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Sen. Lindsey Graham Objects to Trump Reforming Legal Immigration: But Who Will Think of the Poor Golf Club Owners?
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From the New York Times:

Trump Supports Bill That Would Cut Legal Immigration by Half
By PETER BAKER AUG. 2, 2017

WASHINGTON — President Trump embraced legislation on Wednesday that would cut legal immigration to the United States in half within a decade by sharply curtailing the ability of American citizens and legal residents to bring family members into the country.

Arguing that the United States has taken in too many low-skilled immigrants for too long, Mr. Trump invited two Republican senators to the White House to put his weight behind their bill that would judge applicants for legal residency on the basis of education, language ability and job abilities that would benefit the country.

“This competitive application process will favor applicants who can speak English, financially support themselves and their families and demonstrate skills that will contribute to our economy,” Mr. Trump said.

“This legislation,” he added, “will not only restore our competitive edge in the 21st century, but it will restore the sacred bonds of trust between America and its citizens. This legislation demonstrates our compassion for struggling American families who deserve an immigration system that puts their needs first and that puts America first.” …

The proposal revives an idea that was included in broader immigration legislation supported by President George W. Bush in 2007 but that failed in Congress. Republican supporters argued that it would modernize immigration policy that had not been updated significantly in half a century, but critics in both parties contended it would harm the economy by keeping out workers who filled low-wage jobs that Americans did not want.

Under the current system, most legal immigrants are admitted to the United States based on family ties. …

The legislation would establish a system of skills points based on education, English speaking ability, high-paying job offers, age, record of achievement and entrepreneurial initiative. But while it would still allow the spouses and minor children of Americans and legal residents to come in, it would eliminate preference for other relatives, like siblings and adult children. The bill would create a renewable temporary visa for elderly parents who come for caretaking purposes.

The legislation would limit refugees offered permanent residency to 50,000 a year and eliminate a diversity visa lottery that the sponsors said does not promote diversity. The senators said their bill is meant to emulate “merit-based” systems in Canada and Australia.

But Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, criticized the measure, … “Hotels, restaurants, golf courses and farmers,” he added, “will tell you this proposal to cut legal immigration in half would put their business in peril.”

As Enoch Powell observed:

The supreme function of statesmanship is to provide against preventable evils.

Statesman Lindsey is trying to prevent such evils as the profit margin of Trump Enterprises declining and Bill Clinton’s monthly dues at Trump National Golf Club-Westchester going up.

Also, aren’t we all forgetting that the 1980s-1990s immigration laws spared American youths the horrors of holding part-time jobs working at golf courses and ski resorts?

Think of the children!

 
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  1. Say what you will about Trump’s style, but five years ago I would have put the odds of today’s events at slightly below those of Bruce Jenner turning into a woman.

    • Agree: MBlanc46
  2. “…Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, criticized the measure, … ‘Hotels, restaurants, golf courses and farmers,’ he added, ‘will tell you this proposal to cut legal immigration in half would put their business in peril.’

    Sen. Feinstein is already attacking this, using the same argument. It’s almost as though the Chamber of Commerce sent out an e-mail blast with talking points as soon as they found out what was in the proposal.

    Anyway, I was under the impression that agribusiness and the hospitality industry largely employed illegals. The farmers have always done so, and in many (most?) cases hotels and motels are franchises, owned and operated by Indians (dot, not feather) who I am sure think that employers who actually follow U.S. immigration law are chumps.

    Sen. Grahams’ and Sen. Feinstein’s constituents should attend the senators’ upcoming town halls – if they have one – and ask why they think poor minorities who are citizens should have to compete with illegal foreign labor.

  3. So Trump, as an owner of a mess of golf courses, is choosing to do something against his own interests for the benefit of the country as a whole.

    As to hotels, restaurants and farms,Americans did all those jobs before 1986. It allowed young people and working poor to get their feet wet at the bottom of the wage ladder. Prices for those goods and service may rise a but tax revenues from legitimate payroll taxes as opposed to off the books payments would rise. Further remittances would drop dramatically, keeping those dollars and the economic multipliers here.

    Something must also be said that having teens and college kids work made for better and more complete people and employees later in life. As a teen in the 1970s and 1980s, EVERYONE worked. One of the worst statements in the history of GOP stupidity was Karl Rove whining about how his children should never work changing sheets in a Vegas hotel. Marks the exact point GOP Inc. decided to sell out the middle and working class completely for globalism.

    In short, Lindsey Graham is an asshole. And F___ Karl Rove.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob, ic1000
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Bugg

    The post-1990 immigration system has spared American youths of the horrors of working part-time at golf courses and ski resorts.

    Think of the children!

    Replies: @Alec Leamas, @J1234, @Daniel H, @Anon7, @Dave Pinsen

    , @carol
    @Bugg

    When I first moved to Las Vegas from Hollywood in 1969, age 20, I was amazed how all the kitchen and housekeeping help seemed to be young white anglo kids. I didn't know such a thing was possible. Even by then the workforce in LA was turning brown.

    The unions were still strong in LV and that had something to do with it.

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Bugg

    Slightly OT: DJT (PBUH) has threatened to eliminate Congress's exemption from ObamaCare:
    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/aug/1/remove-congress-obamacare-exemption/

  4. This bill looks like a win-win for Trump and backs the globalists into a corner:

    1. Win #1: The Bill gets passed. Suddenly, he’s come through on a major campaign promise, he’s got the unions on his side, and he’s got the press shutting up about his “lack of legislative victories”, whatever that means.

    2. Win #2: The bill gets defeated. Now Trump’s got a list of enemies to campaign against openly, and there is no hiding: every R who voted against it is as good as primaried. They might as well join the D’s at that point, like Arlen Specter. And the Trump voters will blame the R’s, not Trump, because the R’s turned against them.

    And meanwhile….the wall is still being built AND deportations are up AND new illegals are down. (In Mass, even Cucky R Governor Charlie Baker is feeling the immigration heat, and is proposing legislation to authorize Mass jails to cooperate with ICE detainers and hold illegals for them).

    And if the SC rules in his favor come October…..Trump would not even need the legislation. He just declares that current immigration levels are detrimental to employment/crime, and we can’t process them all, and then issues an executive order cutting it in half across the board without regard to race/sex/national origin/religion/etc.

  5. How is this supposed to work? If he (thankfully) couldn’t do health care, when he was going along with the GOP establishment, what possible chance does he have of succeeding with immigration reform where he’s at odds with the establishments of both parties? Maybe we’ll see that deal maven that Trump promised us during the campaign that so far hasn’t evince itself at all but barring some incredible performance from Trump totally at odds with everything he’s done so far as president I don’t see how this is going to happen.

    • Replies: @Travis
    @Guy de Champlagne

    true, it will be difficult, but it starts the debate which will educate many Americans about our current dysfunctional immigration policy. Democrats will be forced to defend why they support our current policies which most Americans oppose. Especially Black Americans who strongly oppose allowing in so many foreigners. It will be interesting to see how much support he gets in congress.

    Odds of getting an immigration bill passed may succeed if he reverses DACA and includes something like DACA in the immigration bill. A path for the 2 million Dreamers to obtain a green card if they pay a $7,500 fee (which would collect the $15 billion needed to build the wall) In this way Mexicans would be paying for the construction of the wall, since 80% of the dreamers are Mexicans.

    I would be willing to see Trump compromise with DACA. He needs to use it as a leverage tool to get congress to act. Eliminating the diversity lottery and reducing Legal Immigration by 30% in return for allowing 2 million dreamers to pay $15 billion for green cards. If the bill does not get enough support, the dreamers get deported. Trump need to use his power to get congress to help achieve his goals.

  6. My attempt at an intelligent comment: This is the sort of bill that will help sort our legislators into Uniparty and Trumpian.

    What I was actually thinking: Graham and McCain are so close personally, I sure hope Graham doesn’t catch McCain’s brain cancer. That would be a real disaster.

    • Replies: @AM
    @Steve in Greensboro


    Graham and McCain are so close personally, I sure hope Graham doesn’t catch McCain’s brain cancer. That would be a real disaster.
     
    I shouldn't have, but I laughed.
    , @Forbes
    @Steve in Greensboro

    What I was actually thinking: Graham and McCain are so close personally, I hope Graham catches McCain’s brain cancer.

    , @Detective Club
    @Steve in Greensboro

    Cancer isn't catching but AIDS is. So far Miss Lindsey has beat the odds!
    https://youtu.be/bn31G2SHkVE

  7. @Bugg
    So Trump, as an owner of a mess of golf courses, is choosing to do something against his own interests for the benefit of the country as a whole.

    As to hotels, restaurants and farms,Americans did all those jobs before 1986. It allowed young people and working poor to get their feet wet at the bottom of the wage ladder. Prices for those goods and service may rise a but tax revenues from legitimate payroll taxes as opposed to off the books payments would rise. Further remittances would drop dramatically, keeping those dollars and the economic multipliers here.

    Something must also be said that having teens and college kids work made for better and more complete people and employees later in life. As a teen in the 1970s and 1980s, EVERYONE worked. One of the worst statements in the history of GOP stupidity was Karl Rove whining about how his children should never work changing sheets in a Vegas hotel. Marks the exact point GOP Inc. decided to sell out the middle and working class completely for globalism.

    In short, Lindsey Graham is an asshole. And F___ Karl Rove.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @carol, @Jim Don Bob

    The post-1990 immigration system has spared American youths of the horrors of working part-time at golf courses and ski resorts.

    Think of the children!

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    @Steve Sailer


    The post-1990 immigration system has spared American youths of the horrors of working part-time at golf courses and ski resorts.

    Think of the children!

     

    You can easily foresee that in a few decades or less they're going to turn "giving poor people the opportunity to do jobs Americans won't do" into a form of brown-skinned race grievance, like slavery lite. "We toiled away making your hotel beds/mowing your lawns/picking your Arugula for slave wages, now pay up whitey!"

    Replies: @Ivy, @EdwardM

    , @J1234
    @Steve Sailer


    The post-1990 immigration system has spared American youths of the horrors of working part-time at golf courses and ski resorts.
     
    We were in Estes Park last week, and just about every waitress in town has an eastern European accent. Don't get me wrong, they're pretty and I prefer them to Mexicans, but what American kid on summer vacation wouldn't do these jobs?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon, @Anonymous

    , @Daniel H
    @Steve Sailer

    As a kid, I worked 8 years as a golf caddy. Today, no kids caddy at that golf course. Likewise, few kids today work at the restaurants in my old hood, whereas when I was coming up all sorts of jobs from waitresses, to dish washers to assistant cooks were done by local kids. No more. Pansy Graham hates American kids.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas, @Bastion

    , @Anon7
    @Steve Sailer

    There must be some American kids working at golf courses somewhere. Google "Evans scholars" which refers to a special scholarship that is available only to kids who were golf caddies. At any given time, there are about 1,000 kids receiving scholarships.

    If you pick the Images tab, you will see the 2014 Purdue and Michigan recipients. Very few are minorities and none appear to be illegals.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Dave Pinsen
    @Steve Sailer

    This reminded me that McDonald's used to have a commercial advertising working there as a rite of passage. It showed a bunch of white guys that worked there as teens and stayed in touch later in life, I think. So I went to YouTube to search for it, and found this instead:
    https://youtu.be/GFOYwz-1TeE

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Jenner Ickham Errican

  8. Low-wage immigration is a massive cost-shifting scheme benefiting immigrants and employers.

    If there were legislation passed to reverse the cost-shifting going on with low-wage immigration, for example making the golf course bear the costs of the tens of thousands of dollars per child of immigrant for annual public school expense, the costs of immigrant health care expense written off by hospitals and doctors, the increased costs of courts and prisons, the increased costs of public infrastructure due to immigrants, the welfare program abuse, etc., the golf courses would be far less enthusiastic about hiring low-wage immigrants.

  9. What gender is a Lindsey Graham?

  10. and assignations for miss lindsey with exotic foreigners.

  11. President Trump embraced legislation on Wednesday that would cut legal immigration to the United States in half within a decade by sharply curtailing the ability of American citizens and legal residents to bring family members into the country.

    Amen. Hopefully he can get it done.

  12. This is vaporware that would not get 40 votes in the senate. I do hope both houses are forced to go on record with a roll call, but realistically the best we can hope for from this congress is replacing the heavily muslim and african diversity lottery visa with the same number of work visas. This would fracture Congress’s pro immigration majority into an anti white block and a Koch block and might actually pass. And Indian IT guys have low chain migration, crime, and fertility compred to what we are getting from the lottery.

    Not that Trump cares about this, today we learned that a fourth Bannon ally has been purged from the NSC and Rick Perry is being considered for Homeland. The same Rick Perry who attacked Romney on immigration from the left and supports in state tuition for illegals but not for out of state Americans.

    Another bit of BS vaporware from Trump is the bill increasing federal sentencing for criminal immigration violations. The problem has never been weak penalties. Illegal reentry after deportation already routinely results in 70 month sentences at huge taxpayer cost. The problem is the lack of funding for ICE and the federal courts that process deportations. And the lack of a wall, visa entry and exit tracking, employer sanctions.

    Whenever Trump has had a chance at meaningless bluster on immigration he has taken it. Where he has a complete free hand, from TPS to DACA to the Muslim “ban” to setting the refugee quota, he has been roughly in line with W and Obama policy. I will say again, the African and Muslim population of the USA will grow more under Trump’s first year than Obama’s. Probably by a lot.

    Not only will Trump preside over huge increases in africans and muslims in the USA, his unpopularity could cost us the House in 2018 and is dragging down the brand of American nationalism generally.

    • Replies: @AM
    @Lot

    Trump: Runs for office at personal expense and sacrifice to himself and his family. Attempts to at least do something about out of control immigration as President, fighting the bureaucracy, media, and globalist Congress. That would be unlike the other choice that almost won.

    NeverTrump: Complains on the Internet about what a dork Trump is. Claim that they have helpful insights.

    Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is...

    , @Jack Hanson
    @Lot

    The eeyore amen corner reminds us why immigration restriction was basically niche blogs before Trump.

    Replies: @Lot

    , @anonymous
    @Lot


    This is vaporware that would not get 40 votes in the senate.
     
    Irrelevant. The debate alone is worth it. I'll take Miller and Trump speaking about this day after day from here until the 2018 election. The working class never gets to hear the argument about how immigration leads to lower wages, less of a safety net and diminished schools.

    The democrats are trying to change their tactics from 'Russia', which is a loser, to 'a better deal'. They realize they lost the working class vote and are desperate to get it back. But you can't appeal to this vote and be for mass immigration at the same time. Hence, the hysteria we are seeing today displayed by Acosta and the MSM. The working class cannot get 'a better deal' when the rest of the world floods in.

    The MSM and the democrats do not want this issue even discussed. They must shut it down. Though the chances of passing this are slim, it is a great talking point and will help keep the working class from going back to the democrats. It will also potentially help primary out the republicans that need to be primaried.

    Replies: @Lot, @Charles Pewitt

    , @The preferred nomenclature is...
    @Lot

    Lord have mercy Lot you are the Truth and Tiny Duck of concern trolls. You are such a bore.

    , @IHTG
    @Lot

    You're not reading all the news about immigration enforcement. You're not paying attention.

    Replies: @Lot

  13. @Steve in Greensboro
    My attempt at an intelligent comment: This is the sort of bill that will help sort our legislators into Uniparty and Trumpian.

    What I was actually thinking: Graham and McCain are so close personally, I sure hope Graham doesn’t catch McCain’s brain cancer. That would be a real disaster.

    Replies: @AM, @Forbes, @Detective Club

    Graham and McCain are so close personally, I sure hope Graham doesn’t catch McCain’s brain cancer. That would be a real disaster.

    I shouldn’t have, but I laughed.

  14. Off-topic,

    Ancient Greek Genes:

    The ancient DNA comes from the teeth of 19 people, including 10 Minoans from Crete dating to 2900 B.C.E. to 1700 BCE, four Mycenaeans from the archaeological site at Mycenae and other cemeteries on the Greek mainland dating from 1700 B.C.E. to 1200 B.C.E., and five people from other early farming or Bronze Age (5400 B.C.E. to 1340 B.C.E.) cultures in Greece and Turkey. By comparing 1.2 million letters of genetic code across these genomes to those of 334 other ancient people from around the world and 30 modern Greeks, the researchers were able to plot how the individuals were related to each other.

    The ancient Mycenaeans and Minoans were most closely related to each other,and they both got three-quarters of their DNA from early farmers who lived in Greece and southwestern Anatolia, which is now part of Turkey, the team reports today in Nature. Both cultures additionally inherited DNA from people from the eastern Caucasus, near modern-day Iran, suggesting an early migration of people from the east after the early farmers settled there but before Mycenaeans split from Minoans.

    The Mycenaeans did have an important difference: They had some DNA—4% to 16%—from northern ancestors who came from Eastern Europe or Siberia. This suggests that a second wave of people from the Eurasian steppe came to mainland Greece by way of Eastern Europe or Armenia, but didn’t reach Crete, says Iosif Lazaridis, a population geneticist at Harvard University who co-led the study.

    http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/08/greeks-really-do-have-near-mythical-origins-ancient-dna-reveals

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @syonredux

    This basically confirms what we already knew from historical sources.

    Replies: @Tex

  15. @Steve Sailer
    @Bugg

    The post-1990 immigration system has spared American youths of the horrors of working part-time at golf courses and ski resorts.

    Think of the children!

    Replies: @Alec Leamas, @J1234, @Daniel H, @Anon7, @Dave Pinsen

    The post-1990 immigration system has spared American youths of the horrors of working part-time at golf courses and ski resorts.

    Think of the children!

