodoo just took the advancement of synthesizers and used that to create the wall of sound onstage against the lead singer's sarcasm.

    While demographic decline of "enough" young White kids to support their own live playing scene plays a part in the stagnation of music (as Blacks just descend into endless bragging music aka RAP) the lack of any real new technology is also a part. Interestingly enough "DJS" who basically remix sounds on stage like DeadM4us etc. are the only "creative" new people on the scene and these guys are pretty boring on stage behind a keyboard.

    Replies: @Jacobite, @Harry Baldwin

    Disagree. Some of McCartney’s best songs came in the 1970s: Live and Let Die, Band on the Run, Simply Having a Wonderful Christmas Time.

    Awful stuff. Total crap. I recall hearing John Lennon on the nighttime Alison Steele Show in NYC in the early 1970s saying that the only thing McCartney did post-Beatles that didn’t suck was “Maybe I’m Amazed.” I would have to agree. (Of course most of Lennon’s post-Beatles work sucks too.)

    • Replies: @Auntie Analogue
    @Harry Baldwin

    Wow, Harry Baldwin, you, too, listened to Alison Steele!?

    She was a great, perhaps the greatest graveyard shift deejay. I listened to her program...religiously. (!)

    I have a handful of sound files of her air checks, nice to listen to once in a blue moon.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    , @Anonymous
    @Harry Baldwin

    yeah, singling out "Wonderful Christmastime" for praise is utterly bizarre. That's one of the worst things McCartney ever recorded. Compare that dreck to McC's '60s songs like "For No One" or "Things We Said Today" & it seems like by the mid-70s McCartney was on the downside of some "Flowers For Algernon" experiment.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Jacobite

  82. @onetwothree
    @dearieme

    Because you have no taste. Show tune schmaltz vs Pink Floyd/Led Zeppelin/Rolling Stones/hundreds of other decent bands? Come on.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    …Pink Floyd/Led Zeppelin/Rolling Stones/hundreds of other decent bands?

    Pink Floyd/Led Zeppelin/Rolling Stones/hundreds of other pasty middle-class British Mississippi-Negro wannabes

    That’s okay for slumming, but I’ll take the “show tune schmaltz”. It’s far better crafted.

    • Replies: @Jacobite
    @Reg Cæsar

    What is often called The Great American Songbook is nonpareil.

  83. @Harry Baldwin
    @Whiskey

    Disagree. Some of McCartney’s best songs came in the 1970s: Live and Let Die, Band on the Run, Simply Having a Wonderful Christmas Time.

    Awful stuff. Total crap. I recall hearing John Lennon on the nighttime Alison Steele Show in NYC in the early 1970s saying that the only thing McCartney did post-Beatles that didn't suck was "Maybe I'm Amazed." I would have to agree. (Of course most of Lennon's post-Beatles work sucks too.)

    Replies: @Auntie Analogue, @Anonymous

    Wow, Harry Baldwin, you, too, listened to Alison Steele!?

    She was a great, perhaps the greatest graveyard shift deejay. I listened to her program…religiously. (!)

    I have a handful of sound files of her air checks, nice to listen to once in a blue moon.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Auntie Analogue

    Lennon was very flirtatious with Alison. She was a beautiful woman. I see from Wikipedia that she died at 58--sad.

  84. @yaqub the mad scientist
    I love how Pete Townsend dissed Pet Sounds when it was released and then turned around and made the most Pet Sounds-influenced album I've heard, The Who Sell Out.

    Replies: @cthulhu

    Are you effing nuts? “Sell Out” owes very little if anything to”Pet Sounds”; the recording that is influenced by “Pet Sounds” is, of course, “Sgt Pepper”.

  85. @ChaseBizzy
    @Danindc

    Wayne Newton was the replacement act. Californian Reagan was friendly with the Wilson/Love family and gently but publicly reprimanded Watt.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Californian Reagan was friendly with the Wilson/Love family and gently but publicly reprimanded Watt.

