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"Licorice Pizza:" Local Boy Makes Good
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From my movie review in Taki’s Magazine:

Licorice Pizza: Local Boy Makes Good
Steve Sailer

December 01, 2021

Paul Thomas Anderson’s critically acclaimed Licorice Pizza is his response to Quentin Tarantino’s similarly nostalgic Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood. As you may recall, I was a huge homer for Tarantino’s 2019 movie set in the Hollywood Hills and the adjoining suburban San Fernando Valley in 1969 because I was 11 then and thus appreciate Tarantino’s glamorized tour of old restaurants and drive-in movie theaters that I went to with my parents.

For sentimental reasons, I should be an even bigger fan of Anderson’s Licorice Pizza (named after a defunct Southern California record and video chain) because it’s about a 15-year-old Sherman Oaks boy in 1973, when I was a 15-year-old at school in Sherman Oaks. The movie even begins at Grant High School, the public school I would have attended if I’d not gone to a Catholic school.

Both Tarantino and Anderson grew up hanging around early SoCal video stores, QT in the South Bay, the seven-years-younger PTA in the North Hollywood region of the southeastern San Fernando Valley. …

The Valley back then offered many opportunities for go-getters, while still being a cheap place to raise a family. Anderson’s new film visually emphasizes the colossal number of white kids who were getting free educations in the Los Angeles Unified School District back in 1973. (Today, less than 9 percent are white. But even then, diversity was our strength: My recollection from high school scuttlebutt is that Grant H.S. had the first of its annual Armenian vs. Mexican race riots in 1975.)

Anderson’s hero Gary, a child actor turned precocious waterbed entrepreneur (played by novice actor Cooper Hoffman, the teenage son of the late Philip Seymour Hoffman, who made five movies with the director), decides at first sight that he’s going to marry a twentysomething woman (singer Alana Haim in her first acting role as well) who works for the photographer taking the yearbook portraits.

Reads the whole thing there.

 
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  1. I don’t like Tarantino. He should have been a cartoonist, not a filmmaker.

    Anderson is a superior director, but his last movies didn’t quite cut it.

    Actually, I can’t remember a whole film by him I really like. A few exceptional scenes, for sure, such as in “There Will Be Blood” and even “Magnolia”, but the sum is always less than the parts.

    I haven’t watched this one. Not sure I will.

    • Agree: LondonBob
    • Replies: @MGB
    @Dumbo

    i liked jackie brown and the first 2/3 or so of once upon a time. the rest of what i have seen is self-indulgent, narcissistic shite. haven't seen magnolia, but thought there will be blood and the master great stuff if often uncomfortable to watch. nobody needs to see joaquin phoenix jacking off into the ocean, even from behind.

    Replies: @Dumbo

  2. I had an uncle who lived in the valley in the ‘70s, and it was great fun to visit him and my cousins (aunt, not so much) because their postage-stamp of a yard was almost entirely pool with an afterthought of a patio. One of my cousins was made in the mold of PTA’s lead character, having started what turned out to be a successful mid-sized business over time.

    For me, those were the things that made SoCal a place I always thought I might move to, but it kind of started to go downhill around the time I was free enough to do so. I guess I have to live that experience vicariously through movies like this and Tarantino’s and rely on your stamp of their authenticity.

    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
    @The Alarmist

    I'm a few years younger than Steve, and I've never been to So Cal. My imprint of what SoCal (the Valley and surrounding environs) was like was formed by watching E.T. in the early 80's. The lead human character (Henry Thomas) and his family (led by single mom plaed by Dee Wallace) I believe lived in a fairly new sub-division somewhere in the Valley. In contrast, growing up around Chicago-land, movies that captured the zeitgeist of that era of my life are Risky Business (Paul Brickman), Ferris Beuller (John Hughes) and to a lesser extent, Breakfast Club (Hughes again).

  3. Re:. Brad Pitt. Guy can’t act. It’s always Pitt on the screen, regardless of character. Which is why the pointless, shirtless roof scene in the middle of Once Upon…Hollywood.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Sick of Orcs

    This is the case with all actors. John Wayne is always John Wayne; De Niro- De Niro; Eastwood- Eastwood; Brando- Brando ....

    Can you imagine Brando in the role of an introverted resigned man, as Chekhov's Uncle Vanya?

    We know the answer.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home), @kaganovitch, @Sick of Orcs, @Bill, @Jack D, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Mike Tre

    , @Slim
    @Sick of Orcs

    My wife got the point of that scene. I, however, thought it was to have us see him observing Manson arriving next door.

    , @Mike Tre
    @Sick of Orcs

    As I’ve said before , he’s not a good lead actor but a very good supporting actor. 12 monkeys, True Romance, Snatch are a few where Pitt is very good. As a lead, he’s always just himself and while that used to work for a lot of lead actors, like Wayne and Eastwood for example, guys like Pitt (and Clooney) struggle to make good films as leads. He does better as part of an ensemble (ocean’s eleven), worse in duets (Interview with a Vampire, Fight Club, Seven) but best in supporting roles.

    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Sick of Orcs

    And of course the film that jumpstarted his career, Thelma and Louise. There wasn't any real point of him being in that chick flick, except as eye candy. It's easy to forget now, but for most of Brad Pitt's early and middle part of his career, he was simply eye candy for women filmgoers.

  4. Steve, great work as usual, but this review had so much name dropping, inside baseball nuggets, and obscure Hollywood tangents it made my head spin. I had to read a few paragraphs twice to keep up. Clearly, you’re excited about the subject and want to jam a lot of stuff in, but it can leave the rest of us confused!

    This sounds like a true nostalgia movie, although since Anderson was only 10 when the 1970s ended, he’s also got the filter of it all seeming much cooler, bewildering, and more adult to him — like he’s trying to see it through a mythical older teenage brother’s eyes.

    I’m always interested in true nostalgia movies, which are different that period pieces. True nostalgia movies are when the creators are truly reminiscing about a time/place they actually lived in, as opposed to just reading about it in a book. True nostalgia movies tend to add a lot of mundane, realistic details about a time period that a period piece doesn’t, while also showing how the everyman was dealing with a time period that to us is only known through Major Historical Events and stereotypes.

    Good directors make two kinds of childhood movies: the ones about the childhood they had and the ones about the childhood they wish they’d had, e.g Steve Spielberg.

    • Agree: Captain Tripps
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @R.G. Camara

    I agree with you on the hard time keeping up with all the people described or mentioned in the column. I didn't care too much, at that. I completely understand being nostalgic for all those times that were probably the best place and time in history to live ANYWHERE (I mean California in general), and Mr. Sailer was part of that.

    However, I never do get this fixation on these Hollywood people. Did they make Southern California what it was in real life? No, that was one "industry", but aerospace must have supported the economy in a much bigger way, along with other real industries. I'll just say it again - I couldn't give a rat's ass about anyone discussed in the column besides our blogger himself.

    Mr. Scarlet Number, mash the Troll button. You know you want to. This kind of talk doesn't sell cable!

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Currahee

    , @AnotherDad
    @R.G. Camara

    One of the contributors to the current crisis is certainly the amount of attention that various entertainers suck up in people's consciousness.

    This is worse in America--relative to most countries--because of Hollywood's dominance by the Jews. Having a majority hostile outgroup pumping shit right into people's eyeballs is a really dangerous situation for any society.

    But even without that, so much attention to the sort of people who want to "play make-believe" for a living is a bad idea.

    , @AnotherDad
    @R.G. Camara


    This sounds like a true nostalgia movie, although since Anderson was only 10 when the 1970s ended, he’s also got the filter of it all seeming much cooler, bewildering, and more adult to him — like he’s trying to see it through a mythical older teenage brother’s eyes.
     
    Had the same thought.

    Even though much in the 70s sucked--the houses, the cars, Vietnam, feminism, inflation, Gerry Ford, recession, Jimmy Carter--i have very fond memories, as it's the decade of most of my "firsts" that you'd expect from a boy in his teens and 20s. Compared to now it was ... pretty damn nice!

    But Anderson is really a generation--or at least half a generation younger.

    Replies: @Goddard, @James J O'Meara, @Jenner Ickham Errican

  5. The movie even begins at Grant High School, the public school I would have attended if I’d not gone to a Catholic school.

    Count yourself fortunate, in a way…

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Daniel H


    The movie even begins at Grant High School, the public school I would have attended if I’d not gone to a Catholic school.
     
    Grant High School?

    Don't they know Grant owned slaves, rented slaves, used slaves during his years in Missouri?

    (Interestingly Lee owned no slaves until he inherited a few upon the death of his father-in-law, kept them for a few years then freed them, all per instructions in his father-in-law's will. Grant definitely "outslaves" him.)

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @guest007, @Rob McX

  6. I haven’t seen this flick, but I know that I prefer

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065981/

  7. “Gary and Alana’s chaste relationship never really goes anywhere as Alana sets her sights on more age-appropriate men, such as the former child star who played Gary’s older brother in Lucille Ball’s Yours, Mine, and Ours, an alcoholic William Holden”

    In 1973, William Holden was 55 yrs old. How exactly is a thirty plus year age difference more age appropriate than Gary, who’s roughly about 6-8 years younger than Alana? Or is it that William Holden’s bank account is more appropriate for Alana when compared to Gary? But judging from the plot, it would appear that Gary has closed the gap on the pocketbook and thus should be taken more seriously as future mating potential.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Even today (putting aside female teachers who go after male HS students), a woman in her late '20s would not normally consider a 17 year old to be suitable dating material. OTOH, a woman in her late '20s might well date Sean Penn. Older men/younger woman relationships have always, and will always, be more accepted and attractive to women than vice versa, especially if the older man is successful. That's just how it is.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  8. There’s already a Mystic Pizza that has Julia Roberts in it before she became famous playing a battered wife and then a high-class hooker twice. I saw in on TV way back. It’s a true chick-flick, but it wasn’t so bad.

    I’ll read your Takimag column, of course, but could you give me a thumbs-up or thumbs-down as to whether this movie is truly devoid of the PC/wokeness enough to not piss a guy like me off to where I need to pop it out.

    I’ve been running into this so much lately, I usually have to borrow 3 movies to watch one complete one. Doing that is a little easier on an airplane flight – got a quick post coming about starting out watching 9 Days and switching fairly quickly to Patton, from 50 years earlier (about).

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Julia Roberts playing a down-and-out poor Portuguese girl was some funny casting, but it gave her the career boost she needed -- she must've been on her back a lot to land the role.

    Not that Portuguese women are insanely dark (just Mediterranean, and the northern ones are quite light) -- but given Roberts's later style of porcelain skin + auburn hair, and given that her family in the film was supposedly a bunch truly swarthy ethnics marginalized for not being WASP/Irish white,---it's just funny this big early hit of hers had her playing the "dark skinned marginalized girl."

    For example, here's Portuguese-Jewish actress Daniela Ruah (of NCIS: Los Angeles fame), who looks typical for the nation.

    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-_CYNo-mbTsk/Ti23y1meWgI/AAAAAAAAG9Q/eIQAflVqOFA/s1600/Daniela+Ruah30.jpg

    , @Ron Mexico
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Licorice Pizza, McFly.

    , @MEH 0910
    @Achmed E. Newman

    https://variety.com/2021/film/features/paul-thomas-anderson-licorice-pizza-alana-haim-cooper-hoffman-1235107853/


    What does the title “Licorice Pizza” mean?

    After many months of banging my head against the wall trying to figure out what to name this film, I concluded that these two words shoved together reminded me the most of my childhood. Growing up, there was a record-store chain in Southern California called Licorice Pizza. It seemed like a catch-all for the feeling of the film. I suppose if you have no reference to the store, it’s two great words that go well together and maybe capture a mood. Maybe it just looks good on a poster? The production company that we shot the film under was called Soggy Bottom, which is the name of Gary Valentine’s waterbed company, and that got miscommunicated in the press as the title. In the long run, I couldn’t live with naming a film “Soggy Bottom.”
     
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman


    There’s already a Mystic Pizza...
     
    Been to the real one. Underwhelming joint in a pretty boring coastal town not far from here that tries to be touristy. They make what they can of the movie connection. The pizza wasn't mystic at all.

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev, @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Alfa158
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I’ve pretty much stopped watching late-production movies and TV shows to get away from the “wokeness”. I mostly watch documentaries on subjects where they can’t deliver political screeds, and Asian, Eastern European and Russian fictional movies and programs. Some of them are fairly good, the production values, CGI etc. are now up to Hollywood standards, and I don’t have to put up with characters who are gays, trannies, Nigerian Knights of the Round Table, Mary Sues, Magic Negroes, absurdly precocious children and bumbling and/or evil White men.
    The last two movies I went to see at a theater were Ford vs. Ferrari and the last James Bond movie. I only saw that one because I had seen the first James Bond movies when I was young and they first came out. Leaked plot spoilers said this was going to be the 26th and last one since the character of James Bond was being replaced by a new 007, so I wanted to sort of put a bookend on the era.

    , @Mike Tre
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I don’t know if you saw my comment a couple weeks ago after I had just rewatched Patton. Certainly not a woke movie by today’s standards but the words “Soviet,” “Stalin,” and “communist” are absent from the dialogue. Soviet’s are referred to generically as “the Russians.”

    Also absent, but for what I presume are different reasons, are the terms “Jews” and “holocaust” and all related terms.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Captain Tripps, @Peter Akuleyev

    , @Kylie
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "I’ll read your Takimag column, of course, but could you give me a thumbs-up or thumbs-down as to whether this movie is truly devoid of the PC/wokeness enough to not piss a guy like me off to where I need to pop it out."

    Sean Penn is in it. What more do you need to know?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Achmed E. Newman


    There’s already a Mystic Pizza
     
    That had a nice balance between the story of the naïve au pair devastated by an affair with her dishonest employer, and that of the frustrated fisherman whose girlfriend greatly enjoyed their canoodling but was equally strong in her resistance to his suggestions of marriage. (I was in such a relationship at the time myself, and the DVD was my sneaky gift to the girl. Didn't work.)

    These plots still resonate with me, while I can't remember Julia Roberts's character or story at all. At the time, she was just Eric's little sister.
  9. So, decades later we tend to wind up with weirdly boyish-looking leading men like DiCaprio. Why?

    While Hollywood (And economic life-scripts) has matured to the place where there isn’t a parade of rugged guys from the mid-West heading out West to be discovered and taught to act later, their place taken by the kinds of ‘threater kids’ who aren’t so masculine and masculine guys who don’t have much behind the eyes and thus lack screen charisma, I don’t think there is still much scope for the true boyish type, DiCarprio had the screen charisma to keep going after aging out of the roles he was more physically right for. He was able to compensate with other things.

    Tom Holland, for example, is doomed to forever play Peter Parker with his forays outside in typical leading male roles being disasters. (Partly this is because he is also psychologically boyish and doesn’t have the same stuff behind his eyes that we call screen charisma, he seems kind of dumb) Timothee Chalamet has a weird face that seems to appeal to adolescent girls and gay men but not to wide audiences and certainly not to straight men. It also doesn’t look like one that can sustain much aging before it looks ‘creepy’. (Can you really have a leading man whose face can’t really be shown in side profile?) Outside ‘Dune’ where not much acting is called for and the part calls for a boyish actor, I don’t see him having classic leading man roles despite the huge press he gets. He was cast right in ‘Ladybird’ as a creep because that actually seems to be who he is as a person.

    More likely is that they’ll keep the obsession with credentialism (Hollywood is an extreme version of corporate America, nobody wants to take responsibility, if somebody doesn’t work out that’s on the guy who gave him his credentials not me who hired him on that basis!) but lean more and more into recruiting actors from abroad. A lot of Australians have been very successful in the US both because they retain the classic Hollywood West European look that gets rarer day by day in the US but also because they have much more TV and film production per capita because of laws mandating a certain amount of local production on TV. This leads to a lot of children’s shows for export that give a lot of attractive and screen charismatic people a chance they wouldn’t have gotten anywhere else, they get picked out for their looks and screen charisma. It’s easy and low risk to get into it. Chris Hemsworth got his start on one of these shows in a non-speaking role playing Lancelot at around 18 before graduating to one of the big Australian soap operas. (That are inexplicably not popular in the US) A lot bigger of a share of the population gets stuff on their IMDB page young, a bigger catchment from which more classic stars can be found.

    Same with the invasion of British actors, a lot of classical acting schools churning out ready-made fodder, some of whom do occasionally look like Henry Cavill. What is interesting to me is the lack of importation of many Scandinavians who all speak perfect fluent English. Surely a few more diamonds waiting to be seen out there above the ones who came to Hollywood, maybe Hollywood should come to them with offers since few will go all the way to them to take a chance.

    Alternatively, Hollywood could take actions to make acting in the US less of a serious gamble to try to break into and thus have a bigger pool of people to make stars from. Guys with screen charisma are often just thoughtful and intelligent. With near universal university tracks for those guys in 2021, they don’t consider acting anymore. Maybe they should make them some offers.

    • Agree: Occasional lurker
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Altai

    I've noticed that some successful actors, such as James Woods and Brad Pitt, tend to drop out of college in their senior year. It could be that they never got around to taking hard required courses (Woods was at MIT) or that they are 21 and in demand for acting. Or both.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Buzz Mohawk, @Paul Rise

    , @Emblematic
    @Altai

    Does Dwayne The Rock Johnson have screen charisma? I can't tell. He's a huge star, but I can't get past his weirdly shaped beetle-head.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alfa158

    , @AndrewR
    @Altai

    Many Scandanavians speak excellent English but very few of them speak "perfect English" aka the way a native speaker would. I knew a Norwegian girl who had an American mom, but her English was not much better than the average Norwegian's.

    And generally audiences want to see native speakers. If non-native speakers are cast then we don't want them pretending tp be natives. Even Jude Law can't pull off and American accent so why would a Swede be able to fool us?

    Replies: @thenon

    , @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Altai

    “Tom Holland, for example, is doomed to forever play Peter Parker with his forays outside in typical leading male roles being disasters.“

    Tom Holland should be a shoo-in for Jared Kushner in any biopic movies about the Trumps.

    , @JMcG
    @Altai

    I remember my sister watching Cell Block H after school in the early 80s. I think that was Australian.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    , @Kratoklastes
    @Altai


    What is interesting to me is the lack of importation of many Scandinavians who all speak perfect fluent English
     
    Maybe the Skarsgards have some sort of Scando-wide monopoly.

    As you say, they do good Yanklish accents, which are important in US-centric productions (although when speaking actual English, Scandos are betrayed by their Scando accents).

    Replies: @RAZ

    , @Ralph L
    @Altai

    I've only seen him in The Tudors and Midsomer Murders that I remember, but Henry Cavill and screen charisma did not go together. Whom did he sleep with to become a movie star?

  10. @Altai

    So, decades later we tend to wind up with weirdly boyish-looking leading men like DiCaprio. Why?
     
    While Hollywood (And economic life-scripts) has matured to the place where there isn't a parade of rugged guys from the mid-West heading out West to be discovered and taught to act later, their place taken by the kinds of 'threater kids' who aren't so masculine and masculine guys who don't have much behind the eyes and thus lack screen charisma, I don't think there is still much scope for the true boyish type, DiCarprio had the screen charisma to keep going after aging out of the roles he was more physically right for. He was able to compensate with other things.

    Tom Holland, for example, is doomed to forever play Peter Parker with his forays outside in typical leading male roles being disasters. (Partly this is because he is also psychologically boyish and doesn't have the same stuff behind his eyes that we call screen charisma, he seems kind of dumb) Timothee Chalamet has a weird face that seems to appeal to adolescent girls and gay men but not to wide audiences and certainly not to straight men. It also doesn't look like one that can sustain much aging before it looks 'creepy'. (Can you really have a leading man whose face can't really be shown in side profile?) Outside 'Dune' where not much acting is called for and the part calls for a boyish actor, I don't see him having classic leading man roles despite the huge press he gets. He was cast right in 'Ladybird' as a creep because that actually seems to be who he is as a person.

    More likely is that they'll keep the obsession with credentialism (Hollywood is an extreme version of corporate America, nobody wants to take responsibility, if somebody doesn't work out that's on the guy who gave him his credentials not me who hired him on that basis!) but lean more and more into recruiting actors from abroad. A lot of Australians have been very successful in the US both because they retain the classic Hollywood West European look that gets rarer day by day in the US but also because they have much more TV and film production per capita because of laws mandating a certain amount of local production on TV. This leads to a lot of children's shows for export that give a lot of attractive and screen charismatic people a chance they wouldn't have gotten anywhere else, they get picked out for their looks and screen charisma. It's easy and low risk to get into it. Chris Hemsworth got his start on one of these shows in a non-speaking role playing Lancelot at around 18 before graduating to one of the big Australian soap operas. (That are inexplicably not popular in the US) A lot bigger of a share of the population gets stuff on their IMDB page young, a bigger catchment from which more classic stars can be found.

    Same with the invasion of British actors, a lot of classical acting schools churning out ready-made fodder, some of whom do occasionally look like Henry Cavill. What is interesting to me is the lack of importation of many Scandinavians who all speak perfect fluent English. Surely a few more diamonds waiting to be seen out there above the ones who came to Hollywood, maybe Hollywood should come to them with offers since few will go all the way to them to take a chance.

    Alternatively, Hollywood could take actions to make acting in the US less of a serious gamble to try to break into and thus have a bigger pool of people to make stars from. Guys with screen charisma are often just thoughtful and intelligent. With near universal university tracks for those guys in 2021, they don't consider acting anymore. Maybe they should make them some offers.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Emblematic, @AndrewR, @Hapalong Cassidy, @JMcG, @Kratoklastes, @Ralph L

    I’ve noticed that some successful actors, such as James Woods and Brad Pitt, tend to drop out of college in their senior year. It could be that they never got around to taking hard required courses (Woods was at MIT) or that they are 21 and in demand for acting. Or both.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Steve Sailer

    Your potential acting roles are limited if you're under 21? (I mean, other than for actresses whose asset is their boobies.)

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Steve Sailer

    Robert Redford dropped out of my alma mater to take acting jobs in New York. He worked at a burger joint across the street from campus that's still there.

    Glenn Miller dropped out there a generation earlier for his big band career. Our ballroom is named after him.

    Bill Gates and Mark Zukerberg both dropped out of Harvard.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    , @Paul Rise
    @Steve Sailer

    Pitt fled the University of Missouri his last semester because of a disastrous affair with a professor in the journalism school that was made public among various student cliques at that school. Pitt was embarrassed and fled the campus. The professor went to some effort to try to get him to return, supposedly he was only a credit or two short of a diploma.

    I knew the professor as an attractive older woman, she would have been a knockout 15 or years earlier when these events supposedly occured.

  11. @Altai

    So, decades later we tend to wind up with weirdly boyish-looking leading men like DiCaprio. Why?
     
    While Hollywood (And economic life-scripts) has matured to the place where there isn't a parade of rugged guys from the mid-West heading out West to be discovered and taught to act later, their place taken by the kinds of 'threater kids' who aren't so masculine and masculine guys who don't have much behind the eyes and thus lack screen charisma, I don't think there is still much scope for the true boyish type, DiCarprio had the screen charisma to keep going after aging out of the roles he was more physically right for. He was able to compensate with other things.

    Tom Holland, for example, is doomed to forever play Peter Parker with his forays outside in typical leading male roles being disasters. (Partly this is because he is also psychologically boyish and doesn't have the same stuff behind his eyes that we call screen charisma, he seems kind of dumb) Timothee Chalamet has a weird face that seems to appeal to adolescent girls and gay men but not to wide audiences and certainly not to straight men. It also doesn't look like one that can sustain much aging before it looks 'creepy'. (Can you really have a leading man whose face can't really be shown in side profile?) Outside 'Dune' where not much acting is called for and the part calls for a boyish actor, I don't see him having classic leading man roles despite the huge press he gets. He was cast right in 'Ladybird' as a creep because that actually seems to be who he is as a person.

    More likely is that they'll keep the obsession with credentialism (Hollywood is an extreme version of corporate America, nobody wants to take responsibility, if somebody doesn't work out that's on the guy who gave him his credentials not me who hired him on that basis!) but lean more and more into recruiting actors from abroad. A lot of Australians have been very successful in the US both because they retain the classic Hollywood West European look that gets rarer day by day in the US but also because they have much more TV and film production per capita because of laws mandating a certain amount of local production on TV. This leads to a lot of children's shows for export that give a lot of attractive and screen charismatic people a chance they wouldn't have gotten anywhere else, they get picked out for their looks and screen charisma. It's easy and low risk to get into it. Chris Hemsworth got his start on one of these shows in a non-speaking role playing Lancelot at around 18 before graduating to one of the big Australian soap operas. (That are inexplicably not popular in the US) A lot bigger of a share of the population gets stuff on their IMDB page young, a bigger catchment from which more classic stars can be found.

    Same with the invasion of British actors, a lot of classical acting schools churning out ready-made fodder, some of whom do occasionally look like Henry Cavill. What is interesting to me is the lack of importation of many Scandinavians who all speak perfect fluent English. Surely a few more diamonds waiting to be seen out there above the ones who came to Hollywood, maybe Hollywood should come to them with offers since few will go all the way to them to take a chance.

    Alternatively, Hollywood could take actions to make acting in the US less of a serious gamble to try to break into and thus have a bigger pool of people to make stars from. Guys with screen charisma are often just thoughtful and intelligent. With near universal university tracks for those guys in 2021, they don't consider acting anymore. Maybe they should make them some offers.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Emblematic, @AndrewR, @Hapalong Cassidy, @JMcG, @Kratoklastes, @Ralph L

    Does Dwayne The Rock Johnson have screen charisma? I can’t tell. He’s a huge star, but I can’t get past his weirdly shaped beetle-head.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Emblematic

    The Rock is fun.

    Replies: @Anon55uu

    , @Alfa158
    @Emblematic

    He has a sense of humor about himself, that comes through in a lot of his movies where he plays action heroes with a comic touch. I am however a little worried about how he is looking these days, which is juiced up with PEDs to an alarming level. Humans aren’t really supposed to look like that outside of comic books.

  12. @Emblematic
    @Altai

    Does Dwayne The Rock Johnson have screen charisma? I can't tell. He's a huge star, but I can't get past his weirdly shaped beetle-head.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alfa158

    The Rock is fun.

    • Replies: @Anon55uu
    @Steve Sailer

    On the Moana soundtrack CD there are versions of the show stopper track You’re Welcome sung by the Rock and then by its writer Lin-Manuel Miranda. The Rock’s is much more fun - he puts it all out there and I cannot remember him having sung previously.

  13. @Sick of Orcs
    Re:. Brad Pitt. Guy can't act. It's always Pitt on the screen, regardless of character. Which is why the pointless, shirtless roof scene in the middle of Once Upon...Hollywood.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Slim, @Mike Tre, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    This is the case with all actors. John Wayne is always John Wayne; De Niro- De Niro; Eastwood- Eastwood; Brando- Brando ….

    Can you imagine Brando in the role of an introverted resigned man, as Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya?

    We know the answer.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Bardon Kaldian


    This is the case with all actors. John Wayne is always John Wayne; De Niro- De Niro; Eastwood- Eastwood; Brando- Brando ….
     
    Not really - the names you cited are more "movie stars" than actors. Their parts seem to be written for their public characters.

    On the other hand, someone like Gary Oldman is an actor - he becomes the character in the drama and Gary Oldman sort of disappears.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Captain Tripps

    , @kaganovitch
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Can you imagine Brando in the role of an introverted resigned man, as Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya? We know the answer.

    Indeed, those actors that can adapt to different parts are known as 'character' actors. Those that remain distinctly themselves in every role are stars/leading actors.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    , @Sick of Orcs
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I should have contrasted Pitt with Cruise, who does disappear into each role. Heck, DiCaprio did a good job in the movie alongside Pitt.

    , @Bill
    @Bardon Kaldian

    It's only the case with bad actors.

    , @Jack D
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Brando really transformed himself in The Godfather. Not just with makeup but in terms of inhabiting the role.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Bardon Kaldian, @Currahee, @JohnnyWalker123, @Reg Cæsar

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Our host is good at pointing out George Clooney's odd practice of getting himself cast in roles that would, in real life, not be populated by a guy with the irrepressible charisma and good looks of a George Clooney. Best example, Up In The Air, where he's cast as a vagabond personnel manager instead of the guy at the head of the conference room table putting together billion-dollar deals. He did good work in O Brother Where Art Thou, despite not looking anything like a low-level grifter trying to support his too-large family in the rural South in the 1930's.

    Steve Buscemi has made good coin playing roles as the weaselly dirtbag loser because he looks like a weaselly dirtbag loser. But I bet in real life he's a charming guy with lots of friends.

    I'd like to see Sailer write some stuff about the truly Hardest Working Man in Showbiz, the late great Brion James. I always thought his casting in The Player was a nod and bit of an inside joke to his extraordinary networking. Here's Brion on Brion:


    [in August 1999, when asked to what he attributes his success] Hard work. You gotta study, man. It's like any profession. I did eight years in theater. I studied two years in school in New York with Stella Adler, the best teacher in the world. I studied under Nina Foch, I did theater, I learned my craft. You got to learn how to build a character, there's a way to do it. Everything I ever did was different. I did 125 films, and over 100 television shows, and you've never seen the same character twice. I think now, in my 50s, with [Robert Duvall], [Albert Finney] and [Gene Hackman], those guys are getting up there in their 60s, it's my time. And I'm making sure that I push myself into their slot. So, my best work's coming.
     