    You can easily foresee that in a few decades or less they’re going to turn “giving poor people the opportunity to do jobs Americans won’t do” into a form of brown-skinned race grievance, like slavery lite. “We toiled away making your hotel beds/mowing your lawns/picking your Arugula for slave wages, now pay up whitey!”

    • Replies: @Ivy
    @Alec Leamas

    Antonio Villaraigosa, aka Tony Villar, a former Mayor of Los Angeles was momentarily famous for the following utterance about immigrants: "We clean your toilets". That little sound bite was in heavy rotation on various drive-time talk shows, always good for a laugh. Señor Villar still harbors Presidential aspirations. Maybe he will pitch his brand of magic to help unclog DC! Think of that as one more gift from California to the nation.

    , @EdwardM
    @Alec Leamas


    You can easily foresee that in a few decades or less they’re going to turn “giving poor people the opportunity to do jobs Americans won’t do” into a form of brown-skinned race grievance, like slavery lite. “We toiled away making your hotel beds/mowing your lawns/picking your Arugula for slave wages, now pay up whitey!”
     
    I can forsee this. How about a subversive remake of Fight Club with this premise -- all brown Club members lashing out at the whitey cosmopolitan class. Sophisticated observers will laud the ostensibly heavy-handed anti-racist social commentary while actual smart people paying attention like Steve will see the truth about who is being lampooned.

    Essentially this occurred to me when Trump’s partial ban (6 countries) was negated because of discrimination. Why not just suspend all immigration until the supreme court rules on the merits of the original presidential declaration? (or, why not just suspend all immigration until Trump feels like turning it back on?).
     
    It could be even easier. Tillerson could just tell the Consular Bureau to deny all or most visas. If ambassadors and Assistant Secretaries refuse, then replace them with people who will comply.

    I agree with Rush Limbaugh who said today that this immigration law is DOA due to feckless Republican senators sacred by the media.

  16. At this point of the game it hardly matters what Trump thinks as he has truly jumped the shark now.

    In his Wall St. Journal interview Trump is reported to have said that in the event of Scottish independence, the British Open (golf championship) would no longer exist.

    Well first of all there is no such thing as the British Open, it is called simply The Open Championship. Secondly, it is run by an organization called the R&A, a group of companies based in St. Andrews, Scotland which is the worldwide ruling body for golf, except in the US and Mexico.

    For a golf enthusiast to be ignorant of these facts, especially someone who owns championship golf courses including some in Scotland, can only be a sign of catastrophic mental deterioration, and the end must be nigh for his presidency.

    • Replies: @EriK
    @Jonathan Mason


    Well first of all there is no such thing as the British Open, it is called simply The Open Championship.
     
    "Nicklaus was asked in late February (2016) about how he decided which sons would caddie for him in the majors. He recalled one year when Jackie, his oldest son, caddied in the Masters and "I think he had the Open." And then he mentioned his second-oldest son, Steve, had "the British Open and the PGA."

    The British Open?

    "That's what it is," Nicklaus said.

    Has he ever referred to the major he won three times as The Open?

    "Sure, when I'm over there," he said. "Over here, people don't know what The Open Championship is. It's 'The Open Championship of the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews.' If it's The Open Championship, it could be the U.S. Open, the Australian Open, the Japanese Open."

    If British Open is good for Jack, you can go pound sand with your nitpicking.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @neprof
    @Jonathan Mason

    I'm hoping you post is sarcastic, hard to know from the international audience that frequents the Unz. But in the US, almost every golfer I know refers to it as the British Open. It seems to me the term "The Open" ,and the push the call it such, is a recent (10 years or so) change of nomenclature.

    There are two major Opens, one in the US and one in Britain. Disintishinghing between the two with the appropriate adjective seems most logical. To refer to the British Open as the "The Open" smacks of a misplaced arrogance aimed at compensating for empire lost (in addition to the world's best golfers).

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  17. @Lot
    This is vaporware that would not get 40 votes in the senate. I do hope both houses are forced to go on record with a roll call, but realistically the best we can hope for from this congress is replacing the heavily muslim and african diversity lottery visa with the same number of work visas. This would fracture Congress's pro immigration majority into an anti white block and a Koch block and might actually pass. And Indian IT guys have low chain migration, crime, and fertility compred to what we are getting from the lottery.

    Not that Trump cares about this, today we learned that a fourth Bannon ally has been purged from the NSC and Rick Perry is being considered for Homeland. The same Rick Perry who attacked Romney on immigration from the left and supports in state tuition for illegals but not for out of state Americans.

    Another bit of BS vaporware from Trump is the bill increasing federal sentencing for criminal immigration violations. The problem has never been weak penalties. Illegal reentry after deportation already routinely results in 70 month sentences at huge taxpayer cost. The problem is the lack of funding for ICE and the federal courts that process deportations. And the lack of a wall, visa entry and exit tracking, employer sanctions.

    Whenever Trump has had a chance at meaningless bluster on immigration he has taken it. Where he has a complete free hand, from TPS to DACA to the Muslim "ban" to setting the refugee quota, he has been roughly in line with W and Obama policy. I will say again, the African and Muslim population of the USA will grow more under Trump's first year than Obama's. Probably by a lot.

    Not only will Trump preside over huge increases in africans and muslims in the USA, his unpopularity could cost us the House in 2018 and is dragging down the brand of American nationalism generally.

    Replies: @AM, @Jack Hanson, @anonymous, @The preferred nomenclature is..., @IHTG

    Trump: Runs for office at personal expense and sacrifice to himself and his family. Attempts to at least do something about out of control immigration as President, fighting the bureaucracy, media, and globalist Congress. That would be unlike the other choice that almost won.

    NeverTrump: Complains on the Internet about what a dork Trump is. Claim that they have helpful insights.

    • Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is...
    @AM

    Darn right AM.

    You've definitely become my favorite and most admired commenter on this board. God Bless you Sir.

  18. @Steve in Greensboro
    My attempt at an intelligent comment: This is the sort of bill that will help sort our legislators into Uniparty and Trumpian.

    What I was actually thinking: Graham and McCain are so close personally, I sure hope Graham doesn’t catch McCain’s brain cancer. That would be a real disaster.

    Replies: @AM, @Forbes, @Detective Club

    What I was actually thinking: Graham and McCain are so close personally, I hope Graham catches McCain’s brain cancer.

  19. @Steve in Greensboro
    My attempt at an intelligent comment: This is the sort of bill that will help sort our legislators into Uniparty and Trumpian.

    What I was actually thinking: Graham and McCain are so close personally, I sure hope Graham doesn’t catch McCain’s brain cancer. That would be a real disaster.

    Replies: @AM, @Forbes, @Detective Club

    Cancer isn’t catching but AIDS is. So far Miss Lindsey has beat the odds!

  20. Stephen Miller killed it at today’s press conference.

    • Agree: Thea, Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @JohnnyD


    Stephen Miller killed it at today’s press conference.
     
    Yes, that was impressive.

    And the A-hole from the Times clearly wasn't acting as a disinterested journalist, but as an immigration advocate.
  21. All this does is slow the rot. What is needed is an immigration moratorium, and emigration reform. Make America Great Again by selecting who is given the boot. Start with chain-migration welfare recipients and go from there. Send them off to Africa and it’s a win-win. Africa also gets relatively superior human capital and experiences the miracle and strength of diversity.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Anonym

    One step at a time. Your ideas may sprout and grow in the ground cleared by Trump.

    Replies: @Anonym

  22. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    https://pjmedia.com/trending/2017/08/01/competitive-victimhood-among-racial-minorities-backfires-study-finds/

    Maybe we should have Victim Olympics or Victimpics.

    Victimhood has been monetized. Lots of prizes for those who play it right.

    You can also leech off other ‘victimhood’, like Muslim kid writing BLM 100x on college application, a story worthy of The Onion that simply can’t keep up with the lunacy.

    Victimhood Politics isn’t about being a victim in current system but using the power to designate certain groups as ‘victims’ thereby gaining MVP or VIP status. More like VIV, or very important victim.

    As victimhood becomes a prized commodity, maybe not being considered a victim is a kind of victimhood.
    Victimhood Neglect or Charlie Brown Syndrome.

  23. Essentially this occurred to me when Trump’s partial ban (6 countries) was negated because of discrimination. Why not just suspend all immigration until the supreme court rules on the merits of the original presidential declaration? (or, why not just suspend all immigration until Trump feels like turning it back on?).

    joeyjoejoe

  24. @Steve Sailer
    @Bugg

    The post-1990 immigration system has spared American youths of the horrors of working part-time at golf courses and ski resorts.

    Think of the children!

    Replies: @Alec Leamas, @J1234, @Daniel H, @Anon7, @Dave Pinsen

    The post-1990 immigration system has spared American youths of the horrors of working part-time at golf courses and ski resorts.

    We were in Estes Park last week, and just about every waitress in town has an eastern European accent. Don’t get me wrong, they’re pretty and I prefer them to Mexicans, but what American kid on summer vacation wouldn’t do these jobs?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @J1234

    We were in Estes Park last week

    So was I.

    Estes Park is the last mountain town between Boulder and Rocky Mountain National Park. Steven King wrote The Shining about the big old resort hotel in town.

    Yup, lots of Eastern European summer workers in Rocky Mountain resorts doing the jobs Americans just won't do.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Reg Cæsar

    , @anon
    @J1234

    Hiring Eastern Europeans may also be a business decision. Customers may like them over some Americans. Hey, even Trump liked them when picking wives.

    Replies: @J1234

    , @Anonymous
    @J1234

    Same story last year at the beach in North Carolina - Eastern Europeans in the T shirt shops, Jamaicans at the mini golf/go carts.

  25. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Trump needs to run with this issue. I know his chances of having it pass are slim to none. But the working class needs to be educated on the effects of immigration to wages and other quality of life issues.

    You will note the democrats and media are going crazy over this. It is a threat to the democrat strategy of rebranding for the next election. They are trying to appeal to the working classes of all races by pushing some sort of ‘better deal’.

    Well you cannot advocate for the working classes ( of all races BTW) and simultaneously advocate for mass immigration. Mass immigration lowers wages and puts more stress on the social safety nets and the public education system. You cannot promote the interests of the working class by importing millions of people who will compete with them.

    The more people hear about this issue in public discourse, the more they will turn to Trump’s position. That is why you see the cries of racism, etc., to shut down any debate. Trump needs to keep discussing it. He needs Miller to keep discussing it.

  26. @Steve Sailer
    @Bugg

    The post-1990 immigration system has spared American youths of the horrors of working part-time at golf courses and ski resorts.

    Think of the children!

    Replies: @Alec Leamas, @J1234, @Daniel H, @Anon7, @Dave Pinsen

    As a kid, I worked 8 years as a golf caddy. Today, no kids caddy at that golf course. Likewise, few kids today work at the restaurants in my old hood, whereas when I was coming up all sorts of jobs from waitresses, to dish washers to assistant cooks were done by local kids. No more. Pansy Graham hates American kids.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    @Daniel H


    As a kid, I worked 8 years as a golf caddy. Today, no kids caddy at that golf course.
     
    There may be some connection between the sorts of jobs American kids used to do and the obesity crisis among American youth.
    , @Bastion
    @Daniel H

    Who's ready for a reboot of Caddyshack set in 2017. Starring a bunch of middle-aged Latin Americans taking the piss out of a bunch of investment bankers and Russian nouveau-riche?

  27. Lindsey Graham is like a caricature of a corrupt closeted sell-out Senator in a good comedy movie by a right-wing Neil Simon.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @whorefinder


    Lindsey Graham is like a caricature of a corrupt closeted sell-out Senator in a good comedy movie by a right-wing Neil Simon.
     
    Yeah, this guy represents South Carolina and S. Carolinians like Nikki-dot-Haley does or Dunkin' Donuts does. Really, he represents one man, the gambling mogul out in Vegas, who wants illegal immigration to keep on keeping on to keep casino labor costs down (not a damn thing to do with S. Carolina), and to keep the lid on internet gambling (it's everywhere, but issue number 287 in the minds of voters).

    This is why Amendment 17 to the US Constitution was not just a slight "housekeeping" change to procedure, but a (nother) BIG blow to the rights of the various States.

    Of course, barring corrupt elections (not to be ruled out), all the donation money in the world or from all over the country would not matter if the voters were informed (hahahaaaa, yeah .... right!).

    Back to the subject, pushing for LEGAL immigration must be just what other big donors want - Ms. Lindsey never bothers listening to any S. Carolinians - they don't have so much money.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Boethiuss

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @whorefinder


    Lindsey Graham is like a caricature of a corrupt closeted sell-out Senator in a good comedy movie by a right-wing Neil Simon.
     
    That is a generous evaluation of the Honorable Lie-say Graham. But in an honorable, or a just, or a self-interested, polity Lindsey Graham would be wearing a black hood and thirteen loops of hemp holding his necktie just before he drew his last breath.
  28. @J1234
    @Steve Sailer


    The post-1990 immigration system has spared American youths of the horrors of working part-time at golf courses and ski resorts.
     
    We were in Estes Park last week, and just about every waitress in town has an eastern European accent. Don't get me wrong, they're pretty and I prefer them to Mexicans, but what American kid on summer vacation wouldn't do these jobs?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon, @Anonymous

    We were in Estes Park last week

    So was I.

    Estes Park is the last mountain town between Boulder and Rocky Mountain National Park. Steven King wrote The Shining about the big old resort hotel in town.

    Yup, lots of Eastern European summer workers in Rocky Mountain resorts doing the jobs Americans just won’t do.

    • Replies: @newrouter
    @Steve Sailer

    " lots of Eastern European summer workers in Rocky Mountain resorts doing the jobs Americans just won’t do."

    Geopolitically not bad? But I say MAGA go home!

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Estes Park is the last mountain town between Boulder and Rocky Mountain National Park.
     
    It's also among the tiredest entries in crossword puzzles, thanks to its low Scrabble score-- 5.

    By the way, is golf course architecture patented, trademarked, copyrighted, or otherwise protected? Or can a new course just steal from Augusta, Pebble Beach, Royal Melbourne, etc, with abandon?

    Replies: @Autochthon

  29. Incidentally:
    I was in Denver last week, and spent the night near the airport (way out west of town, probably 25 miles from Denver proper). The space between the airport and the city is starting to fill in: when the airport was first built, it was 25 miles of empty prairie. Now, the standard mile grid of main streets is appearing, commercial districts on each intersection, with residential housing filling the mile squares between grids.

    The thing about it, though, is that those residential sections are quite simply ugly and crowded. My group drove through a new neighborhood, of decently built houses (ranging from very small 1100 sf to 2400 sf or so). They were so crowded together, it felt like a vast apartment complex (or even a narrow European town. Often, four or five of those houses shared a driveway-such that if one person had one extra car-say a visitor- the other residents would have no room to enter their own garages). Lawns were nonexistent. Public green space was nonexistent (no parks, or community shared space. Literally no room to throw a ball. Individual yards were no more than 6 feet, and often less, wide).

    Several things occurred to us (my colleagues are property managers)
    1) This is the logical endpoint of single family homes. The lot has been shrunk down to the point that further shrinking is impossible. The next step would be an apartment complex.
    2) This is the future of America. Soulless, overcrowded, and ugly. While many new neighborhoods, for many decades, have suffered from the same aesthetic (particularly in the flat midwest-mile grids, with commercial districts lining the mainstreets, and residential filling in the mile sections), this particular neighborhood, with, as I mentioned, community space and personal lawns completely obliterated, takes the whole plan to its ultimate endpoint. Those houses were no place: a random mile square in the prairie, full of houses, with Chipotle and Walmart (and other monocultural chain businesses) a convenient 1/4 mile away. The neighborhood had absolutely nothing to do with Denver, or Colorado, or the Rockies. There was no sense of geography (no building around green streambeds, or hills, or maintained forest, or anything). No main street. No variation in architecture. Utterly soulless.
    3) It is strange that the neighborhood is built that way. Denver essentially has 700 miles to expand to the east (at least to Kansas City and Omaha). There is no reason to compress the houses in that way (the way one would in Boston or Long Island). There is virtually infinite space. But the houses were built that way anyway.

    An utterly depressing experience, and an utterly depressing future. Either population growth (and immigration) is gotten under control, or that is the future.

    joeyjoejoe

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @joeyjoejoe

    I saw that too last week staying at an airport hotel on Tower Road about 8 miles in from the airport. I first started seeing that kind of suburban development east of Oakland, CA in the early 1990s: in the middle of a big open patch of grazing cows, suddenly you have two story houses set right on top of each other with barely any yards.

    Land is expensive, so front lawns are the first to go. Kids don't go outside much anymore, so who needs a backyard? Double pane windows and nonstop air conditioning keep your neighbor's noises out, so why not live jammed up against them. Environmentalists like "open space" when it's undeveloped but they don't like open space in terms of families having yards.

    About 20 years ago, I visited a new suburban development outside Chicago that was, in contrast, built like a New England small town 150 years ago: houses were pretty close together on small lots, but they faced onto a village green. Garages were in back so your kids could go play on the long but not too wide grass field ringed by about 50 houses in front of your house without risking much traffic. Houses had porches in front, and shops and other amenities were within walking distance. There were a lot of fairly safe bike paths too.

    It was about 50% more for, say, a four bedroom house there than in conventional developments nearby. That was a steep premium, but, overall, I was impressed.

    I have no idea if these kind of planned villages have succeeded in the slightest.

    Replies: @Daniel H, @Luke Lea, @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @joeyjoejoe


    The thing about it, though, is that those residential sections are quite simply ugly and crowded
     
    Culs-de-sac (culs-des-sacs?) look positively effeminate from a descending airline window. (Almost said "faggoty", then remembered Ann Coulter's warning about rehab.)