    Reagan and John Lennon were inadvertently invited to the Monday Night Football booth for the same game. The staff frantically tried to keep the two apart.

    They failed. Reagan put his arm around Lennon and explained the rules of gridiron football to a rapt audience.

    Hey, sons of Irish scoundrels gotta stick together.

    In Watt’s defense, though, I think it was drug use by one or more of the Boys that bothered him, not their public image.

  86. @Reg Cæsar
    @onetwothree


    …Pink Floyd/Led Zeppelin/Rolling Stones/hundreds of other decent bands?
     
    Pink Floyd/Led Zeppelin/Rolling Stones/hundreds of other pasty middle-class British Mississippi-Negro wannabes

    That's okay for slumming, but I'll take the "show tune schmaltz". It's far better crafted.

    Replies: @Jacobite

    What is often called The Great American Songbook is nonpareil.

  87. @Former Darfur
    Landy's exploitation of Wilson almost exactly mirrors Ralph Greenson's exploitation of Marilyn Monroe, in fact, with the exception that Wilson survived and escaped and Monroe did not.

    Greenson, who was famous before Marilyn went to him ( he was the acknowledged model for the Gregory Peck film, "Captain Newman, M.D." ) probably greatly exacerbated her neuroses and put her on the contemporary pharmacopeia. I'm reasonably certain that MM died from a barbiturate enema or suppository administered or prepared at his instruction by the medically untrained Eunice Murray which was wildly excessive in dosage. I think it is very unlikely that it was deliberate: she was worth a lot more alive than dead to him and her death, along with that of another less well known actress-patient of the time was devastating to his career and reputation.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I’m reasonably certain that MM died from a barbiturate enema or suppository administered or prepared at his instruction by the medically untrained Eunice Murray

    Any relation to Conrad?

  88. @Auntie Analogue
    @Harry Baldwin

    Wow, Harry Baldwin, you, too, listened to Alison Steele!?

    She was a great, perhaps the greatest graveyard shift deejay. I listened to her program...religiously. (!)

    I have a handful of sound files of her air checks, nice to listen to once in a blue moon.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Lennon was very flirtatious with Alison. She was a beautiful woman. I see from Wikipedia that she died at 58–sad.

  89. @Jefferson
    I wonder if The Beach Boys have any Nonwhite fans? I have a Beach Boys t-shirt and whenever I wear it in public the only racial group that ever compliments my shirt are White people. Not even Black people who are old as Morgan Freeman seem to be fans of The Beach Boys. Probably because it reminds them of a time when America was run by the wrong kind of White people in their eyes.

    Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax, @Anonymous, @Former Darfur, @Chuck

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Chuck

    That's good.

  90. @Chuck
    @Jefferson

    Jackie Chan is a fan.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    That’s good.

  91. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    @Whiskey

    Disagree. Some of McCartney’s best songs came in the 1970s: Live and Let Die, Band on the Run, Simply Having a Wonderful Christmas Time.

    Awful stuff. Total crap. I recall hearing John Lennon on the nighttime Alison Steele Show in NYC in the early 1970s saying that the only thing McCartney did post-Beatles that didn't suck was "Maybe I'm Amazed." I would have to agree. (Of course most of Lennon's post-Beatles work sucks too.)

    Replies: @Auntie Analogue, @Anonymous

    yeah, singling out “Wonderful Christmastime” for praise is utterly bizarre. That’s one of the worst things McCartney ever recorded. Compare that dreck to McC’s ’60s songs like “For No One” or “Things We Said Today” & it seems like by the mid-70s McCartney was on the downside of some “Flowers For Algernon” experiment.

    • Replies: @dearieme
    @Anonymous

    “For No One” or “Things We Said Today”: yep, a couple of wee beauts.

    When the pair of them were writing stuff of that calibre someone wrote an article in The Times making an analogy to Schubert. A bit over the top, I dare say, but it shows the effect their musicality had after people had been listening to dross like Elvis or Perry Como.

