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Lin-Manuel Miranda Represents the New Conservatism
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Jefferson & Washington

Lin-Manuel Miranda’s “Hamilton” represents the New Conservatism:

“Hey, I came up with a great compromise: We don’t have to blow up Mt. Rushmore after all …

“Instead, all we have to do is give the Founding Fathers wider noses!”

Seriously, in 2020, Lin-Manuel Miranda represents the conservative, patriotic wing of Acceptable Discourse.

 
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  1. Why not just paint them in blackface and see what kind of reaction that gets?

    • LOL: RichardTaylor
  2. Here’s where letting social workers make the decisions gets you.

    https://ktla.com/news/local-news/great-grandmother-palmdale-boy-who-died-under-suspicious-circumstances-begged-not-to-be-reunited-with-birth-parents/

    Whatever happens, the taxpayers pay. Along with some unfortunate kids.

  3. • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @anon

    https://twitter.com/matthewstoller/status/1089891195743059968?s=21

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist, @Redneck farmer, @El Dato

    , @Jake
    @anon

    Hamilton was a thorough plutocrat who worshipped the concept of a great trading global empire unencumbered by monarchy and hereditary nobility, and unbeholden in any way to the yeoman farmers that Jefferson and Jackson, in different ways, each as essential to the American Republic being worth the effort. Hamilton was a bastard cut off from meaningful roots ands therefore opposed to roots other than money as being important to the global trading empire.

    He is the most important early American figure for the path that got us to the Hellhole all around us. What Miranda did is make Hamilton not merely acceptable but beloved to hordes of upscale non-whites, rather than Hamilton being just for white Wall Streeters and Neocons.

    Replies: @anon

    , @Steve in Greensboro
    @anon

    Sounds like Old Perly thinks that multiculturalism and "turning debtors into state vassals" are somehow inconsistent with each other. Huh.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    , @RAZ
    @anon

    Hamilton could not be done in the present environment. Hamilton cannot meet the unreachable perfect standard demanded now. Married into a prominent slave holding family and he was an elitist. He'll be cancelled.

    , @anon
    @anon

    If we still had our Constitutional Republic and Heritage American population then "we" (Heritage Americans) could have lively and profitable debates about economic policy, Hamilton, our history, plutocracy vs democracy, etc.
    As it is, "we" are for all practical purposes a despised minority in our own homeland, the only issue is race, race, race, and no debate is allowed.
    There will be no discussion of plutocracy until jews and blacks are defeated in this country. That is the raw truth.

  4. OT: and then they came for Pinker. Surprised he lasted this long. The man sometimes says something true.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Sergeant Prepper

    They came for Pinker because he doesn’t know who his friends are.

    Replies: @SFG

    , @Dieter Kief
    @Sergeant Prepper

    Lots of people tried nightmarish many awful things on Dr. Pinker, but the elegant man still stands. If he has one advantage, then it's that he's a Jew. I'm eager to admit that. But otherwise, he is a) courageous and - has a very good way of fighting and thus still standing.
    Plus: The free speech movement is on the rise. There's Toby Young Fee speech Union in GB, then there's the Heterodox society of Jonathan Haidt, and even Yacha Mounk is now rather on the side of reasonable and open debate - and with him quite a few more liberal big heads (Francis Fukuyama, Jonathan Haidt, John McWhorter, George Packer, Elif Shafak... ).

    The fact that even Sanders-fan Yacha Mounk is now openly for a free debate might be just one more sign indicating that the tides are turning in the (old fashioned) liberal direction. It could well be too late to successfully cancel Steven Pinker.

    https://cdn.substack.com/image/fetch/c_limit,f_auto,q_auto:good,fl_progressive:steep/https%3A%2F%2Fbucketeer-e05bbc84-baa3-437e-9518-adb32be77984.s3.amazonaws.com%2Fpublic%2Fimages%2F53745b91-7c09-4f29-992e-e09f150dc5f3_3451x2501.jpeg  

    Replies: @SFG, @Chrisnonymous

    , @EldnahYm
    @Sergeant Prepper

    I don't recognize the names on the list with one notable exception. Ray Jackendoff is a fairly big name in the field whose non-syntax centered generative models put him in opposition to the dominant Chomskian paradigm. More notably, Jackendoff and Pinker have collaborated on work in the past.

    The large number of graduate students is evidence that much of SJW university activities(and probably true of other places than universities) are just lower ranking status seekers trying to get rid of older people in the hopes that they will replace them(or just out of spite).

    There should be far more support on the right for de-funding(not ruling out more radical measures as well) universities. This is an easy solution which pushes back against some of the madness.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @corrector

    , @V
    @Sergeant Prepper

    "Errata:
    The UCSB incident involved the murder of 2 women and 4 men, not 6 women as stated in the text."

    This is in reference to their claim that Pinker was undermining people who stand up against violence and misogyny because of his tweet that it's "statistically obtuse" to call the murders part of a pattern of hatred against women.

    Which is... just really perfect, when you think about it.

  5. “Instead, all we have to do is give Washington and Jefferson thicker lips!”

    And wet them and stick them to the border wall?

  6. Has anybody noticed that George Floyd has been almost forgotten in all this? By now, all the protests are about something else.

    “What are you rebelling against?”

    “What do you got?”

    • Thanks: Not Only Wrathful
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Anon


    Has anybody noticed that George Floyd has been almost forgotten in all this? By now, all the protests are about something else.
     
    We are at war with Eurasia now. We have always been at war with Eurasia. How many fingers am I holding up, Winston?

    The riots, arson, beatings and murders (please, they are not protests) are not "about" anything. They are organized terror and destruction used for whatever purposes the powers that be want to use them for.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @starthorn
    @Anon

    It happened about a week after it started. Once the fambly started getting their lottery payments they stopped praising the career felon and the mindless masses kept attacking their own kind because there's no accountability.

  7. Hamilton? It’s just blacks pretending they’re whites. So ‘whiteface’ is now culturally cool as long as you don’t make it too glaringly obvious by putting on the white makeup. You just adopt the identity of known whites.

  8. wren says:

    Looks like it will happen.

    https://www.wxxinews.org/post/mt-rushmore-feature-projections-key-women-suffrage-movement

    Someone will projection map some gals up there in a few months, and I’m sure its only a matter of time until Mr. Miranda makes a complete projection mapped show on Rushmore with some reimagined protagonists.

    Done right, it could be pretty good.

    If he doesn’t, maybe Trey Parker could do it.

    That might be even better.

  9. Anon[368] • Disclaimer says:

    In one sense, yes. I thought this too as I watched Hamilton tonight. But then I remembered Miranda was struck by Chernow’s biography sometime around 2007, after which he started seriously writing in 2008, finishing in 2015. What a long way we’ve come since then. I noticed a few things in the show tonight that I’m sure he’d change if he had the chance. It’s not that Miranda 2008-2015 represents the “far right” of acceptable opinion these days, it’s that Barack Obama 2008-2015 is *outside* the realm of acceptable opinion these days, making Obama a ‘white supremacist” like the rest of us.

    As I’ve said numerous times, the Left is on a train to Crazytown, but occasionally someone will get off the train, having had enough. Jordan Peterson got off at the Pronouns stop. Dave Rubin and a bunch of others got off at the Censorship stop. JK Rowling got off at the Men Are Women stop. Barack Obama may have gotten off at the Cancel Culture stop. Some minor democrats are getting off at the Blow Up Statues stop. But most of the people on the Left, including almost certainly Miranda, are still on the train, and until he (or anyone else) publicly gets off the train, one must assume he’s still there, at the Vanguard of the Revolution. I expect at some point, in typical Evil Disney style, the lines about the French Revolutionary mobs being rioters standing for nothing will be quietly excise from the show and the soundtrack, and no normies will even notice, the entire idea that Miranda, through Washington, would denounce riots only kept alive in a backwater of the internet where only a few people remain.

    @CouldntBRighter

    • Agree: Cato
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Anon

    Why did you watch Hamilton instead of 1776?

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=neXdVJNZRg0

    , @Whiskey
    @Anon

    Nope. The left is on an express to Pol Pot. Think about it. With a contracting economy the only way to move up is cancel a superior and go full Red Guard.

    , @James O'Meara
    @Anon

    “Every radical generation, it is said, has its Kronstadt. For some it was the Moscow Trials, for others the Nazi-Soviet Pact, for still others Hungary (the Raik Trial or 1956), Czechoslovakia (the defenestration of Masaryk in 1948 or the Prague Spring of 1968), the Gulag, Cambodia, Poland (and there will be more to come). My Kronstadt was Kronstadt.” -- Daniel Bell

  10. @Sergeant Prepper
    OT: and then they came for Pinker. Surprised he lasted this long. The man sometimes says something true.

    https://twitter.com/joelpust/status/1279195476613632000

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Dieter Kief, @EldnahYm, @V

    They came for Pinker because he doesn’t know who his friends are.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
    • Replies: @SFG
    @Desiderius

    Who are they, though? Certainly not the alt-right, given his ancestry, and they wouldn't be of much use in academia anyway.

    Replies: @gabriel alberton, @Desiderius

  11. One of the most interesting political aspects of 1968 is the transfer of elite urban WASPs from the Republican to the Democratic Party. The New Deal coalition was an alliance between Northern Catholic ethnics and Southern farmers. In 1968 that coalition imploded and would eventually become the coastal WASP/Jewish elite party.

    Many Republican politicians such as Mayor Lindsey soon switched parties after 1968.

    https://www.nytimes.com/1971/08/12/archives/lindsay-the-democrat.html

    But perhaps the change is better marked by Nelson Rockefeller, who likely would’ve preferred free market economics combined with free market morals. (If I recall correctly from Buchanan’s two Nixon books, Rockefeller’s scandalous divorce and fathering a child with an already married women cost him the 1964 Republican nomination.) The future Democratic Party under Bill Clinton would constitute capitalism untethered to Christian morals or Marxist ethics (the latter is apparently a thing.)

    Of course, this encourages the consequential reaction that the Republican Party will ultimately become the working class party. I’d imagine the snobby Bill Buckley tried to avoid both party transformations at all costs but of course failed. Buckley conservatism tried to compromise a bit on the cultural issues while preserving the free market ideology. He couldn’t compete against a Democratic Party that went full free market on both economics and culture.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Kronos

    The late-twentieth-century conservative movement stemmed the tide of social democracy and the worst excesses of the Sixties, elected Ronald Reagan, and helped bankrupt the Soviet Union through an arms race, winning the Cold War.

    I don't agree with all of this--I think the businessmen got way too much and everyone else got the short end of the stick--but it did do quite a bit.

