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From the San Francisco Examiner:

Breed declares state of emergency to clean up the Tenderloin’s ‘nasty streets’
Action allows city to cut through red tape and increase police funding

December 17, 2021 1:30 am – Updated December 17, 2021 3:57 pm

By Examiner staff and wire reports

The mayor on Friday declared a state of emergency in the Tenderloin.

The neighborhood, just steps from City Hall, has been ground zero for drug dealing, overdose deaths and homelessness for years.

In what many observers said was a sharp turnaround in both tone and policy, Mayor London Breed this week said she would pursue an “aggressive” crackdown on the “nasty streets” of her city. It’s a highly unusual move by a liberal mayor in one of the country’s most liberal cities.

“We are in a crisis and we need to respond accordingly,” she said at a news conference Friday. “Too many people are dying in this city, too many people are sprawled on our streets,” she said, referring to residents who have overdosed.

She said declaring a state of emergency would allow The City to cut through red tape and increase funding to police, who she said already had arrested 23 people during felony warrant sweeps.

The announcement specifically targeted The City’s drug overdose crisis. Twice as many people died of drug overdoses in San Francisco last year as died from the coronavirus. But the announcement is part of a broader, aggressive push to crack down on drug dealing and improve conditions of The City’s streets.

“We are losing over two people a day to drug overdoses, mostly to fentanyl, and mostly in the Tenderloin and SoMa,” said Supervisor Matt Haney, whose district includes the Tenderloin.

Michael Shellenberger, author of San Fransicko, takes a victory lap:

 
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  1. a state of emergency in the Tenderloin

    I lost all my coffee.

    • Agree: Cortes
    • LOL: mc23, Bel Darrow
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @El Dato



    a state of emergency in the Tenderloin
     
    I lost all my coffee.
     
    How to Tell If Tenderloin Is Spoiled


    https://nitrocdn.com/yDquYwBKMqlJhvaxylKmXwHxQFSHiYcv/assets/static/optimized/rev-7e2e120/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/MomAtMeatCounter.jpg

    Replies: @J.Ross

  2. I assumed, based on the 1960s – 80s, we were in for a 10 -15 year descent into urban lawlessness before public outcry forced a change in crime policy. Instead it happened in less than 2 years.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    The internet and social media have accelerated a lot of timeline. In 1975 you only saw public images and stats approved of by three networks and your local 2-3 newspapers. Today, images can go viral from just some guy with a cellphone camera.

    Thus, BLM can create George Floyd/Ferguson riots out of nowhere, but the reverse is also true: the degradation from BLM and Antifa communist terrorist policies can get to your eyes in an instant.

    , @Dan Hayes
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    NYC's urban lawfulness occurred over the 8 years of the de Blasio Administration, albeit slowly at first!

    Replies: @Technite78

    , @HammerJack
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Sure. Until the next time a negro resists arrest in dramatic fashion, and it's caught on video.

    Well now, that's an everyday occurrence isn't it. So there must be an additional ingredient. Something to do with the mass media, I believe.

    , @Cato
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    You say that things have turned around in only two years, and I have to admit that I catch myself being optimistic, too. But best not to count one's chickens before they hatch.

    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 -- pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us. Policies extremely unpopular, which will reignite the impetus to wokery. So I am still keeping my arsenal, for the day the thugs come spilling down the pike to my quiet suburban neighborhood.

    Replies: @Curle, @Eric Novak, @PhysicistDave, @Almost Missouri, @Russ, @Wilkey, @tyrone

    , @anonymous
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    I assumed, based on the 1960s – 80s, we were in for a 10 -15 year descent into urban lawlessness before public outcry forced a change in crime policy. Instead it happened in less than 2 years.
     
    We may have the public outcry, but an effective change in policy will take at least a decade. In order to restore law and order, a city would need the mayor, DA, and state government to all be aligned to be tough on crime. A mayor who wants to clean things up won't be able to if there's a SorosDA who won't prosecute, or a state government that keeps decriminalizing things. How long until all three of those factors align for San Fran, Philadelphia, or any of these places?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Unladen Swallow, @John Johnson

    , @JohnnyD
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    The lawlessness could be longer this time. Democrats were much more sane and reasonable in the 1990s than they are today.

    , @Yancey Ward
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    I think if you look back at the history of the 1960s-1990, you will find there were a lot of mayors and governors who pretended to change course, but were too incompetent to accomplish anything. London Breed will prove to be utterly incompetent, even if she is authentically changing her position.

    , @indocon
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Nothing is going to happen, the white middle-class that pushed back against crime earlier does not exist anymore. Their Asian and Hispanic replacements are either too timid or lazy to organize.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @Colin Wright
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    'I assumed, based on the 1960s – 80s, we were in for a 10 -15 year descent into urban lawlessness before public outcry forced a change in crime policy. Instead it happened in less than 2 years.'

    San Francisco started becoming uninhabitable a lot more than two years ago.

    We made our last attempt to visit there a good ten years ago. It was so bad that when it came time to go back to the car, I seriously suggested my wife and daughter wait on Market Street while my son and I made the walk.

    Really, it's been sliding downhill for decades now.

  3. It’s very easy to break things. It’s harder to keep things from being broken. Harder still to make them in the first place. Harder still to put broken things back together just like they were.

    • Agree: Adam Smith, mc23, lavoisier
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @SimpleSong

    I never thought that NYC's Rudy Giuliani could put the genie back into the bottle. But he did it in amazingly fast time! I seriously doubt that Mayor Breed can accomplish anything of that order.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @Anon

    , @Thomas
    @SimpleSong

    She can propose, but the SFPD must dispose. How are they doing?


    San Francisco police seemingly watch as burglars flee crime scene

    Just days before a string of high-end robberies targeting Union Square rattled the Bay Area, an apparent burglary at a San Francisco cannabis dispensary was seemingly not stopped by police at the scene.

    The San Francisco Department of Police Accountability is now investigating the incident, multiple media outlets report, which took place in the early hours of Nov. 16 at Basa, just a block away from Alamo Square Park.

    According to video footage obtained by the San Francisco Chronicle and NBC Bay Area, a police car flashed its lights on an alleged getaway car. (SFGATE and the Chronicle are both owned by Hearst but operate independently of one another.)

    Over the span of the 2-minute recording, at least 45 seconds of footage show the two cars — the suspects' and the police officers — parked just meters away from each other.

    A suspect, leaving the dispensary with a bag in tow, runs into the vehicle and plops the goods into the back seat, dropping some wares into the street as the car rushes to perform a three-point turn and flee the scene.

    Moments after, police officers can be seen strolling just past where the alleged escape vehicle was parked into the dispensary. SFPD did not immediately respond to a request for comment from SFGATE.

    Anisa Alazraie, the owner’s daughter, told NBC Bay Area that the burglars made off with thousands of dollars in goods.

    She told the Chronicle that officers “had every opportunity to intervene and stop this crime from happening.” It is unclear what, if any, repercussions the officers involved will face.

    The burglary — and the apparent officer inaction — is another flashpoint in the blitz of retail and property theft in the Bay Area and elsewhere in the country and comes as San Francisco District Attorney Chesa Boudin is up for recall next year.

    Representatives for the San Francisco Police Commission did not immediately respond to a request for comment from SFGATE.
     
    https://www.sfgate.com/crime/article/San-Francisco-police-watch-burglars-16653700.php

    Replies: @Russ, @SteveRogers42

    , @J.Ross
    @SimpleSong

    easy and fun to hunt the pig harder to build the hut hardest of all to listen to the pilot

  4. The good news for San Franciscog’s is that Pelosi apparently won’t be staggering shit-faced around the place much longer.

    https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/world-news/corruption/pelosi-fleeing-to-florida/

    but she hasn’t bought yet. There’s still time for DeSantis to step in.

    The even better news is that we are going to have an even bigger drunk back on the public stage

    https://babylonbee.com/news/hillary-clinton-reportedly-considering-losing-again-in-2024

  5. London Calling

    London Calling to the Tenderloin
    Now war is declared and battle is joined
    London calling to the underworld
    Come out of the closet, you boys and girlzzz (and whatever)
    London calling, now don’t look at us
    Phony BLM-mania has bitten the dust

    London calling, see we ain’t got no swing
    Except for the ring of the truncheon thing
    The ice age is coming, COVID’s zooming in
    Lockdown expected, the vaccine’s growing thin
    Nose can’t stop running, but I have no fear
    ‘Cause the city is drowning
    In shit like a river

    • Thanks: Gary in Gramercy
    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Voltarde

    Very nice. Now try "Police and Thieves." (Yes, I know the original was a reggae classic by Junior Murvin.) Or "Safe [Inna' City] Home." Or "The Guns of [Frisco]."

    , @Clyde
    @Voltarde

    You have a way with words.

    , @Expletive Deleted
    @Voltarde

    Sillybilly 'agree' widget don't like me.
    But I do want to lol, and likewise kek.

    At least it's only that.
    Until I read the piece, I was appalled by the possibility that UK was farming southeast asians in-house, possibly for export en masse.

    Hybrid warfare, as the Eastern Euros have decided to call that sort of thing. Only moderate response is ball-squeezing sanctions on the invaders-by-proxy, possibly even confiscation of their overseas "running-away" assets that fall within the invaded jurisdiction.

  6. ‘Harder still to put broken things back together just like they were.’

    Any examples of them ever going back the way they were before come to mind?

    • Replies: @Curle
    @Colin Wright

    New York, crime wise in the 1990s. DC, crime wise compared to ‘80s. Doesn’t hurt to change populations.

  7. Sounds desperate. Polling numbers must be abysmal.

    • Agree: Bel Darrow
    • Replies: @John Milton's Ghost
    @R.G. Camara

    The white men in charge apparently haven't been positioning her to succeed.

  8. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I assumed, based on the 1960s - 80s, we were in for a 10 -15 year descent into urban lawlessness before public outcry forced a change in crime policy. Instead it happened in less than 2 years.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Dan Hayes, @HammerJack, @Cato, @anonymous, @JohnnyD, @Yancey Ward, @indocon, @Colin Wright

    The internet and social media have accelerated a lot of timeline. In 1975 you only saw public images and stats approved of by three networks and your local 2-3 newspapers. Today, images can go viral from just some guy with a cellphone camera.

    Thus, BLM can create George Floyd/Ferguson riots out of nowhere, but the reverse is also true: the degradation from BLM and Antifa communist terrorist policies can get to your eyes in an instant.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
  9. I wonder who cracked the whip.

    • Replies: @Mr. Peabody
    @tyrone

    Yes. It's a dog and pony show, presented with plenty of smoke, and lots of mirrors.
    Hold the front page! DEMS TOUGH ON CRIME
    (At least until after the midterms.)
    Meanwhile, the population of a mid-size city will cross our borders every month, to be spirited away to critical swing precincts near you. So pay no attention to the woman in SF. She ain't the great and powerful Oz. She jus' de hehp.

  10. Steve,
    I’m sure you are honest and upright in your tax reporting but these changes may effect you.
    New \$600 reporting limit.

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/new-600-irs-1099k-reporting-threshold-what-your-thoughts-pianko/

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Bill Jones


    I’m sure you are honest and upright in your tax reporting but these changes may effect you.
    New $600 reporting limit.
     
    While I'm not iSteve, nor am I giving him or others tax advice here, I am a retired tax professional.

    As far as I'm aware iSteve (and most others here on Unz) are not selling anything, either goods or services. Anyone can read for free. And does.

    They may be soliciting voluntary gifts or donations. Gifts and donations (legitimate ones, not disguised sales, etc.) are not taxable to the recipient. Ever.

    So while he could, as others might, get one of these 1099ks, and the IRS might also get a copy, the amounts reported on them solely showing gifts wouldn't be reportable or taxable to him. If he is also selling something (say a book) which might be included, he should break that out on his Schedule C or E or whatever.

    Or, to avoid hassle, he could choose to report a Gross Amount total received annually, show that on a Sch. C, E, or whatever, and then totally offset the amount with an added expense line (not shown on the form, but you can add them) saying "Reported amount of non taxable voluntary gifts received." If he does receive payment for services (writing, etc.) he could put both taxable and non taxable gifts on the same Schedule, offsetting the gifts with the added "expense."

    I believe GoFundMe donations received aren't taxable either, and these would have a similar reporting issue. Or really any kind of donations for relief or emergency or sympathy that could come through a 3rd party money collection process (credit card, PayPal, etc.).

    Best to ask your tax professional or at least search online accounting publications for Best Practices on this.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  11. Well, we’ll see if someone named london breed actually puts the city’s welfare above her own breed…

  12. In SF, public safety receives 12% of the general fund.

    Tax residents, tell them it’s for cops, then spend it on other budget items, e.g. PERS.

    Pass a \$X bond measure, lockboxed for cops. An amount equivalent to 88% of X will be subtracted from the general fund’s cop budget, and used to pay for other pet projects.

    The tax dollar bait-&-switch.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @additionalMike
    @Abolish_public_education

    Just like what was done with the money raised "for education" by the New York State Lottery, or the annual fee imposed on attorneys for the privilege of being a lawyer in the Empire State.

    Public finance is a racket in every state.
    All samey-same.

  13. The people in SF are getting just what they have consistently indicated they prefer. Maybe they don’t actually like junkies, unprosecuted assaultive crime, and filthy degenerates living on the streets of the city, but they damn sure vote for people who enable and tolerate all of that and more.

    That city could be cleaned up in about a week. Most of the rest of the shitholes around the nation as well, but there just isn’t any real demand for it from We, the People. We are content with a spiffy new smartphone, lots o’ streaming and not having to go into work much.

    We vote for people like London Breed, Bill DeBlasio, and Lori Lightfoot. We deserve all the bad things we get. We asked for them.

    • Agree: fish
    • Replies: @Negrolphin Pool
    @Brian Reilly

    "We" is a fleeting thing.

    For instance, if I could vote in local California elections — y existe una probabilidad bien grande que lo podria hacer — I would vote for London Breed and Chesa Boudin 1,000 times each and relish in the aftermath.

    But if I were to learn that my neighbor voted for such a person, it would create the kind of rift that only centuries erase.

    Replies: @Bernard

    , @PaceLaw
    @Brian Reilly

    Well said. It should be noted that in just about every big urban city, blacks will consistently vote on skin color alone and usually elect an incompetent person who looks like them. I live here in the Baltimore area, and the current mayor and state’s attorney for the city are leading examples of 2 young incompetents who were voted into their positions based solely on their skin color. It seems that the majority of black voters are too racially prideful to consider non-blacks for major leadership positions in most cities. Sad.

  14. @SimpleSong
    It's very easy to break things. It's harder to keep things from being broken. Harder still to make them in the first place. Harder still to put broken things back together just like they were.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Thomas, @J.Ross

    I never thought that NYC’s Rudy Giuliani could put the genie back into the bottle. But he did it in amazingly fast time! I seriously doubt that Mayor Breed can accomplish anything of that order.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Dan Hayes

    Even if she actually wanted to, you mean.

    , @Anon
    @Dan Hayes

    No longer liver there but I remember the NY of the mid 70's Taxi Driver era. It started to improve some under Koch. Rudy then did a lot. Not just in reducing crime rates but in changing the mind set that decline of the city was inevitable. An interlude with Dinkins. Crime rates continued to decline under Bloomberg. De Blasio an utter disaster. The new mayor Eric Adams will be an improvement compared to De Blasio (faint praise though that is) and is the best that NY could expect under the circumstances. Adams just barely beat in the Dem primary a "progressive" primary opponent Wiley who could've been worse than De Blasio. Curtis Sliwa wasn't going to win against Adams and unlikely even against Wiley.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Anon

  15. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I assumed, based on the 1960s - 80s, we were in for a 10 -15 year descent into urban lawlessness before public outcry forced a change in crime policy. Instead it happened in less than 2 years.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Dan Hayes, @HammerJack, @Cato, @anonymous, @JohnnyD, @Yancey Ward, @indocon, @Colin Wright

    NYC’s urban lawfulness occurred over the 8 years of the de Blasio Administration, albeit slowly at first!

    • Replies: @Technite78
    @Dan Hayes

    The de Blasio's Administration's effect on NYC was similar to taking your hands off the wheel while driving a car. As long as the road is straight, and the car was aimed properly before taking your hands off the wheel you can go a long way before anything bad happens. Of course, as soon as there's a turn in the road or you hit a pothole, bad things start to happen pretty quickly.

  16. OTish:

    The 2020 arrest records of New Yorkers show that 93% of those arrested for rape and 91% of those arrested for other felony sex crimes were not white. It becomes easy to see how bringing in prior bad actions may inflame jurors’ implicit racial biases, and why a criminal system that seeks justice has an interest in keeping the trial focused on the facts of the specific crime being prosecuted.

    (…)

    So yes, the prospect that Weinstein’s conviction will be overturned is maddening. But so is the fact that prosecutors gave Weinstein’s attorneys fodder for appeal rather than proving their case on its merits. If Weinstein’s conviction is overturned, hopefully the courts’ interest in overzealous prosecutions does some good for the poor, Black, and brown defendants who struggle with the same evidentiary questions every day.

    https://news.yahoo.com/why-justice-may-demand-harvey-001506541.html

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Henry's Cat

    Looking forward to prosecutors not bringing up "video games" in antifa removal trials or "has been reading UNZ" when someone drilled holes to defend against sudden enrichment of the home.

  17. Don’t take any of this seriously, the word has clearly gone out from Dem Central to make some anti-crime noises with the midterms soon to be looming.

    NYC will be an interesting test case — will the Adams administration be the first blackety black bunch to improve conditions in a major city? Blacks were headed toward demographic and political irrelevance in NYC and now two years post-Floyd are suddenly running the whole show.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Known Fact


    will the Adams administration be the first blackety black bunch to improve conditions in a major city?
     
    That would be a most impressive feat; the temptation to loot NYC's deep tax base could prove irresistible.
    , @Paleo Liberal
    @Known Fact

    I’m not sure it would be the first time. There have been successful black mayors in the past.

    As for NYC, the feeling is that anyone will look good in comparison to de Blasio.

    Adams needs two things to succeed.

    First, the COVID pandemic must end, or at least become manageable, during his time as mayor. We have 4 years and two weeks. Chances are pretty good.

    Second, the NYPD must get a handle on the increase of crime, or at least start to turn things around. We can all hope for the best.

    And that is it. Adams mostly needs good luck and and least sone competence.

    De Blasio had horrible luck; his incompetence and intransigence made things worse.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Bernard, @The Anti-Gnostic

    , @Technite78
    @Known Fact

    Agreed. It's hard to read Adams, but there are conflicting signs.

    On one hand, he's promised to bring back some form of stop & frisk, enraging the local BLM leader. He's also promised to combat Antifa hooliganism, even meeting with leaders from a predominately white neighborhood hit by property damage.

    On the other hand, almost without exception, when you give a large proportion of high level city government positions to blacks, they run the city as if it was a banana republic in Africa: graft, corruption, incompetence, and hatred of whites.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

  18. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I assumed, based on the 1960s - 80s, we were in for a 10 -15 year descent into urban lawlessness before public outcry forced a change in crime policy. Instead it happened in less than 2 years.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Dan Hayes, @HammerJack, @Cato, @anonymous, @JohnnyD, @Yancey Ward, @indocon, @Colin Wright

    Sure. Until the next time a negro resists arrest in dramatic fashion, and it’s caught on video.

    Well now, that’s an everyday occurrence isn’t it. So there must be an additional ingredient. Something to do with the mass media, I believe.

  19. @SimpleSong
    It's very easy to break things. It's harder to keep things from being broken. Harder still to make them in the first place. Harder still to put broken things back together just like they were.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Thomas, @J.Ross

    She can propose, but the SFPD must dispose. How are they doing?

    San Francisco police seemingly watch as burglars flee crime scene

    Just days before a string of high-end robberies targeting Union Square rattled the Bay Area, an apparent burglary at a San Francisco cannabis dispensary was seemingly not stopped by police at the scene.

    The San Francisco Department of Police Accountability is now investigating the incident, multiple media outlets report, which took place in the early hours of Nov. 16 at Basa, just a block away from Alamo Square Park.

    According to video footage obtained by the San Francisco Chronicle and NBC Bay Area, a police car flashed its lights on an alleged getaway car. (SFGATE and the Chronicle are both owned by Hearst but operate independently of one another.)

    Over the span of the 2-minute recording, at least 45 seconds of footage show the two cars — the suspects’ and the police officers — parked just meters away from each other.

    A suspect, leaving the dispensary with a bag in tow, runs into the vehicle and plops the goods into the back seat, dropping some wares into the street as the car rushes to perform a three-point turn and flee the scene.

    Moments after, police officers can be seen strolling just past where the alleged escape vehicle was parked into the dispensary. SFPD did not immediately respond to a request for comment from SFGATE.

    Anisa Alazraie, the owner’s daughter, told NBC Bay Area that the burglars made off with thousands of dollars in goods.

    She told the Chronicle that officers “had every opportunity to intervene and stop this crime from happening.” It is unclear what, if any, repercussions the officers involved will face.

    The burglary — and the apparent officer inaction — is another flashpoint in the blitz of retail and property theft in the Bay Area and elsewhere in the country and comes as San Francisco District Attorney Chesa Boudin is up for recall next year.

    Representatives for the San Francisco Police Commission did not immediately respond to a request for comment from SFGATE.

    https://www.sfgate.com/crime/article/San-Francisco-police-watch-burglars-16653700.php

    • Replies: @Russ
    @Thomas


    Just days before a string of high-end robberies targeting Union Square rattled the Bay Area, an apparent burglary at a San Francisco cannabis dispensary was seemingly not stopped by police at the scene.
     
    Perhaps the police inaction arose from the stench of illegality associated with the pot trade until just recently, when legalized pot and sports gambling were declared the latest "just the right thing to do" balms for all societal ills.

    As for Breed's Tenderloin emergency declaration: I'm shocked shocked that it carries no provision for vaccinating the perpetrators against that Chinese flu which, though 99+% survivable, constitutes the state of emergency uber alles. Where is that woman's sense of priorities?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @SteveRogers42
    @Thomas

    Why would they bother?

  20. @Dan Hayes
    @SimpleSong

    I never thought that NYC's Rudy Giuliani could put the genie back into the bottle. But he did it in amazingly fast time! I seriously doubt that Mayor Breed can accomplish anything of that order.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @Anon

    Even if she actually wanted to, you mean.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  21. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I assumed, based on the 1960s - 80s, we were in for a 10 -15 year descent into urban lawlessness before public outcry forced a change in crime policy. Instead it happened in less than 2 years.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Dan Hayes, @HammerJack, @Cato, @anonymous, @JohnnyD, @Yancey Ward, @indocon, @Colin Wright

    You say that things have turned around in only two years, and I have to admit that I catch myself being optimistic, too. But best not to count one’s chickens before they hatch.

    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 — pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us. Policies extremely unpopular, which will reignite the impetus to wokery. So I am still keeping my arsenal, for the day the thugs come spilling down the pike to my quiet suburban neighborhood.

    • Agree: Mark G.
    • Replies: @Curle
    @Cato

    “ or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us”

    Wokery is indistinguishable from religious prejudice.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @Eric Novak
    @Cato

    Taxes are not their core constituency. Did you miss the last six years of politics? Also, why would anyone think that law and order will be restored after two years of lawlessness?

    Replies: @Bill

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Cato

    Cato wrote:


    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 — pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us.
     
    Lots of citizens do not care much about taxes one way or another, but very few people favor higher taxes. Abortion is not really a matter that Congress has much say over -- it is up to SCOTUS, who may or may not boot it back to the states. As for "imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us," what on earth are you talking about??

    I'm a militant atheist, but I am not worried in the slightest about the GOP trying to interfere with my religious freedom.

    The country-club GOP types are just nominally religious.

    And the evangelicals are the sort of people to whom Jefferson wrote his famous letter about a "wall of separation" between church and state. They are more solid on church-state separation than most liberals.

    I find their theological beliefs utterly nutty. But as fellow citizens... they are good neighbors and defenders of the Republic.

    Replies: @Skyler the Weird, @Cato

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Cato


    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000
     
    LOL, the Republicans haven't overreached for 150 years. Nowadays they barely reach, nevermind overreach.

    Meanwhile, Democrats' perpetual overreaches are billed as mild reaches because the Democrats and the media are one solid continuum.

    Replies: @Bill

    , @Russ
    @Cato


    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 20[2]0 — pandering to their core constituency.
     
    The core constituency of the establishment GOP is the lobbyist clique on K Street in DC.

    In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us. Policies extremely unpopular, which will reignite the impetus to wokery.
     
    When Dems wield power, they advance the football to the left in length units of first downs rather than mere yards. When the GOP holds office, they historically "stand athwart" ... which hardly moves the ball to the right. It will be interesting to see whether the '22 elections install the McConnell/McCarthy GOPers in Congress, or the Bannon Warroom GOPers. Whatever the case, the parallels of 2022-2024 to 1994-1996 should be interesting ... assuming a big GOP win in Nov'22.

    As for Breed: I find an interesting parallel in TX Gov Abbott, who finally has been galvanized to further a border wall in his state. One story has it that the locals are so disgusted that they are now willing to cede land rights just to get it done. Why matters had to come to that is troubling.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    , @Wilkey
    @Cato


    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 — pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us.
     
    1) Imposing religious prejudices is what Democrats do every minute of every hour of every day. Wokeism is a godless religion far more judgmental, oppressive, and dogmatic than most of the theistic religions that man has ever created. Just walk into many schools or workplaces and announce that men cannot become women and tell us how that goes. Announce that men and women aren't equal and tell us how that goes. Announce that races aren't equal and tell us how that goes.

    2) There is precious little new policy a Republican congressional majority can enact without having control of the White House. The major thing they will be able to do is control the purse strings. They can use that power to effect policy somewhat, but not by much. The best thing they can do with it is defund the worst impulses of the Democratic Party. 70-80% of Americans would be on board with most of that.

    Replies: @anonymous, @nebulafox, @Jack D

    , @tyrone
    @Cato

    McCarthy and McConnel "overreaching", well maybe reaching into the cookie jar to enrich themselves .Have you ever ask yourself how a guy with a middle class bank account goes to Washington and ends up years later with hundreds of millions in the bank does it......on a congressmans salary. These people ain't gonna' do shit for you and me.

  22. London Breed is a type of:

    Raincoat…

    Turncoat.

    London Nicole Breed = Condoned rebellion.

    They don’t make Londons like they used to:

    [MORE]

    7https://youtu.be/3JWq0Nd4UvY

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Reg Cæsar

    London Breed is a type of: Chocolate Stout

    What do I win?

  23. Wasn’t London Breed a groundbreaking blues rock band in the 60s?

    • LOL: Bel Darrow
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Father O'Hara

    Wasn’t London Breed a groundbreaking blues rock band in the 60s?



    https://youtu.be/2CVJFQkPkCg

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

  24. anonymous[366] • Disclaimer says:
    @NJ Transit Commuter
    I assumed, based on the 1960s - 80s, we were in for a 10 -15 year descent into urban lawlessness before public outcry forced a change in crime policy. Instead it happened in less than 2 years.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Dan Hayes, @HammerJack, @Cato, @anonymous, @JohnnyD, @Yancey Ward, @indocon, @Colin Wright

    I assumed, based on the 1960s – 80s, we were in for a 10 -15 year descent into urban lawlessness before public outcry forced a change in crime policy. Instead it happened in less than 2 years.

    We may have the public outcry, but an effective change in policy will take at least a decade. In order to restore law and order, a city would need the mayor, DA, and state government to all be aligned to be tough on crime. A mayor who wants to clean things up won’t be able to if there’s a SorosDA who won’t prosecute, or a state government that keeps decriminalizing things. How long until all three of those factors align for San Fran, Philadelphia, or any of these places?

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @anonymous


    A mayor who wants to clean things up won’t be able to if there’s a SorosDA who won’t prosecute, or a state government that keeps decriminalizing things.
     
    Also, the fact remains that a lot of cops are going to be reticent about doing their job. Who wants to end up as the next Derek Chauvin?
    , @Unladen Swallow
    @anonymous

    As long as the city and the state remain dominated by one party nothing will change, the possibility of being turned out of office has to be present.

    , @John Johnson
    @anonymous

    We may have the public outcry, but an effective change in policy will take at least a decade. In order to restore law and order, a city would need the mayor, DA, and state government to all be aligned to be tough on crime. A mayor who wants to clean things up won’t be able to if there’s a SorosDA who won’t prosecute, or a state government that keeps decriminalizing things. How long until all three of those factors align for San Fran, Philadelphia, or any of these places?

    There is also no plan as to where to put them.

    Anytime a new jail is proposed in a Democrat city there is outcry from the usual suspects about how they should be building schools.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  25. If I were Breed, to get a jumpstart on this initiative, I would do what many social service agencies in farsighted cities have been doing for years. Offer every bum on the streets of the Tenderlolin \$200 on the condition that they enter a departing bus (transportation paid for by the city) for, say, Salt Lake City.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Daniel H

    Don't give them ideas. Let SLC bear the burden of their own sins rather than SF's.

    (Not that I'm too worried. SF's hairball of insane incentives for derelicts and criminals is too strong for $200 to overcome, though the SLC bus station might get temporarily ugly while the unwashed ride the SF-SLC shuttle to earn more handouts.)

    , @Sick 'n Tired
    @Daniel H

    Or like Hawaii, put them on a plane with a one way ticket to California. Good luck getting back

    , @Pericles
    @Daniel H

    Every illegal that cannot be deported should be offered a one-way ticket to a sanctuary state or city.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    , @duncsbaby
    @Daniel H


    Offer every bum on the streets of the Tenderlolin $200 on the condition that they enter a departing bus (transportation paid for by the city) for, say, Salt Lake City.
     
    They'd get off in Oakland and thumb a ride back to San Francisco.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

  26. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I assumed, based on the 1960s - 80s, we were in for a 10 -15 year descent into urban lawlessness before public outcry forced a change in crime policy. Instead it happened in less than 2 years.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Dan Hayes, @HammerJack, @Cato, @anonymous, @JohnnyD, @Yancey Ward, @indocon, @Colin Wright

    The lawlessness could be longer this time. Democrats were much more sane and reasonable in the 1990s than they are today.

  27. London Breed is an English 80’s synth-pop group.

    And I feel that our side is letting these bozos off the hook to disastrous effect. “Defund the Police” was an endzone dance, not the initial cause of the spike in violent crime – the problem is the sudden diminishment of the general esteem of police in mainstream institutions, the notion in every cop’s head (except, evidently, for members of the Capitol Police) that he’s 3 seconds away from being this week’s Emmanuel Goldtstein on a 24/7 news loop, and the resultant millions of entirely reasonable daily decisions not to actively engage in crime intervention. It’s far safer to take pictures, circle cartridge cases in chalk, and fill out paperwork than having to decide in an instant whether to get shot in an ambush or get zealously prosecuted first in the Press, then before a jury of “peers” and having your life blown apart while your wife and kids are beggared.

    This naturally creates a vicious cycle in which criminals become more audacious, and meet little resistance, and therefore become yet more audacious and s0 forth. None of this gets solved by returning to prior levels of funding, or even increased funding. In fact, you can anticipate that they will cite increased funding without a reduction in crime as evidence that police don’t reduce crime.

    • Replies: @thenon
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    Further into the viscous cycle, the police in my small outer suburbs Virginia town are vastly increasing their harassment of honkies, including old men walking dogs and random white pedestrians to maintain their arrest points for promotion and bonuses (convictions don't count) , while black drug dealers work openly. This is a trend that has been coming on for decades, police overfunding and d power with little to no police action on minority crime, while police make take home pay in the low 200s, a combination of fiscal corruption that serves the elite with old fashioned small town police that are a law unto themselves. No where to run, no where to hide for white men unless they can afford tens of thousands in Legal protection.

    Replies: @JimDandy

  28. I never thought that NYC’s Rudy Giuliani could put the genie back into the bottle. But he did it in amazingly fast time!

    It’s good we have a recent template on how to fix things. I think things spun out of control when we started to have a large cohort of people who were too young to remember the last big crime surge that started in the late sixties. Liberalism comes into fashion in cycles as the number of people who remember how it didn’t work the previous time it was tried get old and decline in numbers and are replaced by younger people who don’t know it doesn’t work.

    Early twentieth century Wilsonian liberalism failed and was replaced by Harding and Coolidge. FDR and his New Deal failed and that led to Eisenhower. LBJ and his Great Society welfare programs failed and led to Reagan. Giuliani was first elected mayor in 1993 when we were still in the conservative phase. Clinton was actually a southern moderate who governed more to the right than Bush II, whose big government neoconservatism was actually liberalism making a strong comeback. Obama was a full blown liberal and that was when the recent resurgence of crime started.

    The Tea Party movement was the beginning of a reaction to Bush and Obama style big government liberalism as was the election of Trump but this time the conservative return stalled with Big Tech censorship of conservative viewpoints and probable voting fraud in the last election. It may not be over, though, and there could be a conservative tsunami in the next election.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Mark G.

    The demography has changed. The map might look red but the vote will be finely balanced at best for the Republican Party.

  29. Today we got extremely bad news on two fronts. The 6th Circuit Court of Appeals refused to stop Brandon from firing people for not taking the worthless and harmful vaccine that does nothing against a mostly ordinary cold virus, and the so-called pope is busily destroying the last vestiges of the Catholic faith by proscribing the Latin Mass.

    I wondered whether I was living in some sort of demented nursery rhyme, and then I see that…

    …”London Breed” has declared a state of emergency in “Tenderloin.”

    Well, well. The perfect ending to the perfect day.

    • Thanks: lavoisier
    • Replies: @Daniel H
    @Intelligent Dasein


    Today we got extremely bad news on two fronts. The 6th Circuit Court of Appeals refused to stop Brandon from firing people for not taking the worthless and harmful vaccine that does nothing against a mostly ordinary cold virus, and the so-called pope is busily destroying the last vestiges of the Catholic faith by proscribing the Latin Mass.
     
    No, it's good news on both fronts. We're not ripe yet for reaction. Sharpen the contradictions (sorta). Bad is good. Worse is better.
    , @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Even The NY Times has reported that the vaccines offer no protection against Omicron. The fraud will be exposed , these vaccines failed to stop the spread of coronavirus. They failed to reduce hospitalizations and failed to reduce deaths. More Americans died from Covid this year than in 2020 before the vaccines. We should have had less deaths in 2021 since treatments got better and 90 million Americans acquired natural immunity in 2020, yet despite the vaccines and millions with natural immunity deaths were greater in 2021. Excess deaths are also far greater than 2020. Funny how they stopped talking about excess deaths in 2021.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Thanks for the info., I.D. This stuff is going to matter to my family on a personal (career) level. I do understand Daniel H.'s stance on this though.

  30. @Mark G.

    I never thought that NYC’s Rudy Giuliani could put the genie back into the bottle. But he did it in amazingly fast time!
     
    It's good we have a recent template on how to fix things. I think things spun out of control when we started to have a large cohort of people who were too young to remember the last big crime surge that started in the late sixties. Liberalism comes into fashion in cycles as the number of people who remember how it didn't work the previous time it was tried get old and decline in numbers and are replaced by younger people who don't know it doesn't work.

    Early twentieth century Wilsonian liberalism failed and was replaced by Harding and Coolidge. FDR and his New Deal failed and that led to Eisenhower. LBJ and his Great Society welfare programs failed and led to Reagan. Giuliani was first elected mayor in 1993 when we were still in the conservative phase. Clinton was actually a southern moderate who governed more to the right than Bush II, whose big government neoconservatism was actually liberalism making a strong comeback. Obama was a full blown liberal and that was when the recent resurgence of crime started.

    The Tea Party movement was the beginning of a reaction to Bush and Obama style big government liberalism as was the election of Trump but this time the conservative return stalled with Big Tech censorship of conservative viewpoints and probable voting fraud in the last election. It may not be over, though, and there could be a conservative tsunami in the next election.

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    The demography has changed. The map might look red but the vote will be finely balanced at best for the Republican Party.

    • Agree: Mark G.
  31. @Dan Hayes
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    NYC's urban lawfulness occurred over the 8 years of the de Blasio Administration, albeit slowly at first!

    Replies: @Technite78

    The de Blasio’s Administration’s effect on NYC was similar to taking your hands off the wheel while driving a car. As long as the road is straight, and the car was aimed properly before taking your hands off the wheel you can go a long way before anything bad happens. Of course, as soon as there’s a turn in the road or you hit a pothole, bad things start to happen pretty quickly.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  32. If only Libby Schaaf would hop on board the law and order train.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Michelle

    But she did! Kind of, sort of.

    2021-11-30: Another US mayor presses to undo police defunding

    The mayor of Oakland, California is seeking to reverse a multi-million-dollar budget cut planned for local police, instead calling for more officers and funding amid a surge in violent crime and homicides in the area.

    Mayor Libby Schaaf said her office will press the Oakland City Council to undo the upcoming $18 million budget cut, which was approved by local lawmakers in June and is set to take effect next year. She vowed to continue efforts at “violence prevention” outside the realm of law enforcement, but nonetheless stressed the need to expand the police force.

    “While we are not backing down whatsoever on our historic investments in prevention, as well as a non-police response option... we must address police staffing shortages, and that is what we will do,” Schaaf said on Monday.
     

    But maybe it is better to terraform the whole area from orbit?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qHixc-QAhZQ

    Replies: @Flip, @Deckin

  33. Anon[358] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dan Hayes
    @SimpleSong

    I never thought that NYC's Rudy Giuliani could put the genie back into the bottle. But he did it in amazingly fast time! I seriously doubt that Mayor Breed can accomplish anything of that order.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @Anon

    No longer liver there but I remember the NY of the mid 70’s Taxi Driver era. It started to improve some under Koch. Rudy then did a lot. Not just in reducing crime rates but in changing the mind set that decline of the city was inevitable. An interlude with Dinkins. Crime rates continued to decline under Bloomberg. De Blasio an utter disaster. The new mayor Eric Adams will be an improvement compared to De Blasio (faint praise though that is) and is the best that NY could expect under the circumstances. Adams just barely beat in the Dem primary a “progressive” primary opponent Wiley who could’ve been worse than De Blasio. Curtis Sliwa wasn’t going to win against Adams and unlikely even against Wiley.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Anon

    Rudy then did a lot. Not just in reducing crime rates but in changing the mind set that decline of the city was inevitable. An interlude with Dinkins.