    , @Jacobite
    @Anonymous


    yeah, singling out “Wonderful Christmastime” for praise is utterly bizarre.
     
    Indeed, Wonderful Christmastime doesn't hold a candle to Wilson&Love's Little Saint Nick which unlike the McCartney groaner is still a popular radio play every Christmas.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zshSF3Za7LI&ab_channel=Chrisrocks007
  92. @Anonymous
    @Harry Baldwin

    yeah, singling out "Wonderful Christmastime" for praise is utterly bizarre. That's one of the worst things McCartney ever recorded. Compare that dreck to McC's '60s songs like "For No One" or "Things We Said Today" & it seems like by the mid-70s McCartney was on the downside of some "Flowers For Algernon" experiment.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Jacobite

    “For No One” or “Things We Said Today”: yep, a couple of wee beauts.

    When the pair of them were writing stuff of that calibre someone wrote an article in The Times making an analogy to Schubert. A bit over the top, I dare say, but it shows the effect their musicality had after people had been listening to dross like Elvis or Perry Como.

  93. After hearing Brian Wilson’s much belated “Smile” years ago, I realized that Mike Love was a musical genius, too. His brutal criticism of the album’s early concept demos kept most of that that crap from being released back in the 1960’s. Being objectively critical of one’s own work is very important.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @J1234

    Right. The new movie has a good scene showing Love being brutally dismissive of Pet Sounds but then encouraging Brian Wilson to create Good Vibrations, the perfect blend of Wilson's avant-garde direction and Love's desire to make a hit record.

    The relationship between Wilson and Love was kind of like the relationship between McCartney and Lennon, with Lennon's caustic wit serving to keep McCartney's innate uncoolness in check. But Lennon was fairly close to McCartney in creativity, while Love wasn't on Wilson's plane, so the Love-Wilson relationship wasn't as long-term productive as Lennon-McCartney.

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon, @Reg Cæsar

  94. @J1234
    After hearing Brian Wilson's much belated "Smile" years ago, I realized that Mike Love was a musical genius, too. His brutal criticism of the album's early concept demos kept most of that that crap from being released back in the 1960's. Being objectively critical of one's own work is very important.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Right. The new movie has a good scene showing Love being brutally dismissive of Pet Sounds but then encouraging Brian Wilson to create Good Vibrations, the perfect blend of Wilson’s avant-garde direction and Love’s desire to make a hit record.

    The relationship between Wilson and Love was kind of like the relationship between McCartney and Lennon, with Lennon’s caustic wit serving to keep McCartney’s innate uncoolness in check. But Lennon was fairly close to McCartney in creativity, while Love wasn’t on Wilson’s plane, so the Love-Wilson relationship wasn’t as long-term productive as Lennon-McCartney.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    "The relationship between Wilson and Love was kind of like the relationship between McCartney and Lennon, with Lennon’s caustic wit serving to keep McCartney’s innate uncoolness in check."

    Not quite.

    It's true that Wilson had McCartney's sweetness and romanticism. But he was also quite a strange and eccentric character.

    I'd say Love's influence was more like McCartney's: conventional and pop. Love's personality may not have been all that lovable but his musical tastes were narrower.

    Wilson was more Lennon-like in his self-indulgence and introspection.

    Lennon used to be the most aggressive and witty beatle... before LSD.

    Then, it was Lennon who withdrew into himself and became rather like Wilson.
    And he no longer cared so much about being cool, which is why he made himself into a joke fooling with very uncool Yoko Ono whom no one in the rock scene liked.

    If not for McCartney, Beatles might have fallen apart by 1968.

    Wilson was both Lennon and McCartney. Even Harrison as Wilson got increasingly 'spiritual'.
    He had multiple personalities and the contradictions were bound to undo him.

    , @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Good Vibrations was more to Love's liking because it was more collaborative.