    It was really striking coming into Cincinnati's airport, which is in Kentucky. Not Colonel Sanders country! Certainly not Jack Daniel.
    , @Jonathan Mason
    @joeyjoejoe


    The neighborhood had absolutely nothing to do with Denver, or Colorado, or the Rockies. There was no sense of geography (no building around green streambeds, or hills, or maintained forest, or anything).
     
    Seems to be the same everywhere these days. I grew up in England where every field and stream had a name in the Domesday book written in the 11th century, so that developers are never short of a name when building new homes.

    Or if they do want to invent new names, there is a bit of research behind it, or an attempt to connect with local history. For example my sister lives in a road called Currer Walk, but to get the name you have to realize what many local people will readily tell you, that Charlotte Bronte, who lived a few miles away in Haworth used the gender ambiguous pseudonym Currer Bell when her books were published, and her sisters Ann and Emily were Acton Bell and Ellis Bell.

    But here in Jacksonville, FL, where I now reside names are totally ridiculous. For example the scenic Lakeshore Drive curves along the waterfront, which is fine, except that the waterfront is the Cedar RIVER , a tributary of the St. John's River and there is no lake in sight. This is just one example of hundreds where the names of streets describe geological features that do not exist, because developers just picked random names from approved lists of words, at least I imagine that is how it is done. One street was imaginatively named Noroad and another Blank Drive, which captures something of the spirit of suburbia.

    Replies: @LondonBob

    , @Alec Leamas
    @joeyjoejoe

    Modern housing development is like the proverbial horse designed by committee. It's the interplay between municipal planning codes (which may be designed to discourage building), what the consumer considers must haves, the state of the economy at the time, climate, cost-effective materials, etc.

    Back East it seems that some lessons were learned and the trend is towards more compact, village-like suburban development like Mixed Use and PUDs (Planned Urban Development) where the idea is to allow traditionally compatible uses of real estate to co-exist, and to preserve green belts and open spaces by way of dedication by developers. This is in response to the 80s-90s more adversarial process where large lot sizes and set-backs spawned the McMansion, endless sprawl, and the utter devouring of open space and trees.

    A whole little town popped up on the former outskirts of Rockville MD on the DC Metro line in the last 10 years or so. It consists of several multistory condominium buildings with retail and restaurants on the first floors, built around a town square. In a lot of ways it seems a bit artificial (in part because everything is so new) but it seems human-scaled compared with traditional suburban development. My perception/surmise is that it is populated by young people, some coupled with small children who probably couldn't afford to live in closer proximity to DC or in DC proper, and you can walk to the Metro from the town square in a few short minutes. (This is also a commentary about how metropolitan DC grew through the housing crisis and recession and while lots of the rest of the country was suffering, and how our leaders' perceptions may be occluded by life in and around their burgeoning Imperial City).

    , @Henry Bowman
    @joeyjoejoe

    "An utterly depressing experience, and an utterly depressing future. Either population growth (and immigration) is gotten under control, or that is the future."

    Immigration will be gotten under control very soon.

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/08/01/surveys-show-60-percent-opposition-immigration/

    All it takes are a few senators to channel this massive public desire, after they get their first tastes of the benefits of immigration reductionist (lower costs of living, lower crime rates, lower taxes, lower housing costs, higher wages, starving leftists for voters, more trust/unity, etc.) they will be hooked and support more and more.

    The RAISE act is like the 1919 immigration, bill, the main act, a 1924 Immigration Act will follow soon. And we will be so much better off for it. The time is soon, let us fight to make sure the future is one of OUR choosing, and not theirs.

    , @Anonymous
    @joeyjoejoe

    From what I can figure out, new urbanists and supporters of Smart Growth want people to live in high density housing located near their places of employment, with the idea that everyone will be able to walk or ride bikes to work, eliminating the need for cars.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  30. Eeyore crew tell us how Trump has betrayed us again.

  31. @Bugg
    So Trump, as an owner of a mess of golf courses, is choosing to do something against his own interests for the benefit of the country as a whole.

    As to hotels, restaurants and farms,Americans did all those jobs before 1986. It allowed young people and working poor to get their feet wet at the bottom of the wage ladder. Prices for those goods and service may rise a but tax revenues from legitimate payroll taxes as opposed to off the books payments would rise. Further remittances would drop dramatically, keeping those dollars and the economic multipliers here.

    Something must also be said that having teens and college kids work made for better and more complete people and employees later in life. As a teen in the 1970s and 1980s, EVERYONE worked. One of the worst statements in the history of GOP stupidity was Karl Rove whining about how his children should never work changing sheets in a Vegas hotel. Marks the exact point GOP Inc. decided to sell out the middle and working class completely for globalism.

    In short, Lindsey Graham is an asshole. And F___ Karl Rove.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @carol, @Jim Don Bob

    When I first moved to Las Vegas from Hollywood in 1969, age 20, I was amazed how all the kitchen and housekeeping help seemed to be young white anglo kids. I didn’t know such a thing was possible. Even by then the workforce in LA was turning brown.

    The unions were still strong in LV and that had something to do with it.

  32. @syonredux
    Off-topic,

    Ancient Greek Genes:

    The ancient DNA comes from the teeth of 19 people, including 10 Minoans from Crete dating to 2900 B.C.E. to 1700 BCE, four Mycenaeans from the archaeological site at Mycenae and other cemeteries on the Greek mainland dating from 1700 B.C.E. to 1200 B.C.E., and five people from other early farming or Bronze Age (5400 B.C.E. to 1340 B.C.E.) cultures in Greece and Turkey. By comparing 1.2 million letters of genetic code across these genomes to those of 334 other ancient people from around the world and 30 modern Greeks, the researchers were able to plot how the individuals were related to each other.

     


    The ancient Mycenaeans and Minoans were most closely related to each other,and they both got three-quarters of their DNA from early farmers who lived in Greece and southwestern Anatolia, which is now part of Turkey, the team reports today in Nature. Both cultures additionally inherited DNA from people from the eastern Caucasus, near modern-day Iran, suggesting an early migration of people from the east after the early farmers settled there but before Mycenaeans split from Minoans.

     


    The Mycenaeans did have an important difference: They had some DNA—4% to 16%—from northern ancestors who came from Eastern Europe or Siberia. This suggests that a second wave of people from the Eurasian steppe came to mainland Greece by way of Eastern Europe or Armenia, but didn’t reach Crete, says Iosif Lazaridis, a population geneticist at Harvard University who co-led the study.
     
    http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/08/greeks-really-do-have-near-mythical-origins-ancient-dna-reveals

    Replies: @Anonymous

    This basically confirms what we already knew from historical sources.

    • Replies: @Tex
    @Anonymous

    A slight modification, the East European/Siberian origins were inferred from theories on Indo-European migration in pre-history.

    Getting a closer fix on the homeland of the I-E peoples is pretty good stuff since that location was inferred from archaeology and linguistics with candidates ranging from the Ukraine to the Caucasus to Anatolia to just plain all of Europe at once. This is some nice work.

  33. @joeyjoejoe
    Incidentally:
    I was in Denver last week, and spent the night near the airport (way out west of town, probably 25 miles from Denver proper). The space between the airport and the city is starting to fill in: when the airport was first built, it was 25 miles of empty prairie. Now, the standard mile grid of main streets is appearing, commercial districts on each intersection, with residential housing filling the mile squares between grids.

    The thing about it, though, is that those residential sections are quite simply ugly and crowded. My group drove through a new neighborhood, of decently built houses (ranging from very small 1100 sf to 2400 sf or so). They were so crowded together, it felt like a vast apartment complex (or even a narrow European town. Often, four or five of those houses shared a driveway-such that if one person had one extra car-say a visitor- the other residents would have no room to enter their own garages). Lawns were nonexistent. Public green space was nonexistent (no parks, or community shared space. Literally no room to throw a ball. Individual yards were no more than 6 feet, and often less, wide).

    Several things occurred to us (my colleagues are property managers)
    1) This is the logical endpoint of single family homes. The lot has been shrunk down to the point that further shrinking is impossible. The next step would be an apartment complex.
    2) This is the future of America. Soulless, overcrowded, and ugly. While many new neighborhoods, for many decades, have suffered from the same aesthetic (particularly in the flat midwest-mile grids, with commercial districts lining the mainstreets, and residential filling in the mile sections), this particular neighborhood, with, as I mentioned, community space and personal lawns completely obliterated, takes the whole plan to its ultimate endpoint. Those houses were no place: a random mile square in the prairie, full of houses, with Chipotle and Walmart (and other monocultural chain businesses) a convenient 1/4 mile away. The neighborhood had absolutely nothing to do with Denver, or Colorado, or the Rockies. There was no sense of geography (no building around green streambeds, or hills, or maintained forest, or anything). No main street. No variation in architecture. Utterly soulless.
    3) It is strange that the neighborhood is built that way. Denver essentially has 700 miles to expand to the east (at least to Kansas City and Omaha). There is no reason to compress the houses in that way (the way one would in Boston or Long Island). There is virtually infinite space. But the houses were built that way anyway.

    An utterly depressing experience, and an utterly depressing future. Either population growth (and immigration) is gotten under control, or that is the future.

    joeyjoejoe

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Jonathan Mason, @Alec Leamas, @Henry Bowman, @Anonymous

    I saw that too last week staying at an airport hotel on Tower Road about 8 miles in from the airport. I first started seeing that kind of suburban development east of Oakland, CA in the early 1990s: in the middle of a big open patch of grazing cows, suddenly you have two story houses set right on top of each other with barely any yards.

    Land is expensive, so front lawns are the first to go. Kids don’t go outside much anymore, so who needs a backyard? Double pane windows and nonstop air conditioning keep your neighbor’s noises out, so why not live jammed up against them. Environmentalists like “open space” when it’s undeveloped but they don’t like open space in terms of families having yards.

    About 20 years ago, I visited a new suburban development outside Chicago that was, in contrast, built like a New England small town 150 years ago: houses were pretty close together on small lots, but they faced onto a village green. Garages were in back so your kids could go play on the long but not too wide grass field ringed by about 50 houses in front of your house without risking much traffic. Houses had porches in front, and shops and other amenities were within walking distance. There were a lot of fairly safe bike paths too.

    It was about 50% more for, say, a four bedroom house there than in conventional developments nearby. That was a steep premium, but, overall, I was impressed.

    I have no idea if these kind of planned villages have succeeded in the slightest.

    • Replies: @Daniel H
    @Steve Sailer

    >>> I first started seeing that kind of suburban development east of Oakland, CA in the early 1990s: in the middle of a big open patch of grazing cows, suddenly you have two story houses set right on top of each other with barely any yards.

    Similar neighborhoods, built only within the past 10 years (and are still being built), are all over the west side of Las Vegas. 10 years hence, they will be ghettos and 'hoods.

    , @Luke Lea
    @Steve Sailer

    "About 20 years ago, I visited a new suburban development outside Chicago that was, in contrast, built like a New England small town 150 years ago: houses were pretty close together on small lots, but they faced onto a village green. Garages were in back so your kids could go play on the long but not too wide grass field ringed by about 50 houses in front of your house without risking much traffic. Houses had porches in front, and shops and other amenities were within walking distance. There were a lot of fairly safe bike paths too."

    Steve, you're going to like my Notes Toward a New Way of Life in America, which revolves around the notion of factories in the countryside run on part-time jobs:

    "In this 21st century ‘capitalist’ eutopia, Luke Lea explores a world of New Country Towns in which the people work part-time outside the home and in their free time help build their own houses, cultivate gardens, cook and care for their children and grandchildren, and pursue hobbies and other outside interests. They live on small family homesteads grouped around neighborhood greens, and get around town in glorified golf-carts. So thoroughly are work and leisure integrated into the fabric of their everyday lives that they don’t feel much need to retire, and they die at home in their beds as a rule, surrounded by loved ones.

    For those who would like to move to this world he provides a map with some directions for how to get there from here."

    “[Luke Lea] is an excellent amateur economist.” Milton Friedman

    Coming out soon on Kindle

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer


    Land is expensive, so front lawns are the first to go. Kids don’t go outside much anymore, so who needs a backyard? Double pane windows and nonstop air conditioning keep your neighbor’s noises out, so why not live jammed up against them. Environmentalists like “open space” when it’s undeveloped but they don’t like open space in terms of families having yards.
     
    About this and Joey's 2nd point of his great comment: It's somewhat a vicious cycle on this: These neighborhoods are build with no good way - with all the curves, cul-de-sacs, and what-not - to walk or bike anywhere, and no good place for a reason to walk/ride - i.e. post office, library, corner store (nothing but big box stores and chain restaurants). People get used to getting in the SUV to go anywhere, hence more things are built for driving only.

    Sure, these places are OK to ride the bike for exercise only or walk a pattern, but most people do better having place to walk or bike to, as errands, or just daily life. Nobody wants to bike a spiral pattern to finally get to a big crowded 6-lane road that must be ridden along to get to somewhere. It's not worth it.

    I hate the exurbs as a place to live. Another big thing is that big trees are cut down to make it easier to develop (not applicable in the Plains, but it the East and far West). It'll take 30 years to have a nice leafy area, but most homeowners won't plant Oaks and other big trees to keep the yard work down. It never gets nice there outside, in that case.

    I wish I could find this scene from "The Office", as it IS the funniest show ever, but Mr. Scott is showing off his new townhouse from the outside. After a couple of minutes, he realizes that his one is not the one he's been pointing out, as they all look the same, and his one is on the other side of the street (sorry, it's not funny explaining it ;-}

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

  34. It seems most people are still looking at this in the context of an economic bigger picture that has now irrevocably passed. The American empire is in terminal decline; the Boomers—the only generation with any actual folding money—will soon be retiring, drawing down their savings, and passing away; and entry level jobs at golf courses and ski resorts aren’t going to mean what they used to mean in the era of imperial growth. There isn’t going to be growth like that again, ever.

    The fact of the matter is, that we don’t just need fewer immigrants doing these jobs. We need to recognize that there will be far fewer of such jobs to do by anybody, immigrant or native. The resorts of the future will be boutique settings for the wealthy, not “industries” catering to the leisure and entertainment of millions of middle class weekend warriors. A generation from now, there won’t be much of middle class to speak of, and such remnants of it as remain will not overly concern themselves with golfing and skiing. And as far as agriculture goes, there will be no shortage of people at that time willing to perform cheap farm labor. The problem will be the logistical inability to get fruits and vegetables from southern California to grocery stores across the country at a price people will be able to afford. The farmers will not lose their labor; they will lose their customers instead, especially as the fast-casual dining chains start shuttering locations.

    Furthermore, the myth of the skilled immigrant is a pernicious falsehood that really must be destroyed for good. Everything I said about resorts above applies a fortiori to the tech industry, i.e. there needs to be a lot less of it. The very last thing we need is a bunch of scheming foreigners in Silicon Valley, desperately plotting the next social media scam, crony capitalist ripoff, or surveillance state intrusion, all for the purpose of creaming the last remaining funds out of the American oligarchic graft machine.

    To speak about immigration at all doesn’t even make sense in a no-growth world. The word is a mere euphemism for population replacement. There is nothing—nothing—that these people can contribute to our wellbeing. But this also entails what is less readily assimilated, viz. that the corporations which hire such people, and the governments and institutions which facilitate their presence here, are also contributing nothing. A breakdown of the social order is therefore inevitable. Trump’s legislation, like everything else that emanates from the Washington policy bubble, is pure solipsistic sea foam on the waves of history. It refers to no real quantity; it addresses no substantive problem; and yet the ruling classes are content to argue about it as if it mattered.

    The return of politics—which is to say, the practice of politics as true and prudential problem solving—has not arrived at Washington with the advent of President Trump. Events will force its resurgence, but not before the hubris of the present period is ground utterly to dust.

  35. @Bugg
    So Trump, as an owner of a mess of golf courses, is choosing to do something against his own interests for the benefit of the country as a whole.

    As to hotels, restaurants and farms,Americans did all those jobs before 1986. It allowed young people and working poor to get their feet wet at the bottom of the wage ladder. Prices for those goods and service may rise a but tax revenues from legitimate payroll taxes as opposed to off the books payments would rise. Further remittances would drop dramatically, keeping those dollars and the economic multipliers here.

    Something must also be said that having teens and college kids work made for better and more complete people and employees later in life. As a teen in the 1970s and 1980s, EVERYONE worked. One of the worst statements in the history of GOP stupidity was Karl Rove whining about how his children should never work changing sheets in a Vegas hotel. Marks the exact point GOP Inc. decided to sell out the middle and working class completely for globalism.

    In short, Lindsey Graham is an asshole. And F___ Karl Rove.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @carol, @Jim Don Bob

    Slightly OT: DJT (PBUH) has threatened to eliminate Congress’s exemption from ObamaCare:
    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/aug/1/remove-congress-obamacare-exemption/

  36. @Steve Sailer
    @J1234

    We were in Estes Park last week

    So was I.

    Estes Park is the last mountain town between Boulder and Rocky Mountain National Park. Steven King wrote The Shining about the big old resort hotel in town.

    Yup, lots of Eastern European summer workers in Rocky Mountain resorts doing the jobs Americans just won't do.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Reg Cæsar

    ” lots of Eastern European summer workers in Rocky Mountain resorts doing the jobs Americans just won’t do.”

    Geopolitically not bad? But I say MAGA go home!

  37. @Jonathan Mason
    At this point of the game it hardly matters what Trump thinks as he has truly jumped the shark now.

    In his Wall St. Journal interview Trump is reported to have said that in the event of Scottish independence, the British Open (golf championship) would no longer exist.

    Well first of all there is no such thing as the British Open, it is called simply The Open Championship. Secondly, it is run by an organization called the R&A, a group of companies based in St. Andrews, Scotland which is the worldwide ruling body for golf, except in the US and Mexico.