    Not actually how it went. Dinkins followed Koch and Rudy beat him in his re-election attempt.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

    , @Anon
    @Anon

    You're right. Somehow when I was working on the post I got the Dinkins interlude placed after Rudy instead of before. At least, unlike Dinkins, I didn't "forget" to pay my taxes for four years.

  34. She couldn’t possibly believe that there would be any repercussions for continuing to allow her city’s rapid descent into chaos. The citizens of San Fransisco are far too enlightened to roll back this progress and allow police state oppression. It’s obviously a naked, reactionary power grab by Breed. I for one hope Biden’s Justice Department sees this for what it is and crushes her efforts.

    • LOL: PhysicistDave
  35. @Cato
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    You say that things have turned around in only two years, and I have to admit that I catch myself being optimistic, too. But best not to count one's chickens before they hatch.

    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 -- pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us. Policies extremely unpopular, which will reignite the impetus to wokery. So I am still keeping my arsenal, for the day the thugs come spilling down the pike to my quiet suburban neighborhood.

    Replies: @Curle, @Eric Novak, @PhysicistDave, @Almost Missouri, @Russ, @Wilkey, @tyrone

    “ or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us”

    Wokery is indistinguishable from religious prejudice.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Curle

    Curle wrote:


    Wokery is indistinguishable from religious prejudice.
     
    That is the central theme of John McWhorter's new book, Woke Racism, and he hammers away at it pretty convincingly.

    I think he is a bit too kind in assuming that the Wokists really believe it all -- I think a lot of them are motivated by sadism or by simple mercenary motives.

    But, yeah, Wokism is a religion, and, as an atheist, I find it a hell of a lot more dangerous than old-fashioned Bible-thumping Christianity.

    Replies: @nebulafox

  36. It’d be cool if we had authoritarian East Asian male immigrant mayors.

    Like this.

    At least with East Asian authoritarians in charge, we wouldn’t have to worry about civilization collapsing. Sure, a certain proportion of govt funds would be lost to “guanxi” patronage networks, but that’d be a small price to pay for order. Most of that money probably would come out of “diversity” programs anyway, so it’s not clear if that’d be a net loss.

    Just look at how tightly run the various East Asian societies (North&South Korea, PRC, Taiwan, Singapore, HK, Japan) are by their leaders. Wouldn’t that be nice?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Good morning, sir. Instead of remembering how well things were run, going forward, the focus will be on how much things have changed.

    , @Clyde
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Just look at how tightly run the various East Asian societies (North&South Korea, PRC, Taiwan, Singapore, HK, Japan) are by their leaders. Wouldn’t that be nice?
     
    You would last two minutes in such conformist societies. With them hunched over their bowls of rice and slurping up noodles, blech. I hope you are not a fan of the CCP's social credit scoring system. North Korea? Walker 123 spits on the sidewalks of Singapore and gets a sound thrashing/caning from the authorities.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    , @Supply and Demand
    @JohnnyWalker123

    why do you want a loser to be mayor?

    He'd surrender 95% of the city to the communists, particularly the money-making parts.

  37. Too soon to celebrate. This doesn’t sound like law enforcement, it sounds like social work with drug addicts. I’ll be impressed when the mayoress orders a crackdown on looters, smash&grab car burglars and muggers. It’s those things, and not the sad self-destructive junkies sprawled out where they’ve always been, that have crashed the quality of life these last few years.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @International Jew

    You’re right. It’s just more money for affirmative action grant hustlers to get money to pretend to help drug addicts. Tenderloin isn’t the worst part of the city. The worst parts of the city are still Bayview Sunnyvale Geneva Av parts of Ocean Av Hunters Point Ingleside Fillmore south of Geary all the nasty old black neighborhoods.

    Replies: @Pericles

  38. @Known Fact
    Don't take any of this seriously, the word has clearly gone out from Dem Central to make some anti-crime noises with the midterms soon to be looming.

    NYC will be an interesting test case -- will the Adams administration be the first blackety black bunch to improve conditions in a major city? Blacks were headed toward demographic and political irrelevance in NYC and now two years post-Floyd are suddenly running the whole show.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Paleo Liberal, @Technite78

    will the Adams administration be the first blackety black bunch to improve conditions in a major city?

    That would be a most impressive feat; the temptation to loot NYC’s deep tax base could prove irresistible.

  39. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I assumed, based on the 1960s - 80s, we were in for a 10 -15 year descent into urban lawlessness before public outcry forced a change in crime policy. Instead it happened in less than 2 years.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Dan Hayes, @HammerJack, @Cato, @anonymous, @JohnnyD, @Yancey Ward, @indocon, @Colin Wright

    I think if you look back at the history of the 1960s-1990, you will find there were a lot of mayors and governors who pretended to change course, but were too incompetent to accomplish anything. London Breed will prove to be utterly incompetent, even if she is authentically changing her position.

  40. @anonymous
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    I assumed, based on the 1960s – 80s, we were in for a 10 -15 year descent into urban lawlessness before public outcry forced a change in crime policy. Instead it happened in less than 2 years.
     
    We may have the public outcry, but an effective change in policy will take at least a decade. In order to restore law and order, a city would need the mayor, DA, and state government to all be aligned to be tough on crime. A mayor who wants to clean things up won't be able to if there's a SorosDA who won't prosecute, or a state government that keeps decriminalizing things. How long until all three of those factors align for San Fran, Philadelphia, or any of these places?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Unladen Swallow, @John Johnson

    A mayor who wants to clean things up won’t be able to if there’s a SorosDA who won’t prosecute, or a state government that keeps decriminalizing things.

    Also, the fact remains that a lot of cops are going to be reticent about doing their job. Who wants to end up as the next Derek Chauvin?

  41. @Father O'Hara
    Wasn't London Breed a groundbreaking blues rock band in the 60s?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Wasn’t London Breed a groundbreaking blues rock band in the 60s?

    • Thanks: SafeNow
    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Reg Cæsar

    Reg, you magnificent bastard -- you beat me to it.

    (Was the original commenter thinking of either Canned Heat or Savoy Brown? Or possibly Britpop "It" group the London Suede, which most know simply as Suede?)

  42. Anon[312] • Disclaimer says:

    If there’s anything to be said here, it’s that Democratic mayors care more for protecting their own careers than they do for their DA’s careers. If the Soros DAs are going to make Democratic mayors unelectable, then the DAs are going to find themselves in a savage fight with their own party.

    The donors have to be running away from the Democrats.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Anon

    >The donors have to be running away from the Democrats.

    And the GOP has battered wife syndrome...

    , @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Anon


    If there’s anything to be said here, it’s that Democratic mayors care more for protecting their own careers than they do for their DA’s careers. If the Soros DAs are going to make Democratic mayors unelectable, then the DAs are going to find themselves in a savage fight with their own party.
     
    All but one of the U.S.'s big cities are post-political. Other than New York City, non-Democrats are a dead letter when it comes to big city mayoral elections. All of the action will be on the Democratic primary side of things, as the general elections are mere coronations of the successful primary candidate. This means that the Democrats cannot become unelectable - the only question is which Democrat will win.
  43. @Voltarde
    London Calling

    London Calling to the Tenderloin
    Now war is declared and battle is joined
    London calling to the underworld
    Come out of the closet, you boys and girlzzz (and whatever)
    London calling, now don't look at us
    Phony BLM-mania has bitten the dust

    London calling, see we ain't got no swing
    Except for the ring of the truncheon thing
    The ice age is coming, COVID's zooming in
    Lockdown expected, the vaccine's growing thin
    Nose can't stop running, but I have no fear
    'Cause the city is drowning
    In shit like a river

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfK-WX2pa8c

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Clyde, @Expletive Deleted

    Very nice. Now try “Police and Thieves.” (Yes, I know the original was a reggae classic by Junior Murvin.) Or “Safe [Inna’ City] Home.” Or “The Guns of [Frisco].”

  44. @Reg Cæsar
    @Father O'Hara

    Wasn’t London Breed a groundbreaking blues rock band in the 60s?



    https://youtu.be/2CVJFQkPkCg

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    Reg, you magnificent bastard — you beat me to it.

    (Was the original commenter thinking of either Canned Heat or Savoy Brown? Or possibly Britpop “It” group the London Suede, which most know simply as Suede?)

  45. @International Jew
    Too soon to celebrate. This doesn't sound like law enforcement, it sounds like social work with drug addicts. I'll be impressed when the mayoress orders a crackdown on looters, smash&grab car burglars and muggers. It's those things, and not the sad self-destructive junkies sprawled out where they've always been, that have crashed the quality of life these last few years.

    Replies: @Alden

    You’re right. It’s just more money for affirmative action grant hustlers to get money to pretend to help drug addicts. Tenderloin isn’t the worst part of the city. The worst parts of the city are still Bayview Sunnyvale Geneva Av parts of Ocean Av Hunters Point Ingleside Fillmore south of Geary all the nasty old black neighborhoods.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Alden

    Though I saw plenty of blacks one late evening walking through the Tenderloin. They almost to a man offered me something called 'speed'. Perhaps it's the black business district.

  46. Speaking of San Francisco, it will be interesting to see who ends up replacing Pelosi in Congress when she decides not to run. She will be 82 in March of next year. She was making noises that she would run again but she is becoming fossilized.

  47. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I assumed, based on the 1960s - 80s, we were in for a 10 -15 year descent into urban lawlessness before public outcry forced a change in crime policy. Instead it happened in less than 2 years.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Dan Hayes, @HammerJack, @Cato, @anonymous, @JohnnyD, @Yancey Ward, @indocon, @Colin Wright

    Nothing is going to happen, the white middle-class that pushed back against crime earlier does not exist anymore. Their Asian and Hispanic replacements are either too timid or lazy to organize.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @indocon

    I'm not so certain about that. There's a white upper-class that lives in cities for a reason. They tend to donate to the Democrats. If cities become too obnoxious for them, even this class gets mad about it.

    They get mad about being rich yet having to live in a third-world crap-hole. If this class withdraws their donor money to the Democrats, the Democrats freak out.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @indocon

  48. Can someone trial in this balloon head the Golden Gate being renamed, in African Big Man style, London Breedge?

    She did so without the support of progressive TL supervisor MattHaneySF
    who was caught off guard by her request for more \$ for cops

    Today MattHaneySF moved to Team Breed

    Thumbs down. These cretins were elected to “rethink the Western justice system”. They and the electorate must burn over their own fires.

  49. @Known Fact
    Don't take any of this seriously, the word has clearly gone out from Dem Central to make some anti-crime noises with the midterms soon to be looming.

    NYC will be an interesting test case -- will the Adams administration be the first blackety black bunch to improve conditions in a major city? Blacks were headed toward demographic and political irrelevance in NYC and now two years post-Floyd are suddenly running the whole show.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Paleo Liberal, @Technite78

    I’m not sure it would be the first time. There have been successful black mayors in the past.

    As for NYC, the feeling is that anyone will look good in comparison to de Blasio.

    Adams needs two things to succeed.

    First, the COVID pandemic must end, or at least become manageable, during his time as mayor. We have 4 years and two weeks. Chances are pretty good.

    Second, the NYPD must get a handle on the increase of crime, or at least start to turn things around. We can all hope for the best.

    And that is it. Adams mostly needs good luck and and least sone competence.

    De Blasio had horrible luck; his incompetence and intransigence made things worse.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Paleo Liberal

    As for NYC, the feeling is that anyone will look good in comparison to de Blasio.
    Adams needs two things to succeed.
    First, the COVID pandemic must end, or at least become manageable, during his time as mayor. We have 4 years and two weeks. Chances are pretty good.
    Second, the NYPD must get a handle on the increase of crime, or at least start to turn things around. We can all hope for the best.

    Even that might not be enough. WFH has hit the city harder than just about anywhere else, which has devastated the local economy. Even if Covid disappears companies aren't going to bring their workers back to the office in any huge numbers. After almost two years they've come to realize that it often boosts productivity while reducing costs. From the employee perspective, while WFH can be socially isolating, no more chitchat around the water cooler, not having to commute can outweigh the negatives. About the only bit of hope for the city is that a substantial portion of WFH'ers live in the city so at least they're still spending money and contributing to the tax base.

    , @Bernard
    @Paleo Liberal


    I’m not sure it would be the first time. There have been successful black mayors in the past.

    As for NYC, the feeling is that anyone will look good in comparison to de Blasio.
     
    The bar is so stunningly low, that by comparison, any predecessor will be judged as a monumental political figure. If ever there was an opportunity to shine, this is one.
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Paleo Liberal

    What horrible luck? He was handed the keys to the wealthiest, largest, most culturally rich city in North America and de facto capital of the American Empire.

    "Horrible luck." LOL.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Gary in Gramercy, @Gary in Gramercy

  50. @Anon
    @Dan Hayes

    No longer liver there but I remember the NY of the mid 70's Taxi Driver era. It started to improve some under Koch. Rudy then did a lot. Not just in reducing crime rates but in changing the mind set that decline of the city was inevitable. An interlude with Dinkins. Crime rates continued to decline under Bloomberg. De Blasio an utter disaster. The new mayor Eric Adams will be an improvement compared to De Blasio (faint praise though that is) and is the best that NY could expect under the circumstances. Adams just barely beat in the Dem primary a "progressive" primary opponent Wiley who could've been worse than De Blasio. Curtis Sliwa wasn't going to win against Adams and unlikely even against Wiley.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Anon

    Rudy then did a lot. Not just in reducing crime rates but in changing the mind set that decline of the city was inevitable. An interlude with Dinkins.

    Not actually how it went. Dinkins followed Koch and Rudy beat him in his re-election attempt.

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    @kaganovitch

    "Pearl Harbor? Germans?"

    "Forget it, he's rolling."

  51. @Brian Reilly
    The people in SF are getting just what they have consistently indicated they prefer. Maybe they don't actually like junkies, unprosecuted assaultive crime, and filthy degenerates living on the streets of the city, but they damn sure vote for people who enable and tolerate all of that and more.

    That city could be cleaned up in about a week. Most of the rest of the shitholes around the nation as well, but there just isn't any real demand for it from We, the People. We are content with a spiffy new smartphone, lots o' streaming and not having to go into work much.

    We vote for people like London Breed, Bill DeBlasio, and Lori Lightfoot. We deserve all the bad things we get. We asked for them.

    Replies: @Negrolphin Pool, @PaceLaw

    “We” is a fleeting thing.

    For instance, if I could vote in local California elections — y existe una probabilidad bien grande que lo podria hacer — I would vote for London Breed and Chesa Boudin 1,000 times each and relish in the aftermath.

    But if I were to learn that my neighbor voted for such a person, it would create the kind of rift that only centuries erase.

    • Replies: @Bernard
    @Negrolphin Pool


    Negrolphin Pool says:
    December 19, 2021 at 6:39 am GMT • 55 minutes ago • 100 Words ↑
    @Brian Reilly
    “We” is a fleeting thing.

    For instance, if I could vote in local California elections — y existe una probabilidad bien grande que lo podria hacer — I would vote for London Breed and Chesa Boudin 1,000 times each and relish in the aftermath.

    But if I were to learn that my neighbor voted for such a person, it would create the kind of rift that only centuries erase.
     
    A very noble sentiment, your hopes for what remains of the once great city are inspiring.
  52. [brief delay while you recollect that “London Breed” is a person’s name.]

    • Replies: @LP5
    @J.Ross


    [brief delay while you recollect that “London Breed” is a person’s name.]

     

    London, that other one, is having problems with its own breeding these days.
  53. @Cato
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    You say that things have turned around in only two years, and I have to admit that I catch myself being optimistic, too. But best not to count one's chickens before they hatch.

    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 -- pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us. Policies extremely unpopular, which will reignite the impetus to wokery. So I am still keeping my arsenal, for the day the thugs come spilling down the pike to my quiet suburban neighborhood.

    Replies: @Curle, @Eric Novak, @PhysicistDave, @Almost Missouri, @Russ, @Wilkey, @tyrone

    Taxes are not their core constituency. Did you miss the last six years of politics? Also, why would anyone think that law and order will be restored after two years of lawlessness?

    • Replies: @Bill
    @Eric Novak

    Taxes are their core constituency. Did you miss the Trump administration?

  54. @Negrolphin Pool
    @Brian Reilly

    "We" is a fleeting thing.

    For instance, if I could vote in local California elections — y existe una probabilidad bien grande que lo podria hacer — I would vote for London Breed and Chesa Boudin 1,000 times each and relish in the aftermath.

    But if I were to learn that my neighbor voted for such a person, it would create the kind of rift that only centuries erase.

    Replies: @Bernard

    Negrolphin Pool says:
    December 19, 2021 at 6:39 am GMT • 55 minutes ago • 100 Words ↑

    “We” is a fleeting thing.

    For instance, if I could vote in local California elections — y existe una probabilidad bien grande que lo podria hacer — I would vote for London Breed and Chesa Boudin 1,000 times each and relish in the aftermath.

    But if I were to learn that my neighbor voted for such a person, it would create the kind of rift that only centuries erase.

    A very noble sentiment, your hopes for what remains of the once great city are inspiring.

  55. @Paleo Liberal
    @Known Fact

    I’m not sure it would be the first time. There have been successful black mayors in the past.

    As for NYC, the feeling is that anyone will look good in comparison to de Blasio.

    Adams needs two things to succeed.

    First, the COVID pandemic must end, or at least become manageable, during his time as mayor. We have 4 years and two weeks. Chances are pretty good.

    Second, the NYPD must get a handle on the increase of crime, or at least start to turn things around. We can all hope for the best.

    And that is it. Adams mostly needs good luck and and least sone competence.

    De Blasio had horrible luck; his incompetence and intransigence made things worse.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Bernard, @The Anti-Gnostic

    As for NYC, the feeling is that anyone will look good in comparison to de Blasio.
    Adams needs two things to succeed.
    First, the COVID pandemic must end, or at least become manageable, during his time as mayor. We have 4 years and two weeks. Chances are pretty good.
    Second, the NYPD must get a handle on the increase of crime, or at least start to turn things around. We can all hope for the best.

    Even that might not be enough. WFH has hit the city harder than just about anywhere else, which has devastated the local economy. Even if Covid disappears companies aren’t going to bring their workers back to the office in any huge numbers. After almost two years they’ve come to realize that it often boosts productivity while reducing costs. From the employee perspective, while WFH can be socially isolating, no more chitchat around the water cooler, not having to commute can outweigh the negatives. About the only bit of hope for the city is that a substantial portion of WFH’ers live in the city so at least they’re still spending money and contributing to the tax base.

  56. @JohnnyWalker123
    It'd be cool if we had authoritarian East Asian male immigrant mayors.

    Like this.

    https://cdn-live.foreignaffairs.com/sites/default/files/styles/large_1x/public/public-assets/images/articles/2019/09/26/chiang_kai-shekv2.png

    At least with East Asian authoritarians in charge, we wouldn't have to worry about civilization collapsing. Sure, a certain proportion of govt funds would be lost to "guanxi" patronage networks, but that'd be a small price to pay for order. Most of that money probably would come out of "diversity" programs anyway, so it's not clear if that'd be a net loss.

    Just look at how tightly run the various East Asian societies (North&South Korea, PRC, Taiwan, Singapore, HK, Japan) are by their leaders. Wouldn't that be nice?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Clyde, @Supply and Demand

    Good morning, sir. Instead of remembering how well things were run, going forward, the focus will be on how much things have changed.

    • LOL: JohnnyWalker123
  57. @Paleo Liberal
    @Known Fact

    I’m not sure it would be the first time. There have been successful black mayors in the past.

    As for NYC, the feeling is that anyone will look good in comparison to de Blasio.

    Adams needs two things to succeed.

    First, the COVID pandemic must end, or at least become manageable, during his time as mayor. We have 4 years and two weeks. Chances are pretty good.

    Second, the NYPD must get a handle on the increase of crime, or at least start to turn things around. We can all hope for the best.

    And that is it. Adams mostly needs good luck and and least sone competence.

    De Blasio had horrible luck; his incompetence and intransigence made things worse.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Bernard, @The Anti-Gnostic

    I’m not sure it would be the first time. There have been successful black mayors in the past.

    As for NYC, the feeling is that anyone will look good in comparison to de Blasio.

    The bar is so stunningly low, that by comparison, any predecessor will be judged as a monumental political figure. If ever there was an opportunity to shine, this is one.

  58. @SimpleSong
    It's very easy to break things. It's harder to keep things from being broken. Harder still to make them in the first place. Harder still to put broken things back together just like they were.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Thomas, @J.Ross

    easy and fun to hunt the pig harder to build the hut hardest of all to listen to the pilot

  59. NYC and SF are doomed. There is no reason for them to exist. Other than black/hispanic hell holes filled with squalid homeless degradation, gangstas committing crimes with impunity, and police arresting White people for … being White or something.

    That is the future. Breed is just posturing. She knows and everyone else does that no one in city politics challenges Soros or his anti-fa crew. Think the police will arrest anyone vibrant? Think again, they don’t want to be the next Derek Chauvin. Boudin will easily see off any challenge just like Gavin Newsom did to his authority. Voters LOVE the crime and degradation, they ENJOY the assertion of real authority by black criminals being large and in charge. Its all their movies, TV shows, and commercials come to life. What is not to love?

    And lets be honest, every politician wants their city to be just like Detroit or Baltimore — the perfect city. They provide 4:30 AM mail in ballots, and in return the feds give them unlimited block grants for unlimited graft. No pesky oversight committees, or local businesses wanting reform candidates, or various good government busybodies. Nothing but a G Thang! All day long.

    San Francisco, NYC, Chicago, Atlanta, all the rest will be like Detroit, Baltimore, Oakland, and every other western city: a run-down hell hole that is a no-go place for Whites, Asians, and most Hispanics. The future of the West in other words. Breed is just offering boob bait for Louis Vuitton. In reality she like ever other mayor loves the crime and degradation. Junkies overdosing in the street is just good politics. Now more than ever. Those 4:30 AM ballots don’t print themselves. When everyone is a junkie or gangsta those who can read and write and print out fake ballots are the Kings. Or Kangz if you prefer.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Whiskey

    Think the police will arrest anyone vibrant? Think again, they don’t want to be the next Derek Chauvin.


    Exactly, that's why Mayor Beetlejuice of Chicago reached a new low (which is saying something) when she blamed all the downtown looting on the store owners for not hiring more security. If video was released of private security manhandling black looters, they'd all end up on trial and probably go to prison.

  60. @Voltarde
    London Calling

    London Calling to the Tenderloin
    Now war is declared and battle is joined
    London calling to the underworld
    Come out of the closet, you boys and girlzzz (and whatever)
    London calling, now don't look at us
    Phony BLM-mania has bitten the dust

    London calling, see we ain't got no swing
    Except for the ring of the truncheon thing
    The ice age is coming, COVID's zooming in
    Lockdown expected, the vaccine's growing thin
    Nose can't stop running, but I have no fear
    'Cause the city is drowning
    In shit like a river

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfK-WX2pa8c

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Clyde, @Expletive Deleted

    You have a way with words.

  61. @Henry's Cat
    OTish:


    The 2020 arrest records of New Yorkers show that 93% of those arrested for rape and 91% of those arrested for other felony sex crimes were not white. It becomes easy to see how bringing in prior bad actions may inflame jurors’ implicit racial biases, and why a criminal system that seeks justice has an interest in keeping the trial focused on the facts of the specific crime being prosecuted.

    (...)

    So yes, the prospect that Weinstein’s conviction will be overturned is maddening. But so is the fact that prosecutors gave Weinstein’s attorneys fodder for appeal rather than proving their case on its merits. If Weinstein’s conviction is overturned, hopefully the courts’ interest in overzealous prosecutions does some good for the poor, Black, and brown defendants who struggle with the same evidentiary questions every day.

     

    https://news.yahoo.com/why-justice-may-demand-harvey-001506541.html

    Replies: @El Dato

    Looking forward to prosecutors not bringing up “video games” in antifa removal trials or “has been reading UNZ” when someone drilled holes to defend against sudden enrichment of the home.

  62. @JohnnyWalker123
    It'd be cool if we had authoritarian East Asian male immigrant mayors.

    Like this.

    https://cdn-live.foreignaffairs.com/sites/default/files/styles/large_1x/public/public-assets/images/articles/2019/09/26/chiang_kai-shekv2.png

    At least with East Asian authoritarians in charge, we wouldn't have to worry about civilization collapsing. Sure, a certain proportion of govt funds would be lost to "guanxi" patronage networks, but that'd be a small price to pay for order. Most of that money probably would come out of "diversity" programs anyway, so it's not clear if that'd be a net loss.

    Just look at how tightly run the various East Asian societies (North&South Korea, PRC, Taiwan, Singapore, HK, Japan) are by their leaders. Wouldn't that be nice?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Clyde, @Supply and Demand

    Just look at how tightly run the various East Asian societies (North&South Korea, PRC, Taiwan, Singapore, HK, Japan) are by their leaders. Wouldn’t that be nice?

    You would last two minutes in such conformist societies. With them hunched over their bowls of rice and slurping up noodles, blech. I hope you are not a fan of the CCP’s social credit scoring system. North Korea? Walker 123 spits on the sidewalks of Singapore and gets a sound thrashing/caning from the authorities.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Clyde


    Walker 123 spits on the sidewalks of Singapore and gets a sound thrashing/caning from the authorities.
     
    Singapore has a homicide rate of 0.2 per 100,000. That's crazy low. Love them or hate them, East Asians are ruthlessly efficient about getting results.

    While I was actually kidding about putting East Asian male authoritarians in charge, I do think they'd at least be preferrable to the Black mayors we have in many of our major cities. They'd also, presumably, fit the minority quota.

    You got to admit. It'd be funny if the residents of one of our major cities got sick enough with Black crime that they put one of those guys in power. Imagine the sort of interactions that a Korean-American authoritarian mayor would have with his Black constituents.

    Replies: @Muggles

  63. ‘London Breed’ – Isn’t that a patriotic, WW2 era song by Noel Coward written during the Blitz?

  64. @Known Fact
    Don't take any of this seriously, the word has clearly gone out from Dem Central to make some anti-crime noises with the midterms soon to be looming.

    NYC will be an interesting test case -- will the Adams administration be the first blackety black bunch to improve conditions in a major city? Blacks were headed toward demographic and political irrelevance in NYC and now two years post-Floyd are suddenly running the whole show.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Paleo Liberal, @Technite78

    Agreed. It’s hard to read Adams, but there are conflicting signs.

    On one hand, he’s promised to bring back some form of stop & frisk, enraging the local BLM leader. He’s also promised to combat Antifa hooliganism, even meeting with leaders from a predominately white neighborhood hit by property damage.

    On the other hand, almost without exception, when you give a large proportion of high level city government positions to blacks, they run the city as if it was a banana republic in Africa: graft, corruption, incompetence, and hatred of whites.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @Technite78

    Adams' whole career in the NYPD was that of a belly-aching black agitator. So why should he give up a winning run?

    Replies: @Technite78, @Redman

  65. @Clyde
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Just look at how tightly run the various East Asian societies (North&South Korea, PRC, Taiwan, Singapore, HK, Japan) are by their leaders. Wouldn’t that be nice?
     
    You would last two minutes in such conformist societies. With them hunched over their bowls of rice and slurping up noodles, blech. I hope you are not a fan of the CCP's social credit scoring system. North Korea? Walker 123 spits on the sidewalks of Singapore and gets a sound thrashing/caning from the authorities.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Walker 123 spits on the sidewalks of Singapore and gets a sound thrashing/caning from the authorities.

    Singapore has a homicide rate of 0.2 per 100,000. That’s crazy low. Love them or hate them, East Asians are ruthlessly efficient about getting results.

    While I was actually kidding about putting East Asian male authoritarians in charge, I do think they’d at least be preferrable to the Black mayors we have in many of our major cities. They’d also, presumably, fit the minority quota.

    You got to admit. It’d be funny if the residents of one of our major cities got sick enough with Black crime that they put one of those guys in power. Imagine the sort of interactions that a Korean-American authoritarian mayor would have with his Black constituents.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Imagine the sort of interactions that a Korean-American authoritarian mayor would have with his Black constituents.
     
    So, put some Rooftop Koreans down on the mean streets.

    That's a plan!
  66. @Michelle
    If only Libby Schaaf would hop on board the law and order train.

    Replies: @El Dato

    But she did! Kind of, sort of.

    2021-11-30: Another US mayor presses to undo police defunding

    The mayor of Oakland, California is seeking to reverse a multi-million-dollar budget cut planned for local police, instead calling for more officers and funding amid a surge in violent crime and homicides in the area.

    Mayor Libby Schaaf said her office will press the Oakland City Council to undo the upcoming \$18 million budget cut, which was approved by local lawmakers in June and is set to take effect next year. She vowed to continue efforts at “violence prevention” outside the realm of law enforcement, but nonetheless stressed the need to expand the police force.

    “While we are not backing down whatsoever on our historic investments in prevention, as well as a non-police response option… we must address police staffing shortages, and that is what we will do,” Schaaf said on Monday.

    But maybe it is better to terraform the whole area from orbit?

    • Replies: @Flip
    @El Dato

    I always heard it was getting yuppified. I guess not so much.

    , @Deckin
    @El Dato

    I'm no huge fan of Oakland, but this video is plain stupid. Look at his map. He breaks it down into 2 zones and then ignores the other 3rd of the city--Oakland extends up to the green park on the right.
    Oakland, like Berkeley and all of the East bay north of San Jose, is properly divided up by altitude.

    Freeways running north to south serve as easy markers. Below or west of 880: industrial. Between 880 and 580: not so good. Above 580 south of Oakland or Highway 13 in Oakland: objectively as nice as any place in the world, except that you're in Oakland or parts near about.

  67. @Cato
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    You say that things have turned around in only two years, and I have to admit that I catch myself being optimistic, too. But best not to count one's chickens before they hatch.

    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 -- pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us. Policies extremely unpopular, which will reignite the impetus to wokery. So I am still keeping my arsenal, for the day the thugs come spilling down the pike to my quiet suburban neighborhood.

    Replies: @Curle, @Eric Novak, @PhysicistDave, @Almost Missouri, @Russ, @Wilkey, @tyrone

    Cato wrote:

    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 — pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us.

    Lots of citizens do not care much about taxes one way or another, but very few people favor higher taxes. Abortion is not really a matter that Congress has much say over — it is up to SCOTUS, who may or may not boot it back to the states. As for “imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us,” what on earth are you talking about??

    I’m a militant atheist, but I am not worried in the slightest about the GOP trying to interfere with my religious freedom.

    The country-club GOP types are just nominally religious.

    And the evangelicals are the sort of people to whom Jefferson wrote his famous letter about a “wall of separation” between church and state. They are more solid on church-state separation than most liberals.

    I find their theological beliefs utterly nutty. But as fellow citizens… they are good neighbors and defenders of the Republic.

    • Agree: The Anti-Gnostic
    • Replies: @Skyler the Weird
    @PhysicistDave

    I hope the GOP has the 2022 election stolen again. The Bubble is about to burst and I want the Democrats in charge of everything when it does.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    , @Cato
    @PhysicistDave


    [Evamgelicals, ] as fellow citizens… they are good neighbors and defenders of the Republic.
     
    I agree, they are my neighbors and they are the best. As for religious prejudices, I was thinking of W's abhorrent attack on stem cell research.

    Tax cuts for the rich always stimulate the economy (think what Elon would do with the money he would keep!), but they are politically unpopular. Almost all tax cuts are for the rich, both because of the economic stimulus and because that is what the donors want.

    Abortion is probably the big one. Texas has floated the trial balloon. Let's see how it goes.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  68. @Curle
    @Cato

    “ or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us”

    Wokery is indistinguishable from religious prejudice.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Curle wrote:

    Wokery is indistinguishable from religious prejudice.

    That is the central theme of John McWhorter’s new book, Woke Racism, and he hammers away at it pretty convincingly.

    I think he is a bit too kind in assuming that the Wokists really believe it all — I think a lot of them are motivated by sadism or by simple mercenary motives.

    But, yeah, Wokism is a religion, and, as an atheist, I find it a hell of a lot more dangerous than old-fashioned Bible-thumping Christianity.

    • Agree: El Dato, Dr. DoomNGloom
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @PhysicistDave

    Wokeism is proof that if there is a spiritual vacuum in society, humans beings will subconsciously try to fill it. Razib Khan has an excellent article on his blog that I find convincing.

    https://www.brownpundits.com/2018/09/15/between-the-saffron-and-scimitar

    Basically, he argues the kind of person who relies off analytical logical consistency to navigate the world is a minority, and probably always has been. Most people, including the majority of intelligent people, are intuitive creatures who need to learn how to use that rather than doing so on impulse. I'm not saying that's a good or a bad thing: it's just reality. It does mean that we shouldn't be shocked that secularized societies create secularized religions. And like all new systems do, they'll inevitable incorporate aspects of the old system: the development of Christianity in the 4th and 5th Century shows this in spades. The old cults might have collapsed when Roman civilization nearly did in the 3rd, but-especially out in the countryside-people did incorporate traditions into the new framework. By the time the Middle Ages came, the quiet conservatism, the faith that those who stuck to the ways of their ancestors would receive divine favor, was not that different from high paganism.

    We're not living in one of those periods, which consist of the majority of human history. We're living during one of the hinge points, where things can change rapidly over the course of a few decades (like, say, 250-280 AD in the Roman Empire). That's when things truly change.

    BTW, since I suspect this has always been the case, there's an interesting wrinkle here. In the pre-modern world, where atheism in the modern sense just wasn't on the table most of the time, probably people from that neurologically differently wired minority were the ones who constructed the intellectual underpinnings underneath philosophy, religion, etc.

    >But, yeah, Wokism is a religion, and, as an atheist, I find it a hell of a lot more dangerous than old-fashioned Bible-thumping Christianity.

    Well, I'm not an atheist anymore (long story), but needless to say, I would have agreed with you when I was.

    Though there is a lot of influence that Americanized Protestant Christianity has on wokeness, one key difference is the belief that you can't "achieve grace" and turn over a new leaf, regardless of your wealth or your skin color. You can only constantly ask for forgiveness in a state of degradation. Learned helplessness is encouraged to make societal elites feel better, not actually becoming a better person. That reminds me of Hinduism, a religion I've always had a distinct distaste for due to the caste system. As someone who would, but for good luck, be a "Dalit" in the new American faith... yeah. Makes the hair stand on the back of my neck.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @PhysicistDave

  69. Politicians sure have come to love these “states of emergency.” They do away with the necessity for all those tedious concepts like legislating new law, and the consent of the governed.

    • Replies: @rebel yell
    @Cloudbuster

    "Consent of the governed" and "We the people" are the best phrases in the Declaration and the Constitution. These words are a rebuke to today's minoritarians, internationalists, and oligarchs.

  70. @Thomas
    @SimpleSong

    She can propose, but the SFPD must dispose. How are they doing?


    San Francisco police seemingly watch as burglars flee crime scene

    Just days before a string of high-end robberies targeting Union Square rattled the Bay Area, an apparent burglary at a San Francisco cannabis dispensary was seemingly not stopped by police at the scene.

    The San Francisco Department of Police Accountability is now investigating the incident, multiple media outlets report, which took place in the early hours of Nov. 16 at Basa, just a block away from Alamo Square Park.

    According to video footage obtained by the San Francisco Chronicle and NBC Bay Area, a police car flashed its lights on an alleged getaway car. (SFGATE and the Chronicle are both owned by Hearst but operate independently of one another.)

    Over the span of the 2-minute recording, at least 45 seconds of footage show the two cars — the suspects' and the police officers — parked just meters away from each other.

    A suspect, leaving the dispensary with a bag in tow, runs into the vehicle and plops the goods into the back seat, dropping some wares into the street as the car rushes to perform a three-point turn and flee the scene.

    Moments after, police officers can be seen strolling just past where the alleged escape vehicle was parked into the dispensary. SFPD did not immediately respond to a request for comment from SFGATE.

    Anisa Alazraie, the owner’s daughter, told NBC Bay Area that the burglars made off with thousands of dollars in goods.

    She told the Chronicle that officers “had every opportunity to intervene and stop this crime from happening.” It is unclear what, if any, repercussions the officers involved will face.

    The burglary — and the apparent officer inaction — is another flashpoint in the blitz of retail and property theft in the Bay Area and elsewhere in the country and comes as San Francisco District Attorney Chesa Boudin is up for recall next year.

    Representatives for the San Francisco Police Commission did not immediately respond to a request for comment from SFGATE.
     
    https://www.sfgate.com/crime/article/San-Francisco-police-watch-burglars-16653700.php

    Replies: @Russ, @SteveRogers42

    Just days before a string of high-end robberies targeting Union Square rattled the Bay Area, an apparent burglary at a San Francisco cannabis dispensary was seemingly not stopped by police at the scene.

    Perhaps the police inaction arose from the stench of illegality associated with the pot trade until just recently, when legalized pot and sports gambling were declared the latest “just the right thing to do” balms for all societal ills.

    As for Breed’s Tenderloin emergency declaration: I’m shocked shocked that it carries no provision for vaccinating the perpetrators against that Chinese flu which, though 99+% survivable, constitutes the state of emergency uber alles. Where is that woman’s sense of priorities?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Russ


    ...legalized pot and sports gambling were declared the latest “just the right thing to do” balms for all societal ills.
     
    Cannabis, like abortion before it, is an issue where Americans have flanked Europeans to their left. At least in a number of states, as with women's suffrage.


    Casino gambling is still restricted, but with SCOTUS's Indian loophole. Even in bluenose Minnesota, there is (or was in 2007) a casino on Duluth's main drag, owned by a tribe, though that's hardly a reservation.

    Indians have another loophole-- they can still reject "two-spirit" marriage, which states can no longer do.


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6d/World_marriage-equality_laws_%28up_to_date%29.svg/800px-World_marriage-equality_laws_%28up_to_date%29.svg.png
  71. @Cato
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    You say that things have turned around in only two years, and I have to admit that I catch myself being optimistic, too. But best not to count one's chickens before they hatch.