    Pet Sounds was conceptually a Brian Wilson(and Beach Boys) production.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    …Good Vibrations, the perfect blend of Wilson’s avant-garde direction and Love’s desire to make a hit record.
     
    For all the vaunted studio pyrotechnics attributed to that record, there was a pretty convincing live cover* of it, with standard instruments, on The Cowsills in Concert.

    *By "live cover", I mean in the music industry sense, not the horse racing use of the term!

    Replies: @el topo

  95. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @J1234

    Right. The new movie has a good scene showing Love being brutally dismissive of Pet Sounds but then encouraging Brian Wilson to create Good Vibrations, the perfect blend of Wilson's avant-garde direction and Love's desire to make a hit record.

    The relationship between Wilson and Love was kind of like the relationship between McCartney and Lennon, with Lennon's caustic wit serving to keep McCartney's innate uncoolness in check. But Lennon was fairly close to McCartney in creativity, while Love wasn't on Wilson's plane, so the Love-Wilson relationship wasn't as long-term productive as Lennon-McCartney.

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon, @Reg Cæsar

    “The relationship between Wilson and Love was kind of like the relationship between McCartney and Lennon, with Lennon’s caustic wit serving to keep McCartney’s innate uncoolness in check.”

    Not quite.

    It’s true that Wilson had McCartney’s sweetness and romanticism. But he was also quite a strange and eccentric character.

    I’d say Love’s influence was more like McCartney’s: conventional and pop. Love’s personality may not have been all that lovable but his musical tastes were narrower.

    Wilson was more Lennon-like in his self-indulgence and introspection.

    Lennon used to be the most aggressive and witty beatle… before LSD.

    Then, it was Lennon who withdrew into himself and became rather like Wilson.
    And he no longer cared so much about being cool, which is why he made himself into a joke fooling with very uncool Yoko Ono whom no one in the rock scene liked.

    If not for McCartney, Beatles might have fallen apart by 1968.

    Wilson was both Lennon and McCartney. Even Harrison as Wilson got increasingly ‘spiritual’.
    He had multiple personalities and the contradictions were bound to undo him.

  96. @Steve Sailer
    @J1234

    Right. The new movie has a good scene showing Love being brutally dismissive of Pet Sounds but then encouraging Brian Wilson to create Good Vibrations, the perfect blend of Wilson's avant-garde direction and Love's desire to make a hit record.

    The relationship between Wilson and Love was kind of like the relationship between McCartney and Lennon, with Lennon's caustic wit serving to keep McCartney's innate uncoolness in check. But Lennon was fairly close to McCartney in creativity, while Love wasn't on Wilson's plane, so the Love-Wilson relationship wasn't as long-term productive as Lennon-McCartney.

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon, @Reg Cæsar

    Good Vibrations was more to Love’s liking because it was more collaborative.

    Pet Sounds was conceptually a Brian Wilson(and Beach Boys) production.

  97. @Steve Sailer
    @J1234

    Right. The new movie has a good scene showing Love being brutally dismissive of Pet Sounds but then encouraging Brian Wilson to create Good Vibrations, the perfect blend of Wilson's avant-garde direction and Love's desire to make a hit record.

    The relationship between Wilson and Love was kind of like the relationship between McCartney and Lennon, with Lennon's caustic wit serving to keep McCartney's innate uncoolness in check. But Lennon was fairly close to McCartney in creativity, while Love wasn't on Wilson's plane, so the Love-Wilson relationship wasn't as long-term productive as Lennon-McCartney.

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon, @Reg Cæsar

    …Good Vibrations, the perfect blend of Wilson’s avant-garde direction and Love’s desire to make a hit record.

    For all the vaunted studio pyrotechnics attributed to that record, there was a pretty convincing live cover* of it, with standard instruments, on The Cowsills in Concert.

    *By “live cover”, I mean in the music industry sense, not the horse racing use of the term!