    Just because the three-legged stool of religious, business, and military conservatives doesn't work anymore doesn't mean it didn't make sense at the time. No political coalition lasts forever.

    Replies: @Having enemies helps, @ATBOTL, @Kronos

    , @FPD72
    @Kronos

    Scandal of a sexual nature followed Rockefeller to his grave. Rockefeller had a fatal heart attack at a townhouse he owned at 13 West 54th Street. The heart attack occurred in the late evening in the presence of Megan Marshack, a 25-year-old aide. After Rockefeller suffered the heart attack, Marshack called her friend, news reporter Ponchitta Pierce, to the townhouse; Pierce phoned an ambulance approximately an hour after the heart attack.

  12. @Anon
    Has anybody noticed that George Floyd has been almost forgotten in all this? By now, all the protests are about something else.

    "What are you rebelling against?"

    "What do you got?"

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @starthorn

    Has anybody noticed that George Floyd has been almost forgotten in all this? By now, all the protests are about something else.

    We are at war with Eurasia now. We have always been at war with Eurasia. How many fingers am I holding up, Winston?

    The riots, arson, beatings and murders (please, they are not protests) are not “about” anything. They are organized terror and destruction used for whatever purposes the powers that be want to use them for.

    • Agree: Travis, Ben tillman
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Buzz Mohawk


    The riots, arson, beatings and murders (please, they are not protests) are not “about” anything. They are organized terror and destruction used for whatever purposes the powers that be want to use them for.
     
    The famous phrase "It's crackers to slip a rozer the dropsy in snide!" comes to mind. See: https://www.messagemedia.co/aitkin/opinion/other_opinions/it-s-crackers-to-slip-a-rozzer-the-dropsy-in/article_2afd2e28-5681-11e9-8d00-6f7a99a70754.html

    It's insane to terrorize and destroy your constituents and their homes in order to terrify people who are not your constituents.

    Back in 1968 the effect of the riots was to elicit sympathy for the people who had been so badly treated that they would riot and destroy their own neighborhoods. By the LA riots, the sympathy was wearing very thin. Now there is no sympathy, and the exercise is just as insane as bribing a policemen with counterfeit money.
  13. Anonymous[751] • Disclaimer says:

    dont be confused by famous professor-blogger-scholar brian leiters comment:

    serious people in the field HAVE signed this. Ray Jackendoff is about as big a name as you can get. If Leiter doesnt know who that is its absurd for him to comment.

    • Replies: @Sergeant Prepper
    @Anonymous

    I agree that Jackendoff is a big fish in the linguistics pond, but on the whole the list is indeed not that impressive - lots of PhD candidates, most of whom will probably end up flipping burgers. (My guess is that that's why they're signing things like this: it's an attempt to remove Boomers who refuse to retire so that there's at least a few jobs to fight for.)

    Somewhat surprised that George Lakoff is not on the list - partly because he's always been on the lunatic fringe of the progressive movement, but mostly because I don't think he's the type of man who would forget or forgive Pinker's rather amusing take-down of Lakoff's "Whose Freedom?"... https://newrepublic.com/article/77730/block-metaphor-steven-pinker-whose-freedom-george-lakoff . Guess he retired and was forgotten so quickly that nobody asked him to sign the thing.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Anonymous


    serious people in the field HAVE signed this. Ray Jackendoff is about as big a name as you can get.
     
    Was this petition by any chance also signed by Hugh Jass, Mike Crotch, and Jacques Strap?
  14. wren says:

    It could be an awesome show.

    George: Hey Abe, good morning! Beautiful day! But how about 2020 so far, huh?

    Abe: Well, nice day, but had I known back then what I know now… They are trying to take me down in several locations as we speak.

    Teddy: Yeah, already happened to me at that museum.. I sure am glad I have a big stick around here somewhere…

    Tom: Dynamite? Maybe it is time to go, after all. Before they do it to us. Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today, I always say!

    George: I cannot tell a lie, this is looking grim and they are after me as well, but not that bad yet, surely!

    The ghost of Reagan future Rushmore: If we ever forget that we are One Nation Under God, then we will be a nation gone under. I sure could use some jelly beans.

    George: Yeah, sadly it appears that we are a nation gone under in 2020.

    The ghost of Trump far, far future: Gentlemen, it is gonna be beautiful! Very, very beautiful. Everyone tells me how beautiful it is!

    Teddy: Yeah, right.

    Etc.
    .

  15. @anon
    https://twitter.com/rickperlstein/status/1279089779951521794

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Jake, @Steve in Greensboro, @RAZ, @anon

    • Thanks: starthorn
    • Replies: @Kent Nationalist
    @Dave Pinsen

    He was the original neocon (even down to being raised as a Jew)

    Replies: @Alden

    , @Redneck farmer
    @Dave Pinsen

    One suspects that if Hamilton was actually Jewish, we wouldn't have these tweets.

    , @El Dato
    @Dave Pinsen

    If only that guy knew what I am REALLY endorsing.

  16. @Anonymous
    dont be confused by famous professor-blogger-scholar brian leiters comment:


    serious people in the field HAVE signed this. Ray Jackendoff is about as big a name as you can get. If Leiter doesnt know who that is its absurd for him to comment.

    Replies: @Sergeant Prepper, @Mr. Anon

    I agree that Jackendoff is a big fish in the linguistics pond, but on the whole the list is indeed not that impressive – lots of PhD candidates, most of whom will probably end up flipping burgers. (My guess is that that’s why they’re signing things like this: it’s an attempt to remove Boomers who refuse to retire so that there’s at least a few jobs to fight for.)

    Somewhat surprised that George Lakoff is not on the list – partly because he’s always been on the lunatic fringe of the progressive movement, but mostly because I don’t think he’s the type of man who would forget or forgive Pinker’s rather amusing take-down of Lakoff’s “Whose Freedom?”… https://newrepublic.com/article/77730/block-metaphor-steven-pinker-whose-freedom-george-lakoff . Guess he retired and was forgotten so quickly that nobody asked him to sign the thing.

    • Thanks: Cato
  17. I don’t understand the success of this Hamilton thing, it sounds dreadful. I have zero interest in seeing it. But I am not a fan of musicals anyway. However it seems to be more some kind of “elite signalling” than real aesthetic interest. There’s also a play about the Lehmann Brothers that was successful for similar reasons. Also very common in contemporary art.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Dumbo

    Hamilton sounds completely retarded. I do not get its appeal at all. I wouldn't go if you gave me tickets. I'd rather watch reruns of Hollywood Squares.

    Replies: @anon

  18. [Sigh] The needle is pegged to the Left of the Overton Window.

  19. @Dave Pinsen
    @anon

    https://twitter.com/matthewstoller/status/1089891195743059968?s=21

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist, @Redneck farmer, @El Dato

    He was the original neocon (even down to being raised as a Jew)

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Kent Nationalist

    Some say his mother had him baptized in the local French Protestant church and she and her children attended that church regularly.

    Some say his father was the Duke of Hamilton.

    I say he was the evil genius who decided the frontiermen , not the plantation owners and wealthy merchants would pay the 13 billion we borrowed from France with the Whiskey tax.

    Not only would the frontiersmen drive the Indians west with no help from an army, but in their spare time would make enough whiskey to pay off the war debt, build Washington DC and other government expenses.

  20. I just saw an Indian immigrant posting something about America being great because minorities like him can get a comfortable middle class life, and that rioters are spoiled kids because “America is the best country in the world and the one that treats minorities better”.

    I guess this is a “conservative” message these days. Not much different than what the GOP peddles.

    Of course, if someone suggested that Indians be deported or given less H1B visas, he would probably be the first to complain that “America is racist”.

    In the end, most people are just looking for their own self-interest, the rest is just rationalization.

    “I have my principles, and if you don’t like them, I have others.” (Groucho Marx).

    • Replies: @njguy73
    @Dumbo

    The question isn't, and has never been, "Is America racist?"

    The question is, and has always been, "Is America a good place for my group to do business?"

    , @anon
    @Dumbo

    Of course, if a law is passed to deport Indians or given less H1Bs because they are Indians or to Indians only, then it is definitely racist. Asian exclusion act was racist, not that it was bad then. Japanese internment was not racist if Germans and Italians were also interned.

  21. @Dave Pinsen
    @anon

    https://twitter.com/matthewstoller/status/1089891195743059968?s=21

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist, @Redneck farmer, @El Dato

    One suspects that if Hamilton was actually Jewish, we wouldn’t have these tweets.

  22. • Replies: @brabantian
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    also can be re-done as Mt George Floyd

    https://gab.com/system/media_attachments/files/056/846/593/original/4268540bca3067a7.png

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bgms7YJq4w

  23. @Desiderius
    @Sergeant Prepper

    They came for Pinker because he doesn’t know who his friends are.

    Replies: @SFG

    Who are they, though? Certainly not the alt-right, given his ancestry, and they wouldn’t be of much use in academia anyway.

    • Replies: @gabriel alberton
    @SFG

    Here's one of them:

    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2018/01/28/business/28Table3/merlin_132531764_7db632c3-fc3a-40f0-af91-d24d8ef80afc-superJumbo.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @BB753

    , @Desiderius
    @SFG

    What does the Dork Right have to do with anything? 63 million voted for Trump and dipshit Pinker is bigoted against all of us.

  24. @Sergeant Prepper
    OT: and then they came for Pinker. Surprised he lasted this long. The man sometimes says something true.

    https://twitter.com/joelpust/status/1279195476613632000

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Dieter Kief, @EldnahYm, @V

    Lots of people tried nightmarish many awful things on Dr. Pinker, but the elegant man still stands. If he has one advantage, then it’s that he’s a Jew. I’m eager to admit that. But otherwise, he is a) courageous and – has a very good way of fighting and thus still standing.
    Plus: The free speech movement is on the rise. There’s Toby Young Fee speech Union in GB, then there’s the Heterodox society of Jonathan Haidt, and even Yacha Mounk is now rather on the side of reasonable and open debate – and with him quite a few more liberal big heads (Francis Fukuyama, Jonathan Haidt, John McWhorter, George Packer, Elif Shafak… ).

    The fact that even Sanders-fan Yacha Mounk is now openly for a free debate might be just one more sign indicating that the tides are turning in the (old fashioned) liberal direction. It could well be too late to successfully cancel Steven Pinker.

    https://cdn.substack.com/image/fetch/c_limit,f_auto,q_auto:good,fl_progressive:steep/https%3A%2F%2Fbucketeer-e05bbc84-baa3-437e-9518-adb32be77984.s3.amazonaws.com%2Fpublic%2Fimages%2F53745b91-7c09-4f29-992e-e09f150dc5f3_3451x2501.jpeg  

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @SFG
    @Dieter Kief

    Any under 40, though?