    For a golf enthusiast to be ignorant of these facts, especially someone who owns championship golf courses including some in Scotland, can only be a sign of catastrophic mental deterioration, and the end must be nigh for his presidency.

    Replies: @EriK, @neprof

    Well first of all there is no such thing as the British Open, it is called simply The Open Championship.

    “Nicklaus was asked in late February (2016) about how he decided which sons would caddie for him in the majors. He recalled one year when Jackie, his oldest son, caddied in the Masters and “I think he had the Open.” And then he mentioned his second-oldest son, Steve, had “the British Open and the PGA.”

    The British Open?

    “That’s what it is,” Nicklaus said.

    Has he ever referred to the major he won three times as The Open?

    “Sure, when I’m over there,” he said. “Over here, people don’t know what The Open Championship is. It’s ‘The Open Championship of the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews.’ If it’s The Open Championship, it could be the U.S. Open, the Australian Open, the Japanese Open.”

    If British Open is good for Jack, you can go pound sand with your nitpicking.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @EriK

    Right. Nicklaus is a fairly strict and ostentatious golf traditionalist, and even he won't use "The Open" in America to refer to what Americans call the British Open. Too confusing. It would be like pronouncing "Claret Jug," the trophy, in the French manner rather than in the British manner with a hard T at the end of "claret."

  38. Can somebody please explain to me how someone like Lindsay Graham gets elected in a supposedly conservative state ? Besides all his liberal preferences for things like mass immigration, this man is also either a virgin or a closet homosexual, neither which I assume makes him appealing to conservative. How does he get conservatives to vote for him ?

  39. @Steve Sailer
    @J1234

    We were in Estes Park last week

    So was I.

    Estes Park is the last mountain town between Boulder and Rocky Mountain National Park. Steven King wrote The Shining about the big old resort hotel in town.

    Yup, lots of Eastern European summer workers in Rocky Mountain resorts doing the jobs Americans just won't do.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Reg Cæsar

    Estes Park is the last mountain town between Boulder and Rocky Mountain National Park.

    It’s also among the tiredest entries in crossword puzzles, thanks to its low Scrabble score– 5.

    By the way, is golf course architecture patented, trademarked, copyrighted, or otherwise protected? Or can a new course just steal from Augusta, Pebble Beach, Royal Melbourne, etc, with abandon?

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Reg Cæsar

    One can pretty much steal with abandon; though there are limited protectons.

    I expect self-policing goes a long way toward keeping things from getting put of hand; it would be gauche to replicate Augusta on a few acres in Montana, and the value of the thing is partly like a Veblen good and partly a question of provenance. (A guitar exactly replicating one Steve Hackett played on "Supper's Ready" just isn't the same as the actual guitar he played; think also of famous paintings and copies thereof, however perfect...).

    I also expect one place probably does have many counterfeit courses, or will soon, and with no shame about it: China. Intellectual property is for suckers, as far as the parasites there are concerned.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Achmed E. Newman

  40. @Steve Sailer
    @joeyjoejoe

    I saw that too last week staying at an airport hotel on Tower Road about 8 miles in from the airport. I first started seeing that kind of suburban development east of Oakland, CA in the early 1990s: in the middle of a big open patch of grazing cows, suddenly you have two story houses set right on top of each other with barely any yards.

    Land is expensive, so front lawns are the first to go. Kids don't go outside much anymore, so who needs a backyard? Double pane windows and nonstop air conditioning keep your neighbor's noises out, so why not live jammed up against them. Environmentalists like "open space" when it's undeveloped but they don't like open space in terms of families having yards.

    About 20 years ago, I visited a new suburban development outside Chicago that was, in contrast, built like a New England small town 150 years ago: houses were pretty close together on small lots, but they faced onto a village green. Garages were in back so your kids could go play on the long but not too wide grass field ringed by about 50 houses in front of your house without risking much traffic. Houses had porches in front, and shops and other amenities were within walking distance. There were a lot of fairly safe bike paths too.

    It was about 50% more for, say, a four bedroom house there than in conventional developments nearby. That was a steep premium, but, overall, I was impressed.

    I have no idea if these kind of planned villages have succeeded in the slightest.

    Replies: @Daniel H, @Luke Lea, @Achmed E. Newman

    >>> I first started seeing that kind of suburban development east of Oakland, CA in the early 1990s: in the middle of a big open patch of grazing cows, suddenly you have two story houses set right on top of each other with barely any yards.

    Similar neighborhoods, built only within the past 10 years (and are still being built), are all over the west side of Las Vegas. 10 years hence, they will be ghettos and ‘hoods.

  41. @joeyjoejoe
    Incidentally:
    I was in Denver last week, and spent the night near the airport (way out west of town, probably 25 miles from Denver proper). The space between the airport and the city is starting to fill in: when the airport was first built, it was 25 miles of empty prairie. Now, the standard mile grid of main streets is appearing, commercial districts on each intersection, with residential housing filling the mile squares between grids.

    The thing about it, though, is that those residential sections are quite simply ugly and crowded. My group drove through a new neighborhood, of decently built houses (ranging from very small 1100 sf to 2400 sf or so). They were so crowded together, it felt like a vast apartment complex (or even a narrow European town. Often, four or five of those houses shared a driveway-such that if one person had one extra car-say a visitor- the other residents would have no room to enter their own garages). Lawns were nonexistent. Public green space was nonexistent (no parks, or community shared space. Literally no room to throw a ball. Individual yards were no more than 6 feet, and often less, wide).

    Several things occurred to us (my colleagues are property managers)
    1) This is the logical endpoint of single family homes. The lot has been shrunk down to the point that further shrinking is impossible. The next step would be an apartment complex.
    2) This is the future of America. Soulless, overcrowded, and ugly. While many new neighborhoods, for many decades, have suffered from the same aesthetic (particularly in the flat midwest-mile grids, with commercial districts lining the mainstreets, and residential filling in the mile sections), this particular neighborhood, with, as I mentioned, community space and personal lawns completely obliterated, takes the whole plan to its ultimate endpoint. Those houses were no place: a random mile square in the prairie, full of houses, with Chipotle and Walmart (and other monocultural chain businesses) a convenient 1/4 mile away. The neighborhood had absolutely nothing to do with Denver, or Colorado, or the Rockies. There was no sense of geography (no building around green streambeds, or hills, or maintained forest, or anything). No main street. No variation in architecture. Utterly soulless.
    3) It is strange that the neighborhood is built that way. Denver essentially has 700 miles to expand to the east (at least to Kansas City and Omaha). There is no reason to compress the houses in that way (the way one would in Boston or Long Island). There is virtually infinite space. But the houses were built that way anyway.

    An utterly depressing experience, and an utterly depressing future. Either population growth (and immigration) is gotten under control, or that is the future.

    joeyjoejoe

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Jonathan Mason, @Alec Leamas, @Henry Bowman, @Anonymous

    The thing about it, though, is that those residential sections are quite simply ugly and crowded

    Culs-de-sac (culs-des-sacs?) look positively effeminate from a descending airline window. (Almost said “faggoty”, then remembered Ann Coulter’s warning about rehab.)

    It was really striking coming into Cincinnati’s airport, which is in Kentucky. Not Colonel Sanders country! Certainly not Jack Daniel.

  42. Miss Graham is a Traitor.

  43. @joeyjoejoe
    Incidentally:
    I was in Denver last week, and spent the night near the airport (way out west of town, probably 25 miles from Denver proper). The space between the airport and the city is starting to fill in: when the airport was first built, it was 25 miles of empty prairie. Now, the standard mile grid of main streets is appearing, commercial districts on each intersection, with residential housing filling the mile squares between grids.

    The thing about it, though, is that those residential sections are quite simply ugly and crowded. My group drove through a new neighborhood, of decently built houses (ranging from very small 1100 sf to 2400 sf or so). They were so crowded together, it felt like a vast apartment complex (or even a narrow European town. Often, four or five of those houses shared a driveway-such that if one person had one extra car-say a visitor- the other residents would have no room to enter their own garages). Lawns were nonexistent. Public green space was nonexistent (no parks, or community shared space. Literally no room to throw a ball. Individual yards were no more than 6 feet, and often less, wide).

    Several things occurred to us (my colleagues are property managers)
    1) This is the logical endpoint of single family homes. The lot has been shrunk down to the point that further shrinking is impossible. The next step would be an apartment complex.
    2) This is the future of America. Soulless, overcrowded, and ugly. While many new neighborhoods, for many decades, have suffered from the same aesthetic (particularly in the flat midwest-mile grids, with commercial districts lining the mainstreets, and residential filling in the mile sections), this particular neighborhood, with, as I mentioned, community space and personal lawns completely obliterated, takes the whole plan to its ultimate endpoint. Those houses were no place: a random mile square in the prairie, full of houses, with Chipotle and Walmart (and other monocultural chain businesses) a convenient 1/4 mile away. The neighborhood had absolutely nothing to do with Denver, or Colorado, or the Rockies. There was no sense of geography (no building around green streambeds, or hills, or maintained forest, or anything). No main street. No variation in architecture. Utterly soulless.
    3) It is strange that the neighborhood is built that way. Denver essentially has 700 miles to expand to the east (at least to Kansas City and Omaha). There is no reason to compress the houses in that way (the way one would in Boston or Long Island). There is virtually infinite space. But the houses were built that way anyway.

    An utterly depressing experience, and an utterly depressing future. Either population growth (and immigration) is gotten under control, or that is the future.

    joeyjoejoe

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Jonathan Mason, @Alec Leamas, @Henry Bowman, @Anonymous

    The neighborhood had absolutely nothing to do with Denver, or Colorado, or the Rockies. There was no sense of geography (no building around green streambeds, or hills, or maintained forest, or anything).

    Seems to be the same everywhere these days. I grew up in England where every field and stream had a name in the Domesday book written in the 11th century, so that developers are never short of a name when building new homes.

    Or if they do want to invent new names, there is a bit of research behind it, or an attempt to connect with local history. For example my sister lives in a road called Currer Walk, but to get the name you have to realize what many local people will readily tell you, that Charlotte Bronte, who lived a few miles away in Haworth used the gender ambiguous pseudonym Currer Bell when her books were published, and her sisters Ann and Emily were Acton Bell and Ellis Bell.

    But here in Jacksonville, FL, where I now reside names are totally ridiculous. For example the scenic Lakeshore Drive curves along the waterfront, which is fine, except that the waterfront is the Cedar RIVER , a tributary of the St. John’s River and there is no lake in sight. This is just one example of hundreds where the names of streets describe geological features that do not exist, because developers just picked random names from approved lists of words, at least I imagine that is how it is done. One street was imaginatively named Noroad and another Blank Drive, which captures something of the spirit of suburbia.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @Jonathan Mason

    Well the London suburb I grew up in our first house was on Palmerston Road, the second was on Temple Sheen Road. No prizes for guessing which famous former Prime Minister lived in the area that the Victorian/Edwardian developers derived their inspiration from.

    Replies: @LondonBob

  44. @Lot
    This is vaporware that would not get 40 votes in the senate. I do hope both houses are forced to go on record with a roll call, but realistically the best we can hope for from this congress is replacing the heavily muslim and african diversity lottery visa with the same number of work visas. This would fracture Congress's pro immigration majority into an anti white block and a Koch block and might actually pass. And Indian IT guys have low chain migration, crime, and fertility compred to what we are getting from the lottery.

    Not that Trump cares about this, today we learned that a fourth Bannon ally has been purged from the NSC and Rick Perry is being considered for Homeland. The same Rick Perry who attacked Romney on immigration from the left and supports in state tuition for illegals but not for out of state Americans.

    Another bit of BS vaporware from Trump is the bill increasing federal sentencing for criminal immigration violations. The problem has never been weak penalties. Illegal reentry after deportation already routinely results in 70 month sentences at huge taxpayer cost. The problem is the lack of funding for ICE and the federal courts that process deportations. And the lack of a wall, visa entry and exit tracking, employer sanctions.

    Whenever Trump has had a chance at meaningless bluster on immigration he has taken it. Where he has a complete free hand, from TPS to DACA to the Muslim "ban" to setting the refugee quota, he has been roughly in line with W and Obama policy. I will say again, the African and Muslim population of the USA will grow more under Trump's first year than Obama's. Probably by a lot.

    Not only will Trump preside over huge increases in africans and muslims in the USA, his unpopularity could cost us the House in 2018 and is dragging down the brand of American nationalism generally.

    Replies: @AM, @Jack Hanson, @anonymous, @The preferred nomenclature is..., @IHTG

    The eeyore amen corner reminds us why immigration restriction was basically niche blogs before Trump.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @Jack Hanson

    So it was niche blogs that killed repeated attempts by Bush and Obama to pass amnesty? That got prop 187 on the ballot and passed it? That passed SB 1070 in Arizona?

    Replies: @Jack Hanson

  45. @joeyjoejoe
    Incidentally:
    I was in Denver last week, and spent the night near the airport (way out west of town, probably 25 miles from Denver proper). The space between the airport and the city is starting to fill in: when the airport was first built, it was 25 miles of empty prairie. Now, the standard mile grid of main streets is appearing, commercial districts on each intersection, with residential housing filling the mile squares between grids.

    The thing about it, though, is that those residential sections are quite simply ugly and crowded. My group drove through a new neighborhood, of decently built houses (ranging from very small 1100 sf to 2400 sf or so). They were so crowded together, it felt like a vast apartment complex (or even a narrow European town. Often, four or five of those houses shared a driveway-such that if one person had one extra car-say a visitor- the other residents would have no room to enter their own garages). Lawns were nonexistent. Public green space was nonexistent (no parks, or community shared space. Literally no room to throw a ball. Individual yards were no more than 6 feet, and often less, wide).

    Several things occurred to us (my colleagues are property managers)
    1) This is the logical endpoint of single family homes. The lot has been shrunk down to the point that further shrinking is impossible. The next step would be an apartment complex.
    2) This is the future of America. Soulless, overcrowded, and ugly. While many new neighborhoods, for many decades, have suffered from the same aesthetic (particularly in the flat midwest-mile grids, with commercial districts lining the mainstreets, and residential filling in the mile sections), this particular neighborhood, with, as I mentioned, community space and personal lawns completely obliterated, takes the whole plan to its ultimate endpoint. Those houses were no place: a random mile square in the prairie, full of houses, with Chipotle and Walmart (and other monocultural chain businesses) a convenient 1/4 mile away. The neighborhood had absolutely nothing to do with Denver, or Colorado, or the Rockies. There was no sense of geography (no building around green streambeds, or hills, or maintained forest, or anything). No main street. No variation in architecture. Utterly soulless.
    3) It is strange that the neighborhood is built that way. Denver essentially has 700 miles to expand to the east (at least to Kansas City and Omaha). There is no reason to compress the houses in that way (the way one would in Boston or Long Island). There is virtually infinite space. But the houses were built that way anyway.

    An utterly depressing experience, and an utterly depressing future. Either population growth (and immigration) is gotten under control, or that is the future.

    joeyjoejoe

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Jonathan Mason, @Alec Leamas, @Henry Bowman, @Anonymous

    Modern housing development is like the proverbial horse designed by committee. It’s the interplay between municipal planning codes (which may be designed to discourage building), what the consumer considers must haves, the state of the economy at the time, climate, cost-effective materials, etc.

    Back East it seems that some lessons were learned and the trend is towards more compact, village-like suburban development like Mixed Use and PUDs (Planned Urban Development) where the idea is to allow traditionally compatible uses of real estate to co-exist, and to preserve green belts and open spaces by way of dedication by developers. This is in response to the 80s-90s more adversarial process where large lot sizes and set-backs spawned the McMansion, endless sprawl, and the utter devouring of open space and trees.

    A whole little town popped up on the former outskirts of Rockville MD on the DC Metro line in the last 10 years or so. It consists of several multistory condominium buildings with retail and restaurants on the first floors, built around a town square. In a lot of ways it seems a bit artificial (in part because everything is so new) but it seems human-scaled compared with traditional suburban development. My perception/surmise is that it is populated by young people, some coupled with small children who probably couldn’t afford to live in closer proximity to DC or in DC proper, and you can walk to the Metro from the town square in a few short minutes. (This is also a commentary about how metropolitan DC grew through the housing crisis and recession and while lots of the rest of the country was suffering, and how our leaders’ perceptions may be occluded by life in and around their burgeoning Imperial City).

  46. @joeyjoejoe
    Incidentally:
    I was in Denver last week, and spent the night near the airport (way out west of town, probably 25 miles from Denver proper). The space between the airport and the city is starting to fill in: when the airport was first built, it was 25 miles of empty prairie. Now, the standard mile grid of main streets is appearing, commercial districts on each intersection, with residential housing filling the mile squares between grids.

    The thing about it, though, is that those residential sections are quite simply ugly and crowded. My group drove through a new neighborhood, of decently built houses (ranging from very small 1100 sf to 2400 sf or so). They were so crowded together, it felt like a vast apartment complex (or even a narrow European town. Often, four or five of those houses shared a driveway-such that if one person had one extra car-say a visitor- the other residents would have no room to enter their own garages). Lawns were nonexistent. Public green space was nonexistent (no parks, or community shared space. Literally no room to throw a ball. Individual yards were no more than 6 feet, and often less, wide).

    Several things occurred to us (my colleagues are property managers)
    1) This is the logical endpoint of single family homes. The lot has been shrunk down to the point that further shrinking is impossible. The next step would be an apartment complex.
    2) This is the future of America. Soulless, overcrowded, and ugly. While many new neighborhoods, for many decades, have suffered from the same aesthetic (particularly in the flat midwest-mile grids, with commercial districts lining the mainstreets, and residential filling in the mile sections), this particular neighborhood, with, as I mentioned, community space and personal lawns completely obliterated, takes the whole plan to its ultimate endpoint. Those houses were no place: a random mile square in the prairie, full of houses, with Chipotle and Walmart (and other monocultural chain businesses) a convenient 1/4 mile away. The neighborhood had absolutely nothing to do with Denver, or Colorado, or the Rockies. There was no sense of geography (no building around green streambeds, or hills, or maintained forest, or anything). No main street. No variation in architecture. Utterly soulless.
    3) It is strange that the neighborhood is built that way. Denver essentially has 700 miles to expand to the east (at least to Kansas City and Omaha). There is no reason to compress the houses in that way (the way one would in Boston or Long Island). There is virtually infinite space. But the houses were built that way anyway.