    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 -- pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us. Policies extremely unpopular, which will reignite the impetus to wokery. So I am still keeping my arsenal, for the day the thugs come spilling down the pike to my quiet suburban neighborhood.

    Replies: @Curle, @Eric Novak, @PhysicistDave, @Almost Missouri, @Russ, @Wilkey, @tyrone

    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000

    LOL, the Republicans haven’t overreached for 150 years. Nowadays they barely reach, nevermind overreach.

    Meanwhile, Democrats’ perpetual overreaches are billed as mild reaches because the Democrats and the media are one solid continuum.

    • Replies: @Bill
    @Almost Missouri

    They just did it five minutes ago. Trump did nothing but cut taxes, losing the exact downscale whites who brought him to office. That's Republican overreach.

    Replies: @Marquis, @Almost Missouri

  72. The 65-92 crime explosion was done by the courts, through pseudo-Constitutional decisions, so it could not be reversed until legislatures, lawyers and other courts found work-arounds, like much longer sentences, smarter, data-driven policing and, in New York, redefining probable cause for stop and frisk. The good news is, we did the 2014-16 and 2020-21 crime explosions to ourselves, so we can reverse it.

  73. @Intelligent Dasein
    Today we got extremely bad news on two fronts. The 6th Circuit Court of Appeals refused to stop Brandon from firing people for not taking the worthless and harmful vaccine that does nothing against a mostly ordinary cold virus, and the so-called pope is busily destroying the last vestiges of the Catholic faith by proscribing the Latin Mass.

    I wondered whether I was living in some sort of demented nursery rhyme, and then I see that...

    ..."London Breed" has declared a state of emergency in "Tenderloin."

    Well, well. The perfect ending to the perfect day.

    Replies: @Daniel H, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @Achmed E. Newman

    Today we got extremely bad news on two fronts. The 6th Circuit Court of Appeals refused to stop Brandon from firing people for not taking the worthless and harmful vaccine that does nothing against a mostly ordinary cold virus, and the so-called pope is busily destroying the last vestiges of the Catholic faith by proscribing the Latin Mass.

    No, it’s good news on both fronts. We’re not ripe yet for reaction. Sharpen the contradictions (sorta). Bad is good. Worse is better.

  74. @Daniel H
    If I were Breed, to get a jumpstart on this initiative, I would do what many social service agencies in farsighted cities have been doing for years. Offer every bum on the streets of the Tenderlolin $200 on the condition that they enter a departing bus (transportation paid for by the city) for, say, Salt Lake City.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Sick 'n Tired, @Pericles, @duncsbaby

    Don’t give them ideas. Let SLC bear the burden of their own sins rather than SF’s.

    (Not that I’m too worried. SF’s hairball of insane incentives for derelicts and criminals is too strong for \$200 to overcome, though the SLC bus station might get temporarily ugly while the unwashed ride the SF-SLC shuttle to earn more handouts.)

  75. @Cato
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    You say that things have turned around in only two years, and I have to admit that I catch myself being optimistic, too. But best not to count one's chickens before they hatch.

    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 -- pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us. Policies extremely unpopular, which will reignite the impetus to wokery. So I am still keeping my arsenal, for the day the thugs come spilling down the pike to my quiet suburban neighborhood.

    Replies: @Curle, @Eric Novak, @PhysicistDave, @Almost Missouri, @Russ, @Wilkey, @tyrone

    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 20[2]0 — pandering to their core constituency.

    The core constituency of the establishment GOP is the lobbyist clique on K Street in DC.

    In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us. Policies extremely unpopular, which will reignite the impetus to wokery.

    When Dems wield power, they advance the football to the left in length units of first downs rather than mere yards. When the GOP holds office, they historically “stand athwart” … which hardly moves the ball to the right. It will be interesting to see whether the ’22 elections install the McConnell/McCarthy GOPers in Congress, or the Bannon Warroom GOPers. Whatever the case, the parallels of 2022-2024 to 1994-1996 should be interesting … assuming a big GOP win in Nov’22.

    As for Breed: I find an interesting parallel in TX Gov Abbott, who finally has been galvanized to further a border wall in his state. One story has it that the locals are so disgusted that they are now willing to cede land rights just to get it done. Why matters had to come to that is troubling.

    • Thanks: Cato
    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Russ


    When Dems wield power, they advance the football to the left in length units of first downs rather than mere yards. When the GOP holds office, they historically “stand athwart” … which hardly moves the ball to the right. It will be interesting to see whether the ’22 elections install the McConnell/McCarthy GOPers in Congress, or the Bannon Warroom GOPers. Whatever the case, the parallels of 2022-2024 to 1994-1996 should be interesting … assuming a big GOP win in Nov’22.
     
    Democrats have a supporting apparatus which means that elected members who get turned out of office for going too far left (see, e.g. the wipeout of 2010 after passing the ACA) land in cushy jobs post office which often pay much more and require much less work than even being a U.S. Representative. They will often find themselves in the academy, at think tanks, in the Press, on corporate Boards, on Wall Street, etc. Add to this the added benefit that they don't have to campaign and raise money anymore. (You have to stop conceiving the elected members of Congress as "the Democrats," rather than the elected, subordinate personnel of something much bigger and more wide ranging that spans corporate America, the Press, the academy, Big Tech and so forth).

    Republicans don't have such an apparatus, so when they get turned out of office they need to get actual jobs to support themselves - there is no soft landing for them. As a consequence, apart from the relatively few who are independently wealthy, a lost election really is a job loss for elected Republicans. There are a few, usually "moderate" types who can parlay their terms in office into lobbying gigs. Boehner wound up shilling for the marijuana industry of all things.

    There is therefore not a symmetrical environment for the two parties - Pelosi can make her electeds in swing districts walk the plank on difficult votes because there is a bed of feathers underneath it, whereas Republican leadership can't make such offers that can't be refused. Their members in swing districts are concerned about losing their jobs, and what for many would be a major life and financial disruption.
  76. @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    London Breed is an English 80's synth-pop group.

    And I feel that our side is letting these bozos off the hook to disastrous effect. "Defund the Police" was an endzone dance, not the initial cause of the spike in violent crime - the problem is the sudden diminishment of the general esteem of police in mainstream institutions, the notion in every cop's head (except, evidently, for members of the Capitol Police) that he's 3 seconds away from being this week's Emmanuel Goldtstein on a 24/7 news loop, and the resultant millions of entirely reasonable daily decisions not to actively engage in crime intervention. It's far safer to take pictures, circle cartridge cases in chalk, and fill out paperwork than having to decide in an instant whether to get shot in an ambush or get zealously prosecuted first in the Press, then before a jury of "peers" and having your life blown apart while your wife and kids are beggared.

    This naturally creates a vicious cycle in which criminals become more audacious, and meet little resistance, and therefore become yet more audacious and s0 forth. None of this gets solved by returning to prior levels of funding, or even increased funding. In fact, you can anticipate that they will cite increased funding without a reduction in crime as evidence that police don't reduce crime.

    Replies: @thenon

    Further into the viscous cycle, the police in my small outer suburbs Virginia town are vastly increasing their harassment of honkies, including old men walking dogs and random white pedestrians to maintain their arrest points for promotion and bonuses (convictions don’t count) , while black drug dealers work openly. This is a trend that has been coming on for decades, police overfunding and d power with little to no police action on minority crime, while police make take home pay in the low 200s, a combination of fiscal corruption that serves the elite with old fashioned small town police that are a law unto themselves. No where to run, no where to hide for white men unless they can afford tens of thousands in Legal protection.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @thenon

    If you want a picture of the future, imagine a trans Karen cop hassling white people over nothing— forever.

  77. @Cato
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    You say that things have turned around in only two years, and I have to admit that I catch myself being optimistic, too. But best not to count one's chickens before they hatch.

    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 -- pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us. Policies extremely unpopular, which will reignite the impetus to wokery. So I am still keeping my arsenal, for the day the thugs come spilling down the pike to my quiet suburban neighborhood.

    Replies: @Curle, @Eric Novak, @PhysicistDave, @Almost Missouri, @Russ, @Wilkey, @tyrone

    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 — pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us.

    1) Imposing religious prejudices is what Democrats do every minute of every hour of every day. Wokeism is a godless religion far more judgmental, oppressive, and dogmatic than most of the theistic religions that man has ever created. Just walk into many schools or workplaces and announce that men cannot become women and tell us how that goes. Announce that men and women aren’t equal and tell us how that goes. Announce that races aren’t equal and tell us how that goes.

    2) There is precious little new policy a Republican congressional majority can enact without having control of the White House. The major thing they will be able to do is control the purse strings. They can use that power to effect policy somewhat, but not by much. The best thing they can do with it is defund the worst impulses of the Democratic Party. 70-80% of Americans would be on board with most of that.

    • Agree: Cato
    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Wilkey

    Wilkey you're making the same old, same old Conservative American Right wing mistake of putting all your/our hopes in to electing a Presidential savior to ride in on a White horse and make everything nice again like it supposedly was in Ike's 1950s.

    The USA President isn't an all powerful dictator - the President doesn't control a single major media outlet.

    Look at Nixon and Reagan's landslide victories in 1972 and 1980 - 49 out of 50 states. These victories didn't change much of anything important because we didn't control or really contest the media/culture.

    President Nixon basically got taken out by a Jewish red diaper baby media coup by the Washington Post and CBS - Woodward and Bernstein, Norman Lear J*wish Hollywood. All over a rather low level political scandal Watergate where no one was killed, raped or even beaten.

    Compare Watergate to Roman Polanski drugging and anally raping a young girl. Imagine if Richard Nixon had done that.

    What is needed is tough, no nonsense mayors, governors, police chiefs like former Philly top cop, mayor Frank Rizzo. There is a reason the worst anti White, Antifa Communists, BLM tore down Frank Rizzo's statues in and outside of Philadelphia.

    We haven't had a real populist Governor of any state since George Wallace!

    C'mon folks we can do better than this.

    And stop wasting all/any of your time and money on Libertarian constitutionalist Presidential crusades by the likes of Ron and Rand Paul - these crusades never even win 5% - the public hates that shit

    J Ryan
    TPC The Political Cesspool

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @nebulafox
    @Wilkey

    The good news is, unless something we can't predict happens, the Democrats are going to be absolutely slaughtered in 2022. Plenty of voters that would have never considered voting for a Republican six years ago are now doing so because of them dealing with Democratic insanity on everything from COVID to crime policies.

    The bad news is, it's as if the GOP is utterly determined to win solely on inertia. From what I've seen, rather than embracing the fact that they are the populist party now, whether they want to be or not, they will go right back to offering the kind of warmed over Bushism ("We're not racist because we support amnesty"-which will alienate white voters while failing to attract Hispanic ones-mixed with what I like to call "Socialism For Big Corporate America, Privatization For Peasants") that nobody wants or needs.

    , @Jack D
    @Wilkey

    Also, the abortion fight has largely been between the state legislatures, which had been regulating abortions no problem since the 19th century, and the Supreme Court which somehow discovered that the states regulating abortion was "unconstitutional" in the late 20th. It has nothing to do with Congress.

  78. Why did this suddenly occur to me?

  79. OT – the Good Hitchens on Covid and Tony Blair.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-10324663/PETER-HITCHENS-return-Tony-Blair-really-nightmare-Christmas.html

    Once again his hour has come. Just as, back in 1997, the electorate went collectively mad and voted for New Labour’s Eurocommunist project because it didn’t understand it, we are once again in a period of mass lunacy.

    To be fair, many people are outraged because at the time people were having a few quiet drinks in Downing Street, we were unable to make Christmas visits to elderly relatives in care homes – and we were attending funerals where there was no singing and only five people allowed.

    BTW, yesterday a French friend who lives here came back from France. Despite (officially) having to show a negative Covid test to be allowed entry, no one at Heathrow asked him to show his results, or his vaccination status, where he was going, or even if he had the right of UK residency. The UK immigration system is not fit for purpose after 11 years of first Coalition (Tory/Lib Dem) then Tory rule.

  80. Steve, you’ve usually got your finger on the pulse. What’s going on with the sign language by Biden and by liberal European politicans? Did someone send out a memo? Just a trend amongst the liberal? Any subtext?

  81. @Anon
    @Dan Hayes

    No longer liver there but I remember the NY of the mid 70's Taxi Driver era. It started to improve some under Koch. Rudy then did a lot. Not just in reducing crime rates but in changing the mind set that decline of the city was inevitable. An interlude with Dinkins. Crime rates continued to decline under Bloomberg. De Blasio an utter disaster. The new mayor Eric Adams will be an improvement compared to De Blasio (faint praise though that is) and is the best that NY could expect under the circumstances. Adams just barely beat in the Dem primary a "progressive" primary opponent Wiley who could've been worse than De Blasio. Curtis Sliwa wasn't going to win against Adams and unlikely even against Wiley.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Anon

    You’re right. Somehow when I was working on the post I got the Dinkins interlude placed after Rudy instead of before. At least, unlike Dinkins, I didn’t “forget” to pay my taxes for four years.

  82. Regarding the Twitter post, sure, let’s mock someone who’s actually doing something good.

  83. @J.Ross
    [brief delay while you recollect that "London Breed" is a person's name.]

    Replies: @LP5

    [brief delay while you recollect that “London Breed” is a person’s name.]

    London, that other one, is having problems with its own breeding these days.

  84. Tucker thinks London Breed is a super cool name, and I tend to agree. I think it can be a rock band name.

    • LOL: Cool Daddy Jimbo
  85. @Voltarde
    London Calling

    London Calling to the Tenderloin
    Now war is declared and battle is joined
    London calling to the underworld
    Come out of the closet, you boys and girlzzz (and whatever)
    London calling, now don't look at us
    Phony BLM-mania has bitten the dust

    London calling, see we ain't got no swing
    Except for the ring of the truncheon thing
    The ice age is coming, COVID's zooming in
    Lockdown expected, the vaccine's growing thin
    Nose can't stop running, but I have no fear
    'Cause the city is drowning
    In shit like a river

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfK-WX2pa8c

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Clyde, @Expletive Deleted

    Sillybilly ‘agree’ widget don’t like me.
    But I do want to lol, and likewise kek.

    At least it’s only that.
    Until I read the piece, I was appalled by the possibility that UK was farming southeast asians in-house, possibly for export en masse.

    Hybrid warfare, as the Eastern Euros have decided to call that sort of thing. Only moderate response is ball-squeezing sanctions on the invaders-by-proxy, possibly even confiscation of their overseas “running-away” assets that fall within the invaded jurisdiction.

  86. How come no GOP man besides Ruddy Guliani has ever successfully ran for mayor of a big city on a platform to clean up the streets from crime, public disorder, public drug use, opposing race hustlers like Al Sharpton.

    • Replies: @additionalMike
    @anonymous

    Because Giuliani seized the opportunity of a Dem mayor allowing a pogrom (the Crown Heights riots) to occur on his watch, thus alienating Jews, a key voting bloc of the Party.
    In doing so, Mayor Dinkins fucked up, big time.
    This being the 1990's, there will still enough real reporters around to report this.

  87. @Intelligent Dasein
    Today we got extremely bad news on two fronts. The 6th Circuit Court of Appeals refused to stop Brandon from firing people for not taking the worthless and harmful vaccine that does nothing against a mostly ordinary cold virus, and the so-called pope is busily destroying the last vestiges of the Catholic faith by proscribing the Latin Mass.

    I wondered whether I was living in some sort of demented nursery rhyme, and then I see that...

    ..."London Breed" has declared a state of emergency in "Tenderloin."

    Well, well. The perfect ending to the perfect day.

    Replies: @Daniel H, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @Achmed E. Newman

    Even The NY Times has reported that the vaccines offer no protection against Omicron. The fraud will be exposed , these vaccines failed to stop the spread of coronavirus. They failed to reduce hospitalizations and failed to reduce deaths. More Americans died from Covid this year than in 2020 before the vaccines. We should have had less deaths in 2021 since treatments got better and 90 million Americans acquired natural immunity in 2020, yet despite the vaccines and millions with natural immunity deaths were greater in 2021. Excess deaths are also far greater than 2020. Funny how they stopped talking about excess deaths in 2021.

  88. anonymous[251] • Disclaimer says:
    @Wilkey
    @Cato


    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 — pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us.
     
    1) Imposing religious prejudices is what Democrats do every minute of every hour of every day. Wokeism is a godless religion far more judgmental, oppressive, and dogmatic than most of the theistic religions that man has ever created. Just walk into many schools or workplaces and announce that men cannot become women and tell us how that goes. Announce that men and women aren't equal and tell us how that goes. Announce that races aren't equal and tell us how that goes.

    2) There is precious little new policy a Republican congressional majority can enact without having control of the White House. The major thing they will be able to do is control the purse strings. They can use that power to effect policy somewhat, but not by much. The best thing they can do with it is defund the worst impulses of the Democratic Party. 70-80% of Americans would be on board with most of that.

    Replies: @anonymous, @nebulafox, @Jack D

    Wilkey you’re making the same old, same old Conservative American Right wing mistake of putting all your/our hopes in to electing a Presidential savior to ride in on a White horse and make everything nice again like it supposedly was in Ike’s 1950s.

    The USA President isn’t an all powerful dictator – the President doesn’t control a single major media outlet.

    Look at Nixon and Reagan’s landslide victories in 1972 and 1980 – 49 out of 50 states. These victories didn’t change much of anything important because we didn’t control or really contest the media/culture.

    President Nixon basically got taken out by a Jewish red diaper baby media coup by the Washington Post and CBS – Woodward and Bernstein, Norman Lear J*wish Hollywood. All over a rather low level political scandal Watergate where no one was killed, raped or even beaten.

    Compare Watergate to Roman Polanski drugging and anally raping a young girl. Imagine if Richard Nixon had done that.

    What is needed is tough, no nonsense mayors, governors, police chiefs like former Philly top cop, mayor Frank Rizzo. There is a reason the worst anti White, Antifa Communists, BLM tore down Frank Rizzo’s statues in and outside of Philadelphia.

    We haven’t had a real populist Governor of any state since George Wallace!

    C’mon folks we can do better than this.

    And stop wasting all/any of your time and money on Libertarian constitutionalist Presidential crusades by the likes of Ron and Rand Paul – these crusades never even win 5% – the public hates that shit

    J Ryan
    TPC The Political Cesspool

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @anonymous


    We haven’t had a real populist Governor of any state since George Wallace!
     
    Like most Southerners, Wallace supported the federal welfare state but opposed building one locally. This policy backfired spectacularly. As with the income tax, also popular in Dixie*, they thought they'd be net beneficiaries forever.

    *Except in patrician Virginia and Yankee-infested Florida, which joined Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Pennsylvania in rejecting it.
  89. @tyrone
    I wonder who cracked the whip.

    Replies: @Mr. Peabody

    Yes. It’s a dog and pony show, presented with plenty of smoke, and lots of mirrors.
    Hold the front page! DEMS TOUGH ON CRIME
    (At least until after the midterms.)
    Meanwhile, the population of a mid-size city will cross our borders every month, to be spirited away to critical swing precincts near you. So pay no attention to the woman in SF. She ain’t the great and powerful Oz. She jus’ de hehp.

    • Agree: tyrone, Kylie
  90. @kaganovitch
    @Anon

    Rudy then did a lot. Not just in reducing crime rates but in changing the mind set that decline of the city was inevitable. An interlude with Dinkins.


    Not actually how it went. Dinkins followed Koch and Rudy beat him in his re-election attempt.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

    “Pearl Harbor? Germans?”

    “Forget it, he’s rolling.”

    • LOL: kaganovitch
  91. @Reg Cæsar

    London Breed is a type of:

    Raincoat...
     
    Turncoat.

    London Nicole Breed = Condoned rebellion.

    They don't make Londons like they used to:




    7https://youtu.be/3JWq0Nd4UvY

    Replies: @JimDandy

    London Breed is a type of: Chocolate Stout

    What do I win?

    • Thanks: JimDandy
  92. @Abolish_public_education
    In SF, public safety receives 12% of the general fund.

    Tax residents, tell them it's for cops, then spend it on other budget items, e.g. PERS.

    Pass a $X bond measure, lockboxed for cops. An amount equivalent to 88% of X will be subtracted from the general fund's cop budget, and used to pay for other pet projects.

    The tax dollar bait-&-switch.

    Replies: @additionalMike

    Just like what was done with the money raised “for education” by the New York State Lottery, or the annual fee imposed on attorneys for the privilege of being a lawyer in the Empire State.

    Public finance is a racket in every state.
    All samey-same.

  93. Anonymous[335] • Disclaimer says:

    “We are in a crisis and we need to respond accordingly,” she said at a news conference Friday.

    The unprincipled exception defined

    Modern liberalism stands for principles of equality and non-discrimination which, if followed consistently, would make a decent life in this world, or any life at all, impossible.

    But modern liberal society does not permit the public expression of non-liberal principles, by which rational limits to equality and non-discrimination, or indeed the very falsity of these ideas altogether, can be articulated. This fact forces liberals continually to make exceptions to their own liberalism, without admitting to themselves and others that they are doing so.

    Such exceptions must take inchoate, non-conceptual, pre-rational forms, such as appeals to brute self-interest, to the need to respond to a pressing emergency, or to common sense. For example, liberals who want to escape from the negative consequences of their liberal beliefs in a given instance will often say that the application of a liberal idea in that instance “goes too far,” without their indicating by what principle they distinguish between an idea that has gone “too far” and one that hasn’t. In fact, it’s purely a matter of what suits their own comfort level and convenience.

    http://www.amnation.com/vfr/archives/001091.html

    But, so long as they are unwilling to give up their liberalism, they must always regard these exceptions as merely pragmatic and situational rather than as based in fundamental reason.

    These continual compromises between its own internal logic and the demands of reality are what distinguish liberalism from leftism, which could be understood as consistent liberalism.

    … as a liberal, he could only embrace [changing his mind and taking these prudent and necessary positions] half-heartedly and apologetically, seeing them as a violation of his ideals, as an unfortunate compromise. He couldn’t state a general principle that showed why in each case the policy he favored was morally and politically right.

  94. Robberies at Union Sq are keeping Xmas shoppers away. LB is concerned about loss of sales tax revenue.

    • Agree: fish
  95. I find it amusing that her “ courage” is being held up as the left finally “getting it.”

    Oh they are getting it all right. Well, no. They aren’t. The tax coffers are drying up and San Fransicko has some of the highest pension payouts in the nation.

    She had to do this. It was that or literally go broke. If there was enough money still coming in she would have kept this defund he police bs going until doomsday.

    It’s really just that simple.

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @Deadite

    State PERS, DEM-controlled cities, public school systems, etc. need their shares of another 11+ figure, federal bailout, i.e. Omicron Stimulus. That's on top of whatever they'll be getting from Sleepy's BBB (FFF) spending.

    More public sector theft of private sector wealth. Sickening.

    Replies: @El Dato

  96. @PhysicistDave
    @Curle

    Curle wrote:


    Wokery is indistinguishable from religious prejudice.
     
    That is the central theme of John McWhorter's new book, Woke Racism, and he hammers away at it pretty convincingly.

    I think he is a bit too kind in assuming that the Wokists really believe it all -- I think a lot of them are motivated by sadism or by simple mercenary motives.

    But, yeah, Wokism is a religion, and, as an atheist, I find it a hell of a lot more dangerous than old-fashioned Bible-thumping Christianity.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    Wokeism is proof that if there is a spiritual vacuum in society, humans beings will subconsciously try to fill it. Razib Khan has an excellent article on his blog that I find convincing.

    https://www.brownpundits.com/2018/09/15/between-the-saffron-and-scimitar

    Basically, he argues the kind of person who relies off analytical logical consistency to navigate the world is a minority, and probably always has been. Most people, including the majority of intelligent people, are intuitive creatures who need to learn how to use that rather than doing so on impulse. I’m not saying that’s a good or a bad thing: it’s just reality. It does mean that we shouldn’t be shocked that secularized societies create secularized religions. And like all new systems do, they’ll inevitable incorporate aspects of the old system: the development of Christianity in the 4th and 5th Century shows this in spades. The old cults might have collapsed when Roman civilization nearly did in the 3rd, but-especially out in the countryside-people did incorporate traditions into the new framework. By the time the Middle Ages came, the quiet conservatism, the faith that those who stuck to the ways of their ancestors would receive divine favor, was not that different from high paganism.

    We’re not living in one of those periods, which consist of the majority of human history. We’re living during one of the hinge points, where things can change rapidly over the course of a few decades (like, say, 250-280 AD in the Roman Empire). That’s when things truly change.

    BTW, since I suspect this has always been the case, there’s an interesting wrinkle here. In the pre-modern world, where atheism in the modern sense just wasn’t on the table most of the time, probably people from that neurologically differently wired minority were the ones who constructed the intellectual underpinnings underneath philosophy, religion, etc.

    >But, yeah, Wokism is a religion, and, as an atheist, I find it a hell of a lot more dangerous than old-fashioned Bible-thumping Christianity.

    Well, I’m not an atheist anymore (long story), but needless to say, I would have agreed with you when I was.

    Though there is a lot of influence that Americanized Protestant Christianity has on wokeness, one key difference is the belief that you can’t “achieve grace” and turn over a new leaf, regardless of your wealth or your skin color. You can only constantly ask for forgiveness in a state of degradation. Learned helplessness is encouraged to make societal elites feel better, not actually becoming a better person. That reminds me of Hinduism, a religion I’ve always had a distinct distaste for due to the caste system. As someone who would, but for good luck, be a “Dalit” in the new American faith… yeah. Makes the hair stand on the back of my neck.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @nebulafox

    https://www.brownpundits.com/2018/09/15/between-the-saffron-and-scimitar


    Honestly, I’ve never met these people in real life…most “Indian” people I meet are either coconuts like me or cosmopolitan blockchain engineers.
     
    So that's why Razib 🥥 Khan uses that coconut emoji on Twitter. He's brown on the outside and white on the inside.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Dr. DoomNGloom
    @nebulafox


    Wokeism is proof that if there is a spiritual vacuum in society, humans beings will subconsciously try to fill it. Razib Khan has an excellent article on his blog that I find convincing.

    https://www.brownpundits.com/2018/09/15/between-the-saffron-and-scimitar

    Basically, he argues the kind of person who relies off analytical logical consistency to navigate the world is a minority, and probably always has been. Most people, including the majority of intelligent people, are intuitive creatures who need to learn how to use that rather than doing so on impulse.
     
    Indeed, humans didn't evolve for strict rationality, but for quick intuitive heuristics. Provided these heuristics work well enough, they encourage movement in a productive direction. But not all ideas are equal, some will killed you, albeit slowly. Ideas shown to work earn privilege. Privileging nonsense is self-indulgent and destructive.
    , @PhysicistDave
    @nebulafox

    nebulafox wrote to me:


    Basically, [Razib Khan] argues the kind of person who relies off analytical logical consistency to navigate the world is a minority, and probably always has been. Most people, including the majority of intelligent people, are intuitive creatures who need to learn how to use that rather than doing so on impulse. I’m not saying that’s a good or a bad thing: it’s just reality. It does mean that we shouldn’t be shocked that secularized societies create secularized religions.
     
    It will not surprise you that I tend to generally agree with Razib on the Big Questions.

    McWhorter actually has a quote from Freud along those lines:


    If you wish to expel religion from our European civilization you can only do it through another system of doctrines, and from the outset this would take over all the psychological characteristics of religion, the same sanctity, rigidity, and intolerance, the same prohibition of thought in self-defence.
     
    In terms of those of us who are unusually analytical, I myself, having been raised attending a Protestant Christian church, remember wondering from an early age why the churchgoers' real beliefs differed so dramatically from their proclaimed beliefs.

    Specifically, pretty much everyone in the congregation would have thought someone was utterly bonkers who adhered to the admonition "him that taketh away thy cloak, forbid not to take thy coat also," even though they claimed on Sunday morning to believe this.

    I remember this specific issue being a red flag for me that something was very wrong.

    Of course, I now understand intellectually that professions of belief are badges of group identity (take the Pledge of Allegiance), rather than actual statements of one's factual beliefs or moral principles.

    But I still cannot really empathize with such behavior.

    In any case, there is a wide range of possibilities for specific religions, even if it is inevitable that most people will somehow be quasi-religious.

    As you know, the closest Chinese thought systems to Western religions (Confucianism, Buddhism, and Daoism) do not require any firm commitment to theism.

    And there are surely numerous alternatives to Wokeism (I am sorely tempted to invent some religions based on quantum mechanics -- the possibilities are endless!).

    My own quasi-religious commitments, for what they are worth, are:

    A) A good society allows people to live their lives productively and to provide for their families while exhibiting honesty and integrity

    B) A good society has room for those unusual individuals who are obsessed with understanding the ultimate nature of the universe in which we live.

    I actually had a dream many years ago in which every Sunday people went to their local "Prometheum" to engage in mutual exploration and discovery of what had been discovered about the nature of the universe.

    Only a dream, but history has taken stranger turns than that. Who knows?

    Replies: @JMcG, @nebulafox, @mc23

  97. @Wilkey
    @Cato


    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 — pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us.
     
    1) Imposing religious prejudices is what Democrats do every minute of every hour of every day. Wokeism is a godless religion far more judgmental, oppressive, and dogmatic than most of the theistic religions that man has ever created. Just walk into many schools or workplaces and announce that men cannot become women and tell us how that goes. Announce that men and women aren't equal and tell us how that goes. Announce that races aren't equal and tell us how that goes.

    2) There is precious little new policy a Republican congressional majority can enact without having control of the White House. The major thing they will be able to do is control the purse strings. They can use that power to effect policy somewhat, but not by much. The best thing they can do with it is defund the worst impulses of the Democratic Party. 70-80% of Americans would be on board with most of that.

    Replies: @anonymous, @nebulafox, @Jack D

    The good news is, unless something we can’t predict happens, the Democrats are going to be absolutely slaughtered in 2022. Plenty of voters that would have never considered voting for a Republican six years ago are now doing so because of them dealing with Democratic insanity on everything from COVID to crime policies.

    The bad news is, it’s as if the GOP is utterly determined to win solely on inertia. From what I’ve seen, rather than embracing the fact that they are the populist party now, whether they want to be or not, they will go right back to offering the kind of warmed over Bushism (“We’re not racist because we support amnesty”-which will alienate white voters while failing to attract Hispanic ones-mixed with what I like to call “Socialism For Big Corporate America, Privatization For Peasants”) that nobody wants or needs.

  98. @Anon
    If there's anything to be said here, it's that Democratic mayors care more for protecting their own careers than they do for their DA's careers. If the Soros DAs are going to make Democratic mayors unelectable, then the DAs are going to find themselves in a savage fight with their own party.

    The donors have to be running away from the Democrats.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    >The donors have to be running away from the Democrats.

    And the GOP has battered wife syndrome…

  99. OT: hilariously i-Steve-y article in today’s NYT about tensions between black and Asian activists:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/19/us/black-asian-activists-policing-disagreement.html

    The article refers repeatedly to recent anti-Asian hate crimes, but never once does it mention that most of the perpetrators are black youths. The only reference in the entire article to black-on-Asian violence comes near the very end, and it’s in reference to the Korean shop owners in LA in the 90s, not the recent wave of youths cold-clocking old Asians on the sidewalk:

    Sometimes, though, there have been clashes. In the 1990s, Korean business owners in South Central Los Angeles wrangled with the poorer Black residents in the area. Tensions there peaked in 1992, after four police officers who had beaten Rodney King were acquitted, leading to riots. More than 2,300 Korean-owned business were looted and burned.

    Funnily enough, the central point of the article is that the main source of tension between the two groups is that black activists want to defund the police while Asian activists want *more* police, but the writers essentially throw their hands up and say, “gee, it’s a mystery why that is!” Prime example of crimestop.

    • Agree: Technite78
  100. Anon[143] • Disclaimer says:
    @indocon
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Nothing is going to happen, the white middle-class that pushed back against crime earlier does not exist anymore. Their Asian and Hispanic replacements are either too timid or lazy to organize.

    Replies: @Anon

    I’m not so certain about that. There’s a white upper-class that lives in cities for a reason. They tend to donate to the Democrats. If cities become too obnoxious for them, even this class gets mad about it.

    They get mad about being rich yet having to live in a third-world crap-hole. If this class withdraws their donor money to the Democrats, the Democrats freak out.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Anon


    I’m not so certain about that. There’s a white upper-class that lives in cities for a reason. They tend to donate to the Democrats. If cities become too obnoxious for them, even this class gets mad about it.

    They get mad about being rich yet having to live in a third-world crap-hole. If this class withdraws their donor money to the Democrats, the Democrats freak out.

     

    This class has available means to insulate themselves from the worst of the crime. In the 80s and 90s, there were rich people living in Manhattan - they just had "doormen" and private security and hired cars to get them around the city in comfort and safety. And they have second homes in Connecticut or the Hamptons for weekends and holidays. They might not prefer to live this way compared with the generally low crime city of ten years ago, but do not mistake this for an inability to live insulated from crime and social pathologies. In fact, the ability to perform lots of white collar work remotely probably helps insulate them even better than before.
    , @indocon
    @Anon

    The best rich whites in places like Mexico City can do is to pay for an armed militia defending their neighborhoods, that is what we are heading to here. It's amazing going to visit Mexico City's Polanco neighborhood, armed guards with machine guns protecting a Starbucks.

  101. https://www.tmz.com/2021/12/19/drakeo-the-ruler-dead-dies-stabbing-once-upon-a-time-concert-los-angeles/


    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @MEH 0910

    There is (or rather was) a rap star named "Drakeo the Ruler"?

    Sounds like the name of a villain of the week on Buck Rogers in the 25th Century.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @MEH 0910

    Updated G.K. Chesterton:

    "Journalism largely consists in saying Drakeo the Ruler is dead to people who never knew Drakeo the Ruler* was alive."

    *"Drakeo the Ruler" can be replaced by he name of every rapper or aspiring rapper who was ever killed, with the exception of maybe two or three I had heard of while they were still alive. YMMV.

  102. @PhysicistDave
    @Cato

    Cato wrote:


    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 — pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us.
     
    Lots of citizens do not care much about taxes one way or another, but very few people favor higher taxes. Abortion is not really a matter that Congress has much say over -- it is up to SCOTUS, who may or may not boot it back to the states. As for "imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us," what on earth are you talking about??

    I'm a militant atheist, but I am not worried in the slightest about the GOP trying to interfere with my religious freedom.

    The country-club GOP types are just nominally religious.

    And the evangelicals are the sort of people to whom Jefferson wrote his famous letter about a "wall of separation" between church and state. They are more solid on church-state separation than most liberals.

    I find their theological beliefs utterly nutty. But as fellow citizens... they are good neighbors and defenders of the Republic.

    Replies: @Skyler the Weird, @Cato

    I hope the GOP has the 2022 election stolen again. The Bubble is about to burst and I want the Democrats in charge of everything when it does.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Skyler the Weird

    At this point "US President" is just a game of hot potato. The best part about being President is being an ex-President so you can rake in all those back-ended bribes and set your family and friends up. Nobody wants actually to be occupying the office when the flaming turd blows up.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  103. @Daniel H
    If I were Breed, to get a jumpstart on this initiative, I would do what many social service agencies in farsighted cities have been doing for years. Offer every bum on the streets of the Tenderlolin $200 on the condition that they enter a departing bus (transportation paid for by the city) for, say, Salt Lake City.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Sick 'n Tired, @Pericles, @duncsbaby

    Or like Hawaii, put them on a plane with a one way ticket to California. Good luck getting back

  104. @Paleo Liberal
    @Known Fact

    I’m not sure it would be the first time. There have been successful black mayors in the past.

    As for NYC, the feeling is that anyone will look good in comparison to de Blasio.

    Adams needs two things to succeed.

    First, the COVID pandemic must end, or at least become manageable, during his time as mayor. We have 4 years and two weeks. Chances are pretty good.

    Second, the NYPD must get a handle on the increase of crime, or at least start to turn things around. We can all hope for the best.

    And that is it. Adams mostly needs good luck and and least sone competence.

    De Blasio had horrible luck; his incompetence and intransigence made things worse.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Bernard, @The Anti-Gnostic

    What horrible luck? He was handed the keys to the wealthiest, largest, most culturally rich city in North America and de facto capital of the American Empire.

    “Horrible luck.” LOL.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    ...de facto capital of the American Empire.
     
    It's not even capital of its own state, let alone the country. And at 40% of the state's population-- is any other city that dominant at home? Albany was founded before NYC (and Plymouth) and had held squatter's rights to capital status for 405 years.

    Ottawa serves as Canada's capital, but is not the province's, as well as being chased by Mississauga for title of Ontario's second-largest city.

    London is the capital of the United Kingdom, but not of England, which has none. Perhaps the City of London (pop. 9,401) could take that job.

    Yes, Ontario's City of London is 40 times as populous and 140 times as spacious.

    Replies: @prosa123

    , @Gary in Gramercy
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    De Blasio had also become NYC mayor after twenty (20!) years of almost consistently low crime rates (low by the abysmal standards of the Dinkins Administration, 1990-93). The job Rudy Giuliani, Bill Bratton, Jack Maple, et al., started -- and which the three-term Bloomberg Administration continued, with vigorous application of stop-and-frisk (including an appeal to the Second Circuit of District Judge Shira Scheindlin's outrageous, bordering-on-openly-biased opinion finding stop-and-frisk to be constitutionally suspect) -- ended the day William Wilhelm took office.

    One of the very first things he did, even a few days before becoming mayor, was to instruct the city's lawyers (NYC's Corporation Counsel) to drop the Second Circuit appeal from Judge Scheindlin's stop-and-frisk ruling, since WW ran, and won, on the basis of substantial black support. As Steve constantly points out, no one remembers anything that happened the day before yesterday, so nobody objected to this flight from a successful crime-fighting policy, not even to note that the Second Circuit was so appalled by Judge Scheindlin's ruling that -- even before full consideration of the City's appeal, while Bloomberg was still mayor -- it took the extraordinary step of removing her from the case. (You can see leftist pinko rag The Nation weeping, wailing and gnashing its teeth about this highly unusual public slapdown of a district judge at https://www.thenation.com/article/archive/removing-judge-who-ruled-stop-and-frisk-unconstitutional-blow-justice/.)