    The new generation of lefties is all-in for social justice and against free speech.

    And free speech isn't really a conservative idea--conservatives are for loyalty, authority, and tradition. These things have value, obviously, but they oppose free speech.

    Granted the First Amendment is a genuine American tradition...

    Replies: @Kronos

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Dieter Kief

    But notice that the new strategy is incrementalism. They aren't calling for Pinker to be tossed out of academia, they are calling for him simply to be removed from the roll of fellows who represent the LSA. This is much easier to achieve. It's the same strategy tech companies have been using--first removing "violent" speech, then "hate" speech, then statements that imply inferiority of any kind....

    How do you boil a frog?

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  25. SFG says:
    @Kronos
    One of the most interesting political aspects of 1968 is the transfer of elite urban WASPs from the Republican to the Democratic Party. The New Deal coalition was an alliance between Northern Catholic ethnics and Southern farmers. In 1968 that coalition imploded and would eventually become the coastal WASP/Jewish elite party.

    Many Republican politicians such as Mayor Lindsey soon switched parties after 1968.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2e/John_Lindsay_NYWTS_1.jpg/1920px-John_Lindsay_NYWTS_1.jpg

    https://www.nytimes.com/1971/08/12/archives/lindsay-the-democrat.html

    But perhaps the change is better marked by Nelson Rockefeller, who likely would’ve preferred free market economics combined with free market morals. (If I recall correctly from Buchanan’s two Nixon books, Rockefeller’s scandalous divorce and fathering a child with an already married women cost him the 1964 Republican nomination.) The future Democratic Party under Bill Clinton would constitute capitalism untethered to Christian morals or Marxist ethics (the latter is apparently a thing.)

    Of course, this encourages the consequential reaction that the Republican Party will ultimately become the working class party. I’d imagine the snobby Bill Buckley tried to avoid both party transformations at all costs but of course failed. Buckley conservatism tried to compromise a bit on the cultural issues while preserving the free market ideology. He couldn’t compete against a Democratic Party that went full free market on both economics and culture.

    Replies: @SFG, @FPD72

    The late-twentieth-century conservative movement stemmed the tide of social democracy and the worst excesses of the Sixties, elected Ronald Reagan, and helped bankrupt the Soviet Union through an arms race, winning the Cold War.

    I don’t agree with all of this–I think the businessmen got way too much and everyone else got the short end of the stick–but it did do quite a bit.

    Just because the three-legged stool of religious, business, and military conservatives doesn’t work anymore doesn’t mean it didn’t make sense at the time. No political coalition lasts forever.

    • Replies: @Having enemies helps
    @SFG

    One not very oft-mentioned reason capitalism was more or less regulated (unlike now), social mobility was high and the middle class prospered in the West after WWII was the shadow of the Soviet Union looming over Europe for 45 years.

    People seem to forget it nowadays, but SU had been a very real threat throughout its existence for anyone not under communist rule, and all the proxy wars fought between the Soviet bloc and the West make perfect sense given the dynamics of that time (incl. Vietnam, which seems absurd today for many who view it through an anachronistic lens). The CPSU never backtracked on its declared mission to incite "popular revolution" all over the world, and actively tried to do so through its agents and fellow travelers literally everywhere.

    Every western government of the era was acutely aware of that risk, so they couldn't afford their people getting too impoverished, hence they let the masses get a larger-than-usual piece of the growing pie.

    Also, according to the classic definition of "conservatism", soviet-era communists were way more conservative than anyone called conservative today. But people seem to forget that too. Or they never noticed.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    , @ATBOTL
    @SFG

    But it didn't work to begin with. Under their rule, the country fell apart.

    , @Kronos
    @SFG


    The late-twentieth-century conservative movement stemmed the tide of social democracy and the worst excesses of the Sixties, elected Ronald Reagan, and helped bankrupt the Soviet Union through an arms race, winning the Cold War.
     
    True, I’m just identifying the long term trend of Democrats poaching Rockefeller liberal Republicans while Republicans poach New Deal Democrats.

    In many ways Trump is playing Bill Clinton’s strategy’s of the 1990s but inverted. Trump is triangulating those that got triangulated out during the 1990s.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/78/Conceptual_diagram_of_political_triangulation.png
  26. SFG says:
    @Dieter Kief
    @Sergeant Prepper

    Lots of people tried nightmarish many awful things on Dr. Pinker, but the elegant man still stands. If he has one advantage, then it's that he's a Jew. I'm eager to admit that. But otherwise, he is a) courageous and - has a very good way of fighting and thus still standing.
    Plus: The free speech movement is on the rise. There's Toby Young Fee speech Union in GB, then there's the Heterodox society of Jonathan Haidt, and even Yacha Mounk is now rather on the side of reasonable and open debate - and with him quite a few more liberal big heads (Francis Fukuyama, Jonathan Haidt, John McWhorter, George Packer, Elif Shafak... ).

    The fact that even Sanders-fan Yacha Mounk is now openly for a free debate might be just one more sign indicating that the tides are turning in the (old fashioned) liberal direction. It could well be too late to successfully cancel Steven Pinker.

    https://cdn.substack.com/image/fetch/c_limit,f_auto,q_auto:good,fl_progressive:steep/https%3A%2F%2Fbucketeer-e05bbc84-baa3-437e-9518-adb32be77984.s3.amazonaws.com%2Fpublic%2Fimages%2F53745b91-7c09-4f29-992e-e09f150dc5f3_3451x2501.jpeg  

    Replies: @SFG, @Chrisnonymous

    Any under 40, though?

    The new generation of lefties is all-in for social justice and against free speech.

    And free speech isn’t really a conservative idea–conservatives are for loyalty, authority, and tradition. These things have value, obviously, but they oppose free speech.

    Granted the First Amendment is a genuine American tradition…

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @SFG


    The new generation of lefties is all-in for social justice and against free speech.
     
    They don’t hate free speech, they just want to make serious money by going after “hate” speech. Here are two excerpts from Caldwell’s book. He does a compelling job explaining how civil right legislation led to these legal racketeering shakedowns on freedom of speech and freedom of association.

    https://www.amazon.com/Age-Entitlement-America-Since-Sixties/dp/1501106899

    Armed with such anecdotes, P.C.’s enemies presented it as an enthusiasm of radical, intemperate, and disreputable scholars. But that was not the heart of P.C. at all. The heart of it was a set of sober procedures promulgated by cautious academic administrators and government regulators frightened of civil rights law.
     

    Litigation could make it embarrassing, expensive, and potentially fatal to an organization like the Los Angeles Dodgers or CBS to have anyone in their employ speculating, woolgathering, or talking off the cuff. It was an institutional innovation. It grew directly out of civil rights law. Just as affirmative action in universities and corporations had privatized the enforcement of integration, the fear of litigation privatized the suppression of disagreement, or even of speculation. The government would not need to punish directly the people who dissented from its doctrines. Boards of directors and boards of trustees, fearing lawsuits, would do that.
     

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @SunBakedSuburb, @Dan Hayes, @Jim Don Bob

  27. Sorry OT but Coventry City Council have removed a memorial to a dog which died in 1902.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8488865/Memorial-dog-racist-died-1902-removed-graveyard.html

    Dog had the same name as Guy Gibson’s dog.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Gordo

    Hilarious.

    A dog called "N-WORD" cannot be named and even the image of the gravestone of the dog called DIGGER TRIGGER has to be CENSORED.

    It's to time to stand before that mirror again and sing the DIGGER TRIGGER WORD to deprogram oneself from all this sick fascist mind patrol bullshit.

    Soon, in a book with writings by H.P. Lovecraft:


    As I have said, I moved in on July 16, 1923. My household consisted of seven servants and nine cats, of which latter species I am particularly fond. My eldest cat, “N-WORD-Man”, was seven years old and had come with me from my home in Bolton, Massachusetts; the others I had accumulated whilst living with Capt. Norrys’ family during the restoration of the priory. For five days our routine proceeded with the utmost placidity, my time being spent mostly in the codification of old family data.
     
    , @tyrone
    @Gordo

    Cats?

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Gordo


    Dog had the same name as Guy Gibson’s dog.

     

    https://aircrewremembered.com/editorial/resources/niggers-grave-at-scampton-w800.jpg
  28. @Sergeant Prepper
    OT: and then they came for Pinker. Surprised he lasted this long. The man sometimes says something true.

    https://twitter.com/joelpust/status/1279195476613632000

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Dieter Kief, @EldnahYm, @V

    I don’t recognize the names on the list with one notable exception. Ray Jackendoff is a fairly big name in the field whose non-syntax centered generative models put him in opposition to the dominant Chomskian paradigm. More notably, Jackendoff and Pinker have collaborated on work in the past.

    The large number of graduate students is evidence that much of SJW university activities(and probably true of other places than universities) are just lower ranking status seekers trying to get rid of older people in the hopes that they will replace them(or just out of spite).

    There should be far more support on the right for de-funding(not ruling out more radical measures as well) universities. This is an easy solution which pushes back against some of the madness.

    • Agree: Kronos
    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @EldnahYm

    Jackendoff, huh huh, huh huh.

    In my grad school days there was much chuckling about him and another linguistics guy whose name I have forgotten; Harry Hands or something like that; they actually did publish some work together.

    , @corrector
    @EldnahYm

    Re Jackendoff: check out the *current* list of names on that open letter and you'll find Jackendoff isn't there---and in fact, never (truly) was. Ray's name was fraudulently attached; he demanded that the organizers of the letter remove it immediately, and they did. Be skeptical of electronic petition signatory lists. My guess is that whoever added Ray's name to this was aware that he and Pinker had collaborated on an important rebuttal to the Hauser, Chomsky and Fitch paper in the Science Compass 2007 volume---a superb take-down, well worth reading for the clarity of argumentation---and was deliberately trolling Ray, not Pinker. I know Ray, and rest assured, he's far too reasonable to come within a mile of this kind of agitprop.

  29. @anon
    https://twitter.com/rickperlstein/status/1279089779951521794

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Jake, @Steve in Greensboro, @RAZ, @anon

    Hamilton was a thorough plutocrat who worshipped the concept of a great trading global empire unencumbered by monarchy and hereditary nobility, and unbeholden in any way to the yeoman farmers that Jefferson and Jackson, in different ways, each as essential to the American Republic being worth the effort. Hamilton was a bastard cut off from meaningful roots ands therefore opposed to roots other than money as being important to the global trading empire.