    Then he dropped dead at age 54. God almighty.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @James J O'Meara, @puttheforkdown, @Steve Sailer

    , @Mike Tre
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Most, but not all actors: Robert Duvall had great range. Tom Hagen, LtCol. Kilgore, and Gus McCrae are three completely different and dare I say epic characters that one cannot honestly associate with Duvall just playing Duvall.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Mr Mox

  14. @R.G. Camara
    Steve, great work as usual, but this review had so much name dropping, inside baseball nuggets, and obscure Hollywood tangents it made my head spin. I had to read a few paragraphs twice to keep up. Clearly, you're excited about the subject and want to jam a lot of stuff in, but it can leave the rest of us confused!

    This sounds like a true nostalgia movie, although since Anderson was only 10 when the 1970s ended, he's also got the filter of it all seeming much cooler, bewildering, and more adult to him -- like he's trying to see it through a mythical older teenage brother's eyes.

    I'm always interested in true nostalgia movies, which are different that period pieces. True nostalgia movies are when the creators are truly reminiscing about a time/place they actually lived in, as opposed to just reading about it in a book. True nostalgia movies tend to add a lot of mundane, realistic details about a time period that a period piece doesn't, while also showing how the everyman was dealing with a time period that to us is only known through Major Historical Events and stereotypes.

    Good directors make two kinds of childhood movies: the ones about the childhood they had and the ones about the childhood they wish they'd had, e.g Steve Spielberg.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    I agree with you on the hard time keeping up with all the people described or mentioned in the column. I didn’t care too much, at that. I completely understand being nostalgic for all those times that were probably the best place and time in history to live ANYWHERE (I mean California in general), and Mr. Sailer was part of that.

    However, I never do get this fixation on these Hollywood people. Did they make Southern California what it was in real life? No, that was one “industry”, but aerospace must have supported the economy in a much bigger way, along with other real industries. I’ll just say it again – I couldn’t give a rat’s ass about anyone discussed in the column besides our blogger himself.

    Mr. Scarlet Number, mash the Troll button. You know you want to. This kind of talk doesn’t sell cable!

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Self-referential mode of creation is a sure sign that such a work won't last long.

    , @Currahee
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "but aerospace must have supported the economy in a much bigger way,"
    Worked for Watt Industries (Ray Watt was a major LA homebuilder) in the 70's and 80's. We did a homebuyers' survey in the mid-80's to discover that 45% of our homeowners were employed in aerospace.
    That's huge.

  15. Is any of this relatable to normal people? When Hollywood starts making self-referential paeans to its own past instead of unironic entertainment, it seems like the whole placed desperately needs a good airing out.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Gary is a populist entrepreneur who is in to waterbeds and pinball parlors.

    , @stillCARealist
    @Intelligent Dasein

    I, for one, understood almost nothing from Steve's review. Even though I live in the same state, I might as well be from Mongolia for all I know about these people and that particular area.

    I wonder if we'll get any sort of observation about Get Back, or whatever.

  16. @Achmed E. Newman
    There's already a Mystic Pizza that has Julia Roberts in it before she became famous playing a battered wife and then a high-class hooker twice. I saw in on TV way back. It's a true chick-flick, but it wasn't so bad.

    I'll read your Takimag column, of course, but could you give me a thumbs-up or thumbs-down as to whether this movie is truly devoid of the PC/wokeness enough to not piss a guy like me off to where I need to pop it out.

    I've been running into this so much lately, I usually have to borrow 3 movies to watch one complete one. Doing that is a little easier on an airplane flight - got a quick post coming about starting out watching 9 Days and switching fairly quickly to Patton, from 50 years earlier (about).

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Ron Mexico, @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @Alfa158, @Mike Tre, @Kylie, @Reg Cæsar

    Julia Roberts playing a down-and-out poor Portuguese girl was some funny casting, but it gave her the career boost she needed — she must’ve been on her back a lot to land the role.

    Not that Portuguese women are insanely dark (just Mediterranean, and the northern ones are quite light) — but given Roberts’s later style of porcelain skin + auburn hair, and given that her family in the film was supposedly a bunch truly swarthy ethnics marginalized for not being WASP/Irish white,—it’s just funny this big early hit of hers had her playing the “dark skinned marginalized girl.”

    For example, here’s Portuguese-Jewish actress Daniela Ruah (of NCIS: Los Angeles fame), who looks typical for the nation.

  17. @Intelligent Dasein
    Is any of this relatable to normal people? When Hollywood starts making self-referential paeans to its own past instead of unironic entertainment, it seems like the whole placed desperately needs a good airing out.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @stillCARealist

    Gary is a populist entrepreneur who is in to waterbeds and pinball parlors.

  18. This is seriously on Reddit this very moment.
    Frankly it’s better than Hollywood crap.
    And it has HBD and DNA content.
    And ✡ stuff too. Seriously.

  19. @Achmed E. Newman
    There's already a Mystic Pizza that has Julia Roberts in it before she became famous playing a battered wife and then a high-class hooker twice. I saw in on TV way back. It's a true chick-flick, but it wasn't so bad.

    I'll read your Takimag column, of course, but could you give me a thumbs-up or thumbs-down as to whether this movie is truly devoid of the PC/wokeness enough to not piss a guy like me off to where I need to pop it out.

    I've been running into this so much lately, I usually have to borrow 3 movies to watch one complete one. Doing that is a little easier on an airplane flight - got a quick post coming about starting out watching 9 Days and switching fairly quickly to Patton, from 50 years earlier (about).

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Ron Mexico, @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @Alfa158, @Mike Tre, @Kylie, @Reg Cæsar

    Licorice Pizza, McFly.

  20. @Intelligent Dasein
    Is any of this relatable to normal people? When Hollywood starts making self-referential paeans to its own past instead of unironic entertainment, it seems like the whole placed desperately needs a good airing out.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @stillCARealist

    I, for one, understood almost nothing from Steve’s review. Even though I live in the same state, I might as well be from Mongolia for all I know about these people and that particular area.

    I wonder if we’ll get any sort of observation about Get Back, or whatever.

  21. @Altai

    So, decades later we tend to wind up with weirdly boyish-looking leading men like DiCaprio. Why?
     
    While Hollywood (And economic life-scripts) has matured to the place where there isn't a parade of rugged guys from the mid-West heading out West to be discovered and taught to act later, their place taken by the kinds of 'threater kids' who aren't so masculine and masculine guys who don't have much behind the eyes and thus lack screen charisma, I don't think there is still much scope for the true boyish type, DiCarprio had the screen charisma to keep going after aging out of the roles he was more physically right for. He was able to compensate with other things.

    Tom Holland, for example, is doomed to forever play Peter Parker with his forays outside in typical leading male roles being disasters. (Partly this is because he is also psychologically boyish and doesn't have the same stuff behind his eyes that we call screen charisma, he seems kind of dumb) Timothee Chalamet has a weird face that seems to appeal to adolescent girls and gay men but not to wide audiences and certainly not to straight men. It also doesn't look like one that can sustain much aging before it looks 'creepy'. (Can you really have a leading man whose face can't really be shown in side profile?) Outside 'Dune' where not much acting is called for and the part calls for a boyish actor, I don't see him having classic leading man roles despite the huge press he gets. He was cast right in 'Ladybird' as a creep because that actually seems to be who he is as a person.

    More likely is that they'll keep the obsession with credentialism (Hollywood is an extreme version of corporate America, nobody wants to take responsibility, if somebody doesn't work out that's on the guy who gave him his credentials not me who hired him on that basis!) but lean more and more into recruiting actors from abroad. A lot of Australians have been very successful in the US both because they retain the classic Hollywood West European look that gets rarer day by day in the US but also because they have much more TV and film production per capita because of laws mandating a certain amount of local production on TV. This leads to a lot of children's shows for export that give a lot of attractive and screen charismatic people a chance they wouldn't have gotten anywhere else, they get picked out for their looks and screen charisma. It's easy and low risk to get into it. Chris Hemsworth got his start on one of these shows in a non-speaking role playing Lancelot at around 18 before graduating to one of the big Australian soap operas. (That are inexplicably not popular in the US) A lot bigger of a share of the population gets stuff on their IMDB page young, a bigger catchment from which more classic stars can be found.

    Same with the invasion of British actors, a lot of classical acting schools churning out ready-made fodder, some of whom do occasionally look like Henry Cavill. What is interesting to me is the lack of importation of many Scandinavians who all speak perfect fluent English. Surely a few more diamonds waiting to be seen out there above the ones who came to Hollywood, maybe Hollywood should come to them with offers since few will go all the way to them to take a chance.

    Alternatively, Hollywood could take actions to make acting in the US less of a serious gamble to try to break into and thus have a bigger pool of people to make stars from. Guys with screen charisma are often just thoughtful and intelligent. With near universal university tracks for those guys in 2021, they don't consider acting anymore. Maybe they should make them some offers.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Emblematic, @AndrewR, @Hapalong Cassidy, @JMcG, @Kratoklastes, @Ralph L

    Many Scandanavians speak excellent English but very few of them speak “perfect English” aka the way a native speaker would. I knew a Norwegian girl who had an American mom, but her English was not much better than the average Norwegian’s.

    And generally audiences want to see native speakers. If non-native speakers are cast then we don’t want them pretending tp be natives. Even Jude Law can’t pull off and American accent so why would a Swede be able to fool us?

    • Replies: @thenon
    @AndrewR

    I had a Swedish student who had absolutely flawless american english. I told her that while an american can often tell a non native speaker by english that is a little too correct, without those little sloppy bits that we do without noticing, I was amazed that she spoke as badly as we did! She then betrayed herself by not laughing at my funny remark. Humor is difficult to translate. Like UNZ commenters here betray themselves as nerds by correcting my minor spelling and fakshual errors, and missing the main point.

    Replies: @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2, @Jim Don Bob

  22. @Steve Sailer
    @Altai

    I've noticed that some successful actors, such as James Woods and Brad Pitt, tend to drop out of college in their senior year. It could be that they never got around to taking hard required courses (Woods was at MIT) or that they are 21 and in demand for acting. Or both.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Buzz Mohawk, @Paul Rise

    Your potential acting roles are limited if you’re under 21? (I mean, other than for actresses whose asset is their boobies.)

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @International Jew


    Your potential acting roles are limited if you’re under 21?
     
    Before 1984, it made a difference in where you could raise a toast.




    New England Young People Battle Rise in Drinking Age

    Damn Yankee bluenoses! Damned Cuomo!
  23. @Sick of Orcs
    Re:. Brad Pitt. Guy can't act. It's always Pitt on the screen, regardless of character. Which is why the pointless, shirtless roof scene in the middle of Once Upon...Hollywood.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Slim, @Mike Tre, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    My wife got the point of that scene. I, however, thought it was to have us see him observing Manson arriving next door.

  24. @Achmed E. Newman
    @R.G. Camara

    I agree with you on the hard time keeping up with all the people described or mentioned in the column. I didn't care too much, at that. I completely understand being nostalgic for all those times that were probably the best place and time in history to live ANYWHERE (I mean California in general), and Mr. Sailer was part of that.

    However, I never do get this fixation on these Hollywood people. Did they make Southern California what it was in real life? No, that was one "industry", but aerospace must have supported the economy in a much bigger way, along with other real industries. I'll just say it again - I couldn't give a rat's ass about anyone discussed in the column besides our blogger himself.

    Mr. Scarlet Number, mash the Troll button. You know you want to. This kind of talk doesn't sell cable!

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Currahee

    Self-referential mode of creation is a sure sign that such a work won’t last long.

  25. I was aware of PT’s father before PT was born. He played Ghoulardi every weekday afternoon on my TV set in Ohio.

    Later he followed his friend Tom (Tim) Conway to Hollywood and became the voice of ABC-TV. “Tonight! On the looove boat…”

    I look forward to Licorice Pizza.

  26. @Altai

    So, decades later we tend to wind up with weirdly boyish-looking leading men like DiCaprio. Why?
     
    While Hollywood (And economic life-scripts) has matured to the place where there isn't a parade of rugged guys from the mid-West heading out West to be discovered and taught to act later, their place taken by the kinds of 'threater kids' who aren't so masculine and masculine guys who don't have much behind the eyes and thus lack screen charisma, I don't think there is still much scope for the true boyish type, DiCarprio had the screen charisma to keep going after aging out of the roles he was more physically right for. He was able to compensate with other things.

    Tom Holland, for example, is doomed to forever play Peter Parker with his forays outside in typical leading male roles being disasters. (Partly this is because he is also psychologically boyish and doesn't have the same stuff behind his eyes that we call screen charisma, he seems kind of dumb) Timothee Chalamet has a weird face that seems to appeal to adolescent girls and gay men but not to wide audiences and certainly not to straight men. It also doesn't look like one that can sustain much aging before it looks 'creepy'. (Can you really have a leading man whose face can't really be shown in side profile?) Outside 'Dune' where not much acting is called for and the part calls for a boyish actor, I don't see him having classic leading man roles despite the huge press he gets. He was cast right in 'Ladybird' as a creep because that actually seems to be who he is as a person.

    More likely is that they'll keep the obsession with credentialism (Hollywood is an extreme version of corporate America, nobody wants to take responsibility, if somebody doesn't work out that's on the guy who gave him his credentials not me who hired him on that basis!) but lean more and more into recruiting actors from abroad. A lot of Australians have been very successful in the US both because they retain the classic Hollywood West European look that gets rarer day by day in the US but also because they have much more TV and film production per capita because of laws mandating a certain amount of local production on TV. This leads to a lot of children's shows for export that give a lot of attractive and screen charismatic people a chance they wouldn't have gotten anywhere else, they get picked out for their looks and screen charisma. It's easy and low risk to get into it. Chris Hemsworth got his start on one of these shows in a non-speaking role playing Lancelot at around 18 before graduating to one of the big Australian soap operas. (That are inexplicably not popular in the US) A lot bigger of a share of the population gets stuff on their IMDB page young, a bigger catchment from which more classic stars can be found.

    Same with the invasion of British actors, a lot of classical acting schools churning out ready-made fodder, some of whom do occasionally look like Henry Cavill. What is interesting to me is the lack of importation of many Scandinavians who all speak perfect fluent English. Surely a few more diamonds waiting to be seen out there above the ones who came to Hollywood, maybe Hollywood should come to them with offers since few will go all the way to them to take a chance.

    Alternatively, Hollywood could take actions to make acting in the US less of a serious gamble to try to break into and thus have a bigger pool of people to make stars from. Guys with screen charisma are often just thoughtful and intelligent. With near universal university tracks for those guys in 2021, they don't consider acting anymore. Maybe they should make them some offers.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Emblematic, @AndrewR, @Hapalong Cassidy, @JMcG, @Kratoklastes, @Ralph L

    “Tom Holland, for example, is doomed to forever play Peter Parker with his forays outside in typical leading male roles being disasters.“

    Tom Holland should be a shoo-in for Jared Kushner in any biopic movies about the Trumps.

  27. That promo pic at Taki’s is striking, a (pardon the language) pokey breast in an ironic tee-shirt contrasted with lines under the actress’s eyes, making her look over 40.

    Not exactly Margot Robbie from Once… in Hollywood. I think it’s prudent not to expect a similar box office.

    I see I’m not the only one here, not my cup of tea. But even if this sort of nostalgia doesn’t offer much new, at least it’s not another superhero movie or soft reboot of a 30-year-old “IP.”

  28. @Altai

    So, decades later we tend to wind up with weirdly boyish-looking leading men like DiCaprio. Why?
     
    While Hollywood (And economic life-scripts) has matured to the place where there isn't a parade of rugged guys from the mid-West heading out West to be discovered and taught to act later, their place taken by the kinds of 'threater kids' who aren't so masculine and masculine guys who don't have much behind the eyes and thus lack screen charisma, I don't think there is still much scope for the true boyish type, DiCarprio had the screen charisma to keep going after aging out of the roles he was more physically right for. He was able to compensate with other things.

    Tom Holland, for example, is doomed to forever play Peter Parker with his forays outside in typical leading male roles being disasters. (Partly this is because he is also psychologically boyish and doesn't have the same stuff behind his eyes that we call screen charisma, he seems kind of dumb) Timothee Chalamet has a weird face that seems to appeal to adolescent girls and gay men but not to wide audiences and certainly not to straight men. It also doesn't look like one that can sustain much aging before it looks 'creepy'. (Can you really have a leading man whose face can't really be shown in side profile?) Outside 'Dune' where not much acting is called for and the part calls for a boyish actor, I don't see him having classic leading man roles despite the huge press he gets. He was cast right in 'Ladybird' as a creep because that actually seems to be who he is as a person.

    More likely is that they'll keep the obsession with credentialism (Hollywood is an extreme version of corporate America, nobody wants to take responsibility, if somebody doesn't work out that's on the guy who gave him his credentials not me who hired him on that basis!) but lean more and more into recruiting actors from abroad. A lot of Australians have been very successful in the US both because they retain the classic Hollywood West European look that gets rarer day by day in the US but also because they have much more TV and film production per capita because of laws mandating a certain amount of local production on TV. This leads to a lot of children's shows for export that give a lot of attractive and screen charismatic people a chance they wouldn't have gotten anywhere else, they get picked out for their looks and screen charisma. It's easy and low risk to get into it. Chris Hemsworth got his start on one of these shows in a non-speaking role playing Lancelot at around 18 before graduating to one of the big Australian soap operas. (That are inexplicably not popular in the US) A lot bigger of a share of the population gets stuff on their IMDB page young, a bigger catchment from which more classic stars can be found.

    Same with the invasion of British actors, a lot of classical acting schools churning out ready-made fodder, some of whom do occasionally look like Henry Cavill. What is interesting to me is the lack of importation of many Scandinavians who all speak perfect fluent English. Surely a few more diamonds waiting to be seen out there above the ones who came to Hollywood, maybe Hollywood should come to them with offers since few will go all the way to them to take a chance.

    Alternatively, Hollywood could take actions to make acting in the US less of a serious gamble to try to break into and thus have a bigger pool of people to make stars from. Guys with screen charisma are often just thoughtful and intelligent. With near universal university tracks for those guys in 2021, they don't consider acting anymore. Maybe they should make them some offers.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Emblematic, @AndrewR, @Hapalong Cassidy, @JMcG, @Kratoklastes, @Ralph L

    I remember my sister watching Cell Block H after school in the early 80s. I think that was Australian.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @JMcG

    I vaguely remember that - about a women's prison. I think a lot of guys watched it in the hope of catching a bit of inmate-on-inmate action.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @JMcG

  29. @Steve Sailer
    @Altai

    I've noticed that some successful actors, such as James Woods and Brad Pitt, tend to drop out of college in their senior year. It could be that they never got around to taking hard required courses (Woods was at MIT) or that they are 21 and in demand for acting. Or both.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Buzz Mohawk, @Paul Rise

    Robert Redford dropped out of my alma mater to take acting jobs in New York. He worked at a burger joint across the street from campus that’s still there.

    Glenn Miller dropped out there a generation earlier for his big band career. Our ballroom is named after him.

    Bill Gates and Mark Zukerberg both dropped out of Harvard.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Maybe "getting into Harvard" is itself a great qualification. Don't think that applies to Yale.

  30. As my girlfriend notes, these days when they want a masculine All-American type they apparently have to cast an Australian.

  31. @Achmed E. Newman
    There's already a Mystic Pizza that has Julia Roberts in it before she became famous playing a battered wife and then a high-class hooker twice. I saw in on TV way back. It's a true chick-flick, but it wasn't so bad.

    I'll read your Takimag column, of course, but could you give me a thumbs-up or thumbs-down as to whether this movie is truly devoid of the PC/wokeness enough to not piss a guy like me off to where I need to pop it out.

    I've been running into this so much lately, I usually have to borrow 3 movies to watch one complete one. Doing that is a little easier on an airplane flight - got a quick post coming about starting out watching 9 Days and switching fairly quickly to Patton, from 50 years earlier (about).

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Ron Mexico, @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @Alfa158, @Mike Tre, @Kylie, @Reg Cæsar

    https://variety.com/2021/film/features/paul-thomas-anderson-licorice-pizza-alana-haim-cooper-hoffman-1235107853/

    What does the title “Licorice Pizza” mean?

    After many months of banging my head against the wall trying to figure out what to name this film, I concluded that these two words shoved together reminded me the most of my childhood. Growing up, there was a record-store chain in Southern California called Licorice Pizza. It seemed like a catch-all for the feeling of the film. I suppose if you have no reference to the store, it’s two great words that go well together and maybe capture a mood. Maybe it just looks good on a poster? The production company that we shot the film under was called Soggy Bottom, which is the name of Gary Valentine’s waterbed company, and that got miscommunicated in the press as the title. In the long run, I couldn’t live with naming a film “Soggy Bottom.”

  32. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Sick of Orcs

    This is the case with all actors. John Wayne is always John Wayne; De Niro- De Niro; Eastwood- Eastwood; Brando- Brando ....

    Can you imagine Brando in the role of an introverted resigned man, as Chekhov's Uncle Vanya?

    We know the answer.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home), @kaganovitch, @Sick of Orcs, @Bill, @Jack D, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Mike Tre

    This is the case with all actors. John Wayne is always John Wayne; De Niro- De Niro; Eastwood- Eastwood; Brando- Brando ….

    Not really – the names you cited are more “movie stars” than actors. Their parts seem to be written for their public characters.

    On the other hand, someone like Gary Oldman is an actor – he becomes the character in the drama and Gary Oldman sort of disappears.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    And perhaps this has more to do with the type of a creative personality, than with his talents or education. Maybe this is a "lower level" of creation, pale & limited of necessity- but still authentic, of something Samuel Taylor Coleridge had discussed in "Biographia Literaria", contrasting Milton with Shakespeare:

    „Shakespeare, no mere child of nature; no automaton of genius; no passive vehicle of inspiration possessed by the spirit, not possessing it; first studied patiently, meditated deeply, understood minutely, till knowledge became habitual and intuitive, wedded itself to his habitual feelings, and at length gave birth to that stupendous power by which he stands alone, with no equal or second in his own class; to that power which seated him on one of the two glorysmitten summits of the poetic mountain, with Milton аs his compeer, not rival. While the former darts himself forth, and passes into all the forms of human character and passion, the one Proteus of the fire and the flood; the other attracts all forms and things to himself, into the unity of his own Ideal. All things and modes of action shape themselves anew in the being of Milton; while Shakespeare becomes all things, yet for ever remaining himself.“

    Or, in Isaiah Berlin's words- Milton was a hedgehog, and Shakespeare a fox.

    , @Captain Tripps
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    The current version great actor (to me) in the mold of Oldman is Benedict Cumberbatch. That guy can ACT.

  33. For instance, if you watch carefully, you can see Anderson showing that Gary’s career as a child actor is suddenly over because he’s now a hulking young man,

    SCTV – Oh That Rusty!

    [MORE]

    SCTV – Rusty Van Reddick for The Nursery School Association of America

  34. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Sick of Orcs

    This is the case with all actors. John Wayne is always John Wayne; De Niro- De Niro; Eastwood- Eastwood; Brando- Brando ....

    Can you imagine Brando in the role of an introverted resigned man, as Chekhov's Uncle Vanya?

    We know the answer.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home), @kaganovitch, @Sick of Orcs, @Bill, @Jack D, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Mike Tre

    Can you imagine Brando in the role of an introverted resigned man, as Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya? We know the answer.

    Indeed, those actors that can adapt to different parts are known as ‘character’ actors. Those that remain distinctly themselves in every role are stars/leading actors.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @kaganovitch

    I would question even this. For instance, most characters are so different I doubt the same actor could be successful in all roles- say, Hamlet, Macbeth, Brutus and Iago. All actors, however gifted & educated they may be, play essentially one role with variations.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

  35. @Daniel H

    The movie even begins at Grant High School, the public school I would have attended if I’d not gone to a Catholic school.
     
    Count yourself fortunate, in a way...

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    The movie even begins at Grant High School, the public school I would have attended if I’d not gone to a Catholic school.

    Grant High School?

    Don’t they know Grant owned slaves, rented slaves, used slaves during his years in Missouri?

    (Interestingly Lee owned no slaves until he inherited a few upon the death of his father-in-law, kept them for a few years then freed them, all per instructions in his father-in-law’s will. Grant definitely “outslaves” him.)

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @AnotherDad

    Grant got the $50 bill, which makes him at least half a Franklin. He also liked whiskey and cigars, which makes him a real man. Grant wins.

    Of course, where Steve is, Grant High School could have been named for Cary Grant.

    , @guest007
    @AnotherDad

    Grant High School is:

    Hispanic 53.5%
    White 38.3%
    Asian 3.7%
    African American 3.5%

    with 96% free lunch. So what type of white person lives in Los Angeles an qualifies for free school lunch.

    https://www.niche.com/k12/ulysses-s-grant-high-school-van-nuys-ca/

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Abolish_public_education, @Clifford Brown, @anonymous

    , @Rob McX
    @AnotherDad



    The movie even begins at Grant High School, the public school I would have attended if I’d not gone to a Catholic school.
     
    Grant High School?

    Don’t they know Grant owned slaves, rented slaves, used slaves during his years in Missouri?

     

    Not to mention General Order No. 11.
  36. @AnotherDad
    @Daniel H


    The movie even begins at Grant High School, the public school I would have attended if I’d not gone to a Catholic school.
     
    Grant High School?

    Don't they know Grant owned slaves, rented slaves, used slaves during his years in Missouri?

    (Interestingly Lee owned no slaves until he inherited a few upon the death of his father-in-law, kept them for a few years then freed them, all per instructions in his father-in-law's will. Grant definitely "outslaves" him.)

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @guest007, @Rob McX

    Grant got the \$50 bill, which makes him at least half a Franklin. He also liked whiskey and cigars, which makes him a real man. Grant wins.

    Of course, where Steve is, Grant High School could have been named for Cary Grant.

  37. …after all these years he still can’t string together a plot. So Licorice Pizza just rambles along without much dramatic tension.

    Always my biggest complaint about PTA. Reminds me of my mother telling me her stories–I’m left wondering, “where is this going?” as things just seem to meander pointlessly along, until it abruptly ends. Not to say it’s not entertaining, but structure is the standard for a reason.

  38. Artist Richard Amsel did a lot of movie posters and other showbiz art in the seventies. I think the poster for Licorice Pizza is meant to imitate his style, with the serpentine hair and floating faces. I don’t know who did the Pizza poster, but it couldn’t have been Amsel himself; he died of AIDS in 1985.

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    @the one they call Desanex

    Speaking of artists imitating other artists, this was Amsel imitating J. C. Leyendecker.

    http://adammcdaniel.com/AmselArt/sting_xlg.jpg

    , @MEH 0910
    @the one they call Desanex

    24x36: A Movie About Movie Posters
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfOG3vds9uI


    "24x36: A Movie About Movie Posters" is a documentary that explores the world of illustrated movie poster art; the artists who create it, companies and studios that commission it, galleries that display it, and collectors and fans who hang it.
     
    , @MEH 0910
    @the one they call Desanex


    I don’t know who did the Pizza poster,
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kat_Reeder

    Kat Reeder is a Peruvian-American illustrator, portrait artist, and graphic designer whose work is characterized by attractive female forms and nostalgic scenery. Her work combines elements of pop art, animation, art nouveau, and Latin American art styles. Reeder was born in Lima, Peru, grew up in Miami, Florida, and now lives in Honolulu, HI.[1]

    [...]
    In 2021, Reeder was commissioned by filmmaker Paul Thomas Anderson to create poster art and other key art for his film Licorice Pizza, starring Alana Haim, Cooper Hoffman, Bradley Cooper, Sean Penn, Bennie Safdie, Tom Waits, and Maya Rudolph. Reeder’s work was used as the primary movie poster, and as advertising throughout Los Angeles, New York, and cities world-wide.
     
    https://katreeder.com/blogs/kat-chats-a-sporadic-art-blog/yes-im-the-licorice-pizza-poster-artist

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex

  39. @AnotherDad
    @Daniel H


    The movie even begins at Grant High School, the public school I would have attended if I’d not gone to a Catholic school.
     
    Grant High School?

    Don't they know Grant owned slaves, rented slaves, used slaves during his years in Missouri?

    (Interestingly Lee owned no slaves until he inherited a few upon the death of his father-in-law, kept them for a few years then freed them, all per instructions in his father-in-law's will. Grant definitely "outslaves" him.)

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @guest007, @Rob McX

    Grant High School is:

    Hispanic 53.5%
    White 38.3%
    Asian 3.7%
    African American 3.5%

    with 96% free lunch. So what type of white person lives in Los Angeles an qualifies for free school lunch.

    https://www.niche.com/k12/ulysses-s-grant-high-school-van-nuys-ca/

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @guest007


    So what type of white person lives in Los Angeles an qualifies for free school lunch.
     
    Free lunch numbers are almost always boosted by the locals because so much other school money is tied to them. The whitopia where I used to live didn't even check the accuracy of the applications.
    , @Abolish_public_education
    @guest007

    In 2019, USDA's reduced price (free!) meals costs taxpayers $14.2B. Most meals (90+%?) were distributed in public school cafeterias. When schoolies whine about skool underfunding, they always avoid mention of meal subsidies. Keep in mind that the menu items are RD-certified junk, and what's sold to [gullible] taxpayers as "pro-learning, hunger prevention" is really just a huge welfare payout to Big Ag.