    An utterly depressing experience, and an utterly depressing future. Either population growth (and immigration) is gotten under control, or that is the future.

    joeyjoejoe

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Jonathan Mason, @Alec Leamas, @Henry Bowman, @Anonymous

    “An utterly depressing experience, and an utterly depressing future. Either population growth (and immigration) is gotten under control, or that is the future.”

    Immigration will be gotten under control very soon.

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/08/01/surveys-show-60-percent-opposition-immigration/

    All it takes are a few senators to channel this massive public desire, after they get their first tastes of the benefits of immigration reductionist (lower costs of living, lower crime rates, lower taxes, lower housing costs, higher wages, starving leftists for voters, more trust/unity, etc.) they will be hooked and support more and more.

    The RAISE act is like the 1919 immigration, bill, the main act, a 1924 Immigration Act will follow soon. And we will be so much better off for it. The time is soon, let us fight to make sure the future is one of OUR choosing, and not theirs.

  47. @Daniel H
    @Steve Sailer

    As a kid, I worked 8 years as a golf caddy. Today, no kids caddy at that golf course. Likewise, few kids today work at the restaurants in my old hood, whereas when I was coming up all sorts of jobs from waitresses, to dish washers to assistant cooks were done by local kids. No more. Pansy Graham hates American kids.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas, @Bastion

    As a kid, I worked 8 years as a golf caddy. Today, no kids caddy at that golf course.

    There may be some connection between the sorts of jobs American kids used to do and the obesity crisis among American youth.

  48. I hope middle aged parents and old grandparents are included. California has become the pension system of China because of family unification. Every Chinese computer programmer and optometrist brings in a horde of grandparents, parents, grandparents to collect SSI, Medicare, free food, free bus passes, free van transportation and every possible senior citizen service. And a lot of the 65 year olds applying for SSI are only in their 50s but arrive equipped with Chinese government issued ID claiming they are 65.

    Pack 4 or 5 elders getting $800.00 SSI a month into a house and that’s the mortgage payment and property taxes. That’s how the Chinese are driving White families with just 1 or 2 breadwinners out of California.

    We are the pension system of China.

  49. @Steve Sailer
    @joeyjoejoe

    I saw that too last week staying at an airport hotel on Tower Road about 8 miles in from the airport. I first started seeing that kind of suburban development east of Oakland, CA in the early 1990s: in the middle of a big open patch of grazing cows, suddenly you have two story houses set right on top of each other with barely any yards.

    Land is expensive, so front lawns are the first to go. Kids don't go outside much anymore, so who needs a backyard? Double pane windows and nonstop air conditioning keep your neighbor's noises out, so why not live jammed up against them. Environmentalists like "open space" when it's undeveloped but they don't like open space in terms of families having yards.

    About 20 years ago, I visited a new suburban development outside Chicago that was, in contrast, built like a New England small town 150 years ago: houses were pretty close together on small lots, but they faced onto a village green. Garages were in back so your kids could go play on the long but not too wide grass field ringed by about 50 houses in front of your house without risking much traffic. Houses had porches in front, and shops and other amenities were within walking distance. There were a lot of fairly safe bike paths too.

    It was about 50% more for, say, a four bedroom house there than in conventional developments nearby. That was a steep premium, but, overall, I was impressed.

    I have no idea if these kind of planned villages have succeeded in the slightest.

    Replies: @Daniel H, @Luke Lea, @Achmed E. Newman

    “About 20 years ago, I visited a new suburban development outside Chicago that was, in contrast, built like a New England small town 150 years ago: houses were pretty close together on small lots, but they faced onto a village green. Garages were in back so your kids could go play on the long but not too wide grass field ringed by about 50 houses in front of your house without risking much traffic. Houses had porches in front, and shops and other amenities were within walking distance. There were a lot of fairly safe bike paths too.”

    Steve, you’re going to like my Notes Toward a New Way of Life in America, which revolves around the notion of factories in the countryside run on part-time jobs:

    “In this 21st century ‘capitalist’ eutopia, Luke Lea explores a world of New Country Towns in which the people work part-time outside the home and in their free time help build their own houses, cultivate gardens, cook and care for their children and grandchildren, and pursue hobbies and other outside interests. They live on small family homesteads grouped around neighborhood greens, and get around town in glorified golf-carts. So thoroughly are work and leisure integrated into the fabric of their everyday lives that they don’t feel much need to retire, and they die at home in their beds as a rule, surrounded by loved ones.

    For those who would like to move to this world he provides a map with some directions for how to get there from here.”

    “[Luke Lea] is an excellent amateur economist.” Milton Friedman

    Coming out soon on Kindle

  50. @Daniel H
    @Steve Sailer

    As a kid, I worked 8 years as a golf caddy. Today, no kids caddy at that golf course. Likewise, few kids today work at the restaurants in my old hood, whereas when I was coming up all sorts of jobs from waitresses, to dish washers to assistant cooks were done by local kids. No more. Pansy Graham hates American kids.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas, @Bastion

    Who’s ready for a reboot of Caddyshack set in 2017. Starring a bunch of middle-aged Latin Americans taking the piss out of a bunch of investment bankers and Russian nouveau-riche?

  51. @J1234
    @Steve Sailer


    The post-1990 immigration system has spared American youths of the horrors of working part-time at golf courses and ski resorts.
     
    We were in Estes Park last week, and just about every waitress in town has an eastern European accent. Don't get me wrong, they're pretty and I prefer them to Mexicans, but what American kid on summer vacation wouldn't do these jobs?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon, @Anonymous

    Hiring Eastern Europeans may also be a business decision. Customers may like them over some Americans. Hey, even Trump liked them when picking wives.

    • Replies: @J1234
    @anon


    Hiring Eastern Europeans may also be a business decision.
     
    No, I overheard our hotel staff telling customers that there was a special VISA program bringing non-American workers into Estes Park. As I said, I find eastern Europeans vastly preferable to Mexicans, in part because their English is better, but I don't see the evil in giving Americans priority for American jobs. Especially in a Rocky Mountain tourist town.

    Customers may like them over some Americans.
     

    Oh, so it's market driven! Glad to hear you say that, because then we can stop importing the less desirable African immigrants and concentrate on European immigrants, the ones that are preferred even "over some Americans"...right?

    Yes, some of the Serbian girls are more attractive than some of the overweight and heavily tattooed American girls, but putting Americans first in job placement seems to be well within the scope of government function.

  52. Anonymous [AKA "AnonFee"] says:
    @J1234
    @Steve Sailer


    The post-1990 immigration system has spared American youths of the horrors of working part-time at golf courses and ski resorts.
     
    We were in Estes Park last week, and just about every waitress in town has an eastern European accent. Don't get me wrong, they're pretty and I prefer them to Mexicans, but what American kid on summer vacation wouldn't do these jobs?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon, @Anonymous

    Same story last year at the beach in North Carolina – Eastern Europeans in the T shirt shops, Jamaicans at the mini golf/go carts.

  53. @Alec Leamas
    @Steve Sailer


    The post-1990 immigration system has spared American youths of the horrors of working part-time at golf courses and ski resorts.

    Think of the children!

     

    You can easily foresee that in a few decades or less they're going to turn "giving poor people the opportunity to do jobs Americans won't do" into a form of brown-skinned race grievance, like slavery lite. "We toiled away making your hotel beds/mowing your lawns/picking your Arugula for slave wages, now pay up whitey!"

    Replies: @Ivy, @EdwardM

    Antonio Villaraigosa, aka Tony Villar, a former Mayor of Los Angeles was momentarily famous for the following utterance about immigrants: “We clean your toilets”. That little sound bite was in heavy rotation on various drive-time talk shows, always good for a laugh. Señor Villar still harbors Presidential aspirations. Maybe he will pitch his brand of magic to help unclog DC! Think of that as one more gift from California to the nation.

  54. @whorefinder
    Lindsey Graham is like a caricature of a corrupt closeted sell-out Senator in a good comedy movie by a right-wing Neil Simon.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Lindsey Graham is like a caricature of a corrupt closeted sell-out Senator in a good comedy movie by a right-wing Neil Simon.

    Yeah, this guy represents South Carolina and S. Carolinians like Nikki-dot-Haley does or Dunkin’ Donuts does. Really, he represents one man, the gambling mogul out in Vegas, who wants illegal immigration to keep on keeping on to keep casino labor costs down (not a damn thing to do with S. Carolina), and to keep the lid on internet gambling (it’s everywhere, but issue number 287 in the minds of voters).

    This is why Amendment 17 to the US Constitution was not just a slight “housekeeping” change to procedure, but a (nother) BIG blow to the rights of the various States.

    Of course, barring corrupt elections (not to be ruled out), all the donation money in the world or from all over the country would not matter if the voters were informed (hahahaaaa, yeah …. right!).

    Back to the subject, pushing for LEGAL immigration must be just what other big donors want – Ms. Lindsey never bothers listening to any S. Carolinians – they don’t have so much money.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Ms. Lindsey never bothers listening to any S. Carolinians – they don’t have so much money...
     
    …thanks to three centuries of cheap alien labor. Excuse me, labour.
    , @Boethiuss
    @Achmed E. Newman


    This is why Amendment 17 to the US Constitution was not just a slight “housekeeping” change to procedure, but a (nother) BIG blow to the rights of the various States.
     
    Yeah, there's no way we could have any pro-immigration Establishmentarians in the Senate if the Senators were selected by the state legislatures. /s

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  55. Many people, myself included, have expressed frustration at the seemingly slow pace of immigration reform. But lately I’ve been wondering if anyone has tried to model what would happen if President Trump suddenly prevailed, and there were NO new unskilled legal immigrants entering the country and NO new skilled legal immigrants and EVERY noncitizen who was in the country illegally was pushed out of the country.

    What would happen to the economy if – just at a guess – 40 million people were forced to leave, with about 10 million of them performing some sort of useful work? They all stay in some sort of housing – what would happen to the real estate market?

    Maybe it makes more sense if the soufflé was slowly deflated, over an eight-year Trump administration. Maybe that’s the plan.

  56. @AM
    @Lot

    Trump: Runs for office at personal expense and sacrifice to himself and his family. Attempts to at least do something about out of control immigration as President, fighting the bureaucracy, media, and globalist Congress. That would be unlike the other choice that almost won.

    NeverTrump: Complains on the Internet about what a dork Trump is. Claim that they have helpful insights.

    Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is...

    Darn right AM.

    You’ve definitely become my favorite and most admired commenter on this board. God Bless you Sir.

  57. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot
    This is vaporware that would not get 40 votes in the senate. I do hope both houses are forced to go on record with a roll call, but realistically the best we can hope for from this congress is replacing the heavily muslim and african diversity lottery visa with the same number of work visas. This would fracture Congress's pro immigration majority into an anti white block and a Koch block and might actually pass. And Indian IT guys have low chain migration, crime, and fertility compred to what we are getting from the lottery.

    Not that Trump cares about this, today we learned that a fourth Bannon ally has been purged from the NSC and Rick Perry is being considered for Homeland. The same Rick Perry who attacked Romney on immigration from the left and supports in state tuition for illegals but not for out of state Americans.

    Another bit of BS vaporware from Trump is the bill increasing federal sentencing for criminal immigration violations. The problem has never been weak penalties. Illegal reentry after deportation already routinely results in 70 month sentences at huge taxpayer cost. The problem is the lack of funding for ICE and the federal courts that process deportations. And the lack of a wall, visa entry and exit tracking, employer sanctions.

    Whenever Trump has had a chance at meaningless bluster on immigration he has taken it. Where he has a complete free hand, from TPS to DACA to the Muslim "ban" to setting the refugee quota, he has been roughly in line with W and Obama policy. I will say again, the African and Muslim population of the USA will grow more under Trump's first year than Obama's. Probably by a lot.

    Not only will Trump preside over huge increases in africans and muslims in the USA, his unpopularity could cost us the House in 2018 and is dragging down the brand of American nationalism generally.

    Replies: @AM, @Jack Hanson, @anonymous, @The preferred nomenclature is..., @IHTG

    This is vaporware that would not get 40 votes in the senate.

    Irrelevant. The debate alone is worth it. I’ll take Miller and Trump speaking about this day after day from here until the 2018 election. The working class never gets to hear the argument about how immigration leads to lower wages, less of a safety net and diminished schools.

    The democrats are trying to change their tactics from ‘Russia’, which is a loser, to ‘a better deal’. They realize they lost the working class vote and are desperate to get it back. But you can’t appeal to this vote and be for mass immigration at the same time. Hence, the hysteria we are seeing today displayed by Acosta and the MSM. The working class cannot get ‘a better deal’ when the rest of the world floods in.

    The MSM and the democrats do not want this issue even discussed. They must shut it down. Though the chances of passing this are slim, it is a great talking point and will help keep the working class from going back to the democrats. It will also potentially help primary out the republicans that need to be primaried.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @anonymous

    I agree that pushing a vaporware immigration bill is better than bombing Assad or the Koch Bros tax cut and ACA repeal agenda.

    , @Charles Pewitt
    @anonymous

    Mr. Anonymous says:


    The democrats are trying to change their tactics from ‘Russia’, which is a loser, to ‘a better deal’. They realize they lost the working class vote and are desperate to get it back. But you can’t appeal to this vote and be for mass immigration at the same time. Hence, the hysteria we are seeing today displayed by Acosta and the MSM. The working class cannot get ‘a better deal’ when the rest of the world floods in.

     

    (The working class cannot get a 'better deal' when the rest of the world floods in.) -- That's good political writing.
  58. @Steve Sailer
    @Bugg

    The post-1990 immigration system has spared American youths of the horrors of working part-time at golf courses and ski resorts.

    Think of the children!

    Replies: @Alec Leamas, @J1234, @Daniel H, @Anon7, @Dave Pinsen

    There must be some American kids working at golf courses somewhere. Google “Evans scholars” which refers to a special scholarship that is available only to kids who were golf caddies. At any given time, there are about 1,000 kids receiving scholarships.

    If you pick the Images tab, you will see the 2014 Purdue and Michigan recipients. Very few are minorities and none appear to be illegals.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon7

    I don't play much golf these days (too busy working), but golf courses never seemed to have much trouble attracting young white guys who love golf to handle the carts, clean clubs, etc. And they never had much trouble hiring pretty white girls to drive the drinks cart.

    I suspect ski resorts were similar until management discovered they could hire pretty Polish girls for less.

    Replies: @Anon7

  59. @Steve Sailer
    @joeyjoejoe

    I saw that too last week staying at an airport hotel on Tower Road about 8 miles in from the airport. I first started seeing that kind of suburban development east of Oakland, CA in the early 1990s: in the middle of a big open patch of grazing cows, suddenly you have two story houses set right on top of each other with barely any yards.

    Land is expensive, so front lawns are the first to go. Kids don't go outside much anymore, so who needs a backyard? Double pane windows and nonstop air conditioning keep your neighbor's noises out, so why not live jammed up against them. Environmentalists like "open space" when it's undeveloped but they don't like open space in terms of families having yards.

    About 20 years ago, I visited a new suburban development outside Chicago that was, in contrast, built like a New England small town 150 years ago: houses were pretty close together on small lots, but they faced onto a village green. Garages were in back so your kids could go play on the long but not too wide grass field ringed by about 50 houses in front of your house without risking much traffic. Houses had porches in front, and shops and other amenities were within walking distance. There were a lot of fairly safe bike paths too.

    It was about 50% more for, say, a four bedroom house there than in conventional developments nearby. That was a steep premium, but, overall, I was impressed.

    I have no idea if these kind of planned villages have succeeded in the slightest.

    Replies: @Daniel H, @Luke Lea, @Achmed E. Newman

    Land is expensive, so front lawns are the first to go. Kids don’t go outside much anymore, so who needs a backyard? Double pane windows and nonstop air conditioning keep your neighbor’s noises out, so why not live jammed up against them. Environmentalists like “open space” when it’s undeveloped but they don’t like open space in terms of families having yards.

    About this and Joey’s 2nd point of his great comment: It’s somewhat a vicious cycle on this: These neighborhoods are build with no good way – with all the curves, cul-de-sacs, and what-not – to walk or bike anywhere, and no good place for a reason to walk/ride – i.e. post office, library, corner store (nothing but big box stores and chain restaurants). People get used to getting in the SUV to go anywhere, hence more things are built for driving only.

    Sure, these places are OK to ride the bike for exercise only or walk a pattern, but most people do better having place to walk or bike to, as errands, or just daily life. Nobody wants to bike a spiral pattern to finally get to a big crowded 6-lane road that must be ridden along to get to somewhere. It’s not worth it.

    I hate the exurbs as a place to live. Another big thing is that big trees are cut down to make it easier to develop (not applicable in the Plains, but it the East and far West). It’ll take 30 years to have a nice leafy area, but most homeowners won’t plant Oaks and other big trees to keep the yard work down. It never gets nice there outside, in that case.

    I wish I could find this scene from “The Office“, as it IS the funniest show ever, but Mr. Scott is showing off his new townhouse from the outside. After a couple of minutes, he realizes that his one is not the one he’s been pointing out, as they all look the same, and his one is on the other side of the street (sorry, it’s not funny explaining it ;-}

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Another big thing is that big trees are cut down to make it easier to develop (not applicable in the Plains, but it the East and far West). It’ll take 30 years to have a nice leafy area, but most homeowners won’t plant Oaks and other big trees to keep the yard work down. It never gets nice there outside, in that case.
     