    He is the most important early American figure for the path that got us to the Hellhole all around us. What Miranda did is make Hamilton not merely acceptable but beloved to hordes of upscale non-whites, rather than Hamilton being just for white Wall Streeters and Neocons.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Jake

    So Hamilton is the Founding Father of America is an economy pretending to be a nation?

  30. @anon
    https://twitter.com/rickperlstein/status/1279089779951521794

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Jake, @Steve in Greensboro, @RAZ, @anon

    Sounds like Old Perly thinks that multiculturalism and “turning debtors into state vassals” are somehow inconsistent with each other. Huh.

    • Agree: West reanimator, sayless
    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Steve in Greensboro

    Twitter Rick Perlstein is more identity-hysterical than author Rick Perlstein. I can't think of a notable leftoid who hasn't joined the cult. The lefties who had something to offer are now dead. Perlstein, before he baptized himself in the goo of anti-racism, published a couple of interesting tomes covering the sociopolitical landscape of the late 60s-early 70s. The Rick Perlstein brain that produced those books is now dead.

  31. @anon
    https://twitter.com/rickperlstein/status/1279089779951521794

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Jake, @Steve in Greensboro, @RAZ, @anon

    Hamilton could not be done in the present environment. Hamilton cannot meet the unreachable perfect standard demanded now. Married into a prominent slave holding family and he was an elitist. He’ll be cancelled.

  32. @Dave Pinsen
    @anon

    https://twitter.com/matthewstoller/status/1089891195743059968?s=21

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist, @Redneck farmer, @El Dato

    If only that guy knew what I am REALLY endorsing.

  33. @Gordo
    Sorry OT but Coventry City Council have removed a memorial to a dog which died in 1902.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8488865/Memorial-dog-racist-died-1902-removed-graveyard.html

    Dog had the same name as Guy Gibson's dog.

    Replies: @El Dato, @tyrone, @Joe Stalin

    Hilarious.

    A dog called “N-WORD” cannot be named and even the image of the gravestone of the dog called DIGGER TRIGGER has to be CENSORED.

    It’s to time to stand before that mirror again and sing the DIGGER TRIGGER WORD to deprogram oneself from all this sick fascist mind patrol bullshit.

    Soon, in a book with writings by H.P. Lovecraft:

    As I have said, I moved in on July 16, 1923. My household consisted of seven servants and nine cats, of which latter species I am particularly fond. My eldest cat, “N-WORD-Man”, was seven years old and had come with me from my home in Bolton, Massachusetts; the others I had accumulated whilst living with Capt. Norrys’ family during the restoration of the priory. For five days our routine proceeded with the utmost placidity, my time being spent mostly in the codification of old family data.

  34. @SFG
    @Kronos

    The late-twentieth-century conservative movement stemmed the tide of social democracy and the worst excesses of the Sixties, elected Ronald Reagan, and helped bankrupt the Soviet Union through an arms race, winning the Cold War.

    I don't agree with all of this--I think the businessmen got way too much and everyone else got the short end of the stick--but it did do quite a bit.

    Just because the three-legged stool of religious, business, and military conservatives doesn't work anymore doesn't mean it didn't make sense at the time. No political coalition lasts forever.

    Replies: @Having enemies helps, @ATBOTL, @Kronos

    One not very oft-mentioned reason capitalism was more or less regulated (unlike now), social mobility was high and the middle class prospered in the West after WWII was the shadow of the Soviet Union looming over Europe for 45 years.

    People seem to forget it nowadays, but SU had been a very real threat throughout its existence for anyone not under communist rule, and all the proxy wars fought between the Soviet bloc and the West make perfect sense given the dynamics of that time (incl. Vietnam, which seems absurd today for many who view it through an anachronistic lens). The CPSU never backtracked on its declared mission to incite “popular revolution” all over the world, and actively tried to do so through its agents and fellow travelers literally everywhere.

    Every western government of the era was acutely aware of that risk, so they couldn’t afford their people getting too impoverished, hence they let the masses get a larger-than-usual piece of the growing pie.

    Also, according to the classic definition of “conservatism”, soviet-era communists were way more conservative than anyone called conservative today. But people seem to forget that too. Or they never noticed.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Having enemies helps

    Putin Man Bad.

  35. @Gordo
    Sorry OT but Coventry City Council have removed a memorial to a dog which died in 1902.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8488865/Memorial-dog-racist-died-1902-removed-graveyard.html

    Dog had the same name as Guy Gibson's dog.

    Replies: @El Dato, @tyrone, @Joe Stalin

    Cats?

  36. @Dumbo
    I just saw an Indian immigrant posting something about America being great because minorities like him can get a comfortable middle class life, and that rioters are spoiled kids because "America is the best country in the world and the one that treats minorities better".

    I guess this is a "conservative" message these days. Not much different than what the GOP peddles.

    Of course, if someone suggested that Indians be deported or given less H1B visas, he would probably be the first to complain that "America is racist".

    In the end, most people are just looking for their own self-interest, the rest is just rationalization.

    "I have my principles, and if you don't like them, I have others." (Groucho Marx).

    Replies: @njguy73, @anon

    The question isn’t, and has never been, “Is America racist?”

    The question is, and has always been, “Is America a good place for my group to do business?”

  37. All they have to do is dynamite the noses. Problem solved.

  38. Why not? Conservatism has lost its meaning when the entire GOP establishment and the Christian religious establishment have distorted patriotism to mean patriotism to Israel and the military banking complex, accept gay marriage and help promote mass immigration from the third world. With conservatives like these, who needs liberals?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Anon

    They didn't do any of these things, except in your imagination.

  39. @SFG
    @Desiderius

    Who are they, though? Certainly not the alt-right, given his ancestry, and they wouldn't be of much use in academia anyway.

    Replies: @gabriel alberton, @Desiderius

    Here’s one of them:

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @gabriel alberton


    Here’s one of them:
     
    Or rather: He's one of them
    , @BB753
    @gabriel alberton

    Pinker was also friends with Jeffrey Epstein.

  40. @SFG
    @Kronos

    The late-twentieth-century conservative movement stemmed the tide of social democracy and the worst excesses of the Sixties, elected Ronald Reagan, and helped bankrupt the Soviet Union through an arms race, winning the Cold War.

    I don't agree with all of this--I think the businessmen got way too much and everyone else got the short end of the stick--but it did do quite a bit.

    Just because the three-legged stool of religious, business, and military conservatives doesn't work anymore doesn't mean it didn't make sense at the time. No political coalition lasts forever.

    Replies: @Having enemies helps, @ATBOTL, @Kronos

    But it didn’t work to begin with. Under their rule, the country fell apart.

  41. @Dieter Kief
    @Sergeant Prepper

    Lots of people tried nightmarish many awful things on Dr. Pinker, but the elegant man still stands. If he has one advantage, then it's that he's a Jew. I'm eager to admit that. But otherwise, he is a) courageous and - has a very good way of fighting and thus still standing.
    Plus: The free speech movement is on the rise. There's Toby Young Fee speech Union in GB, then there's the Heterodox society of Jonathan Haidt, and even Yacha Mounk is now rather on the side of reasonable and open debate - and with him quite a few more liberal big heads (Francis Fukuyama, Jonathan Haidt, John McWhorter, George Packer, Elif Shafak... ).

    The fact that even Sanders-fan Yacha Mounk is now openly for a free debate might be just one more sign indicating that the tides are turning in the (old fashioned) liberal direction. It could well be too late to successfully cancel Steven Pinker.

    https://cdn.substack.com/image/fetch/c_limit,f_auto,q_auto:good,fl_progressive:steep/https%3A%2F%2Fbucketeer-e05bbc84-baa3-437e-9518-adb32be77984.s3.amazonaws.com%2Fpublic%2Fimages%2F53745b91-7c09-4f29-992e-e09f150dc5f3_3451x2501.jpeg  

    Replies: @SFG, @Chrisnonymous

    But notice that the new strategy is incrementalism. They aren’t calling for Pinker to be tossed out of academia, they are calling for him simply to be removed from the roll of fellows who represent the LSA. This is much easier to achieve. It’s the same strategy tech companies have been using–first removing “violent” speech, then “hate” speech, then statements that imply inferiority of any kind….

    How do you boil a frog?

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Chrisnonymous

    I might be too optimistic. But compared to Steven Pinker, these linguists for me look heartwarmingly unimportant.

    (The mentality they impersonate sends a shiver down my bones at times though. Then I think of the poet Enzensberger, who wrote in the long poem The Frogs of Bikini in The Fury of Disappearence (1980) about the swine with the good conscience***** and that it's this swine, that the narrator in the poem throws - - - my bomb at his womb).


    ***** that's the patented leftist here because he has eradicated doubt and thus turned into a subhuman creature - at least for the moment of rage of the lyrical Me, which is depicted here.

  42. @Anon
    In one sense, yes. I thought this too as I watched Hamilton tonight. But then I remembered Miranda was struck by Chernow’s biography sometime around 2007, after which he started seriously writing in 2008, finishing in 2015. What a long way we’ve come since then. I noticed a few things in the show tonight that I’m sure he’d change if he had the chance. It’s not that Miranda 2008-2015 represents the “far right” of acceptable opinion these days, it’s that Barack Obama 2008-2015 is *outside* the realm of acceptable opinion these days, making Obama a ‘white supremacist” like the rest of us.

    As I’ve said numerous times, the Left is on a train to Crazytown, but occasionally someone will get off the train, having had enough. Jordan Peterson got off at the Pronouns stop. Dave Rubin and a bunch of others got off at the Censorship stop. JK Rowling got off at the Men Are Women stop. Barack Obama may have gotten off at the Cancel Culture stop. Some minor democrats are getting off at the Blow Up Statues stop. But most of the people on the Left, including almost certainly Miranda, are still on the train, and until he (or anyone else) publicly gets off the train, one must assume he’s still there, at the Vanguard of the Revolution. I expect at some point, in typical Evil Disney style, the lines about the French Revolutionary mobs being rioters standing for nothing will be quietly excise from the show and the soundtrack, and no normies will even notice, the entire idea that Miranda, through Washington, would denounce riots only kept alive in a backwater of the internet where only a few people remain.

    @CouldntBRighter

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Whiskey, @James O'Meara

    Why did you watch Hamilton instead of 1776?

  43. V says:
    @Sergeant Prepper
    OT: and then they came for Pinker. Surprised he lasted this long. The man sometimes says something true.

    https://twitter.com/joelpust/status/1279195476613632000

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Dieter Kief, @EldnahYm, @V

    “Errata:
    The UCSB incident involved the murder of 2 women and 4 men, not 6 women as stated in the text.”