    If de Blasio had "bad luck" as mayor, it's the same bad luck virtually every other mayor or governor had during the initial COVID outbreak. It's hard to say he suffered more than other similarly situated mayors (although, in fairness, he got no help from then-governor Andrew Cuomo, since NYC mayors and governors of the same party traditionally hate one another with the heat of a hundred suns).

    And it's not "bad luck" that forced him to hand over $850 million to his wife to "coordinate" mental health programs. The money has vanished, with no accounting whatsoever. Think of the scene in The Bonfire of the Vanities, in which the Reverend Reginald Bacon answers Edward Fiske III, B.A. Yale, M.B.A. Wharton, when Fiske had the temerity to ask where the Episcopal Church's $350,000 -- earmarked for Harlem's Good Shepherd Day Care Center -- had gone, on discovering that all of it had already been spent: "This was seed money. We had to sow the seed. Some of it fell on fallow ground." That was a work of fiction; Chirlane McCray went through some $850 million in real life. (Details at https://redstate.com/slee/2019/03/05/bill-de-blasios-wife-case-missing-850-million-taxpayer-money-n102201.)

    If there were any real justice, Wilhelm/de Blasio and McCray would be hanging from adjoining lampposts in Morningside Park.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    , @Gary in Gramercy
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    De Blasio had also become NYC mayor after twenty (20!) years of almost consistently low crime rates (low by the abysmal standards of the Dinkins Administration, 1990-93). The job Rudy Giuliani, Bill Bratton, Jack Maple, et al., started -- and which the three-term Bloomberg Administration continued, with vigorous application of stop-and-frisk (including an appeal to the Second Circuit of District Judge Shira Scheindlin's outrageous, bordering-on-openly-biased opinion finding stop-and-frisk to be constitutionally suspect) -- ended the day William Wilhelm took office.

    One of the very first things he did, even a few days before becoming mayor, was to instruct the city's lawyers (NYC's Corporation Counsel) to drop the Second Circuit appeal from Judge Scheindlin's stop-and-frisk ruling, since WW ran, and won, on the basis of substantial black support. As Steve constantly points out, no one remembers anything that happened the day before yesterday, so nobody objected to this flight from a successful crime-fighting policy, not even to note that the Second Circuit was so appalled by Judge Scheindlin's ruling that -- even before full consideration of the City's appeal, while Bloomberg was still mayor -- it took the extraordinary step of removing her from the case. (You can see leftist pinko rag The Nation weeping, wailing and gnashing its teeth about this highly unusual public slapdown of a district judge at https://www.thenation.com/article/archive/removing-judge-who-ruled-stop-and-frisk-unconstitutional-blow-justice/.)

    If de Blasio had "bad luck" as mayor, it's the same bad luck virtually every other mayor or governor had during the initial COVID outbreak. It's hard to say he suffered more than other similarly situated mayors (although, in fairness, he got no help from then-governor Andrew Cuomo, since NYC mayors and governors of the same party traditionally hate one another with the heat of a hundred suns).

    And it's not "bad luck" that forced him to hand over $850 million to his wife to "coordinate" mental health programs. The money has vanished, with no accounting whatsoever. Think of the scene in The Bonfire of the Vanities, in which the Reverend Reginald Bacon answers Edward Fiske III, B.A. Yale, M.B.A. Wharton, when Fiske had the temerity to ask where the Episcopal Church's $350,000 -- earmarked for Harlem's Good Shepherd Day Care Center -- had gone, on discovering that all of it had already been spent: "This was seed money. We had to sow the seed. Some of it fell on fallow ground." That was a work of fiction; Chirlane McCray went through some $850 million in real life. (Details at https://redstate.com/slee/2019/03/05/bill-de-blasios-wife-case-missing-850-million-taxpayer-money-n102201.)

    If there were any real justice, Wilhelm/de Blasio and McCray would be hanging from adjoining lampposts in Morningside Park.

    Replies: @prosa123

  105. @El Dato

    a state of emergency in the Tenderloin
     
    I lost all my coffee.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    a state of emergency in the Tenderloin

    I lost all my coffee.

    How to Tell If Tenderloin Is Spoiled

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Reg Cæsar

    Objectively wrong. Beef turns red if exposed to oxygen and that brown color if insulated from oxygen -- the entire steak could be that color and it will not only be safe to eat, it will be as fresh as the red one.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  106. OT we are going to lose in 2022, then the war starts — four sundays in a row, four, the town hall review of notable right-wing radio is re-re-re-running Terry MacAuliffe tripping on a small rock and impaling hinself on his own sword in the Virginia gubernatorial race. There is no awareness of the real issues, the strategy in its entirety is “maybe the other side will screw up at the last minute.”

  107. @nebulafox
    @PhysicistDave

    Wokeism is proof that if there is a spiritual vacuum in society, humans beings will subconsciously try to fill it. Razib Khan has an excellent article on his blog that I find convincing.

    https://www.brownpundits.com/2018/09/15/between-the-saffron-and-scimitar

    Basically, he argues the kind of person who relies off analytical logical consistency to navigate the world is a minority, and probably always has been. Most people, including the majority of intelligent people, are intuitive creatures who need to learn how to use that rather than doing so on impulse. I'm not saying that's a good or a bad thing: it's just reality. It does mean that we shouldn't be shocked that secularized societies create secularized religions. And like all new systems do, they'll inevitable incorporate aspects of the old system: the development of Christianity in the 4th and 5th Century shows this in spades. The old cults might have collapsed when Roman civilization nearly did in the 3rd, but-especially out in the countryside-people did incorporate traditions into the new framework. By the time the Middle Ages came, the quiet conservatism, the faith that those who stuck to the ways of their ancestors would receive divine favor, was not that different from high paganism.

    We're not living in one of those periods, which consist of the majority of human history. We're living during one of the hinge points, where things can change rapidly over the course of a few decades (like, say, 250-280 AD in the Roman Empire). That's when things truly change.

    BTW, since I suspect this has always been the case, there's an interesting wrinkle here. In the pre-modern world, where atheism in the modern sense just wasn't on the table most of the time, probably people from that neurologically differently wired minority were the ones who constructed the intellectual underpinnings underneath philosophy, religion, etc.

    >But, yeah, Wokism is a religion, and, as an atheist, I find it a hell of a lot more dangerous than old-fashioned Bible-thumping Christianity.

    Well, I'm not an atheist anymore (long story), but needless to say, I would have agreed with you when I was.

    Though there is a lot of influence that Americanized Protestant Christianity has on wokeness, one key difference is the belief that you can't "achieve grace" and turn over a new leaf, regardless of your wealth or your skin color. You can only constantly ask for forgiveness in a state of degradation. Learned helplessness is encouraged to make societal elites feel better, not actually becoming a better person. That reminds me of Hinduism, a religion I've always had a distinct distaste for due to the caste system. As someone who would, but for good luck, be a "Dalit" in the new American faith... yeah. Makes the hair stand on the back of my neck.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @PhysicistDave

    https://www.brownpundits.com/2018/09/15/between-the-saffron-and-scimitar

    Honestly, I’ve never met these people in real life…most “Indian” people I meet are either coconuts like me or cosmopolitan blockchain engineers.

    So that’s why Razib 🥥 Khan uses that coconut emoji on Twitter. He’s brown on the outside and white on the inside.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @MEH 0910


    So that’s why Razib 🥥 Khan uses that coconut emoji on Twitter. He’s brown on the outside and white on the inside.
     
    For a second there, I thought you meant Sadiq Khan.

    Put a lime in the coconut, you drink 'em bot' up
    Put de lime in the coconut, you're such a silly woman

    Put a lime in the coconut and drink 'em bot' togedder
    Put de lime in the coconut, then you feel better
    Put de lime in the coconut, drink 'em bot' down
    Put de lime in your coconut, and call me in the morning

     

    A little touch of Harry in the night:



    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pIe6L2k7Yc8

    Replies: @Pericles

  108. @Reg Cæsar
    @El Dato



    a state of emergency in the Tenderloin
     
    I lost all my coffee.
     
    How to Tell If Tenderloin Is Spoiled


    https://nitrocdn.com/yDquYwBKMqlJhvaxylKmXwHxQFSHiYcv/assets/static/optimized/rev-7e2e120/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/MomAtMeatCounter.jpg

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Objectively wrong. Beef turns red if exposed to oxygen and that brown color if insulated from oxygen — the entire steak could be that color and it will not only be safe to eat, it will be as fresh as the red one.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @J.Ross

    The 'right' color of raw beef
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=82KT_nb26-4

  109. There is precious little new policy a Republican congressional majority can enact without having control of the White House.

    A Republican takeover of Congress in 2022 will disappoint a lot of people. The administrative/deep state rolls on no matter who is president or controls congress. Decimating federal agencies, literally firing every tenth person, might get their attention, but not much else.

    • Agree: houston 1992
  110. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Paleo Liberal

    What horrible luck? He was handed the keys to the wealthiest, largest, most culturally rich city in North America and de facto capital of the American Empire.

    "Horrible luck." LOL.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Gary in Gramercy, @Gary in Gramercy

    …de facto capital of the American Empire.

    It’s not even capital of its own state, let alone the country. And at 40% of the state’s population– is any other city that dominant at home? Albany was founded before NYC (and Plymouth) and had held squatter’s rights to capital status for 405 years.

    Ottawa serves as Canada’s capital, but is not the province’s, as well as being chased by Mississauga for title of Ontario’s second-largest city.

    London is the capital of the United Kingdom, but not of England, which has none. Perhaps the City of London (pop. 9,401) could take that job.

    Yes, Ontario’s City of London is 40 times as populous and 140 times as spacious.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Reg Cæsar

    And at 40% of the state’s population– is any other city that dominant at home?

    Anchorage (also not a capital) is in second place, with about 39% of Alaska's population.

    Speaking of Alaska, here is a shocking article about the nearly complete lack of law enforcement and the resulting chaos in some of the state's Native villages.
    https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/rural-alaska/2021/12/13/citizens-hide-from-active-shooters-as-alaska-fails-to-deliver-on-2019-promise-of-village-troopers/

  111. @MEH 0910
    @nebulafox

    https://www.brownpundits.com/2018/09/15/between-the-saffron-and-scimitar


    Honestly, I’ve never met these people in real life…most “Indian” people I meet are either coconuts like me or cosmopolitan blockchain engineers.
     
    So that's why Razib 🥥 Khan uses that coconut emoji on Twitter. He's brown on the outside and white on the inside.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    So that’s why Razib 🥥 Khan uses that coconut emoji on Twitter. He’s brown on the outside and white on the inside.

    For a second there, I thought you meant Sadiq Khan.

    Put a lime in the coconut, you drink ’em bot’ up
    Put de lime in the coconut, you’re such a silly woman

    Put a lime in the coconut and drink ’em bot’ togedder
    Put de lime in the coconut, then you feel better
    Put de lime in the coconut, drink ’em bot’ down
    Put de lime in your coconut, and call me in the morning

    A little touch of Harry in the night:

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Reg Cæsar



    So that’s why Razib 🥥 Khan uses that coconut emoji on Twitter. He’s brown on the outside and white on the inside.

     


     
    More accurately, brown on the outside, rootless cosmopolitan on the inside (self-described).
  112. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Paleo Liberal

    What horrible luck? He was handed the keys to the wealthiest, largest, most culturally rich city in North America and de facto capital of the American Empire.

    "Horrible luck." LOL.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Gary in Gramercy, @Gary in Gramercy

    De Blasio had also become NYC mayor after twenty (20!) years of almost consistently low crime rates (low by the abysmal standards of the Dinkins Administration, 1990-93). The job Rudy Giuliani, Bill Bratton, Jack Maple, et al., started — and which the three-term Bloomberg Administration continued, with vigorous application of stop-and-frisk (including an appeal to the Second Circuit of District Judge Shira Scheindlin’s outrageous, bordering-on-openly-biased opinion finding stop-and-frisk to be constitutionally suspect) — ended the day William Wilhelm took office.

    One of the very first things he did, even a few days before becoming mayor, was to instruct the city’s lawyers (NYC’s Corporation Counsel) to drop the Second Circuit appeal from Judge Scheindlin’s stop-and-frisk ruling, since WW ran, and won, on the basis of substantial black support. As Steve constantly points out, no one remembers anything that happened the day before yesterday, so nobody objected to this flight from a successful crime-fighting policy, not even to note that the Second Circuit was so appalled by Judge Scheindlin’s ruling that — even before full consideration of the City’s appeal, while Bloomberg was still mayor — it took the extraordinary step of removing her from the case. (You can see leftist pinko rag The Nation weeping, wailing and gnashing its teeth about this highly unusual public slapdown of a district judge at https://www.thenation.com/article/archive/removing-judge-who-ruled-stop-and-frisk-unconstitutional-blow-justice/.)

    If de Blasio had “bad luck” as mayor, it’s the same bad luck virtually every other mayor or governor had during the initial COVID outbreak. It’s hard to say he suffered more than other similarly situated mayors (although, in fairness, he got no help from then-governor Andrew Cuomo, since NYC mayors and governors of the same party traditionally hate one another with the heat of a hundred suns).

    And it’s not “bad luck” that forced him to hand over \$850 million to his wife to “coordinate” mental health programs. The money has vanished, with no accounting whatsoever. Think of the scene in The Bonfire of the Vanities, in which the Reverend Reginald Bacon answers Edward Fiske III, B.A. Yale, M.B.A. Wharton, when Fiske had the temerity to ask where the Episcopal Church’s \$350,000 — earmarked for Harlem’s Good Shepherd Day Care Center — had gone, on discovering that all of it had already been spent: “This was seed money. We had to sow the seed. Some of it fell on fallow ground.” That was a work of fiction; Chirlane McCray went through some \$850 million in real life. (Details at https://redstate.com/slee/2019/03/05/bill-de-blasios-wife-case-missing-850-million-taxpayer-money-n102201.)

    If there were any real justice, Wilhelm/de Blasio and McCray would be hanging from adjoining lampposts in Morningside Park.

    • Agree: Technite78, Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Gary in Gramercy

    Bloomberg turned the City into a yuppie-Jewish playground. All de Blasio had to do was show up and leave to play golf with his Big Law and Big Bank buddies at 1 pm every day. But since Wilhelm de Blasio is a conflicted liberal weirdo instead of an amiable buffoon who knows his limits, he didn't.

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Gary in Gramercy


    Judge Shira Scheindlin’s outrageous, bordering-on-openly-biased opinion finding stop-and-frisk to be constitutionally suspect
     
    Stop-and-frisk as practiced was constitutionally suspect, and it’s good that it’s gone in NYC. Sure, it made the streets safer. But it also fed into bobo New Yorkers’ delusion that it’s no big deal living with ‘diversity’.

    I would rather the Blue-voting scum be made to suffer, but with the potential benefit of them (re)acquiring practical knowledge of HBD. :)

    Replies: @El Dato

  113. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Paleo Liberal

    What horrible luck? He was handed the keys to the wealthiest, largest, most culturally rich city in North America and de facto capital of the American Empire.

    "Horrible luck." LOL.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Gary in Gramercy, @Gary in Gramercy

    De Blasio had also become NYC mayor after twenty (20!) years of almost consistently low crime rates (low by the abysmal standards of the Dinkins Administration, 1990-93). The job Rudy Giuliani, Bill Bratton, Jack Maple, et al., started — and which the three-term Bloomberg Administration continued, with vigorous application of stop-and-frisk (including an appeal to the Second Circuit of District Judge Shira Scheindlin’s outrageous, bordering-on-openly-biased opinion finding stop-and-frisk to be constitutionally suspect) — ended the day William Wilhelm took office.

    One of the very first things he did, even a few days before becoming mayor, was to instruct the city’s lawyers (NYC’s Corporation Counsel) to drop the Second Circuit appeal from Judge Scheindlin’s stop-and-frisk ruling, since WW ran, and won, on the basis of substantial black support. As Steve constantly points out, no one remembers anything that happened the day before yesterday, so nobody objected to this flight from a successful crime-fighting policy, not even to note that the Second Circuit was so appalled by Judge Scheindlin’s ruling that — even before full consideration of the City’s appeal, while Bloomberg was still mayor — it took the extraordinary step of removing her from the case. (You can see leftist pinko rag The Nation weeping, wailing and gnashing its teeth about this highly unusual public slapdown of a district judge at https://www.thenation.com/article/archive/removing-judge-who-ruled-stop-and-frisk-unconstitutional-blow-justice/.)

    If de Blasio had “bad luck” as mayor, it’s the same bad luck virtually every other mayor or governor had during the initial COVID outbreak. It’s hard to say he suffered more than other similarly situated mayors (although, in fairness, he got no help from then-governor Andrew Cuomo, since NYC mayors and governors of the same party traditionally hate one another with the heat of a hundred suns).

    And it’s not “bad luck” that forced him to hand over \$850 million to his wife to “coordinate” mental health programs. The money has vanished, with no accounting whatsoever. Think of the scene in The Bonfire of the Vanities, in which the Reverend Reginald Bacon answers Edward Fiske III, B.A. Yale, M.B.A. Wharton, when Fiske had the temerity to ask where the Episcopal Church’s \$350,000 — earmarked for Harlem’s Good Shepherd Day Care Center — had gone, on discovering that all of it had already been spent: “This was seed money. We had to sow the seed. Some of it fell on fallow ground.” That was a work of fiction; Chirlane McCray went through some \$850 million in real life. (Details at https://redstate.com/slee/2019/03/05/bill-de-blasios-wife-case-missing-850-million-taxpayer-money-n102201.)

    If there were any real justice, Wilhelm/de Blasio and McCray would be hanging from adjoining lampposts in Morningside Park.

    • Thanks: Dan Hayes, Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Gary in Gramercy

    In fairness, NYC's crime rate remained low under the first years of the current administration and didn't start to rise to a major extent until after WFH emptied out so much of the city.

  114. @nebulafox
    @PhysicistDave

    Wokeism is proof that if there is a spiritual vacuum in society, humans beings will subconsciously try to fill it. Razib Khan has an excellent article on his blog that I find convincing.

    https://www.brownpundits.com/2018/09/15/between-the-saffron-and-scimitar

    Basically, he argues the kind of person who relies off analytical logical consistency to navigate the world is a minority, and probably always has been. Most people, including the majority of intelligent people, are intuitive creatures who need to learn how to use that rather than doing so on impulse. I'm not saying that's a good or a bad thing: it's just reality. It does mean that we shouldn't be shocked that secularized societies create secularized religions. And like all new systems do, they'll inevitable incorporate aspects of the old system: the development of Christianity in the 4th and 5th Century shows this in spades. The old cults might have collapsed when Roman civilization nearly did in the 3rd, but-especially out in the countryside-people did incorporate traditions into the new framework. By the time the Middle Ages came, the quiet conservatism, the faith that those who stuck to the ways of their ancestors would receive divine favor, was not that different from high paganism.

    We're not living in one of those periods, which consist of the majority of human history. We're living during one of the hinge points, where things can change rapidly over the course of a few decades (like, say, 250-280 AD in the Roman Empire). That's when things truly change.

    BTW, since I suspect this has always been the case, there's an interesting wrinkle here. In the pre-modern world, where atheism in the modern sense just wasn't on the table most of the time, probably people from that neurologically differently wired minority were the ones who constructed the intellectual underpinnings underneath philosophy, religion, etc.

    >But, yeah, Wokism is a religion, and, as an atheist, I find it a hell of a lot more dangerous than old-fashioned Bible-thumping Christianity.

    Well, I'm not an atheist anymore (long story), but needless to say, I would have agreed with you when I was.

    Though there is a lot of influence that Americanized Protestant Christianity has on wokeness, one key difference is the belief that you can't "achieve grace" and turn over a new leaf, regardless of your wealth or your skin color. You can only constantly ask for forgiveness in a state of degradation. Learned helplessness is encouraged to make societal elites feel better, not actually becoming a better person. That reminds me of Hinduism, a religion I've always had a distinct distaste for due to the caste system. As someone who would, but for good luck, be a "Dalit" in the new American faith... yeah. Makes the hair stand on the back of my neck.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @PhysicistDave

    Wokeism is proof that if there is a spiritual vacuum in society, humans beings will subconsciously try to fill it. Razib Khan has an excellent article on his blog that I find convincing.

    https://www.brownpundits.com/2018/09/15/between-the-saffron-and-scimitar

    Basically, he argues the kind of person who relies off analytical logical consistency to navigate the world is a minority, and probably always has been. Most people, including the majority of intelligent people, are intuitive creatures who need to learn how to use that rather than doing so on impulse.

    Indeed, humans didn’t evolve for strict rationality, but for quick intuitive heuristics. Provided these heuristics work well enough, they encourage movement in a productive direction. But not all ideas are equal, some will killed you, albeit slowly. Ideas shown to work earn privilege. Privileging nonsense is self-indulgent and destructive.

  115. Guys, it seems Drakeo The Ruler has been stabbed to death at an L.A. concert!

    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    @Father O'Hara

    Oh, no! Now we'll never find that cure for cancer!

  116. @Eric Novak
    @Cato

    Taxes are not their core constituency. Did you miss the last six years of politics? Also, why would anyone think that law and order will be restored after two years of lawlessness?

    Replies: @Bill

    Taxes are their core constituency. Did you miss the Trump administration?

  117. @Almost Missouri
    @Cato


    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000
     
    LOL, the Republicans haven't overreached for 150 years. Nowadays they barely reach, nevermind overreach.

    Meanwhile, Democrats' perpetual overreaches are billed as mild reaches because the Democrats and the media are one solid continuum.

    Replies: @Bill

    They just did it five minutes ago. Trump did nothing but cut taxes, losing the exact downscale whites who brought him to office. That’s Republican overreach.

    • Disagree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Marquis
    @Bill

    That’s simply wrong. If anything he failed to capture the suburban mom vote that the tax cuts helped. He did fine with his core constituency.

    Replies: @Bill

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Bill


    Trump did nothing ... That’s Republican overreach.
     
    A.k.a. underreach.

    Replies: @Bill

  118. @Gary in Gramercy
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    De Blasio had also become NYC mayor after twenty (20!) years of almost consistently low crime rates (low by the abysmal standards of the Dinkins Administration, 1990-93). The job Rudy Giuliani, Bill Bratton, Jack Maple, et al., started -- and which the three-term Bloomberg Administration continued, with vigorous application of stop-and-frisk (including an appeal to the Second Circuit of District Judge Shira Scheindlin's outrageous, bordering-on-openly-biased opinion finding stop-and-frisk to be constitutionally suspect) -- ended the day William Wilhelm took office.

    One of the very first things he did, even a few days before becoming mayor, was to instruct the city's lawyers (NYC's Corporation Counsel) to drop the Second Circuit appeal from Judge Scheindlin's stop-and-frisk ruling, since WW ran, and won, on the basis of substantial black support. As Steve constantly points out, no one remembers anything that happened the day before yesterday, so nobody objected to this flight from a successful crime-fighting policy, not even to note that the Second Circuit was so appalled by Judge Scheindlin's ruling that -- even before full consideration of the City's appeal, while Bloomberg was still mayor -- it took the extraordinary step of removing her from the case. (You can see leftist pinko rag The Nation weeping, wailing and gnashing its teeth about this highly unusual public slapdown of a district judge at https://www.thenation.com/article/archive/removing-judge-who-ruled-stop-and-frisk-unconstitutional-blow-justice/.)

    If de Blasio had "bad luck" as mayor, it's the same bad luck virtually every other mayor or governor had during the initial COVID outbreak. It's hard to say he suffered more than other similarly situated mayors (although, in fairness, he got no help from then-governor Andrew Cuomo, since NYC mayors and governors of the same party traditionally hate one another with the heat of a hundred suns).

    And it's not "bad luck" that forced him to hand over $850 million to his wife to "coordinate" mental health programs. The money has vanished, with no accounting whatsoever. Think of the scene in The Bonfire of the Vanities, in which the Reverend Reginald Bacon answers Edward Fiske III, B.A. Yale, M.B.A. Wharton, when Fiske had the temerity to ask where the Episcopal Church's $350,000 -- earmarked for Harlem's Good Shepherd Day Care Center -- had gone, on discovering that all of it had already been spent: "This was seed money. We had to sow the seed. Some of it fell on fallow ground." That was a work of fiction; Chirlane McCray went through some $850 million in real life. (Details at https://redstate.com/slee/2019/03/05/bill-de-blasios-wife-case-missing-850-million-taxpayer-money-n102201.)

    If there were any real justice, Wilhelm/de Blasio and McCray would be hanging from adjoining lampposts in Morningside Park.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Bloomberg turned the City into a yuppie-Jewish playground. All de Blasio had to do was show up and leave to play golf with his Big Law and Big Bank buddies at 1 pm every day. But since Wilhelm de Blasio is a conflicted liberal weirdo instead of an amiable buffoon who knows his limits, he didn’t.

  119. The Tenderloin has always been a sketchy neighborhood. Things must really be bad now for this lefty mayor to be using profanity. But I agree with other commenters–this is all theatre to disguise more grift.

    I miss the city. One of the best Punjabi restaurants I’ve ever been to is in the Tenderloin, Shalimar:

    https://sfinsider.sfgate.com/what-does-the-shalimar-restaurant-in-san-francisco-ca-bring-to-the-tenderloin/

    I always brought my beer in a brown bag when dining and nobody said a word. Highly recommended.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @petit bourgeois

    The liberal rulers of SF have always wanted to take the Tenderloin. It's a complete embarrassment to them. They support Blacks in that they support them moving to across the bridge.

    Breed now has the excuse which is that the voters have had enough. Hands are tied.

  120. The black mayor, prosecuting attorney, and chief of police will not enforce the law against other blacks.

    https://cwbchicago.com/2021/12/firebomber-injures-two-inside-downtown-7-eleven-store-totaled.html

  121. @Reg Cæsar
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    ...de facto capital of the American Empire.
     
    It's not even capital of its own state, let alone the country. And at 40% of the state's population-- is any other city that dominant at home? Albany was founded before NYC (and Plymouth) and had held squatter's rights to capital status for 405 years.

    Ottawa serves as Canada's capital, but is not the province's, as well as being chased by Mississauga for title of Ontario's second-largest city.

    London is the capital of the United Kingdom, but not of England, which has none. Perhaps the City of London (pop. 9,401) could take that job.

    Yes, Ontario's City of London is 40 times as populous and 140 times as spacious.

    Replies: @prosa123

    And at 40% of the state’s population– is any other city that dominant at home?

    Anchorage (also not a capital) is in second place, with about 39% of Alaska’s population.

    Speaking of Alaska, here is a shocking article about the nearly complete lack of law enforcement and the resulting chaos in some of the state’s Native villages.
    https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/rural-alaska/2021/12/13/citizens-hide-from-active-shooters-as-alaska-fails-to-deliver-on-2019-promise-of-village-troopers/

  122. @Gary in Gramercy
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    De Blasio had also become NYC mayor after twenty (20!) years of almost consistently low crime rates (low by the abysmal standards of the Dinkins Administration, 1990-93). The job Rudy Giuliani, Bill Bratton, Jack Maple, et al., started -- and which the three-term Bloomberg Administration continued, with vigorous application of stop-and-frisk (including an appeal to the Second Circuit of District Judge Shira Scheindlin's outrageous, bordering-on-openly-biased opinion finding stop-and-frisk to be constitutionally suspect) -- ended the day William Wilhelm took office.

    One of the very first things he did, even a few days before becoming mayor, was to instruct the city's lawyers (NYC's Corporation Counsel) to drop the Second Circuit appeal from Judge Scheindlin's stop-and-frisk ruling, since WW ran, and won, on the basis of substantial black support. As Steve constantly points out, no one remembers anything that happened the day before yesterday, so nobody objected to this flight from a successful crime-fighting policy, not even to note that the Second Circuit was so appalled by Judge Scheindlin's ruling that -- even before full consideration of the City's appeal, while Bloomberg was still mayor -- it took the extraordinary step of removing her from the case. (You can see leftist pinko rag The Nation weeping, wailing and gnashing its teeth about this highly unusual public slapdown of a district judge at https://www.thenation.com/article/archive/removing-judge-who-ruled-stop-and-frisk-unconstitutional-blow-justice/.)

    If de Blasio had "bad luck" as mayor, it's the same bad luck virtually every other mayor or governor had during the initial COVID outbreak. It's hard to say he suffered more than other similarly situated mayors (although, in fairness, he got no help from then-governor Andrew Cuomo, since NYC mayors and governors of the same party traditionally hate one another with the heat of a hundred suns).

    And it's not "bad luck" that forced him to hand over $850 million to his wife to "coordinate" mental health programs. The money has vanished, with no accounting whatsoever. Think of the scene in The Bonfire of the Vanities, in which the Reverend Reginald Bacon answers Edward Fiske III, B.A. Yale, M.B.A. Wharton, when Fiske had the temerity to ask where the Episcopal Church's $350,000 -- earmarked for Harlem's Good Shepherd Day Care Center -- had gone, on discovering that all of it had already been spent: "This was seed money. We had to sow the seed. Some of it fell on fallow ground." That was a work of fiction; Chirlane McCray went through some $850 million in real life. (Details at https://redstate.com/slee/2019/03/05/bill-de-blasios-wife-case-missing-850-million-taxpayer-money-n102201.)

    If there were any real justice, Wilhelm/de Blasio and McCray would be hanging from adjoining lampposts in Morningside Park.

    Replies: @prosa123

    In fairness, NYC’s crime rate remained low under the first years of the current administration and didn’t start to rise to a major extent until after WFH emptied out so much of the city.

  123. @JohnnyWalker123
    It'd be cool if we had authoritarian East Asian male immigrant mayors.

    Like this.

    https://cdn-live.foreignaffairs.com/sites/default/files/styles/large_1x/public/public-assets/images/articles/2019/09/26/chiang_kai-shekv2.png

    At least with East Asian authoritarians in charge, we wouldn't have to worry about civilization collapsing. Sure, a certain proportion of govt funds would be lost to "guanxi" patronage networks, but that'd be a small price to pay for order. Most of that money probably would come out of "diversity" programs anyway, so it's not clear if that'd be a net loss.

    Just look at how tightly run the various East Asian societies (North&South Korea, PRC, Taiwan, Singapore, HK, Japan) are by their leaders. Wouldn't that be nice?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Clyde, @Supply and Demand

    why do you want a loser to be mayor?

    He’d surrender 95% of the city to the communists, particularly the money-making parts.

  124. @thenon
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    Further into the viscous cycle, the police in my small outer suburbs Virginia town are vastly increasing their harassment of honkies, including old men walking dogs and random white pedestrians to maintain their arrest points for promotion and bonuses (convictions don't count) , while black drug dealers work openly. This is a trend that has been coming on for decades, police overfunding and d power with little to no police action on minority crime, while police make take home pay in the low 200s, a combination of fiscal corruption that serves the elite with old fashioned small town police that are a law unto themselves. No where to run, no where to hide for white men unless they can afford tens of thousands in Legal protection.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    If you want a picture of the future, imagine a trans Karen cop hassling white people over nothing— forever.

  125. @Skyler the Weird
    @PhysicistDave

    I hope the GOP has the 2022 election stolen again. The Bubble is about to burst and I want the Democrats in charge of everything when it does.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    At this point “US President” is just a game of hot potato. The best part about being President is being an ex-President so you can rake in all those back-ended bribes and set your family and friends up. Nobody wants actually to be occupying the office when the flaming turd blows up.

    • Agree: Rob McX
    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    Nobody wants actually to be occupying the office when the flaming turd blows up.
     
    That's why they installed Resident Biden. He won't notice,
  126. @Daniel H
    If I were Breed, to get a jumpstart on this initiative, I would do what many social service agencies in farsighted cities have been doing for years. Offer every bum on the streets of the Tenderlolin $200 on the condition that they enter a departing bus (transportation paid for by the city) for, say, Salt Lake City.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Sick 'n Tired, @Pericles, @duncsbaby

    Every illegal that cannot be deported should be offered a one-way ticket to a sanctuary state or city.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Pericles

    DeSantis is doing that.

    https://www.theepochtimes.com/mkt_breakingnews/desantis-proposes-8-million-in-budget-to-relocate-illegal-immigrants-to-delaware-marthas-vineyard_4152010.html

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  127. In Christopher Caldwell’s January 2020 book, he asks “What did \$20 trillion in debt buy?” (Remember \$20 trillion?). Answering his own question, he wrote “social peace.” Because of a confluence of factors, I think it will no longer be possible for governments to buy social peace. This will now be a matter of private security and fortress architecture. I think many people under-estimate the magnitude of private protection that will be necessary, and the obstacles that will be placed in the way of utilizing private security. One such obstacle will be to upend the lives of private-security workers who are forced to do their job harshly; this will make it very difficult to find people willing to take those jobs.

    A metsphor. When I was in a gun store, I asked the gentleman behind the counter (a former police officer) “Where in the house do you keep your gun?” He replied: “I keep my guns all over the place.”

    • Replies: @Flip
    @SafeNow

    We are going to be living like people in Latin America. Wait until the kidnappings start.

    , @JimDandy
    @SafeNow

    I'm not crazy about blacks seeing this whole self-defense thing as an opportunity.

    "Can a Black Man Claim Self-Defense In Wisconsin and Walk Free? Family of Man Who Killed White Attorney Hopes So, Especially with Surveillance Video," asks & answers crack Yahoo journalist, Kavontae Smalls

    The black man in question was apparently riding his bike in a very black fashion: "According to a police report, Evanjelina was driving and Jason Cleereman was in the passenger seat. She says she had to swerve to miss Edgecomb on his bike who was riding eastbound in the westbound lane against oncoming traffic, and that’s when Jason Cleereman yelled at Edgecomb, “What the heck?”

    The totally innocent black man responded by walking up to the car at a stop light and punching the 54 year old white man in the face for having the audacity to say "What the heck?" at him. When the white racist got out of the car, the black patriot shot him in the head.

    This is clearly the Black! Kyle Rittenhouse.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  128. @Alden
    @International Jew

    You’re right. It’s just more money for affirmative action grant hustlers to get money to pretend to help drug addicts. Tenderloin isn’t the worst part of the city. The worst parts of the city are still Bayview Sunnyvale Geneva Av parts of Ocean Av Hunters Point Ingleside Fillmore south of Geary all the nasty old black neighborhoods.

    Replies: @Pericles

    Though I saw plenty of blacks one late evening walking through the Tenderloin. They almost to a man offered me something called ‘speed’. Perhaps it’s the black business district.

  129. @Reg Cæsar
    @MEH 0910


    So that’s why Razib 🥥 Khan uses that coconut emoji on Twitter. He’s brown on the outside and white on the inside.
     
    For a second there, I thought you meant Sadiq Khan.

    Put a lime in the coconut, you drink 'em bot' up
    Put de lime in the coconut, you're such a silly woman

    Put a lime in the coconut and drink 'em bot' togedder
    Put de lime in the coconut, then you feel better
    Put de lime in the coconut, drink 'em bot' down
    Put de lime in your coconut, and call me in the morning

     

    A little touch of Harry in the night:



    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pIe6L2k7Yc8

    Replies: @Pericles

    So that’s why Razib 🥥 Khan uses that coconut emoji on Twitter. He’s brown on the outside and white on the inside.

    More accurately, brown on the outside, rootless cosmopolitan on the inside (self-described).

  130. @J.Ross
    @Reg Cæsar

    Objectively wrong. Beef turns red if exposed to oxygen and that brown color if insulated from oxygen -- the entire steak could be that color and it will not only be safe to eat, it will be as fresh as the red one.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    The ‘right’ color of raw beef

  131. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Skyler the Weird

    At this point "US President" is just a game of hot potato. The best part about being President is being an ex-President so you can rake in all those back-ended bribes and set your family and friends up. Nobody wants actually to be occupying the office when the flaming turd blows up.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    Nobody wants actually to be occupying the office when the flaming turd blows up.

    That’s why they installed Resident Biden. He won’t notice,

  132. @El Dato
    @Michelle

    But she did! Kind of, sort of.

    2021-11-30: Another US mayor presses to undo police defunding

    The mayor of Oakland, California is seeking to reverse a multi-million-dollar budget cut planned for local police, instead calling for more officers and funding amid a surge in violent crime and homicides in the area.

    Mayor Libby Schaaf said her office will press the Oakland City Council to undo the upcoming $18 million budget cut, which was approved by local lawmakers in June and is set to take effect next year. She vowed to continue efforts at “violence prevention” outside the realm of law enforcement, but nonetheless stressed the need to expand the police force.

    “While we are not backing down whatsoever on our historic investments in prevention, as well as a non-police response option... we must address police staffing shortages, and that is what we will do,” Schaaf said on Monday.
     

    But maybe it is better to terraform the whole area from orbit?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qHixc-QAhZQ

    Replies: @Flip, @Deckin

    I always heard it was getting yuppified. I guess not so much.

  133. @SafeNow
    In Christopher Caldwell’s January 2020 book, he asks “What did $20 trillion in debt buy?” (Remember $20 trillion?). Answering his own question, he wrote “social peace.” Because of a confluence of factors, I think it will no longer be possible for governments to buy social peace. This will now be a matter of private security and fortress architecture. I think many people under-estimate the magnitude of private protection that will be necessary, and the obstacles that will be placed in the way of utilizing private security. One such obstacle will be to upend the lives of private-security workers who are forced to do their job harshly; this will make it very difficult to find people willing to take those jobs.

    A metsphor. When I was in a gun store, I asked the gentleman behind the counter (a former police officer) “Where in the house do you keep your gun?” He replied: “I keep my guns all over the place.”

    Replies: @Flip, @JimDandy

    We are going to be living like people in Latin America. Wait until the kidnappings start.

  134. @Pericles
    @Daniel H

    Every illegal that cannot be deported should be offered a one-way ticket to a sanctuary state or city.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Bill Jones

    And This

    https://www.aicfoundation.com/florida-fights-back/

  135. @Russ
    @Thomas


    Just days before a string of high-end robberies targeting Union Square rattled the Bay Area, an apparent burglary at a San Francisco cannabis dispensary was seemingly not stopped by police at the scene.
     