    (One reason why home schools can operate on a shoestring budget is that the kitchen doubles as classroom and cafeteria, and mom as teacher and chef. Public schools are expensive partly because they operate restaurants, law firms, sports leagues, telecom service firms, health clinics, transportation companies; the list of suck goes on and on.)

    The gov-media complex has been exploiting the latest instance of a catastrophically dangerous, failing public school as an opportunity to laud the "heroic" first unionized-responders, school lockdown contingency plans, and to push an anti-gun agenda.

    As we're "informed" that the boy's parents won't cooperate, we're supposed to cheer that the lawyer-DA has threatened to punish them and has charged the kid as an adult. "Cooperation" means the family's lawyer not being allowed to describe how the boy has been getting bullied since first grade, the parents have complained to the school district 100X, and nothing was ever done.

    This mass shooting totally vindicates the gun rights argument that when schoolkids are disarmed, only criminal schoolkids will own guns.

    Replies: @guest007

    , @Clifford Brown
    @guest007

    There are a fair number of Armenians who may not accurately report their income.

    Replies: @guest007

    , @anonymous
    @guest007

    Most of that 38.3 % White is just as Hispanic as the 53.5% .

    Replies: @guest007

  40. @Achmed E. Newman
    There's already a Mystic Pizza that has Julia Roberts in it before she became famous playing a battered wife and then a high-class hooker twice. I saw in on TV way back. It's a true chick-flick, but it wasn't so bad.

    I'll read your Takimag column, of course, but could you give me a thumbs-up or thumbs-down as to whether this movie is truly devoid of the PC/wokeness enough to not piss a guy like me off to where I need to pop it out.

    I've been running into this so much lately, I usually have to borrow 3 movies to watch one complete one. Doing that is a little easier on an airplane flight - got a quick post coming about starting out watching 9 Days and switching fairly quickly to Patton, from 50 years earlier (about).

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Ron Mexico, @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @Alfa158, @Mike Tre, @Kylie, @Reg Cæsar

    There’s already a Mystic Pizza

    Been to the real one. Underwhelming joint in a pretty boring coastal town not far from here that tries to be touristy. They make what they can of the movie connection. The pizza wasn’t mystic at all.

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Underwhelming joint in a pretty boring coastal town
     
    Fair enough about the pizza place, but kind of odd seeing someone trash Mystic, CT on this blog. The town is 95.8% white, clean and orderly, well kept up, has beautiful 19th century houses, interesting museums if you enjoy the sea, and lies on a scenic river. If you want to hide from the horrors of the 21st century and enjoy American life as it used to be, Mystic is a nice place to go, at least in the off season.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I reckon the movie makers just liked the name of that town, which sounds really out of the way. Isn't that what the movie was somewhat about, these small town happenings, maybe like Eastwick in The Witches of Eastwick? I do agree with Peter - I have no problem with a boring coastal town.

    I like that NY style pizza. If it's got gobs of cheese and that greasy thick crust, Julia Roberts can just keep it .. I'm talking about pizza here, of course ...

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home)

  41. Oh dear, nostalgia for the 1970s.

    M’thinks dark, life in civilization going down is better for this time.

    Boogie Nights was excellent.

    J Ryan
    The Political Cesspool

  42. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Sick of Orcs

    This is the case with all actors. John Wayne is always John Wayne; De Niro- De Niro; Eastwood- Eastwood; Brando- Brando ....

    Can you imagine Brando in the role of an introverted resigned man, as Chekhov's Uncle Vanya?

    We know the answer.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home), @kaganovitch, @Sick of Orcs, @Bill, @Jack D, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Mike Tre

    I should have contrasted Pitt with Cruise, who does disappear into each role. Heck, DiCaprio did a good job in the movie alongside Pitt.

  43. Licorice pizza sounds like something only Aussies would eat.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Reg Cæsar

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salty_liquorice


    Salty liquorice, salmiak liquorice or salmiac liquorice, is a variety of liquorice flavoured with the ingredient "salmiak salt" (sal ammoniac; ammonium chloride), and is a common confection found in the Nordic countries, Benelux, and northern Germany.[1] Salmiak salt gives salty liquorice an astringent, salty taste,[2] akin to that of tannins—a characteristic of red wines, which adds bitterness and astringency to the flavour. Consuming salmiak liquorice can stimulate either a savoury or non-savoury palate and response.[1] Anise oil can also be an additional main ingredient in salty liquorice. Extra salty liquorice is additionally coated with salmiak salt or salmiak powder, or sometimes table salt.

    Salty liquorice candy and pastilles are almost always black or very dark brown and can range from soft candy to hard pastille variety, and sometimes hard brittle. The other colours used are white and variants of grey. Salty liquorice or salmiak is also used as a flavouring in other products, such as ice creams, syrups, chewing gum, snus and alcoholic beverages.
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Reg Cæsar

    "Licorice pizza sounds like something only Aussies would eat."

    Aussies like Funnel Web pizza.

    , @Currahee
    @Reg Cæsar

    Once was offered Vegemite by an Aussie neighbor; so, yes.

  44. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Sick of Orcs

    This is the case with all actors. John Wayne is always John Wayne; De Niro- De Niro; Eastwood- Eastwood; Brando- Brando ....

    Can you imagine Brando in the role of an introverted resigned man, as Chekhov's Uncle Vanya?

    We know the answer.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home), @kaganovitch, @Sick of Orcs, @Bill, @Jack D, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Mike Tre

    It’s only the case with bad actors.

  45. @Reg Cæsar
    Licorice pizza sounds like something only Aussies would eat.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @SunBakedSuburb, @Currahee

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salty_liquorice

    Salty liquorice, salmiak liquorice or salmiac liquorice, is a variety of liquorice flavoured with the ingredient “salmiak salt” (sal ammoniac; ammonium chloride), and is a common confection found in the Nordic countries, Benelux, and northern Germany.[1] Salmiak salt gives salty liquorice an astringent, salty taste,[2] akin to that of tannins—a characteristic of red wines, which adds bitterness and astringency to the flavour. Consuming salmiak liquorice can stimulate either a savoury or non-savoury palate and response.[1] Anise oil can also be an additional main ingredient in salty liquorice. Extra salty liquorice is additionally coated with salmiak salt or salmiak powder, or sometimes table salt.

    Salty liquorice candy and pastilles are almost always black or very dark brown and can range from soft candy to hard pastille variety, and sometimes hard brittle. The other colours used are white and variants of grey. Salty liquorice or salmiak is also used as a flavouring in other products, such as ice creams, syrups, chewing gum, snus and alcoholic beverages.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @MEH 0910


    sal ammoniac
     
    That evokes childhood memories:


    https://youtu.be/1wtchk6UEwA
  46. I saw this trailer last weekend and was underwhelmed. PTA lacks something to make a great movie.

    His nostalgia for the early 70s SoCal is also odd, as I don’t know any Gen X person nostalgic for Boomerism besides PTA.

  47. Liking Paul Thomas Anderson has a virtue signalling vibe to it. Sophistication signalling. “Oh, I find this amusing because I get it. The quirkiness is so delightful. A sophisticated quirkiness. Just adorable.”

    Puke.

    In the same vein, enjoying Anderson’s films is like watching a movie with a bunch of progressives. They laugh, not because something actually hit their funny bone, but rather to show proper sensibilities. Clapter-esque if you will.

    If people watched Anderson in a vacuum (ie not around other people, or unable to let others know they took in an Anderson film), there would be nothing but frustration culminating in sneering contempt.

  48. @Achmed E. Newman
    There's already a Mystic Pizza that has Julia Roberts in it before she became famous playing a battered wife and then a high-class hooker twice. I saw in on TV way back. It's a true chick-flick, but it wasn't so bad.

    I'll read your Takimag column, of course, but could you give me a thumbs-up or thumbs-down as to whether this movie is truly devoid of the PC/wokeness enough to not piss a guy like me off to where I need to pop it out.

    I've been running into this so much lately, I usually have to borrow 3 movies to watch one complete one. Doing that is a little easier on an airplane flight - got a quick post coming about starting out watching 9 Days and switching fairly quickly to Patton, from 50 years earlier (about).

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Ron Mexico, @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @Alfa158, @Mike Tre, @Kylie, @Reg Cæsar

    I’ve pretty much stopped watching late-production movies and TV shows to get away from the “wokeness”. I mostly watch documentaries on subjects where they can’t deliver political screeds, and Asian, Eastern European and Russian fictional movies and programs. Some of them are fairly good, the production values, CGI etc. are now up to Hollywood standards, and I don’t have to put up with characters who are gays, trannies, Nigerian Knights of the Round Table, Mary Sues, Magic Negroes, absurdly precocious children and bumbling and/or evil White men.
    The last two movies I went to see at a theater were Ford vs. Ferrari and the last James Bond movie. I only saw that one because I had seen the first James Bond movies when I was young and they first came out. Leaked plot spoilers said this was going to be the 26th and last one since the character of James Bond was being replaced by a new 007, so I wanted to sort of put a bookend on the era.

  49. Me: “Boogie Nights is great because it portrays 1980 SoCal as a dystopian, soulless hell filled with the most broken people imaginable.”

    LA Native: “Hey, I remember that hi-fi store on Pico. Boogie Nights is great!”

    • LOL: kaganovitch
  50. @Emblematic
    @Altai

    Does Dwayne The Rock Johnson have screen charisma? I can't tell. He's a huge star, but I can't get past his weirdly shaped beetle-head.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alfa158

    He has a sense of humor about himself, that comes through in a lot of his movies where he plays action heroes with a comic touch. I am however a little worried about how he is looking these days, which is juiced up with PEDs to an alarming level. Humans aren’t really supposed to look like that outside of comic books.

  51. @R.G. Camara
    Steve, great work as usual, but this review had so much name dropping, inside baseball nuggets, and obscure Hollywood tangents it made my head spin. I had to read a few paragraphs twice to keep up. Clearly, you're excited about the subject and want to jam a lot of stuff in, but it can leave the rest of us confused!

    This sounds like a true nostalgia movie, although since Anderson was only 10 when the 1970s ended, he's also got the filter of it all seeming much cooler, bewildering, and more adult to him -- like he's trying to see it through a mythical older teenage brother's eyes.

    I'm always interested in true nostalgia movies, which are different that period pieces. True nostalgia movies are when the creators are truly reminiscing about a time/place they actually lived in, as opposed to just reading about it in a book. True nostalgia movies tend to add a lot of mundane, realistic details about a time period that a period piece doesn't, while also showing how the everyman was dealing with a time period that to us is only known through Major Historical Events and stereotypes.

    Good directors make two kinds of childhood movies: the ones about the childhood they had and the ones about the childhood they wish they'd had, e.g Steve Spielberg.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    One of the contributors to the current crisis is certainly the amount of attention that various entertainers suck up in people’s consciousness.

    This is worse in America–relative to most countries–because of Hollywood’s dominance by the Jews. Having a majority hostile outgroup pumping shit right into people’s eyeballs is a really dangerous situation for any society.

    But even without that, so much attention to the sort of people who want to “play make-believe” for a living is a bad idea.

  52. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Sick of Orcs

    This is the case with all actors. John Wayne is always John Wayne; De Niro- De Niro; Eastwood- Eastwood; Brando- Brando ....

    Can you imagine Brando in the role of an introverted resigned man, as Chekhov's Uncle Vanya?

    We know the answer.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home), @kaganovitch, @Sick of Orcs, @Bill, @Jack D, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Mike Tre

    Brando really transformed himself in The Godfather. Not just with makeup but in terms of inhabiting the role.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon, Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
    @Jack D

    Brando may have been a true freak, in the evolutionary sense; able to mimic various "humans" rather than being an ACT-TOR in that pretentious, Method sense. Thus giving credence to the "actors can portray anyone" fallacy along with giving unjustified fame to "The Method" -- really, was Lee Strasberg all that in The Godfather II?

    I saw a clip of Brando walking out of the courtroom at his daughter's trial, a old, broken man (understandably) and being approached by a papparazi. As Brando turned his face was caught on camera, and you could see him transform into Don Corleone. Not a man to harass at his daughter's wedding or trial. The papparazi freaked out and scampered away. It was like the scene where young Vito first sees Don Fabrizio.

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @Jack D

    I am not talking about such things (by the way, he'd been, after his 30s, obesity on steroids & had mumbled his career throughout his life). The question is could he ever played a non-dominant character rife with uncertainties or anything similar. For instance the Steiger character in "The Pawnbroker" or that naive cowardly journalist-biographer in Eastwood's "Unforgiven".

    On the other hand- now everyone can play anyone. Considering the contemporary cultural climate, Brando could play Ann Boleyn, a mistress to some fat king of Afringlicand.

    Replies: @Ian Smith

    , @Currahee
    @Jack D

    Yes, having read the novel, along with everybody else, I was dumbfounded when I read that Brando was given the role. I was so totally wrong and the movie was ten times the book, which was basically a potboiler Harold Robbins sort of thing.

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Jack D

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2D_zITtVJGA

    Tattaglia's a pimp. He never could've out fought Santino.

    I didn't know until this day that it was Barzini all along.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    Brando really transformed himself in The Godfather. Not just with makeup but in terms of inhabiting the role.
     
    It's hard to imagine the Don having an unrequited crush on Mr Peepers.
  53. @R.G. Camara
    Steve, great work as usual, but this review had so much name dropping, inside baseball nuggets, and obscure Hollywood tangents it made my head spin. I had to read a few paragraphs twice to keep up. Clearly, you're excited about the subject and want to jam a lot of stuff in, but it can leave the rest of us confused!

    This sounds like a true nostalgia movie, although since Anderson was only 10 when the 1970s ended, he's also got the filter of it all seeming much cooler, bewildering, and more adult to him -- like he's trying to see it through a mythical older teenage brother's eyes.

    I'm always interested in true nostalgia movies, which are different that period pieces. True nostalgia movies are when the creators are truly reminiscing about a time/place they actually lived in, as opposed to just reading about it in a book. True nostalgia movies tend to add a lot of mundane, realistic details about a time period that a period piece doesn't, while also showing how the everyman was dealing with a time period that to us is only known through Major Historical Events and stereotypes.

    Good directors make two kinds of childhood movies: the ones about the childhood they had and the ones about the childhood they wish they'd had, e.g Steve Spielberg.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    This sounds like a true nostalgia movie, although since Anderson was only 10 when the 1970s ended, he’s also got the filter of it all seeming much cooler, bewildering, and more adult to him — like he’s trying to see it through a mythical older teenage brother’s eyes.

    Had the same thought.

    Even though much in the 70s sucked–the houses, the cars, Vietnam, feminism, inflation, Gerry Ford, recession, Jimmy Carter–i have very fond memories, as it’s the decade of most of my “firsts” that you’d expect from a boy in his teens and 20s. Compared to now it was … pretty damn nice!

    But Anderson is really a generation–or at least half a generation younger.

    • Replies: @Goddard
    @AnotherDad


    Compared to now it was … pretty damn nice!
     
    Geez ... what an old man's site unz is.
    , @James J O'Meara
    @AnotherDad

    "Even though much in the 70s sucked"

    One word: shag. (The material, not the act)

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @AnotherDad


    Even though much in the 70s sucked … i have very fond memories, as it’s the decade of most of my “firsts”
     
    First waterbed genital warts perhaps goes in the ‘bittersweet’ file
  54. @AnotherDad
    @R.G. Camara


    This sounds like a true nostalgia movie, although since Anderson was only 10 when the 1970s ended, he’s also got the filter of it all seeming much cooler, bewildering, and more adult to him — like he’s trying to see it through a mythical older teenage brother’s eyes.
     
    Had the same thought.

    Even though much in the 70s sucked--the houses, the cars, Vietnam, feminism, inflation, Gerry Ford, recession, Jimmy Carter--i have very fond memories, as it's the decade of most of my "firsts" that you'd expect from a boy in his teens and 20s. Compared to now it was ... pretty damn nice!

    But Anderson is really a generation--or at least half a generation younger.

    Replies: @Goddard, @James J O'Meara, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Compared to now it was … pretty damn nice!

    Geez … what an old man’s site unz is.

  55. I had come to truly despise Tarantino before Hollywood came out, and I’m pretty sure your review inspired me to give it a shot. I’m glad I did. It’s my favorite Hollywood film in a long time. Looking forward to reading your full review of Licorice. I suspect this film will contain lots of woke/feminist/anti-“Toxic-Masculinity” content that will make it a hard pass for me.

    • Replies: @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2
    @JimDandy

    " It’s my favorite Hollywood film in a long time. "

    It is the clearly, objectively the best Hollywood film in a long time. There is no debate about this. The question is what movie ever might be better. That is debatable.

  56. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Gary and Alana’s chaste relationship never really goes anywhere as Alana sets her sights on more age-appropriate men, such as the former child star who played Gary’s older brother in Lucille Ball’s Yours, Mine, and Ours, an alcoholic William Holden"

    In 1973, William Holden was 55 yrs old. How exactly is a thirty plus year age difference more age appropriate than Gary, who's roughly about 6-8 years younger than Alana? Or is it that William Holden's bank account is more appropriate for Alana when compared to Gary? But judging from the plot, it would appear that Gary has closed the gap on the pocketbook and thus should be taken more seriously as future mating potential.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Even today (putting aside female teachers who go after male HS students), a woman in her late ’20s would not normally consider a 17 year old to be suitable dating material. OTOH, a woman in her late ’20s might well date Sean Penn. Older men/younger woman relationships have always, and will always, be more accepted and attractive to women than vice versa, especially if the older man is successful. That’s just how it is.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Jack D

    "Older men/younger woman relationships have always, and will always, be more accepted and attractive to women than vice versa, especially if the older man is successful. That’s just how it is."

    It's ONLY how it is, IF the man is successful. If he can afford her. The more beautiful a woman, the more options an older but wealthier man has. William Holden in 1963, when he was still a fairly reliable bankable star, and still had some looks left, as opposed to 1973, when he looked ten yrs older because of the booze, would've been a more realistic option.

    An older man, if he expects to pick up a younger and attractive woman, had better be able to demonstrate that he indeed has a major amount of income.
    If the older man was a janitor or greeter at Walmart, he wouldn't have a chance with the younger woman.

    A personal anecdote, or case in point: A woman in her late 20's is dating a man about 15 yrs her senior. Under normal circumstances, she wouldn't give him the time of day, but he happens to be a successful painter of business offices, has his own pontoon boat, nice SUV, etc. That may not sound like much, but if the woman came from the rough side of town and a fairly downscale neighborhood, then that's a steady source of income and more preferable to her usual options in her social circles--drug dealer, pimp, or someone just starting out in blue collar field.

    Bottom line: money helps an older man stay relevant when attempting to land a good looking younger woman.

    It has been said that attractive women today no longer are committed to the ride or die philosophy. Rather, they much prefer to wait at the finish line and select their best options. As their biological clock strikes midnight, they make their choice based on the best options available to them.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Buzz Mohawk

  57. @Jack D
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Brando really transformed himself in The Godfather. Not just with makeup but in terms of inhabiting the role.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Bardon Kaldian, @Currahee, @JohnnyWalker123, @Reg Cæsar

    Brando may have been a true freak, in the evolutionary sense; able to mimic various “humans” rather than being an ACT-TOR in that pretentious, Method sense. Thus giving credence to the “actors can portray anyone” fallacy along with giving unjustified fame to “The Method” — really, was Lee Strasberg all that in The Godfather II?

    I saw a clip of Brando walking out of the courtroom at his daughter’s trial, a old, broken man (understandably) and being approached by a papparazi. As Brando turned his face was caught on camera, and you could see him transform into Don Corleone. Not a man to harass at his daughter’s wedding or trial. The papparazi freaked out and scampered away. It was like the scene where young Vito first sees Don Fabrizio.

  58. @AnotherDad
    @R.G. Camara


    This sounds like a true nostalgia movie, although since Anderson was only 10 when the 1970s ended, he’s also got the filter of it all seeming much cooler, bewildering, and more adult to him — like he’s trying to see it through a mythical older teenage brother’s eyes.
     
    Had the same thought.

    Even though much in the 70s sucked--the houses, the cars, Vietnam, feminism, inflation, Gerry Ford, recession, Jimmy Carter--i have very fond memories, as it's the decade of most of my "firsts" that you'd expect from a boy in his teens and 20s. Compared to now it was ... pretty damn nice!

    But Anderson is really a generation--or at least half a generation younger.

    Replies: @Goddard, @James J O'Meara, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    “Even though much in the 70s sucked”

    One word: shag. (The material, not the act)

  59. @MEH 0910
    @Reg Cæsar

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salty_liquorice


    Salty liquorice, salmiak liquorice or salmiac liquorice, is a variety of liquorice flavoured with the ingredient "salmiak salt" (sal ammoniac; ammonium chloride), and is a common confection found in the Nordic countries, Benelux, and northern Germany.[1] Salmiak salt gives salty liquorice an astringent, salty taste,[2] akin to that of tannins—a characteristic of red wines, which adds bitterness and astringency to the flavour. Consuming salmiak liquorice can stimulate either a savoury or non-savoury palate and response.[1] Anise oil can also be an additional main ingredient in salty liquorice. Extra salty liquorice is additionally coated with salmiak salt or salmiak powder, or sometimes table salt.

    Salty liquorice candy and pastilles are almost always black or very dark brown and can range from soft candy to hard pastille variety, and sometimes hard brittle. The other colours used are white and variants of grey. Salty liquorice or salmiak is also used as a flavouring in other products, such as ice creams, syrups, chewing gum, snus and alcoholic beverages.
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    sal ammoniac

    That evokes childhood memories:

  60. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Sick of Orcs

    This is the case with all actors. John Wayne is always John Wayne; De Niro- De Niro; Eastwood- Eastwood; Brando- Brando ....

    Can you imagine Brando in the role of an introverted resigned man, as Chekhov's Uncle Vanya?

    We know the answer.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home), @kaganovitch, @Sick of Orcs, @Bill, @Jack D, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Mike Tre

    Our host is good at pointing out George Clooney’s odd practice of getting himself cast in roles that would, in real life, not be populated by a guy with the irrepressible charisma and good looks of a George Clooney. Best example, Up In The Air, where he’s cast as a vagabond personnel manager instead of the guy at the head of the conference room table putting together billion-dollar deals. He did good work in O Brother Where Art Thou, despite not looking anything like a low-level grifter trying to support his too-large family in the rural South in the 1930’s.

    Steve Buscemi has made good coin playing roles as the weaselly dirtbag loser because he looks like a weaselly dirtbag loser. But I bet in real life he’s a charming guy with lots of friends.

    I’d like to see Sailer write some stuff about the truly Hardest Working Man in Showbiz, the late great Brion James. I always thought his casting in The Player was a nod and bit of an inside joke to his extraordinary networking. Here’s Brion on Brion:

    [in August 1999, when asked to what he attributes his success] Hard work. You gotta study, man. It’s like any profession. I did eight years in theater. I studied two years in school in New York with Stella Adler, the best teacher in the world. I studied under Nina Foch, I did theater, I learned my craft. You got to learn how to build a character, there’s a way to do it. Everything I ever did was different. I did 125 films, and over 100 television shows, and you’ve never seen the same character twice. I think now, in my 50s, with [Robert Duvall], [Albert Finney] and [Gene Hackman], those guys are getting up there in their 60s, it’s my time. And I’m making sure that I push myself into their slot. So, my best work’s coming.

    Then he dropped dead at age 54. God almighty.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Oh man. Here's Brion at what looks like a Comic-Con/Dragon-Con a few weeks before his death. He doesn't look good and is either high, drunk or otherwise unable to keep his train of thought. He also doesn't like fags.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCXGF_t9DLA

    He grimaces and grabs his side 14 seconds in so he may have been having some issues already. That's sad. Age 54 is way too young to leave the party.

    , @James J O'Meara
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    "Steve Buscemi has made good coin playing roles as the weaselly dirtbag loser because he looks like a weaselly dirtbag loser. But I bet in real life he’s a charming guy with lots of friends."

    Probably. Before acting he was a fireman, worked at a station in my neighborhood, and came around to attend fundraisers and give speeches when the mayor tried to close it down in the 2000s. Seemed like something a nice guy would do. Don't recall if he succeeded.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @puttheforkdown
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    He's a charming guy with lots of friends because acting pays the bills. Otherwise, guess how he would behave?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Steve Sailer
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Buscemi, a former New York fireman, spent four days digging through the rubble of the World Trade Center looking for remains of his one-time colleagues.

  61. @kaganovitch
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Can you imagine Brando in the role of an introverted resigned man, as Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya? We know the answer.

    Indeed, those actors that can adapt to different parts are known as 'character' actors. Those that remain distinctly themselves in every role are stars/leading actors.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    I would question even this. For instance, most characters are so different I doubt the same actor could be successful in all roles- say, Hamlet, Macbeth, Brutus and Iago. All actors, however gifted & educated they may be, play essentially one role with variations.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Bardon Kaldian

    For instance, most characters are so different I doubt the same actor could be successful in all roles- say, Hamlet, Macbeth, Brutus and Iago. All actors, however gifted & educated they may be, play essentially one role with variations.

    Well nobody has infinite range of course but some have more than others. You bring to mind the pronouncement of the great 19th century Analytical Talmudist R. Haym Soloveitchik ob"m - who fancied himself something of a Musicologist as well- "Es is als eyn niggun, ah knaitch ahin ah knaitch aher, ober als eyn niggun." = It is all one song , a twist this way a twist that way, but all one song. Any thing can be viewed from sufficient distance as all basically one and from sufficiently closeup/granular as vastly different which allows us to talk past each other in Wittgensteinian incommensurability. Oh. the Humanity!

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  62. @Sick of Orcs
    Re:. Brad Pitt. Guy can't act. It's always Pitt on the screen, regardless of character. Which is why the pointless, shirtless roof scene in the middle of Once Upon...Hollywood.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Slim, @Mike Tre, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    As I’ve said before , he’s not a good lead actor but a very good supporting actor. 12 monkeys, True Romance, Snatch are a few where Pitt is very good. As a lead, he’s always just himself and while that used to work for a lot of lead actors, like Wayne and Eastwood for example, guys like Pitt (and Clooney) struggle to make good films as leads. He does better as part of an ensemble (ocean’s eleven), worse in duets (Interview with a Vampire, Fight Club, Seven) but best in supporting roles.

    • Agree: Sick of Orcs
  63. @Achmed E. Newman
    There's already a Mystic Pizza that has Julia Roberts in it before she became famous playing a battered wife and then a high-class hooker twice. I saw in on TV way back. It's a true chick-flick, but it wasn't so bad.

    I'll read your Takimag column, of course, but could you give me a thumbs-up or thumbs-down as to whether this movie is truly devoid of the PC/wokeness enough to not piss a guy like me off to where I need to pop it out.

    I've been running into this so much lately, I usually have to borrow 3 movies to watch one complete one. Doing that is a little easier on an airplane flight - got a quick post coming about starting out watching 9 Days and switching fairly quickly to Patton, from 50 years earlier (about).

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Ron Mexico, @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @Alfa158, @Mike Tre, @Kylie, @Reg Cæsar

    I don’t know if you saw my comment a couple weeks ago after I had just rewatched Patton. Certainly not a woke movie by today’s standards but the words “Soviet,” “Stalin,” and “communist” are absent from the dialogue. Soviet’s are referred to generically as “the Russians.”

    Also absent, but for what I presume are different reasons, are the terms “Jews” and “holocaust” and all related terms.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Mike Tre

    I really am obsessive about reading completely through threads after I start, so maybe I missed the whole post, Mike. (OK, I just checked. No, I've never read anything from Andrew Joyce.)

    Let me just add this, Mike. There was a scene at the end in which Patton wanted to continue the war into Communist Russia. Is it my imagination, or did he say something about having "fought the wrong guys"? Maybe that's the actual General Patton's words (paraphrased), but not in the movie. I can't remember. I just put my post up here, but I didn't get to watch the end this time.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @MEH 0910

    , @Captain Tripps
    @Mike Tre

    I think the movie attempted to show Patton's point of view through the war. He grew up and graduated West Point (1909) when Russia was still a hereditary monarchy, so in his mind, they were still just the "Russians". "Soviet" or "Soviet Union" was just a political term in his frame of reference. I am unfamiliar with any of his personal writings, so he may have referred to them differently in those. I get the sense that the writers/producers/director of the movie wanted to paint a portrait of the man for their intended audience, which in 1970 would have been all the aging European Theater war vets, many of whom served under him.

    , @Peter Akuleyev
    @Mike Tre

    All of that is historically accurate. During 1918-1989, Americans generally referred to the Soviets as "Russians" . Only political scientists, leftists and maybe the occasional immigrant said "Soviet".

    Likewise, while World War II was going on most Americans weren't particularly concerned about the fate of Jews, it certainly wasn't the top of the agenda. You won't hear the word "Jew" once in the movie "Casablanca" for example. If you had asked an average American why Nazis were bad in 1943 they would have said the worst Nazi crimes were invading Paris, bombing England and imprisoning and killing patriotic Czechs, Norwegians, Poles and other brave Europeans. And, of course, declaring war on the USA and supporting the Japs. The word "Holocaust" was only applied to the murder of Jews decades later, it would be a jarring anachronism to hear it in Patton.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Mike Tre

  64. @Jack D
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Brando really transformed himself in The Godfather. Not just with makeup but in terms of inhabiting the role.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Bardon Kaldian, @Currahee, @JohnnyWalker123, @Reg Cæsar

    I am not talking about such things (by the way, he’d been, after his 30s, obesity on steroids & had mumbled his career throughout his life). The question is could he ever played a non-dominant character rife with uncertainties or anything similar. For instance the Steiger character in “The Pawnbroker” or that naive cowardly journalist-biographer in Eastwood’s “Unforgiven”.