    This is in reference to their claim that Pinker was undermining people who stand up against violence and misogyny because of his tweet that it’s “statistically obtuse” to call the murders part of a pattern of hatred against women.

    Which is… just really perfect, when you think about it.

  44. @Anon
    In one sense, yes. I thought this too as I watched Hamilton tonight. But then I remembered Miranda was struck by Chernow’s biography sometime around 2007, after which he started seriously writing in 2008, finishing in 2015. What a long way we’ve come since then. I noticed a few things in the show tonight that I’m sure he’d change if he had the chance. It’s not that Miranda 2008-2015 represents the “far right” of acceptable opinion these days, it’s that Barack Obama 2008-2015 is *outside* the realm of acceptable opinion these days, making Obama a ‘white supremacist” like the rest of us.

    As I’ve said numerous times, the Left is on a train to Crazytown, but occasionally someone will get off the train, having had enough. Jordan Peterson got off at the Pronouns stop. Dave Rubin and a bunch of others got off at the Censorship stop. JK Rowling got off at the Men Are Women stop. Barack Obama may have gotten off at the Cancel Culture stop. Some minor democrats are getting off at the Blow Up Statues stop. But most of the people on the Left, including almost certainly Miranda, are still on the train, and until he (or anyone else) publicly gets off the train, one must assume he’s still there, at the Vanguard of the Revolution. I expect at some point, in typical Evil Disney style, the lines about the French Revolutionary mobs being rioters standing for nothing will be quietly excise from the show and the soundtrack, and no normies will even notice, the entire idea that Miranda, through Washington, would denounce riots only kept alive in a backwater of the internet where only a few people remain.

    @CouldntBRighter

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Whiskey, @James O'Meara

    Nope. The left is on an express to Pol Pot. Think about it. With a contracting economy the only way to move up is cancel a superior and go full Red Guard.

  45. @SFG
    @Kronos

    The late-twentieth-century conservative movement stemmed the tide of social democracy and the worst excesses of the Sixties, elected Ronald Reagan, and helped bankrupt the Soviet Union through an arms race, winning the Cold War.

    I don't agree with all of this--I think the businessmen got way too much and everyone else got the short end of the stick--but it did do quite a bit.

    Just because the three-legged stool of religious, business, and military conservatives doesn't work anymore doesn't mean it didn't make sense at the time. No political coalition lasts forever.

    Replies: @Having enemies helps, @ATBOTL, @Kronos

    The late-twentieth-century conservative movement stemmed the tide of social democracy and the worst excesses of the Sixties, elected Ronald Reagan, and helped bankrupt the Soviet Union through an arms race, winning the Cold War.

    True, I’m just identifying the long term trend of Democrats poaching Rockefeller liberal Republicans while Republicans poach New Deal Democrats.

    In many ways Trump is playing Bill Clinton’s strategy’s of the 1990s but inverted. Trump is triangulating those that got triangulated out during the 1990s.

  46. @Gordo
    Sorry OT but Coventry City Council have removed a memorial to a dog which died in 1902.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8488865/Memorial-dog-racist-died-1902-removed-graveyard.html

    Dog had the same name as Guy Gibson's dog.

    Replies: @El Dato, @tyrone, @Joe Stalin

    Dog had the same name as Guy Gibson’s dog.

    • Thanks: Gordo
  47. @Dumbo
    I don't understand the success of this Hamilton thing, it sounds dreadful. I have zero interest in seeing it. But I am not a fan of musicals anyway. However it seems to be more some kind of "elite signalling" than real aesthetic interest. There's also a play about the Lehmann Brothers that was successful for similar reasons. Also very common in contemporary art.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Hamilton sounds completely retarded. I do not get its appeal at all. I wouldn’t go if you gave me tickets. I’d rather watch reruns of Hollywood Squares.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Jim Don Bob

    Hamilton sounds completely retarded. I do not get its appeal at all.

    Black blackety blackblack territory marking.

    I wouldn’t go if you gave me tickets.

    Wel, I was given tickets and saw it in DC at Kennedy center a couple of years back with friends and coworkers, surrounded by middle aged DC black drones. Sigh. That's a some hours of my life I could have spent otherwise in a more useful fashion, maybe getting drunk somewhere.

    Although it does have a happy ending...

    I’d rather watch reruns of Hollywood Squares.

    This is totally correct. Lin Manuel BlacketyBlackBlack or Charles Nelson Reilly in some 70's sport jacket?

    Very easy decision.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  48. @SFG
    @Dieter Kief

    Any under 40, though?

    The new generation of lefties is all-in for social justice and against free speech.

    And free speech isn't really a conservative idea--conservatives are for loyalty, authority, and tradition. These things have value, obviously, but they oppose free speech.

    Granted the First Amendment is a genuine American tradition...

    Replies: @Kronos

    The new generation of lefties is all-in for social justice and against free speech.

    They don’t hate free speech, they just want to make serious money by going after “hate” speech. Here are two excerpts from Caldwell’s book. He does a compelling job explaining how civil right legislation led to these legal racketeering shakedowns on freedom of speech and freedom of association.

    Armed with such anecdotes, P.C.’s enemies presented it as an enthusiasm of radical, intemperate, and disreputable scholars. But that was not the heart of P.C. at all. The heart of it was a set of sober procedures promulgated by cautious academic administrators and government regulators frightened of civil rights law.

    Litigation could make it embarrassing, expensive, and potentially fatal to an organization like the Los Angeles Dodgers or CBS to have anyone in their employ speculating, woolgathering, or talking off the cuff. It was an institutional innovation. It grew directly out of civil rights law. Just as affirmative action in universities and corporations had privatized the enforcement of integration, the fear of litigation privatized the suppression of disagreement, or even of speculation. The government would not need to punish directly the people who dissented from its doctrines. Boards of directors and boards of trustees, fearing lawsuits, would do that.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @Kronos

    How ironic that the Weekly Standard's demise proved a godsend in freeing Caldwell of neocon/neoliberal publishing constraints!

    Replies: @Kronos

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Kronos

    "they just want to make serious money"

    In a capitalist society everything becomes a racket. Blacks are cashing in on the racial terrorism hustle.

    , @Dan Hayes
    @Kronos

    Instead of mindless lamenting about what happened, Caldwell has provided the reasons why it happened.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Anonymous

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Kronos

    Caldwell's book is very good, and very depressing.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  49. @Chrisnonymous
    @Dieter Kief

    But notice that the new strategy is incrementalism. They aren't calling for Pinker to be tossed out of academia, they are calling for him simply to be removed from the roll of fellows who represent the LSA. This is much easier to achieve. It's the same strategy tech companies have been using--first removing "violent" speech, then "hate" speech, then statements that imply inferiority of any kind....

    How do you boil a frog?

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    I might be too optimistic. But compared to Steven Pinker, these linguists for me look heartwarmingly unimportant.

    (The mentality they impersonate sends a shiver down my bones at times though. Then I think of the poet Enzensberger, who wrote in the long poem The Frogs of Bikini in The Fury of Disappearence (1980) about the swine with the good conscience***** and that it’s this swine, that the narrator in the poem throws – – – my bomb at his womb).

    ***** that’s the patented leftist here because he has eradicated doubt and thus turned into a subhuman creature – at least for the moment of rage of the lyrical Me, which is depicted here.

  50. @Kronos
    @SFG


    The new generation of lefties is all-in for social justice and against free speech.
     
    They don’t hate free speech, they just want to make serious money by going after “hate” speech. Here are two excerpts from Caldwell’s book. He does a compelling job explaining how civil right legislation led to these legal racketeering shakedowns on freedom of speech and freedom of association.

    https://www.amazon.com/Age-Entitlement-America-Since-Sixties/dp/1501106899

    Armed with such anecdotes, P.C.’s enemies presented it as an enthusiasm of radical, intemperate, and disreputable scholars. But that was not the heart of P.C. at all. The heart of it was a set of sober procedures promulgated by cautious academic administrators and government regulators frightened of civil rights law.
     

    Litigation could make it embarrassing, expensive, and potentially fatal to an organization like the Los Angeles Dodgers or CBS to have anyone in their employ speculating, woolgathering, or talking off the cuff. It was an institutional innovation. It grew directly out of civil rights law. Just as affirmative action in universities and corporations had privatized the enforcement of integration, the fear of litigation privatized the suppression of disagreement, or even of speculation. The government would not need to punish directly the people who dissented from its doctrines. Boards of directors and boards of trustees, fearing lawsuits, would do that.
     

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @SunBakedSuburb, @Dan Hayes, @Jim Don Bob

    How ironic that the Weekly Standard’s demise proved a godsend in freeing Caldwell of neocon/neoliberal publishing constraints!

    • Agree: Kronos, AnotherDad
    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Dan Hayes

    You get the sense the book is somewhat a collection of different draft essays that never got past neoconservative editors. But Caldwell kept them in a drawer (or more likely a quality safe) and incorporated them into this book on civil rights history in America.

    He talks about children’s books, technology, and conservatism in regards to civil rights. He even talks quite favorably of Pat Buchanan and Sam Francis in one section. That both were spot on in predicting the outgrowth of SJWs from PC culture and US economic decline from globalization.

    (Much like the “apology” that Tucker Carlson wrote about Buchanan in his “Ship of Fools” book.)

    http://images.huffingtonpost.com/2015-03-24-1427195383-2779777-HEATHER_JACKETSTICKER.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jim Don Bob

  51. @Steve in Greensboro
    @anon

    Sounds like Old Perly thinks that multiculturalism and "turning debtors into state vassals" are somehow inconsistent with each other. Huh.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    Twitter Rick Perlstein is more identity-hysterical than author Rick Perlstein. I can’t think of a notable leftoid who hasn’t joined the cult. The lefties who had something to offer are now dead. Perlstein, before he baptized himself in the goo of anti-racism, published a couple of interesting tomes covering the sociopolitical landscape of the late 60s-early 70s. The Rick Perlstein brain that produced those books is now dead.

  52. @Anonymous
    dont be confused by famous professor-blogger-scholar brian leiters comment:


    serious people in the field HAVE signed this. Ray Jackendoff is about as big a name as you can get. If Leiter doesnt know who that is its absurd for him to comment.

    Replies: @Sergeant Prepper, @Mr. Anon

    serious people in the field HAVE signed this. Ray Jackendoff is about as big a name as you can get.

    Was this petition by any chance also signed by Hugh Jass, Mike Crotch, and Jacques Strap?