    Perhaps the police inaction arose from the stench of illegality associated with the pot trade until just recently, when legalized pot and sports gambling were declared the latest "just the right thing to do" balms for all societal ills.

    As for Breed's Tenderloin emergency declaration: I'm shocked shocked that it carries no provision for vaccinating the perpetrators against that Chinese flu which, though 99+% survivable, constitutes the state of emergency uber alles. Where is that woman's sense of priorities?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    …legalized pot and sports gambling were declared the latest “just the right thing to do” balms for all societal ills.

    Cannabis, like abortion before it, is an issue where Americans have flanked Europeans to their left. At least in a number of states, as with women’s suffrage.

    Casino gambling is still restricted, but with SCOTUS’s Indian loophole. Even in bluenose Minnesota, there is (or was in 2007) a casino on Duluth’s main drag, owned by a tribe, though that’s hardly a reservation.

    Indians have another loophole– they can still reject “two-spirit” marriage, which states can no longer do.

  136. @Technite78
    @Known Fact

    Agreed. It's hard to read Adams, but there are conflicting signs.

    On one hand, he's promised to bring back some form of stop & frisk, enraging the local BLM leader. He's also promised to combat Antifa hooliganism, even meeting with leaders from a predominately white neighborhood hit by property damage.

    On the other hand, almost without exception, when you give a large proportion of high level city government positions to blacks, they run the city as if it was a banana republic in Africa: graft, corruption, incompetence, and hatred of whites.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    Adams’ whole career in the NYPD was that of a belly-aching black agitator. So why should he give up a winning run?

    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @Technite78
    @Dan Hayes

    He's not a wealthy man yet, but he's now in a position to become very wealthy indeed. He might have a big enough ego to try to do it through becoming the "Savior Of New York City", as opposed to another corrupt and forgettable failure (Dinkins would be a good example).

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    , @Redman
    @Dan Hayes

    And didn’t he say he joined the PD because he was beaten up by cops when he was young? I think he wanted to “change” the department or something.

    Doesn’t sound like the kind of guy who’d cotton to aggressive law enforcement to me. Never got why so many conservatives seemed to have faith in this guy.

    Replies: @Alden, @Harry Baldwin

  137. @Bill Jones
    @Pericles

    DeSantis is doing that.

    https://www.theepochtimes.com/mkt_breakingnews/desantis-proposes-8-million-in-budget-to-relocate-illegal-immigrants-to-delaware-marthas-vineyard_4152010.html

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  138. @Dan Hayes
    @Technite78

    Adams' whole career in the NYPD was that of a belly-aching black agitator. So why should he give up a winning run?

    Replies: @Technite78, @Redman

    He’s not a wealthy man yet, but he’s now in a position to become very wealthy indeed. He might have a big enough ego to try to do it through becoming the “Savior Of New York City”, as opposed to another corrupt and forgettable failure (Dinkins would be a good example).

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @Technite78

    Adams will try triangulation between whites and racist blacks but will fail for at least 2 reasons: He's nowhere as adroit as Bill Clinton (who is?) and blacks' self-righteousness knows no bounds!

    Replies: @Technite78

  139. @Cato
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    You say that things have turned around in only two years, and I have to admit that I catch myself being optimistic, too. But best not to count one's chickens before they hatch.

    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 -- pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us. Policies extremely unpopular, which will reignite the impetus to wokery. So I am still keeping my arsenal, for the day the thugs come spilling down the pike to my quiet suburban neighborhood.

    Replies: @Curle, @Eric Novak, @PhysicistDave, @Almost Missouri, @Russ, @Wilkey, @tyrone

    McCarthy and McConnel “overreaching”, well maybe reaching into the cookie jar to enrich themselves .Have you ever ask yourself how a guy with a middle class bank account goes to Washington and ends up years later with hundreds of millions in the bank does it……on a congressmans salary. These people ain’t gonna’ do shit for you and me.

    • Agree: Cato
  140. @Thomas
    @SimpleSong

    She can propose, but the SFPD must dispose. How are they doing?


    San Francisco police seemingly watch as burglars flee crime scene

    Just days before a string of high-end robberies targeting Union Square rattled the Bay Area, an apparent burglary at a San Francisco cannabis dispensary was seemingly not stopped by police at the scene.

    The San Francisco Department of Police Accountability is now investigating the incident, multiple media outlets report, which took place in the early hours of Nov. 16 at Basa, just a block away from Alamo Square Park.

    According to video footage obtained by the San Francisco Chronicle and NBC Bay Area, a police car flashed its lights on an alleged getaway car. (SFGATE and the Chronicle are both owned by Hearst but operate independently of one another.)

    Over the span of the 2-minute recording, at least 45 seconds of footage show the two cars — the suspects' and the police officers — parked just meters away from each other.

    A suspect, leaving the dispensary with a bag in tow, runs into the vehicle and plops the goods into the back seat, dropping some wares into the street as the car rushes to perform a three-point turn and flee the scene.

    Moments after, police officers can be seen strolling just past where the alleged escape vehicle was parked into the dispensary. SFPD did not immediately respond to a request for comment from SFGATE.

    Anisa Alazraie, the owner’s daughter, told NBC Bay Area that the burglars made off with thousands of dollars in goods.

    She told the Chronicle that officers “had every opportunity to intervene and stop this crime from happening.” It is unclear what, if any, repercussions the officers involved will face.

    The burglary — and the apparent officer inaction — is another flashpoint in the blitz of retail and property theft in the Bay Area and elsewhere in the country and comes as San Francisco District Attorney Chesa Boudin is up for recall next year.

    Representatives for the San Francisco Police Commission did not immediately respond to a request for comment from SFGATE.
     
    https://www.sfgate.com/crime/article/San-Francisco-police-watch-burglars-16653700.php

    Replies: @Russ, @SteveRogers42

    Why would they bother?

  141. @Father O'Hara
    Guys, it seems Drakeo The Ruler has been stabbed to death at an L.A. concert!

    Replies: @SteveRogers42

    Oh, no! Now we’ll never find that cure for cancer!

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  142. London Breed is a porn star name. That is all.

  143. @anonymous
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    I assumed, based on the 1960s – 80s, we were in for a 10 -15 year descent into urban lawlessness before public outcry forced a change in crime policy. Instead it happened in less than 2 years.
     
    We may have the public outcry, but an effective change in policy will take at least a decade. In order to restore law and order, a city would need the mayor, DA, and state government to all be aligned to be tough on crime. A mayor who wants to clean things up won't be able to if there's a SorosDA who won't prosecute, or a state government that keeps decriminalizing things. How long until all three of those factors align for San Fran, Philadelphia, or any of these places?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Unladen Swallow, @John Johnson

    As long as the city and the state remain dominated by one party nothing will change, the possibility of being turned out of office has to be present.

  144. @Bill Jones
    Steve,
    I'm sure you are honest and upright in your tax reporting but these changes may effect you.
    New $600 reporting limit.


    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/new-600-irs-1099k-reporting-threshold-what-your-thoughts-pianko/

    Replies: @Muggles

    I’m sure you are honest and upright in your tax reporting but these changes may effect you.
    New \$600 reporting limit.

    While I’m not iSteve, nor am I giving him or others tax advice here, I am a retired tax professional.

    As far as I’m aware iSteve (and most others here on Unz) are not selling anything, either goods or services. Anyone can read for free. And does.

    They may be soliciting voluntary gifts or donations. Gifts and donations (legitimate ones, not disguised sales, etc.) are not taxable to the recipient. Ever.

    So while he could, as others might, get one of these 1099ks, and the IRS might also get a copy, the amounts reported on them solely showing gifts wouldn’t be reportable or taxable to him. If he is also selling something (say a book) which might be included, he should break that out on his Schedule C or E or whatever.

    Or, to avoid hassle, he could choose to report a Gross Amount total received annually, show that on a Sch. C, E, or whatever, and then totally offset the amount with an added expense line (not shown on the form, but you can add them) saying “Reported amount of non taxable voluntary gifts received.” If he does receive payment for services (writing, etc.) he could put both taxable and non taxable gifts on the same Schedule, offsetting the gifts with the added “expense.”

    I believe GoFundMe donations received aren’t taxable either, and these would have a similar reporting issue. Or really any kind of donations for relief or emergency or sympathy that could come through a 3rd party money collection process (credit card, PayPal, etc.).

    Best to ask your tax professional or at least search online accounting publications for Best Practices on this.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Muggles

    The beauty of Unz.

    There's always someone who knows.

  145. @SafeNow
    In Christopher Caldwell’s January 2020 book, he asks “What did $20 trillion in debt buy?” (Remember $20 trillion?). Answering his own question, he wrote “social peace.” Because of a confluence of factors, I think it will no longer be possible for governments to buy social peace. This will now be a matter of private security and fortress architecture. I think many people under-estimate the magnitude of private protection that will be necessary, and the obstacles that will be placed in the way of utilizing private security. One such obstacle will be to upend the lives of private-security workers who are forced to do their job harshly; this will make it very difficult to find people willing to take those jobs.

    A metsphor. When I was in a gun store, I asked the gentleman behind the counter (a former police officer) “Where in the house do you keep your gun?” He replied: “I keep my guns all over the place.”

    Replies: @Flip, @JimDandy

    I’m not crazy about blacks seeing this whole self-defense thing as an opportunity.

    “Can a Black Man Claim Self-Defense In Wisconsin and Walk Free? Family of Man Who Killed White Attorney Hopes So, Especially with Surveillance Video,” asks & answers crack Yahoo journalist, Kavontae Smalls

    The black man in question was apparently riding his bike in a very black fashion: “According to a police report, Evanjelina was driving and Jason Cleereman was in the passenger seat. She says she had to swerve to miss Edgecomb on his bike who was riding eastbound in the westbound lane against oncoming traffic, and that’s when Jason Cleereman yelled at Edgecomb, “What the heck?”

    The totally innocent black man responded by walking up to the car at a stop light and punching the 54 year old white man in the face for having the audacity to say “What the heck?” at him. When the white racist got out of the car, the black patriot shot him in the head.

    This is clearly the Black! Kyle Rittenhouse.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @JimDandy


    When the white racist got out of the car, the black patriot shot him in the head.
     
    Maybe the Black DOAS was anti-immigration and got the wrong vibe from Cleereman:

    Milwaukee mourns Jason Cleereman, well-known immigration attorney and community advocate killed in shooting near Brady Street

    https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/local/2020/09/23/milwaukee-immigration-attorney-jason-cleereman-shot-killed-bicyclist-near-brady/3510565001/
     


    “His life was very ‘walk the talk,’” said Tammy Rivera, executive director of the Southside Organizing Center.

    Cleereman's life serves as an example for people to stand up for their beliefs, Rivera said.

    “You want more green space in the inner city, become a master gardener like he did,” Rivera said. “If you are going to care about immigration as a lawyer, fight for immigration reform like he did.”

     

    Replies: @JimDandy

  146. Off topic but surely a great iSteve opening news event:

    https://www.npr.org/2021/12/19/1065634438/drakeo-the-ruler-stabbed-at-once-upon-a-time-in-la-concert

    Passive headline (NPR) merely says, “has died”, as in, oh maybe just some bad clams.

    Yet another mysterious “backstage” fatal knifing that at first report, as yet unsolved. Not like on Hollywood TV shows. I guess everybody gets kinda stabby backstage at those things.

    Another tragic case of Knife Violence! Being a “rap Ruler” is hard!

    Come on Steve, that concert name (Once Upon A Time in LA) should be more than enough.

  147. @Whiskey
    NYC and SF are doomed. There is no reason for them to exist. Other than black/hispanic hell holes filled with squalid homeless degradation, gangstas committing crimes with impunity, and police arresting White people for ... being White or something.

    That is the future. Breed is just posturing. She knows and everyone else does that no one in city politics challenges Soros or his anti-fa crew. Think the police will arrest anyone vibrant? Think again, they don't want to be the next Derek Chauvin. Boudin will easily see off any challenge just like Gavin Newsom did to his authority. Voters LOVE the crime and degradation, they ENJOY the assertion of real authority by black criminals being large and in charge. Its all their movies, TV shows, and commercials come to life. What is not to love?

    And lets be honest, every politician wants their city to be just like Detroit or Baltimore -- the perfect city. They provide 4:30 AM mail in ballots, and in return the feds give them unlimited block grants for unlimited graft. No pesky oversight committees, or local businesses wanting reform candidates, or various good government busybodies. Nothing but a G Thang! All day long.

    San Francisco, NYC, Chicago, Atlanta, all the rest will be like Detroit, Baltimore, Oakland, and every other western city: a run-down hell hole that is a no-go place for Whites, Asians, and most Hispanics. The future of the West in other words. Breed is just offering boob bait for Louis Vuitton. In reality she like ever other mayor loves the crime and degradation. Junkies overdosing in the street is just good politics. Now more than ever. Those 4:30 AM ballots don't print themselves. When everyone is a junkie or gangsta those who can read and write and print out fake ballots are the Kings. Or Kangz if you prefer.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Think the police will arrest anyone vibrant? Think again, they don’t want to be the next Derek Chauvin.

    Exactly, that’s why Mayor Beetlejuice of Chicago reached a new low (which is saying something) when she blamed all the downtown looting on the store owners for not hiring more security. If video was released of private security manhandling black looters, they’d all end up on trial and probably go to prison.

  148. @MEH 0910
    https://www.tmz.com/2021/12/19/drakeo-the-ruler-dead-dies-stabbing-once-upon-a-time-concert-los-angeles/
    https://twitter.com/TMZ/status/1472540873145688069

    https://twitter.com/latimes/status/1472629116486623232

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Harry Baldwin

    There is (or rather was) a rap star named “Drakeo the Ruler”?

    Sounds like the name of a villain of the week on Buck Rogers in the 25th Century.

  149. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Clyde


    Walker 123 spits on the sidewalks of Singapore and gets a sound thrashing/caning from the authorities.
     
    Singapore has a homicide rate of 0.2 per 100,000. That's crazy low. Love them or hate them, East Asians are ruthlessly efficient about getting results.

    While I was actually kidding about putting East Asian male authoritarians in charge, I do think they'd at least be preferrable to the Black mayors we have in many of our major cities. They'd also, presumably, fit the minority quota.

    You got to admit. It'd be funny if the residents of one of our major cities got sick enough with Black crime that they put one of those guys in power. Imagine the sort of interactions that a Korean-American authoritarian mayor would have with his Black constituents.

    Replies: @Muggles

    Imagine the sort of interactions that a Korean-American authoritarian mayor would have with his Black constituents.

    So, put some Rooftop Koreans down on the mean streets.

    That’s a plan!

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  150. @Technite78
    @Dan Hayes

    He's not a wealthy man yet, but he's now in a position to become very wealthy indeed. He might have a big enough ego to try to do it through becoming the "Savior Of New York City", as opposed to another corrupt and forgettable failure (Dinkins would be a good example).

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    Adams will try triangulation between whites and racist blacks but will fail for at least 2 reasons: He’s nowhere as adroit as Bill Clinton (who is?) and blacks’ self-righteousness knows no bounds!

    • Replies: @Technite78
    @Dan Hayes

    There is no reason to triangulate between Whites and Blacks; the triangulation is between wealthy Jews, Hispanics and Blacks. Whites no longer have any substantial political power in NYC.

    Replies: @John Johnson

  151. “London Breed”, maybe a racehorse, e.g. “Seattle Slew”

    Or a mixed martial artiste.

  152. @Dan Hayes
    @Technite78

    Adams will try triangulation between whites and racist blacks but will fail for at least 2 reasons: He's nowhere as adroit as Bill Clinton (who is?) and blacks' self-righteousness knows no bounds!

    Replies: @Technite78

    There is no reason to triangulate between Whites and Blacks; the triangulation is between wealthy Jews, Hispanics and Blacks. Whites no longer have any substantial political power in NYC.

    • Thanks: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Technite78

    White people in NYC are expected to do their financial or computer job or whatever technical blah blah and then go back to their house in New Jersey.

    De Blasio represents an anti-White alliance and he knows it. He even married a Black woman he isn't attracted to in an effort to prove he won't serve White people.

    Just look at pictures of the two of them in public. He married a racial beard.

  153. @Gary in Gramercy
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    De Blasio had also become NYC mayor after twenty (20!) years of almost consistently low crime rates (low by the abysmal standards of the Dinkins Administration, 1990-93). The job Rudy Giuliani, Bill Bratton, Jack Maple, et al., started -- and which the three-term Bloomberg Administration continued, with vigorous application of stop-and-frisk (including an appeal to the Second Circuit of District Judge Shira Scheindlin's outrageous, bordering-on-openly-biased opinion finding stop-and-frisk to be constitutionally suspect) -- ended the day William Wilhelm took office.

    One of the very first things he did, even a few days before becoming mayor, was to instruct the city's lawyers (NYC's Corporation Counsel) to drop the Second Circuit appeal from Judge Scheindlin's stop-and-frisk ruling, since WW ran, and won, on the basis of substantial black support. As Steve constantly points out, no one remembers anything that happened the day before yesterday, so nobody objected to this flight from a successful crime-fighting policy, not even to note that the Second Circuit was so appalled by Judge Scheindlin's ruling that -- even before full consideration of the City's appeal, while Bloomberg was still mayor -- it took the extraordinary step of removing her from the case. (You can see leftist pinko rag The Nation weeping, wailing and gnashing its teeth about this highly unusual public slapdown of a district judge at https://www.thenation.com/article/archive/removing-judge-who-ruled-stop-and-frisk-unconstitutional-blow-justice/.)

    If de Blasio had "bad luck" as mayor, it's the same bad luck virtually every other mayor or governor had during the initial COVID outbreak. It's hard to say he suffered more than other similarly situated mayors (although, in fairness, he got no help from then-governor Andrew Cuomo, since NYC mayors and governors of the same party traditionally hate one another with the heat of a hundred suns).

    And it's not "bad luck" that forced him to hand over $850 million to his wife to "coordinate" mental health programs. The money has vanished, with no accounting whatsoever. Think of the scene in The Bonfire of the Vanities, in which the Reverend Reginald Bacon answers Edward Fiske III, B.A. Yale, M.B.A. Wharton, when Fiske had the temerity to ask where the Episcopal Church's $350,000 -- earmarked for Harlem's Good Shepherd Day Care Center -- had gone, on discovering that all of it had already been spent: "This was seed money. We had to sow the seed. Some of it fell on fallow ground." That was a work of fiction; Chirlane McCray went through some $850 million in real life. (Details at https://redstate.com/slee/2019/03/05/bill-de-blasios-wife-case-missing-850-million-taxpayer-money-n102201.)

    If there were any real justice, Wilhelm/de Blasio and McCray would be hanging from adjoining lampposts in Morningside Park.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Judge Shira Scheindlin’s outrageous, bordering-on-openly-biased opinion finding stop-and-frisk to be constitutionally suspect

    Stop-and-frisk as practiced was constitutionally suspect, and it’s good that it’s gone in NYC. Sure, it made the streets safer. But it also fed into bobo New Yorkers’ delusion that it’s no big deal living with ‘diversity’.

    I would rather the Blue-voting scum be made to suffer, but with the potential benefit of them (re)acquiring practical knowledge of HBD. 🙂

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Well, eventually will get both of diversity AND stop-and-frisk by people who look less blue but more military camo as society's "living together" dial goes to zero.

  154. @Bill
    @Almost Missouri

    They just did it five minutes ago. Trump did nothing but cut taxes, losing the exact downscale whites who brought him to office. That's Republican overreach.

    Replies: @Marquis, @Almost Missouri

    That’s simply wrong. If anything he failed to capture the suburban mom vote that the tax cuts helped. He did fine with his core constituency.

    • Replies: @Bill
    @Marquis

    Nope. He lost the most ground in 2020, relative to 2016, among non-college-educated white men. He hardly lost any ground at all among college-educated women.

  155. @Intelligent Dasein
    Today we got extremely bad news on two fronts. The 6th Circuit Court of Appeals refused to stop Brandon from firing people for not taking the worthless and harmful vaccine that does nothing against a mostly ordinary cold virus, and the so-called pope is busily destroying the last vestiges of the Catholic faith by proscribing the Latin Mass.

    I wondered whether I was living in some sort of demented nursery rhyme, and then I see that...

    ..."London Breed" has declared a state of emergency in "Tenderloin."

    Well, well. The perfect ending to the perfect day.

    Replies: @Daniel H, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @Achmed E. Newman

    Thanks for the info., I.D. This stuff is going to matter to my family on a personal (career) level. I do understand Daniel H.’s stance on this though.

  156. @El Dato
    @Michelle

    But she did! Kind of, sort of.

    2021-11-30: Another US mayor presses to undo police defunding

    The mayor of Oakland, California is seeking to reverse a multi-million-dollar budget cut planned for local police, instead calling for more officers and funding amid a surge in violent crime and homicides in the area.

    Mayor Libby Schaaf said her office will press the Oakland City Council to undo the upcoming $18 million budget cut, which was approved by local lawmakers in June and is set to take effect next year. She vowed to continue efforts at “violence prevention” outside the realm of law enforcement, but nonetheless stressed the need to expand the police force.

    “While we are not backing down whatsoever on our historic investments in prevention, as well as a non-police response option... we must address police staffing shortages, and that is what we will do,” Schaaf said on Monday.
     

    But maybe it is better to terraform the whole area from orbit?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qHixc-QAhZQ

    Replies: @Flip, @Deckin

    I’m no huge fan of Oakland, but this video is plain stupid. Look at his map. He breaks it down into 2 zones and then ignores the other 3rd of the city–Oakland extends up to the green park on the right.
    Oakland, like Berkeley and all of the East bay north of San Jose, is properly divided up by altitude.

    Freeways running north to south serve as easy markers. Below or west of 880: industrial. Between 880 and 580: not so good. Above 580 south of Oakland or Highway 13 in Oakland: objectively as nice as any place in the world, except that you’re in Oakland or parts near about.

    • Thanks: El Dato
  157. @Cloudbuster
    Politicians sure have come to love these "states of emergency." They do away with the necessity for all those tedious concepts like legislating new law, and the consent of the governed.

    Replies: @rebel yell

    “Consent of the governed” and “We the people” are the best phrases in the Declaration and the Constitution. These words are a rebuke to today’s minoritarians, internationalists, and oligarchs.

  158. @R.G. Camara
    Sounds desperate. Polling numbers must be abysmal.

    Replies: @John Milton's Ghost

    The white men in charge apparently haven’t been positioning her to succeed.

  159. @Deadite
    I find it amusing that her “ courage” is being held up as the left finally “getting it.”

    Oh they are getting it all right. Well, no. They aren’t. The tax coffers are drying up and San Fransicko has some of the highest pension payouts in the nation.

    She had to do this. It was that or literally go broke. If there was enough money still coming in she would have kept this defund he police bs going until doomsday.

    It’s really just that simple.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    State PERS, DEM-controlled cities, public school systems, etc. need their shares of another 11+ figure, federal bailout, i.e. Omicron Stimulus. That’s on top of whatever they’ll be getting from Sleepy’s BBB (FFF) spending.

    More public sector theft of private sector wealth. Sickening.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Abolish_public_education

    What is "FFF" spending?

    FFF = 666 = Ferris F. Fremont predicted in Philip K. Dick's "Radio Free Albemuth"?

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

  160. lol breed thinking heavily about the tenderloin

    In any case this is just talk. Call me when it becomes action. Maybe I’ll credit Brexit. Brussels loves crime.

  161. @JimDandy
    @SafeNow

    I'm not crazy about blacks seeing this whole self-defense thing as an opportunity.

    "Can a Black Man Claim Self-Defense In Wisconsin and Walk Free? Family of Man Who Killed White Attorney Hopes So, Especially with Surveillance Video," asks & answers crack Yahoo journalist, Kavontae Smalls

    The black man in question was apparently riding his bike in a very black fashion: "According to a police report, Evanjelina was driving and Jason Cleereman was in the passenger seat. She says she had to swerve to miss Edgecomb on his bike who was riding eastbound in the westbound lane against oncoming traffic, and that’s when Jason Cleereman yelled at Edgecomb, “What the heck?”

    The totally innocent black man responded by walking up to the car at a stop light and punching the 54 year old white man in the face for having the audacity to say "What the heck?" at him. When the white racist got out of the car, the black patriot shot him in the head.

    This is clearly the Black! Kyle Rittenhouse.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    When the white racist got out of the car, the black patriot shot him in the head.

    Maybe the Black DOAS was anti-immigration and got the wrong vibe from Cleereman:

    Milwaukee mourns Jason Cleereman, well-known immigration attorney and community advocate killed in shooting near Brady Street

    https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/local/2020/09/23/milwaukee-immigration-attorney-jason-cleereman-shot-killed-bicyclist-near-brady/3510565001/

    “His life was very ‘walk the talk,’” said Tammy Rivera, executive director of the Southside Organizing Center.

    Cleereman’s life serves as an example for people to stand up for their beliefs, Rivera said.

    “You want more green space in the inner city, become a master gardener like he did,” Rivera said. “If you are going to care about immigration as a lawyer, fight for immigration reform like he did.”

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Oh, God. Antifa is so confused right now.

  162. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @JimDandy


    When the white racist got out of the car, the black patriot shot him in the head.
     
    Maybe the Black DOAS was anti-immigration and got the wrong vibe from Cleereman:

    Milwaukee mourns Jason Cleereman, well-known immigration attorney and community advocate killed in shooting near Brady Street

    https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/local/2020/09/23/milwaukee-immigration-attorney-jason-cleereman-shot-killed-bicyclist-near-brady/3510565001/
     


    “His life was very ‘walk the talk,’” said Tammy Rivera, executive director of the Southside Organizing Center.

    Cleereman's life serves as an example for people to stand up for their beliefs, Rivera said.

    “You want more green space in the inner city, become a master gardener like he did,” Rivera said. “If you are going to care about immigration as a lawyer, fight for immigration reform like he did.”

     

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Oh, God. Antifa is so confused right now.

  163. @anonymous
    How come no GOP man besides Ruddy Guliani has ever successfully ran for mayor of a big city on a platform to clean up the streets from crime, public disorder, public drug use, opposing race hustlers like Al Sharpton.

    Replies: @additionalMike

    Because Giuliani seized the opportunity of a Dem mayor allowing a pogrom (the Crown Heights riots) to occur on his watch, thus alienating Jews, a key voting bloc of the Party.
    In doing so, Mayor Dinkins fucked up, big time.
    This being the 1990’s, there will still enough real reporters around to report this.

  164. London Breed sounds like a men’s fragrance.

    But then there’s Craig Breedlove, who set land speed records reaching 600 mph (!) in the 1960s. He was a hero to us boys.


    Breedlove and his jet-powered Spirit of America on the Bonneville Salt Flats.

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    @Buzz Mohawk

    There was a documentary on PBS about Mr. Breedlove's rival Art Arfons in the Salt Flats speed record business. Breedlove would get the record and the next year Arfons would top that and back and forth, but they were good friends.

    Breedlove tells the story that he was driving home from a speed run when he got pulled over by a highway patrol officer who scolded, "Who do you think you are, Art Arfons?" to which he replied, "No officer, I'm Craig Breedlove. Art Arfons is the guy in the car stopped along the highway behind us."

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The Beach Boys did a song about Craig Breedlove.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gc0cvsSwvs0

  165. Anonymous[423] • Disclaimer says:

    What I find uniquely bizarre about San Francisco are the absolutely beautiful buildings that look well maintained, with the horrific-looking bums, piles of human feces and garbage on the sidewalk in front of them!

    If you just got rid of the bums, and washed down the streets, it would look like an upscale yuppy paradise. I’ve never seen anything like that in any other failed city I’ve ever visited.

    If you’re up in east harlem, or the Bronx, the buildings reflect what’s happening daily in front of them. Not so with many bum-infested areas of San Francisco. The surrounding architecture is… beautiful!

    That mayor has to be completely over her head to allow that to happen! It’s like the city itself is willfully resisting her!

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Anonymous

    San Francisco is probably the most beautiful city in America. Famous the world over, it attracts people. There was the famous "Summer of '67" when hippies from around the country showed up. Long before that, some of my ancestors crossed the continent to get there during the California Gold Rush.

    The architectural beauty, and the natural setting on the bay, with the hills, the water and the Golden Gate Bridge, are independent of the phenomena you describe.

    People are literally crapping on the place because the people in charge are allowing them to. It has nothing to do with how pretty everything is.

    And yes, those North East Coast crap holes you mentioned have always been ugly, as most North East Coast crap holes are -- and not necessarily just the crap holes.

    , @Alden
    @Anonymous

    The reason rents in San Francisco are so high is because of unlimited Chinese immigration. 20 people living in a thousand sq ft apartment or house raises rents. And Chinese are used to 3 sets of triple bunks in average little 10 by 11 bedrooms. And every other room in the house. The price of housing in SF started to soar 45-40 years ago as soon as Nixon and Kissinger opened to China. It wasn’t People’s Republicans from the mainland. It was Hong Kong Taiwan S Korea Thailand. They were scared China would just roll over their countries.

    They came with so much money. Buying 2 or 3 homes in Sea Cliff St Francis Woods Richmond Sunset Park Merced Russian Nob and Telegraph Hills for cash. Plus businesses like buying 7/11s McDonalds for cash. Plus setting up illegal factories of every kind And thousands of brothels called massage places.

    Get rid of every Asian and their children who arrived after 1980 and they’re won’t be any homeless.

    The homeless are basically livestock. Like chickens and cows, it’s a good living for the farmers who work for the non profits.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  166. @PhysicistDave
    @Cato

    Cato wrote:


    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 — pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us.
     
    Lots of citizens do not care much about taxes one way or another, but very few people favor higher taxes. Abortion is not really a matter that Congress has much say over -- it is up to SCOTUS, who may or may not boot it back to the states. As for "imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us," what on earth are you talking about??

    I'm a militant atheist, but I am not worried in the slightest about the GOP trying to interfere with my religious freedom.

    The country-club GOP types are just nominally religious.

    And the evangelicals are the sort of people to whom Jefferson wrote his famous letter about a "wall of separation" between church and state. They are more solid on church-state separation than most liberals.

    I find their theological beliefs utterly nutty. But as fellow citizens... they are good neighbors and defenders of the Republic.

    Replies: @Skyler the Weird, @Cato

    [Evamgelicals, ] as fellow citizens… they are good neighbors and defenders of the Republic.

    I agree, they are my neighbors and they are the best. As for religious prejudices, I was thinking of W’s abhorrent attack on stem cell research.

    Tax cuts for the rich always stimulate the economy (think what Elon would do with the money he would keep!), but they are politically unpopular. Almost all tax cuts are for the rich, both because of the economic stimulus and because that is what the donors want.

    Abortion is probably the big one. Texas has floated the trial balloon. Let’s see how it goes.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Cato

    Cato wrote to me:


    As for religious prejudices, I was thinking of W’s abhorrent attack on stem cell research.
     
    Well... I disagree with Bush on that issue, but, as I recall, it was only on government-financed research (which is a lot but not all). And I don't think that made much difference politically or in most people's lives.

    Cato also wrote:

    Abortion is probably the big one. Texas has floated the trial balloon. Let’s see how it goes.
     
    Yeah, I was just objecting to your claim that Congress could over-reach on abortion: it's outside their purview.

    The Texas law is cunningly bizarre: my guess is SCOTUS will punt on that, but they could uphold it or strike it down without getting to the heart of Roe v. Wade.

    But the Mississippi law?

    I myself am in the odd position that I agree with the substance of Roe (abortion allowed up to the point of viability) but I think that under our federal system this should be left to the states. So, legalistically, I think SCOTUS should strike down Roe and kick it back to the states. But if they do so, that will energize the Left, contrary to the interests of the GOP.

    Politics is weird.

    Replies: @rebel yell, @Cato

  167. @MEH 0910
    https://www.tmz.com/2021/12/19/drakeo-the-ruler-dead-dies-stabbing-once-upon-a-time-concert-los-angeles/
    https://twitter.com/TMZ/status/1472540873145688069

    https://twitter.com/latimes/status/1472629116486623232

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Harry Baldwin

    Updated G.K. Chesterton:

    “Journalism largely consists in saying Drakeo the Ruler is dead to people who never knew Drakeo the Ruler* was alive.”

    *”Drakeo the Ruler” can be replaced by he name of every rapper or aspiring rapper who was ever killed, with the exception of maybe two or three I had heard of while they were still alive. YMMV.

  168. @Buzz Mohawk
    London Breed sounds like a men's fragrance.

    But then there's Craig Breedlove, who set land speed records reaching 600 mph (!) in the 1960s. He was a hero to us boys.


    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/05/13/article-0-13130DEF000005DC-537_634x458.jpg

    Breedlove and his jet-powered Spirit of America on the Bonneville Salt Flats.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @Harry Baldwin

    There was a documentary on PBS about Mr. Breedlove’s rival Art Arfons in the Salt Flats speed record business. Breedlove would get the record and the next year Arfons would top that and back and forth, but they were good friends.

    Breedlove tells the story that he was driving home from a speed run when he got pulled over by a highway patrol officer who scolded, “Who do you think you are, Art Arfons?” to which he replied, “No officer, I’m Craig Breedlove. Art Arfons is the guy in the car stopped along the highway behind us.”

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Inquiring Mind

    Art Arfons probably deserves even more credit than Craig Breedlove, because Arfons was a do-it-yourselfer who bought his jet engine from a scrap dealer for $500 and made it work. It came from one of Steve's dad's Lockheed Starfighters. Some turbine blades were missing, and Art couldn't replace them, so he removed blades opposite the missing ones to balance things.

    It worked. Art was so brave (or foolish) that he even put his driving position right next to the side of the engine. If any one of his gap-toothed turbines had flown apart, it would have gone right through him.


    https://landspeedrecord.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/art-arfons-green-monster.jpg
    Art Arfons and his 576 mph Green Monster

    Replies: @petit bourgeois, @Jack D

  169. @Buzz Mohawk
    London Breed sounds like a men's fragrance.

    But then there's Craig Breedlove, who set land speed records reaching 600 mph (!) in the 1960s. He was a hero to us boys.


    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/05/13/article-0-13130DEF000005DC-537_634x458.jpg

    Breedlove and his jet-powered Spirit of America on the Bonneville Salt Flats.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @Harry Baldwin

    The Beach Boys did a song about Craig Breedlove.

  170. Anonymous[423] • Disclaimer says:

    “Journalism largely consists in saying Drakeo the Ruler is dead to people who never knew Drakeo the Ruler* was alive.”

    Reminds me of an opinion I shared with a successful black friend: “Isn’t current rap music and it’s fans a lot like country music and it’s fans from back in the sixties? The music was kind of perversely interesting at first, but extremely repetitive, generally non-creative, and essentially the purview of mostly dumb white trash, except with rap it’s mostly dumb black trash? I mean, like ’60’s hardcore country, hip hop/rap music is written and intended for lowbrow prices of shit, who celebrate their own wretchedness, isn’t it?”

    He agreed.

    • Disagree: JimDandy
    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Anonymous

    I mean, like ’60’s hardcore country, hip hop/rap music is written and intended for lowbrow prices of shit, who celebrate their own wretchedness, isn’t it?”

    A lot of that 60s country is corny as hell but some of it seems to have genuine soul and humility. It seems to me that corny music of all kinds was popular in the 60s. I wasn't around then but that is how I view it.

    Rap like NWA was actually targeted at Whites. Once they realized White teenagers would buy it for seeming edgy the money started flowing.

    I remember a rap documentary where a producer talked about how the real money was in White shopping malls. There was an implication that Blacks might like rap but they don't have enough money.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Anonymous

    Damn, how can you dump on Tammy Wynette's "Stand by Your Man"? Granted, it's campy now, but that voice! The crescendo at the end makes makes your hair stand up. (Also, funny that Tammy was married five times.)

    Lots of '60s country was fun. I think it went down in the '80s when it got all corporate.

  171. @petit bourgeois
    The Tenderloin has always been a sketchy neighborhood. Things must really be bad now for this lefty mayor to be using profanity. But I agree with other commenters--this is all theatre to disguise more grift.

    I miss the city. One of the best Punjabi restaurants I've ever been to is in the Tenderloin, Shalimar:

    https://sfinsider.sfgate.com/what-does-the-shalimar-restaurant-in-san-francisco-ca-bring-to-the-tenderloin/

    I always brought my beer in a brown bag when dining and nobody said a word. Highly recommended.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    The liberal rulers of SF have always wanted to take the Tenderloin. It’s a complete embarrassment to them. They support Blacks in that they support them moving to across the bridge.

    Breed now has the excuse which is that the voters have had enough. Hands are tied.

  172. @anonymous
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    I assumed, based on the 1960s – 80s, we were in for a 10 -15 year descent into urban lawlessness before public outcry forced a change in crime policy. Instead it happened in less than 2 years.
     
    We may have the public outcry, but an effective change in policy will take at least a decade. In order to restore law and order, a city would need the mayor, DA, and state government to all be aligned to be tough on crime. A mayor who wants to clean things up won't be able to if there's a SorosDA who won't prosecute, or a state government that keeps decriminalizing things. How long until all three of those factors align for San Fran, Philadelphia, or any of these places?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Unladen Swallow, @John Johnson

    We may have the public outcry, but an effective change in policy will take at least a decade. In order to restore law and order, a city would need the mayor, DA, and state government to all be aligned to be tough on crime. A mayor who wants to clean things up won’t be able to if there’s a SorosDA who won’t prosecute, or a state government that keeps decriminalizing things. How long until all three of those factors align for San Fran, Philadelphia, or any of these places?

    There is also no plan as to where to put them.

    Anytime a new jail is proposed in a Democrat city there is outcry from the usual suspects about how they should be building schools.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @John Johnson


    Anytime a new jail is proposed in a Democrat city there is outcry from the usual suspects about how they should be building schools.
     
    Many schools in the last few decades were modeled after prisons, with features like a central office that can look down every corridor-- kind of like how Haussmann redesigned Paris.

    Replies: @John Johnson

  173. Burlington decided to cut its police force 30 percent. Here’s what happened next.

    Other cities with similar profiles — majority-white college towns — “defunded” their police. Norman, Oklahoma, diverted 4 percent of the police budget to community services. Northampton, Massachusetts, cut 10 percent from the police budget.