    On the other hand- now everyone can play anyone. Considering the contemporary cultural climate, Brando could play Ann Boleyn, a mistress to some fat king of Afringlicand.

    • Replies: @Ian Smith
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Brando played a closeted gay army officer in Reflections in a Golden Eye. It was a role with a lot of vulnerability.

  65. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Sick of Orcs

    This is the case with all actors. John Wayne is always John Wayne; De Niro- De Niro; Eastwood- Eastwood; Brando- Brando ....

    Can you imagine Brando in the role of an introverted resigned man, as Chekhov's Uncle Vanya?

    We know the answer.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home), @kaganovitch, @Sick of Orcs, @Bill, @Jack D, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Mike Tre

    Most, but not all actors: Robert Duvall had great range. Tom Hagen, LtCol. Kilgore, and Gus McCrae are three completely different and dare I say epic characters that one cannot honestly associate with Duvall just playing Duvall.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Mike Tre

    I've seen Hagen & McCrae, and yes, I'd agree. These are different characters & Duvall was successful in his art of representation.

    , @Mr Mox
    @Mike Tre

    In his 1983 book , Adventures in the Screen Trade, author and screenwriter William Goldman describes a tense scene in The Great Santini where Robert Duvall act as an embarrassing a**hole towards his 'coming of age' son.

    Goldman explains how none of the big Hollywood stars at the time would ever have accepted a role like that - unless the Santini character had been given some excuse for his horrible behavior. He then gives a couple of examples how this could have been worked into the movie, making Santini come across as a saint-like father instead of a bitter, military has-been.

    Robert Duvall didn't take the easy way out, and the movie is much better for it.

  66. @AnotherDad
    @Daniel H


    The movie even begins at Grant High School, the public school I would have attended if I’d not gone to a Catholic school.
     
    Grant High School?

    Don't they know Grant owned slaves, rented slaves, used slaves during his years in Missouri?

    (Interestingly Lee owned no slaves until he inherited a few upon the death of his father-in-law, kept them for a few years then freed them, all per instructions in his father-in-law's will. Grant definitely "outslaves" him.)

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @guest007, @Rob McX

    The movie even begins at Grant High School, the public school I would have attended if I’d not gone to a Catholic school.

    Grant High School?

    Don’t they know Grant owned slaves, rented slaves, used slaves during his years in Missouri?

    Not to mention General Order No. 11.

    • Thanks: Old Prude
  67. @Achmed E. Newman
    There's already a Mystic Pizza that has Julia Roberts in it before she became famous playing a battered wife and then a high-class hooker twice. I saw in on TV way back. It's a true chick-flick, but it wasn't so bad.

    I'll read your Takimag column, of course, but could you give me a thumbs-up or thumbs-down as to whether this movie is truly devoid of the PC/wokeness enough to not piss a guy like me off to where I need to pop it out.

    I've been running into this so much lately, I usually have to borrow 3 movies to watch one complete one. Doing that is a little easier on an airplane flight - got a quick post coming about starting out watching 9 Days and switching fairly quickly to Patton, from 50 years earlier (about).

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Ron Mexico, @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @Alfa158, @Mike Tre, @Kylie, @Reg Cæsar

    “I’ll read your Takimag column, of course, but could you give me a thumbs-up or thumbs-down as to whether this movie is truly devoid of the PC/wokeness enough to not piss a guy like me off to where I need to pop it out.”

    Sean Penn is in it. What more do you need to know?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Kylie

    Well, Fast Times at Ridgemont High didn't have any wokeness. Granted... OK, that was, like 40 years ago...

    So, thumbs-down it is then?

    Replies: @Kylie

  68. Anonymous[407] • Disclaimer says:

    In the trailer I was impressed by the ’70s ugly-glamour (I knew PTA would best even the “Sopranos” crew at this) as well as amused by the Jon Peters reference but am mostly relieved to find out it isn’t a young-rutting/teen-hormones flick. It didn’t at first appear to me these characters were supposed to be in their twenties.

  69. Off-topic.

    My handle is meant to convey that I’m an old-fashioned social democrat, favoring an optimally regulated market economy that is organized for the benefit of the lower 90% of the population rather than for the globalist oligarchy. Neighborhoods safe for families, public education and health care, tight labor market, zero immigration, fair trade, anti-imperialist, anti-war, civil liberties. Much of Unz Review is not useful to me but Sailer helps keep me sane. Recently I’ve come to greatly appreciate Greenwald, Taibbi, and others whom Counterpunch deplores as the Trumpenleft.

    Greenwald in 2005 would count as the most radical of leftists, yet throughout he has maintained an honest consistency. He rejected the Russia Hoax from the beginning. Quite surprisingly, he denounced use of the white supremacist slur:

    https://greenwald.substack.com/p/the-cynical-and-dangerous-weaponization?utm_

    And now as iSteve has noticed with a twitter response, Greenwald endorses the traditional left-labor view favoring immigration restriction: https://twitter.com/ggreenwald/status/1465322772624781312

    It’s a rather stunning feat of propaganda that liberals have taken what was until *very* recently the foundational left-liberal view about immigration — we must support restrictive borders to protect the American worker — and turned it into a hallmark of white nationalism

    .
    Further: https://rumble.com/vq15ht-the-poisonous-left-liberal-mentality-on-dialogue-and-race.html

    • Thanks: ic1000, JMcG, AKAHorace
    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @New Dealer

    "Counterpunch deplores as Trumpenleft"

    That's a compliment to Greenwald and Taibbi. Left-liberals and right-conservatives who value a free and open society along with nationalist economic policies are slowly forming a coalition. We can agree to disagree on certain issues and fight it out in the public square after we've eliminated the totalitarian identity Marxists funded by the fascist capitalists who are currently setting this country aflame.

  70. @Dumbo
    I don't like Tarantino. He should have been a cartoonist, not a filmmaker.

    Anderson is a superior director, but his last movies didn't quite cut it.

    Actually, I can't remember a whole film by him I really like. A few exceptional scenes, for sure, such as in "There Will Be Blood" and even "Magnolia", but the sum is always less than the parts.

    I haven't watched this one. Not sure I will.

    Replies: @MGB

    i liked jackie brown and the first 2/3 or so of once upon a time. the rest of what i have seen is self-indulgent, narcissistic shite. haven’t seen magnolia, but thought there will be blood and the master great stuff if often uncomfortable to watch. nobody needs to see joaquin phoenix jacking off into the ocean, even from behind.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    @MGB

    Yes, I think Jackie Brown was actually Tarantino's best film. Well, from the ones I watched, at least. Hateful Eight was just awful, I regret having seen it. From Anderson, I liked Punch Drunk Love and There Will Be Blood, but I wouldn't watch them again.

  71. OT
    Ghislaine Maxwell Trial
    Day The First: Four major executives retire, school shooting in Michigan which gets a near-instant visit from Governor Whitmer and a comment from President Biden.
    Day the Second: Trial delayed, because jurors are missing. [Late add: Texas school locked down, possible shooter.]
    Day the Third: ASTEROIDS!

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @J.Ross

    Follow-up to this
    Day Three of Maxwell trial, no meteors yet but a guy showed up in Manhattan with a shotgun, like ya do, so they locked down the UN.
    https://english.alarabiya.net/News/world/2021/12/02/UN-headquarters-on-lockdown-after-armed-man-seen-outside

  72. @Achmed E. Newman
    There's already a Mystic Pizza that has Julia Roberts in it before she became famous playing a battered wife and then a high-class hooker twice. I saw in on TV way back. It's a true chick-flick, but it wasn't so bad.

    I'll read your Takimag column, of course, but could you give me a thumbs-up or thumbs-down as to whether this movie is truly devoid of the PC/wokeness enough to not piss a guy like me off to where I need to pop it out.

    I've been running into this so much lately, I usually have to borrow 3 movies to watch one complete one. Doing that is a little easier on an airplane flight - got a quick post coming about starting out watching 9 Days and switching fairly quickly to Patton, from 50 years earlier (about).

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Ron Mexico, @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @Alfa158, @Mike Tre, @Kylie, @Reg Cæsar

    There’s already a Mystic Pizza

    That had a nice balance between the story of the naïve au pair devastated by an affair with her dishonest employer, and that of the frustrated fisherman whose girlfriend greatly enjoyed their canoodling but was equally strong in her resistance to his suggestions of marriage. (I was in such a relationship at the time myself, and the DVD was my sneaky gift to the girl. Didn’t work.)

    These plots still resonate with me, while I can’t remember Julia Roberts’s character or story at all. At the time, she was just Eric’s little sister.

  73. “Texan Wes Anderson makes whimsical confections”

    Some might say irritating indulgences.

    “Mexicans vs. [sic] Armenians race riots”

    Who allowed the Armenians into our beloved toilet bowl? They destroyed Glendale.

    “Lucille Ball’s Yours, Mine, and Ours”

    Sorry. Steve. Eric Shea deserves the ownership title of that delightful family film wherein Henry and Lucy sacrifice Tim Matheson to the profitable war in Vietnam. In that time-line, Tim was fragged by black GIs and thus Otter never existed. If Otter doesn’t exist that means no National Lampoon’s Animal House which translates into no film career for John Landis and Vic Morrow is not beheaded by a helicopter blade.

    “Gary Goetzman … Tom Hank’s producing partner”

    Is he responsible for Larry Crowne? Hanks and me both dropped out of Sac State (not at the same time). Maybe I can use this as an “in” when I call Gary to pitch Larry Crowne II.

    “It’s almost as if who you know matters”

    Old wives tale, Steve. It’s talent that’s prized in your town.

    “But the second coming of Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood it’s not”

    Tarantino is Rock n’ [sic] Roll! Anderson is 70s pop.

    “but after all these years he still can’t string together a plot”

    Plots are for rubes. Try adapting Inherit Vice; no easy task. Anderson made There Will Be Blood, which is awesome, and The Master, which is interesting. Over all, its the length of his films that is his major drawback. 70s pop stretched out over 150 t0 180 minutes induces boredom boners in the audience.

  74. “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood” is an extremely high comparison standard for your average movie release. Perhaps that is asking too much of this film (I have not seen “Licorice Pizza”).

  75. The Cosmopolitan Gun Controller in full force.

    A federal judge in Southern California initially declared that California was violating the Second Amendment and the Constitution’s “takings clause.” Last year a three-judge panel on the 9th Circuit sided with the Southern California judge and struck down California’s ban. Now the full 11-judge panel of the 9th Circuit has declared that California can enforce the prohibition on large-capacity magazines, saying the state isn’t violating anyone’s constitutional rights. “The statute outlaws no weapon, but only limits the size of the magazine that may be used with firearms,” wrote Judge Susan Graber. She added that “there is no evidence that anyone ever has been unable to defend his or her home and family due to the lack of a large capacity magazine.”

    Read more at: https://www.sacbee.com/news/california/article256225972.html#storylink=cpy

    LA City Council unanimously votes in favor of ordinance to ban non-serialized ‘ghost guns’
    https://abc7.com/ghost-guns-banned-los-angeles-unserialized/11285508/

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Joe Stalin


    The Cosmopolitan Gun Controller in full force.
     
    A true Gun Graber!

    Still, without decisions like this one, how do the police disarm law-abiding blacks? The 2nd and the 14th clash.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  76. @New Dealer
    Off-topic.

    My handle is meant to convey that I’m an old-fashioned social democrat, favoring an optimally regulated market economy that is organized for the benefit of the lower 90% of the population rather than for the globalist oligarchy. Neighborhoods safe for families, public education and health care, tight labor market, zero immigration, fair trade, anti-imperialist, anti-war, civil liberties. Much of Unz Review is not useful to me but Sailer helps keep me sane. Recently I’ve come to greatly appreciate Greenwald, Taibbi, and others whom Counterpunch deplores as the Trumpenleft.

    Greenwald in 2005 would count as the most radical of leftists, yet throughout he has maintained an honest consistency. He rejected the Russia Hoax from the beginning. Quite surprisingly, he denounced use of the white supremacist slur:

    https://greenwald.substack.com/p/the-cynical-and-dangerous-weaponization?utm_

    And now as iSteve has noticed with a twitter response, Greenwald endorses the traditional left-labor view favoring immigration restriction: https://twitter.com/ggreenwald/status/1465322772624781312

    It's a rather stunning feat of propaganda that liberals have taken what was until *very* recently the foundational left-liberal view about immigration -- we must support restrictive borders to protect the American worker -- and turned it into a hallmark of white nationalism
     
    .
    Further: https://rumble.com/vq15ht-the-poisonous-left-liberal-mentality-on-dialogue-and-race.html

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “Counterpunch deplores as Trumpenleft”

    That’s a compliment to Greenwald and Taibbi. Left-liberals and right-conservatives who value a free and open society along with nationalist economic policies are slowly forming a coalition. We can agree to disagree on certain issues and fight it out in the public square after we’ve eliminated the totalitarian identity Marxists funded by the fascist capitalists who are currently setting this country aflame.

  77. @Reg Cæsar
    Licorice pizza sounds like something only Aussies would eat.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @SunBakedSuburb, @Currahee

    “Licorice pizza sounds like something only Aussies would eat.”

    Aussies like Funnel Web pizza.

  78. @Altai

    So, decades later we tend to wind up with weirdly boyish-looking leading men like DiCaprio. Why?
     
    While Hollywood (And economic life-scripts) has matured to the place where there isn't a parade of rugged guys from the mid-West heading out West to be discovered and taught to act later, their place taken by the kinds of 'threater kids' who aren't so masculine and masculine guys who don't have much behind the eyes and thus lack screen charisma, I don't think there is still much scope for the true boyish type, DiCarprio had the screen charisma to keep going after aging out of the roles he was more physically right for. He was able to compensate with other things.

    Tom Holland, for example, is doomed to forever play Peter Parker with his forays outside in typical leading male roles being disasters. (Partly this is because he is also psychologically boyish and doesn't have the same stuff behind his eyes that we call screen charisma, he seems kind of dumb) Timothee Chalamet has a weird face that seems to appeal to adolescent girls and gay men but not to wide audiences and certainly not to straight men. It also doesn't look like one that can sustain much aging before it looks 'creepy'. (Can you really have a leading man whose face can't really be shown in side profile?) Outside 'Dune' where not much acting is called for and the part calls for a boyish actor, I don't see him having classic leading man roles despite the huge press he gets. He was cast right in 'Ladybird' as a creep because that actually seems to be who he is as a person.

    More likely is that they'll keep the obsession with credentialism (Hollywood is an extreme version of corporate America, nobody wants to take responsibility, if somebody doesn't work out that's on the guy who gave him his credentials not me who hired him on that basis!) but lean more and more into recruiting actors from abroad. A lot of Australians have been very successful in the US both because they retain the classic Hollywood West European look that gets rarer day by day in the US but also because they have much more TV and film production per capita because of laws mandating a certain amount of local production on TV. This leads to a lot of children's shows for export that give a lot of attractive and screen charismatic people a chance they wouldn't have gotten anywhere else, they get picked out for their looks and screen charisma. It's easy and low risk to get into it. Chris Hemsworth got his start on one of these shows in a non-speaking role playing Lancelot at around 18 before graduating to one of the big Australian soap operas. (That are inexplicably not popular in the US) A lot bigger of a share of the population gets stuff on their IMDB page young, a bigger catchment from which more classic stars can be found.

    Same with the invasion of British actors, a lot of classical acting schools churning out ready-made fodder, some of whom do occasionally look like Henry Cavill. What is interesting to me is the lack of importation of many Scandinavians who all speak perfect fluent English. Surely a few more diamonds waiting to be seen out there above the ones who came to Hollywood, maybe Hollywood should come to them with offers since few will go all the way to them to take a chance.

    Alternatively, Hollywood could take actions to make acting in the US less of a serious gamble to try to break into and thus have a bigger pool of people to make stars from. Guys with screen charisma are often just thoughtful and intelligent. With near universal university tracks for those guys in 2021, they don't consider acting anymore. Maybe they should make them some offers.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Emblematic, @AndrewR, @Hapalong Cassidy, @JMcG, @Kratoklastes, @Ralph L

    What is interesting to me is the lack of importation of many Scandinavians who all speak perfect fluent English

    Maybe the Skarsgards have some sort of Scando-wide monopoly.

    As you say, they do good Yanklish accents, which are important in US-centric productions (although when speaking actual English, Scandos are betrayed by their Scando accents).

    • Replies: @RAZ
    @Kratoklastes

    Always struck by how Swedish NHL players have total idiomatic English comprehension when you hear them interviewed - but usually have some accent. Not annoying but you can usually tell they are not native speakers.

    There tend to be Aussie actors who can pick up either American or English accents for specific roles. Toni Collette is an Aussie, she believably played an American housewife in Little Miss Sunshine and an English woman in About A Boy.

    Anthony LaPaglia is an Aussie but he had spent a lot of time filming in the US and as a consequence when he took a role back as an Aussie Detective in Lantana I read he had to work with a speech coach to reacquire an Aussie accent.

  79. @AnotherDad
    @R.G. Camara


    This sounds like a true nostalgia movie, although since Anderson was only 10 when the 1970s ended, he’s also got the filter of it all seeming much cooler, bewildering, and more adult to him — like he’s trying to see it through a mythical older teenage brother’s eyes.
     
    Had the same thought.

    Even though much in the 70s sucked--the houses, the cars, Vietnam, feminism, inflation, Gerry Ford, recession, Jimmy Carter--i have very fond memories, as it's the decade of most of my "firsts" that you'd expect from a boy in his teens and 20s. Compared to now it was ... pretty damn nice!

    But Anderson is really a generation--or at least half a generation younger.

    Replies: @Goddard, @James J O'Meara, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Even though much in the 70s sucked … i have very fond memories, as it’s the decade of most of my “firsts”

    First waterbed genital warts perhaps goes in the ‘bittersweet’ file

  80. OT, but amusing:

    https://thepostmillennial.com/democrat-says-black-girls-brutally-attacked-asian-girl-to-address-racial-bias

    Oriental pol in Philly suggests that Oriental student who endured a beating by black students on the subway had it coming because racism.

  81. Roger Ebert, reviewing the American remake of the European film “The Vanishing”:

    “What’s the story here? Do Sluizer and his American producers believe the American movie audience is so witless it will not accept uncompromising fidelity to a story idea? Are Europeans deserving of smart, cynical filmmaking, but Americans have to be approached on a more elementary level? I don’t know. I simply know that George Sluizer has directed two films named “The Vanishing,” and one is a masterpiece and the other is laughable, stupid and crude.”

    When an American-made movie manages to come along these days that is a gem, most people (not people here) probably would not like it, or even be able to tell you what the movie was about.

  82. @Altai

    So, decades later we tend to wind up with weirdly boyish-looking leading men like DiCaprio. Why?
     
    While Hollywood (And economic life-scripts) has matured to the place where there isn't a parade of rugged guys from the mid-West heading out West to be discovered and taught to act later, their place taken by the kinds of 'threater kids' who aren't so masculine and masculine guys who don't have much behind the eyes and thus lack screen charisma, I don't think there is still much scope for the true boyish type, DiCarprio had the screen charisma to keep going after aging out of the roles he was more physically right for. He was able to compensate with other things.

    Tom Holland, for example, is doomed to forever play Peter Parker with his forays outside in typical leading male roles being disasters. (Partly this is because he is also psychologically boyish and doesn't have the same stuff behind his eyes that we call screen charisma, he seems kind of dumb) Timothee Chalamet has a weird face that seems to appeal to adolescent girls and gay men but not to wide audiences and certainly not to straight men. It also doesn't look like one that can sustain much aging before it looks 'creepy'. (Can you really have a leading man whose face can't really be shown in side profile?) Outside 'Dune' where not much acting is called for and the part calls for a boyish actor, I don't see him having classic leading man roles despite the huge press he gets. He was cast right in 'Ladybird' as a creep because that actually seems to be who he is as a person.

    More likely is that they'll keep the obsession with credentialism (Hollywood is an extreme version of corporate America, nobody wants to take responsibility, if somebody doesn't work out that's on the guy who gave him his credentials not me who hired him on that basis!) but lean more and more into recruiting actors from abroad. A lot of Australians have been very successful in the US both because they retain the classic Hollywood West European look that gets rarer day by day in the US but also because they have much more TV and film production per capita because of laws mandating a certain amount of local production on TV. This leads to a lot of children's shows for export that give a lot of attractive and screen charismatic people a chance they wouldn't have gotten anywhere else, they get picked out for their looks and screen charisma. It's easy and low risk to get into it. Chris Hemsworth got his start on one of these shows in a non-speaking role playing Lancelot at around 18 before graduating to one of the big Australian soap operas. (That are inexplicably not popular in the US) A lot bigger of a share of the population gets stuff on their IMDB page young, a bigger catchment from which more classic stars can be found.

    Same with the invasion of British actors, a lot of classical acting schools churning out ready-made fodder, some of whom do occasionally look like Henry Cavill. What is interesting to me is the lack of importation of many Scandinavians who all speak perfect fluent English. Surely a few more diamonds waiting to be seen out there above the ones who came to Hollywood, maybe Hollywood should come to them with offers since few will go all the way to them to take a chance.

    Alternatively, Hollywood could take actions to make acting in the US less of a serious gamble to try to break into and thus have a bigger pool of people to make stars from. Guys with screen charisma are often just thoughtful and intelligent. With near universal university tracks for those guys in 2021, they don't consider acting anymore. Maybe they should make them some offers.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Emblematic, @AndrewR, @Hapalong Cassidy, @JMcG, @Kratoklastes, @Ralph L

    I’ve only seen him in The Tudors and Midsomer Murders that I remember, but Henry Cavill and screen charisma did not go together. Whom did he sleep with to become a movie star?

  83. the colossal number of white kids who were getting free educations in the Los Angeles Unified School District back in 1973.

    There’s that time bias, again. From the moment when the government took-over the responsibility of educating the kids, the schools have been getting crappier and crappier, and at a constant, exponential rate.

    One who looks nostalgically back at 1973 (or ’43 etc.) as an era when the schools were “good” (“.. because they were so White!”) needs to get a grip. Life was so much better before the cancer metastaticized to my lungs.

    Btw, the “free” part of education traditionally meant “freemen”, i.e. whites only. The government should charge schoolkids a user fee (i.e. tuition). \$14,500 per kid*yr sounds right. No sibling discount.

  84. @Achmed E. Newman
    @R.G. Camara

    I agree with you on the hard time keeping up with all the people described or mentioned in the column. I didn't care too much, at that. I completely understand being nostalgic for all those times that were probably the best place and time in history to live ANYWHERE (I mean California in general), and Mr. Sailer was part of that.

    However, I never do get this fixation on these Hollywood people. Did they make Southern California what it was in real life? No, that was one "industry", but aerospace must have supported the economy in a much bigger way, along with other real industries. I'll just say it again - I couldn't give a rat's ass about anyone discussed in the column besides our blogger himself.

    Mr. Scarlet Number, mash the Troll button. You know you want to. This kind of talk doesn't sell cable!

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Currahee

    “but aerospace must have supported the economy in a much bigger way,”
    Worked for Watt Industries (Ray Watt was a major LA homebuilder) in the 70’s and 80’s. We did a homebuyers’ survey in the mid-80’s to discover that 45% of our homeowners were employed in aerospace.
    That’s huge.

  85. @Reg Cæsar
    Licorice pizza sounds like something only Aussies would eat.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @SunBakedSuburb, @Currahee

    Once was offered Vegemite by an Aussie neighbor; so, yes.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  86. I seldom watch movies despite owning many unopened DVDs and subscribing to several cable TV channels that are nothing but films. Stupid me.

    While this current (seemingly silly) film presses iSteve’s buttons for reasons he explains (localism) it seems very “small town mentality” for Hollywood writers/directors/etc. to fund and film so many movies about this small region of southern California.

    As opposed to the 99.9% of America. Yes, some similar films are made about other locales (childhood/growing up is a common dramatic trope) and some of these Hollywood films are not too bad. But really?

    Aside from the hype and fake glamour (look at any supermarket tabloid to see what they really look like) and what do you have? Boring characters running around a “fabled place” that is peopled with creeps and dreamers.

    The Industry is notoriously corrupt (Harvey Weinstein was a longtime hero…). Sure the music industry might be worse, but if it weren’t for the fact that for decades it was cheaper to film here or shoot TV, would anyone care about SoCal and iSteve’s back yard?

    I think films like Once Upon a Time in Hollywood and Licorice Pizza are like the dreck films (some, not all) set in Paris or Rome. Of course those nations have only once center of gravity. America has many. The Tarantino horror is just an ‘alternative history’ version of a fairy tale instead of the true horror show that occurred there. Can’t say much about the Anderson film except that it was obviously cheaper to film it locally. Does America really want more SoCal set films? Young guy lusting after unattainable older woman? Can’t that happen in say, Macon GA?

    I guess the so-called Kreative Klass can’t be bothered to shoot in Salt Lake City or Cleveland. No stories there, people are boring and stupid. Hollywood has it all. Just don’t go out at night…

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Muggles


    Harvey Weinstein was a longtime hero…
     
    Why were serious actresses like Sarah Polley auditioning applying for jobs with a pornographer, anyway? I mean, unconceal your carry if he tries anything, but don't act surprised later!

    Never, ever, ever go into any man's office, let alone hotel room, without an escort. Half the public will refuse to believe your side of the story.

    Just ask my friend Juanita.

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @Muggles

    The reason is psychologically-historical.

    The so-called American Dream was, first, something perfectly desirable: live your life freely, without coercion or humiliation forced upon you by aristocratic & plutocratic classes, without police terror & crushed by poverty & Godot-like desperation. The message was: for a common man, life can be fulfilled and worth living.

    Then, it transmogrified into a base cartoon of the Jazz Age & Gatsby (also, some time before), the message becoming: the American Dream is material wealth, living in the limelight, being ostentatiously rich & famous, winner at all costs & living a glamorous life-style, a hero for such mindset being Epstein.

    Historically, California has become the archetype, luring people as the Promised Land of becoming rich quickly, either through pure luck (the 1848 Gold Rush), then a post-depression paradise (the Okies) & Hollywood the dream factory, all resulting in the 60s hippies, free sex, dope, music & later as the Mecca for alternative life-styles, plus Silicon Valley myth-reality.

    In sum, this all contributed, especially for the gullible outsiders, but most other Americans, too, to a state of collective hypnosis where one piece of land was equated with the state of hedonistic bliss & lush glamorous life, as if in a fairy tale.

    California, not a real US state, is a state of mind, a mind simultaneously infantile & corrupt.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @James J O'Meara

  87. @Jack D
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Brando really transformed himself in The Godfather. Not just with makeup but in terms of inhabiting the role.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Bardon Kaldian, @Currahee, @JohnnyWalker123, @Reg Cæsar

    Yes, having read the novel, along with everybody else, I was dumbfounded when I read that Brando was given the role. I was so totally wrong and the movie was ten times the book, which was basically a potboiler Harold Robbins sort of thing.

  88. @Steve Sailer
    @Emblematic

    The Rock is fun.

    Replies: @Anon55uu

    On the Moana soundtrack CD there are versions of the show stopper track You’re Welcome sung by the Rock and then by its writer Lin-Manuel Miranda. The Rock’s is much more fun – he puts it all out there and I cannot remember him having sung previously.

  89. @Jack D
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Brando really transformed himself in The Godfather. Not just with makeup but in terms of inhabiting the role.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Bardon Kaldian, @Currahee, @JohnnyWalker123, @Reg Cæsar

    Tattaglia’s a pimp. He never could’ve out fought Santino.

    I didn’t know until this day that it was Barzini all along.

  90. OT: VP Harris is so unpopular that some Dems are trying to unload her now, well in advance of the 2024 elections, even to the point of suggesting that she could go on the Supreme Court. Which nobody really wants.

    But now, Kamala “Hidden Figures” Harris has displayed a new talent:

    Russia’s destructive test of an anti-satellite missile last month that created at least 1,500 pieces of space debris was “irresponsible” Vice President Kamala Harris said at the annual National Space Council meeting Wednesday.

    https://www.axios.com/harris-russia-anti-satellite-missile-test-bbd3da8d-a9c2-475c-b5ad-4c39a29581af.html

    Maybe head of NASA?

  91. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Our host is good at pointing out George Clooney's odd practice of getting himself cast in roles that would, in real life, not be populated by a guy with the irrepressible charisma and good looks of a George Clooney. Best example, Up In The Air, where he's cast as a vagabond personnel manager instead of the guy at the head of the conference room table putting together billion-dollar deals. He did good work in O Brother Where Art Thou, despite not looking anything like a low-level grifter trying to support his too-large family in the rural South in the 1930's.

    Steve Buscemi has made good coin playing roles as the weaselly dirtbag loser because he looks like a weaselly dirtbag loser. But I bet in real life he's a charming guy with lots of friends.