    I am with you on the trees. We have Orcs posing as contractors all over this country. And it happens in the plains too - just not as much.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  60. @Anon7
    @Steve Sailer

    There must be some American kids working at golf courses somewhere. Google "Evans scholars" which refers to a special scholarship that is available only to kids who were golf caddies. At any given time, there are about 1,000 kids receiving scholarships.

    If you pick the Images tab, you will see the 2014 Purdue and Michigan recipients. Very few are minorities and none appear to be illegals.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I don’t play much golf these days (too busy working), but golf courses never seemed to have much trouble attracting young white guys who love golf to handle the carts, clean clubs, etc. And they never had much trouble hiring pretty white girls to drive the drinks cart.

    I suspect ski resorts were similar until management discovered they could hire pretty Polish girls for less.

    • Replies: @Anon7
    @Steve Sailer

    The only ski resort I'm familiar with is at Boyne in Michigan (my kids were into snowboarding, and I was into saving for their college, hence cheap resorts) and they hired Austrian girls, tall pretty Valkyries who did things by the numbers with a bright smile (for example, it's a Michigan January morning, -5 degrees F, gray and snowing... "a pearfekt day fur skiing, ya?") I hate to say it, but those girls were great.

    Local girls and boys did food service.

  61. @Anonym
    All this does is slow the rot. What is needed is an immigration moratorium, and emigration reform. Make America Great Again by selecting who is given the boot. Start with chain-migration welfare recipients and go from there. Send them off to Africa and it's a win-win. Africa also gets relatively superior human capital and experiences the miracle and strength of diversity.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    One step at a time. Your ideas may sprout and grow in the ground cleared by Trump.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    From the Horse's mouth:


    Immigration moderation. Before any new green cards are issued to foreign
    workers abroad, there will be a pause where employers will have to hire from the
    domestic pool of unemployed immigrant and native workers. This will help
    reverse women's plummeting workplace participation rate, grow wages, and allow
    record immigration levels to subside to more moderate historical averages.
     
    https://assets.donaldjtrump.com/Immigration-Reform-Trump.pdf
  62. @whorefinder
    Lindsey Graham is like a caricature of a corrupt closeted sell-out Senator in a good comedy movie by a right-wing Neil Simon.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Lindsey Graham is like a caricature of a corrupt closeted sell-out Senator in a good comedy movie by a right-wing Neil Simon.

    That is a generous evaluation of the Honorable Lie-say Graham. But in an honorable, or a just, or a self-interested, polity Lindsey Graham would be wearing a black hood and thirteen loops of hemp holding his necktie just before he drew his last breath.

  63. Yes Trump should push this. And no, it will go nowhere. It might even get him impeached and convicted. Neither Democrats or Republicans will stand for it; and the Hate-Whitey brigade will seize any opportunity to strike at the enemy they hate the most: White Men.

    For Blacks and Hispanics, its get Whitey all the time. Turning the place into Greater Libya to them is a win, because they can’t even see the results — its Greater Libya. Just getting Whitey is enough. Same with Gays, Feminists, other non-Whites, and of course single White women and quite a lot of married ones particularly in the upper classes.

    So lets get real for a moment — this won’t pass and will likely get Trump impeached and convicted. Heck the Supremes will no doubt find this treason filled by the SJW fantasies of their female clerks who they indulge as fantasy grand-kids or harbor unhealthy thoughts towards. [Or both, this is a monumentally pozzed society.]

    But its a clarifying moment; like Fort Sumter. It lets every average White dude know who is his enemy; and who is his ally or potential ally. There is no, zero, nada, zilch possibility of victory and restoring even a semblance of the United States circa 1988 even. HOWEVER there is still the possibility slim though it is, of Whites surviving in this nation and others.

    Survival is only possible by making others FEAR US. FEAR ALONE should be our goal; and in that regard the tactics of the Irish nationalists like Michael Collins, Morris Dees of the $PLC (is he related to LA DJ Rick Dees?), Louis Farrakhan, CAIR, and Muslims in the West should bear careful examination and copying where likely to be practical and successful; and losing tactics and strategies eschewed. Whites are already destined due to the people already here to be a discriminated against minority, not the least of which is our women are quite happy with that arrangement for obvious reasons. It is imperative we start fighting for survival and start intimidating enemies as often as possible.

  64. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer


    Land is expensive, so front lawns are the first to go. Kids don’t go outside much anymore, so who needs a backyard? Double pane windows and nonstop air conditioning keep your neighbor’s noises out, so why not live jammed up against them. Environmentalists like “open space” when it’s undeveloped but they don’t like open space in terms of families having yards.
     
    About this and Joey's 2nd point of his great comment: It's somewhat a vicious cycle on this: These neighborhoods are build with no good way - with all the curves, cul-de-sacs, and what-not - to walk or bike anywhere, and no good place for a reason to walk/ride - i.e. post office, library, corner store (nothing but big box stores and chain restaurants). People get used to getting in the SUV to go anywhere, hence more things are built for driving only.

    Sure, these places are OK to ride the bike for exercise only or walk a pattern, but most people do better having place to walk or bike to, as errands, or just daily life. Nobody wants to bike a spiral pattern to finally get to a big crowded 6-lane road that must be ridden along to get to somewhere. It's not worth it.

    I hate the exurbs as a place to live. Another big thing is that big trees are cut down to make it easier to develop (not applicable in the Plains, but it the East and far West). It'll take 30 years to have a nice leafy area, but most homeowners won't plant Oaks and other big trees to keep the yard work down. It never gets nice there outside, in that case.

    I wish I could find this scene from "The Office", as it IS the funniest show ever, but Mr. Scott is showing off his new townhouse from the outside. After a couple of minutes, he realizes that his one is not the one he's been pointing out, as they all look the same, and his one is on the other side of the street (sorry, it's not funny explaining it ;-}

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Another big thing is that big trees are cut down to make it easier to develop (not applicable in the Plains, but it the East and far West). It’ll take 30 years to have a nice leafy area, but most homeowners won’t plant Oaks and other big trees to keep the yard work down. It never gets nice there outside, in that case.

    I am with you on the trees. We have Orcs posing as contractors all over this country. And it happens in the plains too – just not as much.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Charles, I brought up the Plains areas as there are not naturally trees everywhere (only by the water), not in terms of where the Orcs are. I see lots of midwest towns with old stately trees too, of course, but it takes more effort out there, as opposed to anywhere in the east or, say, Pacific NW.

  65. @Jonathan Mason
    At this point of the game it hardly matters what Trump thinks as he has truly jumped the shark now.

    In his Wall St. Journal interview Trump is reported to have said that in the event of Scottish independence, the British Open (golf championship) would no longer exist.

    Well first of all there is no such thing as the British Open, it is called simply The Open Championship. Secondly, it is run by an organization called the R&A, a group of companies based in St. Andrews, Scotland which is the worldwide ruling body for golf, except in the US and Mexico.

    For a golf enthusiast to be ignorant of these facts, especially someone who owns championship golf courses including some in Scotland, can only be a sign of catastrophic mental deterioration, and the end must be nigh for his presidency.

    Replies: @EriK, @neprof

    I’m hoping you post is sarcastic, hard to know from the international audience that frequents the Unz. But in the US, almost every golfer I know refers to it as the British Open. It seems to me the term “The Open” ,and the push the call it such, is a recent (10 years or so) change of nomenclature.

    There are two major Opens, one in the US and one in Britain. Disintishinghing between the two with the appropriate adjective seems most logical. To refer to the British Open as the “The Open” smacks of a misplaced arrogance aimed at compensating for empire lost (in addition to the world’s best golfers).

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @neprof

    It's like calling the London Times instead The Times, which is confusing to Americans. The NYT compromises and calls it the Times of London.

  66. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Anonym

    One step at a time. Your ideas may sprout and grow in the ground cleared by Trump.

    Replies: @Anonym

    From the Horse’s mouth:

    Immigration moderation. Before any new green cards are issued to foreign
    workers abroad, there will be a pause where employers will have to hire from the
    domestic pool of unemployed immigrant and native workers. This will help
    reverse women’s plummeting workplace participation rate, grow wages, and allow
    record immigration levels to subside to more moderate historical averages.

    https://assets.donaldjtrump.com/Immigration-Reform-Trump.pdf

  67. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon7

    I don't play much golf these days (too busy working), but golf courses never seemed to have much trouble attracting young white guys who love golf to handle the carts, clean clubs, etc. And they never had much trouble hiring pretty white girls to drive the drinks cart.

    I suspect ski resorts were similar until management discovered they could hire pretty Polish girls for less.

    Replies: @Anon7

    The only ski resort I’m familiar with is at Boyne in Michigan (my kids were into snowboarding, and I was into saving for their college, hence cheap resorts) and they hired Austrian girls, tall pretty Valkyries who did things by the numbers with a bright smile (for example, it’s a Michigan January morning, -5 degrees F, gray and snowing… “a pearfekt day fur skiing, ya?”) I hate to say it, but those girls were great.

    Local girls and boys did food service.

  68. @Lot
    This is vaporware that would not get 40 votes in the senate. I do hope both houses are forced to go on record with a roll call, but realistically the best we can hope for from this congress is replacing the heavily muslim and african diversity lottery visa with the same number of work visas. This would fracture Congress's pro immigration majority into an anti white block and a Koch block and might actually pass. And Indian IT guys have low chain migration, crime, and fertility compred to what we are getting from the lottery.

    Not that Trump cares about this, today we learned that a fourth Bannon ally has been purged from the NSC and Rick Perry is being considered for Homeland. The same Rick Perry who attacked Romney on immigration from the left and supports in state tuition for illegals but not for out of state Americans.

    Another bit of BS vaporware from Trump is the bill increasing federal sentencing for criminal immigration violations. The problem has never been weak penalties. Illegal reentry after deportation already routinely results in 70 month sentences at huge taxpayer cost. The problem is the lack of funding for ICE and the federal courts that process deportations. And the lack of a wall, visa entry and exit tracking, employer sanctions.

    Whenever Trump has had a chance at meaningless bluster on immigration he has taken it. Where he has a complete free hand, from TPS to DACA to the Muslim "ban" to setting the refugee quota, he has been roughly in line with W and Obama policy. I will say again, the African and Muslim population of the USA will grow more under Trump's first year than Obama's. Probably by a lot.

    Not only will Trump preside over huge increases in africans and muslims in the USA, his unpopularity could cost us the House in 2018 and is dragging down the brand of American nationalism generally.

    Replies: @AM, @Jack Hanson, @anonymous, @The preferred nomenclature is..., @IHTG

    Lord have mercy Lot you are the Truth and Tiny Duck of concern trolls. You are such a bore.

  69. Working as a teenager is an incredible learning opportunity .
    It teaches so many things:
    The value of physical labor
    The value of money
    The skills needed to survive the politics of employment
    Not being popular or involved in school activities is actually okay
    There is dignity in all work
    There is dignity in all who work
    True self esteem actualization
    The desire to better oneself by getting better work
    Some solidarity with all who work

    One could go on .
    It is an often rude but effective introduction to reality.
    It is a sad loss for our children.
    It is why we have kids living at home well into adulthood.

    A friend told me recently of a a 17 year old boy who was shown a pair of pliers and didn’t know what they were!

  70. But Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, criticized the measure, … “Hotels, restaurants, golf courses and farmers,” he added, “will tell you this proposal to cut legal immigration in half would put their business in peril.”

    Give Congresswoman Graham some credit. She’s made it crystal clear exactly whose interest she is looking out for.

  71. @Steve Sailer
    @Bugg

    The post-1990 immigration system has spared American youths of the horrors of working part-time at golf courses and ski resorts.

    Think of the children!

    Replies: @Alec Leamas, @J1234, @Daniel H, @Anon7, @Dave Pinsen

    This reminded me that McDonald’s used to have a commercial advertising working there as a rite of passage. It showed a bunch of white guys that worked there as teens and stayed in touch later in life, I think. So I went to YouTube to search for it, and found this instead:

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Dave Pinsen

    Disgusting.

    (Appropriataely, the invaders didn't seem to ever pay for the food!)

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Dave Pinsen

    I like how the john introduced his date as “me ho” while she kept saying “Me ho!” Midday druggies LOL.

  72. @Achmed E. Newman
    @whorefinder


    Lindsey Graham is like a caricature of a corrupt closeted sell-out Senator in a good comedy movie by a right-wing Neil Simon.
     
    Yeah, this guy represents South Carolina and S. Carolinians like Nikki-dot-Haley does or Dunkin' Donuts does. Really, he represents one man, the gambling mogul out in Vegas, who wants illegal immigration to keep on keeping on to keep casino labor costs down (not a damn thing to do with S. Carolina), and to keep the lid on internet gambling (it's everywhere, but issue number 287 in the minds of voters).

    This is why Amendment 17 to the US Constitution was not just a slight "housekeeping" change to procedure, but a (nother) BIG blow to the rights of the various States.

    Of course, barring corrupt elections (not to be ruled out), all the donation money in the world or from all over the country would not matter if the voters were informed (hahahaaaa, yeah .... right!).

    Back to the subject, pushing for LEGAL immigration must be just what other big donors want - Ms. Lindsey never bothers listening to any S. Carolinians - they don't have so much money.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Boethiuss

    Ms. Lindsey never bothers listening to any S. Carolinians – they don’t have so much money…

    …thanks to three centuries of cheap alien labor. Excuse me, labour.

  73. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Estes Park is the last mountain town between Boulder and Rocky Mountain National Park.
     
    It's also among the tiredest entries in crossword puzzles, thanks to its low Scrabble score-- 5.

    By the way, is golf course architecture patented, trademarked, copyrighted, or otherwise protected? Or can a new course just steal from Augusta, Pebble Beach, Royal Melbourne, etc, with abandon?

    Replies: @Autochthon

    One can pretty much steal with abandon; though there are limited protectons.

    I expect self-policing goes a long way toward keeping things from getting put of hand; it would be gauche to replicate Augusta on a few acres in Montana, and the value of the thing is partly like a Veblen good and partly a question of provenance. (A guitar exactly replicating one Steve Hackett played on “Supper’s Ready” just isn’t the same as the actual guitar he played; think also of famous paintings and copies thereof, however perfect…).

    I also expect one place probably does have many counterfeit courses, or will soon, and with no shame about it: China. Intellectual property is for suckers, as far as the parasites there are concerned.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Autochthon

    One of the first great American golf course designers, Charles Blair Macdonald, toured Scotland around the turn of the previous century and returned with a sketchbook of classic hole designs, such as the Road Hole at St. Andrews and the Redan at North Berwick. He then reproduced them in the Hamptons at his National Golf Links of America to great success. Macdonald then went on reproducing his set of classic British holes at other courses such as Chicago Golf Club and Mid-Ocean in Bermuda. Over time, he slowly retired and his engineer, Seth Raynor, went on designing golf courses using the same template holes.

    Then the Macdonald-Raynor courses went out of fashion. One commenter here, for example, was able to buy a membership at the great National Golf Links of America for a quite low price in 1982 when nobody cared about the NGLA. Since then these courses have become wildly fashionable again. Recently Tom Doak built an Old Macdonald tribute course at Bandon Dunes on the Oregon coast.

    Macdonald introduced the conservative prejudice into American golf design that the best holes had evolved in Scotland, and that American architects should study and copy the classics, and then strive to reproduce over and over the time-tested templates in America. Originality in golf architecture was less prized than in picking out the perfect spot of land for rebuilding a classic Redan hole or whatever.

    It would seem to me that Macdonald established the cultural precedent that golf course architects in America are to be encouraged to copy and emulate, and that extreme originality is to be less prized in golf course architecture than in say painting.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Autochthon

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Autochthon

    I talked to an engineer selling commercial aircraft engine starters, and he was doing some business in China. He said they had to be really careful, as the Chinese customers wanted to buy just 1 (they were willing to pay 20 x the price), so they could just take it apart, measure everything, and get to making them in China within a year - all that expensive development engineering work/time (analytical and experimental) would be stolen. The American company would not do business that way ... but sooner or later, the business will be gone, and the cheap, possibly reliable, knock-offs would be flying around.

    OTOH, I don't mind at all buying DVD's of, say "The Office" that I know were ripped/burned in the streets of Guangzhuou, as Hollywood can go to hell, as far as I'm concerned. (Sorry, Steve, that's not in your neck of the woods, is it? You're way down the street from there, right, past that new golf course that resembles, the ... well who cares?) ;-}

    Oh, more here on the odious Chinese plans regarding not industrial, but consumer goods.

    Replies: @LondonBob

  74. @Dave Pinsen
    @Steve Sailer

    This reminded me that McDonald's used to have a commercial advertising working there as a rite of passage. It showed a bunch of white guys that worked there as teens and stayed in touch later in life, I think. So I went to YouTube to search for it, and found this instead:
    https://youtu.be/GFOYwz-1TeE

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Disgusting.

    (Appropriataely, the invaders didn’t seem to ever pay for the food!)

  75. @Dave Pinsen
    @Steve Sailer

    This reminded me that McDonald's used to have a commercial advertising working there as a rite of passage. It showed a bunch of white guys that worked there as teens and stayed in touch later in life, I think. So I went to YouTube to search for it, and found this instead:
    https://youtu.be/GFOYwz-1TeE

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I like how the john introduced his date as “me ho” while she kept saying “Me ho!” Midday druggies LOL.

  76. @JohnnyD
    Stephen Miller killed it at today's press conference.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ngjhdk01V90

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Stephen Miller killed it at today’s press conference.

    Yes, that was impressive.