    • Replies: @el topo
    @Reg Cæsar

    I re-discovered the Cowsills recently, or rather discovered them, as I had heard their songs but knew nothing about them. What a talented and promising bunch they were, and how sad their story turned out. Apparently what's left of them still tours around doing small shows, and those vocals still amaze.
    A documentary was made about them recently - rather amateurish but still affecting. It's a tragic, very American story, similar to that of the Beach Boys: All-American Southern California family, alcoholic and abusive Dad, brilliant but troubled boy songwriter. There's even a drowning death...

  98. @L7's
    I get goose bumps while listening to songs I like but my wife and kids don't. Am I weird or are they?

    Replies: @Kylie, @unpc downunder

    No, but you are in the minority. People who are sensitive or introverted and relatively high on the personality trait of openness to experience, experience higher levels of nervous arousal from listening to music they like or viewing artistically inspiring art. I get it whenever I hear new music with clever cord changes. Most people just don’t get kind of thrill out of art.

  99. el topo [AKA "darryl revok"] says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    …Good Vibrations, the perfect blend of Wilson’s avant-garde direction and Love’s desire to make a hit record.
     
    For all the vaunted studio pyrotechnics attributed to that record, there was a pretty convincing live cover* of it, with standard instruments, on The Cowsills in Concert.

    *By "live cover", I mean in the music industry sense, not the horse racing use of the term!

    Replies: @el topo

    I re-discovered the Cowsills recently, or rather discovered them, as I had heard their songs but knew nothing about them. What a talented and promising bunch they were, and how sad their story turned out. Apparently what’s left of them still tours around doing small shows, and those vocals still amaze.
    A documentary was made about them recently – rather amateurish but still affecting. It’s a tragic, very American story, similar to that of the Beach Boys: All-American Southern California family, alcoholic and abusive Dad, brilliant but troubled boy songwriter. There’s even a drowning death…

  100. @Anonymous
    @Harry Baldwin

    yeah, singling out "Wonderful Christmastime" for praise is utterly bizarre. That's one of the worst things McCartney ever recorded. Compare that dreck to McC's '60s songs like "For No One" or "Things We Said Today" & it seems like by the mid-70s McCartney was on the downside of some "Flowers For Algernon" experiment.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Jacobite

    yeah, singling out “Wonderful Christmastime” for praise is utterly bizarre.

    Indeed, Wonderful Christmastime doesn’t hold a candle to Wilson&Love’s Little Saint Nick which unlike the McCartney groaner is still a popular radio play every Christmas.

  101. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Jacobite
    @Whiskey


    Some of McCartney’s best songs came in the 1970s: Live and Let Die, Band on the Run, Simply Having a Wonderful Christmas Time.
     
    Those songs truly and deeply suck big time. They are nothing but puerile jingles even worse than many of McCartney's songs with the Beatles.

    Replies: @Anon

    “Some of McCartney’s best songs came in the 1970s: Live and Let Die, Band on the Run, Simply Having a Wonderful Christmas Time.”

    “Those songs truly and deeply suck big time. They are nothing but puerile jingles even worse than many of McCartney’s songs with the Beatles.”

    It’s called Pop. What do you expect from pop? Meaning?

    99% of pop songs are silly love songs, and McCartney composed some catchy ones in the 70s and early 80s.

    Sure, they are light but they good light. They are throwaway songs with the fizz.

    “With a little luck”, “Take It Away”, and “No More Lonely Nights”(which I especially love).

    Okay, McCartney was no longer the groundbreaking composer after his stint as a Beatle. None of his later songs made a difference like “All My Loving”, “Yesterday”, “Penny Lane”, and “Hey Jude” did in their time.

    He’s turned into a slick pro, but there’s nothing wrong with cranking out good pop songs. Neil Diamond did it all his life, and I got nothing against “Little Bit You, Little Bit Me” and “Girl, You’ll Be a Woman Soon.”