    I'd like to see Sailer write some stuff about the truly Hardest Working Man in Showbiz, the late great Brion James. I always thought his casting in The Player was a nod and bit of an inside joke to his extraordinary networking. Here's Brion on Brion:


    [in August 1999, when asked to what he attributes his success] Hard work. You gotta study, man. It's like any profession. I did eight years in theater. I studied two years in school in New York with Stella Adler, the best teacher in the world. I studied under Nina Foch, I did theater, I learned my craft. You got to learn how to build a character, there's a way to do it. Everything I ever did was different. I did 125 films, and over 100 television shows, and you've never seen the same character twice. I think now, in my 50s, with [Robert Duvall], [Albert Finney] and [Gene Hackman], those guys are getting up there in their 60s, it's my time. And I'm making sure that I push myself into their slot. So, my best work's coming.
     
    Then he dropped dead at age 54. God almighty.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @James J O'Meara, @puttheforkdown, @Steve Sailer

    Oh man. Here’s Brion at what looks like a Comic-Con/Dragon-Con a few weeks before his death. He doesn’t look good and is either high, drunk or otherwise unable to keep his train of thought. He also doesn’t like fags.

    He grimaces and grabs his side 14 seconds in so he may have been having some issues already. That’s sad. Age 54 is way too young to leave the party.

  92. @Muggles
    I seldom watch movies despite owning many unopened DVDs and subscribing to several cable TV channels that are nothing but films. Stupid me.

    While this current (seemingly silly) film presses iSteve's buttons for reasons he explains (localism) it seems very "small town mentality" for Hollywood writers/directors/etc. to fund and film so many movies about this small region of southern California.

    As opposed to the 99.9% of America. Yes, some similar films are made about other locales (childhood/growing up is a common dramatic trope) and some of these Hollywood films are not too bad. But really?

    Aside from the hype and fake glamour (look at any supermarket tabloid to see what they really look like) and what do you have? Boring characters running around a "fabled place" that is peopled with creeps and dreamers.

    The Industry is notoriously corrupt (Harvey Weinstein was a longtime hero...). Sure the music industry might be worse, but if it weren't for the fact that for decades it was cheaper to film here or shoot TV, would anyone care about SoCal and iSteve's back yard?

    I think films like Once Upon a Time in Hollywood and Licorice Pizza are like the dreck films (some, not all) set in Paris or Rome. Of course those nations have only once center of gravity. America has many. The Tarantino horror is just an 'alternative history' version of a fairy tale instead of the true horror show that occurred there. Can't say much about the Anderson film except that it was obviously cheaper to film it locally. Does America really want more SoCal set films? Young guy lusting after unattainable older woman? Can't that happen in say, Macon GA?

    I guess the so-called Kreative Klass can't be bothered to shoot in Salt Lake City or Cleveland. No stories there, people are boring and stupid. Hollywood has it all. Just don't go out at night...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Bardon Kaldian

    Harvey Weinstein was a longtime hero…

    Why were serious actresses like Sarah Polley auditioning applying for jobs with a pornographer, anyway? I mean, unconceal your carry if he tries anything, but don’t act surprised later!

    Never, ever, ever go into any man’s office, let alone hotel room, without an escort. Half the public will refuse to believe your side of the story.

    Just ask my friend Juanita.

  93. I know the local custom here is to denounce the film industry in general (and Tarantino in particular), and then sneer at Steve’s lickspittle review.

    I’m going to break with tradition, and just say, “Interesting review. I think I’ll take my girlfriend to see this, when it comes out.

    I hope that’s OK!

  94. @Steve Sailer
    @Altai

    I've noticed that some successful actors, such as James Woods and Brad Pitt, tend to drop out of college in their senior year. It could be that they never got around to taking hard required courses (Woods was at MIT) or that they are 21 and in demand for acting. Or both.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Buzz Mohawk, @Paul Rise

    Pitt fled the University of Missouri his last semester because of a disastrous affair with a professor in the journalism school that was made public among various student cliques at that school. Pitt was embarrassed and fled the campus. The professor went to some effort to try to get him to return, supposedly he was only a credit or two short of a diploma.

    I knew the professor as an attractive older woman, she would have been a knockout 15 or years earlier when these events supposedly occured.

  95. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman


    There’s already a Mystic Pizza...
     
    Been to the real one. Underwhelming joint in a pretty boring coastal town not far from here that tries to be touristy. They make what they can of the movie connection. The pizza wasn't mystic at all.

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev, @Achmed E. Newman

    Underwhelming joint in a pretty boring coastal town

    Fair enough about the pizza place, but kind of odd seeing someone trash Mystic, CT on this blog. The town is 95.8% white, clean and orderly, well kept up, has beautiful 19th century houses, interesting museums if you enjoy the sea, and lies on a scenic river. If you want to hide from the horrors of the 21st century and enjoy American life as it used to be, Mystic is a nice place to go, at least in the off season.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Peter Akuleyev

    I'm sorry. Mystic must just remind me of half the towns I've lived in around here. I forgot that they are exotic rarities for many Americans now.

    You know, when I got to Yellowstone, I was like that. I told my girlfriend in the car that it reminded me of my hometown in Colorado, and that I couldn't see what the big deal was. We broke up a few weeks later -- and the place caught on fire. The 1988 Yellowstone fire.

    Sorry, and I agree that Mystic is a nice place. No sarcasm. I realize what just happened and what you made me realize -- how lucky I am.

    Replies: @JMcG

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Peter Akuleyev


    clean and orderly, well kept up
     
    You can be all of those things and still be boring. Just as your snazzy exurban school district could be teaching CRT.

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev

  96. https://variety.com/2021/film/news/paul-thomas-anderson-licorice-pizza-box-office-opening-1235120716/

    Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Licorice Pizza” has secured the best pandemic-era debut at the independent box office.

    With speciality offerings like “Licorice Pizza,” the key metric is per-theater-average rather than overall box office tally since its playing in very few locations. From only four theaters in the country — two in New York and two in Los Angeles — “Licorice Pizza” brought in \$335,000 in total and \$83,852 per location, more than any other specialty film in nearly two years. In other words, PTA has landed the best PTA among arthouse titles since the onset of COVID-19.

    [MORE]

    Variety’s chief film critic Peter Debruge praised acting newcomers Haim, one-third of the band Haim, and Hoffman, the son of Philip Seymour Hoffman, in what he refers to as “a pair of terrific first-time performances.”

    “‘Licorice Pizza’ delivers a piping-hot, jumbo slice-of-life look at how it felt to grow up on the fringes of the film industry circa 1973, as seen through the eyes of an ambitious former child actor plotting how to follow up his early screen career,” Debruge wrote.

  97. @Muggles
    I seldom watch movies despite owning many unopened DVDs and subscribing to several cable TV channels that are nothing but films. Stupid me.

    While this current (seemingly silly) film presses iSteve's buttons for reasons he explains (localism) it seems very "small town mentality" for Hollywood writers/directors/etc. to fund and film so many movies about this small region of southern California.

    As opposed to the 99.9% of America. Yes, some similar films are made about other locales (childhood/growing up is a common dramatic trope) and some of these Hollywood films are not too bad. But really?

    Aside from the hype and fake glamour (look at any supermarket tabloid to see what they really look like) and what do you have? Boring characters running around a "fabled place" that is peopled with creeps and dreamers.

    The Industry is notoriously corrupt (Harvey Weinstein was a longtime hero...). Sure the music industry might be worse, but if it weren't for the fact that for decades it was cheaper to film here or shoot TV, would anyone care about SoCal and iSteve's back yard?

    I think films like Once Upon a Time in Hollywood and Licorice Pizza are like the dreck films (some, not all) set in Paris or Rome. Of course those nations have only once center of gravity. America has many. The Tarantino horror is just an 'alternative history' version of a fairy tale instead of the true horror show that occurred there. Can't say much about the Anderson film except that it was obviously cheaper to film it locally. Does America really want more SoCal set films? Young guy lusting after unattainable older woman? Can't that happen in say, Macon GA?

    I guess the so-called Kreative Klass can't be bothered to shoot in Salt Lake City or Cleveland. No stories there, people are boring and stupid. Hollywood has it all. Just don't go out at night...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Bardon Kaldian

    The reason is psychologically-historical.

    The so-called American Dream was, first, something perfectly desirable: live your life freely, without coercion or humiliation forced upon you by aristocratic & plutocratic classes, without police terror & crushed by poverty & Godot-like desperation. The message was: for a common man, life can be fulfilled and worth living.

    Then, it transmogrified into a base cartoon of the Jazz Age & Gatsby (also, some time before), the message becoming: the American Dream is material wealth, living in the limelight, being ostentatiously rich & famous, winner at all costs & living a glamorous life-style, a hero for such mindset being Epstein.

    Historically, California has become the archetype, luring people as the Promised Land of becoming rich quickly, either through pure luck (the 1848 Gold Rush), then a post-depression paradise (the Okies) & Hollywood the dream factory, all resulting in the 60s hippies, free sex, dope, music & later as the Mecca for alternative life-styles, plus Silicon Valley myth-reality.

    In sum, this all contributed, especially for the gullible outsiders, but most other Americans, too, to a state of collective hypnosis where one piece of land was equated with the state of hedonistic bliss & lush glamorous life, as if in a fairy tale.

    California, not a real US state, is a state of mind, a mind simultaneously infantile & corrupt.

    • Thanks: Rob
    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
    @Bardon Kaldian

    "Then, it transmogrified into a base cartoon of the Jazz Age & Gatsby (also, some time before), the message becoming: the American Dream is material wealth, living in the limelight, being ostentatiously rich & famous, winner at all costs & living a glamorous life-style, a hero for such mindset being Epstein."

    Do you mean that literally? That point in time would gibe nicely with my theory that Prohibition was the biggest cultural own goal in history. Our oh so moral Southern Cavaliers and Northern Presbyterians got together to kick the dirty Catholic immigrant where it hurts: boozing. Extra points for attacking the Mass as well; as we know, Jesus and friends only drank grape juice, as many Baptist scholars have proven.

    Anyway, what actually happened was that not only were people taught contempt for the law, it was the first time most Americans ever encountered Jews. Jews ran the speakeasies (like Toots Shor's in NYC) where Youth could see the mayor, police chief and perhaps a Supreme Court justice carousing together. As for their parents, Jews were often admitted into the family home for the first time, to deliver booze.

    The foot in the door, the cultural subversion began. Nice job, Protestants.

    , @James J O'Meara
    @Bardon Kaldian

    "The message was: for a common man, life can be fulfilled and worth living."

    Detroit, in my youth, was not just a Whitopia (the Paris of the Midwest, as the Wall St. Journal opined). It was a place where a working class guy with little education, like my father, could hold a unionized job (no, not in the auto plants), own a house and car, raise a family, then retire with enough cash to buy a house in the suburbs for cash.

    No one who remembers that can take the "Right" seriously; it's mostly a bunch of reactionaries -- excuse me, "neo-reactionaries" -- using the current crisis to promote their favorite LARP's as the cure for what ails us. To them -- like the Frankfurt School, interestingly -- the previous paragraph describes a world that was already a sinkhole of decadence and perversion. Back to the days of dashing Cavaliers riding on the backs of slaves. No, the Founders were the problem, back to English rule! No, Protestantism is the problem, back to the pre-Reformation! No, Christianity is the problem, back to Aristotle!

    As that great philosopher said, include me out.

  98. @guest007
    @AnotherDad

    Grant High School is:

    Hispanic 53.5%
    White 38.3%
    Asian 3.7%
    African American 3.5%

    with 96% free lunch. So what type of white person lives in Los Angeles an qualifies for free school lunch.

    https://www.niche.com/k12/ulysses-s-grant-high-school-van-nuys-ca/

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Abolish_public_education, @Clifford Brown, @anonymous

    So what type of white person lives in Los Angeles an qualifies for free school lunch.

    Free lunch numbers are almost always boosted by the locals because so much other school money is tied to them. The whitopia where I used to live didn’t even check the accuracy of the applications.

  99. @the one they call Desanex
    Artist Richard Amsel did a lot of movie posters and other showbiz art in the seventies. I think the poster for Licorice Pizza is meant to imitate his style, with the serpentine hair and floating faces. I don’t know who did the Pizza poster, but it couldn’t have been Amsel himself; he died of AIDS in 1985.
    https://i.imgur.com/2qYm0ZI.jpg

    http://adammcdaniel.com/AmselArt/amsel_the_shootist76_poster.jpg
    http://adammcdaniel.com/AmselArt/lucky_lady.jpg
    http://adammcdaniel.com/AmselArt/Amsel_TheChamp_finalposter.jpg

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex, @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    Speaking of artists imitating other artists, this was Amsel imitating J. C. Leyendecker.

    [MORE]

  100. Compare a movie to Tarantino and I don’t watch it, but today I hired to brothers to cut my lawn and plow my driveway, Chris and Andrew something or other. Nicely dressed for two unemployed guys. The older brother, Andy, hit on my wife, too funny, she’s 77 but she thought that he was cute.

    • LOL: JMcG
  101. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Underwhelming joint in a pretty boring coastal town
     
    Fair enough about the pizza place, but kind of odd seeing someone trash Mystic, CT on this blog. The town is 95.8% white, clean and orderly, well kept up, has beautiful 19th century houses, interesting museums if you enjoy the sea, and lies on a scenic river. If you want to hide from the horrors of the 21st century and enjoy American life as it used to be, Mystic is a nice place to go, at least in the off season.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Reg Cæsar

    I’m sorry. Mystic must just remind me of half the towns I’ve lived in around here. I forgot that they are exotic rarities for many Americans now.

    You know, when I got to Yellowstone, I was like that. I told my girlfriend in the car that it reminded me of my hometown in Colorado, and that I couldn’t see what the big deal was. We broke up a few weeks later — and the place caught on fire. The 1988 Yellowstone fire.

    Sorry, and I agree that Mystic is a nice place. No sarcasm. I realize what just happened and what you made me realize — how lucky I am.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I was climbing in the Tetons in the summer of ‘88. I soloed the Grand in July with the smoke of burning National Parks in the air. You didn’t happen to see a band called Papa Clutch and the Shifters in Jackson that summer by any chance?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  102. @Joe Stalin
    The Cosmopolitan Gun Controller in full force.

    A federal judge in Southern California initially declared that California was violating the Second Amendment and the Constitution’s “takings clause.” Last year a three-judge panel on the 9th Circuit sided with the Southern California judge and struck down California’s ban. Now the full 11-judge panel of the 9th Circuit has declared that California can enforce the prohibition on large-capacity magazines, saying the state isn’t violating anyone’s constitutional rights. “The statute outlaws no weapon, but only limits the size of the magazine that may be used with firearms,” wrote Judge Susan Graber. She added that “there is no evidence that anyone ever has been unable to defend his or her home and family due to the lack of a large capacity magazine.”

    Read more at: https://www.sacbee.com/news/california/article256225972.html#storylink=cpy
     

    LA City Council unanimously votes in favor of ordinance to ban non-serialized 'ghost guns'
    https://abc7.com/ghost-guns-banned-los-angeles-unserialized/11285508/
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The Cosmopolitan Gun Controller in full force.

    A true Gun Graber!

    Still, without decisions like this one, how do the police disarm law-abiding blacks? The 2nd and the 14th clash.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    ... how do the police disarm law-abiding blacks?
     
    Why do you care if “law-abiding blacks” are armed or not? What would your hero Thomas Sowell say if he knew you were so niggardly?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  103. @JMcG
    @Altai

    I remember my sister watching Cell Block H after school in the early 80s. I think that was Australian.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    I vaguely remember that – about a women’s prison. I think a lot of guys watched it in the hope of catching a bit of inmate-on-inmate action.

    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @Rob McX

    Yes indeed on both counts. But after school? Hmmm. I recall it being run in the after midnight infomercial ghetto in my part of the country, seems more appropriate.

    , @JMcG
    @Rob McX

    Yep- I was a little concerned about my sister but she’s been married forever with five kids, so all good.

  104. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Underwhelming joint in a pretty boring coastal town
     
    Fair enough about the pizza place, but kind of odd seeing someone trash Mystic, CT on this blog. The town is 95.8% white, clean and orderly, well kept up, has beautiful 19th century houses, interesting museums if you enjoy the sea, and lies on a scenic river. If you want to hide from the horrors of the 21st century and enjoy American life as it used to be, Mystic is a nice place to go, at least in the off season.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Reg Cæsar

    clean and orderly, well kept up

    You can be all of those things and still be boring. Just as your snazzy exurban school district could be teaching CRT.

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    @Reg Cæsar

    True, but in a world where the opposite of boring is often "vibrant", I don't mind boring.

  105. “…in 1969 because I was 11…”

    Is a review of that era’s & protagonist age movie, Belfast, directed by Kenneth Branagh, in the offing?

    “They say” it’s likely to be Oscar’s pick for best of 2021.

  106. @Mike Tre
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Most, but not all actors: Robert Duvall had great range. Tom Hagen, LtCol. Kilgore, and Gus McCrae are three completely different and dare I say epic characters that one cannot honestly associate with Duvall just playing Duvall.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Mr Mox

    I’ve seen Hagen & McCrae, and yes, I’d agree. These are different characters & Duvall was successful in his art of representation.

  107. @International Jew
    @Steve Sailer

    Your potential acting roles are limited if you're under 21? (I mean, other than for actresses whose asset is their boobies.)

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Your potential acting roles are limited if you’re under 21?

    Before 1984, it made a difference in where you could raise a toast.

    New England Young People Battle Rise in Drinking Age

    Damn Yankee bluenoses! Damned Cuomo!

  108. @guest007
    @AnotherDad

    Grant High School is:

    Hispanic 53.5%
    White 38.3%
    Asian 3.7%
    African American 3.5%

    with 96% free lunch. So what type of white person lives in Los Angeles an qualifies for free school lunch.

    https://www.niche.com/k12/ulysses-s-grant-high-school-van-nuys-ca/

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Abolish_public_education, @Clifford Brown, @anonymous

    In 2019, USDA’s reduced price (free!) meals costs taxpayers \$14.2B. Most meals (90+%?) were distributed in public school cafeterias. When schoolies whine about skool underfunding, they always avoid mention of meal subsidies. Keep in mind that the menu items are RD-certified junk, and what’s sold to [gullible] taxpayers as “pro-learning, hunger prevention” is really just a huge welfare payout to Big Ag.

    (One reason why home schools can operate on a shoestring budget is that the kitchen doubles as classroom and cafeteria, and mom as teacher and chef. Public schools are expensive partly because they operate restaurants, law firms, sports leagues, telecom service firms, health clinics, transportation companies; the list of suck goes on and on.)

    [MORE]

    The gov-media complex has been exploiting the latest instance of a catastrophically dangerous, failing public school as an opportunity to laud the “heroic” first unionized-responders, school lockdown contingency plans, and to push an anti-gun agenda.

    As we’re “informed” that the boy’s parents won’t cooperate, we’re supposed to cheer that the lawyer-DA has threatened to punish them and has charged the kid as an adult. “Cooperation” means the family’s lawyer not being allowed to describe how the boy has been getting bullied since first grade, the parents have complained to the school district 100X, and nothing was ever done.

    This mass shooting totally vindicates the gun rights argument that when schoolkids are disarmed, only criminal schoolkids will own guns.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @Abolish_public_education

    I guess that one does not learn opportunity costs when teaching home schoolers. If mom is capable of teaching her children calculus, physics, chemistry, and a foreign language at home, then mom can get a job that pays enough for the family to afford college prep private schools.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @Achmed E. Newman

  109. (Just in case you have a hard time keeping straight the three directors named Anderson: Texan Wes Anderson makes whimsical confections like The Grand Budapest Hotel and Englishman Paul W.S. Anderson created the Resident Evil series.)

    Red Letter Media Watches the Ending of Resident Evil: Afterlife

    http://www.redlettermedia.com – To see the full RLM discussion of the Resident Evil series, watch the latest Half in the Bag on our website.

    Just a note here: None of this was faked or even acted or enhanced. Rich Evans cannot fake his laughter. Sometimes it happens. Sometimes it doesn’t. I can also not fake this. By the end I couldn’t breathe I was laughing so hard. A lot was because of Rich laughing. Also, no drugs were involved other than a few beers. Jay nor I were “wasted” or anything like that. I think a major factor was we watched 4 movies in a row and it was 1am. But, hell, it was still hilarious. – Mike

    [MORE]

    Half in the Bag Episode 38: Resident Evil series Part 1

    Half in the Bag Episode 38: Resident Evil series Part 2

  110. @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Bardon Kaldian


    This is the case with all actors. John Wayne is always John Wayne; De Niro- De Niro; Eastwood- Eastwood; Brando- Brando ….
     
    Not really - the names you cited are more "movie stars" than actors. Their parts seem to be written for their public characters.

    On the other hand, someone like Gary Oldman is an actor - he becomes the character in the drama and Gary Oldman sort of disappears.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Captain Tripps

    And perhaps this has more to do with the type of a creative personality, than with his talents or education. Maybe this is a “lower level” of creation, pale & limited of necessity- but still authentic, of something Samuel Taylor Coleridge had discussed in “Biographia Literaria”, contrasting Milton with Shakespeare:

    „Shakespeare, no mere child of nature; no automaton of genius; no passive vehicle of inspiration possessed by the spirit, not possessing it; first studied patiently, meditated deeply, understood minutely, till knowledge became habitual and intuitive, wedded itself to his habitual feelings, and at length gave birth to that stupendous power by which he stands alone, with no equal or second in his own class; to that power which seated him on one of the two glorysmitten summits of the poetic mountain, with Milton аs his compeer, not rival. While the former darts himself forth, and passes into all the forms of human character and passion, the one Proteus of the fire and the flood; the other attracts all forms and things to himself, into the unity of his own Ideal. All things and modes of action shape themselves anew in the being of Milton; while Shakespeare becomes all things, yet for ever remaining himself.“

    Or, in Isaiah Berlin’s words- Milton was a hedgehog, and Shakespeare a fox.

  111. Anon[209] • Disclaimer says:

    As much as I liked the nostalgic LA scenes and visuals in Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, I thought it was a bad movie overall. Large chunks and extended scenes like the movie theater, the Manson base, etc. that went nowhere. And the final denouement with the comical gore was just silly.

  112. QT on his best day could never make a film half as good as There Will Be Blood. In fact it’s the last film I saw in a theatre. I wasn’t aware of this new film but I will watch it online. I even liked The Master from Anderson, I’ll watch anything he directs. Inherent Vice was made before Once Upon A Time, takes place in LA in the 60’s and it’s a much better film

  113. Tarantino brings up Rebecca Rittenhouse — the actress who played Michelle Phillips in “Once Upon…” and Tarantino’s Italian and Tennessee stuff was the most humorous part of the movie.

    Rebecca RITTENHOUSE is English and German.

    A lot of Americans have both English and German ancestry.

    Tarantino has English and German ancestry.

    I have English and German ancestry.

  114. “(Just in case you have a hard time keeping straight the three directors named Anderson: Texan Wes Anderson makes whimsical confections like The Grand Budapest Hotel and Englishman Paul W.S. Anderson created the Resident Evil series.)”

    Personally, I confuse director Paul Thomas Anderson with director (and actor!) Paul Thomas.

    Wikipedia says;

    Thomas started directing porn films in 1985, and has directed for Vivid Entertainment since 1986. As of 2007 Thomas has acted in over 500 films and directed nearly 300 films, winning seven Adult Video News Awards[8] and two X-Rated Critics Organization Awards[9] for best director. He was inducted into the X-Rated Critics Organization Hall of Fame in 1986.[5]

    Thomas is a member of the Adult Video News Hall of Fame.[4] He is a personal friend of Jennifer Ketcham, who recounts Thomas’ directing style as relying heavily on aesthetics with “one-hundred-page scripts” and “deftly placed lighting” in order to create shadow effects on his performers’ bodies. She also stated that Thomas would require more acting from his performers than many other directors in the industry.

    Beat that, Paul Thomas Anderson!

  115. @Rob McX
    @JMcG

    I vaguely remember that - about a women's prison. I think a lot of guys watched it in the hope of catching a bit of inmate-on-inmate action.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @JMcG

    Yes indeed on both counts. But after school? Hmmm. I recall it being run in the after midnight infomercial ghetto in my part of the country, seems more appropriate.

  116. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Muggles

    The reason is psychologically-historical.

    The so-called American Dream was, first, something perfectly desirable: live your life freely, without coercion or humiliation forced upon you by aristocratic & plutocratic classes, without police terror & crushed by poverty & Godot-like desperation. The message was: for a common man, life can be fulfilled and worth living.

    Then, it transmogrified into a base cartoon of the Jazz Age & Gatsby (also, some time before), the message becoming: the American Dream is material wealth, living in the limelight, being ostentatiously rich & famous, winner at all costs & living a glamorous life-style, a hero for such mindset being Epstein.

    Historically, California has become the archetype, luring people as the Promised Land of becoming rich quickly, either through pure luck (the 1848 Gold Rush), then a post-depression paradise (the Okies) & Hollywood the dream factory, all resulting in the 60s hippies, free sex, dope, music & later as the Mecca for alternative life-styles, plus Silicon Valley myth-reality.

    In sum, this all contributed, especially for the gullible outsiders, but most other Americans, too, to a state of collective hypnosis where one piece of land was equated with the state of hedonistic bliss & lush glamorous life, as if in a fairy tale.

    California, not a real US state, is a state of mind, a mind simultaneously infantile & corrupt.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @James J O'Meara

    “Then, it transmogrified into a base cartoon of the Jazz Age & Gatsby (also, some time before), the message becoming: the American Dream is material wealth, living in the limelight, being ostentatiously rich & famous, winner at all costs & living a glamorous life-style, a hero for such mindset being Epstein.”

    Do you mean that literally? That point in time would gibe nicely with my theory that Prohibition was the biggest cultural own goal in history. Our oh so moral Southern Cavaliers and Northern Presbyterians got together to kick the dirty Catholic immigrant where it hurts: boozing. Extra points for attacking the Mass as well; as we know, Jesus and friends only drank grape juice, as many Baptist scholars have proven.

    Anyway, what actually happened was that not only were people taught contempt for the law, it was the first time most Americans ever encountered Jews. Jews ran the speakeasies (like Toots Shor’s in NYC) where Youth could see the mayor, police chief and perhaps a Supreme Court justice carousing together. As for their parents, Jews were often admitted into the family home for the first time, to deliver booze.

    The foot in the door, the cultural subversion began. Nice job, Protestants.

    • Agree: Ron Mexico
  117. OT We Will Replace You but also there is no great replacement plan
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10264157/Tenement-Museum-replaces-stories-white-immigrants-Lower-East-black-man.html
    NYC Tenement Museum replaces exhibit of actual tenement tenants with exhibit of KANGS who never lived there.

  118. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Steve Sailer

    Robert Redford dropped out of my alma mater to take acting jobs in New York. He worked at a burger joint across the street from campus that's still there.

    Glenn Miller dropped out there a generation earlier for his big band career. Our ballroom is named after him.

    Bill Gates and Mark Zukerberg both dropped out of Harvard.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Maybe “getting into Harvard” is itself a great qualification. Don’t think that applies to Yale.

  119. @Reg Cæsar
    @Joe Stalin


    The Cosmopolitan Gun Controller in full force.
     
    A true Gun Graber!

    Still, without decisions like this one, how do the police disarm law-abiding blacks? The 2nd and the 14th clash.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    … how do the police disarm law-abiding blacks?

    Why do you care if “law-abiding blacks” are armed or not? What would your hero Thomas Sowell say if he knew you were so niggardly?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    Why do you care if “law-abiding blacks” are armed or not?


    Just seeing who's awake!

    Besides, I didn't say I did, just assumed a lot of readers here do. Do you disagree?

    But if I did want to disarm law-abiding blacks, I'd be in agreement with the great majority of them. There is almost zero resistance to gun control in "the community".

    Resistance to enforcement, yes. But that goes for all the white man's laws.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  120. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    ... how do the police disarm law-abiding blacks?
     
    Why do you care if “law-abiding blacks” are armed or not? What would your hero Thomas Sowell say if he knew you were so niggardly?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Why do you care if “law-abiding blacks” are armed or not?

    Just seeing who’s awake!

    Besides, I didn’t say I did, just assumed a lot of readers here do. Do you disagree?

    But if I did want to disarm law-abiding blacks, I’d be in agreement with the great majority of them. There is almost zero resistance to gun control in “the community”.

    Resistance to enforcement, yes. But that goes for all the white man’s laws.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    Besides, I didn’t say I did, just assumed a lot of readers here do. Do you disagree?
     
    Disagree with what:

    1) That you say you did?
    2) That readers here think that law-abiding blacks should be disarmed?
    3) That law-abiding blacks should be disarmed?

    I assume you mean one of the above choices; I may have missed one or more. I’ll answer if you can be specific…

    But if I did want to disarm law-abiding blacks

     

    Ah. So you’re saying you actually don’t want to disarm them? Thus, you also don’t really believe “the 2nd and the 14th clash” in this instance? Okay!

    “Mr. Cæsar, I must say I am a bit disappointed in your commentary this evening. Why you gotta be like that?”

    https://priorprobability.files.wordpress.com/2019/09/img_3242.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  121. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Muggles

    The reason is psychologically-historical.

    The so-called American Dream was, first, something perfectly desirable: live your life freely, without coercion or humiliation forced upon you by aristocratic & plutocratic classes, without police terror & crushed by poverty & Godot-like desperation. The message was: for a common man, life can be fulfilled and worth living.

    Then, it transmogrified into a base cartoon of the Jazz Age & Gatsby (also, some time before), the message becoming: the American Dream is material wealth, living in the limelight, being ostentatiously rich & famous, winner at all costs & living a glamorous life-style, a hero for such mindset being Epstein.