  53. @gabriel alberton
    @SFG

    Here's one of them:

    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2018/01/28/business/28Table3/merlin_132531764_7db632c3-fc3a-40f0-af91-d24d8ef80afc-superJumbo.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @BB753

    Here’s one of them:

    Or rather: He’s one of them

  54. @Kronos
    @SFG


    The new generation of lefties is all-in for social justice and against free speech.
     
    They don’t hate free speech, they just want to make serious money by going after “hate” speech. Here are two excerpts from Caldwell’s book. He does a compelling job explaining how civil right legislation led to these legal racketeering shakedowns on freedom of speech and freedom of association.

    https://www.amazon.com/Age-Entitlement-America-Since-Sixties/dp/1501106899

    Armed with such anecdotes, P.C.’s enemies presented it as an enthusiasm of radical, intemperate, and disreputable scholars. But that was not the heart of P.C. at all. The heart of it was a set of sober procedures promulgated by cautious academic administrators and government regulators frightened of civil rights law.
     

    Litigation could make it embarrassing, expensive, and potentially fatal to an organization like the Los Angeles Dodgers or CBS to have anyone in their employ speculating, woolgathering, or talking off the cuff. It was an institutional innovation. It grew directly out of civil rights law. Just as affirmative action in universities and corporations had privatized the enforcement of integration, the fear of litigation privatized the suppression of disagreement, or even of speculation. The government would not need to punish directly the people who dissented from its doctrines. Boards of directors and boards of trustees, fearing lawsuits, would do that.
     

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @SunBakedSuburb, @Dan Hayes, @Jim Don Bob

    “they just want to make serious money”

    In a capitalist society everything becomes a racket. Blacks are cashing in on the racial terrorism hustle.

  55. @Anon
    Why not? Conservatism has lost its meaning when the entire GOP establishment and the Christian religious establishment have distorted patriotism to mean patriotism to Israel and the military banking complex, accept gay marriage and help promote mass immigration from the third world. With conservatives like these, who needs liberals?

    Replies: @Art Deco

    They didn’t do any of these things, except in your imagination.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  56. Hamilton, Schmamilton. Real men check out Paul Foster’s “Tom Paine: A Play in Two Parts” with its wiggy Godspell- and Marat/Sade-inflected nuttiness.

    Tom Paine came from afar, afar.
    His nose is like a blazing star.
    He stirred the country round and round,
    And turned the whole world upside-down.

    Happy Fourth, Mister Paine, the real Father of Our Country.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    And yeah, I used to get drunk with Johnny Ferraro down at Phoebe's on the Bowery, and yack with him about comedy and Grotowski and Artaud. I did a lot of weird things, who wouldn't.

  57. @Having enemies helps
    @SFG

    One not very oft-mentioned reason capitalism was more or less regulated (unlike now), social mobility was high and the middle class prospered in the West after WWII was the shadow of the Soviet Union looming over Europe for 45 years.

    People seem to forget it nowadays, but SU had been a very real threat throughout its existence for anyone not under communist rule, and all the proxy wars fought between the Soviet bloc and the West make perfect sense given the dynamics of that time (incl. Vietnam, which seems absurd today for many who view it through an anachronistic lens). The CPSU never backtracked on its declared mission to incite "popular revolution" all over the world, and actively tried to do so through its agents and fellow travelers literally everywhere.

    Every western government of the era was acutely aware of that risk, so they couldn't afford their people getting too impoverished, hence they let the masses get a larger-than-usual piece of the growing pie.

    Also, according to the classic definition of "conservatism", soviet-era communists were way more conservative than anyone called conservative today. But people seem to forget that too. Or they never noticed.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    Putin Man Bad.

  58. @Dan Hayes
    @Kronos

    How ironic that the Weekly Standard's demise proved a godsend in freeing Caldwell of neocon/neoliberal publishing constraints!

    Replies: @Kronos

    You get the sense the book is somewhat a collection of different draft essays that never got past neoconservative editors. But Caldwell kept them in a drawer (or more likely a quality safe) and incorporated them into this book on civil rights history in America.

    He talks about children’s books, technology, and conservatism in regards to civil rights. He even talks quite favorably of Pat Buchanan and Sam Francis in one section. That both were spot on in predicting the outgrowth of SJWs from PC culture and US economic decline from globalization.

    (Much like the “apology” that Tucker Carlson wrote about Buchanan in his “Ship of Fools” book.)

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Kronos

    I subtitle this volume ...and No Daddy.

    This cover is new artwork. Were the old pictures cancelled, or is this just the usual pointless update to sell more books?

    Heather is now in her 30s, and probably still doesn't know who her daddy is. (The book just calls him "some sperm".) Ancestry, 23andMe, or Family Tree DNA may help her.

    My copy is in storage, but before we moved, I kept it atop our highest bookshelf where the kids couldn't get at it. Now I'm thinking of bringing it out for them as an example of what not to do.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Dan Hayes, @Jim Don Bob

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Kronos

    Heather has Two Mommies didn't work out too well for that crazy Harvard bitch who ranted so much about stabbing wypipo that she lost her job at Deloitte.

  59. @Hippopotamusdrome
    https://dejareviewer.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/general-zod-changes-the-face-of-mount-rushmore-to-give-himself-the-glory.jpg
    https://johnkennethmuir.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/mars7.jpg

    Replies: @brabantian, @Reg Cæsar

    also can be re-done as Mt George Floyd

  60. Also the wokeness front

    Ghislaine Maxwell’s judge is a pioneer openly LGBT figure amongst the black robes of USA federal courts, Jewish lesbian Alison J Nathan

    Judge Nathan makes a household with her lesbian partner, law professor Meg Satterthwaite, and twin boys as their sons. She teaches part-time at the NYU School of Law.

    photo

  61. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Hamilton, Schmamilton. Real men check out Paul Foster's "Tom Paine: A Play in Two Parts" with its wiggy Godspell- and Marat/Sade-inflected nuttiness.

    Tom Paine came from afar, afar.
    His nose is like a blazing star.
    He stirred the country round and round,
    And turned the whole world upside-down.

    Happy Fourth, Mister Paine, the real Father of Our Country.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    And yeah, I used to get drunk with Johnny Ferraro down at Phoebe’s on the Bowery, and yack with him about comedy and Grotowski and Artaud. I did a lot of weird things, who wouldn’t.

  62. Hamilton from here looks like a cargo cult exercise for the elite. If we just put the dahkies in the garb and have them read the lines (after their entertaining fashion), the liberal democratic impulse will descend on them, finally.

    A lot of this stuff starts as condescension and its target audience of blacks and “liberals”, ever slow on the uptake, eventually figures it out. I think Hamilton is toast by the end of the year.

    • Disagree: Giancarlo M. Kumquat
  63. @Hippopotamusdrome
    https://dejareviewer.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/general-zod-changes-the-face-of-mount-rushmore-to-give-himself-the-glory.jpg
    https://johnkennethmuir.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/mars7.jpg

    Replies: @brabantian, @Reg Cæsar

  64. Lin-Manuel Miranda Represents the New Conservatism

    I think I prefer the old “Liberalism”:

    (Here is a very respectful 2017 rendition of “Take Care of This House” from the same 1972 show, by a black lady. The opening lines are very anti-riot. Of course, she’s a London native of West African descent, a descendant of slave merchants rather than slaves.)

    Note the wonderful irony now hidden in the Bernstein album cover. Almost dead-center in that photograph is a building topped with a sort of green pyramid. Once the tallest building in the world– for about three weeks, a fun story in itself– this is 40 Wall Street.

    Now known as The Trump Building.

  65. @Jake
    @anon

    Hamilton was a thorough plutocrat who worshipped the concept of a great trading global empire unencumbered by monarchy and hereditary nobility, and unbeholden in any way to the yeoman farmers that Jefferson and Jackson, in different ways, each as essential to the American Republic being worth the effort. Hamilton was a bastard cut off from meaningful roots ands therefore opposed to roots other than money as being important to the global trading empire.

    He is the most important early American figure for the path that got us to the Hellhole all around us. What Miranda did is make Hamilton not merely acceptable but beloved to hordes of upscale non-whites, rather than Hamilton being just for white Wall Streeters and Neocons.

    Replies: @anon

    So Hamilton is the Founding Father of America is an economy pretending to be a nation?

  66. @Kronos
    @Dan Hayes

    You get the sense the book is somewhat a collection of different draft essays that never got past neoconservative editors. But Caldwell kept them in a drawer (or more likely a quality safe) and incorporated them into this book on civil rights history in America.

    He talks about children’s books, technology, and conservatism in regards to civil rights. He even talks quite favorably of Pat Buchanan and Sam Francis in one section. That both were spot on in predicting the outgrowth of SJWs from PC culture and US economic decline from globalization.

    (Much like the “apology” that Tucker Carlson wrote about Buchanan in his “Ship of Fools” book.)

    http://images.huffingtonpost.com/2015-03-24-1427195383-2779777-HEATHER_JACKETSTICKER.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jim Don Bob

    I subtitle this volume …and No Daddy.

    This cover is new artwork. Were the old pictures cancelled, or is this just the usual pointless update to sell more books?

    Heather is now in her 30s, and probably still doesn’t know who her daddy is. (The book just calls him “some sperm”.) Ancestry, 23andMe, or Family Tree DNA may help her.

    My copy is in storage, but before we moved, I kept it atop our highest bookshelf where the kids couldn’t get at it. Now I’m thinking of bringing it out for them as an example of what not to do.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Reg Cæsar

    I never heard of it until reading Caldwell’s book.

    , @Dan Hayes
    @Reg Cæsar

    When that book was adopted by the NYC Board of Education, an Orthodox rabbi picketed BoE Brooklyn headquarters in protest. Despite being invited to participate, the gutless RC Bishop of Brooklyn was nowhere to be found!

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Reg Cæsar

    Why do you have this book at all?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  67. Anonymous[344] • Disclaimer says:

    In a similar vein, I realized yesterday that PepsiCo doesn’t actually need to replace Aunt Jemima on their pancake mix packaging. I was looking at her most recent incarnation(de-mammified in 1989) when I noticed her jaw seemed a little large for a woman.

    And then it hit me.

    All they need to do is say that Jemima is a trans-woman, and always has been. She will be the first openly trans corporate mascot in American(world?) history. Nobody will dare remove a black trans corporate mascot, because that’s the same thing as murder. I’m pretty sure dozens of black trans women have been already been murdered as a result of Pepsi even thinking about removing her.

    Now that I’ve saved her corporate owners(with their mostly white board of governors) a boatload of money in terms of new ad campaigns, packaging redesigns, market research, and lost brand power, I will accept payment in PepsiCo stock. And maybe a board seat.