    And the A-hole from the Times clearly wasn’t acting as a disinterested journalist, but as an immigration advocate.

  77. @Autochthon
    @Reg Cæsar

    One can pretty much steal with abandon; though there are limited protectons.

    I expect self-policing goes a long way toward keeping things from getting put of hand; it would be gauche to replicate Augusta on a few acres in Montana, and the value of the thing is partly like a Veblen good and partly a question of provenance. (A guitar exactly replicating one Steve Hackett played on "Supper's Ready" just isn't the same as the actual guitar he played; think also of famous paintings and copies thereof, however perfect...).

    I also expect one place probably does have many counterfeit courses, or will soon, and with no shame about it: China. Intellectual property is for suckers, as far as the parasites there are concerned.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Achmed E. Newman

    One of the first great American golf course designers, Charles Blair Macdonald, toured Scotland around the turn of the previous century and returned with a sketchbook of classic hole designs, such as the Road Hole at St. Andrews and the Redan at North Berwick. He then reproduced them in the Hamptons at his National Golf Links of America to great success. Macdonald then went on reproducing his set of classic British holes at other courses such as Chicago Golf Club and Mid-Ocean in Bermuda. Over time, he slowly retired and his engineer, Seth Raynor, went on designing golf courses using the same template holes.

    Then the Macdonald-Raynor courses went out of fashion. One commenter here, for example, was able to buy a membership at the great National Golf Links of America for a quite low price in 1982 when nobody cared about the NGLA. Since then these courses have become wildly fashionable again. Recently Tom Doak built an Old Macdonald tribute course at Bandon Dunes on the Oregon coast.

    Macdonald introduced the conservative prejudice into American golf design that the best holes had evolved in Scotland, and that American architects should study and copy the classics, and then strive to reproduce over and over the time-tested templates in America. Originality in golf architecture was less prized than in picking out the perfect spot of land for rebuilding a classic Redan hole or whatever.

    It would seem to me that Macdonald established the cultural precedent that golf course architects in America are to be encouraged to copy and emulate, and that extreme originality is to be less prized in golf course architecture than in say painting.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    This discussion is awesome. I like it when golf course architecture comes in from left field. So iStevey! I am now woke to golf course architecture.

    , @Autochthon
    @Steve Sailer

    Fascinating. My ideas associating exclusivity and snobbery to golfers were way off base (I readily confess to know hardly anything of such matters, but was weighing in with expertise about intellectual property and experience of human nature). Come to think of it the golfers I know are rich but also very meat-and-potatoes in a Trumpish way, so it makes sense things haven't evolved as they may have with art collectors, who obsess over obscurity and exclisibity for its own sake....

    I've no interest in golf at all but like others I encourage you to write a book about golf courses. I would but and voraciously read it for insights like these!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  78. @neprof
    @Jonathan Mason

    I'm hoping you post is sarcastic, hard to know from the international audience that frequents the Unz. But in the US, almost every golfer I know refers to it as the British Open. It seems to me the term "The Open" ,and the push the call it such, is a recent (10 years or so) change of nomenclature.

    There are two major Opens, one in the US and one in Britain. Disintishinghing between the two with the appropriate adjective seems most logical. To refer to the British Open as the "The Open" smacks of a misplaced arrogance aimed at compensating for empire lost (in addition to the world's best golfers).

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    It’s like calling the London Times instead The Times, which is confusing to Americans. The NYT compromises and calls it the Times of London.

  79. @Jack Hanson
    @Lot

    The eeyore amen corner reminds us why immigration restriction was basically niche blogs before Trump.

    Replies: @Lot

    So it was niche blogs that killed repeated attempts by Bush and Obama to pass amnesty? That got prop 187 on the ballot and passed it? That passed SB 1070 in Arizona?

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    @Lot

    Lmao if you think niche blogs had anything to do with that. Sailer's Self Important Commentariat strikes again.

    Even your boy Cruz couldn't get past mouthing platitudes about how great legal immigrants are. This is the most we've seen in decades and the best you can do is whine about inanities.

    Go back to scanning your Google alerts for iSteve + Israel. You're approaching art deco levels of mendacity.

  80. @Steve Sailer
    @Autochthon

    One of the first great American golf course designers, Charles Blair Macdonald, toured Scotland around the turn of the previous century and returned with a sketchbook of classic hole designs, such as the Road Hole at St. Andrews and the Redan at North Berwick. He then reproduced them in the Hamptons at his National Golf Links of America to great success. Macdonald then went on reproducing his set of classic British holes at other courses such as Chicago Golf Club and Mid-Ocean in Bermuda. Over time, he slowly retired and his engineer, Seth Raynor, went on designing golf courses using the same template holes.

    Then the Macdonald-Raynor courses went out of fashion. One commenter here, for example, was able to buy a membership at the great National Golf Links of America for a quite low price in 1982 when nobody cared about the NGLA. Since then these courses have become wildly fashionable again. Recently Tom Doak built an Old Macdonald tribute course at Bandon Dunes on the Oregon coast.

    Macdonald introduced the conservative prejudice into American golf design that the best holes had evolved in Scotland, and that American architects should study and copy the classics, and then strive to reproduce over and over the time-tested templates in America. Originality in golf architecture was less prized than in picking out the perfect spot of land for rebuilding a classic Redan hole or whatever.

    It would seem to me that Macdonald established the cultural precedent that golf course architects in America are to be encouraged to copy and emulate, and that extreme originality is to be less prized in golf course architecture than in say painting.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Autochthon

    This discussion is awesome. I like it when golf course architecture comes in from left field. So iStevey! I am now woke to golf course architecture.

    • LOL: Autochthon
  81. @anonymous
    @Lot


    This is vaporware that would not get 40 votes in the senate.
     
    Irrelevant. The debate alone is worth it. I'll take Miller and Trump speaking about this day after day from here until the 2018 election. The working class never gets to hear the argument about how immigration leads to lower wages, less of a safety net and diminished schools.

    The democrats are trying to change their tactics from 'Russia', which is a loser, to 'a better deal'. They realize they lost the working class vote and are desperate to get it back. But you can't appeal to this vote and be for mass immigration at the same time. Hence, the hysteria we are seeing today displayed by Acosta and the MSM. The working class cannot get 'a better deal' when the rest of the world floods in.

    The MSM and the democrats do not want this issue even discussed. They must shut it down. Though the chances of passing this are slim, it is a great talking point and will help keep the working class from going back to the democrats. It will also potentially help primary out the republicans that need to be primaried.

    Replies: @Lot, @Charles Pewitt

    I agree that pushing a vaporware immigration bill is better than bombing Assad or the Koch Bros tax cut and ACA repeal agenda.

  82. @EriK
    @Jonathan Mason


    Well first of all there is no such thing as the British Open, it is called simply The Open Championship.
     
    "Nicklaus was asked in late February (2016) about how he decided which sons would caddie for him in the majors. He recalled one year when Jackie, his oldest son, caddied in the Masters and "I think he had the Open." And then he mentioned his second-oldest son, Steve, had "the British Open and the PGA."

    The British Open?

    "That's what it is," Nicklaus said.

    Has he ever referred to the major he won three times as The Open?

    "Sure, when I'm over there," he said. "Over here, people don't know what The Open Championship is. It's 'The Open Championship of the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews.' If it's The Open Championship, it could be the U.S. Open, the Australian Open, the Japanese Open."

    If British Open is good for Jack, you can go pound sand with your nitpicking.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Right. Nicklaus is a fairly strict and ostentatious golf traditionalist, and even he won’t use “The Open” in America to refer to what Americans call the British Open. Too confusing. It would be like pronouncing “Claret Jug,” the trophy, in the French manner rather than in the British manner with a hard T at the end of “claret.”

  83. @joeyjoejoe
    Incidentally:
    I was in Denver last week, and spent the night near the airport (way out west of town, probably 25 miles from Denver proper). The space between the airport and the city is starting to fill in: when the airport was first built, it was 25 miles of empty prairie. Now, the standard mile grid of main streets is appearing, commercial districts on each intersection, with residential housing filling the mile squares between grids.

    The thing about it, though, is that those residential sections are quite simply ugly and crowded. My group drove through a new neighborhood, of decently built houses (ranging from very small 1100 sf to 2400 sf or so). They were so crowded together, it felt like a vast apartment complex (or even a narrow European town. Often, four or five of those houses shared a driveway-such that if one person had one extra car-say a visitor- the other residents would have no room to enter their own garages). Lawns were nonexistent. Public green space was nonexistent (no parks, or community shared space. Literally no room to throw a ball. Individual yards were no more than 6 feet, and often less, wide).

    Several things occurred to us (my colleagues are property managers)
    1) This is the logical endpoint of single family homes. The lot has been shrunk down to the point that further shrinking is impossible. The next step would be an apartment complex.
    2) This is the future of America. Soulless, overcrowded, and ugly. While many new neighborhoods, for many decades, have suffered from the same aesthetic (particularly in the flat midwest-mile grids, with commercial districts lining the mainstreets, and residential filling in the mile sections), this particular neighborhood, with, as I mentioned, community space and personal lawns completely obliterated, takes the whole plan to its ultimate endpoint. Those houses were no place: a random mile square in the prairie, full of houses, with Chipotle and Walmart (and other monocultural chain businesses) a convenient 1/4 mile away. The neighborhood had absolutely nothing to do with Denver, or Colorado, or the Rockies. There was no sense of geography (no building around green streambeds, or hills, or maintained forest, or anything). No main street. No variation in architecture. Utterly soulless.
    3) It is strange that the neighborhood is built that way. Denver essentially has 700 miles to expand to the east (at least to Kansas City and Omaha). There is no reason to compress the houses in that way (the way one would in Boston or Long Island). There is virtually infinite space. But the houses were built that way anyway.

    An utterly depressing experience, and an utterly depressing future. Either population growth (and immigration) is gotten under control, or that is the future.

    joeyjoejoe

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Jonathan Mason, @Alec Leamas, @Henry Bowman, @Anonymous

    From what I can figure out, new urbanists and supporters of Smart Growth want people to live in high density housing located near their places of employment, with the idea that everyone will be able to walk or ride bikes to work, eliminating the need for cars.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    New Urbanists haven't noticed the existence of the two-career couple. It's kind of hard to live within walking distance of both spouses' jobs.

  84. @Anonymous
    @joeyjoejoe

    From what I can figure out, new urbanists and supporters of Smart Growth want people to live in high density housing located near their places of employment, with the idea that everyone will be able to walk or ride bikes to work, eliminating the need for cars.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    New Urbanists haven’t noticed the existence of the two-career couple. It’s kind of hard to live within walking distance of both spouses’ jobs.

  85. @Lot
    This is vaporware that would not get 40 votes in the senate. I do hope both houses are forced to go on record with a roll call, but realistically the best we can hope for from this congress is replacing the heavily muslim and african diversity lottery visa with the same number of work visas. This would fracture Congress's pro immigration majority into an anti white block and a Koch block and might actually pass. And Indian IT guys have low chain migration, crime, and fertility compred to what we are getting from the lottery.

    Not that Trump cares about this, today we learned that a fourth Bannon ally has been purged from the NSC and Rick Perry is being considered for Homeland. The same Rick Perry who attacked Romney on immigration from the left and supports in state tuition for illegals but not for out of state Americans.

    Another bit of BS vaporware from Trump is the bill increasing federal sentencing for criminal immigration violations. The problem has never been weak penalties. Illegal reentry after deportation already routinely results in 70 month sentences at huge taxpayer cost. The problem is the lack of funding for ICE and the federal courts that process deportations. And the lack of a wall, visa entry and exit tracking, employer sanctions.

    Whenever Trump has had a chance at meaningless bluster on immigration he has taken it. Where he has a complete free hand, from TPS to DACA to the Muslim "ban" to setting the refugee quota, he has been roughly in line with W and Obama policy. I will say again, the African and Muslim population of the USA will grow more under Trump's first year than Obama's. Probably by a lot.

    Not only will Trump preside over huge increases in africans and muslims in the USA, his unpopularity could cost us the House in 2018 and is dragging down the brand of American nationalism generally.

    Replies: @AM, @Jack Hanson, @anonymous, @The preferred nomenclature is..., @IHTG

    You’re not reading all the news about immigration enforcement. You’re not paying attention.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @IHTG


    You’re not reading all the news about immigration enforcement. You’re not paying attention.
     
    Yes, I am. Sessions and ICE are definitely doing a better job than Obama's people. But the issue of capacity remains. There are about 11 million illegal immigrants. At the current rate it looks like the number of deportations will increase by about 32,000 this year over 2016. Even if that figure triples, we are talking about less than 1% of the illegal population.

    Meanwhile, Trump could have set the number of refugees this year at 0. Instead he set it at 50,000, more than making up for the additional 32,000 deportations.
  86. @Steve Sailer
    @Autochthon

    One of the first great American golf course designers, Charles Blair Macdonald, toured Scotland around the turn of the previous century and returned with a sketchbook of classic hole designs, such as the Road Hole at St. Andrews and the Redan at North Berwick. He then reproduced them in the Hamptons at his National Golf Links of America to great success. Macdonald then went on reproducing his set of classic British holes at other courses such as Chicago Golf Club and Mid-Ocean in Bermuda. Over time, he slowly retired and his engineer, Seth Raynor, went on designing golf courses using the same template holes.

    Then the Macdonald-Raynor courses went out of fashion. One commenter here, for example, was able to buy a membership at the great National Golf Links of America for a quite low price in 1982 when nobody cared about the NGLA. Since then these courses have become wildly fashionable again. Recently Tom Doak built an Old Macdonald tribute course at Bandon Dunes on the Oregon coast.

    Macdonald introduced the conservative prejudice into American golf design that the best holes had evolved in Scotland, and that American architects should study and copy the classics, and then strive to reproduce over and over the time-tested templates in America. Originality in golf architecture was less prized than in picking out the perfect spot of land for rebuilding a classic Redan hole or whatever.

    It would seem to me that Macdonald established the cultural precedent that golf course architects in America are to be encouraged to copy and emulate, and that extreme originality is to be less prized in golf course architecture than in say painting.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Autochthon

    Fascinating. My ideas associating exclusivity and snobbery to golfers were way off base (I readily confess to know hardly anything of such matters, but was weighing in with expertise about intellectual property and experience of human nature). Come to think of it the golfers I know are rich but also very meat-and-potatoes in a Trumpish way, so it makes sense things haven’t evolved as they may have with art collectors, who obsess over obscurity and exclisibity for its own sake….

    I’ve no interest in golf at all but like others I encourage you to write a book about golf courses. I would but and voraciously read it for insights like these!

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Autochthon

    Many years ago I sent Tom Wolfe pictures of a couple of golf courses that were designed to be highly original: one done all in hard edged geometric shapes, the other all symbolic. Here's the Scylla & Charybdis par 3 by Desmond Muirhead:

    http://theaposition.com/johnstrawn/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2010/04/Stone_Harbor_7th_old.jpg

    Wolfe was amused.

    But most golf courses less emphasize creativity for the sake of creativity and more on emphasizing fitting a good golf course into a piece of pre-existing land. There are a couple of hundred thousand golf holes in America, so inventing a wholly original one on paper is a fool's errand. The more important thing is to make the golf course as a whole work, which isn't easy to do.

    On the other hand, different architects have different styles. Robert Trent Jones streamlined style from 1948 onward was quite in sync with modernist office buildings like the Seagram's Building.

    Pete Dye from 1960s onward was doing post-modernist stuff, less restrained by strictures of good taste. The last time I looked at a Dye course a few years ago, it looked ugly to me, which it wouldn't have done so in the 1990s. If I live long enough, Dye courses will look good to me again. That's just the nature of fashion.

    Many of the current designers -- Crenshaw & Coore, Doak, Gil Hanse -- are doing neoclassical Chrysler Building type stuff with a lot of ornamentation and complexity.

  87. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Another big thing is that big trees are cut down to make it easier to develop (not applicable in the Plains, but it the East and far West). It’ll take 30 years to have a nice leafy area, but most homeowners won’t plant Oaks and other big trees to keep the yard work down. It never gets nice there outside, in that case.
     
    I am with you on the trees. We have Orcs posing as contractors all over this country. And it happens in the plains too - just not as much.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Charles, I brought up the Plains areas as there are not naturally trees everywhere (only by the water), not in terms of where the Orcs are. I see lots of midwest towns with old stately trees too, of course, but it takes more effort out there, as opposed to anywhere in the east or, say, Pacific NW.

  88. @Autochthon
    @Reg Cæsar

    One can pretty much steal with abandon; though there are limited protectons.

    I expect self-policing goes a long way toward keeping things from getting put of hand; it would be gauche to replicate Augusta on a few acres in Montana, and the value of the thing is partly like a Veblen good and partly a question of provenance. (A guitar exactly replicating one Steve Hackett played on "Supper's Ready" just isn't the same as the actual guitar he played; think also of famous paintings and copies thereof, however perfect...).

    I also expect one place probably does have many counterfeit courses, or will soon, and with no shame about it: China. Intellectual property is for suckers, as far as the parasites there are concerned.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Achmed E. Newman

    I talked to an engineer selling commercial aircraft engine starters, and he was doing some business in China. He said they had to be really careful, as the Chinese customers wanted to buy just 1 (they were willing to pay 20 x the price), so they could just take it apart, measure everything, and get to making them in China within a year – all that expensive development engineering work/time (analytical and experimental) would be stolen. The American company would not do business that way … but sooner or later, the business will be gone, and the cheap, possibly reliable, knock-offs would be flying around.