    Historically, California has become the archetype, luring people as the Promised Land of becoming rich quickly, either through pure luck (the 1848 Gold Rush), then a post-depression paradise (the Okies) & Hollywood the dream factory, all resulting in the 60s hippies, free sex, dope, music & later as the Mecca for alternative life-styles, plus Silicon Valley myth-reality.

    In sum, this all contributed, especially for the gullible outsiders, but most other Americans, too, to a state of collective hypnosis where one piece of land was equated with the state of hedonistic bliss & lush glamorous life, as if in a fairy tale.

    California, not a real US state, is a state of mind, a mind simultaneously infantile & corrupt.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @James J O'Meara

    “The message was: for a common man, life can be fulfilled and worth living.”

    Detroit, in my youth, was not just a Whitopia (the Paris of the Midwest, as the Wall St. Journal opined). It was a place where a working class guy with little education, like my father, could hold a unionized job (no, not in the auto plants), own a house and car, raise a family, then retire with enough cash to buy a house in the suburbs for cash.

    No one who remembers that can take the “Right” seriously; it’s mostly a bunch of reactionaries — excuse me, “neo-reactionaries” — using the current crisis to promote their favorite LARP’s as the cure for what ails us. To them — like the Frankfurt School, interestingly — the previous paragraph describes a world that was already a sinkhole of decadence and perversion. Back to the days of dashing Cavaliers riding on the backs of slaves. No, the Founders were the problem, back to English rule! No, Protestantism is the problem, back to the pre-Reformation! No, Christianity is the problem, back to Aristotle!

    As that great philosopher said, include me out.

  122. OT or maybe not, Jacqueline Avant was shot and killed in her Beverly Hills Mansion today, her security guard was also shot. She’s the wife of a big time record producer and her daughter is married to Ted Sarandros, Co-CEO of Netflix.

    Unsure who the shooter is, no “description” so its likely a black dude in some home invasion. Defund the police and don’t prosecute crimes. Guess what happens?

    A number of celebrities and such have had home invasions and attempted kidnappings. After they’re done with the rich and famous (to the point where the latter all move to Miami or Vail) they will target us.

    Over/under as to when ordinary middle class people here get held for ransom like in Mexico? My guess is maybe three months. And what place will replace Hollywood? Its pretty much dead now, the place cannot function as the bedroom and production HQ if the rich and famous even with security get shot, and the cost of rolling in with a platoon of SEALs is going to be prohibitive for anyone under Spielberg level of money.

    My guess is Vail. Pretty scenery, no blacks, probably enough land to house production companies.

    But for sure, LA is dead as a production center for entertainment. The body may twitch around for a while, but that’s it. Once a place cedes the streets to criminals it can’t get it back. See: Detroit.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Whiskey


    My guess is Vail. Pretty scenery, no blacks, probably enough land to house production companies.
     
    No Vail is full of skiers in the winter and is surrounded by high mountains. Very strict land use controls. Most of the ski workers have to live in small towns miles away.

    Very high altitude.

    So, weather bad (unless you ski, etc.) and no ocean, sun, warm. No room really. Small airport. Proles live elsewhere and commute (just like Hollywood!) but still no room.

    Video/film production is much more mobile now. But Industry Unions require work in certain close by areas or hourly rates go way up for "extra commuting" etc.

    There is much to like in the LA area, and not to like. The weather is good. Ocean nice. Someday of course the Big Quake will slide this all into the ocean.

    "Film at 11 !"
  123. @Kratoklastes
    @Altai


    What is interesting to me is the lack of importation of many Scandinavians who all speak perfect fluent English
     
    Maybe the Skarsgards have some sort of Scando-wide monopoly.

    As you say, they do good Yanklish accents, which are important in US-centric productions (although when speaking actual English, Scandos are betrayed by their Scando accents).

    Replies: @RAZ

    Always struck by how Swedish NHL players have total idiomatic English comprehension when you hear them interviewed – but usually have some accent. Not annoying but you can usually tell they are not native speakers.

    There tend to be Aussie actors who can pick up either American or English accents for specific roles. Toni Collette is an Aussie, she believably played an American housewife in Little Miss Sunshine and an English woman in About A Boy.

    Anthony LaPaglia is an Aussie but he had spent a lot of time filming in the US and as a consequence when he took a role back as an Aussie Detective in Lantana I read he had to work with a speech coach to reacquire an Aussie accent.

  124. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Our host is good at pointing out George Clooney's odd practice of getting himself cast in roles that would, in real life, not be populated by a guy with the irrepressible charisma and good looks of a George Clooney. Best example, Up In The Air, where he's cast as a vagabond personnel manager instead of the guy at the head of the conference room table putting together billion-dollar deals. He did good work in O Brother Where Art Thou, despite not looking anything like a low-level grifter trying to support his too-large family in the rural South in the 1930's.

    Steve Buscemi has made good coin playing roles as the weaselly dirtbag loser because he looks like a weaselly dirtbag loser. But I bet in real life he's a charming guy with lots of friends.

    I'd like to see Sailer write some stuff about the truly Hardest Working Man in Showbiz, the late great Brion James. I always thought his casting in The Player was a nod and bit of an inside joke to his extraordinary networking. Here's Brion on Brion:


    [in August 1999, when asked to what he attributes his success] Hard work. You gotta study, man. It's like any profession. I did eight years in theater. I studied two years in school in New York with Stella Adler, the best teacher in the world. I studied under Nina Foch, I did theater, I learned my craft. You got to learn how to build a character, there's a way to do it. Everything I ever did was different. I did 125 films, and over 100 television shows, and you've never seen the same character twice. I think now, in my 50s, with [Robert Duvall], [Albert Finney] and [Gene Hackman], those guys are getting up there in their 60s, it's my time. And I'm making sure that I push myself into their slot. So, my best work's coming.
     
    Then he dropped dead at age 54. God almighty.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @James J O'Meara, @puttheforkdown, @Steve Sailer

    “Steve Buscemi has made good coin playing roles as the weaselly dirtbag loser because he looks like a weaselly dirtbag loser. But I bet in real life he’s a charming guy with lots of friends.”

    Probably. Before acting he was a fireman, worked at a station in my neighborhood, and came around to attend fundraisers and give speeches when the mayor tried to close it down in the 2000s. Seemed like something a nice guy would do. Don’t recall if he succeeded.

    • Thanks: The Anti-Gnostic
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @James J O'Meara

    No, Steve Buscemi's just been coasting on his good looks all these years.

  125. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Peter Akuleyev

    I'm sorry. Mystic must just remind me of half the towns I've lived in around here. I forgot that they are exotic rarities for many Americans now.

    You know, when I got to Yellowstone, I was like that. I told my girlfriend in the car that it reminded me of my hometown in Colorado, and that I couldn't see what the big deal was. We broke up a few weeks later -- and the place caught on fire. The 1988 Yellowstone fire.

    Sorry, and I agree that Mystic is a nice place. No sarcasm. I realize what just happened and what you made me realize -- how lucky I am.

    Replies: @JMcG

    I was climbing in the Tetons in the summer of ‘88. I soloed the Grand in July with the smoke of burning National Parks in the air. You didn’t happen to see a band called Papa Clutch and the Shifters in Jackson that summer by any chance?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @JMcG

    The name alone makes me wish I'd seen that band. Good on you for climbing the Grand! Beautiful! I climbed (hiked up, really, sometimes with my dog, even) a bunch of fourteeners solo in Colorado when I lived there, but most are rounded and not as spectacular as the Tetons.

  126. @Rob McX
    @JMcG

    I vaguely remember that - about a women's prison. I think a lot of guys watched it in the hope of catching a bit of inmate-on-inmate action.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @JMcG

    Yep- I was a little concerned about my sister but she’s been married forever with five kids, so all good.

  127. Local Boy Makes Good

    Haven’t heard from Lagertha in some time. Is she off getting her free bucket?

  128. @Sick of Orcs
    Re:. Brad Pitt. Guy can't act. It's always Pitt on the screen, regardless of character. Which is why the pointless, shirtless roof scene in the middle of Once Upon...Hollywood.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Slim, @Mike Tre, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    And of course the film that jumpstarted his career, Thelma and Louise. There wasn’t any real point of him being in that chick flick, except as eye candy. It’s easy to forget now, but for most of Brad Pitt’s early and middle part of his career, he was simply eye candy for women filmgoers.

  129. @guest007
    @AnotherDad

    Grant High School is:

    Hispanic 53.5%
    White 38.3%
    Asian 3.7%
    African American 3.5%

    with 96% free lunch. So what type of white person lives in Los Angeles an qualifies for free school lunch.

    https://www.niche.com/k12/ulysses-s-grant-high-school-van-nuys-ca/

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Abolish_public_education, @Clifford Brown, @anonymous

    There are a fair number of Armenians who may not accurately report their income.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @Clifford Brown

    But if the LAUSD is only 9% non-Hispanic White but Grant High School has four times that number (whatever their ethnic group), then what percent of non-Hispanic whites in the LAUSD are on free lunch. Usually by high school, it is the student and not the parents who is either pushing or not pushing for free lunch.

    Replies: @danand

  130. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    Why do you care if “law-abiding blacks” are armed or not?


    Just seeing who's awake!

    Besides, I didn't say I did, just assumed a lot of readers here do. Do you disagree?

    But if I did want to disarm law-abiding blacks, I'd be in agreement with the great majority of them. There is almost zero resistance to gun control in "the community".

    Resistance to enforcement, yes. But that goes for all the white man's laws.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Besides, I didn’t say I did, just assumed a lot of readers here do. Do you disagree?

    Disagree with what:

    1) That you say you did?
    2) That readers here think that law-abiding blacks should be disarmed?
    3) That law-abiding blacks should be disarmed?

    I assume you mean one of the above choices; I may have missed one or more. I’ll answer if you can be specific…

    But if I did want to disarm law-abiding blacks

    Ah. So you’re saying you actually don’t want to disarm them? Thus, you also don’t really believe “the 2nd and the 14th clash” in this instance? Okay!

    “Mr. Cæsar, I must say I am a bit disappointed in your commentary this evening. Why you gotta be like that?”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Don't be corvine.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  131. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    Besides, I didn’t say I did, just assumed a lot of readers here do. Do you disagree?
     
    Disagree with what:

    1) That you say you did?
    2) That readers here think that law-abiding blacks should be disarmed?
    3) That law-abiding blacks should be disarmed?

    I assume you mean one of the above choices; I may have missed one or more. I’ll answer if you can be specific…

    But if I did want to disarm law-abiding blacks

     

    Ah. So you’re saying you actually don’t want to disarm them? Thus, you also don’t really believe “the 2nd and the 14th clash” in this instance? Okay!

    “Mr. Cæsar, I must say I am a bit disappointed in your commentary this evening. Why you gotta be like that?”

    https://priorprobability.files.wordpress.com/2019/09/img_3242.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Don’t be corvine.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar

    That’s all you got? oooof

    Replies: @thenon

  132. @Jack D
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Even today (putting aside female teachers who go after male HS students), a woman in her late '20s would not normally consider a 17 year old to be suitable dating material. OTOH, a woman in her late '20s might well date Sean Penn. Older men/younger woman relationships have always, and will always, be more accepted and attractive to women than vice versa, especially if the older man is successful. That's just how it is.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    “Older men/younger woman relationships have always, and will always, be more accepted and attractive to women than vice versa, especially if the older man is successful. That’s just how it is.”

    It’s ONLY how it is, IF the man is successful. If he can afford her. The more beautiful a woman, the more options an older but wealthier man has. William Holden in 1963, when he was still a fairly reliable bankable star, and still had some looks left, as opposed to 1973, when he looked ten yrs older because of the booze, would’ve been a more realistic option.

    An older man, if he expects to pick up a younger and attractive woman, had better be able to demonstrate that he indeed has a major amount of income.
    If the older man was a janitor or greeter at Walmart, he wouldn’t have a chance with the younger woman.

    A personal anecdote, or case in point: A woman in her late 20’s is dating a man about 15 yrs her senior. Under normal circumstances, she wouldn’t give him the time of day, but he happens to be a successful painter of business offices, has his own pontoon boat, nice SUV, etc. That may not sound like much, but if the woman came from the rough side of town and a fairly downscale neighborhood, then that’s a steady source of income and more preferable to her usual options in her social circles–drug dealer, pimp, or someone just starting out in blue collar field.

    Bottom line: money helps an older man stay relevant when attempting to land a good looking younger woman.

    It has been said that attractive women today no longer are committed to the ride or die philosophy. Rather, they much prefer to wait at the finish line and select their best options. As their biological clock strikes midnight, they make their choice based on the best options available to them.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    You know who else was a painter, don't you?

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi


    As their biological clock strikes midnight, they make their choice based on the best options available to them.
     
    LOL, it's called closing time, and everybody does it. Beer goggles help.

    As for why women prefer older men, its also a matter of maturity. Even in your lowbrow scenario, a women can find a somewhat older man to be strong and reassuring, like her father. Armchair psychology here, but women want strong men, and that means men who have some experience. Older man / younger woman is almost the rule in our culture. It is said that boys/men take a longer time to mature (maybe they have more to go through) so naturally they will tend to be a bit older than the women with whom they mate eventually. Playing along the way is another thing entirely.

    I didn't marry until I was 41, to a woman 10 years younger. I had realized that I didn't want to be that old guy still trying to get poon, dying alone. In other words, I grew up and met the right mate, thank God.

  133. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman


    There’s already a Mystic Pizza...
     
    Been to the real one. Underwhelming joint in a pretty boring coastal town not far from here that tries to be touristy. They make what they can of the movie connection. The pizza wasn't mystic at all.

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev, @Achmed E. Newman

    I reckon the movie makers just liked the name of that town, which sounds really out of the way. Isn’t that what the movie was somewhat about, these small town happenings, maybe like Eastwick in The Witches of Eastwick? I do agree with Peter – I have no problem with a boring coastal town.

    I like that NY style pizza. If it’s got gobs of cheese and that greasy thick crust, Julia Roberts can just keep it .. I’m talking about pizza here, of course …

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I reckon the movie makers just liked the name of that town, which sounds really out of the way. Isn’t that what the movie was somewhat about, these small town happenings, maybe like Eastwick in The Witches of Eastwick? I do agree with Peter – I have no problem with a boring coastal town.
     
    Mystic is on the scenic route to Boston (or Providence if so inclined) along I-95 from points South. But I think the reason it was chosen is probably the name but also that it's a kind of typical place in New England from that time at the intersection of WASP/Ivy League old money and working class Azorean Portuguese fishing communities. The setting is sort of the dramatic theme of the main arc of the film - rich white WASP with a sportscar wooing a poor but pretty Portuguese girl with a limited future. It's a sort of updated, inverted, and more lighthearted "Guess Who's Coming To Dinner" without being as socially edgy as the older film's black man/white woman dynamic. I know that there are still Portuguese there, but there are probably much more exotic types now after thirty more years of third world immigration.

    Of course in 2021 United States, I doubt that "Portuguese girl" carries much of the same frisson as it did thirty years ago, and any WASPs that remain undiluted have adopted multicultural ideology as a marker of high status. "Portuguese" is sort of too white at this point to draw much notice.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  134. @Mike Tre
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I don’t know if you saw my comment a couple weeks ago after I had just rewatched Patton. Certainly not a woke movie by today’s standards but the words “Soviet,” “Stalin,” and “communist” are absent from the dialogue. Soviet’s are referred to generically as “the Russians.”

    Also absent, but for what I presume are different reasons, are the terms “Jews” and “holocaust” and all related terms.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Captain Tripps, @Peter Akuleyev

    I really am obsessive about reading completely through threads after I start, so maybe I missed the whole post, Mike. (OK, I just checked. No, I’ve never read anything from Andrew Joyce.)

    Let me just add this, Mike. There was a scene at the end in which Patton wanted to continue the war into Communist Russia. Is it my imagination, or did he say something about having “fought the wrong guys”? Maybe that’s the actual General Patton’s words (paraphrased), but not in the movie. I can’t remember. I just put my post up here, but I didn’t get to watch the end this time.

    • Thanks: Mike Tre
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Is it my imagination, or did he say something about having “fought the wrong guys”? Maybe that’s the actual General Patton’s words (paraphrased), but not in the movie. I can’t remember.
     
    I believe he was quoted directly there, after having inspected some Jewish hovels after the war. Apparently, they weren’t up to using the latrine provided, preferring to take their shits in the corner of the hovel, and wipe their asses with newspaper, which they threw on the pile with the shit. These were backwards Eastern European Jews, akin to the gypsies in manner and discourse, though perhaps not as tidy.

    Anyway, Patton had been inspecting different German areas, noting how orderly and efficient the Germans had been after having their cities bombed into moonscapes. He had also noted the primitive behavior of Russian soldiers. Afterwards he walked into a Jewish hovel, out of a group of hovels to inspect, and, owing to the piles of shit festering in large piles in a corner of the room, came back out, and threw up his lunch by the front door. After wretching up a masticated mouthful of filet minion, was then he said the famous quote regarding us fighting for the wrong side, apparently.

    Obviously this scene was not re-enacted in his eponymous movie for obvious, Jewish reasons.

    Now you know the rest of the story.
    , @MEH 0910
    @Achmed E. Newman


    There was a scene at the end in which Patton wanted to continue the war into Communist Russia. Is it my imagination, or did he say something about having “fought the wrong guys”?
     
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0066206/characters/nm0083081

    Patton : Bedell?

    Maj. Gen. Walter Bedell Smith : Ike is furious. How could you possibly compare the Republicans and Democrats to the Nazi Party? And this statement that you refuse to denazify has everybody screaming, the Russians, the British, everybody.

    Patton : Well, the hell with the Mongoloid Russians. We've given them Berlin, we've given them Prague, God knows what else. Are we gonna let them dictate policy too?

    Maj. Gen. Walter Bedell Smith : George, don't be a fool. The war in Europe is over. Washington dictates policy.

    Patton : Well, the war shouldn't be over. We should stop pussyfooting about the goddamn Russians! We're gonna have to fight them sooner or later anyway. Why not do it now, when we got the the army here to do it with? lnstead of disarming these German troops, we oughta get them to help us fight the damn Bolsheviks!

    Maj. Gen. Walter Bedell Smith : George, you had better shut up this line may be tapped.

    Patton : I don't give a damn if it is. I'll tell you something Bedell, up until now, we've been fighting the wrong people. Look, you and Ike don't have to get involved, you're so damn soft about it. You leave it to me. In 10 days, I'll have us a war with those sons of bitches and I'll make it look like their fault!

    Maj. Gen. Walter Bedell Smith : George, you're mad. You're absolutely out of your mind!

    Patton : Well, I'm no diplomat! I'm a combat soldier! That's all these jokers understand! You get Ike to give me the word, and I'll kick their behinds back into Russia where they belong!
     

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  135. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Don't be corvine.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    That’s all you got? oooof

    • Replies: @thenon
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qbiUXC6d8v8

  136. @Kylie
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "I’ll read your Takimag column, of course, but could you give me a thumbs-up or thumbs-down as to whether this movie is truly devoid of the PC/wokeness enough to not piss a guy like me off to where I need to pop it out."

    Sean Penn is in it. What more do you need to know?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Well, Fast Times at Ridgemont High didn’t have any wokeness. Granted… OK, that was, like 40 years ago…

    So, thumbs-down it is then?

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "Well, Fast Times at Ridgemont High didn’t have any wokeness. Granted… OK, that was, like 40 years ago…'

    Neither did At Close Range, which had the added attractions of Chris Walken and Chris Penn (who I still miss, he was a gifted character actor and unlike his brother, seemed like a decent guy).

    "So, thumbs-down it is then?"

    You have to ask?

  137. @AndrewR
    @Altai

    Many Scandanavians speak excellent English but very few of them speak "perfect English" aka the way a native speaker would. I knew a Norwegian girl who had an American mom, but her English was not much better than the average Norwegian's.

    And generally audiences want to see native speakers. If non-native speakers are cast then we don't want them pretending tp be natives. Even Jude Law can't pull off and American accent so why would a Swede be able to fool us?

    Replies: @thenon

    I had a Swedish student who had absolutely flawless american english. I told her that while an american can often tell a non native speaker by english that is a little too correct, without those little sloppy bits that we do without noticing, I was amazed that she spoke as badly as we did! She then betrayed herself by not laughing at my funny remark. Humor is difficult to translate. Like UNZ commenters here betray themselves as nerds by correcting my minor spelling and fakshual errors, and missing the main point.

    • Replies: @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2
    @thenon

    I"ve been trying to rid myself of "I gotta" as in "I gotta learn to speak more better" for about a decade now.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @thenon, @AndrewR

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @thenon

    You misspelled factual. ;-)

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  138. “Mystic Pizza”, “Licorice Pizza” I skip and boycott all pizza movies from Hollywood. Though I see Tom Waits is in “Licorice Pizza”. Let me guess: He plays the gritty and authentic old guy who dispenses gritty, authentic advice at the drop of a pizza. I am glad to see this jamoke making some money. Not that I was ever a fan of his drunken blow hard songs. Meanwhile, there are some solid TV series out there. Yes, on your new 55″ OLED smart boob tube.
    -Mayor of Kingstown
    -Yellowstone
    -El Dragon
    TL;DR— Hollywood movies suck, so make mine anchovy pizza, hot out of the oven.

  139. Anonymous[950] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    @Mike Tre

    I really am obsessive about reading completely through threads after I start, so maybe I missed the whole post, Mike. (OK, I just checked. No, I've never read anything from Andrew Joyce.)

    Let me just add this, Mike. There was a scene at the end in which Patton wanted to continue the war into Communist Russia. Is it my imagination, or did he say something about having "fought the wrong guys"? Maybe that's the actual General Patton's words (paraphrased), but not in the movie. I can't remember. I just put my post up here, but I didn't get to watch the end this time.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @MEH 0910

    Is it my imagination, or did he say something about having “fought the wrong guys”? Maybe that’s the actual General Patton’s words (paraphrased), but not in the movie. I can’t remember.

    I believe he was quoted directly there, after having inspected some Jewish hovels after the war. Apparently, they weren’t up to using the latrine provided, preferring to take their shits in the corner of the hovel, and wipe their asses with newspaper, which they threw on the pile with the shit. These were backwards Eastern European Jews, akin to the gypsies in manner and discourse, though perhaps not as tidy.

    Anyway, Patton had been inspecting different German areas, noting how orderly and efficient the Germans had been after having their cities bombed into moonscapes. He had also noted the primitive behavior of Russian soldiers. Afterwards he walked into a Jewish hovel, out of a group of hovels to inspect, and, owing to the piles of shit festering in large piles in a corner of the room, came back out, and threw up his lunch by the front door. After wretching up a masticated mouthful of filet minion, was then he said the famous quote regarding us fighting for the wrong side, apparently.

    Obviously this scene was not re-enacted in his eponymous movie for obvious, Jewish reasons.

    Now you know the rest of the story.

  140. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Mike Tre

    I really am obsessive about reading completely through threads after I start, so maybe I missed the whole post, Mike. (OK, I just checked. No, I've never read anything from Andrew Joyce.)

    Let me just add this, Mike. There was a scene at the end in which Patton wanted to continue the war into Communist Russia. Is it my imagination, or did he say something about having "fought the wrong guys"? Maybe that's the actual General Patton's words (paraphrased), but not in the movie. I can't remember. I just put my post up here, but I didn't get to watch the end this time.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @MEH 0910

    There was a scene at the end in which Patton wanted to continue the war into Communist Russia. Is it my imagination, or did he say something about having “fought the wrong guys”?

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0066206/characters/nm0083081

    [MORE]

    Patton : Bedell?

    Maj. Gen. Walter Bedell Smith : Ike is furious. How could you possibly compare the Republicans and Democrats to the Nazi Party? And this statement that you refuse to denazify has everybody screaming, the Russians, the British, everybody.

    Patton : Well, the hell with the Mongoloid Russians. We’ve given them Berlin, we’ve given them Prague, God knows what else. Are we gonna let them dictate policy too?

    Maj. Gen. Walter Bedell Smith : George, don’t be a fool. The war in Europe is over. Washington dictates policy.

    Patton : Well, the war shouldn’t be over. We should stop pussyfooting about the goddamn Russians! We’re gonna have to fight them sooner or later anyway. Why not do it now, when we got the the army here to do it with? lnstead of disarming these German troops, we oughta get them to help us fight the damn Bolsheviks!

    Maj. Gen. Walter Bedell Smith : George, you had better shut up this line may be tapped.

    Patton : I don’t give a damn if it is. I’ll tell you something Bedell, up until now, we’ve been fighting the wrong people. Look, you and Ike don’t have to get involved, you’re so damn soft about it. You leave it to me. In 10 days, I’ll have us a war with those sons of bitches and I’ll make it look like their fault!

    Maj. Gen. Walter Bedell Smith : George, you’re mad. You’re absolutely out of your mind!

    Patton : Well, I’m no diplomat! I’m a combat soldier! That’s all these jokers understand! You get Ike to give me the word, and I’ll kick their behinds back into Russia where they belong!

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @MEH 0910

    Thanks, MEH. I recognize the scene well.

  141. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I reckon the movie makers just liked the name of that town, which sounds really out of the way. Isn't that what the movie was somewhat about, these small town happenings, maybe like Eastwick in The Witches of Eastwick? I do agree with Peter - I have no problem with a boring coastal town.

    I like that NY style pizza. If it's got gobs of cheese and that greasy thick crust, Julia Roberts can just keep it .. I'm talking about pizza here, of course ...

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    I reckon the movie makers just liked the name of that town, which sounds really out of the way. Isn’t that what the movie was somewhat about, these small town happenings, maybe like Eastwick in The Witches of Eastwick? I do agree with Peter – I have no problem with a boring coastal town.

    Mystic is on the scenic route to Boston (or Providence if so inclined) along I-95 from points South. But I think the reason it was chosen is probably the name but also that it’s a kind of typical place in New England from that time at the intersection of WASP/Ivy League old money and working class Azorean Portuguese fishing communities. The setting is sort of the dramatic theme of the main arc of the film – rich white WASP with a sportscar wooing a poor but pretty Portuguese girl with a limited future. It’s a sort of updated, inverted, and more lighthearted “Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner” without being as socially edgy as the older film’s black man/white woman dynamic. I know that there are still Portuguese there, but there are probably much more exotic types now after thirty more years of third world immigration.

    Of course in 2021 United States, I doubt that “Portuguese girl” carries much of the same frisson as it did thirty years ago, and any WASPs that remain undiluted have adopted multicultural ideology as a marker of high status. “Portuguese” is sort of too white at this point to draw much notice.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    "Mystic Pizza" is a much better title than say "Bridgeport Pizza."

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Achmed E. Newman, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Buzz Mohawk

  142. @guest007
    @AnotherDad

    Grant High School is:

    Hispanic 53.5%
    White 38.3%
    Asian 3.7%
    African American 3.5%

    with 96% free lunch. So what type of white person lives in Los Angeles an qualifies for free school lunch.

    https://www.niche.com/k12/ulysses-s-grant-high-school-van-nuys-ca/

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Abolish_public_education, @Clifford Brown, @anonymous

    Most of that 38.3 % White is just as Hispanic as the 53.5% .

    • Replies: @guest007
    @anonymous

    And what is the basis for this hypothesis? Failure to understand the forms? The schools not checking the forms?

  143. @MEH 0910
    @Achmed E. Newman


    There was a scene at the end in which Patton wanted to continue the war into Communist Russia. Is it my imagination, or did he say something about having “fought the wrong guys”?
     
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0066206/characters/nm0083081

    Patton : Bedell?

    Maj. Gen. Walter Bedell Smith : Ike is furious. How could you possibly compare the Republicans and Democrats to the Nazi Party? And this statement that you refuse to denazify has everybody screaming, the Russians, the British, everybody.

    Patton : Well, the hell with the Mongoloid Russians. We've given them Berlin, we've given them Prague, God knows what else. Are we gonna let them dictate policy too?

    Maj. Gen. Walter Bedell Smith : George, don't be a fool. The war in Europe is over. Washington dictates policy.

    Patton : Well, the war shouldn't be over. We should stop pussyfooting about the goddamn Russians! We're gonna have to fight them sooner or later anyway. Why not do it now, when we got the the army here to do it with? lnstead of disarming these German troops, we oughta get them to help us fight the damn Bolsheviks!

    Maj. Gen. Walter Bedell Smith : George, you had better shut up this line may be tapped.

    Patton : I don't give a damn if it is. I'll tell you something Bedell, up until now, we've been fighting the wrong people. Look, you and Ike don't have to get involved, you're so damn soft about it. You leave it to me. In 10 days, I'll have us a war with those sons of bitches and I'll make it look like their fault!

    Maj. Gen. Walter Bedell Smith : George, you're mad. You're absolutely out of your mind!

    Patton : Well, I'm no diplomat! I'm a combat soldier! That's all these jokers understand! You get Ike to give me the word, and I'll kick their behinds back into Russia where they belong!
     

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Thanks, MEH. I recognize the scene well.

  144. @JimDandy
    I had come to truly despise Tarantino before Hollywood came out, and I'm pretty sure your review inspired me to give it a shot. I'm glad I did. It's my favorite Hollywood film in a long time. Looking forward to reading your full review of Licorice. I suspect this film will contain lots of woke/feminist/anti-"Toxic-Masculinity" content that will make it a hard pass for me.