    Burlington, however, decided to slash almost 30 percent of its police force by attrition. Since then, city leaders have been forced to reckon with the unintended consequences of that decision, including problems with public safety and quality of life, police and residents say.

    Almost a year and a half later, no one, it seems, is happy. Not even the councilor who proposed the resolution.

  174. @John Johnson
    @anonymous

    We may have the public outcry, but an effective change in policy will take at least a decade. In order to restore law and order, a city would need the mayor, DA, and state government to all be aligned to be tough on crime. A mayor who wants to clean things up won’t be able to if there’s a SorosDA who won’t prosecute, or a state government that keeps decriminalizing things. How long until all three of those factors align for San Fran, Philadelphia, or any of these places?

    There is also no plan as to where to put them.

    Anytime a new jail is proposed in a Democrat city there is outcry from the usual suspects about how they should be building schools.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Anytime a new jail is proposed in a Democrat city there is outcry from the usual suspects about how they should be building schools.

    Many schools in the last few decades were modeled after prisons, with features like a central office that can look down every corridor– kind of like how Haussmann redesigned Paris.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Reg Cæsar

    Many schools in the last few decades were modeled after prisons, with features like a central office that can look down every corridor– kind of like how Haussmann redesigned Paris.

    I once toured a juvenile detention center and if not for the psychopathic kids and fences it looked like a school built in the 80s.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

  175. Interesting comment on a Shellenberger thread on San Francisco crime:

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Dave Pinsen

    Sanctuary Moon of Endor:

    https://i.postimg.cc/3wMykdsf/sanctuary-moon.jpg

    Sanctuary City of San Francisco:

    https://i.postimg.cc/GprL0GwR/sanctuary-city.jpg

    "Sanctuary" can mean many things!

    , @rebel yell
    @Dave Pinsen


    This is not actually what most citizens want
     

    We have been sold misguided lies that endanger our citizens and ruin our city.
     
    The essence of a liberal is that they will not take responsibility. Here this liberal is searching for someone else to blame for his own bad opinions and the bad consequences of his bad opinions.
    The truth is that San Francisco voters are now getting exactly what they voted for. This liberal needs to admit that he was not misguided by lies. He had the bad character to succumb to liberal moral sanctimony. The fault lies in himself, and he will forever make the same mistakes until he learns that.
  176. @anonymous
    @Wilkey

    Wilkey you're making the same old, same old Conservative American Right wing mistake of putting all your/our hopes in to electing a Presidential savior to ride in on a White horse and make everything nice again like it supposedly was in Ike's 1950s.

    The USA President isn't an all powerful dictator - the President doesn't control a single major media outlet.

    Look at Nixon and Reagan's landslide victories in 1972 and 1980 - 49 out of 50 states. These victories didn't change much of anything important because we didn't control or really contest the media/culture.

    President Nixon basically got taken out by a Jewish red diaper baby media coup by the Washington Post and CBS - Woodward and Bernstein, Norman Lear J*wish Hollywood. All over a rather low level political scandal Watergate where no one was killed, raped or even beaten.

    Compare Watergate to Roman Polanski drugging and anally raping a young girl. Imagine if Richard Nixon had done that.

    What is needed is tough, no nonsense mayors, governors, police chiefs like former Philly top cop, mayor Frank Rizzo. There is a reason the worst anti White, Antifa Communists, BLM tore down Frank Rizzo's statues in and outside of Philadelphia.

    We haven't had a real populist Governor of any state since George Wallace!

    C'mon folks we can do better than this.

    And stop wasting all/any of your time and money on Libertarian constitutionalist Presidential crusades by the likes of Ron and Rand Paul - these crusades never even win 5% - the public hates that shit

    J Ryan
    TPC The Political Cesspool

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    We haven’t had a real populist Governor of any state since George Wallace!

    Like most Southerners, Wallace supported the federal welfare state but opposed building one locally. This policy backfired spectacularly. As with the income tax, also popular in Dixie*, they thought they’d be net beneficiaries forever.

    *Except in patrician Virginia and Yankee-infested Florida, which joined Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Pennsylvania in rejecting it.

  177. @Reg Cæsar
    @John Johnson


    Anytime a new jail is proposed in a Democrat city there is outcry from the usual suspects about how they should be building schools.
     
    Many schools in the last few decades were modeled after prisons, with features like a central office that can look down every corridor-- kind of like how Haussmann redesigned Paris.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    Many schools in the last few decades were modeled after prisons, with features like a central office that can look down every corridor– kind of like how Haussmann redesigned Paris.

    I once toured a juvenile detention center and if not for the psychopathic kids and fences it looked like a school built in the 80s.

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @John Johnson

    a juvenile detention center .. looked like a school built in the 80s.

    Put:

    • schoolkids in orange jumpsuits, and
    • sharpshooters in lookout towers, and then

    Recess will look like rec time in the prison yard.

    Immigration is not my issue, but it's infuriating how [red state] politicians react to a swell of newcomers (e.g. from CA, NY, and other 3rd world countries) by declaring a crisis and initiating a crash program to build (fund!) new schools.

    (Of course construction costs are max'd by union scale wage rates.)

    Replies: @Alden

  178. @Anonymous

    “Journalism largely consists in saying Drakeo the Ruler is dead to people who never knew Drakeo the Ruler* was alive.”
     
    Reminds me of an opinion I shared with a successful black friend: "Isn’t current rap music and it’s fans a lot like country music and it’s fans from back in the sixties? The music was kind of perversely interesting at first, but extremely repetitive, generally non-creative, and essentially the purview of mostly dumb white trash, except with rap it’s mostly dumb black trash? I mean, like '60's hardcore country, hip hop/rap music is written and intended for lowbrow prices of shit, who celebrate their own wretchedness, isn’t it?"

    He agreed.

    https://youtu.be/f2KP9fYZUWA

    https://youtu.be/TMZi25Pq3T8

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Harry Baldwin

    I mean, like ’60’s hardcore country, hip hop/rap music is written and intended for lowbrow prices of shit, who celebrate their own wretchedness, isn’t it?”

    A lot of that 60s country is corny as hell but some of it seems to have genuine soul and humility. It seems to me that corny music of all kinds was popular in the 60s. I wasn’t around then but that is how I view it.

    Rap like NWA was actually targeted at Whites. Once they realized White teenagers would buy it for seeming edgy the money started flowing.

    I remember a rap documentary where a producer talked about how the real money was in White shopping malls. There was an implication that Blacks might like rap but they don’t have enough money.

  179. @Technite78
    @Dan Hayes

    There is no reason to triangulate between Whites and Blacks; the triangulation is between wealthy Jews, Hispanics and Blacks. Whites no longer have any substantial political power in NYC.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    White people in NYC are expected to do their financial or computer job or whatever technical blah blah and then go back to their house in New Jersey.

    De Blasio represents an anti-White alliance and he knows it. He even married a Black woman he isn’t attracted to in an effort to prove he won’t serve White people.

    Just look at pictures of the two of them in public. He married a racial beard.

  180. @Cato
    @PhysicistDave


    [Evamgelicals, ] as fellow citizens… they are good neighbors and defenders of the Republic.
     
    I agree, they are my neighbors and they are the best. As for religious prejudices, I was thinking of W's abhorrent attack on stem cell research.

    Tax cuts for the rich always stimulate the economy (think what Elon would do with the money he would keep!), but they are politically unpopular. Almost all tax cuts are for the rich, both because of the economic stimulus and because that is what the donors want.

    Abortion is probably the big one. Texas has floated the trial balloon. Let's see how it goes.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Cato wrote to me:

    As for religious prejudices, I was thinking of W’s abhorrent attack on stem cell research.

    Well… I disagree with Bush on that issue, but, as I recall, it was only on government-financed research (which is a lot but not all). And I don’t think that made much difference politically or in most people’s lives.

    Cato also wrote:

    Abortion is probably the big one. Texas has floated the trial balloon. Let’s see how it goes.

    Yeah, I was just objecting to your claim that Congress could over-reach on abortion: it’s outside their purview.

    The Texas law is cunningly bizarre: my guess is SCOTUS will punt on that, but they could uphold it or strike it down without getting to the heart of Roe v. Wade.

    But the Mississippi law?

    I myself am in the odd position that I agree with the substance of Roe (abortion allowed up to the point of viability) but I think that under our federal system this should be left to the states. So, legalistically, I think SCOTUS should strike down Roe and kick it back to the states. But if they do so, that will energize the Left, contrary to the interests of the GOP.

    Politics is weird.

    • Replies: @rebel yell
    @PhysicistDave

    Another way to look at your position is that politics is prioritizing and compromising for the best overall outcome. In this case you've decided (I think correctly) that upholding states powers under the federal system is more important than whether abortion is legal or not. Even if states pass pro- or anti-abortion laws you think are wrong, the damage done will be far less than the damage done by empowering a Kritarchy or Oligarchy to rule us.
    Better that we suffer from our own mistakes than from someone else's.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @Cato
    @PhysicistDave


    I myself am in the odd position that I agree with the substance of Roe (abortion allowed up to the point of viability) but I think that under our federal system this should be left to the states.
     
    Not so odd -- it is the position of Ron Paul and many other libertarians.
  181. @nebulafox
    @PhysicistDave

    Wokeism is proof that if there is a spiritual vacuum in society, humans beings will subconsciously try to fill it. Razib Khan has an excellent article on his blog that I find convincing.

    https://www.brownpundits.com/2018/09/15/between-the-saffron-and-scimitar

    Basically, he argues the kind of person who relies off analytical logical consistency to navigate the world is a minority, and probably always has been. Most people, including the majority of intelligent people, are intuitive creatures who need to learn how to use that rather than doing so on impulse. I'm not saying that's a good or a bad thing: it's just reality. It does mean that we shouldn't be shocked that secularized societies create secularized religions. And like all new systems do, they'll inevitable incorporate aspects of the old system: the development of Christianity in the 4th and 5th Century shows this in spades. The old cults might have collapsed when Roman civilization nearly did in the 3rd, but-especially out in the countryside-people did incorporate traditions into the new framework. By the time the Middle Ages came, the quiet conservatism, the faith that those who stuck to the ways of their ancestors would receive divine favor, was not that different from high paganism.

    We're not living in one of those periods, which consist of the majority of human history. We're living during one of the hinge points, where things can change rapidly over the course of a few decades (like, say, 250-280 AD in the Roman Empire). That's when things truly change.

    BTW, since I suspect this has always been the case, there's an interesting wrinkle here. In the pre-modern world, where atheism in the modern sense just wasn't on the table most of the time, probably people from that neurologically differently wired minority were the ones who constructed the intellectual underpinnings underneath philosophy, religion, etc.

    >But, yeah, Wokism is a religion, and, as an atheist, I find it a hell of a lot more dangerous than old-fashioned Bible-thumping Christianity.

    Well, I'm not an atheist anymore (long story), but needless to say, I would have agreed with you when I was.

    Though there is a lot of influence that Americanized Protestant Christianity has on wokeness, one key difference is the belief that you can't "achieve grace" and turn over a new leaf, regardless of your wealth or your skin color. You can only constantly ask for forgiveness in a state of degradation. Learned helplessness is encouraged to make societal elites feel better, not actually becoming a better person. That reminds me of Hinduism, a religion I've always had a distinct distaste for due to the caste system. As someone who would, but for good luck, be a "Dalit" in the new American faith... yeah. Makes the hair stand on the back of my neck.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @PhysicistDave

    nebulafox wrote to me:

    Basically, [Razib Khan] argues the kind of person who relies off analytical logical consistency to navigate the world is a minority, and probably always has been. Most people, including the majority of intelligent people, are intuitive creatures who need to learn how to use that rather than doing so on impulse. I’m not saying that’s a good or a bad thing: it’s just reality. It does mean that we shouldn’t be shocked that secularized societies create secularized religions.

    It will not surprise you that I tend to generally agree with Razib on the Big Questions.

    McWhorter actually has a quote from Freud along those lines:

    If you wish to expel religion from our European civilization you can only do it through another system of doctrines, and from the outset this would take over all the psychological characteristics of religion, the same sanctity, rigidity, and intolerance, the same prohibition of thought in self-defence.

    In terms of those of us who are unusually analytical, I myself, having been raised attending a Protestant Christian church, remember wondering from an early age why the churchgoers’ real beliefs differed so dramatically from their proclaimed beliefs.

    Specifically, pretty much everyone in the congregation would have thought someone was utterly bonkers who adhered to the admonition “him that taketh away thy cloak, forbid not to take thy coat also,” even though they claimed on Sunday morning to believe this.

    I remember this specific issue being a red flag for me that something was very wrong.

    Of course, I now understand intellectually that professions of belief are badges of group identity (take the Pledge of Allegiance), rather than actual statements of one’s factual beliefs or moral principles.

    But I still cannot really empathize with such behavior.

    In any case, there is a wide range of possibilities for specific religions, even if it is inevitable that most people will somehow be quasi-religious.

    As you know, the closest Chinese thought systems to Western religions (Confucianism, Buddhism, and Daoism) do not require any firm commitment to theism.

    And there are surely numerous alternatives to Wokeism (I am sorely tempted to invent some religions based on quantum mechanics — the possibilities are endless!).

    My own quasi-religious commitments, for what they are worth, are:

    A) A good society allows people to live their lives productively and to provide for their families while exhibiting honesty and integrity

    B) A good society has room for those unusual individuals who are obsessed with understanding the ultimate nature of the universe in which we live.

    I actually had a dream many years ago in which every Sunday people went to their local “Prometheum” to engage in mutual exploration and discovery of what had been discovered about the nature of the universe.

    Only a dream, but history has taken stranger turns than that. Who knows?

    • Agree: Technite78
    • Replies: @JMcG
    @PhysicistDave

    Your penultimate paragraph is reminiscent of the society described in Neal Stephenson’s Anathem. You might enjoy reading it. Anyway, Merry Holiday Season to you and yours!

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @nebulafox
    @PhysicistDave

    Good principles. I'll keep those in mind.

    >I actually had a dream many years ago in which every Sunday people went to their local “Prometheum” to engage in mutual exploration and discovery of what had been discovered about the nature of the universe.

    Dave's new Cult of Reason, Paris 1792 style? ;)

    I kid, I kid. It's actually a pretty neat idea! But not one worth focusing on when the main priority is preventing a new Dark Ages. If what we're saying is true, why don't you write that down somewhere for a descendant fated to live in different times to look at?

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @mc23
    @PhysicistDave


    My own quasi-religious commitments, for what they are worth, are:

    A) A good society allows people to live their lives productively and to provide for their families while exhibiting honesty and integrity

    B) A good society has room for those unusual individuals who are obsessed with understanding the ultimate nature of the universe in which we live.

    I actually had a dream many years ago in which every Sunday people went to their local “Prometheum” to engage in mutual exploration and discovery of what had been discovered about the nature of the universe.

     

    Doesn't sound too hard at first.

    A. Should be the Golden Rule for ordering a society. Progressives and Ayn Rand alocytes and other grifters seem to screw this up every time.
    B. I've always taken for granted but I suppose that's just conceit of the time and place I grew up.

    The "Prometheum" sounds interesting. The name's suggestive of something you would find in Plato.
  182. @PhysicistDave
    @nebulafox

    nebulafox wrote to me:


    Basically, [Razib Khan] argues the kind of person who relies off analytical logical consistency to navigate the world is a minority, and probably always has been. Most people, including the majority of intelligent people, are intuitive creatures who need to learn how to use that rather than doing so on impulse. I’m not saying that’s a good or a bad thing: it’s just reality. It does mean that we shouldn’t be shocked that secularized societies create secularized religions.
     
    It will not surprise you that I tend to generally agree with Razib on the Big Questions.

    McWhorter actually has a quote from Freud along those lines:


    If you wish to expel religion from our European civilization you can only do it through another system of doctrines, and from the outset this would take over all the psychological characteristics of religion, the same sanctity, rigidity, and intolerance, the same prohibition of thought in self-defence.
     
    In terms of those of us who are unusually analytical, I myself, having been raised attending a Protestant Christian church, remember wondering from an early age why the churchgoers' real beliefs differed so dramatically from their proclaimed beliefs.

    Specifically, pretty much everyone in the congregation would have thought someone was utterly bonkers who adhered to the admonition "him that taketh away thy cloak, forbid not to take thy coat also," even though they claimed on Sunday morning to believe this.

    I remember this specific issue being a red flag for me that something was very wrong.

    Of course, I now understand intellectually that professions of belief are badges of group identity (take the Pledge of Allegiance), rather than actual statements of one's factual beliefs or moral principles.

    But I still cannot really empathize with such behavior.

    In any case, there is a wide range of possibilities for specific religions, even if it is inevitable that most people will somehow be quasi-religious.

    As you know, the closest Chinese thought systems to Western religions (Confucianism, Buddhism, and Daoism) do not require any firm commitment to theism.

    And there are surely numerous alternatives to Wokeism (I am sorely tempted to invent some religions based on quantum mechanics -- the possibilities are endless!).

    My own quasi-religious commitments, for what they are worth, are:

    A) A good society allows people to live their lives productively and to provide for their families while exhibiting honesty and integrity

    B) A good society has room for those unusual individuals who are obsessed with understanding the ultimate nature of the universe in which we live.

    I actually had a dream many years ago in which every Sunday people went to their local "Prometheum" to engage in mutual exploration and discovery of what had been discovered about the nature of the universe.

    Only a dream, but history has taken stranger turns than that. Who knows?

    Replies: @JMcG, @nebulafox, @mc23

    Your penultimate paragraph is reminiscent of the society described in Neal Stephenson’s Anathem. You might enjoy reading it. Anyway, Merry Holiday Season to you and yours!

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @JMcG

    JMcG wrote to me:


    Anyway, Merry Holiday Season to you and yours!
     
    Atheist though I am, I am of course happy to wish everyone a Merry Christmas. While I do not accept the theology of the Incarnation, the symbolic resonance of the idea that a child shall save us -- the future does, after all, always belong to the children -- explains why Christmas is the most popular of our holidays.

    Christmas is a celebration of family, birth, and the possibility of a better future.

    Theologically, Easter is the key Christian holiday, but the will of the people throughout the West has decisively made Christmas the central holiday. Even my Jewish neighbors a couple doors down wish everyone a Merry Christmas.

    "Et in terra pax hominibus bonae voluntatis." A noble sentiment indeed.
  183. I hate to be snarky (he lied)

    “We are losing over two people a day to drug overdoses, mostly to fentanyl, and mostly in the Tenderloin and SoMa,”

    But this is probably defining a loss a bit loosely.

  184. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Gary in Gramercy


    Judge Shira Scheindlin’s outrageous, bordering-on-openly-biased opinion finding stop-and-frisk to be constitutionally suspect
     
    Stop-and-frisk as practiced was constitutionally suspect, and it’s good that it’s gone in NYC. Sure, it made the streets safer. But it also fed into bobo New Yorkers’ delusion that it’s no big deal living with ‘diversity’.

    I would rather the Blue-voting scum be made to suffer, but with the potential benefit of them (re)acquiring practical knowledge of HBD. :)

    Replies: @El Dato

    Well, eventually will get both of diversity AND stop-and-frisk by people who look less blue but more military camo as society’s “living together” dial goes to zero.

  185. @Dave Pinsen
    Interesting comment on a Shellenberger thread on San Francisco crime:

    https://twitter.com/garrytan/status/1472583720662036484?s=21

    Replies: @El Dato, @rebel yell

    Sanctuary Moon of Endor:

    Sanctuary City of San Francisco:

    “Sanctuary” can mean many things!

  186. @Wilkey
    @Cato


    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 2000 — pandering to their core constituency. In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us.
     
    1) Imposing religious prejudices is what Democrats do every minute of every hour of every day. Wokeism is a godless religion far more judgmental, oppressive, and dogmatic than most of the theistic religions that man has ever created. Just walk into many schools or workplaces and announce that men cannot become women and tell us how that goes. Announce that men and women aren't equal and tell us how that goes. Announce that races aren't equal and tell us how that goes.

    2) There is precious little new policy a Republican congressional majority can enact without having control of the White House. The major thing they will be able to do is control the purse strings. They can use that power to effect policy somewhat, but not by much. The best thing they can do with it is defund the worst impulses of the Democratic Party. 70-80% of Americans would be on board with most of that.

    Replies: @anonymous, @nebulafox, @Jack D

    Also, the abortion fight has largely been between the state legislatures, which had been regulating abortions no problem since the 19th century, and the Supreme Court which somehow discovered that the states regulating abortion was “unconstitutional” in the late 20th. It has nothing to do with Congress.

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk
    • Thanks: Alden
  187. @Abolish_public_education
    @Deadite

    State PERS, DEM-controlled cities, public school systems, etc. need their shares of another 11+ figure, federal bailout, i.e. Omicron Stimulus. That's on top of whatever they'll be getting from Sleepy's BBB (FFF) spending.

    More public sector theft of private sector wealth. Sickening.

    Replies: @El Dato

    What is “FFF” spending?

    FFF = 666 = Ferris F. Fremont predicted in Philip K. Dick’s “Radio Free Albemuth”?

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @El Dato

    FFF -- an emphatic F -- was meant as a spoof on "BBB", but I suppose it could stand for 666 or F Freedom Further. Whatever. BBB is just another pork-fest.

  188. @Anon
    If there's anything to be said here, it's that Democratic mayors care more for protecting their own careers than they do for their DA's careers. If the Soros DAs are going to make Democratic mayors unelectable, then the DAs are going to find themselves in a savage fight with their own party.

    The donors have to be running away from the Democrats.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    If there’s anything to be said here, it’s that Democratic mayors care more for protecting their own careers than they do for their DA’s careers. If the Soros DAs are going to make Democratic mayors unelectable, then the DAs are going to find themselves in a savage fight with their own party.

    All but one of the U.S.’s big cities are post-political. Other than New York City, non-Democrats are a dead letter when it comes to big city mayoral elections. All of the action will be on the Democratic primary side of things, as the general elections are mere coronations of the successful primary candidate. This means that the Democrats cannot become unelectable – the only question is which Democrat will win.

  189. @Russ
    @Cato


    When Republicans take Congress next year, they are likely to overreach just as the Demoncrats did in 20[2]0 — pandering to their core constituency.
     
    The core constituency of the establishment GOP is the lobbyist clique on K Street in DC.

    In this case, it will probably be something about taxes or abortion or imposing religious prejudices on the rest of us. Policies extremely unpopular, which will reignite the impetus to wokery.
     
    When Dems wield power, they advance the football to the left in length units of first downs rather than mere yards. When the GOP holds office, they historically "stand athwart" ... which hardly moves the ball to the right. It will be interesting to see whether the '22 elections install the McConnell/McCarthy GOPers in Congress, or the Bannon Warroom GOPers. Whatever the case, the parallels of 2022-2024 to 1994-1996 should be interesting ... assuming a big GOP win in Nov'22.

    As for Breed: I find an interesting parallel in TX Gov Abbott, who finally has been galvanized to further a border wall in his state. One story has it that the locals are so disgusted that they are now willing to cede land rights just to get it done. Why matters had to come to that is troubling.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    When Dems wield power, they advance the football to the left in length units of first downs rather than mere yards. When the GOP holds office, they historically “stand athwart” … which hardly moves the ball to the right. It will be interesting to see whether the ’22 elections install the McConnell/McCarthy GOPers in Congress, or the Bannon Warroom GOPers. Whatever the case, the parallels of 2022-2024 to 1994-1996 should be interesting … assuming a big GOP win in Nov’22.

    Democrats have a supporting apparatus which means that elected members who get turned out of office for going too far left (see, e.g. the wipeout of 2010 after passing the ACA) land in cushy jobs post office which often pay much more and require much less work than even being a U.S. Representative. They will often find themselves in the academy, at think tanks, in the Press, on corporate Boards, on Wall Street, etc. Add to this the added benefit that they don’t have to campaign and raise money anymore. (You have to stop conceiving the elected members of Congress as “the Democrats,” rather than the elected, subordinate personnel of something much bigger and more wide ranging that spans corporate America, the Press, the academy, Big Tech and so forth).

    Republicans don’t have such an apparatus, so when they get turned out of office they need to get actual jobs to support themselves – there is no soft landing for them. As a consequence, apart from the relatively few who are independently wealthy, a lost election really is a job loss for elected Republicans. There are a few, usually “moderate” types who can parlay their terms in office into lobbying gigs. Boehner wound up shilling for the marijuana industry of all things.

    There is therefore not a symmetrical environment for the two parties – Pelosi can make her electeds in swing districts walk the plank on difficult votes because there is a bed of feathers underneath it, whereas Republican leadership can’t make such offers that can’t be refused. Their members in swing districts are concerned about losing their jobs, and what for many would be a major life and financial disruption.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Thanks: Harry Baldwin
  190. @Anonymous

    “Journalism largely consists in saying Drakeo the Ruler is dead to people who never knew Drakeo the Ruler* was alive.”
     
    Reminds me of an opinion I shared with a successful black friend: "Isn’t current rap music and it’s fans a lot like country music and it’s fans from back in the sixties? The music was kind of perversely interesting at first, but extremely repetitive, generally non-creative, and essentially the purview of mostly dumb white trash, except with rap it’s mostly dumb black trash? I mean, like '60's hardcore country, hip hop/rap music is written and intended for lowbrow prices of shit, who celebrate their own wretchedness, isn’t it?"

    He agreed.

    https://youtu.be/f2KP9fYZUWA

    https://youtu.be/TMZi25Pq3T8

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Harry Baldwin

    Damn, how can you dump on Tammy Wynette’s “Stand by Your Man”? Granted, it’s campy now, but that voice! The crescendo at the end makes makes your hair stand up. (Also, funny that Tammy was married five times.)

    Lots of ’60s country was fun. I think it went down in the ’80s when it got all corporate.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  191. @Anon
    @indocon

    I'm not so certain about that. There's a white upper-class that lives in cities for a reason. They tend to donate to the Democrats. If cities become too obnoxious for them, even this class gets mad about it.

    They get mad about being rich yet having to live in a third-world crap-hole. If this class withdraws their donor money to the Democrats, the Democrats freak out.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @indocon

    I’m not so certain about that. There’s a white upper-class that lives in cities for a reason. They tend to donate to the Democrats. If cities become too obnoxious for them, even this class gets mad about it.

    They get mad about being rich yet having to live in a third-world crap-hole. If this class withdraws their donor money to the Democrats, the Democrats freak out.

    This class has available means to insulate themselves from the worst of the crime. In the 80s and 90s, there were rich people living in Manhattan – they just had “doormen” and private security and hired cars to get them around the city in comfort and safety. And they have second homes in Connecticut or the Hamptons for weekends and holidays. They might not prefer to live this way compared with the generally low crime city of ten years ago, but do not mistake this for an inability to live insulated from crime and social pathologies. In fact, the ability to perform lots of white collar work remotely probably helps insulate them even better than before.

  192. @Anon
    @indocon

    I'm not so certain about that. There's a white upper-class that lives in cities for a reason. They tend to donate to the Democrats. If cities become too obnoxious for them, even this class gets mad about it.

    They get mad about being rich yet having to live in a third-world crap-hole. If this class withdraws their donor money to the Democrats, the Democrats freak out.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @indocon

    The best rich whites in places like Mexico City can do is to pay for an armed militia defending their neighborhoods, that is what we are heading to here. It’s amazing going to visit Mexico City’s Polanco neighborhood, armed guards with machine guns protecting a Starbucks.

  193. @Anonymous
    What I find uniquely bizarre about San Francisco are the absolutely beautiful buildings that look well maintained, with the horrific-looking bums, piles of human feces and garbage on the sidewalk in front of them!

    If you just got rid of the bums, and washed down the streets, it would look like an upscale yuppy paradise. I’ve never seen anything like that in any other failed city I’ve ever visited.

    If you’re up in east harlem, or the Bronx, the buildings reflect what's happening daily in front of them. Not so with many bum-infested areas of San Francisco. The surrounding architecture is… beautiful!

    That mayor has to be completely over her head to allow that to happen! It’s like the city itself is willfully resisting her!

    https://youtu.be/_um3a8r3qbM

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Alden

    San Francisco is probably the most beautiful city in America. Famous the world over, it attracts people. There was the famous “Summer of ’67” when hippies from around the country showed up. Long before that, some of my ancestors crossed the continent to get there during the California Gold Rush.

    The architectural beauty, and the natural setting on the bay, with the hills, the water and the Golden Gate Bridge, are independent of the phenomena you describe.

    People are literally crapping on the place because the people in charge are allowing them to. It has nothing to do with how pretty everything is.

    And yes, those North East Coast crap holes you mentioned have always been ugly, as most North East Coast crap holes are — and not necessarily just the crap holes.

  194. @Inquiring Mind
    @Buzz Mohawk

    There was a documentary on PBS about Mr. Breedlove's rival Art Arfons in the Salt Flats speed record business. Breedlove would get the record and the next year Arfons would top that and back and forth, but they were good friends.

    Breedlove tells the story that he was driving home from a speed run when he got pulled over by a highway patrol officer who scolded, "Who do you think you are, Art Arfons?" to which he replied, "No officer, I'm Craig Breedlove. Art Arfons is the guy in the car stopped along the highway behind us."

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Art Arfons probably deserves even more credit than Craig Breedlove, because Arfons was a do-it-yourselfer who bought his jet engine from a scrap dealer for \$500 and made it work. It came from one of Steve’s dad’s Lockheed Starfighters. Some turbine blades were missing, and Art couldn’t replace them, so he removed blades opposite the missing ones to balance things.

    It worked. Art was so brave (or foolish) that he even put his driving position right next to the side of the engine. If any one of his gap-toothed turbines had flown apart, it would have gone right through him.

    Art Arfons and his 576 mph Green Monster

    • Replies: @petit bourgeois
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I've been into land speed racing a motorcycle the past year at El Mirage Dry Lake, and while it is a competitive sport, it's also one big happy family. The comraderie of a bunch of rich, old white men with too much money and time to build one-of-kind machines cannot be understated. The Southern California Timing Association has been around since 1938, and everyone knows everyone and helps each other out on the track. Stories like Breedlove v. Arfons still goes on in the current year.

    With all of that time and money invested, my race team won't go out on the salt for the simple reason that Bonneville is not kind to machinery. Salt gets into every fastener and the corrosion is pretty bad. If you love your race bike, you won't take it to Bonneville. El Mirage is a 1.3 mile course, whereas Bonneville has both a 3-mile and a 5-mile course, so the machines that race on those two environments (dirt vs. salt) differ in many ways.

    Last month, on the final run of the season, I managed to set a world record at El Mirage with less than six minutes practice on a new bike and only six months of club membership and I love it. But I know my record is soft and there will be people gunning to break my record when racing starts up again in the spring.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Captain Tripps

    , @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The amazing thing is that Arfons died an old man in bed, although he did manage to kill several others. And Breedlove is still alive.

    Land speed record seems to be an Anglo-Saxon thing. Aside from Americans, the rest are Brits.

    In 64/65, Arfons and Breedlove traded the record back and forth 10 times, but the current record has not been broken since 1998.

    Either our society has stop progessing technologically or else we have just lost interest in what is ultimately a gimmic. These things are not really cars in any conventional sense but basically jet planes that are flying very close to the ground.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @JMcG, @petit bourgeois

  195. @Marquis
    @Bill

    That’s simply wrong. If anything he failed to capture the suburban mom vote that the tax cuts helped. He did fine with his core constituency.

    Replies: @Bill

    Nope. He lost the most ground in 2020, relative to 2016, among non-college-educated white men. He hardly lost any ground at all among college-educated women.

  196. @John Johnson
    @Reg Cæsar

    Many schools in the last few decades were modeled after prisons, with features like a central office that can look down every corridor– kind of like how Haussmann redesigned Paris.

    I once toured a juvenile detention center and if not for the psychopathic kids and fences it looked like a school built in the 80s.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    a juvenile detention center .. looked like a school built in the 80s.

    Put:

    • schoolkids in orange jumpsuits, and
    • sharpshooters in lookout towers, and then

    Recess will look like rec time in the prison yard.

    Immigration is not my issue, but it’s infuriating how [red state] politicians react to a swell of newcomers (e.g. from CA, NY, and other 3rd world countries) by declaring a crisis and initiating a crash program to build (fund!) new schools.

    (Of course construction costs are max’d by union scale wage rates.)

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Abolish_public_education

    Why are you annoyed that construction workers earn good wages? Especially the ones that build schools and other public buildings? Buildings that should be very well built according to all the health fire and building codes and built to last.

    Do you have any idea the difference between the work done by Home Depot parking lot guys and licensed certified union journeymen?

  197. @Colin Wright
    'Harder still to put broken things back together just like they were.'

    Any examples of them ever going back the way they were before come to mind?

    Replies: @Curle

    New York, crime wise in the 1990s. DC, crime wise compared to ‘80s. Doesn’t hurt to change populations.

  198. @Dave Pinsen
    Interesting comment on a Shellenberger thread on San Francisco crime:

    https://twitter.com/garrytan/status/1472583720662036484?s=21

    Replies: @El Dato, @rebel yell

    This is not actually what most citizens want

    We have been sold misguided lies that endanger our citizens and ruin our city.

    The essence of a liberal is that they will not take responsibility. Here this liberal is searching for someone else to blame for his own bad opinions and the bad consequences of his bad opinions.
    The truth is that San Francisco voters are now getting exactly what they voted for. This liberal needs to admit that he was not misguided by lies. He had the bad character to succumb to liberal moral sanctimony. The fault lies in himself, and he will forever make the same mistakes until he learns that.

  199. @PhysicistDave
    @Cato

    Cato wrote to me:


    As for religious prejudices, I was thinking of W’s abhorrent attack on stem cell research.
     
    Well... I disagree with Bush on that issue, but, as I recall, it was only on government-financed research (which is a lot but not all). And I don't think that made much difference politically or in most people's lives.

    Cato also wrote:

    Abortion is probably the big one. Texas has floated the trial balloon. Let’s see how it goes.
     
    Yeah, I was just objecting to your claim that Congress could over-reach on abortion: it's outside their purview.

    The Texas law is cunningly bizarre: my guess is SCOTUS will punt on that, but they could uphold it or strike it down without getting to the heart of Roe v. Wade.

    But the Mississippi law?

    I myself am in the odd position that I agree with the substance of Roe (abortion allowed up to the point of viability) but I think that under our federal system this should be left to the states. So, legalistically, I think SCOTUS should strike down Roe and kick it back to the states. But if they do so, that will energize the Left, contrary to the interests of the GOP.

    Politics is weird.

    Replies: @rebel yell, @Cato

    Another way to look at your position is that politics is prioritizing and compromising for the best overall outcome. In this case you’ve decided (I think correctly) that upholding states powers under the federal system is more important than whether abortion is legal or not. Even if states pass pro- or anti-abortion laws you think are wrong, the damage done will be far less than the damage done by empowering a Kritarchy or Oligarchy to rule us.
    Better that we suffer from our own mistakes than from someone else’s.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @rebel yell

    rebel yell wrote to me:


    In this case you’ve decided (I think correctly) that upholding states powers under the federal system is more important than whether abortion is legal or not. Even if states pass pro- or anti-abortion laws you think are wrong, the damage done will be far less than the damage done by empowering a Kritarchy or Oligarchy to rule us.
     
    Yeah. Specifically, I am a proponent of liberty, of a society that is loose enough at the joints that human beings can find their own way, assuming of course they grant the same right to others.

    And not just in a narrow political sense but in the broader sense that, say, we do not expect everyone to spend four years in college, whether or not he will actually benefit from it.

    And centralized power seems to me generally more dangerous to liberty than localized power.

    At least here in the USA, if the way people choose to live in Alabama is not to your liking, you are free to move to Iowa.

    And then there is the little matter that we do have a written Constitution whose words should actually mean something!
  200. @PhysicistDave
    @nebulafox

    nebulafox wrote to me:


    Basically, [Razib Khan] argues the kind of person who relies off analytical logical consistency to navigate the world is a minority, and probably always has been. Most people, including the majority of intelligent people, are intuitive creatures who need to learn how to use that rather than doing so on impulse. I’m not saying that’s a good or a bad thing: it’s just reality. It does mean that we shouldn’t be shocked that secularized societies create secularized religions.
     
    It will not surprise you that I tend to generally agree with Razib on the Big Questions.

    McWhorter actually has a quote from Freud along those lines:


    If you wish to expel religion from our European civilization you can only do it through another system of doctrines, and from the outset this would take over all the psychological characteristics of religion, the same sanctity, rigidity, and intolerance, the same prohibition of thought in self-defence.
     
    In terms of those of us who are unusually analytical, I myself, having been raised attending a Protestant Christian church, remember wondering from an early age why the churchgoers' real beliefs differed so dramatically from their proclaimed beliefs.

    Specifically, pretty much everyone in the congregation would have thought someone was utterly bonkers who adhered to the admonition "him that taketh away thy cloak, forbid not to take thy coat also," even though they claimed on Sunday morning to believe this.

    I remember this specific issue being a red flag for me that something was very wrong.

    Of course, I now understand intellectually that professions of belief are badges of group identity (take the Pledge of Allegiance), rather than actual statements of one's factual beliefs or moral principles.

    But I still cannot really empathize with such behavior.

    In any case, there is a wide range of possibilities for specific religions, even if it is inevitable that most people will somehow be quasi-religious.

    As you know, the closest Chinese thought systems to Western religions (Confucianism, Buddhism, and Daoism) do not require any firm commitment to theism.

    And there are surely numerous alternatives to Wokeism (I am sorely tempted to invent some religions based on quantum mechanics -- the possibilities are endless!).

    My own quasi-religious commitments, for what they are worth, are:

    A) A good society allows people to live their lives productively and to provide for their families while exhibiting honesty and integrity

    B) A good society has room for those unusual individuals who are obsessed with understanding the ultimate nature of the universe in which we live.

    I actually had a dream many years ago in which every Sunday people went to their local "Prometheum" to engage in mutual exploration and discovery of what had been discovered about the nature of the universe.

    Only a dream, but history has taken stranger turns than that. Who knows?

    Replies: @JMcG, @nebulafox, @mc23

    Good principles. I’ll keep those in mind.