    OTOH, I don’t mind at all buying DVD’s of, say “The Office” that I know were ripped/burned in the streets of Guangzhuou, as Hollywood can go to hell, as far as I’m concerned. (Sorry, Steve, that’s not in your neck of the woods, is it? You’re way down the street from there, right, past that new golf course that resembles, the … well who cares?) ;-}

    Oh, more here on the odious Chinese plans regarding not industrial, but consumer goods.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @Achmed E. Newman

    GE had the choice of China or Russia, they chose Russia as they were concerned the Chinese would steal their technology, not really open their market and that the Chinese legal system is even more impenetrable than the Russian.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  89. Jack Hanson says:
    @Lot
    @Jack Hanson

    So it was niche blogs that killed repeated attempts by Bush and Obama to pass amnesty? That got prop 187 on the ballot and passed it? That passed SB 1070 in Arizona?

    Replies: @Jack Hanson

    Lmao if you think niche blogs had anything to do with that. Sailer’s Self Important Commentariat strikes again.

    Even your boy Cruz couldn’t get past mouthing platitudes about how great legal immigrants are. This is the most we’ve seen in decades and the best you can do is whine about inanities.

    Go back to scanning your Google alerts for iSteve + Israel. You’re approaching art deco levels of mendacity.

  90. @Autochthon
    @Steve Sailer

    Fascinating. My ideas associating exclusivity and snobbery to golfers were way off base (I readily confess to know hardly anything of such matters, but was weighing in with expertise about intellectual property and experience of human nature). Come to think of it the golfers I know are rich but also very meat-and-potatoes in a Trumpish way, so it makes sense things haven't evolved as they may have with art collectors, who obsess over obscurity and exclisibity for its own sake....

    I've no interest in golf at all but like others I encourage you to write a book about golf courses. I would but and voraciously read it for insights like these!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Many years ago I sent Tom Wolfe pictures of a couple of golf courses that were designed to be highly original: one done all in hard edged geometric shapes, the other all symbolic. Here’s the Scylla & Charybdis par 3 by Desmond Muirhead:

    Wolfe was amused.

    But most golf courses less emphasize creativity for the sake of creativity and more on emphasizing fitting a good golf course into a piece of pre-existing land. There are a couple of hundred thousand golf holes in America, so inventing a wholly original one on paper is a fool’s errand. The more important thing is to make the golf course as a whole work, which isn’t easy to do.

    On the other hand, different architects have different styles. Robert Trent Jones streamlined style from 1948 onward was quite in sync with modernist office buildings like the Seagram’s Building.

    Pete Dye from 1960s onward was doing post-modernist stuff, less restrained by strictures of good taste. The last time I looked at a Dye course a few years ago, it looked ugly to me, which it wouldn’t have done so in the 1990s. If I live long enough, Dye courses will look good to me again. That’s just the nature of fashion.

    Many of the current designers — Crenshaw & Coore, Doak, Gil Hanse — are doing neoclassical Chrysler Building type stuff with a lot of ornamentation and complexity.

  91. “I was in Denver last week, and spent the night near the airport (way out west of town, probably 25 miles from Denver proper).”

    Oops. I should have written 25 miles EAST of town.

    “I saw that too last week staying at an airport hotel on Tower Road about 8 miles in from the airport.”

    We ate at a Five Guys restaurant (which was better than fast food, but not as good as I was expecting) at 38th/40th and Tower Road. If you google it and look at the satellite photo, it is still grass.

    But if you scroll around that intersection, you will see very dense housing. The neighborhood we looked at is also too new to be on the satellite photo, but it is even denser than what is already shown. In other words, the uncomfortably dense housing that you can see is spacious (back yards that appear to be about 15-20 feet wide, driveways in the front) compared to the newest development that isn’t showing up yet.

    “An utterly depressing experience, and an utterly depressing future. Either population growth (and immigration) is gotten under control, or that is the future.”
    Immigration will be gotten under control very soon.
    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/08/01/surveys-show-60-percent-opposition-immigration/”

    Public opinion polls have shown opposition to immigration (and illegal immigration) my entire adult life (30+ years).

    joeyjoe

  92. @Achmed E. Newman
    @whorefinder


    Lindsey Graham is like a caricature of a corrupt closeted sell-out Senator in a good comedy movie by a right-wing Neil Simon.
     
    Yeah, this guy represents South Carolina and S. Carolinians like Nikki-dot-Haley does or Dunkin' Donuts does. Really, he represents one man, the gambling mogul out in Vegas, who wants illegal immigration to keep on keeping on to keep casino labor costs down (not a damn thing to do with S. Carolina), and to keep the lid on internet gambling (it's everywhere, but issue number 287 in the minds of voters).

    This is why Amendment 17 to the US Constitution was not just a slight "housekeeping" change to procedure, but a (nother) BIG blow to the rights of the various States.

    Of course, barring corrupt elections (not to be ruled out), all the donation money in the world or from all over the country would not matter if the voters were informed (hahahaaaa, yeah .... right!).

    Back to the subject, pushing for LEGAL immigration must be just what other big donors want - Ms. Lindsey never bothers listening to any S. Carolinians - they don't have so much money.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Boethiuss

    This is why Amendment 17 to the US Constitution was not just a slight “housekeeping” change to procedure, but a (nother) BIG blow to the rights of the various States.

    Yeah, there’s no way we could have any pro-immigration Establishmentarians in the Senate if the Senators were selected by the state legislatures. /s

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Boethiuss

    Hey, I wouldn't say never, but the point is that the state legislators, at least where I live, are just regular guys that you could talk to at the bar or on the sidewalk. They are gonna feel some heat if they ignore the wishes of the people of my state. In addition it would not be a basically-impossible thing to recall one or both of the US Senators if when they go native in their millionaires club, as is the case with most of them nowadays.

    Of course, we'd have more control had the 17th (and 16th even more so) Amendments never been passed. More control by the people is good; that's not rocket science.

  93. @Anonymous
    @syonredux

    This basically confirms what we already knew from historical sources.

    Replies: @Tex

    A slight modification, the East European/Siberian origins were inferred from theories on Indo-European migration in pre-history.

    Getting a closer fix on the homeland of the I-E peoples is pretty good stuff since that location was inferred from archaeology and linguistics with candidates ranging from the Ukraine to the Caucasus to Anatolia to just plain all of Europe at once. This is some nice work.

  94. As I think I’ve commented before, here in Whitopian Norfolk, CT–famously visited by our recent President Obama in his youth–The Norfolk Country Club runs very smoothly with not an immigrant on staff. Why? Because there aren’t any immigrants to speak of in the immediate vicinity.

    Admittedly it’s a pretty low-key operation, open only in the warm months and with only nine holes of golf. Nevertheless the food and drinks get made and served, everything gets mowed and maintained and everyone gets paid. And as far as I can see the membership has yet to go broke.

  95. @Guy de Champlagne
    How is this supposed to work? If he (thankfully) couldn't do health care, when he was going along with the GOP establishment, what possible chance does he have of succeeding with immigration reform where he's at odds with the establishments of both parties? Maybe we'll see that deal maven that Trump promised us during the campaign that so far hasn't evince itself at all but barring some incredible performance from Trump totally at odds with everything he's done so far as president I don't see how this is going to happen.

    Replies: @Travis

    true, it will be difficult, but it starts the debate which will educate many Americans about our current dysfunctional immigration policy. Democrats will be forced to defend why they support our current policies which most Americans oppose. Especially Black Americans who strongly oppose allowing in so many foreigners. It will be interesting to see how much support he gets in congress.

    Odds of getting an immigration bill passed may succeed if he reverses DACA and includes something like DACA in the immigration bill. A path for the 2 million Dreamers to obtain a green card if they pay a $7,500 fee (which would collect the $15 billion needed to build the wall) In this way Mexicans would be paying for the construction of the wall, since 80% of the dreamers are Mexicans.

    I would be willing to see Trump compromise with DACA. He needs to use it as a leverage tool to get congress to act. Eliminating the diversity lottery and reducing Legal Immigration by 30% in return for allowing 2 million dreamers to pay $15 billion for green cards. If the bill does not get enough support, the dreamers get deported. Trump need to use his power to get congress to help achieve his goals.

  96. @anonymous
    @Lot


    This is vaporware that would not get 40 votes in the senate.
     
    Irrelevant. The debate alone is worth it. I'll take Miller and Trump speaking about this day after day from here until the 2018 election. The working class never gets to hear the argument about how immigration leads to lower wages, less of a safety net and diminished schools.

    The democrats are trying to change their tactics from 'Russia', which is a loser, to 'a better deal'. They realize they lost the working class vote and are desperate to get it back. But you can't appeal to this vote and be for mass immigration at the same time. Hence, the hysteria we are seeing today displayed by Acosta and the MSM. The working class cannot get 'a better deal' when the rest of the world floods in.

    The MSM and the democrats do not want this issue even discussed. They must shut it down. Though the chances of passing this are slim, it is a great talking point and will help keep the working class from going back to the democrats. It will also potentially help primary out the republicans that need to be primaried.

    Replies: @Lot, @Charles Pewitt

    Mr. Anonymous says:

    The democrats are trying to change their tactics from ‘Russia’, which is a loser, to ‘a better deal’. They realize they lost the working class vote and are desperate to get it back. But you can’t appeal to this vote and be for mass immigration at the same time. Hence, the hysteria we are seeing today displayed by Acosta and the MSM. The working class cannot get ‘a better deal’ when the rest of the world floods in.

    (The working class cannot get a ‘better deal’ when the rest of the world floods in.) — That’s good political writing.

  97. Both of my sons worked at golf courses in high school and in college. Tips were good. The younger son worked his senior year in high school at Preston Trail, which had a great lunch buffet that he was permitted to eat. They also gave him a nice bonus for educational expenses when he went off to college.

    They also mowed lawns May through September, about 20 a week when working together. They were the only neighborhood kids I ever saw doing that. All of their competition was commercial businesses manned almost exclusively by illegal aliens.

    Despite their work, they both had time for sports; both were captains of their respective teams their senior years in high school (wrestling and golf).

    What I’m trying to express is that these types of work opportunities, although already disappearing when the youngest graduated in 2002, were available and invaluable experiences that helped to teach them many life lessons. My wife and I frequently lament the disappearance of these opportunities and the displacement of American youth by aliens.

    I wonder how much of the sense of entitlement that so many young people have today comes from not working at mundane jobs. I join the writer above who cursed Karl Rove for saying that his son was too good for a manual labor type job (I think it was working at a tomato processing facility).

  98. @anon
    @J1234

    Hiring Eastern Europeans may also be a business decision. Customers may like them over some Americans. Hey, even Trump liked them when picking wives.

    Replies: @J1234

    Hiring Eastern Europeans may also be a business decision.

    No, I overheard our hotel staff telling customers that there was a special VISA program bringing non-American workers into Estes Park. As I said, I find eastern Europeans vastly preferable to Mexicans, in part because their English is better, but I don’t see the evil in giving Americans priority for American jobs. Especially in a Rocky Mountain tourist town.

    Customers may like them over some Americans.

    Oh, so it’s market driven! Glad to hear you say that, because then we can stop importing the less desirable African immigrants and concentrate on European immigrants, the ones that are preferred even “over some Americans”…right?

    Yes, some of the Serbian girls are more attractive than some of the overweight and heavily tattooed American girls, but putting Americans first in job placement seems to be well within the scope of government function.

  99. @Alec Leamas
    @Steve Sailer


    The post-1990 immigration system has spared American youths of the horrors of working part-time at golf courses and ski resorts.

    Think of the children!

     

    You can easily foresee that in a few decades or less they're going to turn "giving poor people the opportunity to do jobs Americans won't do" into a form of brown-skinned race grievance, like slavery lite. "We toiled away making your hotel beds/mowing your lawns/picking your Arugula for slave wages, now pay up whitey!"

    Replies: @Ivy, @EdwardM

    You can easily foresee that in a few decades or less they’re going to turn “giving poor people the opportunity to do jobs Americans won’t do” into a form of brown-skinned race grievance, like slavery lite. “We toiled away making your hotel beds/mowing your lawns/picking your Arugula for slave wages, now pay up whitey!”

    I can forsee this. How about a subversive remake of Fight Club with this premise — all brown Club members lashing out at the whitey cosmopolitan class. Sophisticated observers will laud the ostensibly heavy-handed anti-racist social commentary while actual smart people paying attention like Steve will see the truth about who is being lampooned.

    Essentially this occurred to me when Trump’s partial ban (6 countries) was negated because of discrimination. Why not just suspend all immigration until the supreme court rules on the merits of the original presidential declaration? (or, why not just suspend all immigration until Trump feels like turning it back on?).

    It could be even easier. Tillerson could just tell the Consular Bureau to deny all or most visas. If ambassadors and Assistant Secretaries refuse, then replace them with people who will comply.

    I agree with Rush Limbaugh who said today that this immigration law is DOA due to feckless Republican senators sacred by the media.

  100. @Boethiuss
    @Achmed E. Newman


    This is why Amendment 17 to the US Constitution was not just a slight “housekeeping” change to procedure, but a (nother) BIG blow to the rights of the various States.
     
    Yeah, there's no way we could have any pro-immigration Establishmentarians in the Senate if the Senators were selected by the state legislatures. /s

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Hey, I wouldn’t say never, but the point is that the state legislators, at least where I live, are just regular guys that you could talk to at the bar or on the sidewalk. They are gonna feel some heat if they ignore the wishes of the people of my state. In addition it would not be a basically-impossible thing to recall one or both of the US Senators if when they go native in their millionaires club, as is the case with most of them nowadays.

    Of course, we’d have more control had the 17th (and 16th even more so) Amendments never been passed. More control by the people is good; that’s not rocket science.

  101. @Jonathan Mason
    @joeyjoejoe


    The neighborhood had absolutely nothing to do with Denver, or Colorado, or the Rockies. There was no sense of geography (no building around green streambeds, or hills, or maintained forest, or anything).
     
    Seems to be the same everywhere these days. I grew up in England where every field and stream had a name in the Domesday book written in the 11th century, so that developers are never short of a name when building new homes.

    Or if they do want to invent new names, there is a bit of research behind it, or an attempt to connect with local history. For example my sister lives in a road called Currer Walk, but to get the name you have to realize what many local people will readily tell you, that Charlotte Bronte, who lived a few miles away in Haworth used the gender ambiguous pseudonym Currer Bell when her books were published, and her sisters Ann and Emily were Acton Bell and Ellis Bell.

    But here in Jacksonville, FL, where I now reside names are totally ridiculous. For example the scenic Lakeshore Drive curves along the waterfront, which is fine, except that the waterfront is the Cedar RIVER , a tributary of the St. John's River and there is no lake in sight. This is just one example of hundreds where the names of streets describe geological features that do not exist, because developers just picked random names from approved lists of words, at least I imagine that is how it is done. One street was imaginatively named Noroad and another Blank Drive, which captures something of the spirit of suburbia.

    Replies: @LondonBob

    Well the London suburb I grew up in our first house was on Palmerston Road, the second was on Temple Sheen Road. No prizes for guessing which famous former Prime Minister lived in the area that the Victorian/Edwardian developers derived their inspiration from.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @LondonBob

    For all you Yanks complaining about overpriced compact property I will note a 3 bed terrace on Palmerston Road costs upwards of USD1.5m.

  102. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Autochthon

    I talked to an engineer selling commercial aircraft engine starters, and he was doing some business in China. He said they had to be really careful, as the Chinese customers wanted to buy just 1 (they were willing to pay 20 x the price), so they could just take it apart, measure everything, and get to making them in China within a year - all that expensive development engineering work/time (analytical and experimental) would be stolen. The American company would not do business that way ... but sooner or later, the business will be gone, and the cheap, possibly reliable, knock-offs would be flying around.

    OTOH, I don't mind at all buying DVD's of, say "The Office" that I know were ripped/burned in the streets of Guangzhuou, as Hollywood can go to hell, as far as I'm concerned. (Sorry, Steve, that's not in your neck of the woods, is it? You're way down the street from there, right, past that new golf course that resembles, the ... well who cares?) ;-}

    Oh, more here on the odious Chinese plans regarding not industrial, but consumer goods.

    Replies: @LondonBob

    GE had the choice of China or Russia, they chose Russia as they were concerned the Chinese would steal their technology, not really open their market and that the Chinese legal system is even more impenetrable than the Russian.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @LondonBob

    These were A/C engine starters, Bob, not the engines. These engines were Chinese made, but obviously not made wholly in-house, so to speak, like the starters, for starters. (Haha, get that one?)

  103. @LondonBob
    @Jonathan Mason

    Well the London suburb I grew up in our first house was on Palmerston Road, the second was on Temple Sheen Road. No prizes for guessing which famous former Prime Minister lived in the area that the Victorian/Edwardian developers derived their inspiration from.

    Replies: @LondonBob

    For all you Yanks complaining about overpriced compact property I will note a 3 bed terrace on Palmerston Road costs upwards of USD1.5m.

  104. @IHTG
    @Lot

    You're not reading all the news about immigration enforcement. You're not paying attention.

    Replies: @Lot

    You’re not reading all the news about immigration enforcement. You’re not paying attention.

    Yes, I am. Sessions and ICE are definitely doing a better job than Obama’s people. But the issue of capacity remains. There are about 11 million illegal immigrants. At the current rate it looks like the number of deportations will increase by about 32,000 this year over 2016. Even if that figure triples, we are talking about less than 1% of the illegal population.

    Meanwhile, Trump could have set the number of refugees this year at 0. Instead he set it at 50,000, more than making up for the additional 32,000 deportations.

  105. @LondonBob
    @Achmed E. Newman

    GE had the choice of China or Russia, they chose Russia as they were concerned the Chinese would steal their technology, not really open their market and that the Chinese legal system is even more impenetrable than the Russian.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    These were A/C engine starters, Bob, not the engines. These engines were Chinese made, but obviously not made wholly in-house, so to speak, like the starters, for starters. (Haha, get that one?)

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