    Sadly, I don’t think that the same strategy will work for Mars and Uncle Ben’s. Even in 2020, no one is going to believe that a trans-man could be that bald, even with seven decades worth of corn row-induced traction alopecia.

  68. @Kent Nationalist
    @Dave Pinsen

    He was the original neocon (even down to being raised as a Jew)

    Replies: @Alden

    Some say his mother had him baptized in the local French Protestant church and she and her children attended that church regularly.

    Some say his father was the Duke of Hamilton.

    I say he was the evil genius who decided the frontiermen , not the plantation owners and wealthy merchants would pay the 13 billion we borrowed from France with the Whiskey tax.

    Not only would the frontiersmen drive the Indians west with no help from an army, but in their spare time would make enough whiskey to pay off the war debt, build Washington DC and other government expenses.

  69. @Reg Cæsar
    @Kronos

    I subtitle this volume ...and No Daddy.

    This cover is new artwork. Were the old pictures cancelled, or is this just the usual pointless update to sell more books?

    Heather is now in her 30s, and probably still doesn't know who her daddy is. (The book just calls him "some sperm".) Ancestry, 23andMe, or Family Tree DNA may help her.

    My copy is in storage, but before we moved, I kept it atop our highest bookshelf where the kids couldn't get at it. Now I'm thinking of bringing it out for them as an example of what not to do.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Dan Hayes, @Jim Don Bob

    I never heard of it until reading Caldwell’s book.

  70. @Reg Cæsar
    @Kronos

    I subtitle this volume ...and No Daddy.

    This cover is new artwork. Were the old pictures cancelled, or is this just the usual pointless update to sell more books?

    Heather is now in her 30s, and probably still doesn't know who her daddy is. (The book just calls him "some sperm".) Ancestry, 23andMe, or Family Tree DNA may help her.

    My copy is in storage, but before we moved, I kept it atop our highest bookshelf where the kids couldn't get at it. Now I'm thinking of bringing it out for them as an example of what not to do.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Dan Hayes, @Jim Don Bob

    When that book was adopted by the NYC Board of Education, an Orthodox rabbi picketed BoE Brooklyn headquarters in protest. Despite being invited to participate, the gutless RC Bishop of Brooklyn was nowhere to be found!

  71. @Kronos
    @SFG


    The new generation of lefties is all-in for social justice and against free speech.
     
    They don’t hate free speech, they just want to make serious money by going after “hate” speech. Here are two excerpts from Caldwell’s book. He does a compelling job explaining how civil right legislation led to these legal racketeering shakedowns on freedom of speech and freedom of association.

    https://www.amazon.com/Age-Entitlement-America-Since-Sixties/dp/1501106899

    Armed with such anecdotes, P.C.’s enemies presented it as an enthusiasm of radical, intemperate, and disreputable scholars. But that was not the heart of P.C. at all. The heart of it was a set of sober procedures promulgated by cautious academic administrators and government regulators frightened of civil rights law.
     

    Litigation could make it embarrassing, expensive, and potentially fatal to an organization like the Los Angeles Dodgers or CBS to have anyone in their employ speculating, woolgathering, or talking off the cuff. It was an institutional innovation. It grew directly out of civil rights law. Just as affirmative action in universities and corporations had privatized the enforcement of integration, the fear of litigation privatized the suppression of disagreement, or even of speculation. The government would not need to punish directly the people who dissented from its doctrines. Boards of directors and boards of trustees, fearing lawsuits, would do that.
     

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @SunBakedSuburb, @Dan Hayes, @Jim Don Bob

    Instead of mindless lamenting about what happened, Caldwell has provided the reasons why it happened.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Dan Hayes

    True, it’s only regretful that this information wasn’t widely circulated much sooner.

    , @Anonymous
    @Dan Hayes


    Instead of mindless lamenting about what happened, Caldwell has provided the reasons why it happened.
     
    Does he prescribe anything?

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

  72. Anonymous[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    @Anon


    Has anybody noticed that George Floyd has been almost forgotten in all this? By now, all the protests are about something else.
     
    We are at war with Eurasia now. We have always been at war with Eurasia. How many fingers am I holding up, Winston?

    The riots, arson, beatings and murders (please, they are not protests) are not "about" anything. They are organized terror and destruction used for whatever purposes the powers that be want to use them for.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    The riots, arson, beatings and murders (please, they are not protests) are not “about” anything. They are organized terror and destruction used for whatever purposes the powers that be want to use them for.

    The famous phrase “It’s crackers to slip a rozer the dropsy in snide!” comes to mind. See: https://www.messagemedia.co/aitkin/opinion/other_opinions/it-s-crackers-to-slip-a-rozzer-the-dropsy-in/article_2afd2e28-5681-11e9-8d00-6f7a99a70754.html

    It’s insane to terrorize and destroy your constituents and their homes in order to terrify people who are not your constituents.

    Back in 1968 the effect of the riots was to elicit sympathy for the people who had been so badly treated that they would riot and destroy their own neighborhoods. By the LA riots, the sympathy was wearing very thin. Now there is no sympathy, and the exercise is just as insane as bribing a policemen with counterfeit money.

  73. @Dan Hayes
    @Kronos

    Instead of mindless lamenting about what happened, Caldwell has provided the reasons why it happened.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Anonymous

    True, it’s only regretful that this information wasn’t widely circulated much sooner.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  74. Anonymous[208] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dan Hayes
    @Kronos

    Instead of mindless lamenting about what happened, Caldwell has provided the reasons why it happened.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Anonymous

    Instead of mindless lamenting about what happened, Caldwell has provided the reasons why it happened.

    Does he prescribe anything?

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @Anonymous

    Caldwell prescribes the uprooting of most, if not all, civil rights laws. A tall order to be sure and unfortunately only possible, if at all, in piecemeal steps.

  75. @EldnahYm
    @Sergeant Prepper

    I don't recognize the names on the list with one notable exception. Ray Jackendoff is a fairly big name in the field whose non-syntax centered generative models put him in opposition to the dominant Chomskian paradigm. More notably, Jackendoff and Pinker have collaborated on work in the past.

    The large number of graduate students is evidence that much of SJW university activities(and probably true of other places than universities) are just lower ranking status seekers trying to get rid of older people in the hopes that they will replace them(or just out of spite).

    There should be far more support on the right for de-funding(not ruling out more radical measures as well) universities. This is an easy solution which pushes back against some of the madness.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @corrector

    Jackendoff, huh huh, huh huh.

    In my grad school days there was much chuckling about him and another linguistics guy whose name I have forgotten; Harry Hands or something like that; they actually did publish some work together.

  76. @Anon
    In one sense, yes. I thought this too as I watched Hamilton tonight. But then I remembered Miranda was struck by Chernow’s biography sometime around 2007, after which he started seriously writing in 2008, finishing in 2015. What a long way we’ve come since then. I noticed a few things in the show tonight that I’m sure he’d change if he had the chance. It’s not that Miranda 2008-2015 represents the “far right” of acceptable opinion these days, it’s that Barack Obama 2008-2015 is *outside* the realm of acceptable opinion these days, making Obama a ‘white supremacist” like the rest of us.

    As I’ve said numerous times, the Left is on a train to Crazytown, but occasionally someone will get off the train, having had enough. Jordan Peterson got off at the Pronouns stop. Dave Rubin and a bunch of others got off at the Censorship stop. JK Rowling got off at the Men Are Women stop. Barack Obama may have gotten off at the Cancel Culture stop. Some minor democrats are getting off at the Blow Up Statues stop. But most of the people on the Left, including almost certainly Miranda, are still on the train, and until he (or anyone else) publicly gets off the train, one must assume he’s still there, at the Vanguard of the Revolution. I expect at some point, in typical Evil Disney style, the lines about the French Revolutionary mobs being rioters standing for nothing will be quietly excise from the show and the soundtrack, and no normies will even notice, the entire idea that Miranda, through Washington, would denounce riots only kept alive in a backwater of the internet where only a few people remain.

    @CouldntBRighter

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Whiskey, @James O'Meara

    “Every radical generation, it is said, has its Kronstadt. For some it was the Moscow Trials, for others the Nazi-Soviet Pact, for still others Hungary (the Raik Trial or 1956), Czechoslovakia (the defenestration of Masaryk in 1948 or the Prague Spring of 1968), the Gulag, Cambodia, Poland (and there will be more to come). My Kronstadt was Kronstadt.” — Daniel Bell

  77. @gabriel alberton
    @SFG

    Here's one of them:

    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2018/01/28/business/28Table3/merlin_132531764_7db632c3-fc3a-40f0-af91-d24d8ef80afc-superJumbo.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @BB753

    Pinker was also friends with Jeffrey Epstein.

  78. @Kronos
    @SFG


    The new generation of lefties is all-in for social justice and against free speech.
     
    They don’t hate free speech, they just want to make serious money by going after “hate” speech. Here are two excerpts from Caldwell’s book. He does a compelling job explaining how civil right legislation led to these legal racketeering shakedowns on freedom of speech and freedom of association.

    https://www.amazon.com/Age-Entitlement-America-Since-Sixties/dp/1501106899

    Armed with such anecdotes, P.C.’s enemies presented it as an enthusiasm of radical, intemperate, and disreputable scholars. But that was not the heart of P.C. at all. The heart of it was a set of sober procedures promulgated by cautious academic administrators and government regulators frightened of civil rights law.
     

    Litigation could make it embarrassing, expensive, and potentially fatal to an organization like the Los Angeles Dodgers or CBS to have anyone in their employ speculating, woolgathering, or talking off the cuff. It was an institutional innovation. It grew directly out of civil rights law. Just as affirmative action in universities and corporations had privatized the enforcement of integration, the fear of litigation privatized the suppression of disagreement, or even of speculation. The government would not need to punish directly the people who dissented from its doctrines. Boards of directors and boards of trustees, fearing lawsuits, would do that.
     

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @SunBakedSuburb, @Dan Hayes, @Jim Don Bob

    Caldwell’s book is very good, and very depressing.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Jim Don Bob

    Seeing things as they truly are is never depressing. Despair is arrogance.

  79. @Kronos
    @Dan Hayes

    You get the sense the book is somewhat a collection of different draft essays that never got past neoconservative editors. But Caldwell kept them in a drawer (or more likely a quality safe) and incorporated them into this book on civil rights history in America.

    He talks about children’s books, technology, and conservatism in regards to civil rights. He even talks quite favorably of Pat Buchanan and Sam Francis in one section. That both were spot on in predicting the outgrowth of SJWs from PC culture and US economic decline from globalization.