    >I actually had a dream many years ago in which every Sunday people went to their local “Prometheum” to engage in mutual exploration and discovery of what had been discovered about the nature of the universe.

    Dave’s new Cult of Reason, Paris 1792 style? 😉

    I kid, I kid. It’s actually a pretty neat idea! But not one worth focusing on when the main priority is preventing a new Dark Ages. If what we’re saying is true, why don’t you write that down somewhere for a descendant fated to live in different times to look at?

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @nebulafox

    nebulafox wrote to me:


    Dave’s new Cult of Reason, Paris 1792 style?
     
    That thought did indeed cross my mind -- the human ability to mess things up is indeed impressive! Anyway, that was the content of my actual dream, for better or worse.

    Of course, this issue is one of the compelling reasons for freedom of religion and freedom of expression in general. One reason American Christianity is relatively benign is the competition brought about by the First Amendment. Madison and Jefferson served us well in that respect.

    nebulafox also wrote:

    But not one worth focusing on when the main priority is preventing a new Dark Ages. If what we’re saying is true, why don’t you write that down somewhere for a descendant fated to live in different times to look at?
     
    Well... history has lots of twists and turns. I suspect that our ruling elite and the Woke Left in particular are going through their death spasms. An animal can be pretty dangerous when it is dying, but they are still dying.

    The real question is: can they take Western civilization down with them, so that the achievements of the West live on only in Eastern Eurasia? There are worse possible fates for the human race, but I myself do have a certain attachment to the West!

    Bu the way, have you noticed how impressively well-read Razib is? I read a fair amount, but I do not know how Razib manages to read as much as he does.

    Replies: @nebulafox

  201. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Inquiring Mind

    Art Arfons probably deserves even more credit than Craig Breedlove, because Arfons was a do-it-yourselfer who bought his jet engine from a scrap dealer for $500 and made it work. It came from one of Steve's dad's Lockheed Starfighters. Some turbine blades were missing, and Art couldn't replace them, so he removed blades opposite the missing ones to balance things.

    It worked. Art was so brave (or foolish) that he even put his driving position right next to the side of the engine. If any one of his gap-toothed turbines had flown apart, it would have gone right through him.


    https://landspeedrecord.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/art-arfons-green-monster.jpg
    Art Arfons and his 576 mph Green Monster

    Replies: @petit bourgeois, @Jack D

    I’ve been into land speed racing a motorcycle the past year at El Mirage Dry Lake, and while it is a competitive sport, it’s also one big happy family. The comraderie of a bunch of rich, old white men with too much money and time to build one-of-kind machines cannot be understated. The Southern California Timing Association has been around since 1938, and everyone knows everyone and helps each other out on the track. Stories like Breedlove v. Arfons still goes on in the current year.

    With all of that time and money invested, my race team won’t go out on the salt for the simple reason that Bonneville is not kind to machinery. Salt gets into every fastener and the corrosion is pretty bad. If you love your race bike, you won’t take it to Bonneville. El Mirage is a 1.3 mile course, whereas Bonneville has both a 3-mile and a 5-mile course, so the machines that race on those two environments (dirt vs. salt) differ in many ways.

    Last month, on the final run of the season, I managed to set a world record at El Mirage with less than six minutes practice on a new bike and only six months of club membership and I love it. But I know my record is soft and there will be people gunning to break my record when racing starts up again in the spring.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @petit bourgeois

    Thank you so much. That is fascinating! Godspeed to you.

    Replies: @petit bourgeois

    , @Captain Tripps
    @petit bourgeois


    Last month, on the final run of the season, I managed to set a world record at El Mirage with less than six minutes practice on a new bike and only six months of club membership and I love it. But I know my record is soft and there will be people gunning to break my record when racing starts up again in the spring.
     
    Very cool. Bon chance with your record defense, and may St. Michael protect you...

    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0076/9949/7018/products/[email protected]?v=1535250017
  202. @Dan Hayes
    @Technite78

    Adams' whole career in the NYPD was that of a belly-aching black agitator. So why should he give up a winning run?

    Replies: @Technite78, @Redman

    And didn’t he say he joined the PD because he was beaten up by cops when he was young? I think he wanted to “change” the department or something.

    Doesn’t sound like the kind of guy who’d cotton to aggressive law enforcement to me. Never got why so many conservatives seemed to have faith in this guy.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Redman

    Supposedly Adams was a radical black panther type friendly with NOI. Since he had a normal IQ and no criminal record he was encouraged to join NYPD as a mole.

    Which he did. Now he’s supposed to be the great hope to turn NYC back to semi civilization. I think the theory that he’s a black radical mole is correct. And things will get worse.

    I believe the summer of Floyd, closing the prisons etc , is a lot more than the usual catering to blacks and criminals. Maybe it’s reverse gentrification. For some reason TPTB want to totally destroy America’s cities.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Redman

    Never got why so many conservatives seemed to have faith in this guy.

    Maybe it's wishful thinking rather than faith. WOR talk show host Mark Simone would ask conservative New Yorkers Ann Coulter and Michael Goodwin why they supported Eric Adams rather than Curtis Sliwa. Their only answer was that Sliwa didn't have a chance of winning and they could at least hope that Adams would keep his promises. Whatever you think of Adams, all the other Democrats in the mayoral primary were ultra-progressive and blatantly anti-police. So there was no real alternative.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

  203. @Redman
    @Dan Hayes

    And didn’t he say he joined the PD because he was beaten up by cops when he was young? I think he wanted to “change” the department or something.

    Doesn’t sound like the kind of guy who’d cotton to aggressive law enforcement to me. Never got why so many conservatives seemed to have faith in this guy.

    Replies: @Alden, @Harry Baldwin

    Supposedly Adams was a radical black panther type friendly with NOI. Since he had a normal IQ and no criminal record he was encouraged to join NYPD as a mole.

    Which he did. Now he’s supposed to be the great hope to turn NYC back to semi civilization. I think the theory that he’s a black radical mole is correct. And things will get worse.

    I believe the summer of Floyd, closing the prisons etc , is a lot more than the usual catering to blacks and criminals. Maybe it’s reverse gentrification. For some reason TPTB want to totally destroy America’s cities.

    • Agree: West reanimator
  204. @Abolish_public_education
    @John Johnson

    a juvenile detention center .. looked like a school built in the 80s.

    Put:

    • schoolkids in orange jumpsuits, and
    • sharpshooters in lookout towers, and then

    Recess will look like rec time in the prison yard.

    Immigration is not my issue, but it's infuriating how [red state] politicians react to a swell of newcomers (e.g. from CA, NY, and other 3rd world countries) by declaring a crisis and initiating a crash program to build (fund!) new schools.

    (Of course construction costs are max'd by union scale wage rates.)

    Replies: @Alden

    Why are you annoyed that construction workers earn good wages? Especially the ones that build schools and other public buildings? Buildings that should be very well built according to all the health fire and building codes and built to last.

    Do you have any idea the difference between the work done by Home Depot parking lot guys and licensed certified union journeymen?

  205. @Bill
    @Almost Missouri

    They just did it five minutes ago. Trump did nothing but cut taxes, losing the exact downscale whites who brought him to office. That's Republican overreach.

    Replies: @Marquis, @Almost Missouri

    Trump did nothing … That’s Republican overreach.

    A.k.a. underreach.

    • Replies: @Bill
    @Almost Missouri

    Dude, the only thing they want is to make rich people richer. When they do too much of that and not enough fan service, it's overreach.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  206. @petit bourgeois
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I've been into land speed racing a motorcycle the past year at El Mirage Dry Lake, and while it is a competitive sport, it's also one big happy family. The comraderie of a bunch of rich, old white men with too much money and time to build one-of-kind machines cannot be understated. The Southern California Timing Association has been around since 1938, and everyone knows everyone and helps each other out on the track. Stories like Breedlove v. Arfons still goes on in the current year.

    With all of that time and money invested, my race team won't go out on the salt for the simple reason that Bonneville is not kind to machinery. Salt gets into every fastener and the corrosion is pretty bad. If you love your race bike, you won't take it to Bonneville. El Mirage is a 1.3 mile course, whereas Bonneville has both a 3-mile and a 5-mile course, so the machines that race on those two environments (dirt vs. salt) differ in many ways.

    Last month, on the final run of the season, I managed to set a world record at El Mirage with less than six minutes practice on a new bike and only six months of club membership and I love it. But I know my record is soft and there will be people gunning to break my record when racing starts up again in the spring.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Captain Tripps

    Thank you so much. That is fascinating! Godspeed to you.

    • Replies: @petit bourgeois
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Thank you, Buzz. Your comments here are greatly appreciated.

    My "race team" consists of me and my mechanic, who took 3 years to build the bike. I don't want to go into too much detail at the risk of getting doxxed (world records are published widely on the interwebs, but I don't think I would ever lose my job sitting at a desk Monday through Friday drafting federal lawsuits against cops for a Jewish lawyer whom I regularly call a Bolshevik), but in an abundance of caution here, I will say that I'm piloting a 350 lb. vintage Japanese parallel twin two-stroke with about 80 hp. It is like riding a rocket, with forged Wossner pistons running 110 octane leaded racing gasoline and Motul synthetic oil mixed in at about 32:1. Setting a world record on a small displacement machine is quite a thrill.

    Going down the track, you have to avoid the ruts created by cars spinning their 1,000 hp wheels who ran before you. The power kicks in at about 8,000 rpm and the motorcycle tries to throw you off the back, so you hold on for dear life with handlebars about a foot apart so you can tuck your arms in for maximum aerodynamic efficiency. The instrumentation consists of only a tachometer and a cylinder head temperature gauge, so I don't even know how fast I'm going. On a six-speed gearbox, I have to shift at 12,000 rpm without a clutch (because there is a proprietary device in the gearbox which shuts off the motor for milliseconds during shifts, similar to an air shifter in drag racing).

    I've only raced motocross and autocross before, so land speed racing is new to me, but I'm hooked for life. I'm in the Gear Grinders club, founded in 1936. You can read more at https://www.geargrindersscta.com/

    Totally on-topic: You don't have to worry about crime in San Francisco, because they're cracking down on illegal hot dog vendors!

    https://sfist.com/2021/12/20/union-square-bacon-wrapped-hot-dog-vendors-busted-en-masse-this-weekend-carts-confiscated/

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  207. @El Dato
    @Abolish_public_education

    What is "FFF" spending?

    FFF = 666 = Ferris F. Fremont predicted in Philip K. Dick's "Radio Free Albemuth"?

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    FFF — an emphatic F — was meant as a spoof on “BBB”, but I suppose it could stand for 666 or F Freedom Further. Whatever. BBB is just another pork-fest.

  208. @Redman
    @Dan Hayes

    And didn’t he say he joined the PD because he was beaten up by cops when he was young? I think he wanted to “change” the department or something.

    Doesn’t sound like the kind of guy who’d cotton to aggressive law enforcement to me. Never got why so many conservatives seemed to have faith in this guy.

    Replies: @Alden, @Harry Baldwin

    Never got why so many conservatives seemed to have faith in this guy.

    Maybe it’s wishful thinking rather than faith. WOR talk show host Mark Simone would ask conservative New Yorkers Ann Coulter and Michael Goodwin why they supported Eric Adams rather than Curtis Sliwa. Their only answer was that Sliwa didn’t have a chance of winning and they could at least hope that Adams would keep his promises. Whatever you think of Adams, all the other Democrats in the mayoral primary were ultra-progressive and blatantly anti-police. So there was no real alternative.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @Harry Baldwin

    Greg Kelly (WABC and Newsmax) has rather jaundiced and more realistic views of Adams which undoubtedly are explained by Greg's father being NYPD's longest serving Commissioner!

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  209. @nebulafox
    @PhysicistDave

    Good principles. I'll keep those in mind.

    >I actually had a dream many years ago in which every Sunday people went to their local “Prometheum” to engage in mutual exploration and discovery of what had been discovered about the nature of the universe.

    Dave's new Cult of Reason, Paris 1792 style? ;)

    I kid, I kid. It's actually a pretty neat idea! But not one worth focusing on when the main priority is preventing a new Dark Ages. If what we're saying is true, why don't you write that down somewhere for a descendant fated to live in different times to look at?

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    nebulafox wrote to me:

    Dave’s new Cult of Reason, Paris 1792 style?

    That thought did indeed cross my mind — the human ability to mess things up is indeed impressive! Anyway, that was the content of my actual dream, for better or worse.

    Of course, this issue is one of the compelling reasons for freedom of religion and freedom of expression in general. One reason American Christianity is relatively benign is the competition brought about by the First Amendment. Madison and Jefferson served us well in that respect.

    nebulafox also wrote:

    But not one worth focusing on when the main priority is preventing a new Dark Ages. If what we’re saying is true, why don’t you write that down somewhere for a descendant fated to live in different times to look at?

    Well… history has lots of twists and turns. I suspect that our ruling elite and the Woke Left in particular are going through their death spasms. An animal can be pretty dangerous when it is dying, but they are still dying.

    The real question is: can they take Western civilization down with them, so that the achievements of the West live on only in Eastern Eurasia? There are worse possible fates for the human race, but I myself do have a certain attachment to the West!

    Bu the way, have you noticed how impressively well-read Razib is? I read a fair amount, but I do not know how Razib manages to read as much as he does.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @PhysicistDave

    I think the woke are like their predecessors in history: they are great at destroying, but not so good at creating. That's the good news.

    (It really is a testament to Russian hard-headedness that Communism lasted as long as it did, listening to people who grew up in the latter day USSR. There's nothing inevitable in history, but there is such a thing as odds, and societies that encourage the best rather than the worst in human nature will be the ones that triumph. Ones that go against human nature altogether, now...)

    The bad news is... well, how much damage can they do in the meantime? The US is a finite thing, like all human things.

    >That thought did indeed cross my mind — the human ability to mess things up is indeed impressive!

    Just keep your head down, stoke a healthy ego, but slap it down whenever it risks slipping into megalomania or arrogance.

  210. @JMcG
    @PhysicistDave

    Your penultimate paragraph is reminiscent of the society described in Neal Stephenson’s Anathem. You might enjoy reading it. Anyway, Merry Holiday Season to you and yours!

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    JMcG wrote to me:

    Anyway, Merry Holiday Season to you and yours!

    Atheist though I am, I am of course happy to wish everyone a Merry Christmas. While I do not accept the theology of the Incarnation, the symbolic resonance of the idea that a child shall save us — the future does, after all, always belong to the children — explains why Christmas is the most popular of our holidays.

    Christmas is a celebration of family, birth, and the possibility of a better future.

    Theologically, Easter is the key Christian holiday, but the will of the people throughout the West has decisively made Christmas the central holiday. Even my Jewish neighbors a couple doors down wish everyone a Merry Christmas.

    Et in terra pax hominibus bonae voluntatis.” A noble sentiment indeed.

  211. @PhysicistDave
    @Cato

    Cato wrote to me:


    As for religious prejudices, I was thinking of W’s abhorrent attack on stem cell research.
     
    Well... I disagree with Bush on that issue, but, as I recall, it was only on government-financed research (which is a lot but not all). And I don't think that made much difference politically or in most people's lives.

    Cato also wrote:

    Abortion is probably the big one. Texas has floated the trial balloon. Let’s see how it goes.
     
    Yeah, I was just objecting to your claim that Congress could over-reach on abortion: it's outside their purview.

    The Texas law is cunningly bizarre: my guess is SCOTUS will punt on that, but they could uphold it or strike it down without getting to the heart of Roe v. Wade.

    But the Mississippi law?

    I myself am in the odd position that I agree with the substance of Roe (abortion allowed up to the point of viability) but I think that under our federal system this should be left to the states. So, legalistically, I think SCOTUS should strike down Roe and kick it back to the states. But if they do so, that will energize the Left, contrary to the interests of the GOP.

    Politics is weird.

    Replies: @rebel yell, @Cato

    I myself am in the odd position that I agree with the substance of Roe (abortion allowed up to the point of viability) but I think that under our federal system this should be left to the states.

    Not so odd — it is the position of Ron Paul and many other libertarians.

  212. @rebel yell
    @PhysicistDave

    Another way to look at your position is that politics is prioritizing and compromising for the best overall outcome. In this case you've decided (I think correctly) that upholding states powers under the federal system is more important than whether abortion is legal or not. Even if states pass pro- or anti-abortion laws you think are wrong, the damage done will be far less than the damage done by empowering a Kritarchy or Oligarchy to rule us.
    Better that we suffer from our own mistakes than from someone else's.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    rebel yell wrote to me:

    In this case you’ve decided (I think correctly) that upholding states powers under the federal system is more important than whether abortion is legal or not. Even if states pass pro- or anti-abortion laws you think are wrong, the damage done will be far less than the damage done by empowering a Kritarchy or Oligarchy to rule us.

    Yeah. Specifically, I am a proponent of liberty, of a society that is loose enough at the joints that human beings can find their own way, assuming of course they grant the same right to others.

    And not just in a narrow political sense but in the broader sense that, say, we do not expect everyone to spend four years in college, whether or not he will actually benefit from it.

    And centralized power seems to me generally more dangerous to liberty than localized power.

    At least here in the USA, if the way people choose to live in Alabama is not to your liking, you are free to move to Iowa.

    And then there is the little matter that we do have a written Constitution whose words should actually mean something!

    • Agree: JMcG
  213. Today, 12/20/21 Chesa Boudin and various addiction specialist held a press conference denouncing the mayor and urging more money be diverted to drug addiction and outreach programs LOL.

    London Breed has several acres of addicts and bums sprawled all over civic center plaza right in front of her office.

    I wonder what the main industry of SF is now? Not construction not tourism but probably grant hustling and the breeding and livestock farming of criminals and deranged derelicts to create jobs for social workers.

  214. We have hereby posted 218 comments related either directly, or very remotely, or not at all, to this “London Breed” subject. Steve has done another fine job. That is his real business. Good job, Steve. We are happy to help, and you know it.

    I suggest even more “old timer” questions, like “how many of you remember catching frogs in your backyard?” etc.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Buzz Mohawk

    We had a toad. Way cuter than frogs

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  215. @Harry Baldwin
    @Redman

    Never got why so many conservatives seemed to have faith in this guy.

    Maybe it's wishful thinking rather than faith. WOR talk show host Mark Simone would ask conservative New Yorkers Ann Coulter and Michael Goodwin why they supported Eric Adams rather than Curtis Sliwa. Their only answer was that Sliwa didn't have a chance of winning and they could at least hope that Adams would keep his promises. Whatever you think of Adams, all the other Democrats in the mayoral primary were ultra-progressive and blatantly anti-police. So there was no real alternative.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    Greg Kelly (WABC and Newsmax) has rather jaundiced and more realistic views of Adams which undoubtedly are explained by Greg’s father being NYPD’s longest serving Commissioner!

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Dan Hayes

    Mark Simone had very low expectations of him as well. He noted that Adams left the NYPD rather than submit to an ethics investigation (if that's what you call the dept looking into your corruption) and until recently had cheered on Black Lives Matter.

    Lately, Simone has been looking for reasons to be optimistic.

  216. @Dan Hayes
    @Harry Baldwin

    Greg Kelly (WABC and Newsmax) has rather jaundiced and more realistic views of Adams which undoubtedly are explained by Greg's father being NYPD's longest serving Commissioner!

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Mark Simone had very low expectations of him as well. He noted that Adams left the NYPD rather than submit to an ethics investigation (if that’s what you call the dept looking into your corruption) and until recently had cheered on Black Lives Matter.

    Lately, Simone has been looking for reasons to be optimistic.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  217. @Buzz Mohawk
    We have hereby posted 218 comments related either directly, or very remotely, or not at all, to this "London Breed" subject. Steve has done another fine job. That is his real business. Good job, Steve. We are happy to help, and you know it.

    I suggest even more "old timer" questions, like "how many of you remember catching frogs in your backyard?" etc.

    Replies: @Alden

    We had a toad. Way cuter than frogs

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Alden

    LOL. I had a toad too. They are indeed cute. They're like little people. Then we had to dissect them in high school, and we found out that even inside they are like little people.

    Merry Christmas to you, Alden. Here we all discuss, debate and make fun, and there is a camaraderie.

    Replies: @Alden

  218. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I assumed, based on the 1960s - 80s, we were in for a 10 -15 year descent into urban lawlessness before public outcry forced a change in crime policy. Instead it happened in less than 2 years.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Dan Hayes, @HammerJack, @Cato, @anonymous, @JohnnyD, @Yancey Ward, @indocon, @Colin Wright

    ‘I assumed, based on the 1960s – 80s, we were in for a 10 -15 year descent into urban lawlessness before public outcry forced a change in crime policy. Instead it happened in less than 2 years.’

    San Francisco started becoming uninhabitable a lot more than two years ago.

    We made our last attempt to visit there a good ten years ago. It was so bad that when it came time to go back to the car, I seriously suggested my wife and daughter wait on Market Street while my son and I made the walk.

    Really, it’s been sliding downhill for decades now.

  219. @Daniel H
    If I were Breed, to get a jumpstart on this initiative, I would do what many social service agencies in farsighted cities have been doing for years. Offer every bum on the streets of the Tenderlolin $200 on the condition that they enter a departing bus (transportation paid for by the city) for, say, Salt Lake City.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Sick 'n Tired, @Pericles, @duncsbaby

    Offer every bum on the streets of the Tenderlolin \$200 on the condition that they enter a departing bus (transportation paid for by the city) for, say, Salt Lake City.

    They’d get off in Oakland and thumb a ride back to San Francisco.

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @duncsbaby

    $200 on the condition that they enter a departing bus

    States get upset about illegal dumping (though lawyers don't mind).

    The federal (US Supreme) court was established, or so it was claimed, in order to hear unremarkable cases like this one, i.e. state vs state, in a neutral setting.

    The People have been conditioned to believe that the job of the Supreme Court is to divine the true meaning of guiding principles like #2 (that "shall not" part is so confusing), and that federal courts exist, and indeed need to be expanded, in order to provide the necessary venues for (politically appointed) US:

    • Judges to tell States how to conduct their own affairs.
    • Attorneys to prosecute very bad people for [political non-crimes], e.g.

    •• wire fraud (speaking in disapproved manner over the telephone),
    •• campaign finance violation (enthusiastically supporting one's favorite political candidate,
    •• environmental terrorism (developing private property),
    •• on and on.

  220. @Alden
    @Buzz Mohawk

    We had a toad. Way cuter than frogs

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    LOL. I had a toad too. They are indeed cute. They’re like little people. Then we had to dissect them in high school, and we found out that even inside they are like little people.

    Merry Christmas to you, Alden. Here we all discuss, debate and make fun, and there is a camaraderie.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Ours lived in a little hole in the yard. It was so cute. And Merry Christmas to you and every Steve follower

  221. @petit bourgeois
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I've been into land speed racing a motorcycle the past year at El Mirage Dry Lake, and while it is a competitive sport, it's also one big happy family. The comraderie of a bunch of rich, old white men with too much money and time to build one-of-kind machines cannot be understated. The Southern California Timing Association has been around since 1938, and everyone knows everyone and helps each other out on the track. Stories like Breedlove v. Arfons still goes on in the current year.

    With all of that time and money invested, my race team won't go out on the salt for the simple reason that Bonneville is not kind to machinery. Salt gets into every fastener and the corrosion is pretty bad. If you love your race bike, you won't take it to Bonneville. El Mirage is a 1.3 mile course, whereas Bonneville has both a 3-mile and a 5-mile course, so the machines that race on those two environments (dirt vs. salt) differ in many ways.

    Last month, on the final run of the season, I managed to set a world record at El Mirage with less than six minutes practice on a new bike and only six months of club membership and I love it. But I know my record is soft and there will be people gunning to break my record when racing starts up again in the spring.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Captain Tripps

    Last month, on the final run of the season, I managed to set a world record at El Mirage with less than six minutes practice on a new bike and only six months of club membership and I love it. But I know my record is soft and there will be people gunning to break my record when racing starts up again in the spring.

    Very cool. Bon chance with your record defense, and may St. Michael protect you…

  222. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Alden

    LOL. I had a toad too. They are indeed cute. They're like little people. Then we had to dissect them in high school, and we found out that even inside they are like little people.

    Merry Christmas to you, Alden. Here we all discuss, debate and make fun, and there is a camaraderie.

    Replies: @Alden

    Ours lived in a little hole in the yard. It was so cute. And Merry Christmas to you and every Steve follower

  223. A mayor named ‘London Breed’ is asking for a really good joke. Unfortunately, after abt. 10 min. I haven’t been able to find one yet. The below is lame.

    A:I say, I say, I say.

    B:What?

    A:That’s a mighty vicious looking dog you have there.

    B:Indeed it is.

    A:Is it a Staffordshire terrier?

    B:No, it is a type of pit-bull, beloved of people who otherwise hate dogs.

    A:So what kind of bull-terrier is it then?

    B:A new one, it’s called the London breed.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Che Guava

    This has already been definitely answered: London Breed is the new seasonal Milk Chocolate Stout from a popular microbrewery in Brixton.

    Replies: @Che Guava

  224. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Inquiring Mind

    Art Arfons probably deserves even more credit than Craig Breedlove, because Arfons was a do-it-yourselfer who bought his jet engine from a scrap dealer for $500 and made it work. It came from one of Steve's dad's Lockheed Starfighters. Some turbine blades were missing, and Art couldn't replace them, so he removed blades opposite the missing ones to balance things.

    It worked. Art was so brave (or foolish) that he even put his driving position right next to the side of the engine. If any one of his gap-toothed turbines had flown apart, it would have gone right through him.


    https://landspeedrecord.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/art-arfons-green-monster.jpg
    Art Arfons and his 576 mph Green Monster

    Replies: @petit bourgeois, @Jack D

    The amazing thing is that Arfons died an old man in bed, although he did manage to kill several others. And Breedlove is still alive.

    Land speed record seems to be an Anglo-Saxon thing. Aside from Americans, the rest are Brits.

    In 64/65, Arfons and Breedlove traded the record back and forth 10 times, but the current record has not been broken since 1998.

    Either our society has stop progessing technologically or else we have just lost interest in what is ultimately a gimmic. These things are not really cars in any conventional sense but basically jet planes that are flying very close to the ground.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    Yes! They were jet and rocket planes flying close to the ground.

    This is what happens when men push a sport to its limit. Then, what are they to do? I totally agree with you that it became a gimmick.

    As you say, it seems to be an Anglo-Saxon thing. A lot could be written about why that is. You need wide open expanses to run your vehicles, and Anglo-Saxons / Americans were the very people who had access to those.

    You can't tell me that Germans would not have loved to do the same thing, but for the fact that they did not have access to those lands. Americans and their cousins did.

    Germans built the very first, real, modern highways, which they called autobahns. Our US interstates today could support super speeds, but we are not allowed to enjoy them (though I have!)

    Replies: @Jack D, @Steve Sailer

    , @JMcG
    @Jack D

    As we say in the trade, “You can only tie the record for low-flying, not break it.”

    , @petit bourgeois
    @Jack D

    I'm definitely an Anglo-Saxon, with a little Maori mixed in. Don't forget that Kiwis have been prominent on the salt: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_World%27s_Fastest_Indian

    At the meet last month, a Swede showed up with his belly tanker. He flew over here to race the minute Covid travel restrictions were lifted. Belly tankers are surplus aircraft fuel tanks from WWII (typically P-38 Lightning) converted into land speed race cars. I would love to race one, but I don't have $200k to buy one.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DQnkLaaX4AA8vYA.jpg

    Our society has stopped progressing technologically. The bike I race was made in Japan in 1973, and banned by the EPA in 1985. The SCTA had to make special rules allowing a few millimeters of extra bore when certifying records because stock pistons and cylinders are hard to come by.

    I still have my street legal two-stroke, manufactured in 1977, at least until the State of California confiscates it as a "gross polluter."

  225. @duncsbaby
    @Daniel H


    Offer every bum on the streets of the Tenderlolin $200 on the condition that they enter a departing bus (transportation paid for by the city) for, say, Salt Lake City.
     
    They'd get off in Oakland and thumb a ride back to San Francisco.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    \$200 on the condition that they enter a departing bus

    States get upset about illegal dumping (though lawyers don’t mind).

    The federal (US Supreme) court was established, or so it was claimed, in order to hear unremarkable cases like this one, i.e. state vs state, in a neutral setting.

    The People have been conditioned to believe that the job of the Supreme Court is to divine the true meaning of guiding principles like #2 (that “shall not” part is so confusing), and that federal courts exist, and indeed need to be expanded, in order to provide the necessary venues for (politically appointed) US:

    • Judges to tell States how to conduct their own affairs.
    • Attorneys to prosecute very bad people for [political non-crimes], e.g.

    •• wire fraud (speaking in disapproved manner over the telephone),
    •• campaign finance violation (enthusiastically supporting one’s favorite political candidate,
    •• environmental terrorism (developing private property),
    •• on and on.

  226. @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The amazing thing is that Arfons died an old man in bed, although he did manage to kill several others. And Breedlove is still alive.

    Land speed record seems to be an Anglo-Saxon thing. Aside from Americans, the rest are Brits.

    In 64/65, Arfons and Breedlove traded the record back and forth 10 times, but the current record has not been broken since 1998.

    Either our society has stop progessing technologically or else we have just lost interest in what is ultimately a gimmic. These things are not really cars in any conventional sense but basically jet planes that are flying very close to the ground.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @JMcG, @petit bourgeois

    Yes! They were jet and rocket planes flying close to the ground.

    This is what happens when men push a sport to its limit. Then, what are they to do? I totally agree with you that it became a gimmick.

    As you say, it seems to be an Anglo-Saxon thing. A lot could be written about why that is. You need wide open expanses to run your vehicles, and Anglo-Saxons / Americans were the very people who had access to those.

    You can’t tell me that Germans would not have loved to do the same thing, but for the fact that they did not have access to those lands. Americans and their cousins did.

    Germans built the very first, real, modern highways, which they called autobahns. Our US interstates today could support super speeds, but we are not allowed to enjoy them (though I have!)

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk


    You need wide open expanses to run your vehicles,
     
    It can't just be the wide open spaces. The Salar de Uyuni salt flats in Bolivia are 100x bigger than Bonneville - they are the size of Connecticut. If a German wants to do a speed record run, he can take a plane to Utah the same as a Brit.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Buzz Mohawk

    German tourists love taking bus trips to Death Valley.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

  227. @Muggles
    @Bill Jones


    I’m sure you are honest and upright in your tax reporting but these changes may effect you.
    New $600 reporting limit.
     
    While I'm not iSteve, nor am I giving him or others tax advice here, I am a retired tax professional.

    As far as I'm aware iSteve (and most others here on Unz) are not selling anything, either goods or services. Anyone can read for free. And does.

    They may be soliciting voluntary gifts or donations. Gifts and donations (legitimate ones, not disguised sales, etc.) are not taxable to the recipient. Ever.

    So while he could, as others might, get one of these 1099ks, and the IRS might also get a copy, the amounts reported on them solely showing gifts wouldn't be reportable or taxable to him. If he is also selling something (say a book) which might be included, he should break that out on his Schedule C or E or whatever.

    Or, to avoid hassle, he could choose to report a Gross Amount total received annually, show that on a Sch. C, E, or whatever, and then totally offset the amount with an added expense line (not shown on the form, but you can add them) saying "Reported amount of non taxable voluntary gifts received." If he does receive payment for services (writing, etc.) he could put both taxable and non taxable gifts on the same Schedule, offsetting the gifts with the added "expense."

    I believe GoFundMe donations received aren't taxable either, and these would have a similar reporting issue. Or really any kind of donations for relief or emergency or sympathy that could come through a 3rd party money collection process (credit card, PayPal, etc.).

    Best to ask your tax professional or at least search online accounting publications for Best Practices on this.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    The beauty of Unz.

    There’s always someone who knows.

  228. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    Yes! They were jet and rocket planes flying close to the ground.

    This is what happens when men push a sport to its limit. Then, what are they to do? I totally agree with you that it became a gimmick.

    As you say, it seems to be an Anglo-Saxon thing. A lot could be written about why that is. You need wide open expanses to run your vehicles, and Anglo-Saxons / Americans were the very people who had access to those.

    You can't tell me that Germans would not have loved to do the same thing, but for the fact that they did not have access to those lands. Americans and their cousins did.

    Germans built the very first, real, modern highways, which they called autobahns. Our US interstates today could support super speeds, but we are not allowed to enjoy them (though I have!)

    Replies: @Jack D, @Steve Sailer

    You need wide open expanses to run your vehicles,

    It can’t just be the wide open spaces. The Salar de Uyuni salt flats in Bolivia are 100x bigger than Bonneville – they are the size of Connecticut. If a German wants to do a speed record run, he can take a plane to Utah the same as a Brit.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    https://images.hgmsites.net/hug/mercedes-benz_100641217_h.jpg

    The Mercedes-Benz W 125 held the world speed record for cars on a public road for almost 80 years. It went 433 kph (269 mph) on a German autobahn in 1938.


    It's not the only German speed record car either.

  229. @Buzz Mohawk
    @petit bourgeois

    Thank you so much. That is fascinating! Godspeed to you.

    Replies: @petit bourgeois

    Thank you, Buzz. Your comments here are greatly appreciated.

    My “race team” consists of me and my mechanic, who took 3 years to build the bike. I don’t want to go into too much detail at the risk of getting doxxed (world records are published widely on the interwebs, but I don’t think I would ever lose my job sitting at a desk Monday through Friday drafting federal lawsuits against cops for a Jewish lawyer whom I regularly call a Bolshevik), but in an abundance of caution here, I will say that I’m piloting a 350 lb. vintage Japanese parallel twin two-stroke with about 80 hp. It is like riding a rocket, with forged Wossner pistons running 110 octane leaded racing gasoline and Motul synthetic oil mixed in at about 32:1. Setting a world record on a small displacement machine is quite a thrill.

    Going down the track, you have to avoid the ruts created by cars spinning their 1,000 hp wheels who ran before you. The power kicks in at about 8,000 rpm and the motorcycle tries to throw you off the back, so you hold on for dear life with handlebars about a foot apart so you can tuck your arms in for maximum aerodynamic efficiency. The instrumentation consists of only a tachometer and a cylinder head temperature gauge, so I don’t even know how fast I’m going. On a six-speed gearbox, I have to shift at 12,000 rpm without a clutch (because there is a proprietary device in the gearbox which shuts off the motor for milliseconds during shifts, similar to an air shifter in drag racing).

    I’ve only raced motocross and autocross before, so land speed racing is new to me, but I’m hooked for life. I’m in the Gear Grinders club, founded in 1936. You can read more at https://www.geargrindersscta.com/

    Totally on-topic: You don’t have to worry about crime in San Francisco, because they’re cracking down on illegal hot dog vendors!

    https://sfist.com/2021/12/20/union-square-bacon-wrapped-hot-dog-vendors-busted-en-masse-this-weekend-carts-confiscated/

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @petit bourgeois

    Fantastic! Thank you! Be safe out there, and watch out for hot dogs.


    https://www.simplemost.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Oscar-Mayer-Wienermobile_exterior-1-e1563475374644.jpg

    I wonder if there is a wienermobile land speed record...

    Replies: @petit bourgeois

  230. @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The amazing thing is that Arfons died an old man in bed, although he did manage to kill several others. And Breedlove is still alive.

    Land speed record seems to be an Anglo-Saxon thing. Aside from Americans, the rest are Brits.

    In 64/65, Arfons and Breedlove traded the record back and forth 10 times, but the current record has not been broken since 1998.

    Either our society has stop progessing technologically or else we have just lost interest in what is ultimately a gimmic. These things are not really cars in any conventional sense but basically jet planes that are flying very close to the ground.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @JMcG, @petit bourgeois

    As we say in the trade, “You can only tie the record for low-flying, not break it.”

  231. @Brian Reilly
    The people in SF are getting just what they have consistently indicated they prefer. Maybe they don't actually like junkies, unprosecuted assaultive crime, and filthy degenerates living on the streets of the city, but they damn sure vote for people who enable and tolerate all of that and more.

    That city could be cleaned up in about a week. Most of the rest of the shitholes around the nation as well, but there just isn't any real demand for it from We, the People. We are content with a spiffy new smartphone, lots o' streaming and not having to go into work much.

    We vote for people like London Breed, Bill DeBlasio, and Lori Lightfoot. We deserve all the bad things we get. We asked for them.

    Replies: @Negrolphin Pool, @PaceLaw

    Well said. It should be noted that in just about every big urban city, blacks will consistently vote on skin color alone and usually elect an incompetent person who looks like them. I live here in the Baltimore area, and the current mayor and state’s attorney for the city are leading examples of 2 young incompetents who were voted into their positions based solely on their skin color. It seems that the majority of black voters are too racially prideful to consider non-blacks for major leadership positions in most cities. Sad.

  232. @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The amazing thing is that Arfons died an old man in bed, although he did manage to kill several others. And Breedlove is still alive.

    Land speed record seems to be an Anglo-Saxon thing. Aside from Americans, the rest are Brits.

    In 64/65, Arfons and Breedlove traded the record back and forth 10 times, but the current record has not been broken since 1998.

    Either our society has stop progessing technologically or else we have just lost interest in what is ultimately a gimmic. These things are not really cars in any conventional sense but basically jet planes that are flying very close to the ground.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @JMcG, @petit bourgeois

    I’m definitely an Anglo-Saxon, with a little Maori mixed in. Don’t forget that Kiwis have been prominent on the salt: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_World%27s_Fastest_Indian

    At the meet last month, a Swede showed up with his belly tanker. He flew over here to race the minute Covid travel restrictions were lifted. Belly tankers are surplus aircraft fuel tanks from WWII (typically P-38 Lightning) converted into land speed race cars. I would love to race one, but I don’t have \$200k to buy one.

    Our society has stopped progressing technologically. The bike I race was made in Japan in 1973, and banned by the EPA in 1985. The SCTA had to make special rules allowing a few millimeters of extra bore when certifying records because stock pistons and cylinders are hard to come by.

    I still have my street legal two-stroke, manufactured in 1977, at least until the State of California confiscates it as a “gross polluter.”

  233. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    Yes! They were jet and rocket planes flying close to the ground.