    • Replies: @Jacobite
    @Anon

    Neil Diamond's best (and probably most covered) song was Kentucky Woman.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B-YpI-eJgDc

  102. @Anon
    @Jacobite

    "Some of McCartney’s best songs came in the 1970s: Live and Let Die, Band on the Run, Simply Having a Wonderful Christmas Time."

    "Those songs truly and deeply suck big time. They are nothing but puerile jingles even worse than many of McCartney’s songs with the Beatles."

    It's called Pop. What do you expect from pop? Meaning?

    99% of pop songs are silly love songs, and McCartney composed some catchy ones in the 70s and early 80s.

    Sure, they are light but they good light. They are throwaway songs with the fizz.

    "With a little luck", "Take It Away", and "No More Lonely Nights"(which I especially love).

    Okay, McCartney was no longer the groundbreaking composer after his stint as a Beatle. None of his later songs made a difference like "All My Loving", "Yesterday", "Penny Lane", and "Hey Jude" did in their time.

    He's turned into a slick pro, but there's nothing wrong with cranking out good pop songs. Neil Diamond did it all his life, and I got nothing against "Little Bit You, Little Bit Me" and "Girl, You'll Be a Woman Soon."

    Replies: @Jacobite

    Neil Diamond’s best (and probably most covered) song was Kentucky Woman.

  103. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    Drug taking became normal since the 60s, so there should have been great songs every year since them.

    Even after the psychedelic era, people in the music scene were using all sorts of drugs.
    Granted, new drugs became more prominent which may explain the change in music.

    As heroin became popular, the music grew harder and darker: Yer Blues and Gimme Shelter.

    In the 80s, the rise of ecstasy surely influenced stuff like rave music and techno.

    My guess is drugs are a stimulant to creativity in their initial bloom stage.

    Any novel experience, drug-related or not, releases certain emotions and sensations that could be inspirational.

    But once the initial bloom wore off, the drug use probably became a dead end. Instead of opening new horizons, it led the artist into the weird but familiar creative cul-de-sac.

    You can’t go home again.

    And once strangeness is made familiar, it may feel oppressive than fascinating.
    Like what happens with the guy in the opening of Scanner Darkly.

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/513241/Mental-illness-forced-Joni-Mitchell-to-quit

    Pot probably did more for music than stronger stuff like LSD and heroin.
    Pot altered consciousness without devouring it. LSD was too strange, and heroin was too destructive.

    Also, if psychedelics did open up creativity for some, it had a slow-down effect which is deadly to pop. Pop and rock need to be breezy, mostly at any way. When the pop artist gets mired in his or her own ‘significance’, it can be excruciating. SGT PEPPER would be a lot better if it was faster, crispier, and snappier(like Byrds Younger than Yesterday, a more pleasing album on so many levels). But significance has been poured all over Pepper like syrup. It’s like musical goo. A Day in the Life transcends the material and attains greatness but the some of the other stuff are not helped by the dense texture. She’s Leaving Home and Within You Without You. I mean what the hell.

    Also, psychedelia became embarrassing when it was appropriated by the culture at large. When the Monkees and Cowsils also had the psychedelic touch, it wasn’t cool or cutting edge anymore.

    And even nice pop songs that should have been left alone were loaded with that ‘psyche-significance’.
    Susan was botched with that psyche-crap.

    Spanky and Our Gang almost got away with the psyche-weird-stuff.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Anon


    When the Monkees and Cowsils also had the psychedelic touch…
     
    Bloody hell, when did the Cowsills ever have "the psychedelic touch"? Bill C was fired by his manager father for smoking pot just once. Nobody sat through the Monkees' Head, their only "psycho" foray.

    The bands now being stuck with the retrorubric "sunshine pop" may have hired the same album-cover artists as Hendrix and Joplin, but the similarity ends there. There was still a lot of talented innocence in the late Sixties.