    (Much like the “apology” that Tucker Carlson wrote about Buchanan in his “Ship of Fools” book.)

    http://images.huffingtonpost.com/2015-03-24-1427195383-2779777-HEATHER_JACKETSTICKER.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jim Don Bob

    Heather has Two Mommies didn’t work out too well for that crazy Harvard bitch who ranted so much about stabbing wypipo that she lost her job at Deloitte.

  80. @Reg Cæsar
    @Kronos

    I subtitle this volume ...and No Daddy.

    This cover is new artwork. Were the old pictures cancelled, or is this just the usual pointless update to sell more books?

    Heather is now in her 30s, and probably still doesn't know who her daddy is. (The book just calls him "some sperm".) Ancestry, 23andMe, or Family Tree DNA may help her.

    My copy is in storage, but before we moved, I kept it atop our highest bookshelf where the kids couldn't get at it. Now I'm thinking of bringing it out for them as an example of what not to do.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Dan Hayes, @Jim Don Bob

    Why do you have this book at all?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jim Don Bob


    Why do you have this book at all?
     
    On contentious issues I care about, I like to have some examples of the other side's thinking handy to refer to. I loathe giving them any support, so I get them as close to free as possible. Library discard sales, garage sales, Little Free Libraries, etc.

    How else would I know that the only reference to Heather's sire is "some sperm"?

    I don't hunt these down, just grab them when I see them. I could get it from the public library (the book, that is, not some sperm), but then it would be on record.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  81. @EldnahYm
    @Sergeant Prepper

    I don't recognize the names on the list with one notable exception. Ray Jackendoff is a fairly big name in the field whose non-syntax centered generative models put him in opposition to the dominant Chomskian paradigm. More notably, Jackendoff and Pinker have collaborated on work in the past.

    The large number of graduate students is evidence that much of SJW university activities(and probably true of other places than universities) are just lower ranking status seekers trying to get rid of older people in the hopes that they will replace them(or just out of spite).

    There should be far more support on the right for de-funding(not ruling out more radical measures as well) universities. This is an easy solution which pushes back against some of the madness.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @corrector

    Re Jackendoff: check out the *current* list of names on that open letter and you’ll find Jackendoff isn’t there—and in fact, never (truly) was. Ray’s name was fraudulently attached; he demanded that the organizers of the letter remove it immediately, and they did. Be skeptical of electronic petition signatory lists. My guess is that whoever added Ray’s name to this was aware that he and Pinker had collaborated on an important rebuttal to the Hauser, Chomsky and Fitch paper in the Science Compass 2007 volume—a superb take-down, well worth reading for the clarity of argumentation—and was deliberately trolling Ray, not Pinker. I know Ray, and rest assured, he’s far too reasonable to come within a mile of this kind of agitprop.

    • Thanks: EldnahYm
  82. @Anonymous
    @Dan Hayes


    Instead of mindless lamenting about what happened, Caldwell has provided the reasons why it happened.
     
    Does he prescribe anything?

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    Caldwell prescribes the uprooting of most, if not all, civil rights laws. A tall order to be sure and unfortunately only possible, if at all, in piecemeal steps.

  83. @Kronos
    One of the most interesting political aspects of 1968 is the transfer of elite urban WASPs from the Republican to the Democratic Party. The New Deal coalition was an alliance between Northern Catholic ethnics and Southern farmers. In 1968 that coalition imploded and would eventually become the coastal WASP/Jewish elite party.

    Many Republican politicians such as Mayor Lindsey soon switched parties after 1968.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2e/John_Lindsay_NYWTS_1.jpg/1920px-John_Lindsay_NYWTS_1.jpg

    https://www.nytimes.com/1971/08/12/archives/lindsay-the-democrat.html

    But perhaps the change is better marked by Nelson Rockefeller, who likely would’ve preferred free market economics combined with free market morals. (If I recall correctly from Buchanan’s two Nixon books, Rockefeller’s scandalous divorce and fathering a child with an already married women cost him the 1964 Republican nomination.) The future Democratic Party under Bill Clinton would constitute capitalism untethered to Christian morals or Marxist ethics (the latter is apparently a thing.)

    Of course, this encourages the consequential reaction that the Republican Party will ultimately become the working class party. I’d imagine the snobby Bill Buckley tried to avoid both party transformations at all costs but of course failed. Buckley conservatism tried to compromise a bit on the cultural issues while preserving the free market ideology. He couldn’t compete against a Democratic Party that went full free market on both economics and culture.

    Replies: @SFG, @FPD72

    Scandal of a sexual nature followed Rockefeller to his grave. Rockefeller had a fatal heart attack at a townhouse he owned at 13 West 54th Street. The heart attack occurred in the late evening in the presence of Megan Marshack, a 25-year-old aide. After Rockefeller suffered the heart attack, Marshack called her friend, news reporter Ponchitta Pierce, to the townhouse; Pierce phoned an ambulance approximately an hour after the heart attack.

  84. @SFG
    @Desiderius

    Who are they, though? Certainly not the alt-right, given his ancestry, and they wouldn't be of much use in academia anyway.

    Replies: @gabriel alberton, @Desiderius

    What does the Dork Right have to do with anything? 63 million voted for Trump and dipshit Pinker is bigoted against all of us.

  85. @Jim Don Bob
    @Kronos

    Caldwell's book is very good, and very depressing.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Seeing things as they truly are is never depressing. Despair is arrogance.

  86. anon[392] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon
    https://twitter.com/rickperlstein/status/1279089779951521794

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Jake, @Steve in Greensboro, @RAZ, @anon

    If we still had our Constitutional Republic and Heritage American population then “we” (Heritage Americans) could have lively and profitable debates about economic policy, Hamilton, our history, plutocracy vs democracy, etc.
    As it is, “we” are for all practical purposes a despised minority in our own homeland, the only issue is race, race, race, and no debate is allowed.
    There will be no discussion of plutocracy until jews and blacks are defeated in this country. That is the raw truth.

  87. anon[409] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jim Don Bob
    @Dumbo

    Hamilton sounds completely retarded. I do not get its appeal at all. I wouldn't go if you gave me tickets. I'd rather watch reruns of Hollywood Squares.

    Replies: @anon

    Hamilton sounds completely retarded. I do not get its appeal at all.

    Black blackety blackblack territory marking.

    I wouldn’t go if you gave me tickets.

    Wel, I was given tickets and saw it in DC at Kennedy center a couple of years back with friends and coworkers, surrounded by middle aged DC black drones. Sigh. That’s a some hours of my life I could have spent otherwise in a more useful fashion, maybe getting drunk somewhere.

    Although it does have a happy ending…

    I’d rather watch reruns of Hollywood Squares.

    This is totally correct. Lin Manuel BlacketyBlackBlack or Charles Nelson Reilly in some 70’s sport jacket?

    Very easy decision.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @anon



    I’d rather watch reruns of Hollywood Squares.
     
    This is totally correct. Lin Manuel BlacketyBlackBlack or Charles Nelson Reilly in some 70’s sport jacket?

     

    Paul Lynde was even better.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nj3P7bC9tWc

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=me_XVm5lXso
  88. anon[225] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dumbo
    I just saw an Indian immigrant posting something about America being great because minorities like him can get a comfortable middle class life, and that rioters are spoiled kids because "America is the best country in the world and the one that treats minorities better".

    I guess this is a "conservative" message these days. Not much different than what the GOP peddles.

    Of course, if someone suggested that Indians be deported or given less H1B visas, he would probably be the first to complain that "America is racist".

    In the end, most people are just looking for their own self-interest, the rest is just rationalization.

    "I have my principles, and if you don't like them, I have others." (Groucho Marx).

    Replies: @njguy73, @anon

    Of course, if a law is passed to deport Indians or given less H1Bs because they are Indians or to Indians only, then it is definitely racist. Asian exclusion act was racist, not that it was bad then. Japanese internment was not racist if Germans and Italians were also interned.

  89. @Jim Don Bob
    @Reg Cæsar

    Why do you have this book at all?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Why do you have this book at all?

    On contentious issues I care about, I like to have some examples of the other side’s thinking handy to refer to. I loathe giving them any support, so I get them as close to free as possible. Library discard sales, garage sales, Little Free Libraries, etc.

    How else would I know that the only reference to Heather’s sire is “some sperm”?

    I don’t hunt these down, just grab them when I see them. I could get it from the public library (the book, that is, not some sperm), but then it would be on record.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Reg Cæsar

    Years ago when I was enrolling my first daughter in Catholic school, I told the principal that I was enrolling her even though I was not Catholic because I wanted her to learn reading, writing, and arithmetic before she read Heather has Two Mommies. She looked somewhat shocked, but nodded.

  90. @anon
    @Jim Don Bob

    Hamilton sounds completely retarded. I do not get its appeal at all.

    Black blackety blackblack territory marking.

    I wouldn’t go if you gave me tickets.

    Wel, I was given tickets and saw it in DC at Kennedy center a couple of years back with friends and coworkers, surrounded by middle aged DC black drones. Sigh. That's a some hours of my life I could have spent otherwise in a more useful fashion, maybe getting drunk somewhere.

    Although it does have a happy ending...

    I’d rather watch reruns of Hollywood Squares.

    This is totally correct. Lin Manuel BlacketyBlackBlack or Charles Nelson Reilly in some 70's sport jacket?

    Very easy decision.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I’d rather watch reruns of Hollywood Squares.

    This is totally correct. Lin Manuel BlacketyBlackBlack or Charles Nelson Reilly in some 70’s sport jacket?

    Paul Lynde was even better.

  91. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jim Don Bob


    Why do you have this book at all?
     
    On contentious issues I care about, I like to have some examples of the other side's thinking handy to refer to. I loathe giving them any support, so I get them as close to free as possible. Library discard sales, garage sales, Little Free Libraries, etc.

    How else would I know that the only reference to Heather's sire is "some sperm"?

    I don't hunt these down, just grab them when I see them. I could get it from the public library (the book, that is, not some sperm), but then it would be on record.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Years ago when I was enrolling my first daughter in Catholic school, I told the principal that I was enrolling her even though I was not Catholic because I wanted her to learn reading, writing, and arithmetic before she read Heather has Two Mommies. She looked somewhat shocked, but nodded.

    • Agree: starthorn
  92. @Anon
    Has anybody noticed that George Floyd has been almost forgotten in all this? By now, all the protests are about something else.

    "What are you rebelling against?"

    "What do you got?"

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @starthorn

    It happened about a week after it started. Once the fambly started getting their lottery payments they stopped praising the career felon and the mindless masses kept attacking their own kind because there’s no accountability.

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