    This is what happens when men push a sport to its limit. Then, what are they to do? I totally agree with you that it became a gimmick.

    As you say, it seems to be an Anglo-Saxon thing. A lot could be written about why that is. You need wide open expanses to run your vehicles, and Anglo-Saxons / Americans were the very people who had access to those.

    You can't tell me that Germans would not have loved to do the same thing, but for the fact that they did not have access to those lands. Americans and their cousins did.

    Germans built the very first, real, modern highways, which they called autobahns. Our US interstates today could support super speeds, but we are not allowed to enjoy them (though I have!)

    Replies: @Jack D, @Steve Sailer

    German tourists love taking bus trips to Death Valley.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @Steve Sailer

    Since Germans are notorious wanna-be American cowboys, I’m surprised they do not make Monument Valley pilgrimages. Or do they?

  234. @Che Guava
    A mayor named 'London Breed' is asking for a really good joke. Unfortunately, after abt. 10 min. I haven't been able to find one yet. The below is lame.

    A:I say, I say, I say.

    B:What?

    A:That's a mighty vicious looking dog you have there.

    B:Indeed it is.

    A:Is it a Staffordshire terrier?

    B:No, it is a type of pit-bull, beloved of people who otherwise hate dogs.

    A:So what kind of bull-terrier is it then?

    B:A new one, it's called the London breed.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    This has already been definitely answered: London Breed is the new seasonal Milk Chocolate Stout from a popular microbrewery in Brixton.

    • Replies: @Che Guava
    @JimDandy

    Not bad, but worse than mine.

    I suppose two examples don't make a trend, but both London Breed and General Breedlove have names so hilarious that a good joke in words alone is not possible.

    Replies: @JimDandy

  235. @Almost Missouri
    @Bill


    Trump did nothing ... That’s Republican overreach.
     
    A.k.a. underreach.

    Replies: @Bill

    Dude, the only thing they want is to make rich people richer. When they do too much of that and not enough fan service, it’s overreach.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Bill

    Democrats are making the rich richer as fast or faster than Republicans are. Yet neither party claims this as a goal. (And it is not even very difficult. It will mostly happen naturally by itself, without any legislative intervention.) But on their stated goals, the Democrats are far more effective than the Republicans. The Dems waste no time in implementing their campaign goals and even implement related things they didn't campaign on ("overreach"). The Republicans routinely campaign on stuff they never bother doing once in office.

    The massive health care overhaul in the Obama years wasn't part of an election campaign, just something the Left has wanted to do for long time, for example. By contrast, Republicans actively campaigned on rolling it back, yet never actually did despite ample opportunity and popularity ("underreach").

    Replies: @Bill

  236. @petit bourgeois
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Thank you, Buzz. Your comments here are greatly appreciated.

    My "race team" consists of me and my mechanic, who took 3 years to build the bike. I don't want to go into too much detail at the risk of getting doxxed (world records are published widely on the interwebs, but I don't think I would ever lose my job sitting at a desk Monday through Friday drafting federal lawsuits against cops for a Jewish lawyer whom I regularly call a Bolshevik), but in an abundance of caution here, I will say that I'm piloting a 350 lb. vintage Japanese parallel twin two-stroke with about 80 hp. It is like riding a rocket, with forged Wossner pistons running 110 octane leaded racing gasoline and Motul synthetic oil mixed in at about 32:1. Setting a world record on a small displacement machine is quite a thrill.

    Going down the track, you have to avoid the ruts created by cars spinning their 1,000 hp wheels who ran before you. The power kicks in at about 8,000 rpm and the motorcycle tries to throw you off the back, so you hold on for dear life with handlebars about a foot apart so you can tuck your arms in for maximum aerodynamic efficiency. The instrumentation consists of only a tachometer and a cylinder head temperature gauge, so I don't even know how fast I'm going. On a six-speed gearbox, I have to shift at 12,000 rpm without a clutch (because there is a proprietary device in the gearbox which shuts off the motor for milliseconds during shifts, similar to an air shifter in drag racing).

    I've only raced motocross and autocross before, so land speed racing is new to me, but I'm hooked for life. I'm in the Gear Grinders club, founded in 1936. You can read more at https://www.geargrindersscta.com/

    Totally on-topic: You don't have to worry about crime in San Francisco, because they're cracking down on illegal hot dog vendors!

    https://sfist.com/2021/12/20/union-square-bacon-wrapped-hot-dog-vendors-busted-en-masse-this-weekend-carts-confiscated/

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Fantastic! Thank you! Be safe out there, and watch out for hot dogs.


    I wonder if there is a wienermobile land speed record…

    • Replies: @petit bourgeois
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I saw what you did there. Brilliant!

    I'm spending my Christmas in Tijuana and Rosarito. The bacon wrapped hot dogs originated in Tijuana, and I've been eating them from the street vendors since 1983. I usually load them up with mayo, ketchup, mustard, raw onion and pickled jalapenos (escabeche). There's nothing more heavenly than stumbling out of a bar on Revolution Avenue at 4 a.m. and devouring three or four. You can even make them at home if you are so inclined. I also get them after leaving Cal football games at the LA Colosseum when we play USC. But I am really going to Mexico for Christmas to dine on Pacific spiny lobster for my Christmas dinner.

    As for land speed racing, there is nothing more spiritual than the quiet and solitude you experience on the dry lake bed at the end of a run. It is a five step process to shut down the motor and coast to an area of relative safety at over a 100 mph.

    1. Hit the panic button, which arrests the ignition. This button is important to use if the cylinder head temperature exceeds 1400 Fahrenheit.

    2. Hit the kill switch on the other side. The state of California doesn't like you calling it a kill switch so now it's known as an engine cutoff switch. Refer to the California highway patrol motorcycle safety program to use the proper nomenclature. Calling it a kill switch implies some sort of violence. Now it is called an engine cut off switch.

    3. Pull the clutch lever to disengage the motor.

    4. Turn the throttle clockwise to stop the fuel from entering the motor.

    5. Turn the fuel off using a pingle device, essentially a handlebar mounted petcock. Per the California highway patrol, you can't use the term petcock anymore. Now it's called a fuel distribution valve.

    The best part of the ride is when everything is shut down and you're just flying on a dry lake bed with no engine and coasting to the side of the racetrack in total silence. It really instills your sense of mortality in yourself and your being and that there is a God.

    Thank you to everyone commenting here and Godspeed to all of you.

    Replies: @JMcG

  237. @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk


    You need wide open expanses to run your vehicles,
     
    It can't just be the wide open spaces. The Salar de Uyuni salt flats in Bolivia are 100x bigger than Bonneville - they are the size of Connecticut. If a German wants to do a speed record run, he can take a plane to Utah the same as a Brit.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    The Mercedes-Benz W 125 held the world speed record for cars on a public road for almost 80 years. It went 433 kph (269 mph) on a German autobahn in 1938.

    It’s not the only German speed record car either.

  238. @Anonymous
    What I find uniquely bizarre about San Francisco are the absolutely beautiful buildings that look well maintained, with the horrific-looking bums, piles of human feces and garbage on the sidewalk in front of them!

    If you just got rid of the bums, and washed down the streets, it would look like an upscale yuppy paradise. I’ve never seen anything like that in any other failed city I’ve ever visited.

    If you’re up in east harlem, or the Bronx, the buildings reflect what's happening daily in front of them. Not so with many bum-infested areas of San Francisco. The surrounding architecture is… beautiful!

    That mayor has to be completely over her head to allow that to happen! It’s like the city itself is willfully resisting her!

    https://youtu.be/_um3a8r3qbM

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Alden

    The reason rents in San Francisco are so high is because of unlimited Chinese immigration. 20 people living in a thousand sq ft apartment or house raises rents. And Chinese are used to 3 sets of triple bunks in average little 10 by 11 bedrooms. And every other room in the house. The price of housing in SF started to soar 45-40 years ago as soon as Nixon and Kissinger opened to China. It wasn’t People’s Republicans from the mainland. It was Hong Kong Taiwan S Korea Thailand. They were scared China would just roll over their countries.

    They came with so much money. Buying 2 or 3 homes in Sea Cliff St Francis Woods Richmond Sunset Park Merced Russian Nob and Telegraph Hills for cash. Plus businesses like buying 7/11s McDonalds for cash. Plus setting up illegal factories of every kind And thousands of brothels called massage places.

    Get rid of every Asian and their children who arrived after 1980 and they’re won’t be any homeless.

    The homeless are basically livestock. Like chickens and cows, it’s a good living for the farmers who work for the non profits.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Alden

    My cousin was getting wealthy selling San Francisco houses to Hong Kong millionaires in the 1980s.

    Replies: @Alden

  239. @Buzz Mohawk
    @petit bourgeois

    Fantastic! Thank you! Be safe out there, and watch out for hot dogs.


    https://www.simplemost.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Oscar-Mayer-Wienermobile_exterior-1-e1563475374644.jpg

    I wonder if there is a wienermobile land speed record...

    Replies: @petit bourgeois

    I saw what you did there. Brilliant!

    I’m spending my Christmas in Tijuana and Rosarito. The bacon wrapped hot dogs originated in Tijuana, and I’ve been eating them from the street vendors since 1983. I usually load them up with mayo, ketchup, mustard, raw onion and pickled jalapenos (escabeche). There’s nothing more heavenly than stumbling out of a bar on Revolution Avenue at 4 a.m. and devouring three or four. You can even make them at home if you are so inclined. I also get them after leaving Cal football games at the LA Colosseum when we play USC. But I am really going to Mexico for Christmas to dine on Pacific spiny lobster for my Christmas dinner.

    As for land speed racing, there is nothing more spiritual than the quiet and solitude you experience on the dry lake bed at the end of a run. It is a five step process to shut down the motor and coast to an area of relative safety at over a 100 mph.

    1. Hit the panic button, which arrests the ignition. This button is important to use if the cylinder head temperature exceeds 1400 Fahrenheit.

    2. Hit the kill switch on the other side. The state of California doesn’t like you calling it a kill switch so now it’s known as an engine cutoff switch. Refer to the California highway patrol motorcycle safety program to use the proper nomenclature. Calling it a kill switch implies some sort of violence. Now it is called an engine cut off switch.

    3. Pull the clutch lever to disengage the motor.

    4. Turn the throttle clockwise to stop the fuel from entering the motor.

    5. Turn the fuel off using a pingle device, essentially a handlebar mounted petcock. Per the California highway patrol, you can’t use the term petcock anymore. Now it’s called a fuel distribution valve.

    The best part of the ride is when everything is shut down and you’re just flying on a dry lake bed with no engine and coasting to the side of the racetrack in total silence. It really instills your sense of mortality in yourself and your being and that there is a God.

    Thank you to everyone commenting here and Godspeed to all of you.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @petit bourgeois

    1400° Cylinder Head Temperature?! Holy smokes that’s high. I was timed at 130 on the back straight at Pocono on my heavily modded RD-350 years and years ago during a race. That was just about fast enough. They do land speed racing on an old SAC runway in Maine here on the east coast I believe.
    Good luck and Merry Christmas to you.

  240. @Bill
    @Almost Missouri

    Dude, the only thing they want is to make rich people richer. When they do too much of that and not enough fan service, it's overreach.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Democrats are making the rich richer as fast or faster than Republicans are. Yet neither party claims this as a goal. (And it is not even very difficult. It will mostly happen naturally by itself, without any legislative intervention.) But on their stated goals, the Democrats are far more effective than the Republicans. The Dems waste no time in implementing their campaign goals and even implement related things they didn’t campaign on (“overreach”). The Republicans routinely campaign on stuff they never bother doing once in office.

    The massive health care overhaul in the Obama years wasn’t part of an election campaign, just something the Left has wanted to do for long time, for example. By contrast, Republicans actively campaigned on rolling it back, yet never actually did despite ample opportunity and popularity (“underreach”).

    • Replies: @Bill
    @Almost Missouri

    Nope. Democrats deliver benefits to their various constituent groups. They are endlessly increasing demand for academics, social workers, and various and sundry other loyal constituents. Sometimes they go too far in doing this: they overreach.

    It's Republicans who serve a few thousand rich people at the expense of the actual people who vote and volunteer for them. Sometimes they go too far in doing this: they overreach.


    on their stated goals, the Democrats are far more effective than the Republicans.
     
    Of course. The Republicans are far less honest than are the Democrats, largely because their voters are such utter rubes. So, the Republicans' ostensible goals resemble their goals less than is so for the Democrats. Both parties do a decent job at achieving their goals when they have power. Electing even more rock-ribbed Republicans would make things even worse since they would be even more likely to overreach.
  241. @Alden
    @Anonymous

    The reason rents in San Francisco are so high is because of unlimited Chinese immigration. 20 people living in a thousand sq ft apartment or house raises rents. And Chinese are used to 3 sets of triple bunks in average little 10 by 11 bedrooms. And every other room in the house. The price of housing in SF started to soar 45-40 years ago as soon as Nixon and Kissinger opened to China. It wasn’t People’s Republicans from the mainland. It was Hong Kong Taiwan S Korea Thailand. They were scared China would just roll over their countries.

    They came with so much money. Buying 2 or 3 homes in Sea Cliff St Francis Woods Richmond Sunset Park Merced Russian Nob and Telegraph Hills for cash. Plus businesses like buying 7/11s McDonalds for cash. Plus setting up illegal factories of every kind And thousands of brothels called massage places.

    Get rid of every Asian and their children who arrived after 1980 and they’re won’t be any homeless.

    The homeless are basically livestock. Like chickens and cows, it’s a good living for the farmers who work for the non profits.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    My cousin was getting wealthy selling San Francisco houses to Hong Kong millionaires in the 1980s.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Steve Sailer

    Yep my kids went to school with their kids. Unbelievable the money they arrived with. Even 4 and 5 graders realized that a 300K house was more than a quarter million. And buying a 7/11 or Burger King franchise for cash. Wow, just wow.

    And fill a shabby little 2 bedroom row house with 20-25 restaurant or factory illegal slaves 5,6 K a month easy.

    The cause of homelessness is not having a place to live. I mean, Steve, just drive over the hills to Malibu. Very expensive homes filled with mentally ill, drunk , drug addicts.

    One thing about all these viewing with alarm and gasping in dismay videos about the Tenderloin. It’s all outsiders who interview newcomers. Eastern boundary of Tenderloin is the grand and glorious Beaux Arts style City Hall.

    Western boundary is Cathedral Prep School. Founded 1851 a thousand or more kids who pay high tuition. And take public buses or walk from the subway station and buy snacks or whatever from the nearby Asian owner convenience stores and go out at lunch to move their cars and park their cars all over the infamous Tenderloin and aren’t fazed a bit by the so called horrors of the Tenderloin. The city kids take the public bus or walk down Ellis st to downtown. Where they catch the cable car up to Nob Russian or Telegraph Hill. Or walk through the dreaded Tenderloin to Geary and California Sts to catch the public bus west to Richmond Sunset Pacific Heights. The suburban kids go through the Tenderloin to get to the Bart station. back home or downtown to meet the parents.

    The street crime is committed by blacks who have a place to live. The tax cheating slave labor exploitation prostitution illegal gambling EBT fraud other frauds massive illegal drug importation white collar crimes are committed by the Asian immigrants ignorant conservatives love so much.

    The Tenderloin is a thriving business district of Asian owned restaurants and stores. Plus live theatre. And a few blocks above Ellis st some grand and glorious 1910 1920s apartments. No parking unfortunately.

    San Francisco is turning into a typical squalid Asian City. As intended by the government of China. The Asians on the Board of Supervisors Building Department succeeded in getting approval for 20 story condo buildings of 600 SQUARE FEET 2 bedroom condos. To be filled with 20 people. Built right on the eastern edge of the city on unstable 19th century amateurish landfill and sand. Just like all those tiny condos in China and Chinese diaspora cities. .

    Census says SF is about 30 percent Asian. That’s the just the ones who fill out the census. If Asians are such conservatives the naive conservatives believe, why do they tolerate such a black crime ridden city and elect blacks like London Breed and approve of a black police chief?

    SF public schools have a complete bussing out of the neighborhood system. Every kid goes into a big pot of applicants. So kids are all over town on the public bus and subway system. Very few White kids . The Asian kids are bullied and abused by the blacks. But the Asian parents don’t object. And the public school board is full of elected radical Asian women who created the every kid can be bussed across town system. The Asians who do vote are a solid radical democrat block just like the blacks and Jews.

    Luckily due to Catholicism and capitalism there are plenty of private schools in SF. Last time I counted when the grand kids were applying there were more private high schools than public high schools in town.

    A conspiracy theorist would have to conclude it’s a long range plan by the government of China to make first San Francisco , then the entire Bay Area except Marin a de facto Chinese colony.
    I believe they will succeed. And it will be all Chinese. Not like the Boston Irish or Louisiana NOLA French 100 years ago who shared the town with other ethnicities.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Truth

  242. @JimDandy
    @Che Guava

    This has already been definitely answered: London Breed is the new seasonal Milk Chocolate Stout from a popular microbrewery in Brixton.

    Replies: @Che Guava

    Not bad, but worse than mine.

    I suppose two examples don’t make a trend, but both London Breed and General Breedlove have names so hilarious that a good joke in words alone is not possible.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Che Guava

    You're in denial. Speaking of funny names, just when I thought black names couldn't get any funnier, Nebraska football signed a four-star player named Decoldest Crawford.



    https://cdn.diffords.com/contrib/bws/2017/10/59db9577744ee.jpg

    Replies: @Che Guava

  243. @petit bourgeois
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I saw what you did there. Brilliant!

    I'm spending my Christmas in Tijuana and Rosarito. The bacon wrapped hot dogs originated in Tijuana, and I've been eating them from the street vendors since 1983. I usually load them up with mayo, ketchup, mustard, raw onion and pickled jalapenos (escabeche). There's nothing more heavenly than stumbling out of a bar on Revolution Avenue at 4 a.m. and devouring three or four. You can even make them at home if you are so inclined. I also get them after leaving Cal football games at the LA Colosseum when we play USC. But I am really going to Mexico for Christmas to dine on Pacific spiny lobster for my Christmas dinner.

    As for land speed racing, there is nothing more spiritual than the quiet and solitude you experience on the dry lake bed at the end of a run. It is a five step process to shut down the motor and coast to an area of relative safety at over a 100 mph.

    1. Hit the panic button, which arrests the ignition. This button is important to use if the cylinder head temperature exceeds 1400 Fahrenheit.

    2. Hit the kill switch on the other side. The state of California doesn't like you calling it a kill switch so now it's known as an engine cutoff switch. Refer to the California highway patrol motorcycle safety program to use the proper nomenclature. Calling it a kill switch implies some sort of violence. Now it is called an engine cut off switch.

    3. Pull the clutch lever to disengage the motor.

    4. Turn the throttle clockwise to stop the fuel from entering the motor.

    5. Turn the fuel off using a pingle device, essentially a handlebar mounted petcock. Per the California highway patrol, you can't use the term petcock anymore. Now it's called a fuel distribution valve.

    The best part of the ride is when everything is shut down and you're just flying on a dry lake bed with no engine and coasting to the side of the racetrack in total silence. It really instills your sense of mortality in yourself and your being and that there is a God.

    Thank you to everyone commenting here and Godspeed to all of you.

    Replies: @JMcG

    1400° Cylinder Head Temperature?! Holy smokes that’s high. I was timed at 130 on the back straight at Pocono on my heavily modded RD-350 years and years ago during a race. That was just about fast enough. They do land speed racing on an old SAC runway in Maine here on the east coast I believe.
    Good luck and Merry Christmas to you.

  244. @Almost Missouri
    @Bill

    Democrats are making the rich richer as fast or faster than Republicans are. Yet neither party claims this as a goal. (And it is not even very difficult. It will mostly happen naturally by itself, without any legislative intervention.) But on their stated goals, the Democrats are far more effective than the Republicans. The Dems waste no time in implementing their campaign goals and even implement related things they didn't campaign on ("overreach"). The Republicans routinely campaign on stuff they never bother doing once in office.

    The massive health care overhaul in the Obama years wasn't part of an election campaign, just something the Left has wanted to do for long time, for example. By contrast, Republicans actively campaigned on rolling it back, yet never actually did despite ample opportunity and popularity ("underreach").

    Replies: @Bill

    Nope. Democrats deliver benefits to their various constituent groups. They are endlessly increasing demand for academics, social workers, and various and sundry other loyal constituents. Sometimes they go too far in doing this: they overreach.

    It’s Republicans who serve a few thousand rich people at the expense of the actual people who vote and volunteer for them. Sometimes they go too far in doing this: they overreach.

    on their stated goals, the Democrats are far more effective than the Republicans.

    Of course. The Republicans are far less honest than are the Democrats, largely because their voters are such utter rubes. So, the Republicans’ ostensible goals resemble their goals less than is so for the Democrats. Both parties do a decent job at achieving their goals when they have power. Electing even more rock-ribbed Republicans would make things even worse since they would be even more likely to overreach.

  245. @Steve Sailer
    @Alden

    My cousin was getting wealthy selling San Francisco houses to Hong Kong millionaires in the 1980s.

    Replies: @Alden

    Yep my kids went to school with their kids. Unbelievable the money they arrived with. Even 4 and 5 graders realized that a 300K house was more than a quarter million. And buying a 7/11 or Burger King franchise for cash. Wow, just wow.

    And fill a shabby little 2 bedroom row house with 20-25 restaurant or factory illegal slaves 5,6 K a month easy.

    The cause of homelessness is not having a place to live. I mean, Steve, just drive over the hills to Malibu. Very expensive homes filled with mentally ill, drunk , drug addicts.

    One thing about all these viewing with alarm and gasping in dismay videos about the Tenderloin. It’s all outsiders who interview newcomers. Eastern boundary of Tenderloin is the grand and glorious Beaux Arts style City Hall.

    Western boundary is Cathedral Prep School. Founded 1851 a thousand or more kids who pay high tuition. And take public buses or walk from the subway station and buy snacks or whatever from the nearby Asian owner convenience stores and go out at lunch to move their cars and park their cars all over the infamous Tenderloin and aren’t fazed a bit by the so called horrors of the Tenderloin. The city kids take the public bus or walk down Ellis st to downtown. Where they catch the cable car up to Nob Russian or Telegraph Hill. Or walk through the dreaded Tenderloin to Geary and California Sts to catch the public bus west to Richmond Sunset Pacific Heights. The suburban kids go through the Tenderloin to get to the Bart station. back home or downtown to meet the parents.

    The street crime is committed by blacks who have a place to live. The tax cheating slave labor exploitation prostitution illegal gambling EBT fraud other frauds massive illegal drug importation white collar crimes are committed by the Asian immigrants ignorant conservatives love so much.

    The Tenderloin is a thriving business district of Asian owned restaurants and stores. Plus live theatre. And a few blocks above Ellis st some grand and glorious 1910 1920s apartments. No parking unfortunately.

    San Francisco is turning into a typical squalid Asian City. As intended by the government of China. The Asians on the Board of Supervisors Building Department succeeded in getting approval for 20 story condo buildings of 600 SQUARE FEET 2 bedroom condos. To be filled with 20 people. Built right on the eastern edge of the city on unstable 19th century amateurish landfill and sand. Just like all those tiny condos in China and Chinese diaspora cities. .

    Census says SF is about 30 percent Asian. That’s the just the ones who fill out the census. If Asians are such conservatives the naive conservatives believe, why do they tolerate such a black crime ridden city and elect blacks like London Breed and approve of a black police chief?

    SF public schools have a complete bussing out of the neighborhood system. Every kid goes into a big pot of applicants. So kids are all over town on the public bus and subway system. Very few White kids . The Asian kids are bullied and abused by the blacks. But the Asian parents don’t object. And the public school board is full of elected radical Asian women who created the every kid can be bussed across town system. The Asians who do vote are a solid radical democrat block just like the blacks and Jews.

    Luckily due to Catholicism and capitalism there are plenty of private schools in SF. Last time I counted when the grand kids were applying there were more private high schools than public high schools in town.

    A conspiracy theorist would have to conclude it’s a long range plan by the government of China to make first San Francisco , then the entire Bay Area except Marin a de facto Chinese colony.
    I believe they will succeed. And it will be all Chinese. Not like the Boston Irish or Louisiana NOLA French 100 years ago who shared the town with other ethnicities.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Alden

    Alden, I’ve said it before, but you are peerless. Thanks for your comments here this year, and Merry Christmas to you. God Bless!

    Replies: @Alden

    , @Truth
    @Alden


    The cause of homelessness is not having a place to live.
     
    You see Aldey; this is the high IQ, nitty-gritty, that a man on my level fails to comprehend, for which I daily frequent this website.
  246. @Steve Sailer
    @Buzz Mohawk

    German tourists love taking bus trips to Death Valley.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    Since Germans are notorious wanna-be American cowboys, I’m surprised they do not make Monument Valley pilgrimages. Or do they?

  247. @PhysicistDave
    @nebulafox

    nebulafox wrote to me:


    Dave’s new Cult of Reason, Paris 1792 style?
     
    That thought did indeed cross my mind -- the human ability to mess things up is indeed impressive! Anyway, that was the content of my actual dream, for better or worse.

    Of course, this issue is one of the compelling reasons for freedom of religion and freedom of expression in general. One reason American Christianity is relatively benign is the competition brought about by the First Amendment. Madison and Jefferson served us well in that respect.

    nebulafox also wrote:

    But not one worth focusing on when the main priority is preventing a new Dark Ages. If what we’re saying is true, why don’t you write that down somewhere for a descendant fated to live in different times to look at?
     
    Well... history has lots of twists and turns. I suspect that our ruling elite and the Woke Left in particular are going through their death spasms. An animal can be pretty dangerous when it is dying, but they are still dying.

    The real question is: can they take Western civilization down with them, so that the achievements of the West live on only in Eastern Eurasia? There are worse possible fates for the human race, but I myself do have a certain attachment to the West!

    Bu the way, have you noticed how impressively well-read Razib is? I read a fair amount, but I do not know how Razib manages to read as much as he does.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    I think the woke are like their predecessors in history: they are great at destroying, but not so good at creating. That’s the good news.

    (It really is a testament to Russian hard-headedness that Communism lasted as long as it did, listening to people who grew up in the latter day USSR. There’s nothing inevitable in history, but there is such a thing as odds, and societies that encourage the best rather than the worst in human nature will be the ones that triumph. Ones that go against human nature altogether, now…)

    The bad news is… well, how much damage can they do in the meantime? The US is a finite thing, like all human things.

    >That thought did indeed cross my mind — the human ability to mess things up is indeed impressive!

    Just keep your head down, stoke a healthy ego, but slap it down whenever it risks slipping into megalomania or arrogance.

  248. @Che Guava
    @JimDandy

    Not bad, but worse than mine.

    I suppose two examples don't make a trend, but both London Breed and General Breedlove have names so hilarious that a good joke in words alone is not possible.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    You’re in denial. Speaking of funny names, just when I thought black names couldn’t get any funnier, Nebraska football signed a four-star player named Decoldest Crawford.

    • Replies: @Che Guava
    @JimDandy

    Lol, thank you. It is close and I have seen it before, but barely remembered.

    However, show me an example of 'Breed' being in the name of a beer or wine, and I'll consider it next to my dog breeds image.

    Cheers.

  249. @PhysicistDave
    @nebulafox

    nebulafox wrote to me:


    Basically, [Razib Khan] argues the kind of person who relies off analytical logical consistency to navigate the world is a minority, and probably always has been. Most people, including the majority of intelligent people, are intuitive creatures who need to learn how to use that rather than doing so on impulse. I’m not saying that’s a good or a bad thing: it’s just reality. It does mean that we shouldn’t be shocked that secularized societies create secularized religions.
     
    It will not surprise you that I tend to generally agree with Razib on the Big Questions.

    McWhorter actually has a quote from Freud along those lines:


    If you wish to expel religion from our European civilization you can only do it through another system of doctrines, and from the outset this would take over all the psychological characteristics of religion, the same sanctity, rigidity, and intolerance, the same prohibition of thought in self-defence.
     
    In terms of those of us who are unusually analytical, I myself, having been raised attending a Protestant Christian church, remember wondering from an early age why the churchgoers' real beliefs differed so dramatically from their proclaimed beliefs.

    Specifically, pretty much everyone in the congregation would have thought someone was utterly bonkers who adhered to the admonition "him that taketh away thy cloak, forbid not to take thy coat also," even though they claimed on Sunday morning to believe this.

    I remember this specific issue being a red flag for me that something was very wrong.

    Of course, I now understand intellectually that professions of belief are badges of group identity (take the Pledge of Allegiance), rather than actual statements of one's factual beliefs or moral principles.

    But I still cannot really empathize with such behavior.

    In any case, there is a wide range of possibilities for specific religions, even if it is inevitable that most people will somehow be quasi-religious.

    As you know, the closest Chinese thought systems to Western religions (Confucianism, Buddhism, and Daoism) do not require any firm commitment to theism.

    And there are surely numerous alternatives to Wokeism (I am sorely tempted to invent some religions based on quantum mechanics -- the possibilities are endless!).

    My own quasi-religious commitments, for what they are worth, are:

    A) A good society allows people to live their lives productively and to provide for their families while exhibiting honesty and integrity

    B) A good society has room for those unusual individuals who are obsessed with understanding the ultimate nature of the universe in which we live.

    I actually had a dream many years ago in which every Sunday people went to their local "Prometheum" to engage in mutual exploration and discovery of what had been discovered about the nature of the universe.

    Only a dream, but history has taken stranger turns than that. Who knows?

    Replies: @JMcG, @nebulafox, @mc23

    My own quasi-religious commitments, for what they are worth, are:

    A) A good society allows people to live their lives productively and to provide for their families while exhibiting honesty and integrity

    B) A good society has room for those unusual individuals who are obsessed with understanding the ultimate nature of the universe in which we live.

    I actually had a dream many years ago in which every Sunday people went to their local “Prometheum” to engage in mutual exploration and discovery of what had been discovered about the nature of the universe.

    Doesn’t sound too hard at first.

    A. Should be the Golden Rule for ordering a society. Progressives and Ayn Rand alocytes and other grifters seem to screw this up every time.
    B. I’ve always taken for granted but I suppose that’s just conceit of the time and place I grew up.

    The “Prometheum” sounds interesting. The name’s suggestive of something you would find in Plato.

  250. @Alden
    @Steve Sailer

    Yep my kids went to school with their kids. Unbelievable the money they arrived with. Even 4 and 5 graders realized that a 300K house was more than a quarter million. And buying a 7/11 or Burger King franchise for cash. Wow, just wow.

    And fill a shabby little 2 bedroom row house with 20-25 restaurant or factory illegal slaves 5,6 K a month easy.

    The cause of homelessness is not having a place to live. I mean, Steve, just drive over the hills to Malibu. Very expensive homes filled with mentally ill, drunk , drug addicts.

    One thing about all these viewing with alarm and gasping in dismay videos about the Tenderloin. It’s all outsiders who interview newcomers. Eastern boundary of Tenderloin is the grand and glorious Beaux Arts style City Hall.

    Western boundary is Cathedral Prep School. Founded 1851 a thousand or more kids who pay high tuition. And take public buses or walk from the subway station and buy snacks or whatever from the nearby Asian owner convenience stores and go out at lunch to move their cars and park their cars all over the infamous Tenderloin and aren’t fazed a bit by the so called horrors of the Tenderloin. The city kids take the public bus or walk down Ellis st to downtown. Where they catch the cable car up to Nob Russian or Telegraph Hill. Or walk through the dreaded Tenderloin to Geary and California Sts to catch the public bus west to Richmond Sunset Pacific Heights. The suburban kids go through the Tenderloin to get to the Bart station. back home or downtown to meet the parents.

    The street crime is committed by blacks who have a place to live. The tax cheating slave labor exploitation prostitution illegal gambling EBT fraud other frauds massive illegal drug importation white collar crimes are committed by the Asian immigrants ignorant conservatives love so much.

    The Tenderloin is a thriving business district of Asian owned restaurants and stores. Plus live theatre. And a few blocks above Ellis st some grand and glorious 1910 1920s apartments. No parking unfortunately.

    San Francisco is turning into a typical squalid Asian City. As intended by the government of China. The Asians on the Board of Supervisors Building Department succeeded in getting approval for 20 story condo buildings of 600 SQUARE FEET 2 bedroom condos. To be filled with 20 people. Built right on the eastern edge of the city on unstable 19th century amateurish landfill and sand. Just like all those tiny condos in China and Chinese diaspora cities. .

    Census says SF is about 30 percent Asian. That’s the just the ones who fill out the census. If Asians are such conservatives the naive conservatives believe, why do they tolerate such a black crime ridden city and elect blacks like London Breed and approve of a black police chief?

    SF public schools have a complete bussing out of the neighborhood system. Every kid goes into a big pot of applicants. So kids are all over town on the public bus and subway system. Very few White kids . The Asian kids are bullied and abused by the blacks. But the Asian parents don’t object. And the public school board is full of elected radical Asian women who created the every kid can be bussed across town system. The Asians who do vote are a solid radical democrat block just like the blacks and Jews.

    Luckily due to Catholicism and capitalism there are plenty of private schools in SF. Last time I counted when the grand kids were applying there were more private high schools than public high schools in town.

    A conspiracy theorist would have to conclude it’s a long range plan by the government of China to make first San Francisco , then the entire Bay Area except Marin a de facto Chinese colony.
    I believe they will succeed. And it will be all Chinese. Not like the Boston Irish or Louisiana NOLA French 100 years ago who shared the town with other ethnicities.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Truth

    Alden, I’ve said it before, but you are peerless. Thanks for your comments here this year, and Merry Christmas to you. God Bless!

    • Replies: @Alden
    @JMcG

    Thanks for the compliment and Merry Christmas to your and yours.

  251. @Alden
    @Steve Sailer

    Yep my kids went to school with their kids. Unbelievable the money they arrived with. Even 4 and 5 graders realized that a 300K house was more than a quarter million. And buying a 7/11 or Burger King franchise for cash. Wow, just wow.

    And fill a shabby little 2 bedroom row house with 20-25 restaurant or factory illegal slaves 5,6 K a month easy.

    The cause of homelessness is not having a place to live. I mean, Steve, just drive over the hills to Malibu. Very expensive homes filled with mentally ill, drunk , drug addicts.

    One thing about all these viewing with alarm and gasping in dismay videos about the Tenderloin. It’s all outsiders who interview newcomers. Eastern boundary of Tenderloin is the grand and glorious Beaux Arts style City Hall.

    Western boundary is Cathedral Prep School. Founded 1851 a thousand or more kids who pay high tuition. And take public buses or walk from the subway station and buy snacks or whatever from the nearby Asian owner convenience stores and go out at lunch to move their cars and park their cars all over the infamous Tenderloin and aren’t fazed a bit by the so called horrors of the Tenderloin. The city kids take the public bus or walk down Ellis st to downtown. Where they catch the cable car up to Nob Russian or Telegraph Hill. Or walk through the dreaded Tenderloin to Geary and California Sts to catch the public bus west to Richmond Sunset Pacific Heights. The suburban kids go through the Tenderloin to get to the Bart station. back home or downtown to meet the parents.

    The street crime is committed by blacks who have a place to live. The tax cheating slave labor exploitation prostitution illegal gambling EBT fraud other frauds massive illegal drug importation white collar crimes are committed by the Asian immigrants ignorant conservatives love so much.

    The Tenderloin is a thriving business district of Asian owned restaurants and stores. Plus live theatre. And a few blocks above Ellis st some grand and glorious 1910 1920s apartments. No parking unfortunately.

    San Francisco is turning into a typical squalid Asian City. As intended by the government of China. The Asians on the Board of Supervisors Building Department succeeded in getting approval for 20 story condo buildings of 600 SQUARE FEET 2 bedroom condos. To be filled with 20 people. Built right on the eastern edge of the city on unstable 19th century amateurish landfill and sand. Just like all those tiny condos in China and Chinese diaspora cities. .

    Census says SF is about 30 percent Asian. That’s the just the ones who fill out the census. If Asians are such conservatives the naive conservatives believe, why do they tolerate such a black crime ridden city and elect blacks like London Breed and approve of a black police chief?

    SF public schools have a complete bussing out of the neighborhood system. Every kid goes into a big pot of applicants. So kids are all over town on the public bus and subway system. Very few White kids . The Asian kids are bullied and abused by the blacks. But the Asian parents don’t object. And the public school board is full of elected radical Asian women who created the every kid can be bussed across town system. The Asians who do vote are a solid radical democrat block just like the blacks and Jews.

    Luckily due to Catholicism and capitalism there are plenty of private schools in SF. Last time I counted when the grand kids were applying there were more private high schools than public high schools in town.

    A conspiracy theorist would have to conclude it’s a long range plan by the government of China to make first San Francisco , then the entire Bay Area except Marin a de facto Chinese colony.
    I believe they will succeed. And it will be all Chinese. Not like the Boston Irish or Louisiana NOLA French 100 years ago who shared the town with other ethnicities.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Truth

    The cause of homelessness is not having a place to live.

    You see Aldey; this is the high IQ, nitty-gritty, that a man on my level fails to comprehend, for which I daily frequent this website.

  252. @JMcG
    @Alden

    Alden, I’ve said it before, but you are peerless. Thanks for your comments here this year, and Merry Christmas to you. God Bless!

    Replies: @Alden

    Thanks for the compliment and Merry Christmas to your and yours.

  253. Merry Christmas to everyone.

  254. @JimDandy
    @Che Guava

    You're in denial. Speaking of funny names, just when I thought black names couldn't get any funnier, Nebraska football signed a four-star player named Decoldest Crawford.



    https://cdn.diffords.com/contrib/bws/2017/10/59db9577744ee.jpg

    Replies: @Che Guava

    Lol, thank you. It is close and I have seen it before, but barely remembered.

    However, show me an example of ‘Breed’ being in the name of a beer or wine, and I’ll consider it next to my dog breeds image.

    Cheers.

  255. I’m really determined to win this contest, man. And I don’t even know what the prize is!

    “We chose the name Odd Breed for our brewery because the yeast and bacteria we use are not the typical microbes used in a brewery for fermentation. In a world of industrialized and mainstream beer, most other brewers would consider our brewery and process to be a bit odd.”

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