    Replies: @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2

    ” It’s my favorite Hollywood film in a long time. ”

    It is the clearly, objectively the best Hollywood film in a long time. There is no debate about this. The question is what movie ever might be better. That is debatable.

  145. @thenon
    @AndrewR

    I had a Swedish student who had absolutely flawless american english. I told her that while an american can often tell a non native speaker by english that is a little too correct, without those little sloppy bits that we do without noticing, I was amazed that she spoke as badly as we did! She then betrayed herself by not laughing at my funny remark. Humor is difficult to translate. Like UNZ commenters here betray themselves as nerds by correcting my minor spelling and fakshual errors, and missing the main point.

    Replies: @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2, @Jim Don Bob

    I”ve been trying to rid myself of “I gotta” as in “I gotta learn to speak more better” for about a decade now.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2


    I”ve been trying to rid myself of “I gotta” as in “I gotta learn to speak more better” for about a decade now.
     
    Offended ESL teacher: "I don't say 'gonna', and I'm not gonna teach it to my students!"

    (Not a joke, a true story.)
    , @thenon
    @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2

    I didn't get that far in school, but you guys really should try not to think so hard. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qc5ZtL-_cKU

    , @AndrewR
    @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2

    I would prioritize learning the differwnce between quotation marks and apostrophes

  146. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Kylie

    Well, Fast Times at Ridgemont High didn't have any wokeness. Granted... OK, that was, like 40 years ago...

    So, thumbs-down it is then?

    Replies: @Kylie

    “Well, Fast Times at Ridgemont High didn’t have any wokeness. Granted… OK, that was, like 40 years ago…’

    Neither did At Close Range, which had the added attractions of Chris Walken and Chris Penn (who I still miss, he was a gifted character actor and unlike his brother, seemed like a decent guy).

    “So, thumbs-down it is then?”

    You have to ask?

  147. @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I reckon the movie makers just liked the name of that town, which sounds really out of the way. Isn’t that what the movie was somewhat about, these small town happenings, maybe like Eastwick in The Witches of Eastwick? I do agree with Peter – I have no problem with a boring coastal town.
     
    Mystic is on the scenic route to Boston (or Providence if so inclined) along I-95 from points South. But I think the reason it was chosen is probably the name but also that it's a kind of typical place in New England from that time at the intersection of WASP/Ivy League old money and working class Azorean Portuguese fishing communities. The setting is sort of the dramatic theme of the main arc of the film - rich white WASP with a sportscar wooing a poor but pretty Portuguese girl with a limited future. It's a sort of updated, inverted, and more lighthearted "Guess Who's Coming To Dinner" without being as socially edgy as the older film's black man/white woman dynamic. I know that there are still Portuguese there, but there are probably much more exotic types now after thirty more years of third world immigration.

    Of course in 2021 United States, I doubt that "Portuguese girl" carries much of the same frisson as it did thirty years ago, and any WASPs that remain undiluted have adopted multicultural ideology as a marker of high status. "Portuguese" is sort of too white at this point to draw much notice.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    “Mystic Pizza” is a much better title than say “Bridgeport Pizza.”

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Steve Sailer


    “Mystic Pizza” is a much better title than say “Bridgeport Pizza.”
     
    Cos Cob Salad would have been de trop.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer

    Groton Pizza?

    (Tastes better than it sounds.)

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Steve Sailer


    “Mystic Pizza” is a much better title than say “Bridgeport Pizza.”
     
    I would have gone with "Chorizo in Bridgeport."
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Steve Sailer

    LOL, and Bridgeport is not even remotely like Mystic, in case you don't know. It is the closest place we have here to an iSteve location. Fortunately, it seems to be rather mild, perhaps due to Italian-American dominance, or just small scale. Also, there are plenty of Latin Americans to smooth things out.

    Individual, Latin American contractors of that cohort have flat out told me that their only problem in their neighborhoods is "the black people."

    What more testimony do you need?

    Again: 70,000 years.

    70,000 years of separate evolution.

    "The black people."

  148. huh, the trailer looks good. I wonder what i would think if i’d seen it before reading the review…

  149. @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2
    @thenon

    I"ve been trying to rid myself of "I gotta" as in "I gotta learn to speak more better" for about a decade now.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @thenon, @AndrewR

    I”ve been trying to rid myself of “I gotta” as in “I gotta learn to speak more better” for about a decade now.

    Offended ESL teacher: “I don’t say ‘gonna’, and I’m not gonna teach it to my students!”

    (Not a joke, a true story.)

  150. @Jack D
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Brando really transformed himself in The Godfather. Not just with makeup but in terms of inhabiting the role.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Bardon Kaldian, @Currahee, @JohnnyWalker123, @Reg Cæsar

    Brando really transformed himself in The Godfather. Not just with makeup but in terms of inhabiting the role.

    It’s hard to imagine the Don having an unrequited crush on Mr Peepers.

  151. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Our host is good at pointing out George Clooney's odd practice of getting himself cast in roles that would, in real life, not be populated by a guy with the irrepressible charisma and good looks of a George Clooney. Best example, Up In The Air, where he's cast as a vagabond personnel manager instead of the guy at the head of the conference room table putting together billion-dollar deals. He did good work in O Brother Where Art Thou, despite not looking anything like a low-level grifter trying to support his too-large family in the rural South in the 1930's.

    Steve Buscemi has made good coin playing roles as the weaselly dirtbag loser because he looks like a weaselly dirtbag loser. But I bet in real life he's a charming guy with lots of friends.

    I'd like to see Sailer write some stuff about the truly Hardest Working Man in Showbiz, the late great Brion James. I always thought his casting in The Player was a nod and bit of an inside joke to his extraordinary networking. Here's Brion on Brion:


    [in August 1999, when asked to what he attributes his success] Hard work. You gotta study, man. It's like any profession. I did eight years in theater. I studied two years in school in New York with Stella Adler, the best teacher in the world. I studied under Nina Foch, I did theater, I learned my craft. You got to learn how to build a character, there's a way to do it. Everything I ever did was different. I did 125 films, and over 100 television shows, and you've never seen the same character twice. I think now, in my 50s, with [Robert Duvall], [Albert Finney] and [Gene Hackman], those guys are getting up there in their 60s, it's my time. And I'm making sure that I push myself into their slot. So, my best work's coming.
     
    Then he dropped dead at age 54. God almighty.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @James J O'Meara, @puttheforkdown, @Steve Sailer

    He’s a charming guy with lots of friends because acting pays the bills. Otherwise, guess how he would behave?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @puttheforkdown

    Like most retired firemen?

  152. @Steve Sailer
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    "Mystic Pizza" is a much better title than say "Bridgeport Pizza."

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Achmed E. Newman, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Buzz Mohawk

    “Mystic Pizza” is a much better title than say “Bridgeport Pizza.”

    Cos Cob Salad would have been de trop.

  153. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Our host is good at pointing out George Clooney's odd practice of getting himself cast in roles that would, in real life, not be populated by a guy with the irrepressible charisma and good looks of a George Clooney. Best example, Up In The Air, where he's cast as a vagabond personnel manager instead of the guy at the head of the conference room table putting together billion-dollar deals. He did good work in O Brother Where Art Thou, despite not looking anything like a low-level grifter trying to support his too-large family in the rural South in the 1930's.

    Steve Buscemi has made good coin playing roles as the weaselly dirtbag loser because he looks like a weaselly dirtbag loser. But I bet in real life he's a charming guy with lots of friends.

    I'd like to see Sailer write some stuff about the truly Hardest Working Man in Showbiz, the late great Brion James. I always thought his casting in The Player was a nod and bit of an inside joke to his extraordinary networking. Here's Brion on Brion:


    [in August 1999, when asked to what he attributes his success] Hard work. You gotta study, man. It's like any profession. I did eight years in theater. I studied two years in school in New York with Stella Adler, the best teacher in the world. I studied under Nina Foch, I did theater, I learned my craft. You got to learn how to build a character, there's a way to do it. Everything I ever did was different. I did 125 films, and over 100 television shows, and you've never seen the same character twice. I think now, in my 50s, with [Robert Duvall], [Albert Finney] and [Gene Hackman], those guys are getting up there in their 60s, it's my time. And I'm making sure that I push myself into their slot. So, my best work's coming.
     
    Then he dropped dead at age 54. God almighty.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @James J O'Meara, @puttheforkdown, @Steve Sailer

    Buscemi, a former New York fireman, spent four days digging through the rubble of the World Trade Center looking for remains of his one-time colleagues.

  154. @puttheforkdown
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    He's a charming guy with lots of friends because acting pays the bills. Otherwise, guess how he would behave?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Like most retired firemen?

  155. @Steve Sailer
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    "Mystic Pizza" is a much better title than say "Bridgeport Pizza."

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Achmed E. Newman, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Buzz Mohawk

    Groton Pizza?

    (Tastes better than it sounds.)

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Go there to Groton and tour the USS Nautilus. Far more interesting than anything in Mystic. You know, our nuclear submarines go in and out of there. I watched one: the men were on top, standing with legs stable, hands in "at ease" position, as their sub cruised right past. Go to Grot0n. It is a great, American place. Go down into the Nautilus, the first nuclear-powered submarine. Consider yourself lucky. It cruised across the North Pole, under the ice, in secret.


    https://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/09/4d/dc/76/the-submarine-force-museum.jpg

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  156. @James J O'Meara
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    "Steve Buscemi has made good coin playing roles as the weaselly dirtbag loser because he looks like a weaselly dirtbag loser. But I bet in real life he’s a charming guy with lots of friends."

    Probably. Before acting he was a fireman, worked at a station in my neighborhood, and came around to attend fundraisers and give speeches when the mayor tried to close it down in the 2000s. Seemed like something a nice guy would do. Don't recall if he succeeded.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    No, Steve Buscemi’s just been coasting on his good looks all these years.

    • LOL: The Anti-Gnostic
  157. @Bardon Kaldian
    @kaganovitch

    I would question even this. For instance, most characters are so different I doubt the same actor could be successful in all roles- say, Hamlet, Macbeth, Brutus and Iago. All actors, however gifted & educated they may be, play essentially one role with variations.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    For instance, most characters are so different I doubt the same actor could be successful in all roles- say, Hamlet, Macbeth, Brutus and Iago. All actors, however gifted & educated they may be, play essentially one role with variations.

    Well nobody has infinite range of course but some have more than others. You bring to mind the pronouncement of the great 19th century Analytical Talmudist R. Haym Soloveitchik ob”m – who fancied himself something of a Musicologist as well- “Es is als eyn niggun, ah knaitch ahin ah knaitch aher, ober als eyn niggun.” = It is all one song , a twist this way a twist that way, but all one song. Any thing can be viewed from sufficient distance as all basically one and from sufficiently closeup/granular as vastly different which allows us to talk past each other in Wittgensteinian incommensurability. Oh. the Humanity!

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @kaganovitch

    Soloveitchik was, in this respect, partially right. Only when contrasted with something very different, can we say - this is truly another world.



    For instance, we can claim, and rightfully so, that Scandinavian music:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVMOVhyeDzI

    is evidently different from South Asian:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pbppaMT7-5s

    On the other hand, Mozart here:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnK3kh8ZEgA

    is basically the same as Brahms:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ckuUq7im8H4

  158. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar

    That’s all you got? oooof

    Replies: @thenon

  159. @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2
    @thenon

    I"ve been trying to rid myself of "I gotta" as in "I gotta learn to speak more better" for about a decade now.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @thenon, @AndrewR

    I didn’t get that far in school, but you guys really should try not to think so hard.

  160. @stevesailer

    The rot in California was pretty advanced by 1973. 1967 seems a long way away at that point.

  161. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Jack D

    "Older men/younger woman relationships have always, and will always, be more accepted and attractive to women than vice versa, especially if the older man is successful. That’s just how it is."

    It's ONLY how it is, IF the man is successful. If he can afford her. The more beautiful a woman, the more options an older but wealthier man has. William Holden in 1963, when he was still a fairly reliable bankable star, and still had some looks left, as opposed to 1973, when he looked ten yrs older because of the booze, would've been a more realistic option.

    An older man, if he expects to pick up a younger and attractive woman, had better be able to demonstrate that he indeed has a major amount of income.
    If the older man was a janitor or greeter at Walmart, he wouldn't have a chance with the younger woman.

    A personal anecdote, or case in point: A woman in her late 20's is dating a man about 15 yrs her senior. Under normal circumstances, she wouldn't give him the time of day, but he happens to be a successful painter of business offices, has his own pontoon boat, nice SUV, etc. That may not sound like much, but if the woman came from the rough side of town and a fairly downscale neighborhood, then that's a steady source of income and more preferable to her usual options in her social circles--drug dealer, pimp, or someone just starting out in blue collar field.

    Bottom line: money helps an older man stay relevant when attempting to land a good looking younger woman.

    It has been said that attractive women today no longer are committed to the ride or die philosophy. Rather, they much prefer to wait at the finish line and select their best options. As their biological clock strikes midnight, they make their choice based on the best options available to them.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Buzz Mohawk

    You know who else was a painter, don’t you?

  162. @JMcG
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I was climbing in the Tetons in the summer of ‘88. I soloed the Grand in July with the smoke of burning National Parks in the air. You didn’t happen to see a band called Papa Clutch and the Shifters in Jackson that summer by any chance?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    The name alone makes me wish I’d seen that band. Good on you for climbing the Grand! Beautiful! I climbed (hiked up, really, sometimes with my dog, even) a bunch of fourteeners solo in Colorado when I lived there, but most are rounded and not as spectacular as the Tetons.

  163. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Jack D

    "Older men/younger woman relationships have always, and will always, be more accepted and attractive to women than vice versa, especially if the older man is successful. That’s just how it is."

    It's ONLY how it is, IF the man is successful. If he can afford her. The more beautiful a woman, the more options an older but wealthier man has. William Holden in 1963, when he was still a fairly reliable bankable star, and still had some looks left, as opposed to 1973, when he looked ten yrs older because of the booze, would've been a more realistic option.

    An older man, if he expects to pick up a younger and attractive woman, had better be able to demonstrate that he indeed has a major amount of income.
    If the older man was a janitor or greeter at Walmart, he wouldn't have a chance with the younger woman.

    A personal anecdote, or case in point: A woman in her late 20's is dating a man about 15 yrs her senior. Under normal circumstances, she wouldn't give him the time of day, but he happens to be a successful painter of business offices, has his own pontoon boat, nice SUV, etc. That may not sound like much, but if the woman came from the rough side of town and a fairly downscale neighborhood, then that's a steady source of income and more preferable to her usual options in her social circles--drug dealer, pimp, or someone just starting out in blue collar field.

    Bottom line: money helps an older man stay relevant when attempting to land a good looking younger woman.

    It has been said that attractive women today no longer are committed to the ride or die philosophy. Rather, they much prefer to wait at the finish line and select their best options. As their biological clock strikes midnight, they make their choice based on the best options available to them.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Buzz Mohawk

    As their biological clock strikes midnight, they make their choice based on the best options available to them.

    LOL, it’s called closing time, and everybody does it. Beer goggles help.

    As for why women prefer older men, its also a matter of maturity. Even in your lowbrow scenario, a women can find a somewhat older man to be strong and reassuring, like her father. Armchair psychology here, but women want strong men, and that means men who have some experience. Older man / younger woman is almost the rule in our culture. It is said that boys/men take a longer time to mature (maybe they have more to go through) so naturally they will tend to be a bit older than the women with whom they mate eventually. Playing along the way is another thing entirely.

    I didn’t marry until I was 41, to a woman 10 years younger. I had realized that I didn’t want to be that old guy still trying to get poon, dying alone. In other words, I grew up and met the right mate, thank God.

  164. @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2
    @thenon

    I"ve been trying to rid myself of "I gotta" as in "I gotta learn to speak more better" for about a decade now.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @thenon, @AndrewR

    I would prioritize learning the differwnce between quotation marks and apostrophes

  165. @Mike Tre
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Most, but not all actors: Robert Duvall had great range. Tom Hagen, LtCol. Kilgore, and Gus McCrae are three completely different and dare I say epic characters that one cannot honestly associate with Duvall just playing Duvall.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Mr Mox

    In his 1983 book , Adventures in the Screen Trade, author and screenwriter William Goldman describes a tense scene in The Great Santini where Robert Duvall act as an embarrassing a**hole towards his ‘coming of age’ son.

    Goldman explains how none of the big Hollywood stars at the time would ever have accepted a role like that – unless the Santini character had been given some excuse for his horrible behavior. He then gives a couple of examples how this could have been worked into the movie, making Santini come across as a saint-like father instead of a bitter, military has-been.

    Robert Duvall didn’t take the easy way out, and the movie is much better for it.

    • Thanks: Mike Tre
  166. @kaganovitch
    @Bardon Kaldian

    For instance, most characters are so different I doubt the same actor could be successful in all roles- say, Hamlet, Macbeth, Brutus and Iago. All actors, however gifted & educated they may be, play essentially one role with variations.

    Well nobody has infinite range of course but some have more than others. You bring to mind the pronouncement of the great 19th century Analytical Talmudist R. Haym Soloveitchik ob"m - who fancied himself something of a Musicologist as well- "Es is als eyn niggun, ah knaitch ahin ah knaitch aher, ober als eyn niggun." = It is all one song , a twist this way a twist that way, but all one song. Any thing can be viewed from sufficient distance as all basically one and from sufficiently closeup/granular as vastly different which allows us to talk past each other in Wittgensteinian incommensurability. Oh. the Humanity!

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    Soloveitchik was, in this respect, partially right. Only when contrasted with something very different, can we say – this is truly another world.

    [MORE]

    For instance, we can claim, and rightfully so, that Scandinavian music:

    is evidently different from South Asian:

    On the other hand, Mozart here:

    is basically the same as Brahms:

  167. @The Alarmist
    I had an uncle who lived in the valley in the ‘70s, and it was great fun to visit him and my cousins (aunt, not so much) because their postage-stamp of a yard was almost entirely pool with an afterthought of a patio. One of my cousins was made in the mold of PTA’s lead character, having started what turned out to be a successful mid-sized business over time.

    For me, those were the things that made SoCal a place I always thought I might move to, but it kind of started to go downhill around the time I was free enough to do so. I guess I have to live that experience vicariously through movies like this and Tarantino’s and rely on your stamp of their authenticity.

    Replies: @Captain Tripps

    I’m a few years younger than Steve, and I’ve never been to So Cal. My imprint of what SoCal (the Valley and surrounding environs) was like was formed by watching E.T. in the early 80’s. The lead human character (Henry Thomas) and his family (led by single mom plaed by Dee Wallace) I believe lived in a fairly new sub-division somewhere in the Valley. In contrast, growing up around Chicago-land, movies that captured the zeitgeist of that era of my life are Risky Business (Paul Brickman), Ferris Beuller (John Hughes) and to a lesser extent, Breakfast Club (Hughes again).

  168. @MGB
    @Dumbo

    i liked jackie brown and the first 2/3 or so of once upon a time. the rest of what i have seen is self-indulgent, narcissistic shite. haven't seen magnolia, but thought there will be blood and the master great stuff if often uncomfortable to watch. nobody needs to see joaquin phoenix jacking off into the ocean, even from behind.

    Replies: @Dumbo

    Yes, I think Jackie Brown was actually Tarantino’s best film. Well, from the ones I watched, at least. Hateful Eight was just awful, I regret having seen it. From Anderson, I liked Punch Drunk Love and There Will Be Blood, but I wouldn’t watch them again.

  169. @Mike Tre
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I don’t know if you saw my comment a couple weeks ago after I had just rewatched Patton. Certainly not a woke movie by today’s standards but the words “Soviet,” “Stalin,” and “communist” are absent from the dialogue. Soviet’s are referred to generically as “the Russians.”

    Also absent, but for what I presume are different reasons, are the terms “Jews” and “holocaust” and all related terms.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Captain Tripps, @Peter Akuleyev

    I think the movie attempted to show Patton’s point of view through the war. He grew up and graduated West Point (1909) when Russia was still a hereditary monarchy, so in his mind, they were still just the “Russians”. “Soviet” or “Soviet Union” was just a political term in his frame of reference. I am unfamiliar with any of his personal writings, so he may have referred to them differently in those. I get the sense that the writers/producers/director of the movie wanted to paint a portrait of the man for their intended audience, which in 1970 would have been all the aging European Theater war vets, many of whom served under him.

  170. @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Bardon Kaldian


    This is the case with all actors. John Wayne is always John Wayne; De Niro- De Niro; Eastwood- Eastwood; Brando- Brando ….
     
    Not really - the names you cited are more "movie stars" than actors. Their parts seem to be written for their public characters.

    On the other hand, someone like Gary Oldman is an actor - he becomes the character in the drama and Gary Oldman sort of disappears.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Captain Tripps

    The current version great actor (to me) in the mold of Oldman is Benedict Cumberbatch. That guy can ACT.

  171. @Reg Cæsar
    @Peter Akuleyev


    clean and orderly, well kept up
     
    You can be all of those things and still be boring. Just as your snazzy exurban school district could be teaching CRT.

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev

    True, but in a world where the opposite of boring is often “vibrant”, I don’t mind boring.

  172. @Mike Tre
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I don’t know if you saw my comment a couple weeks ago after I had just rewatched Patton. Certainly not a woke movie by today’s standards but the words “Soviet,” “Stalin,” and “communist” are absent from the dialogue. Soviet’s are referred to generically as “the Russians.”

    Also absent, but for what I presume are different reasons, are the terms “Jews” and “holocaust” and all related terms.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Captain Tripps, @Peter Akuleyev

    All of that is historically accurate. During 1918-1989, Americans generally referred to the Soviets as “Russians” . Only political scientists, leftists and maybe the occasional immigrant said “Soviet”.

    Likewise, while World War II was going on most Americans weren’t particularly concerned about the fate of Jews, it certainly wasn’t the top of the agenda. You won’t hear the word “Jew” once in the movie “Casablanca” for example. If you had asked an average American why Nazis were bad in 1943 they would have said the worst Nazi crimes were invading Paris, bombing England and imprisoning and killing patriotic Czechs, Norwegians, Poles and other brave Europeans. And, of course, declaring war on the USA and supporting the Japs. The word “Holocaust” was only applied to the murder of Jews decades later, it would be a jarring anachronism to hear it in Patton.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Peter Akuleyev


    During 1918-1989, Americans generally referred to the Soviets as “Russians” . Only political scientists, leftists and maybe the occasional immigrant said “Soviet”.
     
    I don't know about that. I used those terms and still do when referring to that era, if only because I think the Soviet Union encompassed a wide range of territory and peoples. Then again, I took political science classes in college and even got brainwashed into communism my freshman year.

    My wife laughs every time I refer to "Soviets" or "the Soviet Union." I'm not kidding. She does laugh. They are all Russian to her. Having grown up in communist Romania, she should know. (We do have these conversations.)

    Her parents had a Russian, excuse me, "Soviet" microwave oven in their kitchen. I used it. Her father had taken a train all the way to Russia to get it. It was the biggest, boxiest, ugliest appliance you've ever seen. It was Russian, I mean "Soviet" (communist) engineering and design.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Mike Tre

    , @Mike Tre
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Doing a search of the terms Soviet and Russian in the google ngram viewer doesn't support your "historical fact." Russian was only at a slightly higher rate of use in 1945 than Soviet. Further, Stalin himself would have certainly been mentioned after Berlin fell as he was central to the politicking that surrounded the dividing up of Germany and the rest of Europe right after the conclusion of the war.

    "Likewise, while World War II was going on most Americans weren’t particularly concerned about the fate of Jews, it certainly wasn’t the top of the agenda. "

    Nor should they have been more than any other group. That's exactly the point I was making: The holocaust industry hadn't been fully ramped up by 1970. Referring to ngram again, the term holocaust doesn't really get going until 1975.

  173. @the one they call Desanex
    Artist Richard Amsel did a lot of movie posters and other showbiz art in the seventies. I think the poster for Licorice Pizza is meant to imitate his style, with the serpentine hair and floating faces. I don’t know who did the Pizza poster, but it couldn’t have been Amsel himself; he died of AIDS in 1985.
    https://i.imgur.com/2qYm0ZI.jpg

    http://adammcdaniel.com/AmselArt/amsel_the_shootist76_poster.jpg
    http://adammcdaniel.com/AmselArt/lucky_lady.jpg
    http://adammcdaniel.com/AmselArt/Amsel_TheChamp_finalposter.jpg

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex, @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    24×36: A Movie About Movie Posters

    “24×36: A Movie About Movie Posters” is a documentary that explores the world of illustrated movie poster art; the artists who create it, companies and studios that commission it, galleries that display it, and collectors and fans who hang it.

  174. @the one they call Desanex
    Artist Richard Amsel did a lot of movie posters and other showbiz art in the seventies. I think the poster for Licorice Pizza is meant to imitate his style, with the serpentine hair and floating faces. I don’t know who did the Pizza poster, but it couldn’t have been Amsel himself; he died of AIDS in 1985.
    https://i.imgur.com/2qYm0ZI.jpg

    http://adammcdaniel.com/AmselArt/amsel_the_shootist76_poster.jpg
    http://adammcdaniel.com/AmselArt/lucky_lady.jpg
    http://adammcdaniel.com/AmselArt/Amsel_TheChamp_finalposter.jpg

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex, @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    I don’t know who did the Pizza poster,

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kat_Reeder

    Kat Reeder is a Peruvian-American illustrator, portrait artist, and graphic designer whose work is characterized by attractive female forms and nostalgic scenery. Her work combines elements of pop art, animation, art nouveau, and Latin American art styles. Reeder was born in Lima, Peru, grew up in Miami, Florida, and now lives in Honolulu, HI.[1]

    […]
    In 2021, Reeder was commissioned by filmmaker Paul Thomas Anderson to create poster art and other key art for his film Licorice Pizza, starring Alana Haim, Cooper Hoffman, Bradley Cooper, Sean Penn, Bennie Safdie, Tom Waits, and Maya Rudolph. Reeder’s work was used as the primary movie poster, and as advertising throughout Los Angeles, New York, and cities world-wide.

    https://katreeder.com/blogs/kat-chats-a-sporadic-art-blog/yes-im-the-licorice-pizza-poster-artist

    • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    @MEH 0910

    Thanks. After checking out more of Kat Reeder’s work, I see that she’s no Richard Amsel in the talent department. Thanks, too for the tip about “24×36.” I had never heard of that documentary, but will definitely watch. It sounds right up my alley.

  175. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Mike Tre

    All of that is historically accurate. During 1918-1989, Americans generally referred to the Soviets as "Russians" . Only political scientists, leftists and maybe the occasional immigrant said "Soviet".

    Likewise, while World War II was going on most Americans weren't particularly concerned about the fate of Jews, it certainly wasn't the top of the agenda. You won't hear the word "Jew" once in the movie "Casablanca" for example. If you had asked an average American why Nazis were bad in 1943 they would have said the worst Nazi crimes were invading Paris, bombing England and imprisoning and killing patriotic Czechs, Norwegians, Poles and other brave Europeans. And, of course, declaring war on the USA and supporting the Japs. The word "Holocaust" was only applied to the murder of Jews decades later, it would be a jarring anachronism to hear it in Patton.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Mike Tre

    During 1918-1989, Americans generally referred to the Soviets as “Russians” . Only political scientists, leftists and maybe the occasional immigrant said “Soviet”.

    I don’t know about that. I used those terms and still do when referring to that era, if only because I think the Soviet Union encompassed a wide range of territory and peoples. Then again, I took political science classes in college and even got brainwashed into communism my freshman year.

    My wife laughs every time I refer to “Soviets” or “the Soviet Union.” I’m not kidding. She does laugh. They are all Russian to her. Having grown up in communist Romania, she should know. (We do have these conversations.)

    Her parents had a Russian, excuse me, “Soviet” microwave oven in their kitchen. I used it. Her father had taken a train all the way to Russia to get it. It was the biggest, boxiest, ugliest appliance you’ve ever seen. It was Russian, I mean “Soviet” (communist) engineering and design.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Buzz Mohawk

    CCCP1: Today Is Moscow!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHjaAu1GTZU


    SCTV taken over by glorious Soviet television with state of art minicam and new pair of Potemkins.
     

    SCTV - CCCP 1 🛰
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWUwFJamrPg

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @the one they call Desanex

    , @Mike Tre
    @Buzz Mohawk

    From what I remember reading somewhere a long time ago (so take that for what it is) the politburo of the Soviet Union insisted that what was formerly Russia and all then current SU territories be referred to exclusively as the Soviet Union. Referring to the SU as Russia was disapproved of, even in US military circles.

  176. @Abolish_public_education
    @guest007

    In 2019, USDA's reduced price (free!) meals costs taxpayers $14.2B. Most meals (90+%?) were distributed in public school cafeterias. When schoolies whine about skool underfunding, they always avoid mention of meal subsidies. Keep in mind that the menu items are RD-certified junk, and what's sold to [gullible] taxpayers as "pro-learning, hunger prevention" is really just a huge welfare payout to Big Ag.

    (One reason why home schools can operate on a shoestring budget is that the kitchen doubles as classroom and cafeteria, and mom as teacher and chef. Public schools are expensive partly because they operate restaurants, law firms, sports leagues, telecom service firms, health clinics, transportation companies; the list of suck goes on and on.)