    Incidentally, Susan and Barry Cowsill settled, and were accepted, in New Orleans where, unlike in LA and London, you can't fake it.
  104. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    Maybe the mid 60s was great for pop because it finally reached the orgasm stage.

    What is the difference between Elvis/Berry and Beatles/Beach Boys?

    Rock n Roll is like the act of sex itself. Rough and raunchy.

    Rock, as defined by Beatles and Beach Boys, was intense and ecstatic, like climax reached.

    Another reason may be that the artists of the mid 60s were more rounded. Sure, they were mad about rock n roll and pop and all that, but they also grew up in a culture where reading and other arts(more adult-oriented) were stressed more. So, they knew something other than pop.

    Lennon used to hang with Stu Sutcliffe, a genuine artist.
    Dylan was well-read.
    Wilson grew up listening all kinds of songs from his dad. Mccartney also had wide-ranging musical taste.
    Jagger was something of a sophisticate.

    But young people since the 60s only know pop music, so their reference is narrower.

    Also, the idea of the personal pop artist was something really new in the 60s, so there was the novelty factor of making a new kind of musical culture.

    Partly, the pop scene was harmed in the 70s with the rise of rock criticism that favored stuff like punk & Patti Smith over Abba. There was some good punk stuff, but Abba had some killer songs too. But critics created a mood where the ‘different’ acts were always favored.

    In time, the audience got sick of rock culture as dictated by critics–just like girls got sick of feminism as dictated by the sisterhood–, and there was a shameless pop backlash overload(just like there was a slut backlash in the 90s). And now, it’s all Taylor Swift, which is crap.

    Anyway, the 60s standards of music(at its highest) was difficult because it required the performer to write his own songs and come up with new and original stuff all the time.

    Sting, though a 70s and 80s act, worked in this mode, but the well can run dry.

    Now, eminem need not worry since he can always crank out more rap crap with a lot of f-bombs.

    http://www.npr.org/2014/10/03/351545257/how-do-you-get-over-writer-s-block

  105. @Anon
    Drug taking became normal since the 60s, so there should have been great songs every year since them.

    Even after the psychedelic era, people in the music scene were using all sorts of drugs.
    Granted, new drugs became more prominent which may explain the change in music.

    As heroin became popular, the music grew harder and darker: Yer Blues and Gimme Shelter.

    In the 80s, the rise of ecstasy surely influenced stuff like rave music and techno.

    My guess is drugs are a stimulant to creativity in their initial bloom stage.

    Any novel experience, drug-related or not, releases certain emotions and sensations that could be inspirational.

    But once the initial bloom wore off, the drug use probably became a dead end. Instead of opening new horizons, it led the artist into the weird but familiar creative cul-de-sac.

    You can't go home again.

    And once strangeness is made familiar, it may feel oppressive than fascinating.
    Like what happens with the guy in the opening of Scanner Darkly.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XT4ObtDs0yc

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/513241/Mental-illness-forced-Joni-Mitchell-to-quit

    Pot probably did more for music than stronger stuff like LSD and heroin.
    Pot altered consciousness without devouring it. LSD was too strange, and heroin was too destructive.

    Also, if psychedelics did open up creativity for some, it had a slow-down effect which is deadly to pop. Pop and rock need to be breezy, mostly at any way. When the pop artist gets mired in his or her own 'significance', it can be excruciating. SGT PEPPER would be a lot better if it was faster, crispier, and snappier(like Byrds Younger than Yesterday, a more pleasing album on so many levels). But significance has been poured all over Pepper like syrup. It's like musical goo. A Day in the Life transcends the material and attains greatness but the some of the other stuff are not helped by the dense texture. She's Leaving Home and Within You Without You. I mean what the hell.

    Also, psychedelia became embarrassing when it was appropriated by the culture at large. When the Monkees and Cowsils also had the psychedelic touch, it wasn't cool or cutting edge anymore.

    And even nice pop songs that should have been left alone were loaded with that 'psyche-significance'.
    Susan was botched with that psyche-crap.

    https://youtu.be/cfjoQ4fUw78?t=1m29s

    Spanky and Our Gang almost got away with the psyche-weird-stuff.

    https://youtu.be/MmKUw0c_jMw?t=2m2s

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    When the Monkees and Cowsils also had the psychedelic touch…

    Bloody hell, when did the Cowsills ever have “the psychedelic touch”? Bill C was fired by his manager father for smoking pot just once. Nobody sat through the Monkees’ Head, their only “psycho” foray.

    The bands now being stuck with the retrorubric “sunshine pop” may have hired the same album-cover artists as Hendrix and Joplin, but the similarity ends there. There was still a lot of talented innocence in the late Sixties.

    Incidentally, Susan and Barry Cowsill settled, and were accepted, in New Orleans where, unlike in LA and London, you can’t fake it.

  106. @V Vega
    LSD isn't for everybody, but for some people, the drug really seems to agree with them creatively.

    McCartney and especially Lennon, who took acid about every day during the Beatles most creative period, as well as Wilson, John Sebastian, John Phillips, the Doors, Hendrix, Joplin and others benefited tremendously. LSD seemed to supercharge them creatively. When they stopped taking it, they had to rely on their technical chops fueled by a little inspiration, rather than the other way around, thanks to LSD.

    Heroin, in the right brain, also seems to be very helpful. James Taylor was at his most prolific creatively while he was shooting smack. Kurt Cobain also. And yes, Jimi and Janis were there too. It seems to have a law of diminishing returns, however. Seems harder to somewhat recover from than dropping acid.

    The unpopular fact remains that hallucinogenics was the driving force for our pop/rock surge of inspired creativity. That's why it couldn't last. Eventually, it fries the brain. McCartney couldn't write another "Hey Jude" if you put a gun to his head. Get him to agree to drop acid in a recording studio for a month with some friends he trusted, and I wouldn't bet against him.

    Brian Wilson, however, indulged too much. I don't think a hallucinogen would benefit him now. It would just make him crazier.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Whiskey, @Neil Templeton, @Anonym

    Certainly the mixing of cultures and import of drugs, e.g. tobacco, coffee; has affected the character and quantity of artistic and intellectual output in the West.

  107. @V Vega
    LSD isn't for everybody, but for some people, the drug really seems to agree with them creatively.

    McCartney and especially Lennon, who took acid about every day during the Beatles most creative period, as well as Wilson, John Sebastian, John Phillips, the Doors, Hendrix, Joplin and others benefited tremendously. LSD seemed to supercharge them creatively. When they stopped taking it, they had to rely on their technical chops fueled by a little inspiration, rather than the other way around, thanks to LSD.

    Heroin, in the right brain, also seems to be very helpful. James Taylor was at his most prolific creatively while he was shooting smack. Kurt Cobain also. And yes, Jimi and Janis were there too. It seems to have a law of diminishing returns, however. Seems harder to somewhat recover from than dropping acid.

    The unpopular fact remains that hallucinogenics was the driving force for our pop/rock surge of inspired creativity. That's why it couldn't last. Eventually, it fries the brain. McCartney couldn't write another "Hey Jude" if you put a gun to his head. Get him to agree to drop acid in a recording studio for a month with some friends he trusted, and I wouldn't bet against him.

    Brian Wilson, however, indulged too much. I don't think a hallucinogen would benefit him now. It would just make him crazier.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Whiskey, @Neil Templeton, @Anonym

    This is an interesting comment.

    The Beach Boys’ Smile Sessions and Pink Floyd’s The Piper at the Gates of Dawn have several similar qualities, and both are basically the final creative spurt before the creative geniuses grew too mad to pull their shit together again. I think most people would recognize the musical genius of the best compositions on those albums. But after repeated listens, the random craziness starts to make my brain hurt. Still, it’s good to listen to every so often.

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