    The gov-media complex has been exploiting the latest instance of a catastrophically dangerous, failing public school as an opportunity to laud the "heroic" first unionized-responders, school lockdown contingency plans, and to push an anti-gun agenda.

    As we're "informed" that the boy's parents won't cooperate, we're supposed to cheer that the lawyer-DA has threatened to punish them and has charged the kid as an adult. "Cooperation" means the family's lawyer not being allowed to describe how the boy has been getting bullied since first grade, the parents have complained to the school district 100X, and nothing was ever done.

    This mass shooting totally vindicates the gun rights argument that when schoolkids are disarmed, only criminal schoolkids will own guns.

    Replies: @guest007

    I guess that one does not learn opportunity costs when teaching home schoolers. If mom is capable of teaching her children calculus, physics, chemistry, and a foreign language at home, then mom can get a job that pays enough for the family to afford college prep private schools.

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @guest007

    You know something about Economics, and you have a respect for rigor, but you confuse parenting with factory production.

    Replies: @guest007

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @guest007

    Get real. They've got these things called books and the internet. Mom doesn't need to know it all. You also have a hell of a lot of optimism about what jobs are out there for someone who knows calculus, physics, chemistry, and a foreign language. Ever heard of the H-1B visa?

    The homeschooled kid WILL learn about opportunity costs if he follows Ron Paul's curriculum. He can do that econ and all the other subjects you mentioned in 4 hr/day schooling periods, and have a life that does not revolve around an indoctrination camp. Yea!!

    Replies: @guest007

  177. @Clifford Brown
    @guest007

    There are a fair number of Armenians who may not accurately report their income.

    Replies: @guest007

    But if the LAUSD is only 9% non-Hispanic White but Grant High School has four times that number (whatever their ethnic group), then what percent of non-Hispanic whites in the LAUSD are on free lunch. Usually by high school, it is the student and not the parents who is either pushing or not pushing for free lunch.

    • Replies: @danand
    @guest007

    "...what percent of non-Hispanic whites in the LAUSD are on free lunch..."

    007, all of them. This year, at least in Silicon Valley California, public school lunches have been "free" since the kids returned to "in class" learning this school year. If I recall correctly this was initially done to minimize risk of covid transmission. Now, from the looks & sounds of it, the policy is ingrained/permanent.

    The high school "lunch hour" was also shortened to encourage kids to remain on campus, though I have observed many making their way to and from the campus adjacent 7-11, pizza hut, and doughnut shop.

    As far as Licorice:

    National Board of Review Names Paul Thomas Anderson & His ‘Licorice Pizza’ As Best Director & Film

    "NBR President Annie Schulhof said, “In a moment of transition and uncertainty, there is nothing like Licorice Pizza to remind us of the joy, hope, and exhilaration that great cinema can inspire. The NBR is honored to award the movie as its Best Film of 2021, as well as its brilliant creator, Paul Thomas Anderson."

    I will be buying a ticket, once it's released to wide audience, if nothing else but for the Goat. As it's local, been to the farm a few times over the decades.

  178. @anonymous
    @guest007

    Most of that 38.3 % White is just as Hispanic as the 53.5% .

    Replies: @guest007

    And what is the basis for this hypothesis? Failure to understand the forms? The schools not checking the forms?

  179. @thenon
    @AndrewR

    I had a Swedish student who had absolutely flawless american english. I told her that while an american can often tell a non native speaker by english that is a little too correct, without those little sloppy bits that we do without noticing, I was amazed that she spoke as badly as we did! She then betrayed herself by not laughing at my funny remark. Humor is difficult to translate. Like UNZ commenters here betray themselves as nerds by correcting my minor spelling and fakshual errors, and missing the main point.

    Replies: @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2, @Jim Don Bob

    You misspelled factual. 😉

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jim Don Bob

    Nice job!

  180. @MEH 0910
    @the one they call Desanex


    I don’t know who did the Pizza poster,
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kat_Reeder

    Kat Reeder is a Peruvian-American illustrator, portrait artist, and graphic designer whose work is characterized by attractive female forms and nostalgic scenery. Her work combines elements of pop art, animation, art nouveau, and Latin American art styles. Reeder was born in Lima, Peru, grew up in Miami, Florida, and now lives in Honolulu, HI.[1]

    [...]
    In 2021, Reeder was commissioned by filmmaker Paul Thomas Anderson to create poster art and other key art for his film Licorice Pizza, starring Alana Haim, Cooper Hoffman, Bradley Cooper, Sean Penn, Bennie Safdie, Tom Waits, and Maya Rudolph. Reeder’s work was used as the primary movie poster, and as advertising throughout Los Angeles, New York, and cities world-wide.
     
    https://katreeder.com/blogs/kat-chats-a-sporadic-art-blog/yes-im-the-licorice-pizza-poster-artist

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex

    Thanks. After checking out more of Kat Reeder’s work, I see that she’s no Richard Amsel in the talent department. Thanks, too for the tip about “24×36.” I had never heard of that documentary, but will definitely watch. It sounds right up my alley.

  181. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer

    Groton Pizza?

    (Tastes better than it sounds.)

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Go there to Groton and tour the USS Nautilus. Far more interesting than anything in Mystic. You know, our nuclear submarines go in and out of there. I watched one: the men were on top, standing with legs stable, hands in “at ease” position, as their sub cruised right past. Go to Grot0n. It is a great, American place. Go down into the Nautilus, the first nuclear-powered submarine. Consider yourself lucky. It cruised across the North Pole, under the ice, in secret.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The NorthEast is not the area we will likely get to, so unfortunately I may never see the beautiful subs there. I take it that is what used to be called General Dynamics Electric Boat Division? It looks beautiful, Buzz.

    Since it was you writing about the "Soviets" vs. "Russians", here's my recollection: The Communists on the other side of the Cold War were "The Russians" to most of us. That's out of ignorance, in a way, because, after 60-70 decades of Communism I, like many Americans didn't see "The Russians" as anything more than "The Commies" (the external ones, that is). Nobody every thought that those Soviet Communists could ever be just the Russians again.

    Thank you, Ronnie, Maggie, Pope J.P. II, and millions of Western engineers, technicians, and soldiers, sailors, and airmen!

    (When people talked specifically military matters, the word Soviets and the term USSR were used more.)

  182. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Peter Akuleyev


    During 1918-1989, Americans generally referred to the Soviets as “Russians” . Only political scientists, leftists and maybe the occasional immigrant said “Soviet”.
     
    I don't know about that. I used those terms and still do when referring to that era, if only because I think the Soviet Union encompassed a wide range of territory and peoples. Then again, I took political science classes in college and even got brainwashed into communism my freshman year.

    My wife laughs every time I refer to "Soviets" or "the Soviet Union." I'm not kidding. She does laugh. They are all Russian to her. Having grown up in communist Romania, she should know. (We do have these conversations.)

    Her parents had a Russian, excuse me, "Soviet" microwave oven in their kitchen. I used it. Her father had taken a train all the way to Russia to get it. It was the biggest, boxiest, ugliest appliance you've ever seen. It was Russian, I mean "Soviet" (communist) engineering and design.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Mike Tre

    CCCP1: Today Is Moscow!

    SCTV taken over by glorious Soviet television with state of art minicam and new pair of Potemkins.

    [MORE]

    SCTV – CCCP 1 🛰

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @MEH 0910

    Oh My God! I remember that first video. Hilarious. In fact, I was even thinking about it when I was using my parents-in-law's Russian microwave oven. No kidding. As we say, there is truth in stereotypes.

    You know, I did a version of that first video on my early public access TV show (long before I met my wife) complete with the reference to new shoes and the new mini-cam. That was all prior to the anti-communist revolutions over there.

    Wow, I haven't seen that in years. Thank you!

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    , @the one they call Desanex
    @MEH 0910

    SCTV was the best TV show ever.

  183. @MEH 0910
    @Buzz Mohawk

    CCCP1: Today Is Moscow!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHjaAu1GTZU


    SCTV taken over by glorious Soviet television with state of art minicam and new pair of Potemkins.
     

    SCTV - CCCP 1 🛰
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWUwFJamrPg

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @the one they call Desanex

    Oh My God! I remember that first video. Hilarious. In fact, I was even thinking about it when I was using my parents-in-law’s Russian microwave oven. No kidding. As we say, there is truth in stereotypes.

    You know, I did a version of that first video on my early public access TV show (long before I met my wife) complete with the reference to new shoes and the new mini-cam. That was all prior to the anti-communist revolutions over there.

    Wow, I haven’t seen that in years. Thank you!

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Here's an edit with just the CCCP1 material from that episode:

    CCCP1
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fOu_t68mjNM


    00:09 Today Is Moscow
    02:53 Uposcrabblenyk
    04:53 What Fits Into Russia
    07:06 Mother Russia Cares PSA
    07:38 Hey Giorgy!
    09:27 Strelnokoff Vodka
    10:44 Tibor's Tractor
     

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  184. @MEH 0910
    @Buzz Mohawk

    CCCP1: Today Is Moscow!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHjaAu1GTZU


    SCTV taken over by glorious Soviet television with state of art minicam and new pair of Potemkins.
     

    SCTV - CCCP 1 🛰
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWUwFJamrPg

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @the one they call Desanex

    SCTV was the best TV show ever.

    • Agree: MEH 0910
  185. @Buzz Mohawk
    @MEH 0910

    Oh My God! I remember that first video. Hilarious. In fact, I was even thinking about it when I was using my parents-in-law's Russian microwave oven. No kidding. As we say, there is truth in stereotypes.

    You know, I did a version of that first video on my early public access TV show (long before I met my wife) complete with the reference to new shoes and the new mini-cam. That was all prior to the anti-communist revolutions over there.

    Wow, I haven't seen that in years. Thank you!

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    Here’s an edit with just the CCCP1 material from that episode:

    CCCP1

    00:09 Today Is Moscow
    02:53 Uposcrabblenyk
    04:53 What Fits Into Russia
    07:06 Mother Russia Cares PSA
    07:38 Hey Giorgy!
    09:27 Strelnokoff Vodka
    10:44 Tibor’s Tractor

    • Thanks: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @MEH 0910

    This is late, but you know, I do have a funny story that relates especially to that "What Fits Into Russia" segment:

    I dated a Ukrainian woman whose father had been a captain in the Soviet nuclear submarine navy.

    No kidding, this is just my life.

    Well, I attended Thanksgiving dinner at their apartment -- even brought the turkey and carved it -- and her father proceeded to brag to me about how his country spanned 11 or 12 time zones.

    I didn't have the heart to remind him that when land is that far north a time zone doesn't amount to as much as it does down here.

    He had tried, unsuccessfully, to offer his expertise to our CIA upon arrival. They didn't bite, so he, his wife, and my girlfriend, his daughter, were making the best of it in a modest apartment in Connecticut.

    "Russia is Big" is a thing among men like him.

    He told me the only reason his nuclear submarine navy was inferior to "mine" was because of lack of money. I didn't have the heart, again, to tell him that this was the fundamental difference between our countries, and perhaps even our people.

    My fundamental take on Russians is that they are braggadocious. I keep that in mind now every time I see yet another article on this webzine about how wonderful and superior some new, hypersonic Russian weapon is. Yes, they are good, but are they superior? Hell no. In fact they are, and always heve been, kind of a joke among people like my wife in surrounding countries.

    Still, they could end up being good allies against the vast, eastern and southern invasion that could come through Turkey -- as Steve Sailer himself warns me.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

  186. @Steve Sailer
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    "Mystic Pizza" is a much better title than say "Bridgeport Pizza."

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Achmed E. Newman, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Buzz Mohawk

    “Mystic Pizza” is a much better title than say “Bridgeport Pizza.”

    I would have gone with “Chorizo in Bridgeport.”

  187. @Steve Sailer
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    "Mystic Pizza" is a much better title than say "Bridgeport Pizza."

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Achmed E. Newman, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Buzz Mohawk

    LOL, and Bridgeport is not even remotely like Mystic, in case you don’t know. It is the closest place we have here to an iSteve location. Fortunately, it seems to be rather mild, perhaps due to Italian-American dominance, or just small scale. Also, there are plenty of Latin Americans to smooth things out.

    Individual, Latin American contractors of that cohort have flat out told me that their only problem in their neighborhoods is “the black people.”

    What more testimony do you need?

    Again: 70,000 years.

    70,000 years of separate evolution.

    “The black people.”

  188. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Mike Tre

    All of that is historically accurate. During 1918-1989, Americans generally referred to the Soviets as "Russians" . Only political scientists, leftists and maybe the occasional immigrant said "Soviet".

    Likewise, while World War II was going on most Americans weren't particularly concerned about the fate of Jews, it certainly wasn't the top of the agenda. You won't hear the word "Jew" once in the movie "Casablanca" for example. If you had asked an average American why Nazis were bad in 1943 they would have said the worst Nazi crimes were invading Paris, bombing England and imprisoning and killing patriotic Czechs, Norwegians, Poles and other brave Europeans. And, of course, declaring war on the USA and supporting the Japs. The word "Holocaust" was only applied to the murder of Jews decades later, it would be a jarring anachronism to hear it in Patton.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Mike Tre

    Doing a search of the terms Soviet and Russian in the google ngram viewer doesn’t support your “historical fact.” Russian was only at a slightly higher rate of use in 1945 than Soviet. Further, Stalin himself would have certainly been mentioned after Berlin fell as he was central to the politicking that surrounded the dividing up of Germany and the rest of Europe right after the conclusion of the war.

    “Likewise, while World War II was going on most Americans weren’t particularly concerned about the fate of Jews, it certainly wasn’t the top of the agenda. ”

    Nor should they have been more than any other group. That’s exactly the point I was making: The holocaust industry hadn’t been fully ramped up by 1970. Referring to ngram again, the term holocaust doesn’t really get going until 1975.

  189. He was great in Southern Comfort as a Cajun local arrested by out-of-their-depth National Guardsmen.

  190. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Peter Akuleyev


    During 1918-1989, Americans generally referred to the Soviets as “Russians” . Only political scientists, leftists and maybe the occasional immigrant said “Soviet”.
     
    I don't know about that. I used those terms and still do when referring to that era, if only because I think the Soviet Union encompassed a wide range of territory and peoples. Then again, I took political science classes in college and even got brainwashed into communism my freshman year.

    My wife laughs every time I refer to "Soviets" or "the Soviet Union." I'm not kidding. She does laugh. They are all Russian to her. Having grown up in communist Romania, she should know. (We do have these conversations.)

    Her parents had a Russian, excuse me, "Soviet" microwave oven in their kitchen. I used it. Her father had taken a train all the way to Russia to get it. It was the biggest, boxiest, ugliest appliance you've ever seen. It was Russian, I mean "Soviet" (communist) engineering and design.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Mike Tre

    From what I remember reading somewhere a long time ago (so take that for what it is) the politburo of the Soviet Union insisted that what was formerly Russia and all then current SU territories be referred to exclusively as the Soviet Union. Referring to the SU as Russia was disapproved of, even in US military circles.

  191. @guest007
    @Abolish_public_education

    I guess that one does not learn opportunity costs when teaching home schoolers. If mom is capable of teaching her children calculus, physics, chemistry, and a foreign language at home, then mom can get a job that pays enough for the family to afford college prep private schools.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @Achmed E. Newman

    You know something about Economics, and you have a respect for rigor, but you confuse parenting with factory production.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @Abolish_public_education

    Parenting is always a set of choices. Look at how Korean and Chinese-American value academic learning while non-Hispanic white parents value athletic performance. There is always an opportunity cost for everything a child does. Every hour playing video games or posting selfies is an hour some else is using to get ahead.

  192. @J.Ross
    OT
    Ghislaine Maxwell Trial
    Day The First: Four major executives retire, school shooting in Michigan which gets a near-instant visit from Governor Whitmer and a comment from President Biden.
    Day the Second: Trial delayed, because jurors are missing. [Late add: Texas school locked down, possible shooter.]
    Day the Third: ASTEROIDS!

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Follow-up to this
    Day Three of Maxwell trial, no meteors yet but a guy showed up in Manhattan with a shotgun, like ya do, so they locked down the UN.
    https://english.alarabiya.net/News/world/2021/12/02/UN-headquarters-on-lockdown-after-armed-man-seen-outside

  193. @Whiskey
    OT or maybe not, Jacqueline Avant was shot and killed in her Beverly Hills Mansion today, her security guard was also shot. She's the wife of a big time record producer and her daughter is married to Ted Sarandros, Co-CEO of Netflix.

    Unsure who the shooter is, no "description" so its likely a black dude in some home invasion. Defund the police and don't prosecute crimes. Guess what happens?

    A number of celebrities and such have had home invasions and attempted kidnappings. After they're done with the rich and famous (to the point where the latter all move to Miami or Vail) they will target us.

    Over/under as to when ordinary middle class people here get held for ransom like in Mexico? My guess is maybe three months. And what place will replace Hollywood? Its pretty much dead now, the place cannot function as the bedroom and production HQ if the rich and famous even with security get shot, and the cost of rolling in with a platoon of SEALs is going to be prohibitive for anyone under Spielberg level of money.

    My guess is Vail. Pretty scenery, no blacks, probably enough land to house production companies.

    But for sure, LA is dead as a production center for entertainment. The body may twitch around for a while, but that's it. Once a place cedes the streets to criminals it can't get it back. See: Detroit.

    Replies: @Muggles

    My guess is Vail. Pretty scenery, no blacks, probably enough land to house production companies.

    No Vail is full of skiers in the winter and is surrounded by high mountains. Very strict land use controls. Most of the ski workers have to live in small towns miles away.

    Very high altitude.

    So, weather bad (unless you ski, etc.) and no ocean, sun, warm. No room really. Small airport. Proles live elsewhere and commute (just like Hollywood!) but still no room.

    Video/film production is much more mobile now. But Industry Unions require work in certain close by areas or hourly rates go way up for “extra commuting” etc.

    There is much to like in the LA area, and not to like. The weather is good. Ocean nice. Someday of course the Big Quake will slide this all into the ocean.

    “Film at 11 !”

  194. When I see nostalgia flicks like this one or Tarantino’s most recent picture, or watch old episodes of the Dick Cavett show where he talks with the likes of Orson Welles, and Richard Burton, I feel- much like Tony Soprano- that at 28 years old, I got in here too late.

  195. How does this film compare to Birdemic?

    Paul Thomas Anderson’s critically acclaimed Licorice Pizza

    How would licorice pizza translate into Poul Anderson’s “Ander-Saxon” (of “Uncleftish Beholding”)? Sweetroot mouthful?

  196. @Jim Don Bob
    @thenon

    You misspelled factual. ;-)

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Nice job!

  197. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Go there to Groton and tour the USS Nautilus. Far more interesting than anything in Mystic. You know, our nuclear submarines go in and out of there. I watched one: the men were on top, standing with legs stable, hands in "at ease" position, as their sub cruised right past. Go to Grot0n. It is a great, American place. Go down into the Nautilus, the first nuclear-powered submarine. Consider yourself lucky. It cruised across the North Pole, under the ice, in secret.


    https://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/09/4d/dc/76/the-submarine-force-museum.jpg

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    The NorthEast is not the area we will likely get to, so unfortunately I may never see the beautiful subs there. I take it that is what used to be called General Dynamics Electric Boat Division? It looks beautiful, Buzz.

    Since it was you writing about the “Soviets” vs. “Russians”, here’s my recollection: The Communists on the other side of the Cold War were “The Russians” to most of us. That’s out of ignorance, in a way, because, after 60-70 decades of Communism I, like many Americans didn’t see “The Russians” as anything more than “The Commies” (the external ones, that is). Nobody every thought that those Soviet Communists could ever be just the Russians again.

    Thank you, Ronnie, Maggie, Pope J.P. II, and millions of Western engineers, technicians, and soldiers, sailors, and airmen!

    (When people talked specifically military matters, the word Soviets and the term USSR were used more.)

  198. @guest007
    @Abolish_public_education

    I guess that one does not learn opportunity costs when teaching home schoolers. If mom is capable of teaching her children calculus, physics, chemistry, and a foreign language at home, then mom can get a job that pays enough for the family to afford college prep private schools.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @Achmed E. Newman

    Get real. They’ve got these things called books and the internet. Mom doesn’t need to know it all. You also have a hell of a lot of optimism about what jobs are out there for someone who knows calculus, physics, chemistry, and a foreign language. Ever heard of the H-1B visa?

    The homeschooled kid WILL learn about opportunity costs if he follows Ron Paul’s curriculum. He can do that econ and all the other subjects you mentioned in 4 hr/day schooling periods, and have a life that does not revolve around an indoctrination camp. Yea!!

    • Replies: @guest007
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Calculus, physics, and chemistry is the minimum it takes to get admitted to a selective university. Remember, homeschoolers should not be compared to urban center public schools but should be compared to the students at the majority white, college prep private schools. If the homeschoolers are not doing as well, then the parents should both work and send their children to the top private schools.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  199. @Achmed E. Newman
    @guest007

    Get real. They've got these things called books and the internet. Mom doesn't need to know it all. You also have a hell of a lot of optimism about what jobs are out there for someone who knows calculus, physics, chemistry, and a foreign language. Ever heard of the H-1B visa?

    The homeschooled kid WILL learn about opportunity costs if he follows Ron Paul's curriculum. He can do that econ and all the other subjects you mentioned in 4 hr/day schooling periods, and have a life that does not revolve around an indoctrination camp. Yea!!

    Replies: @guest007

    Calculus, physics, and chemistry is the minimum it takes to get admitted to a selective university. Remember, homeschoolers should not be compared to urban center public schools but should be compared to the students at the majority white, college prep private schools. If the homeschoolers are not doing as well, then the parents should both work and send their children to the top private schools.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @guest007

    While I agree with your logic here, let's think up one more level. Why do these parents want the kids in that "selective" university? I mean that. If it's going to be Yale, Harvard or whatever just for the connections and name, I don't have any use of that sort of thing. This isn't 1950. To me, those schools are a bad influence on the children - not so much as that at a 1/2 black school, but the wrong kind of influence just the same.

    I found Calculus easy to learn in college (granted, with a really good American professor), and the Calculus-based Chemistry and Physics was a whole nother level compared to high school anyway. (I don't think the prep schools do the Calculus-based Chemistry and Physics, do they?)

  200. @guest007
    @Clifford Brown

    But if the LAUSD is only 9% non-Hispanic White but Grant High School has four times that number (whatever their ethnic group), then what percent of non-Hispanic whites in the LAUSD are on free lunch. Usually by high school, it is the student and not the parents who is either pushing or not pushing for free lunch.

    Replies: @danand

    “…what percent of non-Hispanic whites in the LAUSD are on free lunch…”

    007, all of them. This year, at least in Silicon Valley California, public school lunches have been “free” since the kids returned to “in class” learning this school year. If I recall correctly this was initially done to minimize risk of covid transmission. Now, from the looks & sounds of it, the policy is ingrained/permanent.

    The high school “lunch hour” was also shortened to encourage kids to remain on campus, though I have observed many making their way to and from the campus adjacent 7-11, pizza hut, and doughnut shop.

    As far as Licorice:

    National Board of Review Names Paul Thomas Anderson & His ‘Licorice Pizza’ As Best Director & Film

    “NBR President Annie Schulhof said, “In a moment of transition and uncertainty, there is nothing like Licorice Pizza to remind us of the joy, hope, and exhilaration that great cinema can inspire. The NBR is honored to award the movie as its Best Film of 2021, as well as its brilliant creator, Paul Thomas Anderson.”

    I will be buying a ticket, once it’s released to wide audience, if nothing else but for the Goat. As it’s local, been to the farm a few times over the decades.

  201. Just tacking on a link to an interview with Paul Thomas Anderson (cell phone recorded from audience) about the film. Quite a few fun/interesting, at least to me, insider tidbits:

  202. @guest007
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Calculus, physics, and chemistry is the minimum it takes to get admitted to a selective university. Remember, homeschoolers should not be compared to urban center public schools but should be compared to the students at the majority white, college prep private schools. If the homeschoolers are not doing as well, then the parents should both work and send their children to the top private schools.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    While I agree with your logic here, let’s think up one more level. Why do these parents want the kids in that “selective” university? I mean that. If it’s going to be Yale, Harvard or whatever just for the connections and name, I don’t have any use of that sort of thing. This isn’t 1950. To me, those schools are a bad influence on the children – not so much as that at a 1/2 black school, but the wrong kind of influence just the same.

    I found Calculus easy to learn in college (granted, with a really good American professor), and the Calculus-based Chemistry and Physics was a whole nother level compared to high school anyway. (I don’t think the prep schools do the Calculus-based Chemistry and Physics, do they?)

  203. After suffering through Magnolia and The Royal Tenenbaums, I made a vow never to watch any movie made by anyone named Anderson ever again. I unfortunately broke that vow for There Will Be Blood, but the brutal beatdown at the end was worth it.

  204. @MEH 0910
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Here's an edit with just the CCCP1 material from that episode:

    CCCP1
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fOu_t68mjNM


    00:09 Today Is Moscow
    02:53 Uposcrabblenyk
    04:53 What Fits Into Russia
    07:06 Mother Russia Cares PSA
    07:38 Hey Giorgy!
    09:27 Strelnokoff Vodka
    10:44 Tibor's Tractor
     

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    This is late, but you know, I do have a funny story that relates especially to that “What Fits Into Russia” segment:

    I dated a Ukrainian woman whose father had been a captain in the Soviet nuclear submarine navy.

    No kidding, this is just my life.

    Well, I attended Thanksgiving dinner at their apartment — even brought the turkey and carved it — and her father proceeded to brag to me about how his country spanned 11 or 12 time zones.

    I didn’t have the heart to remind him that when land is that far north a time zone doesn’t amount to as much as it does down here.

    He had tried, unsuccessfully, to offer his expertise to our CIA upon arrival. They didn’t bite, so he, his wife, and my girlfriend, his daughter, were making the best of it in a modest apartment in Connecticut.

    “Russia is Big” is a thing among men like him.

    He told me the only reason his nuclear submarine navy was inferior to “mine” was because of lack of money. I didn’t have the heart, again, to tell him that this was the fundamental difference between our countries, and perhaps even our people.

    My fundamental take on Russians is that they are braggadocious. I keep that in mind now every time I see yet another article on this webzine about how wonderful and superior some new, hypersonic Russian weapon is. Yes, they are good, but are they superior? Hell no. In fact they are, and always heve been, kind of a joke among people like my wife in surrounding countries.

    Still, they could end up being good allies against the vast, eastern and southern invasion that could come through Turkey — as Steve Sailer himself warns me.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Buzz Mohawk


    My fundamental take on Russians is that they are braggadocious. I keep that in mind now every time I see yet another article on this webzine about how wonderful and superior some new, hypersonic Russian weapon is.
     
    I always find it amusing when looking at comments on YT space videos to see the "USSR first in everything in space!"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1COj89afVU
  205. @Buzz Mohawk
    @MEH 0910

    This is late, but you know, I do have a funny story that relates especially to that "What Fits Into Russia" segment:

    I dated a Ukrainian woman whose father had been a captain in the Soviet nuclear submarine navy.

    No kidding, this is just my life.

    Well, I attended Thanksgiving dinner at their apartment -- even brought the turkey and carved it -- and her father proceeded to brag to me about how his country spanned 11 or 12 time zones.

    I didn't have the heart to remind him that when land is that far north a time zone doesn't amount to as much as it does down here.

    He had tried, unsuccessfully, to offer his expertise to our CIA upon arrival. They didn't bite, so he, his wife, and my girlfriend, his daughter, were making the best of it in a modest apartment in Connecticut.

    "Russia is Big" is a thing among men like him.

    He told me the only reason his nuclear submarine navy was inferior to "mine" was because of lack of money. I didn't have the heart, again, to tell him that this was the fundamental difference between our countries, and perhaps even our people.

    My fundamental take on Russians is that they are braggadocious. I keep that in mind now every time I see yet another article on this webzine about how wonderful and superior some new, hypersonic Russian weapon is. Yes, they are good, but are they superior? Hell no. In fact they are, and always heve been, kind of a joke among people like my wife in surrounding countries.

    Still, they could end up being good allies against the vast, eastern and southern invasion that could come through Turkey -- as Steve Sailer himself warns me.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    My fundamental take on Russians is that they are braggadocious. I keep that in mind now every time I see yet another article on this webzine about how wonderful and superior some new, hypersonic Russian weapon is.

    I always find it amusing when looking at comments on YT space videos to see the “USSR first in everything in space!”

  206. @Abolish_public_education
    @guest007

    You know something about Economics, and you have a respect for rigor, but you confuse parenting with factory production.

    Replies: @guest007

    Parenting is always a set of choices. Look at how Korean and Chinese-American value academic learning while non-Hispanic white parents value athletic performance. There is always an opportunity cost for everything a child does. Every hour playing video games or posting selfies is an hour some else is using to get ahead.

  207. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Jack D

    I am not talking about such things (by the way, he'd been, after his 30s, obesity on steroids & had mumbled his career throughout his life). The question is could he ever played a non-dominant character rife with uncertainties or anything similar. For instance the Steiger character in "The Pawnbroker" or that naive cowardly journalist-biographer in Eastwood's "Unforgiven".

    On the other hand- now everyone can play anyone. Considering the contemporary cultural climate, Brando could play Ann Boleyn, a mistress to some fat king of Afringlicand.

    Replies: @Ian Smith

    Brando played a closeted gay army officer in Reflections in a Golden Eye. It was a role with a lot of vulnerability.

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